Idaho History Mar 28, 2021

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 50

Idaho Newspaper clippings April 18-24, 1919

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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April 18 continued

The Idaho Republican. April 18, 1919, Page 1

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Death of Mrs. Peterson

Mrs. Fred Peterson, age twenty-seven years, died at her home in Groveland Sunday evening, after suffering for two weeks with asthma and influenza.

Besides a devoted husband she is survived by two children, Elton seven years of age and a baby boy, Harold, fourteen months old, her mother and father Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Tracey, four sisters and one brother, three cousins, Samuel Chapman of Groveland, J. E. Chapman of Rose and Mrs. A. H. Kruse of Riverside.

The remains were taken to Oakley Wednesday where the interment will be made.

Mrs. Peterson came to this community two years ago, from Oakley, Idaho.
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Infant at Riverside Dies

The seven-months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thaddeus Hein of Riverside, died Monday of pneumonia. The body was sent to Salt Lake City for burial Tuesday, April 15.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 18 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. April 18, 1919, Page 2

Moreland

The Vernal Leavitt family have recovered after a long illness of the flu.

George Furniss is on the sick list this week.
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Rose

The mother of Mrs. Peterson arrived last week to help care for her, but Mrs. Peterson passed away at her home Sunday night at 10 o’clock. The whole community send out their sympathy to the grief stricken husband and children.

(ibid, page 2)
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The Idaho Republican. April 18, 1919, Page 5

Local News

Harold Silene, who has been ill, is very much better.

Mrs. Art Newlon was called to Utah the first of the week on account of the death of her sister.

Miss Edna Gillespie, librarian, was ill Tuesday and her place at the library desk was taken by Miss Eva Yandell.
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Sterling

Mrs. Dolly Parsons Reese, wife of William Reese died Tuesday, April 8 at 6 o’clock p.m., after a long illness of influenza-pneumonia. This makes the fourth death in the Parson’s family within a month. The family are prostrated with grief. Mrs. Reese was twenty-seven years old at the time of her death. She leaves to mourn her untimely death a husband and three children, a boy and two little girls, a mother and several brothers and sisters. The funeral was conducted Wednesday at 2 p.m. from the cemetery under the auspices of the L. D. S. church, Bishop R. A. Ward officiating. She was laid to rest beside her father and brother-in-law, who preceded her two days, in the Sterling-Yuma cemetery. The sympathy of the entire community goes out to these families in their great hour of sadness.

Miss Milo Lundquist has returned from a visit with relatives at Shelley. Her mother has also just returned from Aberdeen, where she has been caring for influenza patients.

Mrs. E. N. Wells is ill with the grippe at the present writing.

Frank Parsons, who is ill with influenza at the home of G. A. Line, is recovering.

John Zeigler Jr. was on the sick list the last of the week.

The school time has been changed to standard summer time.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Idaho Republican. April 18, 1919, Page 6

Moreland

The Feigert family, who live west of Moreland, are at present all suffering from attack of the influenza.

Miss Martha Tanner has been ill for some time and has been forced to discontinue her school work.

Miss Lillie Belnap, who came here a few weeks ago to clerk in the Lindsay-Welker store has been quite ill with tonsillitis.

Miss Annie Leavitt has been very ill for some time.

Last Friday being Arbor Day the school children, under their teachers’ direction, cleaned up the school yards and buildings, which makes a marked difference in the appearance of the school and the grounds.

(ibid, page 6)
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The Idaho Republican. April 18, 1919, Page 7

Kimball

The Woodruff family are able to be out again after having been suffering with the flu.

(ibid, page 7)
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The Idaho Republican. April 18, 1919, Page 8

Goshen

The people of this community who have been suffering with influenza are much improved at this writing.
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Wicks

Miss Mabel Bennett of Presto, who is attending high school at Blackfoot is very ill at the home of Mrs. A. B. Stephens.
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Rich

Claude Brown is on the sick list this week.

