Idaho History June 20, 2021

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 62

Idaho Newspaper clippings November 4-11, 1919

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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November 4

Evening Capital News., November 04, 1919, Page 7

19191104ECN1

In The Panhandle Of The State

Lewiston – The annual report of the officers of the Lewiston chapter of the American Red Cross shows that the membership of the chapter, comprising Nez Perce, Idaho and Lewis counties, is now 8,769. Lewis county has [1,796], Idaho county 2,794 and Nez Perce county 4,179. During the influenza epidemic of a year ago the chapter expended over $8,000 in relief work in the three counties. Several hospitals were maintained and trained nurses secured from coast points to aid the stricken communities. The grand total of articles manufactured by the women of the chapter, including garments, hospital supplies and surgical dressings is 128,429. The canteen department reports that 1,265 returning soldiers and sailors were served with lunches at the depot. The junior Red Cross has 86 auxiliaries and 2,664 members in the three counties.

Lewiston – Women and girls of high school age from all over Nez Perce county are to have the privilege of taking a home nursing course under the instruction of a specially trained Red Cross nurse employed by the Lewiston Red Cross chapter.

Wallace – A mass meeting was held here Wednesday night to discuss the daylight saving system. About 40 residents were present and voted in favor of adopting mountain time. this would mean that instead of turning the clock back next Sunday one hour Wallace time would not be changed and Wallace would have the same time as is used in Missoula. It would also change the departure and arrival of all O. W. R. A. & N. trains one hour later and the city would have the same time as the Northern Pacific. In other words, the time situation would be exactly reversed from what it is now. The opinion of the meeting was not unanimous and the resolution calling on the city council to go on record as favoring mountain time was made with the proviso that that time is adopted throughout the district.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 04 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. November 04, 1919, Page 5

19191104BFH1

Local Pick-ups

Miss Katherine Egan is convalescing from an attack of the Spanish influenza.

William (“Buddie”) Kinnear has been quite sick the past week with influenza but is now reported as improving.

Mrs. A. B. Ashby is critically ill at her home with Spanish influenza. Drs. Fry and Faucett today reported her conditions somewhat improved.

The schools of Independent School District No. 4 began today the serving of soup and hot lunches. This service is in charge of the domestic science department of which Miss Dorothy Spurling is in charge.
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News Notes From Leonia

The two little Fuller children have been taken from the Curley Creek school in Montana, to Leonia, Idaho, to complete the required number of children needed to keep the Leonia school going. Five of the six pupils in the Leonia school belong in Montana districts.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 04 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Market Day at Peck, Idaho ca. 1911

Peck1911Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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November 5

Evening Capital News., November 05, 1919, Page 8

19191105ECN1

Charities Body Joins City Welfare Plans
Miss Bray Named Superintendent at Annual Meeting – Red Cross to Be Asked for Appropriation for Social Service

Further co-operation in the city welfare work is assured by the action of the Associated Charities of Boise in its annual meeting Tuesday night, when Miss Elizabeth Bray, city welfare director, was chosen as superintendent of the organization. A resolution was also passed authorizing a committee to urge upon the executive board of the Red Cross an appropriation for public health and welfare work.

The meeting was held at the mayor’s office in the city hall, Charity work on the last year and plans for the year to come were discussed. Miss Bray told the members what she has learned in her investigations since assuming her office and made recommendations bearing on the employment of a regular social service worker.

