Monthly Archives: August 2021

Aug 29, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

Aug 29, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Because of our [water] situation lawn watering is discouraged. No watering after 2pm. If you are asked to turn your water off, it’s because the system is in danger of running out. Please be respectful. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays weekends.

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions are still in Effect

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order issued
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit season
May 15 – Firewood Season, permits at The Corner
May 25 – Johnson Creek road fully open
June 7 – Lick Creek road open
June 13 – Profile road open
July 16 – Stage 1 Fire Restrictions
Aug 29 – Price of 1st Class Stamps goes up
Aug 31 – Deadline for Fest Chairperson
Sept 1 – Deadline for Stibnite Foundation/Council
Sept 4 – Labor Day Weekend Golf Tournament
Sept 4 – Potluck 4pm at the YP Tavern
Sept 11 – YPFD Budget Meeting 10am at Fire Hall
Sept 11 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
Sept 18 – ATV-UTV Ride to Thunder Mountain
(details below)
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Local Events:

YPFD Meeting Aug 28, 2021

18 people attended to hear County officials explain the legal process for becoming a Yellow Pine Fire District Commissioner.

20210828YPFDMeeting-a
[h/t LI]
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Labor Day Weekend Golf Tournament

Saturday, September 4th, 10am, Annual Labor Day Weekend Golf Tournament. $20/person. Proceeds support the Yellow Pine Fire District. Contact Adam Pellegrini at Email for questions or to sponsor a hole ($50-250 per hole.)

Fire Department Fundraiser

Want to join me in making a difference in Yellow Pine? We are raising money to benefit the Yellow Pine Fire Department through its Annual Golf Tournament, and any donation will help make an impact. You don’t need to come out and golf to support us, simply give $5 or $100. All proceeds go to help update pumps, new equipment and prepare for the coming fire season. Thank you! – Yellow Pine Fire Department. link:
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Potluck 4pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern

Lasagna and Brauts provided by the Tavern, Cory’s and Sullivan’s.
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ATV-UTV Ride to Thunder Mountain

Saturday, September 18, 9am – 4pm

Meet at the Community Hall

Ride with us through the fabulous back-country to the historic Thunder Mountain area and support the Yellow Pine Community Hall. This out-and-back ride is rated as intermediate. Participants ride from Yellow Pine Community Hall up Stibnite Road to Thunder Mountain. BBQ Lunch will be served to participants at the end of the road. The timeframe of this event is estimated to be from 9am to 4pm. $25 for online sign up and $30 at the event.

Sign up link:
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Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in Effect

Under the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions, the following acts are prohibited on state and federally managed or protected lands, roads, and trails:
* Building, maintaining, attending, or using a fire, campfire or stove fire except within a designated recreation site and in a permanent concrete or metal fire ring, or on private land, and only within an owner-provided structure.
* Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle, building, or designated recreation site or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials.
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Village News:

Notice – New Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sundays.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
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Buckhorn Outfitters

Our Elk & Deer hunts are booked for our 2021 season, we do have a couple openings for our 2022 Elk & Deer hunts. We Also have a couple openings for Mountain Lion hunts December 2021 through February 2022 and Spring Bear hunts May of 2022.

Getting new sets of shoes on before season starts next week. Thanks Buck Greenwood

20210825Buckhorn-a
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Yellow Pine General Store

The Liquor Store is now reinstated. Store hours: 10am to 5pm, Monday – Sunday. (See updated ad for more info.)
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Harmonica Festival Chairman

Anyone interested in Harmonica Festival chairman for 2021 needs to notify a Council member by August 31,2021. 2022 festival chairman will be announced at the September VYPA meeting.
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Stibnite Foundation and Stibnite Advisory Council

Letters of interest for being Yellow Pine representatives for the Stibnite Foundation and Stibnite Advisory Council must be submitted to the Village Council by 9/1/2021. The letters will be presented at the September meeting for a vote by the membership.

Link: Community Rep Ltr of Interest.pdf
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Veterans’ Monument

With this heat, the flowers and shrubs at our Veterans’ Memorial dry out quickly. When Niebrand’s are in, they water them, but aren’t here all the time……if you go by, please check, and give them a drink with the hose that is there. Our veterans (and the Niebrand’s) thank you!
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Help Suvanna with medical bills and living expenses

On Saturday, August 7th Suvanna had a severe reaction to a bee sting and had to take a Lifeflight from the back country in Yellow Pine, Idaho to the Emergency room in Boise, Idaho.

We are hoping to help with the massive medical bills and home expenses while she recovers from lingering symptoms that will keep her from her wonderful work at the doggy day care that she loves. Any amount big or small. Even five bucks helps!

We are so grateful she is ok and appreciate any and all help.

Link: Go-Fund-Me
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Conserve (and Boil) Water

Please be conservative when watering lawns. We ask those that are here all week to not water lawns on the weekends so that more water is available for the weekend cabin owners. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!
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Tips on Water Recycling

Use a dishpan to catch the rinse water (a.k.a “gray water”) when doing dishes (and hand washing) and use it to water outdoor flowers or to flush a toilet.
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Road News

Local streets are dusty – no dust abatement this year on main street. Please slow down!

Link: to current road reports.

Johnson Creek road was recently graded, but is already getting rough again.

Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are Open. These roads have not been bladed and are rough. Travel at your own risk.

Hwy 55 projects
Smith’s Ferry area: Starting Tuesday, Sept. 7, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route. Project Website link:
Donnelly to McCall: One lane during the week and two lanes on weekends. Project is slated to last until September.
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Critters

Be Mountain Lion Aware

Note: A report of a mountain lion hanging around the upper end of the village early summer.

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!

Be Bear, Fox & Coyote Aware

* Do not feed them human food
* Secure your trash
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Bats

While bats are an important part of our ecosystem and most do not carry rabies, CDH offers the following tips to protect yourself and pets:
* Never touch a bat with your bare hands.
* If you have had an encounter with a bat, seek medical attention.
* If you come in contact with a bat, save the bat in a container without touching it and contact your health department to arrange testing for rabies. Whenever possible, the bat should be tested to rule out an exposure to rabies. During regular business hours in Ada, Boise and Elmore Counties, call 208-327-7499 and in Valley County, call 208-634-7194. After business hours in all counties, call 1-800-632-8000.
* Always vaccinate your pets for rabies, including horses. Pets may encounter bats outdoors or in the home.
* Bat-proof your home or cabin by plugging all holes in the siding and maintaining tight-fitting screens on windows. Bats can enter through holes the size of a quarter.

Pine Martins & Raccoons

Watch your small pets. Reports of pine martins living in the dump and raccoons on the north side of the village.

Aggressive Deer and Elk

Be aware that mothers will attack dogs and chase people if they feel their babies are threatened. Keep dogs leashed in the forest during “baby season” for their own protection.

Ticks

* Know where to expect ticks. Many ticks live in grassy, brushy, or wooded areas. When possible, avoid wooded and brushy areas with tall grass and leaf litter. Walk in the center of trails, particularly in spring and summer when ticks feed.
* Wear appropriate clothing. When in tick habitats, wear light-colored, tightly woven long pants and long-sleeve shirt. Tuck your pant legs into socks or boots, and your shirt into your pants. This helps keep ticks on the outside of your clothing where you can spot them more easily.
* Use tick repellent when necessary, and carefully follow instructions on the label. Apply an EPA-registered repellent effective against ticks, such as those containing DEET to clothes and exposed skin, and permethrin to clothes and gear. Take care when applying repellent on children. EPA’s search tool can help you find the repellent that best suits your needs.
* Check clothing, gear, and pets after being areas with ticks. Ticks can hitch a ride into your home on clothing and pets, then attach to you or a family member later. Carefully examine coats, camping gear, and daypacks. Don’t forget your dog, see CDC’s where to check your pet for ticks.
* Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming can reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease and may be effective in reducing the risk of other tick-borne disease. Showering can wash off unattached ticks and it is a good opportunity to do a tick check.
* Check your body, your child and pets thoroughly for ticks. Carefully inspect areas in and around the hair, head, neck, ears, under arms, inside the belly button, around the waist, between the legs, and behind the knees. Ticks can be very small before they feed—look for what may appear like a new freckle or speck of dirt. Continue checking for two to three days after returning from areas with ticks.

Mosquitoes – West Nile

* Remove standing water
* Wear long sleeves and pants during morning/evening hours
* Use a good repellent with DEET (our bugs laugh at “backyard” formulas.
* Vaccinate your horses and mules! West Nile can be fatal to equines.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

Starting Aug. 29, USPS will raise prices of first-class postage stamps to 58 cents from 55 cents.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Sunday (Aug 22) The dump is about 25% full and very clean and tidy.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water. No outside watering after 2pm, nor on holiday weekends and especially not during the festival.

July 25 Update:

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association Board asks that individuals refrain from using domestic water to dampen the road. The Water Corporation is doing its best to provide water for domestic use during the low water period but as the supply becomes more limited, it is incumbent upon each of us to be judicious with its use. Thank you for your cooperation in ensuring that all community members have an adequate supply of water.

The corporation has received the first $150k grant of the anticipated $450k. We are hoping to have some of the supply lines replaced by winter. Thanks to those who wrote letters of support. They were very beneficial in securing the grants. – Willie Sullivan

July 8, 2021 Update

DRINKING WATER WARNING
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059
BOIL WATER ADVISORY
Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST. Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 180 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake@drakediversified.com. .
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc. .
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 7-8-21.

YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 at the Community Hall at 10am
Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes.rtf

YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting held July 5, 2020 at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
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VYPA News:

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Hailey Harris, Secretary
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

Elections for Commissioners for both District 2 and 3 will be held in November 2021.

August 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss upcoming election (no minutes yet.)

July 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes.
Link: to 20210710 YPFD Meeting.docx

June 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes.
Link to minutes: 2021 June 12 YPFD meeting minutes.docx

May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes.
Link: to 20210515 YPFD MeetingNotes_Final.docx

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30, 2020 at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

2021 Meeting schedule for the YPFD. All meetings are at the YPFD Station
Sat. May 15 at 10am
Sat. June 12 at 10am
Sat. July 10 at 10am
Sat. September 11 at 10am Budget Meeting

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by a escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful.
link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021.pdf

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Phil Jensen, Acting – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Tim Rogers – Fire Chief
Secretary Ronda Rogers
Treasurer Nikki Saleen
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
Hours: 1pm-8pm, closed on Tuesdays
We offer smoked tri tip, brisket, and chicken sandwiches and also burgers and chicken wings.
Firewood Permits available May 15th.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Open daily: 8am to 9pm
Sunday 8am to 2pm
Indoor Dining and Outdoor Dining Available.
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Opened June 12th for Summer
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Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
Store hours: 10am to 5pm, Monday – Sunday. Gas and Diesel now available. The Liquor Store is now reinstated. Now Selling Black Rifle Coffee.
The store is stocked with basic convenience store items such as food, fuel, liquor, beer, wine, tobacco, ice, non alcoholic beverages, snacks, ice cream. New Yellow Pine branded shirts, hats and koozies have arrived. We are going through the process of installing a propane dispenser and bottle exchange service.
For any particular store item requests, please call 208-633-3300 or Email
For room reservations, please call 208-633-3300 or Email for reservations
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Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buckhorn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Our Elk & Deer hunts are booked for our 2021 season, we do have a couple openings for our 2022 Elk & Deer hunts. We Also have a couple openings for Mountain Lion hunts December 2021 through February 2022 and Spring Bear hunts May of 2022. Please see our Website site for further details.
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation – (208) 382-4844

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:

Garden Mountain Contractors
We would like to extend our services into the Yellow pine area if there may be a need. We dig a lot of dirt! If you need this give us a shout on our FB page below. – Larry Williamson
Garden Valley, Idaho FB Page:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Aug 23) overnight low of 38 degrees. This morning clear sky, light dew and light haze of smoke (Yellow Air Quality.) A robin calling and a steller jay visiting. Light traffic on main street. Clear, breezy and light haze of smoke before lunch time. Pleasant temperatures mid-afternoon, clear sky (very blue to the north, haze to the south) and light breezes, high of 79 degrees. Clear early evening, almost calm and light haze of smoke – Green AQ. Clear sky and good air just before dusk. Clear at midnight.

Tuesday (Aug 24) overnight low of 33 degrees. This morning clear blue sky, dewy grass and good air quality. No early birds visiting. Light street traffic. Clear and chilly light breeze before lunch time. Smoke moving in by early afternoon. Solid layer of smoke with probably clear sky above mid-afternoon, poor air quality and warm breezes, high of 80 degrees. Smoky and warm before sunset, very red sun, Yellow air quality. Cooler and smoky before dusk. Clear enough for Jupiter to shine over Golden Gate before midnight.

Wednesday (Aug 25) overnight low of 37 degrees. This morning clear above smoke (Yellow air quality) and light breeze. A lone steller jay calling. Light street traffic. Warming up, light breezes and sky covered in smoke at lunch time. Mail truck was a little late but reported no problems. Mostly cloudy, warm, breezy and quite smoky mid-afternoon – high end of Yellow air quality, high of 84 degrees. Increased traffic. Warm, breezy, mostly clear, less smoke and Yellow air quality before sunset. High thin wispy cloud over most of the sky after sunset, haze of smoke, warm and calmer. Looked clear to the east before midnight. Internet out after midnight. Still out at 6am.

Thursday (Aug 26) overnight low of 41 degrees. This morning overcast and smoky (Yellow air quality) and few minutes of “dry” sprinkles of rain evaporating on contact. A couple of very low flying airplanes. Light street traffic. Cool cloudy and smoky at lunch time. Helicopter over the village around 315pm. Warming up, mostly cloudy, light breeze and a bit thinner smoke (Yellow air quality) mid-afternoon, high of 80 degrees. Grasshoppers and a few dragonflies around, and a few long legged wasps. Mostly cloudy, warm, calmer and haze of smoke at sunset (low end of Yellow AQ.) Cooling off, partly cloudy, calm and haze of smoke at dusk. Looked hazy/cloudy before midnight.

Friday (Aug 27) overnight low of 43 degrees. This morning mostly cloudy with blue sky between clouds and light smoke (Yellow air quality) local smoke a bit thick by the Community Hall. Early air traffic. Steller jay visiting, no other birds around. Mostly cloudy at lunch time and light haze of smoke. Warmer, breezy and lighter smoke mid-afternoon, mostly cloudy to partly clear sky, high of 79 degrees. Pine squirrels gathering cones. Warm, mostly cloudy (partly clear) and lighter breezes before sunset, better air quality. Cooling off quickly at dusk, partly cloudy, calm and good air quality. A couple of bright stars to the east before midnight.

Saturday (Aug 28) overnight low of 36 degrees. This morning clear blue sky and good air (Green air quality.) OHV traffic in a hurry on main street. A steller jay visiting. Cool, clear and sunny at lunch time. Clear blue sky and pleasant temperatures mid-afternoon, light breeze and good air quality, high of 88 degrees. Two jays visiting. Warm and clear sky before sunset, thin haze of smoke (and dust) in the air. Cooling off, clear and slight haze at dusk. Looked clear before midnight, lots of stars. Late night traffic.

Sunday (Aug 29) overnight low of 36 degrees. This morning clear blue sky, and Green air quality. Very dry – street traffic kicking up clouds of dust. A couple of steller jays visiting. Clear, sunny and light haze at lunch time – smell of smoke. Warm, clear, slight haze and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 87 degrees. Little chipmunk and 2 jays visiting. Clear sky, slight breeze and warm before sunset, slight haze of smoke and dust.
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RIP:

JR VanHoover

July 27, 1975 – August 28, 2021

RIPJRVanHoover-a
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Letter to Share:

Vaccines, masks still the best weapons in the war on COVID-19

By Gregory Irvine, MD

Eighteen months ago, I wrote in The Star-News that we were at war with SARS CoV2 and that all of us were going to have to pull together to fight this common enemy. We now know all too well what has transpired since those early days of the pandemic.

To extend the analogy, our enemy has changed tactics, mutating to multiple variants including the current Delta variant. The virus has changed its structure to be much more transmissible, and probably more virulent. That is a dangerous combination.

Someone who contracted the original version of the virus infected, on average, two to three other people. The Delta variant now infects, on average, six to seven individuals for each infected person, making it two to three times as contagious as the original virus.

That doesn’t sound like much, but when you calculate multiple generations of viral transmission, the effects are multiplied exponentially. That is why more than 90% of the new COVID-19 infections in the US and Idaho are the Delta variant. Our enemy has found a way to spread more rapidly and infect more humans, thereby increasing its survival in the environment.

The good news is that the vaccines in the U.S. remain effective at preventing hospitalizations and death from infection with the Delta variant, which has been our goal since the beginning of the pandemic. In Idaho, 98% of the hospitalizations and 98% of the deaths during the Delta surge have been in the unvaccinated.

We have learned that vaccinated patients can be colonized in their upper respiratory tracts with SARS CoV2, but the vaccine, which produces internal antibodies and cellular immunity, almost always prevents the virus from getting into their organs and making them severely ill.

No vaccine is perfect and immunocompromised people, in particular, can occasionally be sickened by the virus after vaccination. That is why the CDC changed its recommendations about indoor masking to include even vaccinated individuals.

The vaccine has become the most effective weapon that we have against this viral enemy. Misinformation abounds about the COVID vaccines, but they are incredibly safe with very rare serious adverse effects and dramatically reduce hospitalization and death from COVID-19.

The Pfizer vaccine, as of Monday, has been granted full authorization by the FDA and the Moderna vaccine will almost certainly be fully authorized soon. If you want to do your part to end this pandemic and protect yourself and your family, the most important thing that you can do is get vaccinated.

The vaccine is readily available at our local clinics and pharmacies. Our hospitals and ICUs in Idaho are overfilled with very sick COVID-19 patients, and we must do everything possible to urgently reduce viral transmission.

We are now seeing patients almost every day in our emergency room, full of regret that they weren’t vaccinated, and extremely ill from COVID-19. This includes younger people and a worrisome number of children than we saw early in the pandemic. Nationally, almost one in five hospital admissions for COVID-19 complications are now children under 18 years. It is a moral imperative that we protect the youngest among us.

The second-best measure to reduce viral spread is to always wear a high-quality properly worn (mouth and nose covered) mask in public indoor spaces and at crowded outdoor events. Despite the unfortunate misinformation about mask use, they are most effective when worn by everyone in an indoor setting outside of your home.

If we care about our students, teachers and staff in our schools, universal masking in schools is essential. If a student or teacher is unmasked in school and becomes infected, the entire class and anyone else exposed will have to be quarantined.

If that infected student is masked at school, only they will be required to quarantine. If we want our kids in school full-time and in-person this year, we must do everything possible to reduce the spread of the virus in these public spaces.

Vaccination is approved for children 12 years old and above. Studies have shown that the vaccine is extremely safe and highly effective for children in this age range. The risk-benefit ratio of vaccinating teenagers versus infecting teenagers comes down, undoubtedly, on the side of vaccination. Our children under 12 years old cannot be vaccinated yet. They are vulnerable and must be protected by universal masking in our schools.

Today, the Delta variant of SARS CoV2 is winning the war in Idaho, and elsewhere, by overwhelming the unvaccinated by sheer numbers. It is imperative that we use every weapon that we possess to stop this enemy. Get vaccinated, wear a mask. It is a civic duty and moral imperative for all of us.

(Gregory Irvine, MD, is Chief of Staff of St Luke’s McCall Medical Center.)

source: The Star-News August 26, 2021
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Idaho News:

Total COVID-19 cases since pandemic’s start tops 1,000

By Tom Grote for The Star-News August 26, 2021

The total number of cases reported by the two Valley County hospitals since the beginning of the pandemic in March 2020 has now gone over 1,000. The total as of this week was 1,011 cases.

A total of 57 new cases of COVID-19 were reported in the past week by the hospitals, just under the 58 new cases reported the previous week.

St. Luke’s McCall reported 47 new cases in the last week, while Cascade Medical Center reported 10 new cases.

The two hospitals have reported a total of 151 new cases since Aug. 1, which is more than double the 63 new cases reported during all of July.

St. Luke’s McCall offers walk-in COVID-19 vaccines from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at St. Luke’s Clinics – Payette Lakes Family Medicine, 211 Forest Street, McCall.

Appointments also can be scheduled online through St. Luke’s myChart or calling 208-381-9500 or by calling 208-634-2225.

Cascade Medical Center offers a daily walk-in vaccination clinic Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.

full story:
— — —

COVID-19 Updates: 834 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths

August 27, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 834 new COVID-19 cases and 8 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 217,887.

The state said 813,709 people have received the vaccine, and 1,480,615 total doses have been administered. 727,815 people are fully vaccinated.

The age group with the most cases is 18-29 with 53,967 cases.

The state said 23 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 9,730, and 6 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 1,612.

8 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 2,327.

full story: [Valley County 1065 cases 6 deaths.]
— — —

How bad is the COVID situation in Idaho hospitals? Here’s what the data says

by Deni Hawkins 

The blue bars on the graph below show the hospitalization trends across Idaho. While not every hospital has reported data every day, it’s clear that the current surge is happening much faster than the one we saw last fall.

ICU numbers (in purple below) are also at their highest point since the pandemic started in Idaho. During the previous peak, there was a record 122 patients in Idaho ICUs on December 18, 2020. This year, we’ve spent 10 days above that benchmark, starting on August 14. On August 18, there were a record 140 people being treated for COVID in an ICU.


