Idaho History Mar 7, 2021

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 47

Idaho Newspaper clippings April 4-11, 1919

Photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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April 4 continued

The Idaho Republican. April 04, 1919, Page 1

19190404TIR1

19190404TIR2
Mormon Conference Is Postponed For The Flu

On account of the periodic outbreaks of the influenza, and present epidemics in certain localities of Utah and Idaho, the semiannual church conference, which was to have opened this week at Salt Lake City, has been indefinitely postponed by leaders of the L. D. S.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 04 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. April 04, 1919, Page 3

19190404TIR3Flu Strikes Aberdeen With Sudden Epidemic

The village of Aberdeen was quarantined for the influenza Monday, March 24, when more than 125 cases of the disease had developed almost at one time. Two deaths have occurred; the schools were hardest hit with the sickness. But on the whole it is considered a lighter form of flu than that of the winter epidemic.

County Physician W. E. Patrie said Monday that he had found cases of the flu in practically all parts of the county, and that he would isolate them all as fast as they came to his attention.
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Finds Rupert Booming

Robert Patterson of Pingree returned Wednesday morning from Rupert, where he had thought of leasing and going to work. He found things in a good business way, and land held high. While he was there a small ranch sold for $21,000. Patterson got out of the army only a month ago, and when he reached his home, with R. D. Collins, his relatives at Pingree, he was taken down with mumps, followed by the flu and is just getting normal again.
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How Books Are Sterilized
Simple Apparatus Used by French Scientists in Conducting Their Deadly Gas Attack

Almost the first thing to meet the eyes of French hygienists is their wartime campaign for protecting the younger generation was their old enemy, the circulating book, well known as a carrier of disease. The many obvious solutions of the problem shared one disadvantage while killing the germs they destroyed the book also.

For the method perfected by Doctor Marsonian, and now practiced in the Institute for Wounded and Infirm Workmen at Montreuil, it is claimed that for one-fourth of a cent for each book, and with safety to operators, books can be sterilized without the slightest injury. Two pieces of very simple apparatus are used, a beater and a disinfector.

The beater is a long box open at one end and communicating at the other with an ordinary stove. Inside of the beater are wooden rods so arranged that the turning of a handle will cause them to strike on the books placed on a sliding frame. As the roads beat the books, the heavier particles of dust fall out into a tray of disinfectant below, and the lighter are carried by an exhaust fan to a stove, where they are burned.

The books are hung, open by spring clips from a skeleton framework, and wheeled into the disinfecting chamber, which is equipped with a tank containing a solution of formaldehyde. The temperature is raised to 120 degrees Fahrenheit, the formaldehyde kills the germs, and the fumes are carried off by a funnel. – Popular Mechanics Magazine.

(ibid, page 3)
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The Idaho Republican. April 04, 1919, Page 4

19190404TIR4
Girl Victim of Influenza

Lucy Fenimore, the thirteen-year-old step-daughter of Jere B. Early, who lives north of Blackfoot, between the two Snake river bridges, died after an illness of ten days at her home last Thursday, March 27. Dr. Patrie, the attending physician, gave as cause of the child’s death, influenza followed by pneumonia. The funeral was held Saturday from the L. D. S. church.

(ibid, page 4)
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The Idaho Republican. April 04, 1919, Page 5

Local News

Alpha Manning of east Firth returned from a visit to Salt Lake city Tuesday evening, a visit overstayed a week on account of his having the flu there. His wife and children also were ill, but all have recovered.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Idaho Republican. April 04, 1919, Page 7

Moreland

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Grimmett passed away last Wednesday afternoon, after suffering for a short time with pneumonia. The funeral services were held at their home Friday morning.

Glenn Foreman, who has been ill with influenza for some time at the Starkweather ranch, is reported much better and will be home some time this week.

The infant Child of Henry Munson has been very ill for some time, but is now on the way to recovery.
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Groveland

Funeral services were held at the cemetery for Miss Early, who died with influenza. Two more of the Early family are quite seriously ill with the same disease. Miss Hattie Pope is nursing them. The Early family just moved onto the old Sorenson place in this vicinity. The sincere sympathy of the entire community is extended to them.

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Junis Sorenson of this place died at Salt Lake City following an attack of influenza. Mr. and Mrs. Sorenson are also suffering with the same disease.

