Idaho History Nov 7, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 79

Idaho Newspaper Clippings February 19-20, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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February 19 (continued)

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 19, 1920, Page 1

19200219DSM1

19200219DSM2Two Young Men Are Victims Of Influenza

Arlie Hatfield, son of Mrs. M. E. Hatfield, died Wednesday at Bovill, of pneumonia, following influenza. He had been working in the lumber camps and was the main support of his mother, who lives in Moscow. He was 21 years of age. He leaves besides his mother, two sisters and four brothers, the older of whom was in the army and since his discharge has been in Texas. Mrs. Hatfield was called to Bovill Monday to assist in caring for her son, and his uncle, L. E. Brooks, left yesterday for Bovill. Mr. Grice, the undertaker, made the trip to Bovill by automobile, bringing the body to Moscow last night. He also brought the body of Robert Carl Hageman, a boy of 19 years, who died at the Bovill hospital of the same disease. The body of R. C. Hageman will be shipped to Chewelah, Wash., where his relatives live.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 19 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., February 19, 1920, Page 2

[Editorial Page]

The state bureau of public health compliments Moscow on the number in which the influenza epidemic was handled. The compliments are deserved for our mayor and health officer have really done excellent work in stamping out the disease. But the credit is not due to these two, alone, for there has been splendid cooperation and every physician and nearly all citizens did his or her “bit” to bring about normal conditions.

(ibid, page 2)
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The Daily Star-Mirror., February 19, 1920, Page 5

City News

The public library will be opened tomorrow, February 20, for the use of the patrons.

Miss Roxie Hatfield arrived here today from Potlatch, called by the death of her brother, Arlie Hatfield.

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Snow and children returned Tuesday evening from California where they spent the winter. They returned all the way by automobile making the trip in two weeks. They had no car trouble and report the roads as fair on most of the way home.
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19200219DSM3

(ibid, page 5)
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The Daily Star-Mirror., February 19, 1920, Page 6

19200219DSM4Deputy Sheriff a Flu Victim

Word reached Moscow today from Orofino, that Roy Leeper, deputy sheriff of Clearwater county, located at Elk River, had died of flu. No particulars of the death are obtainable. Mr. Leeper was about 35 years old, had lived in Clearwater county since childhood and leaves a widow and two young children.
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Potlatch Paragraphs
Mrs. O. J. Lorenz Dead

Potlatch, Idaho. — Mrs. Otto J. Lorenz, of Onaway, who died at the Palouse hospital on the 12th, was buried at one o’clock today in Potlatch cemetery, the Rev. W. A. Hitchcock conducting the funeral services. Mrs. Lorenz is survived by her husband and three children, ages two, four and six.

Potlatch has been most fortunate during the influenza epidemic through out the country. There have been only a few mild cases at any one time, and at present there is only one case of real influenza in town.
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Auction Sale, Saturday

Mrs. Worley, whose husband died as a result of influenza recently, leaving her with a large family of small children, will sell, at public auction on the streets of Moscow Saturday, at 2 o’clock, a fine young team and a good colt and some other property. The auctioneer donates his service in this sale and the public is asked to bid liberally on the property offered.

(ibid, page 6)
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The Nezperce Herald., February 19, 1920, Page 1

19200219NH1

Public School News

School opened Monday with almost every student present.

A class of 20 students has been organized for the purpose of studying parliamentary law. Mr. Skinner is teaching the class.
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Local News

B. F. Oakley is again on the job at his blacksmith shop after a severe siege of the flu, his entire family having been stricken at the same time. All are now about well except little daughter, whose case developed into pneumonia. She is improving, however.

Mrs. G. C. Marks and children, of Powell, Wyo., are visiting at the home of her sister, Mrs. Geo. Talbot, of this vicinity. Mrs. Marks’ husband fell a victim to the recent flu scourge and she may take up her residence permanently here.

The Temple Theatre will repeat tonight the fine 7-reel feature film, “The Rose of Honor,” which so pleased last night’s audience.
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19200219NH2New Influenza Outbreak On Central Ridge

Eight well known ranches of the Central Ridge district north of Mohler were stricken with influenza yesterday and fears are entertained of a further spread of the malady in that section. Calls for medical assistance from over that way were urgent this morning.

It is the impression that this new appearance of the contagion in the territory where it had been pretty well stamped out originated at the Frank Senter farm auction sale, which brought a large crowd of people together last Monday at his place north of Mohler. So far as can be ascertained, all the men stricken yesterday were in attendance at this sale.

