Idaho History Apr 11, 2021

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 52

Idaho Newspaper clippings May 1-7, 1919

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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May 1

Payette Enterprise., May 01, 1919, Page 1

19190501PE1

Personal and Local Mention

Mrs. A. I. McClanahan who has been quite ill for the last ten days is now improving and will soon be out again.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 01 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Payette Enterprise., May 01, 1919, Page 5

North Payette

Nurse Fay Lauer has charge of the cases of influenza at the W. Beeson home.
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Fruitland Department

Mrs. R. G. Wilson

Mr. R. S. Kutch had a light attack of pneumonia last week. We are glad to report that he is better now.

Miss Pearl Eby is teaching in Miss Goldie Wells’ place as Miss Wells is on the sick list.

Many of Fruitland’s young ladies who have been teaching are returning to their homes now. since the school term is over.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Nezperce Herald., May 01, 1919, Page 4

19190501NH1

Central Ridge News

Mrs. L. D. Parsons is on the sick list.

Ida Frederickson has the scarlet fever.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 01 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Nezperce Herald., May 01, 1919, Page 7

Local and Personal News Notes

The many friends of Clay Smith were glad to greet him on the streets last week, after his recent severe illness. Clay is working into condition for a real fishing trip just as soon as the law allows the removal of the lid from this wholesome sport.

(ibid, page 7)
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The Nezperce Herald., May 01, 1919, Page 8

Central Ridge News

A. K. Tweedy and Donald Coon were on the sick list a few days, but are better now.

The Central Ridge school closed Friday with a basket dinner and Miss Wright will start for her home at St. Maries.

(ibid, page 8)
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Gilmore, Idaho

GilmoreFrtz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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May 2

Evening Capital News., May 02, 1919, Page 5

19190502ECN1

Operation Upon Mrs. Venable Is Postponed

Washington, May 1. — Mrs. Earl Venable who entered Mayo’s hospital at Rochester, Minn., two weeks ago for an operation will not be operated upon for some time, according to a letter received by friends here from Mr. Venable. After arriving at Rochester, Mr. and Mrs. Venable and their little daughter were all taken ill with influenza and suffered rather seriously for a period. All are on the road to recovery now, but Mrs. Venable will be given time to regain her normal strength before submitting to surgical treatment.

Mr. and Mrs. Venable formerly lived at Payette and Boise.
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Kuna

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Neglay is recovering from his second attack of “flu.”

Hearing a noise, David Painter got up Monday night to investigate. He but recently recovered from pneumonia, and when he got to the head of the stairs he fainted and pitched, head foremost, down the stairs. Mrs. Painter heard the fall and no other sound and she too fainted away, but chose a more convenient place to faint in. Both came to in a short time and Mr. Painter suffered nothing more serious than a bruised hip and head.

Little Grace Allen’s condition is still critical. She has been removed from the hospital to the home of a friend in Boise.

Mrs. Fred Hale, who has been very ill for the past week, is still in a serious condition.
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Goat Milk Offered State For Use Of Its Patients In the Tuberculosis Hospitals

Possessing not one goat, but a herd of 55, E. R. Swindler of Banks, Idaho, believes that the milk produced by his horned and whiskered charges is peculiarly adapted to the needs of the patients who will receive treatment at the state’s two prospective tuberculosis hospitals.

Mr. Swindler has written to Commissioner J. K. White of the public welfare department lauding the value of the goats’ milk as a tuberculosis specific and asking for information as to the probable location of the Idaho hospitals.

Having received the information that the appropriation for the state sanitarium will not be available until January of next year, this Idaho herder of Swiss Toggenburgs probably will transfer his allegiance to another state, since increases in the flock have made a change of scenery necessary.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 02 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., May 02, 1919, Page 9

Stake Conference To Be Held By Mormons Saturday And Sunday

President Heber Q. Hale of the Boise stake of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, arrived in Boise today from the eastern part of the state to hold stake conference here Saturday and Sunday. This is the first conference held in nine months, the November and February conferences having been postponed on the account of the influenza epidemic. Advices received at the state office show conditions much improved throughout the stake which extends from Minidoka to Huntington. A large out-of-town representation is expected. …

(ibid, page 9)
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Clearwater Republican. May 02, 1919, Page 5

