Monthly Archives: September 2021

Road Reports Sept 29, 2021

Snow is possible in higher elevations – may not last long.

Please share road reports. Most back country roads have not been graded this season and are rough. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: Recent rain has settled the dust and water in pot holes. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting Wednesday, Sept. 8, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
Project link:
Donnelly to Deinhard Project: Construction on Highway 55 between Donnelly and McCall. This is a much-needed project to repair potholes and cracks in the roadway and will include placing a new layer of pavement on the highway for smoother driving conditions.
What to expect:
* Idaho 55 will be reduced to one lane with pilot cars midweek (Monday – Thursday)
* All lanes will be open on weekends (Friday – Sunday)
* Roadway surface will be uneven for several weeks
* Speed limit will be reduced and 12-foot restrictions will be in place
* Construction is expected to be complete in September.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report of snow on Big Creek summit Tuesday (Sept 28) and in the Scott Valley area.  Just a skiff remained on Wednesday (Sept 29.)
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Sept 29) road is in good shape.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Sept 29) the road is in good shape and dust abated.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Sept 29) just a skiff up high that will melt today. Road is still in good shape.
Report Tuesday (Sept 28) snowing on upper Johnson Creek, not much on Warm Lake summit.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened June 7
No current report. Watch for ATV and UTV traffic.
Possibly some snow Sept 28th.
Last report Wednesday (Aug 18) “Zena bridge is finished and looks great! Road is very rough. I would not recommend taking a car or camp trailer over.” – JB
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Opened June 13
No current report.
Possible snow above 6500′ Sept 28th.
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Profile has seriously rocky sections that are washing out worse than usual. Some are sharp. Carry a saw whether its windy or not — roots of beetle kill trees are now quite rotten and fall easily.” – CP
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Quartz Creek
No current report.
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Cleared Quartz Creek of trees last weekend.” – SA

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open, travel at your own risk.
Possible snow above 6500′
Report Saturday (Sept 18) the wind storm put trees down across the road just past the trailhead to Roosevelt. Trees have been cut out.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open. Travel at your own risk.
No current report. Possible snow above 6500′
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Opened June 9
No current report. Possible snow above 6500′
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Opened by May 27
No current report.

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Sept 26, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 26, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Stage 1 Fire Restrictions rescinded Sept 17th

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit season
May 15 – Firewood Season, permits at The Corner
May 25 – Johnson Creek road fully open
June 7 – Lick Creek road open
June 13 – Profile road open
Sept 17 – Stage 1 Fire Restrictions Rescinded
Sept 30 – Planned Phone/Internet Outage
Oct 5 – Diamond Fall Fuel Delivery
Oct 28 – The Corner closing for the season
Oct 31 – Halloween
Nov 7 – Time Change – Fall back 1 hour
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Planned Phone/Internet Outage Sept 30th

MTE called to let us know they need to replace some equipment and that will entail taking our phones and internet down on September 30th “during daylight hours.” They apologize for the inconvenience.
— — — —

October 5th Diamond Fuel and Feed Fall Delivery

We are planning our fall fuel haul into Yellow Pine for Tuesday, October 5th. Please call or email us so we can add you to the list.
Diamond Fuel and Feed Team
diamondfuel.feed@gmail.com
(208) 382-4430
———

Village News:

Unplanned Power Outage Saturday

Saturday, Sept. 25th, the power went off at 225pm. Idaho Power recording said that approximately 221 customers affected, cause unknown. Eventually the recording was updated with an estimated restoral time of 838pm. In the mean time, locals fired up generators. The lights came back on at 820pm, but were dim for a little while.

The land line telephone service was a bit spotty during the afternoon.
— — — —

Covid in the Community

Covid has hit Yellow Pine and due to exposure though minimal by yours truly the Tavern will be closed until Thursday September 23rd. Per advise from Cascade Medical I should be clear by then. Thanks for your support and patience, Lorinne

The Yellow Pine Tavern Reopened Sept 23rd.
— — — —

Corner Bar

Hi Friends – As the season comes to an end, we are starting to dwindle our inventory. To ensure our stock is fresh and kept to our standards, we will only be taking reservations until the end of our season (October 28). To make arrangements, please call The Corner at 208-633-3325 or call/text Hailey Harris at 970-275-7336. Thank you for a great summer!
— — — —

Jim Adkins

A good turnout for Jim Adkins’ “retirement” potluck Saturday, Sept 18th, at the Yellow Pine Tavern.

20210918AdkinsPotluck-a
(photo courtesy YP Tavern)
— — — —

UTV Rally Sept 18th

Great turn out. Wonderful stories and history thanks to Sandy McRae. Terrific food. Even cutting out downed trees was part of the adventures. Was great to meet so many of the Emmett Rough Riders group.

20210918UTVRally-a
photo courtesy DF
— — — —

Flu Shots Sept 18th at the YP Tavern

About 14 folks received their fall flu shots at the potluck. Thanks Cascade Medical Center and Ann.

More Flu Shots on Sept 25th at Alpine Village

20210925FluShotsAlpineVillage-a
— — — —

Annual Fish Fry Sept 25th

On Saturday, Sept. 25th the annual Fish Fry was held at Alpine Village.
— — — —

Not an Explosion

20210923Contrail-a

Actually just a contrail… not an explosion. I wanted a picture of the contrail in the blue sky and the sun photo bombed it. – LI (9/23/2021)
— — — —

YPFD Hose Brigade

A small group worked on reclaiming the fire hoses that got used during the Buck Fire last Summer. Thanks to our Volunteers on the Fire Department.

20210926YPFDHose-a
photo courtesy Yellow Pine Tavern
— — — —

Notice – New Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sundays.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
— — — —

Heating Season

Before firing up the woodstove, clean your chimney – brushes available from the YPFD. And for those with propane or oil furnaces, take the covers off and vacuum out the summer dust before lighting. Put in a clean air filter if your unit has one.
— — — —

Life Flight

It is a very good idea to have Life Flight insurance if you live or recreate in the back country. If you already have Life Flight, consider it as a gift to a loved one.
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are still Open. These roads have not been bladed and are rough. Travel at your own risk.

Hwy 55 projects
Smith’s Ferry area: Starting Tuesday, Sept. 7, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route. Project Website link:
Donnelly to McCall: One lane during the week and two lanes on weekends. Project is slated to last until September.
— — — —

Critters

Be Mountain Lion Aware

Note: A report of a mountain lion hanging around the upper end of the village early summer.

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!

Be Bear, Fox & Coyote Aware

* Do not feed them human food
* Secure your trash
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Bats

While bats are an important part of our ecosystem and most do not carry rabies, CDH offers the following tips to protect yourself and pets:
* Never touch a bat with your bare hands.
* If you have had an encounter with a bat, seek medical attention.
* If you come in contact with a bat, save the bat in a container without touching it and contact your health department to arrange testing for rabies. Whenever possible, the bat should be tested to rule out an exposure to rabies. During regular business hours in Ada, Boise and Elmore Counties, call 208-327-7499 and in Valley County, call 208-634-7194. After business hours in all counties, call 1-800-632-8000.
* Always vaccinate your pets for rabies, including horses. Pets may encounter bats outdoors or in the home.
* Bat-proof your home or cabin by plugging all holes in the siding and maintaining tight-fitting screens on windows. Bats can enter through holes the size of a quarter.

Ticks

* Know where to expect ticks. Many ticks live in grassy, brushy, or wooded areas. When possible, avoid wooded and brushy areas with tall grass and leaf litter. Walk in the center of trails, particularly in spring and summer when ticks feed.
* Wear appropriate clothing. When in tick habitats, wear light-colored, tightly woven long pants and long-sleeve shirt. Tuck your pant legs into socks or boots, and your shirt into your pants. This helps keep ticks on the outside of your clothing where you can spot them more easily.
* Use tick repellent when necessary, and carefully follow instructions on the label. Apply an EPA-registered repellent effective against ticks, such as those containing DEET to clothes and exposed skin, and permethrin to clothes and gear. Take care when applying repellent on children. EPA’s search tool can help you find the repellent that best suits your needs.
* Check clothing, gear, and pets after being areas with ticks. Ticks can hitch a ride into your home on clothing and pets, then attach to you or a family member later. Carefully examine coats, camping gear, and daypacks. Don’t forget your dog, see CDC’s where to check your pet for ticks.
* Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming can reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease and may be effective in reducing the risk of other tick-borne disease. Showering can wash off unattached ticks and it is a good opportunity to do a tick check.
* Check your body, your child and pets thoroughly for ticks. Carefully inspect areas in and around the hair, head, neck, ears, under arms, inside the belly button, around the waist, between the legs, and behind the knees. Ticks can be very small before they feed—look for what may appear like a new freckle or speck of dirt. Continue checking for two to three days after returning from areas with ticks.

Mosquitoes – West Nile

* Remove standing water
* Wear long sleeves and pants during morning/evening hours
* Use a good repellent with DEET (our bugs laugh at “backyard” formulas.
* Vaccinate your horses and mules! West Nile can be fatal to equines.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

Starting Aug. 29, USPS will raise prices of first-class postage stamps to 58 cents from 55 cents.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Saturday (Sept 4) The dumpsters are being emptied on Wednesdays.

Report Saturday (Sept 25) the dumpsters were about 1/10th full and area is clean, the burn pile is tall and tidy. Road from YP to the dump is in good shape.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water. No outside watering after 2pm, nor on holiday weekends and especially not during the festival.

July 25, 2021 Update:

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association Board asks that individuals refrain from using domestic water to dampen the road. The Water Corporation is doing its best to provide water for domestic use during the low water period but as the supply becomes more limited, it is incumbent upon each of us to be judicious with its use. Thank you for your cooperation in ensuring that all community members have an adequate supply of water.

The corporation has received the first $150k grant of the anticipated $450k. We are hoping to have some of the supply lines replaced by winter. Thanks to those who wrote letters of support. They were very beneficial in securing the grants. – Willie Sullivan

Sept 10, 2021 Update

DRINKING WATER WARNING
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059
BOIL WATER ADVISORY
Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST. Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted.
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 180 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059 . Date distributed: 9-10-21.

YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 at the Community Hall at 10am
Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes.rtf

YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting held July 5, 2020 at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
— — — —

VYPA News:

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall (no minutes yet)
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Hailey Harris, Secretary
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
— — — —

YPFD News:

Remember to clean your chimney before lighting that first fall fire, and check the fittings. Chimney brushes are available to borrow from the YPFD.

Elections for Commissioners for both District 2 and 3 will be held in November 2021.

Sept 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting (no minutes yet.)
August 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss upcoming election (no minutes yet.)
July 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
June 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:

Sept 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

2021 Meeting schedule for the YPFD. All meetings are at the YPFD Station
Sat. May 15 at 10am
Sat. June 12 at 10am
Sat. July 10 at 10am
Sat. September 11 at 10am Budget Meeting

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by a escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021.pdf

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Lorinne Munn
Deputy Fire Chief: Merrill Saleen
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Phil Jensen – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Nikki Saleen
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
As the season comes to an end, we are starting to dwindle our inventory. To ensure our stock is fresh and kept to our standards, we will only be taking reservations until the end of our season (October 28). To make arrangements, please call The Corner at 208-633-3325 or call/text Hailey Harris at 970-275-7336. Thank you for a great summer!
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Open daily: 8am to 9pm
Sunday 8am to 2pm
Indoor Dining and Outdoor Dining Available.
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Opened June 12th for Summer
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
Store hours: 10am to 5pm, Monday – Sunday. Gas and Diesel now available. The Liquor Store is now reinstated. Now Selling Black Rifle Coffee.
The store is stocked with basic convenience store items such as food, fuel, liquor, beer, wine, tobacco, ice, non alcoholic beverages, snacks, ice cream. New Yellow Pine branded shirts, hats and koozies have arrived. We are going through the process of installing a propane dispenser and bottle exchange service.
For any particular store item requests, please call 208-633-3300 or Email
For room reservations, please call 208-633-3300 or Email for reservations
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Our Elk & Deer hunts are booked for our 2021 season, we do have a couple openings for our 2022 Elk & Deer hunts. We Also have a couple openings for Mountain Lion hunts December 2021 through February 2022 and Spring Bear hunts May of 2022. Please see our Website site for further details.
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:

Garden Mountain Contractors
We would like to extend our services into the Yellow pine area if there may be a need. We dig a lot of dirt! If you need this give us a shout on our FB page below. – Larry Williamson
Garden Valley, Idaho FB Page:
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Sept 20) overnight low of 35 degrees. Sunday’s rain total = 0.10″. This morning overcast, top of VanMeter fogged in for a while and good air quality. Jays and hairy woodpeckers visiting. Bits of blue sky, cool and breezy at lunch time. Cool, cloudy, slight breeze and good air mid-afternoon, high of 62 degrees. Mild and mostly clear at sunset, good air. Clear and bright full moon up after 11pm.

Tuesday (Sept 21) overnight low of 28 degrees. This morning clear sky, good air and heavy frost melting as the sun hits it. Robin calling, a pine squirrel and jays visiting. Sunny, clear and light breeze at lunch time. Warm, light breeze, mostly high thin haze and good air mid-afternoon, high of 76 degrees. Clear beautiful evening, and great air quality. Looked clear at 11pm, bright moon.

Wednesday (Sept 22) 24 hour low of 33 degrees from Tuesday’s reset. This morning mostly high thin hazy clouds and good air quality. Streets are drying out with increasing traffic. Jays and hairy woodpeckers visiting. Mostly hazy sky, warm and good air at lunch time. Mail truck made it in on time. Mostly cloudy, mild temperatures and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 78 degrees. Broken overcast before sunset. A short breezy shower of rain after dark, enough to dampen things. Partly clear before midnight, bright moon.

Thursday (Sept 23) overnight low of 35 degrees. Wednesday evening’s rain barely made a trace in the rain gauge. This morning mostly hazy sky and roofs wet with dew. Jays calling. A few patches of blue sky and light breezes at lunch time. Warm, mostly clear and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 74 degrees. Jays, pine squirrel, a chipmunk, grasshoppers and dragonflies were afternoon visitors. Clear, pleasant and nearly calm just before sunset. Looked clear before midnight, bright moon.

Friday (Sept 24) overnight low of 32 degrees. This morning clear sky and good air quality. Quite a bit of morning air traffic, light street traffic and a little dust. Jays calling. Ed Staub truck delivering propane. Clear and good air at lunch time. Idaho Power crew inspecting power poles, drilling and adding a preservative. Quite warm, clear and sunny and very light breeze mid-afternoon, high of 82 degrees. Warm and clear before sunset. Seems like a light haze of smoke in the air right after sunset. Bright moon before midnight.

Saturday (Sept 25) 24 hour low of 37 degrees from Friday’s reset. This morning clear sky and good air quality. Jays and chipmunks visiting. Clear and warm at lunch time. Power out at 225pm, approx 221 customers affected, cause unknown. Increasing street traffic, dust and haze. Very warm mid-afternoon, light breezes, clear sky and hazy poor air quality, high of 86 degrees. Local pine squirrel and jays visiting. Sound of generators running and increased street traffic this afternoon. Cooling off before sunset, clear and hazy (can smell the dust.) Power back on at 820pm. Bright moon above the ridge quite a ways north of Golden Gate peak before midnight.

Sunday (Sept 26) overnight low of 37 degrees. This morning clear sky above light haze (Yellow AQ.) Jays, a robin, male hairy woodpecker and chipmunks visiting. Hazy and clouds building to the south after lunch time. Low flying helicopter at 126pm. Breezy early afternoon. Mountain Larch (Tamarack) are getting some color, some aspens are more yellow than green, and bushes turning color as well. Quite warm mid-afternoon, gusty breezes, one big patch of thin high clouds in a mostly clear sky and light haze of smoke, high of 83 degrees. Warm and about half clear and half cloudy sky (high wispies) haze of smoke and much calmer before sunset.
————–

Idaho News:

St. Luke’s McCall sets record for COVID-19 cases in month

Hospital sends staffers to Boise to aid care efforts

By Tom Grote for The Star-News September 23, 2021

St. Luke’s McCall has broken its previous record for new COVID-19 cases in a month, the hospital reported this week.

The hospital reported 210 positive cases in September through Monday, exceeding the previous high of 188 cases in all of December 2020.

Cascade Medical Center reported 47 new cases so far in September, less than the 63 cases reported in August, which were the most new cases recorded in one month by the hospital.

Youths age 17 and younger made up the greatest number of McCall residents to test positive at all St. Luke’s Health System testing locations in September, the hospital reported.

That group accounted for 36% of new cases among McCall residents during the month, followed by age 40 to 49 (19%), ages 30 to 39 (17%) and ages 50 to 69 (16%).

St. Luke’s McCall has suspended all elective surgeries in order to send staffers to St. Luke’s hospitals in Boise and Meridian to aid in treating those seriously ill with COVID-19.

“We are seeing more COVID-19 patients who are much sicker and require transfer to our facilities in the Treasure Valley and even Twin Falls, than the last winter surge,” said Amber Green, St. Luke’s McCall chief operating officer and chief nursing officer.

A total of 92 new cases of COVID-19 were reported in the past week by the two hospitals. That compares to 119 new cases reported the previous week and 67 new cases the prior week.

St. Luke’s McCall reported 77 new cases in the last week, while Cascade Medical Center reported 15 new cases.

The two hospitals have reported a total of 1,329 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic arrived in Valley County in March 2020.

Vaccines Offered

St. Luke’s McCall offers walk-in COVID-19 vaccines from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at St. Luke’s Clinics – Payette Lakes Family Medicine, 211 Forest Street, McCall.

Appointments also can be scheduled online through St. Luke’s myChart or calling 208-381-9500 or by calling 208-634-2225.

Cascade Medical Center offers a walk-in vaccination clinic from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.

The Moderna vaccine, approved for age 18 and older, is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays. The Pfizer vaccine, approved for age 12 and older, is available on Wednesdays.

Booster shots for those with compromised immune systems are available through a person’s primary physician. Booster shots for the rest of the community were not available this week at the Cascade hospital.

Booster shots are available through Payette Lakes Clinic to those who are immunocompromized, by appointment. Patients need to schedule through MyChart.

full story: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — —

COVID-19 Updates: 1,646 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 34 new deaths

Sept 24, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 1,646 new COVID-19 cases and 34 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 249,740.

The state said 867,498 people have received the vaccine, and 1,580,299 total doses have been administered. 776,792 people are fully vaccinated.

The state said 37 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 10,925, and 12 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 1,825.

5,605 vaccine breakthrough cases have been reported.

34 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 2,753.

full story: [Valley County 1240 cases, 6 deaths]
— — — — — — — — — —

St. Luke’s hospital in McCall defaced with swastikas

“It is very troubling, to say the least, to have such a hateful act occur on our campus.”

Katie Terhune September 20, 2021 KTVB

Police are investigating after someone spray painted multiple swastikas outside of St. Luke’s McCall Medical Center over the weekend.

According to hospital spokeswoman Laura Crawford, the vandalism happened sometime Saturday night or early Sunday morning. The swastikas were scrawled on three outdoor signs at the hospital in orange paint, she said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

WICAP to close Cascade office, go mobile

Services to low-income families to continue

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 23, 2021

WICAP Community Collaborative will close its Valley County office in Cascade in December but will continue to provide services to low-income families in the county, a WICAP spokesperson said.

The Valley County WICAP office has been housed rent-free in a county-owned building at 110 W. Pine St. in Cascade that also houses the program’s thrift store.

The thrift store will close, but people who need clothing can call WICAP staffers who will seek help, WICAP communications and marketing specialist Brenda Davis said.

“We are going to become more mobile and more visible in the entire Valley County area,” Davis said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Johanna Defoort appointed as new Valley County treasurer

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 23, 2021

Johanna Defoort was sworn in as the new Valley County Treasurer on Monday.

Defoort will serve the remainder of the term of former treasurer Gabe Stayton, who resigned in August for personal reasons.

Defoort, 33, has worked as an accountant for Perpetua Resources for the past seven years.

“I have a passion for both accounting and public service,” she said.

“While I loved my job at Perpetua, this was an opportunity that I could not pass up,” Defoort said. “I look forward to using my experience at the county and getting to know the operations there.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Report: Plane that crashed was flying too low

Wilderness wreck killed 2 passengers, injured pilot

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News September 23, 2021

A single-engine airplane crash that killed two people east of McCall last month was the result of the airplane flying too low in a drainage near Mormon Mountain, according to preliminary findings by the National Transportation Safety Board

Passengers James Robert Atkins, 56, of McCall and Donald Scott MacRae, 62, of Las Vegas, were killed after the airplane crashed into a mountainside in the Frank Church – River of No Return Wilderness on Aug. 28.

Seriously injured was pilot Bryan Grey, who works for McCall Aviation, which owned the plane.

continued:
—————

History:

COVID has killed about as many Americans as the 1918-19 flu

by Carla K. Johnson AP Medical Writer Monday, September 20th 2021 CBS2


File – In this November 1918 photo made available by the Library of Congress, a nurse takes the pulse of a patient in the influenza ward of the Walter Reed hospital in Washington. (Harris & Ewing/Library of Congress via AP, File)

COVID-19 has now killed about as many Americans as the 1918-19 Spanish flu pandemic did — approximately 675,000. And like the worldwide scourge of a century ago, the coronavirus may never entirely disappear from our midst.

The 1918-19 influenza pandemic killed an estimated 675,000 Americans in a U.S. population one-third the size of what it is today. It struck down 50 million victims globally at a time when the world had one-quarter as many people as it does now. Global deaths from COVID-19 now stand at more than 4.6 million.

The Spanish flu death toll numbers are rough guesses, given the incomplete records of the era and the poor scientific understanding of what caused the illness. The 675,000 figure comes from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In many ways, the 1918-19 flu — which was wrongly named Spanish flu because it first received widespread news coverage in Spain — was worse.

Spread by the mobility of World War I, it killed young, healthy adults in vast numbers. No vaccine existed to slow it, and there were no antibiotics to treat secondary bacterial infections. And, of course, the world population was much smaller than it is today.

full story:

Note: To read more about the 1918-1920 pandemic in Idaho, see the Idaho History Page for links to Idaho news clippings 1918-1920.
——————-

Public Lands:

Idaho Land Board denies Trident request to reconsider McCall land exchange proposal

By Anna Azallion Sep 22, 2021 KIVI

The Board of Land Commissioners denied Trident Holdings LLC’s request to reconsider its proposal during a meeting on September 21st, 2021.

Trident Holdings LLC requested for the body that oversees the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL), the Board of Land Commissioners to rescind the Idaho Department of Land’s rejection of its proposed land exchange. Trident also asked the board to hold a contested case hearing.

The board voted unanimously to deny both requests.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

United Payette submits proposal for future of McCall endowment land

By Anna Azallion Sep 23, 2021 KIVI

Another group is pitching a proposal to the Idaho Department of Lands on the future of endowment lands in McCall.

United Payette, a collective of citizens and organizations, announced a proposal Thursday that outlines a plan for the endowment lands located around Payette Lake.