Idaho coronavirus hospitalization data (last update: Aug 23, 2021).

full story:
— — —

Idaho’s worrisome COVID-19 week: Nearly 5,000 cases, 44 deaths, packed hospitals

By Idaho Statesman Aug 27, 2021 (KIVI)

There are more COVID-19 patients in Idaho ICUs right now than at any point during the pandemic, and current hospitalizations are at levels not seen since last December, according to updated data from the Department of Health and Welfare.

As of Wednesday, there were 139 COVID patients in ICU units, which is higher than the Dec. 18 peak of 122. There were also 457 patients with confirmed or suspected cases of COVID-19 hospitalized, which is approaching last year’s peak of 496, reached on Dec. 1.

The state added nearly 5,000 COVID-19 cases this week and 44 deaths, according to Health and Welfare. Of the eight deaths recorded on Friday, two were individuals in their 40s and one was in their 30s.

continued:
— — —

Estimates of Americans with long COVID-19, per state

Gabrielle Masson – Tuesday, August 24th, 2021 Beckers Hospital Review

About 11.1 million Americans are living with long COVID-19, according to new estimates from The American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

Long COVID-19, or persistent symptoms up to six months after being cleared of the illness, affects around 30 percent of individuals who had COVID-19, according to two recent publications from the Journal of the American Medical Association. Symptoms of long COVID-19 are varied and may include neurological challenges, cognitive problems, shortness of breath, fatigue, pain and mobility issues.

Idaho = 63,197

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

St. Luke’s McCall to open walk-in urgent care clinic

By Tom Grote for The Star-News August 26, 2021

A walk-in urgent care clinic that will be open every day has been announced by St Luke’s McCall.

The new clinic, expected to be open by the end of 2022, will be located in the current Allen-Nokes building on Forest Street across from St. Luke’s McCall.

The $2 million project will remodel the building to accommodate the new clinic, which will share space with the hospital’s orthopedic clinic, said Amber Green, St. Luke’s McCall chief operating officer and chief nursing officer.

The new clinic likely will be open daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., Green said. It will replace the current appointment-only same-day clinic at the nearby St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine

The urgent-care clinic is also intended to reduce the number of patients who now go to the hospital’s emergency room when the current clinic is not available, Green said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County Commissioners vote against Dr. Cole for CDH Board

KIVI Staff Aug 24, 2021

The Valley County Commissioners voted against appointing Dr. Ryan Cole to the Central District Health board on Monday. The decision comes after the Ada County Commissioners voted to appoint him to the board position earlier this month.

One Valley County Commissioner, Sherry Maupin, voted in favor of Cole.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Applications accepted to fill Valley County treasurer position

The Star-News August 26, 2021

Applications are now being accepted to fill the pending vacancy in the position of Valley County treasurer.

The selected applicant will replace current Valley County Treasurer Gabe Stayton, who has announced his resignation effective Aug. 31 due to personal reasons.

Applicants have until 5 p.m. Sept. 6 to submit an application. Applicants must be at least 21 years old, live in Valley County and be registered Republicans.

Anyone interested in the position must contact their Republican precinct committeeman to request to be nominated, or they may contact Valley County Republican Central Committee Chair Pam Thier at 208-860-1120 or pjt2450@gmail.com.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Former Cascade police building sells for $455,000 in auction

By Tom Grote for The Star-News August 26, 2021

The building that formerly housed the Cascade Police Department was sold for $455,000 last Saturday

The building was purchased by the Scott & Angie Nunes Trust of Nampa.

“We purchased the building as an investment opportunity,” Angie Nunes told The Star-News. She declined to elaborate.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho auctions 16 Priest Lake lots for more than $13 million

KTVB Staff 8/23/2021

The Idaho Department of Lands auctioned off 16 state endowment-owned lake front lots at Priest Lake during an auction in Coeur d’Alene on Saturday.

The land sales generated $13,161,440, which is $3,560,440 over the appraised value, for the endowment fund that supports public schools, with five properties selling for the appraised value and 11 selling to competitive bidding.

The Idaho Constitution requires a public auction for the disposal of state endowment trust lands, and IDL can accept no less than the appraised value of the properties.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho potato growers brace for poor crop amid drought, heat

Where there are potatoes, there are fewer than normal, and most of the tubers are undersized and misshapen.

Associated Press August 25, 2021 (KTVB)

The hot, dry and smoky growing season has left some Idaho potato farmers bracing for a poor crop.

continued:
————-

Labor Day Events

Yellow Pine Saturday September 4th

10am – Golf Tournament to benefit the YPFD.

4pm – Potluck at the Yellow Pine Tavern
— — — — — — — — — —

Meadows Valley Days will see most events return during Labor Day weekend

The 56th annual Meadows Valley Days will return with most of its usual line-up of events during Labor Day weekend in New Meadows.

The event will run Saturday, Sept. 4, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, Sept. 5, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
— — —

Old-Fashioned Ice Cream Social to return to Roseberry Sept. 4

The Old-Fashioned Ice Cream Social will return on Saturday, Sept. 4, at Historic Roseberry, located one mile east of Donnelly. The Ice Cream Social features vintage cars, children’s games, demonstrations, ham radio operators, music, food and, of course, ice cream. Many flavors will be available, with huckleberry being the fan favorite.

Ice cream is offered free but donations will be accepted to help maintain and preserve the grounds and buildings of the museum complex.
— — —

P&IN Depot to host exhibit, yard sale Labor Day weekend

The Adams County Historical Society will have an outdoor Porch Exhibit on the porch at the P&IN Railway Depot in downtown New Meadows during the Labor Day weekend.

The exhibit will feature historical information on local porches and the valley. It will be held in conjunction with a fundraiser rummage sale at Freight Room.

The depot will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 4, and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 5.
— — —

Tamarack Resort to host ‘Bikes, Brews & Bluegrass’ Sept. 5

Tamarack Resort will help send out summer with a bang by hosting its first “Bikes, Brews & Bluegrass” celebration on Sunday, Sept. 5 from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. in The Village and on the mountain.
— — —

Meadows Valley Community Center to hold pie sale Sept. 5

The Meadows Valley Community Center will hold its annual pie sale on Sunday, Sept. 5, during Meadows Valley Days in New Meadows.

Hours will be 10 a.m. until the pies are sold. Whole pies only will be sold, no slices.
— — —

Payette Lake Run entrants will have choice of 30K or 10K courses

Runners can race around the lake at the Payette Lakes Ski Club’s 30K or 10K Payette Lake Run on Sunday, Sept. 5, beginning at Legacy Park in downtown McCall.

The 30K run will begin at 8 a.m., and runners will make a complete lap around the lake.

The 10K run will begin at 9 a.m. Runners will head out to Lick Creek and then back.
— — —

Sept. 4 used book sale to benefit McCall Public Library

Friends of McCall Public Library’s Used Book Sale will be Saturday, Sept. 4, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the Central Idaho Historical Museum’s lawn in McCall with COVID guidelines in place.

more info: The Star-News August 26, 2021
—————

Public Lands:

Kirkham Hot Springs Update – Gate has been reclosed.

Boise NF Aug 27, 2021 (via FB)

Lowman Ranger District opened the gates Aug. 5, 2021, on trial basis but the Kirkham Hot Springs Day Use Area gate has been reclosed in response to increased littering and natural resource damage.

Glass has been found in the hot spring’s pools, signs have been broken and vandalized, and some visitors are not respecting the site’s open hours. Forest Service staff have reported clogged spring pipes and extensively modified upper pools which caused flooding and diverted the hot spring’s natural flow.

Hot springs are sensitive ecosystems that support specialized life forms of algae, bacteria, plants, birds, animals, and insects.

Trampling the pools’ surrounding riparian area and continually rebuilding rock walls has big consequences to those specialized critters and can even damage fish habitat downstream.

We know that most visitors respect this valuable resource, and we are working to make improvements through the Great American Outdoors Act.
— — — — — — — — — —

US Forest Service working to restore Idaho’s state tree

August 24, 2021 Associated Press (Local News 8)

The U.S. Forest Service is trying to bring back Idaho’s state tree to its former prominence.

Western white pine were wiped out in the early to mid-1900s by a fungus that arrived from Europe in 1910.

But efforts starting in 1950 to grow white pine trees resistant to the blister rust fungus are continuing at the Forest Service’s Coeur d’Alene Nursery, in northern Idaho.

continued:
————–

Fire Season:

French Fire
Location 10 miles east of Riggins, Idaho
Percent of Perimeter Contained 100%
InciWeb:
— — — — — — — — — —

2021 Payette Wilderness Fires
Three fires are burning in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Payette National Forest. The Club, Rush Creek, and Vinegar fires were started by lightning on July 15, 2021. A Type 3 Incident Management Team took over the fires on July 19th. A closure order for trails has been put in place in and around these fires for public and firefighter safety to prevent any interference with suppression and response operations.
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — — — — — — — —

Boundary Fire
Salmon-Challis National Forest
The lightning-caused Boundary Fire ~2 miles W of Boundary Creek Boat Launch was detected on August 10.
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — — — — — — — —

Mud Lick, Haynes, and Iron Fires
Salmon-Challis National Forest
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — — — — — — — —

Dixie-Jumbo Fires
Nez Perce – Clearwater National Forests
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — — — — — — — —

Some useful links:

InciWeb Fire info
link:
— — — —

Air Quality McCall
link:
— — — —

National Fire Heat Map
link: (zoom in to our area)
— — — —

Fire Heat Map (Slow to load – be patient)

Weather Station at Stibnite

Real Time Lightning Map (zoom to our area)

GOES-West – Satellite Maps: Pacific Northwest
—————

Critter News:

Water samples taken in Payette Lake after dog falls ill

Tests will seek signs of harmful toxin found in algae

By Tom Grote for The Star-News August 26, 2021

Water samples were taken in Payette Lake on Monday after a dog became ill after swimming in the lake earlier this month, Central District Health reported.

Three staffers from the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality took samples from three locations on the lake that will be tested for the toxins found in harmful algae blooms. Results of those tests are expected to be released next week.

On Aug. 17, the owners of a dog reported their pet became ill after swimming in the northwest part of the lake, DEQ Water Quality Standards Analyst Brian Reese said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

FDA links hundreds of dog deaths, severe illnesses to recalled pet food

by WKRC Staff Sunday, August 22nd 2021 (CBS2 Idaho)

The Food and Drug Administration is warning consumers that a pet food company may be linked to the deaths or illnesses of hundreds of pets, saying the company needs to make changes.

Earlier this month, the FDA sent a warning letter to Midwestern Pet Food, Inc., citing multiple areas of concern after several inspections and recalls.

Officials say the conditions “likely contributed to the illness or death of hundreds of dogs.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

IDFG is asking for hunters help in monitoring and preventing CWD in Idaho

By Lynsey Amundson Aug 25, 2021 KIVI

Big Game Hunting season is approaching, a season many Idahoans look forward to. But, Idaho Fish and Game is also ramping up their efforts to keep chronic wasting disease out of our state and they need hunter’s help.

“It is a pathogen that is a severe neurological degradation, so we start to see issues with brain lesions,” Dr. Nicole Walrath, IDFG Wildlife Veterinarian said. “Your neuro system between your spinal column or your brain starts to look like swiss cheese, and these animals are more likely to die earlier.”

This disease is devastating to deer and elk populations, something our neighboring states are already seeing with CWD-positive herds.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Fish salvage ordered for 2 southeastern Idaho reservoirs

State wildlife officials eliminated limits on how many fish can be taken at Condie and Winder Reservoirs, which are being drained due to irrigation demands.

Associated Press August 26, 2021 (KTVB)

State wildlife officials have authorized a fish salvage and eliminated limits on how many fish can be taken at two southeastern Idaho reservoirs that are being drained due to irrigation demands.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game issued the salvage order this month for Condie and Winder reservoirs near Preston. The reservoirs contain bluegill, bass, perch and trout.

continued:
—————-

Letter to Share:

The Gamebirds Fall Fundraiser

The Gamebird Foundation

Preserving a legacy – Committed to ensuring thriving gamebird populations for generations to come. GIANT RAFFLE, Prize 1: Whole Heritage Pig +7 cu ft. Freezer + FREE cut and wrap; 2nd prize: 2 racks smoked BBQ ribs. 3rd prize: 4 GAMEBIRD porcelain cups. 4th prize: 4 Gamebird porcelain coasters.

Donation of $5.00/ticket or 5/tickets for $20.00. Drawing held October 10, 2021 at the Gamebird Foundation annual banquet. Winner need not be present to win.

Thank you for your support

The gamebird Foundation (TGF) is a 501©3 Organization and your donation is tax-deductible. You can order and pay for your tickets by going to (link). The payments are set in $5.00 increments so you can pay for the amount of tickets you order. Or just send a check (no cash please) to the gamebird Foundation PO Box 100, Viola Idaho. We will fill out your tickets and send you your stubs for a receipt. Any questions call me.

Jim Hagedorn
Executive Director
The Gamebird Foundation
208-883-3423
—————

Fish & Game News:

Tips for safely removing a bat from your house

By Terry Thompson, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, August 26, 2021

If a bat finds its way into your home, don’t panic, there are ways to remove the bat from the house that keeps the homeowner and the bat safe.

A recent report of a rabid bat in Blaine County has raised concerns with homeowners who find a bat in their house and how to safely remove it. While the rate of rabies in bats in Idaho is extremely low, as with any wild animal, personal safety is always encouraged when handling and releasing any wildlife.

Bats, as with all mammals, are a natural host for rabies in Idaho under the right circumstances. A bite is the primary way rabies is transmitted. Other exposures that could also be considered high risk for infection include contacting nervous tissue (brain or spinal cord) from a potentially rabid animal.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Roads on Cecil D. Andrus WMA will reopen to motorized traffic on Aug. 30

By Aaron Switalski, Wildlife Technician
Thursday, August 26, 2021

Starting Monday, Aug. 30, access roads on the Cecil D. Andrus Wildlife Management Area will be reopened to the public.

Due to seasonally dry conditions and high fire danger, WMA roads were temporarily closed to motorized traffic to mitigate the risk of fire and allow Fish and Game staff time to complete road maintenance to reduce the possibility of a vehicle-initiated fire.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Adorable baby sloth snuggles up with mom in cute video

by Georgina Jadikovskaall – Zenger News Monday, August 23rd 2021


The two-toed sloth cub and its mother. The species is found in Central and South America and sleeps 15 to 20 hours a day. (Daniel Zupanc/Zenger)

A two-toed sloth born in an Austrian zoo is a big visitor attraction — and many saw it wrapped around its mother for the first time.

Tiergarten Schonbrunn Zoo in Vienna is now home to three sloths after mother Alberta and father Einstein welcomed their newborn on June 3.

Visitors observe the cub’s development, despite the fact it will cling to the hair of its mother’s back or stomach and hide there for its first six months.

continued: CBS2 Idaho
—————

Seasonal Humor:

OldWest-a

CovidRosietheRiveter-a
—————–

Idaho History Aug 29, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 70

Idaho Newspaper clippings January 30-31, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

January 30 (continued)

The Kendrick Gazette. January 30, 1920, Page 1

19200130KG1

19200130KG2
The Flu Situation

From reports received from all over the country the flu is as much of a menace now as it was at any time last winter. Many deaths have occurred all over the country and the epidemic seems to be present in almost every community. A report from a reliable source stated there were eight deaths in Lewiston Tuesday. It is also reported there are 250 cases in Clarkston and 300 in Moscow.

Kendrick has had a few light cases but the number may be increased at any time as the disease spreads so rapidly. Cases in six families have been reported up to late Thursday afternoon. This is exclusive of three or four cases that have recovered.

The ridges tributary to Kendrick have reported a number of cases a few of which were quite severe.

At an unofficial meeting of the members of the Village council it was decided not to put a ban on public gatherings but the health officers requested that all public meetings be dispensed with whereever possible. No dances will be allowed under any consideration.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. January 30, 1920, Page 6

19200130KG3All “Flu” Cases To Be Isolated
“Flu” Again Appears
Seems to Be Spreading West From Chicago

Seattle — Strict isolation of all influenza and pneumonia cases in the state of Washington has been ordered by the state health commissioner. He urged all health officers to prepare hospitals and engage nurses beforehand for influenza patients in case epidemic should threaten.

Warning Given Montanans

Helena — After a study of the influenza in the east, watching its progress westward, the secretary of the state health board has proclaimed warning against the return of the “flu.”

He says the west can not hope to escape, but he believes it will be in mild form. Deaths depend largely, however, upon individual conduct, he said. He urges all persons who develop colds to go to bed and stay there until danger of complications is past.

Fargo Has 300 Cases

Fargo, N. D. — Fargo has more than 300 cases of influenza.

Quarantine was adopted at Moorhead, across the Red river from Fargo. Other cities are guarding against recurrence of last year’s epidemic.

Epidemic Hits Minnesota

St. Paul — Dr., Charles E. Smith, Jr., executive officer of the state health board, late Sunday proclaimed the influenza epidemic, and called on all health officers to join in the enforcement of regulations, for its control. Government regulations were put into effect again in Minnesota by Surgeon General Rupert Blue of the United States public health service.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 30, 1920, Page 1

19200130DSM1

19200130DSM2
“Flu” Situation Shows Improvement
Fewer New Cases, No Deaths And Many Recoveries In Moscow Is Report

With fewer new cases, many recoveries and several very severe cases in which little hope for recovery was held yesterday, reported much better today, the “flu” situation in Moscow is encouraging. The same is true of nearly all sections. Several towns and cities report slightly increased numbers of new cases but fewer deaths are reported and it is believed the crest of the wave has passed. No deaths have been reported in Moscow since that of Joseph Duffy. Mrs. Duffy, whose condition was regarded as very serious, is reported much better today. Mrs. Robert West, whose condition gave alarm yesterday, is believed to be improved today.

The method of handling the situation adopted by Dr. Leitch, city health officer, seems to be bring [sic] satisfactory results and people are getting over the panicky feeling that was so manifest earlier in the siege. Lewiston reports conditions improved with but one death yesterday compared with three Wednesday, five Tuesday and Monday.

Epidemic Nation Wide

Washington – Steady spread of influenza over the country was indicated by reports to the health service today from state and city health officers. No marked increase in any particular locality, however, was noted.

2,000 N. Y. Phone Girls Down

New York — The total number of new influenza cases reported today was 4,076, a decrease of 883 from yesterday. Pneumonia cases reported totaled 649, a decrease of 37. There were 100 influenza deaths, an increase of 33 over yesterday, and 136 from pneumonia, an increase of 18.

More than 2,000 telephone operators were reported ill.

Spokane Emergency Hospital

Spokane, Wash. — A downtown fire station here tonight was turned into a hospital for firemen ill with influenza, and eight patients at once transferred to it. The fire fighting apparatus was transferred to another station. Owing to the increase in influenza cases, a large building formerly used for a skating rink was turned into an emergency hospital, under the auspices of one of the large hospitals. Eighty-four new cases were reported today, bringing the total to 307. There were three deaths from ordinary lobar pneumonia, but none from influenza-pneumonia.

Taking Hold in Kansas

Topeka, Kan. — Influenza continued to spread rapidly throughout Kansas today, reports showing a total of 1,424 new cases as compared with 778 yesterday.

Two Yakima Deaths.

Yakima, Wash. — Two deaths from influenza reported this morning have stirred the Yakima chapter of the Red Cross to action. Sixty beds were ordered today from Seattle, and an emergency hospital will be opened if conditions get worse. Miss E. King, Red Cross nurse, has been assigned to special duty here.

Epidemic in Rome

Rome — Deaths from influenza on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, in Rome aggregated 122.
— —

19200130DSM3Schools Will Be Closed

Owing to the light attendance the school board announces that Moscow schools will remain closed, after today, until further notice. This does not mean anything serious, but so many are remaining away from school because of fear, and so many teachers are out that it was thought best to make no further attempt to continue school until conditions improve. Physicians believe that in another week the situation will clear up and the rest of the influenza wave will have passed.
— —

Fred Collins’ Family Sick

Fred Collins, city mail carrier, is off duty owing to illness in his family. His route is being carried by Mr. Cady. Mr. Collins is not sick but his wife and children are quarantined and he has to remain at home to care for them. This takes Sam Hall, of the post office force, from the volunteer teaching work he took up in the high school. Mr. Hall is quite disappointed over the closing of the schools. He said: “In one of my classes there were 21 in attendance out of a total of 26 enrolled, and in another of my classes there were nine in attendance out of 15 in the class.” Mr. Hall has hoped to be able to do some more “Good Samaritan” work for the school but closing the schools will end his work there. He has, however, plenty of work to do in the post office with Postmaster Morgareidge and Assistant Postmaster Sudderth and one carrier out of service.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 30, 1920, Page 2

[Editorial Page]

Moscow people are acting sensibly in the influenza matter. There is no panic and no one is badly frightened. The sick are being well cared for and those who are not sick are going on about their business. If this attitude can be maintained – and there is no reason why it cannot – the situation will grow better and in a very short time the epidemic will be but a memory.
— —

What’s In A Name?

Canadian physicians are ridiculing physicians of the United States for calling the present epidemic influenza. The doctors of our northern neighbor says it is nothing more nor less than the “grip” which visits the United States every winter. It makes little, if any difference what the disease is called, its results are deadly enough to cause precaution to be taken. The name amounts to but little more than did the name used by the little boy.

The boy had a dog and his little sweetheart had a cat. The cat had a piece of meat. In taking the meat from the cat a tragedy was enacted, the little boy tried to tell the little girl about it and to “break bad news gently.” He said:

“Your kitty had a piece of meat and my dog thought it was his.” Here he was interrupted by the little girls who was a stickler for proper language and who said: “Please don’t say thought. Dogs don’t think. They instinct.”

The boy’s reply is what applies to the present situation. He said: “I don’t care whether he thought or instincted, he killed your cat, just the same.”