Johnie Sorenson who came here for a visit a short time ago, and was taken ill with influenza is recovering.

Varian Hale and baby have had bad cases of influenza, but are improving.

It is reported that the Hampton family are down with the flu.

The relief society ball given Friday evening was not patronized as well as usual. Miss Roda Hale and Mr. Reynolds took the prize for being the best waltzers.
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Sterling

The funeral of G. W. Parsons, who died Tuesday from an attack of influenza, was held Wednesday from the cemetery under the auspices of the L. D. S. church. Bishop R. A. Ward officiating. The speakers were R. A. Ward, James Christensen and Robert Jones. None of the immediate family were able to attend the funeral, all being bedfast with the flu. Deceased is survived by a wife and a large family of children, a father and several children. The remains were laid to rest in the Yuma cemetery. Our sympathy goes out to the bereaved ones.

Mrs. Rose Nugent and baby are reported to be on the sick list.

The McAlister family on the Judge Cowen ranch are quarantined for influenza.

The family of Robert Stone have been on the sick list this week but are improving now.

Mrs. John Munson of Brigham City, Utah came up to attend the funeral of her brother G. W. Parsons. She was the guest of the Mesdames Pete and Tony Parsons while here.

Miss Adeline Nelson has been quite ill this week with what is reported to be influenza.
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Upper Presto

Sand creek has been flooded worse this year than ever before. It was necessary to place a guard over it for several days last week, and for a while it threatened to force some families to move, William Stoddard’s for one. The ice was finally worked loose under the bridge and the water went down considerably.

(ibid, page 7)
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The Idaho Republican. April 04, 1919, Page 8

19190404TIR5Mrs. Frank T. Halverson Dies Of The Influenza

Mrs. Frank T. Halverson succumbed to an attack of influenza, lasting one week, at her home at Riverside on Wednesday, April 2. Dr. W. W. Beck was called in to attend to the stricken woman on Sunday, but it was not possible to check the advance of the disease.

(ibid, page 8)
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Shoshone Journal. April 04, 1919, Page 1

19190404SJ1

Dietrich – Besslin Notes

W. O. Hamilton left Saturday evening for Yakima, Wash. to attend the funeral of his only sister who was a victim of the flu. His little daughter Betty, of that place is sick with scarlet fever.

Mrs. Campbell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Pavlik, went to Shoshone Thursday for hospital treatment.

Mr. and Mrs. Chris Frees have returned to their home with Mr. Frees greatly improved in health after several weeks treatment at Shoshone.

Mrs. Christ has received a supply of Red Cross yarn to be knitted into children’s stockings for the refugees. Those wishing to help in this work please make a note of this.
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Big Wood River News

Little Laurence Rand is quick sick at this writing.

Mrs. A. L. Horne, whose condition has become so critical that Dr. Fields thought it necessary to move her to the hospital Monday.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 04 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. April 04, 1919, Page 5

Local and Personal News

C. E. Miller, father of Mrs. Murray, of the McFall hotel, is seriously ill this week.

Gordon Custer, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Custer has been seriously ill with broncho-pneumonia the past week but Thursday evening was reported as sufficiently recovered as to be out of danger.
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Card of Thanks

We wish to extend our sincerest thanks to friends and neighbors for their sympathy and assistance during the sickness and death of our baby boy Stanley Devon.

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Grewell
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19190404SJ2

(ibid, page 5)
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Shoshone Journal. April 04, 1919, Page 7

Idaho State News

Spanish influenza has broken out at the state industrial training school at St. Anthony, about ninety cases having developed.

The case of a man, aged 35, whose name is withheld by attending physicians, a patient in the hospital at Twin Falls, who has been asleep for 14 days, has been diagnosed as one of lethargic encephalitis or “sleeping sickness.” The patient at first was fed through a tube but is now awakened for brief periods and takes his meals in a normal manner.

A resident of Kuna has sent east for some skunks and will start a skunk farm. The skunks are deodorized, and are about the size of a common cat.

(ibid, page 7)
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The Daily Star-Mirror., April 04, 1919, Page 1

19190404DSM1

19190404DSM2Children May Attend Sunday School

“The grade children may attend Sunday school on Sunday, providing the churches observe the same regulations as observed by the public schools regarding the quarantine,” stated Dr. Adair today. “As forty-eight hours will have elapsed since the children were examined at school, it will be necessary, and also the safest way, to have their temperatures taken by a competent person before being permitted to attend Sunday school.

