Idaho History Oct 31, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 78

Idaho Newspaper Clippings February 16-19, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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February 16

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 16, 1920, Page 1

19200216DSM1

19200216DSM2Orofino Schools Open Monday

The Orofino public school will open Monday morning according to the announcement made by Dr. Horswill, county physician. Both local doctors have reported the flu epidemic to be abating. Only a small number of cases have developed within the past week and few are undergoing treatment at the present time. It is expected within another week the disease will have disappeared. The usual order of things will be resumed Monday with reference to the ban placed upon public gathering and the schools. — Republican.
— —

The ladies aid of the Methodist church will not hold its meeting Tuesday afternoon on account of the influenza quarantine.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 16 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., February 16, 1920, Page 3

City News

E. M. Johnson and family of Viola are all sick with influenza. Their nurse, Miss Rhoda Hart, from Walla Walla, has also been taken sick.

Clarence Simonson is quite ill with an attack of pneumonia.

Miss Isabel Dickinson is back at her work in the telephone exchange after a three weeks’ illness.

Mrs. M. E. Hatfield was called to Bovill Sunday by the serious illness of her son, Arley, who has pneumonia.

Mrs. C. J. McCollister has been very ill at the L. E. Brooks home but is reported as much better.

Mr. and Mrs. S. E. Reeder, who have been in Moscow to care for their children during an attack of “flu” left for their home at Troy today. The Reeder young people are in Moscow to attend school.

Mr. T. McGillan and sister, Miss Tweedy, left today for Peck, Idaho, to assist in caring for relatives, who are ill of influenza.
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19200216DSM3No New Influenza Cases Reported Sunday

The crest of the influenza epidemic has passed by. With or without strict regulation a few cases may be expected to develop for some time to come. However, no new cases having been reported for yesterday, with the issuance of this order restrictions heretofore enforced will be temporarily lifted and if there is no general increase in the number of cases as heretofore reported will be made permanent.

The exceptions to this general order are that the quarantine of all homes where influenza exists will be maintained as required by law, and that public and parochial school children will be excluded from the picture shows for this week; also that schools will maintain inspection for this week.

Dr. F. M. Leitch, Health Officer
— —

Mrs. Orval Sharp Buried

The funeral of Mrs. Orval Sharp of Spokane was held this morning at the Moscow cemetery, Rev. Wm. Nichols of the United Brethren church of Spokane conducting the service. Mrs. Sharp’s sister, Miss May Shadiger of Spokane was in attendance. Mrs. Sharp’s mother died two weeks ago of influenza and her husband died about a year ago following an operation.

(ibid, page 3)
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Lincoln (High) School, Caldwell, Idaho

SchoolLincolnHighCaldwellFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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February 17

The Caldwell Tribune. February 17, 1920, Page 3

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Local And Personal

Professor O. J. Smith of the science department of C. of I. is reported to be able to walk around a little after his recent severe illness with the influenza. He is expected to take up his work again in a week or so.

Mrs. C. T. Hawkes was ill last week.

The Rev. D. H. Hare supplied his pulpit Sunday for the first time in five weeks, during which his daughter, Miss Hare had the scarlet fever.

Miss Margaret Hare, Rev. D. H. Hare’s daughter, who has been staying with Mrs. Charles L. Chalfant during the quarantine of her sister for scarlet fever, returned to her home Friday when the quarantine was lifted.

Mrs. F. M. Cole is about to be out after her recent illness.

Lewis Goldsmith is convalescing from an attack of influenza.

Mrs. Carrie M. Steunenberg has recovered from the influenza.
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College Of Idaho Notes

Miss Alta Elmer of Nampa went home ill Monday. It developed that she had the influenza with rather serious complications.

Miss Hazel Hunter of Middleton returned to school Sunday after a severe attack of the influenza which has kept her at home.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 17 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Caldwell Tribune. February 17, 1920, Page 5

Canyon

The last one to contract the influenza was Leslie Herndon, who is visiting his uncle, S. P. McNeil. He has now recovered.

Mrs. Fred Herlocker has gone to Cascade to care for her sister, Mrs. Luella Mowbray, now sick with influenza.

The influenza patients are all out enjoying the bright weather. With present weather conditions, farmers will soon be plowing.

Ten Davis Items

Mrs. F. E. Kellogg is slowly recovering from a severe illness. Mrs. Cason of Parma has been substituting at the depot for some time to leave Mr. Kellogg free to care for his wife.

Henry Iverson is just getting out after a severe attack of the influenza.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Caldwell Tribune. February 17, 1920, Page 7

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Ten Davis News

The children in the primary intermediate and seventh and eighth grades enjoyed a valentine box Friday afternoon.

Notus

Notus is not a large place, in fact to quote our friend, Mr. Hannah, there is “hardly room to cuss a cat without getting your mouth full of fur” but it is a busy one these days.

Claytonia

Very pleasant change in the weather this week, the influenza is getting better, the schools have opened again with a good attendance and there is a good feeling all around.