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 30, 1920, Page 3

City News

Mrs. Dave Greear went to her home in Troy today, after remaining in Moscow over a week to take care of her children and grand children, who have been ill of the “flu.”

Mrs. J. J. Martin of Stites arrived today in Moscow to assist in nursing some of the influenza patients at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Bert Crow.

The young people of the Christian church have postponed indefinitely the banquet they had planned for February 3.

John Sudderth, assistant postmaster, has been confined to his home with sickness. He has not been quarantined and it has not been decided that he had the “flu” which he had in severe form last year, but he has been ordered to remain at home until he gets well.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Recorder. January 30, 1920, Page 2

19200130IR1

19200130IR2Flu Is Coming, Warns State Health Officer
Mild Form of Epidemic is Spreading Throughout Western States, Reports Show

Helena, Jan. 24 — After a study of the influenza situation for several weeks and by keeping in close touch with the progress it has made toward the western states, Dr. W. F. Cogswell, secretary of the state board of health, made a statement yesterday in the form of a warning against the return of the flu.

While Dr. Cogswell says the western progress of the influenza indicates that it cannot be hoped to escape a recurrence of it, he says it will appear in a mild form. He says that in the event of a recurrence, the number of deaths depend largely on individual conduct. He advises persons who develop colds to go to bed and remain there until danger of complications is over.

Casper, Wyo., Jan. 24 — With more than 125 cases of influenza reported in Casper to the county health officer, and two deaths in the last three days, further precautions as to prevention of the spread of the disease have been issued. All the cases are light.

Fargo, N. D., Jan. 24 — There are more than 300 cases of influenza in Fargo, most of them developed in the last four days, according to reports at the city health department.

St. Paul, Jan. 24 — State health authorities agreeing that a new epidemic of influenza has arrived in Minnesota, Dr. Charles. E. Smith, Jr., executive officer of the state board of health, yesterday proclaimed the disease epidemic and called on all local health officers to join in the enforcement of state regulations for its control.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. January 30, 1920, Page 3

Northwest Notes

Influenza has appeared in epidemic form in several communities in Idaho.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. January 30, 1920, Page 8

The Flu

We are in receipt of a communication from Ernest E. Laubaugh, M. D., chief of the bureau of public health service, to the effect that influenza has appeared in epidemic form in several communities in Idaho.

The chief claims it is highly contagious and rapidly spreading and asks that every effort be put forth to keep it down and under control. Rigid isolation must be established in all cases and prompt reports rendered.

We sincerely hope that our community may escape a return of this much feared epidemic but should it come again we feel there is no occasion for scare for under proper treatment at the outbreak no deaths should result.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Montpelier Examiner. January 30, 1920, Page 1

19200130ME1

19200130ME2
Death Angel Visits Four Home During Past Week

Mrs. Mary Human died at her home in Liberty Sunday morning, January 18. Grandma, as she was familiarly called, was 80 years of age. … [survived by 11 children, 71 grand children, and 25 great grand children.] …

Within the past week the Angel of Death has visited three homes in Georgetown, in two instances taking therefrom the wife and mother and in the third the husband and father. The death’s were caused from influenza and complications following it.

Mrs. Joseph Hebdon was the first to succumb to the dreaded disease. He death occurred shortly after noon last Sunday.

She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Abel Smart and was born in Smithfield, Utah, June 3, 1875. … Short open air funeral services were held at the Hebdon home last Tuesday afternoon.

The second death was that of Roy Wixom, which occurred last Tuesday afternoon. His death was caused from pneumonia following the influenza. Deceased was 27 years of age and was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Wixom of Sharon. He is survived by his parents, wife and three children. Funeral services were held at his home Monday afternoon.

The third home to be darkened by the shadow of death was that of Ernest P. Hoff, the young wife and mother being called at 11 o’clock Wednesday night after an illness of ten days with the flu.

The deceased was the daughter of Chris Sorensen of Georgetown, where she was born on Sept. 8, 1893. … Besides her husband and infant son, Ernest P. Jr., 17 months old, she is survived by her father, five brothers and five sister. Open air funeral services where held at the Hoff home yesterday afternoon at 3 o’clock.

The three deaths have cast a deep gloom over Georgetown, and the deepest sympathy of the entire community goes out to the grief-stricken families.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. January 30, 1920, Page 2

Says Influenza is Unconquered

London — Official admission that the most mysterious disease germ of the ages – the influenza bacillus – has defeated the world’s greatest scientists was made to Universal Service Saturday by Sir George Newman, chief medical officer of the British health ministry.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. January 30, 1920, Page 4

19200130ME3Flu Situation In City Well In Hand

Montpelier, in common with almost every other community in the country, is again battling with the influenza. The disease made its appearance here last week, and while it quickly spread the cases, with a very few exceptions, have been in a mild form. Up to this morning there has been only one death.

There has been no inclination upon the health authorities to close the schools, picture shows or dances, as the experience of a year ago proved that the strictest of quarantines did no good. However, strict quarantine is placed upon each home where the disease appears.

The situation is being well handled by the doctors, the Red Cross and a committee from the Boosters’ club headed by A. E. Thiel.

John Hillier and Frank Dunn have been appointed quarantine officers, and headquarters have been established at the fire station. If any one who is ill with the disease need assistance of any kind, will phone 141, or get word to Mr. Hillier they will receive prompt attention.

Through action of the Boosters’ club, Chairman Howell of the county commissioners, has appointed Nettie Hillier as city nurse. She is going from house to house investigating conditions and giving such instructions to the nurses and patients as may be needed.

This morning about 45 homes under quarantine and all the patients are reported as getting along nicely.

There is no need of undue alarm over the situation and the people should not become panicky or frightened, as that would only make matters worse. Fear weakens a person’s power of resistance and makes them even more liable to contract any disease than if they went about their daily labors with confidence and a feeling that there was no such a disease as influenza in the land.
— —

Death Claims Three Star Valley People

Vernon, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Crook of Afton, died in Salt Lake on Jan. 20. Death resulted from injuries received two years ago while the young man was branding and dehorning cattle. Deceased was 28 years of age. The remains were brot [sic] to Afton for burial.

Della, the four-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Adolphus Call, died in Afton on January 21. Death was caused from pneumonia.

L. F. Draney died at his home in Freedom on January 21. His death was directly due to hemorrhage of the lungs, he having bled most of the night previous to his death.
— —

No Great Act of Heroism Required

If some great act of heroism was necessary to protect a child from croup, no mother would hesitate to protect her offspring, but when it is only necessary to keep at hand a bottle of Chamberlain’s cough Remedy and give is as soon as the first indication of croup appears, there are many who neglect it. Chamberlain’s Cough Remedy is within the reach of all and is prompt and effectual. – Adv.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — — — — — — — —

Waha General Store, Waha, Idaho ca. 1909

Waha1909Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. January 30, 1920, Page 1

19200130CT1

19200130CT2
Launch Drive To Fight Influenza
Red Cross Takes Over Palace Rooms For Patients

Thursday afternoon the local Red Cross chapter took over the Palace rooms to provide hospital quarters for influenza patients. Because of the rapid spread of the disease both in Caldwell and in the surrounding country districts, it was deemed essential to provide hospital quarters somewhere that the patients might be given prompt medical attention.

Patrons of the hotel were asked to vacate the premises Thursday afternoon that all available room might be utilized for influenza sufferers. A number of cases were immediately quartered there.

So far, while the influenza is quite prevalent, most of the cases are of a quite mild form and no alarm is felt regarding the situation. Some few cases of pneumonia of varying degrees of severity are reported but in general the situation is considered well in hand.

Because of the contagious character of the disease it is not regarded as advisable to use regular hospitals for such patients.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. January 30, 1920, Page 3

Local and Personal

Ten Davis schools have been closed because of influenza. Schools at Star have also been closed.

Prof. H. H. Hayman of the College of Idaho faculty is ill with the influenza. Mrs. J. M. Rankin is also sick with the same disease.

Mrs. Harry Froman and little son Bobby are confined to their home on Cleveland boulevard with influenza.

William March, city night watchman, is confined to his home because of illness. During the absence of Mr. March, Glen McCullough has been acting as night watchman.

Mrs., John Smeed is ill at her home.

R. A. Thornton of the Alexander Clothing company, is confined to his home because of illness.

Tom Reddock, proprietor of the Independent Barber shop, is seriously ill at his home.

Several persons at the court house have been ill the past week. L. C. Knowlton, county recorder, Miss Rose Edwards, chief clerk and B. L. Newell are among those who were absent from duty during the week.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. January 30, 1920, Page 8

19200130CT3
Influenza Has Many Victims
State Department Urges Case But Holds Optimistic View

Influenza continues to invade new areas in the state, but the situation as a whole is somewhat improved. A total of 221 new cases with two deaths have been reported to this office January 25th, as compared with a total of 325 cases January 24th. In those communities in which all organizations are co-operating with the local health authorities the situation is well in hand.

The department of public welfare urges that the communities not become alarmed, but calmly view the situation, assist the local health officers by refraining from attending public gatherings, moving picture shows, dance halls, etc., as the foremost authorities on public health agree that these places are breeding spots for the transmission of the contagion.

Means to Prevent Spread

For the protection of those members of the family who have not influenza when an inmate of their house hold is down, it is essential that all dishes and table ware be boiled. Here again the foremost medical men agree is the second chief avenue of the contagion. Keep the home properly ventilated and when coughing or sneezing be sure to cover the mouse and nose with a handkerchief. This is called droplet infection” and the foremost medical men recognize it as an important avenue for the transmission of contagion.

The following is a report of cases received January 25th.

19200130CT4Bear Lake county, 66 new cases, 1 death.
Pocatello, 2 new cases.
Nampa, 57 new cases, 1 death.
Moscow, 41 new cases.
Minidoka, 55 new cases.
Total new cases reported, 221, two deaths.
Total cases reported since January 8th, 1444.
Total deaths, influenza, since January 8th, 3.
Total deaths, pneumonia, since January 8th, 5.

Yours truly,
Department of Public Welfare
Ernest E. Laubaugh, M. D., Chief Bureau of Public Health Service.
— —

College Of Idaho Notes

Sidney McLaughlin left for home on account of his brother Marvin, who is ill at Ten Davis.

Harley Philpott of Boise returned to college after a week’s absence caused by his parents’ sickness.

Raymond Rice of Roswell is ill.

The joy killer of the campus begins next Wednesday when final examinations are scheduled.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. January 30, 1920, Page 9

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Ten Davis

There is no school this week on account of the sickness in the neighborhood. It is hoped that by Monday it will be possible to have school again.

La Verne Miller came home from Boise Friday evening sick with the influenza. Winston Miller came down with it Sunday morning. They are getting along as well as can be expected.

Carol Gahley has the influenza. She came home from Boise Thursday evening.

Marvin McLaughlin is still unable to be around yet.

Little Ruth Bartles is ill with the pneumonia.

George McNichol is slowly improving from the influenza.

Mrs. L. E. Small has been sick the past week.

There were not many people at church Sunday.

The water in Sand Hollow raised Sunday night and has washed the bridge out near Ten Davis and made the one by McLaughlin unsafe for large cars to cross on.

The mail man was unable to make the trip through here Monday on account of the bridges being out.

Marble Front

W. B. Allicon is confined to his home with influenza. This is the first case in our community.

Miss Edith Clements primary teacher was unable to be in school Monday and Tuesday because of illness. Mr. Bertra Horner substituted during her absence.

Mr. Iva Vassar and son Sammie are confined to their home with a severe attack of grippe.

The S. J. Livesay family are recovering from the grippe.

A. B. Knott is confined to his home with a severe cold.

Helen Packer and Theodore Wells are still unable to return to school. Helen has been tussling with scarlet fever.

Robert, the young son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Milliner is recovering from a sick spell.

The many friends of Bart Thomas will be sorry to learn of his critical illness. Bart was formerly a resident of this community but now resides in Caldwell.

Word has been received from J. T. Bales who is visiting at Leesburg, Va., that he is a victim of the influenza.

(ibid, page 9)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. January 30, 1920, Page 10

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Greenleaf Snaps

Mrs. Seburn Harris is at Melba caring for daughter and son, who are sick with the influenza.

The Ambrose Tish family is sick with the influenza.

Ezra Hinshaw is on the sick list.

Mr. Calvin Harvey is quite sick.

John Ragsdale is on the sick list.

Eugene Hibbs has recovered from the mumps and is back to school in the seminary.

Glen Gulley is sick with the mumps.

Sunny Slope

Quite a lot of sickness seems to have appeared among our residents.

Mrs. Cupp’s family have all been ailing with the grippe and the mumps. Maurice Bailey and Annie Roberts have the influenza, while Hubert Smith is said to have the small pox.

The entire community was greatly shocked to learn of the death of Mrs. Harry E. Smith which occurred at Boise last Thursday morning. Friends knew that both Mr. and Mrs. Smith were ill in a Boise hotel, but no one was prepared for Mrs. Smith’s sudden demise, which was caused by the pneumonia. She leaves her husband, a son, a mother, and two sisters to mourn her loss. Interment was in a Boise cemetery.

(ibid, page 10)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. January 30, 1920, Page 11

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Fair Acre

Mr. and Mrs. Denman and two children are having a siege of the influenza. They are all very sick.

Midway News

Elon Williams is seriously ill with the mumps.

John M. Nicholas has been on the sick list for the past week with a severe cold.

Brier Rose

Leroy Shaw is having a tussle with lagrippe this week.

Mrs. H. E. Smith was threatened with pneumonia last week, but is some better at this time.

Little Sterling Brown, and Jessie Spencer, who were out of school last week on account of colds, are better and in school again.

Robert Christopher is ill with indigestion. Has has not been able to attend school this week.

As the writer is sick abed this whole budget of news savors of sickness.

Last but not least, at the Bill Postlewaite home they seem to be running quite a hospital as there are six patients up to this date, all confined to their beds.

Canyon

La Grippe is very prevalent in Canyon. The school become so depleted that the board of education decided on Tuesday to close for a short time. Some entire families have been stricken down.

R. A. Houdyshell and family are improving slowly. Dr. Hamer was called to treat the entire family of S. P. McNeil.

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Suread were visiting at the home of Dr. B. Nyers on Sunday and reported la grippe in their home in Boise.

Dr. and Mrs. A. J. Cox from Middleton have been assisting in the care of their daughter, Mrs. Houdyshell and her family in their illness.

Pleasant Ridge

The small child of Mr. and Mrs. Wyrick who has been having a tussle with the influenza is reported as being much improved.

Miss Lamson teacher in the lower room is ill with the scarlet fever. Her mother is here from Colorado taking care of her. Miss Daisy Beatty of Caldwell is substituting as teacher during Miss Lamson’s absence.

The higher grades of the school were dismissed several days last week as several of the pupils in the eighth grade were taking examinations.

Maple Grove

Clinton Northroup is slowly improving after a siege of pneumonia.

Miss Doris Chambers is up again after a week sickness.

Bruce Smith is the third patient down with pneumonia in our neighborhood.

Sylvester Hills family are quarantined for small pox. Dr. Gue was called Thursday night to see Jessie and pronounced it such.

Claytonia

We understand that the influenza is on the war path again very strongly in the Gem district. Three families near the Claytonia school have it. Mr. and Mrs. Tom Jackson and one daughter have it. Bill Jackson is down. Bessie Wilson has it and Mrs. Hansbrough was taken to the hospital last Saturday with an undecided case which may turn out to be influenza.

The schools have been closed but what is the use of closing the schools if the young people are allowed to run around to parties.

Mrs. Harry Smith died at the hospital in Caldwell last Thursday due to pneumonia caused by the influenza. She was buried on Friday.

Grandma Andrews is recovering slowly from a severe attack of cold.

Two men were taken sick at a sheep camp at Mrs. Andrew’s place and were taken to Caldwell. We have not learned if it was the influenza.

A sad accident happened at the Froman ferry not long ago when Dr. Young of Caldwell was drowned. He leaves a wife and four children.

(ibid, page 11)
— — — — — — — — — —

Shoshone Journal. January 30, 1920, Page 1

19200130SJ1

19200130SJ2
Official Report On The Flu Situation

Boise, Idaho, Jan. 27th, 1920

Influenza continues to increase throughout Idaho, four hundred and fifty new cases being reported to this office January 26th.

Thus far there has been no evidence of any material increase in the severity of the disease, but three deaths being reported during the past twenty-four hours.

No accurate statistics are available on Pneumonia but it appears that Pneumonia is becoming prevalent.

Influenza Reported 1-26-20

Ada County – Boise 33, Kuna 40, Star 82.
Bannock County – Pocatello 4.
Bear Lake County – Montpelier 100.
Benewah County – 8.
Canyon County – Nampa 60[?], Parma 3.
Fremont County – Ashton 1.
Jerome County – Jerome 1.
Kootenai County – Culdesac 15, Rose Lake 2.
Madison County – 18.
Minidoka County – 29.
Lewis County – Ilo 2.
Nez Perce County – Lewiston, 32.
Payette County – New Plymouth 2, Payette 1.
Shoshone County – Wallace 6.
Twin Falls County – Twin Falls 5.
Death from influenza, Pocatello 1.
Death from pneumonia, Star 2.

Ernest E. Laughbaugh, M. D., Chief Bureau of Public Health Service.
— —

High School Notes

There has been so much absence on the part of both pupils and teachers that we are beginning to think the flu must be around again. Miss Farris, Miss Elenor Jones and Mrs. Johnson were absent Monday, Miss Hollingshead and Miss Henkins on Tues. During the absence of Mrs. Johnson Monday and Miss Henkins Tuesday, Flossie Mason has been teaching.

Mary McMahon was taken ill Mon. and had to return home from school.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

American Falls Press. January 30, 1920, Page 1

19200130AFP1

19200130AFP2Spread Of Influenza Source Of Concern
Ernest Laubaugh Reports Many New Cases But Few Casualties – Urges Cooperation of Public to Confine Cases to Afflicted Localities

Influenza continues to invade new areas in the state, but the situation as a whole is somewhat improved. A total of two hundred and twenty-one new cases with two deaths having been reported to this office January 25th, as compared with a total of three hundred and twenty-five cases on January 24th. In those communities in which all organizations are cooperating with the local health authorities the situation is well in hand.

This office urges that the communities not become alarmed, but calmly view the situation, assist the local health officers by refraining from attending public gatherings, moving picture shows, dance halls, etc., as the foremost authorities on public health agree that these places are breeding spots for the transmission of the contagion.

For the protection of these members of the family who have no “flu’ when an inmate of their household is down, it is essential that all dishes and table … (Continued on page 5.)
— —

Women’s Club Urges Campsite and Parent Teachers Association
Revives Activity After Suspension Of Two Years – Mrs. C. W. Thompson Chosen President, Mrs. Voight Vice Pres.
Meetings Held Bi-Monthly
Mayor Hanson, Dr. Schlitz and Dr. Noth Give Survey of Civic and Health Conditions of Town and County

Election of officers and a survey of the civic needs of the city were the outstanding features of the first meeting of the American Falls Woman’s club since the outbreak of the war in 1917. Mrs. C. W. Thompson was elected president; Mrs. John P. Voight, vice president, and Mrs. R. E. Austin, secretary-treasurer. The meeting was held in the parlor of the Hotel Remington and was attended by 25 women of the city.

Mayor Hanson, Dr. C. F. Schiltz, president of the Chamber of Commerce and Dr. R. F. Noth, county health officer spoke before the club on the civic needs of the town. Mayor Hanson explained the needs of a campsite and the possibilities of obtaining same through the action of the city council. He believed that the financial support should come from the Chamber of Commerce and expressed reluctance on the part of the council to pay the preliminary costs out of the public funds. He intimated that the city would be glad to maintain any campsite chosen and assist in every way possible to bring about the creation of all necessary accommodations for tourists.

Dr. Schlitz urged the cooperation of the Woman’s club in civic affairs and suggested to the women that they exert [their] influence on the members of the [city] council to the end that the city [build?] the necessary improvements for the campsite. He expressed appreciation of the proposed work to be undertaken by the club. “If the Chamber of Commerce and the American Falls Woman’s club say that the city should build the campsite and maintain it, I believe that the council will see that it is done,” he said. Mr. Hanson stated that the undivided support of these two bodies would undoubtedly encourage the council in any undertaking of the sort mentioned.

19200130AFP3No “Flu” in County.

Dr. Noth advised the women that there was not a single case of real influenza in the county. There is considerable illness and many have severe colds bordering on influenza. Local afflictions however, he said, apply to the head and do not include afflictions of the lungs or other vital organs of the body. He advised teachers to watch for the appearance of sickness in the school room and report immediately any symptoms that appear. Persons afflicted with severe colds bordering on influenza should remain at home and prevent possible contagion.

Mrs. Bruce Lampson held the interest of her audience with a few timely suggestions on the value to be realized from a parent-teachers’ association. “Two few parents cooperate with teachers to get the best results from the education of their children,” she said. “A better understanding and acquaintance among parents and teachers will make our school problems much easier and encourage more congenial relationship that will bring improved benefits to our students.”

… The next meeting of the club will be held Wednesday afternoon at 3 o’clock in the parlor of the Remington. There will be a musical program in addition to the regular business. All women of the town are urged to be present as well as all from out of town who are able to attend. Meetings will be held on the first and third Wednesdays of the month. Teachers are particularly invited to join as honorary members.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Wallace, Idaho, Looking West ca. 1914

Wallace1914Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

January 31

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 31, 1920, Page 1

19200131DSM1

19200131DSM2
“Flu” Situation Much Better Today
No More Deaths In Moscow And Fewer Cases – Troy Man Is Flu Victim

Local conditions show marked improvement in regards to the influenza epidemic. It is reported that there were but 28 new cases reported yesterday as compared with an average of 48 for the previous four days. The new cases are generally mild. A number of those who were first taken ill are being released from quarantine. Many of the cases are so mild that the patients do not even go to bed but remain in doors and take care of themselves.

