Monthly Archives: October 2021

Oct 31, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 31, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
May 15 – Nov 30 – Firewood Season
Oct 31 – YPFD Fire Training 2pm
Nov 1-4 – BNF Rx Burns
Nov 4 – Last Amerigas delivery
Nov 7 – Time Change – Fall back 1 hour
Nov 11 – Veterans Day
Nov 15 – Deadline to order 2022 calendars
Nov 25 – Thanksgiving Potluck 3pm
(details below)
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Local Events:

Fire Training Oct 31st

Winter Structure Fire Response Plan & Training
Sunday Oct. 31, 2021 At 2pm Yellow Pine Fire Station
To All Residents:
This is your opportunity to review and practice winter structure-fire response procedures. These sessions are recommended for all residents spending the winter in Yellow Pine. The session includes:
Engine operation, driving, communications, and logistical support will be discussed including:
Structure attack and structure protection techniques.
Actual practice opportunities to deploy engines including driving, spraying water, and refilling engines.
All winter residents are encouraged to attend one or both sessions.
Volunteer agreements will be available for those interested and not yet signed up.
Yellow Pine Fire Protection District (YPFPD), Valley County, Idaho
Dated this 15 day of October 2021 at 09:00. Notice posted at the Fire Station and other locations.
Lorinne Munn, Fire Chief
Merrill Saleen, Deputy Fire Chief
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Nov 1-4 – Cascade Ranger District plans prescribed burns

Weather and conditions permitting, the Cascade Ranger District fuel managers are planning to ignite a number of debris piles, approximately 50 acres, along National Forest System road 413, Nov. 1 – 4, 2021.
The burns are located south of Yellow Pine, Idaho, within the Johnson Creek drainage. Yellow Pine may experience periods of light smoke. (208-382-7441)
Objectives of the burns are to reduce hazardous fuel accumulations collected into piles during fuels reduction, and operation activities from the 2020 Buck Fire as well as slash piles from the Yellow Pine area.
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Payette Fall Rx Burn Postponed until Spring

We will not be burning near Yellow Pine this fall. Conditions have become to wet to meet objectives. We will be looking at opportunities to burn next spring. I will send maps and more info out in the spring as we get closer to burning. – Patrick Schon, Payette NF
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Amerigas November 4

Dan H. wrote to say he is coming to top us off on November 4th.

Note from Shon at Amerigas: I wanted to let you know that we plan on being in the Yellow Pine area one more time for the season the 1st week of Nov. You can make an order by going online at (link) or by calling 1-800-427-4968.
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Thanksgiving Potluck

Please join us for a Thanksgiving Potluck on Thursday, November 25th at 3pm the Community Hall. Turkey and ham are provided.
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Village News:

Halloween/Salmon Bake Party at the Tavern Oct 25

Good crowd at the Salmon Bake – Halloween Party. Thanks to Tom for the Alaska Salmon and to our great local cooks for the Potluck dishes.

20211025TavernHalloween-a— — — —

Rock Migration Season

After the recent rains, rocks came down on the EFSF road.

20211027EFSFRock1-a

20211027EFSFRock2-a

20211027EFSFRock3-a
On the blind corner, East Fork.

20211027EFSFRock4-a
“Gift wrapped migratory rock and many Tamaracks, East Fork of South Fork, Salmon River. 10/27/21”

Note: Local backhoe operator cleared the rocks on Thursday, Oct. 28th.
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Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
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Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Thunder Mountain, Elk Summit and Deadwood roads may have snow. These roads have not been bladed and are rough. Travel at your own risk.
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Critters

Be Bear Aware

* Do not feed them human food
* Secure your trash
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Bats

While bats are an important part of our ecosystem and most do not carry rabies, CDH offers the following tips to protect yourself and pets:
* Never touch a bat with your bare hands.
* If you have had an encounter with a bat, seek medical attention.
* If you come in contact with a bat, save the bat in a container without touching it and contact your health department to arrange testing for rabies. Whenever possible, the bat should be tested to rule out an exposure to rabies. During regular business hours in Ada, Boise and Elmore Counties, call 208-327-7499 and in Valley County, call 208-634-7194. After business hours in all counties, call 1-800-632-8000.
* Always vaccinate your pets for rabies, including horses. Pets may encounter bats outdoors or in the home.
* Bat-proof your home or cabin by plugging all holes in the siding and maintaining tight-fitting screens on windows. Bats can enter through holes the size of a quarter.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

Aug. 29th the price of first-class postage stamps went to 58 cents from 55 cents.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Dump update October 27th: It was [last] emptied today and we are now in winter mode. When it gets fairly full we will call to have it dumped. Contact Cecil.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

October 2021 Water Usage Data

date flow used hours gph gpm dow more less
10/01/21 15531896 27686 24 1154 19 F 2085
10/02/21 15561519 29623 24 1234 21 S 1937
10/03/21 15591162 29643 24 1235 21 S 20
10/04/21 15622036 30874 24 1286 21 M 1231
10/05/21 15654041 32005 24 1334 22 T 1131
10/06/21 15683470 29429 24 1226 20 W 2576
10/07/21 15711373 27903 24 1163 19 T 1526
10/08/21 15738476 27103 24 1129 19 F 800
10/09/21 15765506 27030 24 1126 19 S 73
10/10/21 15791366 25860 24 1078 18 S 1170
10/11/21 15820395 29029 24 1210 20 M 3169
10/12/21 15846394 25999 24 1083 18 T 3030
10/13/21 15872265 25871 24 1078 18 W 128
10/14/21 15898092 25827 24 1076 18 T 44
10/15/21 15920094 22002 24 917 15 F 3825
10/16/21 15947196 27102 24 1129 19 S 5100
10/17/21 15974740 27544 24 1148 19 S 442
10/18/21 16001338 26598 24 1108 18 M 946
10/19/21 16027937 26599 24 1108 18 T 1
10/20/21 16054610 26673 24 1111 19 W 3
10/21/21 16082151 27541 24 1148 19 T 868
10/22/21 16109634 27483 24 1145 19 F 58
10/23/21 16137398 27764 24 1157 19 S 281
10/24/21 16164410 27012 24 1126 19 S 752
10/25/21 16192597 28187 24 1174 20 M 1175
10/26/21 16220802 28205 24 1175 20 T 18
10/27/21 16246726 25924 24 1080 18 W 2281
10/28/21 16273714 26988 24 1125 19 T 1064
10/29/21 16300058 26344 24 1098 18 F 644
10/30/21 16327645 27587 24 1149 19 S 1243
10/31/21 16357672 30027 26 1155 19 S 2440

Oct 11, 2021 Water Update

Warren Drake has been in this week and shut down the summer tank, took samples, and spent time on the winter drip points. He built a small, insulated box from pressure treated wood, around each [trickle] point that will allow better winter access, make it so [he] can use each point for sampling, and also ensure that things don’t freeze.

DRINKING WATER WARNING October 11, 2021
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 180 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059 Date distributed: 10-11-21.

YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 at the Community Hall at 10am. Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting held July 5, 2020 at the Community Hall 2pm. link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
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VYPA News:

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link: (see document at link for attachments)
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Hailey Harris, Secretary
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

Remember to clean your chimney before lighting your first fall fire, and check the fittings. Chimney brushes are available to borrow from the YPFD.

Sept 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting (no minutes yet.)
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss upcoming election (no minutes yet.)
July 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
June 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:

Sept 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

2021 Meeting schedule for the YPFD. All meetings are at the YPFD Station
Sat. May 15 at 10am
Sat. June 12 at 10am
Sat. July 10 at 10am
Sat. September 11 at 10am Budget Meeting

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by a escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Lorinne Munn
Deputy Fire Chief: Merrill Saleen
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Phil Jensen – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Nikki Saleen
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
Closed
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Winter Hours at the Tavern
Open Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat: 9am-2pm 4pm-8pm
Open Sunday 9am-2pm
Closed Tues & Thurs
Call the Tavern 208 633-2233 or Cell 208 739-7086 for other arrangements
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Open through the end of hunting season.
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Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
Store hours: 10am to 5pm, Monday – Sunday. Gas and Diesel now available. The Liquor Store is now reinstated. Now Selling Black Rifle Coffee.
The store is stocked with basic convenience store items such as food, fuel, liquor, beer, wine, tobacco, ice, non alcoholic beverages, snacks, ice cream. New Yellow Pine branded shirts, hats and koozies have arrived. We are going through the process of installing a propane dispenser and bottle exchange service.
For any particular store item requests, please call 208-633-3300 or Email
For room reservations, please call 208-633-3300 or Email for reservations
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Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Our Elk & Deer hunts are booked for our 2021 season, we do have a couple openings for our 2022 Elk & Deer hunts. We Also have a couple openings for Mountain Lion hunts December 2021 through February 2022 and Spring Bear hunts May of 2022. Please see our Website site for further details.
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:

Garden Mountain Contractors
We would like to extend our services into the Yellow Pine area if there may be a need. We dig a lot of dirt! If you need this give us a shout on our FB page below. – Larry Williamson Garden Valley, Idaho FB Page:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 25) rained most of the day on Sunday and continued all night, total = 0.75″. Overnight low of 38 degrees. This morning low foggy overcast and light rain still falling. Foggy clouds sitting down on the mountains and light sprinkles at lunch time. Low foggy overcast, light sprinkles of rain and cool, high of 42 degrees. Low foggy clouds and light rain at dusk. A break in the rain later in the evening. Looked overcast before midnight.

Tuesday (Oct 26) overnight low of 35 degrees. Yesterday’s rain total = 0.06″. This morning overcast, fog belts mid-mountain. Rivers are up above average. Jays, a hairy and a little downy woodpecker visiting. Breaks in the clouds before lunch time. Overcast and light breeze mid-afternoon, high of 43 degrees. Dark overcast, light breeze and a few misty drops at dusk. Cloudy before midnight. Rain shower during the night.

Wednesday (Oct 27) 24 hour low of 36 degrees from Tuesday morning. Rain total = 0.05″. This morning breaks in the overcast. Jays, starlings, hairy woodpecker, chipmunks and pine squirrel visiting. Mostly cloudy and chilly breezes at lunch time. Mail truck was a little later than usual, reports snow on Warm Lake Summit and upper Johnson Creek. Warmer mid-afternoon, mostly cloudy and chilly breezes. Partly clear and chilly light breeze at dusk. Looked cloudy before midnight.

Thursday (Oct 28) overnight low of 38 degrees. This morning dark overcast and light breeze. Raven calling, jays and flock of starlings visiting. Sprinkles of rain (for about an hour) and dark overcast after lunch time. Dark overcast and slight breeze mid-afternoon, high of 49 degrees. Dark clouds and calm at dusk. Looked partly clear before midnight.

Friday (Oct 29) shower early morning, plus yesterday’s rain = 0.01″, overnight low of 38 degrees. This morning mostly cloudy, patches of blue sky. Jays and pine squirrel visiting. Mostly cloudy and a bit of a breeze at lunch time. Dark overcast, a bit breezy and a few drops of rain mid-afternoon, high of 62 degrees. Light rain showers late afternoon, continuing after dusk. Cloudy and not raining before midnight.

Saturday (Oct 30) overnight low of 38 degrees, yesterday’s rain total – 0.18″. This morning low overcast with fog belts on the mountains and light breeze. Jays and chipmunk visiting. Becoming partly clear (top of VanMeter foggy) at lunch time and light breeze. Clear blue sky and a bit of a breeze mid-afternoon, high of 52 degrees. Clear sky at dusk, dew forming on metal roofs. Clear sky before midnight and below freezing.

Sunday (Oct 31) overnight low of 26 degrees. This morning mostly cloudy sky and frosty. Jays, hairy woodpecker and pine squirrel visiting, mule braying off in the distance. Mostly hazy sky at lunch time. Mostly clear by mid-afternoon and light breezes, high of 51 degrees. Mostly cloudy at dusk.
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Idaho News:

New COVID-19 cases in Valley County decline to 31 in week

By Tom Grote for The Star-News October 28, 2021

New cases of COVID-19 declined last week as reported by Valley County’s two hospitals.

A total of 31 new cases were reported for the week through Monday by St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center. That compares to 46 new cases reported the previous week and 41 the prior week.

Youths age 17 and younger accounted for 14 of the 41 positive tests reported in October through Monday of McCall residents, or 34% of the total tested by St. Luke’s McCall. Those age 50 to 69 were among 11 of the total tested, or 27%.

The two hospitals have reported 1,616 cases of cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started in March 2020.

Valley County has had 10 confirmed or probable deaths due to COVID-19, according to Central District Health.

Cascade Medical Center will hold a vaccine day on Wednesday at the Cascade American Legion Hall. Moderna booster shots as well as flu shots will be available.

People are eligible for a booster if it has been more than six months since their second COVID-19 shot and they are either over age 65, are at high risk, or work in a high-exposure occupation such as health care, education, or first responder.

Call the Cascade Family Practice at 208-382-4285 to make an appointment.

full story:
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COVID-19 Updates: 1,076 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 25 new deaths

October 29, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 1,076 new COVID-19 cases and 25 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 290,872.

The state said 84,091 people have received one dose of a two dose series, and 120,504 people have received an additional or booster dose. 1,674,430 total doses have been administered. 829,332 people are fully vaccinated.

The age group with the most cases is 18-29 with 68,108 cases.

The state said 35 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 12,649, and 11 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,122.

25 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 3,534.

full story: [Valley County 1488 cases, 10 deaths.]
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Cascade to require businesses to obtain city license

By Max Silverson for The Star-News October 28, 2021

Businesses in Cascade will have to obtain a business license following action by the Cascade City Council on Monday.

The council voted unanimously to adopt an ordinance requiring licenses for all businesses that sell taxable items.

Each license will cost $25 and only need to be purchased one time. The requirement is expected to go into effect by Jan. 1.

continued:
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Valley sheriff’s office to close Fridays starting next week

The administrative division of the Valley County Sheriff’s Office in Cascade will be closed on Fridays starting next week.

The new operating hours will be Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The administrative division of the Valley County Sheriff’s Office handles all civil actions, driver’s license services, concealed weapons, records requests, finger printing services, release of property and sex offender registry.

The Friday closures are due to lack of staffing. Call the court office at 208-382-7150 with any questions.

source: The Star-News October 28, 2021
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Recent atmospheric river improves Idaho’s drought conditions but not enough

Katija Stjepovic (KTVB) October 28, 2021

The bomb cyclone, an atmospheric river, brought rain, wind and snow from the coast of California and into Idaho.

“It really hit San Francisco and that’s where they had the crazy flooding, came over the Sierras and up through Nevada and over the Owyhees up into the Boise and then back into those central mountains,” said David Hoekema, Hydrologist with the Idaho Department of Water Resources. “It really hit the area of the state that has been in drought pretty hard.”

He added that considering Idaho’s current drought conditions, any kind of precipitation is welcome.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Payette forest seeks comments on roads in East Fork South Fork

The Payette National Forest is seeking public comments on a project to define motorized travel routes and watershed rehabilitation in the East Fork South Fork Salmon River watershed.

The East Fork South Fork Restoration and Access Management Plan will affect about 100,000 acres on the Krassel Ranger District of the Payette National Forest including the Thunder Mountain Area.

Proposed actions were based on preliminary recommendations from the Forest Service and Big Creek Yellow Pine Collaborative group. There are several motorized access actions under consideration.

The project seeks to determine the minimum roads necessary for administrative, public and private access in the area, which could lead to revisions of the travel management plan.

Several new motorized trails and roads are proposed and the access points and locations of dispersed camping within the project could change.

Restoration work on about 70 miles of abandoned mining roads is proposed throughout the area. Work would focus on reducing erosion and could include removing culverts, planting trees and shrubs, or reshaping old roads. Several culverts are also slated for repair or replacement.

This project is being conducted because a 2008 lawsuit found that the Payette failed to include “unauthorized roads” when creating a travel management plan in 2005.

This project will include unauthorized routes in consideration and planning as well as add the minimum necessary road data.

To comment on the project, visit the project webpage by accessing the Payette National Forest website at (link) and searching for “East Fork South Fork Restoration and Access Management Plan.”

Comments must be received by Nov. 22 in order to obtain standing to object to the project later in the review process.

Comments can be submitted through the project webpage or contacting Krassel District Ranger Joshua Simpson by email at Joshua.simpson@usda.gov or sending a physical copy to 500 North Mission Street, Bldg 1, McCall, ID 83638.

source: The Star-News October 28, 2021

Comments requested by 11/22.
link: to East Fork South Fork Restoration and Access Management Plan #60889 comment page.
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New Emmett District Ranger

John Wallace selected as Emmett District Ranger for Boise National Forest

Boise, Idaho, October 27, 2021, — Forest Supervisor, Tawnya Brummett has selected John Wallace to serve as the new Emmett District Ranger for the Boise National Forest.

John started his career at the Boise National Forest in 1997, more than 24 years ago, as a timber marker. He enjoyed working in the timber organization with the employees at the Idaho City Ranger District and eventually became their Timber Management Officer and acting District Ranger.

“John continued to broaden his leadership skills while working as the Timber Program Manager for the Big Horn National Forest in northern Wyoming. In 2021, John returned home to the Boise National Forest accepting the Emmett District Ranger position,” said Brummett. “We are excited to have John join our leadership team and share his extensive experience while working closely with our partners.”

John enjoys a multitude of outdoor activities including, hunting, picking mushrooms, fishing, rockhounding and an occasional golf game.

“I am looking forward to my new adventures as the Emmett District Ranger. I know I will enjoy meeting the Emmett community members, while I strive to build strong team relationships both inside and outside the agency,” said Wallace.

Venetia Gempler
Public Affairs Staff Officer
Boise National Forest
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Fire Season:

Southwest Idaho [Fall] prescribed fire burning planned

Boise, Idaho, October 28, 2021— Southwest Idaho interagency fire managers anticipate favorable spring weather conditions for planned moderate complexity understory burns and low complexity pile burning operations. Prescribed fires are designed to reduce hazardous vegetation (fuels), large wildfire potential to communities, and improve wildlife habitat. Pile burning is designed to reduce hazardous vegetation (fuels) generated from logging, non-commercial thinning operations and administrative site clearing.

Weather and conditions permitting, prescribed burns are scheduled to start in October and continue through February. Approximately 410 acres are planned for ignition in 2 project areas within the Boise National Forest. In addition to understory and broadcast burning a number of landing and hand piles are planned for ignition in 17 different locations within the Boise National Forest.

Public and firefighter safety is always the top priority in all public land fire operations. Fire managers develop burn plans with prescriptions that account for safety, specific fuels/weather conditions and potential smoke impacts. All prescribed burns are closely evaluated and are only approved when favorable conditions are present.

Prescribed burns may affect people sensitive to smoke and may impact access to burn areas and travel routes. Fire officials strongly advise forest visitors and homeowners to prepare and plan activities around the proposed dates and locations of burns and to use extreme caution near prescribed fire areas.

Please be aware of firefighters and equipment in the area and on roadways, comply with posted notices and drive slowly in areas with decreased visibility.

All planned burning during this time frame will be pile burning which will generate smoke but have low probability of fire spread beyond the footprint of the piles due to time of year, weather and adjacent fuels conditions.

Information and signs will be posted on roads that access burn areas in advance of ignitions and remain in place through burn completion.

Visit the interactive map with the latest planned areas of prescribed fire treatments. (link) Zoom into your areas of interest to get the latest information. The Idaho Department of Lands and Boise, Payette, and Sawtooth National Forests’ planned prescribed fire treatments will be featured.

Planned Boise National Forest fall prescribed burns include:

Idaho City Ranger District

* Buckskin project area (500): Hand piles generated from hazardous fuels reduction activities in the Little Muddy Creek drainage and Grimes Pass area. Located approximately 3 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho.

Cascade Ranger District

* Warm Lake Transfer Site (1 large pile/1-acre): Debris pile generated from fuels reduction activities. Located off the Warm Lake Highway near Warm Lake.

* Yellow Pine Transfer Site (1 large pile/1-acre): Debris pile generated from fuels reduction activities Located off National Forest System (NFS) road 413 near Johnson Creek Guard Station.

* Crawford Debris Pile (1 large pile/1-acre): Debris pile generated from hazardous fuels reduction activities around administrative site. Located near NFS road 430 and the Warm Lake Highway.

* Johnson Creek/Buck Hand piles (100+ piles/ 49 acres): Hand piles generated from hazardous fuels reduction activities and operational activities from the Buck Fire. Located near NFS road 413 and Johnson Creek Guard Station.

* Willow-South Landing Piles (3 large piles): Landing piles generated from logging activity in the Willow-South timber sale. Located near NFS Road 404G and Collier Peak.

Lowman Ranger District

* West Lowman project area (300 acres): Prescribed burning in Clear Creek off NFS road 582 and Miller Creek along NFS road 592 north of Idaho State Highway 21.

* Lick Creek Unit 4 (133 acres): Hand piles generated from hazardous fuels reduction activities in Lick Creek along NFS road 558.

* Lowman Administrative site (1 acre): Debris pile generated from hazardous fuels reduction activities around administrative site located at the Lowman Ranger Station.

* Elk Creek Administrative site (1 acre): Debris pile generated from hazardous fuels reduction activities around administrative site located at the Elk Creek Guard Station.

* NFS road 524 debris site (1 acre): Debris pile generated from road maintenance activity located off FS road 524G.

Emmett Ranger District

* High Fork Piles: landing piles generated from logging slash located along NFS roads: 601H, 601J, 601K, 606E near High Valley.

* Little Sage Hen Basin Piles: landing piles generated from logging slash located along NFS road: 626

* Tripod Tussock Piles: landing piles generated from logging slash located in the Tripod meadows area along NFS roads: 626,626C,626D,626E,626F,626H,626P,626L,626M,626O, and 627.

* Williams Creek (110 acres): Prescribed burning west of Idaho State Highway 55, between Banks and Smiths Ferry, Idaho. The project area is to the south and east of High Valley and located entirely on NFS lands in Valley County.

Mountain Home Ranger District

* Bogus Basin piles (approx. 25 piles): Machine and landing piles near NFS 297 road generated from logging operations.

* Minneha/Star Gulch piles (approx. 350 acres): Hand piles generated from hazardous fuels reduction thinning near NFS 202B road.

Venetia Gempler
Public Affairs Staff Officer
Boise National Forest
— — — — — — — — — —

Fall Burning on the Krassel RD – Postponed until Spring

Dated: October 29, 2021 Payette NF

We will not be burning near Yellow Pine this fall. Conditions have become to wet to meet objectives. We will be looking at opportunities to burn next spring. I will send maps and more info out in the spring as we get closer to burning.

Thank you,
Patrick Schon
Fire Management Specialist
Payette National Forest, East Zone
— — — — — — — — — —

BLM to burn logging slash 6 miles east of Smiths Ferry

The Bureau of Land Management will conduct the Round Ridge Pile prescribed burn in Valley County through the end of the year.