“Two of the teachers and several of the grade pupils have the influenza this week.

“The matinee given this afternoon is restricted to the teachers and the grade pupils whose temperature has been taken this afternoon.”

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 04 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Edgemere, Idaho

EdgemereFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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April 5

Evening Capital News., April 05, 1919, Page 1

19190405ECN1

19190405ECN2Wilson Has Restful Night, Grayson Wires; Somewhat Improved
However, He’s Ordered to Remain in Bed Today And probably Sunday; May Work Monday

Washington, April 5. — Rear Admiral Grayson, private physician of President Wilson in Paris today cabled Secretary Tumulty at the White House here there is no need of worry over the president’s condition. His message read;

“The President is better this morning, but is still confined to his bed. There is no cause for worry — Grayson.”

Must Stay In Bed

By Carl D. Groat

Paris, April 5. — President Wilson rested well last night and his condition is now improved, Admiral Grayson, his physician announced today.

Grayson said the president, however has been ordered to remain in bed today and probably tomorrow.

It is not anticipated the president’s cold will develop into anything more serious. Despite rumors which have been in circulation since he was taken ill Thursday night, there are no symptoms of of influenza so far.

Wilson’s absence from the peace conference at this time is deplored by all the delegates, but they agree there is nothing to be gained in taking chances with a severe cold. The belief prevails that the president will be able to resume his work Monday.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 05 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., April 05, 1919, Page 3

Church of the Good Shepard

Eusebio Guerricagoitia, a member of our congregation, died in Emmett March 31. He was buried from this church Friday, this being the first funeral held at the church. He leaves a father and mother in Spain and an uncle, Emanuel Bengoechea, of Pocatello, to mourn his early death.

Father Arregui visited at Price, Utah, during the week, where he baptized eight children. At Ogden he heard confessions and gave holy communion to a large number of men, women and children who are sick with influenza.

(ibid, page 3)
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Elo, Idaho

EloFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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April 6

Evening Capital News., April 06, 1919, Page 1

19190406ECN1

19190406ECN2
President Narrowly Escapes Flu Attack; Plans Work Monday

By Carl D. Groat

Paris, April 5. — President Wilson, although still confined to his bed by a severe cold, is expected to resume his work Monday, it was learned tonight.

That the president narrowly escaped a serious attack of influenza, was stated today by Rear Admiral Grayson, his personal physician.

“The president came very close to having a serious attack of influenza, but by going to bed at once, by my direction, he apparently has escaped it,” said Grayson.

“It is still necessary for him to remain in bed.”

The “big four,” with Colonel House again substituting for the president, met today in a room adjoining Wilson’s chamber. It was believed that much time would be saved by this plan as questions requiring the president’s attention could be promptly referred to him.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 06 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., April 06, 1919, Page 5

Kuna

Mrs. F. A. Hale has received news that her mother, Mrs. Spink, well known here, is very ill at her sister’s near Aberdeen, N. D. She had a severe attack of influenza, followed by pneumonia. Little hope is held for her recovery.

Jaspar Landsburg, who has been ill for several weeks, is improving.
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Payette Club Women Honor Returned Nurse

Wednesday afternoon the Portia club gave a beautiful reception, honoring Mrs. Lillian Foster, the club’s Red Cross nurse, who has just returned from France. The affair was held at the home of Mrs. Mary Wilson, which, during her absence, is occupied by Mrs. E. B. Holmes, the president of the club. …

(ibid, page 5)
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Evening Capital News., April 06, 1919, Page 8

Status of City Lighting Contract
Up to Public Utilities Commission to Decide New Rate Under New System of Lighting — Present Rate Low.

As there was some discussion of the city lighting contract during the recent campaign and the question is still one of issue, Mayor Hays gave out a statement Saturday evening in order that the public might fully understand the situation. His statement follows:

“The price of Boise’s street lighting for the ensuing year is still undetermined.

