Monthly Archives: June 2021

Road Reports June 30, 2021

Note: It has been exstremely hot and dry in the area for the last week.

Please share road reports. Back country roads have not been graded and are rough. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. There is still snow in higher elevations, but it melting fast (rivers are running below normal.) Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are dry and dusty. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting June 1, crews will transition into their summer construction schedule. Drivers can anticipate single-lane, alternating traffic controlled by flaggers Monday – early Friday morning. From Friday morning – Sunday, and any major holidays, the road will be open to two lanes. This schedule will be in place until September.
Project link:
Donnelly to Deinhard Project: Next week construction will begin on Highway 55 between Donnelly and McCall. This is a much-needed project to repair potholes and cracks in the roadway and will include placing a new layer of pavement on the highway for smoother driving conditions.
What to expect:
* Idaho 55 will be reduced to one lane with pilot cars midweek (Monday – Thursday)
* All lanes will be open on weekends (Friday – Sunday)
* Roadway surface will be uneven for several weeks
* Speed limit will be reduced and 12-foot restrictions will be in place
* Construction is expected to be complete in September.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Friday (June 25) the road is in great shape. Compliment on the reconstruction and paving. Lots of traffic and campers.
South Fork Salmon River salmon fishing reopens on July 2-5. Check F&G regs.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Friday (June 25) the road is clear but rough.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (June 30) Mail truck driver reports the road is getting “washboardier.”
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open
Reported to be rough. Watch for ATV and UTV traffic.
Road Closure: Lick Creek Road will be closed at Zena Creek (about 4 miles east of the Ponderosa Campground) from July 19 – July 29 for a bridge replacement. Please plan ahead.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open
No current report.
Last report (June 14) that folks have been traveling over the summit this last weekend, the road is in bad shape.
Another report (June 14) the downed trees from this last winter have been cut out wide enough to accommodate trucks and trailers.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Link: Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open, travel at your own risk. Watch for downed trees.
A 2nd hand report (June 14) that someone made it over to Thunder Mtn. this last weekend in a full sized truck.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: May be open. Travel at your own risk.
A report (June 14) that the route still had snow, but it may be melting open soon. An earlier report that there were a lot of trees down during the winter snow.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Open per Valley County June 9th.
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Open
No current report.
Update from Payette NF May 27: “Secesh Summit to Burgdorf/Warren – Open. Warren Summit – Open to the South Fork Salmon River.”

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
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No Illegal Fireworks

Valley County June 25, 2021

NoFireworksSummer in Valley County has officially arrived and with it, the need for a reminder about fireworks safety and fire prevention. While fire danger is always of concern in the summer months, this year we are seeing increasing drought conditions, unseasonably hot weather, and a large influx of new visitors and forest users to our area who may not be well versed in fire prevention measures.

We urge you to use caution as you celebrate the Fourth of July holiday and keep these things in mind:

• Possessing or lighting any firework on U.S. Forest Service, Idaho Department of Lands, and Bureau of Land Management lands is illegal.
• Idaho allows “safe and sane” fireworks to be purchased and ignited on private land.
• Only light one firework at a time and maintain a safe distance after lighting.
• Keep a bucket of water on hand to douse used fireworks.
• Only light fireworks in clear, open areas away from structures and people.
• Lighting any aerial firework is illegal and a misdemeanor offense in Idaho, even on private property.
• That one bears repeating…lighting any aerial firework is illegal in the state of Idaho, even on private property.

If you plan to recreate on public lands, please keep the following tips in mind to help prevent forest fire:

• Never leave a campfire unattended.
• Completely extinguish campfires using water or stirring with dirt or sand. If it is too hot to touch, it is too hot to leave.
• Prevent sparks by making sure vehicles are not dragging tow chains or loose tail pipes.
• Ensure off-road vehicles have spark arrestors.

Help us protect Valley County from fire.

June 27, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

June 27, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Please be conservative when watering lawns. We ask those that are here all week to not water lawns on the weekends so that more water is available for the weekend cabin owners. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order issued
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit season
May 15 – Firewood Season, permits at The Corner
May 25 – Johnson Creek road fully open
June 7 – Lick Creek road open
June 13 – Profile road open
June 15 thru July 4 – Community Hall Yard Sale
June 26 – South Fork Salmon Season starts
June 26 – Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers Highland Games
July 2-4 Yard Sale Silver Dollar Cafe
July 2-3 Live Music at The Corner
July 3 – Annual Golf Tournament
July 3 – Independence Day Parade 4pm
July 4 – YPWUA 2021 Shareholder Meeting 10am
July 10 – YPFD meeting 10am at Fire Hall
July 10 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
July 11 – Festival Planning Meeting on Zoom 2pm
July 17 – ATV/UTV Escapade 10am
July 19-29 – Lick Creek Road closure for bridge replacement
July 21-22 – Mastercraft stove maintenance days
Aug 14 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
Sept 11 – YPFD Budget Meeting 10am at Fire Hall
(details below)
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Local Events:

Community Hall Yard Sale – Going on now.

June 15 thru July 4, 2021. At the Community Hall, This self-serve yard sale supports maintenance on the Community Hall. Shop at your leisure; decide what the items are worth to you; and pay one of the volunteers. Easy-peasy

Received a report complimenting on how well things were laid out at the hall.
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Dust Abatement

The infrastructure committee has determined to use Calcium Chloride this year (same stuff used on the E. Fork.) It is slightly less expensive than the Earthbind. If you are interested in dust abatement this year please let Deb Filler know. She can give you the cost information. If you would prefer the Earthbind (the stuff that was used last year) let Deb know that. If you choose Earthbind, North American Dust Control will bill you directly.

Dust abatement will occur once Landmark is open. (No date set yet as of June 18th, will be coordinated with the EFSF county dust abatement.)
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Yard Sale July 2-4

I am having a huge yard sale between the store and the Silver Dollar July 2nd, 3rd and 4th. Items include restaurant equipment, antiques, tools, building supplies, furniture, electrical wire, stainless steel cable, diesel heaters and much, much more. -S Holloway
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The Corner July 2-3

Live music at The Corner both Friday and Saturday evenings, starting at 5 p.m.
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Annual Golf Tournament, July 3rd

Check in at the golf course at 10am. Bring a team or we’ll set one up for you. $20 registration requested. Fun Prizes.

Proceeds support the Village of Yellow Pine
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Independence Day Parade July 3 4pm

Join us to watch or participate in the annual Yellow Pine Independence Day Parade. All family-friendly entrants are welcome. If you want to participate, meet at the fire house at 315pm.
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YPWUA 2021 Shareholder Meeting July 4 at 10am

Sunday July 4th 10am Community Hall

1. Financial Report – Willie
A. Willie stepping down as treasurer

2. Operations – Warren
A. Boil order status
B. Leaks

3. Grants – IMPORTANT VOTE BY SHAREHOLDERS TO OBTAIN GRANTS
A. Details of grants
B. Requirements to receive grants
C. More future grants

4. Summer lawn watering
A. Because of our situation lawn watering is discouraged
B. Odd/Even days watering
C. No watering after 2 pm

5. Election of one board member
A. Dave Prouty is not running for another term
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ATV/UTV Escapade July 17

July 17, 2021: This out-and-back ride is rated as intermediate. Participants ride from Yellow Pine Community Hall to Logan Creek , then return to Big Creek Campground for lunch (provided) and history/stories. After lunch, participants will continue the ride to Pilot Peak. The timeframe of this event is estimated to be from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. Check-in starts at 9:00am; leave at 10:00am. You can register early at (link)
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Heating Maintenance Day July 21-22

Deb Filler is coordinating with Mastercraft of McCall to schedule a maintenance day in Yellow Pine for propane and pellet stoves. If you are interested, please contact Deb at 208 633-6945. Mastercraft will be here July 21 and 22 to do stove maintenance.
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Village News:

The Highland Games Yellow Pine

BaldMtnKnuckleDraggers-aOn June 26th the Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers competed in Yellow Pine.

Link: to more info about the Highland Games and the Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers

Thank you to Steve Holloway for donating Alpine Village Lodge for the Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers so they could have their competition here in Yellow Pine.

This is the crew from Highland games.
20210626HighlandGames-a
courtesy Ann F.

Stone Throw

20210626HighlandGames1-a

Hammer Throw

20210626HighlandGames2-a

Caber Toss

20210626HighlandGames3-a

Weight Over Bar

20210626HighlandGames4-a

Photos courtesy of Deb F.
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Power Outage and Thunderstorm

Tuesday evening Yellow Pine had a power outage 833pm-115am due to high winds damaging infrastructure down in the valley. Power was out from Kuna to Donnelly. We also experienced an intense thunderstorm with lightning striking Golden Gate Hill. About 10 minutes of intense rain, followed by light sprinkles adding up to 0.23″ total.

Link: to short time-lapse video courtesy John B.