The burn will be located six miles east of Smiths Ferry and will involve burning 30 large piles of logging slash spread over 250 acres from a 2020 timber harvest.

Fire managers will wait for adequate moisture levels and cooler conditions in the project area to minimize fire spread and eliminate what might otherwise be a hazardous fuel source during a wildfire.

Once initiated, prescribed burning operations are expected to last up to three days, with personnel and equipment patrolling areas up to five days afterward.

Smoke from the burn may be visible from large distances due to the location, fuel types and burning conditions.

Contact the Bureau of Land Management’s Boise Fire District information line at 208-384-3378 for more information.

source: The Star-News October 28, 2021
——————-

Critter News:

Dog attacked by coyote in Boise Foothills

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, October 27th 2021

A coyote attacked a dog in the Boise Foothills, prompting Idaho Fish and Game to caution hikers to keep their dogs close by and on a leash.

The attack happened on Chickadee Ridge Trail. A hiker was walking a large dog when a coyote came out of the brush and attacked, biting the dog. The owner was able to scare the coyote away.

Coyotes have attacked and killed domestic dogs before, IDFG says. This has happened even within city limits. Coyotes can be territorial with dogs, especially around their dens.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho family inherits 80 dogs from a deceased relative

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, October 28th 2021


A family in Marsing is struggling to care for approximately 80 dogs left behind by a deceased relative.

All of the dogs are infested with fleas and worms, and some are malnourished, West Valley Humane Society says. They will all need medical care.

“We are working with the family to bring in dogs as fast as possible as kennel space opens,” WVHS said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Horseshoe Bend Goat Killed

On 10/23/2021, Boise County deputies were dispatched to a report of a dead goat in the Horseshoe Bend area. From the initial reports, it was believed that a human could have possibly killed the goat on the owners property.

An investigation was conducted by BCSO along with Fish & Game into the unfortunate demise of the goat.

The BCSO investigation determined that a cougar was the most probable suspect in the death of the goat. The department of Fish & Game will determine what to do about the cougar.

There have been quite a few recent reports of cougar sightings throughout Boise County.

Boise County Sheriffs Office (via FB)
————–

Letters to Share:

Upcoming Habitat Restoration Opportunities

The Gamebird Foundation Oct 27, 2021

The Gamebird Foundation is Helping Landowners Restore Habitat

We now have a drill-seeder to establish food plots and habitat plantings. The seeder requires at least a 35 to 50 h/p tractor. Contact us if you are interested!

Do you want to learn more about establishing wildlife habitat? You can by helping us plant game bird habitat! We have 150 wildlife plants we need help planting this Saturday October 30th from 10-3, at Terry Carlson’s near Potlatch Idaho. We have the power auger, we only need some folks to drop the trees in the holes and put the dirt in. Please Call, 208-883-3423, or email if you can make it this Saturday or in the future!

We also have more habitat plantings coming up at the youth hunting area and plantings in Viola, Troy and Potlatch we can use your help there too.

Do you know, if you have land in CRP, you are eligible to have food plots installed? If you are interested contact us. We have a wildlife Biologist that can give you some recommendations.

The Gamebird Foundation is here to help bring back our pheasant and create a new Red Legged Partridge population with Private landowners. 208-883-3423
— —

October Banquet was Huge Success!

We had our Second Annual Banquet and Auction! We had a great Banquet Feast and Auctioned off a lot of great things, raising thousands of dollars for the Gamebird Foundation’s Mission.

We want to thank all those who came or contributed to help build our organization!

We also want to thank some of our major donators including, but not limited to:

Little Canyon Shooting Preserve is a major contributor to Our Foundation: Donated a fully outfitted pheasant hunt at the Preserve.

The Wall Tent Shop donated a 12×14 canvas wall tent w/floor, stove jack and frame.

Andy Sewell, a famous local artist, painted live at the banquet a beautiful rooster water color for live auction.

Thanks Again to the many other auction contributors and members who believe in our mission. Thank you!
—————-

Fish & Game News:

Hunters: Know what hunting units have Motorized Hunting Rule restrictions

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Friday, October 22, 2021


Idaho Fish and Game

There are 30 big game hunting units that have motorized restrictions in place

Hunters are reminded that the Motorized Hunting Rule is specific to hunting big game animals, including moose, bighorn sheep and mountain goat, in designated units, and applies from Aug. 30 through Dec. 31. ATVs, UTVs, e-bikes, and other off-road motor vehicles are restricted to roads that are built, maintained, approved or designated by any governmental entity or private landowner for the purpose of travel by full-sized automobiles.

For the past 20 years, Idaho Fish and Game has been regulating the use of motorized vehicles during big game hunting dates. Hunter conflict, noise disruptions, off-trail use, and access to closed areas were all taken into consideration by the Fish and Game Commission to determine these restrictions.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Hunters: Please fill out your big game hunter reports

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Friday, October 29, 2021

Hunter reports are critical to effective big game management, and hunters are needed to do their part

Now that October big game seasons are over, Idaho Fish and Game needs all big game hunters to take a few minutes to fill out their mandatory hunter reports regardless of whether they harvested.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Hunters at check stations provide samples to test for chronic wasting disease

By Sara Cassinelli, Digital Content Strategist
Friday, October 29, 2021

At check stations across the state, Idaho Fish and Game staff are collecting lymph nodes from harvested deer, elk, and moose to increase monitoring efforts for chronic wasting disease, a disease that has not been detected in Idaho.

Chronic wasting disease, or CWD, is a contagious and fatal neurological disease that affects deer, elk, moose, and caribou. Detection of the disease has been inching closer to home as states like Montana, Wyoming, and Utah have all reported positive cases. Fish and Game has increased sampling efforts in game management units closest to those states and relies on hunters throughout Idaho to provide this critical data as a proactive measure for early detection.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wood River Valley website to provide residents with information to reduce human – wildlife conflicts

By Terry Thompson, Regional Communications Manager
Wednesday, October 27, 2021


Idaho Fish and Game

A new website has been launched in the Wood River Valley to help residents reduce human-wildlife conflicts

The Wood River Valley Wildlife Smart Communities Coalition recently announced the unveiling of a new website that will provide local residents and visitors with information about how to live safely with wildlife, including species commonly involved in human-wildlife conflict such as mountain lions and black bears. The new website can be found at (link).

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Elk gets child’s swing stuck on his head

by Peter Barker – Zenger News Tuesday, October 26th 2021


Colorado Parks and Wildlife/Zenger

A young elk was saved by wildlife officers after it wrapped a child’s swing around its head like a muzzle, leaving it unable to eat or drink.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife said in a statement the two-and-a-half-year-old bull elk was first sighted near the Evergreen Golf Course in Jefferson County, Colorado on Oct. 23.

As seen in the footage, the distressed elk was charging up and down a hill entangled in the swing.

continued: CBS2 Idaho
————–

Seasonal Humor:

HalloweenCooking-a

CovidHalloweenGhost-a
————

Idaho History Oct 31, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 78

Idaho Newspaper Clippings February 16-19, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

February 16

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 16, 1920, Page 1

19200216DSM1

19200216DSM2Orofino Schools Open Monday

The Orofino public school will open Monday morning according to the announcement made by Dr. Horswill, county physician. Both local doctors have reported the flu epidemic to be abating. Only a small number of cases have developed within the past week and few are undergoing treatment at the present time. It is expected within another week the disease will have disappeared. The usual order of things will be resumed Monday with reference to the ban placed upon public gathering and the schools. — Republican.
— —

The ladies aid of the Methodist church will not hold its meeting Tuesday afternoon on account of the influenza quarantine.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 16 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 16, 1920, Page 3

City News

E. M. Johnson and family of Viola are all sick with influenza. Their nurse, Miss Rhoda Hart, from Walla Walla, has also been taken sick.

Clarence Simonson is quite ill with an attack of pneumonia.

Miss Isabel Dickinson is back at her work in the telephone exchange after a three weeks’ illness.

Mrs. M. E. Hatfield was called to Bovill Sunday by the serious illness of her son, Arley, who has pneumonia.

Mrs. C. J. McCollister has been very ill at the L. E. Brooks home but is reported as much better.

Mr. and Mrs. S. E. Reeder, who have been in Moscow to care for their children during an attack of “flu” left for their home at Troy today. The Reeder young people are in Moscow to attend school.

Mr. T. McGillan and sister, Miss Tweedy, left today for Peck, Idaho, to assist in caring for relatives, who are ill of influenza.
— —

19200216DSM3No New Influenza Cases Reported Sunday

The crest of the influenza epidemic has passed by. With or without strict regulation a few cases may be expected to develop for some time to come. However, no new cases having been reported for yesterday, with the issuance of this order restrictions heretofore enforced will be temporarily lifted and if there is no general increase in the number of cases as heretofore reported will be made permanent.

The exceptions to this general order are that the quarantine of all homes where influenza exists will be maintained as required by law, and that public and parochial school children will be excluded from the picture shows for this week; also that schools will maintain inspection for this week.

Dr. F. M. Leitch, Health Officer
— —

Mrs. Orval Sharp Buried

The funeral of Mrs. Orval Sharp of Spokane was held this morning at the Moscow cemetery, Rev. Wm. Nichols of the United Brethren church of Spokane conducting the service. Mrs. Sharp’s sister, Miss May Shadiger of Spokane was in attendance. Mrs. Sharp’s mother died two weeks ago of influenza and her husband died about a year ago following an operation.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — — — — — — — —

Lincoln (High) School, Caldwell, Idaho

SchoolLincolnHighCaldwellFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

February 17

The Caldwell Tribune. February 17, 1920, Page 3

19200217CT1

Local And Personal

Professor O. J. Smith of the science department of C. of I. is reported to be able to walk around a little after his recent severe illness with the influenza. He is expected to take up his work again in a week or so.

Mrs. C. T. Hawkes was ill last week.

The Rev. D. H. Hare supplied his pulpit Sunday for the first time in five weeks, during which his daughter, Miss Hare had the scarlet fever.

Miss Margaret Hare, Rev. D. H. Hare’s daughter, who has been staying with Mrs. Charles L. Chalfant during the quarantine of her sister for scarlet fever, returned to her home Friday when the quarantine was lifted.

Mrs. F. M. Cole is about to be out after her recent illness.

Lewis Goldsmith is convalescing from an attack of influenza.

Mrs. Carrie M. Steunenberg has recovered from the influenza.
— —

College Of Idaho Notes

Miss Alta Elmer of Nampa went home ill Monday. It developed that she had the influenza with rather serious complications.

Miss Hazel Hunter of Middleton returned to school Sunday after a severe attack of the influenza which has kept her at home.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 17 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 17, 1920, Page 5

Canyon

The last one to contract the influenza was Leslie Herndon, who is visiting his uncle, S. P. McNeil. He has now recovered.

Mrs. Fred Herlocker has gone to Cascade to care for her sister, Mrs. Luella Mowbray, now sick with influenza.

The influenza patients are all out enjoying the bright weather. With present weather conditions, farmers will soon be plowing.

Ten Davis Items

Mrs. F. E. Kellogg is slowly recovering from a severe illness. Mrs. Cason of Parma has been substituting at the depot for some time to leave Mr. Kellogg free to care for his wife.

Henry Iverson is just getting out after a severe attack of the influenza.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 17, 1920, Page 7

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Ten Davis News

The children in the primary intermediate and seventh and eighth grades enjoyed a valentine box Friday afternoon.

Notus

Notus is not a large place, in fact to quote our friend, Mr. Hannah, there is “hardly room to cuss a cat without getting your mouth full of fur” but it is a busy one these days.

Claytonia

Very pleasant change in the weather this week, the influenza is getting better, the schools have opened again with a good attendance and there is a good feeling all around.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 17, 1920, Page 8

Ralph Hinshaw Called To The Great Beyond
Pay Tribute to Stalwart American Who Answers Final Summons at Greenleaft Home

The Greenleaf neighborhood was saddened Sunday morning February 8 when the word went out that Ralph Hinshaw had answered his Savior’s summons and gone home. He had been sick but one week taking down with the influenza Saturday which was followed by pneumonia and caused his death. A short funeral service was held at the Peckham chapel Wednesday afternoon by Rev. Lindley Wells.

As soon as Mrs. Hinshaw can get things fixed up here so she can leave she will take the body to Oskaloosa Iowa for burial. …
— —

Arena Valley Items

S. C. Dunaway and family who came here a short time ago, have all been very ill with influenza but are better. They are staying with Paul Smallwood and family on the John Prinz place.
— —

[Local News]

Nine speeders were arrested on Kimball avenue Sunday on north Kimball. Joyriders were evidently trying to burn up the new pavement and the attempt cost each of them $5 and costs, together with the warning that the fine would be doubled if they ever were taken into custody again.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Republican. February 17, 1920, Page 1

19200217TIR1

19200217TIR2Quillins Ill

J. J. Quillin and wife are confined to their homes suffering with the influenza.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 17 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. February 17, 1920, Page 2

Rose

Miss Ruth Hoff spent the weekend with Miss Cook as her parents were ill with the influenza.

The two sons of Mr. and Mrs. William E. Gardner are ill with the influenza.

I. J. Larson and family have been ill with the influenza.

Neil Gushwa, son of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Gushwa, who had to have his leg reset, is now able to walk without his crutches and intends to start to school again soon.

The leap year dance given last Friday evening was well attended and everybody enjoyed themselves.

Groveland

The family of L. Killion are much improved after a siege of illness.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. February 17, 1920, Page 3

Centerville

The sick members of the Killion family are all improving and able to be up and around again.

Allen Hays is on the sick list this week and unable to attend school.

The Fay and Brown families are on the sick list this week. Dr. Simmons is in attendance.
— —

19200217TIR3Volunteer Nurses

In a number of influenza cases in Blackfoot and surrounding territory nursing service is needed, and available nurses are asked to list their names with Mrs. George Holbrook at the city hall or with W. B. Goodnough at the Goodnough Cleaning & Tailoring Co. if they desire to volunteer to take cases where help is required.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. February 17, 1920, Page 5

Local News

The young son of J. B. DeHart is reported to be ill with the influenza.

John J. Boyle has been taken ill and is confined to his home.

Mark Tuohy was taken ill with the influenza the latter part of the week. He is at a local hospital.

Miss Elva Cherrington, who has been ill has returned to take up her work at the Moreland school.

Mrs. Affie Frandsen of the Gibson school spent the week-end in Blackfoot. She reports a splendid attendance at the school.

Mrs. Lois Reynolds of the Pingree school has recovered from her recent illness and is now able to resume her duties.

Miss Grace Gallet has returned to her home in Boise, after spending several days here in connection with the work of the health crusaders.
— —

Infant Dies

Funeral services of Florence G. Dahlstrom, infant daughter of Aurthur E. Dahlstrom were held from the family home Sunday afternoon, Bishop Williams officiating. Interment was in the Grove City Cemetery. The child died Friday from the influenza.
— —

19200217TIR4Moreland School Closed

The Moreland school is closed this week on account of illness in the vicinity. A number of pupils are absent on account of their own illness or illness in the family and the school authorities deemed it wise to close until more children are able to resume their studies.
— —

Working on Roads

The continued good weather is permitting the county commissioners to state the road work for the year considerably ahead of the time set during the winter. Gravel is being hauled to Aberdeen and the roads in that section are being surfaced with it. The road scrapers have been out on the roads for several days and the road between this city and Shelley are in fine shape as a result of their work. Work will be continued as long as the weather permits.
— —

19200217TIR5After-the-Flu Cough

or any cough should be treated and eliminated.
It isn’t the cough that carries you off, but the coughing, coughing, coughing.

Good Cough Syrups
Cherry Bark and White Pine
35c and 65c

Kantleek Can’t Leak
The latest in good hot water bottles, seamless and leak-less
$2.00 to $4.75

Palace Drug Store

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. February 17, 1920, Page 6

Northwest Notes

Influenza has appeared in epidemic form in several communities in Idaho.

It is estimated that there are upwards of 300 families in the vicinity of Miles City Mont., who are more or less unfamiliar with the English language.

Bee stings caused the death of Mrs. Mary La Pier of Sara, Wash. Mrs. La Pier, who was 72 years old, was collecting honey at her farm when she knocked over a hive and the bees attacked her.

By shooting into both rear tires of an automobile containing three alleged “moonshiners,” deputy sheriffs captured three men and lodged them in the county jail at Tacoma charged with violating the prohibition law.

Dentists summoned by the state dental board of Idaho and the bureau of license of the state law enforcement department to show cause why their licenses should not be revoked, will fight the state authorities in the courts.

The executive committee of the Retail Merchants’ association of Idaho Falls, Idaho, has indorsed [sic] the plan to raise funds to extend relief to the dry farmers east and west of town who did not produce a crop last season and whose livestock, particularly work horses, are suffering for lack of feed.
— —

Sleeping Sickness in Northwest

Spokane. — The third death from sleeping sickness has occurred here, Charles Hartman, a butcher, dying Sunday night after an illness of a week from the strange malady.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. February 17, 1920, Page 8

Wicks

There are a number of cases of influenza in the district at present, but no one seems to be seriously ill. In order to safeguard the other pupils the law requires all pupils to present a doctor’s certificate on reentering school after having had any contagious disease.

Mrs. J. T. Woodland received word last week that her son Newell Rollison, who left on a mission in the southern states about three weeks ago, was seriously ill at Chattanooga, Tenn. having suffered a relapse, after an attack of influenza. His many friends here will be glad to know that the last report stated that he was improving.

Mrs. E. E. Bingham and Mrs. R. E. Lambert came up from Pocatello Thursday to attend the funeral of Georgia, the year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Arave of Wapello.

Miss Grace Gallet of Boise, accompanied by Mrs. Faulconer and George Ezell of Blackfoot visited the school here on Tuesday. Miss Gallet gave a very good address to the teachers and pupils on the modern health crusade work now being conducted by the National Tuberculosis association.
— —

School Gives Social

The Lavaside school, gave a basket social last Friday night at the school. A large number were present and the sum of $67 was obtained from the sale of baskets and a large cake. A voting contest to determine the prettiest girl present created much interest.
— —

Martins Buried

David Martins, eighteen year old son of Carl Martins, who died last week was buried from the family home at Moreland, Sunday. Burial was in the Thomas cemetery.
— —

Lid Clamped Down Quickly

New York. — Four minutes after the eighteenth amendment became effective in New York Saturday morning, a Brooklyn cafe owner was arrested by an internal revenue inspector for selling a glass of brandy.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 17, 1920, Page 1

19200217DSM1

19200217DSM2Marshal Placed Flu Tags At 246 Homes

That there were 246 homes in Moscow quarantined because of the influenza is shown by an itemized report by Marshal Grant Robbins. The report gives the name of the owner, location and date of quarantine and there are just 246 on the list. It is believed that a great many were never reported and consequently never quarantined, but the number shows how general the disease was scattered over the town. Taking an average of three cases to each home, which is considered conservative, the report shows there were 738 cases of influenza in Moscow. The tags have been removed from all but 33 homes.
— —

No Chamber Of Commerce Luncheon This Week

Owing to the “flu” situation, the Chamber of Commerce will not hold its regular luncheon on Wednesday. The annual election of officers of the Chamber will occur on the first meeting in March and in accordance with the by-laws, the president of the Chamber has appointed a committee to nominate the president, vice president and five members of the board of directors.
— —

Sunday Services At St. Mark Church
Beautiful Day Brings Out Big Congregation For Sunday Meeting

The sky-blue weather, assisted by the quieter habit of mind which the flu ban imposes, brought out a large congregation. More people are getting into the habit of singing the Episcopal service; the whole congregation on Sunday seemed to get right into it. …
— —

Cheating Two “Industries”

A Star-Mirror reporter overheard the following conversation on the street this morning:

First citizen: — “I had the flu, but I didn’t call a doctor. I watched my temperature, and kept quiet.”

Second citizen — “And cheated some doctor out of a job!”

Third citizen — “And the undertaker, also.”
— —

Wilson Better Today

Washington. — (By A. P.) — President Wilson continued to show improvement today. He was up early and occupied the usual routine, Admiral Grayson stated.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 17 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 17, 1920, Page 3

City News

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Heard returned home today from a two months visit with their sons, Clyde at Lincoln, Nebraska, and Claude, at Phoenix, Arizona, both of whom are in the agricultural extension work. They report a delightful trip with a short siege of “flu” at Phoenix.

News comes from Troy of the death of Chas. Robertson last evening, of pneumonia, following influenza. Mr. Robertson was section foreman on the Northern Pacific railway. He leaves a wife and four children.

The funeral of the seven weeks old baby daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Foote will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at Grice’s chapel. The baby died Monday.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — — — — — — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. February 17, 1920, Page 4

19200217BFH1

Local Pick-ups

Mrs. E. Bolleau suffered an attack of the influenza last week but was able to be up and around again Thursday.

Miss Marie Muhlfeld, assistant cashier at the First State Bank, was among the Spanish influenza victims last week.

Senator W. S. Walker returned Friday evening from Boise where he attended the special session of the state legislature held Wednesday. On the way to Boise Senator Walker had the misfortune to contract a severe cold.

Miss Grace Farnsworth, assistant in the Bonners Ferry postoffice, is quite ill with an attack of the tonsillitis.

The Callahan family received word yesterday that Miss Katherine Callahan was ill at Sandpoint with the influenza.

Mrs. E. L. Little has bee ill the past week with Spanish influenza but was well improved in health this morning according to reports.

Mrs. S. T. Faucett returned Sunday from a several weeks visit with her friends in Yakima and Tacoma, Wash. She states that the influenza epidemic is very serious in many Washington cities and that several towns have forbidden all public gatherings for a time in hopes of holding the disease in check.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 17 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. February 17, 1920, Page 5

Local Pick-ups

The Cow Creek school was closed all last week on account of the illness of the teacher, Miss Ethel Loomis.

Frank Inoue, proprietor of the Casey hotel, was able to be up and around on Friday after an attack of the Spanish influenza.

The pupils of the Meadow Creek school held a dance Saturday night and used the proceeds to apply on paying for their new phonograph.

Miss Ruth Buchanan, teacher of the eighth grade and principal of the grade school, was called to Spokane Thursday by the serious illness of a relative.

County Commissioner Fred Chambers was able to be up and around on Friday after having been confined to his bed for ten days with an attack of pneumonia.

Miss Ellen Hawkins, one of the teachers of the Naples school, has been quite ill the past week and Mrs. Amy Perry has had charge of the class in the absence of Miss Hawkins.

Mrs. J. J. Bradford, of Delta, Alberta, arrived here last week to visit at the home of her sister, Mrs. A. B. Barnes. Mrs. Barnes is just recovering from a severe attack of the Spanish influenza.

Mrs. Mary Wright Dore has resigned as teacher of the Curley Creek school and is now located at Granite, Ida. The Curley Creek school has been closed the past week on account of the trustees being unable to find a new teacher.
— —

Copeland News Notes

Julius Dehlbom has been on the sick last the past eek.