(ibid, page 7)
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The Caldwell Tribune. February 17, 1920, Page 8

Ralph Hinshaw Called To The Great Beyond
Pay Tribute to Stalwart American Who Answers Final Summons at Greenleaft Home

The Greenleaf neighborhood was saddened Sunday morning February 8 when the word went out that Ralph Hinshaw had answered his Savior’s summons and gone home. He had been sick but one week taking down with the influenza Saturday which was followed by pneumonia and caused his death. A short funeral service was held at the Peckham chapel Wednesday afternoon by Rev. Lindley Wells.

As soon as Mrs. Hinshaw can get things fixed up here so she can leave she will take the body to Oskaloosa Iowa for burial. …
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Arena Valley Items

S. C. Dunaway and family who came here a short time ago, have all been very ill with influenza but are better. They are staying with Paul Smallwood and family on the John Prinz place.
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[Local News]

Nine speeders were arrested on Kimball avenue Sunday on north Kimball. Joyriders were evidently trying to burn up the new pavement and the attempt cost each of them $5 and costs, together with the warning that the fine would be doubled if they ever were taken into custody again.

(ibid, page 8)
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The Idaho Republican. February 17, 1920, Page 1

19200217TIR1

19200217TIR2Quillins Ill

J. J. Quillin and wife are confined to their homes suffering with the influenza.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 17 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. February 17, 1920, Page 2

Rose

Miss Ruth Hoff spent the weekend with Miss Cook as her parents were ill with the influenza.

The two sons of Mr. and Mrs. William E. Gardner are ill with the influenza.

I. J. Larson and family have been ill with the influenza.

Neil Gushwa, son of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Gushwa, who had to have his leg reset, is now able to walk without his crutches and intends to start to school again soon.

The leap year dance given last Friday evening was well attended and everybody enjoyed themselves.

Groveland

The family of L. Killion are much improved after a siege of illness.

(ibid, page 2)
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The Idaho Republican. February 17, 1920, Page 3

Centerville

The sick members of the Killion family are all improving and able to be up and around again.

Allen Hays is on the sick list this week and unable to attend school.

The Fay and Brown families are on the sick list this week. Dr. Simmons is in attendance.
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19200217TIR3Volunteer Nurses

In a number of influenza cases in Blackfoot and surrounding territory nursing service is needed, and available nurses are asked to list their names with Mrs. George Holbrook at the city hall or with W. B. Goodnough at the Goodnough Cleaning & Tailoring Co. if they desire to volunteer to take cases where help is required.

(ibid, page 3)
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The Idaho Republican. February 17, 1920, Page 5

Local News

The young son of J. B. DeHart is reported to be ill with the influenza.

John J. Boyle has been taken ill and is confined to his home.

Mark Tuohy was taken ill with the influenza the latter part of the week. He is at a local hospital.

Miss Elva Cherrington, who has been ill has returned to take up her work at the Moreland school.

Mrs. Affie Frandsen of the Gibson school spent the week-end in Blackfoot. She reports a splendid attendance at the school.

Mrs. Lois Reynolds of the Pingree school has recovered from her recent illness and is now able to resume her duties.

Miss Grace Gallet has returned to her home in Boise, after spending several days here in connection with the work of the health crusaders.
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Infant Dies

Funeral services of Florence G. Dahlstrom, infant daughter of Aurthur E. Dahlstrom were held from the family home Sunday afternoon, Bishop Williams officiating. Interment was in the Grove City Cemetery. The child died Friday from the influenza.
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19200217TIR4Moreland School Closed

The Moreland school is closed this week on account of illness in the vicinity. A number of pupils are absent on account of their own illness or illness in the family and the school authorities deemed it wise to close until more children are able to resume their studies.
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Working on Roads

The continued good weather is permitting the county commissioners to state the road work for the year considerably ahead of the time set during the winter. Gravel is being hauled to Aberdeen and the roads in that section are being surfaced with it. The road scrapers have been out on the roads for several days and the road between this city and Shelley are in fine shape as a result of their work. Work will be continued as long as the weather permits.
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19200217TIR5After-the-Flu Cough

or any cough should be treated and eliminated.
It isn’t the cough that carries you off, but the coughing, coughing, coughing.

Good Cough Syrups
Cherry Bark and White Pine
35c and 65c

Kantleek Can’t Leak
The latest in good hot water bottles, seamless and leak-less
$2.00 to $4.75

Palace Drug Store

(ibid, page 5)
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The Idaho Republican. February 17, 1920, Page 6

Northwest Notes

Influenza has appeared in epidemic form in several communities in Idaho.

It is estimated that there are upwards of 300 families in the vicinity of Miles City Mont., who are more or less unfamiliar with the English language.

Bee stings caused the death of Mrs. Mary La Pier of Sara, Wash. Mrs. La Pier, who was 72 years old, was collecting honey at her farm when she knocked over a hive and the bees attacked her.

By shooting into both rear tires of an automobile containing three alleged “moonshiners,” deputy sheriffs captured three men and lodged them in the county jail at Tacoma charged with violating the prohibition law.

