Monthly Archives: April 2021

Road Reports Apr 28, 2021

Please share road reports. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads. Rock Migration season has started. Conditions change quickly this time of year. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. There is still quite a bit of snow in higher elevations. Remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are bare and starting to dry out. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, wandering dogs, deer, elk, moose, fox, squirrels and chipmunks.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
Starting April 2, at 8am the original spring construction schedule for the ID-55 Smiths Ferry project will resume. From April 2 through mid-May, the road will be closed Monday through Thursday from 10am to 2pm, and open to one lane of alternating traffic with a 15-minute delay outside of the closure hours.
Project link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Wed (April 28) Mail truck driver reports the highway is bare.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open – Spring weight limits in effect.
Report Wednesday (April 28) Mail truck driver reported the road is clear. FS crew working above the Camp Creek area today.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open – Watch for rocks.
Report Wed (April 28) mail truck driver reports the the road is clear today.

Johnson Creek Road: Upper end closed to wheeled vehicles at Landmark.
The lower end of the road is more than likely in good shape out to the dump. No current report.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
Update from PR April 14: “The avalanches have been cleared from the Stibnite road and the road is open. The surface of the road was mostly undamaged by the slides. Like every spring there are rocks coming down daily with the freeze and thaw cycles, and the road is still icy in the shaded spots.”
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
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April 25, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

April 25, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17 – Boil water order issued
Feb 19 – Valley County Mask Advisory
March 11 – Tick Season Began
March 31 – Weight Limits on South Fork Salmon River road
April 2 – Hwy 55 weekday closures
April 26 – Hearing on Water Grant
May 1 – Dump Cleanup Day at 12pm
May 9 – Next Festival Planning Zoom Meeting
June 12 – VYPA Meeting
(details below)
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Local Events:

Public Hearing Monday April 26

Grant – Yellow Pine Water Users Association

Comments due by 5pm April 23

Valley County is submitting a proposal to the Idaho Department of Commerce for an Idaho Community Development Block Grant (ICDBG) for post disaster funding on behalf of the Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Inc. in the amount of $150,000.00.

The intent of the emergency grant funds is to provide aid to replace the severely damaged transmission and distribution lines from the public drinking water facility to the community which were severely damaged in the March 30, 2020 earthquake.

The hearing will include a discussion of the need of the project; the application process; and the project’s scope of work, location, funding/budget, schedule, and expected benefits. Action Item

Public Hearing
April 26, 2021 3:00 p.m.
Courthouse Building 2nd Floor
219 North Main Street Cascade, ID

Social distancing will be required, requiring telephonic testimony and/or limited access. Please call for further information. To listen to the hearing, please go to (link) and click on link labeled “Watch Commissioner Meetings Live” Instructions will be provided.

Direct questions & written comments to: Douglas Miller, Valley County Clerk PO Box 1350 Cascade, ID 83611 208-382-7100 (phone) 208-382-7119 (fax) dmiller@co.valley.id.us To comment telephonically or in-person, call 208-382-7100 prior to 5:00 p.m. April 23, 2021 OR email dmiller@co.valley.id.us until testimony is opened.
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Community Cleanup at the Dump May 1 at Noon

We are going to do a community cleanup at the dump on May 1 and the transfer people will come and dump the dumpsters for the beginning of summer.
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Plumbers Coming to Yellow Pine

Rocky Mountain Mechanical will be coming to Yellow Pine some time in April to do a plumbing project. If you are interested in plumbing work please call (208) 365-PIPE (7473). These guys are professionals and do great work, clean and courteous.
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Next Festival Planning Meeting

Sunday, May 9, 2021, Zoom meeting at 2pm. Contact Deb for link and passcode.
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Heating Maintenance Day

Deb Filler is coordinating with Mastercraft of McCall to schedule a maintenance day in Yellow Pine for propane and pellet stoves. If you are interested, please contact Deb at 208 633-6945. The date will be at least a couple months out.
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Village News:

Rx Burn Yellow Pine April 19th


Photo by Local Color Photography

After a couple of days of thick smoke during the ignition, air quality improved somewhat during the week with light smoky haze for several days. Much better by this weekend.
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Yellow Pine General Store

Laundry is open. Gas Available and rooms for rent.
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Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Upper Johnson Creek road is still closed at Landmark.

The Stibnite road between Yellow Pine and Stibnite mine is open.

The Hwy 55 project resumed April 2nd, expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10am to 2pm in the Smith’s Ferry area. Project Website link:

South Fork Salmon River Spring weight limits are in effect March 31 through at least June 1st.
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Critters

Ticks

Tick season started March 11th, and are numerous this spring. Check your dogs and yourself after a walk in the woods.

Pine Martins & Raccoons

Watch your small pets, reports of pine martins on the west side and raccoons on the north side of the village.

Be Fox & Coyote Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Be Mountain Lion Aware

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 2nd. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Community Cleanup at the Dump May 1 at Noon

We are going to do a community cleanup at the dump on May 1 and the transfer people will come and dump the dumpsters for the beginning of summer.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

See Notice of Public Hearing for water grant under Village News.

Update April 16, 2021: Water usage is holding at around 35k gallons per day, down about 15k since a leak was fixed.

Please conserve water. Turn off your trickle when it is above freezing during the day.

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Your Water Before Using
Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020.
Link: to Notice

Update Nov 29: Warren replaced the water meter because of inconsistent readings. With the new meter, the community is currently using over 55,000 gallons of water per day. A leak has been identified and will be repaired as soon as we can coordinate the contractor, equipment needed and weather together. It is difficult to get everything planned in the winter. When the repair is scheduled, the community will have a few days notice before the water is shut down. Since we are using more water than the rated use through the sand filters, the boil order will remain in effect. We continue the grant request process that is extremely slow. – Steve H

Update Nov 25: the boil order is still in effect due to the large quantity of water that is leaking from the system. – Warren D
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VYPA News:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Secretary
Ron Noel, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)

Festival
Anyone interested in being a part of the Festival Planning/Working committee, please contact Deb Filler. Meetings will begin at the end of January. Even if you aren’t physically in YP, you can participate in the committee.
Next Festival Planning Meeting May 9, 2021 – Contact Deb for Zoom link and passcode.
2021 Planning Notes updated May 28th (link)
Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival Policy and Procedure Link:
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YPFD News:

YP Fire District 2 (east of Yellow Pine Ave) up for election Nov 2nd for 4 year term (per Valley County.) Link:

After Action Report meeting Oct 13, 2020 (no minutes yet.)

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30th at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

Make sure to keep your chimney clean. Cleaning brushes can be borrowed from the YPFD.

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS (May 23)

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Tim Rogers – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
We will now be open 11am-8pm, closed on Tuesdays only. We will still offer smoked tri tip, brisket, and chicken sandwiches and also burgers and chicken wings.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Yellow Pine Tavern open daily:
Monday thru Thursday 8am to 9pm
Friday and Saturday 8am to 10pm
Sunday 8am to 8pm
Indoor Dining with limited seating and Outdoor Dining Available.
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer, Wine and Pop
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed Nov 3rd for winter.
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Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
Rooms, fuel, and laundry available. Store opens early May.
Email for reservations
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Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Apr 19) overnight low of 30 degrees, mostly cloudy this morning, gusty breezes, a few balls of “graupel”, and haze of smoke in the air. Jays, clark’s nutcracker, cassin’s finches, red-breasted nuthatches, a dark-eyed junco, hairy and downy woodpeckers, first evening grosbeak and collared dove visiting, later a big fat colombian ground squirrel popped out for a bit. Gusty breezes and mostly cloudy at lunch time, haze of smoke. Gusty breezes early afternoon, mostly cloudy and haze of smoke. Mostly clear, breezy and better air quality mid-afternoon, high of 54 degrees. VanMeter is still smoking here and there. Clear sky before sunset, light breezes and light haze of smoke settling in along the river. Clear sky and light breeze at dusk. Clear and haze of smoke before midnight.

Tuesday (Apr 20) overnight low of 22 degrees, clear very blue sky and light breezes this morning. The trees are full of cassin’s finches singing, tree swallows are back, jays, nuthatches, robins, male red-wing blackbird and pine squirrel visiting. Clear sky and light haze of smoke at lunch time. A few clouds, thin haze of smoke and light breezes early afternoon. Clear sky, warm, light breeze and light haze of smoke late afternoon, high of 59 degrees. Clear and above freezing at dusk. Looked mostly clear before midnight.

Wednesday (Apr 21) overnight low of 21 degrees, clear sky above a thin haze of smoke this morning. Swallows, cassin’s finches, pine siskins, jays, nuthatches, hairy and downy woodpeckers, colombian and pine squirrels visiting. Clear, warm and breezy with a haze of smoke at lunch time. Mail truck made it in on time. Clear, smoky haze and breezy early afternoon. Clear sky, light breezes, warm and light haze of smoke late afternoon, high of 62 degrees. Clear, calm and haze of smoke at dusk. Looked clear before midnight.

Thursday (Apr 22) overnight low of 24 degrees, mostly cloudy (high thin small clouds) and variable breezes this morning, 0.02″ in the rain gauge. The tree swallows are still around, more robins have arrived, lots of cassin’s finches, a few pine siskins, jays, nuthatches, downy woodpecker, a colombian and a pine squirrel visiting. Thicker broader clouds and light breezes at lunch time. Shooting started around 5pm. Breezy, overcast (sitting down on VanMeter) and a few misty drops of rain late afternoon, then a few small cracks in the clouds, high of 62 degrees. Heard a red-winged blackbird calling. Bigger breaks in the clouds and a little breezy before sunset. Starting to rain just before dusk, didn’t last long. Skiff of snow fell during the night.

Friday (Apr 23) overnight low of 32 degrees, mostly cloudy (foggy ridges) and breezy this morning, good air quality. Heard a flicker calling, a few tree swallows swooping, robins, jays, cassin’s finches, nuthatches, chickadee, hairy and downy woodpeckers and a pine squirrel visiting. Broken cloud cover at lunch time. First rufus hummingbird sighted. Warm, mostly cloudy and breezy late afternoon, high of 61 degrees. Mostly cloudy, calmer and warm before sunset. Calm, above freezing and mostly cloudy at dusk. Looked cloudy before midnight.

Saturday (Apr 24) overnight low of 34 degrees, overcast and light breeze this morning. Some tree swallows still around, no finches, red-winged blackbird calling, jays, nuthatches, downy and hairy woodpeckers, clark’s nutcracker and pine squirrel visiting. Gusty breezes before lunch time. Light sprinkles, overcast and breezy early afternoon. Cooler, overcast and still raining lightly late afternoon, high of 51 degrees. Quit raining by early evening, broken cloud cover. Cloudy and not raining at dusk, foggy on top of VanMeter. Raining pretty good at 1015pm, then light showers. Still sprinkling lightly after midnight. Probably sprinkled most of the night.

Sunday (Apr 25) overnight low of 35 degrees, 24 hour rainfall measured 0.17″, low overcast (foggy ridges) and misting very lightly this morning. Red-winged blackbird calling, no finches, jays, nuthatches, female downy and male hairy woodpeckers visiting. Stopped raining a little after lunch time. A report there was 4″ of new snow on the road going over Big Creek summit this morning. Gusty breezes kicking up early afternoon. Sprinkles of rain on and off mid-afternoon, temperature and clouds dropping, high of 47 degrees. Raven calling off in the distance. Break in the rain late afternoon and overcast.
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Idaho News:

190 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

April 23, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 190 new COVID-19 cases and three new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March to 186,183.

There are a total of 149,366 confirmed cases and 36,817 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state. …

The state said 585,090 people have received the vaccine, and 997,994 total doses have been administered. 444,371 people are fully vaccinated. …

The state said 14 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 8,033 and 1 new case has been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 1,368. …

3 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 2,031.

full story: [Valley County 833 cases, 6 deaths]
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Valley County COVID-19 vaccination rate rises to 52%

By Tom Grote for The Star-News April 22, 2021

A total of 52% of Valley County residents over age 16 had received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine by Monday, the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare reported. That is up from the 50% rate reported last week.

A total of 4,968 county residents had received the vaccine out of an estimated 9,552 total population age 16 or over, according to the H&W’s online COVID-19 tracking site.

One new positive case of COVID-19 was reported by St. Luke’s McCall last week. That broke a streak of two weeks where no new positive cases were reported in Valley County.

St. Luke’s McCall has now reported 639 total cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic reached Valley County a year ago.

Cascade Medical Center reported no new cases in the last week, holding at 106 total positive cases for the third week in a row. A total of 745 cases have been reported in Valley County since the start of the pandemic.

Four confirmed deaths and two suspected deaths related to COVID-19 among Valley County residents have been reported by Central District Health.

continued:
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3.5 magnitude earthquake reported near Stanley

by CBS2 News Staff Sunday, April 25th 2021

The United States Geological Survey (USGS) reported a 3.5 magnitude earthquake near Stanley just after 10 a.m. on Sunday.

The approximate location of the quake occurred 1.9 miles west-southwest of town.

The USGS said it was about 3.2 km deep.

source:

more info: USGS Link
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The USGS is showing 3 quakes in Idaho so far today:

2.6 3 km WSW of Stanley, Idaho 2021-04-25 05:09:15 (UTC-06:00) 1.1 km

3.5 3 km WSW of Stanley, Idaho 2021-04-25 04:23:21 (UTC-06:00) 3.2 km

2.7 11 km NW of Stanley, Idaho 2021-04-25 03:42:39 (UTC-06:00) 5.8 km

link:
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Scam Alert:

Beware of these tax scams

By Natasha Williams Apr 20, 2021 KIVI

Tax day is coming up on May 17–but the Better Business Bureau is warning Idahoans about scammers trying to cash in on your refund.

According to the BBB, scammers will steal your identity and file taxes for you in hopes of stealing your refund–and sometimes you won’t even know it’s happening until it’s too late.

That’s why the BBB says it’s best to file early.

continued:
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Mining News:

Council to do its own water tests at Stibnite

Sampling would be separate from Perpetua’s

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News April 22, 2021

Independent water quality tests will be done at the proposed Stibnite Mine Project under a project announced by the Stibnite Advisory Council.

The testing will be funded by Perpetua Resources, which is proposing to extract gold and antimony from the Stibnite area of Valley County, but Perpetua will have no part of the drawing or testing of water samples, the council said.

The first tests will take place in July, when water samples will be taken from 18 locations around the area of the proposed mine that is crossed by the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon.

The samples will be collected from groundwater, the East Fork and other streams around the mine site, said Bob Crump of Riggins, who chairs the Stibnite council.

“This will allow community members to compare the results with the information Perpetua Resources is currently sharing and develop a clearer picture of the conditions that exist today,” Crump said.

After each round of samples is analyzed, results will be available for public review at (link)

The water samples will be collected in addition to samples from 70 locations that Perpetua already collects and submits to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Payette National Forest, Perpetua CEO Laurel Sayer said.

“We believe in total transparency,” Sayer said. “Giving the community the ability to check our work is simply part of being a responsible mining company.”

The program was developed after community members and local groups expressed worries over the how water quality in the East Fork will affect areas downstream, Crump said.

Perpetua will fund the program at a cost of about $89,000 per year, said Denis Duman, who represents Idaho County on the Stibnite council and teamed up with Crump to develop the program.

“We don’t see that as a conflict of interest,” Duman said, noting an independent lab that will be used to analyze the results.

The samples will be collected by the Idaho Water Resources Research Institute, which was established by the University of Idaho.

Water samples will then be sent to Anatek Laboratories in Moscow, which will report the results back to the Stibnite council.

“The lab will report to the council, not Perpetua,” Duman said.

The results will include water temperature, acidity levels and dissolved metals, among other things.

The council plans to allow local citizens to observe and participate in the testing, with details to be determined, Duman said.

The East Fork, groundwater and other streams at Stibnite do not currently meet federal drinking water standards due to pollutants left by previous mining operations.

Some recent samples taken at Stibnite show arsenic levels 700 times higher than federal standards allow.

Mining at Stibnite began in 1939 and continued sporadically through the 1990s, when the site was abandoned.

Perpetua Resources, formerly known as Midas Gold, began mineral exploration at Stibnite in 2009.

Perpetua reached an agreement in January with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to begin cleaning up the historic waste.

That agreement authorizes about $7.5 million in work to begin this summer, including moving 325,000 tons of waste away from the East Fork and diverting streams around historic waste.

Two more areas outside of the mine project area could be cleaned up if the mine is given permits by the Payette National Forest. Those permits are pending.

The Stibnite Advisory Council was formed by Perpetua, then known as Midas Gold, in 2019 to allow community representatives to share information and voice worries related to the Stibnite Gold Project.

Communities represented on the council are the cities of Cascade, Donnelly, New Meadows, Riggins and Council, the Village of Yellow Pine and Adams and Idaho counties.

The City of McCall declined to join and Valley County is not a member due to potential conflicts since the county will be asked to issue permits for the mine.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
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Public Lands:

State: Tamarack not liable to pay fire costs

West State Fire costs $400,000 to battle

By Max Silverson for The Star-News April 22, 2021

Tamarack Resort will not be required to cover firefighting costs for the West State Fire, which burned 61 acres within the resort in November 2020 after slash fires burned out of control on the resort’s ski slopes, according to the Idaho Department of Lands.

The state investigated the cause of the fire and determined that the resort would not be cited or billed for the about $400,000 cost of fighting the fire, Public Information Officer Sharla Arledge said.

Several precautions were taken by the resort staff tending the fires and there was a quick response once they realized the fire was out of control, Arledge said.

“Tamarack employees appear to have been diligent in preparing for the planned burn that, unfortunately, got away from them,” she said.

continued:
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Payette plans to improve campsites in New Meadows area

The Payette National Forest is seeking comments on a project to improve campsites in the New Meadows Ranger District.

The Cold Springs, Last Chance, Grouse and Hazard Lake campgrounds are candidates for work done to expand, improve or replace fire rings, picnic tables, campsite markers, fee tubes, signs and kiosks.

A fence and toilet at the Last Chance campground are proposed to be replaced. The campground is located about nine miles northwest of McCall and has 20 single and two double campsites

Work on the Last Chance and Hazard Lake campgrounds is proposed to start this summer.

The Hazard Lake Campground has 12 campsites and is about 27 miles north of McCall.

The Cold Springs Campground has 19 campsites and is about eight miles west of New Meadows.

The Grouse Campground has 12 campsites and is about nine miles north of McCall.

“Camping is such a timelessly classic way to enjoy public lands and create great memories,” New Meadows District Ranger Erin Phelps said.

“We’re very excited about this opportunity to update our campgrounds and improve the visitor experience,” Phelps said.

The work would be funded by the Great American Outdoors Act of 2019, which provided $285 million to the Forest Service to reduce the backlog of maintenance across the agency.

Comments can be submitted electronically through the project webpage.

For more information about the project, visit (link) and search for “Campgrounds Deferred Maintenance Project.”

For more information on how to comment on the project or to request further information, contact Payette National Forest Central Zone Recreation Manager, Mike Beach at michael.beach@usda.gov or New Meadows District Ranger Erin Phelps at 208-514-5809 or erin.phelps@usda.gov.

Comments are requested before May 7.

source: The Star-News April 22, 2021
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State seeks comments on changes to timber cutting near streams

The Idaho Department of Lands is seeking public comment on proposed changes that would make it easier to understand rules for harvesting timber next to fish-bearing streams.

The department is holding a series of public meetings as part of negotiated rulemaking procedures on proposed changes to two rules.

Revisions of these two rules would simplify implementation as well as account for up-dated forest management practices of the current Shade Rule, which went into effect in 2014.

The Shade Rule was established to protect the shading of fish bearing streams when timber is harvested, but many consider the rule to be too complicated with numerous opportunities for error, an IDL news release said.

Local residents can offer comments during a meeting on Tuesday, May 4, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Holiday Inn Express and Suites, located at 201 N. Third St. in McCall.

For more information, visit (link) and search for “rulemaking” or “Rules Pertaining to the Idaho Forest Practices Act.”

source: The Star-News April 22, 2021
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Southwest Idaho Resource Advisory Committee to Accept Project Proposals

April 19, 2021

The Southwest Idaho Resource Advisory Committee (SWI-RAC) will be accepting proposals for review and consideration for funding for Fiscal Years 2021, 2022 and 2023. The proposal deadline is May 18, 2021.

“The SWI-RAC will be very busy as they have about approximately $1.4m eligible for awarding to projects,” said Brian Harris, Designated Federal Official for the SWI-RAC. “RAC participation enables local residents to have a meaningful role in deciding how federal funds are spent on public lands.” The funds are available through the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self Determination Act.

SWI-RAC-funded projects must be located on National Forest System Lands in Ada, Adams, Boise, Elmore, Gem, Valley, and Washington counties, or on nearby lands if the project will benefit resources on the National Forests. Projects can be completed by Forest Service personnel, through partnership agreements, or by open-bid contracting with individuals and corporations. The SWI-RAC works closely with the Forest Service to recommend projects that will benefit forest health, fish, wildlife, soils, watersheds and other resources; maintains roads, trails and other infrastructure; or control noxious weeds.

The SWI-RAC covers the Payette and Boise National Forests, the Fairfield Ranger District on the Sawtooth National Forest, the Middle Fork Ranger District on the Salmon-Challis National Forest, and the Hell Canyon Recreation Area in Adams County that is managed by the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest.

Applications for SWI-RAC proposals can be obtained at (link), or from the Designated Federal Official, Brian Harris at brian.d.harris@usda.gov , 208-634-6945.