Treasurer Charles M. Kahn reported total expenditures during the year of $4,931, and total receipts of $5,465. An additional fund raised by the Commercial and Rotary clubs brought in $2,600, of which $1,000 has been used. Disbursements were heavier than usual because of the influenza epidemic last winter. …

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Challis Messenger., November 05, 1919, Page 2

19191105CM1

19191105CM2

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Street Scene, Pierce, Idaho

PierceFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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November 6

Evening Capital News., November 06, 1919, Page 16

19191106ECN1

Monthly Review of County Agent Work in This State Given by University Extension Department

The extension department of the University of Idaho, headquarters in Boise, has issued a monthly review of the activity of county agent work in various counties in the state. …

Bannock

Livestock – The livestock co-operative shipment from two communities did not turn out so well as expected on account of the poor condition of stock and flood of Kansas City market. A loss of about $2 per head below local prices was sustained in this venture. State and federal veterinaries have been assisting in the control of the influenza among the horses, a number having died from the results of this disease, but it seems to be checked by the use of the serum and many are demanding the vaccination of their animals. …

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 06 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Filer Record., November 06, 1919, Page 11

19191106FR1

19191106FR2Surgeon General Blue On The “Flu”

19191106FR3“Flu” cost 500,000 lives in the United States. Will it come back this year? This question, being asked by thousands of scientists and millions of laymen throughout the world, is discussed by Surgeon General Blue of the Public Health Service in an official bulletin, in which it is said that the plague probably will reappear, but not in as severe a form as last winter.

“Probably, but by no means certainly, there will be a recurrence of the influenza epidemic this year,” said General Blue. “Indications are that should it occur it will not be as severe as the pandemic of the previous year. City officials, state and city boards of health, should be prepared in the event of a recurrence. The fact that a previous attack brings immunity in a certain percentage of cases should allay fear on the part of those afflicted in the previous epidemic.

“Influenza is spread by direct and and indirect contact. It is not yet certain that the germ has been isolated or discovered, and as a consequence there is yet no positive preventive, except the enforcement of rigid rules of sanitation and the avoidance of personal contact.[“]

General Blue says that evidence points strongly to infected eating and drinking utensils, especially in places where food and drink are sold to the public, as being one of the modes of transmission of this disease.

source: The Filer Record. (Filer, Idaho), 06 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 06, 1919, Page 3

19191106DSM1

19191106DSM2‘Flu’ Spread By Handshake
Dirtier the Atmosphere, the More Immune One is to Disease, Says Colonel Vaughn.

St. Louis, Mo. – There is no indication of an epidemic of influenza this winter, according to speakers at the convention of the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States here.

One method of spreading the disease is by handshaking, it was said.

Col. Victor C. Vaughn [sic], in an address, declared the dirtier the atmosphere and the more bacteria one breathed, the more immune he would be to disease. This was proved, he said, by statistics complied during the war, which showed that the greatest death rate from disease was among men from rural districts.

“The city-reared man,” he asserted, “is accustomed to breathing filthy air, while the country-bred man is not, and consequently a foul atmosphere will affect the latter sooner than the former.”

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 06 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Nezperce Herald., November 06, 1919, Page 1

19191106NH1

Death of Leander Smith

Leander R. Smith, who came to the Mohler section from Omaha, Neb., some two weeks ago to visit his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Smith and his sister, Mrs. Harley Brannon, died on October 31 from the effects of an attack of influenza suffered by him a year ago

The funeral was conducted from the home of his parents at 11 a.m last Sunday by Rev. Geo. H. Ellis, and the remains were laid to rest in the Nezperce cemetery.

The deceased was born near Leslie, Iowa; 36 years ago, and besides his parents, leaves a brother and two sisters, all of whom were at his bedside except the brother, whose home is in Kansas City, Mo.

The bereaved family has the sympathy of the community in this sad experience which so untimely came to them.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 06 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Main Street, Plummer, Idaho ca. 1912

Plummer1912Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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November 7

Evening Capital News., November 07, 1919, Page 3

19191107ECN1

Tuberculosis And The Christmas Seal Sale

By M. S. Parker

In some of the states of the Union nearly one-fifth of the deaths caused by preventable diseases during the first six months of this year resulted from the dread disease tuberculosis, notwithstanding the epidemic of influenza that swept over this country during the early months. Idaho had its full portion of mortality from that cause. During the past few years hundreds of citizens of the Gem state have fallen victims of tuberculosis and the situation is worse now than ever before, being augmented by influenza.