19190502CR1

What Your Friends and Neighbors Are Doing

Miss Lillie Simpson departed for Palouse, Wash., Tuesday morning to nurse her sister, Mrs. Charles Hughes, who is ill with influenza.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 02 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. May 02, 1919, Page 1

19190502IR1

M. D. Merritt is up and about again after a severe flu attack in Salmon, expecting to return to Forney soon.
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This Star Route Man Has Strenuous Time With Snow

Ferrill Terry, star route contractor on the Leesburg-Forney-Salmon stage lines, experienced teamster that he is, is having the time of his life this spring getting over the Leesburg snow. On one trip over last week night overtook one of his teams on the mountain. Lester Withington was the driver. Passengers tell of the heroic efforts to get through where in places the horses are off their feet half the time wallowing and slipping and sliding in the snow. With all the hindrances from this cause, the business of the line has steadily increased until now the daily offering of freight will run around 5000 lbs. per trip besides numerous passengers going and coming. Mr. Terry is putting on all the horses that can be secured to maintain the services.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 02 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. May 02, 1919, Page 2

75,344 Yanks Die in War

Washington, April 24. — Revised casualty totals announced by the war department placed the total of dead in the army and marine corps at 75,344, of which 33,887 were killed in action. Prisoners reported were 4,791, including 15 reported now held by the bolsheviki. Of prisoners previously held by the central powers the records now show 281 died during internment and 218 [?] of doubtful status. The grand total of wounded in the list is 201,230, of whom it is estimated more than 85 per cent returned to duty.

(ibid, page 2)
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The Idaho Recorder. May 02, 1919, Page 6

System That Was Used In Mustering Out Our Army Men
Chief of Staff Says Home Folks Do Not Understand Methods
Big Problems To Solve
Why the Old Draft Boards Could No Be Used – Prevision Supplied for All Those in Distress – Bonus Given to Discharged Men

Washington – The war department authorizes the following statement from the office of the chief of staff:

The present system of demobilization does not seem to be understood by the people of the country. As a fundamental starting point, let us assume that all the selected service men who have been inducted into the service during the war were removed from their home communities at one time, and that upon their departure, and until their return conditions of labor and industry did not change in the slightest respect in any portion of the country. Again let us assume that the conditions of labor and industry having remained exactly the same, all these selected service men were returned at the same moment to the niches previously held by them in civil life. Under such assumptions the entire operation would have been performed without the slightest jar to the industrial conditions of the country.

This would be an ideal condition, but it is based on an utterly absurd hypothesis. The selected service men were not all inducted into the service at one time. Nor did the conditions of labor and industry remain unchanged after their departure from their home districts.

Tremendous Problem

Could the history of each particular job from which employed men had been withdrawn be traced, could it be discovered whether the job remained open to him or whether A’s job had been filled by B; could it be definitely ascertained that B left a job which remains open to A; it might be possible, were these returning men so many spare parts of a machine, to assign each returning man a definite job. But they are not spare parts of a machine. They are human beings, influenced on the one hand by home ties, and on the other by varying desires and ambitions; and if no positions which they want are immediately open to them, they, as well as the original unemployed, must be gradually absorbed in the industrial life of the nation.

This, then, is the tremendous problem that confronts us – to return to a country whose digestion for labor is not now of the best hundred of thousands of men without employment, not forgetting that they and their families deserve the grateful thanks of the nation, and remaining keenly aware that their patriotism and sacrifice demand that they be given every possible recognition and favor.

Certain Specific Laws

As certain specific laws govern the discharge of soldiers, and their interests as well as those of the government must be jealously guarded, the use of local draft boards for the entire demobilization of the army would, among other things, involve the following: Necessary commissioned and enlisted personnel for the preparation of all records of each man discharged; for the reception, storing, care and shipment of all government equipment turned in by him; for his physical examination and final payment. There would also be needed facilities for housing and feeding men, including hospital treatment, while awaiting discharge.

The machinery necessary at each one of the local draft boards would depend upon the amount of work which it would be required to do. About 1,680 [?] local draft boards would have to be provided with this necessary personnel and other facilities mentioned above. The machinery of each local draft board would have to be maintained intact as long as there were in the service men from the particular district involved, and would have to be kept at such strength as to be able to handle such men as were sent to it for discharge at any time.

The difficulties of transportation from the port to local draft boards, assuming the abandonment of the present demobilization camps, would be materially increased.

