Idaho History May 2, 2021

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 55

Idaho Newspaper clippings June 2-13, 1919

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

June 2

The Daily Star-Mirror., June 02, 1919, Page 1

19190602DSM1

Moscow Man Tells of Conventions
Secretary of Chamber of Commerce Boosts For Moscow’s Meetings

L. F. Parsons, secretary of the Moscow Chamber of Commerce, is at the Davenport. “We are preparing for the second semi-annual meeting of the North Idaho Chamber of Commerce which will be held at Moscow June 4 and 5,” said Mr. Parsons. “The first meeting was held at Coeur d’Alene last May. A meeting was to have been held last November, but on account of the influenza was called off.

“Delegates from the Chamber of Commerce, commercial clubs and business men’s associations of the following towns of the 10 counties of northern Idaho will attend the meeting: Sandpoint, Bonners Ferry, Coeur d’Alene, Kellogg, Wallace, Harrison, Moscow, Lewiston, Orofino, Marysville, Nez Perce, Kendrick, Volmer-Ilo, Winchester, Cottonwood, Culdesac, Genesee, Juliaetta, Rathdrum, Post Falls, Athol, Clarks Fork, Kooskia, Kamiah, Grangeville and Stites.

“The farmers’ unions, county commissioners of the 10 counties of northern Idaho, and the state highway commissioners and other state officials have also been invited to attend. — Spokesman-Review.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 02 June 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., June 02, 1919, Page 4

The Road Hog

The road hog is a hateful gink, a wild and reckless rover; he meets you on a narrow brink and tries to crowd you over.

He hugs the middle of the pike, in vain you toot your trumpet, and if his style you do not like, it’s up to you to lump it.

I followed one of them today, in vain I tried to pass him; a motor Bolshevik at play, I think is how I’d class him.

Upon my face he threw his dust, my eyes were red and gritty; I hope some day his car will “bust” ten furlongs from the city.

I hope the day is cold and drear, that corns will make him suffer; his call for help I’ll fail to hear; I’ll let him walk, the duffer.

I honked my squawker good and loud to tell him I was coming; his wheels kicked up a bigger cloud as off he went a-humming.

And every time I sought to pass and made my Betsie travel, he’s step upon his can of gas and feed me powdered gravel.

And so I had to slow my gait behind the highway lizard, consuming flying real estate, which disarranged my gizzard.

He thinks he owns the boulevard; he’s selfish and he’s cruel; some day I’ll send around my card and date him for a duel.

He longs to crowd us in a rut and smash our wheels or fender, and makes us out a reckless nut upon a moonshine bender.

He always claims the right-of-way at highway intersections; we meet him many times a day, he hails from all directions.

And though we almost have a fit, it boots us not to bellow — the road hog, if you but admit, is just the other fellow.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — — — — — — — —

Military on Parade, Idaho Falls, Idaho

IdahoFallsFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

June 5

The Filer Record., June 05, 1919, Page 2

19190605FR1

Idaho State News

Approximately $3600 must be raised in the seven counties of the state for the purpose of conducting an Idaho campaign against certain diseases, if a recently allotted federal appropriation designed for that purpose is made available.

source: The Filer Record. (Filer, Idaho), 05 June 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Filer Record., June 05, 1919, Page 3

North Filer News

R. T. Graves has been on the sick list this week.

Mrs. J. Ennis is very ill at her home in Filer.

Melvin Blackburn had the misfortune to be kicked by a horse last Saturday.
— —

Washington District

The Washington schools closed Thursday of last week with a picnic dinner.

(ibis, page 3)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., June 05, 1919, Page 1

19190605DSM1

Pure Food Laws Will Be Enforced
Adulterations of Food and Those Serving Filth Will Be Prosecuted

Boise. — “If food manufacturies are found in an insanitary condition when the inspector arrives, prosecution will be prompt and vigorous. The practice of giving notice has been abandoned.”