Dentists summoned by the state dental board of Idaho and the bureau of license of the state law enforcement department to show cause why their licenses should not be revoked, will fight the state authorities in the courts.

The executive committee of the Retail Merchants’ association of Idaho Falls, Idaho, has indorsed [sic] the plan to raise funds to extend relief to the dry farmers east and west of town who did not produce a crop last season and whose livestock, particularly work horses, are suffering for lack of feed.
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Sleeping Sickness in Northwest

Spokane. — The third death from sleeping sickness has occurred here, Charles Hartman, a butcher, dying Sunday night after an illness of a week from the strange malady.

(ibid, page 6)
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The Idaho Republican. February 17, 1920, Page 8

Wicks

There are a number of cases of influenza in the district at present, but no one seems to be seriously ill. In order to safeguard the other pupils the law requires all pupils to present a doctor’s certificate on reentering school after having had any contagious disease.

Mrs. J. T. Woodland received word last week that her son Newell Rollison, who left on a mission in the southern states about three weeks ago, was seriously ill at Chattanooga, Tenn. having suffered a relapse, after an attack of influenza. His many friends here will be glad to know that the last report stated that he was improving.

Mrs. E. E. Bingham and Mrs. R. E. Lambert came up from Pocatello Thursday to attend the funeral of Georgia, the year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Arave of Wapello.

Miss Grace Gallet of Boise, accompanied by Mrs. Faulconer and George Ezell of Blackfoot visited the school here on Tuesday. Miss Gallet gave a very good address to the teachers and pupils on the modern health crusade work now being conducted by the National Tuberculosis association.
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School Gives Social

The Lavaside school, gave a basket social last Friday night at the school. A large number were present and the sum of $67 was obtained from the sale of baskets and a large cake. A voting contest to determine the prettiest girl present created much interest.
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Martins Buried

David Martins, eighteen year old son of Carl Martins, who died last week was buried from the family home at Moreland, Sunday. Burial was in the Thomas cemetery.
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Lid Clamped Down Quickly

New York. — Four minutes after the eighteenth amendment became effective in New York Saturday morning, a Brooklyn cafe owner was arrested by an internal revenue inspector for selling a glass of brandy.

(ibid, page 8)
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The Daily Star-Mirror., February 17, 1920, Page 1

19200217DSM1

19200217DSM2Marshal Placed Flu Tags At 246 Homes

That there were 246 homes in Moscow quarantined because of the influenza is shown by an itemized report by Marshal Grant Robbins. The report gives the name of the owner, location and date of quarantine and there are just 246 on the list. It is believed that a great many were never reported and consequently never quarantined, but the number shows how general the disease was scattered over the town. Taking an average of three cases to each home, which is considered conservative, the report shows there were 738 cases of influenza in Moscow. The tags have been removed from all but 33 homes.
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No Chamber Of Commerce Luncheon This Week

Owing to the “flu” situation, the Chamber of Commerce will not hold its regular luncheon on Wednesday. The annual election of officers of the Chamber will occur on the first meeting in March and in accordance with the by-laws, the president of the Chamber has appointed a committee to nominate the president, vice president and five members of the board of directors.
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Sunday Services At St. Mark Church
Beautiful Day Brings Out Big Congregation For Sunday Meeting

The sky-blue weather, assisted by the quieter habit of mind which the flu ban imposes, brought out a large congregation. More people are getting into the habit of singing the Episcopal service; the whole congregation on Sunday seemed to get right into it. …
— —

Cheating Two “Industries”

A Star-Mirror reporter overheard the following conversation on the street this morning:

First citizen: — “I had the flu, but I didn’t call a doctor. I watched my temperature, and kept quiet.”

Second citizen — “And cheated some doctor out of a job!”

Third citizen — “And the undertaker, also.”
— —

Wilson Better Today

Washington. — (By A. P.) — President Wilson continued to show improvement today. He was up early and occupied the usual routine, Admiral Grayson stated.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 17 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., February 17, 1920, Page 3

City News

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Heard returned home today from a two months visit with their sons, Clyde at Lincoln, Nebraska, and Claude, at Phoenix, Arizona, both of whom are in the agricultural extension work. They report a delightful trip with a short siege of “flu” at Phoenix.

News comes from Troy of the death of Chas. Robertson last evening, of pneumonia, following influenza. Mr. Robertson was section foreman on the Northern Pacific railway. He leaves a wife and four children.

The funeral of the seven weeks old baby daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Foote will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock at Grice’s chapel. The baby died Monday.

(ibid, page 3)
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Bonners Ferry Herald. February 17, 1920, Page 4

19200217BFH1

Local Pick-ups

Mrs. E. Bolleau suffered an attack of the influenza last week but was able to be up and around again Thursday.

Miss Marie Muhlfeld, assistant cashier at the First State Bank, was among the Spanish influenza victims last week.

Senator W. S. Walker returned Friday evening from Boise where he attended the special session of the state legislature held Wednesday. On the way to Boise Senator Walker had the misfortune to contract a severe cold.

