Idaho History Apr 4, 2021

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 51

Idaho Newspaper clippings April 25-30, 1919

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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April 25

The Caldwell Tribune. April 25, 1919, Page 5

19190425CT1

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Middleton

There have been a number of cases of flu the last two weeks. Mrs. W. T. Plowhead and Mayor Jones are now ill with it.

On Tuesday evening, April 29th the patrons of the local school are asked to come to the school house to determine whether the four years of high school will be continued or whether just the two years will continue. The Co-operative Club have charge of the meeting.

Lake Lowell

Mrs. W. S. Davis has the influenza.

Evart Coon’s baby is recovering from the pneumonia.

The Coon children are recovering from the flu.

Waldo Eby’s baby was quite sick Saturday.

Mrs. Earl Davis and little daughter are recovering from the flu.

Mrs. G. C. White has been confined to her bed, the past week.

Evart Gibben is able to be out again after two weeks’ illness.

Midway

Lylis McAdams was quite sick the first of the week.

Dean Oeder has resumed work with the U. S. R. S. near Caldwell, after an enforced absence of four weeks with the mumps.

Mrs. Wrantham of Meridian, who had spent two weeks with Mrs. I. L. Bumbarner, was called home Saturday by the death of her brother-in-law, R. C. Watson, who died suddenly Saturday morning in Boise.

The children of Midway school and members of the Parent-Teacher Association send 60 dozen of eggs to the Children’s Home in Boise, as an Easter gift.

Brier Rose

Mrs. W. A. Douglas is seriously ill and under the doctor’s care.

Miss Bennett, the nurse, is in Caldwell taking care of the sick.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 25 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Caldwell Tribune. April 25, 1919, Page 7

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Marble Front

Mabel Jones has been sick the past few days.

The school meeting was held at Marble Front. Mr. Moor will fill the office that Mrs. Walter Thomas has previously held and $800 was voted on for permanent improvements such as a heating plant and indoor toilets.

Greenleaf

Harland Rinard has influenza.

Harland Tucker has the influenza.

Mr. Vance Siler is sick with influenza. This is his second attack of the epidemic within the past few months.

Mrs. Lloyd Armstrong has the mumps.
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19190425CT2
Judge Smith Dies In Capital City After Long Illness
Well Known Jurist of Seventh Judicial District – Flu Followed By Heart Trouble the cause

Isaac N. Smith of Weiser, judge of the seventh judicial district, died early Tuesday morning at a Boise home, 715 North Ninth street.

Heart disease, following a severe attack of influenza last winter, caused his death. The body was taken to Weiser Wednesday morning for burial.

Weiser is in mourning over the death of Judge Smith. He was judge of the seventh district, with Washington and Adams county in his jurisdiction, having been appointed in 1917 by Governor Alexander. Mr. Smith was born in California July 29, 1854. He came to Weiser in 1880 and engaged in farming on the land now owned by the Idaho Industrial institute. Later he moved to Weiser for the educational advantages for his children and clerked in the general merchandising store of Herman Haas.

Elected Last Fall

In 1890 he was elected clerk of the district court of Washington county and served 12 years, following which he took up the practice of law. In 1903 he entered into a law partnership with frank Harris, which continued for 14 years until his appointment as judge for two years. Last November he was elected for the four-year term.

Judge Smith was a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellow fraternities and a member of the Weiser school board for 30 years. He rendered every assistance in the building of the three handsome brick school houses in Weiser.

He is survived by his wife and six children, Hattie, Frank and Walter of Weiser; Mrs. Hazel Burbidge of Salt Lake; Isadore of Boise, and Bert of Seattle. The funeral will probably be held Thursday.

In speaking of his old partner, Frank Harris said: “In my 3 years acquaintance I never knew Judge Smith to advocate anything dishonest or dishonorable, but found him at all times a man of sterling character, high ideals and in whom perfect confidence and trust was imposed.. His loss will be keenly felt.”

(ibid, page 7)
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The Caldwell Tribune. April 25, 1919, Page 9

Fairview

Margie and Cairy Vail were on the sick list the past week.

Mrs. Jones of lower Dixie is quite sick, and Earl and George Jones are able to be up and around again.

Mrs. John Greer is still poorly.

There were several who regretted to have the school close Friday. Miss Greenfield has been an excellent teacher.

(ibid, page 9)
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The Caldwell Tribune. April 25, 1919, Page 10

City and County Intelligence

The district court was adjourned Tuesday by Judge Ed. L. Bryan in respect to Judge Isaac N. Smith of Weiser, who died in Boise Tuesday morning. Judge Smith was appointed as an associate judge of the seventh judicial district by former Governor Alexander some two years ago, the business of the district having reached such proportions that is was impossible for Judge Bryan to transact it alone. For the past year Judge Smith had been in declining health and his death was not unexpected.
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College of Idaho – Finney Hall

The hall is now free from mumps.

(ibid, page 10)
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Opera House, Glenns Ferry, Idaho ca. 1918

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Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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The Idaho Recorder. April 25, 1919, Page 4

19190425IR1

May

Jane Herndon is home after a siege of the flu while visiting in Armstead. Mrs. Herndon is recovering from the flu and will soon get back in May.