This was the announcement made this morning from the office of the state department of public welfare in response to several inquiries touching upon the department’s prospective policy.

Two fines already have been paid following pleas of guilty to the charge of milk adulteration. J. G. Berry, manager of the Boise Ice Cream company, was assessed $25.00 and costs after samples of milk dispensed from his concern were found to contain an illegal quantity of sediment. Ray Dunn, manager of the Edgewood Dairy paid a fine after milk bearing the Edgewood label also had been filth loaded.

A. J. Flack, superintendent of the [?] company, this morning was assessed $25 and costs in Judge Anderson’s court after he had pleaded guilty to the accusation that short weight butter had been distributed by his concern. Complaint against him was made by Inspector A. H. Wilson and Bert T. Barr of the public welfare department.

“I have no sympathy whatever for the individual who through carelessness, negligence or deliberation adulterates milk which may be served little children,” declared J. K. White, public welfare commissioner, today.

“There can be no questioning the fact that such an individual is a serious menace to any community. This department would be seriously derelict in its duty if such offenses were not prosecuted vigorously. Contempt should be the portion of the man who sells short weight butter. He is, in many instances, a petty larcenist of the most despicable species.”

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 05 June 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., June 05, 1919, Page 2

Red Cross Aids Exiled Greeks
Aegean Islands Are Thronged With Fugitives From Asia Minor Towns.
Nearly All Are In Rags
Cheering Crowds at Mytilene Take Horses From Red Cross Carriage and draw it to Residence of Governor General.

Athens. — In its work in the Greek islands the American Red cross has the co-operation of the United States navy. Six submarine chasers have been assigned for transporting personnel and supplies.

On the Island of Mytilene are 52,000 Greeks, who fled there from Asia Minor five years ago. Red Cross workers are regularly visiting all the towns and clothing has been given to about 20,000 of the refugees.

At the outbreak of the war, in 1914, there were 3,000,000 in Asia Minor. More than 500,000 escaped to the islands in the Aegean. Thousands were massacred. Armed bands of Turks roamed the countryside, plundering and murdering Greeks wherever found. The others, driven out of their homes and sent inland, are now returning, to find their homes either destroyed or occupied by Turks.

Allowed Six Cents a Day

The refugees in the Aegean islands intend to return to Asia Minor as soon as conditions permit. At present the Greek government gives each refugee six cents a day.

The Red Cross is devoting much attention to the prevention of further epidemics, such as the typhus scourge, which took such a heavy toll at Mytilene.

Food is scanty and costly, and most of the refugees are underfed, even in the large towns. Nearly all are in rags. The hospitals are short of medicines and other supplies, and have been crowded by influenza cases.

Clothing, blankets and medicine are needed on all the islands. Canned meat for broth is wanted in the hospitals. American women run the workshops where clothing is made on the three islands of Mytilene, Chios and Samos.

22,000 in Town of Mytilene

Of the 52,000 refugees on Mytilene 22,000 are in the town of Mytilene and its suburbs; the others are scattered about in 62 villages.

Of the 20,000 refugees on Crios part are sheltered in old houses and the rest in wooden barracks, divided with bagging and old carpets into “rooms,” each accommodating a family of from five to ten persons.

The islands of Lemnos, Imbros, Tenedos and Samothrace are served with red Cross supplies from Mytilene; Oinousa is served from Chios, and Ilcania from Samos.

The American Red Cross agents were received at Mytilene with the greatest enthusiasm. The horses were unhitched and the carriage drawn by a cheering crowd to the residence of the governor general, who commandeered a private home and placed it at their disposal.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho City, Idaho ca. 1911

IdahoCity1911Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

June 6

The Rathdrum Tribune., June 06, 1919, Page 1

19190606RT1

Veterans Honored
Memorial Day Observed In Rathdrum

The services at Fraternal hall last Friday afternoon, in observance of Memorial day, were attended by the usually large audience, which overtaxed the seating capacity of the building. The program, arranged by the G. A. R. and W. R. C. was interesting. …
— —

From Over The County

Spirit Lake

19190606RT2The schools closed last week. The influenza demoralized the classes so that there were no graduates, hence no commencement exercises.