Miss Grace Farnsworth, assistant in the Bonners Ferry postoffice, is quite ill with an attack of the tonsillitis.

The Callahan family received word yesterday that Miss Katherine Callahan was ill at Sandpoint with the influenza.

Mrs. E. L. Little has bee ill the past week with Spanish influenza but was well improved in health this morning according to reports.

Mrs. S. T. Faucett returned Sunday from a several weeks visit with her friends in Yakima and Tacoma, Wash. She states that the influenza epidemic is very serious in many Washington cities and that several towns have forbidden all public gatherings for a time in hopes of holding the disease in check.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 17 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. February 17, 1920, Page 5

Local Pick-ups

The Cow Creek school was closed all last week on account of the illness of the teacher, Miss Ethel Loomis.

Frank Inoue, proprietor of the Casey hotel, was able to be up and around on Friday after an attack of the Spanish influenza.

The pupils of the Meadow Creek school held a dance Saturday night and used the proceeds to apply on paying for their new phonograph.

Miss Ruth Buchanan, teacher of the eighth grade and principal of the grade school, was called to Spokane Thursday by the serious illness of a relative.

County Commissioner Fred Chambers was able to be up and around on Friday after having been confined to his bed for ten days with an attack of pneumonia.

Miss Ellen Hawkins, one of the teachers of the Naples school, has been quite ill the past week and Mrs. Amy Perry has had charge of the class in the absence of Miss Hawkins.

Mrs. J. J. Bradford, of Delta, Alberta, arrived here last week to visit at the home of her sister, Mrs. A. B. Barnes. Mrs. Barnes is just recovering from a severe attack of the Spanish influenza.

Mrs. Mary Wright Dore has resigned as teacher of the Curley Creek school and is now located at Granite, Ida. The Curley Creek school has been closed the past week on account of the trustees being unable to find a new teacher.
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Copeland News Notes

Julius Dehlbom has been on the sick last the past eek.

Members of the E. J. Wilson’s family are ill with the influenza and this week Clarence Dehlbom is assisting Mr. Wilson in the latter’s store.

Harold Dehlbom is one of the several victims of influenza in this district.

Three horses belonging to C. B. Van Alstine, fell into the Kootenai river, through the ice last Sunday. With assistance of neighbors the horses were recovered.
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Will Save Their Good Clothes

The students of the Bonners Ferry high school held a meeting Wednesday and decided to put a crimp in the high cost of living. It was decided that from February 16 until the end of the term the boys should forego white collars, neckties and new suits and they must wear dark shirts and overalls or kahki trousers while the girls will wear aprons. It is said that all who fail to keep the pledge will be promptly hazed.

(ibid, page 5)
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Bonners Ferry Herald. February 17, 1920, Page 8

Insane Man In Sheriff’s Custody

An insane man was taken in charge last Tuesday at Naples by Deputy Sheriffs Bangs and Fry, on complaint of citizens of the district. The man was examined as to his sanity on Thursday afternoon before Probate Judge Henderson and was ordered committed to the state asylum at Orofino. Saturday Sheriff Dunning received word that the man could not be received at Orofino because the institution was in quarantine.

The man taken in custody Tuesday refuses to tell his name or anything of his past history. He carried discharge papers issued to Andrew Anderson in 1917 from the Canadian army for physical disability. The man also carried receipts in his pockets made out to Peter Peterson. It is likely that arrangement will be made to deport the man.

(ibid, page 8)
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High School, Moscow, Idaho ca. 1911

SchoolMoscow1911Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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February 18

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 18, 1920, Page 1

19200218DSM1

Idaho Defeated W.S.C. Last Night
University Team Beat State Collegers At Pullman By Score of 29-24

Idaho’s Vandals walked on Washington State College basketeers, 29 to 24 on the Pullmanites’ home floor, Tuesday night. …

Carried Off the Floor

Idaho players were carried triumphantly off the floor to their dressing room by a crowd of about 30 Idaho men who attended the game. Due to a strict influenza ban on the W.S.C. campus only a limited number, five men from each fraternity or dormitory, were allowed to attend. …

A vociferous Idaho violently voiced her victory over W.S.C. with a yell rally, band concert, bonfire, and a general hullabaloo lasting from late last night to early this morning, the scene of said festival activities being the proverbial campus steps. ..

For a time ear blistering blares by the band and face blistering flares from the fire absorbed the attentions of all, until Dean Eldridge offered a variation of interest by appearing in bathrobe and slippers and voiced the combined complaints of the nearby natives. Whereupon the majority of the rompers betook themselves to their respective habitations.

