May 9, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

May 9, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order issued
March 31 – Weight Limits on SF road
April 2 – Hwy 55 weekday closures
May 9 – Next Festival Planning Zoom Meeting
May 10-27 The Corner open weekends only
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit season
May 15 – YPFD meeting 10am at the Fire Hall
May 15 – Firewood Season starts
June 12 – VYPA Meeting
(details below)
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Local Events:

Next Festival Planning Meeting

Sunday, May 9, 2021, Zoom meeting at 2pm. Contact Deb for link and passcode.
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Plumbers Coming to Yellow Pine

Rocky Mountain Mechanical will be coming to Yellow Pine some time in May to do plumbing projects. If you are interested in plumbing work please call (208) 365-PIPE (7473). These guys are professionals and do great work, clean and courteous.
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Heating Maintenance Day

Deb Filler is coordinating with Mastercraft of McCall to schedule a maintenance day in Yellow Pine for propane and pellet stoves. If you are interested, please contact Deb at 208 633-6945. The date will be at least a couple months out.
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Village News:

Bald Hill Rx Burn

The Payette NF continues to reduce fuel near Yellow Pine. On Thursday, May 6th, they started on Units I and J in the Bald Hill project. A light haze of smoke was visible to the north east.

Rx burning was also done on the South Fork of the Salmon River.

20210506SoFkRxBurnLutz-a
Photo from Ray Lutz, May 6th around 1030pm between MP 12-18.
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Cinco De Mayo

A power outage did not stop the fun on May 5th. Folks gathered for free Tacos at the Community Hall provided by the VYPA hall committee. Such a good time was had by all that no photos were submitted by press time.
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Power Outage

Power went off at 104pm May 5th and came back on at 625pm. The Idaho Power recording said “150 customers” affected, but gave no cause.
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The Corner

As of Monday 5/10 we will only be open on the weekends, until Memorial Day. Friday-Sunday 11am-8pm
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Water Dept. News

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an application with the USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility planning grant.

If any additional information is needed please contact:

Willie Sullivan, Treasurer
Ypwater@gmail.com

Distributed to Yellow Pine Water Users Association customers via Yellow Pine Times on May 6, 2021.
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Community Hall

The Community Hall Storage Shed project is complete!

After a six-month delay at the manufacturer, the shed was delivered on April 22nd.

A huge Thanks to both the Stibnite Foundation for funding and to YPAC Corp. for acting as our Fiscal Agent so we could get the grant.

20210422CommHallShed-a
photo provided by DF
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Scrap Metal

I have a message that Mike Amos will haul out a load of scrap metal. If you have scrap metal, contact Mike. He has an area by his place to stack it.
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Quail in Yellow Pine

Male showed up a few days ago and on May 7th a female.

20210507Quail-a
photo courtesy LI
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Yellow Pine General Store

Laundry is open. Gas Available and rooms for rent. The store plans to open by Memorial Weekend.
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Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Upper Johnson Creek road is still closed at Landmark.

The Stibnite road between Yellow Pine and Stibnite mine is open.

The Hwy 55 project resumed April 2nd, expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10am to 2pm in the Smith’s Ferry area. Project Website link:

South Fork Salmon River Spring weight limits are in effect March 31 through at least June 1st.
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Critters

Ticks

Tick season is in full swing, and they are numerous this year. Check your dogs and yourself after a walk in the woods.

Pine Martins & Raccoons

Watch your small pets, reports of pine martins living in the dump and raccoons on the north side of the village.

Be Fox & Coyote Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Be Mountain Lion Aware

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 2nd. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

The bins were emptied May 1st and area cleaned up by the local community.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water. Turn off your trickle when it is above freezing during the day.

Update Apr 26, 2021: Yellow Pine Water Grant Presentation at the Valley County Commissioner Meeting April 26, 2021, YouTube video, Yellow Pine Water starts at the 2:10:00 mark and lasts about 27 minutes.

Here is the ‘power point’ presentation (in a PDF format) that was given during the public hearing April 26th at the Valley County meeting.
link: 20210426 ValleyCountyPresentation.pdf

Update Apr 16, 2021: Water usage is holding at around 35k gallons per day, down about 15k since a leak was fixed.

Update Nov 29, 2020: Warren replaced the water meter because of inconsistent readings. With the new meter, the community is currently using over 55,000 gallons of water per day. A leak has been identified and will be repaired as soon as we can coordinate the contractor, equipment needed and weather together. It is difficult to get everything planned in the winter. When the repair is scheduled, the community will have a few days notice before the water is shut down. Since we are using more water than the rated use through the sand filters, the boil order will remain in effect. We continue the grant request process that is extremely slow. – Steve H

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Your Water Before Using
Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020.
Link: to Notice
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VYPA News:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Secretary
Ron Noel, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)

Festival
Anyone interested in being a part of the Festival Planning/Working committee, please contact Deb Filler. Meetings will begin at the end of January. Even if you aren’t physically in YP, you can participate in the committee.
Next Festival Planning Meeting May 9, 2021 – Contact Deb for Zoom link and passcode.
2021 Planning Notes updated May 28th (link)
Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival Policy and Procedure Link:
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YPFD News:

The Fire Station recently had a propane heater installed. The heater will be a great addition to the fire station. It will be more efficient at keeping the station above freezing during the winter, especially since we keep water in the engines so they are ready to roll if an emergency occurs. It will also make it more pleasant to hold meetings at the fire station. Big thanks to Fire Chief Tim Rogers for coordinating this.