“There have been numerous delays which could not be avoided. Mr. Markhus of the power company was ill in a Portland hospital for a time. Then came the influenza, and finally while the case was being considered Commissioner Graham’s term of office expired. Colonel Patch, then in France, was appointed to succeed him and has not yet arrived in Idaho. As soon as he arrives the Boise case will come up for final determination. …”

(ibid, page 8)
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Evening Capital News., April 06, 1919, Page 9

Around Boise Valley Loop

Caldwell

Mrs. W. A. Stone, who is in a Boise hospital under medical treatment, is reported to be improving nicely.

Attorney W.. A. Stone transacted legal business in Boise today and visited with his wife, who is there under medical treatment.

M. T. Hargrove, the local real estate man, who has been quite ill, is reported to be much improved.

L. G. Magee, who has been quite ill, has sufficiently recovered to be at his office again.

Star

Clark Baldwin is on the sick list.

(ibid, page 9)
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Building a railroad from Enaville to Murray, Idaho

EnavilleFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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April 8

Evening Capital News., April 08, 1919, Page 3

19190408ECN1

19190408ECN2
Isolated Idaho Points to Have Mail Service

(Special News Special Service.)

Washington, April 8. — The postmaster at Yellow Pine, Idaho, has been authorized by the postoffice department to employ temporarily a mail carrier to make one round trip every two weeks between Yellow Pine, Johnson Creek and Cascade at not to exceed $50 a trip. The carrier is not to be required to carry more than 50 pounds of mail a trip. One of the purposes of the service is to supply the office at Profile. Bids are soon to be asked for carrying the mail between these points once a week during the period from July 1 to October 1, the carrier to transport not to exceed 600 pounds the trip. This contract would cover the balance of the year with the requirement to carry only 50 pounds each trip.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 08 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., April 08, 1919, Page 5

[The Washington Baseball Club]

Augusta, Ga, April 7. — …

Janvrin Mopes Around

The failure of Janvrin to join the club for spring training was quite a blow to Griff’s plans. The former Red Sox was ill with influenza and pneumonia at his home in Boston and now is too weak to do anything but loaf in the sunshine and regain his strength. He probably will not do any practicing until the middle of next month. In the meantime, Harold Shanks has been moved to second and Davis is playing short. …

(ibid, page 5)
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Evening Capital News., April 08, 1919, Page 8

Little News of Boise

19190408ECN3Epidemic About Over

J. Fred Williams, superintendent of the Idaho Industrial school [St. Anthony, Idaho] in a letter to C. S. McConnell, probation officer of Ada county, says he has been unable to give any attention to correspondence during the influenza epidemic, but now reports conditions are much improved. Only a few students are ill and they are convalescing nicely. The school expects to be out of quarantine in a few days.

(ibid, page 8)
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Evening Capital News., April 08, 1919, Page 9

Around Boise Valley Loop

Nampa

S. D. McLain of the McLain Hardware company has gone to Rochester, Minn., to take medical treatment at the Mayo Brothers’ institution.

Caldwell

Attorney W. A. Stone transacted legal business in Boise yesterday and visited with his wife who is under medical treatment in a hospital. Mrs. Stone is reported to be much improved.

Star

Mr. Corren is reported very ill at this writing.

Middleton

Miss Maud Harvey is recovering from a siege of influenza.

Mrs. Nellie Personette and little son have just returned from Nyssa, where Mrs. Personette was called to help care for the W. D. Robinson family during the influenza. While there, the little boy also had the “flu,” the second time this year.

(ibid, page 9)
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The Daily Star-Mirror., April 08, 1919, Page 1

19190408DSM1

19190408DSM2
Two Flu Flags Up

Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, reports two influenza flags put up yesterday, one at Synder’s, 224 Asbury street, and another just outside of town. Dr. Adair says people must not get careless because of warm weather for the danger is not past. He read from the government health reports that influenza has increased in the past week in Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Oregon, Vermont and Washington. It will be noted that two of them Louisiana and California, are southern states with mild climates.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 08 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., April 08, 1919, Page 5

City News

W. F. Rickets, of Spokane, is here for a few days trying to dispose of the property of his father, the late W. F. M. Rickets, who died of influenza last fall. Part of the estate consists of 15 acres on Orchard avenue.

Frank A. Hanna left yesterday for Stanford, Mont., called by the serious illness of his brother, Henry Hanna.