A faithful few remained behind and flushed the last vistages [sic] of the celebration from the campus with the fire hose.
— —

Women may Form Party

Chicago. — (By A.P.) — The alignment of women voters with existing political parties was abandoned and efforts to inaugurate a political organization of their own was advocated today by the leaders of the league of women voters, successor to the American Women Suffrage Association.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 18 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., February 18, 1920, Page 2

19200218DSM2School Attendance Growing

Professor W. E. Wiley, acting superintendent of Moscow schools, reports the attendance increasing rapidly and that it has reached normal in the high school, while every grade shows increased attendance. The work is progressing rapidly and smoothly. Both teachers and pupils are trying to make up for the time lost during the flu epidemic when the schools were closed for 10 days. It is hoped that by the end of the term this will be fully made up and that the schools will not have suffered at all from the enforced vacation.

(ibid, page 2)
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The Daily Star-Mirror., February 18, 1920, Page 5

19200218DSM3Only Six Flu Cases In Past Three Days

In connection with the statement of Chief Robbins as to the number of homes quarantined for influenza I would say that for the last two weeks of January there were reported to me a total of 456 cases. For the first 17 days of this month a total of 131 cases have been reported, making a total of 587 cases. The number of cases not reported is problematical but there must have been a considerable number. The total number of cases reported for the past three days is only six, which shows the epidemic to be rapidly subsiding.

Dr. Leitch
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City News

Mrs. J. F. Holbrook left today for her home at Creston, Wash., after three weeks visit with her sister, Mrs. J. T. Neal, south of Moscow. While here Mrs. Holbrook suffered an attack of influenza.

H. D. Martin is home from Helmer to spend the week, while convalescing from a recent attack of the “flu.”

Miss Margaret Reeder, who has been ill over a month at the home of her sister, Mrs. H. L. Coats, is reported as slowly improving.
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19200218DSM4John Gibb Dead From Flu At Genesee

John Gibb died Tuesday evening at 8 o’clock at his home five miles east of Genesee of pneumonia and pleurisy following influenza. Mrs. John Gibb, formerly Miss Lulu Cornwall of Moscow, passed away with her infant child in July, 1919.

Mr. Gibb was 31 years of age. He was well known in Moscow and throughout Latah county.

He leaves three children, eight, five and three years of age; his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Gibb of Genesee; one brother, Wm. Gibb, an engineer at Boise; and two sisters, Miss Alice Gibb, a teacher in Oregon, and Miss Mary Gibb of Genesee.

W. N. Gibb is at present in California and the time of the funeral will be decided after his return. Burial will be made in the Moscow cemetery where Mrs. John Gibb was buried.
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Have You Had It?

When your back is broke and your eyes are blured,
And your shin bones knock and your tongue is furred,
And your tonsils squeak and your hair gets dry,
And your dogdone sure that you’re going to die,
But you’re skeered you won’t and afraid you will.
Just drag to bed and have your chill,
And pray the Lord to see you thru,
For you’ve got the flu, boy, You’ve got the flu.

When your toes curl up and your belt goes flat,
And your twice as mean as a Thomas cat,
And life is a long and dismal cruse,
And you’r food all taste like a hard boiled hearse;
When your lattice aches and your head’s a-buzz,
And nothing is as it ever was,
Here are my sad regrets to you –
You’ve got the flu, boy, You’ve got the flu.

What is it like, this Spanish flu?
Ask me brother, for I’ve been through.
It is by Misery out of Despair;
It pulls your teeth and curls your hair;
It thins your blood and brays your bones,
And fills your craw with moans and groans.
And sometimes maybe, you get well.
Some call it Flu – I call it Hell!

— Dick Micks
— —

American Legion Convention

Twin Falls, Ida. — The state convention of the Idaho American Legion will be held here, April 7, 8 and 9, according to a recent announcement by La Verne Collier, state adjutant. Redrafting of the legion constitution will be one of the important matters that will come before the delegates.

(ibid, page 5)
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High School, Grangeville, Idaho ca. 1908

SchoolHighGrangeville1908Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

February 19

The Grangeville Globe. February 19, 1920, Page 1

19200219GG1

19200219GG2Hospital Notes
Citizens Taking Advantage of Modern Equipment Installed by Dr. Alcorn

That the Alcorn hospital which is now fully equipped, is proving a boon to the afflicted in this vicinity is being evidenced this week by the number of surgical cases that is being handled by Dr. R. J. Alcorn and his graduate nurse, Miss Hazel Calhoun.

Dr. Alcorn has leased the entire upper floors of the Telcher and Allen blocks and has had them renovated throughout, freshly calsomined, painted and varnished. Before the work was actually completed demands were made upon the hospital and there are now four surgical cases confined there.

Yesterday Mrs. Geo. A. Cowgill was operated upon for a growth on the scalp.

Mrs. Ascher underwent a serious operation on Wednesday; Miss Florance Woodard of Ferdinand, was operated on this forenoon for gaal [sic] stones, and Mrs. Curtis of near Columbus, was operated on this forenoon. Dr. G. S. Stockton assisted in the operations.

All of the patients are doing as well as could be expected.
— —

Pleaded Guilty To Making Whiskey
Gary Karnes of Keuterville, Sentenced to 30 Days, Fined $50.00

Having been afflicted with the “flu” and unable to properly “cover up” his illicit still, Gary Karnes was taken into custody last Sunday and the latter lodged in the county jail at Grangeville. On Monday he waived preliminary examination and entered a plea of guilty before Judge Campbell in the probate court. He was taken before District Judge W. N. Scales and a sentence of 30 days in the county jail and a fine of $10.00 [sic] was imposed.