Potential project sponsors should contact local Forest Service offices to obtain information that may be needed for a proposal, including a Forest Service contact, and to ensure proper agreements and paperwork are completed that will enable the project sponsor to obtain funding if recommended for funding by the SWI-RAC. Projects must include a letter of support from the County Commissioners in those counties where the project is proposed. Selected project sponsors may be asked to make a 20 minute presentation to the SWI-RAC if deemed necessary. Times and locations will be assigned by the DFO.

SWI-RAC meetings to review and recommend projects will be held in late May and early June at dates and times to be determined. Meetings will be held in a virtual environment and are always open to the public.

Date: May 18, 2021 What is Due? Project Proposals

Completed applications must be received in hardcopy form or via email to DFO Brian Harris at brian.d.harris@usda.gov on or before the May 18, 2021 deadline. If submitting hardcopy proposals, mail completed proposals to Brian Harris, Payette National Forest, 500 N. Mission Street, suite 2, McCall, Idaho 83638 with a postmark no later than May 18, 2021.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Tribal Liaison
Payette National Forest
—————

Fire Season:

Valley County offers $500 grants to reduce wildfire risk

[Deadline May 2]

The Star-News April 22, 2021

Valley County is offering $500 grants through a new Firewise pilot program to encourage landowners to reduce wildfire risk on their property.

There are 20 awards available, with three being reserved for each of the county’s three fire districts and one for a backcountry location. The remaining will be awarded by priority.

Applications will be reviewed by a panel of members from the Valley County Fire Working Group and final recipients will be approved by Valley County commissioners.

“The review panel is looking for innovative and creative projects that contribute to the community, even if the project is implemented only on one parcel,” Stephanie Nelson of the Valley County Fire Working Group said.

Examples of approved uses of funds include:

• Removal of hazard fuels, such as trees, brush and pine needles, that require hired labor, equipment rental or supplies, including leaf bags and chainsaw gas.

• Landscape hardening and upgrading to Firewise plants.

• Upgrading building materials to those that are fire resistant.

• Improvements for soffits, attic screens, enclosing wood decks and firewood storage areas.

• Support for community work days.

• Development and implementation of evacuation signage.

• Disbursement of educational materials, contacting absentee landowners and informing the community about defending their homes against wildfire.

A site visit will be required during the application process and again for photos to be taken once the grant application is selected.

Successful applicants will be reimbursed for their approved, completed projects that meet agreed criteria.

The application deadline is May 2, and awards will be announced within two weeks. Projects must be completed by Aug. 1.

For more information, including applications and rules, email VCFirewise@gmail.com or visit the Valley County Fire Working Group’s Facebook page.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — — — — — — — —

Preparing your property for fire season

By Emma Iannacone April 21, 2021 Local News 8

With the weather warming up, fire officials are hoping property owners will take steps to make sure they’re ready for fire season. …

Stouse offers some tips for homeowners:

* Create a fire-resistant zone around your home that is free of leaves, debris or flammable materials. Stouse suggests starting closest to your home and working outward.

* When working on spring and summer projects, use fire-resistant materials to build, renovate or make repairs.

* Space out trees and trim branches that hang over decks and roofs to keep fire from traveling to structures. Trim low-hanging and low-lying branches that can light from a ground fire and ignite a tree.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Yellow Pine “Rake it and Take it”

Instead of burning pine needles and branches, rake it and take it to the Transfer Station and pile NEATLY in the burn pile.

Remember only pine needles, branches and brush, no furniture, tires or construction materials.
— — — — — — — — — —

Full Lavaside Fire containment delayed

April 23, 2021 Local News 8

Firth, Idaho (KIFI) – Update 4/24 6:36 A post on The Bureau of Land management’s Facebook page says the blaze is 75% contained at this hour, but no “significant fire activity observed.” Crews had planned on it being 100% contained by now. Their new timeline is for Saturday at 6pm. The adjustment was made due to the sensitive nature of the fire.

The post goes on to say light precipitation occurred over the fire. 1 hand crew and 4 engines are scheduled to staff the fire tomorrow.

We expect another update tomorrow when 100% containment is reached.

continued:
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Critter News:

Fish and Game urges keeping trash away from hungry bears

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is asking residents for help curbing the problem of hungry bears foraging for food in McCall neighborhoods by making sure they don’t find any.

The department is already receiving reports of bears in the area, said Regan Berkley, Idaho Department of Fish and Game wildlife manager in McCall.

“Bears emerge hungry in the spring and are drawn to town by smells of food and trash,” Berkley said.

The bears will knock over trash cans many times in search of something to eat, she said.’

“It is important to make sure they don’t get a reward for this behavior,” Berkley said.

Bears are likely to return if they find even one trash can, cooler or freezer with food.

To prevent bear problems, residents are asked to do the following:

• Use bear-resistant trash containers properly by not overfilling them or tampering with latches.

• Take down bird feeders, as bird seed is a high-protein food source for bears. Birds are less dependent on feeding sources in the spring.

• Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can access them.

• Businesses are asked to not prop open bin lids.

Bears that have become too accustomed to human food sources cannot responsibly be relocated. They can become dangerous and, in some cases, must be trapped and lethally removed, Berkley said.

“Please help us avoid this situation by ensuring bears do not have access to human foods or trash,” Berkley said in the press release.

source: The Star-News April 22, 2021
— — — — — — — — — —

Legislation aims to kill 90% of wolves roaming Idaho

By Associated Press (AP) Apr 21, 2021

An Idaho Senate committee has approved legislation allowing the state to hire private contractors to kill about 90% of the wolves roaming Idaho.

The agriculture industry-backed bill approved Tuesday includes additional changes intended to cut the wolf population from about 1,500 to 150. Backers say there are too many wolves and they’re attacking cattle, sheep and wildlife.

Opponents say the legislation threatens a 2002 wolf management plan involving the federal government that could ultimately lead to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking back control of managing the state’s wolves. About 500 wolves have been killed in Idaho in each of the past two years.

source: KIVI
— — — — — — — — — —

Yellowstone park hazes wolves that get used to people

Associated Press April 25, 2021

Yellowstone National Park is using paintballs, rubber bullets and flying beanbags to haze wolves that have become too comfortable around people.

Biologist Doug Smith got permission from park rangers to use the non-lethal projectiles when members of the Wapiti Pack began travelling along roads and getting close to tourists on snowmobiles.

Park workers were instructed to fire on the wolves only during “teachable moments,” when they’d associate the pain with their nearness to humankind.

The hazing worked on one wolf that had become so used to people that it took a photographer’s tripod in November 2019.

source: Local News 8
— — — — — — — — — —

Horseback riders highlight the challenges they face on the trails

By Steve Dent Apr 22, 2021 KIVI

… Equestrian riders often use the foothills trails, especially those off of Cartwright Road. Now, they’re hoping to raise awareness to help everyone stay safe on the trails.

“Horses are more a fight or flight. They are going to see a predator,” said Karen Danley, a board member with the Foundation for Ada/Canyon Trails Systems. “They might think of you as a cougar and they are going to react to that.”

A horse typically weighs more than 1,000 pounds so a reaction on the trails can create a dangerous situation for both riders and other users.

“If something that startles him, his first reaction is fear and he might lash out at you with his hooves or he may run right into you,” said Beumeler. “It doesn’t make sense to a person, but it is very logical to a horse.”

Trail etiquette requires hikers and bikers to yield to horseback riders and bikers need to yield to hikers.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

World Center for Birds of Prey to break ground on new building on Earth Day

By Meredith Spelbring Apr 22, 2021 KIVI

The World Center for Birds of Prey will break ground on an expansion of its Interpretive Center on Earth Day.

The center will begin an expansion project to include more “educational opportunities and exhibits” on April 22 as part of a $3.2 million campaign known as HATCHED. Full construction will begin in July 2021 once the World Center’s Critically Endangered Californian Condors’s nestlings have fledged their nest, according to the Center.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Spring Chinook salmon fishing starts at 3 Idaho rivers

By Cooper Waytenick Apr 24, 2021

Spring Chinook salmon fishing on the Snake, Lower Salmon and Little Salmon rivers started Saturday after the Idaho Fish and Game Commission approved the start date back in March.

While returns to the Clearwater River are forecasted to be insufficient for fishing, fisheries managers are forecasting a run of more than 11,000 hatchery spring Chinook Salmon which are bound for all of the above locations.

Fishing on the Lower Salmon and Little Salmon rivers is limited to 4 days per week, Thursday through Sunday, while fishing on the Snake River will be 7 days per week.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

F&G seeks public input on whether to mandate gender identification for mountain goats

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Thursday, April 22, 2021

Deadline to comment is April 30

Fish and Game is seeking public input regarding whether to mandate a gender identification course for mountain goats for hunters who draw mountain goat tags. People can comment by going to the public survey webpage. Deadline to comment is April 30.

Mountain goats are sensitive to harvest, particularly harvest of adult females. Increased nanny harvest can lead to population declines and fewer tags available to hunters in the future. Idaho and other states have various programs to educate hunters on gender identification of mountain goats and the importance of reducing the numbers of nannies taken in the harvest.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Weekly Salmon Fishing Update – April 21, 2021

By Chris Sullivan, Anadromous Fisheries Coordinator
Wednesday, April 21, 2021

Welcome to our new weekly Chinook Salmon Fishing Update. Each week, we will provide updates on seasons and rules and share data from creel surveys, hatchery returns, and fish passage through the Columbia and Snake rivers to help anglers plan their salmon fishing trips.

Chinook salmon fishing starts April 24, and this week we cover seasons and rules information and point anglers towards informational tools on the Idaho Fish and Game website.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Giant tortoise with injured legs given skateboard to get about

by Georgina JadikovskA Zenger News Monday, April 12th 2021

Munich — A giant endangered tortoise was seen moving around on a roller board during a physiotherapy session after joint problems left it with difficulties in lifting its massive shell.

The male African spurred tortoise (Centrochelys sulcata), named Helmuth, is treated at ZOOM Erlebniswelt Gelsenkirchen zoological adventure world in the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia.

Helmuth, 23, has recently been whizzing around the zoo on a roller board due to problems with its front legs. African spurred tortoises are listed as endangered on the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s Red List of Endangered Species.

continued: w/video
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Seasonal Humor:

CovidWashHands-a
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Idaho History Apr 25, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 54

Idaho Newspaper clippings May 13-31, 1919

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

May 13

The Idaho Republican. May 13, 1919, Page 6

19190513TIR1

Taber

Word was received here Wednesday of the death of Mrs. Bert Evans of American Falls from Influenza.

George Patrie was in town Tuesday, getting fixtures for his well and reported some cases of flu out their way.

School will be dismissed here on May 23.
— —

Inland Northwest

The epidemic of sickness raging in Tonopah, Silver Peak and Blair is said by Goldfield physicians not to be influenza, but plain grippe, and they explain the number of deaths recently by stating that the number is not unusual for this season of the year when the present large population is considered.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 13 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Post Office, Hansen, Idaho

HansenFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

May 15

Idaho County Free Press. May 15, 1919, Page 4

19190515ICFP1

Clearwater

Miss Jennette Hanners, who taught the intermediate room here this year, closed her school Friday and has gone to Spokane. Miss Bechannan and Miss Heater are making up time in their rooms lost during the influenza epidemic.

Rain fell here Sunday evening and did much good to the crops and gardens in this vicinity.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 15 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Nezperce Herald., May 15, 1919, Page 1

19190515NH1

Farmers Union Convention June 6-7

The regular tri-annual convention of the Farmers Union, of Nez Perce, Lewis and Clearwater counties, will be held at Melrose on Friday and Saturday, June 6th and 7th. This will be the first one of these meetings since last summer – the regular fall and winter gatherings having been annulled because of the influenza epidemic – and it is anticipated that a large turnout will result. Especially so since the annual election of officers will take place at this time and much other important business is to be disposed of. …

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 15 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Main Street, Harvard, Idaho

HarvardFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

May 16

Cottonwood Chronicle. May 16, 1919, Page 1

19190516CC1

News Around The State
Items of Interest From Various Sections Reproduced for Benefit of Our Readers

The spring term of the federal court opened at Moscow last Monday. There are many sedition cases carried over from the fall term. These are a number of “bootlegging” cases and two cases of food hoarding that have been postponed twice. Judge Dietrich and the other court officers will reach Moscow Sunday. The last term of the court was adjourned hastily on account of the influenza situation, as a number of jurors and witnesses were taken sick while attending court.

The capitol building improvement bonds carried last Saturday at Boise by a 99 per cent vote, 2929 for to 41 against. The capitol building wings, which will cost approximately $900,000 are to be built during the next two years, are assured to Boise. The state is prepared to start building operations immediately. The city will take quick action to have the approach property vacated. The bond was for the purpose of raising money to purchase two blocks by the city of Boise adjacent to the state capitol building.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 16 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. May 16, 1919, Page 5

County Seat News Items

Dr. R. J. Alcorn of Ferdinand has located in Grangeville for the practice of his profession of physician and surgeon. Dr. Alcorn has taken office rooms upstairs in the Grangeville Savings & Trust block. His wife, Dr. Cora Alcorn, will continue to practice medicine in Ferdinand.

John Phillips of Stites was in Grangeville Wednesday carrying his arm in a sling. Mr. Phillips, Wednesday morning, while enroute to Grangeville, fractured a bone of his left wrist while cranking his automobile.
— —

Salmon River Ripplings

Mrs. Steve Farthing of Rocky canyon who has been ill is improving nicely.

Mrs. and Mrs. Arlie Gentry of Rocky canyon have returned home from Clarkston. The latter going there for treatment and is greatly improved in health.

Mrs. Eva Lancaster who was very ill is improving and is able to be about again.

The Salmon river country was visited by a good rain Sunday.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. May 16, 1919, Page 7

[Local News]

Dr. Orr and Dr. Stockton of Grangeville departed Monday morning for Boise in Dr. Stockton’s car.

Miss Edna McDonald finished her school term at the Crea school last week and is visiting at the Stevenson home in Cottonwood this week.

Marie Schueman closed her school near Keuterville last week and is visiting at the Jenny home before returning to her home at Clarkston.

(ibid, page 7)
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American Falls Press. May 16, 1919, Page 1

19190516AFP1

Mrs. Geo. S. Butler Passes Away

Early Wednesday morning Mrs. Madge J. Butler, wife of Geo. S. Butler, passed away at the family home. She had been ill since last October when she had had an attack of the flu which left her in a weakened condition and which finally developed into heart trouble which was the cause of her death. Mrs. Butler was born in Kansas and at the time of her death had reached the age of 45 years, 9 months and 7 days,.

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 3 o’clock in the Methodist church at American Falls, the Rev. Mr. Richards officiating.

Besides her husband she leaves three children.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 16 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

American Falls Press. May 16, 1919, Page 9

Boy Scout Doings

The New Orleans Red Cross has been working on the reclamation of soldiers’ garments. Boy scouts assisted by adjusting the button on the military blouses.

Among “good turns” reported by a Freeland (Pa.) troop of boys scouts are: Assisted the doctors and nurses in the Spanish influenza epidemic; donated ten baskets of provisions to the widows and orphans; assisted in picking 11 bushels of berries for I. O. O. F. orphanage at Sunbury, Pa.

(ibid, page 9)
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The Idaho Recorder. May 16, 1919, Page 1

19190516IR1

19190516IR2
Belated Flu Attack

The entire family of Ludwig Mogg is afflicted with a belated attack of flu, according to reports that comes from the home two miles south of Salmon this morning. Mrs. Murphey of the Red Cross is looking for a nurse for the family.
— —

Red Cross Work Is To Be Maintained After The War

Miss Van Wormer, field representative of the Red Cross, has been visiting Salmon this week, the guest of the Misses Shoup at the family home. The Lemhi chapter, of which Miss Laura Shoup is the head, was called together at Odd Fellows hall last night to hear Miss Van Wormer outline the post war work for the organization, which is to be kept up, both as to the junior Red Cross and parent body.

The principal undertakings still in hand are to look after child welfare in the devastated states of Europe, to help those made destitute who cannot help themselves, and finally to bring home to our own land the benefits of county nurses. To this end the organization is to be kept alive everywhere throughout the land, with the call for annual renewals of membership. Miss Shoup has announced, however, that the Salmon Red Cross rooms will not be maintained during the summer months after closing June 1.
— —

Strange Case Of Walking Typhoid

A strange case of a man in Montana carrying typhoid germs in his hands and infecting milk taken by him from cows has come to light at Helena, Montana. From this cause it is stated, there have arisen 17 cases of the dread disease with five deaths resulting.

The man [was] employed at the Sleeping Child Springs, a small resort in the Bitter Root valley. Shortly after he came there an epidemic of typhoid broke out at the place and spread, resulting in deaths in Missoula, Hamilton and Wallace, Ida. Five deaths in all were traced to the typhoid contagion contracted at the Sleeping Child Springs, and seventeen cases of the disease.

Health authorities investigated the resort. They found everything clean it is said. The water used there was analyzed and found pure and wholesome. Dr. John J. Sippy, state epidemiologist, and Dr. A. H. McGray, state bacteriologist, were called upon by Dr. G. Gordon, health officer of Ravalli county. All other clues as to the source of the disease proving fruitless, search for a typhoid carrier was begun.

An investigation disclosed that in every case of typhoid contracted at Sleeping Child Springs the patient was fond of milk and had partaken freely of the beverage at the springs. The ranch hand who did the milking was examined and it was found he carried positive typhoid germs, but to make absolutely sure the officials concluded to bring him to Helena to conduct more exhaustive tests.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 16 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. May 16, 1919, Page 4

Automobile Manners

The people who write etiquette books have not so far got out any code of automobile manners. But perhaps in these hurried times people do not read etiquette books any more. But anyway there are certain basic principles of good manners that should be applied to new developments of modern life.

The use of the automobile has had the effect to upset certain people’s ideas of what constitutes mannerly conduct. In ordinary life these people may be very courteous. But when they get on the road, they seem obsessed with the fear that someone will get ahead of them, or get away from them some precedence to which they are entitled.

If they seem a shade closer to a corner than a car coming from the entering street, they will rush ahead to claim the right to go ahead first. Frequently they misjudge the distance or speed and an accident results.

In their home life these same people would probably be very scrupulous to rise when a lady enters the room, and they would always insist on passing through a door last. But that spirit seems gone when they get out at a steering wheel. They blow their horn violently when approaching a crossing, as a notice to everyone to wait until they get by. It is of course easier for the pedestrian to stop and start than a big motor. Yet drivers who come down through a street slowly do not have to ask everyone to yield for them.

These remarks do not apply to the majority of drivers, who carry out on the road the same spirit of courtesy that they exercise in their homes. But it does fit a lot of people who ought to know better, and who do not realize how boorish an appearance they are making. If they could understand how objectionable they are made by their bad manners, their pride would compel an instant change of attitude.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. May 16, 1919, Page 5

Salmon Locals

The young returned soldier, Wesley Perkins, is recovering nicely from the attack of pneumonia that gave alarm last week.

Mrs. George A Martin, wife of the Salmon-Armstead stage man, has been ill for the past two weeks under hospital treatment at Butte. Mrs. Hunter is assisting Mrs. Martin in the management of her growing hotel and restaurant business at Armstead.

W. A. Brown, prominent livestock man of the Mayfield company, who has been through a siege attack of typhoid fever, is reported safely over the crisis and will soon be able to be out and about. His home is in Salmon.

W. F. Stipe has installed new counter show cases in the Salmon bakery to improve appearances and secure the more perfect sanitary handling of products. The interior is to have new linoleum also.
— —

19190516IR3
Filters Don’t Stop Influenza

Recent researches conducted by M. Nicolle and Lebailly of the Pasteur institute of Tunish have proven that the microbe of influenza is what is known as a “filter passer” – that is, it is so small as to pass through any filter, no matter how minute the interstices may be.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

Montpelier Examiner. May 16, 1919, Page 4

19190516ME1

[Deaths]

Funeral services for A. M. Hill of Pegram, were held in Salt Lake last Friday. Abe, as he was familiarly known to many local people, died last Tuesday at the home of his sister at Murray, Utah. He was down with influenza three months ago, which developed into tuberculosis. In addition to his widow he is survived by sons Stanley, Guy and Hood, and daughter Marvel of Pegram, and a sister, Amanda, of Salt Lake.

Mr. and Mrs. Andy Evans desire to thank the people of Raymond and Montpelier for their kindly acts on the occasion of the death of their infant son.
— —

Salt Lake Sheepman Died Here Last Night

Will Covey, the Salt Lake sheepman who has been ill with the flu at the Montpelier hospital, died last night at 1:55. Mr. Covey was 51 years old, and was born and raised in Salt Lake. He has been in the sheep business around Montpelier for the past fourteen years and is well known to many residents of this county.

Mr. Covey is survived by his wife, a son, Wallace, and a daughter, Grace, of Salt Lake. Mrs. Covey, a brother, and Mr. Stephen Covey, a brother, were at his bedside when he passed away. Dr. Claude Shields of Salt Lake and Miss Fife, a trained nurse, were called into consultation by Dr. Ashley, but Mr. Covey’s condition for several days has been slowly growing worse. The funeral will be held in Salt Lake, but arrangements have not yet been announced.
— —

Montpelier Now Has Modern Auto Hearse

Frank Williams drove his new auto hearse up from Ogden Tuesday on his return from the Golden Spike celebration there. The hearse is a beautiful pearl-colored auto, electrically fitted both inside and out and finished on the inside in mahogany.

It is a combination design after Mr. Williams’ own ideas, being constructed by the Sidney Stevens Implement Co. of Ogden to specifications, and can be used as an ambulance as well as a hearse.