The plan was submitted to IDL Wednesday and suggests short-term and long-term solutions for the land, focused on conservation.

continued:
—————–

Fire Season:

Shy Bear Fire

September 21, 2021 Payette NF (via FB)

Firefighters have responded to a 1/2 acre fire in Bear Basin just west of McCall. The fire is actively burning, but the potential for fire spread is low. Engines, ground based firefighter and a helicopter are working the fire. Additional information will be posted as it becomes available.

Update 820pm: Firefighters have constructed a containment line around the fire and are conducting mop-up operations now and throughout the night. No additional growth to the fire as it has been held at 1/2 acre.

Update 745am Wednesday, September 22: No additional growth of the Shy Bear Fire took place over night. Firefighters worked on holding and mopping up the fire throughout the night. The fire is contained and expected to be declared as controlled later today.

Payette National Forest Fire Information Hotline: 208-634-0820.
— — — — — — — — — —

2021 Payette Wilderness Fires
Three fires are burning in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Payette National Forest. The Club, Rush Creek, and Vinegar fires were started by lightning on July 15, 2021. A Type 3 Incident Management Team took over the fires on July 19th. A closure order for trails has been put in place in and around these fires for public and firefighter safety to prevent any interference with suppression and response operations.
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — —

Boundary Fire
Salmon-Challis National Forest
The lightning-caused Boundary Fire ~2 miles W of Boundary Creek Boat Launch was detected on August 10.
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders

Lowman Ranger District has temporarily closed the roads and area near Fir Creek Campground and the Blue Bunch Trailhead

9-21-2021

The Lowman RD of the Boise National Forest has temporarily closed access to all public entry to roads and area near Fir Creek Campground and the Blue Bunch Trailhead due to a wildfire.

The purpose of the closure is to provide public health and safety during the potential growth of the Boundary Fire. The emergency closure was ordered as the result of the Boundary Fire’s spread over a fire management action point. The adjacent portion of the Frank Church-River of No Return is also closed due to the Boundary Fire (Salmon Challis National Forest Closure Order Number: 04-13-21-015)

This Order will be in effect from September 21, 2021 and shall remain in effect until October 31, 2021, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-05-88)

source w/more info:

Boundary Fire 57% contained

Sept 24, 2021 Local News 8

The Salmon-Challis National Forest Boundary Fire Emergency Area, Road and Trail Closure Order #04-13-21-015 has been reduced in size to exclude the southwest portion of the Wilderness.

The lightning caused fire that began on August 10 has burned 79,856 acres and is 57% contained.

A point protection strategy is being applied to the Boundary Creek Fire, which is burning in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. Firefighter and public safety remain the number one priority.

continued:
— — — —

Dixie Fire

Sept 23, 2021 Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests (via FB)

The existing area closure in place for public safety due to the Dixie Fire on the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests’ Red River Ranger District has been updated. Forest Service Road #222 is now OPEN between Dixie Guard Station and Mackay Bar.

For full details of the updated closure order, please see the map below and view the closure order document online at (link)

For questions, please contact the Elk City Ranger Station at (208) 842-2245.

Map
20210925BoundaryClosureMap
— — — —

Mud Lick, Haynes, and Iron Fires
Salmon-Challis National Forest
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — — — — — — — —

Some useful links:

InciWeb Fire info link:
Air Quality McCall link:
National Fire Heat Map link: (zoom in to our area)

Weather Station at Stibnite

Real Time Lightning Map (zoom to our area)

GOES-West – Satellite Maps: Pacific Northwest
—————–

Critter News:

National retriever trials to draw 1,110 dogs, 300 people to Valley County

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 23, 2021

More than 1,100 dogs and almost 300 handlers from across the country are set to compete for bird hunting certifications in the Master National Retriever Club competition.

The prestigious bird dog event, sanctioned by the American Kennel Club will be hosted at several ranches in Valley County from Sept. 30 through Oct. 10.

The 1,115 dogs participating in the event are tested on their ability to retrieve dead or downed ducks to prove their ability as hunting companions.

The Master National is the largest event of its kind in the country and this year will be the largest field of dogs in the event’s history.

Spectators are not encouraged to attend in order to both reduce the risk of potential COVID-19 spread and to minimize distractions for the dogs, Winch said.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Veterinarians urge vaccination as dog flu cases rise

By KESQ Staff Sep. 24, 2021

It is flu season and not only are humans being advised to get the flu shot, but also our furry friends to protect them from canine influenza.

Kathryn Carlson, the owner of Village Park Animal Hospital, says dogs can get really sick with canine influenza.

“It actually develops into pneumonia,” she said.

The pneumonia can go undetected and eventually land a dog in the emergency room. …

“The most important thing to know is that there is a vaccine that prevents it,” Carlson said.

full story:
— — — —

Can dogs get the flu from humans? Yes, and your cat can too

Kate Barber Insider

Hugs, pats, hanging out. These are all things you do on the regular with your pet. But they’re also exactly what can get your pet sick if you’re fighting off the flu. Unlike the common cold , which cannot be spread from human to canine, the flu virus can jump between species. But just like humans, dogs can get a vaccine that will help prevent them from getting the flu.

Since the flu is mostly spread through the air, your pet can get infected just by being close to you while you’re sick. And it can be especially bad when the flu virus jumps between species because the receiving species generally hasn’t built an immunity to that particular viral strain. Like when the H1N1 flu virus jumped from swine to humans in 2009, sparking the influenza pandemic that killed an estimated 150,000 to 600,000 people, from 2009 to 2010, and a few cats, as well.

Warning signs that your pet might be sick with influenza are similar to human symptoms:

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Hunters shoot charging sow grizzly in Island Park

Sept 23, 2021 Local News 8

On Thursday, Idaho Fish and Game received a report of a sow grizzly bear that charged two elk hunters in the Stamp Meadows area near Island Park.

As the bear charged, one of the hunters deployed bear spray while the other discharged a firearm at close range, mortally wounding the bear.

Neither hunter appeared to be injured during the encounter.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Mule deer buck illegally killed with pellet gun in Pocatello

Sept 22, 2021 Local News 8


Tyler Peterson/Idaho Fish and Game
This mule deer buck was found dead in a residential yard on the 900 block of Bryan Road in Pocatello on Aug 30, 2021. The deer had been illegally killed with a pellet gun.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is seeking information regarding the illegal killing of a mule deer buck in Pocatello.

On the afternoon of Aug. 30, Idaho Fish and Game received a call about a dead deer located on the 900 block of Bryan Road in Pocatello in a residential yard. Fish and Game personnel thought they were responding to the aftermath of a deer/vehicle collision—an event that happens all too often in the Pocatello and Chubbuck communities. However, after further investigation, Fish and Game officers determined the buck had been killed with a pellet gun.

Neighborhood residents had seen the buck, a frequent visitor to the area, alive at 7 a.m. on Sunday, Aug 29. Though officers are not sure when or where the deer was shot, the deer was reported dead at 4:15 p.m. the next day.

continued:
—————-

F&G euthanizes black bear in southeast Boise industrial park compound

By Brian Pearson, Regional Conservation Manager
Friday, September 24, 2021

On the morning of September 18, Idaho Department of Fish and Game officers euthanized a black bear in a southeast Boise industrial park compound between South Federal Way and I-84. The black bear was a subadult male that had been captured and moved from a north-end Boise residential neighborhood 4 months earlier. Despite having been relocated to the mountains 40 miles away, the bear returned to town.

Fish and Game was first notified about the black bear by the Boise Police Department who had responded to multiple public reports of a bear wandering the area in recent days. A responding officer observed the bear entering a fenced industrial yard and contacted Fish and Game. After assessing the circumstances and location, Fish and Game staff determined the appropriate course of action was to euthanize the bear.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

F&G euthanizes black bear in residential north Boise neighborhood

By Brian Pearson, Regional Conservation Manager
Friday, September 24, 2021

On the morning of September 24, Idaho Department of Fish and Game officers dispatched an adult male black bear in a north Boise neighborhood, close to the foothills and near the junction of Hill Road and Lancaster Drive. Fish and Game dispatched the bear due to concerns for public safety.

Fish and Game’s Southwest Regional Office received numerous reports of a black bear wandering the area on Friday morning, and conservation officers and biologists located the bear in a cottonwood tree in the back yard of a Hillway Drive residence.

Fish and Game officials attempted to chemically immobilize the bear. Before the immobilization drug could fully take effect, the bear fell out of the tree and ran downhill toward Hill Road. Officers from Fish and Game and the Boise Police Department dispatched the bear before it could move further into more densely populated residential areas.

This is the second incident involving a bear in Boise in the past week that has resulted in the bear being euthanized.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Area hunters asked to help monitor for CWD and prevent it from entering Idaho

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Friday, September 24, 2021

Big game hunters are asked to help Idaho Fish and Game increase its monitoring efforts for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), a contagious and always-fatal disease that affects mule deer, white-tailed deer, elk, caribou and moose.

CWD has not been detected in Idaho. However, Montana, Utah and Wyoming have confirmed cases of CWD in animals close to the Idaho border. Several states with CWD in their wild deer and elk herds have documented population declines and fewer mature bucks and bulls.

This fall, successful hunters can help get more Idaho big game animals tested for CWD by doing one of the following:

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD) continues to cause deer deaths across the Clearwater Region

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Communications Manager
Tuesday, September 21, 2021

Deer can continue to be infected by EHD for about two weeks or more after the first significant frost.

Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD) continues to cause an increase in the number of deer deaths across the Clearwater Region. Every year, Idaho Fish and Game receives reports of deer potentially infected with EHD in small, isolated outbreaks. Although EHD is a naturally occurring disease in Idaho, this summer’s prolonged hot, dry summer with little rain caused animals to congregate intensifying the occurrence and duration of this year’s EHD outbreak.

As usual water sources become scarce on the landscape, more deer use any water that is available. As deer gather around these water sources, more deer in the population may become exposed to infected biting midges, which spread the disease via bites from the insects. Higher deer concentrations can further exacerbate an outbreak as more deer frequent these watering holes.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Backyard Squirrel Maze 2.0 – The Walnut Heist


————

Seasonal Humor:

Bear911-a

CovidWarNetflix-a
————-

Idaho History Sept 26, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 73

Idaho Newspaper Clippings February 6, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

February 6

The Rathdrum Tribune., February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206RT1

Idaho State News Items

A total of 2488 cases of influenza in Idaho, most of them in the southern part of the state, were reported to the department of public welfare at Boise for the week ended Jan. 31. Eighteen influenza deaths and 16 pneumonia deaths were reported for the same period, a marked increase over the previous week.

Wm. J. Hall, state commissioner of public works, promises the governor that a finished capitol building will be delivered to the state this fall, the legislative halls completely furnished for business.

There are 600 silos in Ada county.
— —

From Over The County

Post Falls

The picture show was closed on account of the flu.

Coeur D’Alene

A few cases of influenza were reported in Coeur d’Alene last week.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Rathdrum Tribune., February 06, 1920, Page 3

Personal Mention

Mrs. H. A. Knox is reported recovering from a severe illness.

Mrs. R. E. Young and children are ill with influenza.

Miss Linda McCoid was able to attend school again last Friday, after two weeks’ illness with pneumonia.

Miles F. Egbers is ill at his home, but expects to be out again in another day or two. Rumors that he had influenza are erroneous.

Jas. H. Wright, who has were from Hauser Lake, Tuesday, reported his family ill with influenza. His daughter, Miss Corinne Wright, a student in the Rathdrum high school, went home to spend Sunday and was unable to return to school this week.
— —

Local Paragraphs

Four cases of influenza were reported in Rathdrum the first of the week, the first appearance of the infection here this year. These cases are confined to one family, and no other cases have been reported up to the time these forms were closed.

Precautions to avoid spreading influenza were urged by Chairman Geo. W. Flemming of the board of village trustees in a brief speech at the Star theater Saturday night, in compliance with a request from the state medical advisor. Persons ill with colds are advised to consult a physician before going out and mingling with others.

The Rathdrum school district received some red fir wood from the Welch place last week, contracted for some time ago by R. E. Young. It cost the district over $8 a cord delivered at the heating plant.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206DSM1

19200206DSM2
Influenza Cases Still Decreasing
Only Five New Cases Reported For Thursday – Lowest Record Yet

Still more encouraging is the report of the influenza situation in Moscow. With only five new cases reported Thursday, the lowest number since the disease began, and many times that number released as cured, the outlook is indeed much brighter.

There was one more death, that of Mrs. Duffey, who was among the first to be stricken with the disease and whose death has been expected for some time. But so far as known all other cases show improvement and it is believed there will be no more deaths from the disease.

Weather conditions are much more favorable. The bright sunshine of Thursday afternoon and the warmer weather Friday replacing the cold damp fog of the previous three days, is welcomed by all.

An encouraging sign is the rapid disappearance of influenza quarantine cards from Moscow homes. A few days ago it seemed, in driving over the city, that almost every third house had a quarantine sign, but these are rapidly disappearing and the patients who have been “holed up” like squirrels during the winter season, are seen on the street, somewhat emaciated, but cheerful and very glad to be out.

Judge and Mrs. W. G. Barge, who had the disease at the same time and were both quite sick, are able to be out and Judge Barge says there is no joke about the “flu” being a disagreeable disease.

Better At Lewiston

Lewiston reports conditions much better than at any time since the epidemic struck that town. There are a number of cases throughout Nez Perce county but in Lewiston few cases are reported and there have been no deaths for several days.

No Deaths At Grangeville

Grangeville reports yesterday as the first day in six in which there were no influenza death in the city. General conditions in Grangeville are reported much improved.

Decreasing At Seattle

Seattle. — Influenza has reached its crest in Seattle and is now on the decline, according to City Health Commissioner H. M. Read, who announced tonight that 168 new cases of influenza had been reported today as compared to 190 yesterday. A total of 1,056 cases had been reported up to tonight, Dr. Read said, with 12 deaths, four of them occurring today. Five deaths have been reported from broncho-pneumonia.

Fewer Spokane New Cases

Spokane. — A marked decrease in the number of new influenza cases were reported here tonight, 134 being the total as against 308 yesterday. There were 106 releases today and four deaths, leaving 1,574 cases prevailing. Cooler, dry weather is given as cause for the decrease.

Three Portland Deaths

Portland. — Three deaths from influenza were reported today to the local board of health, making a total of seven deaths in Portland since the disease first was discovered several weeks ago. Eighty-six new cases were reported today, making the total 520 thus far reported. Fifty cases were released from quarantine yesterday as cured.

300 New at San Francisco

San Francisco. — Three hundred new cases of influenza were reported here today.

Decrease at Chicago

Chicago. — A continued gradual decline in influenza and pneumonia cases was recorded today. New cases of influenza numbered 570; pneumonia, 237. There were 61 deaths from influenza and the same number from pneumonia.

Many in Atlanta

Atlanta Ga. — Five hundred and eight new cases of influenza were reported here today.

Increase at Denver.

Denver, Colo. — Deaths from influenza and pneumonia are daily increasing according to records at the bureau of health. A like condition prevails at the state board of health. Twenty-one deaths occurred here today.

Three Deaths At Pullman

Pullman, Wash. — Three deaths growing out of influenza was the toll of the epidemic at Pullman within the last 24 hours, although the general situation is improving. Baker Wilson Gilbert, prominent farmer, of Johnson; Mrs. Harry Young, wife of a Pullman farmer, and Olphus Howard were the first deaths directly attributable to the influenza epidemic here.

Baker Wilson Gilbert died this morning at 7 o’clock from pneumonia following influenza. He was 33 years of age.

Mrs. Harry Young died from complications due to heart trouble during an attack of pneumonia following influenza. The deceased was 30 years of age and had been afflicted with heart trouble for seven years. She leaves a husband and two children, a boy and a girl. The death occurred last evening.

The first death among the students of the state college was that of Olphus Howard, second year student in the elementary science department and 18-year-old son of Mrs. and Mrs. T. A. Howard of Union Flats. He died last night at the Northwest sanitarium, following pneumonia and influenza. The funeral will take place tomorrow noon, with interment in the South side cemetery. He was a member of the Pullman camp of the Woodmen of the World.
— —

19200206DSM3Schools Open Monday

Moscow schools will open Monday and it is hoped there will be a full attendance of every one who is well. No persons who is not well will be admitted. Nurses will be on hand to make examinations and ascertain if pupils are well enough to attend school. It is urged that all pupils who are not sick attend school, beginning Monday, in order that they may make up for the time lost since the schools closed. This request is made by the school board.
— —

Mrs. Joseph Duffy Joins Her Husband
Woman Loses Brave Fight For Life – Double Funeral To Be Held

Mrs. Joseph L. Duffey, whose husband died more than a week ago after a brief illness with influenza, succumbed to the dread disease Thursday night and the body will be shipped to Centralia where a double funeral will be held Sunday. Mr. Duffey’s body had been shipped to Centralia and the funeral was scheduled for Sunday, but a telegram was sent Friday morning asking that the funeral be postponed until the body of Mrs. Duffey would be sent to be buried with that of her husband and the funeral will be a double one.

The little daughter, Eva, aged 13, is left alone, being the sole survivor of the family of three. Two weeks ago last Sunday Mr. and Mrs. Duffey and daughter took dinner with Mr. and Mrs. R. C. West. Since that time three of the five at the dinner party, Mr. and Mrs. Duffey and Mrs. West, have died and only Mr. West and Eva Duffey are left of the happy diner party, all of whom were in perfect health less than three weeks ago.

Besides her daughter Mrs. Duffey leaves her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Enos Byers, of Troy, four sisters and two brothers. The parents and two of her sisters were with here when the end came.

Mrs. Duffey was 32 years old. For 11 years the family had lived near Orofino but came here last September to send the daughter to school.
— —

Pigeon Brings Accident News

Los Angeles. — One man was killed and 20 were injured, five seriously, yesterday when a heavy truck returning from field maneuvers to the army balloon school at Ross field, near here, overturned on a grade near Mount Wilson. Ambulances with surgeons were rushed to the scene after a carrier pigeon, released from the wreck by a soldier, arrived at Ross field with news of the accident.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 06, 1920, Page 3

City News

Several of the First National bank force have been ill of influenza. F. D. Hawley and Mr. Lenhard have returned to their work after several day’ absence and Mr. Heckathorn and Mr. Reufrew are still confined to their homes but expect to be out in a few days.

Mrs. David Greear returned to her home today at Troy. Her son, Jas. Greear and his family are improving from the attacks of influenza.

Mrs. Andrew Olson of Troy has been in Moscow to care for her daughter, Miss Edith Olson, student at the business college, who has been ill of influenza. Miss Olson is much improved and Mrs. Olson returned to her home today.

Laxative-Aspirin Cold Tablets might keep off the flu. Owl Drug Store [Adv.]
— —

Mrs. Wade Keen’s Mother Dead

Mr. and Mrs. Lafayette Keene have received word of the death of Mrs. Wade Keene’s mother, Mrs. Douglas Hunter, at Spokane. Mr. and Mrs. Hunter, who house is at Peck, Ida., had been visiting four months in Missouri, returning last Saturday to Spokane to visit their daughter, Mrs. Wade Keene. Mr. and Mrs. Hunter were both stricken with influenza, Mrs. Hunter passing away Wednesday evening. The body passed through Moscow today to be taken to Peck for burial. She leaves eight children, all of whom are gown but two, a daughter 11 years of age, and a son of five years. Mr. Hunter is unable to leave Spokane yet. Mrs. Hunter was a sister of Martin Thomas of Juliaetta.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 06, 1920, Page 4

Firemen Are Thanked

Judge W. G. Barge, veteran member of the Moscow fire department, extends his thanks to the firemen for beautiful flowers sent to the Barge home when both Judge and Mrs. Barge were sick with the influenza. “The flowers, certainly brightened the sick room and we feel very grateful to the firemen for their kindness,” said Judge Barge, who is again at his office, looking after business.
— —

D. W. Miller Is Better

Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Patten received a telegram today from their daughter Mrs. D. W. Miller, who is on her way to Chicago, where her husband is ill of influenza, stating that she had heard from Mr. Miller’s father that her husband is getting along nicely and is in no immediate danger.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206KG1

19200206KG2
Flu Still Continues

There are quite a number of influenza cases in Kendrick at this time, a number of new ones having developed since last week. Fortunately, however, none appear to be serious at all. Among the business men Mr. Lutz and Mr. Joday Long are the only ones to date who have had to desist from their labors until they had had their chills and remained in bed the required length of time.

It seems that most of those who have contracted the disease failed to have it last year. The writer is one of those who was passed up last year and it is needless to say that he is knocking wood at every opportunity, crossing his fingers ever time he passes a white horse and making a detour of the block every time a rabbit starts across the road ahead of him, which causes considerable pedestrying [sic] in this bunny infested town.

Fortunately the people of the community are taking the situation calmly and are taking care of themselves as soon as they contract the disease. Both doctors are going day and night to handle their many patients in town and surrounding country.
— —

Closed Schools Monday

By order of the health officer the Kendrick schools were closed Monday for a period of two weeks. This action was taken on account of the prevalence of scarlet fever and influenza in town. Several cases of scarlet fever developed among some of the younger children and it was thought best to take every precaution by forbidding all public gatherings. While neither scarlet fever nor influenza had developed serious cases, as those who were ill were not in a dangerous condition, but was thought best to use precautions before the epidemic had gotten beyond control.
— —

Over The County

Genesee News

While the flu has spread considerably the past week, the situation seems to be well in hand and there is at present no cause for alarm. From its inception here but a few cases have been reported that have taken a serious turn and these are now reported as on the road to recovery.

All public gatherings of whatever nature have been forbidden, and the people have willingly complied with the order. The school has been kept open, but the attendance is very poor. This is due only partly to the flu, as many children are kept at home on account of it being in the family and in many cases they are kept at home as a precaution. Extra care is being taken at the school to have the rooms well ventilated and children who show any symptoms of illness are asked to remain at home. Two of the teachers have been slightly ill, but they are not ill with flu.

Juliaetta Record

A call meeting of the Red Cross was held at the home of Mrs. T. O Green Wednesday. Quite a number of the members were present and the time was occupied in making a supply of pneumonia jackets. Owing to the rapid spread of the flu and the development of pneumonia in some of the more severe cases the Red Cross wants to be prepared to meet the situation and the ladies made a number of the jackets to have them ready for use in case they are needed.

Troy News

The news is rather devoid of local news this week, owing to sickness in our family. The “flu” has had us down this week and it is only through strained efforts that we are getting out this issue. We hope there will be no occasion for such apologies in the future.
— —

Mrs. Frank Thompson

Mrs. Frank Thompson, a pioneer resident of Potlatch ridge, died at her home in Southwick, Sunday evening. Death was caused by influenza and was quite sudden. Her death seems particularly sad on account of the fact that her husband was in a Moscow hospital at the time, where he had undergone an operation, one of his feet having been amputated a few days prior to his wife’s death.

Mrs. and Mrs. Thompson have resided in and around Southwick the greater part of the past twenty-five years, during which time they were engaged in farming.

The funeral service was held at the Methodist church at Southwick last Tuesday.
— —

Mrs. A. D. Hunter

Mrs. A. D. Hunter of Peck, sister of Mrs. Ben Callison and M. V. Thomas, died at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Wade Keen in Spokane, Wednesday night. Death was caused from pneumonia resulting from influenza. [age 48] …
— —

Death of Ellen Emmett

Ellen Emmett, the twelve-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Emmett, died at the White hospital in Lewiston, Sunday morning. She had been taken to the hospital some time ago on account of serious illness and a short time prior to her death contracted influenza which resulted in death.