And severe as was the epidemic, influenza caused but a little less than twice as many deaths the first half of this year in most sections of the United States as did the “great white plague.”

Officials everywhere are emphasizing this appalling fact in urging wholehearted support by the citizens of the annual Christmas Seal sale, the purpose of which, in the main, is to raise funds with which to fight tuberculosis, indeed a very humanitarian purpose, and there should be generous response to the appeal among the people in every walk of life.

Funds raised through the sale of millions of seals to be offered the public as health investment this fall will be used during the coming year, not only to fight tuberculosis, but other preventable diseases as well. Idaho’s allotment of the $6,500,000 fund to be raised throughout the nation in the campaign headed by the National Tuberculosis association is not large and I am sure the state will make a very gratifying showing.

It may be assumed that the general public does not fully realize the menace of tuberculosis because the disease is not surrounded by so many dramatic features as was the influenza epidemic which was given such very general publicity.

The people must be brought to realize that tuberculosis is not only one of the greatest enemies of the human race but that it can be prevented and can be cured, if treatment is not too long delayed.

The campaign against tuberculosis as well as other preventable diseases must be carried into every county in Idaho next year but only by generous purchase of Christmas Seals can it be done, at least in a manner that the situation demands. Citizens of Idaho, don’t fail to meet your share of the responsibility in this important matter.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Cottonwood Chronicle. November 07, 1919, Page 1

19191107CC1

Red Cross Wants 10,000
Membership of Idaho, Nez Perce and Lewis counties 8800

When the citizens of Idaho, Lewis and Nez Perce Counties give their dollars for membership in the Red Cross, it must not be forgotten that several thousands of these membership dollars will be spent in these three counties during 1920.

In the first place, the splendid Public Health program now being started by the Red Cross will soon be under way in the Lewiston Chapter. Two nurses have already been engaged and in addition to this public health work, the Chapter has employed a graduate nurse for each of the three counties to give instruction in Home Hygiene and Care of Sick. Every community in the chapter jurisdiction will have this wonderful opportunity to better public and individual health conditions, at no expense to those taking the courses. Your membership dollars help pay for this greatly needed work.

Another branch of Red Cross activity now being conducted by the Lewiston Chapter in behalf of returned service men of the three counties, is the Home Service Section.

Up to the present time the Home Service Section of the Lewiston chapter has attended to over 400 cases of soldiers and sailors in Lewis, Idaho and Nez Perce Counties, 88 of these men were disabled in some manner, and are receiving special attention Ten of them are tubercular; fourteen have received treatment in hospitals; many have received financial aid for their families. In all these cases the Lewiston Red Cross chapter has supplemented and aided the government in every possible way. A trained secretary is employed to give assistance in all cases of need. The secretary keeps in touch with all service men who have needed advice or aid, and with all families in similar need. This work is supported entirely by your Red Cross dollars, and will continue until the last man returns home from service, or from the hospitals.

The Red Cross Canteen

Although the numbers are dwindling gradually, eight, ten, twelve or more service men are returning each week, and are being met at the train by a uniformed Canteen worker. Until the last boy returns Lewiston Chapter will see that the returning men are cared for and all their needs satisfied, when they reach Lewiston to stay, or pass through to their homes in the three counties.

The Junior Red Cross is another of the branches of work that is being continued with greater emphasis than ever. There are almost 3,000 junior workers in the three counties.

These are some of the reasons why the people of our district have a special interest in seeing the 10,000 membership mark reached. We want to know that all the advantages of the American Red Cross may be available to our people now, as well as in time of great emergency, such as was experienced in the influenza epidemic of last year.

Idaho, Nez Perce and Lewis Counties have 8800 members of the American Red Cross.