Mr. Williams announces that he will now answer calls to any part of the county without extra charge for mileage, and is to be complimented for his initiative in providing this city with a first class mortuary and auto hearse.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 16 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. May 16, 1919, Page 5

Local News

Peter Black, an employee of Mumford’s sheep camp, was brought into the city Tuesday with a severe case of influenza, and died the same day. Funeral services were held at the city cemetery Wednesday. Nothing is known of any of Black’s relatives, or his home.

Funeral services were held at St. Charles last Thursday for the six-weeks old infant of Daniel Laker of Camp Lifton, which died of pneumonia.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. May 16, 1919, Page 3

19190516CT1

Ten Davis

After four months of splendid success in its work the Ten Davis school closed Thursday evening. The pupils all made their semesters credit, passing with good grades. Since our new set of teachers came out school has improved wonderfully. Mr. Bay made a splendid principal and teacher. He being able to teach the children to sing was very helpful and each student enjoyed the forty minute period of singing which they had every day. Mr. Jewell was a favorite with the boys as he enjoyed being out doors playing baseball and any other games the boys played. Mr. Jewel [sic] was also an excellent teacher. The rest of the teachers were very successful as teachers also. Miss Ruth Miller and Mrs. Conners will teach here again next year. We all hope that the three teachers yet to be hired will be as successful teachers as their predecessors have been.

Misses Ruth Miller and Ruth Mead and Mrs. Margaret Conners left Friday evening for their respective homes where they will spend the vacation.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 16 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. May 16, 1919, Page 4

Camp Fire Gleams

The Camp Fire Girls are beginning to think with more or less patience of their summer vacation. The school year being a strenuous one, crowding each one of their greatest efforts, trying for both teacher and pupil.

Now the peaceful voice of the pine tree, the symbol of rest and strength, is calling.

“Again and again shall thou sit at my feet and listen until thou too shall find rest and peace, and shall become steadfast and true. Tho self and truth fulfilling the law. The sky is not far. Osoah the pine tree has spoken and hath pointed the great sky trail.”

No wonder they turn from their books to listen to the message and think with longing of the dusk of the pine forest, of its sheltering safety and the untasted joys of the unknown trail beyond. Where misunderstandings, mistakes and troubles are forgotten and we find in the sound of the pines some signs of the eternal language.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. May 16, 1919, Page 6

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Marble Front

The Marble Front school will have a picnic in the Walter Thomas grove Friday, which is the last day of school.

Roswell

John Steele, who has been quite ill, is recovering.

Midway

Friday, Miss Martha Nicholas received word of the death of her cousin, Miss Lydia Morgan, of Malad, which occurred that day, from the flu. Miss Morgan was well known to the older residents of Midway as she taught the intermediate grade in the school six years ago, and for the past four years was country treasurer of Oneida county.

Miss Sina Williams is quite sick this week.

Mrs. E. R. Bennett, nurse specialist of the extension department, and Miss Louise Riddle of the County Farm bureau, met with several ladies at the school house, and Mrs. Bennett gave a fine talk on “home nursing.” Those who did not hear her missed a treat, as she gave many facts and suggestions that everyone should know. It is to be regretted there was not a larger representation of the district present.

Clyde Dorv is assisting in the People’s Cash Grocery this week, as Mr. Hostettler is on the sick list.

David Kauffman is suffering from the grippe.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. May 16, 1919, Page 10

Brier Rose

Mr. W. C. Postlethwaite was sick the first of the week, but is better and able to be at work again.

Mary Shaw is out of school this week with a sore throat.

Mrs. C. L. Crew is on the sick list and under the doctor’s care.

It is reported a number of persons are ill with the influenza on the Pons ranch.

Mr. E. L. Shaw, who was home two days last week on account of illness, is better and back in his office.

Greenleaf

Miss Glennie Dines is on the sick list.

The Nordyke family, who has had influenza the past few days, is reported better.

Lake Lowell

The Lake Lowell Red Cross met with Mrs. S. H. Peters Thursday afternoon of last week. There was a large attendance and the work was all finished up and sent in. At the close of the meeting it was decided to meet once a month during the summer just for a social good time.

(ibid, page 10)
— — — — — — — — — —

Post Office, Helmer, Idaho

HelmerFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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May 19

The Daily Star-Mirror., May 19, 1919, Page 2

19190519DSM1

Soldiers Should Keep Insurance
War Risk Department Issues Appeal To Men To Hang On To Policies

That the soldier, sailor or marine who took out an insurance policy with the government during the war makes a serious mistake when he relinquishes his insurance is the statement sent out by the war risk department, which it asks the newspapers to publish and to impress upon the minds of the men who served their country so faithfully that they should keep this insurance in force. The appeal follows:

Think it Over

Soldiers, sailors and marines —

Stop a minute while we tell you something for your own good.

Suppose “abandon ship” had been sounded and one of your pals was without a life belt. You would say to him – “Here, Jim, you get into this life belt and get into it quick! You will need it and you will need it badly. It’s a great protection – it’s a good thing – hang on to it.”

Your government insurance is a good thing. Hang on to it.

You say – “the war is over. What’s the use?” The government says, we say, every thinking person says – “Insurance protection is needed, war or peace.”

Influenza alone killed more young, healthy and vigorous persons in the world than were killed by bullets and disease four and one-half years of war.

And YOU say – “what’s the use?”

Isn’t it worth while protecting your mother, wife or other dependents – don’t you want to protect YOURSELF against disability?

During the period of the war the government issued a temporary type of insurance known as war risk, or term insurance. It was designed primarily for protection purposes only, simply to tide the service men over the danger period of the war at the lowest possible price.

This term insurance was the best possible TEMPORARY insurance the government could arrange. But the government realized that it lacked the elements which would make permanency in life insurance desirable.

The cost of this old style of war risk insurance increases as the years go by.

The cost of the new insurance does not increase once you convert.

The government will announce shortly a plan for changing this war risk, or term insurance to permanent life, or endowment insurance. It will introduce features highly desirable in any form of insurance but particularly in this new government insurance at its low cost.

Some of you men after being mustered out, are allowing your war risk insurance policies to lapse by nonpayment of premiums.

At the time when the government is about to make a “good thing” a “better thing” you men are letting this privilege slip thru your fingers.

Boys – don’t let your policies lapse. If you have done so thru misunderstanding, or lack of information, you have six months from the date of lapse in which to re-instate the policy.

If you want information regarding the re-instatement of your policy, or regarding the new government plan for converting policies, white to the insurance officer, Thirteenth Naval District, Navy Yard, Puget Sound, Wash. He will be glad to answer your questions regarding insurance.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 19 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Herrick, Idaho

HerrickFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

May 20

The Daily Star-Mirror., May 20, 1919, Page 1

19190520DSM1

Crime And Divorce Afflicts Spokane
Wave of Insanity, Juvenile Delinquency and Drunkenness Prevailing

Spokane. — Divorce, juvenile crime and insanity waves have been rampant here of late, and all are traceable to a condition of ‘social unrest.”

This is the opinion of Judge R. M. Webster, who as presiding judge of the Spokane county superior court, is charged with the adjudication of all cases of these three types.

Even the rapid rate of growth of divorce cases in the past 20 years has been exceeded recently. Juvenile crime has been rampant, and the police declare it their greatest problem.

“The divorce and insanity waves are traceable directly to a condition of social unrest,” Judge Webster said recently. “There is undoubtedly some connection between divorces and juvenile crime. A divorce, as rule means that a home has broken up and broken homes lead to juvenile troubles.

“Recently we have had from four to eight divorce hearings on every Tuesday and Thursday. “The run of insanity cases seems to have abated. Until recently I had a commitment almost every day. This week I had only one.”

Judge Webster asserts that the closing of schools during the influenza period had a detrimental effect upon juvenile morals, removing, as it did, the necessary “something to do,” which children crave.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 20 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., May 20, 1919, Page 4

19190520DSM2
“Flu” Claims Five Million in India

London. — Almost 5,000,000 persons have died in British India from Spanish influenza and fully a million others are believed to have died in the native states from the same cause, according to a report of the Indian government made public here. The area affected contained a population of 238,026,240 and the number of deaths was 4,899,725, or 20.6 deaths per thousand. In a few months, it is observed, influenza claimed half as many victims.

The influenza, which made its appearance in India early last autumn was particularly fatal in the central, northern and western portions, while in Burma it was not so severe. No part of the Punjab escaped. The hospitals were so choked it was impossible to quickly remove the dead and make room for the dying. Streets and lanes of the cities were littered with dead and dying people and the postal and telegraph services were completely demoralized.

The burning ghats and burial grounds were literally swamped with corpses, while an even greater number awaited removal from houses and hospitals. The depleted medical service, itself sorely stricken by the epidemic, was incapable of dealing with more than a minute fraction of sickness requiring attention.

(ibid, page 4)
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Oregon Short Line Depot, Homedale, Idaho

HomedaleFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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May 22

The Daily Star-Mirror., May 22, 1919, Page 4

19190522DSM1

Harvard Happenings
School Closed Friday

Harvard school closed a successful term Friday, May 16, under the able management of Miss Margaret Terry, in charge of the advanced grades and Miss Manilla Hanson, of the intermediate grades and Miss Jo Guy of the primary. …

The young people handled their work in a way that would do credit to older students in the city schools and shows what talent and practice can be made to produce. …

Despite the fact that ten weeks were lost during the influenza quarantine, eleven of the twelve applicants to write the examinations passed successfully, which speaks very highly, not only for the hard work of the pupils but for the teachers as well.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 22 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Horse Shoe Bend, Idaho ca. 1909

HorseShoeBend1909Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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May 23

Clearwater Republican. May 23, 1919, Page 1

19190523CR1

Schools Close Friday

Next Friday, May 30, the public schools will close for the year. In spite of the long vacation, caused by the influenza, the pupils will be able to finish their work in fairly good shape. Of course, the work has not been as thorough as in ordinary years, but by following the “cramming” process, the teachers have been able to get most of the pupils ready for promotion.

There are ten graduates this year. Nellie Chase, Blanche Simpson, Mary O’Hara, Ruby Wahl, Beatrice Rogers, Winnifred Wellman, Mary Biegart, Dorothy Gallaher, Mavis Aiken and Julia Brown. …
— —

Miss Roberts Gets Good Position

The Misses Nell Roberts and Agness Gillespie made the round trip to Ahsahka, Sunday. Miss Roberts has accepted the principalship of the Ahsahka school, for the next term, and her sister, Miss Veda will be her assistant. After the school house had been inspected by the two young lady visitors, they camped on the banks of the beautiful North Fork and partook of a bountiful lunch, in true Weary Willie and Dusty Roads style – coffee a la tomato can and wienies a la pointed stick.
— —

Notice

On account of the illness of Mr. C. H. Ede, School Trustee of District No. 22, opening of bids for gymnasium, auditorium and assembly room, at Orofino, which was advertised for May 19, was postponed until Monday, May 26th.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 23 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Clearwater Republican. May 23, 1919, Page 5

What your Friends and Neighbors Are Doing

The Republican is pleased to advise that Miss Mavis Aiken is rapidly recovering from a serious attack of pneumonia.

(ibid, page 5)
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American Falls Press. May 23, 1919, Page 2

19190523AFP1

19190523AFP2
Nurses Rescued From Quicksand
Three Girls Dug Out by Athlete Recuperating From Influenza

Chicago. — Three pretty nurses at the North Shore Health resort at Winnetka are deeply grateful for the fact that Harold Rubin, University of Chicago athlete, had the “flu” recently.19190523AFP3

If he hadn’t, he in all probability would not have been at the resort, convalescing from his recent illness, and the three young nurses might have perished in quicksand.

Misses Grace Williams, Helen Conrad and Clara Babroth went out along the lake shore to the bluff at Willow street. Dangerous quicksands about there.

Rubin and his cousin, Miss Fal Rubin, walking near by, heard the the girls scream. The athlete started on a sprint when he saw the girls sinking in quicksand. One of the young women was up to her waist.

Efforts to extricate the nurses were unsuccessful. Rubin sprinted back to the health resort. Despite his weakened condition, he probably never did the distance in better time.

With the help of a resort attaché and a couple of shovels, the girls were dug out. As soon as he ascertained they were safe, Rubin dashed off blushing furiously.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 23 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

American Falls Press. May 23, 1919, Page 4

Roy and Vicinity

Mrs. C. M. Confer of Landing returned to her home Tuesday of last week from the hospital at American Falls where she has been three weeks. Mrs. Confer is well on the way to complete recovery and has words of praise only for Miss Lehman and the other nurses of the Bethany Deaconess hospital.

Lawrence Roy’s little boy who is staying with his grandmother, Mrs. H. C. Roy was quite sick with croup one day last week. Dr. Logan was sent for and gave the little one relief.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

American Falls Press. May 23, 1919, Page 5

Local Briefs

Miss Gellette who is teaching in the Washington school is ill and will be unable to finish her term.

Mrs. Pete Helsler of Spokane, Wash., sister of S. E. Kramlich, died Tuesday morning. She had been ill for some time.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Minnihaha Homestead, Happy Creek, Idaho (1)

HappyCreekFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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May 28

The Challis Messenger., May 28, 1919, Page 6

19190528CM1

19190528CM2Australians Wear Flu Masks

Melbourne. — Because of prevalence of influenza, the government of Victoria has ordered every person appearing on the streets or in public gatherings to wear a mask.
— —

Typhus Epidemic in Russia

Copenhagen. — A typhus epidemic has broken out in several of the larger Russian towns. Thousands are reported dead.

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 28 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Challis Messenger., May 28, 1919, Page 3

19190528CM3

19190528CM4

(ibid, page 3)
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Headquarters, Idaho (5)

HeadquartersFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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May 30

The Caldwell Tribune. May 30, 1919, Page 1

19190530CT1

Children Need Medical Attention is Report
Examined 302 Pupils in Rural Schools – Startling Revelations Made Public

Canyon county is supposed to be as healthful a community as any in the state. The general health of the people of the county is thought to be above the average. Investigations made by Miss Ebba Djupe of the State Anti-Tuberculosis association and Miss Mertis Riddle, county home demonstration agent, indicates that medical supervision in the rural communities of this county is demanded.

In the Roswell, Midway, Lone Star and Franklin school districts 302 children were examined. Sanitary conditions in some districts are said to be bad. At Roswell the conditions are exceptionally good.

Particularly noticeable among the children examined was the prevalence of dental disorders, badly infected tonsils and the prevalence of ringworm. The latter was found to be almost universal among the children of all of the schools except Roswell. Miss Djupe attributed this to the use of common drinking cups or the type of fountains used in some institutions.

Girl Almost Blind

Among the most startling cases revealed through the examinations were those of a 12-year-old girl who was found to be almost totally blind, both parents and teachers being wholly ignorant of the fact; another girl with such a badly infected throat that Miss Djupe was of the opinion that she had diphtheria; and the case of a 6-year-old boy whose tonsils were extremely bad. This fact brought consternation to the child’s parents, who had but recently had a faulty operation performed upon the boy’s tonsils and, without an examination, would never have considered the possibility of them causing further trouble.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 30 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. May 30, 1919, Page 3

Lake Lowell

Almeda Gibbons is reported as improving.

Florence Gibbons is much improved at this writing.

Elsie Gibbons made a business trip to Boise Saturday.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. May 30, 1919, Page 7

Midway

School closed this week, after a very successful year, despite the influenza and smallpox.

The Parent-Teachers Association gave the school children their annual picnic and treat of ice cream and cake at the school house Friday afternoon. There were about 100 children and about 75 parents and visitors present. The children gave a fine program of sports, and everyone seemed to have a very pleasant afternoon.

Mrs. T. F. Fry was ill several days last week.

Mr. and Mrs. A. Sebree and family visited Mrs. Sebree’s mother, Mrs. W. L. Gibbons who is seriously ill at her home near Deer Flat reservoir, last week.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. May 30, 1919, Page 9

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Roswell

The children of the public schools were given a physical examination Wednesday under the direction of Miss Ebba Djupe, a nurse of the anti-tuberculosis society and Mrs. A. A. Steel, country health chairman. Although defects were found the results were very satisfactory.

Miss Swatman’s grades were closed Monday as she was in New Plymouth to see her brother who has just returned from service in Germany

Ten Davis

After a lingering illness of several months Bessie Bartles passed away in a Boise hospital Sunday afternoon. She has been suffering with diabetes. On Friday of last week she had her tonsils and adenoids removed. Up to Saturday evening she was feeling quite well, when she suddenly grew worse and died Sunday afternoon. Last winter she had to quit school on account of her poor health. She was a junior in high school when she quit. Bessie was a favorite among the young folks in the community and they will all miss her very much. She was 18 years old at the time of her death.

(ibid, page 9)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Meridian Times., May 30, 1919, Page 1

19190530MT1

Editorial Mention

Vera Ruth, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Fowler, died at the family home south of Meridian, May 26th, at the age of 8 years, 8 months and 14 days. Throat trouble, resembling diphtheria, was the cause of death. A brief service was conducted on the lawn at the home by Carman E. Mell, of the Christian church. Only the family were present. Interment was in Morris Hill cemetery.

J. H. McSparran, having closed the term of school at Montour, came to Meridian Wednesday with his household goods. …

The members of the Meridian high school board and the grade school board have mutually agreed on the “6 and 6” plan as before mentioned in the Times, and which means that 6 grades will be taught in the grade school and six in the high school. The appointment of the teachers for the high school and the selection of grades will be made by the newly appointed superintendent, Prof. Powers, and announced in a few days. The list has already been announced of the grade teachers, but the high school force awaits the action of the board and the new superintendent.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 30 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Meridian Times., May 30, 1919, Page 2

News Of A Week In Condensed Form
Records Of The Important Events Told In Briefest Manner Possible

Domestic

Unable to pay death claims of $580,000 as a result of influenza epidemic, the Catholic Mutual Benefit association will notify members that extra assessments must be levied until the deficit is wiped out, it was announced at Buffalo, N. Y., last week.

Washington

Passage by the house, on May 21, of a deficiency bill providing urgent appropriations of $45,044,500 for war risk allowances to soldiers and sailors’ families and civil war pensioners, made another speed record for the new house.

National suffrage for women was introduced by the house of representatives for the second time when the Susan B. Anthony amendment resolution was adopted on May 21 by a vote of 304 to 89.

Sending bombs and other explosives through the mails would be made a capital offense under a bill introduced by Senator King of Utah and referred to the judiciary committee. The Utah senator was one of those to whom infernal machines were addressed in the May day bomb plot

Foreign

The total damage in the north of France, including buildings, agriculture, furniture and public works, is estimated at 64,600,000,000 francs, or about $13,000,000,000.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Meridian Times., May 30, 1919, Page 5

19190530MT2

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

Ice Crew at Humphrey, Idaho

HumphreyFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

May 31

The Daily Star-Mirror., May 31, 1919, Page 1

19190531DSM1

Parents of Heroes Guests of “U”

Some of the parents of the Idaho students who died in the service were guests of the University yesterday. These are Mrs. Emma A. Paterka of Republic, the mother of Frank Paterka a member of the S. A. T. C. who died of influenza at Moscow, and Mrs. G. W. Sylvester of Rathdrum, the mother of Clarence Sylvester who was killed in action in the battle of Argonne Forest.

Dean French has received a number of communications from parents and relatives of other boys who died in the service indicating their appreciation of the exercises held and of the Memorial bulletin which will be sent them.
— —

Must Clean the Alleys

Dr. Leitch, city health officer, wants to call the attention of Moscow people to the ordinance providing for keeping the alleys clean. Dr. Leitch says the people are either ignorant of the law or do not care to obey it. The ordinance provided that if manure is thrown in the alleys at all it must be in a fly-tight box, and that the box must not protrude more than four feet into the alley, that is, must not extend more than four feet from the building or fence. He calls attention to the fact that manure is piled in alleys in Moscow, and that the ordinance is not obeyed by a great many persons who keep cows or horses in town. Rigid enforcement of the provisions of this ordinance will be made in the future. This warning is given in order that people may know the law and henceforth they will be required to obey it strictly.
— —

Autos Interfere With The Fire Department

Complains is made of the way automobiles crowd the streets when the fire bell rings. It is claimed that when the last alarm was found, Wednesday evening, so many automobiles blocked the streets that had there been a fire instead of a false alarm, the department could not have reached the hydrant. Warning is given that automobile or vehicle drivers who block the streets when the fire alarm sounds, will be arrested. Our efficient fire department has made an enviable record because it gets to the scene of the fire promptly. Idle curiosity will not be permitted to mar this splendid record.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 31 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
—————–

Further Reading

1918 flu pandemic in India

1918 flu pandemic in India was the outbreak of an unusually deadly influenza pandemic in India between 1918–1920 as a part of the worldwide Spanish flu pandemic. Also referred to as the Bombay Influenza or the Bombay Fever in India, the pandemic is believed to have killed up to 17 – 18 million people in the country, the most among all countries. David Arnold (2019) estimates at least 12 million dead, about 5% of the population. The decade between 1911 and 1921 was the only census period in which India’s population fell, mostly due to devastation of the Spanish flu pandemic. The death toll in India’s British-ruled districts was 13.88 million.

In India, the pandemic broke out in Bombay in June 1918, with one of the possible routes being via ships carrying troops returning from the First World War in Europe. The outbreak then spread across the country from west and south to east and north, reaching the whole of the country by August. It hit different parts of the country in three waves with the second wave being the highest in mortality rate. The death rate peaked in the last week of September 1918 in Bombay, in the middle of October in Madras, and in the middle of November in Calcutta.