The question then arises: If local draft boards cannot be used for complete discharge of the soldier, cannot they be used in conjunction with present camps? And the answer is that it is not feasible.

The present system of demobilization is that certain camps and cantonments throughout the country have been designated as demobilization centers. These centers are provided with personnel, temporarily retained in the service, for the operation of the machinery of discharge. This system of demobilization necessitates the splitting up of organizations upon arrival from overseas and their distribution in small groups to the various demobilization centers.

Experience of Other Nations

The suggestion has been made that we pattern our demobilization system after that of Great Britain. The United Sates, in formulating its plans for mobilization, was fortunate enough to have profited by some of the costly experiences of others, and by a systematic classification prevented men from being sent to the trenches who later had to be withdrawn and returned to industries essential to the prosecution of the war. In carrying out its systematic draft system, the tendency was to retain in the industrial world the pivotal or key men, the return of whom to their normal activities in the industrial world appears to be one of the outstanding principles in the British demobilization system. The war department has consistently declined to discharge out selected service men by classes, the needs of industry having been recognized in the selective service law.

In many families distress exists. Certain men are indispensable to industry. To enable such men to be released, the war department has issued a circular to all commanders covering their cases.

The secretary of war has also recommended to congress that a man be paid an additional month’s pay and allowance on discharge in order to tide him over the interim between his discharge and the date he obtains employment; and congress has now passed a bill authorizing a $60 bonus to be paid on discharge to each officer and man who is honorably separated from the service.

Some dissatisfaction has arisen because families find it difficult to immediately see their sons and relatives on their arrival at the port of debarkation. This is due to the fact that public health demands that these men be segregated until they can be disinfected, in order to prevent the spread of diseases, such as typhus, trench fever and influenza, in the country. Also practical conditions connected with the handling and discharge of large bodies of men demand that they be sent after their disinfection direct to their demobilization points.

This all seems hard, and being a difficult practical problem, is of necessity entirely devoid of sentiment, which is, however, continually impelling those intrusted [sic] with the carrying out of these measures to devise some way of showing the soldier the esteem in which he is held by the country, and of satisfying the just pride which his family possesses in his exploits.

There is a general belief that the emergency has passed, that the war is over, and that there is no reason for keeping troops in France. The war is not over until a treaty of peace ends it.

The emergency cannot be considered over until the last of our troops arrive from France. What could we say to these men and their families if we demobilized all troops in this country and were powerless to care for and return to their home districts the men returning from overseas?

Troops much be kept in France for such army of occupation as may be decreed by the treaty of peace, and for every division held there to clinch the fruits of victory must be kept a certain proportion of men for their supply, to provide measures for their comfort and for their final embarkation.

(ibid, page 6)
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The Idaho Recorder. May 02, 1919, Page 8

Lemhi

Dorothy, the winsome little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Don Pyeatt, was quite ill for a few days last week.

The infant son of Ranger Huestis has been critically ill at the home of his grandparents in Indiana, where Mrs. Huestis has been visiting, while her husband was in the army.

(ibid, page 8)
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Montpelier Examiner. May 02, 1919, Page 1

19190502ME1

19190502ME2Rolla Orchard A Victim Of Influenza

From the last issue of a Tooele, Utah, paper we clip the following account of the death of a former Montpelier boy:

Rolla Francis, the 17-year old boy of Francis H. and Emma Orchard, succumbed to the “flu” early Wednesday morning after an illness for over a week. For several days he had been hovering between life and death and it was thought that his wonderful vitality might finally pull him through, but he succumbed after a hard fight for life. Deceased was born at Montpelier, Idaho, on January 1, 1902. His father has been employed as an engineer on the Tooele Valley Ry. for the past four years. Last June the family moved from Montpelier to make their home in Tooele.

The funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at two o’clock at the cemetery.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 02 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. May 02, 1919, Page 5

Local News

Word has been received here that William M. Mathison of Ovid, is one of the eight Idaho boys who are now in hospitals in New York City.

During the past week a number of Montpelier boys who served in the army have been receiving $60, the sum allowed all discharged soldiers, from the government.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Idaho Republican. May 02, 1919, Page 1

19190502TIR1

Church Conference To Hold First June Week

The semi-annual conference of the church of Latter Day Saints, postponed this spring because of the epidemic of flu, will be held the first week in June.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 02 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. May 02, 1919, Page 3

Taber

Little Lillie Zeck, who has been ill for the past five weeks, is improving.