Post Falls

Charles, 6-year-old son of P. F. Holden of McGuires, was hit by an auto while playing in the road and seriously if not fatally hurt.

Coeur D’Alene

In the federal court Monday Roy Dixon and William Dixon, brothers, were given jail sentences for resisting arrest and violating the liquor law.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 06 June 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Rathdrum Tribune., June 06, 1919, Page 3

Local Paragraphs

19190606RT3The Rathdrum grade school closes next week, having made up the time lost during the influenza epidemic.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Rathdrum Tribune., June 06, 1919, Page 4

Idaho State News Items

Careywood, on the N. P. railroad in Bonner county, has been quarantined on account of diphtheria.

State school land to the value of $200,000 was sold by I. H. Nash, state land commissioner, in Cassia, Minidoka and Twin Falls the forepart of last week.
— —

World News In Brief

The public debt of the United States is now $26,000,000,000 and growing at the rate of one billion per month.

Estimates sent to congress by the war department provide for maintaining 600,000 men in France and Germany in July, 400,000 in August, and 200,000 in September. Major McKay, of the army bureau of finance, told the house military committee that should an army of occupation be needed after October 1, congress would be asked for additional funds.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — — — — — — — —

Montpelier Examiner. June 06, 1919, Page 5

19190606ME1

Local News

Mrs. D. C. Oakley came in from Kemmerer Wednesday morning and went to Afton, being called there by the illness of her daughter, Mrs. Ollie Brown.

Selma, the 10-year-old daughter of Robert Wuthrick of Nounan, died Tuesday night of peritonitis, following a few days illness. Funeral services were held at Nounan.

Misses Nora Beckstrom and Oral Groo returned last night from Albion, where they have been attending normal school. Both young ladies received both the literacy and life-long teaching certificates.
— —

Notice To Clean Up

All property owners, and tenants in the city of Montpelier, Idaho, are hereby ordered to have all rubbish and filth removed from their yards and alleys, and all outhouses repaired so as to conform with the state sanitary laws.

This work must be done by June 16, 1919, and those failing to comply with this order will be prosecuted as provided by the state law and city ordinance.

By the order of the city board of health, made and entered this 4th day of June, 1916.

Geo. F. Ashley, Chairman

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 06 June 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Meridian Times., June 06, 1919, Page 2

19190606MT1

Idaho Budget

Veterans of three wars will take part in the Memorial day exercises to be held in Pocatello, Friday, May 30. G. A. R. veterans, Spanish war veterans and world war veterans are cooperating in the program to be given on Memorial day, and the Pocatello municipal band will furnish music for the occasion.

Cinnabar deposits in the Yellow Pine basin bid fair to bring Idaho into the limelight as a quicksilver producing state.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 06 June 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Meridian Times., June 06, 1919, Page 7

News Of A Week In Condensed Form…

Intermountain

Formal charges, backed by affidavits, ranging from complaints regarding improper food and insanitary living conditions to charges that patients at the order of hospital physicians have been put in straitjackets at the United States army general hospital No. 23, at Aurora, Colo., have been forwarded to Washington.

An epidemic of mysterious origin has broken out in the Waverly baby home of Portland, and as a result eleven babies are dead. Twenty-one are afflicted with the malady.

Washington

To prevent the navy from being left in a crippled condition when the peace treaty is signed, automatically releasing 150,000 men from service, the navy department is planning to wage an intensive recruiting campaign as soon as congress determines how large a navy will be authorized.

Foreign

Three nurses attached to the American expeditionary force were killed Sunday in an automobile accident at Chateau Thierry.

England’s bill for transporting a million American soldiers across the Atlantic in British ships is approximately $82,000,000.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

The Meridian Times., June 06, 1919, Page 8

Meridian Local News

Vernon Taylor is ill with a severe case of tonsillitis.