(ibid, page 8)
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Fern, Idaho ca. 1913

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Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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April 19

Evening Capital News., April 19, 1919, Page 5

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Around Boise Valley Loop

Caldwell

H. K. Cleaver is reported quite ill.

M. T. Hargove, the local real estate man, who has been ill the past month, has sufficiently recovered to be at his office again.

County Recorder L. C. Knowlton is reported quite ill.

Middleton

W. T. Plowhead is confined to his home with influenza.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 19 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., April 19, 1919, Page 10

Huston

The Wright children are recovering from the “flu.”

Mrs. George Vogt is quite sick.

Mrs. C. B. Anderson is on the sick list.

(ibid, page 10)
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Ferrell, Idaho ca. 1908

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Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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April 20

Evening Capital News., April 20, 1919, Page 6

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Pierce Park – Collister

Mrs. Frank Leonard and children are sick with the influenza.

Two granddaughters, aged 15 months and 14 years respectively, have arrived from Minnesota to make their home with Mr. and Mrs. George W. Hicks.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 20 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., April 20, 1919, Page 9

Deaths – Funerals

Herbst – Harry E. Herbst, aged 31 years, died Saturday at a Boise hospital. Typhoid fever, following influenza, caused his demise. Mr. Herbst was a mechanic and came to Boise six years ago from Seattle. He is survived by his wife and son, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Herbst of Dixon, Ill., one sister and one brother. The body lies at the Fry & Summers chapel and will be taken to Dixon, Ill., for burial.

(ibid, page 9)
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Evening Capital News., April 20, 1919, Page 10

Additional Loop

Caldwell

Mrs. W. A. Stone who is under medical treatment in a Boise hospital is reported to be progressing nicely.

Captain and Mrs. F. M. Cole will arrive home this evening from Salt Lake, where Mrs. Cole joined her husband a few days since upon his return from a southern training camp. Captain Cole will be recalled as Dr. Cole of this city, who let his practice in this city last year and enlisted in the army service.

(ibid, page 10)
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Firth, Idaho

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Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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April 21

The Daily Star-Mirror., April 21, 1919, Page 5

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City News

The many friends of the deceased will regret to hear that word has been received from Canada that Mrs. Robert Coop, who formerly lived here, had recently died of pneumonia, following influenza. Mrs. Coop was formerly Miss Lottie Ramseier. She leaves her husband and three small children.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 21 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Galena, Idaho (2)

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Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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April 22

Evening Capital News., April 22, 1919, Page 7

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St. Michael’s Has A Prosperous Year …

… The dean also spoke of the excellent growth of the Sunday school, the auxiliaries and other church societies, notwithstanding the influenza epidemic of the winter months. …

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 22 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., April 22, 1919, Page 8

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Spring Rains Bring Grippe

This sort of weather brings colds and grippe. If it’s just a common cold people say, “there’s no danger in that!” But many a fatal sickness begins with a cold – with vitality weakened – the system is ready for the Influenza germs. Begin early to ward off the attack. Purge the systems of the toxins (poisons) by taking castor oil, or a vegetable laxative made of Mayapple, leaves of aloe, and jalap, rolled into sugar-coated pills and to be had at all drug stores as Dr. Pierce’s Pleasant Pellets.

If the cold starts with a cough, and it persists then some local treatment for this condition should be taken. A well known alternative extract which has been on the market for a great many years, and which has been highly recommended by thousands of users, is Dr. Pierce’s Golden Medical Discovery. This tonic compound is composed of an extract of roots and herbs without alcohol, and has a soothing effect upon the mucous membrane, allays the irritation and at the same time works in the proper and reasonable way, at the seat of the trouble – the stagnated or poisoned blood.
(Adv.)

(ibid, page 8)
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The Idaho Republican. April 22, 1919, Page 2

19190422TIR1

Springfield

Mrs. W. C. Wells, died Wednesday morning, April 9, of pneumonia, following an attack of influenza. A baby daughter, born Monday morning, lived but a few hours. The loss of this young mother was a severe blow to her family and the community. Mrs. Wells was formerly Miss Myrtle Thurston. She leaves a daughter, four years old and a son two years old, besides her father and several brothers and sisters.