(ibid, page 5)
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Emida, Idaho

EmidaFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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April 9

Evening Capital News., April 09, 1919, Page 1

19190409ECN1

19190409ECN2
56,979 Yanks in Hospitals

Washington, April 9. — Patients in army hospitals March 31 totaled 56,979. Of these 38,214 have been brought from overseas, the war department announced today.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 09 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Business Block, Emmett, Idaho

EmmettFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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April 10

Evening Capital News., April 10, 1919, Page 5

19190410ECN1

Holcomb

Mr. Hoff was on the sick list last week.

Mr. and Mrs. Balber entertained Saturday evening. Dancing was enjoyed throughout the evening and refreshments were served. About 25 nurses from St. Luke’s hospital were present.
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19190410ECN2

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 10 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., April 10, 1919, Page 7

Around Boise Valley Loop

Meridian

J. M. Jackson of the Meridian Hardware company, is reported quite ill.

Ustick

Joseph Roberts, who has quite ill last week, is improving and able to be out of doors.

Caldwell

Jay Galligan, manager of the Caldwell flouring mills is able to be at his office again after an illness of two weeks.

Midway

Prof. Edwards resumed his duties at the Midway school Wednesday after an enforced vacation of three weeks on account of his having a case of smallpox.

Dean Oeder is convalescing from a bad case of mumps.

Lake Lowell

Everett Gibbens is ill with scarlet fever.

(ibid, page 7)
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Evening Capital News., April 10, 1919, Page 8

Idaho News In Brief

19190410ECN3
Slept Several Weeks.

Buhl — J. A. Boyd, who is living on the H. H. Parker ranch six miles southwest of town, is reported to be convalescing after several weeks of sound sleep. He can be awakened now, long enough to take some nourishment.
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Under The Capitol Dome

Moore Improving

Lieutenant Governor C. C. Moore, who has been at Long Beach, Cal., for his health, says in a letter to state officials he feels much better and expects to be back at his home in St. Anthony soon.

(ibid, page 8)
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Jerome County Times., April 10, 1919, Page 1

19190410JCT1

High School Pupils Are Studying Hard

Any student absent from school even for a day has been required to report to Miss Nesbit before reentering classes. This has been done for the protection of all.

Pupils should come to school on time but not before half past eight. Unless there is some special reason children in the grades especially should not come to school before that time.

The change in time did not cause much inconvenience at all for those in school. It is as easy to come at nine by the clock as it was before, with the same ones tardy as before, of course.

source: Jerome County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 10 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Jerome County Times., April 10, 1919, Page 2

19190410JCT2President Has Close Call
Wilson Threatened With Serious Attack of Influenza

Paris. — “The president has come very near having a serious attack of influenza but by getting to bed at once by my direction, he has apparently escaped, but still is necessarily confined to his bed,” said a statement issued Saturday afternoon by Rear Admiral Grayson, the president’s physician.

(ibid, page 2)
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Jerome County Times., April 10, 1919, Page 4

Eldorado Heights

We record with sadness the death of Mr. Horace McElyea, brother-in-law of James Falkerson, which occurred Monday morning April 1, at the latter’s home. Mr. and Mrs. McElyea arrived only a week ago from Arkansas. Both took severe colds enroute, from which Mr. McElyea developed pneumonia, the cause of his death. He had been in poor health for some time, and came to Idaho hoping to benefit by the change. The McElyea’s spent a season here some years ago, many of their old neighbors and relatives from Arkansas live on the tract. Mrs. McElyea accompanied by Jas. Fulkerson, have taken the remains to the old home in Berryville, Ark., for burial.
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Grand View

Mr. Otto Ward has returned from Picabo, where he was called by the serious illness of his mother who passed away shortly after Mr. Ward arrived there.
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Arcadia Valley

Mr. H. J. Goemmer, who has quite sick last week is able to be at his work again.

Mrs. Fulkerson left Wednesday for Oklahoma. She is to return in a short time, bringing her two little grand children, who lost their mother this winter.

(ibid, page 4)
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The Daily Star-Mirror., April 10, 1919, Page 1

19190410DSM1

19190410DSM2
Prof. Ph. Soulen On High Schools
Head of Department of Education Tours North Idaho and Makes Report

“High schools in the northern part of the state are planning to graduate their seniors in May and June despite the fact that the flu epidemic closed all schools nearly two months last fall.” This is the report of Prof. Ph. Soulen, who has returned from an inspection tour of several high schools.