Meeting schedule for the YPFD. All meetings are at the YPFD Station
Sat. May 15 at 10am
Sat. June 12 at 10am
Sat. July 10 at 10am
Sat. September 11 at 10am Budget Meeting

YP Fire District 2 (east of Yellow Pine Ave) up for election Nov 2nd for 4 year term (per Valley County.) Link:

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30, 2020 at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

Make sure to keep your chimney clean. Cleaning brushes can be borrowed from the YPFD.

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by a escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Tim Rogers – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
As of Monday 5/10 we will only be open on the weekends, until Memorial Day. Friday-Sunday 11am-8pm
We offer smoked tri tip, brisket, and chicken sandwiches and also burgers and chicken wings.
Firewood Permits available May 15th.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Yellow Pine Tavern open daily:
Monday thru Thursday 8am to 9pm
Friday and Saturday 8am to 10pm
Sunday 8am to 8pm
Indoor Dining with limited seating and Outdoor Dining Available.
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer, Wine and Pop
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed Nov 3rd for winter.
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Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
Rooms, fuel, and laundry available now. Store plans to open by Memorial Day weekend.
Email for reservations
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Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (May 3) overnight low of 25 degrees, heavy frost melting this morning under an almost clear sky. Some of the tree swallows are back, robins chirping, cassin’s finches calling and jays visiting. First daffodil starting to bloom. Mostly cloudy by lunch time. Breezy and mostly cloudy all afternoon, high of 62 degrees. Broken cloud cover and light breeze early evening. Mostly cloudy and fairly calm at dusk, robins calling. Looked cloudy before midnight.

Tuesday (May 4) overnight low of 30 degrees, partly clear sky this morning, light dew and slight breeze. A few tree swallows, jays and lots of cassin’s finches and a hairy woodpecker visiting, fat colombian ground squirrels scampering around. Daffodils blooming like crazy. Overcast before lunch time. Partly clear and breezy afternoon, high of 63 degrees. Temperature dropping and dark clouds coming in early evening. Mostly cloudy, warm and light breezes at dusk. Stars out before midnight.

Wednesday (May 5) overnight low of 27 degrees, almost clear sky (tiny hazy spots) and slight breeze this morning. A few tree swallows swooping around, robins and finches calling, ground squirrels running about, later several hummingbirds including a male black-chinned and a dark-eyed junco stopped by. Warm, clear and light breezes at lunch time. Mail truck made it in early today, roads were good. Power out 104pm-629pm. Warm, breezy and partly hazy afternoon, high of 69 degrees. Report of 2 ospreys on the nest down by the EFSF river. Hazy sky at dusk, calmer and warm. Frogs croaking after dark. A few stars out before midnight.

Thursday (May 6) overnight low of 31 degrees, almost clear sky (small patch of thin haze to the east.) Lots of tree swallows, cassin’s finches, robins, jays, male and female cowbirds and colombian ground squirrels. Report of 3 collared doves in the neighborhood. Mostly clear and getting a little breezy at lunch time. Smoke to the north east by early afternoon (Bald Hill Rx burn) and blustery. Biting gnats are out. Mostly cloudy, hot and blustery late afternoon, high of 80 degrees. Dark overcast early evening and gusty breezes. Still light out at 915pm. Gusty rain shower around 10pm. Cloudy after midnight. Probably more rain during the night.

Friday (May 7) 24 hour low of 45 degrees from Thursday morning, measured 0.05″ of rain from last night’s showers, dark overcast and light breezes this morning. Helicopter to the north east around 830am and again a little after 9am. Dozens of birds this morning, cassin’s finches, a few evening grosbeaks, some cowbirds, a few jays, hummingbirds, swallows and robins. A report of a pair of quail in the neighborhood. Rain fell before lunch time for less than an hour. Leaves getting bigger on aspens. Thinner clouds early afternoon. Breezy sprinkles of rain on and off late afternoon for about an hour and cooler, high of 58 degrees. Elk wandering the neighborhood just after sunset. Partly clear and calmer at dusk. Looked cloudy before midnight.