The outbreak most severely affected younger people in the age group of 20–40, with women suffering disproportionately. According to the Sanitary Commissioner’s report for 1918, the maximum death toll in a week exceeded 200 deaths in both Bombay and Madras. The spread of the disease was exacerbated by a failed monsoon and the resultant famine-like conditions, that had left people underfed and weak, and forced them to move into densely populated cities. As a result of the severity of the outbreak, the year 1919 saw a reduction of births by around 30 percent. The population growth of India during the decade from 1911–1921 was 1.2%, the lowest among all decades under the British Raj. In his memoirs the Hindi poet, Suryakant Tripathi, wrote “Ganga was swollen with dead bodies.” The sanitary commissioner’s report for 1918 also noted that all rivers across India were clogged up with bodies, because of a shortage of firewood for cremation.

Mahatma Gandhi, the leader of India’s independence struggle, was also infected by the virus. The pandemic had a significant influence in the freedom movement in the country. The healthcare system in the country was unable to meet the sudden increase in demands for medical attention. The consequent toll of death and misery, and economic fallout brought about by the pandemic led to an increase in emotion against colonial rule.

from: Wikipedia
— — — —

The Virus That Killed 18 Million Indians

Exactly a 100 years ago, a ship returning with World War I soldiers unleashed the Spanish Flu in India. The worst pandemic in human history is strangely unremembered

Madhavankutty Pillai 06 Sep, 2018

On the 10th of November, 1918, Mahadev Desai, the personal secretary of Mahatma Gandhi, began his diary entry with, ‘Influenza raging in the Ashram’. He then went on to quote verbatim a letter that Gandhi, in a disease- stricken weakened state, wrote to one Gangabehn —

‘I could read only today your card telling me that you, Kiki and others had fallen ill. I was glad to learn, however, that by the grace of God you are all progressing. The body of the person who has chosen to follow the dharma of service must become as strong as steel as a result of his holy work. Our ancestors could build such tough bodies in the past. But today we are reduced to a state of miserable weakness and are easily infected by noxious germs moving about in the air. There is one and only one really effective way by which we can save ourselves from them even in our present broken state of health. That way is the way of self-restraint or of imposing a limit on our acts. The doctors say, and they are right, that in influenza our body is safest from any risk to life if we attend to two things. Even after we feel that we have recovered, we must continue to take complete rest in bed and have only an easily digestible liquid food. So early as on the third day after the fever has subsided many persons resume their work and their usual diet. The result is a relapse and quite often a fatal relapse. I request you all, therefore, to keep to your beds for some days still. And I wish you kept me informed about the health of you all. I am myself confined to bed still. It appears I shall have to keep to it for many days more, but it can be said that I am getting better. The doctors have forbidden me even to dictate letters, but how could I have the heart to desist from writing to you?… Vande Mataram, Mohandas Gandhi.’

The disease that Gandhi alludes to and almost forgotten in India’s cultural memory was the Spanish Flu, one of the biggest killers that mankind had ever seen in recorded history. Around the world, it is estimated to have claimed between 50 to 100 million lives. And in India, which was the worst affected, within the space of just a couple of months, it could have killed as many as 18 million or 7 per cent of the total population. The flu came in three waves. The first, which arrived in summer, wasn’t very markedly different from a seasonal variant. But exactly a 100 years ago, in September 1918, after a ship of soldiers returning from World War I landed in Mumbai, the second lethal wave began. From Mumbai it radiated to the rest of the country and the bodies kept piling on.

continued: Open Magazine
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Spanish Influenza in Australia

1918Atlantic16-a
People arrive at a quarantine camp in Wallangarra, Australia, during the influenza epidemic of 1919. State Library of Queensland

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
— — — — —

The ‘Spanish’ Influenza Pandemic in Australia, 1912-19

Humphrey McQueen

(Originally published in Social Policy in Australia – Some Perspectives 1901-1975. Edited by Jill Roe. Cassell Australia 1976)

Six months before the Armistice ended the Great War a new and more deadly scourge was unleashed upon the world. Popularly known as ‘Spanish’ flu it killed twenty million people within twelve months. Australia remained free of infection for much of that time, but by the end of 1919 all Australian States shared a death toll of 12,000. No one knew precisely what the disease was, or how to cure or prevent it. Was the Australian version simply a more virulent strain of the influenza which recurred every year, as claimed by the Director of Quarantine? The Federal structure of Australian government was ignored as States closed their borders: was Victoria responsible for allowing infection to spread to the rest of Australia as many New South Welshmen alleged? Or was the Pandemic a continuation of God’s punishments, the fulfilment of Apocalyptic prophecy?

In discussing the Pandemic’s Australian career four areas will be examined. Firstly, the origins of the disease and the quarantine regulations designed to prevent its penetration into and spread throughout Australia; some implications for Federalism and nationalism are pointed to. Secondly, the medical professions’ responses will be considered. Thirdly, the public health activities of State governments will be detailed. Fourthly, the psychological impact of the Pandemic will be located in its total environment to evaluate its contribution to any Australian ‘loss of certainty’ consequent upon the Great War.

`Spanish’ influenza earned its geographic epithet because the king of Spain was amongst its earliest victims; one of the few things known for certain is that the disease did not originate in his realm. The most likely explanation is that a milder form of influenza carried to Europe by American troops in April 1918 was transformed into the Pandemic type which, by October, spread throughout Europe and into Africa, Asia and the Americas; Australia remained free from infection until the following January. Before the Pandemic abated nearly thirty millions died, mostly in Asia.

Outbreaks in Britain were marked by three peaks of intensity between July 1918 and February 1919 during which Australian troops in Britain suffered approximately a 10 per cent infection rate; 209 cases were fatal. Returning troop ships were often badly hit. Half the complement of the Barambah were affected and twenty-three deaths occurred during the voyage. In contrast, another transport lost only one member, a sergeant, who ‘in a delirious condition’ and ‘fascinated by the cool depths of the moonlit sea. . .dropped overboard’ leaving ‘behind him the aroma of a gracious disposition’; however, twenty-four soldiers and four nurses from this vessel subsequently died in quarantine at Fremantle.

Outbreaks in Britain were marked by three peaks of intensity between July 1918 and February 1919 during which Australian troops in Britain suffered approximately a 10 per cent infection rate; 209 cases were fatal.2 Returning troop ships were often badly hit. Half the complement of the Barambah were affected and twenty-three deaths occurred during the voyage. In contrast, another transport lost only one member, a sergeant, who ‘in a delirious condition’ and ‘fascinated by the cool depths of the moonlit sea. . .dropped overboard’ leaving ‘behind him the aroma of a gracious disposition’3; however, twenty-four soldiers and four nurses from this vessel subsequently died in quarantine at Fremantle.

Outbreaks in Britain were marked by three peaks of intensity between July 1918 and February 1919 during which Australian troops in Britain suffered approximately a 10 per cent infection rate; 209 cases were fatal.2 Returning troop ships were often badly hit. Half the complement of the Barambah were affected and twenty-three deaths occurred during the voyage. In contrast, another transport lost only one member, a sergeant, who ‘in a delirious condition’ and ‘fascinated by the cool depths of the moonlit sea. . .dropped overboard’ leaving ‘behind him the aroma of a gracious disposition’3; however, twenty-four soldiers and four nurses from this vessel subsequently died in quarantine at Fremantle.

Once the disease was established in the resident population there were several instances of troops breaking quarantine.

continued: Social Policy in Australia (excellent long article)
— — — — —

How Australia’s response to the Spanish flu of 1919 sounds warnings on dealing with coronavirus

1919AustraliaMedicalStaff-aMedical staff in Surry Hills, NSW, 1919. NSW State Archives

The Spanish flu came in waves and was extraordinarily virulent. There were reports of people seeming perfectly health at breakfast and dead by evening.

An illness lasting ten or so days, followed by weeks of debility, was more common. An early sign was a chill or shivering, followed by headache and back pain. Eventually, an acute muscle pain would overcome the sufferer, accompanied by some combination of vomiting, diarrhoea, watering eyes, a running or bleeding nose, a sore throat and a dry cough. The skin might acquire a strange blue or plum colour. …

Almost a third of deaths in Australia were of adults between 25 and 34. The Spanish flu probably infected 2 million Australians in a population of about 5 million. In Sydney alone, 40% of residents caught it. …

There were too few doctors and nurses to deal with the crisis – many were still with the armed forces overseas, and others caught the flu. Health facilities were overrun. In Melbourne, the Exhibition Building was turned into a large hospital, as were some schools. Schools shut down at various times in different states during 1919, but widespread disruption was caused either by government decisions to close or the illness of teachers.

excerpted from: March 22, 2020 The Conversation
— — — — —

1919: Influenza pandemic reaches Australia

1919AustraliaMasks-aWomen wearing surgical masks during influenza epidemic, Brisbane 1919

The Spanish flu pandemic emerged at the end of the First World War, killing more than 50 million people worldwide.

Despite a swift quarantine response in October 1918, cases of Spanish flu began to appear in Australia in early 1919. About 40 per cent of the population fell ill and around 15,000 died as the virus spread through Australia.

What is influenza?

Influenza, or the flu, is a highly contagious respiratory illness caused by the influenza virus.

In 15th-century Italy an upper respiratory infection was considered to be ‘influenced’ by the stars, thereby giving the disease its name.

continued: National Museum of Australia
— — — — —

An Australian Perspective of the 1918–1919 Influenza Pandemic

Peter Curson and Kevin McCracken
Department of Human Geography Macquarie University

Abstract

The 1918–1919 influenza pandemic stands as one of the greatest natural disasters of all time. In a little over a year the disease affected hundreds of millions of people and killed between 50 and 100 million. When the disease finally reached Australia in 1919 it caused more than 12,000 deaths. While the death rate was lower than in many other countries, the pandemic was a major demographic and social tragedy, affecting the lives of millions of Australians.

This paper briefly assesses the impact of the pandemic on Australia and NSW with particular reference to the demographic and social impact and the measures advanced to contain it.

continued: NSW Public Health Bulletin Vol. 17 No. 7–8
——————–

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports Apr 25, 2021

Note: we had some rain this weekend, snow in higher elevations.

It is Rock Migration Season. Please share road reports. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads. Rock Migration season has started. Conditions change quickly this time of year. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road, icy conditions and deep snow in higher elevation. Remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are bare, there are a few small icy patches lingering in shady places. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, wandering dogs, deer, elk, moose, fox, squirrels and chipmunks.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
Starting April 2, at 8am the original spring construction schedule for the ID-55 Smiths Ferry project will resume. From April 2 through mid-May, the road will be closed Monday through Thursday from 10am to 2pm, and open to one lane of alternating traffic with a 15-minute delay outside of the closure hours.
Project link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open – possible snow at the summit.
Wed (April 21) Mail truck driver reports the highway is bare.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
March 31: Spring weight limits in effect
“Forest Service officials on the Payette and Boise National Forests implemented the annual seasonal break up limits/road weight restrictions on portions of the South Fork Salmon River Road (National Forest System Road #674 and #474) effective today, March 31, 2021. The restriction is in effect annually through June 1, or as Forest Service officers determine that no further damage will occur to the roadway and remove the signing.”
Report Wednesday (April 21) Mail truck driver said the road is clear, a few small rocks. Very smoky today from Rx burning. The FS is using a backhoe to clean ditches today.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open – Watch for rocks.
Report Wed (April 21) mail truck driver reports the the road is snow free.

Johnson Creek Road: Upper end closed to wheeled vehicles at Landmark.
The lower end of the road is more than likely in good shape out to the dump. No current report.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Trail report and video April 10th from C&L: “Yesterday [April 9] we came into BC with a smooth trail and had sunshine all the way. We were so lucky that [people] had gone in a couple of days before us & cleared a HUGH number of large down trees, and we only widened one down tree going in. Our trip from YP to BC was a short one (2 1/2 hr). It will be a big job for anyone to take a full sized vehicle up the Profile Creek Road once the snow is gone because of the downed trees – most were cut wide enough for an ATV, and some big ones were not cut at all. … [A] little video of the trail from Profile Gap to Belvadere Creek -see following link:”
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
Update April 14: “The avalanches have been cleared from the Stibnite road and the road is open. The surface of the road was mostly undamaged by the slides. Like every spring there are rocks coming down daily with the freeze and thaw cycles, and the road is still icy in the shaded spots.”
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Weather Reports Apr 18-24, 2021

April 18 Weather:

At 930am it was 38 degrees, clear sky, good air quality and light breeze. The last of the “natural” snow has melted, piles under north facing roofs about 2′ deep. At 1pm air quality is getting smoky, Rx burns north west of the village. At 5pm it was 66 degrees, looks like a few high wispy clouds above the smoke (mostly clear) and getting breezy. Gusty breezes around 630pm. At 9pm it was 48 degrees and smoky. Calm at 11pm. Looked hazy at 2am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 19, 2021 at 09:30AM
Mostly cloudy, gusty breezes, haze of smoke
Max temperature 69 degrees F
Min temperature 30 degrees F
At observation 47 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

April 19 Weather:

At 930am it was 47 degrees, mostly cloudy and gusty breezes, haze of smoke in the air. At 940am a few balls of “graupel” and gusty. At 1215pm gusty breezes and mostly cloudy, haze of smoke. At 445pm it was 52 degrees, mostly clear and breezy, better air quality. At 7pm it looked clear, light breezes and light haze of smoke settling in along the river. At 830pm it was 41 degrees, clear and light breeze. Clear sky at 11pm and haze of smoke.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 20, 2021 at 09:30AM
Clear, slight breeze, good AQ
Max temperature 54 degrees F
Min temperature 22 degrees F
At observation 32 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

April 20 Weather:

At 930am it was 32 degrees, clear sky, slight breeze and good air quality. At 1pm clear sky and light haze of smoke. At 230pm it was partly cloudy, light haze of smoke and light breezes. At 5pm it was 58 degrees, clear, light breezes and light haze of smoke. At 830pm it was 44 degrees and clear. At 1045pm looked mostly clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 21, 2021 at 09:30AM
Clear, haze of smoke
Max temperature 59 degrees F
Min temperature 21 degrees F
At observation 33 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

April 21 Weather:

At 930am it was 33 degrees, clear sky and haze of smoke. At 1230pm it was 55 degrees, clear sky, light haze of smoke and breezy. Gusty breezy before 440pm. At 5pm it was 60 degrees, clear sky, light haze of smoke and light breezes. At 830pm it was 45 degrees, clear sky, haze of smoke and calm. Looked clear at 1030pm, stars out and moon still up.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 22, 2021 at 09:30AM
Mostly high thin clouds, variable breezes
Max temperature 62 degrees F
Min temperature 24 degrees F
At observation 37 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

April 22 Weather:

At 930am it was 37 degrees, most of the sky had high thin hazy clouds, variable breezes and good air quality. At 1pm it was 55 degrees, thicker and broader clouds with light breezes. Around 530pm it was 52 degrees, lowering overcast, blustery breezes and a few rops of rain. By 545pm breaks in the overcast. At 7pm bigger breaks in the clouds and a little breezy. At 825pm it was 44 degrees, cloudy and starting to rain a little, didn’t last long. A skiff of snow came down during the night.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 23, 2021 at 09:30AM
Mostly cloudy, breezy
Max temperature 62 degrees F
Min temperature 32 degrees F
At observation 36 degrees F
Precipitation 0.02 inch
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

April 23 Weather:

At 930am it was 36 degrees, mostly cloudy (foggy ridges) good air quality and breezy. Mostly cloudy and breezy at 1pm. First Rufus hummingbird sighted. At 5pm it was 59 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy. At 720pm it was 54 degrees, mostly cloudy and calmer. At 830pm it was 49 degrees, mostly cloudy and almost calm. At 1045pm it looked cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 24, 2021 at 09:30AM
Overcast, light breezes
Max temperature 61 degrees F
Min temperature 34 degrees F
At observation 43 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

April 24 Weather:

At 930am it was 43 degrees, overcast and light breeze. Gusty at 1115am. Light sprinkles of rain started just before 1pm, overcast and breezy. Still sprinkling lightly at 2pm and calmer. At 530pm it was 43 degrees, overcast and still raining lightly. It quit raining before 7pm and breaks in the clouds. At 840pm it was 43 degrees, cloudy and not raining. Raining pretty good at 1015pm. Sprinkling lightly at 1230am. Not raining at 6am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 25, 2021 at 09:30AM
Low overcast, light mist
Max temperature 51 degrees F
Min temperature 35 degrees F
At observation 38 degrees F
Precipitation 0.17 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
———————

Road Reports Apr 21, 2021

It is Rock Migration Season. Please share road reports. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads. Rock Migration season has started. Conditions change quickly this time of year. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road, icy conditions and deep snow in higher elevation. Remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are bare and starting to dry out, there are a few icy patches lingering in shady places. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, wandering dogs, deer, elk, moose, fox, squirrels and chipmunks.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
Starting April 2, at 8am the original spring construction schedule for the ID-55 Smiths Ferry project will resume. From April 2 through mid-May, the road will be closed Monday through Thursday from 10am to 2pm, and open to one lane of alternating traffic with a 15-minute delay outside of the closure hours.
Project link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Wed (April 21) Mail truck driver reports the highway is bare.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Watch for FS fire traffic doing Rx Burns, and equipment cleaning ditches.
March 31: Spring weight limits in effect
“Forest Service officials on the Payette and Boise National Forests implemented the annual seasonal break up limits/road weight restrictions on portions of the South Fork Salmon River Road (National Forest System Road #674 and #474) effective today, March 31, 2021. The restriction is in effect annually through June 1, or as Forest Service officers determine that no further damage will occur to the roadway and remove the signing.”
Report Wednesday (April 21) Mail truck driver said the road is clear, a few small rocks. Very smoky today from Rx burning. The FS is using a backhoe to clean ditches today.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open – Watch for rocks.
Report Wed (April 21) mail truck driver reports the the road is snow free. No new rocks have come down since his last trip.

Johnson Creek Road: Upper end closed to wheeled vehicles at Landmark.
The lower end of the road is more than likely in good shape out to the dump. No current report.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Trail report and video April 10th from C&L: “Yesterday [April 9] we came into BC with a smooth trail and had sunshine all the way. We were so lucky that [people] had gone in a couple of days before us & cleared a HUGH number of large down trees, and we only widened one down tree going in. Our trip from YP to BC was a short one (2 1/2 hr). It will be a big job for anyone to take a full sized vehicle up the Profile Creek Road once the snow is gone because of the downed trees – most were cut wide enough for an ATV, and some big ones were not cut at all. … [A] little video of the trail from Profile Gap to Belvadere Creek -see following link:”
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
Update April 14: “The avalanches have been cleared from the Stibnite road and the road is open. The surface of the road was mostly undamaged by the slides. Like every spring there are rocks coming down daily with the freeze and thaw cycles, and the road is still icy in the shaded spots.”
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

April 18, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

April 18, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17 – Boil water order issued
Feb 19 – Valley County Mask Advisory
Feb 23 – Avalanche closed Stibnite Road
March 11 – Tick Season Began
March 31 – Weight Limits on South Fork Salmon River road
April 2 – Hwy 55 closures
April 16-19 – Rx Burn near Yellow Pine
April 26 – Hearing on Water Grant
May 1 – Dump Cleanup Day at 12pm
May 9 – Next Festival Planning Zoom Meeting
June 12 – VYPA Meeting
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Rx Burning Near Yellow Pine

The helicopter flights started on Saturday, April 17th, the smoke was quite thick all afternoon, but better air quality by evening. On Sunday, April 18th the helicopter started flying over around 1030am and continued for about an hour. Here is a photo from the webcam taken at noon.
20210418YellowPineRxBurn
About 1pm looking west:
20210418YellowPine-W

Update on Bald Hill Rx Burn April 16: Crews are “black lining” the Rx area today and taking advantage of perfect Rx burning conditions to accomplish some of the burning. They will be igniting the broadcast burn area Saturday through Monday via helicopter ignition with use of the “ping-pong balls.” The burn is proceeding well and exactly as desired – flame length remain below 1 foot and 1, 10 and 100 hour fuels are consuming well with fire behavior meeting all objectives. Crews will remain on site through beyond Monday to watch over the burn area.

Prescribed Burning update near Yellow Pine and Eiguren

The Krassel Ranger District is planning to start burning next week (4/13/21). Ignitions will occur in the 4 mile and Bald Hill projects areas. Priority units are Bald Hill units F,G and 4 mile unit G,A. Maps of the project areas can be found below. Units may be broken into smaller portions to aid in implementation. Ignitions should take 1-3 days for each project, with smoke and fire most likely present in the project area until the next significant precipitation.

Please email me with any questions or concerns.

Patrick Schon
Fire Management Specialist
Payette National Forest, East Zone
p: 208-634-0623
f: 208-634-0634
patrick.schon@usda.gov
— — — —

Public Hearing – Grant – Yellow Pine Water Users Association

Valley County is submitting a proposal to the Idaho Department of Commerce for an Idaho Community Development Block Grant (ICDBG) for post disaster funding on behalf of the Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Inc. in the amount of $150,000.00.

The intent of the emergency grant funds is to provide aid to replace the severely damaged transmission and distribution lines from the public drinking water facility to the community which were severely damaged in the March 30, 2020 earthquake.

The hearing will include a discussion of the need of the project; the application process; and the project’s scope of work, location, funding/budget, schedule, and expected benefits. Action Item

Public Hearing
April 26, 2021 3:00 p.m.
Courthouse Building 2nd Floor
219 North Main Street Cascade, ID

Social distancing will be required, requiring telephonic testimony and/or limited access. Please call for further information. To listen to the hearing, please go to (link) and click on link labeled “Watch Commissioner Meetings Live” Instructions will be provided.