Friends of Mr. and Mrs. D. G. Taggart regret to hear of the sad news of the death of James Hannah, a brother of Mr. Taggart, who served in the late war over seas and was appointed escort to President Wilson’s party on their trip abroad. He was a native of Ireland. While abroad he received a furlough that he might return to his native country to visit his parents. While there he contracted pneumonia and died. James was a find lad and his going has cast a gloom over his many Pahsimaroi friends.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 25 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. April 25, 1919, Page 6

Typhoid Patient

W. A. Brown of the Mayfield Livestock company has been critically ill at his Salmon home this week from typhoid. He contracted the disease somewhere while on a recent visit outside.

(ibid, page 6)
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The Idaho Recorder. April 25, 1919, Page 7

Salmon Locals

Mrs. Roy B. Herndon is ill with an attack of influenza at Armstead. Mr. Herndon brought the little daughter Jane to the home of Mrs. A. J. Herndon in Salmon, the father proceeding to his May home and business.

Mrs. Minnie Hobbs, the Grand Matron of the O. E. S., who was expected to visit the local chapter on Tuesday evening, was ill and could not come.

(ibid, page 7)
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The Oakley Herald. April 25, 1919, Page 1

19190425OH1

Basin Items

The body of Mrs. Fred Peterson who passed away at Blackfoot, of pneumonia following the influenza, was brought to the Basin last week for burial. Mrs. Petersen was formerly Miss Marilla Tracy, the daughter of Jas. F. and Betsy H. Tracy, both of whom reside here.

Mrs. Peterson had a host of friends in Basin, and she will be missed by all. She is survived by her husband, two children, one brother, and four sisters, besides her father and mother.

Some of the members of James Steel’s family have been ill.

The District School has closed for the winter term. Mrs. Leslie Koch gave a masquerade ball in meeting house on the closing day.
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Idaho Budget

Pocatello was jammed on April 16 with one of the biggest crowds in its history to view the war relics carried on the Victory special. A conservative estimate places the number who visited the train in the Gate city at 25,000.

A whirlwind with tendencies of a small cyclone swept through Middleton at noon Friday of last week, doing considerable damage to small buildings. A narrow strip diagonal through the town was affected.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 25 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. April 25, 1919, Page 5

Locals and Personals

Russell Gray has been ill with pneumonia.

Miss Mabel Mabey has had a severe cold this week. During her illness, Miss Zina Haight has been working at the Ladies Shop.

On and after Monday, April 27, all stock found on the streets will be taken in by the village and held for payment.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Idaho Republican. April 25, 1919, Page 1

19190425TIR1

Child Dies At Pingree

The three-months old baby of Tony Marks at Pingree passed away Sunday, a victim of pneumonia. Three months ago Tony Marks lost his wife who succumbed to an attack of influenza.
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Death of Infant

The seven months old baby of Mr. and Mrs. John H. Jensen of Blackfoot died last Friday morning of pneumonia. The child was sick for just a week.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 25 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. April 25, 1919, Page 2

19190425TIR2
Neglect and Carelessness of Our Troops
Chief Surgeon Charges That Officials Failed to Prevent Spread of Some Diseases
Many Instances Are Cited

Washington. — Charges of gross carelessness and negligence on the part of war department officials in failing to prevent or control the spread of typhoid and paratyphoid fevers in the American army in France during the war with Germany, are made by the chief surgeon of the expeditionary forces in a statement just issued.

Many instances are cited of epidemics among our troops, especially during the last offensives on the Western front, in spite of the fact that the occurrence and distribution of disease were constantly reported.

“It would appear,” the report says, “that many officers utterly failed to grasp the significance of these warnings, a fact which may be due to a false sense of security under the popular belief that vaccination against typhoid and paratyphoid gives complete immunity even in the midst of gross insanitary [sic] conditions. During the Chateau-Thierry offensive approximately 75 per cent of the troops were afflicted with diarrhea diseases. The high incidence of intestinal diseases in this sector was due to entire disregard of the rules of sanitation.”

(ibid, page 2)
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The Idaho Republican. April 25, 1919, Page 3

Moreland

Mr. and Mrs. Leavitt are suffering again with influenza. They also had a very severe attack last season. The little son Jimmie is ill also.

Mr. and Mrs. Chancey Christensen’s little son has the influenza. He is getting along as well as possible.

The England family are influenza sufferers this week.

(ibid, page 3)
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The Idaho Republican. April 25, 1919, Page 4

Upper Presto

Orson Davis, son of George Davis, is still very sick with typhoid fever; he has been ill three weeks and the entire community are wishing him a speedy recovery.

Mrs. Dave Crawford, of Emmett, Idaho is at the bedside of her brother Orson Davis, who is very ill.

(ibid, page 4)
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The Idaho Republican. April 25, 1919, Page 5

Local News

Miss Hay is at her place at the high school this week, after an attack of influenza.

Mr. Richmond of the high school faculty is not at school this week on account of illness.

C. E. Eichelberger is at his desk at the high school directing affairs once more this week, being the last one of his family to recover from the flu.