Saturday (May 8) overnight low of 29 degrees, partly clear sky and light breezes, a trace of rain yesterday but enough to measure. Lots of finches visiting, also tree swallows, jays and a clark’s nutcracker. Mostly cloudy and breezy at lunch time. Partly clear, cool and light breezes late afternoon, high of 53 degrees. Mostly clear at dusk. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Sunday (May 9) overnight low of 24 degrees, partly clear sky and light breezes this morning. A few swallows, finches, hummingbirds and jays visiting, later a sharp-shinned hawk stopped by (and scared all the song birds and chickens.) Overcast before lunch time. Breaks in the clouds and a bit breezy early afternoon. Mostly cloudy and chilly breezes late afternoon, high of 51 degrees. Smell of wood smoke in the air, presumably from local wood stoves. Quiet and lighter breezes before sunset.
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RIP:

John Albert Hanson
Feb 6, 1925 – March 19, 2021

John was a WWII veteran. He joined the navy in the late fall of 1942. He served in the Pacific on submarines. He was part of a special operation that is still classified today. After the war, he attended U.C. Berkley, graduating with a Masters degree in Education. He was a teacher and a principal during his career.

We first came to Yellow Pine in the summer of 1979 to visit Don and Dottie Millen and Carl Kitchen who we knew from teaching in the same school district in the past. In 1980 we learned from them that the teacher position in Yellow Pine would be open in the fall. John had just retired and we were looking for a new adventure. We decided to apply. We went to McCall for an interview in early August and were hired that day, much to our surprise. Thus began our life in Yellow Pine. We taught from the fall of 1980 through June of 1987. We taught in McCall the year of 1985-1986, as there were no students for school in Yellow Pine that year.

School days in Yellow Pine were always an adventure. As teachers and students together we were always busy learning, living and taking care of each other. As a group we camped, we hiked, we learned about our surrounds, we discovered, we sewed, we painted, we did woodcrafts, we skied, we cooked, we played baseball and basketball, we picked huckleberries, we did a Christmas play at the B&F Bar directed by Dale Johnson, we sang, we welcomed the National Geographic crew to Yellow Pine, we visited Lafe and Emma Cox at the ranch to see a Presidential Inauguration on TV. A first TV view for some. We learned to read the newspaper when we could get one. we consumed many books of all kinds, we learned games and puzzles. John and Don Millen and several students flew to McCall for a cross country ski race. We had a Christmas “Brazeer” as one student called it, where the students sold things they made so they could buy treats and things they wanted for school (like new balls, ski poles, and boots.) They wrote the University of Yellow Pine Cookbook, which was a big seller. Most all residents came to buy something. With the help of Harlow Struble and Dave McClintock and other community members the basketball court was poured. There was always something going on.

John loved the game of golf, so with the forest all around us, he decided to put in a few holes. He and neighbor Rick Boyd laid the original 9 holes with Rick throwing a baseball different directions through the forest. They drank a lot of beer, lost the baseball many times, and found it again over the time it took to establish those 9 holes. Over the years other community members and forest service became involved and supported the course including Bud Boyd who named all of the holes.

When Don Millen, Bud Boyd and John felt we needed to establish a fire district (to lower home insurance costs if you could get insurance at all,) we started golf tournaments to benefit the Fire Department. They were very popular. People came to Yellow Pine just to play golf. John was always buying clubs in thrift stores and leaving them at the store so anyone could go play a round anytime.

A relative of the Sumners (we were told) interviewed John for an article she wanted to write about the golf course. She submitted it to Golf Magazine. They printed the article in the August 2006 issue. The photographer they sent in made several errors in the captioned photos. 1) The teacherage house, where we first lived and is no longer there, was NOT a course club house and 2) John, who was 81 at the time was not the founder of Yellow Pine, but he was very proud of the course, community members and others who helped maintain it over the years. It always put a smile on his face when he saw or heard others enjoying a round of golf.

While we were active in the community for many many years, we tended to hang out at home and entertain family and friends, community members, and others from all over the United States and Canada.

John served on the Village Council many times, helped establish the Fire District, build the Fire Department building, served on the Fire District Board, the Water Board and was a Quick Responder Unit member.

As John got older it got harder for him to get around and do things that needed to be done. It was very frustrating for him. He had always been very active. He fished, hunted, snowmobiled and loved to ride the ATV. While gathering winter wood was a chore, it was one he enjoyed. He was always looking for a “good tree” as we drove in or out.

We closed the house in October 2019 and were not able to return until now.

He is survived by 4 children: Deborah, Eric, Barbara and Holly and their spouses; 8 grandchildren: Dawn, Jannelle, Joshua, John, Abby, Chloe, Rupert, Marcella and their spouses; 10 great-grandchildren: Kate, Brad, Gabriella, Alyssa, Bentley, Kayla, Elijah, Emma, Ender, and a newborn son of Marcella, myself and a very loyal English Black Lab – Shadow II – who owns him still.
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Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 187 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths

May 7, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 187 new COVID-19 cases and 8 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March to 188,788.

There are a total of 151,224 confirmed cases and 37,564 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state. …

The state said 616,645 people have received the vaccine, and 1,1,04,528 total doses have been administered. 521,942 people are fully vaccinated. …

The age group with the most cases is 18-29 with 47,217 cases.