A report from Peck early this week indicated a return of the flu at that point and the schools there were closed on Monday, but yesterday word came up from there that conditions were not bad, only a few mild cases being under treatment.
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Central Ridge News

The Central Ridge school reopened Wednesday, and the Senter school resumed work Thursday.

The flu broke out in Peck again last week and the school was closed Monday.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 19 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Nezperce Herald., February 19, 1920, Page 2

[Editorial Page]

While authorities continue at a loss in accounting for the contagious tendency of influenza, it has been too often demonstrated that its outbreak generally follows the assemblage of crowds – then the condition is prevalent – for the fact to be overlooked.
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The question of sustaining our public school system becomes a more serious one every day, and why the law makers do not hasten means of raising more funds for meeting the demand of increasing teachers’ salaries is a matter the public should look into. These salaries much be raised else instructors cannot be had and the schools will close. Last week an acquaintance of the writer, who held the superintendency of a school wherein a dozen teachers were employed, resigned to take a job that paid a much better salary, and the school was left to flounder along as best it could without a head. It’s time for action. The schools must not go down.

(ibid, page 2)
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The Nezperce Herald., February 19, 1920, Page 9

Local and Personal News Notes

Miss Edna Waters, a student in the Clarkston high schools, returned to that city Sunday, after a visit with homefolks here during the period of the flu ban.

N. H. Jacobs arrived home last Friday from a several weeks’ visit over his old Minnesota stomping ground. He was held up by eight days in Spokane by an attack of the flu, and though still weak from the experience, is pretty well recovered. He was accompanied from Eden Valley, Minn., by his nephew, Nick Bauer, and Frank Drossard, two young men will help him operate his farm this season.

(ibid, page 9)
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Idaho County Free Press. February 19, 1920, Page 1

19200219ICFP1

19200219ICFP2Henry Kuther Dies; Influenza-Pneumonia

Henry Kuther, 29 years old, a young farmer residing near Ferdinand, died Monday of the influenza-pneumonia. Mr. Kuther, who was born at Keuterville, was a life-long resident of Idaho county.

Surviving him are his widow, three children, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Kuther, of Lewiston; a brother Joe Kuther, of Ferdinand, and four sisters, Mrs. Joe Buscher, Orofino; Mrs. Nick Kinzer, California; Mrs. Stricker, Cottonwood; Mrs. Henry Sprute, Fenn; and Mrs. Josephine Swearmine, Ferdinand.

Funeral services were held Wednesday morning from the Catholic church in Ferdinand, with interment in the Ferdinand cemetery. A. J. Maugg Grangeville funeral director, was called to Ferdinand owing to the death of Mr. Kuther.
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James M’Kennen Of Elk City Succumbs

James McKennen died on Thursday of last week at Elk City, death resulted from influenza. Mr. McKennen, who was about 40 years of age, was a bachelor. The body was taken to his former home in Wisconsin for burial.
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Roy Leeper, Formerly Of Stites, Succumbs

Word was received here of the death Monday, of Roy H. Leeper at Elk River. He was a son of Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Leeper of Stites and son-in-law of Mr. and Mrs. Phill Hartman of Stites.

Mr. Leeper was 31 years old and leaves to mourn his death a widow, who is postmistress at Elk River, three children, father, mother, brother, Forest Leeper, cashier of the Bank of Stites, and a sister May Leeper attending high school. …
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Whitebird Without Public School Head

Whitebird is without a superintendent for its public school, and doesn’t know where to find one. John Watson, who had been at the head of the school since last fall, was obliged to give up the job, owing to a ruling by the state department of education. He was teaching under a permit, and was unable to qualify for a regular certificate, and therefore was forced to quit. A Professor Huges, who was selected to fill the vacancy, recently arrived in Whitebird, but remained only over night, and suddenly decided to leave, without trying out the job.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 19 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. February 19, 1920, Page 2

Whitebird

(Special Correspondence)

Influenza epidemic having subsided in this vicinity, the Whitebird public schools were reopened Monday after two weeks’ vacation.

Mrs. Gormand, who has been nursing influenza patients in Whitebird, has returned to her home.

Mrs. Sam Robins, who had not entirely recovered from influenza suffered a relapse last week and is now in a serious condition.