Miss Eula Palmer has been called to Grandview, near Payette, by the serious illness of her mother. In her absence Miss Lillian Christensen is acting clerk for Superintendent Vincent at the high school.
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Inland Northwest

Use of captive balloons, as well as airplanes in patrolling the forests of the west, to locate fires, and for fighting fires from the air, was predicted by Henry S. Graves, chief of the United States forest service, who attended a five-day conference at Spokane with district foresters from Missoula, Portland, Denver, San Francisco, Ogden and Albuquerque.
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Dyer Recovering at Ft. Douglas

Oma Dyer, who as with the troops in France, is expected home any day. Oma was in France in six weeks after he left Blackfoot with one of the draft contingents. He has been in the hospital for a long time mending up from injuries received by being stuck by a motor truck in the night when working behind the lines. While Oma was in the hospital in France his father was alone on the ranch and had a six weeks’ siege of the flu and nobody to care for him.

Oma is at the base hospital at Fort Douglas now, and the prospects for his early return home are bright.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Idaho Republican. April 25, 1919, Page 8

Sterling

Mrs. Charles Corbridge is very ill at the present writing.

The school attendance now is very small owing to the epidemic of mumps.

Willis Ward is ill with the mumps.
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Centerville

Mrs. C. I. Stone is nursing her mother Mrs. Spencer, who is quite sick this week.

J. W. Fay, who has been quite ill with the flu, is slowly improving.

Mrs. Berbst has been very sick with the flu for several weeks, but is now slowly improving.
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Presto

Miss Mabel Bennett is recovering from the influenza.

School was dismissed last Friday so that the kiddies could see the trophy train in Blackfoot.
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Groveland

Elmer Hale, just returned from the central states, is ill with an attack of malarial fever.
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19190425TIR3

(ibid, page 8)
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Shoshone Journal. April 25, 1919, Page 1

19190425SJ1

Dietrich – Besslin Notes

Mrs. Lewis Joy is reported to be ill with the flu, after much experience in attending to others, but is better now.

Mrs. Fred Rutherford and Mrs. J. H. Culbertson are recovering from a season of sickness they have recently suffered.

W. O. Hamilton has returned from his visit to Yakima, bringing with him his two oldest daughters, Helen and Ruth, who will live with him in his bereavement and doubtless assuage the grief of the stricken family.
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Big Wood River News

Jim Fullington is quite sick at this writing.

Mrs. A. L. Horn still continues in a very critical condition.

Mrs. Harvey Otis has been quite ill the past ten days with quinsy.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 25 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., April 25, 1919, Page 3

19190425DSM1

19190425DSM2
“Near Flu” Hits Palouse

Palouse is having an epidemic of something resembling the influenza of last winter, although the physicians say that it is not in nearly so virulent form. There have been perhaps 60 cases in the community during the week. With few exceptions the disease has been but little worse than a severe cold. — Palouse Republic.
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City News

Walter Nelson, who lives east of Moscow, is seriously ill with typhoid and meningitis.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 25 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Golden, Idaho

GoldenFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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April 26

Evening Capital News., April 26, 1919, Page 1

19190426ECN1

19190426ECN2
Women Comes To Life While Relatives Get Ready For Funeral

Paris, Texas, April 26. — Relatives of Mrs. R. P. Baker put away their mourning today. While they were making arrangements for Mrs. Baker’s funeral yesterday, following a report from Straford, Okla., she was dead there, a son, R. P. Baker, here, received a message from physicians that Mrs. Baker had “suddenly come to life.” The message said physicians had pronounced Mrs. Baker dead, but later it was discovered she was breathing. Today is was believed she will recover.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 26 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., April 26, 1919, Page 5

Around Boise Valley Loop

Star

Mrs. Bill Conner is reported ill at this writing.

The high school went on a picnic to Kuna cave Friday.

Caldwell

Mrs. C. L. Austin has been called east by the illness of her niece, Mrs. Guy Fields.

Middleton

Earl Bray, who has been seriously ill the past month, is reported some better, following an operation Wednesday.

Huston

The school election was held Monday afternoon. Carl Show was elected director. Only five persons voted.

(ibid, page 5)
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Evening Capital News., April 26, 1919, Page 6

St. Michael’s Cathedral

Rev. Alward Chamberlaine, Dean

… Many patients at the hospital were brightened and cheered by the potted Easter lilies from the altar of the cathedral. …

Our Sunday school made the splendid Easter offering of $400 for missions, as a result of their Lenton self denials. This is most excellent, considering the fact that for four months the school was closed by reason of the influenza, thereby causing more or less disorganization.

(ibid, page 6)
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Main Street, Gooding, Idaho

GoodingFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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April 27

Evening Capital News., April 27, 1919, Page 1

19190427ECN1

19190427ECN2
Woman Recovers After Sleeping Sickness Of More Than Two Months

Modesto, Calif., April 26. — After sleeping for more than two months, Miss Nora Miller of Cooperstown, California, has awakened and will recover from an attack of “sleeping sickness.” She is now apparently in good health.