Troy Man is Dead

Samuel Sletto, of Troy, died of pneumonia following influenza last night. He had been sick but a few days. He leaves a wife and four children. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ole Sletto, of Moscow, are under quarantine with the disease as is his sister, Mrs. J. Wilson.

No Deaths in Moscow

Contrary to persistent reports via the street rumor route, there have been no more deaths in Moscow and general conditions are regarded as much better. The warm, bright sunshine is regarded as much better for health conditions than the cloudy, damp and chilly weather of a week ago. The past two days have been more like April than January and this is believed to have helped conditions locally.

Two Deaths at Lewiston

Two more deaths are reported at Lewiston yesterday, making a total of 12, to date, but conditions are reported much better in Lewiston than they have been and it is believed the crest of the wave has passed there as in many other places. Camas Prairie towns report conditions much improved today.

Much Worse in New York

New York — Deaths from influenza and pneumonia showed another increase in the reports submitted to the health department today, while the number of new cases of each disease again jumped nearly to record figures. There were 119 influenza and 143 pneumonia deaths reported today, and increase of 19 and 7 respectively over those reported yesterday. New influenza cases reported reached a total of 5,532, an increase of 825 over yesterday and within 57 of the record number reported Wednesday. New pneumonia cases totaled 851, and increase of 202 over the previous day.

Chicago Stops Public Funerals

Chicago — New cases of influenza for the last 24 hours numbered 1,015 as against 1,149 on Thursday, while pneumonia claimed 340 new patients, compared with 455. Deaths from influenza totaled 112 and from pneumonia 80.

A ban was placed on public funerals and on wakes, and persons attending funerals are limited to ten, by order of the health department tonight.

Increase at Spokane

Spokane — One hundred and ninety-five cases of influenza with no deaths were reported here tonight, bringing the total cases to 500, practically all of a mild nature.

U. of Minnesota Student Deaths

Minneapolis — Eight students at the University of Minnesota died of influenza today. One hundred and fifty students at the school are ill. There are 2,000 cases in Minneapolis.

Deaths at Honolulu

Honolulu, T. H. — Three deaths from influenza were reported here today, making twelve fatalities here from the disease since Jan. 1. Sixty-four cases have been reported during that time.

The situation on the island of Maui, second largest of the Hawaiian group, was declared out of hand today and the territorial health doctor has been dispatched to the place. Two deaths have occurred in Maui and 26 cases have been reported to date.
— —

No Services at Nazarene Church

Owing to the influenza situation and the fact that Pastor Goss and wife have been assisting to care for the sick, there will be no services tomorrow at the Nazarene Church.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 31 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 31, 1920, Page 5

City News

The sheriff’s office has had several of its officers absent on account of influenza. Sheriff Woody and his family have just been released from quarantine and Deputy Sheriff L. G. Peterson is now a victim of the disease, but he is recovering rapidly.

Clinton Havens is quite ill of the influenza.

(ibid, page 5)
————-

Further Reading

The Spanish Flu in Spokane

By Kenneth Knoll 2/07/2005 HistoryLink.org Essay 7247

Kenneth Knoll was 12 years old when the influenza epidemic came to Spokane. This catastrophic event so impressed him that he felt compelled to describe it 70 years later. His essay is based mainly on newspaper accounts, official records and personal recollections and is reprinted from The Pacific Northwesterner, Vol. 33, No. 1, 1989. It is here edited by David Wilma and reprinted by permission of the publisher.

1918SpokaneYoungMasks-aKenneth Knoll (c.) and his sisters wearing gauze masks against influenza, Spokane, 1918 Courtesy Kenneth Knoll, The Pacific Northwesterner

When the Plague Hit Spokane

By Kenneth Knoll

By October 1918, the faltering Allied forces had regrouped to stem the advance of the German Army. After great human sacrifice, the tide was changing in war-ravaged Europe. Young men from Spokane were among those who had been killed or wounded in the fighting. The list of casualties in the Spokesman-Review served as a constant reminder of the toll of war.

Underlying these concerns was another dread. The Spanish Influenza which had been sweeping Europe with severe and fatal effects had leaped the Atlantic Ocean and was now present on the East Coast. The first case of the flu had been reported in Boston on September 5. On October 1, the City Health Department declared that some cases might be in Spokane but saw no need for alarm. The Department recommended covering the mouth and nose while sneezing and using antiseptic sprays and gargles to prevent infection.

As the days passed, newspapers reported a virtual explosion in the number of cases as the disease relentlessly spread across the nation. On the Atlantic Coast, the highest incidence of illness occurred in crowded army cantonments. By October 1, 72,327 cases were reported in Army camps, 20,000 of them occurring in the previous 48 hours. By October 3, there were more than 100,000 cases with over 2,000 deaths in members of the Armed Forces. By the next day, the total number of cases stood at 137,975.

Similar phenomenon was occurring in the civilian population. On October 1, Boston reported 171 deaths from influenza. Philadelphia had 446 new cases and Helena, Montana, 100. By October 3, cases had been reported in 42 states.

The University of Washington in Seattle reported 820 cases among its students on October 4, with one death. On October 5, Chicago had 916 new cases and 78 deaths. Philadelphia had 788 cases and 171 deaths. Officials in Washington, D.C., closed all places of public assembly such as churches, theaters, and dance halls. Seattle did the same and police declared that spitting in the streets would be cause for arrest. By October 7, Washington state was added to the list of states having influenza in epidemic proportions.

The causes and means of transmission of the disease were poorly understood in the early 1900s and as a result, the methods proposed for prevention were often bizarre. Dr. John B. Anderson, Spokane Health Officer, pointed out in the Spokesman-Review for October 10, 1918, that the methods used to fight pestilence in medieval times, such as public bonfires, the burning of mixtures of spices or of salt or vinegar sprinkled on flames were useless. Eye witness accounts tell of the practice in some areas around Spokane of burning sulfur on a kitchen range to protect those entering the home of a flu sufferer. Physicians in the community recommended living in the open, avoiding crowds, ingesting large quantities of water and avoiding fatigue as the best available preventive measures. One City Health Officer stated that the use of aspirin and phenacetin for analgesia was dangerous but that some of the digitalis group would be helpful in sustaining the heart during the illness. Gauze masks were recommended for use by the healthy to prevent exposure to the infection but the protection they afforded was questionable.

Today, we know that Influenza is caused by two types of viruses, that it primarily involves the nose, throat, and bronchial tree, and that it can extend into the lungs in the form of pneumonia, at which time a bacterial infection may be superimposed. What first presents as a simple illness with fever and chills and malaise can progress rapidly to a state in which the patient has shortness of breath, heart failure, and circulatory collapse leading to death. During the flu epidemic of 1918, the infectious agent was particularly virulent, placing the patient in desperate straits. This was particularly true in Europe where malnutrition was prevalent.

By October 8, Dr. Anderson declared that Spokane was in the throes of the influenza epidemic, and ordered that as of midnight, all schools, theaters, places of amusement, dance halls, churches, and Sunday Schools would be closed and that conventions and other public meetings were prohibited. Schools were closed the next day and students who showed up were sent home. I remember that day very well. To us boys, it was an unexpected vacation that allowed us to play war all day long. We had converted one of our friend’s backyard into a battlefield with trenches, dug-outs and other trappings of the battlefield. Clods of dirt made very good hand grenades and we got pretty good at lobbing them at each other.

Department stores were forbidden to have special sales as these would draw crowds. Rules regarding ventilation, sanitation, and spitting were strictly enforced. Jury trials were stopped and the Spokane Stock Exchange was closed.

The ban on public meetings brought some unforeseen results. The rule included funerals and weddings. One man’s funeral was scheduled for October 11. His wife hired a brass band to play at the service but was told that attendance would have to be limited. By arrangement with the City Health Officer, the services were held in the Gonzaga Chapel with only six mourners and six pallbearers present. The brass band and a large gathering of friends stayed outside in the open air.

A minister asked the City Health Department to determine if a wedding with 30 guests would be considered a public gathering. He was told that it was, and therefore, the wedding could not be held. The bride solved the problem by reducing the guest list and got married anyhow.

A clairvoyant was arrested for holding a séance for spirit-rapping. She claimed that it was not a public meeting but rather a gathering of friends. Her plea was of no avail and she was jailed. The proprietor of the Pastime Pool Room was arrested for continuing to hold card games. Then there was the case of the owner of a soft drink establishment who was arrested for having too large a crowd in his place. He weighed 350 pounds. When the police officers tried to put him into the patrol wagon, they discovered the door was too narrow for him to pass through, so to add to his indignity, he had to walk behind the paddy wagon to the station.

Bowling alleys were closed on October 11. As a result, toy and game departments of stores were flourishing as people looked for entertainment at home. Some theater managers made use of the closure of their establishments to redecorate the interiors. Two theater musicians, now without jobs, used the time to get married.

On October 14, Spokane experienced 59 new cases and three deaths. The City Council discussed the need for a public hospital for flu cases. A rapid solution consisted of using a downtown hotel for this purpose.

The municipal hospital for influenza patients opened at noon on October 17. It replaced the Lion Hotel at 1121/2 South Lincoln. Miss Ethel Butts of the Deaconess Hospital nursing staff was the hospital manager. The hotel furnished heat, linens, and maintenance.

The First Church of Christ Scientist asked the Health Department for permission to resume church services in the belief that their meetings would be effective in preventing the epidemic. Dr. Anderson replied that he could not waive the rules against indoor assemblies for one group only.

On October 30, the Red Cross summoned the women of Spokane to a sewing bee at the Old National Bank Building to sew flu masks for the Army Training Corps at Moscow, Idaho. The masks were made of six plies of surgical gauze, six by eight inches in size, gathered slightly at the narrow end with strings attached at each corner to tie around the head and neck.

By morning of October 22, the epidemic appeared to be lessening, but by the following day, there were 209 new cases and a total death toll of 35. Among these was a young woman who had given birth to a baby girl five days earlier. Her husband followed her in death the next day.

The sense of fear and helplessness bred by the situation led to feelings of anger and frustration. As part of the war effort, restaurants were required to conserve fats, and were limited to serving one pat of butter, weighing no more than half an ounce, to each customer. One jeweler in Spokane believed that the pat of butter he received was less than the allowed amount. When he could not get his grievance satisfied by his waiter, he announced that the next time he came for lunch, he was bringing his jeweler’s balance with him and his pat of butter better be a full half ounce.

Drug stores reported sales of large amounts of gargles, germicides, and inhalers. The clerks at the Exchange National Bank started wearing flu masks on the job. The bank president was already wearing his.

The Spokesman-Review for October 27 carried a large advertisement by the Davenport Hotel stressing the freshness of the air in the hotel. The public was told that the air was taken from above street level and then passed through “marvelous devices” to warm and humidify it. Two days later, the Kemp and Herbert Department Stores ran a similar advertisement saying that there was a constant change of air on every floor. Flu masks were now being worn by store clerks, messenger boys, and paper boys.

Seven people died in Spokane on October 28. There were 300 new cases and the flu hospital was filled to capacity. On November 3, the State Board of Health ordered that flu masks be worn throughout the state in all public conveyances, corridors, lobbies, and other public buildings. Stores were ordered to keep their doors wide open. The next day, the Superior Court closed for three weeks in response to the epidemic.

At midnight, November 10, 1918, the Armistice agreement was signed, ending World War I. This was an occasion for much celebration. Dr. Anderson said that if there was no marked increase in flu cases after the crowded celebrations, he would feel that the danger was past. At this time, the State Board of Health withdrew the mask regulation and stated that the quarantine might be lifted the following Sunday, after which theaters, schools, and churches could open.

On November 14, one Spokane citizen urged that the officials release confiscated whiskey to the flu sufferers to help their recovery. The Volstead Act prohibiting the sale of alcoholic beverages had become law on October 28. On November 15, the Judge of the Superior Court ruled that the whiskey could not be released, so the flu victims had to suffer soberly.

Spokane Public schools opened on November 25, but the Superintendent warned that one sneeze and the pupil would be sent home. If any member of a family had the flu, none of the children in that family were permitted to attend school.

On November 30, there was a dramatic rise in the number of flu cases 242 new ones; the next day there were 250. On December 2, several churches held memorial services for the victims and there were 603 new cases with 118 in the municipal hospital. Twenty-nine percent of the students were absent from school that day, and at an emergency meeting, the School Board asked the Health Department to close the schools again. The next day, the schools were closed indefinitely.

By December 5, 300,000 to 350,000 people had died in the United States since September 15. Walla Walla and Yakima reported that their hospitals were full of flu patients. In Spokane, the Health Department re-instituted a modified flu ban. Theaters were required to close and air out between 5 and 7 p.m. and to use only alternate rows of seats. Churches were allowed to have services only if they used alternate row seating and did not allow singing. Street cars could carry only as many passengers as could be seated. All homes with flu patients posted warning placards.

By December 13, the total reported cases in the city stood at 10,024. Western Union Life Insurance Company reported policy sales had doubled since the start of the epidemic and that their losses had increased. The total paid by Spokane County for widows’ pensions was the largest in its history. The disease reached its peak on the week ending December 7, with 2,210 cases and 52 deaths. The next week the number of cases was half that but the number of deaths was 76. By December 19, there were only 32 patients in the flu hospital and two deaths that day. Yakima reported that for the first time in six weeks, a day had passed without a death from the flu. The City Health Department ruled that Christmas church services could be held but would not allow any congregational singing.

On December 22, there were no deaths and only 23 patients in the flu hospital. On December 24, the patient count was down to 16. Dr. Anderson said that restrictions would be lifted after the first of the year and that theaters having modern systems of ventilation would be the first to be allowed to open.

Christmas arrived on this hopeful note. On December 31, the papers announced that schools would reopen on January 2 and that churches and theaters could also reopen. Dance halls had to stay closed. The two Spokane high schools reported only 10 to 15 percent absenteeism, although grade schools showed 30 to 50 percent absent. To recover lost time, school hours were lengthened.

Life was starting to return to normal. On January 13, 1919, the flu hospital closed its doors. It had been open for 89 days and had cared for 617 patients, 68 of whom had died. Miss Ethel Butts was in charge the entire time, and she served without pay.

During the epidemic, the four visiting nurses of the Social Service Bureau were of great help. Many times they found entire families ill with no one to take care of them. The nurses carried a supply of broth with them for those who were unable to prepare their own food. Physicians who had not been called into military service had provided care and reassurance to the multitude of patients whom they had visited day and night at their homes and at the hospital. Morticians worked overtime to remove the dead and maintain burial services.

The incidence of illness gradually tapered off and after the middle of January, news items regarding the epidemic dropped from 12 or more column inches a day to one or two. On January 23, 12 cases were reported, with no deaths. Except for a brief resurgence during the first three months of 1920, the epidemic was over. For the entire period in Spokane, out of a total of 16,985 patients with influenza and its complications, 1,045 had succumbed. Compared to many other cities, Spokane had suffered lightly.

The citizenry reacted well toward the problems produced by the epidemic even though this was a period disrupted by the demands of an all out war in Europe and the adjustments needed for the establishment of peace. The annual report of the City Health Department for 1918 makes special mention of how the people rallied with volunteer efforts to relieve suffering, by transporting and assisting stricken families and aiding doctors and nurses in their labors, particularly at the influenza hospital.

Farmers in the surrounding areas freely donated food supplies such as eggs and milk; stores donated fruit and vegetables to the hospital; the city and county governments furnished money and supplies to the needy. A sense of personal responsibility for helping in an emergency was evident.

Today there is little by which to remember the event. There are few who can recall it. The hotel which housed the flu hospital has been torn down and the site is now a downtown motel. The only remaining physical evidences of the Influenza Epidemic of 1918 are the newspaper reports, the official health records and some tombstones in the cemeteries.

source: The Pacific Northwesterner, Vol. 33, No. 1, 1989.
This essay is licensed under a Creative Commons license that encourages reproduction with attribution.
————-

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports Aug 29, 2021

Please share road reports. Most back country roads have not been graded this season and are rough. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are dusty. No dust abatement this year. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting Tuesday, Sept. 7, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
Project link:
Donnelly to Deinhard Project: Construction on Highway 55 between Donnelly and McCall. This is a much-needed project to repair potholes and cracks in the roadway and will include placing a new layer of pavement on the highway for smoother driving conditions.
What to expect:
* Idaho 55 will be reduced to one lane with pilot cars midweek (Monday – Thursday)
* All lanes will be open on weekends (Friday – Sunday)
* Roadway surface will be uneven for several weeks
* Speed limit will be reduced and 12-foot restrictions will be in place
* Construction is expected to be complete in September.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Friday (Aug 13) “SF slide occurred (on Aug 6) in the middle of the [4-mile] controlled burn… Guessing 300’ on the road and filled the new grill-covered drain ditches.” – SL
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Friday (Aug 27) county is applying Mag Chloride to the EFSF road this week.
Report Wednesday (Aug 25) mail truck driver says the County is about done grading the EFSF road and will be applying dust abatement soon.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Aug 25) mail truck driver reports the newly graded road is getting rough again already.
Report Sunday (Aug 22) the road is getting rough between YP and the dump.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened June 7
Report Wednesday (Aug 18) “Zena bridge is finished and looks great! Road is very rough. I would not recommend taking a car or camp trailer over.” – JB
Watch for ATV and UTV traffic.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Opened June 13
Report Thursday (Aug 19) “Profile has seriously rocky sections that are washing out worse than usual. Some are sharp. Carry a saw whether its windy or not — roots of beetle kill trees are now quite rotten and fall easily.” – CP
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Link: Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Quartz Creek
Report Thursday (Aug 19) “Cleared Quartz Creek of trees last weekend.” – SA

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open, travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open. Travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Opened June 9
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Opened by May 27
No current report.

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Road Reports Aug 25, 2021

Please share road reports. Most back country roads have not been graded and are rough. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are getting dusty again. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting Tuesday, Sept. 7, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
Project link:
Donnelly to Deinhard Project: Construction on Highway 55 between Donnelly and McCall. This is a much-needed project to repair potholes and cracks in the roadway and will include placing a new layer of pavement on the highway for smoother driving conditions.
What to expect:
* Idaho 55 will be reduced to one lane with pilot cars midweek (Monday – Thursday)
* All lanes will be open on weekends (Friday – Sunday)
* Roadway surface will be uneven for several weeks
* Speed limit will be reduced and 12-foot restrictions will be in place
* Construction is expected to be complete in September.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Friday (Aug 13) “SF slide (on Aug 6) occurred in the middle of the [4-mile] controlled burn… Guessing 300’ on the road and filled the new grill-covered drain ditches.” – SL
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Aug 25) mail truck driver says the County is about done grading the EFSF road and will be applying dust abatement soon.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Aug 25) mail truck driver reports the road is getting rough again already.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened June 7
Report Wednesday (Aug 18) “Zena bridge is finished and looks great! Road is very rough. I would not recommend taking a car or camp trailer over.” – JB
Watch for ATV and UTV traffic.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Opened June 13
Report Thursday (Aug 19) “Profile has seriously rocky sections that are washing out worse than usual. Some are sharp. Carry a saw whether its windy or not — roots of beetle kill trees are now quite rotten and fall easily.” – CP
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Link: Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Quartz Creek
Report Thursday (Aug 19) “Cleared Quartz Creek of trees last weekend.” – SA

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open, travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open. Travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Opened June 9
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Opened by May 27
No current report.

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Aug 22, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

Aug 22, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Because of our [water] situation lawn watering is discouraged. No watering after 2pm. If you are asked to turn your water off, it’s because the system is in danger of running out. Please be respectful. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays weekends.

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions are still in Effect

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order issued
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit season
May 15 – Firewood Season, permits at The Corner
May 25 – Johnson Creek road fully open
June 7 – Lick Creek road open
June 13 – Profile road open
July 16 – Stage 1 Fire Restrictions
Aug 28 – 10am Fire Hall re: Election
Aug 29 – Price of 1st Class Stamps goes up
Sept 4 – Labor Day Weekend Golf Tournament
Sept 11 – YPFD Budget Meeting 10am at Fire Hall
Sept 11 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
Sept 18 – ATV-UTV Ride to Thunder Mountain
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

August 28 10am Fire Hall Meeting re: Election

The Yellow Pine Fire District Commissioner elections are upcoming. We have 2 positions opened for District 2 and District 3.

We have to move our scheduled conference call with Valley County to Saturday, August 28 at 10:00 am in the Fire Station.

(see YPFD News below for more info.)
— — — —

Labor Day Weekend Golf Tournament

Saturday, September 4th, 10am, Annual Labor Day Weekend Golf Tournament. $20/person. Proceeds support the Yellow Pine Fire District. Contact Adam Pellegrini at Email for questions or to sponsor a hole ($50-250 per hole.)
— — — —

ATV-UTV Ride to Thunder Mountain

Saturday, September 18, 9am – 4pm. Meet at the Community Hall

Ride with us through the fabulous back-country to the historic Thunder Mountain area and support the Yellow Pine Community Hall. This out-and-back ride is rated as intermediate. Participants ride from Yellow Pine Community Hall up Stibnite Road to Thunder Mountain. BBQ Lunch will be served to participants at the end of the road. The timeframe of this event is estimated to be from 9am to 4pm. $25 for online sign up and $30 at the event.