Dan Johnson, an employee of the Grant Smith & Co., Camp 3, was seriously hurt Saturday while trimming on a slope. The rock on which he was prying broke and caused him to lose his footing. He fell more than twenty feet, striking on his chest. He incurred fractures of several ribs and one of his lungs was crushed. Dr. W. A. Foskett was immediately summoned and Mr. Johnson was taken to Slate creek, where he was left in the care of Ben Hall.

While cutting wood recently, S. K. Mahurin had the misfortune to be hit in one of his eyes by a stick of wood. Not thinking it very serious the doctor was not called until a few days ago. It is probable that he will lose the sight of his eye.
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Fenn

(Special Correspondence)

Mrs. Marion Weber is ill at her home with the “flu.”

A. T. Gardner is out after being confined to his home the past week with the flu.

(ibid, page 2)
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Idaho County Free Press. February 19, 1920, Page 3

Doumecq

(From Last Week)

School is closed temporarily on account of the influenza epidemic. All cases on the hill are improving so it is hoped that the world can soon be resumed.

Miss Esther Crawford, a pupil in the Grangeville high school, is home during the influenza quarantine in Grangeville.

Mrs. Cora Wells, who has been at work near Lucile, was called home last week on account of illness of her daughter Effie.

Continued mild weather is a delight to stockmen and ranchers. Cattle are turned on the breaks and a number of the farmers are plowing. A slight fall of snow Saturday night made some think that perhaps winter wasn’t quite over.

(ibid, page 3)
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Idaho County Free Press. February 19, 1920, Page 5

19200219ICFP3Mrs. Clara May Hill Is Victim Of Influenza

Mrs. Clara May Hill, wife of Cleve Hill, died on February 8 of influenza at her home near Ferdinand. She was 31 years of age.

Mrs. Hill was born on Dec. 7, 1889 in Layon county, KS.

Mrs. Hill leaves to mourn her passing her husband, Cleve Hill, five children, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Gideon Unzieker; three sisters, Mrs. D. H. Hill, Miss Bertha Unzicker, and three brothers, Roy Unzicker, Ernest Unzicker and John Unzicker.

Funeral was held from the home the morning of February 10, the Rev. C. J. Cole of Clarkston officiating. Burial was in the cemetery at Westlake.
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19200219ICFP4Influenza Claims Mrs. Gehring of Keuterville

Cotton Chronicle: Mrs. George Gehring, aged about 50 years, and a pioneer resident of the Keuterville section passed away in her home near that place Wednesday from influenza. Besides her sorrowing husband, she is survived by her father, Warner Herzog, several children, three brothers, Joe, Henry and Barney Herzog, and a sister, Mrs. William Entrup.

The body was laid to rest in the Keuterville cemetery Thursday morning, funeral services being held from the Catholic church of that place.
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19200219ICFP5Tony Roos Of Near Cottonwood Dead

Cottonwood Chronicle: Tony Roos, a young farmer, residing six miles north of Cottonwood passed away Wednesday morning at 1:15 after battling with influenza, followed by pneumonia for only seven days.

Mr. Roos was born in Illinois Nov. 17, 1885, being 34 years of age at the time of his death. In 1908 he was married to Miss Mary Kaschmitter to which union four children were born, Alfons, age 10; Hubert, 8; Pauline, 5 and Edward. Besides his widow, he leaves other relatives and a large number of friends.

Funeral services were held from the Ferdinand Catholic church Thursday morning at 9 o’clock. Services were conducted by Father Jerome Veith. Interment was in Ferdinand cemetery.
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Doumecq

(Special Correspondence)

Doumecq school, which has been closed for two weeks on account of the influenza epidemic, resumed work Monday. A perfect attendance was reported.

The play, “Waiting for the Trolley,” which is being managed by Miss Marguerite McAllister, was postponed one week on account of influenza. It is now in readiness for February 20.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Crawford have been ill the past week. Their daughter, Miss Esther, will return to Grangeville to school in a few days.

(ibid, page 5)
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Idaho County Free Press. February 19, 1920, Page 6

Local News In Brief

Schools Resume — Grangeville public schools reopened Monday morning, after two weeks’ enforced vacation, due to the influenza epidemic.

Lyric Reopens — Lyric theater was reopened Monday night by Manager Edmundson, after having been closed for two weeks, owing to restriction on public gatherings, during the influenza epidemic.

Catholic Services — Services will be resumed at the Catholic church next Sunday at the usual hours, 10:30. Sunday school at 10:10.