Mr. and Mrs. Clint Waggoner who have been ill with tonsillitis are improving.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Republican. June 06, 1919, Page 2

19190606TIR1

Idaho And Idahoans

The Modern Woodsmen of America, at a meeting held at Boise, voted unanimously in favor of increasing the dues paid by members in order to build up their organization which suffered greatly by the war and even more so by the ravages of the influenza.

Last year many teachers in the rural districts received from $100 to $125 a month and in some instances as much as $150.

Veterans of three wars will take part in the Memorial day exercises to be held in Pocatello, Friday, May 30. G. A. R. veterans, Spanish war veterans and world war veterans are cooperating in the program to be given on memorial day, and the Pocatello municipal band will furnish music for the occasion.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 06 June 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. June 06, 1919, Page 4

Blackfoot Pioneer Ill

W. F. Martin, one of the pioneer builders of Blackfoot and for many years a local coal dealer, is very ill at his home on South University avenue.

His health began failing in early winter after an attack of influenza and he has never been able to fully regain his strength.
— —

Young Bumgarner Ill

Thomas Bumgarner, who has been ill at the home of his father for the past ten days, is slowly improving at this writing.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. June 06, 1919, Page 5

Local News

Mrs. Pat Boyle, who has been ill at Idaho Falls, is getting along nicely.

Miss Benita Dowdle is slowly recovering from a two weeks siege of typhoid fever, at the home of her father, S. C. Dowdle.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. June 06, 1919, Page 6

Centerville

Mrs. E. S. Deardorff, who has been ill, is improved at this writing.

Charles Farnworth, who was ill the first of last week is able to be at his work again.

We are glad to inform the friends of Mr. and Mrs. Cyrus Farnworth that their little son Ancil is rapidly recovering from the injury sustained by a fall last week.

Wicks

Clive Reynolds was on the sick list the first of the week.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. June 06, 1919, Page 7

Riverside

Miss Guenevere Kotter of Bingham and Miss Ana Powell of Malad, who taught the past school term here, returned the last of the week to their respective homes.

Misses Orpha Hampton and Glendora Malcom, who taught school here the past term, returned to their homes the last of the week.

Rose

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. [?] Norman, who has been very ill, has recovered.

Miss Dorothy Taylor, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. U. W. Taylor has been on the sick list for the last few days.

Miss Rosa Hale, who has spent the last year teaching in Sterling returned home Monday.

Miss Vera Swenson was on the sick list last week, but is somewhat improved at this time.

The Misses Ellen and Hazel Hale, Norma Johnston, Mildred and Syble [?] and Erma Taylor are home now from school.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. June 06, 1919, Page 8

Moreland

Mrs. Alvina Farnworth recently returned from Lava Hot Springs, where she went for her health.

A large crowd attended the eighth grade graduation exercises Friday. A good program was rendered.

Shelley

All schools closed here last Thursday with a successful year, considering the influenza condition during the fall and winter. Professor Langton has accepted the position as superintendent again for next year. It is understood that not many of the grade teachers will be with us again next year.

Miss Grace Greiner left for her home at Camas Monday last week, after having taught the full school year.

Miss Helen Jillson, principal of the grade school, left for her home at Frankfort, Kan., last week.

A. C. Quigg has recovered from a severe attack of the mumps.

Fred Glenn has been confined to his home for over ten days with a severe case of the small pox.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Shoshone Journal. June 06, 1919, Page 1

19190606SJ1

Big Wood River News

Mrs. A. L. Horn is still quite sick.

Mrs. Chas. Furniss and baby are visiting her parents at Hollister. Mrs. Furniss is in very poor health.

Little Edna Ryan is suffering a severe cold this wee.