Sign up link:
— — — —

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in Effect

Under the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions, the following acts are prohibited on state and federally managed or protected lands, roads, and trails:
* Building, maintaining, attending, or using a fire, campfire or stove fire except within a designated recreation site and in a permanent concrete or metal fire ring, or on private land, and only within an owner-provided structure.
* Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle, building, or designated recreation site or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials.
———

Village News:

Notice – New Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sundays.

A reminder – if your group or business wants an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
— — — —

Rain, Cooler and Better Air by Weekend

Yellow Pine received measurable rain during three thunderstorms this past week for a total of 0.48″, giving us exactly 2″ of precipitation so far in August.

The air quality was in the Red during the first part of the week with temperatures in the 90s, improving to Yellow AQ mid-week with temperatures in the 70s, and finally Green AQ by the weekend (Saturday’s high was 66F.)
— —

Yellow Pine Weather 10 Year Average

MonthlyNormalsChar-at
(click image for larger size)

Average temperatures and precipitation over the last 10 years reported from Yellow Pine. Link:
— — — —

Outdoor Burn Ban

August 13th through 17th the Idaho DEQ issued a burn ban for all outdoor burning due to the unhealthy air quality.

Under a State DEQ Burn Ban all outdoor burning is prohibited, even on private property.

This was separate from the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions that apply to Federal lands and is still in effect. No campfires in disbursed sites, only in FS approved campground fire rings.
— — — —

Veterans’ Monument

With this heat, the flowers and shrubs at our Veterans’ Memorial dry out quickly. When Niebrand’s are in, they water them, but aren’t here all the time……if you go by, please check, and give them a drink with the hose that is there. Our veterans (and the Niebrand’s) thank you!
— — — —

Help Suvanna with medical bills and living expenses

On Saturday, August 7th Suvanna had a severe reaction to a bee sting and had to take a Lifeflight from the back country in Yellow Pine, Idaho to the Emergency room in Boise, Idaho.

We are hoping to help with the massive medical bills and home expenses while she recovers from lingering symptoms that will keep her from her wonderful work at the doggy day care that she loves. Any amount big or small. Even five bucks helps!

We are so grateful she is ok and appreciate any and all help.

Link: Go-Fund-Me
— — — —

Conserve (and Boil) Water

Please be conservative when watering lawns. We ask those that are here all week to not water lawns on the weekends so that more water is available for the weekend cabin owners. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!
— —

Tips on Water Recycling

Use a dishpan to catch the rinse water (a.k.a “gray water”) when doing dishes (and hand washing) and use it to water outdoor flowers or to flush a toilet.
— —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are Open. These roads have not been bladed and are rough. Travel at your own risk.

Hwy 55 projects
Smith’s Ferry area: Starting Tuesday, Sept. 7, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route. Project Website link:
Donnelly to McCall: One lane during the week and two lanes on weekends. Project is slated to last until September.
— — — —

Critters

Be Mountain Lion Aware

Note: A report of a mountain lion hanging around the upper end of the village early summer.

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!

Be Bear, Fox & Coyote Aware

* Do not feed them human food
* Secure your trash
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Bats

While bats are an important part of our ecosystem and most do not carry rabies, CDH offers the following tips to protect yourself and pets:
* Never touch a bat with your bare hands.
* If you have had an encounter with a bat, seek medical attention.
* If you come in contact with a bat, save the bat in a container without touching it and contact your health department to arrange testing for rabies. Whenever possible, the bat should be tested to rule out an exposure to rabies. During regular business hours in Ada, Boise and Elmore Counties, call 208-327-7499 and in Valley County, call 208-634-7194. After business hours in all counties, call 1-800-632-8000.
* Always vaccinate your pets for rabies, including horses. Pets may encounter bats outdoors or in the home.
* Bat-proof your home or cabin by plugging all holes in the siding and maintaining tight-fitting screens on windows. Bats can enter through holes the size of a quarter.

Pine Martins & Raccoons

Watch your small pets. Reports of pine martins living in the dump and raccoons on the north side of the village.

Aggressive Deer and Elk

Be aware that mothers will attack dogs and chase people if they feel their babies are threatened. Keep dogs leashed in the forest during “baby season” for their own protection.

Ticks

* Know where to expect ticks. Many ticks live in grassy, brushy, or wooded areas. When possible, avoid wooded and brushy areas with tall grass and leaf litter. Walk in the center of trails, particularly in spring and summer when ticks feed.
* Wear appropriate clothing. When in tick habitats, wear light-colored, tightly woven long pants and long-sleeve shirt. Tuck your pant legs into socks or boots, and your shirt into your pants. This helps keep ticks on the outside of your clothing where you can spot them more easily.
* Use tick repellent when necessary, and carefully follow instructions on the label. Apply an EPA-registered repellent effective against ticks, such as those containing DEET to clothes and exposed skin, and permethrin to clothes and gear. Take care when applying repellent on children. EPA’s search tool can help you find the repellent that best suits your needs.
* Check clothing, gear, and pets after being areas with ticks. Ticks can hitch a ride into your home on clothing and pets, then attach to you or a family member later. Carefully examine coats, camping gear, and daypacks. Don’t forget your dog, see CDC’s where to check your pet for ticks.
* Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming can reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease and may be effective in reducing the risk of other tick-borne disease. Showering can wash off unattached ticks and it is a good opportunity to do a tick check.
* Check your body, your child and pets thoroughly for ticks. Carefully inspect areas in and around the hair, head, neck, ears, under arms, inside the belly button, around the waist, between the legs, and behind the knees. Ticks can be very small before they feed—look for what may appear like a new freckle or speck of dirt. Continue checking for two to three days after returning from areas with ticks.

Mosquitoes – West Nile

* Remove standing water
* Wear long sleeves and pants during morning/evening hours
* Use a good repellent with DEET (our bugs laugh at “backyard” formulas.
* Vaccinate your horses and mules! West Nile can be fatal to equines.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

Starting Aug. 29, USPS will raise prices of first-class postage stamps to 58 cents from 55 cents.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Sunday (Aug 22) The dump is about 25% full and very clean and tidy.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water. No outside watering after 2pm, nor on holiday weekends and especially not during the festival.

July 25 Update:

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association Board asks that individuals refrain from using domestic water to dampen the road. The Water Corporation is doing its best to provide water for domestic use during the low water period but as the supply becomes more limited, it is incumbent upon each of us to be judicious with its use. Thank you for your cooperation in ensuring that all community members have an adequate supply of water.

The corporation has received the first $150k grant of the anticipated $450k. We are hoping to have some of the supply lines replaced by winter. Thanks to those who wrote letters of support. They were very beneficial in securing the grants. – Willie Sullivan

July 8, 2021 Update

DRINKING WATER WARNING
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059
BOIL WATER ADVISORY
Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST. Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 180 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake@drakediversified.com. .
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc. .
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 7-8-21.

YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 at the Community Hall at 10am
Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes.rtf

YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting held July 5, 2020 at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Water Board:

Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
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VYPA News:

August 21, 2021 Letter to Share

Correction to information provided in the July 10th, YPFD Meeting Minutes:

The Village of Yellow Pine Council members did not agree with the statements in the letter to the Forest Service regarding the Buck Fire of 2020.

Village of Yellow Pine Council

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Hailey Harris, Secretary
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
— — — —

YPFD News:

Elections for Commissioners for both District 2 and 3 will be held in November 2021.

Commissioner Elections Call Saturday August 28

The Yellow Pine Fire District Commissioner elections are upcoming. We have 2 positions opened for District 2 and District 3.

We have to move our scheduled conference call with Valley County to Saturday, August 28 at 10:00 am in the Fire Station.

All are invited. It’s your chance to ask the experts your questions about who can run office and who can vote.

Below are the list of questions that we’ve sent to the County to answer during the call. You are welcome to ask your own questions as well.

– Who can run for Fire Commissioner? Can both full-time and part-time residents run for Commissioner if they live in the correct Sub-District?

– How does the election work? Are ballots mailed out that apply to each specific Fire Sub-District? Do the ballots only allow people to vote within their specific district?

– What requirements are required to vote in the elections? Do you have to be a registered voter in Yellow Pine to vote? What about property owners that pay taxes?

– How does the petition process work in relation to getting your name on the ballot? Who can sign the petitions? Where do the completed petitions go?

– Please explain how uncontested candidates modify the process (doesn’t require a vote?). Also what about Write-In Candidates?

– What documents are needed to run for office? Where do we find them?

July 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes.
Link: to 20210710 YPFD Meeting.docx

June 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes.
Link to minutes: 2021 June 12 YPFD meeting minutes.docx

May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes.
Link: to 20210515 YPFD MeetingNotes_Final.docx

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30, 2020 at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

2021 Meeting schedule for the YPFD. All meetings are at the YPFD Station
Sat. May 15 at 10am
Sat. June 12 at 10am
Sat. July 10 at 10am
Sat. September 11 at 10am Budget Meeting

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by a escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful.
link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021.pdf

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Phil Jensen, Acting – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Tim Rogers – Fire Chief
Secretary Ronda Rogers
Treasurer Nikki Saleen
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
Hours: 1pm-8pm, closed on Tuesdays
We offer smoked tri tip, brisket, and chicken sandwiches and also burgers and chicken wings.
Firewood Permits available May 15th.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Open daily: 8am to 9pm
Sunday 8am to 2pm
Indoor Dining and Outdoor Dining Available.
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Opened June 12th for Summer
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
Store hours: 10am to 5pm Gas and Diesel available.
The store is now receiving inventory of Food items. The ATM is operational, and Debit/Credit cards are accepted. Currently there is fuel, ice, alcoholic beverages (non liquor) tobacco, non alc beverages, snacks, and Dairy items (ice cream, milk, butter, and yogurt). Fresh produce is soon to come. If there are needs for fuel or anything during off hours, Josh will be around on call to accommodate. For any particular store item requests, please call 208-633-3300 or Email
For room reservations, please call 208-633-3300 or Email for reservations
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Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation – (208) 382-4844

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Aug 16) overnight low of 53 degrees. This morning it appears to be partly cloudy above the smoke – Red Air Quality. No birds around, very dry and crunchy. Smoky at lunch time, probably some clouds and mild temperatures. A few hummingbirds visited. Likely mostly cloudy above the smoke and heating up mid-afternoon, high of 91 degrees. Appeared clear over lighter smoke by early evening, a little better air quality (Orange) and starting to cool off a bit before sunset. Warm, smoky and Yellow air quality at dusk.

Tuesday (Aug 17) overnight low of 51 degrees. This morning it appears to be overcast above the smoke – Yellow Air Quality. No birds around. One early (loud) airplane, very light street traffic. Cool, thicker clouds and smoke blotting out the sun at lunch time. Air quality improving by mid-afternoon, broken overcast and gusty breezes, high of 78 degrees. No rain today. By early evening it was mostly cloudy, breezy and increasing smoke – especially along the river – poor air quality. Cool, cloudy, breezy and thinner smoke at dusk. Looked clear to the east before midnight.

Wednesday (Aug 18) overnight low of 41 degrees. This morning broken overcast, haze of smoke – Yellow Air Quality. Steller jay visiting. Mostly cloudy, cool and breezy at lunch time. Mail truck was late – due to a large delivery – reported no problems. Cooler, mostly cloudy and breezy with a light haze of smoke mid-afternoon, high of 72 degrees. Thunder and lightning then rain for about 40 minutes late afternoon to early evening, then clear patches and breezy with better air quality. Dark overcast at dusk and calmer. Jupiter and some stars out before midnight.

Thursday (Aug 19) overnight low of 38 degrees. Measured 0.17″ of rain from yesterday. This morning mostly cloudy over haze of smoke and light breeze. Robin chirping. Light traffic. Mostly cloudy, breezy and haze of smoke at lunch time. Warming up, lighter smoke, mostly cloudy and light breeze mid-afternoon, high of 74 degrees. Breezy later in the afternoon. Partly cloudy and gusty breezes at times by early evening, thin haze of smoke. Cloudy and calm at dusk with a light haze of smoke. Getting dark a lot earlier. Broken overcast before midnight, bright Jupiter shining through a crack in the clouds.

Friday (Aug 20) overnight low of 42 degrees. This morning mostly clear sky (can see the blue!) light breeze and light haze of smoke, much better air quality. Steller jay visiting. Increasing clouds, mostly cloudy by lunch time (some dark bottoms) light breeze and light smoke. Light traffic. Pleasant temperatures mid-afternoon, mostly cloudy (dark bottoms) and light breeze, light haze of smoke. Dark broken overcast by early evening, mild temperatures and increasing smoke – especially along the river – Yellow air quality. Dark clouds, calm and haze of smoke at dusk. Rain storm between 130am and around 7am.

Saturday (Aug 21) overnight low of 50 degrees. Measured 0.29″ rain in the gauge. This morning overcast (foggy tendrils mid-mountain) and slight breeze, fairly good air quality. Lots of happy robins calling. Dark overcast and short sprinkle before lunch time. Dark overcast mid-afternoon, cool and sprinkles of rain, distant thunder, increasing haze of smoke, high of 66 degrees. Thunderstorm (a few strikes in the Johnson Creek area) and rain moving thru the area from 240pm-3pm. Another short shower late afternoon (enough to drip) and another shorter shower early evening (just spots.) Degrading air quality before sunset. Partly clear before midnight, then cloudy.

Sunday (Aug 22) overnight low of 40 degrees. Measured 0.02″ in the gauge from Saturday’s showers. This morning partly cloudy in a very blue sky and great air quality, heavy dew and light breeze. Hairy woodpecker, robin and pine squirrel calling. Breezy and partly cloudy before lunch time. Gusty breezes and partly cloudy mid-afternoon, high of 76 degrees. Pleasant temperatures by early evening, partly clear (high thin wispy clouds) breezy and increasing haze of smoke.
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Idaho News:

Valley hospitals report 58 new COVID-19 cases in week

Total cases for August already exceeds July

By Tom Grote for The Star-News August 19, 2021

A total of 58 new cases of COVID-19 were reported in the past week by Valley County’s two hospitals, a sharp jump from the 32 new cases reported the previous week.

St. Luke’s McCall reported 36 new cases in the last week, while Cascade Medical Center reported 22 new cases.

The two hospitals have reported a total of 94 new cases since Aug. 1, which is 31 more than the 63 new cases reported during all of July.

Cascade Medical Center had three critically ill patients Monday night who required a higher level of care, but hospital staffers could only find beds in Boise hospitals for two of the patients, CEO Tom Reinhardt said Tuesday.

“We are still looking for an available staffed ICU bed to transfer our third patient,” Reinhardt said.

St. Luke’s Health System has suspended elective surgeries and procedures that require an overnight stay at hospitals in Boise, Meridian, Nampa and Twin Falls in order to free beds for COVID-19 patients. The suspension does not apply to St. Luke’s McCall.

Not available in the latest figures of positive cases were the ages of those infected, how many had contracted the Delta variant and how many were previously unvaccinated. Release of that information is restricted due to state and federal privacy laws.

However, the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare has reported that 98.9% of new COVID-19 cases statewide since Jan. 1 have been among people not vaccinated.

A total of 892 cases of COVID-19 have been reported by the two Valley County hospitals since the beginning of the pandemic in March 2020.

A total of 289 cases and four deaths related in COVID-19 have been reported in Adams County by Southwest District Health since the start of the pandemic.

St. Luke’s McCall offers walk-in COVID-19 vaccines from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at St. Luke’s Clinics – Payette Lakes Family Medicine, 211 Forest Street, McCall.

Appointments also can be scheduled online through St. Luke’s myChart or calling 208-381-9500 or by calling 208-634-2225.

St. Luke’s and Brundage Mountain Resort will bring the St. Luke’s Mobile Vaccine Unit to the resort near McCall from noon to 7 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 27.

Anyone receiving a vaccine on that day will also receive a free scenic chair lift ride or bike haul ticket good through the end of the summer season.

Cascade Medical Center offers a daily walk-in vaccination clinic Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserve (used with permission.)
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COVID-19 Update: 612 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

Aug 20, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 612 new COVID-19 cases and 2 new deaths Friday. There were 795 cases reported Thursday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 212,939.

The state said 795,283 people have received the vaccine, and 1,450,819 total doses have been administered. 714,645 people are fully vaccinated.

The age group with the most cases is 18-29 with 52,867 cases.

The state said 41 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 9,509, and 11 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 1,575.

2 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 2,283.

full story: [Valley County 1017 cases, 6 deaths.]
— — —

CDH: 98% of COVID-19 cases are of unvaccinated patients

CDH says they use five factors to monitor the state of the pandemic and influence local decision making. Data suggest we’re trending in the wrong direction.

Andrew Baertlein August 20, 2021 KTVB

… “Cases reported are raising, we’re seeing about a doubling every two weeks. All of our counties are considered high transmission,” Haskell explained. “Our percent positivity continues to increase. So all the indicators we monitor continue to go in the wrong direction for the last month.”

CDH officials said 98.3% of COVID-19 cases reported in its jurisdiction are from unvaccinated people. Of the 255,494 vaccinated people in the four-county district, 0.4% of them have contracted COVID-19, a total of 1,058 breakthrough cases.

Data from CDH also states that 28 breakthrough cases resulted in hospitalization. Of those, four of those cases resulted in death. A total of 521 unvaccinated people have died from COVID-19.

full story:
— — —

Idaho adds nearly 5,000 COVID cases for week, ICUs at fullest level since pandemic began

By Idaho Statesman Aug 20, 2021 (KIVI)

The number of patients in an ICU with COVID-19 this week reached a number higher than at any point during the pandemic, according to data from the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare.

On Aug. 18, there were 140 patients with COVID-19 in Idaho ICUs. On Dec. 18, during the previous peak, that number was 122.

COVID-19 hospitalizations overall are close to, but have not yet reached, the peaks of last winter. On Aug. 18, there were 416 patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 at Idaho hospitals. That number was 496 on Dec. 1.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Census: Valley County grew by 19.1% since 2010

McCall’s population increased by 23.2%

By Tom Grote for The Star-News August 19, 2021

Valley County’s population grew by nearly 20% between 2010 and 2020, the U.S. Census Bureau said. The population of the City of McCall grew by 23.2%, the census bureau figures said.

Populations totals were the first release of information of the 2020 census last week. Statistics on age, gender, race and ethnicity will be available later.

Valley County’s population grew from 9,862 in 2010 to 11,746 in 2020, a 19.1% increase, the figures said.

… Donnelly grew the fastest of the three cities in Valley County, from 152 to 249 or 63.8%.

… The City of McCall grew from 2,991 in 2010 to 3,686 in 2020, or 23.2%

The City of Cascade grew from 939 in 2010 to 1,005 in 2020, or 7%.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley treasurer Stayton to step down for personal reasons

By Max Silverson for The Star-News August 19, 2021

Valley County Treasurer Gabe Stayton will resign effective Aug. 31 for personal reasons.

“Life circumstances that I did not anticipate at the time of running for office have resulted in my decision to move out of the county,” Stayton said in a statement to The Star-News.

… In his letter of resignation to Valley County commissioners, Stayton recommended Valley County Chief Deputy Treasurer Jody Green be appointed to finish his term.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

DEQ cites McCall for water chlorination violation

High demand caused lower disinfecting than required by state

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News August 19, 2021

Water pumped from Payette Lake to McCall residents between June 13 and July 6 was not fully disinfected, according to the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality.

The City of McCall’s Water Department was cited for not meeting chlorine standards during those days, DEQ Drinking Water Compliance Supervisor Brandon Lowder said.

State standards require drinking water to be treated to kill 99.9% of giardia, a waterborne parasite. The rate during the violation period was 99.85% removal, the statement said.

continued:
—————-

Public Lands:

Lake Cascade algae spur health alert

Outbreak marks 4th year in a row of widespread blooms

By Max Silverson for The Star-News August 19, 2021

An outbreak of toxic cyanobacteria on Lake Cascade has triggered a public health advisory for the fourth consecutive year.

The advisory was issued last Friday by Central District Health and the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality for dangerous concentrations of the toxin-producing bacteria that can be harmful to both humans and animals.

… People and animals should avoid swimming, wading or other activities in the water, especially children, pets and livestock, the advisory said.

Do not drink or cook with water containing a bloom, as boiling or filtering the water can increase the risk.

Wash hands thoroughly after handling fish caught in water with a bloom.

Cyanotoxins can accumulate in fish and the risk to people is being researched, the advisory said.

If people choose to eat fish from the area, fillet the fish and remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, the advisory said.

… Wash pets with clean water and shampoo if they have been around a harmful algal bloom and contact a veterinarian immediately if pets show symptoms like vomiting, staggering, drooling or convulsions, the advisory said.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Woodhead South – Seeking comments

The Forest is seeking comments on the proposed action for the Woodhead South Project during the scoping period. The scoping period will run until September 20, 2021.

Aug 20, 2021

The Forest Service is seeking public comment on a forest management project known as the Woodhead South Project on the Weiser Ranger District, Payette National Forest. You are being contacted because you have expressed an interest in projects on the Forest, and/or because you live adjacent to the project area. Please see the How to Comment section of this letter for information on how to provide input into this proposal. Comments will help inform the environmental analysis and decision-making process.

Project Location and Description

The Project area is in Management Area (MA) 2 (Snake River), is currently identified as approximately 5,150 acres in size, and located approximately 15 miles northwest of Cambridge, Idaho in Washington County. The Project is within the boundary of the Weiser Ranger District on the Payette National Forest, within the Upper Pine Creek subwatershed, which flows into the Weiser River drainage and the Brownlee Creek subwatershed which flows directly into the Snake River.