The funeral services for Mrs. Wells and the infant daughter were held at the Springfield cemetery Thursday afternoon. Hosea Berg and Thomas Blackburn officiated. The floral tributes were many and very beautiful.

Miss Hazel Nelson assisted at the W. C. Wells home during the recent illness there.

Mr. and Mrs. Chris Thurston returned to Ogden Thursday, after attending the funeral of Mrs. W. E. Wells, Mrs. Thurston’s eldest daughter. The blow was particularly sad for them, because only a year ago a younger daughter died of heart failure.

W. E. Wells is convalescing from a severe attack of influenza at the home of his parents Mr. and Mrs. C. N Wells.

Mrs. Don Shelman has taken Laveda Wells, the small daughter of W. E. Wells, to be at her home for a few days.

H. N. Wells and family left Tuesday for their home in St. Anthony. They had been delayed by sickness in the family. Ray Wells has rented the W. E. Wells ranch for two years. Mrs. Wells resigned as mail carrier for the rural route from Sterling.

Miss Oral Blackburn is slowly recovering from a tedious attack of the flu.

Mrs. E. Poulson has been quite seriously ill with pneumonia, but is improved very much.

A trained nurse was called to the Flemister home on the Carmen ranch last week, in fear that Mrs. Flemister was coming down with the flu, but it proved not the dreaded disease, and the nurse was dismissed.
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Lavaside

Mrs. W. Hammon has been sick for the last few days.

Everyone seems to have a terrible cold nowadays. We know of at least eight, who have complained.

Those afflicted with mumps are improving rapidly.

School was dismissed Friday afternoon for the war exhibit.

Examinations were taken the ninth and tenth. Part of the seventh and eighth grades wrote on them.
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Upper Presto

Mrs. James Taylor of Kimball was called to the bedside of her brother Albert Davis, at their parent’s home last week.

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Jones of Moreland are at the home of Albert Davis during his illness. He is a brother of Mrs. Jones.

Orson Davis, the eighteen year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Davis, was down with pneumonia for two weeks and then his illness changed to complications that can not be explained by the several doctors called in. The young man has a host of friends who will watch anxiously for his recovery.

James Anderson’s baby is ill with pneumonia. The infant baby of Neph Johnson has just recovered from an attack of the same disease.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 22 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. April 22, 1919, Page 3

In The Gem State

By a system of voluntary quarantine the public school at Rexburg has practically kept full control of the influenza situation. All physical exercises were held on the campus and practically every amusement for pupils was conducted in the school gymnasium.

A visiting nurses’ association of Boise and Ada county has been organized by representatives from a number of the prominent organizations of the city including the insurance companies and the trades council.

Dr. Ernest E. Laubaugh, captain in an army medical corps stationed at Camp Stuart, former state bacteriologist under the Hains administration, has been offered his old place by J. K. White, commissioner of public welfare.

Waiting to have the Pasteur treatment applied for the bite of a mad coyote, Frank Tama, 20 years of age, is at an Ogden hospital. He was rushed there from Blackfoot, after having been bitten while working at his sheep camp.
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Inland Northwest

A rigid quarantine against the importation of sheep into the state of Oregon was put into effect by Governor Olcott last week, after consultation with State Veterinarian Lytle, who is seeking to guard the sheep on the ranges of this state against the raves of scabies, a contagious sheep disease which is raging in our states.

(ibid, page 3)
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The Idaho Republican. April 22, 1919, Page 5

Local News

Mrs. Arthur Newland and her sister Miss Myrtle Cushing were called to Salt Lake City the first of the week by the death of their sister. Miss Cushing will remain for an indefinite time to take care of the two orphaned children.
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Shelley

Funeral of Soldier Boy

The funeral services of Alverious Hanks, soldier son of this community and dear son of Mr. and Mrs. E. K. Hanks, were held here last Sunday afternoon, April 18. No greater number of people ever attended a funeral here. The returned soldier boys of the community attended in full dress uniform and marched in parade formation to the cemetery. Four of the marine comrades of the deceased acted as pall-bearers. This is the third Shelly boy to die in training camps at home, and the sympathy of the community goes out to the dear mother of this boy.