The state said 12 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 8,211, and 2 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 1,385. …

225 vaccine breakthrough cases have been reported.

8 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 2,061.

full story:
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McCall City Council votes to lift mask mandate

City leaders are still encouraging the public to follow Central District Health recommendations.

KTVB Staff May 7, 2021

Face masks will no longer be required for visitors in McCall city limits.

At a special meeting Thursday, the McCall City Council voted to lift a mask mandate that was set to expire on May 26.

During its April 22nd meeting, city leaders approved a series of four metrics to monitor as influencers on their decision to require masks in McCall. …

All McCall businesses will now have the option to continue requiring masks as it fits their service model.

full story:
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Valley County COVID-19 vaccination rate creeps up to 54%

By Tom Grote for The Star-News May 6, 2021

The total of eligible Valley County residents who had received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine continued its slow climb last week, the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare reported.

A total of 54% of eligible Valley County residents had received a dose by Monday, according to the H&W’s online COVID-19 tracking site.

That is up 1% from the 53% reported last week and up 2% from the 52% reported two weeks ago.

A total of 5,164 county residents had received the vaccine out of an estimated 9,552 eligible, an increase of 95 over the previous week.

Six new COVID-19 cases were reported by St. Luke’s McCall last week, while Cascade Medical Center has not seen a new case since March 17, reports from the hospitals said.

A total of 751 cases have been reported in Valley County since the start of the pandemic.

Four confirmed deaths and two suspected deaths related to COVID-19 among Valley County residents have been reported by Central District Health.

St. Luke’s McCall is now offering walk-in vaccines with no appointment from 8 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesdays and Wednesdays at Payette Lakes Family Medicine, 211 Forest St.

St. Luke’s McCall is giving the Moderna vaccine, which is approved for those age 18 and older. The Pfizer vaccine, approved for those age 16 and older, is available at St. Luke’s sites in the Boise area.

Appointments can be scheduled online on St. Luke’s myChart or by calling 208-381-9500.

Cascade Medical Center offers both the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines. To schedule an appointment, visit (link), follow the vaccine request button and fill out the information, or call 208-382-4285.

Hospital employees will call back to schedule the appointment.

continued:
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Valley County gets $1.4M in federal funds for roads, schools

By Max Silverson for The Star-News May 6, 2021

Local governments recently received about $1.4 million in federal funding for road work, schools, search and rescue and firewise projects from the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act of 2000.

Of that money, about $894,000 went to the Valley County Road Department, about $349,000 went to the McCall-Donnelly School District and about $50,000 went to the Cascade School District.

Also, about $105,000 went to a fund used for search and rescue and programs to thin and prune trees near homes to prevent wildfires. Valley County Commissioners have discretion to allocate those funds to each use. About $425,000 of the funding going to the Valley County Road Department will be used to reconstruct West Lake Fork Road between Norwood Road and Nisual Road, said Road Superintendent Jeff McFadden.

Work on the mile-long stretch of road will include culvert replacements, widening the roadway and a new asphalt surface, McFadden said.

Bids for construction of the project are scheduled to be opened next Thursday, May 13.

Historically, the road and bridge department received about $3 million per year from timber receipts on federal lands.

That program was dissolved in 2000 and replaced with SRS, but the program is not guaranteed, with Congress extending the act on a sporadic basis.

The department received only about $75,000 in SRS funds in 2017, and over $1 million from 2018 to 2020.

The future of the funding is not guaranteed and it has not been reauthorized for 2022.

Rural counties will need to continue to engage members of congress to advocate for future funding, said Valley County Clerk Douglas Miller.

Of the total money the county receives from SRS, 30% is allocated to the school districts. The McCall-Donnelly School District receives 87% of those funds, and the Cascade School District receives 13%.

The M-D District will likely save the funds for one-time expenditures like facility improvements or renovations, said Superintendent Jim Foudy.

The district has some needs that are not tied to the $33 million bond that was recently passed to expand and remodel Donnelly Elementary School and Payette Lakes Middle School, he said.

Cascade School District Superintendent Jeff Blaser said the funds would be used to purchase new social studies curriculum and help complete asbestos abatement in some older areas of the school.

Funding requests have already been made for the $105,000 set aside for firewise programs and search and rescue.

Valley County Search and Rescue has requested about $33,000 to purchase a new all-terrain vehicle, said Valley County Search and Rescue Captain Larry Mangum.

In 2020, SRS funds for the program included $53,000 for a search and rescue truck and about $5,500 for a drone to assist in searches, Mangum said.

The SRS funds are used throughout the county to support wildfire education, risk assessment and planning to reduce risk, said Stephanie Nelson of Wildfire Prevention Associates.