Federated Church — We open, full drive, next Sunday and want everybody in their places and a full attendance. …
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Personal

Dr. G. A. Green is sunning himself on the streets again these warm bright days after being confined to his home for nearly a month with influenza. He says he expects to be able to be in his dental office next week, at least during part of each day until his strength recovers sufficiently for him to take up the full responsibilities of his profession.

T. B. Fuller has returned from Portland, where he spent some time in a sanitorium. Mr. Fuller is much improved in health.

J. Frank Sims arrived Friday night from Clarkston. Mr. Sims spent ten days in a sanitorium in Clarkston, and returned greatly improved in health.

George Davis has departed for the mountain country, where he will take the census at Florence, Hump and Warren. He is making the journey on foot, and expects to be absent from Grangeville for several weeks.

(ibid, page 6)
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St. Alphonsus Hospital, Boise, Idaho

HospitalStAlphonsusFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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The Emmett Index. February 19, 1920, Page 1

19200219EI1

An Unusual Experience

To Round Valley by auto, speeder and sleigh was the unusual experience of Dr. B. O. Clark, who was called there Wednesday by the serious illness of Cliff Gifford, who is suffering with pneumonia. Dr. Clark left Emmett with his car, going as far as Sweet, where he left it in a bottomless mudhole. At Sweet he got a car to take him to Gardenia, where he took the speeder to Smith’s Ferry, and continued the remainder of the trip by sleigh.
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Except In Ada County!

A Boise physician, driving to Payette, made the announcement upon his return that the roads were in fine shape – except in Ada county. He told nothing new. Ada county – the wealthiest in the state, by the way – is noted for bad roads. Between Emmett and Boise the roads are excellent – except in Ada county, and there they are disgraceful. That Boise Physician enunciated a slogan that fits Boise and Ada county to a T – the roads are good everywhere – except in Ada County!

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 19 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. February 19, 1920, Page 2

Tales Of Town

A Chicago doctor says whiskey will cure “flu” sufferers who have faith in it. If it’s a matter of faith, then castor oil will do as well and it’s cheaper.

The coffin makers have arranged things so it costs more to die now than formerly, and the other price manipulators are trying to fix things so it is worth more.

“Sneeze correctly,” says a learned member of the medical profession. “Do not say, ‘a-choo.’ Let the sneezer learn to say, ‘a-da’ or ‘a-de.'” We knew it would be only a question of time until some reformer attempted to place his own method of interpretation upon the sneeze. The reason we knew it is that the sneeze and sitting cross-legged are the only expressions of personal liberty in which the masses now are permitted to indulge. There is a prescribed form for everything else, enforceable at the point of a jail sentence.
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“I hate my woolen underwear,”
Said little Willie B.
“It makes me itchy everywhere
And wastes my energy.
It itches here and itches there,
The tickle seems to crawl.
A place will itch, but when I scratch,
That ain’t the place at all.”

(ibid, page 2)
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The Emmett Index. February 19, 1920, Page 4

Emmett News

Rev. Father F. Reis has recovered from a severe illness sufficiently to resume his work and conducted services in the Catholic church on Sunday.

John Lake on Monday received news of the serious illness of his sister, Miss Lillie Lake, at Aberdeen, Idaho. He left Tuesday morning to be at her bedside.

Mrs. F. N. Luse of Nampa, who recently suffered a partial paralytic stroke, has been brought to Emmett and is being cared for at the home of her brother, R. B. Shaw.

Charlie McAuley is now day marshal and John Jacobs is on the night job during the illness of W. R. Crabtree.
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Automobile Licenses

In order that there may be a uniformity in the enforcement of the automobile license law for 1920, it has been suggested that a certain date be specified, subsequent to which any person operating a motor vehicle on the highways of the State without a license be subject to arrest. Heretofore one Assessor has set a certain date, another one has a date later on, and there has been general confusion. I therefore request that March 15th, 1920, be set as the dead line for this year. Notice should be so given by advertising in the local papers, and after that date is is hoped the cooperation between the Assessors, the Sheriffs, members of the State Constabulary, and other peace officers will develop a strict enforcement of this particular law.

Of course the license fees are due January 1st, 1920, and registrations will occur in January and February as usual, but the dead line date, March 15th, sets the limit of patience and enables peace officers to begin a concerted and uniform drive to enforce the law.

By delay in the collection of these fees, the Counties and State lose a large amount of revenue in interest which belongs to them. By early cooperative effort on the part of the Assessors and peace officers of Idaho, the automobile law can be more effectively enforced, and these fees can be more quickly made available for highway purposes.