Mrs. Herman Steffsen motored to Pingree Wednesday and brought her daughter Elvera home. She was very ill with tonsillitis.

Moreland

The William England family are rapidly recovering from the flu.
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Little Girl’s Hard Life
She Has Had Influenza, Pneumonia and Abscesses on Her Lungs

Ill luck seems to be the portion of little Marie Davis, not yet six years of age, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bert Davis, who live in the country near Fostoria, Ohio. Influenza, pneumonia, abscessed lungs, necessitating an operation, is the record of the little girl within the past two weeks.

But that is not all. Marie is known throughout this section of the country for her sad experience with burglars when she was still a baby. Burglars visited the Davis home at midnight several years ago, and the father hearing them, arose and surprised them at their work. Mr. Davis lit a lamp and a burglar shot it out.

During the interchange of shots one bullet grazed the cheek of the sleeping Marie, putting a gash three inches long, which has left a disfiguring scare.

(ibid, page 3)
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The Idaho Republican. May 02, 1919, Page 5

Local News

W. Keith Snyder, Mrs. Snyder and the two children are down with what seems [to be] influenza. All are recovering but Mr. Snyder, who Tuesday and Wednesday night was in a high fever.

Amos Taylor and his wife came from Grouse to Blackfoot Wednesday. Mrs. Taylor in very weak condition, after an attack of the influenza. They are at the home of C. S. Beebe, where she may receive constant attention. Mrs. Beebe is a sister of Amos Taylor.

George Dore has recovered from his recent illness and is able to be out again.

Miss Eula Palmer returned Sunday from Grandview, where she was called on account of the serious illness of her mother, who was somewhat improved at the time of her return.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Idaho Republican. May 02, 1919, Page 8

School Affairs Are Looked Into

[This is the reply from the school board of trustees to a petition questioning school dances from page 1.]

Answer of the Board

Beg to submit, first, in answer to the paragraph regarding the holding of dances in the exhibition room in the new technical building;

At the January meeting of the board of trustees, shortly after school was commenced after the intermission during the influenza epidemic, the board requested all of the high school scholars to [refrain] from dances for a period of one month. This was done upon advice of the physicians of Blackfoot, as in their opinion at that time they thought that the dances were causing the spreading of the influenza, and if this request was complied with, the board would grant them the privilege to hold dances in the exhibition room of said building. At this time, the question of allowing dances in the exhibition hall was thoroly [sic] discussed by all members of the board, and each individual member of the board expressing himself as being of the opinion that it would be better to have the high school scholars dance under the proper chaperonage of teachers and parents of the school in this building, than have them at public dances. Upon investigation, it was found that this custom has been and is now being followed by many of the schools thruout [sic] the state.

It is also the opinion of the board, based on personal interviews, that a large majority of the patrons of the independent school district No. 8 favor occasional week-end dancing parties being held in this building.

Upon investigation, we find that attendance to these dances has not been compulsory, and that a dance is given due publicity so that schalors [sic] may know whether there is going to be a dance or a party. We recommend that the superintendent prepare cards to be filled in by each parent and state whether or not they wish their child or children to attend these properly chaperoned dances in the school building. …

(ibid, page 8)
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The Meridian Times., May 02, 1919, Page 2

19190502MT1

News Of A Week In Condensed Form
Record Of The Important Events Told In Briefest Manner Possible
Happenings That Are Making History – Information Gathered from All Quarters of the Globe and Given in a Few Lines

Washington

Revised casualty totals announced by the war department placed the total of dead in the army and marine corps at 75,344, of whom 33,887 were killed in action.

Full suffrage for all American women for the 1920 elections is foreshadowed in a statement authorized Sunday by Senator Charles Curtis of Kansas, the Republican whip, Senator Curtis said that both houses of congress will pass the amendment as soon as they reconvene.

Foreign

Great loss of life among the natives of the Belgian Congo as a result of an influenza epidemic is reported in dispatches received at Brussels. Some estimates place the number of deaths at 500,000.