The Bring It Don’t Burn It program encourages landowners to remove and dispose of their woody debris instead of starting a fire on their land, she said.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
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The Star-News wins 12 awards from Idaho Press Club

The Star-News May 6, 2021

The Star-News won 12 awards, including first place in General Excellence among weekly newspapers, in the Best of 2020 Annual Awards Contest sponsored by the Idaho Press Club.

The Star-News won five first-place awards, six second-place awards and one third-place award in the contest results announced last Saturday.

The Star-News finished first for General Excellence for weekly newspapers based on a sampling of three issues during 2020 specified by contest rules. The Meridian Press won second place while the Idaho Mountain Express in Ketchum won third place.

continued:
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Burn permits required in Idaho from May 10 to Oct. 20

by CBS2 News Staff Friday, May 7th 2021

The Idaho Department of Lands issued a statement Friday notifying Idaho residents that state burn permits are required from May 10 to Oct. 20.

The number of burn permits issued each year in Idaho averages at about 18,000, and that number continues to rise.

Idaho law (38-115) requires any person planning to burn outside city limits within Idaho, including crop residue burning, to get a state burn permit during closed fire season.

A burn permit must be obtained before starting debris burning and you must have it with you when burning.

Permits are free and good for 10 days. Campfires do not require a burn permit.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Fuelwood Season Starts May 15 on the Payette National Forest

McCall, Idaho, May 4, 2021 – Personal use fuelwood permits for the Payette National Forest will be available beginning May 15, through November 30, 2021. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic we will be selling permits with curbside service only.

Curbside service is being implemented for the safety of members of the public, and the safety of our front-line employees. For curbside services, call the local District office first.

Additionally, fuelwood permits can be purchased in person at these locations:

Weiser: Ridley’s Food and Drug (208) 549-1332
Open: Everyday 7 a.m. – 11 p.m.

Weiser Farmer’s Supply Cooperative (208) 549-0654
Open: Everyday 5 a.m. – 10 p.m.

Cambridge: Jay’s Sinclair (208) 257-5000
Open: Everyday 6 a.m. – 10 p.m.

Council: Farmer’s Supply Co-op (208) 253-4266
Open: Everyday 6 a.m. – 10 p.m.

McCall: Albertsons (208) 634-8166
Open: Everyday 6 a.m. -11 p.m.

New Meadows: C&M Lumber (208) 347-2194
Open: Monday – Saturday 8 a.m. -6 p.m.

Yellow Pine: The Corner (208) 634-3325
Open: Wednesday – Monday (closed on Tuesday) 11 a.m. -8 p.m.

The prohibition of cutting Larch (Tamarack) after November 1 remains in place this year. Larch lose their needles every fall and appear to be dead, resulting in too many live trees being accidentally cut. This regulation is to prevent the cutting of live Larch trees after they have lost their needles in the fall.

Fuelwood permit prices remain at $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum, and a 10-cord maximum per household. Please note we cannot sell permits for only 2 cords. If you want all ten cords, permits purchased will need to be 5 cords and 5 cords, or 4 cords and 6 cord, or all 10 cords at once.

The Payette National Forest has a free-use area located in the Big Creek area. A free-use permit is required for this area, and can be obtained by calling the McCall Ranger District office. Specifics of the free-use location and requirements will be explained to people seeking free-use permits. Free-use fuelwood counts as personal use toward the 10-cord maximum per household.

Cutting fuelwood within a closure area is prohibited. Check on the Alerts and Notices page of Forest websites for closure information.

Check this year’s fuelwood brochure and current Motor Vehicle Use Maps to make sure you are cutting in an area open to fuelwood gathering, and pay special attention to closed areas and roads with restoration project areas. Regulations prohibit the cutting of dead or living Whitebark pine trees due to decline in this tree species, and their critical importance to wildlife.

Fuelwood permits are valid within the Boise, Payette and Sawtooth Forests. All motorized travel related to fuelwood gathering must be in full accordance with Forest Service travel regulations for the area as shown in the Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM), unless specifically exempted in the fuelwood permit. For information about fuelwood cutting on surrounding National forests, please contact them directly.

Permit holders are encouraged to cut fuelwood early in the year because fire restrictions may impact the cutting season later in the summer. Early season fuelwood cutters are asked to use caution to avoid wet muddy roads where travel may cause resource damage. Fuelwood cutting is not allowed within riparian areas (adjacent to creeks and rivers).

For additional information, contact the local Ranger District offices, or visit the Forest website and Payette National Forest Facebook page.

Weiser Ranger District, Monday through Friday, 8a.m. to 4:30p.m. 208-549-4200

Council Ranger District, Monday through Friday, 8a.m. to 4:30p.m. 208-253-0100

McCall Ranger District, Monday through Friday, 8a.m. to 4:30p.m. 208-634-0400

New Meadows Ranger District, Monday through Friday, 8a.m. to 4:30p.m. 208-347-0300

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Tribal Liaison
Payette National Forest
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Boise National Forest begins personal use fuelwood sales May 15

Boise, Idaho, May 5, 2021 — Personal use fuelwood permits for the Boise National Forest will be available for sale beginning May 15, through Nov. 30, 2021. To reduce the risk of COVID-19 exposure to the public and employees the Boise National Forest is offering multiple choices to purchase personal fuelwood permits. For information about fuelwood cutting on surrounding National Forests, please contact them directly.