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Veterans’ Monument

With this heat, the flowers and shrubs at our Veterans’ Memorial dry out quickly. When Niebrand’s are in, they water them, but aren’t here all the time……if you go by, please check, and give them a drink with the hose that is there. Our veterans (and the Niebrand’s) thank you!
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Attention

Would the person who borrowed the measuring wheel please return it to the community hall? It will be needed for the festival.
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Lick Creek Road

Lick Creek Road will be closed at Zena Creek (about 4 miles east of the Ponderosa Campground) from July 19 – July 29 for a bridge replacement. Please plan ahead!
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Conserve (and Boil) Water

Please be conservative when watering lawns. We ask those that are here all week to not water lawns on the weekends so that more water is available for the weekend cabin owners. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!
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Scrap Metal

Sharing a message that Mike Amos will haul out a load of scrap metal. If you have scrap metal, contact Mike. He has an area by his place to stack it.
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Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Lick Creek Road will be closed at Zena Creek (about 4 miles east of the Ponderosa Campground) from July 19 – July 29 for a bridge replacement. Please plan ahead.

South Fork Salmon River salmon fishing opens on June 26.

Johnson Creek, Profile Gap and Lick Creek roads are Open. These roads have not been bladed and are rough.

Monumental summit is rumored to be open.

Elk summit was still closed last weekend (June 14) but could be open soon. Travel at your own risk.

Deadwood summit is open from the Landmark side.

The Hwy 55 project Smith’s Ferry area: Starting June 1, crews will transition into their summer construction schedule. Drivers can anticipate single-lane, alternating traffic controlled by flaggers Monday – early Friday morning. From Friday morning – Sunday, and any major holidays, the road will be open to two lanes. This schedule will be in place until September. Project Website link:

The Hwy 55 project from Donnelly to McCall starts soon. One lane during the week and two lanes on weekends. Project is slated to last until September.
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Critters

Aggressive Deer and Elk

Be aware that mothers will attack dogs and chase people if they feel their babies are threatened. Keep dogs leashed in the forest during “baby season” for their own protection.

Ticks

* Know where to expect ticks. Many ticks live in grassy, brushy, or wooded areas. When possible, avoid wooded and brushy areas with tall grass and leaf litter. Walk in the center of trails, particularly in spring and summer when ticks feed.
* Wear appropriate clothing. When in tick habitats, wear light-colored, tightly woven long pants and long-sleeve shirt. Tuck your pant legs into socks or boots, and your shirt into your pants. This helps keep ticks on the outside of your clothing where you can spot them more easily.
* Use tick repellent when necessary, and carefully follow instructions on the label. Apply an EPA-registered repellent effective against ticks, such as those containing DEET to clothes and exposed skin, and permethrin to clothes and gear. Take care when applying repellent on children. EPA’s search tool can help you find the repellent that best suits your needs.
* Check clothing, gear, and pets after being areas with ticks. Ticks can hitch a ride into your home on clothing and pets, then attach to you or a family member later. Carefully examine coats, camping gear, and daypacks. Don’t forget your dog, see CDC’s where to check your pet for ticks.
* Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming can reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease and may be effective in reducing the risk of other tick-borne disease. Showering can wash off unattached ticks and it is a good opportunity to do a tick check.
* Check your body, your child and pets thoroughly for ticks. Carefully inspect areas in and around the hair, head, neck, ears, under arms, inside the belly button, around the waist, between the legs, and behind the knees. Ticks can be very small before they feed—look for what may appear like a new freckle or speck of dirt. Continue checking for two to three days after returning from areas with ticks.

Pine Martins & Raccoons

Watch your small pets. Reports of pine martins living in the dump and raccoons on the north side of the village.

Be Bear, Fox & Coyote Aware

* Do not feed them human food
* Secure your trash
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Be Mountain Lion Aware

Note: A report of a mountain lion near the upper end of the village early this spring.

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
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Yellow Pine US Mail

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report June 13th: “The bins were half full.”

The bins were emptied May 22nd. Locals worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water. Turn off your trickles.

Update May 14, 2021: Kerry and Dion from Idaho Rural Water were onsite yesterday along with Nicki and me for leak detection in the “downtown” Yellow Pine grid.

Utilizing their leak detection equipment, and Nicki’s knowledge of the distribution system, Kerry and Dion successfully located a number of leaks including a large leak at a fire hydrant. The fire hydrant was turned off and Tim, the fire chief, was notified that the hydrant is not operational.

Many small leaks were identified and marked, but of particular concern is the waterline that runs under the alley behind the hotel and all the way down to the community center. Numerous active leaks were located in that section. So many leaks exist along the alley that the best course of action is probably replacing the entire run of pipe.

Nicki followed up after the guys left and using her tablet and GPS program, accurately recorded the location of all the leaks identified. Now that a record of the leak locations exists, prioritization of the leaks and a plan to repair them can be developed.

Kerry and Dion were very thorough and helpful, and the work they completed will be beneficial to reducing demand on the system as a whole. Based on today’s daily system data, reported this morning by Nicki, it appears that daily demand was reduced by approximately 10,000 gallons as a result of yesterday’s work.

Regards, Warren Drake, Drake Diversified LLC

Update May 13, 2021: Cecil, Tom and Ron fixed a leaking valve which resulted in saving 5000 gallons of water!

Update May 6, 2021: The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an application with the USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility planning grant. If any additional information is needed please contact: Willie Sullivan, Treasurer Ypwater @ gmail.com

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Your Water Before Using
Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020.
Link: to Notice
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VYPA News:

June 12 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall (no minutes yet)
Minutes link:

Village Of Yellow Pine Association June 12,2021

In attendance: Deb Filler Chairmen, Ronda Rogers Treasurer, Rhonda Egbert Secretary

Joel Fields, Marj Fields, Willie Sullivan, Lynn Imel, Virginia Bartholomew

Meeting called to order at 2pm, June12,2021 by Deb Filler.

Prior Meeting minutes approved.

Treasurer’s report by Ronda Rogers:
Account Fund Balance
General Fund $8311.94
Festival $14712.50
Cemetery $4350.36
Infrastructure $7191.98
Community Hall $4198.23
Total $38765.01

Community – Ronda Rogers reported the storage shed was delivered and being used for Harmonica Festival and other event storage. Grant completed.

Cemetery – Tim Rogers has resigned, Ron Basabe has agreed to take his position. Flags were present for Memorial Day weekend. Marj noted that the cemetery needs mowing and trimming. Information will be passed on.

Infrastructure – Ronda Rogers reporting. Repairs on Ellison waiting for OK Gravel to have time to fit in their schedule.

Valley county is making progress on the Abstein bridge.

Cleaning ditches will be addressed in the fall.

Festival Planning – Deb Filler reporting. Plans are progressing successfully. Next planning meeting is July 11 at 2 pm.

Stibnite Advisory Council – Lynn Imel said the council formed a sub-group to provide water testing at the mine. This is to reassure surrounding communities and prevent distrust. Information on results will be provided in the fall.

Stibnite Foundation – Ronda Rogers reported: We have three grants up for consideration with the foundation. Fire department, Community Hall repairs, Digital sign for advertising. Selection takes place in August.

Nominations Ad-Hoc Committee for open positions for council to fill in July. Chairman and Member- at- large terms are up for election. Ronda Rogers agreed to recruit potential candidates.

Old Business – update on 2020 Shed Grant, Deb Filler said final report has been submitted.

New Business – Dust Abatement – no date set yet. Waiting for Valley County to set time for E. Fork Rd. Choice of Earthbind or Calcium Chloride to choose from. Cost within cents of each other. Willie noted that if you used Earthbind before, the Calcium Chloride may not adhere to the old Earthbind, unless completely gone. The road must be wet down before applying Calcium Chloride. The water truck will be used to wet the road for those wanting Calcium Chloride.

Deb Filler said the yard sale runs June 15-July 4. In community hall, serve yourself, pay a council member what it is worth to you. Exercise equipment in community hall has not been used in years, should it stay for use? now that we have heat, or removed by owners or donated to yard sale? Ginny said she would ask Cecil and Deb would call other owners. Note: follow-up, all exercise equipment has been donated to yard sale.

Willie Sullivan reported the Yellow Pine Water Users Association is making progress on the grants for repairs to the water system. Their will be a YPWUA meeting on July 4 to vote on a grant to be submitted.

Sally Imel requested information on the downed, stacked fence by the ditch, near the yurt. Note: follow up- Shelly had an accident last winter and stacked the logs.

Adjournment 3:08 by Deb Filler.
Submitted by VYPA Secretary, Rhonda Egbert

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Secretary
Ron Noel, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)

Festival
Want to join YPAC Corp in making a difference? We are raising money to benefit the Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival . Any donation will help.
Each year, during the first full weekend of August, the sleepy mountain village of Yellow Pine is transformed into the largest festival of it’s kind in the western hemisphere!
The festival is produced by volunteers and raises funds to support the village of Yellow Pine as well as the funds needed to hold next year’s festival.
As you all know, the 2020 festival had to be cancelled due to Covid-19. This placed a significant burden on Yellow Pine to come up with enough funding to hold the 2021 festival this August 5, 6, 7.
Souvenirs and events at the festival help raise funds. We also know there are many of you who support the festival, but are not able to attend. This fund raiser is to give you an opportunity to help us help Yellow Pine.
Thanks in advance for your tax-deductible contribution to this cause that means so much to us!
GoFundMe link:

Anyone interested in being a part of the Festival Planning/Working committee, please contact Deb Filler. Meetings will begin at the end of January. Even if you aren’t physically in YP, you can participate in the committee.
Next Festival Planning July 11, 2021 – Contact Deb for Zoom link and passcode.
2021 Planning Notes updated June 6, 2021 (link)
Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival Policy and Procedure Link:
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YPFD News:

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful.
link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021.pdf

June 12, 2020 – 10am Fire siren test and YPFD meeting (no minutes yet.)