The lights were out again for a short time last Saturday evening. Maybe they got too bright and had to be turned off.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Idaho Republican. April 22, 1919, Page 6

Taber

The people of Taber were much disappointed Friday when the trophy train whizzed past them, after they had all gathered at the station expecting to be permitted to view the exhibits for a few minutes at least.

(ibid, page 6)
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The Idaho Republican. April 22, 1919, Page 8

Sterling

Mrs. Pete Parso has been spending the week with Mrs. S. Cooper, who is ill.

Mrs. Charles Corbridge and two of their children are very ill with the mumps.

Little Arline Andrews is ill this week with an attack of mumps.

Eugene Atkins and Elmer Partridge are ill with the mumps.

Zelda and Edmund Loveless are nursing an attack of the mumps.

Hazel and Doris Furniss are ill with the mumps.

Mrs. Carlos Partridge, Averel Corbridge and Gordon Atkins are all victims of the mumps.

Lilore and Dallas Wells are ill with the mumps.

John Zeigler Jr. is ill with an attack of malaria.

(ibid, page 8)
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Gem, Idaho

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Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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April 23

Evening Capital News., April 23, 1919, Page 5

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19190423ECN2
10 Army Hospitals For Public Health

Washington, April 23. — Ten army hospitals with equipment, buildings and land have been transferred for public health service use to the treasury department, by the war department. The hospitals are:

Camp Beauregard, Louisiana; Camp Cody, New Mexico; Camp Fremont, California; Camp Hancock, Georgia; Camp J. E. Johnson, Florida, Camp Logan, Texas; Camp Sevier, South Carolina; Camp Sheridan, Alabama; Nitrate Plant, Perryville, Md., and General Hospital 13, Dansville, N. Y.
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19190423ECN3Don’t Buy Aspirin In A “Pill” Box
Ask for “Bayer Tablets of Aspirin” in a Bayer package – Marked with “Bayer Cross.”

You must say “Bayer.” Never ask for merely Aspirin tablets. The name “Bayer” means you are getting the genuine “Bayer Tablets of Aspirin,” proven safe by millions of people.

Don’t buy Aspirin tablets in a pill box. Insist on getting the Bayer package with the safety “Bayer Cross” on both package and on tablets. No other way!

Beware of counterfeits. Only recently a Brooklyn manufacturer was sent to the penitentiary for flooding the country with talcum powder tablets, which he claimed to be Aspirin.

In the Bayer package are proper directions and the dose for Headache, Toothache, Earache, Neuralgia, Rheumatism, Lumbago, Sciatica, Colds, Grippe, Influenza-Colds, Neuritis and pain generally.

“Bayer Tablets of Aspirin,” American made and owned, are sold in vest pocket boxes of 12 tablets, which cost only a few cents, also in bottles of 24 and bottles of 100 – also capsules. Aspirin is the trade mark of the Bayer Manufacture of Monoaceticacidester of Salicylicacid.
(Adv.)

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 23 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., April 23, 1919, Page 9

Caldwell To See Tank

C. B. Ross, the chairman of the Canyon county liberty loan committee, announced today that the whippet tank to be exhibited in Canyon county in the interests of the loan, will arrive at Parma on the Pony, Thursday morning. After being shown there it will go to Wilder on its own power, then to Greenleaf in the afternoon. Friday morning it will be shown in Caldwell and at Middleton and in the afternoon. Saturday the tank will show its prowess at Star and Eagle.

(ibid, page 9)
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The Daily Star-Mirror., April 23, 1919, Page 1

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19190423DSM2
Adair Exonerates Mayor W. Truitt
City Health Officer Says Charges Against Mayor Not Based On Facts

That some of the most violent opposition to Mayor Truitt’s reelection yesterday was directed against him by church members who believed that he had interfered with the churches by ordering them closed during the quarantine while the influenza epidemic raged here.