Robert O. Jones, Secretary of State

Pursuant to the above suggestion from the State Department, all peace officers of Gem County are hereby requested, after March 15th, 1920, to arrest and swear to a complaint charging misdemeanor, against any person violating the provision of the automobile license law.

D. J. McGowan, Assessor of Gem County

(ibid, page 4)
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The Emmett Index. February 19, 1920, Page 5

Emmett News

Mrs. Lee Forbes entertained her Sunday school class at a Valentine party Saturday afternoon. Almost a dozen little girls enjoyed games and a valentine exchange box with a delicious lunch.

Mrs. Rachel Cartwright returned home Saturday after an absence of several weeks, having been called to Oregon to attend her brother who was dangerously ill. She left the sick one greatly improved in health.

J. S. Robinson, who was called to Weiser two weeks ago to take care of his son-in-law, B. B. Wilson, who had the flu, returned home Saturday, bringing his daughter Alta and little Wayne with him till they can gain strength, as they also had the flu.
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19200219EI2

(ibid, page 5)
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The Emmett Index. February 19, 1920, Page 10

News Of Gem County
By The Index’s Correspondents

South Slope

There was to have been an entertainment at the South Slope school-house on Friday, commemorating Washington’s birthday, but owing to prevailing sickness it has had to be postponed.

The family of Kirby Baker has been having a hard time with the flu during the past two weeks. Kirby is better, but the three children are quite ill.

Mrs. Bert Wright is about to be up after quite a sick spell with flu and pneumonia.

The Crescent Improvement club enjoyed Friday afternoon with Mrs. Anthony Peterson and Mrs. McIntyre as hostesses. The Club’s work has been somewhat disarranged during the past two years and the members are of one mind that greater activity must be assumed hereafter. The hostesses served the usual dainty refreshments and the members left with the feeling that with greater efforts much good could be accomplished in the future.

Bissell Creek

Raymond, Florence and Willis Davidson are having the mumps.

Delmar Slone is ill with the mumps.

Andy Little is having a large sheep shed built on his Bissell creek ranch.

East Of Town

The Dean children have been having a siege of the flu, but are on the mend now.

Leonard Dresser is going to be on the safe side this summer. He has been putting in an electric pump to water his stock. He isn’t going to depend on the Canyon canal.

Montour

Mrs. F. L. Palmer has been quite ill for several days.

Tom Patton, who was very ill with pneumonia following influenza, was sufficiently recovered to be able to leave the Gatfield camp for his home at Falk, where he will remain until entirely well.

Mrs. R. E. Noland, who was called by the Red Cross at Seattle to report for a flu nurse at headquarters in Emmett, returned home on Friday’s train.

Letha

Letha Baptist Sunday school will be held as usual Sunday at 10:30. Owing to the flu epidemic several Sundays were missed, but the children are all well now and also their elders, so let’s have a big attendance Sunday.

Central Mesa

Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Hill and Grace Carey are now out of quarantine, and Grace has started to school again.

The Kraus family are having their turn with the flu.

Grandma Conrad is on the sick list.

(ibid, page 10)
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The Filer Record., February 19, 1920, Page 1

19200219FR1

In Hospital

Ray Wilcox was taken to the Boyd hospital where he is recovering from an illness contracted while working for the Twin Falls Canal company.

source: The Filer Record. (Filer, Idaho), 19 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Filer Record., February 19, 1920, Page 3

Elmwood Items

The family of Chas. Sieber are ill with the influenza.

Mrs. George Lincoln is ill with the influenza.

The family of Will Rutherford are ill with influenza.

Little Dorothy Rogers has been absent from school the past week on account of illness.

Mr. Dick Lincoln and little daughter, Arline, are ill with the influenza.

Delbert Modlin is absent from school on account of illness.

The pupils of Elmwood school had a wiener roast and Valentine box at the school house Friday afternoon.

(ibid, page 3)
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The Filer Record., February 19, 1920, Page 6

Filer Rural High School Notes

The Domestic science department entertained the students last Friday with a Valentine luncheon. The dining room was artistically decorated with red hearts, and red streamers. The menu was carried out in the color schemes of red and white.

The attendance in High school this week is nearly normal. Many of the students who have been ill are back in school.

On account of sickness a number of the students have found it necessary to drop out of the declamation contest. However, the number still remaining is quite large and the prospects are bright.

(ibid, page 6)
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The Filer Record., February 19, 1920, Page 7

News Notes

Mrs. Guy. H. Shearer is recovering from her recent illness, and Guy Shearer is regaining his strength after an annoying attack of the grippe.