The funeral service was held on Bear Ridge at the Wild Rose cemetery. No church service could be held because of the influenza epidemic. Rev. Hood had charge of the service.

Ellen Emmett is survived by her father and mother, four sisters and two brothers.

The deepest sympathy has been expressed for the family in their hour of bereavement.
— —

Viola May Nichols

The funeral of Viola May Nichols, age 13, a victim of pneumonia, following influenza, was held Tuesday afternoon at the Merchant chapel at Clarkston and interment took place in the Clarkston cemetery. Rev. N. J. Holm, pastor of the Norwegian Lutheran church had charge of the services.

Viola was the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard H. Nicols, who moved to Clarkston from Texas ridge a few weeks ago. Mrs. Nichols is said to be very ill with pneumonia. …
— —

Influenza Victim at Moscow

John H. Rich, city superintendent of schools at Moscow, died Saturday night from pneumonia resulting from influenza. Mr. Rich was stricken about a week before his death and both he and his wife were taken to a local hospital for treatment. Mr. Rich was about 38 years of age and had been at the head of the Moscow schools for the past three years, having served three years as principal of the high school, prior to that time.
— —

City Fathers Meet

At the regular meeting of the Town Council held at the hall Tuesday night, the general routine of business was transacted. A number of matters concerning the welfare of the town were discussed but no definite action taken. …
— —

19200206KG3
The Flu Patient

At the last meeting of the American Public Health Association men from all parts of the country were present to deal with the “flu” problem in a scientific way. The “I know it is all spirit” was not present, for all were anxious to learn. It was generally conceded that the epidemic as the result of a disease of extreme communicability; furthermore, that it was not possible to tell when a person having the disease ceased to be capable of transmitting it to others.

Our greatest concern at the present moment is closing the door of communication, but for those who have been unfortunate enough to contract the disease the feeding of the patient is of common interest. The patients usually can be classed as follows:

1. Fever patients require – Liquid diet.

2. Normal temperature patients require – Soft diet.

3. Convalescent patients require – Light diet.

Miss Katherin Jensen, Professor of Home Economics, suggests the following foods as typical for each class.

Liquid Diet — Feed 3 hours from 5 a.m. to 11 p.m. Milk (hot or cold), cocoa, milk, chicken broth, egg nog, gruels, beef froth, lemonade, egg lemonade.

Soft Diet 3 meals a day — Light lunch forenoon and afternoon. Cereals (well cooked), toast, butter, milk, eggs soft cooked, poached custards, cream soups, rice, baked potato, cornstarch pudding, baked apple.

Light Diet — Cereals (well cooked), toast, bread, cocoa, tea, coffee, soups, eggs, potato, rice, squash, roast chicken, fresh or stewed fruits, puddings (tapioca, rice, bread.)

For the fever patient it is necessary to give easily digested food in small quantities that there may be no disturbance of digestive or absorptive functions. One cup of any one of the foods named in the liquid diet list is sufficient for one feeding. There is a great tendency also of overfeeding the patient who has been placed on soft diet list (temperature normal).

Typical menu for patient on soft diet:

5:30 a.m. — Cream of wheat, 3/4 cup; top milk, 1/3 cup; toast 1 slice; butter 1 pat; milk cocoa 3/4 cup.

9:45 a.m. — Cream tomato soup, 3/4 cup; crackers 2; toast, one slice; soft cooked egg 1; Brown Betty 1/2 cup; tea, 3/4 cup.

2:45 p.m. — Gruel, 1 cup.

5:30 p.m. — Pea puree, 1/2 cup; baked potato 1; toast, 1 slice; butter, 1 pat; apple tapioca; milk, 1 glass.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. February 06, 1920, Page 8

Gleanings

It is a good idea during the flu and scarlet fever epidemics to be careful not to exaggerate conditions. The first of the week a young lady phoned to a party in the country and stated that the town was alive with scarlet fever. When she hung up a man who overheard the conversation asked how many cases there were in town. She said there were three that she knew of. At present there are four homes quarantined for scarlet fever and the quarantine is being rigidly observed, so there is not very much danger of a serious increase of the epidemic. So far as influenza is concerned it seems to make little difference what precautions are taken. The main thing is to keep in good physical condition so that if you contract the disease you will have it in a light form.

Will Stump of Southwick was reported seriously ill yesterday. He contracted influenza but did not use the proper care while recovering and had a relapse. His mother, who was caring for him, is also quite ill from an attack of the disease. Allen, Will’s brother, arrived from Lewiston Wednesday.

Mr. and Mrs. M. V. Thomas returned from Spokane last week. While there they both had the flu but recovered before returning home.

The funeral of Samuel Sletto, the barber at Troy, was held Tuesday. Mr. Sletto’s death was caused by influenza.

John L. Waide went to Troy the latter part of last week to take charge of the business of the Idaho Bean & Elevator Co., during the absence of Frank Green who was ill with the flu. John had to remain at home this week as his family all contracted the disease.

The public school at Juliaetta was closed the first of the week until the flu situation there shows decided improvement.

The flu in and around Cavendish and Teakean is going the rounds and there are a number of severe cases. Gorden Harris and family have all been taken ill with the disease. Mrs. Ed Choate is just recovering from an attack of pneumonia. All schools and public meetings have been discontinued until further notice. Mrs. Claude King is quite ill from an attack of the disease as are all of the Fred Daniels family.
— —

Big Bear Ridge

The Steele, Taney and Fern Hill schools are closed temporarily on account of the flu epidemic.

Miss Della Wilson has gone to her home in Lewiston to remain until her school will be opened.

Mrs. A. Kleth and children are home from Kendrick until the school reopens there.

Dr. Faust of Deary was called to the Rufus May home Sunday, their little daughter, Gertude, being seriously ill with the flu which had developed into pneumonia.

There are numerous flu cases on this ridge and all are recovering at this writing.

Miss Flora Nelson spent last week in Deary, with her brother Albert who is recovering from a severe attack of the mumps.

Tom Whybark is at the home of his sister, Mrs. George Eacker on Texas ridge, and is recovering from a relapse of the mumps.

Miss Mayme Slind is ill with the mumps.

News items are scare articles of late as people do not venture very far from home.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206CC1

Public School Closed

The public school has been closed the past week owing to illness among a large number of the pupils and teachers. Superintendent Lustie who was taken down last week is again able to be out. In all probability school will again resume next Monday if conditions continue to improve.
— —

19200206CC2
Flu Appears To Be On Decline
Grangeville Has Been Hit Exceptionally Hard

Influenza, the most dangerous and treacherous disease, that has taken the country as a whole in many years, appears to be on a decline in Cottonwood and vicinity at the present time. While Cottonwood is far from being free from the malady most of the cases here have been in a mild form with the exception of perhaps some four or five cases. At the present time in Cottonwood, T. C. Keith, manager of the Cottonwood Mercantile Co., is the only one effected with the disease who is in a critical condition. Mr. Keith has been hovering between life and death for the past four days and it is hoped that he may be able to withstand the attack of the disease. Mrs. Keith, who has been taking care of her husband is also ill with the flu, but in no critical condition.

12 In One Family

The Keuterville section, has not been as fortunate as the Cottonwood section and while there has been but one death there. Mrs. Charles Mader, there are several homes where the entire family are bedfast with the disease. The Foresman family has 12 members of its family in bed and the Mader family some 8 or 9.

County Seat Hit Hard

Grangeville has lost some of its most prominent citizens, the past week from the flu. Among those who died there are: Mrs. Roy Nail, Mrs. Geo. Manning, John Howard, George Stanbery, and Mrs. Henry Kurthuis. The obituary of the deceased are given by the Idaho County Free Press as follows:

Mrs. Addie Alice Nail

The first victim of the present influenza epidemic in Grangeville was Mrs. Addie Alice Nail, wife of Roy E. Nail. Mrs. Nail died Saturday morning in her home, after an illness of but a few days. [age 33] …

Mrs. Ethel Manning

Influenza claimed another victim at 7:15 Sunday morning when Mrs. Ethel Manning, wife of George W. Manning, died in her home in this city, after an illness of ten days’ duration. She was 37 years old. …

John Grant Howard

John Grant Howard, 48 years old, a well-known Camas Prairie rancher, died of influenza-pneumonia, Monday morning in the Alcorn hospital, in Grangeville. Mr. Howard was stricken a week before he died. …

George David Stanbery

George David Stanbery is dead. Big hearted, jovial Dave Stanbery is no more. He has fallen victim to influenza. Death came to him at 2 Tuesday morning in his home in this city, after a brief illness of influenza-pneumonia. [age 49] …

Mrs. Trientje Kurthuis

Mrs. Trientje Kurthuis, wife of Henry Kurthuis, died early Wednesday morning in her home, two miles north of Grangeville. Death was caused by pneumonia following influenza. [age 35] …
— —

Death Of Mrs. Mader

Mrs. Charles Mader, the mother of eight children, died at her home in the Keuterville section Wednesday from pneumonia following influenza. Mrs. Mader, as well as her entire family were down with the flu, and owing to this fact, we have been unable to obtain little of their family history. She was about 45 years of age and is survived by her husband and 8 children. The Mader family are old time pioneers of the Keuterville section. The funeral was conducted from the Catholic church at Keuterville Thursday morning. A. H. Nau supplied the funeral furnishings.
— —

E. Pfennebecker Dead

Elmer Pfennebecker died at the Hotel de France from pneumonia following influenza. He was first stricken with influenza about a week ago and pneumonia developed a few days later. He had been a sufferer from heart trouble for the greater part of the winter.

Mr. Pfennebecker was about 28 years of age and is survived by parents in Iowa, his father now being en route to Lewiston to take charge of the remains. An uncle and cousins reside in the Greencreek section. He was employed in the timber during the summer and fall and had been about Lewiston much of the time during the winter. He was a young man of pleasing personality and had made many friends about the hotel. – Lewiston Tribune.

The remains of the young man were shipped to his old home in Iowa for burial.
— —

Died At Lewiston

W. R. Dixon, a former resident of this section died at Lewiston Tuesday at the home of his son-in-law John Evans, the cause of the death being kidney trouble and influenza. The funeral services were held at Clarkston Wednesday.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. February 06, 1920, Page 2

County Seat News Items

Owing to prevalence of Spanish influenza, Judge Scales has postponed for one week the opening of the February term of district court in Lewis county. Court was scheduled to convene in Nezperce next Monday.

Quite a number of people are absent from their usual places of business this week on account of sickness. Some have contracted the “flu” and others who have slight colds are remaining inside to administer the proper treatment and to avoid contact with the disease while in a receptive mood. A good idea.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. February 06, 1920, Page 6

[Local]

Travel on the Grangeville – Lewiston train has been exceptionally light the past week, due perhaps to the influenza epidemic which is prevailing in various sections of the country.

The Orpheum Theatre was forced to close this week on account of Grangeville and Nezperce having cancelled their pictures during the flu epidemic. As Cottonwood is on the same circuit with the above named towns it was almost prohibitive in a financial way for the Orpheum to continue to run.

Sheriff Wiliam Eller who the first of the week was reported to be critically ill at Grangeville with the flu is reported to be greatly improved and considered to be out of danger at the present writing, which is welcomning [sic] news to his many friends in Cottonwood.

Leo Simon who has been attending an auto school at Spokane for the past three months returned home Saturday evening. Leo intended to remain for about three weeks longer but owing to the fact that he contracted the flu he decided to come home to recuperate. He had a very hard tussle with the malady.

John Rooke departed Saturday morning for Lewiston to act in the capacity of nurse for his brother Will, who while at Lewiston was taken down with the flu and for several days was very sick. Bill is now out of danger and his brother John is now afflicted with the malady. Both gentlemen are now at the St. Joseph hospital.

Miss Leasel Hussman and Miss Beatrice Calhoun, 2 of the Pacific Telephone Co’s operators in this city were called to Grangeville Sunday evening to do relief work at the Grangeville office, the county seat operators all being ill with influenza. Mrs. Bert Schroeder and Miss Hattrup are filing the vacancies of the two regular operators.

Another six weeks must elapse before spring can come to Cottonwood Mr. Groundhog waking lazily Monday from his long sleep, stalked forth to see what he could see. All day long the sun shown forth and the groundhog saw a long, lank, lean shadow and forthwith he scampered back into his hole for another nap.

For prices on chickens see T. Clarke, the junk man.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — — — — — — — —

Hoban’s Cabins, Osburn, Idaho

OsburnFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Recorder. February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206IR1

19200206IR2
Health Officer Reports Total Flu Cases Are 53

Dr. Hanmer, health officer, reports the reappearance of influenza in remote localities of Lemhi county.

Shoup is the worst sufferer, with a total of 32 cases in two families but representing almost the entire population of the community.

Ulysses comes next with 13 cases in six families, while at Northfork there are eight cases in three families.

Dr. Hanmer was summoned to the Pashimaroi valley this morning to meet with Dr. Kirtley, health officer of Custer. The two physicians will act jointly in taking whatever preventative measures may be necessary to protect that community.

[?] … reported that flu has broken out at Patterson.

Dr. Hanmer tells The Recorder that he has already quarantined both Shoup and Ulysses as communities and also as to dwellings where the epidemic is known to exist, while at Northfork the same action has been taken with respect to the dwellings and individual cases.
— —

19200206IR3Ready To Combat Flu Epidemic If It Comes

The historical committee members were hostesses to the Woman’s Club at the home of Mrs. Wm. Osborne, the chairman, on last Thursday afternoon, the regular meeting day. Mrs. Stringfellow, club president, was in the chair for the transaction of business. Miss Laura Shoup of the Red Cross reported plans for taking care of the flu patients in case the epidemic returns to Salmon. The cooperation of the Woman’s club is asked in fitting up an emergency hospital, in supplying bed linens, etc., and volunteer nurses in case the need arises.

… Just fifty ladies enjoyed the hospitality of the afternoon, forty-six of whom were club members, the other four being invited guests. …
— —

A Meteor On Its Way

An illumination in the sky, above the brightness of an arc light, flashed through the heavens last Sunday night. Apparently the light shot downward from the zenith with a tail half as long as the whole space traversed. The same occurrence is reported in the Leadore column of this paper. Nobody has found where it landed if it landed anywhere. But wherever it was going it reached its stopping place in a mightily little space of time.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. February 06, 1920, Page 2

19200206IR4Confiscated Booze Is Needed To Fight Flu
Many Deaths Reported From Chicago – Six Hundred New York Policemen Unable to Work

Chicago, Jan. 29. — Influenza caused 87 deaths in the last 24 hours, the health department announced. New cases of influenza during the same period numbered 1,472 and pneumonia cases 400.

United States District Attorney C. F. Clyne announced last night that an effort will be made today to have hundreds of cases of liquors seized by the government in recent raids distributed to the hospitals for use in fighting the epidemic.

New York. Jan. 29. — Six hundred policemen and between 200 and 300 firemen were unable to report for duty yesterday because of influenza.

Topeka, Kan., Jan. 29. — Seven hundred and seventy-eight new cases of influenza were reported to the state board of health yesterday from all parts of the state, bringing the total so far reported to 2,982. The disease is prevalent in 77 of the 105 counties.

Halifax, N. S., Jan. 29. — Three thousand Chinese coolies bound home from France are being held on board the steamer Minnekahda here until the military authorities and the chief health officers of the port settle their dispute as to whether the illness of some of them is influenza or colds.

Bremerton, Wash., Jan. 29. — Influenza at the Puget sound navy yard has sent 180 men of the battleship division, Pacific fleet, to the hospital during the last few days, it became known yesterday. One death was reported.

Omaha, Jan. 29. — Ninety-seven new cases of influenza were reported at the city health office Tuesday, with 34 yesterday. No additional deaths were reported.

St. Paul, Jan. 29. — One hundred and fifty-two cases of influenza and six deaths were reported to the health department yesterday.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. February 06, 1920, Page 3

Idaho State News

A mild form of influenza has appeared at Lewiston and the authorities are taking precautions to keep the disease checked. No serious cases are reported.

In a week’s work in Madison county, 345 cattle were tested for tuberculosis and no reactors were found.

Idaho and Utah are to be allotted regiments in the regular army, according to information received by the Boise recruiting station.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Oakley Herald. February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206OH1

Locals

Milford Bates, son of E. L. Bates, died at his home in Basin Tuesday, Feb. 3, after a short illness of influenza.

Mrs. W. T. Jack and son Calvin each suffered a relapse and have been quite sick for some time. Calvin was near the point of death for several days but both are now reported to be improving.

Mayor Geo. A. Day experienced a serious illness while in Salt Lake City to attend the Wool Growers meeting last week. After his return home he suffered a slight relapse but is now up and about again.

The Herald force craves the indulgence of its readers this week. The Editor has been ill, and unable to take any part in the editing or publishing of this issue.
— —

Vipont News

By The Kitten

A few bad colds among the people at the mine, but owing to the diligent efforts of Dr. Thorn who generously dispenses pills and painkiller all are on the improved.

All are well at the mill with the exception of Jackson who is suffering with a young case of La Grippe. But Jack says it takes more than La Grippe to kill a marine. We hope so.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Oakley Herald. February 06, 1920, Page 6

Local Mention

L. A. Critchfield and Dr. Neilson have rented the old postoffice building and fitted it up for a flu hospital in case conditions become so critical that patients cannot be cared for in their homes. Quite a number of cases have developed the past week. The quarantine is being rigidly enforced, show houses have been asked to suspend for a time, and every effort is being made to prevent the further spread of the disease.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — — — — — — — —

Montpelier Examiner. February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206ME1

19200206ME2Death Angel Calls At Many Homes
Ten Deaths in the County the Past Week – From One Home the Father and Mother are Both Taken, Leaving Six Children

The Grim Reaper has been exceedingly busy in Bear Lake county during the past week, there having been ten deaths since the last issue of the Examiner. Of these, eight have been caused by the flu or pneumonia resulting from the disease.

The deaths in their order, as near as we have been able to get them are as follows: Mrs. Amos Grimes of Paris, Wilson Blaine of Georgetown; Mrs. Edward Bischoff of Geneva; Stanley, the three-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Shepherd of Paris; Pearl, nine-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Milford Birch; John Williams, Mrs. George A. Sparks, Mrs. John Williams, Ester Schmid and the four-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Gustave Graff. The last six deaths occurred in Montpelier.

Besides these deaths two former residents of Montpelier have died within the past week. They were Mrs. Wm. H. Stanton of Salt Lake, who died last Friday morning from pneumonia. The deceased was formerly Arline Rose, daughter of the late F. W. and Amelia Rose, who were residents of Montpelier for a number of years. She was 28 years of age. She is survived by her husband and one child.

Wednesday afternoon Mrs. Josephine Driver received a telegram announcing the death of Mrs. Chas. Sweet at Hollywood, Cal., where Mr. and Mrs. Sweet and the latter’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hutchins, were spending the winter. Death was caused from pneumonia. The deceased will be remembered by all of the old time citizens of the city and county, as Ethel Hutchins. She came here with her parents when two year of age, and lived here until ten years ago when the family removed to Salt Lake.

She is survived by her parents, one brother, one sister, her husband and one daughter eighteen year old. Her funeral services will be held next Sunday morning and the remains will be buried at Hollywood.

Mrs. Edward Bischoff died at her home in Geneva last Monday morning at 11 o’clock. Death resulted from hemorrhage following child birth. Deceased was the daughter of George and Anna Blechert and was 35 years of age. She had lived in Geneva practically all of her life. Besides her parents, she is survived by her husband, one son and three daughters, including the babe of a few hours for whom she gave her life. Her funeral services were held at the Geneva meeting house yesterday afternoon at 2 o’clock.

Pearl Arline, the nine-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Milford Birch, died at 3 o’clock last Tuesday morning. Last year Pearl was the only member of the family who escaped the influenza. She was taken down with the disease about a week prior to her death, and although she had been very ill for several days, it was thought she had passed the danger period, when the end came unexpectedly, the disease having suddenly affected her heart. She is survived by her parents, two brothers and one sister. Her funeral services were held from the Third ward meeting house this morning at 11 o’clock.

The dreaded flu claimed another victim Monday afternoon in the person of John Williams, who died at the Montpelier hospital after an illness of less than one week.

Another extremely and features in connection with his death was the fact that Mrs. Williams was at the point of death at her home, and four of their six children were also ill with the flu. In less than 48 hours after Mr. Williams’ death, the spirit of Mrs Williams’ took flight to join that of her husband in the Great Beyond.

Mr. Williams was the son of Jacob Williams. He was born at Pittsburgh, Pa., Oct. 26, 1881, but had been a resident of Montpelier since boyhood. He had been in the service of the Short Line at various times, and was working in the car repair department when taken down with his illness. …

Mrs. Williams was 31 years of age last December. She was the daughter of John Jewett, who survives her, together with her step mother, under who casr she was raised. She also leaves one sister, Mrs. George Hunter of this city.

By the death of Mr. and Mrs. Williams six children are made orphans. The oldest are twin boys nine year old and the youngest is only 16 months.

Short funeral services for the husband [and] wife were held at the cemetery yesterday morning at 11 o’clock and the remains were consigned to their final resting place side by side.

Never in the history of Montpelier has a sadder affair occurred. The relatives, and six children none of whom are old enough to fully realize that they have for all time been deprived of the care and love of their father and mother, have the deepest sympathy of the entire community.

Tuesday afternoon another extremely sad death occurred when Mrs. George A. Sparks passed away after a week’s illness with the flu. She was the daughter of Joe Lewis, one of the pioneers of the county and was born at Paris 27 years ago. The family later moved to Dingle. There she grew to woman hood and about ten years ago was married to George A. Sparks. They have resided in this city for the past year.

Besides her husband and four little children, she is survived by her mother, Mrs. Mary Lewis, two brothers and three sisters.

Her funeral services will be held at the Second ward meeting house this afternoon.

Tuesday evening at 8 o’clock Miss Ezda Schmid died at the home of her mother, Mrs. Jake Jensen. Death was caused from pneumonia following the flu. Deceased was a native of Montpelier, having been born here 22 years ago last January. She is survived by her mother, two brothers and two sisters.

Miss Schmid was a very popular young lady and a great many of the young people of the community join with the bereaved mother, sisters and brothers in mourning her early and untimely death.

Her funeral services will be held at the Second ward meeting house this afternoon a 2 o’clock.

William the four-year-old son of Mrs. and Mrs. Gustave Graff, died from pneumonia Wednesday night. Funeral services will be held some time tomorrow.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. February 06, 1920, Page 4

[Editorial Page]

19200206ME3The Flu Situation Is Greatly Improved

The Examiner is please to state that the flu situation in Montpelier is greatly improved. Yesterday only one home was placed under quarantine and ten or more were released. This morning there were only 34 homes under quarantine as compared with 45 a week ago.