It is not known whether Karnes will liquidate the fine or elect to stay in jail.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 19 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Grangeville Globe. February 19, 1920, Page 5

19200219GG3School Resumed Monday
Eleven Students Won Honor Grades During First Semester

School opened in Grangeville Monday after a two and one-half weeks’ interruption on account of influenza. The attendance, while not up to normal was good. About ninety per cent of the pupils were in attendance.

… Eleven students of the high school won honor grades during the first semester of the present school year. Of this number ten were girls, there being only one boy to receive the honor. This boy was Fred Day, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Day. His rank was third among the students of the school, his grade being one-fifth of one per cent below that of leader Ruth Munro. …
— —

At Catholic Church

Services will be resumed at the Catholic church next Sunday at the usual hour.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Grangeville Globe. February 19, 1920, Page 8

Local Happenings

The Cowboy band resumed rehearsals Tuesday night of this week after having discontinued the meetings during the influenza ban.

J. A. Peterson, acting postmaster, was down town Sunday for the first time following his severe illness. He is regaining his strength very slowly.

Sam McMeeken came out from Florence last week and spent a few very pleasant days having some dental work attended to. Sam had 22 teeth extracted at one sitting.

Joe Roakey, one of our army of subscribers of the Winona country was attending to business here Tuesday. While extending his subscription well into 1921 Mr. Roakey remarked that while the freezing nights and thawing days were possibly doing some damage to winter crops, he did not think it serious at the present time. Sickness from the epidemic was also about a thing of the past in his neighborhood.
— —

Whitebird News

Mrs. Ed Wyatt of Deer creek is reported very ill with influenza.

Miss Ida Wickman of the Whitebird schools, spent the vacation at her home near Slate creek.

(ibid, page 8)
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Payette Enterprise., February 19, 1920, Page 1

19200219PE1

Personal And Local Mention

Mr. E. W. Blakesley who has been confined to the house for the past two months is now able to be out on the walk and enjoy the sun these fine days.

Mr. A. S. Luther is recuperating from a severe cold and other complications which has caused his confinement at home for some time. He was able to be down town one day last week.

Harry Kent has just received a letter from Mrs. Kent who is still at the home of her sister in Canada, which states she is ready to return home but owing to the snow and weather conditions it is impossible, as all trains are snow bound and the mercury 40 below zero.

Henry Solterbeck is now rapidly improving from a three weeks siege of pneumonia and other complication. Upon a thorough diagnosis of his case last Monday by Drs. Woodward, showed an abscess had formed on the left side near the heart. A small incision was made without even the administering of an anesthetic, releasing fully five pints of puss greatly to the relief of the patient.

City Marshal Scott Fitch is confined to his home this week with the Flu.

The Memorial service to be held at the Christian Church Sunday evening at 7:30 o’clock is to commemorate the lives of those who made the complete sacrifice in France. There are seven certificates of appreciation signed by the President of France, to be given to relatives in this community. It is hoped the community will be well represented at this service of which the American Legion will be in charge.
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Succumbs To Pneumonia

Just before going to press we learn of the death of Mr. Butts at his home on Second Avenue South which occurred at one o’clock this morning after suffering with pneumonia but a few days. Funeral services were held from the Nazarine Church this afternoon at three o’clock. We have learned no further particulars but hope to be able to publish an appropriate obituary next week.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 19 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Payette Enterprise., February 19, 1920, Page 4

Clinic Has Proved Worth
Organization Established by Boston Firm Well Worthy of Imitation by Other Employers

A pioneer medical clinic, established 15 years ago to protect the health of 600 employees, and gradually enlarged and expanded until it now cares for a total of 2,700 — that is the record proudly held today by a well-known Boston firm. At the time of its organization the medical director was in charge of of the clinic in the capacity of director and visiting nurse. Now the clinic is in charge of a practicing physician and surgeon, assisted by three full-time graduate nurses.

During the influenza epidemic of last winter, over 350 employees were treated per day, with only six deaths during the entire course of the dreaded disease. All cases were given careful individual attention and, in instances where no family doctor was in attendance, immediate arrangements were made for medical care.

It is the policy of the nurses in the clinic to advise all employees with whom they come in contact to be insured, an activity which the firm itself handles through an employees’ organization. The purpose of such advice is to secure insurance for all employees in order that they may receive its benefits after one week’s illness.

This arrangement does not place a premium upon the employees’ being ill, and at the same time the clinic cooperates in the matter of insurance.

A dental clinic is in a formative state and, no doubt, will be established in a short time. The plan and method of administration and organization is simply in the making, but is safe to say that the dental clinic will be as efficient as the medical clinic.

The Modern Hospital, in describing the clinic, says that it has fully proved its value in protecting the health of the employees of this particular company and merits the commendation and imitation of other mercantile and industrial establishments.