Dr. W. A. Adair, a member of the Methodist church and a brother-in-law of Mayor-elect Gibson, thinks an injustice has been done Mayor Truitt by these charges which he says are not true and he has given out the following statement which he asks be published in justice to Mayor Truitt. Dr. Adair’s statement follows:

Statement to the Public

In as much as I am informed that some time before, and at the city election yesterday, the charge was made against Mayor Truitt that he had advised and caused the closing of the churches and Sunday schools of the city during part of the flu epidemic, I deem it only just and proper for me to state that in all maters pertaining to the quarantine of the city I was and am responsible for all rules and orders pertaining thereto. Mayor Truitt put the entire matter into my hands, he never attempted to control my actions but did frequently ask me to be just as lenient as I possibly could in all my rules and regulation affecting churches, schools and all kinds of business. He at different times said to me that he knew nothing about the disease and must depend upon the health officer and physicians of the city to do what in their judgement was best to protect the health of the city and the lives of its citizens.

I am positive we got good results and this is proven by comparing out death rate with that of neighboring towns, such as Genessee, Palouse and Troy. If we had had as large a death rate in proportion to population as these and many other towns we would have buried from 65 to 75 citizens instead of eight or nine.

Dated this 23d day of April, 1919
W. A Adair, City Health Officer

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 23 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., April 23, 1919, Page 3

City News

Dean Eldridge, director of the summer school, is receiving many inquiries about the summer session, which begins June 16 and closes July 25. This interest indicates a probably good attendance.

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Sudderth have received a German helmet from a friend in France. Rev. Bridge wore this helmet last Friday evening in the play of the “Terrible Meek” in representing the character of a soldier.

(ibid, page 3)
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Main Street, Genesee, Idaho ca. 1916

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Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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April 24

The Filer Record., April 24, 1919, Page 4

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North Filer News

The little son of Mr. and Mrs. J. A Harshburger is reported very ill.

W. D. Griffith and family left Thursday for Los Angeles, Calif., to spend the summer on account of their son’s health.
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Rural High School Notes

Arranged by – Mary Otto, Ralph Beer, Miss Gourley.

Fern Fisher was absent the first of the week on account of illness.

Joice Louder returned today from the hospital.

Monday afternoon the High School was dismissed for an hour to witness a tractor demonstration held on the school grounds. The tractor is owned by the Filer Hardware Co. About an acre was plowed during the demonstrations. Considerable rock, alfalfa roots and sod were found on the ground that was plowed but the tractor with the two bottom plows moved steadily along. We appreciate the interest of the Hardware in the school and we are also thankful that we have the grounds plowed. Myrtle Musser drove the tractor, thus proving that a girl can do a man’s work.

source: The Filer Record. (Filer, Idaho), 24 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., April 24, 1919, Page 5

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Kuna

Jaspar Landsburg was moved Tuesday morning to Franklyn B. Fiss’ home. He stood the trip nicely. His condition has been much improved the last week.

The M. E. Ladies’ Aid Easter bazaar was postponed until later as the town was quite empty Saturday, many having gone to Boise to see the flying circus.

The young sons of J. H. Ross decided to break a calf to drive and, having no cart of a suitable size, hitched it to the baby carriage, entirely overlooking the fact that the baby was in it. The calf gave one bellow and started off across the yard but hit a bump and the front wheel came off the carriage and the baby bobbed out just as the mother came into view. Nothing was hurt, but the calf’s feelings and the boys did prefer to stand up to eat dinner that night.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 24 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., April 24, 1919, Page 7

Start Road Work

Work on the connecting link of the wagon road from Garden valley to Lowman has been started by the forest service and it is expected it will be completed within a month.

(ibid, page 7)
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Evening Capital News., April 24, 1919, Page 11

Health Notes

By M. S. Parker

What can the individual citizen do toward the elimination of disease? First, it is necessary that he take an active interest in the subject and let no opportunity pass to inform himself concerning its various phases. If the nation at large took as much interest in its health as it does in politics or in countless other things we should have cleaner politics and more for countless other things. When one’s interest is once aroused, the problem of getting information is not usually a very difficult one. In this country we regard education as a birthright, and to obtain it we establish free schools and libraries everywhere. And we should demand that these institutions educate in the matter of health also. We should insist that our public libraries carry a full line of literature on public health subjects and on personal hygiene, and then the libraries should be well patronized. We should also insist that in our public school there be liberal and obligatory courses in hygiene.