The first panic over rabies in twenty-one years is spreading through England. Several cases developed in the country recently and two were discovered in London in the last week.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 02 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., May 02, 1919, Page 8

Meridian Local News

S. H. Griffiths who has been ill at his home is improving.

Harry E. Waid, teacher of manual training at the Meridian high school had the end of his thumb cut off, in an accident Thursday, while at class work.

(ibid, page 8)
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Grand Forks, Idaho

GrandForksFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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May 3

Evening Capital News., May 03, 1919, Page 4

19190503ECN1

What You Ought to Know of How to Stop Bleeding

By Dr. Leonard Keene Hirshberg A.B., M.A., M.D. (Johns Hopkins University)

If you are suddenly confronted with a bloody nose, a hemorrhage of the lungs, or, for that matter, violent bleeding at any fountain head of your anatomy, would you act quickly and correctly to check it, or would you “try to think” what to do, as pints of blood flowed freely and your very life ebbed away?

Man may be fearfully and wonderfully made, yet the loss of two [sic] much blood turns him to dust and a shadow. Yes, a ruddy drop of manly blood outweighs the surging sea. You can ill afford to lose any of it.

While it is true that an ordinarily healthy individual will seldom lose much blood by virtue of the innate tendency of normal blood to congeal, there are, nevertheless, periods when the blood of even the healthiest mortal may fail in its appointed duty and not clot.

Some External Aids

Certain rations, various fevors [sic], the strange recent visitation called “influenza,” make the “best” and “bluest” of blood behave oddly. Hemorrhages abound and bleeding then becomes difficult to stop

Some persons believe much in styptics, such as chloride of iron, silver caustic and similar applications to the bleeding point. These, however, often invite the formation of pus and blood poisoning bacteria. Modern physicians are loth [sic] to employ these things or ergot, which alleviates blood pressure sometimes to a dangerous degree.

Raw meat, pephalin, tissues freshly cut and blood serum itself, all have a scientific reason for their use at the bleeding point.

Constriction such as tying the hand, arm, leg or foot above the amputated or cut surface is good as far as it goes, but it cannot be employed when there are hemorrhages of internal structures, such as the liver, lungs, kidneys or stomach.

Epinephrine or adrenaline, is an excellent temporary means with which local bleeding can be diminished. Internally it is also helpful.

The Internal problems

Pressure with disinfected fingers upon the bleeding places, such as tonsils, gums and other areas within reach of the hands often does much good. I know of one child that was thus saved from bleeding to death. Three doctors and two nurses relieved each other alternately after the pressure and fatigue involved had cramped their fingers held with great force inside the mouth against the child’s tonsils.

Internally, blood transfusions, injections of horse serum, anti-toxin serum, gelatin and chloride of lime have been effective.

Finally, you should be on guard against hemorrhages if you eat canned, stale or refrigerated victuals and few fresh ones.

Liver and gall bladder diseases, jaundice, scurvy, bari bari, influenza, typhoid, pneumonia and tuberculosis all seem to diminish the clotting power of the blood. After or during these affections guard against a chance hemorrhage.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 03 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., May 03, 1919, Page 7

Around Boise Valley Loop

Nampa

Advice has been received by his parents in this city from the war department to the effect that Amoreux Mayse is ill with lobular pneumonia at Camp Merritt, New Jersey. The young man had just arrived from France when he was stricken.

Caldwell

Kemp Heath has returned from Rochester, Minn., where he has been in the Mayo Brothers’ hospital under medical treatment the past month.

Maple Grove

A number of the pupils of the Maple Grove school have been absent from school on account of sickness.

Sydna Pfost has returned to Meridian, where she is attending school, after an absence of three weeks caused by illness.

(ibid, page 7)
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Granite, Idaho (1)

GraniteFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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May 4

Evening Capital News., May 04, 1919, Page 3

19190504ECN1

South Boise

Grandma Nugent, who has been poorly all winter, is now confined to her bed and is very feeble.

Mrs. W. Chapman is ill at her home in South Boise.

Mrs. J. H. Foster is quite ill at her home.

Marion Prickett, son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Prickett, is very ill with typhoid fever.

Mrs. T. L. Gearhart of Michigan is very ill with typhoid pneumonia.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 04 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., May 04, 1919, Page 5

Little News of Boise

Reports of Health Department

The report of the city health officer for April shows 35 births, 16 male and 19 females. The parents of 25 were residents of Boise. There were 28 deaths, 23 were males and five females. Contagious diseases reported were smallpox, one; chickenpox, 11; measles, three; scarlet fever, 11; whooping cough, one; influenza, one. Eighteen cases still remain in quarantine and none is serious.