May 15, 2020 – there was a YPFD meeting 10am at the Fire Hall.
Link: to 20210515 YPFD MeetingNotes_Final.docx

The Fire Station recently had a propane heater installed. The heater will be a great addition to the fire station. It will be more efficient at keeping the station above freezing during the winter, especially since we keep water in the engines so they are ready to roll if an emergency occurs. It will also make it more pleasant to hold meetings at the fire station. Big thanks to Fire Chief Tim Rogers for coordinating this.

Meeting schedule for the YPFD. All meetings are at the YPFD Station
Sat. May 15 at 10am
Sat. June 12 at 10am
Sat. July 10 at 10am
Sat. September 11 at 10am Budget Meeting

YP Fire District 2 (east of Yellow Pine Ave) up for election Nov 2nd for 4 year term (per Valley County.) Link:

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30, 2020 at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by a escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Tim Rogers – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
Hours: 1pm-8pm, closed on Tuesdays
We offer smoked tri tip, brisket, and chicken sandwiches and also burgers and chicken wings.
Firewood Permits available May 15th.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Yellow Pine Tavern open daily:
Monday thru Thursday 8am to 9pm
Friday and Saturday 8am to 10pm
Sunday 8am to 8pm
Indoor Dining with limited seating and Outdoor Dining Available.
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer, Wine and Pop
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Opened June 12th for Summer
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Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
Store hours: 10am to 5pm
The store is now receiving inventory of Food items. The ATM is operational, and Debit/Credit cards are accepted. Currently there is fuel, ice, alcoholic beverages (non liquor) tobacco, non alc beverages, snacks, and Dairy items (ice cream, milk, butter, and yogurt). Fresh produce is soon to come. If there are needs for fuel or anything during off hours, Josh will be around on call to accommodate. For any particular store item requests, please call 208-633-3300 or Email
For room reservations, please call 208-633-3300 or Email for reservations
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Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation – (208) 382-4844

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (June 21) overnight low of 44 degrees, clear sky this morning and light breeze. Light morning air traffic. Swallows, robins, finches and a flicker calling. Golden mantled and colombian ground squirrels running about. Clear and warm before lunch time. A few hummingbirds visiting. Hot sunny afternoon, high of 91 degrees. Still pretty hot by early evening, clear and slight breeze. Two female hairy woodpeckers stopped by after sunset, (they look like they have been around burned trees.) Cooling off at dusk, clear sky and slight breeze. Still a little bit light out at 1045pm on our longest day, Mars rising above Golden Gate before midnight.

Tuesday (June 22) overnight low of 49 degrees, partly cloudy (high thin hazy clouds) and slight breeze this morning. Early air traffic. Tree swallows, robins and a flicker calling, a few finches visiting. Warm and partly cloudy at lunch time. Large machinery up on main street near the Community Hall clanking away. Hot, muggy and mostly cloudy early afternoon. Hot, partly clear and light breezes late afternoon, high of 94 degrees. Clear sky, hot and light breezes early evening, haze of dust(?) in the sky. Getting breezy at sunset. Dark clouds to the south before dusk, visible lightning and mutters of thunder. Power out 833pm. Intense thunder and lighting with gusty breezes after dark and rain until after midnight. Lightning striking Golden Gate hill, loud thunder. Power back on around 115am.

Wednesday (June 23) overnight low of 55 degrees, measured 0.23″ of rain from last night’s storm. This morning mostly cloudy, (clouds sitting down on top of VanMeter and Johnson Creek ridge) humid and light breeze. Light (and some loud) air traffic. Swallows, robins and finches calling, hummingbird visiting, golden mantled and colombian ground squirrels running around. Power out at 1052am for about a minute. Mostly clear, nice temperature and light breeze before lunch time. Mail truck was a little late, but no problems. Partly cloudy and very warm after lunch time. Not quite as hot late afternoon, high of 86 degrees, partly cloudy and light breezes. Still partly cloudy and light breezes but starting to cool off before dusk. Partly cloudy before midnight.

Thursday (June 24) overnight low of 48 degrees, partly clear sky and light breeze this morning. Moderate air and street traffic. Swallows, robins and finches calling. Partly clear/cloudy, and pretty warm and a little breezy at lunch time. A pine squirrel, a golden mantled and a few colombian ground squirrels running about. Hot early afternoon, light breezes and partly cloudy, high of 88 degrees. Mostly cloudy, cooler and nearly calm late afternoon. Warm, partly cloudy and light breeze before sunset. Increased street traffic. Cooling off a little and clear sky before dusk. Looked clear after midnight and bright full moon.

Friday (June 25) overnight low of 46 degrees, partly cloudy sky this morning. Air and street traffic. Swallows, robins and a few finches calling. Mostly cloudy, pleasant temperatures and light breeze at lunch time. Mostly cloudy (big clouds w/dark bellies) and breezy late afternoon, high of 87 degrees. Mostly clear and slight breeze before sunset. Cooling off nicely before dusk. Very bright big moon up after midnight.

Saturday (June 26) overnight low of 48 degrees, clear sky this morning. An early loud airplane, otherwise light air traffic. Several swallows, lots of jays, a couple of robins and a few finches calling. Clear sky, pleasant temperatures and light breeze at lunch time. Getting a bit warm, clear and light breezes early afternoon. Jays calling from the trees. Hot and sunny mid-afternoon, high of 90 degrees. Still hot, clear and light breeze early evening. Golfers out enjoying the Yellow Pine Country Club. Cooling off after dark. Looked clear before midnight.

Sunday (June 27) overnight low of 50 degrees, clear sky and nearly calm this morning. Light (and sometimes loud) air traffic. A few swallows, several jays and a couple of finches visiting. Hot and sunny at lunch time, light breeze. Pine squirrel, golden mantled and colombian squirrels running about, and a flicker calling. Hot sunny afternoon, clear sky and light breezes, high of 95 degrees. Cooling off a little before sunset.
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Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 81 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

June 25, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 81 new COVID-19 cases and 2 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 194,690.

There are a total of 155,853 confirmed cases and 38,837 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state. …

The state said 713,134 people have received the vaccine, and 1,315,924 total doses have been administered. 652,762 people are fully vaccinated.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says Idaho has the eighth lowest adult partial COVID-19 vaccination rate in the U.S. …

The age group with the most cases is 18-29 with 48,522 cases.

The state said 8 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 8,787, and 3 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 1,478. …

445 vaccine breakthrough cases have been reported.

2 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 2,145.

full story: [Valley County 870 cases, 6 deaths.]
— — — — — — — — — —

Monday deadline noted to pay Adams, Valley property taxes

The Star-News June 24, 2021

Monday at 5 p.m. is the deadline for property owners in Adams and Valley counties to pay the second half of their yearly property taxes.

Late charges and interest will begin on Tuesday, with interest retroactive from Jan. 1, so mailed payments should be correctly stamped by date.

The treasurers’ offices in both counties are open during the lunch hour Mondays through Fridays.

Valley County accepts credit card payments at (link) or by calling 208-382-7110.

continued:
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One person hospitalized after chain-reaction crash near Horseshoe Bend

Idaho State Police say four vehicles were involved and one of them crashed into a building.

KTVB Staff June 21, 2021

One person was taken to the hospital after a chain-reaction crash Monday morning on Highway 55 near the south end of Horseshoe Bend.

Idaho State Police responded around 9 a.m. to a collision that involved four vehicles and a building.

Troopers say the driver of a commercial truck hauling lumber was northbound on the highway and appears to have lost control. He rear-ended a pickup truck that went off the road and into a building. Police say the driver of the pickup was taken to a nearby hospital with what appeared to be non-life-threatening injuries.

continued:
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Two injured when plane crashes near Warren

Local residents praised for efforts to rescue victims

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News June 24, 2021

Two men were injured on Monday when the airplane they were flying crashed near Warren, according to the Idaho County Sheriff’s Office.

A Cessna 182 single engine airplane carrying John McClelland, 58, and Rick McCarthy, 62, both of San Diego, crashed about 2 p.m. Monday in the Mayflower Creek drainage about three miles northeast of Warren.

McClelland and McCarthy suffered burns and other non-life-threatening injuries, according to Warren Fire and Rescue, a community backcountry rescue and fire protection group.

Both men were transported to the University of Utah Hospital’s Intermountain Burn Center following their rescue Monday night, according to Dale Points of Caldwell, who is McClelland’s uncle. …

Points made several phone calls to Warren locals and local McCall pilot Mike Dorris, who immediately flew his airplane up to the area to help search for the wreckage.

Meanwhile, volunteers from Warren Fire were alerted by Idaho County dispatch to a emergency airplane beacon that had been activated, said Kelly Martin of Warren Fire.

