Idaho History Aug 8, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 67

Idaho Newspaper clippings January 16-23, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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January 16

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 16, 1920, Page 1

19200116DSM1

19200116DSM2Influenza Hits Big Naval Training Camp

Chicago. — A partial quarantine of Great Lakes Naval Training station was ordered yesterday by Commandant Bassett, due to influenza. Between 150 and 175 cases, said to be mild, developed Monday.

The recurrence of influenza will postpone plans to send 500 men to sea, 300 of whom were to join the Pacific fleet.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 16 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Caldwell Tribune. January 16, 1920, Page 1

19200116CT1

19200116CT2According to latest advices from Dr. F. M. Cole, city physician, the only case of alleged influenza in Caldwell, that of H. G. Morris, resolved itself into a case of smallpox. There is no influenza in Caldwell.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 16 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Caldwell Tribune. January 16, 1920, Page 3

Local and Personal

H. G. Morris was quarantined Tuesday for influenza at his home on Arthur street. This is the first case of the season and prompt measure were taken to prevent a recurrence of an epidemic. Dr. F. M. Cole, city physician, expressed himself as being certain that the case was influenza. Mr. Morris is affiliated with the Farmer’s Society of Equity here.

Miss Jeanette Runciman is reported ill at her home. She has been employed teaching at Meridian.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon for Juanita Jackson at the Christian church, the Rev. Francis Cook conducting them. Juanita Jackson was a nine months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Jackson of Claytonia. She died Monday of pneumonia. Burial was in Canyon Hill cemetery.

(ibid, page 3)
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The Rathdrum Tribune., January 16, 1920, Page 4

19200116RT1

World News In Brief

A million cases of influenza are reported in Japan.

All the entente allies and associate powers, excepting the United States, formally concluded peace with Germany Jan. 10.

The American forestry association has sent a gift of thirty-five million tree seeds to Europe to reforest devastated and depleted areas in France, Belgium and the British Isles.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 16 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater Republican. January 16, 1920, Page 7

19200116CR1

Summary Of The World’s Events

Influenza is spreading throughout Japan. There are 1,000,000 cases reported. Of these stricken 12,000 are soldiers.

The American government has reached no decision to withdraw its troops from Siberia.

The former transport St. Louis was scuttled recently at New Jersey in a desperate effort to check flames which had swept the ship from stem to stern.

The German army, which numbered 280,000 men on January 1, 2ill be reduced monthly, so that by April the strength laid down by the treaty will be attained.

Reviewing the legislative record of the two Wilson administrations, the resolutions also expressed gratification that the president was regaining health after a breakdown “due largely to his efforts for world peace.”

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 16 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Street Scene, Sweet, Idaho ca. 1911

Sweet1911Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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January 19

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 19, 1920, Page 1

19200119DSM1

19200119DSM2
Influenza Causes Alarm In This State
State Board of Health Send Out Instructions To Guard Against It

The following letter has been sent out from Boise by the state board of health, known as the “department of public welfare” in regard to the influenza situation. It is addressed to “all mayors, women’s clubs, Red Cross chapters, commercial clubs, etc.” It follows:

Influenza has appeared in six communities in the state. From all appearances it is the same infection as had last year and from the rapidity with which it is spreading, will tax the united efforts of all organizations, if it is to be controlled.

You are urged to organize in your community. Get together and map out a program for its prevention and control. Do not wait until the disease is present in your community in epidemic form.

Last year thousands of dollars were lost because it was necessary to enforce rigid quarantine. Your business men will suffer another loss if prompt steps are not taken to control the first cases which appear in your community. Protection is possible but depends on how vigorously you act. If you delay putting your shoulder to the wheel now, don’t howl if restrictive measures are applied when the disease gets a foot hold in your community.

The Red Cross chapter in your community has a plan completely mapped out for the handling of the situation. Get in touch with the Red Cross Immediately. Study their plan and get together so that complete cooperation may be had from all organizations.

Yours truly,
Department of Public Welfare,
Ernest E. Laubaugh, M. D., Chief,
Bureau of Public Health Service.
— —

Thirty Seven Deaths in Chicago

Chicago. — There was a marked increase today in the number of deaths caused by influenza and pneumonia in Chicago during the last 24 hours. Thirty-two persons died of pneumonia and seven of influenza.