B. P Kirkpatrick is again able to be about after having an illness that confined him to his home for several days.

L. D. Allen, who together with his family has been confined to his home with illness, is now back to his duties as marshal and street commissioner.

L. O. Hughes, who has been confined to his home has sufficiently recovered to resume his work.
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Maroa Notes

School has been closed during the past week on account of the prevalence of influenza.

Mr. and Mrs. R. H. McAtee are recovering from influenza.

Mrs. B. L. McAtee is on the sick list.

The power and light line to the school house is under construction and will soon be completed.

Horting Brothers hauled coal for the school Saturday.

Leonard Brown has returned from an extended visit to Nebraska and Illinois. He reports having the flu while there.
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Washington District

Miss Lowe of Burley has been teaching one room at the Washington school on account of Mrs. Byl being sick.

(ibid, page 7)
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The Filer Record., February 19, 1920, Page 11

19200219FR2

(ibid, page 11)
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General Hospital, Grangeville, Idaho

HospitalGrangevilleFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

February 20

The Rathdrum Tribune., February 20, 1920, Page 1

19200220RT1

19200220RT2
Under The Flu Ban
Rathdrum Trustees Stop Public Gatherings

The “flu” ban was put on in Rathdrum at a special meeting of the village trustees last Saturday night, after it was learned that several new cases of influenza had appeared, including two school teachers and several high school students. Acting as the local board of health, the trustees, partly in response to renewal of the recommendation by the school board, issued an order closing the schools and prohibiting all public gatherings under provisions of Ordinance No. 63.

At an adjourned meeting Monday morning, the village trustees accepted the resignation of Geo. W. Flemming as a member and as chairman of the board, and appointed him marshal to enforce quarantine regulations. Mr. Flemming immediately entered upon his new duties, and put up “flu” cards on twenty homes. He ascertained that the number of cases in town that day was 31, seven being in one family. This showed a rapid increase from the few cases of three days before.

Chas. F. Borell was elected chairman of the village board Monday morning to succeed Mr. Flemming.
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From Over The County

Post Falls

There were 130 cases of flu in the community at one time last week. All gatherings were prohibited.

There was no school at Cedar creek last week, Miss Marshall, teacher, being ill with the flu.

Spirit Lake

An all embracing flu ban was declared by the village board Monday of last week. There were 90 cases.

Earle Pitz, aged 5, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Pitz, of Coleman, died Feb. 12, of pneumonia.

Harrison

The steamer Harrison resumed regular runs lately.

The steamers Flyer and Copenhagen have broken up the ice between here and Conkling park and are again making trips to St. Maries, the St. Joe river being open.

Coeur D’Alene

The flu ban has returned on all this week altho [sic] the number of new cases shows a falling off from day to day. A movement to have the school reopened last Monday met with failure.
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Idaho State News Items

Idaho stands first in the list of sheep grazed on forest reserves, second in number of horses, and 4th in number of cattle, according to information obtained by Congressman French.

Idaho automobiles, 42,732 in number, brought $723,900 into the state treasury during 1919. Of this amount and motorcycle licenses 75 per cent was apportioned back to the counties and 25 per cent went to the state highway fund.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 20 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., February 20, 1920, Page 2

[Editorial Page]

The efficacy of closing regulation to suppress epidemics is still a mooted question with a great many people. Cities like Spokane take no such measures and the influenza comes, runs its course and dies out while business goes on as usual. But in the smaller cities and towns drastic regulations are invoked and have their supporters who wish to play safe with the grim reaper. It happens that Rathdrum falls in the latter class, and while the regulations are in force it is the part of good citizenship that they be observed in hope of hastening the day when the restrictions will be again removed.
— —

Fearing the “flu” does not help to keep it away.
— —

19200220RT3

(ibid, page 2)
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The Rathdrum Tribune., February 20, 1920, Page 3

Personal Mention

Sup’t L. O. Swenson, who was among those taken ill with influenza last Sunday, is reported doing nicely.

Robt. Neustel is carrying the mail on Route 2, while F. B. Chambard is recovering from an attack of influenza.

Mrs. Frances James and Miss May Berry, teachers in the Rathdrum schools, are among the influenza patients, both having been taken ill last Saturday.

Morris Hoffman, who has been living alone, was ill several days with a severe attack of bronchitis before his condition became known to his friends. He is able to be about again.
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Local Paragraphs

It is a little too early to announce when school will re-open.