Miss Miller was taken ill over two months ago at San Jose while attending school and slept practically all of the eight weeks. Her illness was preceded by an attack of influenza.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 27 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., April 27, 1919, Page 3

19190427ECN3
Major Maxey Home From Camp Sherman
Well Known Specialist Returns To Civilian Life After 20 Months in the Service – Battle Influenza.

“The battles against influenza, fought by the medical profession and nurses in the cantonments of this country, will go down in the history of this war with other famous battles fought on foreign soil”

This statement was made in substance today by Major Ed E. Maxey, the well known eye, throat, nose and ear specialist, who was among the first Boise physicians to enlist in the medical corps and who has been continuously in the service since August 9, 1917.

Dr. Maxey was first stationed for two weeks at the Boise barracks, then at Fort D. A. Russell at Cheyenne, Wyo., until January 25, 1918, after which he was transferred to the base hospital at Camp Sherman, Chillicothe, Ohio, as chief of the eye service and remained in that capacity until his discharge April 16.

Up to the first of the year, he states, the hospital reports showed that over 5000 eye cases had been treated in the hospital and since the first of the year, he states, 1000 overseas men have been treated there for eye trouble alone.

From September 15 to October 15, he states, during the month of influenza epidemic, the base hospital was cleared of every case not extremely serious, and 11,000 influenza patients were treated. As that there were 33,000 men at the camp, he says, and one-third of that number had the disease and approximately 1100 died.

Medical men and nurses worked hours and hours without rest, he stated, during that period and nothing that could be done was left undone for the boys who had enlisted to serve their country. Dr. Maxey found that most of the men stricken with influenza were new ones, men who had not been in camp to exceed 30 days, although there were a few exceptions.

Being at one of the big camps of the nation, Dr. Maxey was in a position to note the condition of many men and states that the training which they received in the camps has undoubtedly made more physically fit men in the country today than ever before, despite the number of wounded from overseas.

(ibid, page 3)
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Evening Capital News., April 27, 1919, Page 7

19190427ECN4
Mother Gets Facts About Death Of Son In Far Off Germany
Neal Melvin Buncel Died of Influenza – Buried on Hill Overlooking City of Coblenz Above Rhine.

Neal Marvin [sic] Buncel lies in a heroes grave overlooking the city of Coblenz and the river Rhine. He died from the dread malady, influenza, while in the service of his country. The facts concerning his death and burial are contained in a letter received Saturday by his mother, Mrs. Minnie E. O’Keefe of South Boise. He enlisted in the United States cavalry September 20, 1917, in Boise, reported to Fort Douglas and was sent to the Mexican border where he served until this country entered the war at which time he was transferred and sent to France. He was raised in Boise, attending the public schools and making this city his home up to the time of his enlistment.

Writing to Mrs. O’Keefe, Lieutenant Robert C. Knowlton, second cavalry, now stationed at Ehrenbreitstein, Germany, says:

“Your letter of February 27 addressed to First Lieutenant James S. Rodwell has been turned over to me for reply. The death of your son, Neal, touched all of us because of the admiration and esteem which we all had for him. Always obedient to duty, cheerful and fearless, he did much to keep up the esprit de corps of troop 1 during the days when life and death walked hand in hand; when many of us never believed that we would ever see the homes we had left again.

“He joined us on August 12, 1918, while we were in the woods near Arcis le Ponsart, near Fismes, and at which latter place we received our baptism of fire. He was with us, continually through the remainder of the Marne-Vesle offensive and during the Argonne-Meuse affair and marched into Germany when we formed the advance guard for the Third army. Since arriving at the Rhine we have been doing routine garrison duties much similar to what we would be doing if we were in the States.

Stricken With Flu

“During the months of January and February we were crippled by a serious influenza epidemic and it was a victim to this terrible malady that your son fell on January 28. He reported that he was not feeling very well and was marked quarters by the attending physician and his condition not being improved the next day he was evacuated to one of the Coblenz hospitals. I visited him a few days later and found him in one of the influenza wards in evacuation hospital No. 2. I talked with him and his nurse and though seriously ill, hopes of recovery were excellent. I am sure that he had the best of care, for this hospital occupies buildings which were formerly used by the Germans as a hospital and is well equipped in every way. The medical and nursing staff is unequaled in the A. E. F.

“The records of the hospital show that on February 3 he took a decided turn for the worse and was transferred to the pneumonia ward where he died on February 4. We received no news of his death until the 11th due to our poor mail service and consequently were not permitted to assist in the last rites. This has been a matter of sincere regret to all of us, for he was unusually popular and had many friends. He was respected by men and officers alike. I always felt that when I sent him on any special mission that it would be done in a faultless manner and that he wouldn’t return until it was properly done. We had confidence in his ability.

Buried Near Coblenz

“He was buried in a plot of ground on a hill overlooking the city of Coblenz and commanding a beautiful view of both the Rhine and Mosalie valleys.