(ibid, page 5)
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Evening Capital News., May 04, 1919, Page 8

Appoint Varian to Succeed The Late Judge Isaac Smith
Weiser Lawyer Named by Governor Davis to Fill Unexpired Term – Takes Up His Duties Immediately

Bert. S. Varian, a prominent and well known Weiser attorney, was Saturday appointed by Governor Davis as judge of the Seventh judicial district to succeed the late Isaac N. Smith, who died in Boise from the after-effects of Spanish influenza. Judge Varian will take up his duties immediately. His appointment is for the remainder of Judge Smith’s term, which expires on the first Monday in January 1923. …

(ibid, page 8)
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Greenleaf, Idaho 1913 (1)

Greenleaf1913Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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May 5

The Daily Star-Mirror., May 05, 1919, Page 2

19190505DSM1

City News

Miss Ruth Fogle preached Sunday at Oakedale, substituting for the Methodist pastor, who was ill.
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Death of Mrs. Boyer

The many friends of Mrs. S. R. Boyer will regret to learn of her death, Sunday afternoon at 1 o’clock at Clarkston, Wash. Mrs. Boyer had lived many years in Moscow, going to Clarkston about a year ago, in hopes of benefiting her health. She seemed in excellent health until a recent mild attack of influenza from which she had entirely recovered, but her former illness returned causing her death.

Mrs. Boyer was a woman of a very kind disposition; to know her was to love her.

She leaves a husband and two sons, Harry and Warren. Her father, John W. DeWitt and two brothers, John C. and Walter, live at Moscow.

The funeral will occur Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at Moscow. The services will be held at the Methodist church.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 05 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Downtown Greer, Idaho

GreerFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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May 6

Evening Capital News., May 06, 1919, Page 3

19190506ECN1

19190506ECN2For Colds, Catarrh or Influenza

Do you feel weak and unequal to the work ahead of you? Do you still cough a little, or does your nose bother you? Are you pale? Is your blood thin and watery? Better put your body into shape. Build strong! Now’s the time.

An old, reliable blood-maker and herbal tonic made from wild roots and herbs is Dr. Pierce’s Golden Medical Discovery. This “nature remedy” comes in table or liquid form. It will build up your body, cure your cold, and protect you from disease germs which lurk everywhere. One of the active ingredients of this temperance alternative and tonic is wild cherry bark with stillingis, which is so good for the lungs and for coughs; also Oregon grape root, blood root, stone root, Queen’s root – all skillfully combined in the Medical Discovery. These roots have a direct action on the stomach, improving digestion and assimilation. These herbal extracts in the “Discovery” aid in blood-making, and are best for scrofula. By improving the blood they aid in throwing off an attack of influenza and act as oil on machinery.

Catarrh should be treated, first as a blood disease, with this alternative; then, in addition, the nose should be washed daily with Dr. Sage’s Catarrh Remedy which can be had at drug stores.

Los Angeles, Cal. – “I will gladly tell of the relief and cure Dr. Pierce’s Golden Medical Discovery gave me. I was sick with all troubles of stomach, liver, etc., and La Grippe with all its attending ailments. When all else failed Dr. Pierce’s Golden Medical Discovery did the good work. I also took ‘Pleasant Pellets’ for biliousness, with grand success. I write with gratitude to tell others of the relief that is in store for them. Do not delay but hasten to get the above remedies if suffering from any indisposition.” – Samuel Kolisky, 978 Euclid Ave.

(Adv.)

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 06 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. May 06, 1919, Page 1

19190506TIR1

19190506TIR2Prominent Young Man Passed Away Saturday

Wilson Keith Snyder departed this life at his home, just after noon, Saturday, May 3, after suffering an influenza relapse.

Mr. Snyder was born January 30, 1888 at Cokeville, Wyo., and moved to Blackfoot with his parents in 1907, having been a constant resident here since that time. For the past eight years he very competently filled a position in the Blackfoot post office and it was his steadiness and capability that gradually brought him promotions, the last one being a promotion to the stamp window, which place he filled for only a week before his illness compelled him to retire.