Members of the E. J. Wilson’s family are ill with the influenza and this week Clarence Dehlbom is assisting Mr. Wilson in the latter’s store.

Harold Dehlbom is one of the several victims of influenza in this district.

Three horses belonging to C. B. Van Alstine, fell into the Kootenai river, through the ice last Sunday. With assistance of neighbors the horses were recovered.
— —

Will Save Their Good Clothes

The students of the Bonners Ferry high school held a meeting Wednesday and decided to put a crimp in the high cost of living. It was decided that from February 16 until the end of the term the boys should forego white collars, neckties and new suits and they must wear dark shirts and overalls or kahki trousers while the girls will wear aprons. It is said that all who fail to keep the pledge will be promptly hazed.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. February 17, 1920, Page 8

Insane Man In Sheriff’s Custody

An insane man was taken in charge last Tuesday at Naples by Deputy Sheriffs Bangs and Fry, on complaint of citizens of the district. The man was examined as to his sanity on Thursday afternoon before Probate Judge Henderson and was ordered committed to the state asylum at Orofino. Saturday Sheriff Dunning received word that the man could not be received at Orofino because the institution was in quarantine.

The man taken in custody Tuesday refuses to tell his name or anything of his past history. He carried discharge papers issued to Andrew Anderson in 1917 from the Canadian army for physical disability. The man also carried receipts in his pockets made out to Peter Peterson. It is likely that arrangement will be made to deport the man.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

High School, Moscow, Idaho ca. 1911

SchoolMoscow1911Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

February 18

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 18, 1920, Page 1

19200218DSM1

Idaho Defeated W.S.C. Last Night
University Team Beat State Collegers At Pullman By Score of 29-24

Idaho’s Vandals walked on Washington State College basketeers, 29 to 24 on the Pullmanites’ home floor, Tuesday night. …

Carried Off the Floor

Idaho players were carried triumphantly off the floor to their dressing room by a crowd of about 30 Idaho men who attended the game. Due to a strict influenza ban on the W.S.C. campus only a limited number, five men from each fraternity or dormitory, were allowed to attend. …

A vociferous Idaho violently voiced her victory over W.S.C. with a yell rally, band concert, bonfire, and a general hullabaloo lasting from late last night to early this morning, the scene of said festival activities being the proverbial campus steps. ..

For a time ear blistering blares by the band and face blistering flares from the fire absorbed the attentions of all, until Dean Eldridge offered a variation of interest by appearing in bathrobe and slippers and voiced the combined complaints of the nearby natives. Whereupon the majority of the rompers betook themselves to their respective habitations.

A faithful few remained behind and flushed the last vistages [sic] of the celebration from the campus with the fire hose.
— —

Women may Form Party

Chicago. — (By A.P.) — The alignment of women voters with existing political parties was abandoned and efforts to inaugurate a political organization of their own was advocated today by the leaders of the league of women voters, successor to the American Women Suffrage Association.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 18 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 18, 1920, Page 2

19200218DSM2School Attendance Growing

Professor W. E. Wiley, acting superintendent of Moscow schools, reports the attendance increasing rapidly and that it has reached normal in the high school, while every grade shows increased attendance. The work is progressing rapidly and smoothly. Both teachers and pupils are trying to make up for the time lost during the flu epidemic when the schools were closed for 10 days. It is hoped that by the end of the term this will be fully made up and that the schools will not have suffered at all from the enforced vacation.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 18, 1920, Page 5

19200218DSM3Only Six Flu Cases In Past Three Days

In connection with the statement of Chief Robbins as to the number of homes quarantined for influenza I would say that for the last two weeks of January there were reported to me a total of 456 cases. For the first 17 days of this month a total of 131 cases have been reported, making a total of 587 cases. The number of cases not reported is problematical but there must have been a considerable number. The total number of cases reported for the past three days is only six, which shows the epidemic to be rapidly subsiding.

Dr. Leitch
— —

City News

Mrs. J. F. Holbrook left today for her home at Creston, Wash., after three weeks visit with her sister, Mrs. J. T. Neal, south of Moscow. While here Mrs. Holbrook suffered an attack of influenza.

H. D. Martin is home from Helmer to spend the week, while convalescing from a recent attack of the “flu.”

Miss Margaret Reeder, who has been ill over a month at the home of her sister, Mrs. H. L. Coats, is reported as slowly improving.
— —

19200218DSM4John Gibb Dead From Flu At Genesee

John Gibb died Tuesday evening at 8 o’clock at his home five miles east of Genesee of pneumonia and pleurisy following influenza. Mrs. John Gibb, formerly Miss Lulu Cornwall of Moscow, passed away with her infant child in July, 1919.

Mr. Gibb was 31 years of age. He was well known in Moscow and throughout Latah county.

He leaves three children, eight, five and three years of age; his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Gibb of Genesee; one brother, Wm. Gibb, an engineer at Boise; and two sisters, Miss Alice Gibb, a teacher in Oregon, and Miss Mary Gibb of Genesee.

W. N. Gibb is at present in California and the time of the funeral will be decided after his return. Burial will be made in the Moscow cemetery where Mrs. John Gibb was buried.
— —

Have You Had It?

When your back is broke and your eyes are blured,
And your shin bones knock and your tongue is furred,
And your tonsils squeak and your hair gets dry,
And your dogdone sure that you’re going to die,
But you’re skeered you won’t and afraid you will.
Just drag to bed and have your chill,
And pray the Lord to see you thru,
For you’ve got the flu, boy, You’ve got the flu.

When your toes curl up and your belt goes flat,
And your twice as mean as a Thomas cat,
And life is a long and dismal cruse,
And you’r food all taste like a hard boiled hearse;
When your lattice aches and your head’s a-buzz,
And nothing is as it ever was,
Here are my sad regrets to you –
You’ve got the flu, boy, You’ve got the flu.

What is it like, this Spanish flu?
Ask me brother, for I’ve been through.
It is by Misery out of Despair;
It pulls your teeth and curls your hair;
It thins your blood and brays your bones,
And fills your craw with moans and groans.
And sometimes maybe, you get well.
Some call it Flu – I call it Hell!

— Dick Micks
— —

American Legion Convention

Twin Falls, Ida. — The state convention of the Idaho American Legion will be held here, April 7, 8 and 9, according to a recent announcement by La Verne Collier, state adjutant. Redrafting of the legion constitution will be one of the important matters that will come before the delegates.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

High School, Grangeville, Idaho ca. 1908

SchoolHighGrangeville1908Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

February 19

The Grangeville Globe. February 19, 1920, Page 1

19200219GG1

19200219GG2Hospital Notes
Citizens Taking Advantage of Modern Equipment Installed by Dr. Alcorn

That the Alcorn hospital which is now fully equipped, is proving a boon to the afflicted in this vicinity is being evidenced this week by the number of surgical cases that is being handled by Dr. R. J. Alcorn and his graduate nurse, Miss Hazel Calhoun.

Dr. Alcorn has leased the entire upper floors of the Telcher and Allen blocks and has had them renovated throughout, freshly calsomined, painted and varnished. Before the work was actually completed demands were made upon the hospital and there are now four surgical cases confined there.

Yesterday Mrs. Geo. A. Cowgill was operated upon for a growth on the scalp.

Mrs. Ascher underwent a serious operation on Wednesday; Miss Florance Woodard of Ferdinand, was operated on this forenoon for gaal [sic] stones, and Mrs. Curtis of near Columbus, was operated on this forenoon. Dr. G. S. Stockton assisted in the operations.

All of the patients are doing as well as could be expected.
— —

Pleaded Guilty To Making Whiskey
Gary Karnes of Keuterville, Sentenced to 30 Days, Fined $50.00

Having been afflicted with the “flu” and unable to properly “cover up” his illicit still, Gary Karnes was taken into custody last Sunday and the latter lodged in the county jail at Grangeville. On Monday he waived preliminary examination and entered a plea of guilty before Judge Campbell in the probate court. He was taken before District Judge W. N. Scales and a sentence of 30 days in the county jail and a fine of $10.00 [sic] was imposed.

It is not known whether Karnes will liquidate the fine or elect to stay in jail.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 19 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Grangeville Globe. February 19, 1920, Page 5

19200219GG3School Resumed Monday
Eleven Students Won Honor Grades During First Semester

School opened in Grangeville Monday after a two and one-half weeks’ interruption on account of influenza. The attendance, while not up to normal was good. About ninety per cent of the pupils were in attendance.

… Eleven students of the high school won honor grades during the first semester of the present school year. Of this number ten were girls, there being only one boy to receive the honor. This boy was Fred Day, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Day. His rank was third among the students of the school, his grade being one-fifth of one per cent below that of leader Ruth Munro. …
— —

At Catholic Church

Services will be resumed at the Catholic church next Sunday at the usual hour.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Grangeville Globe. February 19, 1920, Page 8

Local Happenings

The Cowboy band resumed rehearsals Tuesday night of this week after having discontinued the meetings during the influenza ban.

J. A. Peterson, acting postmaster, was down town Sunday for the first time following his severe illness. He is regaining his strength very slowly.

Sam McMeeken came out from Florence last week and spent a few very pleasant days having some dental work attended to. Sam had 22 teeth extracted at one sitting.

Joe Roakey, one of our army of subscribers of the Winona country was attending to business here Tuesday. While extending his subscription well into 1921 Mr. Roakey remarked that while the freezing nights and thawing days were possibly doing some damage to winter crops, he did not think it serious at the present time. Sickness from the epidemic was also about a thing of the past in his neighborhood.
— —

Whitebird News

Mrs. Ed Wyatt of Deer creek is reported very ill with influenza.

Miss Ida Wickman of the Whitebird schools, spent the vacation at her home near Slate creek.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Payette Enterprise., February 19, 1920, Page 1

19200219PE1

Personal And Local Mention

Mr. E. W. Blakesley who has been confined to the house for the past two months is now able to be out on the walk and enjoy the sun these fine days.

Mr. A. S. Luther is recuperating from a severe cold and other complications which has caused his confinement at home for some time. He was able to be down town one day last week.

Harry Kent has just received a letter from Mrs. Kent who is still at the home of her sister in Canada, which states she is ready to return home but owing to the snow and weather conditions it is impossible, as all trains are snow bound and the mercury 40 below zero.

Henry Solterbeck is now rapidly improving from a three weeks siege of pneumonia and other complication. Upon a thorough diagnosis of his case last Monday by Drs. Woodward, showed an abscess had formed on the left side near the heart. A small incision was made without even the administering of an anesthetic, releasing fully five pints of puss greatly to the relief of the patient.

City Marshal Scott Fitch is confined to his home this week with the Flu.

The Memorial service to be held at the Christian Church Sunday evening at 7:30 o’clock is to commemorate the lives of those who made the complete sacrifice in France. There are seven certificates of appreciation signed by the President of France, to be given to relatives in this community. It is hoped the community will be well represented at this service of which the American Legion will be in charge.
— —

Succumbs To Pneumonia

Just before going to press we learn of the death of Mr. Butts at his home on Second Avenue South which occurred at one o’clock this morning after suffering with pneumonia but a few days. Funeral services were held from the Nazarine Church this afternoon at three o’clock. We have learned no further particulars but hope to be able to publish an appropriate obituary next week.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 19 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Payette Enterprise., February 19, 1920, Page 4

Clinic Has Proved Worth
Organization Established by Boston Firm Well Worthy of Imitation by Other Employers

A pioneer medical clinic, established 15 years ago to protect the health of 600 employees, and gradually enlarged and expanded until it now cares for a total of 2,700 — that is the record proudly held today by a well-known Boston firm. At the time of its organization the medical director was in charge of of the clinic in the capacity of director and visiting nurse. Now the clinic is in charge of a practicing physician and surgeon, assisted by three full-time graduate nurses.

During the influenza epidemic of last winter, over 350 employees were treated per day, with only six deaths during the entire course of the dreaded disease. All cases were given careful individual attention and, in instances where no family doctor was in attendance, immediate arrangements were made for medical care.

It is the policy of the nurses in the clinic to advise all employees with whom they come in contact to be insured, an activity which the firm itself handles through an employees’ organization. The purpose of such advice is to secure insurance for all employees in order that they may receive its benefits after one week’s illness.

This arrangement does not place a premium upon the employees’ being ill, and at the same time the clinic cooperates in the matter of insurance.

A dental clinic is in a formative state and, no doubt, will be established in a short time. The plan and method of administration and organization is simply in the making, but is safe to say that the dental clinic will be as efficient as the medical clinic.

The Modern Hospital, in describing the clinic, says that it has fully proved its value in protecting the health of the employees of this particular company and merits the commendation and imitation of other mercantile and industrial establishments.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

Payette Enterprise., February 19, 1920, Page 5

Fruitland Department
Mrs. F. M. Burtch

The churches all resumed services on Sunday and the school re-opened on Monday. No new cases of illness have been reported for some time.

Little Jaunita Griner whose life was almost despaired of a short time ago is improving at present.

Mrs. Chas. Miller is seriously ill this week and Miss Maggie Beeghley is caring for her.

Daniel Griner arrived on Thursday of last week from Danville, Illinois, called here by the death of his son Clarence Griner.

Word was received this week that Mrs. Earl Hobbs, one of our former teachers, is ill with influenza at her home in Cornelius, Oregon.

Miss Avis Thebo went to Boise Saturday to care for her sister’s family, the members of whom are ill.

Mr. C. M. Lackey returned on Thursday of last week from this trip east. He had been gone several weeks and was ill most of the time while away.

E. B. Sargent returned from the east on Friday of last week. While away he was ill in a hospital at Des Moines for some time.

Little Margaret Smith, who has been dangerously ill for some time is much improved at present.
— —

Birds Have Right of Way

Fowl have the right of way in the air, warns the director of military aeronautics. This is justice indeed, since birds flew first.

But this is not all. Recently many towns along the Atlantic coast have been visited with dead bird showers. Aviators flying by a town would see a flock of wild fowl coming their way. They would set their machine guns and let the bullets fly.

Presently a prominent citizen walking below would be hit with a large, bloody bird. He complained to the department of agriculture. Then the federal migratory bird law between the United States and Great Britain was referred to, and it was found that shooting birds from airplanes is unlawful.

(ibid, page 5)
—————-

Further reading

Modern Health Crusade 1920

1920HealthCrusade-a

Vintage 1920 Modern Health Crusader Pin National Tuberculosis
source: Ebay
— — — — — — — — — —

Report of the Commissioner of Education for the Year Ended June 30, 1920

Educational Hygiene.

In the summary of educational hygiene in the report for the year 1918–19 it was stated that “in no former year has so much, so varied, and so far-reaching work been done in the field of educational hygiene.” The emotional intensity caused by the war was at full tide, and the projects thus initiated were going ahead proportionately. During the year just ended there has been some decrease of emotional intensity and evidence of a wholesome tendency to deal in a constructive critical way with new plans and programs — the field of educational hygiene. On the other hand the momentum generated during the war period is working steadily and without serious abatement both in long-established channels and in the channels newly broken out. Gains have been consolidated and fruitful new lines of effort have been extended.

(page 65)

Progress of Health Education.

In the spring of 1920 the Bureau of Education sent a questionnaire to about 10 per cent of the schools of the country to ascertain the extent of health education throughout the country and particularly to what extent the plan of health education started by the bureau a year before was used.

The Bureau of Education received 4,016 answers to questionnaires. Forty-eight per cent of the schools showed health teaching of some sort. Thirty-two per cent used classroom instruction of one kind or another and textbooks and sent up clamorous calls for more and better material. Nineteen per cent weigh and measure the children according to the plan suggested by the Bureau of Education. A few, of course, struggle against cruel handicaps, especially in rural localities and where the curriculum is crowded, but the majority of educators seem anxious and ready to devise ways and means of procuring life more abundant for the American school child, and making it part of their manifold duties to see that he knows how to live a healthy and a happy life.

A relatively small percentage of these schools, 1.9 per cent, reported medical inspection, and seventy-two hundredths of 1 per cent have nutritional clinics and feedings. Comment on the situation received through the questionnaire has been sometimes discouraging or unenlightened, but the general spirit is one of quick cooperation, and often original methods of health education have come to light. The section of the country quickest to adopt modern health education in the schools has been, according to these reports, the West. Utah stands out bravely at the head of the list, with 72 per cent of her schools doing weighing. Iowa comes next with 54 per cent of the schools using the height and weight standard for child health. Minnesota is third with 31 per cent of her schools weighing the children. And so the States come up with a will out of their welter of ignorance and irresponsibility toward physical young America.

Voluntary Organizations.

Brief summaries of some of the more important activities of voluntary organization in the field of educational hygiene are shown.

(1) National Physical Education Service. — The National Physical Education Service was established about two years ago by the Playground and Recreation Association of America. The creation of this new service resulted from a request by the National Committee on Physical Education formed in the spring of 1918. The National Physical Education Service is actively engaged in promotion of State and Federal legislation for physical education. It has contributed largely to the success of the State campaigns for physical education legislation, and is directing the movement for Federal legislation.

(2) The Child Health Organization of America. This organization continued its work along the lines indicated in our 1918-19 annual report. Their general health program stresses five particular points: (1) A scale in every school; (2) time allowed in every school day for the teaching of health habits; (3) a hot school lunch available for every child; (4) teachers trained in normal schools to teach health habits; (5) every child’s weight record sent home on the monthly report card.

They have published an attractive child health alphabet, a health reader, and other literature on health education.

Cho-Cho, the health clown, has traveled from coast to coast demonstrating the value of teaching health through fun and make-believe. The picture man, a clever cartoonist, and a health fairy are also sent out by this organization and have met with great success.

A special conference of well-known educators was called by the child-health organization last December to suggest a program of child health adapted to the work of the elementary grades and high schools. As a result of this conference a bulletin entitled “Further Steps in Teaching Health” was prepared for the Bureau of Education and printed on the Government presses.

In order to create a wider interest and secure from a large circle suggestions for a modern health syllabus to meet the needs for health teaching in all grades, a $1,000 fellowship, including one year’s study in modern health work at Columbia University, was offered for the best graded plan on modern health teaching. The results of this contest will be made available in a short time for the use of superintendents of State and city schools.

(3) Modern Health Crusade. — Reports from over the country indicate no less than 6,000,000 enlistments of children as Modern Health Crusaders through the performance of the health chores.

During 1919-20 the Modern Health Crusade was adopted on a State-wide basis as obligatory or authorized curriculum work throughout Maine, Alabama, Tennessee, Indiana, Wyoming, Idaho, and Utah. The crusade has been officially adopted also in the District of Columbia, in Alaska, and in hundreds of cities and counties outside of the seven States.

Under the policy of a progressive program the Order of the Round Table has been re-created for Modern Health Crusaders after a plan worked out by the National Tuberculosis Association in consultation with other national organizations engaged in child-health work. The new order is designed to stimulate interest in physical and athletic fitness. The boy or girl to be admitted to the Round Table earns points by demonstrating athletic ability; by passing weight, posture, and physical examinations; and by obtaining a high grade in health studies. The standards are those set by the Child Health Organization, the Playground and Recreation Association of America, the American Posture League, the First Aid Division of the American Red Cross, the Boy Scouts of America, the Girl Scouts, and the Camp Fire Girls.

The National Tuberculosis Association desires to make the movement a means of bringing to the schools improved methods of health instruction. Correlation of crusade work with such studies as English composition, history, arithmetic, and civics, as well as with hygiene, has been readily carried out.

The Record of Health Chores is now published in primary, standard (intermediate), and senior editions, corresponding to grades 1 to 3, 4 to 6, 7 or 8, and to the higher grades. With the three editions of chores as foundation, schools may at their discretion add features of the program set forth in the crusade manual, thus affording a further progression through the grades. The manual, a 32 page booklet, may be obtained from the National Tuberculosis Association, 381 Fourth Avenue, New York.

(4) Committee on Health Problems in Education of the National Council of Education. The committee reports completion of its study and report upon health improvement in the rural schools. It also reports that a study of standards of health norms and health defects of school children is being conducted. A report on this practical and important matter, supported by our joint health committee, promises to add greatly through improved uniformity of findings and methods to the practical health work for the school children of the entire country.

(pages 68-71)

excerpted: from Google Books
— — — — — — — — — —

Leitch house in Moscow

1900DrLeitchHouse-a
Ott Historical Photograph Collection, Digital Initiatives, University of Idaho Library

Dr. F.M. Leitch, an early day doctor, residence located at the northwest corner of Washington Street and the Troy Highway [Highway 8]. Picture early 1900s.

source: University of Idaho Library
— — — — — — — — — —

What is old is now new again: 100 years ago Idaho doctors enforced quarantine to slow spread of smallpox

Brian Holmes August 17, 2020 KTVB

The Spanish Flu of 1918 has been one of the closest comparisons to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic but it wasn’t the only infectious disease that Idahoans dealt with 100 years.

The years following the Spanish Flue Pandemic, people still battled infectious diseases, like smallpox and yellow fever,

On August 17, 1920, one Idaho town had enough with the caviler attitude some residents had with public health.

100 years ago, Dr. F.M. Leitch was the City of Moscow’s Health Officer, took to the local newspaper, the Daily-Star Mirror, to remind people about a local outbreak of smallpox and the laws that could be enforced if people didn’t take quarantine seriously or didn’t report being sick.

“Quarantine laws for the control of contagious diseases will be rigidly enforced in Moscow in the future,” Leitch wrote.

A physician by trade, Leitch took up issuing the warning after he received multiple complaints that families came down with smallpox but didn’t tell anyone and they went around town spreading and exposing others to the disease.

The state law said physicians who were called to treat people with say, smallpox, the plague, yellow fever, or any other disease dangerous to the public health, they had to report the names of those diagnosed with 24 hours.

If someone just thought someone else might have such an illness, health officials had the right to come into the home and put everyone there under temporary quarantine.

And if a stay-at-home sanction wasn’t enough. A quarantine card “having printed on it in large letters the name of the disease within,” would be placed on your front door and no one could come in or out without written permission from the board of health.

Considered a flight risk? “Quarantine guards” with police powers would be placed at your door and allowed to use “all necessary means to enforce” that quarantine.

Caught not following the law of Idaho? That’s a misdemeanor and could mean you quarantine at the county jail for 90 days or a fine of $50.

source: KTVB
—————

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports Oct 31, 2021

Please share road reports. Most back country roads have not been graded this season and are rough. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. This time of year there could be snow in higher elevations. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are damp. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting Wednesday, Sept. 8, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
Project link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Wednesday (Oct 27) mail truck driver reports just a little snow on Big Creek Summit this morning, not much on the road. Probaby melted by now, but watch for ice in the shady corners.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 27) road is in good shape. No rocks or trees down. Many hunters camped along the South Fork and a noticeable number of vehicles.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 27) – Rocks in the road, pot holes by the bridges.
Report Thursady (Oct 28) – the recent batch of rocks have been cleared.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 27) About 6″ of snow on Warm Lake Summit and upper Johnson Creek. Road is rough, wash boards deeper. (May have melted by now?)
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 27) About 6 inches of wet snow on top but the road is still good. – JB
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open – Likely snow up high
No current report.
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Profile has seriously rocky sections that are washing out worse than usual. Some are sharp. Carry a saw whether its windy or not — roots of beetle kill trees are now quite rotten and fall easily.” – CP
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Quartz Creek
No current report.