Make it 10,000. All you need is a heart and a dollar.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Residence Section of Potlatch, Idaho ca. 1911

Potlatch1911Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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November 8

Evening Capital News., November 08, 1919, Page 8

19191108ECN1

Don’t Disregard A Cold

The influenza and pneumonia that swept the country a year ago were proceeded [sic] by an epidemic of colds. Foley’s Honey and Tar will check a cold if taken in time, and will also stop a cough of long standing. It promptly gives relief, soothes and heals. Mrs. Geneva, Robinson, 88 N. Swan St., Albany, N. Y., writes: “Foley’s Honey and Tar is the best cough medicine I ever used. Two bottles broke a most stubborn lingering cough.” It loosens phlegm and mucous, clears air passages, eases hoarseness, stops tickling throat.

– Adv.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Main Street, Preston, Idaho, January 1913

Preston1913Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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November 10

Evening Capital News., November 10, 1919, Page 3

19191110ECN1

Gooding College Campaign
One Hundred Fifty Thousand Dollars For Men’s Dormitory
Starts Today — Let’s Go

19191110ECN2The Intermountain Empire

Gooding College is located on the main line of the Oregon Short Line, just half way between Granger and La Grande. It is the only Methodist college between Denver and the coast and has only one other school, offering full academic and collegiate work, within a distance of 250 miles. It assists worthy young men and women with work and furnishes scholarships to returned soldiers. It had an increase of four hundred per cent in enrollment last year and never lost a day on account of the influenza. It is better than ever this year with night classes for adults, a Rural Life School, a Summer Session and an Epworth League Institute.

Study the map and ask yourself, “How can I invest my money in any other place where it will do as much for humanity and the Kingdom of God as it will in this popular school of the Inter-Mountain people?”

For further particular address Charles Wesley Tenney, President, Gooding, Idaho

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 10 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Main Street Looking North, Pocatello, Idaho ca. 1914

Pocatello1914Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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November 11

Bonners Ferry Herald. November 11, 1919, Page 1

19191111BFH1

19191111BFH2
Mrs. A. B. Ashby Passes Away
Died Thursday After An Illness Of Eleven Days With Influenza And Meningitis
Funeral Sunday Afternoon
Was Prominent and Respected Matron of This District

Mrs. Maggie Ashby died last Thursday evening at her home in the south part of town, death being due to an attack of meningitis resultant from Spanish influenza which was contracted October 26th.

The funeral services were held at the Ashby home Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock and were conducted by Rev. G. H. Wilbur, pastor of the Union church, who spoke words of cheer and comfort to the mourning family and relatives of the deceased and gave a brief obituary. Several hymns were sung by a choir composted of Mrs. G. H. Wilbur, Mrs. F. A. Shultis, Mrs. Belle Bishop, Miss Mildred Jarvis, J. W. Stewart and W. F. Kinnear.

The funeral was attended by a host of the friends of the deceased and her family and the most beautiful floral tributes were banked on and about her coffin, expressive of the great respect and love felt for her by all her acquaintances. Interment was had in the Bonners Ferry cemetery.

The deceased is survived by her husband, A. B. Ashby, station agent of the Great Northern Railway Co., four children, Lester, aged 16, Gladys, aged 14, Geraldine, aged 10 and Shirley, aged 6 years; her father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Harvey, of Marshalltown, Iowa; two brothers, George Harvey, of Marshalltown, Iowa, and Calvin Harvey, of Bonier, Iowa, and Calvin Harvey, of Bonier, Iowa; four sisters, Mrs. Ida Shumway, of Newport, Wash., Mrs. Emma Welcho, of Iowa Falls, Iowa, Mrs. Maude Ashby, of Seattle, Wash., and Mrs. Mabel Ritchie of Hillyard, Wash. Mrs. and Mrs. Walter Shumway, of Newport, Wn., Mrs. Robert Ritchie and Mrs. S. W,. Ashby were here to attend the funeral and Mrs. S. W. Ashby will remain for a time to help take care of the Ashby home.