This cemetery adjoins the one in which the captured prisoners of war were buried who died during the war of 1870. There are some 400 graves in the latter, all neatly arranged and marked. The American cemetery is being similarly laid out and all graves marked with the regulation cross and identification cards. We wanted to erect a suitable monument over his grave which is No. 169, but were informed that only a small headstone set flush with the top of the ground would be permitted in addition to the cross. At the captain’s request I took the matter in hand and ordered a polished dark grey granite headstone inscribed with Neal’s name, rank, serial number, organization and date of death. I personally supervised its erection and everything has been done that possibly could be done. There are already several hundred graves in this cemetery which is in the midst of a beautiful grove of hardwood trees. The hardest part of it all to me is that these men were denied death on the battlefield and unfortunately found their last resting place here.

“Whatever of Neal’s personal effects that are here you will receive in due time for the captain intends to handle the matter himself. You doubtless will receive what ever personal effects that he took to the hospital with him from the chaplain of that hospital.

“If I can be of any further service to you in this time of your sad bereavement, please feel at liberty to call upon me for anything within my power. Your loss is not entirely a personal one, but a loss to all who ever knew him.”
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19190427ECN5
Considering The Successor Of Smith
Vacancy on Bench of Seventh Judicial District Caused by Death – Six Well Known Lawyers Mentioned.

Governor Davis will not announce the successor to Judge Isaac N. Smith of the Seventh judicial district court bench, who died last week in Boise, until on or about May 5, it is announced. There are six men being seriously considered for the appointment at the present time. One of these six will likely be named. They are: Harry S. Wrothman of Emmett; Frank D. Ryan, F. B. Lloyd and B. S. Barry of Weiser; B. J. Dillon of Council and F. H. Lyon of Payette.

Judge Smith died after a lingering illness which started with influenza. He was originally appointed to the position of judge of the Seventh judicial district by Governor Alexander after the legislature two years ago passed an act providing for two judges of that district, the legal work of which is becoming very heavy. Judge Ed. L. Bryan is the other presiding judge. A bill was passed by the last legislature, but vetoed by Governor Davis, seeking to create the Eleventh district out of the Seventh, confining it to Adams and Washing counties. …

The vacancy caused on the Seventh judicial district court bench by the death of Judge Smith makes possible the first judicial appointment by Idaho’s new chief executive.
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South Boise

The two young sons of C. J. Matthews are ill with influenza.

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Scheer received word this week that their son, Charles, who is in the navy, is ill with pneumonia.

(ibid, page 7)
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Evening Capital News., April 27, 1919, Page 11

Around Boise Valley Loop

Caldwell

Harry Hargrove, the local real estate man, who has been quite ill the past month, is reported to be much improved.

Mrs. W. A. Stone, who is under medical treatment in a Boise hospital, is reported to be much improved.

(ibid, page 11)
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Main Street, Grace, Idaho ca. 1913

Grace1913Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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April 28

Evening Capital News., April 28, 1919, Page 6

19190428ECN1

Mountain Home

Mrs. Electa G. Rhodes is quite ill at her home with the influenza.

Mrs. Ernest W. Latimore is quite ill at her home.

Mrs. Albert White, who is ill at St. Luke’s hospital in Boise, is reported to be improving rapidly.

Bill Blackman, who has been ill for some time at the Stanfield hospital, has fully recovered and is able to be out again.
— —

Maple Grove

Mrs. Marion Pfost was called to Meridian Friday by the illness of her mother, Mrs. George Powell.

Kathryn and Helen, children of Jas. Madsen, have been quite ill the past week, but are reported better.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 28 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., April 28, 1919, Page 7

Little News of Boise

Health Officer Out

L. P. Pfirman, deputy city health officer, who had influenza late in November is still suffering from after “flu” effects and is just out again after 14 days at home. Mr. Pfirman states he did not regain his strength after being sick, but kept on the job for a long time, thinking he would get all right, but finally was taken sick again.

For Soldiers and Sailors

Dr. E. G. Cox, vocational advisor for the federal board for vocational education, will be at the Red Cross rooms, 709 Idaho street, Thursday and until noon Friday. It is announced that the government has made splendid provision for all men who are entitled to compensation for any disability and whether or not such men have had previous advice or hospital treatment, they are requested to see Dr. Cox and present their case as they will learn just what can be done for them.

(ibid, page 7)
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Main Street, Grangeville, Idaho (1)

GrangevilleFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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April 29

Evening Capital News., April 29, 1919, Page 3

19190429ECN1

Drink A Glass Of Real Hot Water Before Breakfast
Says we will both look and feel clean, sweet and fresh and avoid illness

Sanitary science has of late made rapid strides with results that are of untold blessings to humanity. The latest application of its untiring research is the recommendation that it is as necessary to attend to internal sanitation of the drainage system of the human body as it is to the drains of the house.

Those of us who are accustomed to feel dull and heavy when we arise, splitting headache, stuffy from a cold, foul tongue, nasty breath, acid stomach, can, instead, feel as fresh as a daisey [sic] by opening the sluices of the system each morning and flushing out the whole of the internal poisonous stagnant matter.