The number of new cases of influenza and pneumonia was larger than for any similar period since last winter.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 19 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Santa, Idaho

SantaFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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January 20

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 20, 1920, Page 2

19200120DSM1

[Editorial Page]

Enforce The Quarantine

Attention is called to the statement of Dr. Leitch that quarantine laws will be enforced in Pullman, and the people are urged to cooperate with the health officer in this movement. Too many homes were made desolate by the influenza epidemic last year to pass lightly over the warnings of danger that are coming to us daily. Chicago, with 900 new cases a day and 50 to 100 deaths daily, has the disease worse than it had it a year ago. It is reported in many sections of southern Idaho and Lewiston has it in mild form.

Can we, with the university, with our schools and our business interests, afford to take chances of permitting a spread of the disease like it spread last year? There can be no division of opinion on that question. It must be answered in the negative by all. And the way to make that answer effective is by cooperation.

We believe that Dr. Leitch’s plan of quarantining the homes of those afflicted or exposed to contagious disease is preferable to closing the schools and the churches and the theatres and other places were people congregate. The well do not need to be quarantined. It is the sick who spread the disease. Dr. Leitch has made a plain statement and publishes the law. Let us all cooperate with him and help to save Moscow from another scourge like that of a year ago.

Moscow escaped lightly in the scourge of 1918-19, but many homes suffered the loss of a loved one and while we did not have nearly as many deaths as other communities, we had too many. One would have been too many, if it were “our one” and we must work together to prevent a recurrence of this terrible epidemic.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 20 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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St. Johns, Idaho

StJohnsFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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January 21

The Challis Messenger., January 21, 1920, Page 5

19200121CM1

Items About People You Know

Not Determined Yet — Mrs. Daniel Stephens, who returned home from a visit with relatives and friends at Boise last Monday evening, was taken ill Tuesday and Dr. Kirtley was called. Upon examination the doctor discovered that the patient had “flu” symptoms and the family was quarantined as safety first precautions. It has not yet been determined if the case is one of influenza.

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 21 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., January 21, 1920, Page 1

19200121DSM1

19200121DSM2
Health Officer Says Flu In Moscow
Dr. Leitch Reports Six Suspicious Cases In One House Here Today

“Has the influenza reappeared in Moscow?”

This question is agitating physicians and is to be thoroughly investigated. Dr. Leitch, city health officer, reports six very suspicious cases in one house in town and thinks it is flu. There is some doubt about this, it seems, as physicians do not agree, but a close quarantine is to be enforced and no chances take of letting the disease spread.

Dr. Leitch consulted with the school board today and proposed that should there be a reappearance of “flu” in Moscow the schools will be permitted to run provided nurses and doctors are provided to make careful examinations of the pupils and care for any who may be taken sick. He contends that authorities on “flu” have announced that closing the schools and other public meetings is not a preventative measure, but that a close quarantine at home of all cases is the best remedial measure to prevent the spread of the disease.

Dr. Leitch calls upon every one in Moscow to assist in this work of preventing this dread disease from gaining a foothold here. He says by cooperation he believes the disease can be controlled, if it really has appeared, and that the town can escape the dire results that have been suffered by other places.
— —

6,000 Cases in Chicago

Chicago. — (By A. P.) — Over six thousand persons in Chicago are ill today with influenza. Reports are that the contageon has appeared in cities and towns throughout the middle west.

Pneumonia is also epidemic and proportionately, has caused a large number of deaths.
— —

Flu Bad in Army Camps

Washington. — Influenza has become epidemic in several army camps, particularly in the middle west, Surgeon General Ireland of the army announced today, and it has made its appearance among the American troops in Germany. While the disease is increasing among the civilian population of the United States, it has not reached epidemic form and Surgeon Blue of the public health service said there was nothing to cause alarm. The malady is of a mild type and the resulting death rate proportionately has been far below that of the war time epidemic, while the incidence of pneumonia also has been much lower.

Approximately 100 physicians in every state, trained in last year’s epidemic, have been appointed reserve officers in the health service and can be immediately mobilized if needed, Dr. Blue said.

The outbreak among the troops in Germany has assumed more alarming proportions with 163 new cases reported there for the week ended January 9, an increase of 65 over the week before. There also were 23 cases of pneumonia.
— —

Lewiston Conditions Bad

The Lewiston Tribune of this morning says:

“There is urgent need for more nurses to go into the homes of the Lewiston country to care for the sick. The hospitals are filled and new cases are being reported daily and in many of these cases the services of nurses or of persons capable of caring for the sick are required.

“The Red Cross has been able to fill all demands until the last few days and the first appeal for the registration of women who are willing to go into the homes, was made yesterday morning. It was stated yesterday at Red Cross headquarters that it is very urgent that women give this matter their immediate attention and it is hoped a goodly number of women will register at the Red Cross headquarters before noon today. Such women may register by calling the secretary, Mrs. Harry Lydon, over the telephone and leaving their names and addresses so that they can be quickly reached when a call is made. At the present time several women can be placed immediately upon registration.