(ibid, page 4)
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Payette Enterprise., February 19, 1920, Page 5

Fruitland Department
Mrs. F. M. Burtch

The churches all resumed services on Sunday and the school re-opened on Monday. No new cases of illness have been reported for some time.

Little Jaunita Griner whose life was almost despaired of a short time ago is improving at present.

Mrs. Chas. Miller is seriously ill this week and Miss Maggie Beeghley is caring for her.

Daniel Griner arrived on Thursday of last week from Danville, Illinois, called here by the death of his son Clarence Griner.

Word was received this week that Mrs. Earl Hobbs, one of our former teachers, is ill with influenza at her home in Cornelius, Oregon.

Miss Avis Thebo went to Boise Saturday to care for her sister’s family, the members of whom are ill.

Mr. C. M. Lackey returned on Thursday of last week from this trip east. He had been gone several weeks and was ill most of the time while away.

E. B. Sargent returned from the east on Friday of last week. While away he was ill in a hospital at Des Moines for some time.

Little Margaret Smith, who has been dangerously ill for some time is much improved at present.
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Birds Have Right of Way

Fowl have the right of way in the air, warns the director of military aeronautics. This is justice indeed, since birds flew first.

But this is not all. Recently many towns along the Atlantic coast have been visited with dead bird showers. Aviators flying by a town would see a flock of wild fowl coming their way. They would set their machine guns and let the bullets fly.

Presently a prominent citizen walking below would be hit with a large, bloody bird. He complained to the department of agriculture. Then the federal migratory bird law between the United States and Great Britain was referred to, and it was found that shooting birds from airplanes is unlawful.

(ibid, page 5)
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Further reading

Modern Health Crusade 1920

1920HealthCrusade-a

Vintage 1920 Modern Health Crusader Pin National Tuberculosis
source: Ebay
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Report of the Commissioner of Education for the Year Ended June 30, 1920

Educational Hygiene.

In the summary of educational hygiene in the report for the year 1918–19 it was stated that “in no former year has so much, so varied, and so far-reaching work been done in the field of educational hygiene.” The emotional intensity caused by the war was at full tide, and the projects thus initiated were going ahead proportionately. During the year just ended there has been some decrease of emotional intensity and evidence of a wholesome tendency to deal in a constructive critical way with new plans and programs — the field of educational hygiene. On the other hand the momentum generated during the war period is working steadily and without serious abatement both in long-established channels and in the channels newly broken out. Gains have been consolidated and fruitful new lines of effort have been extended.

(page 65)

Progress of Health Education.

In the spring of 1920 the Bureau of Education sent a questionnaire to about 10 per cent of the schools of the country to ascertain the extent of health education throughout the country and particularly to what extent the plan of health education started by the bureau a year before was used.

The Bureau of Education received 4,016 answers to questionnaires. Forty-eight per cent of the schools showed health teaching of some sort. Thirty-two per cent used classroom instruction of one kind or another and textbooks and sent up clamorous calls for more and better material. Nineteen per cent weigh and measure the children according to the plan suggested by the Bureau of Education. A few, of course, struggle against cruel handicaps, especially in rural localities and where the curriculum is crowded, but the majority of educators seem anxious and ready to devise ways and means of procuring life more abundant for the American school child, and making it part of their manifold duties to see that he knows how to live a healthy and a happy life.

A relatively small percentage of these schools, 1.9 per cent, reported medical inspection, and seventy-two hundredths of 1 per cent have nutritional clinics and feedings. Comment on the situation received through the questionnaire has been sometimes discouraging or unenlightened, but the general spirit is one of quick cooperation, and often original methods of health education have come to light. The section of the country quickest to adopt modern health education in the schools has been, according to these reports, the West. Utah stands out bravely at the head of the list, with 72 per cent of her schools doing weighing. Iowa comes next with 54 per cent of the schools using the height and weight standard for child health. Minnesota is third with 31 per cent of her schools weighing the children. And so the States come up with a will out of their welter of ignorance and irresponsibility toward physical young America.

Voluntary Organizations.

Brief summaries of some of the more important activities of voluntary organization in the field of educational hygiene are shown.

(1) National Physical Education Service. — The National Physical Education Service was established about two years ago by the Playground and Recreation Association of America. The creation of this new service resulted from a request by the National Committee on Physical Education formed in the spring of 1918. The National Physical Education Service is actively engaged in promotion of State and Federal legislation for physical education. It has contributed largely to the success of the State campaigns for physical education legislation, and is directing the movement for Federal legislation.

(2) The Child Health Organization of America. This organization continued its work along the lines indicated in our 1918-19 annual report. Their general health program stresses five particular points: (1) A scale in every school; (2) time allowed in every school day for the teaching of health habits; (3) a hot school lunch available for every child; (4) teachers trained in normal schools to teach health habits; (5) every child’s weight record sent home on the monthly report card.

They have published an attractive child health alphabet, a health reader, and other literature on health education.