Volunteers Robert Carver and Danny Rosselli set out on a dirt bike and an ATV to search for the wreckage, which was located at about 3:30 p.m. Martin said. …

The crash sparked a small wildfire that was contained by 6 p.m. Tuesday by firefighters from the Payette National Forest, Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said.

full story:
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Missing mushroom hunter found safe

The 76-year-old man was reported missing after foraging for mushrooms near Fish Creek Campground.

MacKenzie Belley June 22, 2021 KTVB

The Idaho County Sheriff’s Office found missing 76-year-old man who was last seen foraging for mushrooms Saturday.

John “Mack” McBoyle was found at 3 p.m. on Tuesday. He was found in the area of Service Flats, which is approximately five miles west of where McBoyle’s vehicle was parked. He was last seen was last seen in the area of forest road 2000, near Fish Creek Campground.

McBoyle was found in fair condition, but disoriented.

continued:
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One dead, another airlifted after tree falls during storm in Boise National Forest

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, June 23rd 2021

One female camper died and another was airlifted after a tree fell on them during Tuesday night’s storm.

The Gem County Sheriff’s Office says two female campers were at the Antelope Campground at Sage Hen Reservoir when the storm hit. Both took refuge in a vehicle to avoid the storm.

The storm caused severe damage in the area, including toppling several trees. GCSO says the upper portion of a fallen tree hit the vehicle.

continued:
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Idaho Power asks customers to conserve energy during evening hours

Air conditioners are expected to be working overtime as the heat wave ramps up in Idaho over the next week.

Temperatures are expected to climb into the triple digits in southwest Idaho on Sunday and could remain above 100 degrees for another week.

The hot weather is just one of the factors ramping up electrical use in the region.

Idaho Power is preparing for increased demand and is asking its customers to conserve energy during the evening hours.

continued:
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Idaho History:

Cherry Festival began with dances for money

Jun 5, 2013 Idaho Press


The most entertaining entertainment of the Cherry Festival is the cherry pie eating contest. Second from the left in this 1953 photo is Gary Harris, second heat winner and by far the fastest cherry pie eater in Gem County. Gary’s pie disappeared in about half the time of that of his closest rival. First heat winners were in order were Gene Chambers, Butch Averett and Jim Victor. Messenger Index file photo

From a humble beginning in the early 1930s, the Emmett Cherry Festival has gained national attention, now at attracting thousands of visitors to the valley around the cherry harvest season.

The celebration originated with a dance by Shorty Britton and due to its success, the next year was taken over by the American Legion. A small cherry exhibit was added and the event called the Cherry Pickers Dance. Repeating the event the following the year the American Legion added a carnival spirit with concessions.

That year, in 1932, it became the “Cherry Festival,” a name that has come to mean more and more each year and annually jams the town with vacationists and fun seekers.

continued:
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Public Lands:


— — — — — — — — — —

Segment of Edna Creek road temporarily closed July 7 -Sept. 2

Contact: Venetia Gempler, Public Affairs Officer 208-373-4105

Edna Creek Campground will also be affected and temporarily closed

Idaho City, Idaho, June 22, 2021 – The Boise National Forest is temporarily closing National Forest Systems (NFS) Road 384, commonly referred to as the Edna Creek road from July 7—Sept.2 to replace three large culverts and perform much needed road maintenance and resurfacing. Edna Creek campground lies within the affected area and for public safety is also closed. The Idaho City Ranger District was awarded a Federal highways administration grant to improve the road system and update infrastructure that has exceeded its life span.

“This is a continuation of the work we began last year to update our most traveled road on the district, and create additional fish habitat for bull trout,” said Brant Petersen, Idaho City District Ranger. “We scheduled the work to begin after the Fourth of July holiday to lessen the impact for visitors. Going forward, users should plan for this temporary closure and access the forest by the alternate route.”

The full road closure starts Wednesday, July 7, 2021, at 7 a.m. and lasts through Friday, Sept. 2, 2021, at 5 p.m. During this time there will be no access to trails or the campground.

A detour around the closure will be via NFS road 327 “Granite Creek” road to access the North Fork of the Boise River, and the town of Atlanta (see attached map). Several kiosks and signage will be placed out on the ground at major intersections to inform users of the temporary closure.

This is the second phase of the infrastructure improvement project. “The reconstruction work will result in real improvement that travelers will appreciate for years to come,” said Petersen. We were fortunate to be awarded this funding and while the road closed for a period of time is an inconvenience, the project will lead to a better travel experience in the future and improved fish habitat.

The Beaver/Edna sub-watershed is within a key bull trout recovery area. Habitat connectivity is a crucial factor in ensuring long-term sustainability of fish populations which are an essential aspect of an overall healthy forest ecosystem. Project efforts will improve drainage, reduce erosion and reduce direct sediment delivery to bull trout habitat, while improving driving conditions for all forest users.

Once the closure is in place it will be posted at: Boise National Forest Alerts and Notices and the Boise National Forest Closure Story map.

Venetia Gempler
Public Affairs Staff Officer
Boise National Forest
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Visitors dump trash Salmon-Challis National forest lands

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, June 22nd 2021

Officials and general park enthusiasts were not happy Tuesday after a picture surfaced of a large pile of trash left in one of Idaho’s national forests.

The large pile of trash was found on lands in the Salmon-Challis National Forest. The forest service took to Facebook to express their concern and advice after the pile was found.

“Dispose of Waste Properly! Visitors – PLEASE be mindful of even the smallest effects you may have on the land and on the experiences of those around you,” the post reads.

continued:
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Fire Season:

Firefighters prepare for busy season

Dry conditions called worst in 15 years

By Max Silverson for The Star-News June 24, 2021

Firefighters on the Payette National Forest have already put out several small fires started by lightning and could be looking at a busy season ahead, Payette officials said.

April and May were the driest for those months in the past 15 years, said Fire Staff Officer for the Payette National Forest Sean Johnson, who oversees firefighting and aviation operations on the Payette.

The forest is drier and the potential for large fire growth is almost a month sooner than normal, Johnson said.

For the rest of the month, the region is predicted to have record breaking high temperatures, high winds and excessive heat warnings, Johnson said.

“And everything that we’ve been hearing is to expect that same kind of weather pattern through the entire fire season, which could go clear out until November this year,” he said.

continued:
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Forest officials warn of ‘very high’ fire danger in central Idaho

The Central Idaho Dispatch Zone is urging the public to be extremely careful when out in the forest this summer.

KTVB Staff June 24, 2021

The Forest Service is urging the public to be extremely careful when camping, hiking or taking a motorized trip on public lands.

Hot weather and dry fuel conditions in Idaho’s backcountry has prompted the Central Idaho Dispatch Zone to move the fire danger to “very high.” …

When the fire danger gets this high it means that fires can start easily and spread rapidly. There is a good chance that small fires can quickly become large ones and exhibit extreme fire intensity right after ignition. These fires can be difficult to control and will often become much larger and longer-lasting fires.

full story:
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Fritzer Fire near Salmon National Forest about 20% contained

Officials say the Fritzer Fire is burning in steep, mountainous terrain. It’s being fueled by grass and timber in an old burn scar.

KTVB Staff June 26, 2021


Credit: inciweb

A wildfire is burning in high, steep mountainous terrain in the Salmon National Forest about 20 miles west of Salmon, Idaho.

Forest Service officials say the Fritzer Fire was sparked by lightning on Tuesday. As of Saturday morning, the fire is burning 137 acres and is 20% contained.

It is being fueled by grass and timber, mostly Ponderosa Pine, and is burning the fire scar of the 2000 Clear Creek Fire.

continued:
— —

more info:

Fritzer Fire

Inciweb:
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Blaine County bans fireworks to prevent wildfires

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, June 22nd 2021

Blaine County announced Tuesday that it has banned the use of fireworks to prevent human-caused wildfires.

The Board of Commissioners unanimously voted to ban fireworks and the use of exploding targets in unincorporated Blaine County.

“Please do your part in helping to prevent human-caused wildfires by following these new bans and avoiding the use of fireworks and exploding targets during this dry summer,” a spokesperson said.

News of Blaine County’s ban followed the city of Hailey, whose city council also voted to ban the use of fireworks due to drought conditions.

source:
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Fremont County prohibits firework use, bans open burning

June 23, 2021 Local News 8

Fremont County has reached high fire danger, and as a result, a ban on open burning has been issued.

All open burning, including burn barrels and fireworks, are prohibited. Campfires in approved fire pits, charcoal grills and gas grills are allowed.

This order does not apply to federal lands.

continued:
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Critter News:


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Donnelly Rural Fire welcomes newest crew member

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, June 23rd 2021

The Donnelly Rural Fire Protection District welcomed its newest crew member Wednesday.

This sweet pup was provided by Coleen Goodwin with Council House Golden’s.

“We have big plans for this Sweet sweet girl!!” a spokesperson said. “You all will be seeing a lot more of her! Stay tuned!!!”

source:
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IDFG looking for information about pronghorn killing near Emmett

By Katie Kloppenburg Jun 21, 2021 KIVI

Idaho Fish and Game (IDFG) is asking for information about a buck antelope that was shot and left near the Emmett dump early on June 6. IDFG says it likely happened before sunrise.

Conservation officers are looking for any information that might help solve the case. A reward is available for anyone who provides information that leads to an arrest or a citation.