Professor Soulen adds that already there is a reaction showing itself, occasioned by the exodus of men teachers from public schools. This reaction is noticeable in the repeated demand for men teachers and the very substantial increase in salaries paid to them.

In speaking of four high schools which he visited, Professor Soulen said: “There were only four men teachers in these schools, not including superintendents.”

In connection with this phase of the Idaho school problem, Professor Soulen said that recently his office had received two letters of inquiry from school boards of high schools in Montana asking for teachers. One high school wants four teachers and offers salaries ranging from $1200 to $1800 a year.

On Wednesday of last week Prof. Soulen discussed the subject of the “High School Curriculum” before the students and teaching bodies on St. Maries’ high school. Thursday afternoon he met with the trustees and talked on the matters of finance and school organization.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 10 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., April 10, 1919, Page 5

City News

J. R. Collins left yesterday for Spokane to meet his son, Kenneth, who is studying medicine in Chicago. Kenneth had an attack of influenza in January, followed by pleural pneumonia, and he is now convalescent from the attack.
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Eighth Grade Examinations

About 40 pupils from the districts near Moscow are taking the eighth grade examination at the county seat. Miss Myra Moody is conducting the examination at the Presbyterian church, assisting County Superintendent Lillian Skattaboe.
— —

Woman Doctor Returns

Dr. Virgil Gilchrist returned to Moscow today. She has been six months in the medical service in France and returned to America February 21. Dr. Gilchrist graduated from the University of Idaho before she studied medicine. Her parents live nine miles southeast of Moscow.

In the near future, Dr. Gilchrist will locate in Spokane and open offices in that city to practice her profession.

(ibid, page 5)
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Scene on P & I N R R, Evergreen, Idaho (1)

EvergreenFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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April 11

The Oakley Herald. April 11, 1919, Page 5

19190412OH1

19190412OH2Monkeys Die of Flu

Monkeys are the latest victims of the Spanish influenza scourge which has been sweeping the world, according to a letter received by a resident of Albany, Ore. from a relative who is a banker in a South African city. Thousands of monkeys have perished in the forests of South Africa from influenza, the letter declares. Moreover the plague is prevalent among the white and black population, with high mortality.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 11 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., April 11, 1919, Page 3

19190411ECN1

Kuna

David Painter was taken suddenly ill Saturday morning with severe pain and nausea. His attack is probably an after-effect of Influenza from which he had apparently recovered two weeks ago. His is improving.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 11 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., April 11, 1919, Page 8

Deaths – Funerals

Richter — William Richter died of influenza Thursday at a Boise hospital. He was 27 years of age. He contracted the disease at Oreana and was brought to Boise Thursday morning. He is survived by a brother at Menlom Ore. The body is at the Fry and Summers parlors. Funeral arrangement will not be made until word is received from his brother.

Peterson — William Peterson, aged 65, died this morning at his home, 812 Resseguie street, after an illness of two months. A complication of diseases caused his demise. He is survived by a wife and one son, W. L. Peterson of Boise, an attache of the First National bank. Mr. Peterson has made Boise his home for 24 years. Prior to moving here he lived in Silver City. …

(ibid, page 8)
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Evening Capital News., April 11, 1919, Page 12

Little News of Boise

March Report

Deputy Health Officer Pfirman has just gotten out his March report which shows 15 deaths, 11 of whom were residents of Boise, eight were males and seven females. There were six cases of influenza, all light and none remained in quarantine at the end of the month. There is very little contagion, says the officer, and no influenza in Boise at present.

Navy Man Released

Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Wilkinson are in receipt of a cablegram from their son, Reginald Wilkinson, stationed at Cavite, Philippine Islands, announcing his has been released from the service and will leave for home on April 15, which should bring him to Boise early in May. Mr. Wilkinson has been ill for some time, never having recovered from the influenza last fall. Senator Nugent, upon learning of the elder Mr. Wilkinson’s illness, took up the matter with the navy department, insisting upon the early release of the junior Wilkinson, which was granted upon receipt of his request.
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Personals

Jefferson L. Davis has gone to Portland to visit his wife, who is receiving treatment in a sanitarium.