1. Vendors in surrounding communities will be selling personal use fuelwood permits
2. Visitor Information Center/BLM Public Room, 1387 S. Vinnell Way, Boise, Idaho
3. All mail-in applications will be processed at the Cascade Ranger District
4. Call-in applications will be processed at all Ranger District offices

1. Vendors – Fuelwood permits can be purchased at the following commercial vendor locations:
Caldwell: East Cleveland Beverage: (208) 459-6442
Emmett: B & W Fuels: (208) 365-2291
Horseshoe Bend: Ray’s Corner Market (208) 793-2391
Garden Valley: Garden Valley Chevron (208) 462-3869
Placerville: Donna’s Place (208) 392-9666
Idaho City: Tom’s Service (208) 392-4900
Idaho City: Idaho City Grocery (208) 392-4426
Idaho City: Seasons (208) 392-9777

2. Visitor Information Center/BLM Public Room – 208-373-3889
Fuelwood permits can be purchased at the Visitor Information Center/BLM Public Room
Located at – 1387 S. Vinnell Way, Boise, Idaho; Monday thru Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

3. The Mail-in application process are for the continued safety of the public and our front-line employees. Mail-in application forms are available to print or can be picked up outside Boise National Forest Ranger District offices.
Mail-in applications with check or money order payable to USDA (No Cash) to: Cascade Ranger District / Attn: Fuelwood Program / P.O. Box 696 / Cascade, ID 83611.
For questions contact the Cascade Ranger District Office 208-382-7400; Monday – Friday: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Business Operations may be impacted by COVID-19 Restrictions and Closures, or Forest Fire Operations.)

4. Call-in applications – Please note: Not all Districts are able to provide pick up services. Please confirm with the individual District offices when calling in your application if pick up is available.
Call-in applications with a credit card will be processed at the Ranger District Offices and then, either mailed to the applicant or arrangements may be made to pick up the permit. Days and Hours of Business Operations may be impacted by COVID-19 Restrictions and Closures, or Forest Fire Operations.
• Mountain Home Ranger District 208-587-7961
• Idaho City Ranger District 208-392-6681
• Cascade Ranger District 208-382-7400
• Lowman Ranger District 208-259-3361
• Emmett Ranger District 208-365-7000

For more information:
• Boise National Forest fuelwood webpage. (link)
• Motor Vehicle Use Maps to ensure you are cutting in areas open to motor vehicle use. (link)
• To see current forest closures visit the interactive Forest Closure story map. Cutting fuelwood within a closed area is prohibited. (link)

Fuelwood permit prices remain at $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum, and a 10-cord maximum per household. Please note we cannot sell permits for only 2 cords. If you want all 10 cords, permits purchased will need to be 5 cords and 5 cords, or 4 cords and 6 cord, or all 10 cords at once. Pick up your 2021 fuelwood brochure with tags when you purchase the fuelwood permit

Permit holders are encouraged to cut fuelwood early in the year because fire restrictions may impact the cutting season later in the summer. Early season fuelwood cutters are asked to use caution to avoid wet muddy roads where travel may cause resource damage. Fuelwood cutting is not allowed within riparian areas (adjacent to creeks and rivers).

There is no cutting of Larch (Tamarack) after Nov. 1. Larch lose their needles every fall and appear to be dead, resulting in too many live trees being accidentally cut. This new regulation is to prevent the cutting of live Larch trees after they have lost their needles in the fall.

Venetia Gempler
Public Affairs Officer
(208) 373-4105
Boise National Forest
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Clear Creek Forest Health – Community Meeting Materials Available

May 4, 2021

Clear Creek Project: Virtual Community Meeting Recording Available

Meeting materials from the March 30 Clear Creek Forest Health Project Virtual Community Meeting have been posted on the project webpage.

* Click Here to access the project webpage. Materials from the meeting, including Q&A, presentation slides, and a video recording can be found here.
* Click Here for a direct link to the video recording of the Virtual Community Meeting.

The Boise National Forest, Mountain Home Ranger District hosted this meeting. For questions about this project, please send an email to comments-intermtn-boise-mtn-home@usda.gov. Include “Clear Creek Project” in the subject line.
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Boise National Forest officials find ‘disturbing situation’ at Kirkham Hot Springs

by Ryan L Morrison Tuesday, May 4th 2021 CBS2


Boise National Forest officials find ‘disturbing situation’ at Kirkham Hot Springs. (Courtesy of the Boise National Forest, USFS)

Officials with USFS for Boise National Forest said they recently found a “disturbing situation” at the Kirkham Hot Springs.