Everyone, whether ailing, sick or or well, should each morning before breakfast, drink a glass of real hot water with a teaspoonful of limestone phosphate in it to wash from the stomach, liver and bowels the previous day’s indigestible waste, sour bile and poisonous toxins; thus cleaning, sweetening and purifying the entire alimentary canal before putting more food into the stomach. The action of hot water and limestone phosphate on an empty stomach is wonderfully invigorating. It cleans out all the sour fermentations gases, waste and acidity and gives one a splendid appetite for breakfast. While you are enjoying your breakfast the phosphated hot water is quietly extracting a large volume of water from the blood and getting ready for a thorough flushing of all the inside organs.

The millions of people who are bothered with constipation, bilious spells, stomach trouble, rheumatic stiffness; others who have sallow skins, blood disorders and sickly complexions are urged to get a quarter pound of limestone phosphate from the drug store. This will cost very little, but is sufficient to make anyone a pronounced crank on the subject of internal sanitation. — Adv.
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Labor Clauses of Treaty Announced
Eight-hour Day, Equal Pay for Men and Women and Right of Organization Among the Leading Principles

Washington, April 29. — Labor clauses adopted by the Paris conference yesterday for insertion in the peace treaty were announced by the state department today.

The clauses declare that the wellbeing of the wage earners is of supreme national importance and declare for the right of organization by labor, an eight-our day, and equal pay for women and men, among other reforms for which labor has fought.

The following principles are regarded as of special and urgent importance:

First – The guiding principle that labor should not be regarded merely as a commodity or article of commerce.

Second – The right of association for all lawful purposes by the employed as well as by the employers.

Third – Payment to the employed of a wage adequate to maintain a reasonable standard of life, as this is understood in their time and country.

Fourth – Adoption of an eight-hour day or a 48-hour week as the standard to be aimed at where it has not already been obtained.

Fifth – Adoption of a weekly rest of at least 24 hours which should include Sunday, whenever practicable.

Sixth – Abolition of child labor and the imposition of such limitations on the labor of young persons as shall permit the continuation of their education and assure their proper physical development.

Seventh – The principle that men and women should receive equal remuneration for work of equal value.

Eighth – The standard set by law in each country with respect to the conditions of labor should have due regard for the equitable economic treatment of all workers lawfully residents therein.

Each state should make provision for a system of inspection in which women should take part in order to insure the enforcement of the laws and regulations for the protection of the employed.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 29 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., April 29, 1919, Page 7

Around Boise Valley Loop

Star

Birdie Smith is reported ill at this writing.

There will be an examination of children up to six years of age Wednesday the 30th. The child welfare committee is sending Mrs. Keener of Boise to have charge of the meeting and all mothers of this district are urged to bring the children. The examination will be held at the home of Mrs. J. T. Ohl beginning at 12 o’clock.

Caldwell

Harry Hargrove, the local real estate man, who has been quite ill the past two weeks, has sufficiently recovered to be at his office again.

Nampa

Mrs. H. A. Partridge has returned from Wisconsin, where she was called some two weeks since by the illness of her mother, who she left much improved.

(ibid, page 7)
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Evening Capital News., April 29, 1919, Page 8

Holcomb

Mr. Hicks has had a recurrence of the “flu” but is reported better now.

Mr. and Mrs. A. Bahler and son George were sick with the “flu” for some time, but are now able to be out.

Marion Prickett is very sick with typhoid fever at his home here.

(ibid, page 8)
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The Idaho Republican. April 29, 1919, Page 5

19190429TIR1

Local News

George Dore, of the Central Meat Market, is ill this week and confined to his home. Dr. Mitchell is in attendance.

Books on the war at the public library in the city hall at Blackfoot.
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Attention

Beginning with April 30, and regular once a month thereafter, there will be given at the Progress hall, a dancing party free to all returned soldiers and sailors. This will continue until all have returned who have been in the service of Uncle Sam.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 29 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. April 29, 1919, Page 6

Soldier’s Letters

April 1, 1919

My dear friend Mrs. Woody:

It affords me great pleasure to take the liberty of writing you a few lines. I received your note attached to the letter you wrote your boy Thomas, and I certainly appreciate your kind words. You are the mother of a good boy, who has proved himself a man in every way. Thru him you have won my friendship and great love for a mother.

My mother is still living, but she has been in bed nearly all winter with the flu. As she is getting old I have been much worried about her.

It is six years since I saw her last. My father died two years ago, I see Thomas received another letter from you, and I noticed where you stated how you were looking forward to the day when he would be home. Now you must not grow impatient. We are all anxious to get home and be with our loved one once more, but we must wait until our turn comes. That is a part of our sacrifice, which we had to make in this war. We know the folks at home have no great hardships to contend with, and that knowledge helps us to keep up our spirit, so many miles from you. We are all coming home. How soon I don’t know, but it won’t be long.

At present we are in La Mans. Our next move will be to a sea port, which we expect to make in another two weeks. I have reasons to believe Thomas an I will be mustered out in Camp Lewis. Should that be the case I may be able to pay you folks a short visit and I would be very glad to do that. I also expect to visit my folks in Oklahoma and after that return to California to take up my work that I left when drafted into the army.

I must close for this time, trusting to hear from you again.