(ibid, page 12)
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Cottonwood Chronicle. April 11, 1919, Page 2

19190411CC1

County Seat News Items

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Parker have recovered from attacks of influenza which kept them confined to their home for a week. Mr. Parker who receives a number of London papers, says English physicians, after a study of Spanish influenza have concluded that the disease is identical with the old Black plague of London.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 11 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Cottonwood Chronicle. April 11, 1919, Page 6

Cottonwood and Vicinity
Personal Mention and Local Happenings of the Week

J. B. McCully accompanied the remains of his one-day-old grandson to this city Wednesday from Cottonwood and tenderly laid the little body to rest in the local cemetery. The child was born to Mrs. Gerald McCully on the 1st instant and survived but a few hours. Thus members of three generations of this stricken family have been called across the Great Divide within the past six months, the others being the child’s father, Gerald McCully, and its great grandfather, Judge Adams G. Johnson. – Nezperce Herald.

The work laid out for the Cottonwood Red Cross was greatly helped along this week by a large number of workers being present. It is the intention of the local Red Cross to finish up all work before hot weather arrives. So all be present next week and with everybody assisting who possibly can this can be finished very rapidly.

(ibid, page 6)
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Cottonwood Chronicle. April 11, 1919, Page 3

19190411CC2

(ibid, page 3)
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Further Reading

What Happened When Woodrow Wilson Came Down With the 1918 Flu?

The president contracted influenza while attending peace talks in Paris, but the nation was never told the full, true story

By Meilan Solly Smithsonian Magazine October 2, 2020

1919WilsonPeaceGettyimages-a
Woodrow Wilson, seen here at the start of the Paris Peace Conference in January 1919, never publicly acknowledged the pandemic’s toll on his country. (Photo by Hulton Archive / Getty Images)

The 1918 influenza pandemic killed an estimated 50 to 100 million people worldwide—including some 675,000 Americans—in just 15 months. But Woodrow Wilson’s White House largely ignored the global health crisis, focusing instead on the Great War enveloping Europe and offering “no leadership or guidance of any kind,” as historian John M. Barry, author of The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History, recently told Time’s Melissa August.

“Wilson wanted the focus to remain on the war effort,” Barry explained. “Anything negative was viewed as hurting morale.”

In private, the president acknowledged the threat posed by the virus, which struck a number of people in his inner circle, including his personal secretary, his oldest daughter and multiple Secret Service members. Even the White House sheep came down with the flu, reports Michael S. Rosenwald for the Washington Post.

Wilson himself contracted the disease shortly after arriving in Paris in April 1919 for peace talks aimed at determining the direction of a post-World War I Europe. As White House doctor Cary T. Grayson wrote in a letter to a friend, the diagnosis arrived at a decidedly inopportune moment: “The president was suddenly taken violently sick with the influenza at a time when the whole of civilization seemed to be in the balance.”

Grayson and the rest of Wilson’s staff downplayed the president’s illness, telling reporters that overwork and Paris’ “chilly and rainy weather” had sparked a cold and fever. On April 5, the Associated Press reported that Wilson was “not stricken with influenza.”

Behind the scenes, the president was suffering the full force of the virus’ effects. Unable to sit up in bed, he experienced coughing fits, gastrointestinal symptoms and a 103-degree fever.

Then, says biographer A. Scott Berg, the “generally predictable” Wilson started blurting out “unexpected orders”—on two separate occasions, he “created a scene over pieces of furniture that had suddenly disappeared,” despite the fact that nothing had been moved—and exhibiting other signs of severe disorientation. At one point, the president became convinced that he was surrounded by French spies.

“[W]e could but surmise that something queer was happening in his mind,” Chief Usher Irwin Hoover later recalled. “One thing was certain: [H]e was never the same after this little spell of sickness.”

Wilson’s bout of influenza “weaken[ed] him physically … at the most crucial point of negotiations,” writes Barry in The Great Influenza. As Steve Coll explained for the New Yorker earlier this year, the president had originally argued that the Allies “should go easy” on Germany to facilitate the success of his pet project, the League of Nations. But French Prime Minister Georges Clemenceau, whose country had endured much devastation during the four-year conflict, wanted to take a tougher stance; days after coming down with the flu, an exhausted Wilson conceded to the other world leaders’ demands, setting the stage for what Coll describes as “a settlement so harsh and onerous to Germans that it became a provocative cause of revived German nationalism … and, eventually, a rallying cause of Adolf Hitler.”