“It is explained that the situation is so urgent that the services of women for only a part of the day will be welcomed.

Several new cases of influenza were re ported yesterday to City Health Officer Dr. Susan E. Bruce but up to the present time none of the cases are considered serious.”

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 21 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., January 21, 1920, Page 4

19200121DSM3
Quarantine Laws Will Be Enforced
City Health Officer Announces Plans For Combating Influenza

Much uneasiness if felt over a threatened return of influenza which proved so disastrous last winter and is estimated to have caused 15,000,000 deaths in all parts of the world. National state and county health officers are taking steps to combat the disease before it gains a foothold like it did a year ago. Dr. J. W. Stevenson, county health officer, and Dr. F. M. Leitch, city health officer, announce that quarantine rules will be rigidly enforced. Dr. Leitch said:

“There have been a number of cases of scarlet fever and some cases of mumps that have not been reported. The law is very strict in such matters and requires physicians to report all contagious diseases and these much be reported. We are warned that there is grave danger of a recurrence of the influenza with its terrible consequences and should begin at once to prepare to combat the first symptoms of this disease. I shall enforce a rigid house quarantine in all cases of contageous diseases in Moscow. I believe if all cases of contageous disease are strictly quarantined at home it will not be necessary to close the schools and other public meetings and that we can save a great amount of trouble and an immense expense by quarantining the homes instead of the schools, churches and public meetings.” Dr. Leitch furnishes a copy of the law on this subject which is here given for the information of all interested:

Sec. 1099. — Any physician or other person called to attend any person who is suffering from smallpox, cholera, plague, yellow fever, typhus fever, diphtheria, membranous croup, scarlet fever, typhoid fever, infantile paralysis and cerebrospinal meningitis, or any other disease dangerous to the public health or required by the state board of health to be reported, shall report the name within twenty-four hours to the health officer within whose jurisdiction such person is found, giving in such report the name, age, sex, and color of the patient, and the house or place in which such person may be found; and in the case of smallpox, cholera, plague, yellow fever, diphtheria, membranous croup, scarlet fever or infantile paralysis and cerebrospinal meningitis, the attending physician shall at once declare a temporary quarantine, and shall prohibit entrance to or exit from such house; such temporary quarantine to remain in effect only until such time as the proper health officer can be notified and can act in the matter. In like manner it shall be the duty of the head of the family, and of the owner or agent of the owner of the building in which a person resides who has any of the diseases herein named or provided against, or in which are the remains of a person having died of any such disease, immediately after becoming aware of the fact, to give notice thereof to the health officer. When complaint is made or a reasonable belief exists that an infectious or contagious disease prevails in any house or any other locality which has not been reported as hereinbefore required, the board shall cause such house or locality to be inspected by its health officer, and discovery that such infectious disease prevails in any house or any other locality which has not been reported as hereinbefore required, the board shall cause such house to locality to be inspected by its health officer, and on discovering that such infections or contageous disease exists, the board may, as it deems best, send such person to a quarantine hospital or other place provided for such persons, or may restrain them or other persons exposed within said house from intercourse with other persons, and prohibit ingress and egress to or from such premises. Any person, on whom a duty is imposed by the provisions of this section, who fails, neglects or refuses to perform the same as herein required, and any persons who violate any regulation of the physician attending a person afflicted with any of the diseases guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction thereof, shall be fined a sum not exceeding fifty dollars ($50.00), or be imprisoned in the county jail not exceeding ninety days, or shall suffer both fine and imprisonment.
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Chicago Situation Worse

Chicago. — Chicago’s health department was swamped with appeals for nurses today to combat the spread of influenza and pneumonia, of which more than 2,000 cases have been reported in 48 hours, with 50 deaths.

Since 9 a.m. today 900 new cases of influenza were reported, with 10 deaths, and pneumonia cases numbered 100, with 16 deaths.

Health Commissioner John D. Roberton started a campaign against “cold flat” owners when 105 complaints were received.
— —

Several Cases at Lewiston

Several more cases of influenza were reported yesterday to City Health Officer Dr. Susan E. Bruce but none of the cases are serious and the view is held there will be little trouble with the disease here if the people exercise the necessary precaution. It is stated there are about 25 cases in Lewiston at the present time, but all of the patients are doing nicely.