Purpose and Need for Action

The purpose of proposed treatments within the Project area include:

* Move forest stands toward desired conditions by increasing forest resiliency to insects and disease, and by promoting the development of large tree forest structures mixed with a mosaic of size classes and seral species composition.
* To produce merchantable timber products from trees killed during the wildfire.
* To reestablish forest vegetation in areas affected by the fire and forest resilience treatments.
* Reduce the risk of additional tree mortality and subsequent hazard trees to forest visitors.

The need for the proposed treatments within the Project area include:

* The treat forest vegetation in stands where density dependent forest health issues from insects and disease are occurring.
* To harvest trees killed during the fire before they lose market value and help support the economic viability of the local communities.

Background

The Woodhead Fire burned 96,614 acres from September 7 to November 16, 2020. This human caused fire started on state lands near Brownlee Reservoir and burned onto adjacent ownerships including the Payette National Forest in Washington and Adams counties. A previously identified forest resilience project (HFRA Section 603 CE) to address Douglas-fir tussock moth activity and other forest health issues, is mostly within the Woodhead Fire perimeter.

Proposed Action

Portions of the Project area are experiencing high insect activity and/or are at high risk for insect infestation and mortality according to a recent USDA Forest Health and Protection survey. Within the Project area, there are isolated stands of fire damaged trees with potential for economic salvage harvest. Some of the potential salvage exists in previously identified units for treatment. Treatments are summarized below.

The following activities are proposed:

* Commercial thinning
* Salvage harvest of fire damaged trees
* Noncommercial thinning
* Slash treatments (lop and scatter or pile burning)
* Broadcast prescribed burning
* Related transportation actions

Vegetation treatments would be designed to promote species adapted to disturbance and desired forest and wildlife habitat conditions in accordance with the Payette Forest Land and Resource Management Plan (LRMP) (2003). Treatments would maximize the retention of large trees, as appropriate for the forest type, to the extent that the trees promote stands that are resilient to insects and disease. The project will consider the best available scientific information to maintain or restore the ecological integrity, including maintaining or restoring structure, function, composition, and connectivity. In addition, salvage harvest is proposed using ground-based logging systems.

RCAs for this project will be defined by Forest Plan Option 2 and based on site-potential tree height. For perennial streams, this means 240 feet, and for intermittent, 120 feet. Desired snag densities and coarse woody debris will be retained following tables A-8 and A-9, respectively, from Forest Plan Appendix A. No RCA treatments have been identified with the proposed action.

Considering the Project area is mostly within a recent fire perimeter, maintenance burning would occur as necessary after commercial and noncommercial vegetation treatments are complete. Prescribed fire would be applied according to Fire Regime conditions to maintain desired conditions, especially density management, forest structural and species composition diversity. Pile burning would occur where necessary to manage residual fuels from vegetation treatments where lop and scatter following thinning is not appropriate. Natural barriers and existing roads would be utilized to minimize the need to construct fire line. Prescribed burning operations may occur at any time of year when conditions permit, typically spring (April, May, June) and fall (August, September, October). Prescribed fires would be designed to achieve a mosaic of burned and unburned areas resulting in low soil severities and low-moderate vegetation severities in treatment areas.

Road maintenance activities to facilitate commercial harvest may occur on NFS roads within and around the project area. All National Forest System (NFS) roads will be returned to the current maintenance level. Temporary roads constructed for project implementation will be decommissioned within three years of project completion. No more than ½ mile of temporary road will be constructed for purposes of fire salvage. Unauthorized routes used for timber haul will either be stabilized and closed if needed for long-term access to the suited timber base where no other access exists or decommissioned. Routes that are being obviously driven to cut between open roads and trails have been identified and proposed to effectively close them to use.

Anticipated Analysis

The project and analysis will be completed under the direction and guidance of the 2003 Payette National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan. The Management Prescription Category (MPC) for the Project area is: 5.1 – Restoration and Maintenance within Forested Landscapes. The proposed action will be consistent with the Forest Plan standards, guidelines, and management direction, Section 603 of Title VI of the Healthy Forests Restoration Act as amended by the 2014 Farm Bill, combined with the categorical exclusion for salvage of dead and dying trees, not to exceed 250 acres requiring no more than 1/2 mile of temporary road construction, and other applicable law, regulation, and policy.

Deciding Official

The Deciding Official is anticipated to be the Payette Forest Supervisor.

How to Comment:

More information including location will be posted to the project webpage. The legal notice regarding the scoping process is anticipated to be published in the Idaho Statesman on August 20, 2021. Copies of the legal notice will be posted to the project web page for reference. The Scoping period will run through September 20, 2021.

To be most helpful, please make your comments as specific as possible. Comments may pertain to the nature and scope of the environmental, social, and economic issues, and possible modifications to the proposed action. Your comments will help the Forest Service refine the proposal, ensure issues are identified and addressed appropriately, and will also assist the agency in making a well-informed decision. Comments received in response to this request will become part of the project record and will be available for public inspection on the “Public Comment/Objection Reading Room” on the Woodhead South Project web site: (link).

Written, facsimile, hand-delivered, and electronic comments concerning this project will be accepted. Send written comments to Ronda Bishop, Council District Ranger, Payette National Forest, 2092 Highway 95, Council, Idaho 83612. Comments may also be sent via facsimile to 208-253-0109. The office hours for those submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Oral comments may also be provided at the Council Ranger District Office during normal business hours via telephone 208-253-0100. Comments may also be submitted through the Woodhead South Project webpage at: (link). To submit comments using the web form select “Comment/Object on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s web page. If the webform does not load and says to send comments to the Forest please try again at a later date as it may be experiencing technical difficulty.

Thank you for your interest and participation in the Woodhead South Project.

Sincerely,
Ronda Bishop
Council and Weiser District Ranger
Payette National Forest
—————-

Fire Season:

Payette Update Aug 20

Fire update for the Payette National Forest.

The French Fire is at 90% containment and no longer impacting travel and rafting operations along the Salmon River. The Burgdorf-French Creek road closure order has been terminated – the roadway is fully open.

The Willow Fire in the California Lakes area is 100% contained with no closures.

A huge hand to our initial attack firefighters who have caught 56 wildfire in the early stages of initial attack and extended initial attack so far this year. Their outstanding work was kept all fires on the Forest from growing into large fires. Yes, we are knocking on wood as we still have a fair amount of the typical fire season ahead of us!

A Red Flag Flag Warning is in effect this evening through Saturday evening for thunderstorms and strong gusty winds – be safe with fire and recall that Stage 1 Fire Restriction are still in effect.
— — — —

Payette Update Aug 17

Isolated thunderstorms moved through the area yesterday igniting 3 new fires on the Payette and surrounding protection areas. Temperatures today will cool considerably and remain below normal through early next week with increased humidity and chances of isolated precipitation. This weather will be helpful for firefighters working on the 3 new fires that started yesterday.

August 17, 2021 8:30 A.M. Payette Fire Update

Willow Fire: located 2 miles west/north-west of California Lake. The fire is holding at 6 acres and currently staffed with 12 smokejumpers, 4 rappelers and 1 hand crew will be arriving today.

Summit Fire: 1 mile SW of Lake Rock Lake off Warren Wagon Road, fire contained at .5 acres, no issues

Needle Fire: Located off the Gold Fork Road, SITPA protection, Boise National Forest. Estimated at 5-10 acres and being supported by Engines, Dozer and hand crew expected to arrive today.

*Update for French Fire: started on 8/13, currently holding at 1500 acres, 58% contained. Firefighters will continue to secure the perimeter and working on tree felling and securing debris on the Salmon River Road to re-open to the public.

Stage 1 Fire restrictions remain in place across the forest.
— — — —

Map, French Fire August 18

French Fire
Location 10 miles east of Riggins, Idaho
Last Update
InciWeb:
— — — — — — — — — —

2021 Payette Wilderness Fires
Three fires are burning in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Payette National Forest. The Club, Rush Creek, and Vinegar fires were started by lightning on July 15, 2021. A Type 3 Incident Management Team took over the fires on July 19th. A closure order for trails has been put in place in and around these fires for public and firefighter safety to prevent any interference with suppression and response operations.
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — — — — — — — —

Mud Lick, Haynes, and Iron Fires
Salmon-Challis National Forest
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — — — — — — — —

Dixie-Jumbo Fires
Nez Perce – Clearwater National Forests
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders

Dixie Fire IR Map – August 16, 2021

— — — — — — — — — —

Snake River Complex
Idaho Department of Lands
Percent of Perimeter Contained 100%
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — — — — — — — —

Some useful links:

InciWeb Fire info
link:
— — —

Air Quality McCall
link:

Air Quality Index

— — — —

National Fire Heat Map
link: (zoom in to our area)
— — — —

Fire Heat Map (Slow to load – be patient)

Weather Station at Stibnite

Real Time Lightning Map (zoom to our area)

GOES-West – Satellite Maps: Pacific Northwest
—————-

Critter News:

Snowdon sanctuary to host Beers for Bear Cubs Friday at SRB

The Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary will host a Beers for Bear Cubs fundraiser with a raffle on Friday from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Salmon River Brewery in McCall.

Merlin, Snowdon’s resident Great Horned Owl, will make a special guest appearance at the fundraiser.

Participants can purchase a Snowdon pint glass and the brewery will fill it. Raffle prizes include a one-night stay at the Lick Creek Yurt and a $250 Visa gift card.

Proceeds from the event will benefit the Black Bear Rehabilitation program at Snowdon, which provides a safe home for orphaned cubs until they are ready to live on their own in the wild.

Visit (link) for more information on the wildlife sanctuary and its programs.

Salmon River Brewery is located at 411 Railroad Ave. in McCall.

source: The Star-News August 19, 2021
— — — — — — — — — —

ISDA confirms multiple equine West Nile cases

August 20, 2021 Local News 8

The Idaho State Department of Agriculture (ISDA) Animal Health Laboratory has confirmed multiple cases of West Nile Virus (WNV) in horses.

The affected horses are located in Lemhi, Twin Falls, Canyon, Ada and Blaine counties.

One horse was euthanized due to the severity of the disease, and the other horses are recovering under the supervision of a veterinarian.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

IDFG: 300 white-tailed deer reported dead from hemorrhagic disease

By Meredith Spelbring Aug 18, 2021 KIVI

Idaho Department of Fish and Game reported between 250-300 white-tailed deer have died from a hemorrhagic disease in the Kamiah area.

Department officials say additional tests are being done to determine the specific type of hemorrhagic disease killed the deer, according to a news release from IDFG. The department is encouraging people to remove food and water sources that attract deer due to the potential of deer-to-deer transmission. Anyone who witnesses a deer showing symptoms, which can include lethargy and respiratory issues, is asked to report the deer or deer carcasses.

IDFG says officers are “stretched thin and are not able to keep up with all the reports of dead deer” and anyone who knows of someone with a dead deer on their property is asked to assist with removal. The deer can be taken to Simmons Sanitation for disposal at the expense of the department, according to the release.

Reports can be made at the Wildlife Health webpage.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Bird migration forecast high in Boise this week

By Katie Kloppenburg Aug 18, 2021 KIVI

A migration alert is in effect in Boise as the BirdCast model predicts a peak migration over the next few nights. The Peregrine Fund asks people to consider turning off their outdoor lights to help protect the birds on their journey.

Large numbers of birds are expected to migrate at night, so head outdoors to look and listen. The Bird Migration Forecast says it will be high through Thursday with over 3,000 birds per kilometer per night.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Excessive heat makes it more difficult for sockeye salmon to return to Idaho

By Steve Dent Aug 15, 2021 KIVI

In early July, the Idaho Fish and Game transported 201 sockeye salmon from the Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River because rising water temperatures have made the journey home more difficult.

This happened after the Army Corps of Engineers and NOAA Fisheries helped trap the fish then the Idaho Fish and Game brought the sockeye to the Eagle Fish Hatchery.

“Obviously in a normal year we would prefer that these fish complete that last leg of their journey and their full ocean-going life cycle,” said John Powell of the Idaho Fish & Game. “But in a year like this, we had to give them that assistance and increase migratory survival because of those extreme conditions.”

continued:
—————

Letter to Share:

Deep freeze and heritage pig.

Get ready for that winter meat. The Gamebird Foundation is having a raffle. This is a combination new DEEP FREEZE AND A CUT UP AND CURED HERITAGE PIG. The drawing for the chest with the pig in it will be held at the RIB BANQUET OCT. 10TH. You do not have to be there to win. The cost of the raffle tickets will be $5.00 each or 5 tickets for $20.00. There is only a limited amount of tickets printed. Again you need not be present at the banquet to win. The second prize for the drawing will be 2 racks of BBQ, SMOKED RIBS, 3RD PRIZE WILL BE 2 GAMEDBIRD COFFEE MUGS BY ANDY.

You can go to web (link), or email me or call me at 208-883-3423 to order your raffle tickets. You can send a check to The Gamebird Foundation at PO Box 100, Viola Idaho 83872. We ran out of tickets on the last pig. Don’t miss out.

God Bless and be safe.
Jim Hagedorn
Executive Director
The Gamebird Foundation
208-883-3423
—————–

Fish & Game News:

Doorbell cameras capture footage of mountain lion in Eagle

By Brian Pearson, Regional Conservation Manager
Friday, August 20, 2021

F&G asking people in area to take precautions over the next few days and report mountain lion sightings

Idaho Fish and Game staff in the Southwest Region received reports of a mountain lion in an Eagle neighborhood near Dry Creek on Aug. 20. Two doorbell security cameras, approximately a quarter-mile apart, captured footage of a mountain lion in the early hours of the morning.

There have been no reports of conflicts with people or pets. At this time, Fish and Game does not plan to trap or haze. However, officials are asking people in the area to take precautions and report any mountain lion sightings over the next few days.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Fish and Game Conservation Officer awarded Idaho Medal of Honor

By Brian Pearson, Regional Conservation Manager
Thursday, August 19, 2021

Conservation Officer Randy Martinez returned fire while two deputies were under attack in New Meadows

Idaho Fish and Game Senior Conservation Officer Randy Martinez was among ten Idaho first responders awarded the Idaho Medal Of Honor during a ceremony on Aug. 18 in Boise.

The medal is the state’s highest honor for bravery and exceptional courage. It is awarded to first responders, including law enforcement officers, firefighters, or EMS providers, who perform exceptional, meritorious conduct in the line of duty in a situation that may have resulted in death or serious injury.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

A Cat Led A Rescue Team To An 83-Year-Old Woman Who Had Fallen Down A Ravine

August 17, 2021 NPR

Normally it’s dogs who receive attention for their heroic acts. Now, it’s a cat’s turn.

Thanks to one frantic feline, an 83-year-old woman in Cornwall, England, who had fallen down a ravine was found and rescued. Her pet, a black cat named Piran, had meowed relentlessly at the point where she’d fallen, leading a neighbor, who had been helping search crews, right to her.

Now, members of the search team are calling the cat a hero.

“Without the cat waiting at the gate to that field, it could have been hours later that I or anyone else would have checked there,” the neighbor, Tamar Longmuir, told Sky News.

continued:
—————

Seasonal Humor:

LionChaseResponse-a

CovidMaskScrewYou-a
————–

Idaho History Aug 22, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 69

Idaho Newspaper clippings January 29-30, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

January 29

The Grangeville Globe. January 29, 1920, Page 1

19200129GG1

19200129GG2“Flu” Epidemic Conditions Not Serious; Invades Many Families
Board of Health Adopt Strict Quarantine Regulations to Assist in Avoiding Spread of Disease; Public Places Closed

The presence of a number of cases Grangeville the first of the week prompted the necessity of formulating and meeting the emergency of an epidemic, and acting on instructions received from the state board of health Mayor Campbell called a meeting of the board of health of the City of Grangeville, consisting of Dr. B. Chipman, chairman, and councilmen Lingo and Riutcel, to meet with the physicians of Grangeville, on Tuesday evening. The county superintendent, Superintendent Lukens, and Mrs. B. Lanningham representing the local chapter of the Red Cross were present.

The sentiment of all who were present, including local physicians, was that prompt and strict measures be taken to prevent the epidemic from becoming serious. And as a first precaution Dr. Chipman stated that a quarantine of all reported cases in the city would be had, and requested the doctors to report all cases and at the same time he procured a statement of absences from school with a view of investigating cases in the city where no physician had been called. It was determined to close all public schools, but no steps were planned at the meeting, this matter being left open.

Tuesday hand bills were ordered printed and placards made for posting asking the people of the city to cooperate with the board of health in getting control and stamping out the flu. It was asked that every one move along and tend strictly to their business, not to gather in public places, stay at home, and to report all cases as soon as possible to Dr. Chipman and above all to observe the quarantine when families were quarantined.

The increasing number of children absent from school either by reason of being ill or on account of being taken out of school by parents to prevent exposure to the disease, made it advisable in the opinion of Superintendent Lukens and the members of the school board to close the schools.

Wednesday evening the board of health acting on the advice of Dr. Chipman, requested that the mayor order all places of public amusement and gatherings to suspend until further order, and the picture show was closed, and pool hall proprietors were instructed to cover tables, remove chairs and prevent loafing in their places of business. The hotels were also instructed to keep their lobbies clear and cards were printed and put up in all business places requesting people to move along. These regulations and rules imposed by the board of health will be strictly enforced, and violators will be prosecuted if the necessity should arise.

Local business men all expressed willingness to cooperate heartily with the board of health to enforce the rules against congregating and loafing and to keep the crowd moving until the situation should be relieved. Another police officer was put on to assist in enforcing the regulations and minors will not under any circumstances be permitted to be on the streets or in business places, except on good excuse, and will be expected to stay at home during the continuance of the present regulations. The officers are instructed to enforce this provision strictly.

Although there are a number of cases in the city, only a few have been reported serious. However it was thought best to take steps to prevent the spread of the epidemic and get it under control and not to wait until conditions got so bad that there would be small chance of handling the situation. Hearty cooperation of everyone will make the task more pleasant for the board of health and city officials and will assist in cutting down the number of cases so that the epidemic will soon pass and ordinary business be resumed.

The state department of public welfare is kept busy sending out literature regarding the influenza, with statement of the condition, new prevalent over the state, and giving advice in connection therewith. Among them is the following:

“This office urges that the communities not become alarmed, but calmly view the situation, assist the local health officers by refraining from attending gatherings of any kind whatsoever, as the foremost authorities on public health agree that places of public gatherings are breeding spots for the transmission of the contagion.

“For the protection of those members of the family who have not contracted the “Flu,” when an inmate of their household is down, it is essential that all dishes and tableware be boiled before being used or placed in contact with other dishes, etc. Here again the foremost medical men agree is the chief avenue of the contagion. Keep the home properly ventilated and when coughing or sneezing be sure to cover the mouth and nose with a handkerchief. This is called “droplet infection” and medical men recognize it as an important avenue for the transmission of the contagion.”

Opinions of Physicians

From the daily press we glean the following expressions from well known physicians:

“All attempts by army physicians to determine last year how influenza is communicated were unavailing.”

“Atmospheric and climatic conditions bring out influenza and quarantining does not limit or confine it.”

“Persons who have the proper blood pressure do not contract the disease, and those who pressure is low do, quarantine or no quarantine.”

“There is no more use in quarantining against influenza than against mosquitoes.”

But it goes without saying that if you are ill the proper place for you is at home and not on the streets, and to overcome the disease you must stay within the home and observe the rules that have been laid down by the physicians if you expect to recover. Care and the strict observance of the physicians orders is what is needed for speedy recovery.
— —

Court Postponed
Regular Term for Lewis County is Deferred by Judge Scales.

The regular term of the district court for Lewis county which was set for Monday, February 2, has been postponed by Judge Wallace N. Scales. The judge had made arrangements to depart for Nezperce on Sunday but on conversing with the officers of that county it was deemed advisable to postpone the term owing to the influenza. Just when the term will be convened will depend on the subsiding of the epidemic.
— —

J. E. McPherson Dead
Well Known Pioneer Passed Away This Morning From Diabetes

John Edward McPherson, aged 57 years, 9 months and 23 days, died at the family residence in this city early this morning, the 29th, leaving the widow and five children, three boys and two girls, to mourn is taking away. The children, all of whom reside in and near Grangeville, are as follows: Howard, Marlon, Glenwood, Mrs. Minnie Chamberlain and Mrs. Zettie Chamberlain.

Funeral services will be held at the residence in the southeast part of the city at 2:30 Friday afternoon, W. N. Knox officiating, and E. S. Hancock funeral director.

Deceased was born in Missouri and came to Idaho many years ago where he engaged in farming. For the past several years he as resided in this city, having amassed a considerable fortune from his business operations. He had been a sufferer for the past five years from diabetes. He was seen on the streets early this week and contracted a slight attack of the “flu” which aggravated the disease with which he was afflicted.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 29 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Grangeville Globe. January 29, 1920, Page 7

Meeting of the County Board of Health

State of Idaho, County of Idaho, ss.

Be it known that on this Monday the 19th day of January, 1920 the County Board of Health meets in called session at the omce [sic] of the Board of County Commissioners at the Court house, in Grangeville, Idaho.

Members present, Dr. G. S. Stockton, Clerk of said board and John D. Long, President, and Dale Clark and Edward S. Vincent, members.

After discussing of matters affecting its duties the following resolution was unanimously adopted:

It appearing to the board that a demand has been received by the County Board of Health of this county from the State Board of Health, directing that steps be taken to prepare for an out break of the influenza. It is hereby ordered that all incorporated cities, towns, villages and other communities shall prepare to take care of all cases of influenza of such cities, towns, villages and communities, maintaining a strict isolation of all such cases, and that the expense of such isolation and care be a charge against each separate city, town, village or community and not against the county. It is further ordered that the county Commissioners will not be responsible for any charges made, nor pay any claims filed by physicians or quarantine officers in the care and isolation of influenza cases occurring in this county.