On account of bad colds and the epidemic there was only a fifty per cent attendance in the high school last Friday.

The influenza patients are nearly all reported doing well. There are a few new cases each day in town and country, but others are recovering, so that the number of homes quarantined in town remains about the same as on Monday. Three new cases were reported in town yesterday.

Buttercups and pussy willows have appeared.
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Funeral At Pleasant View

Labold Beck, age 21, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Beck, pioneer farmers of the Spokane Bridge neighborhood, died there Feb. 11, of influenza-pneumonia, and was buried in the Pleasant View cemetery last Friday. O. W. Stone of Rathdrum directed the funeral. A large assemblage of neighbors and friends attended the services, which owing to the epidemic, were held at the cemetery.

Labold Beck was born Feb 16, 1899. He leaves, besides his parents, four brothers: Milton, Warren, Charles and Marvin Beck; and two sisters: Mrs. Verna Tautenbahn and Miss Zinna Beck; also, many friends, who mourn his untimely death.
— —

Died In Colorado

Word of the death of Charles Seavey of Pueblo, Colorado, was received by Rathdrum friends. Death was caused by pneumonia, following influenza. The advices stated that Mrs. Seavey and little daughter, Marjorie, were still suffering from the same disease. Mr. Seavey was formerly a resident of Rathdrum, being employed as a clerk in G. W. Ott’s store.
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19200220RT4

(ibid, page 3)
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Clearwater Republican. February 20, 1920, Page 1

19200220CR1

19200220CR2
Influenza Takes Roy H. Leeper
Was Well-Known And Prominent Citizen Of Clearwater County

Roy H. Leeper, aged 28, died at his home in Elk River Monday morning at one o’clock of pneumonia, following influenza. Mr. Leeper was town marshal of Elk River and deputy sheriff of Clearwater county. He has been a well-known and prominent citizen of the county for a number of years. He was a packer for the Northern Pacific railway twelve or thirteen years ago, later becoming proprietor of the Leeper Blacksmith shop of Orofino. He was proprietor of the Home Implement Company also, and served as deputy under sheriff Albert Harper eight years ago, later moving to Elk River where he made his residence until death.

He leaves a wife and three small children to mourn his departure. He was a son of J. B. Leeper and a brother of F. E. Leeper of Stites, and a son-in-law of Phil Hartman, the well-known business man of Stites. The burial will take place at Lewiston today.
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Loyalty Week

Boise, Feb. 17. — Gov. Davis today issued a statement asking the citizens of Idaho to recognize by appropriate exercises, and signing pledges of American loyalty, the week of February 22 to 28 as “Loyalty” week. This action is in support of a move by fire insurance men of the country to unite the citizens in a formal agreement, they will use their influence toward suppression of disloyalty and toward the widest possible dissemination of American ideals in the public schools, the press, pulpit and in public meetings.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 20 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater Republican. February 20, 1920, Page 5

What Your Friends And Neighbors Are Doing

Mrs. Oscar Austin went to Kendrick Sunday morning to assist her mother, Mrs. M. S. Crockett, in nursing the family of Charles Lewis who are ill with the Flu. Mrs. Austin returned Wednesday afternoon and reported the sick folks as getting along nicely.

There are several unmarked packages at the post office, that were mislaid in the lobby. Packages will be returned by postmaster J. M. Molloy, upon proper evidence of ownership.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Oakley Herald. February 20, 1920, Page 1

19200220OH1

Vipont News

by The Kitten

We have two or three cases of bad colds or flu at the Mill.

Mr. and Mrs. Newbold’s baby has been quite sick for a few days, but is improving.
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Boulder News

School reopened Monday morning with a large per centage of pupils in attendance.

Miss Ida Nelson has had to quit school on account of her health. The flu left her very weak.

Nancy Frost is just recovering from an attack of flu.

Mrs. Loneva Frost has gone to Oakley to nurse her daughter, Mrs. Elva McClause, who has pneumonia.
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Moulton News

Frank Trunkey is in bed with la grippe. His boy has been quite sick.

Bishop Saunders went to Oakley last week in his car after Dr. Rains to see some of the sick people at Moulton.