Little Lawrence Rand was quite sick last week.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 06 June 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Main Street, Idaho City, Idaho

IdahoCityFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

June 10

Bonners Ferry Herald. June 10, 1919, Page 1

19190610BFH1

Patron’s Day on Friday Afternoon

The usual closing exercises of the grade classes of the Bonners Ferry schools will be substituted this year for an open air festival which will be held on Friday afternoon, June 18, to which all parents and patrons are invited.

The day will also be observed as “patron’s day” from two o’clock on and exhibits will be made of the work of the past year in the grades and in the manual training and domestic science departments.

A visit to the schools on Friday will be worth the while of both the parents and the patrons of the local schools. Bonners Ferry has schools and equipment of which it may be proud and the work the students are doing goes to prove the value of the investment that has been made in their behalf.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 10 June 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. June 10, 1919, Page 2

P. J. Fransioli Dies

Tacoma. — Paul J. Fransioli, 49 years old, prominent Tacoma grain dealer died Saturday at his home at Gravelly lake of influenza.
— —

Amendment For Suffrage Signed
Vice President’s Signature Last Act Upon Resolution to Give Vote to Women

Washington. — Vice President Marshall June 5 signed the woman suffrage constitutional amendment resolution passed in Congress in the presence of Chairman Watson of the senate woman suffrage committee and other senators and representatives of women’s organizations. The vice president’s signature was the last act upon the resolution of the capital. Speaker Gillett having attached his signature June 4.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. June 10, 1919, Page 5

Local Pick-ups

W. H. Richardson, who has been on the sick list for several weeks, is able to be up and around again and on Saturday was able to come down town for a short visit.

Miss Mary Hawkins will leave on Saturday for the Lewiston State Normal school to be gone for six weeks.

A. A. McIntyre left yesterday for Moscow where he will appear before the state board of education in the effort to secure their adoption of the puzzle map which he is manufacturing. He was accompanied by Master “Bill” Gale who was selected from among the students of the locals schools to demonstrate the map.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., June 10, 1919, Page 3

19190610DSM1

19190610DSM2Dogs And Hens Are Wiser
Physician Arraigns the Modern Practice of Treating Influenza Patients

New Orleans, La. — “When a dog gets sick, what’s the first thing he does? He sticks his nose between his hind legs. What does he do it for? So that he can breath the warm air. When a chicken gets sick, the first thing it does is to tuck its head under its wing – so that it can breath the warm air. Physicians who advocate for the cold-air treatment for the ‘flu’ have less sense than either dogs or chickens.”

Such is the opinion rendered by Dr. Cooper Holtzclaw of Chattanooga, formerly president of the Association of Surgeons of the Southern Railway. He said it before the hundreds of surgeons who attended the twenty-third annual meeting of the association, held in this city.

He was arraigning the modern practice of treating influenza patients in the open air. He insisted that the best treatment for influenza is to keep the patient under such conditions of care and freedom from exposure as were wont to obtain when our mothers of the old school used to treat the measles.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 10 June 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Busy Day in Ilo, Idaho ca. 1910 (1)

Ilo1910Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

June 12

The Grangeville Globe. June 12, 1919, Page 1

19190612GG1

Mr. Batty Recovering

Fen Batty, one of the pioneer residents of this section, but who has been looking after his extensive land holdings near Maupin, Oregon, for the past year, came in on Saturday night’s train. Last fall Mr. Batty had a very severe illness and before recovering was also attacked by the influenza. He was confined to the hospital for more than three months and certainly shows the ravages of the disease with which he was afflicted. While he is very thin he states he is feeling fairly well at this time. He will remain here while convalescing.
— —

Red Cross Nurse Returned

Miss Rosa Williams returned last Monday night from overseas, where she has been for the greater part of the past year in the capacity of a Red Cross nurse. Before reaching Grangeville Miss Williams stopped at Salem Oregon for a weeks visit with relatives and friends.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 12 June 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Grangeville Globe. June 12, 1919, Page 8

[Local News]

Mrs. A. F. Parker left Monday morning for Boise, where she will visit with her daughter Mrs. R. B. Kading. Mrs. Parker recently underwent a second attack of the flu, and has been very slow in recovering from the effects of the disease, and it is anticipated that the change will prove beneficial to her health.