A photo from a Boise National Forest Facebook post shows a completely trashed bathroom. Unfortunately, this doesn’t seem to be an isolated event.

“This is the very disturbing situation that is occurring at many Forest Service campsites,” the post explains. “PLEASE pack out your trash!”

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Woodhead Fire Rehabilitation Project

May 5, 2021

The Forest Service is seeking scoping comments for the proposed Woodhead Fire Rehabilitation Project on the Council and Weiser Ranger Districts of the Payette National Forest. A Description of the Proposed Action and associated Maps are available on the project’s webpage at (link).

The Forest Service is contacting interested individuals, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by May 21, 2021, and make your comments as specific as possible.

The project webpage provides you tools to engage this process as you wish. From “Get Connected” on the right hand side of the page, click on “Subscribe to Email Updates” if you wish to receive electronic communication about this project. Use the “Comment/Object on project” link to access a simple webform to submit your comments on this project. The “Public Comment/Objection Reading Room” are the published comments received on this project.

Webform submission of comments is preferred but written, facsimile, hand-delivered, verbal, and electronic comments concerning these projects will be accepted. Hand delivered comment letters may be delivered during regular business hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, excluding holidays at the Council Ranger District office, 2092 Highway 95, Council, ID 83612, Ph: 208-253-0100, Fax: 208-253-0109.

Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection and will be released in their entirety if requested pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act. Comments received in response to this request will also be available for public inspection on the “Public Comment Reading Room” on the project webpage.

For further information on this project, please contact Mark Fox, NEPA Coordinator, mark.fox@usda.gov

Sincerely,
Ronda Bishop, District Ranger
Council and Weiser Ranger Districts
Payette National Forest
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Council and Indian Mountains C & H Allotments Range Improvements Project

May 5, 2021

The Forest Service is seeking scoping comments for the proposed Council and Indian Mountains C & H Allotments Range Improvements Project on the Council Ranger District of the Payette National Forest. A Description of the Proposed Action and associated Maps are available on the project’s webpage at (link).

The Forest Service is contacting interested individuals, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by May 21, 2021, and make your comments as specific as possible.

The project webpage provides you tools to engage this process as you wish. From “Get Connected” on the right hand side of the page, click on “Subscribe to Email Updates” if you wish to receive electronic communication about this project. Use the “Comment/Object on project” link to access a simple webform to submit your comments on this project. The “Public Comment/Objection Reading Room” are the published comments received on this project.

Webform submission of comments is preferred but written, facsimile, hand-delivered, verbal, and electronic comments concerning these projects will be accepted. Hand delivered comment letters may be delivered during regular business hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, excluding holidays at the Council Ranger District office, 2092 Highway 95, Council, ID 83612, Ph: 208-253-0100, Fax: 208-253-0109.

Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection and will be released in their entirety if requested pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act. Comments received in response to this request will also be available for public inspection on the “Public Comment Reading Room” on the project webpage.

For further information on this project, please contact Mark Fox, NEPA Coordinator, mark.fox@usda.gov

Sincerely,
Ronda Bishop, District Ranger
Council and Weiser Ranger Districts
Payette National Forest
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Great American Outdoors Act funds local projects

Improving recreation opportunities and supporting communities

Boise, Idaho, May 7, 2021 — The Boise National Forest is pleased to announce that they will begin working on nine projects using funding from the Great American Outdoors Act (GAOA). The projects are the first round of infrastructure improvements to address deferred maintenance on the Forest while improving visitor experiences.

“Our highest priority when implementing the Great American Outdoors Act are those projects that reduce deferred maintenance, are ready to implement and provide the greatest immediate benefit to the public,” said Tawnya Brummett, Boise National Forest Supervisor.

* Yellow Jacket, Ten Mile Ridge and Silver Creek Summit Trail Maintenance
* Scriver Creek Priority Bridge Replacement
* East Fork Burnt Log Creek Priority Bridge Replacement
* Boundary Creek -Dagger Falls Road Improvements
* Central Idaho Wilderness Complex Priority Area Trails Maintenance.
* Edna Creek Campground Redesign and Improvements
* Toilet Replacements at Buck Mountain, Penny Springs and Trout Creek Campgrounds
* Idaho City Compound Water System Reconstruction
* Third Fork Project Camp and Recreation Rental Cabin Water System Reconstruction.

Signed into law in August 2020, the Great American Outdoors Act provides funding that will enable federal land managers to take aggressive steps to address deferred maintenance and other infrastructure projects on national forests and grasslands through 2025.

Each year Forests submit projects for consideration using the following criteria: Reduction of deferred maintenance; Promote Sustainability; Improve visitor experiences.

For more information related to specific Boise National Forest GAOA projects, Intermountain Region’s Great American Outdoor Act projects or USDA Forest Service webpage. (link)

Venetia Gempler
Public Affairs Staff Officer
Boise National Forest
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Critter News:

Idaho governor greenlights killing of 90% of state’s wolf population

The new law allows the animals to be shot from snowmobiles and ATVs and diverts taxpayer money to pay private contractors to kill an estimated 1,350 wolves.