— Lewiston Tribune

(ibid, page 4)
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Sawyer Store, Sawyer, Bonner County, Idaho

SawyerFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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January 22

Idaho County Free Press. January 22, 1920, Page 1

19200122ICFP1

19200122ICFP3Precautions To Halt Influenza Are Urged

Precautions should be taken by the public to prevent a recurrence of an epidemic of influenza in Idaho county. This was the sentiment expressed at a special meeting of the executive board of the Grangeville Commercial club Wednesday. While no cases of influenza are known to exist in Idaho county, the epidemic has broke out in Lewiston and south Idaho. Persons complaining of illness are urged to summon a physician in order to determine whether they are suffering from influenza. School children, especially, should be observed, it was suggested.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho, 22 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., January 22, 1920, Page 1

19200122DSM1

19200122DSM2
Several New Cases Of Flu In Moscow
Health Officer Leitch Gives Warning About Conditions In Town

The flu situation is more menacing. A number of new cases have been reported today and unless the citizens whole heartedly cooperate with the health authorities we are going to have a more general epidemic than during 1918. There is practically no difference in so call [sic] influenza and La Grippe and instructions from Boise are not to quibble over the diagnosis but to place every suspicious case under quarantine until a certain diagnosis can be made. It is better to err and be safe than to err and be wrong in the diagnosis. If every citizen will fully comply with regulations the disease will be more easily controlled or stamped out than if no precautions are observed. Every home with children is urged to get a clinical thermometer and test every child for temperatures before sending him to school if there is the slightest symptoms of illness. Thru cooperation of the school board the Red Cross and health board, beginning next Monday morning a force of nurses will be on hand to inspect every pupil before entering school. Inspections would begin at once but Dr. Smith says he cannot get his inspection force before next Monday.

Other regulations to be enforced until further notice: All school children are forbidden under penalty from attending church, Sunday school, picture shows, parties or other gatherings, unless they can comply with the same regulation for inspection to be enforced at the schools. A rigid quarantine will be enforced in every known case of infectious or contageous disease. This is an earnest effort to control or stamp out the disease and if it cannot be held within reasonable bounds by this means it may become necessary to close all schools, churches, picture shows, pool halls and all public gatherings and with this notice I sincerely hope no citizen will be indifferent to the situation that confronts us.

Dr. Leitch, Health Officer.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 22 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Sinclairs Store, Sinclair, Idaho, 1921

Sinclair1921Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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January 23

The Rathdrum Tribune., January 23, 1920, Page 1

19200123RT1

Idaho State News Items

State officials last week clapped a rigid influenza quarantine upon the industrial school at St. Anthony.

Up to Jan. 15, influenza cases in Mountain Home, Boise, Grandview, Bruneau, St. Anthony and Wallace were reported to the state health office to the number of 179, and the state medical director immediately put out a warning thruout [sic] the state that the disease was spreading rapidly and that steps should be taken at once by every community to organize to prevent or control the epidemic before quarantine measures become necessary.

The smallpox situation at Sandpoint is becoming acute.

Twenty per cent of the Idaho potato crop, or $1,630,000 worth, was lost last year due to the new disease called “Potato Wart,” found in the potato fields thruout [sic] the United States, according to C. W. Hungerford, plant pathologist of the University of Idaho.

A movement has been started to have U. S. soldiers stationed in the timber areas to protect the forests against loss by fire.

The war department has authorized Adjutant General L. V. Patch of Idaho to organize in the state units of cavalry, heavy artillery, machine gun or infantry, to be located in the towns which desire them. The government furnishes and pays for the care of and supplies for all horses and equipment, furnishes the men uniforms and ammunition for target practice and pays them for attending drill.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 23 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Cottonwood Chronicle. January 23, 1920, Page 1

19200123CC1

News Around The State
Items of Interest From Various Sections Reproduced for Benefit of Our Readers.

The influenza in a mild form has made is [sic] appearance in Lewiston and the authorities are taking every precaution to hold the disease in check. No serious cases have been reported.

State officials Wednesday clapped as [sic] rigid influenza quarantine upon the industrial school at St. Anthony and Dr. E. A. Bryan, state commissioner of education and the highest executive officer in direct charge of the school, requested probate judges of every Idaho county to refrain from making additional commitments to that institution until the ban is lifted.

Idaho’s future highway development stands in serious danger of curtailment as the result of the present congress’ announced policy of “retrenchment and economy,” and converted pressure on the part of every individual, every public and semi-public organization, will be necessary to assure the passage of federal and state appropriations liberal enough to meet the demands.