Your sincere friend, Pvt. Paul Streller
— —

Bellboy Left Estate

William Spanton, a bellboy, who died recently at San Francisco, from influenza, leaves an estate of more than $10,000, according to Tommy West, the head bellboy, who was with Spanton when he died. Spanton was the oldest employee in the bellboy department. Spanton’s estate is the result of his earnings in tips.

(ibid, page 6)
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The Idaho Republican. April 29, 1919, Page 7

Goshen

Orson Davis, eighteen year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Davis of Presto, who has been sick with complications, which could not be explained by the several doctors called in, died Thursday morning, April 24, at 3 a.m.

Wednesday, April 23 a fierce storm reached Goshen blowing down trees and the lighting [sic] killed one fresh milk cow and calf for George Summers and two milk cows for Henry Bolander.

Sand creek is over flowing her banks and making the road to Shelley very bad.
— —

Upper Presto

Lightning Wednesday killed five head of cattle belonging to Mr. Sommers north of Sand creek.

(ibid, page 7)
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The Idaho Republican. April 29, 1919, Page 8

Lavaside

Rex Nelson has been on the sick list all week. Deaun Nelson was also sick the latter part of the week.

O. W. Fraker is feeling fine since his accident. He worries because he is getting a rest tho.

The old white school house has completed its second journey. Thursday afternoon sixteen head of horses took the building up to Hiram Gardner’s dry farm. Mr. Gardner expects to use it for a barn. About ten years ago, the house was moved from where the church now stands. It served its purpose well and gave place recently to a splendid brick building. Now that the building is removed Lavaside expects to have a clean up day soon and then the general appearance will be more school like.
— —

Sterling

W. R. Leach is very ill at the present writing.

Alvin Partridge is on the sick list this week.

Ella May Hays is ill with an attack of the mumps.

The small son of Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Ward is quite ill with the mumps.
— —

Mothers’ Day

The day set aside for all sons and daughters in the nation to honor “The best mother who ever lived” will soon be long, the second Sunday in May. Churches give something special in their services on that day, schools celebrate the day on Friday, and business people observe it on Saturday.

“Mothers’ Day” was first made a national holiday by a proclamation on Saturday, May 9, 1914. It was originally intended that on that day fathers should come in for a share of attentions, but it became solely a mothers’ day, and another day was therefore dated for fathers.

It is customary on Mothers’ Day for sons and daughters to write or send remembrances, such as flowers, to their mothers. A year ago the army got together on the movement and almost put the mail service out of commission. The white carnation is the official flower of the day.

(ibid, page 8)
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Gifford, Idaho

GiffordFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

April 30

Evening Capital News., April 30, 1919, Page 4

19190430ECN1

19190430ECN2Attorney General Again Rules On The School Flu Question

In an opinion to Dr. E. A. Bryan, commissioner of education, relative to the collection of tuition for high schools during the period when students were forced to be absent from schools, Attorney General Black says:

“We are of the opinion that the law contemplates no tuition shall be collected save for the actual time a pupil is in attendance at school, except that fractions of a month are counted as a full month. We do not think the reason for closing the schools (the flu) affects this question.”

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 30 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., April 30, 1919, Page 6

Lake Lowell

Mr. and Mrs. Everett Coon’s baby died Saturday evening at 5:30 of pneumonia following influenza.

Several families of this vicinity attended the funeral of the Coon baby Sunday. It died Saturday at 5:30.

Mr. G. H. Davis’s mother is recovering from influenza.

(ibid, page 6)
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Evening Capital News., April 30, 1919, Page 8

19190430ECN3

(ibid, page 8)
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Further Reading

Don’t Forget to Drink Your Limestone!

By Ruth Kendall Special to the Chickasaw Journal Aug 23, 2019

For some time now, I have searched for facts about an old limestone mine, or quarry, located west of Okolona, south of Hwy. 32. I know it was there – it was begun about 1916-17 and was a project of the “Mississippi Penitentiary Board”. Seems there was a deposit of limestone there and farmers throughout the country were being urged to use crushed limestone on their fields to enrich the soil. State prisoners operated the ‘mine’ where the limestone was crushed and loaded on boxcars to be taken to various destinations for sale. I would search awhile, get tired of the hunt then go on to something else. Recently in my search of old newspapers I kept getting a hit on “limestone” but not the rocks – but what we need to be drinking every day.

I kid you not. It will, as they used to say, cure anything that ails you! I did find one article that gave more of a historical/scientific view of it. It said that “the largest and least expensive source of phosphate is obtained by mining and concentrating phosphate rock from the numerous phosphate deposits of the world. Some phosphate rock is used to make calcium phosphate nutritional supplements for animals. Virtually all common fertilizers today have an “N-P-K” rating. Phosphate is the “P” and it helps plants capture the sun’s energy and begins the photosynthesis process.”

Now, on to the more interesting uses of limestone. An ad in 1917 reads “Drink Hot Water Before Breakfast Every Morning”. Continuing, it reads “Why is man and woman half the time feeling nervous, despondent, worried, some days headachy, dull and unstrung; some days really incapacitated by illness. If we all would practice the drinking of phosphated hot water before breakfast, what a gratifying change would take place. Instead of thousands of half-sick, anemic looking souls with pasty, muddy complexions, we would see crowds of happy, healthy, rosy-cheeked people everywhere.”