Direct questions & written comments to: Douglas Miller, Valley County Clerk PO Box 1350 Cascade, ID 83611 208-382-7100 (phone) 208-382-7119 (fax) dmiller@co.valley.id.us To comment telephonically or in-person, call 208-382-7100 prior to 5:00 p.m. April 23, 2021 OR email dmiller@co.valley.id.us until testimony is opened.
— — — —

Community Cleanup at the Dump May 1 at Noon

We are going to do a community cleanup at the dump on May 1 and the transfer people will come and dump the dumpsters for the beginning of summer.
— — — —

Plumbers Coming to Yellow Pine

Rocky Mountain Mechanical will be coming to Yellow Pine some time in April to do a plumbing project. If you are interested in plumbing work please call (208) 365-PIPE (7473). These guys are professionals and do great work, clean and courteous.
— — — —

Next Festival Planning Meeting

Sunday, May 9, 2021, Zoom meeting at 2pm. Contact Deb for link and passcode.
— — — —

Heating Maintenance Day

Deb Filler is coordinating with Mastercraft of McCall to schedule a maintenance day in Yellow Pine for propane and pellet stoves. If you are interested, please contact Deb at 208 633-6945. The date will be at least a couple months out.
———-

Village News:

The Yellow Pine Tavern is open
— — — —

Stibnite Road is Open

Received a report that the road between Yellow Pine and Stibnite mine is open.
— — — —

Hwy 55

The project resumed April 2nd, expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10am to 2pm in the Smith’s Ferry area.

Project Website link:

If you have Facebook, here is a (link) to a cool ITD video, preparing and blasting.
— — — —

Spring weight limits in effect SF Road

“Forest Service officials on the Payette and Boise National Forests implemented the annual seasonal break up limits/road weight restrictions on portions of the South Fork Salmon River Road (National Forest System Road #674 and #474) effective today, March 31, 2021. The restriction is in effect annually through June 1, or as Forest Service officers determine that no further damage will occur to the roadway and remove the signing.”
— — — —

Ticks!

A report on March 11th of the first tick found. Check your dogs and yourself after a walk in the woods.
— —

Yellow Pine General Store

Please welcome Josh Jones as the new owner of the Yellow Pine General Store.
— — — —

Critters

Pine Martins & Raccoons

Watch your small pets, reports of pine martins on the west side and raccoons on the north side of the village.

Be Fox & Coyote Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Be Mountain Lion Aware

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
— — — —

Road Reports

Link: to current road reports.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 2nd. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Community Cleanup at the Dump May 1 at Noon

We are going to do a community cleanup at the dump on May 1 and the transfer people will come and dump the dumpsters for the beginning of summer.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

See Notice of Public Hearing above under Village News.

Update April 16, 2021: Water usage is holding at around 35k gallons per day, down about 15k since a leak was fixed.

Please conserve water. Turn off your trickle when it is above freezing during the day.

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Your Water Before Using
Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020.
Link: to Notice

Update Nov 29: Warren replaced the water meter because of inconsistent readings. With the new meter, the community is currently using over 55,000 gallons of water per day. A leak has been identified and will be repaired as soon as we can coordinate the contractor, equipment needed and weather together. It is difficult to get everything planned in the winter. When the repair is scheduled, the community will have a few days notice before the water is shut down. Since we are using more water than the rated use through the sand filters, the boil order will remain in effect. We continue the grant request process that is extremely slow. – Steve H
— — — —

VYPA News:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Secretary
Ron Noel, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)

Festival
Anyone interested in being a part of the Festival Planning/Working committee, please contact Deb Filler. Meetings will begin at the end of January. Even if you aren’t physically in YP, you can participate in the committee.
Next Festival Planning Meeting May 9, 2021 – Contact Deb for Zoom link and passcode.
2021 Planning Notes updated May 28th (link)
Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival Policy and Procedure Link:
— — — —

YPFD News:

YP Fire District 2 (east of Yellow Pine Ave) up for election Nov 2nd for 4 year term (per Valley County.) Link:

After Action Report meeting Oct 13, 2020 (no minutes yet.)

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30th at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

Make sure to keep your chimney clean. Cleaning brushes can be borrowed from the YPFD.

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS (May 23)

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Tim Rogers – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
Starting Nov 3rd open 3 days a week on mail days.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Opened April 16, 2021
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed Nov 3rd for winter.
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
New owner, plans to open this spring.
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Apr 12) overnight low of 18 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning and light breeze, old snow lingers in the shade. Hairy woodpecker, jays, robin and nuthatches visiting. Breezy and more clouds at lunch time. Mostly cloudy and breezy early afternoon. Mostly cloudy and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 50 degrees. Elk on the golf course by late afternoon. Mostly cloudy and breezy before sunset. Above freezing, cloudy and breezy at dusk. A few stars out before midnight.

Tuesday (Apr 13) overnight low of 26 degrees, gusty winds earlier, overcast and breezy this morning, a few patches of old snow remain in the shade. Nuthatches, jays, juncos, and pine squirrel visiting. Decreasing clouds and increasing winds at lunch time. Blustery and almost clear mid-afternoon, high of 48 degrees. Ticks are blowing around in the breeze. Clear and calmer early evening, elk wandering the golf course and neighborhood before sunset. Getting gusty again right after sunset. Temperature dropping and lighter breezes at dusk. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Wednesday (Apr 14) overnight low of 27 degrees, mostly high thin clouds and light breezes this morning, smaller patches of old snow in the shade. Flock of juncos, hairy woodpecker drumming, robin visiting and clark’s nutcrackers calling. Getting blustery before lunch time. Mail truck made it in on time. Partly clear and gusty breezes mid-afternoon, high of 50 degrees. Calmer, cloudy and above freezing at dusk. It looked cloudy and lighter breezes before midnight.

Thursday (Apr 15) overnight low of 28 degrees, mostly cloudy sky and light breezes this morning, a few patches of old snow remain in the shade. Robin chirping, tree swallow swooping, jays calling and nuthatches visiting. Gusty before lunch time. Blustery and mostly cloudy early afternoon. Warm, partly clear/cloudy and lighter breezes mid-afternoon, high of 55 degrees. Mostly cloudy and gusty before sunset. Patches of clear sky, lighter breezes and above freezing at dusk. Some stars out before midnight.

Friday (Apr 16) overnight low of 25 degrees, about half the sky is clear and half has small white clouds. Several tree swallows swooping and calling, male and female hairy and male and female downy woodpeckers, a few cassin’s finches, jay and robin hopping around, mountain chickadee and red-breasted nuthatches visiting, pine squirrel showed up late afternoon. Gusty breezes by 1045am. Mail truck was a little early. Partly cloudy and blustery at lunch time. Almost clear, warm and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 58 degrees. Clear at sunset, light haze of smoke along the river. Above freezing and gentle breezes at dusk. “Eye burning” smoke settling in from the Rx burn by 930pm. Looked clear or mostly clear before midnight.

Saturday (Apr 17) overnight low of 23 degrees, clear sky and light breezes this morning, smaller piles of old snow in the shade. Tree swallows swooping around, robin calling, cassin’s finches, a few juncos, hairy and downy woodpeckers and nuthatches visiting; later the pine squirrel stopped by for a snack. Helicopter flights started at lunch time under a clear sky with light breezes. By 145pm socked in with smoke. Warm, smoky and low visibility early afternoon. Quite warm mid-afternoon, high of 63 degrees, light breeze, clear sky above thinner smoke (still eye burning) VanMeter is mostly visible. At dusk, the smoke was settling in along the river, clear sky and above freezing. Stars out before midnight.

Sunday (Apr 18) overnight low of 25 degrees, clear sky, light breeze and good air quality this morning. The last of the natural snow in the shade has melted down here on the flat, but piles that slid off north facing roofs have a ways to go. Swallows calling and swooping, finches singing from the trees, robin and jays hopping around, hairy woodpecker and first colombian ground squirrel sighting. Helicopter started flying at 1035am. Starting to get smoky at 1pm, helicopter still flying. Smoke hiding VanMeter hill from view by early afternoon, smoke above and behind Golden Gate hill but Johnson Creek ridge still visible. Quite warm, mostly clear above the smoke and gusty breezes late afternoon, high of 69 degrees. Sounds like trees falling and rocks rolling down VanMeter hill. Smoke settling in closer to the ground before sunset.
—————

Idaho News:

212 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

April 16, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 212 new COVID-19 cases and 2 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March to 184,769.

There are a total of 148,276 confirmed cases and 36,493 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state. …

The state said 559,968 people have received the vaccine, and 927,665 total doses have been administered. …

The state said 6 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 7,943 and zero new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 1,361.

There are 11,301 asymptomatic reported cases and 10,303 cases among health care workers.

2 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 2,017.

full story: [Valley County 830 cases, 6 deaths]
— — — —

McCall extends mask order to May 26

Council splits 3-2 over COVID-19 precaution

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News April 16, 2021

A 45-day extension of an order requiring face masks to be worn in public places in the City of McCall was approved on a 3-2 vote last week by the McCall City Council.

The order is now set to expire on May 26 after it had been set to expire last Sunday. The order originally took effect on Feb. 26 after being passed by the council to stop the spread of COVID-19. …

St. Luke’s McCall Chief of Staff Gregory Irvine advised council members not to lift the mask order too soon.

“The analogy of spiking the football on the five yard-line when you’re running for a touchdown is an apt one,” Irvine said.

full story:
— — — —

Half of Valley County gets COVID-19 vaccine

Second week with no new cases reported

By Tom Grote for The Star-News April 15, 2021

Half of the population of Valley County over age 16 had received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine by Monday, the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare reported.

A total of 4,766 county residents had received the vaccine out of an estimated 9,552 total population age 16 or over, or 49.9%, according to the H&W’s online COVID-19 tracking site. …

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Cascade Food Pantry needs new truck to help keep up with demand

Before the pandemic, the pantry was hauling 4,200 pounds of food. Now, they’ve been hauling around 7,200 pounds of food between the Treasure Valley and Cascade.

Joey Prechtl April 16, 2021 KTVB

Food banks have become more and more important throughout the pandemic, including the Cascade Food Pantry.

Due to the pandemic, they saw an enormous increase in demand and have also changed their operations and how they get the food to the people who need it.

They shifted to a drive-up system, with volunteers giving people a few boxes of food and they go on their way.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County offers $500 grants to reduce wildfire risk

Valley County is offering $500 grants through a new Firewise pilot program to encourage landowners to reduce wildfire risk on their property.

There are 20 awards available, with three being reserved for each of the county’s three fire districts and one for a backcountry location. The remaining will be awarded by priority.

Applications will be reviewed by a panel of members from the Valley County Fire Working Group and final recipients will be approved by Valley County commissioners.

“The review panel is looking for innovative and creative projects that contribute to the community, even if the project is implemented only on one parcel,” Stephanie Nelson of the Valley County Fire Working Group said.

Examples of approved uses of funds include:

• Removal of hazard fuels, such as trees, brush and pine needles, that require hired labor, equipment rental or supplies, including leaf bags and chainsaw gas.

• Landscape hardening and upgrading to Firewise plants.

• Upgrading building materials to those that are fire resistant.

• Improvements for soffits, attic screens, enclosing wood decks and firewood storage areas.

• Support for community work days.

• Development and implementation of evacuation signage.

• Disbursement of educational materials, contacting absentee landowners and informing the community about defending their homes against wildfire.

A site visit will be required during the application process and again for photos to be taken once the grant application is selected.

Successful applicants will be reimbursed for their approved, completed projects that meet agreed criteria.

The application deadline is May 2, and awards will be announced within two weeks. Projects must be completed by Aug. 1.

For more information, including applications and rules, email VCFirewise@gmail.com or visit the Valley County Fire Working Group’s Facebook page.

source: The Star-News April 15, 2021
— — — — — — — — — —

About 25% of Idaho in drought; 1 area in extreme drought

April 12, 2021 Associated Press

About a quarter of Idaho is experiencing some degree of drought, with one pocket in the south-central part of the state in extreme drought.

The area in extreme drought is in the Pioneer Mountains, which straddles Blaine County and Custer County, Boise State Public Radio reported Monday during a water supply meeting.

“This is an ongoing, long-term drought that started back in the fall of 2019, and we just haven’t seen any kind of recovery there yet,” David Hoekema, a hydrologist for the Idaho Department of Water Resources, said Friday.

continued:
—————-

Mining News:

Stibnite Advisory Council Launches Independent Water Monitoring Program

Work will Verify Conditions at Site and Bring Enhanced Transparency Around Water Quality to Perpetua Resources

Donnelly, ID – The Stibnite Advisory Council is launching an Independent Water Monitoring Program to bring increased transparency to Perpetua Resources’ Stibnite Gold Project and independently verify ground and surface water quality conditions at site. The Independent Water Monitoring Program (IWMP) was created after community members and city officials expressed concerns over the project’s potential impacts to water quality and a desire to see data provided by an entity other than Perpetua Resources.

The Independent Water Monitoring Program will give our community members access to objective data, which will be collected, analyzed and reported by Idaho Water Resources Research Institute (IWRRI) and an EPA-certified lab. This will allow community members to compare the results with the information Perpetua Resources is currently sharing and develop a clearer picture of the conditions that exist today.”

continued:
———————-

Public Lands:

Idaho State Parks increasing fees for vehicles, overnight use

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, April 13th 2021

If you’re planning to visit one of Idaho’s many state parks this spring or summer be prepared for some increased fees.

The state on Tuesday says it will be increasing entrance fees from $5-7 for every vehicle that enters a park. In addition, there will now be an additional $8 charge for each vehicle beyond the first two vehicles associated with a campsite.

The overnight use fee associated with use of any non-camping lands for the parking of motor vehicles or trailers not associated with a campsite between the hours of 10 p.m. and 7 a.m. has increased to $20. And, if you don’t pay the required fees in a park, expect a surcharge of $20 (up from $10).

If you’re not really feeling the entrance fee price increase, the state reminds folks they can purchase a $10 Parks Passport for unlimited entry.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Forest Supervisor issues decision on Sage Hen Integrated Restoration Project

Boise, Idaho, April 14, 2021 – Boise National Forest Supervisor Tawnya Brummett signed the Decision Notice for the Sage Hen Integrated Restoration Project April 13, 2021. The decision implements the proposed action as described in the Need for the Proposal and Proposed Action chapters of the Environmental Assessment with modifications prompted by:

• consideration of comments received during the public scoping and comment period

• discussions with interested public, elected officials, Boise Forest Coalition, other interest groups and the project interdisciplinary team

• conversations with and input from objectors

By implementing activities at a landscape scale and using a condition-based management approach, this project optimizes biodiversity and improves resilience and integrity allowing for endemic levels of disturbance. The proposed action addresses critical health and safety needs by reducing hazardous fuels and removing hazard trees, thereby reducing risks to government workers, firefighters and the public. The work focuses on public safety and ensures continued, safe access to the forest in the Sage Hen project area. The project supports local livelihoods and economies and improves recreation opportunities for the rapidly growing Boise metropolitan area.

“Condition-based management is an approach that supports responsiveness and flexibility between planning and implementation in natural resource management. The concept allows the forest to respond to changing conditions on the ground’, said Forest Supervisor, Tawnya Brummett. “With the ability to modify our response to address those conditions we will be able to use resources more efficiently at the landscape scale.”

“In addition to the changes described above, I am committed to, and approving a phased decision for implementation of this project,” said Brummett. “This decision approves all project activities as described in the environmental assessment and decision notice; however, by phasing project implementation, additional public engagement will be allowed with the goal of increased transparency, and real-time problem-solving and dialogue with interested parties”

This phased approach is specific to this project and does not set precedent for how projects currently

underway or future projects will be implemented.

For specifics about the Decision Notice and phased implementation actions visit: (link).

To subscribe to email updates about this project and others, visit: (link).
— — — — — — — — — —

Bear Valley Borrow Source Development- Comment Period

The Lowman Ranger District of the Boise National Forest is soliciting comments for the Bear Valley Borrow Source Development Project. The Proposed Action Report is available electronically on the project webpage (link).

The proposed project is an activity implementing a land management plan and is subject to the pre-decisional objection process at 36 CFR 218 Subparts A and B.

The purpose of the project is to provide a cost-effective material source facilitate the maintenance and improve the overall condition of the Forest roads in the Bear Valley area. The proposal is to reopen and expand the existing borrow source located adjacent to Forest Road 579.

Comments may be submitted in the following ways:

1. Electronically through the Bear Valley Borrow Source Project webpage (link above). Select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel. If uploading a file with comments, comments must be in the form of plain text (.txt), Word (.doc, .docx) or PDF (.pdf).

2. Mail to the Lowman Ranger District, 7359 Highway 21, Lowman, ID 83637, Attention Terre Pearson-Ramirez.

Hand delivered comments are not being accepted at this time as there are limited office functions as part of precautions in response to the coronavirus. Comments received will be included in the project record and may be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

The opportunity to comment ends 30 days following the date of publication of the legal notice in the Idaho World. Only those who submit timely and specific written comments (36 CFR §218.2) regarding the proposed project or activity during a public comment period established by the responsible official are eligible to file an objection (36 CFR §218.24(b)(6)).

For objection eligibility, each individual or representative from each entity submitting timely and specific written comments must either sign the comment or verify identity upon request. The publication date of the legal notice in the newspaper of record is the exclusive means for calculating the time to submit written comments on a proposed project or activity. The time period for the opportunity to comment on a proposed project or activity to be documented with an environmental assessment shall not be extended. It is the responsibility of all individuals and organizations to ensure that their comments are received in a timely manner. Additional information concerning the project may be obtained from Terre Pearson-Ramirez, at 208-259-3361.
— — — — — — — — — —

Hikers warned to be on the lookout for toxic plant on the trail

Myrtle spurge is an invasive noxious plant all over the Northwest. It’s a light green weed that has yellow flowers on it this time of year.

Chase Biefeldt (KTVB) April 12, 2021

With the temperatures rising and warmer days ahead, there will be more people out recreating in the foothills, but a nice hike on the trails could go awry if you come in contact with a toxic invasive plant.

One of the most relevant noxious plants right now is Myrtle Spurge – an invasive noxious plant all over the Northwest, including Oregon, Washington, and Idaho.
It’s a light green weed that has yellow flowers on it during spring.

continued:

More info:

Myrtle spurge


Myrtle Spurge Ron Patterson

Myrtle spurge is a non-native, tap-rooted perennial that does well in low-water landscape situations. The problem is that it does so well in low-water situations, it can easily escape cultivation. The sap is very caustic and toxic. It can cause rashes, blisters, even blindness if it gets in the eyes. These plants are very dangerous around children. It is best to remove it from your landscape.

continued:
——————

Critter News:

Fish and Game urges keeping trash away from hungry bears

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is asking residents for help curbing the problem of hungry bears foraging for food in McCall neighborhoods by making sure they don’t find any.

The department is already receiving reports of bears in the area, said Regan Berkley, Idaho Department of Fish and Game wildlife manager in McCall.

“Bears emerge hungry in the spring and are drawn to town by smells of food and trash,” Berkley said.

The bears will knock over trash cans many times in search of something to eat, she said.

“It is important to make sure they don’t get a reward for this behavior,” Berkley said.

Bears are likely to return if they find even one trash can, cooler or freezer with food.

To prevent bear problems, residents are asked to do the following:

• Use bear-resistant trash containers properly by not overfilling them or tampering with latches.

• Take down bird feeders, as bird seed is a high-protein food source for bears. Birds are less dependent on feeding sources in the spring.

• Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can access them.

• Businesses are asked to not prop open bin lids.

Bears that have become too accustomed to human food sources cannot responsibly be relocated. They can become dangerous and, in some cases, must be trapped and lethally removed, Berkley said.

“Please help us avoid this situation by ensuring bears do not have access to human foods or trash,” Berkley said in the press release.

source: The Star-News April 15, 2021
— — — — — — — — — —

Domestic sheep cross Idaho Highway 55, head to Boise Foothills on Saturday

Spectators lined up on both sides of the highway to watch Wilder sheep rancher Frank Shirts move nearly 2,600 ewes and lambs into the Boise Foothills.

KTVB April 17, 2021

A large crowd gathered at the Idaho State Highway 55 and Beacon Light junction to watch rural sheep cross Highway 55 on Saturday morning.

As many as 500 people were possibly in attendance, according to Steve Stuebner with the Idaho Rangeland Resources Commission (IRRC). People lined up on both sides of the highway to watch Wilder sheep rancher Frank Shirts move nearly 2,600 ewes and lambs into the Boise Foothills.

continued: w/video
— — — — — — — — — —

You can put your bird feeders up but keep them clean, officials say

April 12, 2021 Local News 8


Emily Carter – Two Pine Siskins and one American goldfinch on a bird feeder.

Salmonellosis outbreaks among birds have been making headlines in Idaho and neighboring states, which highlights the importance of keeping bird feeders and feeding sites clean to prevent the spread of diseases.

If you want to set up your bird feeders for spring, Idaho Fish and Game says go for it—just keep these tips in mind to help protect your fine-feathered friends.

* Before putting up your feeders, clean them with warm soapy water and then dunk/rinse them with a 10% bleach solution. Rinse and dry them well before adding food. This process will disinfect your feeders and reduce the spread of salmonellosis, respiratory infections, eye ailments, and other diseases among birds. To avoid spreading salmonella bacteria to humans, wear rubber gloves while cleaning/handling bird feeders, and immediately afterward wash hands with soap and water, hand sanitizer, or alcohol wipes.

* Use this sanitization method to clean your feeders (and even bird baths) at least once every two weeks. While the design of hummingbird feeders makes them a much lower risk for salmonella transmission, these feeders also require regular cleaning.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise man catches record-breaking steelhead from the South Fork

The man caught the catch-and-release state record trout on April 11.