It is like spring in Moulton. We are going to start farming if the weather keep nice like it has been.
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Lunches In Five Schools

As a result of the activity of Miss Lucile Lee, home demonstration agent of the university extension division, the hot lunch has been installed in five rural schools of Bonner county.
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Mortgage on a Cat

There was filed in the office of the recorder of deeds in Stockton, Mo., the most unusual chattel mortgage every presented at the office. The articles mentioned to secure a debt of $46 were as follows: One shotgun, one Winchester rifle, two violins, one black tomcat with white feet, named Tom. It was not specified that the guns had hammers nor the fiddle with bow, but the identification of the tomcat was considered by the mortgagee the most valuable part of the security. — St. Louis Republic

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 20 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. February 20, 1920, Page 3

Vipont News

by The Kitten

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne P. Joy have gone to Salt Lake City. Mrs. Joy’s sister at that place is seriously ill with flu.

Mrs. Wilcox of the mine was a visitor at the mill today. Mrs. Wilcox has been sick with flu, and we are glad to see her out again.

(ibid, page 3)
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The Oakley Herald. February 20, 1920, Page 8

Locals

Marion Hutch is out after a fight with lagrippe.

John Bailey is out again after a severe case of flu.

Dan Miller of the Mackey ranch has been sick this week.

John Garvin is about to be out after an attack of lagrippe.

Dr. H. B. Smith and children were sick the first of the week.

Dr. Smith’s mother arrived from Logan Tuesday to nurse his family through a siege of flu.

The funeral of Mrs. Alma Butler was conducted in the cemetery Friday by Bishop Seth Harper. Mrs. Butler leaves a husband and six small children.

On account of the illness of their daughter, Mrs. Howard Price, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Clark returned Monday from California, where they had been spending the winter.

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Tanner lost their little baby last week from influenza. Another little girl, who has been suffering from pneumonia for several weeks, is in a critical condition.

Influenza claimed another victim here Saturday morning in the death of Lulu Lake, the 13-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Lake. The funeral was held on the lawn of their home at noon Sunday. Bishop Severe conducted the services. Mr. and Mrs. Lake have the sincere sympathy of the entire community.
— —

Boyd Hospital Twin Falls, Established 1905
19200220OH2Departments: General Surgery, General Medicine, Obstetrics, Clinical Laboratories, Xray Laboratory, Electro and Hydro Therapeutics.
Each department in charge of a specialist.

(ibid, page 8)
——————

Further Reading

Dr. Wilson Foskett – White Bird, Idaho

Dr. Wilson Foskett was a physician who practiced in White Bird, Idaho from 1899 until his death in 1924. He married Loris Taylor in 1902 and they had three children. Dr. Foskett built this Victorian style house, one room of which served as his office. Between 1910 and 1914, Dr. Foskett added a second building about 70 feet to the south of the house that served as a drugstore.

Being the only physician in this isolated area, Dr. Foskett served his far-flung residents by horseback. Because of his unwavering dedication, he was universally respected and gained almost legendary status. By the early 1920s, Dr. Foskett abandoned horseback travel and, whenever possible, visited his patients by automobile. On April 13, 1924 he presided over the birth of a baby near Riggins. After a long night’s labor, he started the drive back to White Bird. Near Slate Creek, his car left the road and plunged into the Salmon River, killing the doctor.

continued: Yellow Pine Times Idaho History
— — — — — — — — — —

Loyalty Oaths

The history of loyalty oaths goes back to the First World War. Prior to that time, teachers were relatively free to express their opinions on matters of public interest. Loyalty oaths acquired an even more sinister and far reaching application during the post-war Red Scare of 1919-1920.

On March 26, 1919, the New York State Legislature set up a joint committee of six members under the chairmanship of Senator Clayton R. Lusk. The committee was charged with investigating and reporting back to the full legislature on matters involving radical and seditious activities.

excerpted from: Howlett, Charles F. Ph.D. and Cohan, Audrey Ed.D, “Loyalty Oaths and Academic Witch Hunts” (2008). Faculty Works: Education.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Red Scare

The fighting in World War I ended on November 11, 1918, but the ceasefire halted only one of wars America was engaged in during the years 1917-1920. Another war, the internal battle against revolutionaries and radicalism, soon intensified into a national fury that became the twentieth century’s first “Red Scare.” In the name of protecting the nation from revolution, vigilante mobs fought deadly battles with labor radicals, and state legislatures passed laws criminalizing radical beliefs and actions, banning the display of red communist flags and banners, and demanding that teachers sign loyalty oaths declaring they would not teach un-American doctrines.

excerpted from: The Red Scare and Civil Liberties by: David E. Hamilton, University of Kentucky
—————-

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)