The thing for people to do now is to go about their business in the usual way and think and talk about the influenza as little as possible. Be normal and sensible, but take good care of yourself and in another week business will be going along as tho the disease had never struck Montpelier.
— —

Card Of Thanks

We desire to extend more sincere thanks to those who rendered assistance during the illness and after the deaths of our beloved son, daughter and brother. Words can only feebly express the gratitude we feel to all.

Jacob Williams and Family
John Jewett and Family.
— —

Paris

Paris, Feb. 4. — A sad death occurred here Sunday morning when the young wife of Mr. Amos Grimes died after an illness of but a few hours. Mr. and Mrs. Grimes have made many friends during their short residence here, and the sudden death of the young woman came as a distinct shock. The body was taken to Missouri for burial.

Another home was saddened Monday morning, when the three-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin T. Shepherd passed away. The little boy had been suffering from a severe cold and cough for a month and complications which caused his death finally set in. Open air funeral services were held Wednesday at the home. Smith Hoge and Arthur Pendrey were the speakers. Both spoke consolingly to the bereaved family. Music was furnished by Russel Shepherd, Alfred Shepherd, Elva Law, and Veda Low. Bishop Morris D. Low took charge of the services.

Priesthood meetings which were held here last Saturday were largely attended in spite of the influenza scare and bad roads.

All public gatherings have been prohibited here pending further action next Monday. The spread of influenza throughout the valley and the number of cases reported in town have made this action seem imperative. About half a dozen cases are reported in Paris.

The meteor which lit up the valley and fell in Bear Lake last Sunday evening caused much interest and some excitement. Scores of people were interested spectators in the phenomena.
— —

Fielding Academy

Owing to the spread of the influenza, and the Paris order closing all public gatherings, the Academy has been forced to close down at least until Monday. Many students have returned to their homes while many are still in town awaiting further decisions as to the opening of the school again.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Republican. February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206TIR1

19200206TIR2
Maurice Watson Dies of Influenza

Maurice Watson departed this life at the Blackfoot hospital on Wednesday afternoon, February 4, after a brief illness with influenza. He is survived by his wife and a host of friends who have known him from boyhood.

Mr. Watson’s parents came to this locality when he was a child and he has been a resident of the county practically all of the time. He has buried his father, mother and sister here, the mother having passed away only a few months ago.

Arrangements for the funeral have not yet been announced.
— —

19200206TIR3Volunteer Nurses

In a number of influenza cases in Blackfoot and surrounding territory nursing service is needed, and available nurses are asked to list their names with Mrs. George Holbrook at the city hall or with W. B. Goodnough at the Goodnough Cleaning & Tailoring Co. if they desire to volunteer to take cases where help is required.
— —

Musical Postponed

The L. D. S. Glee club which was to have appeared here in the near future has postponed its performance on account of the flu epidemic. The club will probably be heard in March according to W. B. Goodnough.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

American Falls Press. February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206AFP1

19200206AFP2Red Cross Wants Volunteers For Call During Flu Season

Mrs. R. F. Noth, acting for the Power county chapter of the Red Cross, has issued a call for volunteer workers to assist during the influenza epidemic. All who can devote any of their time to helping families or cases in distress are asked to give their names to Mrs. Noth who will call them only when urgently needed. The Red Cross is straining every effort to meet all its obligations during the present situation and will appreciate every form of assistance given.
— —

Back To School Drive Postponed Indefinitely

The visit of E. A Bryan and President Lindley of the University of Idaho, and their party was indefinitely postponed early in the week because of the severity of the influenza epidemic in other cities of the valley. Many towns forbid public meetings and the tour will be conducted at a later date when the situation is more favorable.
— —

19200206AFP3Woman’s Club Suspends During “Flu” Rampage

Mrs. R. E. Austin announced today that the Woman’s club will not meet again until there is less illness in the town. The influenza epidemic has spread to every section of the city and attendance at meetings it is believed will increase the danger from the contagion.
— —

19200206AFP4
Influenza On The Wane

Present indications are that the peak of the influenza epidemic has been passed over. The city schools are operating on a more nearly normal basis and calls for assistance seem to be diminishing daily. It is estimated, however, that there are still 200 cases of “flu” in town with the prospect that it will be several weeks before the epidemic is completely cleared away.

Almost the only exception to the general mildness of the cases thus far, is the case of Mrs. R. L. Ross, wife of Rev. Ross of the Baptist church. She was in a very critical condition yesterday afternoon and had shown no improvement over the day before.

Public meetings scheduled for the southern counties of Idaho have been postponed indefinitely. Rupert, Burley and other towns on the branch lines have cancelled dates making it necessary for the cancellation of other dates from American Falls north.

The city council in regular meeting Tuesday evening declined to take any action that would restrict activity among the schools, the theaters or churches. The danger from public gatherings was not deemed of sufficient importance to warrant any action.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

American Falls Press. February 06, 1920, Page 5

School Notes

by Alvin Reading

The high school play has been postponed owing to the illness of some of those who are to take part in it.

About half of the school has been absent this week owing to the “flu.” None, however, are very serious.
— —

Rockland

Miss Edith Alvord went to American Falls when the school closed and returned after the ban was lifted to resume her work in the school room.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

McCammon State Bank & Investment Co’s Store, McCammon, Idaho

McCammonFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206CT1

Widely Known Youth Answers Final Call

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the Peckam chapel for Bazel Gurwell, one of the well known young men of Caldwell who died Sunday following an attack of pleural pneumonia. The Rev. G. C. Runciman conducted the services. Interment was in Canyon hill.

Mr. Gurwell was born in Gem, Kansas, August 20, 1899. He was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Gurwell who have made their home here for a number of years. Besides his parents, Mr. Gurwell is survived by Mrs. Ellen Brody, Mrs. Nellie Spencer and Mrs. Hazel Swedland, three sisters, all of whom live in Caldwell.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 06, 1920, Page 3

Local And Personal

The local emergency hospital, for which the Palace rooms are being utilized, is almost taxed to capacity with influenza patients. Miss Djupe, county school nurse with the farm bureau organization, has charge of the work being done there. She has issued a call for additional volunteer nurses.

Miss Louise Riddle, county home demonstration agent, is among those who are ill with influenza.

A. E. Oman, assistant county agent is ill with the influenza.

Mrs. Joe Erwin is ill at her home on Chicago street.

Word was received in Caldwell last Tuesday of the death of Mrs. R. C. Pasley of pneumonia following influenza. Mrs. Pasley has been spending some time in Arizona while her husband is in the east on a purchasing trip. They left Caldwell together some time ago, Mrs. Pasley accompanying her husband a portion of the way east before leaving for the south. Mr. Pasley is the local manager of the Golden Rule store.

Mrs. J. L. Streets has been spending some time in the Riverside community caring for members of the McCluskey family, several of whom have been ill.

Several employees of the Commercial bank are ill with influenza.
— —

19200206CT2
County Agent Asks Help To Fight Disease
Farm Bureau Makes Appeal For Nurses To Care For Increasing Number of Cases

Appeal for help in combating the influenza epidemic which is rapidly spreading throughout the county, has been made by the farm bureau for such persons as can aid in caring for victims. No especial training is necessary to volunteer for this work since the plan is not so much to provide expert nursing as it is to see that every person ill with the disease has some sort of care. At present there are many comparatively mild cases of influenza which may not result seriously but it is believed that by giving such patients reasonable care, any possibility of serious effects will be eliminated. It is pointed out that there are many such cases in need of care, even of the simplest kind.

Services of both men and women will be entirely acceptable. Red Cross funds will probably be used to further this work. Those who would be willing to carry on this work are urged to get in touch with the local farm bureau office.

Following is a letter that has been sent from the farm bureau office to all project leaders:

Dear Friend:

The policy of the farm bureau is to render assistance to the farmers within the county. Aid in the case of sickness and want is of a higher order than any heretofore rendered by our organization.

During the present influenza epidemic which is rapidly increasing, entire families are afflicted and are with out assistance in the house or in caring for stock. The spirit of helpfulness within our community which reaches out to those in trouble will do more towards developing the genuine community spirit than years of toil and propaganda.

This letter is being sent to all community project leaders, you should take it upon yourself to see that there are no families in your section suffering from lack of neighborly attention.

Doctors and nurses are badly rushed and the supply of available nurses is getting short. Information as to the names of nurses and where they may be secured will be of value to the farm bureau office in our mission of helpfulness.

The many new families which have moved into our communities and are without friends should be given special care and attention. In case any family is in need of help which can not be supplied by your neighborhood, the farm bureau office will endeavor to see that aid is supplied.

Let us do unto others as we would that they should do unto us and do it first.

Yours for a strong campaign against the common fore.

G. W. Dewey, County Agri. Agent.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 06, 1920, Page 5

Interesting Items from Surrounding Territory

Pleasant Ridge

Mr. George Springer was called to the C. A. Bartch home near Middleton last week to assist in caring for the Burtch family who were all down with influenza.

Basil Gurwell died of pneumonia Sunday night at ten o’clock at the home of his sister, Mrs. Brody in Caldwell after a brief illness. The Gurwell family and relatives have the sympathy of the entire community in their bereavement.

Lake View

Mr. S. R. Tucker has been very ill with influenza but is somewhat better now.

Dr. Montgomery was called out to the H. S. Salisbury home last Saturday.

The Orville Shaw family have all been down with the influenza but are better at this writing.

Marjory Kendall was home from school on account of sickness Tuesday.

Roswell

Miss Bertha Rock was called to Twin Falls last week by the illness of her sister and family.

Supt. W. E. Goodell and Miss Vannie Lister who were ill last week with the epidemic are now able to be back at their school duties.

Mrs. Anna Laude was quite ill early in the week with the influenza.

Lester Green who was seriously ill with influenza and complications is slightly improved.

Miss Rowena Hammond of Boise came Sunday to help care for her sister, Mrs. E. W. Rockwood and family who are all ill with the influenza.

Miss Winnie Fouch who was nursing influenza patients at the Lawrence Wamstead place is now ill with the epidemic.

Mrs. Tom Rooney, who has been seriously ill, is slightly improved.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 06, 1920, Page 7

Wilder

There is much sickness in Wilder and the vicinity from influenza and small pox.

Miss Hazel Foley, the efficient postmistress is confined to her home with the influenza.

Old Time dance which was to have been given on Friday evening was postponed for two weeks.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 06, 1920, Page 10

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Marble Front

Most everyone in this community is suffering from the influenza.

Mrs. J. L. Baker has gone to Wilder to care for her two daughters who are seriously ill at that place.

Roy Livesay have taken a relapse after the influenza and is very ill at this writing.

Miss Luella Painter is nursing in Caldwell this week.

Mrs. A. D. King has gone to Caldwell to help care for the sick.

The entire community was shocked Tuesday to hear of the death of little Archie Lee White, who passed into the great beyond last Monday evening. The remains were laid to rest in the Star cemetery Tuesday. This entire neighborhood extends Mr. and Mrs. Ira white and family their sympathy.

The many friends of Ira Vassar will be sorry to learn that he is still very ill at this writing.

Miss Ethel Bales spent Tuesday evening with Mrs. Emery Bales. The school Miss Bales was teaching at Meridian was dismissed on account of poor attendance only about 50 per cent were present.

Canyon

The influenza seems to be rapidly disappearing from this district. Mr. Houdyshell and family are much improved, Mr. Long and Mr. Grubb are better, and all, so far as heard from are gaining.

This visitation of the dreaded disease brought out many manifestations of the friendly feeling among the neighbors. Carl Hammar made himself especially useful in caring for the Harmon family and the Fitts family. With his own stock to care for his time was completely occupied from six a.m. till eight p.m.

School opened on Monday.

Fairview

There is several cases of influenza in this vicinity now. The Landreth family have it, Mrs. Thompson has had a severe case, one of the Hulbert children went home from school last Friday night sick and there are several cases in lower Dixie.

Mrs. Conklin was in Central Cove the first of the week caring for her daughter Mrs. Vanslyke who has the influenza.

W. W. Vails whole family are down with the influenza, also M. Gales family.

(ibid, page 10)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 06, 1920, Page 11

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Lake Lowell

Mrs. G. C. White went to Boise Sunday morning in response to a message stating that her little brother Roland had died of pneumonia.

There were no services Sunday at the M. E. church on account of so much sickness in the neighborhood.

Lois Coon missed school several days on account of sickness.

Roy Gibbons and family have the influenza.

Harry Coon has been on the sick list the past few days.

Mrs. McAdams is staying at the Arthur Vogt home and caring for the influenza patients.

W. L. Gibbons returned home Saturday from Meridian where he has been helping care for a brother, Mr. Gibbons was called there again on Sunday.

The weeks family are recovering from their recent illness.

Grandma Kimes came over from Boise to help care for her son and family who have been suffering with the influenza.

Maple Grove

We like all other localities are having our full share of sickness. We all will rejoice to see “Old Sol” shine out again with his brightness and his warmth and drive away this fog.

J. H. Chambers’ family are entertaining small pox, influenza and the mumps. Mrs. Chambers has been very sick.

Five of the Northroup family who have been having the influenza are convalescing.

Our hearts were saddened to hear of the death of Mrs. Fillimore due to pneumonia following the influenza. The sympathy of the community is extended to the family.

The Woodhouse home is quite a hospital as all the family are ill. Geo. Smith is helping them.

Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Smith are getting better after both being ill.

Alden Garvin has been confined to his home several days due to sickness.

Lifelet Simpson has been numbered among the sick the past week, but is improving.

The whole Sarratt family are reported as being down sick.

There is a new case of small pox at the S. Hill home.

Has any one seen a census enumerator out our way?

Ten Davis News

There was no Sunday school and church Sunday on account of the sickness on the neighborhood.

George McNicol who has been quite ill with the influenza was well enough to go to Eagle Sunday.

The influenza seems to be about the same in Ten Davis. Mrs. Evans is the only one who is quite sick now. The Iverson family have it, Little Nova Dunn also has it. All the other victims seem to be improved.

School started Monday morning after a weeks vacation on account of the influenza. Several of the children were not able to come back. Miss Miller has the influenza and will not be able to teach this week. Miss Veda Jones from the college is substituting for her.

Mr. Waterman is staying at the F. C. Hertig home this week. La Verne and Winston Miller are not fully over the influenza yet and the Dr. thought it wouldn’t be safe for the teacher to stay there for a week.

Arena Valley

The influenza situation is quite serious here. Almost two-thirds of the families in the valley have had one or more members ill. No pneumonia has developed and it is hoped the epidemic will soon be on the decline. This last week of foggy weather has been very conducive to the influenza.

A number of friends surprised Mr. and Mrs. Blayney Saturday evening at their new home. Owing to so much illness, many were unable to go who wished to do so. A most enjoyable evening was spent by all present.

The literary met Friday evening and the largest crowd of the season enjoyed the program including the debate. The next meeting will be one week from Friday night February 13, if the influenza has flown by then.

Rev. Welch did not preach here Sunday and there was no Sunday school for the first Sunday in more than a year.

(ibid, page 11)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Meridian Times., February 06, 1920, Page 1

19200206MT1

19200206MT2
How To Keep The Flu At A Distance

Copies of a bulletin on “Influenza” are being distributed by the government health bureau. How to guard against influenza? The bulletin says:

“In guarding against disease of all kinds it is important that the body be kept strong and hale to fight off disease germs. This can be done by having a proper proportion of work, play and rest, by keeping the body well clothed, and by eating sufficient, wholesome and properly selected food in connection with diet it is well to remember that milk is one of the best all-around foods obtainable for adults as well as children.

So far as a disease like influenza is concerned health authorities everywhere recognize the close relation between its spread and overcrowded homes. While it is not always possible, especially in times like the present, to avoid such overcrowding, people should consider the health danger and make every effort to reduce the home overcrowding to a minimum. The value of fresh air through open windows can not be over emphasized.

“Where crowding is unavoidable, as in street cars, care should be taken to keep the face so turned as not to inhale directly the air breathed out by another person.

“It is especially important to beware of the person who coughs or sneezes without covering his mouth and nose. It also follows that one should keep out of crowds and stuffy places as much as possible, keep homes, offices, and workshops well aired, spend some time out of doors, each day, walk to work if at all practicable – in short make every possible effort to breathe as much pure air as possible.”

What can you do when you get the flu?

“It is very important that every person who becomes sick with influenza should go home at once and go to bed. This will keep away dangerous complications and will, at the same time keep the person from scattering the disease far and wide. It is highly desirable that no one be permitted to sleep in the same room with the patient. In fact, no one but the nurses should be allowed in the room.”

When death occurs it is usually the result of a complication.

The bulletin states that the highest medical authorities agree that a person who has once had influenza may contract the disease again.
— —

Death Tuesday Of Mrs. John Voorhees

The community was shocked Tuesday morning when they learned that at 4 o’clock Mrs. John Voorhees had passed away. Mrs. Voorhees was a victim of influenza, but it was hoped she would recover. Pneumonia set in and no power on earth could save her. Helen Edith Dunkin was born in Putnam county, Missouri, Jan. 31, 1886. She came to Idaho with her parents in 1904. In 1905 she was united in marriage to John Voorhees, and to this union was born seven children, six living. Her father, one sister, one brother, beside the husband and children already mentioned and a host of friends to mourn her going. She was a mother and helpmeet [sic] in every sense that term implies. The sympathy of the entire community is extended to the bereaved.

Funeral services took place from the M. E. church Wednesday afternoon at 2:30, Rev. C. A. Quinn conducting it. The remains were buried in the local cemetery.
— —

The Meridian Grade Scholars Can Spell!

Despite the prevailing sickness there was a spelling match at the Meridian high school last Friday evening, at which the third, fourth and fifth grades from the grade building participated. …

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 06 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Meridian Times., February 06, 1920, Page 8

Meridian News Notes

Joe Daly is reported ill with pneumonia.

Frank Baldwin has returned from a Boise hospital.

C. F. Arzt was among those on the sick list this week.

Guy Remington is quite ill at a hospital. Report yesterday said he was much improved.

Floyd Adams, grandson of Mrs. Hannah Turner, is very ill with pneumonia.

Wm. Florence of the Shorthorn farm is in the hospital with the influenza.

The ground hog did not see his shadow in Meridian Monday.

(ibid, page 8)
————

Further Reading

1919 Idaho Capitol

1919IdahoStateCapitol-a
By Internet Archive Book Images – Image from page 381 of “What to see in America”; (1919), No restrictions, Wikimedia Commons

Construction of the first portion of the capitol building began in the summer of 1905, fifteen years after statehood, and the architects were John E. Tourtellotte and Charles Hummel. Tourtellotte was a Connecticut native whose career began in Massachusetts and continued when he moved to Boise. Hummel was a German immigrant who partnered with Tourtellotte in 1901. The final cost of the building was just over $2 million; it was completed in 1920. The architects used varied materials to construct the building and their design was inspired by Classical examples. Its sandstone exterior is from the state-owned quarry at nearby Table Rock.

continued: Wikipedia
— —

Idaho Capitol History

In 1905, the Idaho legislature passed the bill authorizing construction of the Capitol Building.

The architects of the Capitol Building were J.E. Tourtellotte and Charles Hummel.

The dome and central parts of the Capitol were built first—from 1905-1912.

The wings (House and Senate chambers) were constructed during 1919 and 1920.

Most of the superstructure is made of sandstone taken from Table Rock (near Boise).

Convicts from the old Idaho Penitentiary were responsible for transporting the 10-ton sandstone blocks from the quarry.

more info: Idaho Department of Administration Capitol Commission
————–

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Report Sept 26, 2021

Please share road reports. Most back country roads have not been graded this season and are rough. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: Local have dried out and dusty again. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting Wednesday, Sept. 8, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
Project link:
Donnelly to Deinhard Project: Construction on Highway 55 between Donnelly and McCall. This is a much-needed project to repair potholes and cracks in the roadway and will include placing a new layer of pavement on the highway for smoother driving conditions.
What to expect:
* Idaho 55 will be reduced to one lane with pilot cars midweek (Monday – Thursday)
* All lanes will be open on weekends (Friday – Sunday)
* Roadway surface will be uneven for several weeks
* Speed limit will be reduced and 12-foot restrictions will be in place
* Construction is expected to be complete in September.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Monday (Sept 20) road is in good shape.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Monday (Sept 20) the road is in good shape and dust abated.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Sept 22) mail truck driver reports the road is in pretty good shape.
Report Saturday (Sept 25) lower Johnson Crk road between YP and the dump is much improved.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened June 7
No current report. Watch for ATV and UTV traffic.
Last report Wednesday (Aug 18) “Zena bridge is finished and looks great! Road is very rough. I would not recommend taking a car or camp trailer over.” – JB
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Opened June 13
No current report.
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Profile has seriously rocky sections that are washing out worse than usual. Some are sharp. Carry a saw whether its windy or not — roots of beetle kill trees are now quite rotten and fall easily.” – CP
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Quartz Creek
No current report.
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Cleared Quartz Creek of trees last weekend.” – SA

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open, travel at your own risk.
Report Saturday (Sept 18) the wind storm put trees down across the road just past the trailhead to Roosevelt. Trees have been cut out.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open. Travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Opened June 9
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Opened by May 27
No current report.