KTVB

Winning the championship is one thing, defending it is entirely different. One Boise man showed that after he set a new catch-and-release state record steelhead for the second time since 2017.

According to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Scott Turner caught a record-breaking 39.25-inch long steelhead on April 11 in the South Fork of the Clearwater River, nearly four years to the day after he last set the record in 2017 with a 36-inch long trout.

Turner’s first record was beaten by Tucker Young in December of 2018 and again by Samuel Brumbaugh, who caught a 38-inch steelhead on April 19, 2019, on the South Fork Clearwater River.

continued:
————-

Fish & Game News:

Windows to Wildlife Newsletter

In this Spring 2021 issue:

* Lending a Hand to Help Wildlife, Habitat Conservation, and Researchers
* How to Get Started with eBird and iNaturalist
* Birds, Bees, and Milkweed
* On the Idaho Birding Trail: Roswell Marsh WHA

Link:
— — — — — — — — — —

Put your bird feeders up, but keep them clean says Idaho Fish and Game

By Jennifer Jackson, Regional Communications Manager
Monday, April 12, 2021

Salmonellosis outbreaks among birds have been making headlines in Idaho and neighboring states, which highlights the importance of keeping bird feeders and feeding sites clean to prevent the spread of diseases. If you want to set-up your bird feeders for spring, Idaho Fish and Game says go for it—just keep these tips in mind to help protect your fine-feathered friends.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

April 12 Upper Salmon River Steelhead Fishing Report

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Tuesday, April 13, 2021

Steelhead angler effort on the upper Salmon River was most concentrated upstream of the East Fork Salmon River in location code 19 during the past week. Outside of location code 19, steelhead anglers were most commonly observed near the mouth of the Pahsimeroi River in location code 17.

The best catch rates were once again observed within location code 19, and anglers interviewed within that area averaged 10 hours per steelhead caught. Anglers interviewed downstream of the Pahsimeroi River in location code 17 averaged 23 hours per steelhead caught, and anglers interviewed upstream of the Pahsimeroi River in location code 18 averaged 49 hours per steelhead caught.

River conditions were good throughout the week. The river had slightly cloudy visibility in all areas downstream of the East Fork on Sunday, and water temperatures ranged from the low to mid-40s depending on location. Currently, the Salmon River is flowing at 1,430 cfs through the town of Salmon, which is 96 percent of average for today’s date. Upstream, near the Yankee Fork, the Salmon River is flowing at 712 cfs which is 90 percent for today’s date.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Mother chimp at Maryland Zoo interacts with adopted baby chimp

by Kendra Mann, Sinclair Broadcast Group Thursday, February 25th 2021

The Maryland Zoo shared an adorable video of a mother chimpanzee interacting with a baby chimpanzee adopted by the zoo.

“Lola’s mom Bunny interacts with baby chimpanzee Maisie the most of the adult chimps. She leads Maisie from place to place and seems to oversee which chimps socialize with her,” The Maryland Zoo wrote on Facebook.

… Maise was adopted by The Maryland Zoo in September 2020. According to the zoo’s website, Maise was born at the Oklahoma City Zoo on Aug. 28 but was moved to The Maryland Zoo to be paired with a surrogate mother and interact with other baby chimpanzees after her birth mother was unable to properly care for her.

full story w/video:

see also:

Baby Maisie Plays With Chimps Lola & Violet


——————-

Seasonal Humor:

SmokeyAnt-a

CovidSuperspreaderEvent-a
—————-

Idaho History Apr 18, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 53

Idaho Newspaper clippings May 8-12, 1919

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

May 8

The Grangeville Globe. May 08, 1919, Page 5

19190508GG1

19190508GG2Mrs. Wadsworth Dead
Influenza Claimed Wife of Former Superintendent of Schools

Some time ago word was received here of the death in California of Mrs. George Wadsworth, who as at one time superintendent of the city schools, but nothing definite was known until this week when a letter was received by friends from Professor Wadsworth, who stated that Mrs. Wadsworth, who had been in a hospital in the east where she had undergone an operation, was on her way home during the winter when her train was snowbound for some days. During this time Mrs. Wadsworth contracted influenza and by the time she reached home pneumonia had developed, and after a struggle of two weeks the lady passed away.

Professor Wadsworth also contracted the disease and for a time was very ill. He has had a long struggle in overcoming the ravages of the malady. He has recently been reappointed superintendent of Westside high school at Tracy, California.

Prof. and Mrs. Wadsworth made many warm friends during the time they resided here, who deeply regret the seemingly untimely calling away of one of such lovely character, and they mourn her loss sincerely.

These friends extend to Professor Wadsworth their heartfelt sympathy.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 08 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Grangeville Globe. May 08, 1919, Page 8

[Local News]

S. C. McDaniel returned early this week from a three months’ visit at California points. Mc states that while away he suffered nearly all there was in connection with the influenza, but returns to the city enjoying the best of health.

Mrs. Israel Harris returned from Spokane last Sunday where she has been taking treatment for some time past. Mrs. Harris states that she feels 75 percent better than when she left, and certainly looks the part.

Victor Baldwin of Portland, is spending a few days at the J. A. Zuver farm southwest from town. He accompanied the remains of Mrs. Baldwin, who died suddenly at Portland last Friday, here for interment.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Emmett Index. May 08, 1919, Page 4

19190508EI1

Emmett News

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Mays are both quite ill with the influenza.

Mrs. G. B. Mains departed Monday for Denver in response to a telegram announcing the serious illness of her sister, Miss Margaret Keenan, with pneumonia. Miss Keenan as spent some time in Emmett and her friends feel gravely concerned for her condition.

W. H. Appel’s aged mother is quite ill.

A man named Anderson was brought in from near Montour this week with a painful rattlesnake bite. Medical aid was given and he is said to be recovering nicely. (But where did they get the remedy?)

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 08 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Emmett Index. May 08, 1919, Page 8

News Of Gem County
By The Index’s Correspondents

Bissell Creek

Henry Schoening’s and B. Limbaugh’s children have the whooping cough.

Lower Mesa

School will close Friday, after a rather unsatisfactory term due to the influenza ban and irregular attendance after school did start.

Pearl

Miss Laura Keefer has just closed a very successful term of school at Pearl and has left for her home in Mountain Home, having the best wishes of a host of friends, who hope to see her back again next fall.

Letha

A meeting in District 21, to talk further of the school housing problem, found the people about evenly divided as to the site. Nothing was decided upon.

Upper Mesa

Eugene St. John has been sick a few days the past week, missing one day of school.

Falk

Mrs. W. I. Kennedy is home from Kansas, where she has been visiting her mother, who has been very ill for some time past.

Emmett News

Mr. Fred VanDeusen is suffering from an attack of rheumatism.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Filer Record., May 08, 1919, Page 4

19190508FR1

North Filer News

Mrs. J. G. Fisher is improving after a severe attack of Pneumonia.

Word comes from Emporia, Kansas, that C. A. Bishop is slowing recovering from an attack of the flu.

Mrs. Harold Vining returned home Saturday after a short illness at the Boyd Hospital.

Mabel Graves is reported ill with the mumps this week.

source: The Filer Record. (Filer, Idaho), 08 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Filer Record., May 08, 1919, Page 5

Local News Notes

The Record reporter and compositor, Lula Macaw, has been off duty a part of the week on account of illness, and the “boss” has been the whole force a part of the time.

Warner Kirkpatrick left for Hoodriver, Wyoming [sic] Monday to see his mother who is very ill.

The temperature the past week bordered close to the danger line for fruit, but no damage has been reported yet and we are optimistic enough to predict a big fruit yield this year.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Filer Record., May 08, 1919, Page 6

19190508FR2
Warning to the Public

A warning to the public is hereby given that violation of the quarantine laws are subject to severe penalties. All parties exposed to contagious diseases will duly observe the law are subject to penalty. Needless exposure of others will not be tolerated. If you have been exposed or are suffering from an infection or contagious disease, notify your local health officer at once.

L. D. Allen, Marshal.
— —

L. Kirkpatric received a telegram from relatives at Hoodriver, Wyoming [sic], Wednesday with the sad news of his wife’s death. He left Wednesday evening for Hoodriver [sic].

(ibid, page 6)
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Main Street, Hailey, Idaho January, 24, 1918

Hailey1918Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

May 9

The Rathdrum Tribune., May 09, 1919, Page 1

19190509RT1

Idaho State News Items

Superintendent Park of Sandpoint has announced a summer school for the benefit of the pupils of the city school, who lost time by reason of the influenza epidemic

A booze laden Oakland car on its way from Montana to Washington was seized at Kootenai and the driver, E. R. Smith, arrested. The car contained five cases of whisky.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 09 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Rathdrum Tribune., May 09, 1919, Page 3

Personal Mention

Mrs. Martha Bennett was over from Post Falls last Friday to attend the funeral of her sister, Mrs. Sarah Satchwell.

Mrs. and Mrs. A. T. Gaston’s little daughter is to be taken to Spokane in a few days to receive medical treatment.
— —

Local Paragraphs

No particular damage has been reported from Rathdrum prairie from the heavy frost of last Friday night, altho [sic] cherry blooms were well advanced. Down the valley toward Spokane, prunes, peaches and some early apples are reported injured.

(ibid, page 3)
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Clearwater Republican. May 09, 1919, Page 1

19190509CR1

19190509CR2
Sanitary Rules to be Enforced
Commissioner of Public Welfare to Prosecute Violations of State Sanitary Laws

Boise, May 3, 1919.

Excuses arising from war time exigencies having become inacceptable [sic], prosecutions for violations of the state sanitary laws will be based entirely upon conditions as they exist at the time inspections are completed, according to a recent announcement made by J. K. White, commissioner of public welfare.

“It has been brought to my attention,” said Commissioner White Saturday, “that inspectors of this department are making an unusual number of prosecutions based principally upon the maintenance of public nuisances within city and village limits and upon unsanitary conditions in and about places of business which come under our jurisdiction.

“It is not the policy of this department to conduct a campaign of prosecution, but it must be generally understood that these inspectors will take conditions as they find them at the time of the inspection. If conditions are discovered to be in violation of the general principles of decency and the rules of sanitation, legal action necessarily must be taken.

“In the recent past, much was overlooked because of the scarcity of labor, but this is no longer an excuse and inspectors have instructions to accept no excuse what ever for dirty, filthy, unsanitary conditions in public places.

“It is hoped that our city officials and the various newspapers will cause this information to be given to the public that full knowledge may be had of the policy and plan of work of this department that all concerned may protect themselves from prosecutions sure to follow if unsanitary conditions are found by inspectors.”

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 09 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Clearwater Republican. May 09, 1919, Page 2

Bert S. Varian Named Judge

Bert S. Varian, Weiser attorney, has been appointed by our governor as judge of the Seventh judicial district to succeed the late Issac [sic] N. Smith, who died in Boise from the after effects of Spanish influena. Judge Varian will take up his duties immediately. His appointment is for the remainder of Judge Smith’s term, which expires on the first Monday in January, 1923. Judge Varian has been a practicing attorney of Weiser for 20 years. He is the son of Judge Varian of Salt Lake.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

Clearwater Republican. May 09, 1919, Page 3

Simplest Remedies Found To Be Best Disinfectants During Severe Epidemics

Years ago Marseilles was visited by a great plague. Rich and poor died in their hundreds, and to rob the former four men invented aromatic vinegar, which, used as a disinfectant, enabled them to rifle the dead without fear of infection. During the great plague of 1665 those who were deputed to bury the dead always carried a phial of aromatic vinegar, and history tells us that whenever Cardinal Wolsey had cause to go among the poorer members of his flock he invariably held to his nose a golden orange filled with the same preventative. Canary wine, too, was used in 1665 as a disinfectant. Doctors carried little cassolettes on the top of their canes, which they sniffed when visiting the stricken, and in the affected houses the smoke of juniper was used.
— —

Preventive Measures Save Loss of Money and Health

Loss of time, money and health often can be prevented by the use of some simple, inexpensive preventive measures, says Thrift magazine. At all times, especially during these days of influenza, you should never allow yourself to remain in a rundown physical condition. If attacked by disease while your resistance is low you may pay for it with a long illness or possibly with life itself. Most people think a doctor’s [sic] only use it to be sent for in a case of emergency, like a fireman, and be brought running with his pillbox in hand just in the nick of time.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

Clearwater Republican. May 09, 1919, Page 5

What Your Friends And Neighbors Are Doing

Miss Lillie Simpson returned from Palouse, Wash., Thursday afternoon, where she has been nursing her sister, Mrs. Chas. Hughes, who is rapidly recovering from the influenza.

Miss Alma O’Hara, who has been teaching up the North Fork, returned to Orofino Wednesday, her school having closed for the term.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Kendrick Gazette. May 09, 1919, Page 1

19190509KG1

Memorial Service

Memorial services were conducted at American ridge church last Sunday in memory of Father Davidson who died of heart-failure, Oct. 26, 1918, and Mrs. George Davidson who died January 17, 1919, of complications following influenza. At the time of their deaths the ban prohibiting assembling of people was on and only ritualistic services were held. It was decided to hold the memorial service on May 4. The church was taxed to its capacity with neighbors and sympathizing friends. The music was furnished by friends and neighbors of the bereaved family, most of them having known the deceased for many years.

Many beautiful flowers were furnished as tokens of appreciation, but the friends of those who had passed away. Obituaries were read by J. L. Mitcham who had been intimately acquainted with the Davidson family for many years. The address was delivered by J. C. Gregory, the pastor, subject: “Models for earthy lives.”
— —

Big Bear Ridge

Miss Delcia White closed a very successful term of school at Stele Friday. A program and picnic dinner were greatly enjoyed by a large number Friday afternoon.
— —

Southwick Items

Thomas Grove is home from France and is now visiting his brother, Homer, who has been quite sick.

Mrs. Vester Whitinger has been very sick. She has undergone an operation at the hospital.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 09 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. May 09, 1919, Page 4

The influenza epidemic has made a lasting impression on school children. The following conversation was overheard in a grammar school in West Philadelphia, where the recent epidemic rather than orthography claimed prominences:

“Say, Bill, this ‘flue’ isn’t anything new. Sir Walter Raleigh died with it.”

“Aw, go on. He did not.”

“Sure he did. I’ll show you. It’s here in the history.” He pointed a grimy finger to the sentence: “Sir Walter Raleigh’s death was due to Spanish influence.”
— —

Amy Has Released 1,942,391
Total Authorized Discharges Are Over 2,000,000 Men

Washington. – Demobilization of the army has returned 2,942,391 [sic] officers and men to civil life, the war department announced Monday. Of these 103,524 were in the commissioned grades. The total authorized discharge was announced as 2072,000, and of these 789,320 are men returned from overseas.

Volunteer enlistments continue to increase, 23,663 recruits having been recorded. Of the men signifying desire for particular services, 6187 asked to be sent to the army of occupation and 1243 to the Philippines.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — — — — — — — —

Main Street, Harrison, Idaho 1905

Harrison1905Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

The Oakley Herald. May 09, 1919, Page 10

19190509OH1

In the Gem State

The state sanitary commission is waging war on all unsanitary public eating and business houses throughout the state and imposing fines on all guilty operators.

Physicians are not entitled to permits to transport liquor into the state, the attorney general’s office has held in an opinion written in answer to a question raised by a north Idaho firm of Lawyers. Only pharmacists are entitled to such permits, under the law, it was held.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 09 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Montpelier Examiner. May 09, 1919, Page 1

19190509ME1

School Year Will Close Next Friday
Eleven Graduate from the High School – Baccalaureate Address Next Sunday Night

(By Supt. Cummings)

This year the high school commencement exercises will be held in the stake tabernacle, due to the generosity of the Stake Presidency. Heretofore there has been no place large enough to accommodate all those who desired to witness these exercises. This year an invitation is extended to all the patrons and friends of education in the entire valley to attend these exercises. …

Following are the prospective graduates: Fern Welker, Frances E. Stephens, Ella Quayle, Cornelia Mumford, Rulon Pearce, Ruth Perkins, Katheryn Stephens, A. Van Lindsay, Stewart Barkdull, Rosina Schmidt, Ella Murphy.

Besides these students two others, Ross Murphy and Helen Beckstrom, are expecting to do work this summer to complete the requirements for graduation. If this is done they will be given diplomas this fall.

Most of the students have worked diligently during the short time they have been permitted to attend school this year. This is especially true of the two upper classes. When opportunity was granted them to do home work during the quarantine, they took advantage of it and worked faithfully. Many of them have completed a full year’s work in spite of being in actual attendance but half a year, and we feel to commend them for their exceptional diligence.

Some few have an idea that this school year has been a complete failure. This is by no means true. Most of the pupils have received at least one full semester’s work, and we feel that those parents who kept their children out, feeling that it was of no use to send them, have made a decided mistake. Their children could have made at least half a grade the same as those who did come.

The schools have not been entirely lacking in the matter of school activity and school spirit, as some have imagined. On registration day last fall all the schools united in a patriotic parade where they sang songs, waved flags and banners and otherwise demonstrated the fact that they were true American citizens. They have subscribed one hundred per cent membership to the Junior Red Cross in every instance and have done two or more “clean up” days during the year where the pupils have done much toward bettering [the] appearance of the grounds. In the high school the students have indulged somewhat in athletics though this has been quite limited. They have had several class and inter-class debates, put on a very creditable school play, had two very successful dances, several social parties in the school building, furnished the local paper with school notes nearly every week, indulged in several essay and speaking contests and have had several excellent student body programs. In view of these things and many others not mentioned, we feel that criticism along these lines is without foundation. We believe in this respect that we rank favorably with other schools of the same size. Right here let us urge that all the patrons and friends boost for the schools, boost for education in general and especially for education in our own community. Always have a good word for the schools and make it very unpopular for the knocker. You have a right to the best; you have the best and all you need to do it think so and act accordingly.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 09 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. May 09, 1919, Page 5

Local News

Mother’s Day will be observed Sunday in all the wards of the stake. A special program has been prepared for the Second ward and all mothers and soldiers are invited to attend.

Funeral services were held Wednesday at Bloomington for the three month old baby of Wilford Thornock which died Monday in Ogden.

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Andy Evans of Raymond, died last Tuesday, after a short illness. The body was brought to Montpelier Wednesday for burial.

Frank Williams left today for Ogden to attend the Golden Spike celebration. He will bring his new auto hearse when he returns.

Fire almost completely destroyed the home of Mrs. James Laughter on Ninth street last Saturday morning. The roof, second story and kitchen of the home were badly burned and the damage done is estimated at $500. One of Mrs. Laughter’s sons is in the navy, and another has been in the hospital suffering from pneumonia for seven weeks. The citizens of the town are co-operating with the Odd Fellows in making the necessary repairs to the home.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. May 09, 1919, Page 8

Hospital Train Passes Through Montpelier

U. S. Hospital train No. 1 passed through Montpelier Monday evening and stopped for twenty minutes. The ladies of the Red Cross met the train and distributed fruit and candy among the patients, and the band played a number of patriotic airs. Almost 1000 people were at the depot to pay homage to the returning wounded heroes. One hundred and sixty-eight wounded Yanks were on board and were from practically every fighting division of the army. All lived in the northwestern states and were being taken to the base hospital at Camp Lewis for discharge.

Troop trains are passing through this city every day now taking returned soldiers from the eastern ports to the western coast, and a number of local people have met acquaintances among the boys.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Republican. May 09, 1919, Page 1

19190509TIR1

19190509TIR2Mrs. Amos Taylor Dies After Influenza

Mrs. Ethel May Taylor, who came here with her husband, Amos Taylor, from Grouse, Idaho, two weeks ago for medical attention, died at the Dora France hospital Tuesday, May 6, after three days of unconsciousness. Mrs. Taylor had a severe attack of the influenza before coming to Blackfoot.

A young wife, only twenty-three years and six months of age, she leaves an orphaned baby boy of eighteen months and a bereaved husband. The body was taken to Mackay for interment Wednesday. Mrs. C. S. Beebe, sister of Amos Taylor, accompanied him to Mackay to be present at the funeral services and burial.
— —

Funeral Services for Wilson Keith Snyder

With impressive ceremonies at home and at the cemetery the body of Wilson Keith Snyder was laid to rest Tuesday afternoon with every show of affection for the man he was and reverence for him dead. Bounteous gifts of flowers were heaped upon the mound that rose over the last tenure of a departed friend….

Mr. Snyder has lived in Blackfoot for twelve years, was a member of the Knigthts of Pythias fraternal organization, and had built up a large and hearty circle of friends. For eight years he served in the post office, always genial and always accommodating in dealing with the public. …

Wilson Keith Snyder died at his home Saturday morning, May 3, following a stubborn attack of influenza at the age of thirty-one years. He leaves a wife and two daughters, Ruth aged five and Dorothy May aged sixteen months.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 09 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. May 09, 1919, Page 3

Upper Presto

Verta and Eugene Stoddard are on the sick list.

J. M. Lee, who is working for R. P. Hansen, received a telegram Tuesday, stating that his brother had died at Butte.
— —

Men of Many Nations In Graves At Nish
Germans Buried in Cemetery With French, Serbians and Russians

There is a cemetery at Nish in which is epitomized the entire history of the great war in the Orient. In is the various groups of soldiers, prisoners and refugees have their separate plots.

Largest of all is that of the German soldiers and officers. each grave is marked by a permanent heavy, solid cement stone, roughly in the shape of an iron cross. A neighboring factory, formerly devoted to the manufacture of briquets for fuel, was diverted to the manufacture of these tombstones.