You can report information online anonymously or by calling the Citizens Against Poaching hotline at 800-632-5999.

source:
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Cold water released from N. Idaho dam to help salmon

June 24, 2021 Associated Press


Roger Phillips, IDFG

Authorities have started releasing cold water from a northern Idaho dam to keep Snake River water temperatures cool to help migrating salmon and steelhead.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers started increasing releases of the 43-degree water at Dworshak Dam on Tuesday ahead of an expected heat wave.

The Lewiston Tribune reports the agency will up the flows to 12,400 cubic feet per second.

continued: (Local News 8)
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Mosquitoes trapped in Canyon County test positive for West Nile Virus

The infected mosquitoes were caught June 23 south of Melba. That area has been treated for both larval and adult stage mosquitoes in response.

KTVB Staff June 25, 2021

Mosquitoes collected from traps in Canyon County have tested positive for West Nile Virus, the first confirmation of the illness in the Treasure Valley so far this year.

The infected mosquitoes were caught June 23 south of Melba. That area has been treated for both larval and adult stage mosquitoes in response.

West Nile cases in insects are common during the summer months. So far, the Canyon County Mosquito Abatement District has tested 94 pools for West Nile Virus.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Chinook fishing on South Fork Salmon River opens Saturday, June 26

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Tuesday, June 22, 2021

Season opens for two days, then is scheduled to reopen on July 2 if enough fish are available

Chinook fishing on the South Fork of the Salmon River opens Saturday, June 26 and closes at the end of fishing hours on Sunday, June 27. If harvest objectives are not met on the opening weekend, it will then reopen four days per week, Friday through Monday, until the season is closed by the Director of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

continued:
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see also:

South Fork Salmon River – Chinook Update 6/24/21

By Jordan Messner, Fisheries Regional Manager
Thursday, June 24, 2021

link:
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Aggressive food-conditioned black bear charges Ketchum resident within city limits

By Terry Thompson, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, June 24, 2021

An aggressive food-conditioned black bear continues to get food rewards from residential garbage carts in Ketchum.

A Ketchum woman had a face-to-face encounter with an aggressive black bear early Wednesday morning, June 23 when a late night walk through her neighborhood took a serious turn when she faced a food-conditioned bear in the area of lower Warm Springs in Ketchum. The neighborhood streets were lined with garbage carts prior to pick-up the next day, which attracts black bears into area neighborhoods looking for an easy high-calorie meal. While the direct encounter was alarming, no physical contact was made and the woman did not suffer any physical injury.

continued:
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Backcountry camper kills moose in self-defense north of Sandpoint

By Kara Campbell, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, June 24, 2021

An aggressive bull moose charged a camper at the Harrison Lake backcountry camping area north of Sandpoint on June 22, 2021. The moose died after being shot by the camper in self-defense.

On Tuesday, June 22, 2021, Fish and Game received a report of an aggressive bull moose that charged a camper at a Harrison Lake backcountry campsite north of Sandpoint. The moose tore apart the campsite and charged at the camper and his dog. The camper hid behind a tree, but the moose did not stop charging. The camper then discharged a firearm at the moose in self-defense from close range. Fish and Game responded to the incident and located the deceased moose. The Forest Service has closed the Harrison Lake trailhead to hikers in order to prevent possible conflicts between hikers and any bears that may feed on the carcass.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Cats on Roombas: Compilation


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Seasonal Humor:

moosecop-a

CovidJabsCats-a
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Idaho History June 27, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 63

Idaho Newspaper clippings November 13-17, 1919

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

November 13

Jerome County Times., November 13, 1919, Page 1

19191113JCT1

19191113JCT2People Should Safeguard Themselves Against “Flu”

The frequency with which communications are being sent the Department of Public Welfare for information relative to influenza denotes conclusively the citizens of Idaho are wide awake to the possibility of the return of “Flu” in epidemic form.

Each day brings forth the following questions:

1. Has the “Flu” made its appearance in Idaho?

2. Will we have a return of last year’s epidemic of Flu?

Question 1 may be answered by the statement that isolated cases of influenza have occurred throughout the state, a total of nine cases having been reported from four counties but there is no evidence of its return in epidemic form.

Question No. 2 is far more difficult to answer. Not even a seer could foretell how you and your neighbor consider a “cold.” Flu begins as a “cold.” Infection is spread broadcast hours before the patient feels ill enough to call a physician.

A study of the sequence of events in a typical outbreak of influenza, supposing that each case infects only three others, will prove highly instructive and will shed light on the subject. At this rate 729 persons would be infected at the end of thirteen days.

source: Jerome County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 13 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Filer Record., November 13, 1919, Page 1

19191113FR1

19191113FR2
Must Avoid Recurrence of Influenza Epidemic

E. E. Laubaugh, M.D., Chief Bureau of Public Health Service, Department of Public Welfare, Boise, says:

If we are not to have “Flu” you must observe the following:

1. Consider all colds as “Flu colds.”

2. Complete isolation of patients with “Flu colds.”

3. Keep away from those with colds.

4. Make the fellow who insists he just has a “Slight cold” cough into his handkerchief.

5. Wash your hands frequently and don’t put them to your lips or mouth.

6. Gargles have little or no merit and wash the protective secretions from the throat.

source: The Filer Record. (Filer, Idaho), 13 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Filer Record., November 13, 1919, Page 11

19191113FR3

(ibid, page 11)
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Priest River, Idaho ca. 1915

PriestRiver1915Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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November 14

The Rathdrum Tribune., November 14, 1919, Page 1

19191114RT1

19191114RT2Endless Chain Not Mystical
Doctor Fighting Influenza Explains How Curative Serum Went From Patient to Patient

The prevalence of influenza and pneumonia with their high death rate makes it imperative to resort to heroic methods of treatment rather than to follow the accepted ones only. The lack of serum or other specific remedy for influenza, writes Dr. Charles R. Humbert in the Medical Record, together with the inability to obtain antipneumococcus serum forced me to use convalescent serum.

The Endless Chain

[?] a well known fact that persons convalescing from pneumonia have anti-bodies in their blood streams. As soon as the patients’ condition permits, therefore, they are bled as much and as frequently as possible.

Serum is prepared and treated, and is placed in stock. When another patient comes in with pneumonia, treatment is begun. When convalescence set in the above procedure is repeated. It is a cause of one gives serum to two, two gives serum to three and so on, the procedure becoming endless.
— —

[Armistice Day]

Armistice day, Nov. 11 was observed to some extent thruout [sic] the state in conformity with Governor Davis’ proclamation declaring it “a holiday to be observed by the people in a spirit of thankfulness and joy and prayer.”

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 14 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Rathdrum Tribune., November 14, 1919, Page 2

[Editorial Page]

The state health board is sending out advices that it is up to the citizens of the state to prevent an epidemic of influenza this winter, by taking proper care of the “slight colds”. All colds, we are told, should be considered “flu colds” until it is positively known they are not.

(ibid, page 2)
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Main Street, Pine, Idaho (1)

PineFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. November 14, 1919, Page 9

19191114CT1

19191114CT219191114CT3Is Influenza To Run As An Epidemic Again This Winter
While Only Nine Cases Have Been Reported In Idaho, Dr. Lanbaugh [sic], In Analyzing Situation, Issues Warning

Boise – The frequency with which communications are being sent the Department of Public Welfare for information relative to influenza denotes conclusively the citizens of Idaho are wide awake to the possibility of the return of influenza in epidemic form.

Each day brings forth the following questions:

1. Has influenza made its appearance in Idaho?

2. Will we have a return of last year’s epidemic of influenza?

3. What steps should be taken to prevent a recurrence of last year’s epidemic?

4. What merit is there in the use of prophylactic vaccines against influenza?

Question No. 1 may be answered by the statement that isolated cases of influenza have occurred throughout the state, a total of nine cases having been reported from four counties, but there is no evidence of its return in epidemic form.

Question [2] is far more difficult. Not even a seer could foretell how you and your neighbor consider “a cold.” Influenza begins as “a cold.” Infection is spread broadcast before the patient feels ill enough to call for a physician.

A survey of the sequence of events in a typical outbreak of influenza, supposing that each case infects only three others, will prove highly instructive and will shed light on the subject.

1st day. 1. (Primary) case.

The original or primary case comes to town with a slight cold.

2nd and 3rd days. 3. (Secondary) cases.

The primary case begins to feel sick.

Secondary cases begin to have slight colds.

4th and 5th days. 9. (Tertiary) cases.

Primary case sends for physician.

Secondary cases begin to feel sick.

Tertiary cases begin to have slight colds.

6th and 7th days. 27. (Fourth Series).

Primary case goes to bed.

Secondary cases send for physician.

Tertiary cases begin to feel sick.

Fourth series of cases begin to have slight colds.

8th and 9th days. 81. (Fifth Series).

Primary case reported as pneumonia.

Secondary cases go to bed.

Tertiary cases send for a physician.

Fourth series of cases begin to feel sick.

Fifth series of cases begin to have slight colds.

10th and 11 days. 243. (Sixth Series).

Primary case dead.

Secondary cases begin to have pneumonia.

Tertiary cases go to bed.

Fourth series of cases send for a physician.

Fifth series of cases feel sick.

Sixth series of cases begin to have slight colds.