Mrs. Joe Sorrow left last Friday for Lewiston where she will spend a week or so. Mrs. Sorrow recently suffered an attack of bronchial pneumonia, and has gone to Lewiston with the hope that a change of climate will be beneficial.

T. E. Edmundson, proprietor of the Lyric theatre, is confined to his home this week with a very severe attack of lumbago. Dr. Scallon, the attending physician, reports his patient as slowly improving at the present time.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Mack’s Inn Among the Pines, Island Park, Idaho ca. 1932 (1)

IslandPark1932Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

June 13

American Falls Press. June 13, 1919, Page 1

19190613AFP1

Half Of School Children Delinquent Says Miss Drake
Parents to Blame for Keeping Boys and Girls at Home to Work in Fields – Stricter Next Year She Says.

The attendance reports supplied the county superintendent of schools from the school districts of Power county are proof of the fact that over 50 per cent of the school children of the county were kept from school during the spring months to work at home.

“This means” said Miss Drake, county superintendent, “that all the children kept home will lose a grade in school and when the fall term opens they will be in the same grade that they started in last year. When a school girl or boy gets to be about fifteen years old and has lost three or four years of school he will drop his schooling entirely.

“Parents all over the county are equally guilty of this neglect in the education of their children. Many children are kept from school to do home work in families where one would least expect it. In my opinion school comes before everything. Children can always work, while there are only a few valuable years in which to attend school.”

More Strict Next Year

Miss Drake will begin next term with the distinct understanding with school directors, that all violations of the school laws will be severely dealt with. She has been promised the assistance of the probation officer, C. H. Torrance, who says he will be on the job to deal severely with all parents of children who remain out of school unlawfully.

“The war and the influenza have been to blame for much of the school delinquency,” said Miss Drake, “but there has really been no excuse for much of the trouble. I shall give all parents ample warning concerning school problems, then make them give a strict accounting for every day that their children are out of school.”

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 13 June 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

American Falls Press. June 13, 1919, Page 5

Facts From Fairview

W. A. Phillips and family moved in recently on the Kampf place. They have lived near Aberdeen for several years. Last year they were unfortunate enough to lose five of their children with influenza. Four of them were married, the other being a soldier boy in training at camp.
— —

19190613AFP2

Influenza and Headaches

Light (electric) is electricity, and electricity is current – generate by a dynamo and transmitted by wires. Decreased current means partial or a lack of light.

Health is life, and life is current generated in the brain and transmitted by the nerves. The difference between a live and a dead man is – one has life currant and the other has not. The difference between a healthy and a sickly man, is – in the healthy man the current is normal, while in the sickly it is decreased by mechanical interference; so, primarily, health is the result of life-current transmitted without interference, while disease is the result of decreased life-current. Chiropractic removes the interference.

It Works out in Practice

An example: “I started to feel better from the first adjustment I received at hands of Dr. Wilson, Chiropractor. I got better rapidly and all it took to make me well was three adjustments. Not only did he cure me of the Flu but he cured me of the bad headache that I had suffered with for a long time before I took sick. I know that Chiropractic saved my life, for I was almost dead when Dr. Wilson was called.” – (Signed) (The name will be furnished upon request.)

Dr. G. A. Wilson
Chiropractor
Phone 7-W Wones Bldg.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. June 13, 1919, Page 2

19190613KG1

Southwick Items

Miss Edith Faris has been engaged to teach a summer school in the mountains about sixty miles from Mountain Home.

The Misses Wilma and Stella McCleland left for Lewiston last Saturday where Stella will attend the summer normal, and Wilma will visit friends and recuperate after her long sick spell.