Whether Wilson would have pushed harder for more equitable terms if he hadn’t come down with the flu is, of course, impossible to discern. According to Barry, the illness certainly drained his stamina and impeded his concentration, in addition to affecting “his mind in other, deeper ways.”

Despite his personal experience with the pandemic, the president never publicly acknowledged the disease wreaking havoc on the world. And though Wilson recovered from the virus, contemporaries and historians alike argue that he was never quite the same.

Six months after he came down with the flu, Wilson suffered a debilitating stroke that left him paralyzed on his left side and partially blind. Instead of disclosing her husband’s stroke, First Lady Edith Wilson hid his life-threatening condition from politicians, the press and the public, embarking on a self-described “stewardship” that Howard Markel of “PBS Newshour” more accurately defines as a secret presidency.

The first lady was able to assume such broad power due to a lack of constitutional clarity regarding the circumstances under which a president is considered incapacitated. A clearer protocol was only established with the ratification of the 25th Amendment in 1967.

As Manuel Roig-Franzia wrote for the Washington Post in 2016, Edith’s “control of the flow of information did not go unnoticed by an increasingly skeptical Congress.” At one point, Senator Albert Fall even declared, “We have a petticoat government! Wilson is not acting! Mrs. Wilson is President!”

Though Wilson’s condition improved marginally in the final years of his presidency, Edith continued, for all intents and purposes, to serve as the nation’s chief executive until her husband left office in March 1921. The weakened president died three years later, on February 3, 1924.

source: Smithsonian Magazine
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How the 1918 Pandemic Hit Woodrow Wilson and His White House

Smithsonian Channel

In the spring of 1919, with the Spanish Flu having infected one third of the Earth’s population, sitting U.S. president Woodrow Wilson falls ill. At a time when the whole of civilization seemed to be in balance, Wilson’s doctor agonizes over what to tell the press.

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Woodrow Wilson Got the Flu in a Pandemic During the World War I Peace Talks

Dave Roos Oct 6, 2020 History.com

Georges Clemenceau, President Woodrow Wilson and British Prime Minister David Lloyd George during the Paris Peace Conference on June 28, 1919.
1919WilsonPeaceConference-a
Mansell/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

… When Wilson was finally well enough to re-join the Conference, he scarcely resembled the man who had fought so doggedly for his principles. The flu had weakened both his body and his mind, and Wilson simply didn’t have the strength or the will to stand his ground. …

full story: The History Chanel
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The Spanish Flu Was Deadlier Than WWI

History Chanel

In 1918 the Spanish Flu killed at least 50 million people around the world and was the second deadliest plague in history – after, well, the plague in the 1300s. But how exactly did a flu virus cause such massive death and destruction across the world? #HistoryChannel

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When the Public Feared That Library Books Could Spread Deadly Diseases

“The great book scare” created a panic that you could catch an infection just by lending from the library

By Joseph Hayes Smithsonian Mag. August 23, 2019

1873ChicagoWaterTankBookRoom-a
The original public library in Chicago, a book room constructed inside an old iron water tower, opened to the public on New Year’s Day, 1873. (Public Domain)

On September 12, 1895, a Nebraskan named Jessie Allan died of tuberculosis. Such deaths were a common occurrence at the turn of the 20th century, but Allan’s case of “consumption” reportedly came from an unusual source. She was a librarian at the Omaha Public Library, and thanks to a common fear of the time, people worried that Allan’s terminal illness may have come from a book.

“The death of Miss Jessie Allan is doubly sad because of the excellent reputation which her work won for her and the pleasant affection which all librarians who knew her had come to feel for her, and because her death has given rise to a fresh discussion as to the possibility of infection from contagious diseases through library books,” the Library Journal, published by the American Library Association, wrote in October of 1895.

Allan’s death occurred during what is sometimes called the “great book scare.” This scare, now mostly forgotten, was a frantic panic during the late 19th and early 20th centuries that contaminated books—particularly ones lent out from libraries—could spread deadly diseases. The panic sprung from “the public understanding of the causes of diseases as germs,” says Annika Mann, a professor at Arizona State University and author of Reading Contagion: The Hazards of Reading in the Age of Print.

Librarians worried that Allan’s death, which became a focal point of the scare, would dissuade people from borrowing books and lead to a decline in support for public libraries.

continued: Smithsonian Magazine
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Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)