Health officer gets the first reports of a few of the worst cases. Rumors that everybody in town has a cold. Outbreak is really at its height.

12th and 13th days. 729. (Seventh Series).

Funeral of primary patient.

Secondary cases begin to die.

Tertiary cases begin to have pneumonia.

Fourth series of cases go to bed.

Fifth series of cases send for a physician.

Sixth series of cases feel sick.

Seventh series of cases begin to have slight colds.

Health officer gets a number of reports of cases.

Health officer, Red Cross, and other public health agencies begin to get busy. The number of new cases begin to diminish on account of the lack of susceptible persons.

Now let us repeat our question:

“Will we have an recurrence of last year’s epidemic?” The answer is to be found in your answer to the question: “How are you and your neighbors going to manage the ‘slight colds?'” Your physician arrives on one of the most communicable dis-[…] to assist and the health authorities come along with a whoop and a hurrah after the battle is lost. Their efforts are almost wholly confined to the saving as much as possible out of the wreck.

Mr. Citizen you hold the answer. Instead of asking the health authorities, “Shall we have influenza?” the health officers are asking you “Shall we have influenza?”

The third question has been largely answered in the discussion of the second. We know we are dealing with one of the most communicable diseases and it starts as “a cold.” Fortunately all “colds” are not “influenza colds,” but your physician or no one else can tell an “influenza cold” from an ordinary “cold,” therefore every cold, no matter how mild, must be considered an “influenza cold,” if we are not to have a recurrence of influenza.

After our experience of one year ago, it would be superfluous to discuss what we should do. The citizen with a “cold” has a plain duty, to immediately call his physician and completely isolate himself.

The fourth question is rather difficult of a general answer. Your physician will have to determine whether or not you should be given a vaccine. There still remains considerable doubt as to whether the causative agent of influenza has been discovered and it can readily be understood the utter futility of giving a vaccine if we don’t know what vaccine to give. Don’t misunderstand this statement. I am speaking of influenza and not the complication of influenza. There is a rational scientific basis for giving vaccines to prevent the serious complications of influenza, but this vaccine must be carefully selected, after a complete investigation of the causative agents producing these complications. They vary in different localities. Your physician will have these facts and act on them accordingly.

In conclusion, if we are not to have influenza you must observe the following:

1. Consider all colds as “influenza colds.”

2. Complete isolation of patients with “influenza colds.”

3. Keep away from those colds.

4. Make the fellow who insists he has just a “slight cold” cough into his handkerchief.

5. Wash your hands frequently and don’t put them to your lips or mouth.

6. Gargles have little or no merit and wash the protective secretions from the throat.

From E. E. Laubaugh, M.D., Chief, Bureau of Public Health Service, Department of Public Welfare, Boise, Idaho.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 14 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Placerville, Idaho

PlacervilleFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 14, 1919, Page 3

19191114DSM1

Addressed Modern Woodmen

A. G. Pate, a member of the board of audit of the Modern Woodmen of America, attended the regular meeting of the local camp last night and delivered an interesting address. The local camp is making a drive for new members and already has a strong membership. The Modern Woodmen have gone through the trying period of the war in good condition, having paid more than $5,000,000 death claims last December, mostly due to deaths from influenza and war losses. The order paid all death claims of soldiers killed in action, although its charter does not provide for this.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 14 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Pioneerville, Idaho July 3rd, 1917 (1)

PioneervilleJuly031917Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

November 17

Evening Capital News., November 17, 1919, Page 3

19191117ECN1

19191117ECN2

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 17 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 17, 1919, Page 4

19191117DSM1

19191117DSM2Racking Routine

Life with most of us becomes too much a matter of routine. Household duties, office work and other obligations often cause people to overlook their health. As a result – the run-down condition become serious before relief is sought.

Nyals Tonic Hypophosphites

Will build up your health promptly and give you a store of energy which will enable you to ward off serious cold-weather ailments such as Grippe, Tonsillitis and Influenza and the serious complications which usually follow.

This tonic will increase appetite, aid digestion, re-vitalize the nervous system and give your system a chance to store up vitality.

Price $1.00

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 17 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
—————

Further Reading

Hypophosphite

noun hy·​po·​phos·​phite
Medical Definition of hypophosphite
: a salt of hypophosphorous acid
especially : one (as the sodium salt) used as a source of assimilable phosphorus

source: Merriam-Webster
— — — —

Fellows’ Compound Syrup of Hypophosphites, Fellows Co., New York

Old Main Artifact Posted on June 26, 2014 by Jessica

Fellows’ Compound Syrup of Hypophosphites was widely marketed to physicians, not consumers, as a remedy for many illnesses. It was a commercial success, even though it contained strychnine, a potent poison, and likely made its customers sicker.

Fellows Compound Syrup of Hypophosphites was invented by James Fellows who worked with his father as drug merchants in St John, New Brunswick, Canada.

According to blogger Mary Fran Stotler, “James along with his father were listed as drug merchants in St John in 1850. He worked in his chemist’s shop at 56 Germain Street in St John. Together they established “Fellows & Company” producing household remedies such as Fellows’ Worm Lozenges, Fellows’ Speedy Relief, Fellows’ Dyspepsia Bitters, Fellows’ Golden Ointment, Fellows’ Leemings’ Essence and Fellows’ Balsam Liverwort & Colts Foot. It was here that James developed his formula for the well known, “Fellows Compound Syrup of Hypophosphites.” Patented and internationally recognized as an effective remedy, it is listed in many medical books of the period as “an excellent recuperative tonic”. An advertisement found in International Clinics Quarterly, Vol 3 dated 1905, Fellows Syrup was used “in the treatment of anemia, neurasthenia, bronchitis, influenza, pulmonary tuberculosis and wasting diseases of childhood, and during convalescence from exhausting diseases.” In the ad, there is a reference to the ingredient Strychnine, which is an exceptionally bitter tasting and extremely powerful poison. It acts on the central nervous system, causing powerful convulsions. It was used in some medications in the late 1800’s. In an article in the Canadian Illustrated News dated December 16, 1871 , it mentions that James himself had been a victim of “secondary stage”, pulmonary consumption and use of his own preparation had cured him. Following the death of his father, James moved to London, England where he lived with his family. From there, through a judicious system of advertising and an energetic method of doing business, he established a most flourishing and lucrative business in the sales of his Syrup of Hypophosphites. He returned to St. John on several occasions, renewing old acquaintances. But his failing health made him an invalid and he died in 1889. The St John Globe records him as a man of fine presence, affable and courteous and of a most friendly disposition. ”

This passage in Mary Fran Stotler’s blog also appears on a genealogy page but no direct sources are cited, other than the mentioned articles, and other records about James Fellows’ life seem to be unavailable.

Interestingly, the sentence from the above passage “Patented and internationally recognized as an effective remedy, it is listed in many medical books of the period as “an excellent recuperative tonic” is misleading. While it may have appeared in many medical books, this is by no means a guarantee of it being an “effective remedy”. Many dishonest purveyors of ineffective or harmful concoctions (aka nostrums) routinely published their own advertisements and favorable articles in medical journals to misinform doctors as well as patients.

According to James Harvey Young, author of The Medical Messiahs: A Social History of Health Quackery in Twentieth-Century America, “Being the chameleon-like creature that it is, quackery continued growing during the late 19th century by taking advantage of orthodox medicine’s promising prospects as well as its persisting weaknesses. For one thing nostrum makers began to simulate the methods by which medical and pharmaceutical science kept the profession informed of new developments, turning the doctors themselves into unwitting allies in the campaign to reach the public. Articles were planted in medical periodicals reporting exciting therapeutic advances. The names of the new remedies had a scientific lilt, and complex (if nonsensical) formulas were revealed. Reprints were mailed to doctors, who soon were visited by detailmen, talking as knowingly as did the agents of reputable pharmaceutical manufacturers. The truth was, however, that the first prescription which a doctor wrote for products like Fellows’ Syrup of Hypophosphites was apt to be the last. When the sufferer looked at the printing on the carton and the pamphlets packed within it, he found enough medical advice in vigorous, down-to-earth, and frightening prose to let him dispense with a doctor. As late as 1915 Fellows’ proprietary syrup was still being promoted exclusively to physicians, with not a cent spent on direct advertising to the consumer, but 90 per cent of its sales were over the counter without a prescription.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Before Vaccines, Doctors ‘Borrowed’ Antibodies from Recovered Patients to Save Lives

Dave Roos April 1, 2020 History.com

Doctors first tried injecting patients with blood plasma in the early 1900s. The method has been used against diphtheria, the 1918 flu pandemic, measles and Ebola.

In 1934, a doctor at a private boy’s school in Pennsylvania tried a unique method to stave off a potentially deadly measles outbreak. Dr. J. Roswell Gallagher extracted blood serum from a student who had recently recovered from a serious measles infection and began injecting the plasma into 62 other boys who were at high risk of catching the disease.

Only three students ended up contracting measles and all were mild cases.

The method, while relatively novel, was not new to science. In fact, the very first Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine was awarded in 1901 to Emil von Behring for his life-saving work developing a cure for diphtheria, a bacterial infection that was particularly fatal in children. His groundbreaking treatment, known as diphtheria antitoxin, worked by injecting sick patients with antibodies taken from animals who had recovered from the disease.