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Weather Reports Sept 19-25, 2021

Sept 19 Weather:

At 945am it was 45 degrees, overcast (patches of fog mid-mountain) and Good air quality. Light sprinkle started around 10am, probably lasted 15 minutes. Overcast and a bit breezy at 1140am. At 245pm it was 47 degrees, dark overcast and sprinkling lightly (not sure when it started) and light breeze. Sprinkles tapered off to drops by 305pm. Dark and sprinkling again at 320pm, steady rain 330pm. Small patch of blue sky at 520pm. At 630pm it was 47 degrees, mostly cloudy and light sprinkles of rain. Not raining at 825pm and 43 degrees. At 1045pm it was mostly cloudy, large bright moon shining in a break in the clouds.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 20, 2021 at 09:30AM
Overcast, light breeze, Green AQ
Max temperature 49 degrees F
Min temperature 35 degrees F
At observation 38 degrees F
Precipitation 0.10 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Sept 20 Weather:

At 930am it was 38 degrees, overcast (top of VanMeter fogged in earlier) light breeze and good air quality. Bits of blue sky, cool and breezy at 12pm. At 230pm it was 60 degrees, mostly cloudy to partly clear and slight breeze. At 650pm it was 54 degrees, mostly clear and good air. Looked clear w/bright moon at 1115pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 21, 2021 at 09:30AM
Clear, frosty, Green AQ
Max temperature 62 degrees F
Min temperature 28 degrees F
At observation 33 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Sept 21 Weather:

At 930am it was 33 degrees, clear sky, good air and heavy frost melting. Sunny and light breeze at 1230pm. At 245pm it was 74 degrees, mostly high thin haze, light breeze and good air. At 630pm it was 69 degrees, clear sky, calm and good air quality. Looked clear at 11pm, bright moon.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 22, 2021 at 09:30AM
Mostly high thin haze, Green AQ
Max temperature 76 degrees F
Min temperature 33 degrees F <– yesterday morning
At observation 40 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Sept 22 Weather:

At 930am it was 40 degrees, mostly high thin haze and good air quality. At 130pm it was 77 degrees, mostly cloudy, light breeze and good air. At 230pm it was 76 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breeze. At 640pm it was 68 degrees and broken overcast. Sprinkling and breezy around 825pm, lasted long enough to make things damp. Partly cloudy/clear at 11pm, bright moon.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 23, 2021 at 09:30AM
Mostly hazy, good air
Max temperature 78 degrees F
Min temperature 35 degrees F
At observation 41 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

Sept 23 Weather:

At 930am it was 41 degrees and mostly hazy. At 1230pm it some blue patches and light breezes. At 3pm it was 71 degrees, mostly clear and light breezes. At 645pm it was 66 degrees, clear sky and nearly calm. At 1130pm it looked clear, bright moon.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 24, 2021 at 09:30AM
Clear, good air
Max temperature 74 degrees F
Min temperature 32 degrees F
At observation 37 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Sept 24 Weather:

At 930am it was 37 degrees, clear sky and good air. At 12pm it was 64 degrees and clear. At 245pm it was 80 degrees, clear and slight breeze. At 645pm it was 71 degrees, clear and good air. At 720pm it was 66 degrees, clear, light haze and calm. At 11pm a bit of haze, bright moon.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 25, 2021 at 09:30AM
Clear, good air
Max temperature 82 degrees F
Min temperature 37 degrees F
At observation 40 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Sept 25 Weather:

At 930am it was 40 degrees, clear sky and good air. Sunny and warm at 1230pm. Power out 225pm. At 230pm it was 85 degrees, clear sky and slight haze (dust?) Light afternoon breezes. At 615pm it was 77 degrees, clear sky and light haze, air quality not so good. At 8pm it was 63 degrees, clear sky, light haze (smells dusty.) Power on at 820pm. Looked clear and bright moon at 1130pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 26, 2021 at 09:30AM
Clear, light haze (Yellow AQ)
Max temperature 86 degrees F
Min temperature 37 degrees F
At observation 40 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
—————————-

Road Reports Sept 22, 2021

Please share road reports. Most back country roads have not been graded this season and are rough. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are starting to dry out again. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting Wednesday, Sept. 8, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
Project link:
Donnelly to Deinhard Project: Construction on Highway 55 between Donnelly and McCall. This is a much-needed project to repair potholes and cracks in the roadway and will include placing a new layer of pavement on the highway for smoother driving conditions.
What to expect:
* Idaho 55 will be reduced to one lane with pilot cars midweek (Monday – Thursday)
* All lanes will be open on weekends (Friday – Sunday)
* Roadway surface will be uneven for several weeks
* Speed limit will be reduced and 12-foot restrictions will be in place
* Construction is expected to be complete in September.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Monday (Sept 20) road is in good shape.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Monday (Sept 20) the road is in good shape.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Sept 22) mail truck driver reports the road is in pretty good shape.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened June 7
No current report. Watch for ATV and UTV traffic.
Last report Wednesday (Aug 18) “Zena bridge is finished and looks great! Road is very rough. I would not recommend taking a car or camp trailer over.” – JB
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Opened June 13
No current report.
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Profile has seriously rocky sections that are washing out worse than usual. Some are sharp. Carry a saw whether its windy or not — roots of beetle kill trees are now quite rotten and fall easily.” – CP
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Quartz Creek
No current report.
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Cleared Quartz Creek of trees last weekend.” – SA

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open, travel at your own risk.
Report Saturday (Sept 18) the wind storm put trees down across the road just past the trailhead to Roosevelt. Trees have been cut out.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open. Travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Opened June 9
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Opened by May 27
No current report.

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Sept 19, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 19, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions rescinded Sept 17th

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit season
May 15 – Firewood Season, permits at The Corner
May 25 – Johnson Creek road fully open
June 7 – Lick Creek road open
June 13 – Profile road open
Sept 17 – Stage 1 Fire Restrictions Rescinded
Oct 31 – Halloween
Nov 7 – Time Change – Fall back 1 hour
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions Rescinded Sept 17

Lifting the restrictions means the public is free to build a campfire, use a charcoal barbecue, or smoke outside of designated campgrounds and recreation sites. However, fire managers would like to remind the public that the accidental start of a wildfire can still be devastating. Be alert and be aware. Follow these tips to help prevent wildfire:

* NEVER leave a campfire unattended.
* Keep water, dirt and a shovel near your fire at all times.
* Make sure your fire is dead out and cold to the touch before you leave it.
* Never use fireworks, exploding targets or tracer rounds on or near public land.
———

Village News:

Busy Labor Day Weekend in Yellow Pine

20210604LaborDay-a
photo courtesy Yellow Pine Tavern
— — — —

Corner Bar

Hi Friends! As the season comes to an end, we are starting to dwindle our inventory. To ensure our stock is fresh and kept to our standards, we will only be taking reservations until the end of our season (October 28). To make arrangements, please call The Corner at 208-633-3325 or call/text Hailey Harris at 970-275-7336. Thank you for a great summer!
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern

Mushroom Steve and Brad did a great job refinishing the porch of the Tavern. After who knows how many years the old porch floor was crumbling and dangerous.

20210915YPTavernPorch-a
photo courtesy YP Tavern Sept 15th
— — — —

ATV-UTV Ride to Thunder Mountain

Was held Saturday, September 18, 9am – 4pm
— — — —

Sept 18th Pot Luck for Jim Adkins

Jim Adkins “retirement” party at the Yellow Pine Tavern.
— — — —

Flu Shots Sept 18th at the YP Tavern

20190918FluShots-a
— — — —

Notice – New Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sundays.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
— — — —

Heating Season

Before firing up the wood stove, clean your chimney – brushes available from the YPFD. And for those with propane or oil furnaces, take the covers off and vacuum out the summer dust before lighting. Put in a clean air filter if your unit has one.
— — — —

Life Flight

It is a very good idea to have Life Flight insurance if you live or recreate in the back country. If you already have Life Flight, consider it as a gift to a loved one.
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are Open. These roads have not been bladed and are rough. Travel at your own risk.

Hwy 55 projects
Smith’s Ferry area: Starting Tuesday, Sept. 7, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route. Project Website link:
Donnelly to McCall: One lane during the week and two lanes on weekends. Project is slated to last until September.
— — — —

Critters

Be Mountain Lion Aware

Note: A report of a mountain lion hanging around the upper end of the village early summer.

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!

Be Bear, Fox & Coyote Aware

* Do not feed them human food
* Secure your trash
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Bats

While bats are an important part of our ecosystem and most do not carry rabies, CDH offers the following tips to protect yourself and pets:
* Never touch a bat with your bare hands.
* If you have had an encounter with a bat, seek medical attention.
* If you come in contact with a bat, save the bat in a container without touching it and contact your health department to arrange testing for rabies. Whenever possible, the bat should be tested to rule out an exposure to rabies. During regular business hours in Ada, Boise and Elmore Counties, call 208-327-7499 and in Valley County, call 208-634-7194. After business hours in all counties, call 1-800-632-8000.
* Always vaccinate your pets for rabies, including horses. Pets may encounter bats outdoors or in the home.
* Bat-proof your home or cabin by plugging all holes in the siding and maintaining tight-fitting screens on windows. Bats can enter through holes the size of a quarter.

Ticks

* Know where to expect ticks. Many ticks live in grassy, brushy, or wooded areas. When possible, avoid wooded and brushy areas with tall grass and leaf litter. Walk in the center of trails, particularly in spring and summer when ticks feed.
* Wear appropriate clothing. When in tick habitats, wear light-colored, tightly woven long pants and long-sleeve shirt. Tuck your pant legs into socks or boots, and your shirt into your pants. This helps keep ticks on the outside of your clothing where you can spot them more easily.
* Use tick repellent when necessary, and carefully follow instructions on the label. Apply an EPA-registered repellent effective against ticks, such as those containing DEET to clothes and exposed skin, and permethrin to clothes and gear. Take care when applying repellent on children. EPA’s search tool can help you find the repellent that best suits your needs.
* Check clothing, gear, and pets after being areas with ticks. Ticks can hitch a ride into your home on clothing and pets, then attach to you or a family member later. Carefully examine coats, camping gear, and daypacks. Don’t forget your dog, see CDC’s where to check your pet for ticks.
* Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming can reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease and may be effective in reducing the risk of other tick-borne disease. Showering can wash off unattached ticks and it is a good opportunity to do a tick check.
* Check your body, your child and pets thoroughly for ticks. Carefully inspect areas in and around the hair, head, neck, ears, under arms, inside the belly button, around the waist, between the legs, and behind the knees. Ticks can be very small before they feed—look for what may appear like a new freckle or speck of dirt. Continue checking for two to three days after returning from areas with ticks.

Mosquitoes – West Nile

* Remove standing water
* Wear long sleeves and pants during morning/evening hours
* Use a good repellent with DEET (our bugs laugh at “backyard” formulas.
* Vaccinate your horses and mules! West Nile can be fatal to equines.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

Starting Aug. 29, USPS will raise prices of first-class postage stamps to 58 cents from 55 cents.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Saturday (Sept 4) The dumpsters are being emptied on Wednesdays.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water. No outside watering after 2pm, nor on holiday weekends and especially not during the festival.

July 25, 2021 Update:

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association Board asks that individuals refrain from using domestic water to dampen the road. The Water Corporation is doing its best to provide water for domestic use during the low water period but as the supply becomes more limited, it is incumbent upon each of us to be judicious with its use. Thank you for your cooperation in ensuring that all community members have an adequate supply of water.

The corporation has received the first $150k grant of the anticipated $450k. We are hoping to have some of the supply lines replaced by winter. Thanks to those who wrote letters of support. They were very beneficial in securing the grants. – Willie Sullivan

Sept 10, 2021 Update

DRINKING WATER WARNING
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059
BOIL WATER ADVISORY
Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST. Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted.
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 180 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059 . Date distributed: 9-10-21.

YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 at the Community Hall at 10am
Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes.rtf

YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting held July 5, 2020 at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
— — — —

VYPA News:

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall (no minutes yet.)
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Hailey Harris, Secretary
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
— — — —

YPFD News:

Remember to clean your chimney before lighting that first fall fire, and check the fittings. Chimney brushes are available to borrow from the YPFD.

Elections for Commissioners for both District 2 and 3 will be held in November 2021.

Sept 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting (no minutes yet.)

August 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss upcoming election (no minutes yet.)

July 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
June 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:

Sept 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

2021 Meeting schedule for the YPFD. All meetings are at the YPFD Station
Sat. May 15 at 10am
Sat. June 12 at 10am
Sat. July 10 at 10am
Sat. September 11 at 10am Budget Meeting

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by a escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021.pdf

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Phil Jensen, Acting – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Tim Rogers – Fire Chief
Secretary – Ronda Rogers
Treasurer – Nikki Saleen
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
As the season comes to an end, we are starting to dwindle our inventory. To ensure our stock is fresh and kept to our standards, we will only be taking reservations until the end of our season (October 28). To make arrangements, please call The Corner at 208-633-3325 or call/text Hailey Harris at 970-275-7336. Thank you for a great summer!
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Open daily: 8am to 9pm
Sunday 8am to 2pm
Indoor Dining and Outdoor Dining Available.
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Opened June 12th for Summer
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
Store hours: 10am to 5pm, Monday – Sunday. Gas and Diesel now available. The Liquor Store is now reinstated. Now Selling Black Rifle Coffee.
The store is stocked with basic convenience store items such as food, fuel, liquor, beer, wine, tobacco, ice, non alcoholic beverages, snacks, ice cream. New Yellow Pine branded shirts, hats and koozies have arrived. We are going through the process of installing a propane dispenser and bottle exchange service.
For any particular store item requests, please call 208-633-3300 or Email
For room reservations, please call 208-633-3300 or Email for reservations
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Our Elk & Deer hunts are booked for our 2021 season, we do have a couple openings for our 2022 Elk & Deer hunts. We Also have a couple openings for Mountain Lion hunts December 2021 through February 2022 and Spring Bear hunts May of 2022. Please see our Website site for further details.
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:

Garden Mountain Contractors
We would like to extend our services into the Yellow pine area if there may be a need. We dig a lot of dirt! If you need this give us a shout on our FB page below. – Larry Williamson
Garden Valley, Idaho FB Page:
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Sept 13) overnight low of 37 degrees. This morning mostly cloudy (high cotton balls) and haze of smoke, Yellow air quality (AQI=59). Jays and flicker calling. Light air and street traffic. Mostly high thin clouds at lunch time and a little breezy. Warm and breezy mid-afternoon, partly cloudy and light haze of smoke, high of 80 degrees. Local aspens starting to turn yellow. Report of a few quail in the village. Clear sky and light breeze before sunset, warm and increasing smoke towards the river. Cooling off after sunset, dark by 830pm. It appeared to be at least mostly clear before midnight.

Tuesday (Sept 14) overnight low estimated at 35 degrees (gizmo error.) This morning clear blue sky and no smoke – but poor air quality from road dust. Jays calling and visiting. Blue sky and light breeze at lunch time. Warm, clear blue sky and light breezes mid-afternoon, no smoke (but traffic on main street kicking up dust clouds), high of 81 degrees. Pine squirrel visiting. Clear and warm before sunset, occasional gusts, no smoke and quite dusty. Appeared to be clear or mostly clear before midnight.

Wednesday (Sept 15) overnight low of 36 degrees. This morning mostly clear (a few small clouds) blue sky and no smoke – clouds of dust from street traffic making air quality rather poor. Jays, a pine squirrel and chipmunks visiting. Warming up, mostly clear, light breeze, no smoke but dusty at lunch time. Warm with gusty breezes and mostly clear sky mid-afternoon, no smoke but a haze of dust in the air, high of 81 degrees. Helicopter flying around at 330pm. Warm, breezy and partly cloudy before sunset, no smoke but there is a light haze of dust in the air. Sunset before 724pm. Mostly cloudy by dusk.

Thursday (Sept 16) overnight low of 34 degrees. This morning clear sky, light chilly breeze, light dew and no smoke – Green air quality. Haze of dust hanging over main street. Early air traffic. Jays, flicker, hairy woodpecker and robin calling and visiting. Sunny and cool at lunch time. Clear, light breeze and slight haze by mid-afternoon, high of 70 degrees. Cool, clear and a bit hazy before sunset. Temperature dropping after dusk. Hazy, maybe some clouds before midnight.

Friday (Sept 17) overnight low of 27 degrees. This morning clear above moderate smoke and poor air quality. Smoky at lunch time, breezy early afternoon. Warming up mid-afternoon, almost clear, haze of smoke and gusty breezes, high of 81 degrees. Strong wind gusts at times late afternoon. Still warm just before sunset, clear sky and haze of smoke, air quality a little better than earlier. Got the impression that it was clear and hazy before midnight.

Saturday (Sept 18) 24 hour low of 36 degrees (from Friday morning.) This morning it is likely clear above moderate smoke and Yellow air quality. A couple early loud air planes and light street traffic. Jays and 2 hairy woodpeckers visiting. Breezy before lunch time and internet connection spotty. Mostly cloudy and windy (gusts estimated up 30+mph) after lunch time. Warm, windy and mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, less smoke and better air quality, high of 79 degrees. Rain started late afternoon, cloudy and light breezes. Internet connection spotty. Much cooler, low overcast and steady light rain before sunset. Rained for approx. 4 hours. Not raining at midnight.

Sunday (Sept 19) overnight low of 43 degrees. Yesterday’s rain = 0.23″. This morning overcast with patches of fog mid-mountain. Short light sprinkle of rain around 10am, enough to wet the roof. Cloudy and breezy before lunch time. Cool, dark overcast and lighter breezes mid-afternoon. Sprinkles and showers on and off during the afternoon, high of 49 degrees. Late afternoon air traffic. Jays and hairy woodpeckers visiting. Light shower before sunset and patches of blue sky.
————–

Idaho News:

Valley hospitals report 119 new COVID-19 cases in past week

By Tom Grote The Star-News September 16, 2021

A total of 119 new cases of COVID-19 were reported in the past week by Valley County’s two hospitals. That compares to 67 new cases reported the previous week and 42 new cases the prior week.

St. Luke’s McCall reported 99 new cases in the last week, while Cascade Medical Center reported 20 new cases, including a record one-day high of seven new cases reported on Monday.

“We don’t test everyone who requests it – if we did, we would see many more positives,” Cascade Medical Center CEO Tom Reinhardt said.

“For example, if a family drives up with symptoms, we test the sickest one,” Reinhardt said. “If that person has COVID, we don’t test the others; no need, they probably all have it.”

In those cases, those known to be exposed to COVID-19 must not leave home for 10 to 14 days, he said.

The two hospitals have reported a total of 167 new cases in September, nearly equaling the 171 new cases reported in all of August.

The two hospitals have reported a total of 1,118 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic arrived in Valley County in March 2020.

St. Luke’s McCall offers walk-in COVID-19 vaccines from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at St. Luke’s Clinics – Payette Lakes Family Medicine, 211 Forest Street, McCall.

Appointments also can be scheduled online through St. Luke’s myChart or calling 208-381-9500 or by calling 208-634-2225.

Cascade Medical Center offers a daily walk-in vaccination clinic Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.

full story:
— — — —

St. Luke’s: Many new COVID-19 cases are kids

93% of new cases are not vaccinated

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News September 16, 2021

School-age children are now being infected with COVID-19 more than any other age group, the McCall City Council was told last week.

Data from COVID-19 tests at St. Luke’s McCall show that the delta variant of the virus is spreading more effectively among children than previous strains of the virus.

“The majority of the positive tests from McCall residents are coming from our age group zero to 17, which is not what we’ve seen previously,” Chief Operating and Nursing Officer Amber Green said.

Hospital Capacity

On Monday, St. Luke’s McCall suspended elective surgeries and procedures in response to a lack of capacity in St. Luke’s hospitals in the Treasure Valley.

That will allow the McCall hospital to send employees to work in Treasure Valley hospitals that are overrun with virus patients and struggling with staffing.

“We’ve had to send patients as far as Twin Falls because we can’t get them into Boise,” Green said.

full story:
— — — —

City of McCall again requires masks in all city buildings

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News September 16, 2021

Masks are again required in all City of McCall buildings in response to the latest surge in COVID-19 cases.

The mask precaution and others were put in place on Monday after being aired to the McCall City Council last week during its regular meeting on Thursday night.

City buildings include McCall City Hall, McCall Public Library, McCall Golf Course clubhouse, McCall Police Department, the city building at the McCall Airport, and buildings housing the city’s public works and parks and recreation departments. Masks will not be required at city parks.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

COVID-19 Updates: 1,730 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 13 new deaths

Sept 17, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 1,730 new COVID-19 cases and 13 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 241,263.

The age group with the most cases is 18-29 with 58,695 cases.

The state said 60 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 10,580, and 10 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 1,757.

13 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 2,613.

full story: [Valley County 1191 cases, 6 deaths)
— — — — — — — — — —

All of Idaho now under Crisis Standards of Care as COVID-19 surges

by KBOI Staff Thursday, September 16th 2021

The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare has activated Crisis Standards of Care across the entire state of Idaho due to the state’s massive influx of COVID-19 patients being hospitalized. The surge, IDHW says, has exhausted existing resources in all areas of Idaho.

Crisis Standards of Care (CSC) was activated in northern Idaho back on September 6. This activation now expands that declaration to the rest of the state.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Counties with highest COVID-19 infection rates in Idaho

September 14, 2021 Local News 8

#20. Valley County, ID
– New cases per 100k in the past week: 421 (48 new cases, +20% change from previous week)
– Cumulative cases per 100k: 10,121 (1,153 total cases)
— 22.7% less cases per 100k residents than Idaho
– Cumulative deaths per 100k: 53 (6 total deaths)
— 61.6% less deaths per 100k residents than Idaho
– Population that is fully vaccinated: 50.3% (5,732 fully vaccinated)
— 25.1% higher vaccination rate than Idaho

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Six vehicles involved in chain-reaction wreck on Idaho 55

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 16, 2021

A McCall woman was cited for driving under the influence after causing a chain reaction accident on Idaho 55 just south of Lake Fork last Thursday, Idaho State Police said.

Laura Larimore, 30, was driving north in a pickup at about 6 p.m. and failed to stop for traffic in a construction zone.

The pickup rear-ended a sedan driven by a 38-year-old Nampa man who was not identified, according to the Idaho State Police.

The collision caused a chain reaction that involved the pickup and five other vehicles.

Three people, including a 30-year-old man in Larimore’s pickup as well as a 42-year-old woman and 30-year-old man from Boise, were transported by ambulance to St. Luke’s McCall, where they were treated and released. Their identities were not released by ISP.

continued:
————

Public Lands:

Preliminary Advertisement Sale of National Forest Timber

The Forest Service intends to advertise timber designated for cutting in the following proposed timber sale area on the Payette National Forest prior to February 1, 2022.

The Big Creek Fuels sale contains 118 acres more or less within the Big Creek/Edwardsburg area. This sale contains an estimated volume of 1,731 hundred cubic feet of timber (CCF) designated for cutting. We estimate that 1,080 CCF is in sawtimber, 23 CCF in post and pole with 627 CCF being firewood. The species composition is 79% lodgepole pine, 14% subalpine fir and 3% each for Engelmann spruce and Douglas-fir. Estimated 14 acres of jammer logging.

This advance notice is to afford interested parties time to examine the sale area prior to winter. Interested parties may obtain information and maps from Jeremy Greenwood (jeremy.greenwood@usda.gov) or 208-347-0315. The final advertisement will contain final minimum stumpage rates, bidding provisions and other sale conditions.

(via FB Sept 18th)
— — — — — — — — — —

Land Management Agencies lift Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in all Zones of the Payette Fire Restriction Area

Date: September 15, 2021
Contact: Brian Harris, Payette National Forest, 208-634-6945

McCall, Idaho – With cooler temperatures and chances of precipitation increasing over the next few weeks, local land management agencies will lift Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in all zones of the Payette Fire Restrictions Area effective Wednesday, September 15, 2021 just after midnight at 0001 hours. The Fire Restrictions are rescinded by agencies managing state, private and public lands in the area, including the United States Forest Service (USFS), United States Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association (SITPA), and the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL). See map for the location of the Payette Fire Restrictions Area.

The restrictions were put into effect on July 16 when fire danger and burning conditions were unusually high. Recent storms have brought moisture with much cooler temperatures to the area, and with the days getting shorter, fire conditions have moderated. Forest visitors are reminded that vegetation is still dry, and to be careful with all use of fire in the outdoors. The accidental start of a wildfire can still be devastating.

Be alert and be aware. Follow these tips to help prevent wildfire:

* NEVER leave a campfire unattended
* Keep water, dirt, and a shovel near your fire at all times
* Make sure your fire is dead out and cold to the touch before you leave it
* Fireworks are never allowed on National Forest and State lands and are prohibited on BLM lands during closed fire season (May 10 through October 20).
* Exploding targets or tracer rounds are prohibited on all public lands.

Area closures may still be in effect on some public lands. Contact the land management agency for your area of interest for specific information regarding fire closures.