The next paragraph was not so appetizing to read, but for what it’s worth: “The reason is that the human system does not rid itself each day of all the waste it accumulates under our present mode of living. For every ounce of food and drink taken into the system, nearly an ounce of waste material must be carried out, else it ferments and forms ptomaine-like poisons in the bowels, which are absorbed into the bowels.”

And did you know you had “sluices” in your system? Neither did I until I read an ad in the Winona Times dated 25 February, 1921. The ad read that we could “open sluices of the system each morning and wash away the poisonous stagnant matter.” Continuing, the article reads: “Those of us who are accustomed to feel dull and heavy when we arise; splitting headache, stuffy from a cold, foul tongue, nasty breath, acid stomach, lame back, can, instead both look and feel as fresh as a daisy always by washing the poisons and toxins from the body with phosphate hot water each morning.” I am sure I did not need to know that I had all these conditions ‘cause this ad continues by telling me that this phosphated water “cleans out all the sour fermentations, gases, waste and acidity and gives one a splendid appetite for breakfast and it is said to be but a little while until the roses begin to appear in the cheeks.”

Then, an ad in the Winona Times on April 8, 1921, we are told if we “wake up with a bad taste, bad breath and tongue is coated; if your head is dull or aching; if what you eat sours and forms gas and acid in stomach, or you are bilious constipated, nervous, sallow and can’t get feeling just right, begin inside bathing. Drink before breakfast a glass of real hot water with a teaspoon of limestone phosphate in it. Or if you want to “feel like young folks feel, like you felt before your blood, nerves and muscles became loaded with body impurities, get from your pharmacist a quarter pound of limestone phosphate which is inexpensive and almost tasteless, except for a sourish twinge which is not unpleasant. Just as soap and hot water act on the skin, cleansing, sweetening and freshening, so hot water and limestone phosphate act on the stomach, liver, kidneys and bowels.”

In the Vicksburg Herald on March 15, 1918, we are told if we want to feel as “fine as the proverbial fiddle, we must keep the liver washed clean, almost every morning, to prevent its sponge-like pores from clogging with indigestible material, sour bile and poisonous toxins, says a noted physician. Oddly enough, we are not told who this noted physician is. This ad goes on to say “if you get headaches, it’s your liver. If you catch cold easily, it’s your liver. If you wake up with a bad taste, furred tongue, nasty breath or stomach becomes rancid, it’s your liver. Sallow skin, muddy complexion, watery eyes all denote liver uncleanliness. Of course the ad goes on to tell us if we will just drink that glass of hot water with a teaspoon of limestone phosphate every morning, all our medicinal problems will vanish.

Now I ask you – why is it that we of the present generation have missed out on this wonderful bit of knowledge? What happened to it? Was it so effective and wonderful that those who came before us drank all the available limestone phosphate up, glass by glass all across this country and left us to our present misery? And another thing, as I read these ads, first from local newspapers, then I began to search and search. I found, from about 1916 to at least 1935, these ads appeared in EVERY state in this nation, plus Manitoba, British Columbia and Saskatchewan in Canada, Northern Ireland, Ireland, Scotland and England! Somebody was making a tub full of money from the lowly limestone phosphate. Who knew?

source: Chickasaw Journal
— — — —

HotWaterLimestonePhosphate

— — — — — — — — — —

Paratyphoid fever

Paratyphoid fever, also known simply as paratyphoid, is a bacterial infection caused by one of the three types of Salmonella enterica. Symptoms usually begin 6–30 days after exposure and are the same as those of typhoid fever. Often, a gradual onset of a high fever occurs over several days. Weakness, loss of appetite, and headaches also commonly occur. Some people develop a skin rash with rose-colored spots. Without treatment, symptoms may last weeks or months. Other people may carry the bacteria without being affected; however, they are still able to spread the disease to others. Typhoid and paratyphoid are of similar severity. Paratyphoid and typhoid fever are types of enteric fever.

Paratyphoid is caused by the bacterium Salmonella enterica of the serotypes Paratyphi A, Paratyphi B, or Paratyphi C growing in the intestines and blood. They are usually spread by eating or drinking food or water contaminated with the feces of an infected person. They may occur when a person who prepares food is infected. Risk factors include poor sanitation as is found among poor crowded populations. Occasionally, they may be transmitted by sex. Humans are the only animals infected. Diagnosis may be based on symptoms and confirmed by either culturing the bacteria or detecting the bacterial DNA in the blood, stool, or bone marrow. Culturing the bacteria can be difficult. Bone-marrow testing is the most accurate. Symptoms are similar to that of many other infectious diseases. Typhus is a different disease.

While no vaccine is available specifically for paratyphoid, the typhoid vaccine may provide some benefit. Prevention includes drinking clean water, better sanitation, and better handwashing.

continued: Wikipedia
— — — — — — — — — —

Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic

1918Atlantic29-a

Volunteer nurses from the American Red Cross tend to influenza patients in the Oakland Municipal Auditorium, used as a temporary hospital in 1918. Edward A. “Doc” Rogers / Library of Congress via AP

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
—————–

Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)