1890VonBehring-aNobel Prize winning German bacteriologist and physiologist Emil Adolf von Behring, right, uses a syringe to inject a guinea pig held by lab assistant, circa 1890. Stock Montage/Getty Images

How ‘Convalescent Plasma’ Treatment Works

Von Behring’s antitoxin wasn’t a vaccine, but the earliest example of a treatment method called “convalescent plasma” that’s being resurrected as a potential treatment for COVID-19. Convalescent plasma is blood plasma extracted from an animal or human patient who has “convalesced” or recovered from infection with a particular disease.

“Convalescent plasma has been used throughout history when confronting an infectious disease where you have people who recover and there’s no other therapy available,” says Warner Greene, director of the Center for HIV Cure Research at the Gladstone Institutes. “There must be something in their plasma—i.e. an antibody—that helped them recover.”

Convalescent plasma interacts differently with the immune system than a vaccine. When a person is treated with a vaccine, their immune system actively produces its own antibodies that will kill off any future encounters with the target pathogen. That’s called active immunity.

Convalescent plasma offers what’s called “passive immunity.” The body doesn’t create its own antibodies, but instead “borrows” them from another person or animal who has successfully fought off the disease. Unlike a vaccine, the protection doesn’t last a lifetime, but the borrowed antibodies can greatly reduce recovery times and even be the difference-maker between life and death.

“Convalescent plasma is the crudest of the immunotherapies, but it can be effective,” says Greene.

Plasma Treatments Cut Spanish Flu Fatalities in Half

After von Behring’s antitoxin was distributed worldwide to treat diphtheria in 1895, doctors experimented with the same passive immunity technique for curing measles, mumps, polio and influenza.

During the pandemic influenza outbreak of 1918 known as the “Spanish flu,” fatality rates were cut in half for patients who were treated with blood plasma compared to those who weren’t. The method seemed particularly effective when patients received the antibodies in the early days of their infection, before their own immune systems had a chance to overreact and damage vital organs. In the 1930s, doctors like Gallagher used convalescent plasma effectively against measles.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

The Spanish Flu Was Deadlier Than WWI

History Channel

In 1918 the Spanish Flu killed at least 50 million people around the world and was the second deadliest plague in history – after, well, the plague in the 1300s. But how exactly did a flu virus cause such massive death and destruction across the world?


—————

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports June 27, 2021

Please share road reports. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are dry and dusty. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting June 1, crews will transition into their summer construction schedule. Drivers can anticipate single-lane, alternating traffic controlled by flaggers Monday – early Friday morning. From Friday morning – Sunday, and any major holidays, the road will be open to two lanes. This schedule will be in place until September.
Project link:
Donnelly to Deinhard Project: Next week construction will begin on Highway 55 between Donnelly and McCall. This is a much-needed project to repair potholes and cracks in the roadway and will include placing a new layer of pavement on the highway for smoother driving conditions.
What to expect:
* Idaho 55 will be reduced to one lane with pilot cars midweek (Monday – Thursday)
* All lanes will be open on weekends (Friday – Sunday)
* Roadway surface will be uneven for several weeks
* Speed limit will be reduced and 12-foot restrictions will be in place
* Construction is expected to be complete in September.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Friday (June 25) the road is in great shape. Compliment on the reconstruction and paving.
South Fork Salmon River salmon fishing opens on June 26. Check F&G regs.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Friday (June 25) the road is clear but rough.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (June 23) Mail truck driver reports trees had come down but had been cut out before he came in. Road has not been graded yet, and is rough.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open
Reported to be rough. Watch for downed trees, ATVs and UTVs.
Road Closure: Lick Creek Road will be closed at Zena Creek (about 4 miles east of the Ponderosa Campground) from July 19 – July 29 for a bridge replacement. Please plan ahead.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open
Last report (June 14) that folks have been traveling over the summit this last weekend, the road is in bad shape.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Link: Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open, travel at your own risk. Watch for downed trees. No current report.
A 2nd hand report (June 14) that someone made it over to Thunder Mtn. this last weekend in a full sized truck.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: May be open. Travel at your own risk.
A report (June 14) that the route still had snow, but it may be melting open soon. An earlier report that there were a lot of trees down during the winter snow.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Open per Valley County June 9th.
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Open
Update from Payette NF May 27: “Secesh Summit to Burgdorf/Warren – Open. Warren Summit – Open to the South Fork Salmon River.”

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Excessive Heat Warning June 29, 12pm to July 3, 9pm

Excessive Heat Warning June 29, 12pm to July 3, 9pm

Yellow Pine Forecast

Tuesday Sunny and hot, with a high near 96. East wind around 5 mph becoming calm in the morning.
Tuesday Night Clear, with a low around 64.
Wednesday Sunny and hot, with a high near 96.
Wednesday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 65.
Thursday A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms after noon. Sunny and hot, with a high near 96.
Thursday Night A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms before midnight. Partly cloudy, with a low around 64.
Friday A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Sunny and hot, with a high near 94.
Friday Night Partly cloudy, with a low around 64.
Saturday A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Sunny and hot, with a high near 94.

Excessive Heat Warning

URGENT - WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
312 AM MDT Sun Jun 27 2021

IDZ011-013-028-029-272100-
/O.EXT.KBOI.EH.W.0003.210629T1800Z-210704T0300Z/
West Central Mountains-Boise Mountains-Camas Prairie-
Owyhee Mountains-
312 AM MDT Sun Jun 27 2021

...EXCESSIVE HEAT WARNING NOW IN EFFECT FROM NOON TUESDAY TO 9 PM
MDT SATURDAY...

* WHAT...Dangerously hot conditions with temperatures 90 to 105
  in the mountain valleys.

* WHERE...West Central Mountains, Boise Mountains, Camas
  Prairie, Owyhee Mountains.

* WHEN...From noon Tuesday to 9 PM MDT Saturday.

* IMPACTS...Extreme heat will significantly increase the
  potential for heat related illnesses, particularly for those
  working or participating in outdoor activities.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS...Overnight lows during this time frame will
  only cool into the upper 50s to mid 60s and thus will offer less
  relief from the heat than is typical in these locations.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Drink plenty of fluids, stay in an air-conditioned room, stay out
of the sun, and check up on relatives and neighbors. Young
children and pets should never be left unattended in vehicles
under any circumstances.

Take extra precautions if you work or spend time outside. When
possible reschedule strenuous activities to early morning or
evening. Know the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat
stroke. Wear lightweight and loose fitting clothing when
possible. To reduce risk during outdoor work, the Occupational
Safety and Health Administration recommends scheduling frequent
rest breaks in shaded or air conditioned environments. Anyone
overcome by heat should be moved to a cool and shaded location.
Heat stroke is an emergency! Call 9 1 1.

Weather Reports June 20-26, 2021

June 20 Weather:

At 9am it was 60 degrees, partly clear (mostly small clouds) and light breeze. At 1250pm it was 79 degrees, partly cloudy and breezy. At 630pm it was 81 degrees, almost clear (a few thin spots of haze) and breezy. At 845pm it was 73 degrees, clear and very light breeze. Stars out before 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 21, 2021 at 09:00AM
Clear, light breeze
Max temperature 86 degrees F
Min temperature 44 degrees F
At observation 60 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

June 21 Weather:

At 9am it was 60 degrees, clear sky and light breeze. At 1115am it was 77 degrees and clear. Hot dry afternoon. At 6pm it was 89 degrees, clear and slight breeze. At 930pm it was 69 degrees, slight breeze and clear. Looked clear at 1045pm, Mars rising over Golden Gate, still a little bit of light on our longest day.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 22, 2021 at 09:00AM
Partly cloudy, slight breeze
Max temperature 91 degrees F
Min temperature 49 degrees F
At observation 65 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

June 22 Weather:

At 9am it was 65 degrees, partly cloudy (thin hazy clouds) and slight breeze. Partly cloudy and pretty warm at 1130am. At 130pm it was 89 degrees, mostly cloudy and muggy. At 540pm it was 87 degrees, light breeze and partly clear (thin small clouds.) At 630pm it was 86 degrees, clear and light breeze. Getting stronger breezes at 740pm. Power off 833pm. At 9pm it was 78 degree, mostly cloudy and a little breezy. At 950pm dark clouds to the south, w/visible lighting and far off thunder. At 1010pm breeze picking up and closer thunder. At 1013pm lots of lightning bolts and close thunder. At 1020pm lighting hitting Golden Gate, light spatters of Rain. At 1022pm gusty sheet rain, frequent close lightning. At 1033pm, calmer rain tapering off, lots of thunder but farther away. At 1040pm very light misty rain, lightning and thunder father away north west. At 1050pm very light rain, quieter and calmer. At 11pm light steady rain and almost calm. At 1120pm 2 close claps of thunder and light sprinkles At 1129pm a close lightning strike sprinkles and light breeze. At 1135pm light steady rain and quiet. At 1155pm not raining and cool breeze. At 1209am light sprinkles. At 1217am light rain. At 1227am one last close lightning strike w/loud thunder. Rain probably stopped around 1230am. Power back on around 115am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 23, 2021 at 09:00AM
Mostly cloudy, humid, light breeze
Max temperature 94 degrees F
Min temperature 55 degrees F
At observation 60 degrees F
Precipitation 0.23 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