The victims of the white plague in Idaho should take courage and fight the dread disease harder than ever before, for a better day is coming in this state. Next year it will commence the erection of two tuberculosis hospitals in which to care for those who have been attacked by that terrible malady, and this should be an era of new hope for them.

The Modern Health Crusaders, working through the public schools of Idaho are doing some splendid work along health lines. The coming generation in this state is going to be stronger and more efficient than any generation that has preceded it, due in large measure to the health education that it is receiving.

(ibid, page 11)
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Payette Enterprise., April 24, 1919, Page 1

19190424PE1

Personal and Local Mention

Mr. Burt Venable, editor of the Cascade News left for Cascade Tuesday morning after spending a few days in Payette, being called here on account of the death of Mrs. Walkington, mother of Mrs. Venable.
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Second Annual Conference of Chapter
Northwestern Division American Red Cross Seattle Washington

Conference opened at 10 Thursday morning with Mr. Stimpson, Division manager presiding. In part he said that the greatest call to the Red Cross was in January and February with expenses more than any other period of the war, his report for the quarter January 1st to April 1st on production surgical dressing, Hos. Garments and supplies, Knitting, Refugee Garments – total 471,512 with a money valuation of the same $374,073.86. That answering the call had brought the treasury to the very lowest limits. He expressed appreciation for the hearty co-operation of the chapters in the charge of program made necessary by the signing of the armistice. During the influenza epidemic, two ships equipped with medicines, nurses, food and comforts were sent to Alaska. …

The Public Health Nursing and Home service will co-ordinate activities in the same chapter. Each is necessary to the fullest success of the [?]. The chairman of Public Health Nursing must be a trained nurse and is a nursing service for the benefit of all people in the community. The War Council has appropriated $30,000 to be used in making loans to nurses desiring to take up courses in Public Health Nursing. …

One of the Public Health men from Washington urged that children be trained in public health and in that way reach many homes. He also told how Dr. Livingston Farin had spent eighteen months in France to improve the public health. That chapters know that much of the misery is preventable and urged that chapters go into the a war for liberation from disease, that cleanliness is the corner stone. …

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 24 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Payette Enterprise., April 24, 1919, Page 2

North Payette

Jno. Beeson is on the sick list, suffering with the grippe.

Howard Harker is quite ill with spotted fever.
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Little Willow

One of the little boys of Mr. and Mrs. H. Walters has been quite sick with spotted fever the past week.

Several loads of Little Willow people went over to Boise Saturday to see the airplanes. They all pronounced it a sight well worth the trip.

Word has been given out from the Payette postmaster that unless the roads are fixed on the upper end of Little Willow and over on Big Willow the daily mail will be held up until it is done.

(ibid, page 2)
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The Emmett Index. April 24, 1919, Page 1

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Judge Smith Dead

Isaac N. Smith, judge of the district court of this district, died Tuesday in Boise. Heart disease, following a severe attack of influenza last winter, caused his death. Mr. Smith was appointed judge of this district by Governor Alexander and was elected last fall to succeed himself. He was a pioneer resident of Weiser.
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Died

The body of Joseph E. Gerhart, who died Saturday, April 19, at Exeter, Calif., was brought to Emmett the former home, for burial, arriving this morning. The mother, Mrs. Hannah Gerhart, and younger brother Paul accompanied the body. A brother Ernest, with his family of Idaho Falls, and four sisters, Mrs. Clarence Davis, and husband, and Mrs. Moon of Boise, Mrs. Sneed of Spokane and Miss Beth Gerhart of Sanders, Idaho, are all present to attend the funeral service which was held today at 2 o’clock at the Bucknum chapel. Also Mrs. Sam Atchinson and Mrs. Maxwell, old friends from Weiser, are here. Joseph E. Gerhart was the son of Peter Gerhart, deceased, and Mrs. Hannah Gerhart, and spent several years of his life in Emmett where his people owned ranch property just east of town. He was a boy of good habits, loved by his associates, and for a time a teacher in Oregon. But ill health overtook him, and he was compelled to abandon this, and sought benefit by a change of climate. The family left Emmett about a year and a half ago and have been in Exeter, Calif., some time, where the dread disease finished its work, cutting off a life of but 24 years. Interment was made in the Riverside Cemetery.
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Home Coming in Doubt