Next in size is the Bulgarian, each grave being marked by a heavy wooden cross. These timbers were requisitioned by the Bulgarians from the houses of people of Nish and each cross represents not only the grave of a Bulgarian but the partial demolition of the home of a citizen of Nish. These wooden crosses are so numerous as to almost give the effect of a forest.

The group of Austrian graves is considerably smaller. Separated from these are the plots for the allied soldiers. Here are to be found a much smaller number of graves of the French and the Italians. On the hillside was a large number of new graves, those of the Serbian soldiers who died in the final capture of Nish. The Germans made one of the last stands here and Nish was taken only after five assaults with the bayonet.

Here are three queer-looking plots. One includes the graves of the Russian prisoners of war who were brought here to work by the enemy. They are numerous. Another is that of the Roumanian [sic] prisoners of war, also numerous. Less numerous are those of the Italian prisoners of war.

Nearby are two newer groups of graves. One includes the grave of the Greek refugees who died, many of them from the influenza, as they passed through Nish on their way back to Macedonia. Another is that of Serbian refugees who met a similar fate in the course of their wanderings toward their homes either to the north or south.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. May 09, 1919, Page 5

Local News

Miss Vada Thompson has been ill this week and unable to attend school. She is getting along nicely, however.

Dr. R. W. Jackson is opening up his offices in the Hopkins building, having shelves built in for medicines and putting in new furniture.

Mrs. S. J. Snyder, Mrs. L. M. Stevens and two daughters left Thursday morning for their home in Ogden. There were here to attend the funeral of their son and brother the late W. Keith Snyder.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. May 09, 1919, Page 6

Sterling

Ben Atkins has been very ill the past week with a severe attack of grippe.
— —

Centerville

Mrs. Hannah Roubidoux was on the sick list last week.

Thelma Farnsworth was unable to attend to school last week on account of sickness.

Barney Olsen was quite sick the first of the week with a very severe spell of tonsillitis.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. May 09, 1919, Page 7

Lavaside

We understand there will be no more programs given by the school this year. The remainder of the year must be given to hard study in order to complete the work.

The Meade family has been sick with bad colds the last week.

Edith Fraker has the mumps. She was absent from school the latter part of the week.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. May 09, 1919, Page 8

New Scale of Pay For Teachers
Induces Nearly All of Our Teachers to Remain Next Year
New Standards

That all teachers are underpaid for the class of public service they render is usually conceded and that Blackfoot teachers of grades and high school have been drawing less than they could get in neighboring towns was brought before the school board at its meeting of April 21. A committee was appointed to work out a new schedule of salary with the co-operation of Superintendent W. D. Vincent. The new scale keeps nearly all of this year’s teachers in Blackfoot for at least another year, while failure to act would possibly have lost two thirds of the present teaching force. The committee reported Monday evening this week.

The grade school scale has been $85 base pay. It is now raised to $100 base pay per month, with an increase of $10 per month for the second and third successive years on the job. By attending summer school a teacher can command an extra $2.50 each month for those two years.

At the high school a minimum of $100 has been raised to a minimum of $130, which may be increased by remaining for successive years to $150.

New Standards of Efficiency.

Working together the school board and Superintendent Vincent have drawn up a new set of qualifications for teacher, which from this time on will be followed.

No grade teacher will be engaged by the school board hereafter unless qualified by two years of normal school training and two years of experience.

No married woman will be elected to teach in the Blackfoot schools unless such domestic arrangements are made in her home that she may give her entire time to teaching, and not be called away or kept from her duties to the school by household cares. …

(ibid, page 8)
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Shoshone Journal. May 09, 1919, Page 1

19190509SJ1

Big Wood River Grange

Mrs. A. S. Viera is on the sick list this week.

The Sunny Slope school on Wood river will close May 9.
— —

Dietrich – Besslin Notes

Elkanah Crist is sick with an undefined illness that keeps him at home with a high fever.

Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Clark have returned from an extensive outing for Mr. Clark’s illness. Their trip embraced a visit to Salt Lake City and thence to interesting points along the coast. Mr. Clark is by no means well and will spend some more time looking for more vigorous health before assuming his duties for the O.S.L.

Vance Shellman has been confined to his house by sickness for several days, but is better now and will be able to look after the business of the Irrigation company again.

C. F. Bornden went to Twin Falls Sunday to bring home his daughter, Miss Alice, who has been taking treatment there in the Boyd hospital. She returns very much improved and in a fair way for complete recovery.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 09 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Hope, Idaho

HopeFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

Evening Capital News., May 09, 1919, Page 6

19190509ECN1

Deaths – Funerals

Moriarity – The body of Kate Moriarity, who died at the Boulder mines near Idaho City Thursday noon, was brought to Boise and is at the undertaking parlors of Schreiber & Sidfenfaden. The cause of death was pneumonia. The decease was 51 years of age and is survived by three brothers, two in Idaho City and one in Ireland. No funeral arrangement have as yet been made.
— —

19190509ECN2The Blood
(By Lee Herbert Smith, M. D.)
After Influenza and Hard Winter Colds

After an attack of the grip or pneumonia, or even a hard cold, the blood is left thin, watery, and one is said to be anemic. Instead of the blood cells being round, as in diagram “A”, they become irregular, as in “B.” When you feel weak, nervous, or the skin breaks out in pimples, eruptions or boils, and you feel “blue” and without any snap or energy, sometimes hands cold and clammy, there is usually a large decrease in the red or white blood corpuscles and one should build up with some good blood builder and tonic.

You can put iron in your blood and the cells become round and red, losing the irregular shape, by taking a good iron tonic, called “Irontic,” put up by Dr. Pierce and sold by most druggists. This “Irontic” is compounded of a soluble iron, nux and herbal extracts. With this you gain in vim, vigor and vitality. Instead of pale cheeks, tired and worn out before the day is half done, after taking “Irontic” your cheeks will have color, you will feel strong and vigorous and ready for work.

Or if you like a good alternative and herbal tonic, such a one can be obtained at any drug store, favorably known for the past fifty years as Dr. Pierce’s Golden Medical Discovery. This is made from the wild roots and barks of forest trees and without the use of alcohol.

(Adv.)

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 09 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. May 09, 1919, Page 1

19190509CT1

Lake Lowell

Mrs. G. C. White is able to be around after a few weeks illness.

Lloyd Ross, the 12-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Ross died Sunday morning of leakage of the heart. Funeral services were held in Caldwell Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Burial in Canyon cemetery.
— —

Card of Thanks

I wish to thank the many friends and neighbors for their kindness and help during the long illness and death of my husband, Daniel S. Brown, and for the beautiful flowers.

Mrs. Daniel S. Brown.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 09 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. May 09, 1919, Page 5

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Brier Rose

Margaret Shaw is out of school this week on account of illness.

The Postlethwaites have recovered from the mumps and are back in school.

Deer Flat

Carrie and Marguerite Hitson are on the sick list.

The Nelson family have recovered from the flu.

Wesley Dotson’s family are ill with the flu.

Miss Blanch Hanson went to her home near Melba for the weekend and was taken sick and has not been able to return since.

Sunny Slope

Mrs. D. E. Gammon, who has been seriously ill with the flu, is much improved at this writing.

Mrs. H. E. Smith returned from Glenn’s Ferry where she has been nursing her mother who was suffering from a relapse of the flu.

Miss Vera Stephenson is suffering from an attack of the mumps.

The entire community extends its deepest sympathy to the parents of Lloyd Cox in their sad bereavement.
— —

Horrors of War

“War has upset not only our home life, but the traditions of the business world as well,” remarked Senator Penrose the other day, “so it behooves you to watch your step. If you aren’t careful you’re likely to find yourself in the same fix that Jones was. This Jones had become rich over night on war profits and it was with an exaggerated ideal of his own importance that he stepped into an office one day and demanded to see the manager.

‘What is your business?’ asked the very dainty girl who confronted him.

‘None of yours,’ snapped Jones; ‘I’ve got an important proposition to lay before the firm and I don’t want to talk to any fool woman.’ ‘You would rather talk to a gentleman?’ asked the fool woman sweetly. ‘Certainly,’ growled Jones. ‘So would I,’ retorted the woman promptly, adding, ‘so you might send one to state your business to me, I am the manager.'”

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. May 09, 1919, Page 7

Greenleaf

The Nordyke family has influenza.

Midway

Miss Doris Oeder has been quite sick, threatened with pneumonia, but is somewhat improved.

Mrs. David Strand died Sunday evening at the family home, aged 32 years 6 months and 17 days. The cause of her death was cancer, from which she had suffered many years. She leaves her husband and 10-year-old daughter, besides her parents and several brothers and sisters. The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon at two o’clock, at the home, conducted by Rev. W. W. Deal. Interment was in Kohler lawn cemetery.

Fairview

Mrs. Graves, who has been on the sick list for several weeks is able to be out again.

Earnest Franks was on the sick list this past week.

Mrs. Dan Cashman is able to be out again after a short illness.

Mrs. Hannan was called to Oregon by the sudden illness of her mother.

S. W. Vail and daughter Blanche left on the noon train Sunday for Colorado Springs, where Blanche expects to spend a few months for her health.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Meridian Times., May 09, 1919, Page 8

19190509MT1

Meridian Local News

Mrs. Homer Tolleth is seriously ill at her home.

S. H. Griffith was able to walk down town Thursday for the first time since his recent illness.

Miss Lois Fountain who teaches on Ten Mile, was operated on for appendicitis Thursday.
— —

Death of George Hyde

George Hyde residing four miles southwest of Meridian was stricken with apoplexy Wednesday and died a few hours afterwards. …

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 09 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Main Street, Hill City, Idaho

HillCityFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

May 11

Evening Capital News., May 11, 1919, Page 10

19190511ECN1

Around Boise Valley Loop

Middleton

The local schools will close May 23.

Huston

The Misses Carrie and Marguerite Hitson have been on the sick list since last week.

The Nelson family has recovered from the “flu” and the W. Dotson family is recovering from the same disease.

Miss Irene Rose is recovering from the mumps.

The primary and intermediate rooms of the school will be out Friday, May 16. Miss Reed’s room will continue one week longer to make up time lost by sickness.

Mothers’ day will be observed at the Huston church Sunday morning. Besides the sermon for mothers, there will be special music. Carnations will be given to the mothers present.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 11 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

A Part of Heyburn, Idaho, watch us grow, 1908 (1)

Heyburn1908Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

May 12

Evening Capital News., May 12, 1919, Page 3

19190512ECN1

Mountain Home

Mrs. Electa G. Rhodes, who has been quite ill with influenza, is rapidly improving.

Mrs. Ernest W. Latimore, who has been quite ill at her home, is improving rapidly.

Mr. and Mrs. Stanton Park took their little daughter Janet to Boise Thursday for medical treatment.
— —

Health Notes

Now that the fly season is here, it is well to understand that the common house or typhoid fly is not only an annoying pest, but a very potent factor in the spread of communicable diseases. It may be said that the number of flies in a community is a fair index of the sanitary condition of that community. Indeed flies and filth are synonymous because flies grow and develop in filth, and it is hardly necessary to say that the absence of flies indicates the absence of filth. To prevent the fly from spreading disease the following is suggested: Destroy the wintering places of flies; screen the house, particularly the kitchen and sleeping room; render privies and privy vaults fly-proof; keep flies away from the sick and their discharges.

To prevent the spread of communicable diseases, it is necessary to exercise careful supervision over the sick, for it is the individual having a communicable disease or harboring the causative organism who is the real danger to the community. He spreads his infection through the fresh discharges from his mouth, nose, throat, intestines, etc., to those with whom he comes in contact.

This is the time of the year when all Idaho should put forth special efforts to bring about better sanitary conditions. Filth and refuse of every kind should be disposed of effectually and special efforts should be put forth to keep clean during warm weather, when the danger of typhoid and summer complaint is greater than at any other time of the year.

Tuberculosis is a communicable, preventable and curable disease. It is spread by others coming in contact with execrations from the bodies of those suffering from it. It should be borne in mind that intimate personal contact with a consumptive, such as kissing, using the same dishes not properly sterilized, sleeping in the same beds, will render one very likely to contract the disease. All discharges from the throat or nose, bowels or kidneys of a consumptive may contain the germs of tuberculosis, therefore such discharges are dangerous.

The number of school children enrolled under the banner of the Modern Health Crusaders in Idaho is increasing very rapidly, it now being about 30,000, and very gratifying results of the crusaders’ activities along health and sanitary lines are being obtained.

The day will come, and it is not far distant, when it will generally be considered as much of a disgrace to have a fly in the house as it is now to have a bedbug in it, and the fly is a thousand times more dangerous than is the bedbug.

One of the saddest things in the world is that over 100,000 children die every year in this country from preventable diseases. To permit this to occur is little less than a crime and authorities and communities should speed up the matter of health conservation and life saving if the boys and girls of today are to be the strong, efficient men and women of tomorrow that they should be, ready and able to do the world’s work.

The importance of instruction in sanitary science and personal hygiene in the public schools cannot be overestimated and I sincerely hope the time will soon come when such instruction will ne require in evry school in the land.

Our national death rate is about 14 per thousand inhabitants each year, while the average rate in Idaho is only about one-half that number, certainly a splendid showing for the “Gem of the Mountains.” Surely, Nature smiled abundantly on this fair state.

Street venders of fruits and other articles of food who neglect to cover their wares and protect them from flies, dust, dirt and other elements are a positive menace to the community in which they operate and should be suppressed or made to comply with the law.
— —

U. S. Hospitals Best For Wounded
Red Cross Advises Relatives Not to urge Those Receiving Treatment to Hurry to Their Homes

The May 10 bulletin of the American Red Cross in a letter to mothers, wives, sisters and sweethearts of boys in the United States hospitals, give assurances that they are being well cared for and that is the best place for them. It also sounds a timely warning that they should not urge their return home. The letter is as follows:

“The United States truly intends to offer its all and best for the wounded and returned men who offered their all for their country. The United States government knows and feels that the work of the war is not finished until the wounded men have been mended and the sick healed. It has instructed its agencies to spare no pains in time or money to heal the hurts of the disabled and put them back again upon the sure path of earning a livelyhood [sic].

“The reconstruction work of the government hospitals is a revelation to those who have observed it. Medical reports show, and investigation gives proof, that the best place in the world for a sick or wounded soldier is a government hospital.

“Mothers, wives, sisters, sweethearts of the boys in the United States hospitals, let us give you this suggestion:

“Stop influencing the boys to get home, much as you want them.

“Do not hurry them out of the hospitals where the government is giving them good food, the finest surgical skill and trained nursing, and the splendid oversight of competent, interested military and scientific care.

“Give the government time to nurse and repair, with the assurance that nothing is being left undone that can be done by human sympathy, skill and attention.”

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 12 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., May 12, 1919, Page 3

19190512DSM1

19190512DSM2
Call New Malady Epidemic Stupor
Disease Misnamed “Sleeping Sickness” is Believed to Be Contagious
Medical Experts Puzzled
Health Authorities Declare Strange Illness Has No Relation to “Sleeping Sickness,” Which Originated in Africa

Washington – “Epidemic stupor” is the name the health authorities have decided to give the new disease, wrongly called sleeping sickness, which sprang up a few weeks ago. It has invaded eighteen American cities and several army camps, has taken several lives and laid hundreds under its spell.

The scientific name of this new malady is lethargic encephalitis. It is not “sleeping sickness” and has nothing to do with the real sleeping sickness. It has been known for only a few years, and its cause and origin are even more mysterious than those of the influenza.

The disease, when it was first discovered in this country, was found to be a form of sleeping sickness common in the interior parts of Africa, but a closer observation of the symptoms proved this belief to be unsound. Sleeping sickness as found in the jungles of Africa, is caused by the bite of a peculiar insect, known as the tsetse fly.

The new disease was first observed in Austria.

The first case noted in England occurred February 11, 1918, and the epidemic, which never attained large proportions, came, at least, temporarily, to and end in June. The medical research committee off England became deeply interested in the new malady and instituted clinical and pathological investigations. The committee found the disease is a general infectious disorder, characterized by manifestations originating in the central nervous system, of which the most frequent and characteristic are progressive lethargy or stupor and an involvement of the nerve centers controlling the eye muscles.

Marked by High Temperature

Although a rise in temperature was not observed in all of the 164 cases of the disease of which notes were obtained, there seemed to be little doubt that there is always a certain amount of fever in an early stage. The fever usually lasts from two to five days, but may continue for ten or even fourteen days. It may fall suddenly or gradually with oscillation. A period of subnormal temperature not infrequently follows.

Usually the first symptom is simple catarrhal conjunctivitis (a mild “pink eye”) or it may be tonsillitis – simple sore throat and cold in the chest. The disease may be ushered in suddenly by a fainting attack of fit. In marked cases the lethargy was accompanied by heaviness of the eyelids, pain in the eyes and blurred vision. Headache is a common symptom, and rigidness was characteristic of the early symptoms of many cases during the epidemic in England.

After the first stages, the symptoms of a general infectious disease become manifest. The patient lies in bed on the back, often unable to make any voluntary movement on account of great muscular weakness; the face is quite expressionless and masklike, and there may be definite double facial paralysis. The patient is in a condition of stupor, although true sleep is often not obtained.

No Specific Treatment

With regard to treatment, no specific method has been devised, and the best that can be done is to put the patient to bed and provide good nursing. Cold sponging is often beneficial during the early stages and tends to diminish the delirium. For the pain, numbness and tingling of the limbs warmth is the best remedy. Constipation is obstinate and often difficult to overcome, except by enemas followed by such drugs as liquid paraffin or pheolphthalein. No hypnotics and no morphine or other preparations of opium should be given. Daily cleansing of the mouth and antiseptic treatment of the nose and mouth should be carried out and respiratory complications systematically looked for. The patient should be given to understand that his convalescence will last at least six months after the beginning of the illness.

Officials of the United States public health service are investigating cases of the disease in several cities. They are especially anxious to keep the malady out of the army camps. The first army camp to be invaded was Camp Lee, Petersburg, Va., where one death was reported out of nine cases. Investigation made at the camp showed that in each case the soldier had been ill with influenza.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 12 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Further Reading

What caused the 1918-30 epidemic of encephalitis lethargica?

R R Dourmashkin MD Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine Volume 90 September 1 997

Encephalitis lethargica, often called epidemic encephalitis at the time of the epidemic, was prevalent worldwide during the years 1918-1930. The acute phase, characterized by somnolence and a mask-like facial appearance, was associated with a 20-40% mortality.

Later in the epidemic, almost all those who had had an acute episode of encephalitis lethargica developed sequelae to a greater or lesser degree. In some cases, the symptoms persisted without respite to the chronic state; in others they developed weeks, months or years after the patient was thought to have recovered. The outstanding motor manifestation was the parkinsonian syndrome, present in almost every case. This resembled the picture of Parkinson’s disease (paralysis agitans), except that the ‘pill-rolling’ movement typical of Parkinson’s disease was often absent; the tremor in postencephalitic parkinsonism was usually coarse. The common general features of the latter were rigidity of all the muscles, loss of automatic or synergistic movements, loss of equilibrium, and a running or shuffling gait. Oculogyric crises were an important feature. There were mental changes, especially in children, and respiratory tics were often noted. Sometimes signs of pyramidal tract damage were found.

Epidemiology

In the USA, few cases were reported before 1920, the peak period being between 1920 and 1929. The epidemic of influenza burst upon the USA a year before the epidemic of encephalitis lethargica in 1919. There were 3100 cases during 1920-1924 and 1222 cases during 1925-1929. Subsequently, the incidence decreased rapidly. At the outset of the encephalitis epidemic in the USA, 46% of patients with encephalitis gave a history of influenza compared with 30% for the rest of the population. Many patients reported a flu-like illness at the onset with stupor, unconsciousness or fever. These observations led the US Surgeon General’s medical officer to state in 1920 that the aetiology of encephalitis lethargica was the same as that for influenza.

The opinion in Britain as to the aetiology of encephalitis lethargica was varied. The frequent observation within living memory of isolated cases before the great epidemic suggested that this was not a new disease. During the epidemic, the years in which encephalitis lethargica occurred more frequently coincided with a drop in the number of cases of influenza. Other theories as to the cause of the epidemic included botulism and poliomyelitis. Some cases of encephalitis following influenza in young children and infants would be regarded today as post-influenzal encephalitis or Reye’s syndrome. In others the description of encephalitis with a preceding history of influenza was well documented. Of von Economo’s 13 cases of encephalitis lethargica in 1916-1917, none showed signs attributable to influenza. He differentiated the characteristic clinical and pathological signs of encephalitis lethargica from postinfluenzal encephalitis. He found that the earliest cases of encephalitis lethargica in Central Europe preceded the influenza epidemic by three years. The first cases were reported in Romania in 1915. In France, 40 cases of encephalitis lethargica occurring in the winter of 1916-1917 were reported by Cruchet at a military neuropsychiatric centre. These represented 3% of the patients admitted. The French cases closely resembled those that occurred later in England in their presentation and evolution. Hallls found reports of cases of encephalitis in Europe in the years 1903, 1907, 1908, 1910, 1912 and 1913. In northern Italy there was a serious outbreak of what probably was encephalitis lethargica in 1889-1890, called la nona. It followed an epidemic of influenza the year before. Crookshank and von Economo reported other epidemics of encephalitis in the past that might have been encephalitis lethargica dating back to the sixteenth century.

By 1918, the number of sporadic cases of encephalitis lethargica reported in Europe and elsewhere increased rapidly and the condition became epidemic at the same time as the influenza pandemic of 1918. The disease prevalence was greatest in the colder months of the year, as with influenza. Stallybrass, however, found that of over 1000 cases reported in 1923, only 4 had a history of influenza within six months, of which 2 were doubtful. Similar observations were made by others. Conversely, in a very large influenza epidemic at Camp Dix, New Jersey, in 1918, there were 6000 cases of influenza with 800 deaths but no concurrent cases of encephalitis lethargica. While the encephalitis lethargica epidemic was distinct from the epidemic of influenza, there is no doubt that historically the two diseases repeatedly occurred in close proximity of time.