Months and months of prospecting has brought its reward to E. P. Adams and Walter V. Martin, at the Warren mining camp in Idaho county, but a rich gold strike where by the assays bring a report that same will go $820 in gold values per ton. The discovery was made on Washington Creek, a tributary to Warren creek, two miles from Warren, Idaho.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 23 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. January 23, 1920, Page 1

19200123KG1

19200123KG2
Influenza Causes Alarm

The following letter has been sent out from Boise by the state board of health known as the “department of public welfare” in regard to the influenza situation. It is addressed too “All mayors, women’s clubs, Red Cross chapters, commercial clubs, etc.” It follows:

Influenza has appeared in six communities in the state. From all appearances it is the same infection as had last year and from the rapidity with which it is spreading, will tax the united efforts of all organizations, if it is to be controlled.

You are urged to organize in your community. Get together and map out a program for its prevention and control. Do not wait until the disease is present in your community in epidemic form.

Last year thousands of dollars were lost because it was necessary to enforce rigid quarantine. Your business men will suffer another loss if prompt steps are not taken to control the first cases which appear in your community. Protection is possible but depends on how vigorously you act. If you delay putting your shoulder to the wheel now, don’t howl if restrictive measures are applied when the disease gets a foot hold in your community.

The Red Cross chapter in your community has a plan completely mapped out for the handling of the situation. Get in touch with the Red Cross Immediately. Study their plan and get together so that complete cooperation may be had from all organizations.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 23 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. January 23, 1920, Page 6

19200123KG31200 New Cases of “Flu” in Chicago

Chicago. — Twelve hundred new cases of influenza were reported Sunday. Deaths from influenza and pneumonia totaled 51.

(ibid, page 6)
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The Idaho Recorder. January 23, 1920, Page 2

19200123IR1

19200123IR2J. F. Dodge, Auto Man, Is Dead Of Pneumonia

New York, Jan. 15. — John F. Dodge, the automobile manufacturer, died last night from pneumonia.

Mr. Dodge, with his brother, Horace, came here to attend the automobile show. They were both stricken with influenza, which in each case developed into pneumonia. Horace Dodge is said by physicians to be out of danger.

Mr. Dodge died at the hotel where he has been since his arrival here.

The career of Mr. Dodge paralleled in many ways that of a majority of Michigan’s leading automobile makers. It began in a small machine shop, included many struggles against poverty and failure and in its close found him one of the motor kings of the world, with a fortune estimated at up wards of $50,000,000.
— —

Cider Is Now Under Ban Of Prohibition

Washington, Jan. 15. — In one of the broadest constructions yet placed on provisions of the act for enforcement of constitutional prohibition, Prohibition Commissioner Kramer has ruled that fruit juices and ciders come within the dry ban if they contain more than one-half of one percent alcohol. The commissioner’s interpretation of the law was set forth yesterday in a memorandum charging prohibition directors and inspectors with the added duty of examining the alcoholic content of such beverages.

The drastic regulation goes into effect with constitutional prohibition on January 16. Violations of it carries the same penalties as for the manufacture of sale of stronger liquors.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 23 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
——————

Further Reading

Influenza in Idaho

How the World’s Deadliest Pandemic Shaped the Gem State

Idaho State University Students, Idaho History, Summer 2020June 25, 2020

HowToPreventInfluenza

The local experiences of a global pandemic, 1918-1920

Historical memory is often jogged by anniversaries or by perceptions of shared experience with the past. The influenza pandemic of 1918-1920 grabs our attention now for both reasons. We in 2020 are drawn to the centennial of this massive wave of a novel H1N1 virus that took the lives of an estimated 100 million people worldwide. And we in 2020, engulfed in a destabilizing first wave of a novel coronavirus, eagerly look to a century ago for lessons and parallels. The purpose of this project is to examine the experiences and responses of people in various Idaho communities to the pandemic of “Spanish Influenza.” As part of our course on Idaho history, this is an effort to understand the complex interactions between communities of this region and broader influences of a shared global history.

Local and state history has too often been viewed in isolation. Earlier studies of Idaho history dive into details on the personalities and events within the state, paying little attention to the national and global contexts. Scholars focusing on regional history at Idaho State University have long promoted a broader perspective, emphasizing the dynamic and complex interactions that Idaho (or any part of the world) has with powerful, global forces of change. Examining the global helps us to understand the patterns and significance of our local heritage. Equally so, studying the local experiences and responses helps us to put faces to the range of human experiences in the vast sweep of global events.

The following 15 articles examine the local context of the influenza pandemic, each on a different community, each using available digital sources from the time. They were written by students in the HIST 4423/5523 Idaho History course, summer semester 2020. A list of suggested readings follows the last article. Any questions or suggestions may be sent to Professor Kevin Marsh, marskevi@isu.edu.

continued: w/15 stories
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Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)