Mr. Snyder was an active member of the K. P. lodge and out of fraternal reverence and respect for their departed brother, the committee have postponed a social event planned for this week.

Mr. Snyder was married to Miss Gussie May Cleary on the first of June, 1913, and two little daughters have been born to that union, Ruth Age five years, and Dorothy May age sixteen months. Besides his wife and daughters Mr. Snyder is survived by his mother Mrs. S. Snyder of Ogden, a brother Orville E., a local barber; four sisters, Mrs. F. A. Sloan and Mrs. Hazel Von Lostowicka of Blackfoot and Mrs. W. J. Banks of Ualatka, Flo., and Mrs. L. M. Stevens of Ogden. All arrived in Blackfoot to attend the funeral services, which will be conducted from the home at 2 p.m. Tuesday afternoon with Rev. Cullison officiating. The K. P. lodge will have charge of the ceremonies at the cemetery.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 06 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. May 06, 1919, Page 3

Rose

Mrs. Louis Felt was on the sick list last week.

Mrs. Albert Gardner and daughter Elverna are ill at this writing.

Ellis Jackman, the eleven year old son of Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Jackman, has been very ill, but is slowly recovering.

Alma Norman, who has been ill, is able to be up and around again.

(ibid, page 3)
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The Idaho Republican. May 06, 1919, Page 5

19190506TIR3A Relapse of Influenza

George Dore, one of the congenial proprietors of the Central meat market, who had an attack of influenza last week, suffered a relapse, but we are glad to report that Monday morning he was getting along nicely.
— —

Local News

Mrs. W. O. Bridges was ill a few days the latter part of the week, but recovered by Sunday.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Idaho Republican. May 06, 1919, Page 6

Sterling

Green Bowser was on the sick list the last of the week.

The Wheeler children are ill with the mumps.
— —

Death of Infant

The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Corbridge died Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock, after a brief life of only three days. The funeral was conducted from the L. D. S. Church Tuesday at 3 in the afternoon and burial made in the Sterling-Yuma cemetery. Mrs. Corbridge is very seriously ill.

(ibid, page 6)
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Bonners Ferry Herald. May 06, 1919, Page 5

19190506BFH1

Local News

W. H. Richardson is on the sick list and his physician has ordered him to remain in bed for a week at least.

While plowing in his garden on the Northside recently, Lee Fewkes found a granite rock which looks as if it might have been a ham which had become petrified. The stone is plainly marked in exactly the same place that one would skin a ham. It was displayed for several days this week at the City Meat Market.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 06 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Grand Junction, Idaho (5)

GrandJunctionFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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May 7

The Daily Star-Mirror., May 07, 1919, Page 2

19190507DSM1

Born in a Bobsled

Cedar Falls, Ia. — “A bouncing baby boy” first saw the light of day and felt the cold impact of the world while his mother was en route from the family home, five miles southwest of here, in a bobsled to Sartori hospital. Members of the family had been afflicted by influenza and it was decided that the prospective mother would have better care and her life safeguarded if she were taken from the home and isolated from danger of infection.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 07 May 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., May 07, 1919, Page 4

Harvard Happenings – Popular Soldier Returns

William Lewless, one of our popular young farmers in the service of his country during the great war, returned home the first of last week. Bill, as he is familiarly known by his many friends, enlisted in the field artillery in April 1918. He spent some time in training at Fort Wright, Camp Kearney and at Fort Sill, Oklahoma and was sent overseas from Camp Mills on October 28, landing in France two days before the Armistice was signed, sick with influenza and pneumonia, from which he fully recovered and was started on his homeward trip January 5. He was given his discharge from Camp Taylor, Kentucky, on February 19. Sine then he has been visiting relatives in Minnesota.

Harvard schools will close May 16, after a successful term. …

(ibid, page 4)
————–

Further Reading

Dr. Pierce’s Golden Medical Discovery

DrPierceGoldenMedicalDiscovery-a
source: National Museum of American History

Nickell Collection of Dr. R.V. Pierce Medical Artifacts

It was in Buffalo where Pierce really began his ascendency to fame as a leading seller of mail-order patent medicines, including “Dr. Pierce’s Golden Medical Discovery Pills,” “Dr. Pierce’s Favorite Prescription Tablets,” and “Dr. Pierce’s Pleasant Pellets.” Many of Pierce’s cures were aimed at addressing “female illnesses.” Pierce’s medicines, like several other remedies available at the time, would often include alcohol and opium.