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open? Travel at your own risk – likely snow up high.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open? Travel at your own risk – likely snow up high.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Open? Travel at your own risk – likely snow up high.
The SNOTEL station showed 12″ snow on October 31.
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Open, travel at your own risk.
No current report.

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Road Reports Oct 27, 2021

Note: There is snow in the high country above 6500 feet. In the last 7 days YP has received 1.25″ of rain.

Please share road reports. Most back country roads have not been graded this season and are rough. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. This time of year there is likely snow in higher elevations. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are wet. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting Wednesday, Sept. 8, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
Project link:
Donnelly to McCall Project: They have finished paving the highway, but work remains to align driveways.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Wednesday (Oct 27) mail truck driver reports just a little snow on Big Creek Summit this morning, not much on the road.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Monday (Oct 18) road is in good shape.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Monday (Oct 18) the road is in good shape.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 27) About 6″ of snow on Warm Lake Summit and upper Johnson Creek. Road is rough, wash boards deeper.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 27) About 6 inches of wet snow on top but the road is still good. – JB
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open – Likely snow up high
No current report.
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Profile has seriously rocky sections that are washing out worse than usual. Some are sharp. Carry a saw whether its windy or not — roots of beetle kill trees are now quite rotten and fall easily.” – CP
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Quartz Creek
No current report.

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open? Travel at your own risk – likely snow up high.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open? Travel at your own risk – likely snow up high.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Open? Travel at your own risk – likely snow up high.
The SNOTEL station showed 13″ snow on October 26th.
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Open, travel at your own risk.
No current report.

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Oct 24, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 24, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
May 15 – Nov 30 – Firewood Season
Oct 25 – Halloween and Salmon Feed YP Tavern 7pm
Oct 28 – The Corner to close for the season
Oct 31 – YPFD Fire Training 2pm
Nov 4 – last Amerigas delivery
Nov 7 – Time Change – Fall back 1 hour
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Halloween/Salmon Bake Party at the Tavern

Monday, October 25th at 7pm. Salmon provided by Tom Wood. Bring a Potluck Dish if you wish. Halloween Costumes encouraged or come as a Hunter.

20211024YPTavernHalloween-a
photo courtesy Yellow Pine Tavern
— — — —

Fire Training Oct 31st

Winter Structure Fire Response Plan & Training
Sunday Oct. 31, 2021 At 2pm Yellow Pine Fire Station
To All Residents:
This is your opportunity to review and practice winter structure-fire response procedures. These sessions are recommended for all residents spending the winter in Yellow Pine. The session includes:
Engine operation, driving, communications, and logistical support will be discussed including:
Structure attack and structure protection techniques.
Actual practice opportunities to deploy engines including driving, spraying water, and refilling engines.
All winter residents are encouraged to attend one or both sessions.
Volunteer agreements will be available for those interested and not yet signed up.
Yellow Pine Fire Protection District (YPFPD), Valley County, Idaho
Dated this 15 day of October 2021 at 09:00. Notice posted at the Fire Station and other locations.
Lorinne Munn, Fire Chief
Merrill Saleen, Deputy Fire Chief
— — — —

Amerigas November 4

Dan from Amerigas wrote to say he will be coming to Yellow Pine Nov 4th to top us all off for the winter.
Note from Shon at Amerigas: I wanted to let you know that we plan on being in the Yellow Pine area one more time for the season the 1st week of Nov. You can make an order by going online at http://www.amerigas.com or by calling 1-800-427-4968.
———

Village News:

UTV Accident

The community’s men and women joined together to extricate an accident victim on Sunday, Oct 17th. A UTV went over the embankment on Stibnite road (Hopeless Point) resulting in a four hour rescue, an ambulance trip and a helicopter ride after dark.
— — — —

Planned Power Outage Oct 20th

Power off from 1030am to 1256pm. This was for equipment maintenance scheduled for our area.
— — — —

Celebrating Candy’s Birthday at the Tavern

20211020TavernCandyBday-a
photo courtesy Yellow Pine Tavern
— — — —

From Perpetua Resources

Last month, we hosted the Yellow Pine and Cascade Fire Departments at Stibnite to participate in a Hazardous Waste Operations & Emergency Response (Hazwoper) Training alongside our site crews

2021SeptTrainingStibnite-a
Photo courtesy Perpetua
— — — —

Fall Colors October 24, 2021

20211024YellowPineWest-a
Yellow Pine West Webcam

The local webcams were off line for a few days, but back in service as of Sunday, October 24th.
— — — —

Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are Open. These roads have not been bladed and are rough. Travel at your own risk. High elevation snow possible after the weekend.
— — — —

Critters

Be Bear Aware

* Do not feed them human food
* Secure your trash
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Bats

While bats are an important part of our ecosystem and most do not carry rabies, CDH offers the following tips to protect yourself and pets:
* Never touch a bat with your bare hands.
* If you have had an encounter with a bat, seek medical attention.
* If you come in contact with a bat, save the bat in a container without touching it and contact your health department to arrange testing for rabies. Whenever possible, the bat should be tested to rule out an exposure to rabies. During regular business hours in Ada, Boise and Elmore Counties, call 208-327-7499 and in Valley County, call 208-634-7194. After business hours in all counties, call 1-800-632-8000.
* Always vaccinate your pets for rabies, including horses. Pets may encounter bats outdoors or in the home.
* Bat-proof your home or cabin by plugging all holes in the siding and maintaining tight-fitting screens on windows. Bats can enter through holes the size of a quarter.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

Aug. 29th the price of first-class postage stamps went to 58 cents from 55 cents.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Saturday (Sept 4) The dumpsters are being emptied on Wednesdays.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

Oct 11, 2021 Water Update

Warren Drake has been in this week and shut down the summer tank, took samples, and spent time on the winter drip points. He built a small, insulated box from pressure treated wood, around each [trickle] point that will allow better winter access, make it so [he] can use each point for sampling, and also ensure that things don’t freeze.

DRINKING WATER WARNING October 11, 2021
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 180 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059 Date distributed: 10-11-21.

YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 at the Community Hall at 10am. Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting held July 5, 2020 at the Community Hall 2pm. link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
— — — —

VYPA News:

Notice to all VYPA Members:

I have accepted a position on the board of directors of the Yellow Pine Area Coalition (YPAC).
I will be relinquishing all my VYPA responsibilities by January 1, 2022.
I will complete my responsibilities as Project Manager for the Community Hall Repair Project prior to stepping off the Council.
If you are interested in filling the position of VYPA Chairman; leading the Harmonica Festival committee; coordinating the YP Escapades; managing the village’s online presence; or working on the Community Hall committee, please contact one of the Council members.
Over the next 2 1/2 months, the VYPA Council will be working toward a smooth transition for my successor. Thank you for allowing me to serve our community for the last 13 years.
Deb Filler, VYPA Chairman

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link: (see document at link for attachments)
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Hailey Harris, Secretary
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
— — — —

YPFD News:

Remember to clean your chimney before lighting your first fall fire, and check the fittings. Chimney brushes are available to borrow from the YPFD.

Sept 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting (no minutes yet.)
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss upcoming election (no minutes yet.)
July 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
June 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:

Sept 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

2021 Meeting schedule for the YPFD. All meetings are at the YPFD Station
Sat. May 15 at 10am
Sat. June 12 at 10am
Sat. July 10 at 10am
Sat. September 11 at 10am Budget Meeting

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by a escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Lorinne Munn
Deputy Fire Chief: Merrill Saleen
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Phil Jensen – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Nikki Saleen
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
As the season comes to an end, we are starting to dwindle our inventory. To ensure our stock is fresh and kept to our standards, we will only be taking reservations until the end of our season (October 28). To make arrangements, please call The Corner at 208-633-3325 or call/text Hailey Harris at 970-275-7336. Thank you for a great summer!
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Open daily: 8am to 9pm Sunday: 8am to 2pm
Indoor Dining and Outdoor Dining Available.
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Open through the end of hunting season.
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
Store hours: 10am to 5pm, Monday – Sunday. Gas and Diesel now available. The Liquor Store is now reinstated. Now Selling Black Rifle Coffee.
The store is stocked with basic convenience store items such as food, fuel, liquor, beer, wine, tobacco, ice, non alcoholic beverages, snacks, ice cream. New Yellow Pine branded shirts, hats and koozies have arrived. We are going through the process of installing a propane dispenser and bottle exchange service.
For any particular store item requests, please call 208-633-3300 or Email
For room reservations, please call 208-633-3300 or Email for reservations
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Our Elk & Deer hunts are booked for our 2021 season, we do have a couple openings for our 2022 Elk & Deer hunts. We Also have a couple openings for Mountain Lion hunts December 2021 through February 2022 and Spring Bear hunts May of 2022. Please see our Website site for further details.
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:

Garden Mountain Contractors
We would like to extend our services into the Yellow Pine area if there may be a need. We dig a lot of dirt! If you need this give us a shout on our FB page below. – Larry Williamson Garden Valley, Idaho FB Page:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 18) 24 hour low of 30 degrees from Sunday morning. This morning mostly cloudy and no frost. Chipmunks, pine squirrel and jays visiting. Overcast at lunch time. Dark overcast, light breeze and mild mid-afternoon, high of 59 degrees. Overcast and scarlet clouds to the west after sunset. Bright moon after midnight.

Tuesday (Oct 19) overnight low of 27 degrees. This morning clear sky and frosty. Mostly clear and slight breeze at lunch time. Ed Staub propane delivering in the village today. Mostly cloudy and mild temperatures mid-afternoon, high of 65 degrees. Sounds of winter firewood in the air, the “thunk” of splitting wood and a chainsaw buzzing off in the distance. Looked partly cloudy at dusk. Partly cloudy and bright moon before midnight.

Wednesday (Oct 20) 24 hour low of 29 degrees from Tuesday morning, likely low 41F. This morning dark overcast and started getting blustery. Power off at 1030am. Two minute shower of rain and gusty breezes at lunch time. Mail truck was a little early. Power on just before 1pm. Chipmunks, pine squirrel, jays and male hairy woodpecker visiting. Lighter breezes and mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, high of 57 degrees. Late afternoon rain shower for about 15 minutes, enough to wet things. Mostly cloudy and light breeze after sunset. Cloudy before midnight.

Thursday (Oct 21) overnight low of 35 degrees. Recorded just a “trace” from yesterday’s rain showers. This morning partly clear, small white clouds and no frost. Jays and chipmunks visiting. Mostly cloudy (nearly overcast) at lunch time. Getting windy by early afternoon. Warmer, partly cloudy and blustery mid-afternoon, high of 67 degrees. Calm and mostly high thin clouds after sunset. Looked mostly clear to the east before midnight – bright moon. Rain showers early morning.

Friday (Oct 22) estimated low of 40 degrees (equipment error.) Early morning rain shower = 0.03″. This morning dark overcast, short sprinkle around 1030am. Broken overcast and 51 degrees at noon. Dark overcast and rain showers mid-afternoon, high of 62 degrees, then temperature dropping. Dark low overcast and steady rain continues at sunset and calmer. More rain after midnight.

Saturday (Oct 23) overnight low of 36 degrees. The 24 hour rain total = 0.36″. This morning low overcast, foggy peaks and ridges, snow on top of VanMeter but not Golden Gate. Hairy woodpecker, jays and chipmunks visiting. Thinner clouds around lunch time. Dark overcast sitting down on top of VanMeter and slight chilly breeze mid-afternoon, high of 46 degrees. Light rain shower late afternoon. Dark overcast at sunset. Cloudy before midnight. Early morning sprinkle of rain before 6am.

Sunday (Oct 24) overnight low of 36 degrees. The 24 hour rain total = 0.03″. This morning dark overcast and light breeze. Jays visiting. Light rain started falling before lunch time, dark overcast. Getting breezy, steady light rain and dark overcast mid-afternoon, high of 44 degrees. Pine squirrel calling from the trees, jays bopping around in the rain. Still raining at sunset, dark and overcast.
————

RIP:

John Miller

John Miller, passed away on Tuesday evening, [October 19, 2021.] Carolyn and John had been married for MANY years and had an anniversary on the 16th. Their son and granddaughter are coming today to spend some time with Carolyn. Please send prayers for her as she continues to recover from a back injury a few weeks ago and now grieves the loss of her husband.

[John used to drive the mail truck to Yellow Pine, and Carolyn had been doing the shopping for the back country for many years.]
— — — — — — — — — —

Nicole Irving Musgrove

Nicole Irving Musgrove was born Sept. 8, 1978, to Marian Knight Irving and Thomas Irving in New Orleans, Louisiana. She moved on to her next great adventure Oct. 10, 2021, at the age of 43.

Nicole grew up in Metairie, Louisiana. She loved being in the kitchen with her mother and grandmother, and had the spirit of a Cajun chef mixed with a bit of Southern flair.

She attended St. Martin’s Episcopal School and graduated Ecole Classique. She attended University of New Orleans and Delgado Community College.

Nicole married her life partner, Clint Musgrove, in 1999, and they produced two incredible children, Parrish and Cole. After living in Metairie, the couple moved to Kentwood, Louisiana where she owned and operated Southern Belle Catering and worked for Regions Bank.

The family survived Hurricane Katrina and relocated to New Meadows (Clint’s childhood dream country) in 2013.

Nicole has been involved in the community in many capacities including the McCall Area Chamber of Commerce, McCall-Donnelly High School, America’s Best Communities, Idaho First Bank, The Ponderosa Center, and many other varied community activities.

Nicole spent countless hours of her personal time on community enhancement and celebrations for her friends. However, her most important contributions to the area were for her family and her children’s friends. They all knew if they needed a safe place to go, they had it. She always had an “open door” policy.

Nicole is survived by her husband, Clint, daughter Parrish, son Cole, mother Marian Baroni (Frank), and her brother, Thomas Irving, Jr.

A celebration of Nicole’s life will be held Friday, Oct. 22, 2021, at 2 p.m. at Elk Creek Church in McCall. All who wish to attend are invited. In lieu of flowers, memorials may go to Ponderosa Center or a fund of your choice.

source: The Star-News October 21, 2021
—————

Idaho News:

Ninth COVID-19 death in Valley County reported

Number of new cases sees slight increase

By Tom Grote for The Star-News October 21, 2021

The ninth confirmed death from COVID-19 in Valley County was reported this week by Central District Health.

No details on the death were available on Wednesday. Two other suspected deaths from the virus among Valley County residents have been reported by Central District Health since the pandemic started 18 months ago.

Valley County’s two hospitals last week reported a slight increase in new cases after several weeks of decline.

A total of 46 new cases were reported in the last week by St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center. That compares to 41 new cases reported the previous week.

The two hospitals have reported 1,570 cases of cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started in March 2020.

The most new cases among McCall residents tested by St. Luke’s were age 50 to 69, which made up 24% of the total. Those up to age 17 were the next largest group, with 21% of the total, the hospital reported.

St. Luke’s McCall now has free take-home COVID-19 tests available to pick up in the hospital’s main entrance at 1000 State St. The saliva-based test offers results for COVID-19 in two to three days.

full story:
— — — —

COVID-19 Updates: 1,480 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 26 new deaths

October 22, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 1,480 new COVID-19 cases and 26 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 284,278.

The state said 85,532 people have received one dose of a two dose series, and 74,645 people have received an additional or booster dose. 1,656,961 total doses have been administered. 819,443 people are fully vaccinated.

26 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 3,403.

full story: [Valley County 1449 cases, 10 deaths.]
— — — — — — — — — —

Community Christmas Concert canceled due to COVID-19

The traditional McCall Community Christmas Concert has been canceled this year due to COVID-19 concerns and time restraints, but organizers hope to return for the spring community event.

continued: The Star-News October 21, 2021
— — — — — — — — — —

Tamarack Resort ownership changes

Florida company buys out partners from 2018 acquisition

By Tom Grote for The Star-News October 21, 2021

One partner in Tamarack Resort near Donnelly has sold its share to the other partner, a news release from Tamarack Resort said.

Imperium Blue, a partnership of families in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., and Atlanta, Ga., has sold its interests to existing partner MMG Equity Partners of Pinecrest, Florida, a suburban village in Miami-Dade County.

The two companies acquired the resort in November 2018, 10 years after the original developers closed the resort due to financial troubles.

The new owners have revived The Village at Tamarack with new businesses opening and the first phase of condos sold.

“We are immensely proud of what the entire team has accomplished over the past three years at Tamarack Resort and remain very excited about what lies ahead for the future of Tamarack,” said Kyle Mowitz of Imperium Blue.

MMG Equity Partners is a privately-owned investment company focused on the long-term ownership, development, and acquisition of commercial properties in Florida according to the company’s website.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County Sheriff’s Office to close Fridays starting Nov. 1

The administrative division of the Valley County Sheriff’s Office in Cascade will be closed on Fridays beginning the week of Monday, Nov. 1 until further notice.

The new operating hours will be Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The administrative division of the Valley County Sheriff’s Office handles all civil actions, driver’s license services, concealed weapons, records requests, finger printing services, release of property and sex offender registry.

The Friday closures are due to lack of staffing. Call the court office at 208-382-7150 with any questions.

source: The Star-News October 21, 2021
————-

Mining News:

FS: No plans submitted from Stallion Gold

Mine would be located adjacent to Perpetua Resources

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News October 21, 2021

Stallion Gold Corp. has not yet submitted plans required to begin exploration of its mining claims near Yellow Pine, according to the Boise National Forest.

The Vancouver, British Columbia, mining company has notified the Boise Forest of its intent to conduct exploration on its “Horse Heaven Project,” but still needs to finalize exploration plans.

“The Forest has not accepted any plan as complete,” said Venetia Gempler, a spokesperson for the Boise National Forest.

If complete plans are submitted, the Boise Forest would review the plans with a team of geologists, botanists, fisheries biologists, wildlife biologists and other specialists, Gempler said.

“We would be trying to look at what the impacts could be,” she said.

It is unknown how long it could take to review an exploration plan submitted by Stallion Gold, Gempler said.

Stallion Gold CEO Drew Zimmerman said this week that his company is working on formal plans to be submitted to the Boise Forest for review.

Last summer, crews were collecting soil and rock samples from the site to help the company refine locations for its drilling permit applications, Zimmerman.

If exploration reveals Horse Heaven’s mineral deposits are feasible for mining, Stallion Gold would need to submit a complete plan of mining operations for review by the Boise Forest.

“Only a very small percent of mineral deposits become a ‘mine,’” said Rick Wells, a geologist with the Boise Forest.

Golden Gate Hill

The requests submitted so far by Stallion Gold involve exploration of two areas on Golden Gate Hill, which takes in two of three primary exploration zones identified by the company.

Golden Gate Hill is located in the northeast corner of 5,644 acres on which Stallion Gold owns 695 mining claims.

The hill is less than a mile from Yellow Pine, a village of 25 year-round residents, and is flanked by Johnson Creek to the west and the East Fork South Fork Salmon River to the north.

The Golden Gate mineral zone stretches 1.8 miles and could include high-grade gold deposits, according to Stallion Gold.

Another area Stallion Gold wants to explore is Antimony Ridge, a smaller mineral zone located about one mile southeast of the Golden Gate Zone.

However, Stallion Gold has not filed documents with the Boise Forest to begin exploration of Antimony Ridge, Gempler said.

Antimony Ridge has historically been mined as far back as World War I for antimony, a mineral used in munitions and renewable energy, among other things.

The company has “numerous targets to be evaluated and prioritized” for exploration once the Antimony Ridge and Golden Gate zones are explored, according to Stallion Gold.

Benefits of the project’s location include year-round road access, nearby power lines, water rights availability and the nearby Johnson Creek airstrip, the company said.

The Horse Heaven Project shares its eastern boundary with Perpetua Resources’ Stibnite Gold Project, for which a mining plan is currently under review by the Payette National Forest.

Officials from both companies have said the projects are independent and unrelated.

Perpetua began exploration of its Stibnite deposits in 2009. Review of its mining plan began in September 2016 after it was submitted to the Payette Forest.

Stallion Gold was known as Hybrid Minerals Inc. until the company announced a name change on June 2 after it acquired the Horse Heaven Project.

Hybrid’s main focus was exploring a cobalt mine near Salmon in Lemhi County. That project was abandoned in April 2019 due to falling cobalt prices, according to the company.

Stallion Gold has four employees, three of which are based in British Columbia. President and Vice President of Exploration Bill Breen is a long-time Idaho resident.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
————–

Public Lands:

Public Scoping Period Opens for the East Fork-South Fork Restoration and Access Management Plan

McCall, Idaho, October 19, 2021 – The Krassel Ranger District of the Payette National Forest is interested in hearing your comments on a proposal to implement a range of actions under the East Fork South Fork Restoration and Access Management Plan project.

The Forest is considering a range of actions relating to motorized travel management and watershed rehabilitation within the East Fork South Fork Salmon River watershed and non-wilderness portion of the upper Monumental Creek drainage within the headwaters of the Middle Fork Salmon River.

With publication of the legal notice in the Idaho Statesman anticipated October 21, the Scoping Period will run for a 30-day timeframe. This is the first public opportunity to provide input on the initial proposal, with an opportunity to review and comment on a completed environmental analysis prior to an objection period on a draft decision.

Information on the project is available in the scoping document on the project webpage at: (link)

For further information on this project, please contact Joshua Simpson, Recreation Program Manager at 208-634-0616 or via email at joshua.simpson@usda.gov

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Tribal Liaison
Payette National Forest

Scoping document link:
————–

Fire Season:

Fall Burning on the Krassel RD

Sept 29, 2021 Payette NF

The Krassel Ranger District, Payette National Forest is planning to implement prescribed fire this fall east of Yellow Pine. The unit is located east of Yellow Pine, on the North side of the East Fork Rd, between Quartz creek and Profile creek. See attached maps for more specific areas affected. Ignitions should take 1 to 2 days for each. Hazards from the prescribed fires including fire spread, smoke, rolling debris, ash pits and fire weakened trees may be present in the area until significant weather (precipitation and cooler temperatures) occurs.

Ignition is anticipated to take place in October or early November.

Please contact Patrick Schon at 208-634-0623 patrick.schon@usda.gov or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622 laurel.ingram@usda.gov with any questions or comments, or if you will be operating in or close to that area this fall.

Map

Thank you,
Patrick Schon
Fire Management Specialist
Payette National Forest, East Zone
— — —

BLM to burn logging slash east of Smiths Ferry this fall

The Bureau of Land Management will conduct the Round Ridge Pile prescribed burn in Valley County through the end of the year.

The burn will be located six miles east of Smiths Ferry and will involve burning 30 large piles of logging slash spread over 250 acres from a 2020 timber harvest.