We hear that Jas. L. Mabry and Wm. Stump are improving in health. We congratulate them.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 13 June 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
——————-

Further reading

The 1918 Spanish flu outbreak that devastated a Greek island

Ioannis N Mammas, Maria Theodoridou, Demetrios A Spandidos, March 2018, Acta Paediatr

Abstract
This year marks the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of Spanish flu, which is estimated to have killed more than 50 million people worldwide. One area that was devastated was the Aegean island of Skyros, where the first cases appeared following celebrations for the feast day of Saint Demetrios at the end of October 1918. The island, which is the largest and southernmost island of the Northern Sporades, had 3,200 residents and one‐third of the 3,000 people who were infected died.

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the authors. link:
— — — — — — — — — —

Greek refugees en route to Salonika

GreekRefugeesGreek refugees board a liner for Salonika docked in Fiume.
Brunell, W. J. (Photographer), n.d., n.p.

source: International Encyclopedia of the First World War
— — — — — — — — — —

The first announcement about the 1918 “Spanish flu” pandemic in Greece through the writings of the pioneer newspaper “Thessalia” almost a century ago

Gregory Tsoucalas, Fotini Karachaliou, Vasiliki Kalogirou, Giorgos Gatos, Eirini Mavrogiannaki, Antonios Antoniou, Konstantinos Gatos

Neurological Clinic “O Agios Georgios”, Alykes, Volos, Greece

Introduction

… It was the year 1918, when the influenza pandemic had been widespread from the American continent to all over Europe. Yet, the first wave of the flu had largely gone unnoticed during the spring and summer of 1918. The spring wave did not even receive a mention in the index of 1918 volume of the journal of “The American Medical Association”. The disease, at the beginning had been mild, the mortality was not unusually high, and the world had been preoccupied with the fifth year of the 1st World War. However influenza was brewing quietly, with localized outbreaks inside the U.S.A. military camps in early 1918. By April of the same year, the disease had been spread to France, most probably being carried there by the American troops. At the end of April, influenza reached neutral Spain where the disease was widely publicized, “A strange form of disease of epidemic character has appeared in Madrid”. Influenza then, acquired its name, “The Spanish Flu”. Britain, Germany, Switzerland, and Poland were the next countries for the flu to be spread.

By May 1818, “Spanish flu” had reached Greece. The newspaper “Thessalia” was the first to announce its arrival, watching closely its dissemination.

On July 19th of the year 1918, in an article entitled “Spanish flu”, we have the first recorded reference for the appearance of the influenza pandemic in Greece. It was at the Peloponnesian town of Patra, where a few days earlier, a flu outbreak had shown its malignant character. Physicians of the era had recognized the flu’s similarity to that which had been occurred in Spain.

About 25 days earlier inside a tobacco factory five boxes arrived from Salonika. From the next day of the opening of the boxes, factory’s Director, had felt ill from the disease, and four days later died. The following day a worker had died, while most workers of the factory, if not all, became ill by the flu.

The second deadly autumn wave of the Spanish flu, probably caused by a mutated strain of the virus, had lasted six weeks. The mortality rates were extremely high and the variety of symptoms excluded no organ.

Nasal haemorrhage, pneumonia, encephalitis, temperature as high as 40 degrees, miscarriage, early labour, pulmonary oedema, ruptured muscles of the rectum, swollen ankles, mimic nephritis, blood-streaked urine, and coma were among some serious defects forming some deadly clusters of symptomatology. Finally the world took notice and “Thessalia” newspaper, was once more the shrine of information for the people to protect themselves. The first two deaths of the second wave, were reported at the beginning of October in the area of “Trikala”, and “Thessalia” immediately noted the physicians assembly in the town.