Any study of encephalitis lethargica must take into account the recent characterization of the 1918 influenza virus by Taubenberger et al.. This work established that the virus was a H1N1 influenza A virus of probable swinehuman origin. With parts of the genome sequenced, it is possible to identify, by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), residual influenza virus that may be in archival material of encephalitis lethargica.

Stallybrass noted that the most common age of incidence of encephalitis lethargica was 10-20 years of age. He remarked that this was at variance with the age of incidence of most communicable diseases at the time and it was also the age group in which such diseases were least fatal. The rarity of person-to-person spread was noted in every country and in every outbreak. Exceptionally, local spread of the disease in isolated communities was recorded, with a variable incubation period. In a severe wave of encephalitis lethargica that engulfed certain villages in Lapland in 1921, the morbidity rate varied from 7.1% to 45%; whole families were involved, and side by side with acute typical cases were others in which the disease was mild. In a girls’ home in Derby, 12 cases of encephalitis lethargica occurred in a total community of 22 persons within two weeks, resulting in 5 deaths. In a rural school in Warwickshire in 1922 a child developed encephalitis after a visit to town. Four to five weeks after her return to school 3 other girls in her dormitory fell ill. This suggested an incubation period for the disease of up to four weeks. Infants born to mothers ill with the disease were reported to develop encephalitisls. Parsons estimated that the incubation period ranged from one day to two weeks or more. In 1926, the Scottish Board of Health stated that carriers of the infective agent in the nasopharynx were common, but only a minute fraction of those exposed to the disease acquired it; the factor of lowered resistance was far more potent than the presence of the agent. The outbreaks of encephalitis in Britain were generally local and ran their course over several weeks. High morbidity in the local epidemics suggested a low level of immunity in the population. The manner of spread of encephalitis lethargica suggests an intermediate vector of infection. With this epidemiological background von Economo, Duvoisin and Yahr and others rejected an aetiological relationship to influenza.

More recently, Ravenholt and Foege reviewed the incidence of influenza and encephalitis lethargica in Seattle and Samoa. They found that both these diseases appeared in Western Samoa – influenza in 1918 and encephalitis lethargica in 1919. Outbreaks of these two diseases continued and their peak incidence was always separated by a year.

Contemporary observers in Europe calculated that the incubation period for encephalitis lethargica varied from one day to several weeks (see below). The incidence of encephalitis lethargica in England up to 1924 was as follows: 1919, 541 cases; 1920, 890 cases; 1921, 1470 cases; 1922, 454 cases; 1923, 1025 cases; 1924, 5039 cases; 1925, 2635 cases. A total of 12,054 cases were reported in England and Wales from 1918 to 1925. Yearly totals did not appear in the leading British medical journals thereafter. In addition, there were many mild and abortive cases, including epidemic hiccup, that were widely described but not reported. These patients frequently went on to develop serious post-encephalitic sequelae. By 1927, the acute cases occurring in England were often so mild that the acute phase would pass without much notice; however, the postencephalitic sequelae continued to be devastating. In France there were at least 10,000 cases up to 1920 and 3900 cases in Italy. Subsequently, sporadic cases continued to be reported; recently, Rail et al. described 8 patients whose disease was initiated between 1945 and 1968, one of whom was screened for virus antigen by Elizan (see below). …

Clinical Description

The signs and symptoms of the acute phase of encephalitis lethargica were described in excellent detail by the early observers. The afflicted individuals became ill suddenly with only slight prodromal upper respiratory signs and low-grade fever. In the acute ‘oculo-lethargic’ stage, most common early in the epidemic, the presenting features were: somnolence, at times deep, but from which the patient could be roused; mask-like facies accompanied by mental apathy; tired, expressionless, toneless speech, often thick and slurred; eye signs (e.g. oculogyric crises, diplopia, ptosis, squint, nystagmus, pupil irregularity); convulsive seizures, and stroke. These features differentiated the disorder from other types of encephalitis recognized at that time.

From early in the epidemic, encephalitis lethargica was separated from other clinical entities such as purulent meningitis (cerebrospinal fever as it was then known), postinfectious and postvaccinal encephalomyelitis, poliomyelitis, herpes encephalitis, rabies and Japanese encephalitis. The parkinsonian sequelae of encephalitis lethargica were almost unique. Exceptionally, however, postencephalitic parkinsonism was reported after measles, herpes, Coxsackie virus encephalitis and Japanese encephalitis. Bassoe subdivided encephalitis lethargica into several types according to the patients’ affective behaviour.

In 1923 Stallybrass noted a change in the clinical picture of the disease. He observed that only 45% of cases could be classified as oculo-lethargic. Other forms were found, including myoclonic (14%), choreiform (25%), or psychomotor (16%). These had been described earlier but became more common by 1923. Instead of lethargy Stallybrass observed delirium, excitement, sleeplessness, myoclonus and tachypnoea. A striking observation made in the early work was the frequent appearance of a generalized rash early in the acute illness. The rash was papular, macular, morbilliform or even petechial. One observer reported a ‘glove’ desquamation of the hands and feet akin to that of scarlet fever but clearly different. Such exanthems may have been caused by the same vasculitis that was found in the brain in acute cases coming to necropsy. Curiously, exanthems were not mentioned in the copious reports after 1923. Conceivably mutation of the causal virus changed in the clinical picture over time.

Related, perhaps, to the dermatological signs were reports of a haemorrhagic syndrome, most often in fulminating cases of encephalitis. These presented as purpura, epistaxis, gastrointestinal haemorrhage and meningeal haemorrhage. Gastrointestinal symptoms were often found; at the onset the patients suffered from persistent vomiting, sometimes accompanied by diarrhoea but more often by constipation. In contrast to most observers, Parsons quoting Gardner stated that the illness was heralded by a severe sore throat in which the pharynx was deeply inflamed and the tonsils were covered with a patchy white exudate. The tongue and the throat were very dry and there was difficulty in swallowing. This pointed to an upper respiratory infection as the primary portal of entry. Yates and Barnes suggested that the nasal sinuses were a route of infection. …

Conclusions

The contemporary observers of the encephalitis epidemic of 1916-1930 carefully recorded the clinical and pathological details of the disease. Some observers noted that its onset resembled influenza with severe upper respiratory inflammation. Others found that prodromal signs were very mild. It appeared to follow waves of epidemic influenza. The epidemiology, transmission and progress of the disease, however, were unique and differed greatly from those of influenza. There were outbreaks of what may have been encephalitis lethargica previous to the great epidemic and also after it had receded. Chronic progressive inflammation of the brain resulted in destruction of the basal ganglia over months and years and caused the disastrous syndrome that was aptly named post-encephalitic parkinsonism. The more recent care and treatment of these patients has been described by Sacks, who elicited transient remissions with levodopa.

The early observers studied the epidemiological characteristics of its spread – a baffling mixture of phenomena, in which tens of thousands in Europe, America and worldwide fell ill. The spread of the disease nevertheless was sporadic, without obvious relation to economic class, geography or age group. There were documented outbreaks of person-to-person spread of encephalitis lethargica but these were notable for their rarity. The disasters of the First World War and the starvation and population displacement that followed may have contributed to the epidemics of the period. These conditions are being re-enacted in some parts of Eastern Europe today.

The early virologists developed acceptable evidence for a viral aetiology but the methods available were limited to animal transmission. The technique for long-term preservation of infective virus had not been developed and so little material remains for modern study. In the 1970s attempts were made to relate the aetiology of post-encephalitic parkinsonism to an influenza virus. Conflicting results were obtained by different workers using immunofluorescence of tissue with anti-influenza antibodies. Today, it is possible to examine fixed tissue by electron microscopy and also to rescue virus nucleic acid by PCR, if there are clues to suggest which virus probe to use. The characterization of parts of the genome of the 1918 influenza virus is a great step forward and will be instrumental in this endeavour. Monoclonal antibodies may turn out to be more specific in localizing influenza antigen in preserved tissues than the polyclonal sera previously used. Luck et al. showed that influenza virus antigen could be demonstrated in fixed paraffin-embedded tissue only after trypsin treatment of the sections.

An autoimmune mechanism for the pathogenesis of postencephalitic parkinsonism should be investigated; however, the lack of patient sera for autoantibody examination makes such study difficult. There is only one surviving patient in Britain.

It would be well to understand this disease better, as it has not disappeared entirely. The knowledge retrieved by this historical study will be useful in the molecular and EM investigation of encephalitis lethargica that is in preparation in this laboratory.

excerpted from:
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The Demise of Poskanzer and Schwab’s Influenza Theory on the Pathogenesis of Parkinson’s Disease

by Danny Estupinan, Sunina Nathoo, and Michael S. Okun

Abstract

In 1961, David C. Poskanzer and Robert S. Schwab presented a paper, “Studies in the epidemiology of Parkinson’s disease predicting its disappearance as a major clinical entity by 1980.” This paper introduced the hypothesis that Parkinson’s disease was derived from a single aetiology, the influenza virus. We review the original Poskanzer and Schwab hypothesis that Parkinson’s disease was based on the association between the 1918-19 influenza epidemic and the later observation of Parkinsonism in some influenza sufferers. We also further explore the prediction that Parkinson’s disease would totally disappear as an entity once original influenza victims were all deceased. Current research has revealed that there are many potential causes and factors important in the occurrence of Parkinson’s disease, postencephalitic Parkinsonism, and encephalitis lethargica. Poskanzer and Schwab presented a novel hypothesis; however, it was proven false by a combination of research and time. …

4.2. Encephalitis Lethargica and Influenza

The PSH was based on the idea that there was a subclinical infection prior to 1920, with EL, a potential cause identified by the authors and perhaps a cause that was more likely than influenza. Therefore, discussion of EL such as its historical context, potential aetiologies, and implications is warranted. Contemporary observers of the EL epidemic maintained that both the EL and the influenza epidemics were not connected, despite the popularity at the time of the idea that the influenza virus was the cause of EL. The medical profession at that time simply viewed EL as a form of influenza. The current prevailing viewpoint is that EL and the 1918 influenza pandemic were not related etiologically. von Economo ultimately concluded that EL was a separate disorder. EL preceded the 1918 influenza pandemic, had a distinct clinical picture and unique pathology. EL was associated with midbrain lesions, while influenza was associated with pulmonary lesions.

Additionally, there was epidemiological evidence that suggested that the 1918 influenza virus originated in USA, and was transported to Europe by American troops in World War I. EL actually spread in the opposite direction from Europe to North America. It is however possible that there was an EL-like syndrome that went unrecognized during the time since public interest was centred on World War I. Interestingly, the years of higher occurrence of EL coincided with a drop in influenza cases, suggesting a weak correlation.

Timelines revealed inconsistencies, as influenza spread in weeks, and EL over months. Historically, EL-like disorders have been reported during previous influenza epidemics, such as the nona pandemic in Italy in the 1890s. On the basis of 1889 influenza being associated with certain nervous manifestations, some authors assumed all nervous symptoms were attributed to influenza. However, no syndrome resembling EL occurred in the two influenza pandemics after 1918 (e.g., 1957 and 1968) suggesting that a unique type of virus was required to produce the array of neurological symptoms associated with EL. Finally, there was a lack of influenza history in two thirds of EL patients, supporting the notion the two were not related.

Due to the temporal association between EL and influenza, it was assumed that influenza must be the cause. It is however possible that EL was actually due to another virus, or due to an infective agent that was concurrently circulating with influenza. If influenza was not the cause of EL, then what was? The aetiology of EL remains a mystery, although there are several theories concerning possible causes. Such theories include viruses — either a neurotropic virus different from influenza (e.g., polio), or activation of a latent virus, bacteria — poststreptococcal-like illness analogous to chorea and rheumatic fever, toxins, dietary issues due to wartime deprivation, miscellaneous, or “rag bag” diagnosis with the actual incidence being inflated by other conditions, or an autoimmune reaction to a virus.

The relationship between EL and influenza has been examined historically and scientifically, with most EL researchers maintaining that influenza is an unlikely cause of EL. Others suggest that the association cannot be ruled out. No gold standard titer testing was available at the time, making diagnosis of EL and influenza subjective and based on clinical findings alone. The supervisor of the vaccine trials for EL and a major contributor to the Matheson commissioned EL literature survey Josephine Neal in 1942 commented “the range of symptomatology in acute EL was so wide that often the diagnosis could be made only with difficulty and occasionally not with certainty”. There were many limitations in the available cases in the literature. Ultimately, most diagnoses in the literature of both EL and PEP were post hoc, recounted a plethora of symptoms, and attributed the symptoms to various aetiologies. Many reported cases of influenza were likely biased by patient recall. The 1918 influenza epidemic frequently resulted in cases where reports of neurological symptoms were identical to EL (i.e., diplopia, ptosis, paralyses, or psychoses), making EL a subjective diagnosis that was difficult to separate from influenza alone. Lethargy could result from either EL or influenza. All of the reports of EL and of influenza were retrospective and unblinded, demonstrating the difficulty of ascertaining which cases were which.

Given the lack of advances in virology during the pandemic, objective diagnosis of influenza was not possible. There is a lack of direct evidence from serological, PCR, or antibodies that link influenza and EL, with all studies limited by the amount of EL material available. Studies that have used PEP tissue, which is more readily available than EL tissue, have not confirmed influenza as more likely occurring in idiopathic Parkinson’s disease. Study of these dated specimens is troublesome due to the lack of temperature control and autolysis due to lack of postmortem refrigeration. Decades later, archived EL brain specimens when carefully examined had not revealed evidence of influenza RNA. Attempts to reproduce EL from postmortem brain extracts have been failures. One study demonstrated direct antibody immunofluorescence for the neurotropic influenza virus A antigen within in the hypothalamus in six human PEP brains. In the same study, there was, however, no antibody reaction in five postmortem human cases of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease. A human postmortem study of substantia nigra depigmentation in young victims of EL suggested that an infectious aetiology may have been responsible for the Parkinsonism symptoms. Basal ganglia autoimmune reactions have been shown in 90% of cohort of 20 postmortem patients known to have suffered from EL. These patients had bradykinesia, rigidity, or resting tremor suggesting the parkinsonian phenotype and an autoimmune mechanism. …

Conclusion

The PSH that Parkinson’s disease would diminish or disappear as a particular cohort died was false. The original hypothesis that Parkinson’s disease was due to subclinical infection due to an exposure prior to 1920 was compelling given the increase in Parkinsonism seen during the 1920s and 1930s. The birth cohort had a mean age similar to that of patients affected with EL, suggesting that these patients were exposed to a similar agent. There were many reasons why during the first half of the twentieth century there was an idea that Parkinsonism could be due to a viral etiology. EL and PEP were assumed to be influenza or influenza related historically, but these relationships were never proven. Today, most people who develop Parkinson’s disease have had no one specific cause identified. Influenza may, however, provide the first “hit” that may lead to the later development of Parkinson’s disease, suggesting a possible mechanism for viral infection in disease manifestation. More importantly, despite discounting Poskanzer and Schwab’s initial hypothesis, the association between virus exposure and Parkinson’s disease is still being actively pursued. Parkinson’s disease has now outlived Poskanzer and Schwab’s postinfluenza eradication theory; therefore new hypotheses to elucidate potential causes are warranted to explain why the incidence has increased, rather than decreased, as previously suggested.

excerpted from:
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Road Reports Apr 18, 2021

It is Rock Migration Season. Please share road reports. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads. Rock Migration season has started. Conditions change quickly this time of year. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road, icy conditions and deep snow in higher elevation. Remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are bare, there are a few icy patches lingering in the shady places. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, wandering dogs, deer, elk, moose, fox, squirrels and chipmunks.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
Starting April 2, at 8am the original spring construction schedule for the ID-55 Smiths Ferry project will resume. From April 2 through mid-May, the road will be closed Monday through Thursday from 10am to 2pm, and open to one lane of alternating traffic with a 15-minute delay outside of the closure hours.
Project link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Wed (April 14) Mail truck driver reports the highway is bare, there is still one icy corner on the west side of the summit.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Watch for FS fire traffic doing Rx Burns.
March 31: Spring weight limits in effect
“Forest Service officials on the Payette and Boise National Forests implemented the annual seasonal break up limits/road weight restrictions on portions of the South Fork Salmon River Road (National Forest System Road #674 and #474) effective today, March 31, 2021. The restriction is in effect annually through June 1, or as Forest Service officers determine that no further damage will occur to the roadway and remove the signing.”
Report Wednesday (April 14) Mail truck driver said the upper end of the road still has a few icy patches. The lower end is bare. The FS has brought in a backhoe and dump truck in preparation to clean the ditches. There were no trees down or rocks in the road this morning.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open – Watch for rocks.
Report Wed (April 14) mail truck driver reports the the road is snow free. A few rocks in the road this morning, no trees down.

Johnson Creek Road: Upper end closed to wheeled vehicles at Landmark.
The lower end of the road is more than likely in good shape out to the dump. No current report.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Trail report and video April 10th from C&L: “Yesterday [April 9] we came into BC with a smooth trail and had sunshine all the way. We were so lucky that [people] had gone in a couple of days before us & cleared a HUGH number of large down trees, and we only widened one down tree going in. Our trip from YP to BC was a short one (2 1/2 hr). It will be a big job for anyone to take a full sized vehicle up the Profile Creek Road once the snow is gone because of the downed trees – most were cut wide enough for an ATV, and some big ones were not cut at all. … [A] little video of the trail from Profile Gap to Belvadere Creek -see following link:”
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
Update April 14: “The avalanches have been cleared from the Stibnite road and the road is open. The surface of the road was mostly undamaged by the slides. Like every spring there are rocks coming down daily with the freeze and thaw cycles, and the road is still icy in the shaded spots.”
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
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Weather Reports Apr 11-17, 2021

April 11 Weather:

At 930am it was 25 degrees, clear sky and light breeze. Gusty breezes kicking up before 12pm. At 345pm it was 45 degrees, partly cloudy and light breeze. At 645pm it was 40 degrees. At 815pm it was 35 degrees, mostly clear and breezy. Looked clear at 1030pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 12, 2021 at 09:30AM
Mostly clear, light breeze
Max temperature 46 degrees F
Min temperature 18 degrees F
At observation 26 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

April 12 Weather:

At 930am it was 26 degrees, mostly clear and light breeze. Mostly cloudy at 130pm. At 350pm it was 47 degrees, mostly cloudy and a little breezy. At 7pm it was mostly cloudy and breezy. At 815pm it was 42 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy. At 1030pm a few stars out.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 13, 2021 at 09:30AM
Overcast, breezy
Max temperature 50 degrees F
Min temperature 26 degrees F
At observation 34 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

April 13 Weather:

Gusty earlier this morning. At 930am it was 34 degrees, overcast and breezy. Partly cloudy and gusty breezes at 1pm. At 215pm it was 45 degrees, almost clear and quite breezy. Clear and calmer at 7pm. Getting gusty again at 743pm and high thin clouds. At 840pm it was 39 degrees, mostly clear and lighter breezes. At 11pm lots of stars out and breezy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 14, 2021 at 09:30AM
Mostly cloudy, light breezes
Max temperature 48 degrees F
Min temperature 27 degrees F
At observation 33 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

April 14 Weather:

At 930am it was 33 degrees, mostly high thin clouds and light breeze. Gusty breezes by 1115am and thicker clouds. At 1230pm it was 45 degrees, mostly cloudy and quite breezy. At 4pm it was 45 degrees, partly clear and gusty breezes. Quite blustery at 7pm. At 815pm it was 43 degrees, calmer and cloudy. At 11pm it looked cloudy and lighter breezes.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 15, 2021 at 09:30AM
Mostly cloudy, light breeze
Max temperature 50 degrees F
Min temperature 28 degrees F
At observation 35 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

April 15 Weather:

At 930am it was 35 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breeze. Gusty breezes kicking up at 1045am. Blustery and mostly cloudy at 1pm. At 420pm it was 54 degrees, partly cloudy/clear and breezy. At 7pm some wind gusts and mostly cloudy. At 830pm it was 47 degrees, mostly cloudy and lighter breeze. At 11pm stars out to the east.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 16, 2021 at 09:30AM
Partly clear/cloudy
Max temperature 55 degrees F
Min temperature 25 degrees F
At observation 32 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

April 16 Weather:

At 930am it was 32 degrees and partly clear/cloudy. Gusty breezes kicking up by 1045am. Partly cloudy and breezy at 130pm. At 420pm it was 56 degrees, almost clear and breezy. At 825pm it was 45 degrees, some thin high haze and gentle breezes. At 927pm the sky was clear and smoke settling in from nearby Rx Burn. At 11pm lots of starts out to the east.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 17, 2021 at 09:30AM
Clear, light breeze
Max temperature 58 degrees F
Min temperature 23 degrees F
At observation 34 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

April 17 Weather:

At 930am it was 34 degrees, clear sky and light breeze. Clear and light breeze at noon, Rx burns started. Socked in with smoke by 145pm. At 220pm it was 60 degrees, low visibility from smoke. At 430pm it was 60 degrees, light breeze, clear sky above thinner (eye burning) smoke. At 830pm it was 45 degrees, clear sky and smoke settling in along the river. At 11pm it looked clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 18, 2021 at 09:30AM
Clear, light breeze, good AQ
Max temperature 63 degrees F
Min temperature 25 degrees F
At observation 38 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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