Fire managers will wait for adequate moisture levels and cooler conditions in the project area to minimize fire spread and eliminate what might otherwise be a hazardous fuel source during a wildfire.

Once initiated, prescribed burning operations are expected to last up to three days, with personnel and equipment patrolling areas up to five days afterward.

Smoke from the burn may be visible from large distances due to the location, fuel types and burning conditions.

Contact the Bureau of Land Management’s Boise Fire District information line at 208-384-3378 for more information.

source: The Star-News October 21, 2021
——————

Critter News:

Cascade Veterinary Clinic

(from their FB page, Oct 20, 2021)

Due to the outbreak of COVID we have been forced to close our doors to the Cascade Veterinary Clinic and Garden Valley Clinic We apologize for any inconvenience We will keep you up dated, Thank you for understanding
— — — — — — — — — — —

Herd of sheep cross Idaho Highway 55, with the help of Eagle Police

Eagle police had to help out with a BAAA-d traffic jam on Highway 55 Tuesday morning.


Credit: Eagle Police Department

KTVB Staff October 19, 2021

If you’ve ever pondered life’s biggest questions and wondered why the sheep crossed the road, the Eagle Police Department has your answer.

On Tuesday morning, a BAAA-d traffic jam hit Idaho Highway 55 in Eagle. According to a Facebook post by Eagle police, Frank Shirts, a rancher from Wilder, was driving his herd west across Highway 55 on Tuesday morning and needed the help of police.

In their post, the Eagle Police Department shared a wooly cool aerial photo of the sheep’s’ migration from the Boise National Forest near Highway 55 and Beacon Light Road. According to police, Shirts’ herd of sheep spent the last few months in the national forest.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Rats found in Coeur d’Alene Library book drop-off are now in need of homes

The pet rats, four males and a female, were left behind by an obscured figure about 12:30 a.m. Wednesday, as recorded by the library video surveillance system.

Bill Buley (Coeur d’Alene Press) October 21, 2021

Consider them a new breed of literary critic.

Five pet rats were discovered Wednesday morning in the book drop-off at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library, as reported by our news partner the Coeur d’Alene Press.

The rats apparently didn’t care for the books in the bin.

“They simply pooped on them,” said Michael Priest, library director.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Angler sets record with huge Snake River grass carp

October 19, 2021 Local News 8

Congratulations to Cris Endicott of Meridian for setting a new certified state record for grass carp.

Endicott caught the monster carp on Oct. 10 using a twin-tail bass jig while prospecting the Snake River for smallmouth.

The fish weighed 46.7 pounds, and measured 50-inches long, clinching a new certified weight state record. Carp records are kept separately for rod/reel and archery anglers, and this fish surpasses the current 39.5-pound archery record set by Saige Wilkerson in 2012.

Grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) are an herbivorous (plant-eating) member of the Cyprinidae family, which is a large family of fish that contains all carp and minnow species. They are native to Asia and may be found in portion of the Snake River, but are much less numerous than their cousins the common carp, which are widespread throughout Southwest Idaho.

source:
————–

Fish & Game News:

Public can comment on proposed rules pertaining to Fish and Game

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, October 20, 2021

The public has opportunity to comment about Fish and Game proposed rules, including proposed fee rules. Deadline for comment is November 10 and people can comment via email to rules@idfg.idaho.gov or mail to Jim Fredericks, P.O. Box 25, Boise, ID, 83707.

Proposals are found in the Oct. 20 Administrative Rules Bulletin.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Nonresident elk tags still available for residents to buy as second tags

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Thursday, October 21, 2021

Residents pay full nonresident price for the tags, which are available for a limited number of elk zones

Resident Idaho hunters looking to potentially double their elk hunting opportunities this year are in luck. Some nonresident elk tags remain available for residents as second tag for the 2021 season. After Aug. 1, unsold nonresident tags remaining can be bought by resident hunters as second tags, but still at the nonresident price. Available tags and zones are listed online at gooutdoorsidaho.com. Residents can also buy the tags at all license vendors, at Fish and Game regional offices, or by calling 1-800-554-8685.

These elk tags fall within the statewide limit of 12,815 nonresident tags. The tags are not currently available to nonresidents because the nonresident limits for each individual elk zone has already been met, but the total nonresident tags in all combined elk zones was less than the statewide limit for nonresident tags.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Studying Idaho’s white sturgeon fishery in the upper Snake River

By Nathanial Tillotson, Fisheries Technician
Tuesday, October 19, 2021


Ben Anderson / Idaho Fish and Game
Fish and Game biologist with a white sturgeon caught in the Snake River

This past summer, fisheries biologists with the Magic Valley Region spent weeks on the Snake River between Milner Dam and Idaho Falls surveying the white sturgeon population. The work, which will continue for a few more years, will help Fish and Game better understand how hatchery white sturgeon in the upper Snake River grow, survive, move, and just how many are out there. White sturgeon are not native to the Snake River above Shoshone Falls. However, since 1990, Fish and Game occasionally stocked white sturgeon upstream of Shoshone Falls to provide additional angling opportunity for sturgeon outside of their native range.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Pooch trapped in crevice 5 days rescued, unharmed

by Associated Press Thursday, October 14th 2021


This photo provided by New York State Parks on Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2021, shows a 12-year-old dog named Liza being viewed on a plumbing camera in a crevice in Kerhonkson, N.Y. (New York State Parks via AP)

A dog trapped for five days deep inside a narrow, rocky crevice at a state park north of New York City was rescued unharmed — though it was hungry and thirsty, parks officials said Wednesday.

While the 12-year-old dog, Liza, went days without food or water at the Minnewaska State Park Preserve, it was observed licking the damp walls of the crevice before a rescuer was finally able to shimmy in Tuesday, the state parks agency said in a news release.

A local woman was hiking with the dog Thursday when it fell out of sight into crevice. Park staffers were unable to get into the crevice to help the barking dog.

Two members of the New Jersey Initial Response Team, a volunteer group specializing in cave rescue, were able to descend into the crevice enough on Tuesday to get a specialized plumbing camera close enough to observe Liza.

Rescuer Jessica Van Ord shimmied through the passage and used a hot dog hanging from the end of a modified catch pole to attract the dog into putting its head into a loop. That allowed another rescuer nearby to close the loop.

continued:
————

Seasonal Humor:

FallBearDiet-a

CovidSocialDistanceCat-a
——————

Idaho History Oct 24, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 77

Idaho Newspaper Clippings February 13-14, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

February 13 (continued)

Cottonwood Chronicle. February 13, 1920, Page 1

19200213CC1

19200213CC2
Flu Claims Two Victims
A Father And Mother Taken Away From Their Families

The influenza epidemic which has run its course in a great many sections of the country tributary to Cottonwood, appears to be at its height in and around Cottonwood. Perhaps more cases have been reported this week than any previous week since the epidemic first took a grip on the community. While most of the cases are in a mild form some, however, are very sick with the malady. Those who were reported to be held in a firm hand by the flu, the first of the week were Frank Wimer, John Romain and H. G. Agnew, but at the present time are doing nicely and no serious results are anticipated.

While Cottonwood has been exceptionally fortunate in escaping from any serious casualties, our neighbors in the country have not fared as well.

This week a father and mother were called to the great beyond from the effects of influenza, they being Tony Ross and Mrs. Geo. Gehring.

Death of Young Father

Tony Ross, a young and prosperous farmer, residing 6 miles north of Cottonwood passed away Wednesday morning at 1:15 after battling with the flu, followed by pneumonia for only seven days.

Mr. Ross was born in Illinois Nov. 17, 1885 being 34 years of age at the time of his death. In 1908 he was married to Miss Mary Kaschmitter to which union four children were born, they being Alfons, age 10; Hubert, age 8; Pauline, age 5 and Edwarde, age 4. Besides his wife, he leaves other relatives and a large number of friends.

The funeral services were held from the Ferdinand Catholic church Thursday morning at 9 o’clock, and the services were conducted by Father Jerome Veith. The remains were laid to rest in the Ferdinand cemetery. The sympathy of the entire community is extended towards the bereaved family.

The funeral arrangements were in charge of Undertaker A. H. Nau.

Keuterville Mother Dead

Mrs. Geo. Gehring, aged about 50 years and a pioneer resident of the Keuterville section passed away in her home near that place Wednesday from influenza. Mrs. Gehring is the mother of a number of children whose names we were unable to obtain. Besides her sorrowing husband, she is survived by her father, Werner Herzog, three brothers, Joe, Henry and Barney Herzog and a sister, Mrs. William Entrup.

The remains of Mrs. Gehring were laid to rest in the Keuterville cemetery Thursday morning, the funeral services being held from the Catholic church of that place. The sympathy of the entire community goes out to them in this their sad bereavement. Funeral furnishings were supplied by A. H. Nau of Cottonwood.

At the time of Mrs. Gehring’s death several other members of the family were bedfast with the disease and at the present time a 6-year old daughter is very ill, as well as a son at Ferdinand.
— —

19200213CC3School Open Monday

The public school, which has been closed for practically two weeks will open Monday morning at 9 o’clock. A large number of the students, as well as some of the teachers, during this time have been afflicted with influenza but all are on the road to recovery and it is expected a full attendance will report Monday morning.
— —

To Enlarge Hospital

A movement for enlargement of the St. Joseph hospital was launched Tuesday evening at a meeting held at the Knights of Columbus hall and steps will be taken in the very near future to bring the matter before the people.

The hospital has been in need of enlarged facilities for the past several years and the campaign inaugurated about four years ago was halted because of the war conditions and the general trend towards curtailing all new construction. The plan proposed is to construct an addition to the present hospital building and the estimated cost of this structure is about $100,000.

The plan favored last evening is for the Catholic people of Lewiston to provide 25 percent of the money needed and a general subscription will then be circulated among the citizens to secure an additional 25 per cent. It is then proposed to take the campaign outside of Lewiston to secure the remaining 50 per cent.

The first work will be with the Catholic people of Lewiston to secure the first 25 per cent and it is expected this matter will be taken up at an early date. – Lewiston Tribune.

No doubt the movement to enlarge the hospital at Lewiston will receive considerable financial aid in this section of the country as a large percentage of those seeking hospital facilities go to this hospital in Lewiston.
— —

Idaho Acts on Suffrage
Six Votes Recorded Against the Measure

Boise, Feb. 11. — Idaho went on record today as the thirtieth state in the union to ratify the amendment to the federal constitution, giving to women the right to vote. The ratification resolution was passed by the senate by a vote of 29 to 6, but was unanimously approved by the house, 52 voting for it. It was thought the resolution would receive unanimous approval.

The senate vote created somewhat of a scare, for had two more solons voted against it, it would have been defeated. …
— —

Attend Special Session

State Senator Nate Pettibone and Representative Seth Jones of Idaho county attended the special session of the Idaho legislature at Boise Wednesday. Representative August Schroeder of Cottonwood had made preparations to attend, but owing to illness in the family was unable to go.
— —

Notice To Auto And Truck Owners

Keep to the right on all street corners. By order of John Franke, Marshal

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 13 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. February 13, 1920, Page 2

[Local News]

Mrs. and Mrs. Edgar Fry returned Sunday evening from a two months visit with relatives and friends at Spokane. Mr. Fry stated that they enjoyed their visit immensely while away but were more than pleased to return home. Their visit was cut short on account of the serious influenza condition at Spokane, which they wished to escape if possible.
— —

Professor May Have Been Wrong

The Famous Professor Metchnikoff gave it as his opinion a few years ago that old age was due to the formation of certain poisons in the system. The most deadly of these poisons are called indols and phenols, and the professor’s theory was that they could be destroyed by eating sugar.

Unfortunately, however, few people can absorb enough sugar to destroy the poisons, but the professor did not let this trouble him in the least. He found, he asserted, that there is a microbe in dogs called “The glycobacter,” which, if put into the human system will manufacture a large amount of sugar with which it will fight the indols and the phenols and rid the system of these enemies to youth and beauty. Doctor Metchnikoff’s theory created a great amount of interest among men of science, especially in France, but apparently it “hung fire” somewhere, and we are still growing old, although dogs are as common in our midst as ever.

[see Further Reading below]

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. February 13, 1920, Page 4

County Seat News Items

Judge Scales announces that opening of district court in Lewis county has been postponed until March 22, owing to the influenza epidemic.

The postoffice crew is seriously crippled this week with the illness of Acting Postmaster J. A. Peterson and Clerk Frank Reynolds. A. M. Ecker has the morning shift, working from 3:30 to 1 o’clock p.m., and W. T. Williams and Charles Simmons now handle the evening mail alone. It requires a little longer, perhaps, but under the circumstances all patrons of the office should be very considerate.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. February 13, 1920, Page 7

19200213CC4Home Nursing Care In Influenza

The following instructions, sent broadcast over the land by the American Red Cross, have, where followed, been a wonderful help in combating the influenza attack in this country. It will pay every family to familiarize itself with them:

Symptoms

1. Fever, chill, sore throat, marked weakness, discharge from the nose, cough, headache, vomiting, disturbance of digestion, shaking of limbs.

Treatment of Patient.

Call doctor.

1. Patient should be put to bed in a room alone, with plenty of fresh air and no draughts.

2. Hot tub bath to induce perspiration before going to bed unless patient is weak.

3. Liquid diet – such as eggnog, cocoa, milk soup, milk, lemonade, weak teach and coffee, broth every two hours.

4. Give water freely – one glass every hour.

5. Give cathartic. One tablespoonful castor oil or one or two tablespoonfuls of epsom salts. If bowels do not move well in twelve hours, give an injection or repeat the cathartic.

6. If fever is high, give as much water as patient can stand.

7. Very weak patients should be coaxed to take liquid nourishment every two hours at least.

8. For sore throat, gargle with hot salt solution, one teaspoonful salt to one pint of water.

9. For pain in the chest, rub chest and back twice daily with camphorated oil, with a few drops of turpentine added.

10. For profuse perspiration, rub patient dry with towels and change clothing. Do not expose the patient.

11. For headache apply cold compress or ice bag to head.

12. Patient should not be allowed to sit up more than ten or fifteen minutes the first few times. Increase the time gradually and watch patient for signs of weakness.

13. Patient should not be allowed out of bed for any reason until temperature has been normal for forty eight hours or as doctor orders.

14. For delirious patients, keep ice to the head and watch very carefully.

15. Do not give medicines except the cathartic unless they are ordered by the doctor.

16. Care of the mouth:

Use salt solution – one teaspoonful salt to one pint backing soda or some good antiseptic mouth wash, if able to use tooth brush, patient should cleanse his mouth as often as necessary.

If patient is not able to do so, attendant should use swabs made of toothpicks wound with cotton and cleanse mouth thoroughly. Use vaseline or cold cream on lips for sores or for cracking.

17. Unless patient is very feverish, or perspiring profusely, do not insist upon daily bathing, guard against chilling at all times. Wash face and hands before and after eating.

18. Continue to give liquid diet until temperature is normal. Then give gruels, cooked cereal, milk toast, jellies, soft boiled egg.

19. Keep sick room quiet. Patient should get as much sleep as possible. No visitors.

Precautions

1. Avoid dust in the sick room. Do not dry sweep.

2. Care of sputum. Fasten paper bag to side of bed. Use toilet paper or paper napkins or newspaper and burn several times a day.

3. Scraps of uneaten food and mouth swabs should be burned immediately.

4. Milk containers should not be taken into patient’s room and should be boiled before returning to the milkman.

5. All handkerchiefs, linen, sheets, masks, towels, should be covered with cold water in the sick room. Boil for twenty minutes. Anyone may safely finish caring for the linen.

6. Where there is no toilet with running water, all mouth washes, bath water, discharges from bowels and bladder and all uneaten liquid foods should be disinfected with solution of chloride of lime before being thrown into the toilet. The toilet should be kept thoroughly scrubbed with hot water and soap.

7. To make chloride of lime solution: Mix thoroughly one half pound chloride of lime with one gallon of water. Use twice as much of this solution as the material to be disinfected. Allow to stand for one hour before emptying.

Care of the Family and Precautions for the Nurse

1. Keep other members of the family out of the room.

2. Keep patient’s dishes separate and boil twenty minutes before putting them into family use.

3. Scrub hands well with hot water and soap after handling the patient or the bed.

4. Keep your hands away from your face.

5. The attendant must be constantly masked, must wear large all-over apron in the sick room, changing it to a different one always, before entering any other part of the house. It is well to keep hair covered with an ordinary dust cap. When the attendant cannot stop to wash her own hands, door knobs, faucets, should be protected by scraps of newspaper which can be destroyed after each using.

6. Protect eyes if caring for a patient. Ordinary ten-cent glasses will do.

7. Families can help doctors, nurses and attendants by having hot water ready for use.

8. When taking care of a patient, the attendant should try to get enough sleep and rest. Take plenty of nourishing food. See the bowels move well every day. If necessary, take a cathartic every other night. Get out of doors every day.

To Avoid Getting the “Flu”

1. Get plenty of sleep and rest.

2. Take nourishing food, but do not over eat.

3. Avoid all crowds.

4. Avoid getting near anyone who is coughing, sneezing, spitting or who seems to have a cold.

5. Avoid using common towels, drinking cups, soap or anything handled by others in public places.

6. Wash hands thoroughly before eating.

7. See that bowels move regularly every day.

8. If you feel sick or “catch cold,” go to bed at once and [call] for the doctor.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. February 13, 1920, Page 8

[Local News]

A large number of people from Cottonwood attended the funeral of Tony Ross at Ferdinand Thursday morning.

The Cottonwood Battery and Welding Shop was closed for several days the past week on account of both owners of the business, P. H. Dye and Wm. Buettner being ill with the flu. They are again on duty we are pleased to announce.

Miss Leasel Lussman and Miss Beatrice Calhoun returned Monday from Grangeville where they have been for the past week substituting in the place of the regular telephone operators at the county seat, who were all afflicted with the flu.

Mrs. Dr. J. E. Reilly received a message Sunday from Spokane stating that her sister, Mrs. H. Driscoll was seriously ill but at the present writing is somewhat improved and if no complications set in doctors predict her recovery, which is welcoming news.

It is reported that every family in the Keuterville section has been afflicted with the flu except the Henry Bosse and Dominii Dunlos families.

H. G. Agnew returned Friday evening from a business trip to Spokane. While at Spokane or enroute, he contracted the flu. The disease took a rather severe grip on him at first but he is reported to be getting along nicely at the present time.

Deputy Sheriff John Powell was a business visitor in Cottonwood Tuesday. He stated that Sheriff Eller was now on the road to recovery and that within a few days the sheriff would again be on duty.

The local Post of the American Legion has changed their headquarters from the Fireman Hall to the lodge room of the I. O. O. F. hall where they expect to be located permanently. Owing to the flu epidemic the regular meeting in February was adjourned until Wednesday the 18th, when they will meet in their new headquarters.

T. C. Keith, whose life hung on a balance all last week, due to influenza, has made exceptionally good progress towards recovery this week, which is welcoming news to his many friends.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 13, 1920, Page 1

19200213DSM1

19200213DSM2
One New Flu Case Yesterday’s Total
Dr. Leitch, City Health Officer, Makes Statement Defending Attitude

In reply to some things said in last evening’s Star-Mirror, I want to give the following statement given me a short time ago by a man living near Genesee and vouched for by him as absolutely true.

Last winter the citizens of Genesee supposed the influenza epidemic to have come to an end and held a dance to celebrate the event. One young man who attended the dance that night was ill the following morning with influenza. Within forty-eight hours almost every person who attended the dance and were infected by the presence of this young man were also ill with influenza. That as a direct result of that dance being held, within two weeks’ time over two hundred new cases of influenza had developed, with seventeen deaths resulting, which was certainly an awful penalty to pay for a few fleeting hours of pleasure. And a like result of which I am sure no one living in Moscow wants repeated here.

From an average of six new cases reported daily for the past week only one new case was reported yesterday and from present indications it would appear that if strict regulations are maintained for a week or ten days longer the city of Moscow may be entirely freed from the present epidemic and all quarantine regulations lifted.

Dr. F. M. Leitch

Complaint has reached me that some of the physicians of Moscow are not having their cases of influenza properly placed under quarantine and that inmates of said houses are passing in and out at will. I therefore request that every physician of Moscow on discovering a new case of influenza or any contagious disease immediately call up the city hall and have the house quarantined or call me that I may have the same done. People should remember that there is a penalty for disregarding quarantine regulations and I sincerely hope that it will not be necessary to enforce the penalty in any case.

Dr. F. M. Leitch, City Health Officer.
— —

19200213DSM4University Of Idaho Observes The Quarantine

Exception is taken by University of Idaho people to rumors circulating about the streets that “everything is wide open” at the university. Professor H. T. Lewis, who has charge of that work, said: “The rumors are entirely unfounded. We have observed the rules rigidly. Nothing but student activities have been permitted and no dances, receptions or other entertainments are allowed. We are observing the rules and shall continue to do so.”
— —

Basket Ball Games Cancelled

Owing to the quarantine regulations the basket ball games which were to have been played tonight at Potlatch and tomorrow night at Moscow, between the Potlatch and Moscow high school basket ball teams, have been cancelled.
— —

19200213DSM3John M. Shepherd Called By Death
Well-Known And Popular Graduate Of The University A Flu Victim

A telegram received Friday morning by the local lodge of Elks bring the sad news that John. W. Shepherd, a graduate of the University of Idaho, class of 1903, died at Caldwell, Idaho, from pneumonia, following an attack of “flu”. His wife was in Illinois visiting and his death came so suddenly that relatively [sic] had no time to reach his bedside before the end came. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Shepherd of Howell, received a wire Wednesday but did not reach there till Friday afternoon, and the funeral will occur Saturday and the body laid to rest there.

Deceased was born in Oregon, September 8, 1878. He was a student under Dr. Little and received his degree as a civil engineer. Later he was engineer for the Canadian Pacific railway, and successfully carried through some very difficult engineering for that company. He leaves no children. He joined the Moscow lodge of Elks in January 1908, and is held in the highest esteem by this community.

When the news of his death reached Moscow, Dr. Little, of the department of engineering at the university was called over the phone, and although ill, he gave the following information:

“Before his graduation Mr. Shepherd was successful in water measurement and as water master in south Idaho. Later he accepted employment with the Canadian Pacific Railway company and had charge of the construction of the two spiral tunnels by which the important grade reduction on Field Hill was accomplished. His skill here was so great, and his work so successful that he was placed in charge of the relocation of 50 miles of the Canadian Pacific, including the great Rogers Pass tunnel, which at the time of the start of this work was the longest tunnel in North America. In recent years he has been engaged in general engineering work in south Idaho, and at the time of his death was engineer for the Gem Irrigation District. I met Mr. Shepherd at the recent engineers’ convention at Pocatello and he was in robust health. In his death Idaho loses one of her most competent engineers and a man of sterling character.”

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 13 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., February 13, 1920, Page 3

City News

The Cornwall school expects to be reopened Monday after being closed for three weeks on account of influenza.