There being no further business the board here adjourned sine die.

John D. Long, President
Attest: Dr. G. S. Stockton, Clerk.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

The Grangeville Globe. January 29, 1920, Page 8

Local Happenings

Quite a number of people are absent from their usual places of business this week on account of sickness. Some have contracted the “flu” and others who have slight colds are remaining inside to administer the proper treatment and to avoid contact with the disease while in a receptive mood. A good idea.

Rehearsals of the home talent play “The Girl from France,” like all other activities of a public nature, have been temporarily halted during the prevalence of the influenza quarantine. The play was slated to be produced at an early date for the benefit of the local fire department. It is the intention of those in the case to resume rehearsals and to plan for the early production of the piece as soon as the influenza ban is lifted. Home talent plays are always a real treat in Grangeville and the forthcoming presentation has been assured the hearty support of all.
— —

Federated Church

To be on the safe side and help to prevent an epidemic of the influenza, there will be no services next Sunday. Let us all use every precaution.

H. S. Randall, Pastor
— —

19200129GG3Broth For “Flu” Patients

Mrs. Bert Lanningham, together with members of the Grangeville Red Cross, have been arrangements to prepare broth for families who are sick and are short of help, and to send this to such families on notice.
— —

Whitebird News

Although there are a few cases of “flu” in town the movie show and dance at Zerr’s hall was well attended. Several young people from Doumecq were down.

The children of the seventh grade enjoyed a party at the Thompson home Saturday night.

On the same evening the high school students surprised their classmate L. Lennons. The evening was spent playing games.

Word has been received that Mr. Nail, cashier of the bank here, is ill at the White Hospital in Lewiston. Mrs. Nail and the children are in Grangeville.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Jerome County Times., January 29, 1920, Page 2

19200129JCT1

19200129JCT2Says Influenza is Unconquered

London — Official admission that the most mysterious disease germ of the ages – the influenza bacillus – has defeated the world’s greatest scientists was made to Universal Service Saturday by Sir George Newman, chief medical officer of the British health ministry.

source: Jerome County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 29 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Emmett Index. January 29, 1920, Page 1

19200129EI1

19200129EI2
Influenza Epidemic Spreads
Few Families Escape Around Sweet – Disease Not Severe – No Fatalities So Far

The influenza epidemic in Gem county may be summed up as follows: The high point is in the Squaw creek country, where 81 cases were reported Monday. Zeke Sweet, who was in town, says only two families in that community had escaped. In other portions of the county, the disease is much less general. It is not nearly so severe in character as last year, and so far there have been no fatalities. Everywhere, there is lack of nurses and help of any kind.

In the Squaw creek country the help situation has been a serious one, entire families being sick and being compelled to take care of each other the best they can, in most cases. The good people who are not sick at Sweet and Montour have been supplying the afflicted with soup and bread.

The Bank of Emmett employees were hard hit and all at once, V. T. Craig, Misses Norwood, Marler and Gamage, all being stricken at once. When the bank opened for business Monday, Ed Hayes was behind the cashier’s window assisting Lauren Dean, and A. O. Sutton and Tillie Peterson were assisting Mrs. Dean with the bookkeeping. All the afflicted ones were reported better yesterday and will soon be back on the job again.

Billy Wilton’s real estate office opened up Tuesday morning with Col. Jim Barnard at the desk and threatening to sell everything listed at auction sale unless Bill got well p.d.q., which had the desired effect, and Bill tried to make it down town yesterday but while the spirit was willing his legs were wobbly and wouldn’t track.

The Boise Payette mill was hit hard and many of its employees have been off duty. Bob Burlingame has been working night and day, three of his assistants being sick. One of the mill houses has been turned into a hospital, where men without families are being cared for.

In the city and the country districts the help proposition is as serious as in the upper country, and calls for nurses are constant, but cannot be filled.

Dr. Byrd returned today from a trip to Squaw creek, and reports the situation there greatly improved. Most of the patients are convalescent and there are only a few who are real sick.

The epidemic is playing havoc with the attendance in the schools, among both pupils and teachers. High school attendance was, early in the week, almost alarmingly depleted, but is increasing and there seems to be no cases of serious illness. The problem of providing High school teachers was a difficult one. Prof. Godwin has taken double work and Rev. Jas. Adams consented to help out a few days; it is expected by next week the teaching force will be normal. In the grades, Mrs. Walter Brown is substituting for Miss Quinn who is ill, and Mrs. Karl Mann is filling the place of Miss Gruber, the latter remaining at home to care for Miss Quinn and Mrs. Gamage.
— —

Died

Mrs. Sidney Douglass, living in Circle addition, died this afternoon of pneumonia following influenza. The Douglass family were former residents of the Ola country.
— —

19200129EI3
Postpone Road Meeting
Prevalence of Flu and Bad Roads Make Change Advisable

No more forcible argument in favor of the good roads program in Gem county has been presented than this: That it has become necessary to postpone the good roads conference, to have been held Friday of this week, because of the almost impassible condition of the roads. The flu epidemic also was another factor.

The road committee has advised the Commercial Club that the meeting has been postponed indefinitely, as road conditions and sickness would prevent a general attendance from all portions of the county, which is very much desired.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 29 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Emmett Index. January 29, 1920, Page 8

News of Gem County
By the Index’s Correspondents

Bramwell

The Davis Hunter family are all down with the flu. Lelia has been quite sick and under the care of Dr. Cummings, but is better at this time.

The Ed Heightsman family, who have had quite a siege of sickness are all up and around now.

School attendance is rather small this week, so many of the children being out on account of sickness.

Quite a number of folks went down to the river bridge Tuesday to see the big ice jam.

South Slope

The South Slope school is arranging for a school entertainment to take place on some date in February.

Letha

A doctor was called to the Henderson home last week. At this writing all the flu patients are up and on the road to recovery.

Dr. Cummings was called to Bismark Youtsler’s Friday and pronounced their trouble the flu. At present writing all in the family have had it except the baby. All are up, with the exception of Bismark and he is gaining fast.

Mrs. A. E. Pomeroy helped at Youtsler’s Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Mrs. Reese came down from Emmett.

Allan Newell has been helping with the chores at Youtslers for a week.

Mr. Gaines is doing chores for Dan Hansen, who is ill with the flu, as are all of his family.

Our school is quite small at present, down to 15 one day. When a teacher is used to 40 or more it must seem easy to handle 15.

Mrs. Wampler helped with the sick until Wednesday.

Dr. Polly came down Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday to see Mrs. Pomeroy, who is ill with the flu. She nursed her home folks, then was Good Samaritan to the neighbors and finally came down herself.

May and Chiles Riggs are recovering from the influenza.

The Ballenger family are up again after a siege of the prevailing epidemic.

Mrs. Lester Applegate was ill several days last week.

Mr. and Mrs. Kiggins came down from Emmett Tuesday, the latter prepared to stay and nurse her mother, whom she understood had the flu. She was agreeable surprised to find Mrs. Bott in her usual health, tho she and Mr. Bott had waited on Mrs. Henderson’s family through their illness.

The ice gorges in the river are the occasion of considerable apprehension to people on the low lands. The road to the bench is cut off because of the condition of the small red bridge, both approaches being washed out. A big gorge is lodged near the Burton place and another is reported to be following, having passed Emmett. The county officials have been blasting and breaking up ice about the Letha bridge for several days.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Oregon Short Line Railroad, Victor, Idaho January 18, 1927

Victor1927Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho County Free Press. January 29, 1920, Page 1

19200129ICFP1

19200129ICFP2
Many Influenza Cases, But All In Mild Form, Is Doctor’s Opinion
Places of Amusement Closed and Public Gatherings Are Forbidden by Authorities
City Health Department Exerts Every Effort to Stamp Out Malady in Grangeville

Between sixty and seventy-five cases of Spanish influenza exist in Grangeville, but no person affected with the disease is in critical condition. This was the statement made Thursday afternoon by Dr. B. Chipman, city health officer.

Twenty families in Grangeville are under quarantine. Number of cases of illness in the families from one to nine. No pneumonia cases exist, said Dr. Chipman. Most cases of influenza are in mild form.

Cases Are Quarantined

Individual quarantine of families in which the disease prevails were determined upon Monday following a meeting of the board of health, local physicians, school and Red Cross heads, called by Mayor W. L. Campbell.

The public schools were closed Wednesday evening and on Thursday, on order of the board of health, all public gatherings were suspended, pool halls and the picture show were closed and every measure of precaution to prevent spread of the disease was taken.

More than 100 pupils were absent from the public schools the first three days of the week.

Statement To Public

Mayor Campbell and Dr. Chipman, in a joint communication to the public outlining measures for protection against spread of the disease.

“You can help by not attending public meetings, dances, or places of amusement until danger is past.

“By reporting all cases to the health officer.

“By observing strictly the quarantine if you are quarantined.

“By sending for your physician to advise and care for the patient.

“By moving along and attending to necessary business and occupations. Do not gather in public places. Stay at home.”

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 29 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Idaho County Free Press. January 29, 1920, Page 6

Local News In Brief

Recovering — Mrs. Pat Toal of Mount Idaho is recovering from a severe illness which was for a time a matter of grave concern to her friends.

Federated Church — To be on the safe side and help to prevent an epidemic of influenza there will be no services next Sunday. H. S. Randall, pastor.

Court Postponed — Owing to prevalence of Spanish influenza, Judge Scales has postponed for one week the opening of the February term of district court in Lewis county. Court was scheduled to convene in Nezperce next Monday.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 29, 1920, Page 1

19200129DSM1

19200129DSM2
Influenza Spreads Over United States
Local Situation About The Same – Chicago Deaths increase – At Lewiston

The influenza situation is the chief topic of interest throughout the United States. The disease is spreading slowly but it is mild in most places. Comparatively few deaths are reported. There are a few very serious cases in Moscow and at least three more deaths are expected almost any time, but many of the cases are mild and some of those who were taken ill when the disease first appeared, are again out on the streets.

Mrs. Peter Sonna, mother of Mrs. S. E. Hutton, of Moscow, died at Los Angeles, California, this morning of pneumonia, following influenza, showing the disease is widespread. Chicago reports a marked increase in pneumonia cases, many deaths from pneumonia and influenza but the number of new cases of influenza has decreased rapidly and steadily since last Saturday, the high point of the wave.

Spokane has hundreds of cases and is fitting up an emergency hospital in the old skating rink. Every town, village, city and settlement in the west reports the disease increasing. Pullman has only about 100 cases but is preparing for the worst. Pullman had more than 100 deaths during the siege last year.

Lewiston is also fitting up an emergency hospital and three deaths were reported from there yesterday. The Lewiston Tribune of this morning says:

Three More Victims Yesterday

The need of the emergency hospital was brought to the attention of the officials yesterday with impelling force when it was learned that the two Lewiston hospitals are already filled to congestion and that there are many cases of influenza in the city that should be in hospitals where the care of trained nurses will be available. Three additional deaths in the city as a result of the epidemic caused the officials to take prompt action to provide the needed hospital facilities.

There were many new cases of influenza reported yesterday and the three victims of the disease were:

John Clinton Sherar, aged 54 years.
Gaylord Skinner, aged 15 months.
Mrs. Frances Stafford, aged 19 years.

There were five deaths in the city yesterday but the other two deaths were not caused by influenza.

The emergency hospital will be conducted by the Red Cross and all matters connected with its management will be in the hands of the Red Cross officials. Telegrams were sent out last night to secure the necessary equipment and it is expected the hospital will be in readiness to receive patients by the first of the week.

The Masons were more than willing to furnish their quarters for the care of the afflicted and the best of facilities will be available. There are about twelve large rooms on the two floors that can be devoted to hospital purposes. A complete kitchen is already in place and plenty of dishes are in the closets for all purposes. The rooms are all well heated, well ventilated and are served with hot and cold water.
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Mrs. S. E. Hutton’s Mother Called Home
Mrs. Peter Sonna, of Boise Died at Los Angeles Thursday A.M.

Word reached Moscow Thursday that Mrs. Peter Sonna, of Boise had died at Los Angeles that morning. The news came in a telegram from Mrs. S. E. Hutton, who was with her mother at the time. She asked that Moscow friends be notified. Mrs. Sonna’s death was due to pneumonia, following influenza. The funeral arrangements had not been made when the telegram was sent. …
— —

Chicago Has More Deaths

Chicago — (By A. P.) — Pneumonia, following influenza, reached the highest level of the present epidemic today. There were 407 new cases of pneumonia and 70 deaths reported. Influenza continued to subside, there being 87 deaths from influenza.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 29 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., January 29, 1920, Page 2

[Editorial Page]

Have Mercy On “Central”

There is merit to the appeal of the Moscow Telephone and Telegraph Company, published elsewhere in this issue to not call “Central” unless it is absolutely necessary. Nearly half of the operating force is sick. The girls are overworked. Those now working may be stricken at any time. They need assistance instead of being bothered by unnecessary calls.

If every one would refrain from calling “Central” or using the telephone except when absolutely necessary, those who have to use the system would get better service. This applies 12 months in the year, but especially is it true now. So many people call the telephone office to ask unnecessary questions.

The Moscow operators have always been very obliging and accommodating. They have given the best service possible and they never complain. They never have been uncivil in answering although there is no doubt they have had thousands of provocations.

In this time of distress, when homes are quarantined and operators are sick and the sick and the doctors have to use the telephone so much, let those who are not sick or quarantined or unable to get away from home, refrain from using the telephone except when absolutely necessary. If every patron will cut down his or her calls one or two a day (and not one of us but use the telephone unnecessarily at least that often) it will make a wonderful saving on the girls. Remember they are human and are working over time and if one or two more have to quit work the system will be demoralized. When the influenza wave is over you will feel better for having helped in this way and will get a better services.

(ibid, page 2)
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The Daily Star-Mirror., January 29, 1920, Page 3

City News

The American Legion is prepared to help any of their members or families who may be ill of influenza. If assistance is needed, telephone S. E. Mnoaham at 346 or 302Z.

Mrs. H. Kalinowski and daughter, Miss Madoline, arrived home today from Portland, called by the illness of Weldon Kalinowski.

(ibid, page 3)
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The Nezperce Herald., January 29, 1920, Page 1

19200129NH1

19200129NH2
District Court Be Postponed To Feb. 9
[Judge] Scales So Orders Because [of] Influenza Outbreak – Of [?] Cases Docketed, Six for Divorce

… influenza making its appearance in Lewis county during [the past] week, with a tendency … into an epidemic, Judge … Scales yesterday issued an … postponing the February … district court from the … the 9th, which order is as … [story cut off]
— —

19200129NH5Nezperce Has Return Of The Influenza
Two Families In Town and Several In Country Stricken – No Fatalities – Observe Quarantine; Schools Close

Until the first of the week this town had escaped the recurrence of influenza, while it had been making serious inroads in several neighboring communities, Kamiah, in particular reporting a large number of cases. Then reports coming from the surrounding farming section indicated that the malady had gained a foothold in at least four families. With this information at hand, and 1918’s sad experience still fresh in the memory of the community, it was decided to take steps to forestall as far as possible the spread of the disease here. County Attorney Pennell held a conference with County Health Officer Dr. E. Taylor, of Kamiah, the result of which was a visit to our city yesterday by the latter. After investigating the situation Dr. Taylor order the closing of the public schools and all public gathering places, and the cancelling of all contemplated public gatherings. This ruling has been strictly followed.

As The Herald goes to press late this evening, 16 defined cases of influenza are reported in town, these being in the families of L. J. Rowe, Roy Lyons, Mrs. Covey, B. F. Oakley, Frank Thompson and A. E. Wade. None of these are said to be serious and some are well on the way to recovery.

In the adjacent country cases are reported at the homes of John Gehrke, Clarence Eastman, Ed. Reed, Percy Marker, and Abel Newton. These are in various stages of the disease, but none seem to be extreme.

Frank Shaw, who was stricken with pneumonia five days ago, died at 5:20 this evening. He has been employed in the B. J. Fike garage here for some time, but his family is on a homestead in Montana, and funeral plans await the arrival of his oldest son, who is enroute. Little is known of him here. His was not an influenza case.
— —

Local News

In time of flu, “keep the mind and system open and the heart free from fear.”

Frank Shaw, an employee in the B. J. Fike garage in this city, was stricken with pneumonia five days ago and yesterday his condition was extremely serious, but he rallied and is said to be considerably improved today.
— —

J. M. Vorhies, who is visiting in the city from northeast of Greer, states the flu became epidemic in his neighborhood the first of the week, and the schools there – the Cottonwood district – which had an attendance of 72 last Friday, closed yesterday when the attendance had dwindled to 13.
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19200129NH4State Health Board Offers Flu Suggestion

Boise, Jan. 26. — This office urges that the communities not become alarmed, but calmly view the situation, assist the local officers by refraining from attending public gatherings, moving picture shows, dance halls, etc., as the foremost authorities on public health agree that these places are breeding spots for the transmission of the contagion.

For the protection of those members of the family who have not “flu,” when an inmate of their household is down, it is essential that all dishes and table ware be boiled. Here again the foremost medical men agree is the second chief avenue of the contagion. Keep the home properly ventilated and when coughing or sneezing be sure to cover the mouth and nose with a handkerchief. This is called “droplet infection” and the foremost medical men recognize it as an important avenue for the transmission of contagion.
— —

19200129NH3For Preventing Influenza

The Herald republishes the following article from its issue of November 7, 1918, by request:

Geo. P. Christenson submits the following as coming from a doctor with whom he was well acquainted back in his old home state and whom he knows to be capable and reliable:

Goldfield, Ia., Oct. 9. — Believing I have an effective preventative for grippe or influenza, and hoping it may be considered important enough to warrant publication, I herewith submit my remedy which I have used for years to my own satisfaction.

Let any one go to a drug store and buy a four drachm homeopathic vial and fill it loosely with absorbent cotton. Pour into this vial enough of the ordinary commercial 40 percent formaldehyde to thoroughly saturate the cotton. Stop the vial with a well-fitted cork and you have a remedy that will prevent or destroy any infection that is communicated by inspiration thru the air passages.

Respectfully yours, A. S. Cunningham, M. D.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 29 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Train Depot, Vollmer, Idaho

VollmerFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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January 30

The Rathdrum Tribune., January 30, 1920, Page 1

19200130RT1

Idaho State News Items

Influenza continues to invade new areas in Idaho, but the situation as a whole was somewhat improved Jan. 26, according to the state medical director at Boise. Out of over 1400 cases of influenza in the state since Jan. 8, only two deaths from influenza were reported, and five deaths from pneumonia.

A Nez Perce rural school district, joined with another to form a high school district, will not be permitted to withdraw therefrom, notwithstanding that the high school costs it $2700 annually, while only two students from the complaining district attend it. So ruled Attorney General Black Friday.

In a ruling on the Lewiston case, the attorney general and state superintendent declare a school district cannot legally issue bonds or deficiency warrants in payment of increases in teachers’ salaries in excess of the amount appropriated in the current year’s budget.

In a week’s work in Madison county, 345 cattle were tested for tuberculosis and no reactors were found.
— —

From Over The County

Coeur D’Alene

Complying with a request by the teachers for increased pay, the Coeur d’Alene school board granted a bonus of $100 to each teacher and the superintendent, and $50 to each janitor of the city schools, to be paid at the end of the term.

Post Falls

Owing to an oversight in fixing precinct boundaries the Washington Water Power island in the Spokane river and its inhabitants are not in any voting precinct. The condition was discovered by John Peters, census enumerator.

A. W. Klein, graduate of a diving school, repaired the water main in the Spokane river.
— —

World News In Brief

Inferior sanitary arrangements on the Russo-Polish frontier are said to be responsible for the alarming epidemic of typhus in Poland and the Baltic provinces. More than a million cases of the disease have been report to Red Cross officials.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Oakley Herald. January 30, 1920, Page 6

19200130OH1

Local Mention

Any who would be willing to nurse cases of influenza are requested to leave their names with Dr. Nielson.

The health lecture at the opera house last Thursday was well attended and instructive. The lecture was repeated the following day for the benefit of the school children. Both the Academy and the public school dismissed to allow the students to attend.

Mrs. Rhea Jones has recovered from a serious illness of influenza and pneumonia.

Fred Van Wynen is recovering from an illness.

E. E. Stock’s baby, who has been very ill, is reported to be improving.
— —

Revolt and Plague at Moscow

Helsingfors. — Report from Dorpat say a revolt has broke out in the red garrison at Moscow, and that the people’s commissaries at Moscow have moved to Tver owing to the spread of the plague.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater Republican. January 30, 1920, Page 1

19200130CR1

19200130CR2135 Cases of “Flu” In County

One hundred and thirty-five cases of the influenza have been reported by the local physicians. Ten cases were found in this territory last Sunday, 19 on Monday, 39 on Tuesday and 68 all told up to Wednesday morning. Yesterday seven more cases were reported in Orofino and 60 in the Fraser district, bring the total to the astounding number of 135 cases. The flu seems to be of a light character and no deaths or pneumonia have been reported to date.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater Republican. January 30, 1920, Page 2

19200130CR3Fred De Bolt Dead
Young Man Succumbed to Pneumonia Following Influenza

Lewiston, Jan. 28. — Yesterday morning at the home of his sister, Mrs. Carl Porter, on Normal Hill, Fred DeBolt, a popular young resident of Lewiston, passed away, a victim of pneumonia that developed from an attack of influenza. Mr. DeBolt was taken ill on Monday, Jan 19.