Fire restrictions are being lifted but burn bans may still be in place in some areas. Fire

Restrictions and burn bans address different types of activities. Burn bans pertain to controlled burning activities such as debris burning, slash burning, or agricultural burning, for which a fire safety burn permit from IDL is required. Visit (link) for more information.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Tribal Liaison
Payette National Forest
— — — — — — — — — —

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions rescinded for southwest Idaho

Date: September 15, 2021
Contact: Sharla Arledge (IDL)- 208-334-0286
Fire Information (BLM)- 208-384-3378
Venetia Gempler (USFS)- 208-373-4105

Boise, Idaho — Effective Friday, Sept. 17 at 12:01 a.m., the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Reclamation and Idaho Department of Lands will remove Stage One Fire Restrictions for federal, state, state endowment, private forestland and rangelands in the following Fire Restriction Zones:

Owyhee Mountains Fire Restrictions Zone –

All of Owyhee County west of the Bruneau Canyon.

Treasure Valley Fire Restrictions Zone –

All of Ada, Canyon, Gem, Payette and Washington Counties. Portions of Boise County including the administrative boundary of Lucky Peak Lake to Arrowrock Dam, south shore of Arrowrock Reservoir and that portion of Elmore County that lies south of the South Fork Boise River to Anderson Ranch Dam, south along Anderson Dam Rd (FS134) to Hwy 20, east on Hwy 20 to the Elmore/Gooding County line south to I-84.

West Central Mountains Fire Restrictions Zone –

Boise National Forest, Boise District BLM and State and Endowment Lands within Elmore County and Boise County. Boise National Forest lands within Valley County. From the point where the Boise National Forest boundary intersects Idaho State highway 20 near Dixie following the Boise Forest boundary west and north along the ridge of the Danskin to Boise front foothills and extending North encompassing the Idaho Department of Lands to its intersection back with the Boise National Forest boundary near Sagehen reservoir and State and Endowment Lands in the High Valley Area (Valley County). The far northern boundary includes all Boise National Forest lands excluding those within the Frank Church Wilderness. All lands north of Sagehen reservoir including Tripod Mountain and West Mountain within the North Fork Payette River drainage north to near Tamarack Resort.

Lifting the restrictions means the public is free to build a campfire, use a charcoal barbecue, or smoke outside of designated campgrounds and recreation sites. However, fire managers would like to remind the public that the accidental start of a wildfire can still be devastating. Be alert and be aware. Follow these tips to help prevent wildfire:

* NEVER leave a campfire unattended.
* Keep water, dirt and a shovel near your fire at all times.
* Make sure your fire is dead out and cold to the touch before you leave it.
* Never use fireworks, exploding targets or tracer rounds on or near public land.

The BLM Fire Prevention Order remains in effect for all BLM-managed lands within Idaho. This order prohibits discharging, using or possessing fireworks, discharging a firearm using incendiary, steel core or tracer ammunition, or burning, igniting or causing to burn explosive material, including exploding targets.

Together for Idaho, we can keep south-central Idaho safe from wildfires. For more information on wildfire prevention, up-to-date fire information and resources on becoming Firewise, visit (link):
http://www.idahofireinfo.com
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise NF Fall Campground Closure Dates by District

View the Document (You will need to use the percent + zoom tool to see the information.)

If the campground is closed, that means that there are no longer any services like reservations, campground hosts, fees, trash pick up, water and many of the out-houses and gates will be locked. Schedule for out-house and gate closures will vary depending on the District. If a gate is locked, you may choose to pack in and pack out of the campground. Please remember to take your trash with you.

Keep in mind, snow will arrive very soon at the higher elevations. Forest Roads ARE NOT PLOWED and there is NO CELL SERVICE. You may want to call the Districts before you leave for the most current weather and road information. There are no longer Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in effect, but conditions remain very dry and we ask everyone to continue to be very careful with campfires.
—————

Fire Season:

Satellite Smoke Map Sept 17

20210917SatMapIdaho-a
— —

Rush Creek

Rush Creek Fire IR Map 9/10/21 (link)

Rush Creek Heat Map Sept 17
20210917RushHeat-a

2021 Payette Wilderness Fires
Three fires are burning in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Payette National Forest. The Club, Rush Creek, and Vinegar fires were started by lightning on July 15, 2021. A Type 3 Incident Management Team took over the fires on July 19th. A closure order for trails has been put in place in and around these fires for public and firefighter safety to prevent any interference with suppression and response operations.
Vicinity Map Club-Vinegar-Rush Crk Fires 7-29-21

InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — —

Infrared flight allows for updated acreage of Boundary Fire

Sept 17, 2021 Local News 8

A recent infrared flight has allowed for updated acreage figures of the Boundary Fire.

The lightning caused fire that started on August 10 has burned 64,670 acres and is 48% contained.

The Boundary Fire is burning in steep and inaccessible terrain in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, on the Middle Fork Ranger District of the Salmon-Challis National Forest and the Lowman Ranger District of the Boise National Forest. Firefighter and public safety remain the number one priority.

continued:

Boundary Fire

Infrared Map of Boundary Fire Sept 16

Boundary Fire Heat Map Sept 17
20210917BoundaryHeat-aBoundary Fire
Salmon-Challis National Forest
The lightning-caused Boundary Fire ~2 miles W of Boundary Creek Boat Launch was detected on August 10.
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — —

Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests Fire Update Sept 15th

(via FB)

The Sheep Creek Fire is now approximately 7,700 acres and located in the Sheep Creek Drainage in the Gospel Hump Wildness area. It is burning in Idaho Fish and Game, Game Management Unit 19. The fire is mainly burning in the 2007 Rattlesnake Fire burn scar and is surrounded by steep, rugged terrain.

The fire is currently burning on both sides of the Sheep Creek drainage and along Forest Service Trail #201. The fire is also currently burning southeast around Elk Butte and Quartzite Butte and has impacted Forest Service Trails #226 and #227. The fire is currently burning in East Fork Sheep Creek near Shinning Butte, and has also moved north near Plummer Point. None of the forecasted precipitation materialized this weekend, but confidence is high among forecasters that widespread rain will be coming this coming Saturday. Trail closures remain in place.

Local resources are currently assigned to structure protection in the Concord and Humptown areas. Frost kill amongst the vegetation is now contributing to this fire’s spread, and potential high winds are being predicted just ahead of this weekends rain event.

Fires in this area can move quickly day or night, and extreme caution should be used whenever in the vicinity especially near adjacent drainages and ridges.

The Lynx Fire is estimated at 6,600 acres. This fire is located 23 miles east of Elk City, Idaho. This fire is being managed at the local unit. Firefighters are periodically patrolling the area and structure protection remains in place and effective at Warm Springs Bar outfitter camp.

The Dixie-Jumbo Fires total acreage is estimated at 46,500 acres. The Dixie fire and Jumbo fires are located 15 miles south of Elk City, Idaho. A local Type 3 organization will be transitioning to a local Type 4 organization tomorrow. Suppression repair and clean-up is continuing to take place. An area closure which includes Forest Service Road #222 from Dixie Guard Station to Mackay Bar remains in place. Fire managers are hoping and expecting to be able to further reduce current road and area closures once a shift in the weather happens.

Official forest closure orders are still in effect for multiple fires.

Note: InciWeb is not being updated for this fire north of the main Salmon river.
— — — —

Mud Lick, Haynes, and Iron Fires
Salmon-Challis National Forest
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — —

Some useful links:

InciWeb Fire info link:
Air Quality McCall link:
National Fire Heat Map link: (zoom in to our area)

Weather Station at Stibnite

Real Time Lightning Map (zoom to our area)

GOES-West – Satellite Maps: Pacific Northwest
—————-

Critter News:

Dog Tired: Surge in animal patients has left vet clinics scrambling

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 16, 2021

MCPAWS purchased the Donnelly Veterinary Hospital and Long Valley Veterinary Hospital in the spring of 2020.

Since then, the MCPAWS Veterinary Hospital north of Donnelly has seen an increase in patients every month.

The pace of business has caused burnout among the staff and longer wait times for pets in need of emergency service and regular checkups, MCPAWS Executive Director Amber Kostoff said.

The clinic treated 2,100 animals in July and August, a 26% increase over the 1,661 patients seen during the same months in 2020, Kostoff said.

The increase is not unique to MCPAWS. The 24-hour emergency services veterinarian office West Vet in Garden City sent an email to MCPAWS and other veterinarians in the area that regularly refer animals for emergency services that they too were overwhelmed and understaffed.

“The reality is that we have reached or exceeded our capacity to continue to deliver exceptional care we pride ourselves on, while also supporting our team’s wellbeing,” the email from WestVet said.

Cascade Clinic

Dr. Keith Ruble also reported a busier than normal year at the Cascade Veterinary Clinic. “When we’re an hour behind and scheduled past closing the staff have to refer them elsewhere,” Ruble said.

“The need for more runs for surgery and emergencies has required us to discontinue animal boarding, there simply is not enough room anymore,” he said noting that the clinic has had to turn away several emergency cases.

The team at the Cascade clinic is tired and every day is full, Ruble said.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

BLM rounds up wild horses north of Emmett

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, September 14th 2021

The Bureau of Land Management has begun a helicopter-assisted wild horse gather in the Four Mile Herd Management Area north of Emmett to help prevent the degradation of public lands.

The BLM says there should be roughly 37-60 wild horses in the area, but there are currently about 210, including the 2020 foal crop.

“The purpose of the gather is to prevent undue degradation of the public lands associated with wild horses, and to restore a thriving natural ecological balance and multiple-use relationship on public lands,” the BLM said.

The horses will go up for adoption at the BLM Boise Off-Range Wild Horse Corrals this winter.

source:
————–

Fish & Game News:

Epizootic hemorrhagic disease detected in Southwest Idaho

By Brian Pearson, Regional Conservation Manager
Thursday, September 16, 2021

Editor’s Note: This press release was updated on Sept. 17 after Fish and Game received confirmation that the sample taken from a white-tailed deer in the Garden Valley area was positive for EHD.

A sample collected from dead mule deer in Southwest Idaho has tested positive for epizootic hemorrhagic disease. The deer was recently discovered in the Treasure Valley within the Garden City limits, and Fish and Game wildlife staff confirmed that the deer was positive for EHD on Sept. 13.

Elsewhere in the Southwest Region, there have been five reports of dead white-tailed deer in the Garden Valley area since Sept. 8, and Fish and Game staff on Sept. 16 received confirmation that a sample taken from one of those deer carcasses was also positive for EHD.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Ring-necked pheasants were transplanted into Idaho over 100 years ago and are a prized game bird

By Adare Evans, Wildlife Educator
Monday, September 13, 2021

If you would like to try pheasant hunting, youth seasons for licensed hunters 17 years or younger run Oct. 2-8. Youth must be accompanied by an adult 18 years or older. Adult seasons vary across the state depending on area and whether the hunter is a resident or nonresident. Check the Upland Game, Turkey and Furbearer Seasons and Rules booklet for more information on pheasant seasons.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Why is there a fence in the stream?

By Staff Writer
Tuesday, September 14, 2021

By Kat Gillies-Rector, Fisheries Biologist, Salmon Region

During the spring or fall you may have seen Idaho Fish and Game staff building metal picket fences across a nearby stream. These fences are actually an important sampling tool called a picket weir that IDFG biologists use to capture and sample migrating salmon and trout.

Picket weirs were used for centuries to capture fish for subsistence, commercial, and scientific purposes. Native Americans used picket weirs in streams and small rivers to capture migrating salmon for food. Similar structures have also been used to capture returning salmon for commercial harvest and brood stock at hatcheries. In Idaho, IDFG biologists have been using picket weirs for decades to study wild salmon, steelhead, and trout as they migrate to spawn.

A picket weir is made of two panels of pickets that serve to “fence” off the stream and funnel fish towards a trap box. Weirs can be operated to capture fish migrating upstream, downstream, or in both directions, depending on the study and how the weir and trap box is placed. In the example below, fish swim downstream to the panels, then swim along them until they find the opening to the trap box. Fish that swim into the trap are unable to swim back out because of “fingers” placed on the opening to the trap. When biologists arrive, they close off the opening to the box with more pickets, then net fish out of the box to take data.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

No bull: Scientists potty train cows to use ‘MooLoo’

by Seth Borenstein AP Science Writer Monday, September 13th 2021


AP

Turns out cows can be potty trained as easily as toddlers. Maybe easier.

It’s no bull. Scientists put the task to the test and 11 out of 16 cows learned to use the “MooLoo” when they had to go.

Just like some parents, the researchers used a sweet treat to coax the cows to push through a gate and urinate in a special pen. And it took only 15 days to train the young calves. Some kids take quite a bit longer.

continued:
————-

Seasonal Humor:

HuntBirdDog-a

CovidSocks-a
————–

Idaho History Sept 19, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 72

Idaho Newspaper Clippings February 5, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

February 5

The Filer Record., February 05, 1920, Page 1

19200205FR1

19200205FR2
Many Cases of Flu Reported In Filer
110 Pupils Absent From Grade School Today

With twelve homes in the community quarantined for influenza, [and] at least two quarantined for small pox the local health situation has become a matter of no small concern.

At the Rural high school a nurse has been employed to examine daily the students, and all pupils found to be ill are cared for and sent to their homes.

Doctors state that while the influenza this season does not appear to be a virulent as in the past, still there should be no lessening of precautionary measures.

The small pox cases in town are few and it is said little fear of its spread is anticipated. However it has been found necessary to close the schools of Hansen on account of the disease.

Over 150 cases of influenza have been reported in the county and every effort is being made to control the spread of the disease. At Twin Falls it is said that a large number of school teachers and pupils are out of school with the “flu.”

A total of 2,488 cases of influenza deaths and 15 pneumonia deaths have been reported to the office of the State Board of Health for the week ending January 31st.

The hopeful note in the situation is to be found in the fact that many of the communities have been able to bring the situation under control. The reports received toward the end of the week having diminished very materially. The virulence of the infection seems to be gradually increasing, the influenza and pneumonia deaths showing a marked increase over the previous week.
— —

The Groundhog Saw His Shadow Monday

Monday was “groundhog day,” and to those who are superstitious, six more weeks of winter are promised. A warming and not unwelcome sun enabled Mr. and Mrs. Groundhog to view their shadows most all day. According to tradition, they once more took up their abode in the ground and shall remain there, waiting the passing of six more weeks of winter. It is fortunate that seasons are not governed by tradition and superstition and that notwithstanding almanacs and weather prognosticators, weather continues to be governed by forces more powerful than signs and “old sayings.”

source: The Filer Record. (Filer, Idaho), 05 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Payette Enterprise., February 05, 1920, Page 1

19200205PE1

Personals And Local Mention

Mr. A. E. Wood who has been confined to his home suffering from an attack of lung fever,* is now able to be at his office.

Ed. Shellworth, head plumber at Lauer Brothers, was away from business this week on account of his family being down with the flu.

Miss Marjorie White who was taken to a Boise hospital suffering from the effects of the flu, is some better but it is feared she will lose the sight of her right eye.

The many friends of Mrs. M. F. Albert will be pleased to learn that she is now slightly improving. Her condition for some time has been quite critical, but unless further complications arise it is believed she will soon recover.

Mr. Smith of this office received a letter this week from his sister at Sioux City, Iowa, stating that diphtheria is quite bad at Sioux City. His sister’s children are down with the disease. The letter contained strong odor of disinfectant. While here in Payette quite a few are down with lagrippe or flu we may be thankful that diphtheria is not among us.

* Lung fever = pneumonia
— —

Clarence Wallace Farlow

Clarence Wallace Farlow died Tuesday evening at the home of his sister, Mrs. Anson Hoyt here in Payette following a relapse of the flu which developed into pneumonia. The body was shipped Wednesday to Norcaster, Kansas, for burial. He was first taken with the flu, complicated with bronchial pneumonia about a month ago. He recovered and was able to be up and assist in the care of his sister and family who were all down with influenza, which may have caused the relapse which resulted in his death. Clarence was a bright young man 20 years of age, and is survived by a father, G. W. Farlow of Lennox, Idaho, who was here and accompanied the body, and a sister, Mrs. Anson Hoyt of Payette.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 05 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Emmett Index. February 05, 1920, Page 1

19200205EI1

19200205EI2
Red Cross Emergency Hospital
Beds and Nurses Provided in Masonic Temple to Care For Unfortunates

The prevalence of influenza and pneumonia and the scarcity of nurses induced the Red Cross chapter to open an emergency hospital for the care of patients who are unable to secure proper care and attention. The Masonic lodge tendered the use of rooms in its temple for the purpose and on Saturday three beds were installed and Mrs. Turner, a professional nurse from Coeur d’Alene was secured to take charge. So far only one patient has availed himself of the privileges – a Spaniard who is suffering from influenza. Three beds have been set up. Others will be added as necessity requires.

The services will be free to those who are unable to pay for it. To those who are able to pay a small fee will be charged. Patients may bring their own bedding, and are requested to do so if possible.

In providing the community with this assistance and service in combating disease, the Red Cross chapter is living up to its record of unselfish devotion to humanity. The members are giving freely of their time and funds to alleviate suffering and distress, and seek to extend their helpfulness to all who need their services by the institution of this emergency hospital.
— —

Groundhog Befuzzled

Monday was Groundhog Day, and there was such a variety of weather in this part of Idaho that His Porkship doesn’t know whether to go bury himself in his hole for six more weeks or to stay out and take chances of Old Man Flu getting him. Here in the valley there was not even a glimpse of the sun to be had all day, while on Freezeout hill, and from the top of Pickett Corral hill to McCall, Old Sol beamed with full refulgence. If the old Missouri legend still holds good, there will be six weeks more of winter weather on the butte and in the country north and east of Emmett, but here in the Emmett valley “Springtime Has Come, Gentle Annie” right now and will stay. So what’s a poor groundhop [sic] to do, anyway!

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 05 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Emmett Index. February 05, 1920, Page 4

Emmett News

The Bank of Emmett force is back at work again after a tussle with the flu.

Frank S. Moore, of the forest office, is convalescent from an attack of the grip.

A. O. Sutton, who has been confined to his home for a week, is on the road to recovery.

Frank Wallis is recovering from a severe attack of flu, but his wife and young son are seriously ill and grave concern is felt as to their recovery.

A. P. Peterson, who has been quite ill with the flu, is improving.

G. W. Maxfield, who has been confined at home a week with a threatened attack of pneumonia, is on the mend. Superintendent Goodwin and Mrs. Goodwin have both been quite ill, but they, too, are improving. A more settled condition of weather will be a big aid to convalescents – it be soon.

Word was received here recently of the death from influenza of Blasius Shaull at the home of his brother-in-law, Conrad Pope, near Nampa.

Considerable complaint is being made of the practice of throwing ashes in the alleys. Those who do so are violating the city’s ordinance and officials expect to take action against offenders if the practice is not stopped.
— —

Letha

Mr. Robinson of Cedar Edge, Colo., arrived Wednesday of last week for a visit with his sister, Mrs. D. F. Bott and family. While he wanted to stay and look over the country, he was anxious to get home because of the flu epidemic and left today (Wednesday.)

Allan Newell was ill last week, but is in the store this week. He believes he didn’t have the flu, but is taking care of himself nevertheless. He has news that both Mr. and Mrs. Stegner are ill at Fruitland and one of the children and would like to go down, but believes it not wise.

Dr. Polly has been down several times the past week treating Mrs. Pomeroy, Mr. Henderson and R. L. Battan.

Among those who have come down with the prevailing epidemic since last news day are: R. L. Battan, Glenn Kiser and Mrs. Butler, and also the Lew Gordon and Whitely families.

Mr. Munson is doing chores for Glenn Kiser this week.

Mrs. Pomeroy, who has been appointed a member of the executive board of the Red Cross to represent Letha and vicinity, this week had a letter from headquarters at Emmett telling of the establishment of an emergency hospital for flu in the Masonic rooms at Emmett. The Red Cross are prepared to care for those who have no one to look after them. A small amount will be accepted from those wishing to pay, otherwise it will be done free of cost.

Dan Hanson, Irb DeMasters, C. L. Henderson and Bismark Youtaler are out after a tussle with the flu, but they are not looking for work – not yet.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

The Emmett Index. February 05, 1920, Page 8

News Of Gem County
By The Index’s Correspondents

South Slope

The young son of Louis Obermeyer is ill this week, threatened with a bad cold.

Haw Creek

(Too late for last Week)

The Jay Sanders family, who have been quite sick with flu, are now recovering.

The J. Loe Reed family are on the sick list this week with the flu.

Owing to sickness and bad roads, there will be no meeting of the U. A. Club. The next meeting will be February 12th with Mrs. Ed Francis. It will also be election of officers, so every one come.

Central Mesa

(Too late for last Week)

The Frank Nicks family are having a siege of the flu.The Brogan family have had their turn with the flu.

Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Hereth and baby are nicely recovering from the flu.

Edgar Brogan has the influenza.

The Sherwood family are having their turn with the flu.

Mary Heath has the flu.

Elwood Schoening has the chicken pox.

Quite a number of children are absent from school this week on account of sickness. Miss Johnson has the flu and Mr. Teerink is teaching in her place.

Hanna

(Too late for last Week)

Louise Blaser has been quite sick the past week, being confined to her bed for several days.

The Spoor family, who have been quarantined for influenza, are all recovering nicely.

The ice jam in the river, with its consequent flooding of fields and washing out of bridges, has made the road to Letha impassable, and it is causing much inconvenience to our farmers, who use Letha as a shipping point.

Bramwell

The Mart Smith family have all recovered from their recent sickness and are ready to fumigate as soon as the weather will permit.

This is seven days of dark, foggy weather. We can not remember a time when such has occurred in the last ten years in Idaho. Give us a day of sunshine.

Dr. Reynolds had the misfortune to upset his car while driving in the fog Monday evening. He had crossed the sleigh bridge near the Vanderdasson schoolhouse and as he neared the first culvert beyond, someway in making the turn, the car went over into the ditch. Luckily the car was not damaged to any extent and the doctor was able to proceed on his way.

Bissell Creek

Mr. and Mrs. Warner Head and Thelma have been confined to their bed with influenza.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Fielding Academy, Paris, Idaho (1)

ParisFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

The Grangeville Globe. February 05, 1920, Page 1

19190205GG1

19190205GG2
Grim Reaper Leaves Dark Trail; Many Deaths Are Recorded
Dreaded Influenza, While Apparently on Wane, Taking Heavy Toll; Few New Cases Reported; None Desperate.

The outbreak of influenza that has been sweeping over the country for the past few weeks seems to have about reached the maximum and many people are of the opinion that the dreaded disease is now dying down, the precautions that have been taken by the different communities no doubt having a great deal to do with the rapid check of the epidemic.

While there are a great many individual cases in the community all seem to be doing well, a shortage of nurses being the greatest drawback in fighting the disease. A large number of the Red Cross ladies who had experience in the work last year are rendering valuable aid to the patients and likewise to the physicians who are on the go day and night.

The toll taken since our last issue seems unusually heavy, four deaths having been recorded, a pall of gloom has been cast over the entire community.

Mrs. Roy Nail

Mrs. Addie Alice Nail, aged 32 years 8 months and 12 days, wife of our esteemed townsman, Roy Nail, died last Saturday and was laid to rest in Prairie View cemetery at 10 a.m. on Monday, February 2, all that was mortal being followed to the grave by a large number of admiring friends. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. H. S. Randall, of the Federated church, A. J. Maugg directing.