The next day, October the 6th, the Ministry of Internal Affairs, had taken under serious consideration the worldwide spread of the “Spanish flu” pandemic and issued an informative telegram. Although the city of Volos was alarmed by the fact of the two dead citizens, and measures were taken, “Thessalia” published the whole telegram, “The disease germs enter the body through the mouth, and generally from the respiratory system. Frequent gargles, mainly with an oxygenated water and antiseptic cream, may have some preventive action. The disease spreads by coughs and transmitted by air. Therefore it is recommended the avoidance of mentally stress and overwork, as well as concentrations of each kind. All schools must be close, and meticulous maintenance of cleanliness of lingerie and hands is proposed. In particular, it is highly recommended to avoid close contact with every person who displays flu symptoms”.

Two days later “Thessalia” had announced the precautionary measures that had been taken all over the cities of Volos and Larisa.

An influenza-phobia was spread among the common people. Before a chaotic situation to appear, the prefect of Magnesia, the prefecture in which Volos belongs, had announced strict regulations to be followed. It was October the 18th when “Thessalia” published the announcement, “All schools, public and private are to be closed for 15 days. Instructions against the flu are to provided to pupils. Prohibition of pedestrian traffic between 17.00 hours and 05.00 hours in the morning. Prohibition of any assembly, punished with immediate arrest”. Some days later a more medical announcement had reached “Thessalia’s” headquarters, in an attempt to minimize the flies’ role as an epidemic vector, “To fight the flies, a mixture of 300 drams (1 dram is almost equal to 3 grams) of water, 180 drams of milk and 60 drams of lyzopharm (cosmetic of the era) must be placed within basins inside halls and rooms”.

It was November the 10th, when “Thessalia” had announced a painful summary, “In Magnesia 179 cases of “Spanish flu had been recorded, 86 of them were fatal. At the village of Cannalia Magnesias, 41 patients died after receiving no medical care due to the expulsion of their physician. The flu outbreak at Trikala caused more than 50 deaths” The fear to catch the flu was so great, that every death had to be demystified. During December the 14th, “Thessalia” wrote, “Three new cases of Spanish flu were announced. Four deaths occurred yesterday at the city of Volos, none because of the flu”.

“Thessalia”, as a liberal newspaper had also dealt with the social and economical impacts of the flu to the local society. Many articles had been written stressing out the consequences, “It is not only unjustified the destruction of the small coffee shops, nor of the 300 artists of the theatre that are doomed to endure daily. Shaken is the economic life of the entire city. First of all those who are at risk of becoming victims of influenza-phobia, the employees of the coffee shops. Follow the working classes, who are doomed to suffer the consequences of panic. Why, according to the logic of the police regulations, the tobacco warehouses, factories and in general all the factories, where the labourer earns his bread, are hotbeds of death. The Backgammon checkers and card players of koltsina (local Greek card game), they are all dangerous. How to start to work on the tobacco warehouses, winter, with the Damocles sword (Greek expression for high stress) of unjustified panic? Therefore why to condemn thousands of labourers, out of nothing in distress? And the economic malaise is not the best helper against the disease”.

Conclusion

“Spanish flu”, was widespread inside Thessaly’s District (Magnesia-Volos, Larisa, Trikala) since the first wave of the pandemic during the 1918. The liberal and pioneer newspaper of Thessaly, “Thessalia”, was the very first to announce the appearance of the flu in Greece. A plethora of articles were written, not only clarifying the epidemic, but additionally giving general instructions to the common people, as well as underlining the social and economical aspects of the flu’s consequences. Furthermore, the editorial board, had tried to awaken the citizens of Volos, in order not to fear the influenza. “Thessalia” had left its stigma, not only by fathom in the flu, but also by criticizing the strict orders given by the helpless and fearful Greek state.

excerpted from: Le Infezioni in Medicina, n. 1, 79-82, 2015
— — — — — — — — — —

The Spanish Flu in Athens

Bournova Eugenia May 2020 Athens Social Atlas

[A long and detailed paper.]  link:
— — — — — — — — — —

Dr. Cooper Holtzclaw: Healing Through Change

[Biography and history of the practice of medicine in the early 1900s.]

link: Southern Adventist University
——————

Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)