The deceased, who was born at Moscow, was 20 year old on March 4, last. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. DeBolt, died a number of years ago and for the past six years the youth has made his home with Mr. and Mrs. Carl Porter at Juliaetta. When the Porters moved to Lewiston he accompanied them here and he has been an employee at the R. C. Beach company store. He is survived by Mrs. Porter, another sister, Mrs. Marsh Paine of Pendleton, and a brother, Frank DeBolt, who is an employee of the Hub store Lewiston.

The deceased was a member of the Woodmen of the World lodge and he served for a year in the marines during the war, being stationed at Galveston, Texas.

The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon from the Vassar chapel, Rev. J. D. Keith of the Presbyterian church officiating.

The people of Orofino will remember Fred DeBolt as a former student of the Orofino high school. He left Orofino to enlist in the Marines.

(ibid, page 2)
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Cottonwood Chronicle. January 30, 1920, Page 1

19200130CC1

19200130CC2Influenza Again Makes Its Appearance; No Serious Cases

The influenza epidemic, which last year cost the lives of thousands of young men and women and even elderly people has again made its appearance in various sections of the country, and this immediate section of the country is no exception. At the present time there are perhaps some 30 cases in the city and surrounding country, but as most of the cases are in a mild stage there is no great cause for alarm and of people losing their heads, as was stated by one of Cottonwood’s physicians. However the greatest caution should be taken by everyone to guard against the epidemic spreading.

None of the schools in the city have been closed with the exception of the high school which was dismissed Thursday morning on account of some of the teachers being absent and ill. On Friday morning 24 high school students out of 55 reported for work and as Superintendent Lustie and Principal Hannon were numbered among the sick the high school was again dismissed for the day.

Lewiston Hit Hard

Lewiston, perhaps is hit the hardest of any city in this section of the country, there being some 2000 cases reported in the city and the past four days, death has claimed about 15 patients of the disease.

No Flu at Nezperce

At Nezperce, where the flu last year claimed more deaths than perhaps any city in the state, according to the size of the town, so far it has failed to make its appearance. The city, however has taken every precaution possible by closing the city school, ordering pool halls to remove all chairs, and by also forbidding public gatherings of any kind.

Grangeville Quarantines

At Grangeville where there are some 70 cases the health authorities are quarantining every family afflicted with the disease. None of the cases there are considered critical.

Cottonwood’s physicians, Drs. Blake, Orr and Shinnick are practically working night and day to check the malady in its infancy and there advise it to keep cool and not lose your head. Do not expose yourself any more than is absolutely necessary and if sick go to bed and stay there, until all chances of a setback are entirely eliminated. Follow the advice of your physician and you will in nine cases out of ten come out of it in A No. 1 shape, if you should be so unfortunate as to contract the flu.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 30 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. January 30, 1920, Page 6

Watch Your Health

“Influenza” the disease that took hundreds, yes thousands of lives throughout the country last year has again made its appearance in various sections of the country and to be frank Cottonwood today is also again infected with the malady, but only in a slight form, there being some cases, however, where the patients have the disease in a more severe form.

There is absolutely no cause for alarm or scare. But likewise there is no reason for not exercising great precautions. The health should be carefully guarded.

Every cold should be attended to at once. The feet should be kept warm and dry. It is essential that no risks of an unnecessary nature be assumed. Remember to protect your health and there is no danger from influenza.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. January 30, 1920, Page 8

Cottonwood And Vicinity
Personal Mention and Local Happenings of the Week in This Vicinity

Mrs. A. J. Maugg, of Grangeville arrived in Cottonwood Friday morning to nurse Mrs. John Maugg and daughter Agnes who are afflicted with the flu.

Mrs. A. J. Barth and John Wasem departed Tuesday morning for Tammany, where they attended the funeral of their niece, Miss Louise Thiessen, a 19 year old girl who was one of the first influenza victims in that section of the country.

Bill Rooke, who came out from his ranch on the river last week and departed for Lewiston on a business mission is now detained there with an attack of the flu.

Wess Hockersmith received word Thursday that his wife, who has been waiting on an elderly lady at Lewiston whih whom she made her home during her childhood days, had taken down with influenza.

Dr. H. B. Blake was a professional business visitor at Vollmer Thursday.

Dr. G. S. Stockton of Grangeville was a professional visitor in Cottonwood Tuesday.

Miss Harriet Greve arrived home Wednesday evening from Lewiston where she has been attending the Lewiston State Normal, which has been closed on account of the flu.

Miss Hazel Miller and Miss Minnie Pfannebecker who are students of the Lewiston Business College returned home Thursday evening and will not return until the flu epidemic at Lewiston has passed over.

The basket ball game between Grangeville and Cottonwood high school, which was scheduled for Wednesday evening was called off on account of the influenza epidemic.

The Metro picture, “Sylvia on a Spree,” for Tuesday evening, February 3, has been cancelled on account of the flu epidemic through an order of the Metro corporation. The Orpheum.

There will be a Red Cross meeting at their headquarters on Tuesday afternoon, February 3. All members are requested to be present.

(ibid, page 8)
———————-

Navy Scientists

The source of the influenza illness remained a mystery to scientists as viruses were too small and obscure for the optical microscopes available in 1918. Credit: Naval Historical Society

source: American Experience (See Part 44 of the Idaho Influenza News – Yellow Pine Times)
————————

Further Reading

Study: Bacterial pneumonia was main killer in 1918 flu pandemic

By Robert Roos Aug 22, 2008

It was secondary bacterial pneumonia — not the influenza virus by itself — that killed most of the millions who perished in the 1918 flu pandemic, which suggests that current pandemic preparations should include stockpiling of antibiotics and bacterial vaccines, influenza researchers reported this week.

Experts at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) examined pieces of lung tissue preserved from 58 victims of the 1918 pandemic and reviewed reports distilled from thousands of autopsies to reach their conclusions, published online by the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

“Histological and bacteriologic evidence suggests that the vast majority of influenza deaths resulted from secondary bacterial pneumonia,” says the report by David M. Morens, MD, Jeffery K. Taubenberger, MD, PhD, and NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, MD.

Many accounts of the 1918 pandemic have emphasized how quickly patients succumbed to the infection, creating an impression that a large share of the victims died of the virus’s direct effects on the lungs or the immune system’s intense response to the infection. But the new report suggests that more than 90% actually died of invading bacterial pneumonia after the virus wiped out cells lining the bronchial tubes and lungs.

“In essence, the virus landed the first blow while bacteria delivered the knockout punch,” said Fauci in an NIAID news release.

Lung sections and autopsy reviews

The researchers pursued two strategies. First, they examined sections newly cut from blocks of lung tissue preserved from 58 military members who died during the pandemic, representing all known 1918 flu cases in a tissue collection at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology.

Second, they reviewed 1918-era literature on influenza pathology and bacteriology, gleaning 109 reports providing useful bacteriologic information from 173 series of autopsies. These covered 8,398 autopsies from 15 countries.

Nearly all of the lung tissue examinations yielded “compelling histologic evidence of severe acute bacterial pneumonia, either as the predominant pathology or in conjunction with underlying pathologic features now believed to be associated with influenza virus infection,” including damage to the bronchial epithelium, the report says. Bacteria were often present in “massive numbers.”

In perusing the contemporary autopsy studies, the authors found 96 reports of lung tissue culture results from 5,266 patients, in which only 4.2% showed no bacterial growth. In 68 “higher quality” autopsy series, representing 3,074 patients, 92.7% of the lung cultures were positive for at least one bacterial species. Cultures of blood samples from another 1,887 victims were positive for bacteria in 70.3% of cases.

At the time of the pandemic, nearly all experts agreed that deaths were almost never caused by the then-unidentified flu virus itself, “but resulted directly from severe secondary pneumonia caused by well-known bacterial ‘pneumopathogens’ that colonized the upper respiratory tract,” the report states. The most common pathogens were pneumococci, streptococci, and staphylococci.

The authors also reviewed evidence from the relatively mild pandemic of 1957-58 and determined that most deaths were due to secondary bacterial pneumonia. In addition, the “few relevant data from the 1968-1969 pandemic” reflect the same pattern, they write.

“We believe that the weight of 90 years of evidence, including the exceptional but largely forgotten work of an earlier generation of pathologists, indicates that the vast majority of pulmonary deaths from pandemic influenza viruses have resulted from poorly understood interactions between the infecting virus and secondary infections due to bacteria that colonize the upper respiratory tract,” the report says.

Severity still unexplained

The researchers say their findings leave the extreme severity of the 1918 pandemic unexplained. Because they found evidence of many different types of invading bacteria, it was probably not due to specific virulent bacterial strains. Instead, they speculate that “any influenza virus with an enhanced capacity to spread to and damage bronchial and/or bronchiolar epithelial cells” could pave the way for bacteria in the upper respiratory tract to invade the lungs and cause a severe infection.

The authors suggest that, as in past pandemics, secondary bacterial pneumonia is likely to be the leading killer in the next pandemic — if it is caused by “a human-adapted virus similar to those recognized since 1918.” If that’s the case, they assert, pandemic preparations must go beyond the development and stockpiling of influenza vaccines and antiviral drugs; efforts should also include the stockpiling of antibiotics and bacterial vaccines to protect against bacterial pneumonia.

However, the investigators also write that if a derivative of the H5N1 avian flu virus causes a future pandemic, lessons from past pandemics may not be “strictly applicable.” That virus’s pathogenic mechanisms may be atypical because it is poorly adapted to humans and because it causes unusual pathology in animals. On the other hand, they say that if the H5N1 virus fully adapts to humans, the spectrum of resulting disease could revert to something more similar to what was seen in past pandemics.

Study may change thinking

William Schaffner, MD, an influenza expert and chairman of the Department of Preventive Medicine at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, said the new study may change the general understanding of the causes of death in the 1918 pandemic.

“The general notion at least heretofore is that there were two kinds of deadly illnesses, the first caused by the virus all by itself,” Schaffner told CIDRAP News. “We know that the influenza virus can cause primary pneumonia, and the time course was so brief from onset to death in many patients that it was thought this was likely due to an extremely virulent influenza virus — an influenza virus on steroids.”

But it has also been assumed that bacterial pneumonia often complicated flu cases then, as it does today, and was fatal for many patients in that pre-antibiotic era, he added. “So the general notion was that there were two causes of death. The general sense was that the former, the virus, was more important than the latter. This comes largely from repeated stories about the rapidity with which this carried people off.”

But the findings of Morens and colleagues indicate that secondary bacterial pneumonia was the more common cause of death. “The impressive thing is, though this is a tiny, tiny sample of what went on, they showed bacterial pneumonia was extraordinarily common,” Schaffner said. “I think they make the point that it was in every one of the autopsy sections they examined. I have to tell you that made me sit up.”

He suggested one possible source of inadvertent bias in the study: Because the evidence is derived from autopsies, the subjects included in the study could represent a skewed sample. The victims most likely to be autopsied were those who died in hospitals, and they probably were less sick initially and had a longer course of illness than those who died at home, Schaffner said. Those who died at home were much less likely to be autopsied.

Nevertheless, the study is an important contribution for showing that bacterial pneumonia was common in the 1918 pandemic, Schaffner added. “I’m still not convinced that that bimodal concept [of the causes of death in 1918] is not true,” he said. “These fellows have nailed the second part; I’m just not sure they represent the entire population of deaths.”

continued: University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy
———————

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports Aug 22, 2021

Please share road reports. Most back country roads have not been graded and are rough. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: Rain this week has settled the dust on local streets. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Quartz Creek
Report Thursday (Aug 19) “Cleared Quartz Creek of trees last weekend.” – SA

Highway 55
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting Tuesday, Sept. 7, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
Project link:
Donnelly to Deinhard Project: Construction on Highway 55 between Donnelly and McCall. This is a much-needed project to repair potholes and cracks in the roadway and will include placing a new layer of pavement on the highway for smoother driving conditions.
What to expect:
* Idaho 55 will be reduced to one lane with pilot cars midweek (Monday – Thursday)
* All lanes will be open on weekends (Friday – Sunday)
* Roadway surface will be uneven for several weeks
* Speed limit will be reduced and 12-foot restrictions will be in place
* Construction is expected to be complete in September.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Friday (Aug 13) the “SF slide occurred in the middle of the [4-mile] controlled burn… Guessing 300’ on the road and filled the new grill-covered drain ditches.” – SL
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Aug 18) mail truck driver says the County has started grading the EFSF road.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Aug 18) mail truck driver reports the County has graded the entire length of the road.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened June 7
Report Wednesday (Aug 18) “Zena bridge is finished and looks great! Road is very rough. I would not recommend taking a car or camp trailer over.” – JB
Watch for ATV/UTV traffic.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Opened June 13
Report Thursday (Aug 19) “Profile has seriously rocky sections that are washing out worse than usual. Some are sharp. Carry a saw whether its windy or not — roots of beetle kill trees are now quite rotten and fall easily.” – CP
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Link: Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open, travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open. Travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Opened June 9
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Opened by May 27
No current report.

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Weather Reports Aug 15-21, 2021

Aug 15 Weather:

At 9am it was 56 degrees, likely clear above opaque flat sky of smoke – Red Air Quality and slight breeze. At 230pm it was 93 degrees, smoky sky and crappy air quality. At 630pm it was 90 degrees, light breeze, appears partly cloudy above the smoke and poor air quality. At 11pm back to Red air quality.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 16, 2021 at 09:00AM
Partly cloudy, smoky, Red AQ
Max temperature 96 degrees F
Min temperature 53 degrees F
At observation 59 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Aug 16 Weather:

At 9am it was 59 degrees, appears to be partly cloudy above the smoke – Red Air Quality. At 1pm it was 77 degrees, probably some clouds above the smoke – bad air quality. At 220pm it was 85 degrees, probably mostly cloudy and bad air quality. At 630pm it 86 degrees and appeared clear above lighter smoke – a little better air quality. At 9pm it was 70 degrees, appears clear and haze of smoke – Yellow Air Quality.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 17, 2021 at 09:00AM
Overcast? smoky Yellow AQ
Max temperature 91 degrees F
Min temperature 51 degrees F
At observation 55 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Aug 17 Weather:

At 9am it was 55 degrees, appears to be overcast above the smoke – yellow AQ. Thicker clouds and smoke blotting out the sun at noon and making it rather dark. At 1pm it was 65 degrees, dark overcast (and smoke) and chilly breezes. At 245pm it was 75 degrees, broken overcast, gusty breezes and better air quality. At 630pm it was 71 degrees, mostly cloudy, increased smoke and breezy. At 9pm it was 59 degrees, mostly cloudy (dark to the south) breezy and thinner smoke. Looked clear to the east at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 18, 2021 at 09:00AM
Broken overcast, haze of smoke Yellow AQ
Max temperature 78 degrees F
Min temperature 41 degrees F
At observation 45 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Aug 18 Weather:

At 9am it was 45 degrees, broken overcast, haze of smoke and yellow air quality. At 1pm it was 65 degrees, mostly cloudy, haze of smoke and a stiff breeze. At 250pm it was 67 degrees, mostly cloudy, breezy and light haze of smoke (Yellow AQ.) Increasing smoke. Thunder 530pm, rain at 545pm, moderately hard rain 555pm-605pm then steady rain until around 625pm (0.17″). At 630pm patches of open sky and quite breezy. At 645pm it was 50 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy, better air quality. At 730pm it was 52 degrees, mostly cloudy, lighter breezes and light haze of smoke. At 840pm it was 51 degrees, dark overcast and calmer. Mars and some stars out to the east at 1045pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 19, 2021 at 09:00AM
Mostly cloudy, light breeze, smoky
Max temperature 72 degrees F
Min temperature 38 degrees F
At observation 42 degrees F
Precipitation 0.17 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Aug 19 Weather:

At 9am it was 42 degrees, mostly cloudy, light chilly breeze and smoky. Mostly cloudy, breezy and smoky at 1pm. At 3pm it was 73 degrees, mostly cloudy, breezy and light haze of smoke. Breezy until around 430pm. At 645pm it was 66 degrees, partly cloudy, haze of smoke and breezes gusting up at times. At 850pm it was 63 degrees, cloudy, calm and haze of smoke. Looked mostly cloudy at 11pm, bright Jupiter rising in the cracks.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 20, 2021 at 09:00AM
Mostly clear, light breeze, light smoke
Max temperature 74 degrees F
Min temperature 42 degrees F
At observation 50 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Aug 20 Weather:

At 9am it was 50 degrees, mostly clear, light breeze and light haze of smoke. At 1230pm it was 73 degrees, mostly cloudy, light breeze and light smoke. At 245pm it was 77 degrees, mostly cloudy (dark bottoms), light breeze and light haze of smoke. At 645pm it was 73 degrees, broken gray overcast, slight breeze, increasing smoke and Yellow air quality. At 845pm it was 65 degrees, cloudy and calm with light haze of smoke. Started raining probably around 130am until maybe 6 or 7am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 21, 2021 at 09:00AM
Overcast, slight breeze, light smoke
Max temperature 80 degrees F
Min temperature 50 degrees F
At observation 51 degrees F
Precipitation 0.29 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Aug 21 Weather:

At 9am it was 50 degrees, overcast (some fog mid-mountain) and slight breeze. Short sprinkle started at 1125am, probably less than 10 minutes. At 225pm it was 63 degrees, dark overcast and starting to sprinkle, distant thunder, increased haze of smoke. At 240pm thunder and steady rain for about 20 minutes or a little more. Mostly cloudy and light breeze at 430pm. Short rain started at 515pm. Rain started at 628pm, lasted a couple of minutes. At 635pm it was 61 degrees, mostly cloudy and haze of smoke, degrading air quality. At 9pm it was 57 degrees and cloudy. Looked clear to the east at 11pm. Looked cloudy at 2am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 22, 2021 at 09:00AM
Partly cloudy, light breeze, Good AQ, heavy dew
Max temperature 66 degrees F
Min temperature 40 degrees F
At observation 45 degrees F
Precipitation 0.02 inch
—————————–

Red Flag Warning Aug 20, 9pm to Aug 22, 12am

Red Flag Warning Aug 20, 9pm to Aug 22, 12am

Yellow Pine Forecast

Today Patchy smoke. Mostly sunny, with a high near 74. Calm wind.

Tonight A slight chance of showers and thunderstorms, then showers and possibly a thunderstorm after midnight. Patchy smoke. Low around 52. Light and variable wind. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New rainfall amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.

Saturday Showers and possibly a thunderstorm. Patchy smoke. High near 66. Calm wind becoming west around 5 mph in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New rainfall amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.

Saturday Night Showers likely and possibly a thunderstorm before midnight. Patchy smoke. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 46. Light south wind. Chance of precipitation is 60%.

Aug 20 morning satellite map

Red Flag Warning

URGENT - FIRE WEATHER MESSAGE...CORRECTED
National Weather Service Boise ID
830 AM MDT Fri Aug 20 2021

...FIRE WEATHER WATCH ISSUED FRIDAY EVENING THROUGH SATURDAY
EVENING...

.An upper level storm and cold front will bring scattered
lightning to the area from this evening through Saturday evening,
starting earliest on the Oregon side, then in the NF districts
and Northern Boise BLM on the Idaho side, and finally from the
Treasure and Western Twin Falls districts south to the NV border
early Saturday morning. Scattered lightning will not occur the
entire time, but several waves of storms are expected as the low
moves through the area.

Northern Boise BLM-Western Payette National Forest-
Eastern Payette National Forest-Northern Boise National Forest-
Southern Boise National Forest/Western Sawtooth National Forest-
830 AM MDT Fri Aug 20 2021

...RED FLAG WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 9 PM THIS EVENING TO
MIDNIGHT MDT SATURDAY NIGHT FOR LIGHTNING FOR NORTHERN BOISE BLM...
WESTERN PAYETTE NATIONAL FOREST...EASTERN PAYETTE NATIONAL
FOREST... NORTHERN BOISE NATIONAL FOREST...TREASURE VALLEY BLM
AND SOUTHERN BOISE NATIONAL FOREST/WESTERN SAWTOOTH NATIONAL
FOREST...WHICH ARE FIRE WEATHER ZONES 400...401...402...403...
420 AND 421...

* THUNDERSTORMS...Scattered thunderstorms are expected.

* OUTFLOW WINDS...Gust to 40 mph are possible.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A Red Flag Warning means that critical fire weather conditions
are either occurring now, or will occur shortly.

Road Reports Aug 18, 2021

Please share road reports. Most back country roads have not been graded and are rough. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are dusty again. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting Tuesday, Sept. 7, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
Project link:
Donnelly to Deinhard Project: Construction on Highway 55 between Donnelly and McCall. This is a much-needed project to repair potholes and cracks in the roadway and will include placing a new layer of pavement on the highway for smoother driving conditions.
What to expect:
* Idaho 55 will be reduced to one lane with pilot cars midweek (Monday – Thursday)
* All lanes will be open on weekends (Friday – Sunday)
* Roadway surface will be uneven for several weeks
* Speed limit will be reduced and 12-foot restrictions will be in place
* Construction is expected to be complete in September.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Aug 10: The South Fork Road is open for public travel.
Report Friday (Aug 13) “SF slide occurred in the middle of the [4-mile] controlled burn… Guessing 300’ on the road and filled the new grill-covered drain ditches.” – SL
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Aug 18) mail truck driver says the County has started grading the EFSF road.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Aug 18) mail truck driver reports the County has graded the entire length of the road.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open
Folks were making it in and out over Lick creek festival weekend, but no report on conditions.
Bridge replacement due to be completed July 29th. No current report.
(Opened June 7) Watch for ATV and UTV traffic.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Opened June 13
No current report. Not graded and probably rough
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Link: Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open, travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open. Travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Opened June 9
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Opened by May 27
No current report.

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————