KTVB Staff May 7, 2021

Idaho Gov. Brad Little signed a controversial bill Thursday that will allow the killing of most of the wolves in the state.

The bill allocates taxpayer money to pay private contractors to kill wolves, as well as expanding permission for hunters and trappers to kill the animals.

Senate Bill 1211 allows for up to 1,350 wolves to be killed, or about 90% of Idaho’s wolf population.

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If you encounter ‘abandoned’ baby animals, Idaho Fish and Game says it’s best to leave them be

Animals sometimes leave their young alone for a long period of time for numerous reasons, but IFG says young animals know instinctively to stay where they are.

Celina Van Hyning (KTVB) May 4, 2021


Credit: Idaho Fish and Game

As the spring season continues, young wildlife may begin to roam across the outdoors without their mothers. While instincts may encourage you to rescue the seemingly abandoned babies, Idaho Fish and Game (IFG) is encouraging people to leave them alone.

IFG receives numerous calls each spring from well-intentioned people who have “rescued” baby animals that are seemingly lost or abandoned. IFG knows these individuals have the best of intentions but wants to reiterate that removing baby animals from their habitat often does more damage than good.

Animal parents will sometimes leave their babies alone for an extended period of time for a number of reasons, from searching for food to diverting the attention of predators from their vulnerable offspring.

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Fish and Game asks public to report deer found dead

The public should report the deaths of deer to help detect possible disease outbreaks, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game said,.

Every year, especially during and just after winter, F&G receives frequent reports of dead deer in McCall, said Regan Berkley, regional wildlife manager in McCall.

“While we appreciate reports of dead deer, we do not have the resources to remove every dead deer found in town,” Berkley said.

F&G wants to hear about dead wildlife to identify potential disease outbreaks, highway crossing hot spots or suspected illegal activity, she said.

However, residents are asked to remove dead animals on their own property.

“Fish and Game staff need to prioritize addressing animals that are causing a hazardous situation in town: dead wildlife in roadways, bears that have become habituated to people, and deer that are aggressively defending fawns,” Berkley said.

Animals that are not causing hazards can be moved by homeowners, especially once F&G has been notified about the dead animal.

Smaller animals can be bagged and put in the trash, while larger animals can be moved to nearby woods or transported in a pickup truck either to woods or the county transfer station.

The growing town deer herd has led to increased reports of dead or injured town deer, Berkley said.

“Dead wildlife can be sad, unsightly, and stinky but with a limited staff it’s just not possible for us to remove them all,” she said.

source: The Star-News May 6, 2021
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Fish & Game News:

Weekly Salmon Fishing Update – May 5, 2021

By Chris Sullivan, Anadromous Fisheries Coordinator
Wednesday, May 5, 2021

Welcome to our weekly Chinook Salmon Fishing Update. Each week, we will provide updates on seasons and rules and share data from creel surveys, hatchery returns, and fish passage through the Columbia and Snake rivers to help anglers plan their salmon fishing trips.

Chinook salmon fishing started April 24, and this week we cover seasons and rules information, review fish passage data through the hydrosystem, and discuss fishing effort and harvest from the weekend fisheries.

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Boise Angler Sets Rod/Reel Carp Record

By Martin Koenig, Natural Resource Program Coordinator
Wednesday, May 5, 2021


Henry Charlier

Congratulations to Henry Charlier of Boise on landing a 34-pound common carp from the Snake River. Henry wrangled the lunker carp while fishing the stretch below CJ Strike Reservoir on May 3, 2021. The fish beats the previously-held record of 30.4 pounds, set by Alexander Veenstra last December. As an avid angler, Henry enjoys the challenge of chasing big carp, which can be very challenging to catch on conventional tackle.

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The Complexities of Idaho’s Bull Trout

By Brett Bowersox, Fisheries Staff Biologist
Thursday, May 6, 2021

We often talk about the complexities of Idaho’s anadromous salmon and steelhead which make their long journey all the way to the ocean and back, but another Idaho native, the Bull Trout, has some amazing tricks up its sleeve.

Idaho’s Bull Trout are dispersed across much of the state, ranging from the Canadian border all the way south to drainages such as the Boise River, Little Lost, and even the Jarbidge River which originates in Nevada. Since Bull Trout are found in so many places, they are required to adapt to a wide variety of habitats. The result is a variety of strategies, known as life histories, being used by Bull Trout to maximize the use of the habitats available. Here are the major life history types of Bull Trout in Idaho.


Corey Comstock

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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Angry rhino flips car at safari park

CCTV Sept. 1, 2019

A keeper at a German safari park is lucky to be alive after a powerful rhinoceros flipped her car numerous times while she was trapped inside.


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Seasonal Humor:

MothersDayEgg-a

CovidArkTP-a
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