A letter received this morning from “The Boy” contains the following in regard to coming home: “There is no news of when we are going home. The number of patients in the hospital is decreasing every day, so it cannot be long before they will have to send some of the personnel home, or to come other places, and we think it will be homeward. I am interested in what will be done, as in all probability I shall go wherever the bunch goes. …

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 24 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. April 24, 1919, Page 7

Emmett News

Mrs. Burger and baby who had been very ill with pneumonia, are getting better.
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Card of Thanks

We wish to thank our friends and neighbors who so kindly assisted us during the illness and death of our dear father. Albert Ray, Edward Ray, Mrs. Myrtle Stickney, Mrs. Chas. Hedrick.

(ibid, page 7)
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The Emmett Index. April 24, 1919, Page 10

News of Gem County
By The Index’s Correspondents

Bramwell

Mrs. Mart Smith came home Monday from Emmett, where she had been for the past month at the home of her sister, taking medical treatment. She is quite improved in health.

Mrs. Social Rolph is reported on the sick list this week.

Letha

The smallpox patients are all recovered at the Mary Fishback home and only one member of the family is left with restrictions about his coming and going. Dr. Cummings fumigated Tuesday and allowed the visitors to proceed on their journey.

South Slope

Mrs. Gray of the South Slope was called to Portland last week by the illness and death of her father. Mrs. Gray returned to Emmett yesterday.

(ibid, page 10)
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The Emmett Index. April 24, 1919, Page 8

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(ibid, page 8)
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Further Reading

WWI Whippet Tank

WhippetTank-aWorld War 1 Whippet Tank on square May 5, 1919 on Victory Loan Campaign at Shippensburg, Pa.

The Medium Tank Mk A (also known as the “Whippet”) was an armored vehicle specifically designed to exploit breaches in the battle lines created by heavier lozenge-shaped combat tanks such as the Mark 1 series. The Whippet went on to become the most successful British tank of the war and was used to spearhead assaults, going on to cause many German casualties in the process. Designer William Tritton was an expert in designing agriculture and was assigned to work with Major Walter Gordon Wilson in producing a “caterpillar tracked” vehicle for transporting large naval guns. While working on the project, they saw a separate but equal military application of the tractor and were credited with the invention of the Medium Tank Mk A (Whippet). A prototype (interestingly with a revolving turret emplacement borrowed from an Austin armored car design) was made ready in February of 1917 and underwent evaluations thereafter. An order of 200 was placed March of 1917 to which the system was delivered for operational service of that year. At a later date, Tritton would go on to design the notable mark 1 thru Mark V series of heavy tanks for the war effort

source: Centennial Legion
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see also:

Medium Mark A Whippet

Wikipedia:
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America’s World War I Trophy Trains

by Shirley Wajda July 7, 2019

WWITrophyTrain-aTrains bearing war trophies captured by the Americans about to start on its tour of New York State, Northern New Jersey, and Fairfield Co., Conn. To aid in the Fourth Liberty Loan Drive. Visitors waiting in line to see the trophies. (Original caption; National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC)

Research in incomplete government records has not yet revealed the decision making to employ war exhibition trains in Liberty Loan drives. The War Loan Organization, established in 1918 by and in the Treasury Department, was headed by Director Lewis P. Franklin and Assistant Directors Clarkson Potter and Labert St. Clair. Frank R. Wilson, Director of Publicity, R. W. Emerson, Chief of the Division of Publications, and Charles F. Horner, Director of the Speakers’ Bureau, rounded out this team of men originally from the publishing, journalism, and advertising fields. These men marshaled the five Liberty Loan drives by adopting the structure of the then-new Federal Reserve system in which the nation was divided in twelve fiscal districts. A Central Liberty Loan Committee was formed in each district and each assigned a monetary amount of bonds to sell. The War Loan Organization was responsible for the sales, publicity, and speakers of these campaigns.