Cho-Cho, the health clown, has traveled from coast to coast demonstrating the value of teaching health through fun and make-believe. The picture man, a clever cartoonist, and a health fairy are also sent out by this organization and have met with great success.

A special conference of well-known educators was called by the child-health organization last December to suggest a program of child health adapted to the work of the elementary grades and high schools. As a result of this conference a bulletin entitled “Further Steps in Teaching Health” was prepared for the Bureau of Education and printed on the Government presses.

In order to create a wider interest and secure from a large circle suggestions for a modern health syllabus to meet the needs for health teaching in all grades, a $1,000 fellowship, including one year’s study in modern health work at Columbia University, was offered for the best graded plan on modern health teaching. The results of this contest will be made available in a short time for the use of superintendents of State and city schools.

(3) Modern Health Crusade. — Reports from over the country indicate no less than 6,000,000 enlistments of children as Modern Health Crusaders through the performance of the health chores.

During 1919-20 the Modern Health Crusade was adopted on a State-wide basis as obligatory or authorized curriculum work throughout Maine, Alabama, Tennessee, Indiana, Wyoming, Idaho, and Utah. The crusade has been officially adopted also in the District of Columbia, in Alaska, and in hundreds of cities and counties outside of the seven States.

Under the policy of a progressive program the Order of the Round Table has been re-created for Modern Health Crusaders after a plan worked out by the National Tuberculosis Association in consultation with other national organizations engaged in child-health work. The new order is designed to stimulate interest in physical and athletic fitness. The boy or girl to be admitted to the Round Table earns points by demonstrating athletic ability; by passing weight, posture, and physical examinations; and by obtaining a high grade in health studies. The standards are those set by the Child Health Organization, the Playground and Recreation Association of America, the American Posture League, the First Aid Division of the American Red Cross, the Boy Scouts of America, the Girl Scouts, and the Camp Fire Girls.

The National Tuberculosis Association desires to make the movement a means of bringing to the schools improved methods of health instruction. Correlation of crusade work with such studies as English composition, history, arithmetic, and civics, as well as with hygiene, has been readily carried out.

The Record of Health Chores is now published in primary, standard (intermediate), and senior editions, corresponding to grades 1 to 3, 4 to 6, 7 or 8, and to the higher grades. With the three editions of chores as foundation, schools may at their discretion add features of the program set forth in the crusade manual, thus affording a further progression through the grades. The manual, a 32 page booklet, may be obtained from the National Tuberculosis Association, 381 Fourth Avenue, New York.

(4) Committee on Health Problems in Education of the National Council of Education. The committee reports completion of its study and report upon health improvement in the rural schools. It also reports that a study of standards of health norms and health defects of school children is being conducted. A report on this practical and important matter, supported by our joint health committee, promises to add greatly through improved uniformity of findings and methods to the practical health work for the school children of the entire country.

(pages 68-71)

excerpted: from Google Books
— — — — — — — — — —

Leitch house in Moscow

1900DrLeitchHouse-a
Ott Historical Photograph Collection, Digital Initiatives, University of Idaho Library

Dr. F.M. Leitch, an early day doctor, residence located at the northwest corner of Washington Street and the Troy Highway [Highway 8]. Picture early 1900s.

source: University of Idaho Library
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What is old is now new again: 100 years ago Idaho doctors enforced quarantine to slow spread of smallpox

Brian Holmes August 17, 2020 KTVB

The Spanish Flu of 1918 has been one of the closest comparisons to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic but it wasn’t the only infectious disease that Idahoans dealt with 100 years.

The years following the Spanish Flue Pandemic, people still battled infectious diseases, like smallpox and yellow fever,

On August 17, 1920, one Idaho town had enough with the caviler attitude some residents had with public health.

100 years ago, Dr. F.M. Leitch was the City of Moscow’s Health Officer, took to the local newspaper, the Daily-Star Mirror, to remind people about a local outbreak of smallpox and the laws that could be enforced if people didn’t take quarantine seriously or didn’t report being sick.

“Quarantine laws for the control of contagious diseases will be rigidly enforced in Moscow in the future,” Leitch wrote.

A physician by trade, Leitch took up issuing the warning after he received multiple complaints that families came down with smallpox but didn’t tell anyone and they went around town spreading and exposing others to the disease.

The state law said physicians who were called to treat people with say, smallpox, the plague, yellow fever, or any other disease dangerous to the public health, they had to report the names of those diagnosed with 24 hours.

If someone just thought someone else might have such an illness, health officials had the right to come into the home and put everyone there under temporary quarantine.

And if a stay-at-home sanction wasn’t enough. A quarantine card “having printed on it in large letters the name of the disease within,” would be placed on your front door and no one could come in or out without written permission from the board of health.

Considered a flight risk? “Quarantine guards” with police powers would be placed at your door and allowed to use “all necessary means to enforce” that quarantine.

Caught not following the law of Idaho? That’s a misdemeanor and could mean you quarantine at the county jail for 90 days or a fine of $50.

source: KTVB
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Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)