The pallbearers were Tom Nicholson, J. T. Bush, L. N. Brown, S. W. Biggar, J. B. Brody and Ray Homesley.

The deceased was 42 years of age and was born at Marshalltown, Iowa, on April 16, 1877. She became the bride of A. B. Ashby at Iowa Falls, Iowa on October 7, 1901. The couple came west in 1906 and have made Bonners Ferry their home since 1908.

The deceased was a loving and faithful wife and mother. Her first thoughts were always for her home and her family and she was a true helpmate to her husband in his efforts to make a comfortable home for his children. The deceased had a charming personality and made friends readily and was always anxious to extend a helping hand to anyone in trouble. She was a faithful member of the Union church Ladies’ Aid society and whenever her home duties permitted, took an active part in all social events and matters pertaining to the public welfare.

In the death of Mrs. Ashby this district has lost one of its most beloved and respected matrons. The entire community is united in mourning her death and in extending condolences to the bereaved relatives.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 11 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Further Reading

Victor C. Vaughan

Wikipedia

Victor Clarence Vaughan (October 27, 1851 – November 21, 1929) was an American physician, medical researcher, educator, and academic administrator. From 1891 to 1921 he was the dean of the University of Michigan Medical School, which rose to national prominence under his leadership.

He also served as president of both the American Medical Association and the Association of American Physicians, founded multiple medical journals, and was a leader in standardizing state medical licensing exams throughout the country. Serving with the U.S. Army during the Spanish–American War and World War I, he was instrumental in helping the military cope with the threats of typhoid fever and influenza. …

World War I

Even with his distaste for war, Vaughan termed the delay in the United States joining World War I a “national disgrace”. He and all five of his sons were commissioned in 1917. The Council of National Defense created the General Medical Board on April 2, 1917, and Vaughan was appointed to its executive committee along with Gorgas (by then the Surgeon General of the Army), three other officers, and five doctors: Surgeon General William C. Braisted, Surgeon General Rupert Blue, Admiral Cary T. Grayson, Franklin Martin, F. F. Simpson, William J. Mayo, Charles H. Mayo, and William H. Welch.

Gorgas had successfully lobbied Congress to remove a prohibition on reserve medical officers being promoted above major, and Vaughan was soon promoted to colonel and put in charge of the communicable diseases division. Disease was a major problem with the early mobilization effort; measles was the leading cause of mortality in the army during 1917, and from September 1917 to March 1918 the death rate for pneumonia at the most populous army camps was twelve times that of the general population. Vaughan, Gorgas, and William H. Welch toured camps, finding overcrowding and poor facilities, and the publicity surrounding Gorgas’s reports led Congress to hold hearings that led to increased medical staffing and some improvements in conditions. But the largest challenge the military faced was influenza.

The outbreak of influenza, first at Camp Kearny in December 1917, and then at Camp Funston in March and April, became a major issue when thousands of troops became ill at Camp Devens in September, with nearly 750 dying. Vaughan and Welch were dispatched there to investigate. Vaughan observed that this strain of influenza, rather than attacking the very young and very old, was killing men in prime physical condition, leading him to warn, “If the epidemic continues its mathematical rate of acceleration, civilization could easily disappear from the face of the earth.” By the time the epidemic ran its course, over a million troops were afflicted with influenza, and 30,000 of them died; 675,000 people died in the United States as a whole.

excerpted from: Wikipedia
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Hill’s Cascara Quinine Cold Tablets

HillsCascaraQuinineColdTablets-aphoto source: The Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Whitehall Pharmacal Company

Patent Medicines; Drugs; Non-Liquid

The indications or uses for this product as provided by the manufacturer are: Recommended for the relief of the following discomforts usually associated with colds: nasal stuffiness and discharge, headache, muscular aches and pains, neuralgia and neuritic pains, constipation, and that hot, flushed feeling.