Each war exhibit train, decorated with posters, bunting, and signs, consisted of a Pullman coach provided comfort for the train manager, speakers, and other dignitaries. Much was made of electrically lighted flat cars which carried and displayed larger pieces; in the spring 1918 Third Liberty Loan drive, these included “trench mortars, cannon [including a ‘partly destroyed French 75 gun’, parts of aeroplanes and trophies captured from the Germans or collected on the battlefields”. Later loan drives incorporated even more and varied material culture. An electrically lighted baggage car was fitted with an exhibit of smaller battlefield trophies, including German helmets, gas masks, and personal items, as well as examples of American and Allied firepower, such as the Lewis machine gun. Lining the baggage car’s interior walls were hundreds of “large-sized photographs of scenes from actual battlefronts” showing “German atrocities in France and Belgium.”

A war exhibit train’s arrival was usually hailed by a parade or rally welcoming its occupants, making the public event a ritual performance of patriotism. Informative posters and newspaper articles and advertisements urged readers’ attendance. Civic and war-related volunteer associations, as well as veterans and local military bands, led these parades to the trains. With or without instrumental music, attendees sang patriotic airs. City and town officials called for businesses and schools to close, so that all could visit the train. In some towns time was set aside so that schoolchildren alone could view the exhibits.

excerpted from:
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Mumps

Mumps is a viral disease caused by the mumps virus. Initial symptoms are non-specific and include fever, headache, malaise, muscle pain, and loss of appetite. These symptoms are usually followed by painful swelling of the parotid glands, called parotitis, which is the most common symptom of infection. Symptoms typically occur 16 to 18 days after exposure to the virus and resolve within two weeks. About one third of infections are asymptomatic.

Complications include deafness and a wide range of inflammatory conditions, of which inflammation of the testes, breasts, ovaries, pancreas, meninges, and brain are the most common. Testicular inflammation may result in reduced fertility and, rarely, sterility.

Humans are the only natural host of the mumps virus, an RNA virus in the family Paramyxoviridae. The virus is primarily transmitted by respiratory secretions such as droplets and saliva, as well as via direct contact with an infected person. Mumps is highly contagious and spreads easily in densely populated settings. Transmission can occur from one week before the onset of symptoms to eight days after. During infection, the virus first infects the upper respiratory tract. From there, it spreads to the salivary glands and lymph nodes. Infection of the lymph nodes leads to presence of the virus in blood, which spreads the virus throughout the body. Mumps infection is usually self-limiting, coming to an end as the immune system clears the infection.

In places where mumps is common, it can be diagnosed based on clinical presentation. In places where mumps is less common, however, laboratory diagnosis using antibody testing, viral cultures, or real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction may be needed. There is no specific treatment for mumps, so treatment is supportive in nature and includes bed rest and pain relief. Prognosis is usually excellent with a full recovery as death and long-term complications are rare. Infection can be prevented with vaccination, either via an individual mumps vaccine or through combination vaccines such as the MMR vaccine, which also protects against measles and rubella. The spread of the disease can also be prevented by isolating infected individuals.

Mumps historically has been a highly prevalent disease, commonly occurring in outbreaks in densely crowded spaces. In the absence of vaccination, infection normally occurs in childhood, most frequently at the ages of 5–9. Symptoms and complications are more common in males and more severe in adolescents and adults. Infection is most common in winter and spring in temperate climates, whereas no seasonality is observed in tropical regions. Written accounts of mumps have existed since ancient times, and the cause of mumps, the mumps virus, was discovered in 1934. By the 1970s, vaccines had been created to protect against infection, and countries that have adopted mumps vaccination have seen a near-elimination of the disease. In the 21st century, however, there has been a resurgence in the number of cases in many countries that vaccinate, primarily among adolescents and young adults, due to multiple factors such as waning vaccine immunity and opposition to vaccination.

continued: Wikipedia
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