Deceased leaves to mourn her sudden taking away the bereaved husband and young son, Cornelius, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Mitchell, and one sister Mrs. Will Huff, all residing in this community.

Addie Alice Mitchell was born in Melrose, Montana, and in 1903 came with her parents to Idaho county and settled near Stites. Three years later on July 2, 1906, she was united in marriage to Roy E. Nail at Stites. For the past five years the family home has been at Grangeville.

Mrs. George Manning

Mrs. George W. Manning, aged 37 years, died at the family residence in this city last Sunday morning after suffering for ten days with an attack of influenza. Funeral services were held in the open air at the home Tuesday morning and interment was made at Prairie View cemetery, Rev. H. S. Randall officiating, and A. J. Maugg directing.

The deceased lady is survived by her husband, George W. Manning, who for the past number of years has been connected with the Inland Abstract company, and three daughters, Pauline, aged 15, Zelma, 2, and Verna, 4 years of age.

Ethel Manning was born November 25, 1882, near Southwest City, Missouri, where she grew to womanhood and where on September 10, 1903, she was united in marriage to George W. Manning of the same place, they having been schoolmates. Immediately afterward they removed to this place where they have since made their home. From early girlhood she had been a member of the Church of Christ always a persistent and tireless worker. When she passed away she was superintendent of the Cradle Roll and teacher of the ladies’ Bible class of the Christian church.

John Grant Howard

A sufferer for a number of years from acute stomach trouble John Grant Howard passed out from this life Monday forenoon, February 2nd, the end being hastened by an attack of the influenza from which pneumonia resulted. Funeral services were conducted at the graveside at 11 o’clock this forenoon (Thursday) by Rev. H. S. Randall of the Federated church and were attended by many friends of the family, the funeral being directed by Undertaker A. J. Maugg.

Deceased is survived by the widow and eight children as follows: Dennis, Leonard, Otis, Gladys, Beulah, Zuwa, Velda and Mary, three brothers and seven sisters also survive.

John Grant Howard was born January 13, 1872, in Stone county, Missouri, where he grew to manhood. He was united in marriage with Miss Minnie Bass, on February 24, 1895. The family removed to this country in 1901, since which time they have been engaged in farming.

George David Stanbery

Geo. D. Stanbery, one of the best known farmers and stockmen of the Winona section, passed away at the family home in this city early Tuesday morning after a short illness from pneumonia which resulted from an attack of influenza, at the age of 49 years.

The deceased is survived by his widow and eight children, four boys and four girls, as follows, Mabel, Elsie, Roy, Martin, Stanley, Ernest, Velda and Minnie. With the exception of Mabel and Elsie, the children were all at home at the time of death. The former is married, and we are informed resides in the Winona district, and Miss Elsie who is attending university at Berkeley, California, is expected to reach home on Friday night’s train.

Funeral services will be held at Mount Zion church, Winona, Saturday afternoon, and interment will be under auspices of Lowe lodge I. O. O. F. of that place of which he was a member. Undertaker E. S. Hancock will direct the funeral.

Mr. Stanbery was one of the big farmers of the Winona country up to last year when he disposed of the greater part of his land interests in that section and moved to Grangeville. Later on he purchased a tract of land near the foothills and spent his time between that place and his town home which he purchased in order to give his family the benefit of our school system. He was born in Stoddard county, Missouri, January 20, 1871. On January 2, 1896, in the same county he was united in marriage to Miss Cornelia Mitchell, and came west to the state of Washington. In October, 1898, the family settled in the Winona country where they have since followed farming and stockraising.

Mrs. Henry Kurthuis

Mrs. Henry Kurthuis, aged 35 years, died at the family home two miles north from Grangeville, Wednesday morning from pneumonia, and is survived by her husband, four sons, Bart, John, Jake and Neil; two sisters, Mrs. A. Doornbas and Mrs. H. Sholteus, Grangeville; also two brothers, M. Vanderwall, Grangeville and John Vanderwall of Conrad Montana.

Deceased was a native of Holland and had resided in the United States for 14 years, coming with her husband from Montana about six years ago.

Funeral services will be held at the home at 11 o’clock Saturday and interment at Prairie View cemetery. It is expected a minister from Sunnyside, Wash., will officiate, with A. J. Maugg in charge of the funeral.

Mrs. Thomas Seay

The remains of Mrs. Thomas Seay, who passed away at the family home at Clarkston Tuesday will reach this city on the evening train and will be laid to rest in Prairie View cemetery Friday, the hour not being set at the time of going to press.

Mrs. and Mrs. Thomas Seay removed to Clarkston from Winona last fall to spend the winter and place their son in school. With the outbreak of influenza the entire family was afflicted. Deceased also leaves a child a few days old.

Reily Seay went down to Clarkston on Wednesdays train to aid the family of his brother in their distress and will accompany the remains to this city.
— —

19190205GG3John Hadorn Is Called
Whitebird Resident, Native of County, Victim of Influenza

After suffering about a week from an attack of influenza which was followed by pneumonia, John Milton Hadorn, aged 33 years, one month and eight days, succumbed to the ravages of the disease, leaving to mourn his untimely departure the widow, two step-children, his mother, Mrs. T. B. Hadorn, one brother and three half-sisters.

Deceased was born at Deer Creek, in Idaho county. After reaching manhood he followed farming and stock raising, but of late had been running a saw mill. About a month ago he sold his ranch and saw mill interests.

Funeral Services, conducted by Rev. Gamble of the local church were held at the cemetery at Whitebird at 2 o’clock p.m. Monday. Undertaker E. S. Hancock had charge of the funeral.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 05 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Grangeville Globe. February 05, 1920, Page 8

Local Happenings

Fred Miller, is back again at his harness shop, after a week’s suffering with the influenza.

Attorney A. S. Hardy has been confined to his home for the past week with the prevalent disease. At this writing he is much improved and will soon be at his office again.

Jack Hartnett, Pacific telephone trouble shooter at this point, has been released from the Alcorn hospital, where he spent a week suffering from the influenza.

Robert Reilly, formerly telephone man for the Pacific phone company at this place and erstwhile deputy sheriff of Idaho county, came up from Lewiston early this week to look after the company’s work at this point during the illness of Jack Hartnett who has been confined in the Alcorn hospital with the “flu.”

Clarence Nixon is able to be about again after an illness extending over several weeks.

Lance McCready, who has been ill for a week or more, is able to be around again. He has not returned to work in the Day & Abramson barber shop, however.

Geo. M. Robertson, cashier of the First National bank of Cottonwood, was in the city Monday, assisting in arranging for the funeral of his niece, Mrs. Geo. W. Manning, which occurred on Tuesday morning.

Lee Miller was down town for the first time this forenoon for quite a spell. Mr. Miller is well advanced in years and is not as strong on his pins as formerly. He stated he was feeling fairly good, had a good appetite and thus far has escaped “flu.”
— —

Short Handed at P. O.

The postoffice crew is seriously crippled this week with the illness of Acting Postmaster J. A. Peterson and Clerk Frank Reynolds. A. M. Ecker has the morning shift, working from 3:30 to 1 o’clock p.m. and W. T. Williams and Charles Simmons now handle the evening mail alone. It requires a little longer, perhaps, but under the circumstances, all patrons of the office should be very considerate.
— —

Judge Scales Sets Term

Judge Wallace N. Scales this week set the time for holding the adjourned term of district court for Lewis county for March 22nd. The term was slated for February 2nd but on account of the prevalent influenza it was deemed best on conferring with the officers at Nezperce to have the date postponed.
— —

19190205GG4Delay On court Building
Influenza Causing Setback in Completion of Repairs Under Way

Work has been progressing nicely on the remodeling of the old school building which is to be used for a court house to house all the county officials, but the visitation of the influenza. Doc Jesse and Elmer Kennedy were making fine headway with the work until stricken with the disease early last week. Several of the partitions had been removed and new ones placed where needed. Plastering was also going on at the same time.

The new vault constructed by Chester Arnold has been completed and is a very substantial and strong box. So strong, indeed, that Mr. Arnold states that it could not be blown out with dynamite.

When finished, this structure will afford ample room for all the county officers, in fact there will be rooms for every needed purpose about a court house.
— —

Federated Church

No services next Sunday but we hope to be able to resume on the 15th. Persons desiring to get the Sunday school papers may do so by calling at Mrs. Harry Morris’ Residence.

H. S. Randall, Pastor.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho County Free Press. February 05, 1920, Page 1

19200205ICFP1

19200205ICFP2

5 Are Dead From Influenza Here In 5 Days; Epidemic Now Is Abating
Few New Cases in Grangeville, but in the Country Many Are Ill with Disease
Doctors Busy Day and Night Ministering to Sick; Shortage of Nurses Keenly Felt

19200205ICFP3

Five deaths from Spanish influenza in Grangeville or vicinity in five successive days is the toll of the disease locally during the last week.

The contagion late last week spread with alarming rapidity over the city and adjoining farming districts. It spread to Cottonwood and to Whitebird, where one death, that of John Haydorn was reported.

The epidemic has reached its crest in Grangeville, according to physicians who have been busy day and night answering hundreds of calls. Fewer new cases were reported in the city during the last few days, and many families have been released from quarantine. In the country districts, however, the disease is spreading, physicians declare. It was much later in breaking out in the rural communities than in town.

Scarcity of nurses to care for influenza patients has resulted in difficulty being experienced in many families, where several members were ill with the malady. Persons who were convalescent having been obliged to leave their beds in order to care for other members of the family who were ill, and thereby have suffered relapses.

Dr. B. Chipman, city health officer who was attending a large number of patients, has been ill for several days, and his work has been taken over by other physicians of the city who already were busy almost twenty-four hours in the day.

Mrs. Addie Alice Nail

The first victim of the present influenza epidemic in Grangeville was Mrs. Addie Alice Nail, wife of Roy E. Nail. Mrs. Nail died Saturday morning in her home, after an illness of but a few days. …

Mrs. Ethel Manning

Influenza claimed another victim at 7:15 Sunday morning when Mrs. Ethel Manning, wife of George W. Manning, died in her home in this city, after an illness of ten days’ duration. She was 37 years old. …

John Grant Howard

John Grant Howard, 48 years old, a well known Camas Prairie rancher, died of influenza-pneumonia, Monday morning in the Alcorn hospital, in Grangeville. Mr. Howard was stricken a week before he died. …

George David Stanbery

George David Stanbery is dead. Big hearted, jovial Dave Stanbery is no more. He has fallen victim to influenza. Death came to him at 2 Tuesday morning in his home in this city, after a brief illness of influenza-pneumonia. …

Mrs. Trientje Kurthuis

Mrs. Trientje Kurthuis, wife of Henry Kurthuis, died early Wednesday morning in her home, two miles north of Grangeville. Death was caused by pneumonia, following influenza. … 35 years old …
— —

John M. Haydorn Of Whitebird Is Dead

John Milston Haydorn, 33 years old, died late Saturday night in his home in Whitebird, of influenza-pneumonia. Mr. Haydorn, who was well-known throughout the Salmon river country, where he had spent his entire life, contracted influenza two weeks before his death. Though a robust man, the disease was aggravated by exposure when Mr. Haydorn walked two miles from his ranch to his home in Whitebird. …
— —

19200205ICFP4Epidemic On Down Grade At Whitebird

The influenza Epidemic at Whitebird is greatly improved, according to advices received by the Free Press from Whitebird at noon, Thursday. A number of serious cases existed early in the week, but in all the crisis has passed. Only one death, that of John Haydorn, occurred at Whitebird.
— —

Mrs. T. H. Seay Dies In Clarkston; Pneumonia

Mrs. T. H. Seay of Winona died Tuesday of pneumonia in Clarkston, where she was spending the winter. The body was brought to Grangeville Thursday evening, and taken to the Maugg parlors. The funeral will be held, probably Friday, with burial in Prairie View cemetery.
— —

Mrs. W. H. Hill, Nee Ina Adams, Is Dead

Word has just been received in Grangeville of the death recently in Seattle of Mrs. W. H. Hill, formerly Miss Ina Adams, who several years ago resided in Grangeville, and was well known here. Death resulted from pneumonia.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 05 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Idaho County Free Press. February 05, 1920, Page 2

Fenn

(From Last Week)

Lloyd Spencer was taken ill a few days ago with influenza. It is the only case reported in this vicinity so far.

Lucile

(From Last Week)

Carl Kennedy is here taking the census for this district.

Whitebird

(Special Correspondence)

Dr. W. A. Foskett has ordered the public school in this district closed because of seriousness of the influenza epidemic.

Mrs. Crooks, while caring for her son and family, who are bedfast with influenza, on their farm near here, was attacked by frequent fainting spells while doing chores. Dr. Foskett attended and pronounced her illness heart trouble.

Following is a list of persons recovering from influenza: Tom Galloway, Mr. and Mrs. Marion Tipton and son, Dale, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Irwin, the Gill and Jilson families.

Doumecq

(From Last Week)

Considerable illness is reported on the hill this week. Mr. and Mrs. McSpadden and son have been confined to their home for several days. Mr. Allison Vaughn is unable to be out. Mary Morgan is not in school on account of illness.

Doumecq farmers are being visited this week by the census enumerator, Charles Sallee.

Roads from Canfield to Boles are almost impassible on account of ice. The road is almost a solid pack of ice and very slanting in places.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

Idaho County Free Press. February 05, 1920, Page 6

Local News In Brief

Federated Church — No services next Sunday, but we hope to be able to resume on the 15th. Persons desiring to get the Sunday school papers may do so by calling at Mrs. Harry Morris’ home. H. S. Randall, pastor.

Court Postponed — Judge Scales announces that opening of district court in Lewis county has been postponed until March 22, owing to the influenza epidemic.

Dr. Chipman Ill — Dr. B. Chipman was confined to his home the first of the week, suffering from an abscess in the nose.
— —

Personal

George M. Robertson, Cottonwood banker, was called to Grangeville Sunday evening, owing to the death of his niece, Mrs. George Manning.

Mrs. A. J. Maugg was called to Cottonwood last Saturday to care for Mr. Maugg’s mother, Mrs. John Maugg, and sister, Miss Agnes Maugg, who were suffering from influenza.

Robert Riley, telephone lineman, formerly of Grangeville, is here from Lewiston on telephone work, to take the place of Jack Hartnett, who has been ill with influenza.

Miss Elsie Stanbery is expected to arrive in Grangeville Friday evening from Berkeley, Cal., where she is a student at the University of California. She was called home owning to the death of her father, G. D. Stanbery.

Miss Leasel Hussman and Miss Beatrice Calhoun, telephone operators, of Cottonwood, were in Grangeville this week, employed on the local Pacific States switchboard, in the absence of Misses O’Kelley, regular operators, who are ill with influenza.
— —

Notice

Dr. B. Chipman, announces that he will be able to answer calls in both city and country on and after next Saturday.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 05, 1920, Page 1

19200205DSM1

19200205DSM2
Report Influenza Conditions Better
Only Six New Influenza Cases Reported Wednesday – No New Flags Up

No new quarantine flags were put out Wednesday and but six new cases were reported, these being in homes where the disease had already appeared. This is far below the smallest number of new cases reported in one day since the epidemic struck Moscow and is regarded as very encouraging. Despite the fact that there was one death, that of the five-year-old child of James Greer, conditions are regarded today as better than at any time since the epidemic appeared here.

While no record of the number of patients release from quarantine are available it is understood that many times as many were released as the number of new cases reported, and many quarantine flags have been taken down and whole families released from quarantine.

Weather conditions are regarded as unfavorable, the cold, damp, foggy weather being especially adapted to spreading the influenza, but in spite of that there has been a rapid and marked decrease in the number of cases and also in the severity of the cases reported. Taken as a whole Wednesday was regarded as by far the most favorable day in Moscow since the first cases of influenza were discovered here.

Much Better at Lewiston

Lewiston, Idaho — The reports on the influenza situation in Lewiston were again encouraging yesterday, with very few new cases reported and the condition of patients generally improving. The reports of the physicians show there are several very severe cases remaining in the city and the appeal is again made for all citizens to continue all precautions and safeguards.

The reports received yesterday by Dr. J. N. Alley, county health officer, show there are 400 cases in the county outside of Lewiston that are being cared for by licensed physicians, practically every community is affected as cases are reported from Gifford, Lenore, Lapwai, Leland and Spalding. The government tuberculosis sanatorium at Lapwai has 72 cases and there have been several deaths there. It is reported there are a number of very serious cases remaining at the sanitarium.

The reports from prairie points show the entire upper country is stricken. One death was reported last night from Keuterville, and it has become necessary to close the schools at Cottonwood because of the “flu” conditions there. Motion picture theatres and all other public gathers [sic] have been placed under the ban.

Mrs. Englis is Dead

Mrs. Maude Englis, wife of Charles P. Englis of 626 Ninth avenue, died at White’s hospital Tuesday at 12:45 o’clock, noon, death ensuing from pneumonia following an attack of influenza contracted two weeks before. While suffering from influenza Mrs. Englis gave birth to a baby girls one week ago last Sunday, and her weakened condition made her very susceptible to the ravages of the disease resulting in her death.

Nezperce Farmer Dead

Nezperce — Fred Maher, a farmer residing eight miles northeast of Nezperce, died this morning from influenza-pneumonia. He was about 35 years of age and had resided in the prairie country since a child. He is survived by a wife, two daughters, his parents and a sister. His wife and sister are both ill with the disease, but were reported doing nicely this evening.

The general conditions in the Nezperce section are improved and the reports show only a few serious cases remaining. It is believed the schools can be reopened next week in the event the conditions continue to improve.

Death at Keuterville

Cottonwood — Mrs. Charles Mader of Keuterville died at the family home this morning from pneumonia, following influenza. All of the members of the family were stricken and it has been necessary for neighbors to care for them. Mrs. Mader was about 45 years of age and is survived by a husband and four children. The family has resided in the Keuterville section for many years. No funeral arrangement have been made.

Many New Cases at Spokane

Spokane — Three hundred and eight new cases of influenza and one death were reported here today. The total now is 1,561. The cases for the most part are mild and last only a few days.

Spread at Berkeley

Berkeley, Cal. — The Berkeley board of health ordered tonight that all schools, churches, motion picture houses and other places of public gatherings be closed until such time as the decreased number of influenza cases made their reopening advisable. Seven hundred cases have been reported.

Death at Walla Walla

Walla Walla — One death from influenza occurred here today, Harry Lanhart, 10-year-old son of Mrs. and Mrs. George Lanhart, passing away. He became ill at 3 p.m. and died at 7 o’clock.

Another Death at Grangeville

Grangeville — The death of Mrs. Henry Courthouse occurred at an early hour this morning from influenza-pneumonia. Mrs. Courthouse was about 45 years of age and was stricken several days ago. She is survived by her husband. The funeral will be conducted Saturday.

The general situation in Grangeville is improving but there are a number of critical cases remaining. City Health Officer Dr. Chipman has been confined to his home with the disease for the past several days and has turned over the handling of the situation to the other physicians. The reports show that few new cases have developed this week.
— —

19200205DSM3Another Death From Influenza
Small Child Victim – Family Has Had Twelve Members Down With The Flu

Johnny L. Greear, aged five years last August, died last night making the third death in Moscow from influenza. The case is a peculiarly sad one. Both parents are very sick with the disease and will not be able to attend the funeral of their child. It is reported that 12 members of the family have had the disease.

The child is a son of Mrs. and Mrs. James Greear, living in the south-easten part of town. He has been sick for three weeks. The entire family has been sick and the grand-parents, Mr. and Mrs. David Greear, of Troy, came to assist in caring for the sick and they were also taken down with the disease.

A sister, Mrs. Fred Gray, went to help and she and her children have had the disease. Several of these are still quite ill and both Mr. and Mrs. Greear are very sick, their condition causing much alarm.

Neighbors have been very kind in assisting to care for the sick folks and are doing all in their power to relieve the suffering and see that the sick lack nothing essential to their comfort or welfare.

The funeral will be held at 10 o’clock tomorrow forenoon. There will be brief services at the cemetery, only.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 05 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 05, 1920, Page 2

School May Open Monday

The present indications are that Moscow schools will open Monday. The board is not prepared to state definitely today that the schools will be opened, but unless conditions grow worse it is stated the schools will be opened Monday morning and a full attendance is desired in all rooms.
— —

Remember “Central”

Moscow people, who responded so readily to the appeal made last week to use their telephones as little as possible during the influenza epidemic, seem to have forgotten the plea of the operators, or to have reached the conclusion that the central office is not short of help now.

Business has been almost up to normal in the past two days despite the fact that just half of the operators are still away from their desks. Some of them have been very sick and have not recovered from the flu. It may be several days before they are back at their desks and in the mean time the public is urged to use the telephone just as little as possible.

“We ought to get a better service with the increase in rates,” said a Moscow citizen. But he forgot that the telephone operators are not responsible for the increased rates and that they are human. At times there are so many calls in at one time that all cannot be given prompt attention and impatient patrons frequently show their temper and “scold” the girls. The girls do not “talk back” but their feelings are hurt and when they are working overtime and under a nervous, physical and mental strain, it takes very little unkindness to bring tears to their eyes. If people would only realize this they would be more patient and they could make the work of the operators very much easier at this trying time by the exercise of a little more patience and by not using the telephone except when absolutely necessary.
— —

No American Legion Meeting

Owning to the influenza situation the regular meeting of the American Legion will not be held tonight, but an executive meeting will be held at the Moscow hotel at 7:30. There will be no dance Friday night. The Legion is for upholding the officers in all things and was the first to call off its dance in Moscow. Dr. Leitch, city health officer, said: “I want to thank and commend the American Legion and Commander Monahan for the splendid way in which they have cooperated with the authorities in the flu situation.”

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 05, 1920, Page 4

W. O. Sholes returned home today from a two weeks visit to the coast. The Sholes home is now out of quarantine, Maxwell Sholes and Dr. Chislett, having recovered from the influenza.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 05, 1920, Page 5

City News

Frank Stevens, who has been ill with influenza and pneumonia is now sufficiently recovered to be up around home.

Grace and Hugh Wallace, children of Dean and Mrs. J. G. Eldridge, are recovering nicely from attacks of the influenza.

The family of A. H. Olson has been ill of influenza but is now much improved. Miss Susan Johns assisted in the nursing.

The C. S. Clarke home is released from quarantine. Miss Jones, high school teacher, who rooms there, has recovered from a serious attack of the “flu.”

Mrs. Anna Colby was called home from Palouse to assist in nursing at the J. H. Whorley home south of Moscow, which was formerly Mrs. Shea’s farm. Mr. and Mrs. Whorley and five children are ill with influenza. Mr. Whorley and two of the children are now seriously ill. Mrs. John King is taking care of the three month’s old baby.

Clyde Hunter, who has been very ill of pneumonia, is reported as improved.
— —

Two Basketball Teams Play At Moscow

Willammette and Whitman, both said this year to possess teams of unusual ability, are on the University of Idaho’s menu for next week, an affray with Willammette having been scheduled for Monday night and games with the Whitman Missionaries having been arrange for Wednesday and Thursday.