Physical Description
acetophenetidin, 2 grs. per tablet (drug active ingredients)
cascara sagrada (drug active ingredients)
quinine sulfate (drug active ingredients)
aloin (drug active ingredients)
aspirin (drug active ingredients)
ephedrine sulfate (drug active ingredients)

source: The Smithsonian National Museum of American History
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Cascara Sagrada

Rhamnus purshiana. Family: Rhamnaceae

Cascara sagrada was first used by the American Indians. It means “sacred bark.” It’s made from the bark of a tree found in the northwestern U.S.

The bark contains anthraquinone glycosides. This acts as a cathartic or laxative. Cascara may help relieve constipation. But in 2002, the FDA marked laxatives that contain cascara sagrada as category II agents. This means they are not generally recognized as safe and effective for over-the-counter use. Manufacturers had not done the studies to show the safety of cascara sagrada.

excerpted from: University of Rochester Medical Center Health Encyclopedia
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Foley’s Honey and Tar Compound

FoleysHoneyandTarCompound-aFoley’s Honey and Tar Compound bottle, ca. 1895, St. Albans
Contributed by St. Albans Historical Society

Foley’s popular “cough syrup” retailed during the late 1800’s until the mid-1960’s. It was made in Chicago, Illinois and boasted that it was “sold everywhere. “ O. W. Bigelow sold it in his store in St. Albans in the late 1800’s. During the 1918 influenza epidemic newspaper ads touted the mixture as the answer to those suffering from the flu. In the early days the syrup of 7% alcohol, along with other ingredients, was given to infants with a dose being five to ten drops.

source: Maine Memory Network
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Foley & Co., Chicago, IL

Posted on December 3, 2014 by Jessica

Foley & Co. of Chicago made a range of medicinal products starting in the 1870s, the most well known of which was Foley’s Honey and Tar Compound.

According to the Pocono Record,

“The use of Foley’s cough syrup was long-lived — it was retailed during the late 1800s until the mid-1960s. In the early days, Foley’s concoction was 7 percent alcohol mixed with a special solution of pine tar and honey, terpin hydrate, sodium benzyl succinate and gum arabic. The recommended dosage for adults was one teaspoon; for children, a half teaspoon; for infants, five to 10 drops, according to the directions on the label of another undated bottle. Foley’s mixture cleared the throat of phlegm and mucus, stopped the tickling, opened the air passages for easier breathing and coated inflamed surfaces with a soothing medicine, according to an advertisement published in The Evening Independent of St. Petersburg, Fla., in 1919.

Another ad in the Evening Independent boasted that Foley’s Honey and Tar was “sold everywhere,” which may be true since ads for the product can be easily found in old newspapers throughout the country. Even the Stroudsburg Daily Times carried an ad in 1889, promoting the “wonderful value” of the compound. Although newspaper ads for Foley’s Honey and Tar were common, the number grew during the flu epidemic of 1918, touting the mixture as the answer to those who were suffering.”

There isn’t much written history about the founder of Foley & Co or the inventor of Foley’s Honey and Tar but records do show that two men, John B. Foley and Harry B. Foley, were associated with the business. …

Around the turn of the century, there was a great deal of negative press surrounding patent medicines, which brought about passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906. In an attempt to dispel some of that negative association, Harry B. Foley wrote an article for Western Druggist, a trade magazine widely read by pharmacists and drug store merchants. Foley tries persuade retail druggists that patent medicines are a great deal for them commercially, as well as protecting them from any unhappy customers.

“A store that makes a specialty of selling no-secrets [non patent medicines] soon loses the confidence of the people and they will trade with the druggist who pushes advertised proprietary medicines, and if they are not satisfied, they do not hold the druggist responsible.”

excepted from: Artifacts from the Old Main building of Illinois State University
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The Great Influenza Outbreak of 1918

It was an unusual pandemic in the United States involving the H1N1 virus which infected 500 million globally resulting in the loss of 50 to 100 million.

[This has interesting oral history from elders that were alive during the pandemic.]


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Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)