June 23 Weather:

At 9am it was 60 degrees, mostly cloudy (high peaks and ridges fogged in,) humid and light breeze. At 11am it was 71 degrees, mostly clear and light breeze. At 1pm it was 79 degrees, partly cloudy and slight breeze. At 645pm it was 83 degrees, partly cloudy and light breezes. At 9pm it was 67 degrees, partly cloudy and light breezes. At 11pm it looked partly cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 24, 2021 at 09:00AM
Partly clear, light breeze
Max temperature 86 degrees F
Min temperature 48 degrees F
At observation 59 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

June 24 Weather:

At 9am it was 59 degrees, partly clear and light breeze. It 130pm it was over 80F, partly cloudy/clear and a little breezy. At 6pm it was 80 degrees, mostly cloudy and nearly calm. At 8pm it was 78 degrees, partly cloudy and light breezes. At 920pm it was 68 degrees and clear. At 11pm it looked clear or mostly clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 25, 2021 at 09:00AM
Partly cloudy
Max temperature 88 degrees F
Min temperature 46 degrees F
At observation 59 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

June 25 Weather:

At 9am it was 59 degrees and partly cloudy. At 1230pm it was 79 degrees, mostly cloudy and pleasant breeze. At 6pm it was 80 degrees, mostly cloudy (dark bellies) and breezy. At 8pm it was mostly clear and light breeze. At 945pm it was 66 degrees and fairly calm. Big bright moon during the night.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 26, 2021 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 87 degrees F
Min temperature 48 degrees F
At observation 63 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

June 26 Weather:

At 9am it was 63 degrees and clear. Clear sky and light breeze at noon. At 2pm it was 85 degrees, clear and light breeze. At 620pm it was 88 degrees, clear and light breeze. At 10pm it was 68 degrees. Looked clear at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 27, 2021 at 09:00AM
Clear, almost calm
Max temperature 90 degrees F
Min temperature 50 degrees F
At observation 65 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
——————–

Excessive Heat Warning June 28, 12pm to July 2, 12am

Excessive Heat Warning June 28, 12pm to July 2, 12am

Yellow Pine Forecast

Monday Sunny and hot, with a high near 96.
Monday Night Clear, with a low around 64.
Tuesday Sunny and hot, with a high near 98.
Tuesday Night Clear, with a low around 65.
Wednesday Sunny and hot, with a high near 98.
Wednesday Night Partly cloudy, with a low around 66.
Thursday Sunny and hot, with a high near 96.

Excessive Heat Warning

URGENT - WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
209 PM MDT Thu Jun 24 2021

West Central Mountains-Boise Mountains-Camas Prairie-
Owyhee Mountains-
209 PM MDT Thu Jun 24 2021

...EXCESSIVE HEAT WARNING IN EFFECT FROM NOON MONDAY TO MIDNIGHT
MDT THURSDAY NIGHT...

* WHAT...Dangerously hot conditions with temperatures 90 to 105
  in the mountain valleys.

* WHERE...West Central Mountains, Boise Mountains, Camas Prairie,
  Owyhee Mountains.

* WHEN...From noon Monday to midnight MDT Thursday night.

* IMPACTS...Extreme heat will significantly increase the potential
  for heat related illnesses, particularly for those working or
  participating in outdoor activities.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS...Overnight lows during this time frame will
  only cool off into the upper 50s to mid 60s and thus will not
  offer much in the way of cooling like it normally does in these
  areas.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Monitor the latest forecasts and warnings for updates on this
situation. Be prepared to drink plenty of fluids, stay in an air-
conditioned room, stay out of the sun, and check up on relatives
and neighbors.

Young children and pets should never be left unattended in
vehicles under any circumstances. This is especially true during
warm or hot weather when car interiors can reach lethal
temperatures in a matter of minutes.

Take extra precautions if you work or spend time outside. When
possible reschedule strenuous activities to early morning or
evening. Know the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat
stroke. Wear lightweight and loose fitting clothing when
possible. To reduce risk during outdoor work, the Occupational
Safety and Health Administration recommends scheduling frequent
rest breaks in shaded or air conditioned environments. Anyone
overcome by heat should be moved to a cool and shaded location.
Heat stroke is an emergency! Call 9 1 1.

High Fire Danger

Hot weather and dry fuel conditions in Idaho’s backcountry has prompted the Central Idaho Dispatch Zone to move the fire danger to “very high.”

When the fire danger gets this high it means that fires can start easily and spread rapidly. There is a good chance that small fires can quickly become large ones and exhibit extreme fire intensity right after ignition. These fires can be difficult to control and will often become much larger and longer-lasting fires.

Excessive Heat Watch June 27, 12pm to July 1, 12am

Excessive Heat Watch June 27, 12pm to July 1, 12am

Yellow Pine Forecast
Sunday Sunny and hot, with a high near 94.
Sunday Night Clear, with a low around 62.
Monday Sunny and hot, with a high near 97.
Monday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 66.
Tuesday Sunny and hot, with a high near 99.
Tuesday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 66.
Wednesday Sunny and hot, with a high near 99.

Excessive Heat Watch

URGENT - WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
233 PM MDT Wed Jun 23 2021

West Central Mountains-Lower Treasure Valley ID-Boise Mountains-
Upper Treasure Valley-Southwest Highlands-Western Magic Valley-
Camas Prairie-Owyhee Mountains-Southern Twin Falls County-
Upper Weiser River-Harney County-Baker County-Malheur County-
Oregon Lower Treasure Valley-
233 PM MDT Wed Jun 23 2021 /133 PM PDT Wed Jun 23 2021/

...EXCESSIVE HEAT WATCH IN EFFECT FROM SUNDAY AFTERNOON THROUGH
WEDNESDAY EVENING...

* WHAT...Dangerously hot conditions with temperatures of 100 to
  112 possible in the valleys. Mountain valleys will see
  temperatures of 90 to 100 possible.

* WHERE...southeast Oregon and southwest Idaho.

* WHEN...From Sunday afternoon through Wednesday evening.

* IMPACTS...Extreme heat will significantly increase the
  potential for heat related illnesses, particularly for those
  working or participating in outdoor activities.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

An Excessive Heat Watch means that a prolonged period of hot
temperatures is expected. The hot temperatures will create a
DANGEROUS SITUATION in which heat illnesses are possible. Drink
plenty of fluids, stay in an air-conditioned room, stay out of the
sun, and check up on relatives and neighbors.

Young children and pets should never be left unattended in
vehicles under any circumstances. This is especially true during
warm or hot weather when car interiors can reach lethal
temperatures in a matter of minutes.

Road Reports June 23, 2021

Note: Late Tuesday evening, June 22nd, the area experienced a thunderstorm with lots of lightning, a few wind gusts and a little rain. The power was off for nearly 5 hours. Watch for downed trees.

Please share road reports. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. There is still snow in higher elevations, but it melting fast (rivers are running below normal.) Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are damp today but will be drying out by tomorrow and dusty. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting June 1, crews will transition into their summer construction schedule. Drivers can anticipate single-lane, alternating traffic controlled by flaggers Monday – early Friday morning. From Friday morning – Sunday, and any major holidays, the road will be open to two lanes. This schedule will be in place until September.
Project link:
Donnelly to Deinhard Project: Next week construction will begin on Highway 55 between Donnelly and McCall. This is a much-needed project to repair potholes and cracks in the roadway and will include placing a new layer of pavement on the highway for smoother driving conditions.
What to expect:
* Idaho 55 will be reduced to one lane with pilot cars midweek (Monday – Thursday)
* All lanes will be open on weekends (Friday – Sunday)
* Roadway surface will be uneven for several weeks
* Speed limit will be reduced and 12-foot restrictions will be in place
* Construction is expected to be complete in September.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Tues (June 22) Tea Pot Dome weather station recorded a 53mph gust around 1030pm. Watch for downed trees. No current report.
South Fork Salmon River salmon fishing opens on June 26. Check F&G regs. Watch for campers and extra traffic.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
No current report.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (June 23) Mail truck driver reports trees had come down but had been cut out before he came in. Road has not been graded yet, it is rough.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open
Reported to be rough. Watch for downed trees, ATVs and UTVs.
Road Closure: Lick Creek Road will be closed at Zena Creek (about 4 miles east of the Ponderosa Campground) from July 19 – July 29 for a bridge replacement. Please plan ahead.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open, travel at your own risk. Watch for new trees down.
Last report (June 14) that folks have been traveling over the summit this last weekend, the road is in bad shape.
Another report (June 14) the downed trees from this last winter have been cut out wide enough to accommodate trucks and trailers.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Link: Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
Stibnite weather station recorded a 26mph wind gust at 1030pm June 22nd. No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open, travel at your own risk. Watch for downed trees.
A 2nd hand report (June 14) that someone made it over to Thunder Mtn. this last weekend in a full sized truck.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
A report (June 14) that the route still had snow, but it may be melting open soon. An earlier report that there were a lot of trees down during the winter snow.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Open per Valley County June 9th.
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Open
Update from Payette NF May 27: “Secesh Summit to Burgdorf/Warren – Open. Warren Summit – Open to the South Fork Salmon River.”

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
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