Mrs. Maud Benton and her mother, Mrs. Hobart of Cornwall have recovered from severe attacks of influenza.

Miss Jessie Hoover, specialist in dairy by-products of the U. S. dairy division left Moscow yesterday for Washington, D. C., having been compelled to cancel engagement on account of the influenza situation.

M. K. Bue and P. O. Juve left today for their home at Enterprise, Oregon, the funeral of Mrs. M. K. Bue having been held in Moscow Thursday afternoon. They were accompanied home by Olaf Croghan of Michigan, who was called here by the death of his sister, Mrs. Bue. Mr. Crogan will visit his sister, Mrs. P. O. Juve, at Enterprise before going to his home in Michigan.

Mr. and Mrs. D. D. Miles left today for Duluth, Minnesota, called by the illness of their daughter-in-law.

W. Claude Renfrew left for Spokane this morning to visit his family, several members of whom are ill.

Harry Johnson, south of town, and Mrs. Johnson’s sister, Mrs. R. F. Whitman and son, Donald, of Marshfield, Oregon, have all been ill of influenza at the Johnson home. All are recovering.

Miss Isabel Richards, who has been ill at her home for three weeks with influenza, is able to be out again.
— —

Funeral of Mrs. M. K. Bue held Thursday

The remains of Mrs. M. K. Bue were laid to rest yesterday afternoon at the Moscow cemetery. A large number of relatives and old-time friends gathered together to pay their last respects to her memory.

Those from out of town were, besides her husband, her brother-in-law, T. O. Juve of Enterprise, Oregon; Mr. and Mrs. Braham of Spokane, Mrs. A. Lee of Lewiston, a cousin of the deceased, and a brother, Olaf Croghan, from Crystall Falls, Mich.

The funeral was conducted by Rev. F. I. Schmidt of the Lutheran church, of which deceased had been a member and the many beautiful flowers from friends here and at outside points bespoke the high regard in which Mrs. Bue and always been held.

(ibid, page 3)
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The Kendrick Gazette. February 13, 1920, Page 1

19200213KG1

Frank C. Wittman

Frank Cornelius Wittman of Potlatch ridge, son of Mr. and Mrs. F. O. Wittman, passed away at the home of his parents last Sunday afternoon. His death was caused from influenza which developed into pneumonia. He was eight years old at the time of his death. The funeral service was conducted by Rev. Berriman, Monday morning.
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Death of Claud May

Claud May, son of Mr. and Mrs. William May of this place, died in Spokane Wednesday from pneumonia, following influenza. The body was brought here Wednesday night for burial. The funeral will be held today.

His father was just recovering from influenza when he received a message Sunday that his son was in a critical condition. He went to Spokane at once and was with Claud before he died.
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Over the County

Genesse News: Word was brot [sic] in from the district just west of town, last Thursday afternoon, that something “turrible” had happened to our “Cannonball” and that help should be dispatched at once in order to save the stranded “crew” or the portion that remained on the part that had been ruthlessly left behind – stranded, as it were.

It seems that Jonny Roberts and his engineer and crew were going merrily on their way to Uniontown last Thursday afternoon, when something out of the ordinary happened. When a little more than a mile west of town the rear end of the train, which consisted of some two or three cars, was left behind, while the engine and the rest of the “train” went on its way to Uniontown. However, the grapevine telegraphy, which is sometimes used, was brought into play and the engineer was informed that he had left half of his “train” back on the track several miles and was requested to return for Johnny and those in the “baggage car behind.”

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 13 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. February 13, 1920, Page 2

[Editorial Page]

Whiskey gets another jolt! A prominent physician in the east says that whiskey does not assist in any manner in fighting the flu. He goes on to show that according to statistics there were 71 deaths from alcohol pneumonia during this dry year as against 230 during the preceding wet year. If the good doctor would only be fair and give both sides of the question he could make these figures look less favorable by giving the total number of those who died of thirst during the past year.
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19200213KG2The “Flu” Is again Raging

See McConnell today for life insurance. The Northwestern Mutual means absolute protection for your family. Your insurance is in force when you make application. – Adv.

(ibid, page 2)
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The Kendrick Gazette. February 13, 1920, Page 8

Gleanings

E. W. Lutz appeared on the street Tuesday morning, the first time in ten days. He is now “back on the job” again after his experience with the flu.

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Brooks spent the week-end with their daughter, Mrs. E. W. Lutz. Mr. Brooks returned home Monday but Mrs. Brooks stayed over to be with the Lutz family until they had all completely recovered from the flu.

A trained nurse from Spokane arrived Monday to care for Ira Gentry, who is quite ill with pneumonia. The last reports as to his condition are quite favorable.

The readers of the Gazette this week will please make allowance for the fact that ye editor had to get the paper out alone, on account of the absence of Mr. MacPherson, who was taken ill with the flu Monday evening. Even the devil isn’t immune to the flu. So, if any of the ads are upside down and typographical errors are glaring and numerous, it is because the paper had to dispense with the services of a good printer, while he took his whirl at the flu.

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bailey of Texas ridge spent several days last week with relatives in Deary. Fred returned the first of this week but his wife remained on account of the illness of one of the children.

Leland Idaho

Mrs. C. G. Cludray has been ill with the flu but is able to be around again.

Clyde Daugherty came from Spokane Sunday, returning Monday accompanied by his father, T. H. Daugherty. Clyde and family have had the flu.

Mrs. Harry Smith is quite ill with an attack of the flu.

Big Bear Ridge

Mrs. Ira Altig is at the home of her mother recovering from a severe attack of influenza.

Mrs. Bernet Nelson and Miss Emma Nelson are spending the week at the Nels Nelson home helping to care for the influenza patients there.

(ibid, page 8)
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Clearwater Republican. February 13, 1920, Page 1

19200213CR1

19200213CR2
Schools Open Monday

The Orofino public schools will open Monday morning according to the announcement made by Dr. Horswill, county physician. Both local doctors have reported the Flu epidemic to be abating. Only a small number of cases have developed within the last week and few are undergoing treatment at the present time. It is expected within another week the disease will have disappeared. The usual order of things will resume Monday with a reference to the ban placed upon public gatherings and the schools.
— —

Mrs. Babcock Succumbs

Mrs. Grace Babcock, wife of F. C. Babcock of the Orofino Auto Company, died Sunday night from influenza after an illness of several week’s duration. She was 24 years old and leaves besides her husband, an infant son and a daughter three years old, to mourn her death. She came from Spokane to Orofino a number of months ago with her husband, who had accepted a position as mechanic in the Clearwater Garage and later becoming interested in the Orofino Auto Co. The body was shipped to Spokane Tuesday morning, burial taking place Wednesday.

Mrs. Babcock’s death came as a shock to her many friends, who join the bereaved family in mourning her untimely loss.
— —

Village Trustees Meet

The village trustees held their regular monthly meeting at the fire hall Monday night. On account of the sickness of several trustees, the meeting adjourned without transacting much business. It is understood the creation of improvement districts for the laying of cement sidewalks will come before the next meeting and be acted upon.
— —

Do You Know?

Of course you don’t but listen – Experience tells us the celebrated Flu is the result of Congestion, nervousness, etc., also that congestion and nervousness, the principal causes are the result of overtaxed eyes, from one cause or another. Perfect eyes and body go hand in hand. Let’s stop that persistent pain.

Dr. Schillings, the Eye Specialist and Neurologist will be at the Orofino Hotel for your personal benefit, Feb. 20-21. Tell him your troubles. He knows. – Adv.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 13 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater Republican. February 13, 1920, Page 4

Obituary

William John Doran was born December 6, 1891, at Caramoyie near Armagh, Keady County, Ireland, and died at Orofino, Idaho, Saturday, February 6, 1920. He was educated in a Presbyterian academy in the town of his birth. Nine years ago he came to America locating in San Bernardino, California, where he received employment in the state hospital. About six years ago he moved to Medical Lake, Wash., to accept employment at the state hospital. It was there that he met Miss Rose E. White, an Orofino girl, who was a nurse. A warm friendship ensued between the young couple, culminating in their marriage at Spokane, November 11, 1915. The following summer they moved to Orofino to accept employment at the state hospital. The husband became chief cook and the wife a nurse. Mr. Doran was a large man and in the best of health until January 29, when he contracted influenza, which turned into pneumonia and caused his death. Interment took place February 9 at the Gilbert cemetery, Rev. J. A. Hoffman, pastor of the Methodist church officiating. The deceased leaves his widow and two small children. An uncle lives in California. His parents, two brothers and four sisters live in Ireland.
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19200213CR3
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19200213CR4

(ibid, page 4)
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Clearwater Republican. February 13, 1920, Page 6

Idaho News Paragraphs
Recent Happenings in This State Given in Brief Items for Busy Readers

Smallpox Epidemic at Hope

Hope. — Schools are closed on account of the epidemic of smallpox and public meetings are forbidden.

Mrs. Cynthia Nann Dies

Boise. — Mrs. Cynthia Nann, age 68, founder of the Idaho state children’s home in this city, died recently of pneumonia, following influenza. She was a leading benefactor of homeless children.

(ibid, page 6)
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Boot Hill, Warren, Idaho

WarrenFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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Montpelier Examiner. February 13, 1920, Page 1

19200213ME1

19200213ME2
Mrs. John Kunz, Jr., of Bern Falls Victim of the Flu

Deep sorrow was brought to every home in Bern last Saturday night by the death of Mrs. John Kunz, Jr. Her death came after a week’s illness with the influenza.

Deceased was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Karl A. Schmid. She was born at Zurich, Switzerland in 1874. She accepted the Mormon faith and came to America with friends in 1883. She was followed by her parents three years later, who came to this valley and located at Paris.

On April 11, 1894, she was united in marriage to John Kunz, Jr., and they took up their home in Bern, where they have since resided. She was the mother of twelve children – nine of whom survive her – five sons and four daughters, the youngest of whom is three years and the eldest 21 years.

Besides her husband and children, she is survived by two brothers, Robert and August Schmid, and two sisters, Mrs. Wm. J. Kunz of Bern and Mrs. W. J. Thornton of Georgetown.

Her funeral services were held at the Bern meeting house last Tuesday at noon. The place was not half large enough to hold those who gathered to pay their last respect to one of whom they had known and loved in life. The speakers were Presidents Wm. L. and Ed C. Rich, Bishop J. T. Peterson of Ovid, Ezra Phelps and D. M. Hymas of Montpelier. Each referred to the noble character of the deceased and to the true Christian life she led.
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19200213ME3Loren Headley Falls Victim of Pneumonia

Loren Headley died in this city last Sunday morning following influenza. Deceased was born in Polk county, Mo., 33 years ago. He came to Montpelier with his parents about eight years ago and has since resided here.

Five years ago he was united in marriage to Miss Mary McDonald. A sad feature in connection with death was that Mrs. Headley and two children were ill with the flu at Norwood, Colo., where they were visiting with relatives. They are doing nicely, however, and will be able to return to Montpelier in a few days. The remains of Mr. Headley are now at the Williams Undertaking parlors, where they will be held until the arrival of Mrs. Headley and children.

Besides his wife and two small children, Mr. Headley is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. P. Headley, and two sisters.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 13 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. February 13, 1920, Page 4

19200213TIR1

19200213TIR2Infant Dies

Nona May, the six months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Handwerk of Basalt died Tuesday morning of the influenza and pneumonia. Funeral services were held Wednesday and interment was in the Grove City cemetery.
— —

Shelley

The baby girl of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Handwerk died last Monday evening after only a few days illness with the croup. The many friends of the parents of the child extend their sincere sympathy during this time of sorrow.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 13 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. February 13, 1920, Page 5

Local News

Judge Anderson is confined to his home suffering with an attack of influenza.
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19200213TIR3Volunteer Nurses

In a number of influenza cases in Blackfoot and surrounding territory nursing service is needed, and available nurses are asked to list their names with Mrs. George Holbrook at the city hall or with W. B. Goodnough at the Goodnough Cleaning & Tailoring Co. if they desire to volunteer to take cases where help is required.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Idaho Republican. February 13, 1920, Page 8

Firth

Funeral services of Mrs. Christena Lofquist, who died in Blackfoot Friday, were held from the West Firth Baptist church Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock, Rev. Eckler officiating. Interment was made in the Riverview cemetery. The many friends of this bereaved family wish to extend to them their heartfelt sympathy in their hour of sorrow.

L. F. Ramsey has been unable to be at his duties in the store the last week on account of illness.

H. J. Slayton is at his work after an illness of a few days.

On account of illness the Ladies’ Aid meeting was postponed. A later date of meeting will be announced Sunday morning.

Florence Bybee is reported on the sick list.

(ibid, page 8)
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American Falls Press. February 13, 1920, Page 1

19200213AFP1

19200213AFP2Three Die Of “Flu”; Others Reported In Critical Condition
Eighty-Three cases In City Wednesday Though Force Of Epidemic Believed To Be On Wane
Ray Baugh Buried Thursday
Funerals Also Held for Mrs. A. L. Ross, Sarah Ross and Retta Davis – Interment Made in Falls View Cemetery

Influenza claimed three victims this week and threatens many more, even though the peak of the epidemic is believed to have been passed. Eighty three cases were reported Wednesday. Mrs. A. L. Ross, wife of the Baptist minister died at Bethany Deaconess hospital Friday of last week, Retta Dean Davis, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Davis, died last Thursday and Ray Baugh died Tuesday after a short illness. The death of Sarah Ross, nine year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Ross, is not believed to have been caused directly from influenza.

In many cases entire families are prostrate and dependent upon outside help for assistance and nursing. This is true of the Henry Hose family where five are ill, the family of five belonging to Harry Smith and the Cazler family where the mother and four children are bedfast. Best efforts on the part of the local chapter of the Red Cross and neighbors, only partially care for the needs of these families. Nurses are difficult to obtain and volunteer help is not dependable.

Other families, severely afflicted with the influenza are as follows: The Stanfield family, four; the Winnett family, four; Knowles family, three; the Baugh family; Miss Nancy Houk, Mrs. Charles Hartley and J. F. Kosanke. Several cases are considered serious and more fatalities may result. Louis Behrens who was seriously ill last week with pneumonia is well on the road to recovery.

Funeral of Ray Baugh

The funeral of Ray Baugh was held Thursday afternoon at 3 o’clock. The exercises were held at the cemetery and were very simple. Many friends of the family were present to witness the last rites. Ray Baugh was born at Wellsville, Utah, March 2nd, 1885 and died in American Falls Tuesday night, February 10th, with influenza that developed into pneumonia. Practically his entire family of five were afflicted with the influenza before and when it attacked him he was worn out with the night and day vigil that he had kept over them. In this exhausted state he fell a victim to the disease and his encumbered strength was not sufficient to ward off the more severe attack of pneumonia. He came to American Falls with his parents when a small boy and was married five years ago to Miss Flora Carlysle. His wife and four boys survive him.

Mrs. A. L. Ross, wife of the pastor of the German Baptist church in the first ward of the city, was buried Saturday afternoon in Falls View cemetery. Funeral services were conducted in the church by Reverend Hendricks of Minidoka, assisted by Rev. J. A. Ford of the Bethany Baptist church. A crowded church testified to the esteem in which the departed member was held.

Funeral services for Sarah Emily Ross were held Thursday afternoon at the cemetery. She died Tuesday night after every effort had been made to tide her life past the critical stage. She is survived by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Ross of American Falls.

Influenza followed by pneumonia caused the death of little Retta Dean Davis, fourteen months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Davis. Funeral services for the deceased were held in Falls View cemetery Thursday. Mrs. Davis went to Burley Sunday with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Billingsley where she will remain indefinitely.
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19200213AFP3Mrs. W. G. Leighty Dies In Pocatello
Bronchial Pneumonia Takes Well Known Woman From Prominent Family of State – Was Sister to Governor Davis

Mrs. W. G. Leighty of Pocatello died at one o’clock yesterday morning at her home in Pocatello of bronchial pneumonia. She is the sister of Mrs. J. T. Doran of Pocatello, Arthur Davis of American Falls and Governor D. W. Davis of Boise. Her mother, Mrs. Frances Davis, lives in American Falls.

Mrs. Leighty was ill only a few days and her death was an unexpected shock to her many friends all over the state. Her husband recently entered business in Pocatello with Mr. Doran, formerly of American Falls.

Her body was shipped Friday morning to Dawson, Iowa for interment. Mr. Leighty and Mrs. Davis, mother to Mrs. Leighty will go east with the body. Mrs. Arthur Davis may also go to be with her sister who is seriously ill at Dawson, as well as be present for the funeral services held at that time.
— —

Mrs. Jack Stuart returned the first of the week from Twin Falls where she assisted her son Guy, and family during an attack of the influenza.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 13 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. February 13, 1920, Page 4

School Notes

By Alvin Reading

They boys’ and girls’ basketball teams have scheduled a double-header game with Pocatello on the home floor this Friday. Our boys’ team is rather weak at present owing to the recent illness of Elwood Meadows, Gene Winters and Curtis Spalding, but we hope to show Pocatello an interesting time.

The game with Aberdeen has been postponed at the request of Aberdeen. Owing to the amount of influenza in Rupert the girls’ team did not play a game there last Friday.

The flu here is quieting down. The students are returning to school only to be attacked by spring fever.

(ibid, page 4)
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American Falls Press. February 13, 1920, Page 5

Local Briefs

Grandma Crane is a patient at the Bethany Deaconess hospital.

Mrs. S. H. McCullough is recovering from an attack of the influenza.

John Welo, prisoner from the county jail, is at the hospital with a light attack of the flu.

Grandpa Parmer, father of Mrs. Pete Nelson, is seriously ill with pneumonia.

Rev. Ford was confined to his rooms the first of the week with a severe throat affliction.

James Baugh of Burley came Wednesday morning to attend the funeral of his nephew, Ray Baugh.

Miss Ethel Cennell of Smithfield, Utah and Mrs. Mabel Holmes of Benson, Utah, sisters of Ray Baugh, came Thursday morning to attend the funeral of their brother.

Mrs. Frances Davis was called to Pocatello Wednesday on account of the serious illness of her daughter, Mrs. Maud Leighty.

Mrs. P. P. Spaulding and her sister, Miss Short, left Wednesday morning for St. Louis where they were called by the illness of their mother.

(ibid, page 5)
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Shoshone Journal. February 13, 1920, Page 1

19200213SH1

Passed To Her Rest

The community was grieved Tuesday morning by the announcement of the death of Mrs. Ralph Hanson of flu pneumonia at her home here in Shoshone. She was in her 38th year.

Mr. and Mrs. Hanson moved to Shoshone in 1916 and have resided here ever since where they have endeared themselves to the entire community.

Mrs. Hanson was the daughter of James and Rachel Nail, of Napavine, Washington. She was born in Illinois but in her infancy her parents moved to Napavine, Washington, where they have since resided. Mrs. Hanson grew to womanhood there and was married at that place to Ralph Hanson in 1905.

From this marriage there were born four children who survive their mother, Maurice, age 12; Gaynell, age 9; Roland, age 5 and baby Stewart, age three months.

Besides her husband and children who mourn her loss, Mrs. Hanson leaves her father and mother, James and Rachel Nail of Napavine, Wash., three sisters, Mrs. F. G. Schmidt, of Napavine, Wash., Mrs. Chas. Harper, of Portland, Ore., Mrs. Robert Phillips, Chehalis, Wash., and three brothers, Lafayette Nail, Hoquiam, Wash., Omar Nail and Randall Nail of Napavine.

Mrs. Hanson was a member of the Baptist Church and an active and ardent worker in the cause of the Master. She was a teacher in the Baptist Sunday School and was beloved by her fellow workers for her many high qualities of Christian character.

Funeral services were held at the Baptist church Tuesday afternoon.

The remains were shipped to Napavine for burial among the scenes of her childhood and young womanhood.

Ralph Hanson with the children accompanied the remains of the wife and mother to Napavine Wednesday. Mr. Hanson plans to permanently remove to that place. He will be greatly missed in this community and every one joins in regrets that conditions arising from the death of Mrs. Hanson necessitate our losing this family from among our citizens.
— —

Dietrich Precinct Notes

Little Margaret, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Sine, is seriously ill.

George Saviers, erstwhile a Dietrich citizen, has been wrestling with the flu down at Twin Falls, but is reported as getting well.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 13 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. February 13, 1920, Page 5

Local Items
I can not say what the truth may be, I tell the tale as ’twas told to me.

Mrs. Geo. Anderson is quite ill with the prevailing grip or flu.

Keith Ferguson has been on the sick list the past week with the epidemic, lagrippe.

E. A. Bowler is recovering from an attack of grippe which kept him at home for several days.

Mrs. W. H. Wright, who has been dangerously ill for some weeks, has so far recovered as to be out of danger.

George W. Warcer [?], proprietor of the O. K. barber shop was sick and confined to his house for several days last week.

Mr. Pethick, of Pethick Bros., is recovering from this illness and with good care will soon be around the garage at work again.

Mrs. Hail Horne and Miss Keith Horne went to Hailey a few days ago to aid in caring for Mrs. Horne’s family who have been having a siege with the influenza. They are all doing well at the last reports.

(ibid, page 5)
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Shoshone Journal. February 13, 1920, Page 8

Additional Locals

The town of Carey and the entire Carey valley have been having a near epidemic of influenza, or lagrippe during the past two weeks, and one or two nurses have gone from here to assist in caring for the patients. The druggist and his assistant at that place have both been sick in bed and Russell Fuller of the Sinclair Pharmacy went to Carey to run the drug store.
— —

Home Nursing Class

A home nursing class has been formed under Miss Sinclair’s supervision, the first meeting being held at the home of Mrs. Frank Grosse.

Twenty-two ladies were present. The next meeting will be held at Mrs. Yaden’s, Feb. 12 at 8 o’clock.

(ibid, page 8)
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Birds Eye View of Weippe, Idaho

WeippeFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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The Meridian Times., February 13, 1920, Page 8

19200213MT1

Meridian News Notes

Harold Mateska is quite ill with an attack of the measles.

The Herbert Morsdorf family are ill with the prevailing influenza.

Mrs. May Ulmer is recovering after an illness from influenza.

Mrs. J. E. Clark is reported much improved after an attack of influenza.

Floyd Adams who has been in a critical condition with pneumonia, is reported as improving.

Eleanor, the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Songer has been quite ill during the past few days with scarlet fever.

Owing to the flu the revival meetings which were announced for Feb 22d at the Nazarene church in Meridian, will be postponed until about March 23d. Evangelist Mrs. Mattie Wines is expected at these gatherings.

Dr. H. F. Neal has a slight case of the influenza, and Dr. P. P. French of Boise is looking after the more urgent cases of the doctor during his illness.

Mabel, the 5-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D. B. Saunders died of influenza Sunday afternoon at 5:30. Mabel was an unusually bright child and the joy and pride of the home, full of life and sunshine. It is hard for us to see why she had to be taken away. But God had need of her and she is with the angels now. The funeral took place from the Mateer undertaking parlors Tuesday afternoon, Rev. C. A. Quinn officiating. Burial was in the Meridian cemetery.