The enormous demand created for Pierce’s remedies led to his building of the World’s Dispensary Building (664 Washington Street), from where his numerous cures were manufactured, packaged, and distributed to people around the world. Pierce went on to establish Pierce’s Palace Hotel in 1878 to accommodate the many patients who came flocking to seek his apparent curative skills. The building burned down in 1881 and was replaced with the Invalids Hotel and Surgical Institute (at 663 Main Street). Pierce also had a facility in London, England. Pierce incorporated his entire medical “empire” under the name World’s Dispensary Medical Association in 1883. Later, the company became “Pierce’s Proprietaries” and continued under the supervision of his son, Dr. Valentine Mott Pierce, until the late 1940s.

Perhaps the most significant accomplishment of Dr. Pierce was his ability to market and sell his medicines more successfully than almost any other physician at a time when availability of home remedies and nostrum cures were at their height. His descriptions of illnesses and their symptoms, with just the right amount of medical terminology and human pathos for cures, made them seem authentic and scientifically possible. Pierce was a master of the media, using newspapers, broadsides, and later billboards, to saturate the country with word of his success. Many of the original signs painted on barns and other buildings can still be seen along the roads and highways throughout the U.S.

Another marketing skill employed by Pierce was that of the testimonial. His advertising, which includes his book, The People’s Common Sense Medical Adviser (essentially an advertisement for his various products), sold millions of copies, and included testimonials from patients whose claims of near-miraculous cures convinced millions of people to try the remedies of Dr. Pierce. In some ways, the media-savvy skills of Pierce and the resounding public response to his bold assurances of cures sound remarkably like today’s media campaigns waged by various pharmaceutical companies.

Pierce was a strong proponent of free enterprise, and took a lead in the fight against the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906. He also was involved in a lawsuit against The Ladies Home Journal, which tested “Dr. Pierce’s Favorite Prescription” and reportedly found traces of opium, digitalis, and alcohol (Pierce actually won the case).

Pierce also served as a New York State Senator from 1878-1879 and then as a Republican representative for the 32nd Congressional District of New York in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1879-1880, when he resigned due to ill health.

Pierce spent his last years in his winter home in St. Vincent, Florida, where he passed away in 1914. He is buried in Forest Lawn Cemetery in Buffalo, NY.

from: New York Heritage
— — — — — — — — — —

Catarrh

Catarrh is inflammation of the mucous membranes in one of the airways or cavities of the body, usually with reference to the throat and paranasal sinuses. It can result in a thick exudate of mucus and white blood cells caused by the swelling of the mucous membranes in the head in response to an infection. It is a symptom usually associated with the common cold, pharyngitis, and chesty coughs, but it can also be found in patients with adenoiditis, otitis media, sinusitis or tonsillitis. The phlegm produced by catarrh may either discharge or cause a blockage that may become chronic.

The word “catarrh” was widely used in medicine since before the era of medical science, which explains why it has various senses and in older texts may be synonymous with, or vaguely indistinguishable from, common cold, nasopharyngitis, pharyngitis, rhinitis, or sinusitis. The word is no longer as widely used in American medical practice, mostly because more precise words are available for any particular disease. Indeed, to the extent that it is still used, it is no longer viewed nosologically as a disease entity but instead as a symptom, a sign, or a syndrome of both. The term “catarrh” is found in medical sources from the United Kingdom. The word has also been common in the folk medicine of Appalachia, where medicinal plants have been used to treat the inflammation and drainage associated with the condition.

continued: Wikipedia
— — — — — — — — — —

Leonard Keene Hirshberg

Leonard Keene Hirshberg (January 9, 1877 – 1969), best known as Leonard K. Hirshberg was an American physician who was convicted of mail fraud.

Hirshberg was born in Baltimore from a Jewish family. He obtained his M.D. from Johns Hopkins University in 1902. He had a successful career as a health writer with his articles appearing in mainstream medical columns and journals. With H. L. Mencken he collaborated on a series of baby care articles, these were published in What You Ought to Know About Your Baby (1910).

In September, 1922 Hirshberg was convicted of defrauding investors in a mail fraud investment scam of one millions dollars.

source: Wikipedia
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Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
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Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)