Idaho’s prospects have been somewhat dimmed by the illness of Ernest K. Lindley, captain and crack guard, who has been an influenza victim and who may be unable to appear in the first contest scheduled. His position will be filled either by Cobb Cozier or Boyde Cornelison, both Moscow high school products. …

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 05, 1920, Page 6

19200205DSM4Speed Of Epidemic Varies
Disease travel According to the Modes of Transportation in the Regions Afflicted.

The speed at which an epidemic – whether it be of influenza or any other infectious disease – spreads depends upon the rapidity of the usual means of transportation. In his presidential address at the congress of American Physicians and Surgeons, Dr. Simon Flexner said:

“In eastern Russia and Turkestan influenza spreads with the pace of a caravan, in Europe and America with the speed of an express train, and in the world at large with the rapidity of an ocean liner; and if one project forward the outcome of the means of intercommunication of the near future we may predict that the next pandemic, should one arise, will extend with the swiftness of the airship. Moreover, not only is this rate of spread determined by the nature of the transportation facilities of the region or the era, but towns and villages, mainland and island, are invaded early or late or preserved entirely from attack according as they lie within or without the avenues of approach or are protected by inaccessibility, as in instances of remote mountain settlement and of islands distant from the ocean lanes or frozen in during winter periods.”

(ibid, page 6)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Nezperce Herald., February 05, 1920, Page 1

19200205NH1

19200205NH2Fred Maher Influenza Victim

Fred Maher died at 7:10 o’clock Tuesday morning at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Maher, in the Alpine section northeast of this city. The cause of his death was pneumonia, following influenza. He had been ailing since last December, but did not seem to realize the seriousness of his case until too late.

The funeral was conducted at noon today from the undertaking parlors of the Nezperce Hardware Co. and the remains were interred in the local cemetery. Owing to the nature of the ailment the service was not public.

The deceased was 25 years of age and had grown to manhood with his parents on their homestead farm in the Alpine district.

He was married three years ago last March and two children were born to the union. He is survived by his wife and children, his parents and a sister. The wife and their children and his sister were also ill of the influenza, but have recovered.

His is the first fatality in this community chargeable to the present spread of influenza. The neighbors and friends of this stricken family feel deepest sympathy for them in this sad hour of bereavement.

We take this means of expressing our sincere thanks to our neighbors and friends who so generously assisted us through our recent sad trial.

Mrs. Fred Maher and Mr. and Mrs. Jas Maher
— —

The latest cases of influenza reported in town are, the entire family of Sanford Stapleton, who were stricken yesterday, and Leo Robertson, the druggist, who developed flu symptoms this morning. As we go to press, it appears all cases in town are getting along satisfactorily; that of Lloyd Whiting being the most serious, and his condition shows improvement this afternoon.
— —

19200205NH3Superintendent Moscow Schools Flu Victim

Professor John H. Rich, superintendent of Moscow city schools is dead.

His death occurred at 9 o’clock last Saturday night. He went to a local hospital suffering with influenza just a week before and his case was regarded as serious from the start. Mrs. Rich was also stricken with the disease but recovered and was able to be up and about the hospital when the summons came to her husband.

Professor Rich was serving his sixth year with the Moscow high school. He was principal of the high school three years and was promoted to be city superintendent three years ago last fall and was in the second semester of his third year as superintendent when he was taken ill. His work here was of a remarkably high order. – Star-Mirror
— —

District Court March 22

To further safeguard conditions anent [sic] the influenza situation, Judge W. N. Scales has again ordered the postponement of the Lewis county February term of district court, and has set Monday, March 22, as the date for opening such term.
— —

Teachers’ Conference Postponed

The conference of Lewis county teachers, which was to have been held on February 13, has been indefinitely postponed because of the prevalence of influenza. The new date of this conference will depend upon conditions making the postponement necessary, but it will be as early as practicable.
— —

19200205NH4Home Nursing Care In Influenza

The following instructions, sent broadcast over the lad by the American Red Cross, have, where followed, been a wonderful help in combating the influenza attack in this country. It will pay every family to familiarize itself with them:

Symptoms

1. Fever, chill, sore throat, marked weakness, discharge from the nose, cough, headache, vomiting, disturbance of digestion, shaking of limbs.

Treatment of Patient.

Call doctor.

1. Patient should be put to bed in a room alone, with plenty of fresh air and no draughts.

2. Hot tub bath to induce perspiration before going to bed unless patient is weak.

3. Liquid diet – such as eggnog, cocoa, milk soup, milk, lemonade, weak teach and coffee, broth every two hours.

4. Give water freely – one glass every hour.

5. Give cathartic. One tablespoonful castor oil or one or two tablespoonfuls of epsom salts. If bowels do not move well in twelve hours, give an injection or repeat the cathartic.

6. If fever is high, give as much water as patient can stand.

7. Very weak patients should be coaxed to take liquid nourishment every two hours at least.

8. For sore throat, gargle with hot salt solution, one teaspoonful salt to one pint of water.

9. For pain in the chest, rub chest and back twice daily with camphorated oil, with a few drops of turpentine added.

10. For profuse perspiration, rub patient dry with towels and (Continued on last page.) change clothing. Do not expose the patient.

11. For headache apply cold compress or ice bag to head.

12. Patient should not be allowed to sit up more than ten or fifteen minutes the first few times. Increase the time gradually and watch patient for signs of weakness.

13. Patient should not be allowed out of bed for any reason until temperature has been normal for forty eight hours or as doctor orders.

14. For delirious patients, keep ice to the head and watch very carefully.

15. Do not give medicines except the cathartic unless they are ordered by the doctor.

16. Care of the mouth:

Use salt solution – one teaspoonful salt to one pint backing soda or some good antiseptic mouth wash, if able to use tooth brush, patient should cleanse his mouth as often as necessary.

If patient is not able to do so, attendant should use swabs made of toothpicks wound with cotton and cleanse mouth thoroughly. Use vaseline or cold cream on lips for sores or for cracking.

17. Unless patient is very feverish, or perspiring profusely, do not insist upon daily bathing, guard against chilling at all times. Wash face and hands before and after eating.

18. Continue to give liquid diet until temperature is normal. Then give gruels, cooked cereal, milk toast, jellies, soft boiled egg.

19. Keep sick room quiet. Patient should get as much sleep as possible. No visitors.

Precautions

1. Avoid dust in the sick room. Do not dry sweep.

2. Care of sputum. Fasten paper bag to side of bed. Use toilet paper or paper napkins or newspaper and burn several times a day.

3. Scraps of uneaten food and mouth swabs should be burned immediately.

4. Milk containers should not be taken into patient’s room and should be boiled before returning to the milkman.

5. All handkerchiefs, linen, sheets, masks, towels, should be covered with cold water in the sick room. Boil for twenty minutes. Anyone may safely finish caring for the linen.

6. Where there is no toilet with running water, all mouth washes, bath water, discharges from bowels and bladder and all uneaten liquid foods should be disinfected with solution of chloride of lime before being thrown into the toilet. The toilet should be kept thoroughly scrubbed with hot water and soap.

7. To make chloride of lime solution: Mix thoroughly one half pound chloride of lime with one gallon of water. Use twice as much of this solution as the material to be disinfected. Allow to stand for one hour before emptying.

Care of the Family and Precautions for the Nurse

1. Keep other members of the family out of the room.

2. Keep patient’s dishes separate and boil twenty minutes before putting them into family use.

3. Scrub hands well with hot water and soap after handling the patient or the bed.

4. Keep your hands away from your face.

5. The attendant must be constantly masked, must wear large all-over apron in the sick room, changing it to a different one always, before entering any other part of the house. It is well to keep hair covered with an ordinary dust cap. When the attendant cannot stop to wash her own hands, door knobs, faucets, should be protected by scraps of newspaper which can be destroyed after each using.

6. Protect eyes if caring for a patient. Ordinary ten-cent glasses will do.

7. Families can help doctors, nurses and attendants by having hot water ready for use.

8. When taking care of a patient, the attendant should try to get enough sleep and rest. Take plenty of nourishing food. See the bowels move well every day. If necessary, take a cathartic every other night. Get out of doors every day.

To Avoid Getting the “Flu”

1. Get plenty of sleep and rest.

2. Take nourishing food, but do not over eat.

3. Avoid all crowds.

4. Avoid getting near anyone who is coughing, sneezing, spitting or who seems to have a cold.

5. Avoid using common towels, drinking cups, soap or anything handled by others in public places.

6. Wash hands thoroughly before eating.

7. See that bowels move regularly every day.

8. If you feel sick or “catch cold,” go to bed at once and [call] for the doctor.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 05 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Nezperce Herald., February 05, 1920, Page 2

[Editorial Page]

Nezperce wisely discontinued public gathering when the recent spared of influenza approached its gates. That this was an action of wisdom is substantiated by the fact that thus far no serious results have befallen locally, and though over twenty cases have been reported in the community, the attacks have been more or less mild and the outlook brightens. Communities which have not closed their places of public assembly have not fared so well. In the light of this experience, and the past distressing trial in this town and neighborhood, it is the general opinion that we should continue closed until the malady shows a general subsidence in the Lewiston country.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Nezperce Herald., February 05, 1920, Page 4

How to Get a Drink

Collector Edwards has announced the rules under which liquor may be procured, for medicinal purposes, under the revised, revamped, and reinforced prohibition amendment. The complete proceeding follows:

1. Patient develops a slight cold.

2. Speaks to wife about it; expresses opinion that hot whiskey might cure it, and suggests hurry call for the doctor.

3. Wife suspects faking, and administers white pine syrup and hot lemonade.

4. Patient develops grippe.

5. Wife becomes alarmed and sends for family physician.

6. Family physician satisfies self that patient is not camouflaging, but calls in nine other physicians, as required by law, to verify his findings and indorse [sic] the prescription for a half-pint.

7. Bertillion expert is called to take finger prints, foot prints, nose prints and breath prints of patient, all of which must be affixed to prescription for purposes of identification.

8. Patient is then required to fill out whiskey prescription questionnaire, giving date of birth, color of father’s hair, number of cousins who where addicted to drink, date on which he took first sip of intoxicating liquors, number of times arrested for drunkenness, complete list of every colds, etc., etc., etc.

9. Patient develops Spanish influenza.

10. Physicians then send finger prints, questionnaire, etc., to Washington to the Senate committee for the investigation of prescriptions for colds in the head and lungs.

11. Committee will summon patient to Washington for a Congressional hearing.

12. Congress will hold two-weeks’ quiz, and then require a two-thirds vote before prescription can be endorsed.

13. Patient will develop diphtheria.

14. Senate and House will finally endorse prescription, but send it to the War Department, Navy Department, Post Office Department, and Committee on Indian Affairs for filing purposes.

15. Patient will then return to home town on a stretcher, and present finger prints, prescription and photographs, questionnaire and Congressional papers to druggist.

16. Druggist will then require eleven good-character witnesses.

17. Druggist will then notify local revenue agents that prescription has been presented, and revenue agents will require carbon copy for card indexing.

18. Patient will develop pneumonia.

19. Druggist will go to cellar to fill prescription and find that his stock is exhausted.

20. Anti-Saloon League will raid drug store.

21. Patient will expire.

— New York Globe.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

The Nezperce Herald., February 05, 1920, Page 7

Local and Personal News Notes

The local physicians report the flu situation well in hand with some show of abatement in Nezperce and immediate vicinity, though several severe cases are still receiving attention. It is their opinion, however that the ban on public gatherings should be continued at least for another week.

An emergency hospital was opened at Lewiston last Saturday to aid in handling the influenza epidemic at that place and the “splendid organization of citizens and the Red Cross which is handling this was perfected by Miss Stella Booth,” says the Tribune. Miss Boothe only recently finished instructing classes at several points in Lewis county in Red Cross first aid work and hygienic care of the home, the good effect of which is being felt by our people in the present stress.

Miss Esther Smith went to Vollmer Tuesday to nurse Mrs. Wm. Stratton, who is ill of pneumonia. Mrs. Herbert Doggett is filling Miss Smith’s place at the switch board of the local Nezperce Cooperative Telephone exchange.

Geo. Tweedt, of Spokane, who came to Nezperce last week on a business mission, was ill of the flu for several days at the Nezperce Hotel, but is now able to be out.

Wm. Maher, of Lewiston, was called to Nezperce Monday on account of the serious illness of his nephew, Fred Maher, who died Tuesday.

(ibid, page 7)
——————–

Further Reading

Pandemics: 1918
Do flu outbreaks of past portend the future?

By Geoffrey Fattah Mar 2, 2005 Deseret News

1918UtahWomenMasks-a
Utah women wear masks to protect against the flu during the 1918 outbreak. Lynne Clark Collection

Jesse Boulton, 93, of Woods Cross remembers the winter of 1918 as a season of sorrow.

As a 7-year-old growing up in Granger, Wyo., she didn’t know why day after day, week after week, people in her town were dying.

“There was a family across the tracks. They buried two children, I believe, just small babies,” Boulton said.

Her mother kept her and her siblings home and away from their friends. When she was older, she learned that she had lived through one of the greatest disease pandemics in modern history.

Utah health statistics estimate that the flu killed one of every 25 Utahns who were infected. The late historian Leonard Arrington put the scope of the pandemic into perspective in his history of the influenza outbreak in Utah, published in the Utah Historical Quarterly.

“Approximately a fifth of the world population endured the fever and aches of influenza,” Arrington wrote, calling the event “the worst humanity has undergone since the Black Death (bubonic plague) of the fourteenth century.”

Widespread impact

Today, those who can recall the flu of 1918 are few. Many are in their mid-90s or over 100.

“I remember it was terrible. We couldn’t have school, church or anything,” said 91-year-old Margaret Callister, who spent her childhood in Panguitch and now lives in Delta. “Dead people were all around us, three or four to a family.”

Callister remembers her mother tying lumps of herbs around the necks of her brothers and sisters in an effort to keep them healthy. She does remember that her family was one of the lucky ones. Even with several of her brothers extremely sick, none of them died.

By Oct. 10, hundreds of cases were reported in Salt Lake City and Ogden, and health officials took action, prohibiting public and private gatherings “not held in the open air,” said the Deseret Evening News of Oct. 10.

From church meetings and funerals to private parties and political gatherings, any social event was ordered canceled or restricted. The Deseret Evening News reported that many political party officials were frustrated, wondering how they were going to nominate political candidates if they couldn’t hold caucuses. Even the funeral for LDS Church President Joseph Fielding Smith, who died Nov. 19, was restricted to a small number of family members.

Streets became near empty. Laws were passed, requiring anyone walking in public to wear a gauze mask. Spitting on the sidewalk could get you fined, or worse, jailed.

Police and health officials worked to enforce laws. People sweeping sidewalks had to water it down first to prevent dust. Soda fountains were ordered to use individual drinking cups, and workers at Utah Copper Company were advised by health officials to avoid communal drinking cups.

Although Utah went “dry” in August 1917, health officials allowed doctors to administer “spirits,” which were thought to help prevent the disease. Some took this the wrong way, as newspapers reported a few people were brought before judges for public intoxication.

By early November health officials began to see a reduction in reported infections. But then the war officially ended on Nov. 11, and hundreds took to the streets in Salt Lake City and elsewhere to celebrate. Arrington noted that Salt Lake City Police Chief Parley White decided it was futile to keep the crowds from celebrating.

The outcome was predictable. Several hundred new cases were reported in Ogden and Salt Lake City between Nov. 13 and Nov. 16.

The rural toll

In rural places like southern Idaho, the flu was also taking its toll.

“I remember the epidemic of that time,” said 103-year-old Russell Clark. “I saw the mortality rate around 50 percent. . . . There was a feeling of depression and sadness because neighbors, you see, were passing away.”

Growing up just outside Paris, Idaho, Clark said he remembers when his younger brother fell ill with a high fever.

“He was getting worse instead of better. So at midnight I called my parents out on the ranch,” Clark said, noting he and his brother were boarding in town to attend school. “They got their best team of horses and sleigh.”

Clark recalls his mother, who was a local nurse and midwife, saved his brother’s life by refusing to take him to the hospital.

Having spent many years as a surgeon himself, Clark said looking back, he saw his mother’s wisdom.

“They didn’t die of influenza per se. It was pneumonia because of a lack of nursing care to keep the patients rotated, and my mother was aware of that.”

There were horrifying accounts of patients drowning in their own fluids, even brain swelling brought on by the virus. But Clark said his mother stood vigil, rotating his brother in his bed. “He didn’t come down with pneumonia, and he made an uneventful recovery in two weeks,” he said.

By the start of the new year in 1919, there were an estimated 72,573 reported cases in Utah, with 2,607 deaths. Between 1919 and 1920, there were 19,226 cases and 308 deaths. In 1919 Utah had the second-highest death rate in the country from the pandemic, with 180.2 deaths per 100,000 population, Arrington wrote. Only South Carolina, with 189.3 deaths per 100,000, exceeded that rate.

For all the laws ordering people to wear masks and the partial lift on the alcohol ban, medical experts at the time did not know that the flu was caused by a virus, said Dr. Harry Gibbons, former director of the Salt Lake City/County Health Department. Gibbons, who has more than 40 years of public health experience, said the best thing health officials could have done was to limit public gatherings.

Excerpted from: [a longer and very interesting article.]
———————

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports Sept 19, 2021

Please share road reports. Most back country roads have not been graded this season and are rough. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: Almost a quarter inch of rain on Saturday settled the dust. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting Wednesday, Sept. 8, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
Project link:
Donnelly to Deinhard Project: Construction on Highway 55 between Donnelly and McCall. This is a much-needed project to repair potholes and cracks in the roadway and will include placing a new layer of pavement on the highway for smoother driving conditions.
What to expect:
* Idaho 55 will be reduced to one lane with pilot cars midweek (Monday – Thursday)
* All lanes will be open on weekends (Friday – Sunday)
* Roadway surface will be uneven for several weeks
* Speed limit will be reduced and 12-foot restrictions will be in place
* Construction is expected to be complete in September.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Windy and rain on Saturday (Sept 18) watch for trees and/or rocks down.
Report Monday (Sept 13) road is in good shape.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Monday (Sept 13) the road has been graded and dust abatement applied.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Windy and rain on Saturday (Sept 18) watch for trees and/or rocks down.
Report Wednesday (Sept 15) mail truck driver reports the county has nearly completed the grading, road is in pretty good shape.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened June 7
No current report.
Last report Wednesday (Aug 18) “Zena bridge is finished and looks great! Road is very rough. I would not recommend taking a car or camp trailer over.” – JB
Watch for ATV and UTV traffic.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Opened June 13
Windy and rain on Saturday (Sept 18) watch for trees and/or rocks down.
No current report.
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Profile has seriously rocky sections that are washing out worse than usual. Some are sharp. Carry a saw whether its windy or not — roots of beetle kill trees are now quite rotten and fall easily.” – CP
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Quartz Creek
No current report.
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Cleared Quartz Creek of trees last weekend.” – SA

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open, travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open. Travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Opened June 9
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Opened by May 27
No current report.

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Weather Reports Sept 12-18, 2021

Sept 12 Weather:

At 930am it was 45 degrees, partly cloudy (high wispy) light breeze, light haze of smoke and Yellow air quality. At 11am it was mostly cloudy. At 3pm it was 75 degrees, mostly cloudy, light breeze and haze of smoke (Yellow AQ.) At 630pm it was 70 degrees, mostly cloudy, slight breeze and haze of smoke. At 840pm it was 58 degrees. Looked cloudy at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 13, 2021 at 09:30AM
Mostly cloudy, hazy (Yellow AQ)
Max temperature 77 degrees F
Min temperature 37 degrees F
At observation 44 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Sept 13 Weather:

At 930am it was 44 degrees mostly cloudy (high and thin) and haze of smoke – Yellow air quality. Mostly cloudy and breezy at noon. At 250pm it was 79 degrees, partly cloudy, light haze of smoke and breezy. At 630pm it was 71 degrees, clear sky, light breeze and increasing haze of smoke. At 830pm it was 57 degrees. At 1050pm it looked at least partly clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 14, 2021 at 09:30AM
Clear, no smoke, dusty! (Green AQ)
Max temperature 80 degrees F
Min temperature 35 degrees F (est.)
At observation 42 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Sept 14 Weather:

At 930am it was 42 degrees, clear blue sky, no smoke but air quality poor from road dust. Clear and light breezes at 1230pm. At 230pm it was 78 degrees, light breezes, clear blue sky and no smoke (some road dust.) At 630pm it was 73 degrees, clear sky, occasional gusts, no smoke and quite dusty. At 830pm it was 60 degrees. Likely clear or mostly clear at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 15, 2021 at 09:30AM
Mostly clear, no smoke, dusty! (Green AQ)
Max temperature 81 degrees F
Min temperature 36 degrees F
At observation 44 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Sept 15 Weather:

At 930am it was 44 degrees, mostly clear (a few small clouds) no smoke but cloud of dust in the air. At 12pm it was 72 degrees, mostly clear, light breeze and no smoke. At 245pm it was 81 degrees, mostly clear to partly cloudy and gusty breezes, no smoke! At 630pm it was 71 degrees, partly cloudy, breezy and no smoke (haze of dust.) Looked mostly cloudy at dusk. Appeared to be cloudy to the east at 1045pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 16, 2021 at 09:30AM
Clear, light breeze, light dew, no smoke (Green AQ)
Max temperature 81 degrees F
Min temperature 34 degrees F
At observation 41 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Sept 16 Weather:

At 930am it was 41 degrees, clear sky, light chilly breeze, light dew and no smoke (Green air quality.) At 1230pm it was cool, clear and no smoke. At 230pm it was 66 degrees, clear, light breeze and light haze. At 630pm it was 63 degrees, clear and getting hazy (smoke and dust.) At 830pm it was 50 degrees. Partly clear/cloudy at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 17, 2021 at 09:30AM
Clear, mod smoke (Poor AQ)
Max temperature 70 degrees F
Min temperature 27 degrees F
At observation 36 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Sept 17 Weather:

At 930am it was 36 degrees, clear above moderate smoke and poor air quality. Smoky at 1230pm. Breezy before 130pm. At 2pm it was 78 degrees, almost clear, haze of smoke and gusty breezes. Strong wind gusts during the afternoon. At 630pm it was 74 degrees, clear sky with haze of smoke and lighter breezes. It appeared to be clear yet hazy at 1115pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 18, 2021 at 09:30AM
Clear? Smokey (Yellow AQ)
Max temperature 81 degrees F
Min temperature 36 degrees F <– yesterday morning
At observation 51 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Sept 18 Weather:

At 930am it was 51 degrees, likely clear above moderate smoke and Yellow air quality. Windy by 1110am. At 1245pm it was 72 degrees, mostly cloudy and gusty, estimate up to 30mph. At 230pm it was 75 degrees, mostly cloudy and windy, lighter haze of smoke. Started raining some time before 530pm, cooler, overcast and light breezes. At 630pm it was 49 degrees, low dark overcast and steady light rain. Not raining at 905pm (not sure when it stopped.) Not raining at 11pm. Not raining at midnight. Could have rained a little early morning? Roof dry by sunrise.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 19, 2021 at 09:45AM
Overcast, Good AQ
Max temperature 79 degrees F
Min temperature 43 degrees F
At observation 45 degrees F
Precipitation 0.23 inch
—————————-