Lincoln’s birthday was fittingly celebrated in the schools yesterday by appropriate programs.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 13 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Caldwell Tribune. February 13, 1920, Page 1

19200213CT1

[Local News]

Mr. and Mrs. Sawmeyer and their son who have been ill with the influenza are improving rapidly.

Bert Northrup is quite ill with pneumonia complicated with the influenza.

David Hoyt, who has been ill with the influenza is now convalescing.

Mr. and Mrs. Grieve came from Twin Falls by auto Tuesday because of the illness of their grand daughter, Dorothy Tish in Greenleaf.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 13 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Caldwell Tribune. February 13, 1920, Page 3

Local And Personal

Miss Hilda Mowrey, an employee at the local telephone office, has fully recovered from a serious attack of influenza.

C. V. Liggett is back on the job at The Tribune after spending about a month in the hospital as a result of a severe attack of the mumps.

Dr. S. Hopper of Cambridge has opened an office at Homedale the first physician to locate at that rapidly growing town.

Lester Leedy died Tuesday morning at the Emergency hospital after a brief illness from pneumonia. He was a stranger in Caldwell.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the Peckham chapel for Ralph Hinshaw who died Sunday of pneumonia. The Rev. S. A. Wells conducted the services. The funeral was private.

Quarantine has been lifted on the home of the Rev. and Mrs. D. H. Hare. Members of their family had scarlet fever and they have been quarantined for about a month. The Rev. Mr. Hare will again occupy the pulpit at the Presbyterian church at both services Sunday.

(ibid, page 3)
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The Caldwell Tribune. February 13, 1920, Page 5

Belmont Novelty Orchestra To Play Return Engagement

There is just one musical hit after another at the Belmont Novelty Orchestra at Danceland, Saturday night.

The Belmont “Jazz Hounds” have played here last January to a very pleased audience and they were on their [way] to Chicago. They were unfortunately forced to turn back on account of the influenza epidemic in Utah and Colorado. Those who were at the dance last January 21 know that the six musical entertainers can deliver the goods. A large crowd is expected at Danceland tomorrow night, February 14. – Adv.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Caldwell Tribune. February 13, 1920, Page 9

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Arena Valley

Mr. and Mrs. Leon Atkins of Vale, Ore., came last week to help care for Mrs. Atkins father, William Moore and family who were all down with influenza. Mrs. Atkins is now ill.

School was closed last Thursday and Friday and the upper grades had no school Monday because of the illness of Miss Parke. She is able to be back at her work now. Miss Hetrick cared for her.

Mrs. Victor Gibson received word Monday that her sister, Mrs. Drinkwater of Crane, Ore., has taken a relapse and is seriously ill again.

Rev. Hollenbeck of Nampa came down Saturday evening but decided not to preach Sunday morning on account of so much illness. He will preach here one week from Sunday at 11:30 a.m.

Dr. Mitchell was called to the O. F. Packwood home twice last week to see Carl who has been having a severe attack of the influenza.

E. W. Rockwood has pneumonia following an attack of influenza.

Mrs. Walter Aten who has had a severe case of influenza is reported quite ill again after having been up about the house.

Brier Rose Notes

Perhaps some were disappointed last week by not seeing the items from our community in the paper, but beg to be excused as ‘ye writer’ has been struggling with the influenza for some time.

Rachel and Bernice Terrance have both been quite sick of the influenza since our last report. But are getting along nicely at present..

Little Miss Jessie Spencer who was seriously ill last week is now well on the road to recovery.

Fred Burris has been quite ill but is better at this writing.

Peter Golden drove the school wagon Monday and Tuesday for Mr. Christopher.

Mary Meek has missed about two weeks of her school duties, having been confined at her home with a bad case of the influenza.

Jeanette Runican school was closed last week on account of so much sickness in and around Meridian.

The McLaughlins are out of quarantine after having had scarlet fever in their home for about three weeks.

Greenleaf Snaps

Many people around here have fallen victims to the influenza. The Greenleaf public school, seminary and church have been closed for an indefinite time, owing to the disease.

Mrs. Ora Harris has returned to her home after spending some time at Melba nursing her son and daughter Carl and Cleole who have had the influenza.

(ibid, page 9)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 13, 1920, Page 10

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Lake Lowell

The Traughber and Kimes families have recovered from the influenza.

Mr. W. L. Gibbens has returned home from Meridian, where he has been helping care for a brother who was ill.

Mrs. Will Tomason and daughter Florence have the mumps.

The Tipton family are all down with the influenza.

Marble Front

The P. T. A. will be postponed until February 27 on account of sickness.

Mrs. W. H. King is very much improved after a week of illness.

Fairview

The past few days have been lifting to one’s spirits if not the influenza, but think it is a help to both.

The roads in this vicinity are drying up fast.

Lois Greer has been having the influenza but is better a present.

Mr. Thompson is getting along very nicely, also the McBride family.

Mrs. Myra Chashman of San Jose, Calif., arrived in Caldwell Saturday to visit relatives here. She is helping to care for a sister, Mrs. Odonell, who is quite sick in Caldwell.

Mrs. Conklin, was over in Central Cove Sunday, she reports every one better in the Vanslyke family.

Four of the William Ode family have pneumonia in Lower Dixie.

North Sunny Slope

We are glad to report that the sick in this community are greatly improved.

The funeral services of Wilbur Miller was held Sunday at Peckham chapel in Caldwell. The sympathy of the entire community goes to Mr. and Mrs. Miller.

Everybody is busy this week getting ready for spring work.

Miss Olive McCormick, our school teacher has the influenza.

Most of the school children have been sick and attendance at the school very small but we hope before long there will be full attendance.

Pleasant Ridge

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Fowler who have been quite ill with influenza are rapidly improving. Mrs. Shaffer has been caring for them.

Mrs. Willard Ross was called Sunday to Weiser to take care of the Hicks family who have all been sick with influenza.

Miss Pearle Chester had to miss several days last week from school on account of being ill with tonsillitis.

Lewis Post has been ill with influenza.

(ibid, page 10)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 13, 1920, Page 11

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Midway News

F. N. Luse, who was called to Kansas City on account of his mother’s illness and subsequent death arrived home Saturday evening.

A. W. Kline is confined to his home with mumps.

Miss Marie Karcher resumed her work Monday in the telephone office in Nampa after an absence of three weeks with the influenza.

Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Reynolds are both on the sick list this week.

The seven year old son of Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Baker died last week at the J. J. Bicker [sic] home in Nampa. Mr. Baker and family moved here from Minersville, Utah, two weeks ago to take possession of the ranch they purchased off J. J. Becker. But before they could get moved to the ranch several members of the family were taken ill with influenza and they were forced to remain at the Becker home until able to move.

Miss Margarite Bumgarner was absent from her school last week at Wilder on account of sickness.

C. M. Dory is able to resume his work at H. H. Hostettlers store in Nampa after an enforced vacation with influenza.

Miss Hamilton was able to resume her school duties as intermediate teacher after a week’s absence with sickness.

Mrs. G. L. Karcher is slowly recovering from an attack of the influenza.

Ten Davis News

Ruth Miller is back to her duties at school after a weeks absence at her home in Nampa where she was ill with influenza.

Mrs. Fred Spaeth has been on the sick list the past week.

The school board met at the school house Monday evening.

Mrs. A. W. Andrews has been quite ill the past week.

Fair Acres

Mrs. Hubard received the sad news of the death of a sister in Illinois. She died of pneumonia leaving a three weeks old baby.

The Fair Acre womans club met with Mrs. Emily Vantress Friday, January 30 but few were present on account of so much sickness.

There was no Sunday school last Sunday. It was thought best to close for a while on account of so much sickness.

Scott Wilson and children are down with the influenza.

Mrs. Auger who is visiting Mrs. Paine has been quite sick but is up and around now.

Mr. Deaman has been very sick but we are glad to report him as up and around again.

J. W. Klinfelter returned from Payette Sunday where he was called on account of his father’s sickness. He reports his father as on the mend.

Mrs. Sam Smith has had an attack of the influenza but is better.

Glenn and Denham Barnes have been out of school for two weeks, down with the influenza, but started back to school Monday.

Bert Vauntress is confined to his bed with the influenza.

(ibid, page 11)
— — — — — — — — — —

View from School of Mines Building, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho ca. 1915

UofIdahoMoscow1915Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

February 14

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 14, 1920, Page 1

19200214DSM1

19200214DSM2Six New Influenza Cases Reported Friday

Six new influenza cases were reported again for yesterday. Owing to the increasing severity of the new cases now developing every reasonable means within my power will be taken to stamp the disease out as quickly as possible. As two possible sources of infection by contact, picture shows after tonight and churches after tomorrow morning services will remain closed until further notice.

Dr. F. M. Leitch, Health Officer

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 14 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 14, 1920, Page 4

19200214DSM3Mrs. Struppler of Pullman A Flu Victim

Mrs. Euginia Staley Struppler of Pullman is dead as the result of influenza. Mrs. Struppler was a daughter of the late L. C. Staley, one of the pioneers of the Pullman district, and a niece of John, and D. F. Staley and their sister, Miss Staley. The Staley family came to the Palouse country more than 40 years ago and located several homesteads, and preemption claims, and timber cultures. By purchase they added to their holdings until the family is said to now hold more than 4000 acres in the neighborhood of Staley, between Johnson and Pullman, on the Genesee branch of the Northern Pacific. Mrs. Struppler and her brother, L. C. Staley, Jr., were the only descendants of the pioneer family as D. F. has no children and John and his sister never married. The dead woman was born in Whitman county and had grown to young womanhood there. She leaves a husband but no children. Her father died 18 months ago.
— —

Church and Sunday School

St. Mark’s Church

School re-opens with full attendance of all well pupils and officers. Superintendent, Mrs. H. T. Mackintire.

The Presbyterian Church

The church is indebted to Mrs. Carl Versteeg for her faithful service as examining nurse in the Sunday school during the influenza epidemic. Mrs. Versteeg served as a Red Cross nurse during the recent war.

First Baptist Church

Sunday school. Dr. Harrington has charge of the medical examination. Come if you feel well. If you are not well, we will tell you what is the matter.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 14, 1920, Page 5

City News

Mrs. R. F. Gibson returned today from a visit at Viola with her daughter, Mrs. Chas. Goetz, who has recovered from the “flu.”

John Vollmer and his brother of Viola, who have been ill of influenza, are able to be out again.

Miss Eunice Darr has just recovered from a severe attack of influenza.

Dr. J. N. Clarke was called to Palouse yesterday for consultation on a severe case of pneumonia, in the case of David Hackett.

Andrew C. Hagen, who has been a week at the hospital for treatment for rheumatism, has returned to his home, much improved in health.
— —

Mrs. Sharp’s Funeral Here

Mrs. Orville Sharp died this week in Spokane, a victim of pneumonia, following influenza. The body will be brought to Moscow for burial Monday. It will arrive on the Inland train at 11:25 a.m. and be taken at once to the Moscow cemetery for burial. Mr. Orville Sharp died last winter in Spokane during the similar epidemic, and was buried at Moscow.
— —

Strange Animal Killed On Farm Near Troy

Harold Frisk, a farmer residing a short distance northeast of Troy, recently killed an animal which had all his neighbors guessing as to what it was. It put in its appearance about his barn and was such an oddity that it even had Mr. Frisk’s chickens running in all directions. Noticing a commotion about his barn yard he hastened to the scene and upon seeing the queer-looking beast he lost no time in getting his rifle. After putting a bullet through a vital spot of its body he cautiously examined it, but it was still “Dutch” to him. Neighbors had never seen anything like it, so he was left in the dark as much as ever. Finally he skinned the animal which measured about 18 inches from tip to tip and stood about ten inches high. Simon Johnson was told about the strange animal Mr. Frisk had killed, and when he saw the hide nicely stretched over a board he recognized it as his Angora cat, which he had missed from his place for several days. What made the cat look so odd was the long hair which covered its body from one end to the other. It has not been decided whether the joke is on Simon or Harold, but the people in that community had a good laugh over the incident. — Troy News.

(ibid, page 5)
———————-

Further Reading

Élie Metchnikoff

1913Metchnikoff-a
Photograph of Nobel Prize winner, Ilya Ilyich Mechnikov, who discovered phagocytes.
This file comes from Gallica Digital Library and is available under the digital ID btv1b6926750k/f1

Ilya Ilyich Mechnikov 15 May 1845 – 15 July 1916) was a Russian Imperial zoologist of Romanian nobility ancestry and Ukrainian Jewish origin best known for his pioneering research in immunology. He and Paul Ehrlich were jointly awarded the 1908 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine “in recognition of their work on immunity”. He was born, lived and worked for many years on the territory of Ukraine. Given this complex heritage, four different nations and peoples justifiably lay claim to Mechnikov.

Honoured as the “father of innate immunity,” Mechnikov was the first to discover a process of immunity called phagocytosis and the cell responsible for it, called phagocyte, specifically macrophage, in 1882. This discovery turned out to be the major defence mechanism in innate immunity, as well as the foundation of the concept of cell-mediated immunity, while Ehrlich established the concept of humoral immunity to complete the principles of immune system. Their works are regarded as the foundation of the science of immunology.

Mechnikov developed one of the earliest concepts in ageing, and advocated the use of lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus) for healthy and long life. This became the concept of probiotics in medicine. Mechnikov is also credited with coining the term gerontology in 1903, for the emerging study of aging and longevity. In this regard, Ilya Mechnikov is called the “father of gerontology” (although, as often happens in science, the situation is ambiguous, and the same title is sometimes applied to some other people who contributed to aging research later).

Supporters of life extension celebrate 15 May as Metchnikoff Day, and used it as a memorable date for organizing activities.

Career

Mechnikov was appointed docent at the newly established Imperial Novorossiya University (now Odessa University). Only twenty-two years of age, he was younger than his students. After being involved in a conflict with a senior colleague over attending scientific meetings, he transferred to the University of St. Petersburg in 1868, where he experienced a worse professional environment. In 1870 he returned to Odessa to take up the appointment of Titular Professor of Zoology and Comparative Anatomy.

In 1882 he resigned from Odessa University due to political turmoils after the assassination of Alexander II. He went to Sicily to set up his private laboratory in Messina. He returned to Odessa as director of an institute set up to carry out Louis Pasteur’s vaccine against rabies; due to some difficulties, he left in 1888 and went to Paris to seek Pasteur’s advice. Pasteur gave him an appointment at the Pasteur Institute, where he remained for the rest of his life.

Mechnikov became interested in the study of microbes, and especially the immune system. At Messina he discovered phagocytosis after experimenting on the larvae of starfish. In 1882 he first demonstrated the process when he inserted small citrus thorns into starfish larvae, then found unusual cells surrounding the thorns. He realized that in animals which have blood, the white blood cells gather at the site of inflammation, and he hypothesised that this could be the process by which bacteria were attacked and killed by the white blood cells. He discussed his hypothesis with Carl Friedrich Wilhelm Claus, Professor of Zoology at the University of Vienna, who suggested to him the term “phagocyte” for a cell which can surround and kill pathogens. He delivered his findings at Odessa University in 1883.

His theory, that certain white blood cells could engulf and destroy harmful bodies such as bacteria, met with scepticism from leading specialists including Louis Pasteur, Behring and others. At the time, most bacteriologists believed that white blood cells ingested pathogens and then spread them further through the body. His major supporter was Rudolf Virchow, who published his research in his Archiv für pathologische Anatomie und Physiologie und für klinische Medicin (now called the Virchows Archiv). His discovery of these phagocytes ultimately won him the Nobel Prize in 1908. He worked with Émile Roux on calomel (mercurous chloride) in ointment form in an attempt to prevent people from contracting the sexually transmitted disease syphilis.

In 1887, he observed that leukocytes isolated from the blood of various animals were attracted towards certain bacteria. The first studies of leukocyte killing in the presence of specific antiserum were performed by Joseph Denys and Joseph Leclef, followed by Leon Marchand and Mennes between 1895 and 1898. Almoth E. Wright was the first to quantify this phenomenon and strongly advocated its potential therapeutic importance. The so-called resolution of the humoralist and cellularist positions by showing their respective roles in the setting of enhanced killing in the presence of opsonins was popularized by Wright after 1903, although Metchnikoff acknowledged the stimulatory capacity of immunosentisitized serum on phagotic function in the case of acquired immunity.

This attraction was soon proposed to be due to soluble elements released by the bacteria. Some 85 years after this seminal observation, laboratory studies showed that these elements were low molecular weight (between 150 and 1500 Dalton (unit)s) N-formylated oligopeptides, including the most prominent member of this group, N-Formylmethionine-leucyl-phenylalanine, that are made by a variety of replicating gram positive bacteria and gram negative bacteria. Mechnikov’s early observation, then, was the foundation for studies that defined a critical mechanism by which bacteria attract leukocytes to initiate and direct the innate immune response of acute inflammation to sites of host invasion by pathogens.

The issues of aging occupied a significant place in Mechnikov’s works. Mechnikov developed a theory that aging is caused by toxic bacteria in the gut and that lactic acid could prolong life. Based on this theory, he drank sour milk every day. He wrote The Prolongation of Life: Optimistic Studies, in which he espoused the potential life-lengthening properties of lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus). He attributed the longevity of Bulgarian peasants to their yogurt consumption. This concept of probiotics was influential in his lifetime, but became ignored until the mid-1990s when experimental evidences emerged.

excerpted: from Wikipedia
——————

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Road Reports Oct 24, 2021

Note: Weather forecast calls for high elevation snow.

Please share road reports. Most back country roads have not been graded this season and are rough. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. This time of year there could be snow in higher elevations. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are damp. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting Wednesday, Sept. 8, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
Project link:
Donnelly to McCall Project: They are finished paving the road, but work remains for some driveways.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Monday (Oct 18) road is in good shape.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Monday (Oct 18) the road is in good shape.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 20) Road is getting rough, wash boards deeper.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open
No current report. Watch for ATV and UTV traffic.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open
No current report.
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Profile has seriously rocky sections that are washing out worse than usual. Some are sharp. Carry a saw whether its windy or not — roots of beetle kill trees are now quite rotten and fall easily.” – CP
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Quartz Creek
No current report.

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open, travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open, travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Open, travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Open, travel at your own risk.
No current report.

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Weather Reports Oct 17-23, 2021

Oct 17 Weather:

At 10am it was 30 degrees, mostly high thin haze and light breeze. At 1240pm it was 66 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy. At 3pm it was 71 degrees, mostly clear and gusty breezes. At 645pm it was 52 degrees, mostly clear and calmer. At 11pm it looked partly cloudy, bright moon.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 18, 2021 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloud
Max temperature 72 degrees F
Min temperature 30 degrees F <– yesterday AM
At observation 36 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 18 Weather:

At 10am it was 36 degrees and mostly cloudy. Cloudy at 1230pm. At 3pm it was 58 degrees, dark overcast and light breeze. At 645pm it was 54 degrees, overcast and colorful clouds to the west (after sunset.) Bright moon after midnight.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 19, 2021 at 10:00AM
Clear, frost
Max temperature 59 degrees F
Min temperature 27 degrees F
At observation 29 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 19 Weather:

At 10am it was 29 degrees, clear and frosty. At 1230pm it was 55 degrees, mostly clear and slight breeze. At 315pm it was 64 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 7pm it was 50 degrees and appeared to be partly cloudy. At 11pm it looked partly cloudy, bright moon.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 20, 2021 at 10:00AM
Overcast, light breeze
Max temperature 65 degrees F
Min temperature 29 degrees F <– yesterday AM
At observation 43 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 20 Weather:

At 10am it was 43 degrees, light breeze and dark overcast. At 1045am gusty breezes and mostly cloudy. At 1212pm a 2 minute shower of rain, blustery and mostly cloudy. Power outage 1030am-1256pm. At 3pm it was 56 degrees, mostly cloudy and lighter breezes. Rain shower started 440pm and lasted about 15 minutes. At 7pm it was 48 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breezes. At 1050pm clumpy thick clouds almost obscuring the big moon.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 21, 2021 at 10:00AM
Partly clear
Max temperature 57 degrees F
Min temperature 35 degrees F
At observation 41 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 21 Weather:

At 10am it was 41 degrees and partly cloudy. At 12pm it was 59 degrees and nearly overcast. Wind gusts and quite breezy starting a little after 1pm. At 3pm it was 66 degrees, partly cloudy and blustery. At 7pm it was 54 degrees, clam and mostly cloudy (high and thin.) Looked mostly clear to the east at 11pm, bright big moon. Rain shower estimated around 7am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 22, 2021 at 10:00AM
Dark overcast
Max temperature 67 degrees F
Min temperature 40 degrees F <– estimate
At observation 44 degrees F
Precipitation 0.03 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 22 Weather:

At 10am it was 44 degrees and dark overcast. Short sprinkle of rain around 1030am. At 12pm it was 51 degrees and broken overcast. At 315pm it was 57 degrees, dark overcast, breezy and starting to rain. Dropped to 53F by 335pm and light rain. At 630pm it was 46 degrees, dark low overcast and steady rain continues. Stopped raining before 9pm. Raining before 130am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 23, 2021 at 10:00AM
Low overcast
Max temperature 62 degrees F
Min temperature 36 degrees F
At observation 38 degrees F
Precipitation 0.36 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 23 Weather:

At 10am it was 38 degrees, low overcast (foggy ridges and peaks) looks like snow line about 7000 feet. Cloudy at 1230pm. At 3pm it was 44 degrees, light chilly breeze and dark low overcast. Rain shower occurred some time between 430pm and 6pm, enough to make things damp. At 645pm it was 39 degrees and dark overcast. At 1145pm it looked cloudy. Rain show early morning before 6am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 24, 2021 at 10:00AM
Dark overcast, light breeze
Max temperature 46 degrees F
Min temperature 36 degrees F
At observation 38 degrees F
Precipitation 0.03 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
—————————

Road Reports Oct 20, 2021

Note: Gusty winds today – watch for trees down.

Please share road reports. Most back country roads have not been graded this season and are rough. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. This time of year there could be snow in higher elevations. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are dry. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting Wednesday, Sept. 8, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
Project link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Monday (Oct 18) road is in good shape.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Monday (Oct 18) the road is in good shape.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 20) Road is getting rough, wash boards deeper.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open
No current report. Watch for ATV and UTV traffic.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open
No current report.
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Profile has seriously rocky sections that are washing out worse than usual. Some are sharp. Carry a saw whether its windy or not — roots of beetle kill trees are now quite rotten and fall easily.” – CP
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Quartz Creek
No current report.

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open, travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open, travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Open, travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Open, travel at your own risk.
No current report.

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Oct 17, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 17, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit season
May 15 – Nov 30 – Firewood Season
Oct 17 – YPFD Fire Training 2pm
Oct 20 – Planned Power Outage
Oct 25 – Halloween and Salmon Feed YP Tavern 7pm
Oct 28 – The Corner to close for the season
Oct 31 – YPFD Fire Training 2pm
Nov 7 – Time Change – Fall back 1 hour
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Planned Power Outage Oct 20th

Dylan from Idaho Power called. They have equipment maintenance scheduled for our area, and have planned to shut the power off for approximately 3 hours on October 20th beginning around 1030am until about 130pm.
— — — —

Halloween/Salmon Bake Party at the Tavern

Monday, October 25th at 7pm. Salmon provided by Tom Wood. Bring a Potluck Dish if you wish. Halloween Costumes encouraged or come as a Hunter.
— — — —

Fire Training

Winter Structure Fire Response Plan & Training
Two Sessions Sunday Oct. 17 And Sunday Oct. 31, 2021 At 2:00 pm Yellow Pine Fire Station
To All Residents:
This is your opportunity to review and practice winter structure-fire response procedures. These sessions are recommended for all residents spending the winter in Yellow Pine. The session includes:
Engine operation, driving, communications, and logistical support will be discussed including:
Structure attack and structure protection techniques.
Actual practice opportunities to deploy engines including driving, spraying water, and refilling engines.
All winter residents are encouraged to attend one or both sessions.
Volunteer agreements will be available for those interested and not yet signed up.
Yellow Pine Fire Protection District (YPFPD), Valley County, Idaho
Dated this 15 day of October 2021 at 09:00. Notice posted at the Fire Station and other locations.
Lorinne Munn, Fire Chief
Merrill Saleen, Deputy Fire Chief
———

Village News:

Internet Issues

We experienced internet (and some phone) connection issues starting late Sunday night, Oct 10th, and continuing all day Monday. The internet would be OK for a few minutes then drop the connection (or phone call.) MTE said they were trouble shooting on their end. Connection problems persisted until Tuesday morning and then returned to normal.
— — — —

Fall Color

20211017Larch

Western Larch (Tamarack) Oct 17, 2021 – rrS
— — — —

Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are Open. These roads have not been bladed and are rough. Travel at your own risk.
— — — —

Critters

Be Bear Aware

* Do not feed them human food
* Secure your trash
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Bats

While bats are an important part of our ecosystem and most do not carry rabies, CDH offers the following tips to protect yourself and pets:
* Never touch a bat with your bare hands.
* If you have had an encounter with a bat, seek medical attention.
* If you come in contact with a bat, save the bat in a container without touching it and contact your health department to arrange testing for rabies. Whenever possible, the bat should be tested to rule out an exposure to rabies. During regular business hours in Ada, Boise and Elmore Counties, call 208-327-7499 and in Valley County, call 208-634-7194. After business hours in all counties, call 1-800-632-8000.
* Always vaccinate your pets for rabies, including horses. Pets may encounter bats outdoors or in the home.
* Bat-proof your home or cabin by plugging all holes in the siding and maintaining tight-fitting screens on windows. Bats can enter through holes the size of a quarter.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

Aug. 29th the price of first-class postage stamps went to 58 cents from 55 cents.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Saturday (Sept 4) The dumpsters are being emptied on Wednesdays.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

July 25, 2021 Update:

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association Board asks that individuals refrain from using domestic water to dampen the road. The Water Corporation is doing its best to provide water for domestic use during the low water period but as the supply becomes more limited, it is incumbent upon each of us to be judicious with its use. Thank you for your cooperation in ensuring that all community members have an adequate supply of water.

The corporation has received the first $150k grant of the anticipated $450k. We are hoping to have some of the supply lines replaced by winter. Thanks to those who wrote letters of support. They were very beneficial in securing the grants. – Willie Sullivan

Oct 11, 2021 Water Update

Warren Drake has been in this week and shut down the summer tank, took samples, and spent time on the winter drip points. He built a small, insulated box from pressure treated wood, around each [trickle] point that will allow better winter access, make it so [he] can use each point for sampling, and also ensure that things don’t freeze.

DRINKING WATER WARNING October 11, 2021
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 180 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059 Date distributed: 10-11-21.

YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 at the Community Hall at 10am. Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting held July 5, 2020 at the Community Hall 2pm. link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
— — — —

VYPA News:

Notice to all VYPA Members:

I have accepted a position on the board of directors of the Yellow Pine Area Coalition (YPAC).
I will be relinquishing all my VYPA responsibilities by January 1, 2022.
I will complete my responsibilities as Project Manager for the Community Hall Repair Project prior to stepping off the Council.
If you are interested in filling the position of VYPA Chairman; leading the Harmonica Festival committee; coordinating the YP Escapades; managing the village’s online presence; or working on the Community Hall committee, please contact one of the Council members.
Over the next 2 1/2 months, the VYPA Council will be working toward a smooth transition for my successor. Thank you for allowing me to serve our community for the last 13 years.
Deb Filler, VYPA Chairman

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link: (see document at link for attachments)
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Hailey Harris, Secretary
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
— — — —

YPFD News:

Remember to clean your chimney before lighting your first fall fire, and check the fittings. Chimney brushes are available to borrow from the YPFD.

Sept 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting (no minutes yet.)
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss upcoming election (no minutes yet.)
July 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
June 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:

Sept 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

2021 Meeting schedule for the YPFD. All meetings are at the YPFD Station
Sat. May 15 at 10am
Sat. June 12 at 10am
Sat. July 10 at 10am
Sat. September 11 at 10am Budget Meeting

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by a escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Lorinne Munn
Deputy Fire Chief: Merrill Saleen
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Phil Jensen – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Nikki Saleen
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
As the season comes to an end, we are starting to dwindle our inventory. To ensure our stock is fresh and kept to our standards, we will only be taking reservations until the end of our season (October 28). To make arrangements, please call The Corner at 208-633-3325 or call/text Hailey Harris at 970-275-7336. Thank you for a great summer!
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Open daily: 8am to 9pm Sunday: 8am to 2pm
Indoor Dining and Outdoor Dining Available.
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Open through the end of hunting season.
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
Store hours: 10am to 5pm, Monday – Sunday. Gas and Diesel now available. The Liquor Store is now reinstated. Now Selling Black Rifle Coffee.
The store is stocked with basic convenience store items such as food, fuel, liquor, beer, wine, tobacco, ice, non alcoholic beverages, snacks, ice cream. New Yellow Pine branded shirts, hats and koozies have arrived. We are going through the process of installing a propane dispenser and bottle exchange service.
For any particular store item requests, please call 208-633-3300 or Email
For room reservations, please call 208-633-3300 or Email for reservations
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Our Elk & Deer hunts are booked for our 2021 season, we do have a couple openings for our 2022 Elk & Deer hunts. We Also have a couple openings for Mountain Lion hunts December 2021 through February 2022 and Spring Bear hunts May of 2022. Please see our Website site for further details.
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:

Garden Mountain Contractors
We would like to extend our services into the Yellow Pine area if there may be a need. We dig a lot of dirt! If you need this give us a shout on our FB page below. – Larry Williamson Garden Valley, Idaho FB Page:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 11) Internet connection spotty after midnight and and still spotty this morning. Rain changed to snow early this morning. Low temperature estimated to be 30 degrees (equipment error.) Measured 1/4″ new snow on the board, the 24 hour precip. total = 0.24″. This morning low overcast, flaking snow. Internet connection spotty all morning. MTE is trouble shooting on their end. Downy woodpecker and a chipmunk visiting. Still snowing at lunch time and socked in low. Stopped snowing early afternoon, no accumulation. Still rather cold mid-afternoon, low clouds sitting down on VanMeter Hill, chilly light breezes and occasional flakes of snow, high of 37 degrees. Overcast, light breeze and a few flakes of snow at sunset. Intermittent internet connection continues. Looked cloudy before midnight.

Tuesday (Oct 12) overnight low of 27 degrees. Yesterday’s light snow gave us 0.01″ of water in the gauge, no accumulation. This morning mostly cloudy, breezy and cold. Snow line about 6000′ although the webcam shows snow on the ground at Big Creek Lodge. Hairy woodpecker, jays, pine squirrel and chipmunks visiting. Mostly cloudy, cool and breezy at lunch time. Mostly cloudy with bits of sunshine and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 41 degrees. Looked overcast at sunset and calmer. Appeared cloudy before midnight.

Wednesday (Oct 13) overnight low of 25 degrees. This morning overcast and light breeze. Jays, a hairy and a downy woodpecker, chipmunks, a pine squirrel and a flock of starlings visiting. Overcast and chilly at lunch time. Mail truck made it in on time, reports a little snow on Warm Lake summit and upper Johnson Creek. Raven flying over and calling. Overcast with chilly light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 40F. Light rain shower late afternoon. At sunset broken overcast cool and calm. Partly clear before midnight.

Thursday (Oct 14) started snowing before 6am. Two loud gun shots at 730am. Overnight low of 26 degrees. This morning measured 3/8″ new snow (SWE=0.20″) on the board with patchy snow on the ground, overcast (top of VanMeter foggy) and still flaking lightly. Early street traffic. Hairy woodpecker, jays, chipmunks and pine squirrel visiting. Stopped snowing before lunch time, melted snow dripping off the roof and breaks in the clouds. A pair of flickers stopped by. Dark overcast and light cold breeze mid-afternoon, high of 42 degrees. Dark overcast, chilly light breeze and light sprinkles of rain for a short while at sunset. Looked cloudy before midnight.

Friday (Oct 15) overnight low of 29 degrees. This morning mostly cloudy. Jays, hairy woodpecker, pine squirrel and chipmunks visiting. Partly cloudy, light breeze and warming up at lunch time. Raven calling, possible hawk in the area. Warmer, partly cloudy and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 60 degrees. Looked clear at sunset, calmer and cooling off quickly. Bright moon and some stars before midnight.

Saturday (Oct 16) overnight low of 25 degrees. This morning partly cloudy (high thin haze) frosty and light breeze. Hairy woodpecker, jays and chipmunks visiting. Mostly sunny, warm and light breeze at lunch time. Warm, sunny, mostly clear (a little haze) and light breeze mid-afternoon, high of 71 degrees. Ravens calling. Clear and calm at sunset. Clear before midnight, bright moon.

Sunday (Oct 17) overnight low of 27 degrees. This morning mostly high thin haze, frosty and light breeze. Jays, male hairy woodpecker, chipmunks and a pine squirrel visiting. Flock of starlings in the neighborhood. Mostly cloudy and breezy at lunch time. Mostly clear, sunny, warm and gusty breezes mid-afternoon, high of 72 degrees. Streets are dusty again. Loud gunshot at 430pm. The gusty breezes are stripping the colored leaves off the aspens. Mostly clear and calmer at sunset.
————–

RIP:

Nicole Irving Musgrove

Nicole Irving Musgrove, 43, died Sunday, Oct. 10, 2021.

Services are pending and will be announced when scheduled.

If desired, online condolences may be left at McCall Funerals (link)

Arrangements in care of McCall Funeral Home.

source: The Star-News October 14, 2021

Yellow Pine sends sincere condolences to Clint, Dennis and Dee Dee.
—————-

Idaho News:

Two new local deaths to COVID-19 reported

Hospitals say number of new cases decline

By Tom Grote for The Star-News October 14, 2021

Two new deaths of local residents due to complications from COVID-19 were reported this week.

Valley County’s two hospitals last week continued to report a decline in new COVID-19 cases.

A total of 41 new cases were reported in the last week by St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center. That compares to 63 new cases reported the previous week, 90 new cases reported three weeks ago and 92 new cases reported a month ago.

“We are definitely happy to see the case trend down,” Cascade CEO Tom Reinhardt said. “But we are heading into winter, which means people are heading indoors.”

“We have already seen this pandemic ebb and flow, and I would not be surprised if we have another surge this winter,” Reinhardt said.

It is too soon to tell if the downward trend will continue, St. Luke’s Chief Operating Officer/Chief Nursing Officer Amber Green said.

“Now is not the time to let our guard down,” Green said. “We need everyone to continue to take necessary precautions to protect themselves and we urge people who have not yet been vaccinated for COVID-19 to choose to get vaccinated.”

The two hospitals have reported 1,524 cases of cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started in March 2020.

full story:
— — — —

COVID-19 Updates: 1,520 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 34 new deaths

October 15, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 1,520 new COVID-19 cases and 34 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 276,080.

The average age of Idahoans with COVID-19 is 39.6 years… The age group with the most cases is 18-29 with 65,411 cases.

The state said 59 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 12,024, and 14 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 1,998.

34 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 3,251.

full story: [Valley County 1403 cases, 10 deaths.
— — — — — — — — — —

Tamarack Resort bringing back golf course, hopes to have grand opening in 2023

by CBS2 News Staff Monday, October 11th 2021

Tamarack Resort is hitting the links once again.

The resort outside of Donnelly on Monday said it has reached an agreement to acquire its former 18-hole golf course, Osprey Meadows. The golf course opened in 2005 and was in operation through the 2015 season.

“We are extremely pleased to have reached agreement for the acquisition of Osprey Meadows,” said Scott Turlington, Tamarack president. “With this milestone behind us, we are now eager to turn our attention toward restoration and getting golfers back on our course.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Mountain Community School partners with Tamarack to bring a school to the Resort

By Lynsey Amundson Oct 15, 2021 KIVI

Among a ski resort and other recreational activities, Tamarack will now be home to a school.

Through a partnership with Tamarack Resort and Mountain Community School, a new and unique opportunity for learning in the outdoors is coming to the McCall-Donnelly School District area.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Impacts of exceptional drought in the Gem State as water managers look to winter 2022

by Sarah Jacobsen Friday, October 15th 2021 CBS2 Idaho

Leaves are changing across the Gem State, but drought conditions remain.

Idaho’s spring drought was exceptional, and the term exceptional means that conditions like this are only seen once in 50 to once in 100 years.


Photo: Idaho Department of Water Resources)

And with an upcoming La Niña winter, water managers are watching closely.

continued:
————-

Tips & Advice:

Tips to help drivers prepare for fall, winter weather

October 11, 2021 Local News 8

If your vehicle is long overdue for a tune-up, you’re not alone.

According to AAA, 35% of Americans put off needed repairs and routine maintenance. October Car Care Month is a good time to catch up before the cold, wet weather returns.

The average age of the American automobile fleet is 11.6 years, the oldest ever. As vehicles age, delayed repairs can quickly lead to a roadside mishap – last year, AAA rescued 33 million people who were stranded by dead batteries, fuel shortages, misplaced keys and flat tires.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Last day to send gifts: Major mail carriers release 2021 holiday shipping deadlines

by Katie Caviness Sinclair Broadcast Group Wednesday, October 13th

With the holidays right around the corner, mail carriers released their shipping deadlines for the 2021 season.

The nation’s three largest carriers, UPS, FedEx and the United States Postal Service, have varying recommended days to ship last-minute gifts.

USPS: 2021 Holiday Shipping Dates for the Lower 48 States (excluding Hawaii and Alaska)

* USPS Retail Ground Service — Dec. 15
* First-Class Mail Service — Dec. 17
* Priority Mail Service — Dec. 18
* Priority Mail Express Service — Dec. 23

full story:
—————

Public Lands:

DEQ lifts Lake Cascade algae advisory

Toxic blooms have covered reservoir for the last 4 years

By Max Silverson for The Star-News October 14, 2021

A health advisory for toxin producing cyanobacteria on Lake Cascade was lifted last Friday but Central District Health warned people to stay away from isolated areas where the bloom may still be visible.

The advisory was lifted after Idaho Department of Environmental Quality monitoring found that toxins had returned to normal and safe levels. It had been in effect since Aug. 13.

It was the fourth harmful algal bloom on Lake Cascade in as many years. The 2020 and 2019 advisories also lasted about eight weeks while the 2018 advisory lasted only six weeks.

continued:
———–

Fire Season links:

Fall Burning on the Krassel RD

Sept 29, 2021 Payette NF

The Krassel Ranger District, Payette National Forest is planning to implement prescribed fire this fall east of Yellow Pine. The unit is located east of Yellow Pine, on the North side of the East Fork Rd, between Quartz creek and Profile creek. See attached maps for more specific areas affected. Ignitions should take 1 to 2 days for each. Hazards from the prescribed fires including fire spread, smoke, rolling debris, ash pits and fire weakened trees may be present in the area until significant weather (precipitation and cooler temperatures) occurs.

Ignition is anticipated to take place in October or early November.

Please contact Patrick Schon at 208-634-0623 patrick.schon@usda.gov or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622 laurel.ingram@usda.gov with any questions or comments, or if you will be operating in or close to that area this fall.

Map

Thank you,
Patrick Schon
Fire Management Specialist
Payette National Forest, East Zone
— —

The Payette National Forest will be conducting prescribed burns beginning today, October 12th, between Brundage Mountain Resort and McCall.

Burning will include both broadcast burning and slash pile burning. Residual smoke may be visible for several weeks. Use caution when recreating within recently burned areas. Hazards may include falling snags, burning stump holes, etc.
— — — — — — — — — —

Bureau of Land Management to conduct prescribed burns

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management will be conducting two prescribed burns this fall as part of an effort to reduce wildfire threat by removing hazardous fuels. Burns will occur in both Elmore and Valley counties with timing dependent on weather and ground conditions.

Martha Avenue Prescribed Burn – Located about eight miles north of Mountain Home, this burn will occur between Oct. 20 and Nov 20. The burn will remove 25 acres of Russian thistle that has grown within the Paradigm Fuel Break Project, a network of roadside buffer zones in which highly flammable vegetation has been reduced or removed to prevent fire starts and spread.

Round Ridge Pile Prescribed Burn –– Located about six miles east of Smiths Ferry, this burn will occur between Oct. 15 and Dec. 30 and will involve burning 30 large piles of logging slash, spread over 250 acres, that accrued from a 2020 timber harvest. Burning these piles under cooler, moist conditions will eliminate what might otherwise be a hazardous fuel source during a wildfire.

Before starting any burn, fire managers will wait for adequate moisture levels in the project area to minimize unintended fire spread. Once initiated, prescribed burning operations are expected to last up to three days, with personnel and equipment patrolling areas up to five days afterwards. Smoke from these prescribed burns has the potential to be visible from large distances due to the projects’ locations, fuel types and burning conditions.

For more information, contact the BLM Boise District Fire Information Line at 208-384-3378.
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Teens playing with fireworks started Boise Foothills fire, ACSO says

KTVB Staff October 14, 2021

On Wednesday, Oct. 6, the Goose Fire burned more than 425 acres in the Boise Foothills. Soon after, investigators from the Ada County Sheriff’s Office found the blaze was started by fireworks.

Now, the Eagle Fire Department Fire Chief told KTVB on Thursday that the fire was started after a group of juveniles played with fireworks north of the Eagle Bike Park in the Boise Foothills. The fire was started in unincorporated Ada County.

According to the Ada County Sheriff’s Office, four teens were identified as being responsible for the fire. The teens, a 15-year-old girl, a 15-year-old boy and two 16-year-old boys, were lighting off aerial fireworks at about 4:30 p.m. Wednesday near a trail by the Eagle Bike Park.

Officials added that a man in the area saw the teens and told them to stop and leave.

The Ada County Sheriff’s Office said in a press release that the teens later moved towards Goose Creek Road and lit off more fireworks, which sparked the Goose Fire. The teens then ran off without trying to put out the grass fire.

continued:
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Fire Season links:

InciWeb Fire info link:
Air Quality McCall link:
National Fire Heat Map link: (zoom in to our area)
Weather Station at Stibnite link:
Real Time Lightning Map link: (zoom to our area)
GOES-West Satellite Maps Pacific Northwest link:
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Critter News:

Best in the Business

Retrievers, handlers awarded coveted pewter plates at Master National

By Max Silverson for The Star-News October 14, 2021

A total of 658 of the 1,035 dogs that started the 2021 Master National hunting retriever test in Valley County qualified for a coveted pewter plate to memorialize their achievement as the best hunting dogs in the business.

The Master National Retriever Club wrapped up its weeklong test of hunting dogs from across the country on Sunday.

In the event, dogs were required to retrieve dead or downed ducks to prove their hunting ability as judged against a set standard of performance.

This year’s social events were canceled due to COVID-19 worries.

full story:
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Idaho reaches deal to reimburse hunters who kill wolves

By Associated Press Oct 11, 2021

Idaho officials will make available up to $200,000 to be divided into payments for hunters and trappers who kill wolves in the state through next summer.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game late last month entered into an agreement with a nonprofit hunting group to reimburse expenses after a proven kill. The agreement follows a change in Idaho law aimed at killing more wolves that are blamed for attacking livestock and reducing deer and elk herds.

continued:
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Rare grizzly bear confirmed in northern Idaho forest

by Associated Press Friday, October 15th 2021

Wildlife managers in northern Idaho are warning people to be on the watch for grizzly bears after one was recently reported in the Coeur d’Alene National Forest.

The Coeur d’Alene Press reports Idaho Fish and Game regional wildlife biologist Barb McCall Moore wrote in a prepared statement that the bear was confirmed northeast of Magee on Oct. 6. Bears are active this time of year as they try to consume enough food to prepare for winter.

McCall Moore says bears can be active throughout the day and night, covering large areas of ground as they search for food. Black bears are common throughout northern Idaho but grizzlies are rarer.

source: CBS2 Idaho
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Fish & Game News:

Windows to Wildlife – beavers, bats, and ground squirrels!

In the fall edition of Windows to Wildlife:

* Beavers: the original habitat restoration engineers
* On the Idaho Birding Trail: Boundary-Smith Creek WMA
* Bat Week: October 24-31
* Species Spotlight: Merriam’s ground squirrels

link: (PDF file)
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Idaho Fish and Game untangles buck from backyard hammock in Pocatello

By Jennifer Jackson, Regional Communications Manager
Friday, October 15, 2021

Earlier this month a mule deer buck discovered first hand that hammocks aren’t always as relaxing as they are claimed to be.

Idaho Fish and Game received a call on October 8 from a concerned Pocatello resident who had discovered that a two-point buck had its antlers completely entangled within the support ropes of a backyard hammock and could not free itself.

It took two Fish and Game personnel to grab and hold the buck while another cut the twisted, knotted ropes from the antlers. The buck was released unscathed for the most part, though its antlers were bobbing loosely as a result of the animal’s struggle with the hammock.

continued: w/tips
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Squirrel stores 350 pounds of nuts in man’s pickup truck

by Peter Barker Zenger News Monday, October 4th 2021


Bill Fischer

In a battle between man and squirrel, the squirrel is winning.

A red squirrel keeps filling a North Dakota pickup truck with walnuts in order to prep for winter.

Bill Fischer, an insurance agent from Fargo, said he has been trying to stop the pesky squirrel from filling his car with nuts for eight years — without success.

Last month, the squirrel set a new record: Fischer found and removed 348 pounds of walnuts from his truck.

continued: CBS2 Idaho
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Seasonal Humor:

Squirrel32-a

CovidCorpProbs-a
[h/t CP]
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