Idaho History Nov 14, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 80

Idaho Newspaper Clippings February 20, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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February 20 (continued)

Cottonwood Chronicle. February 20, 1920, Page 1

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19200220CC2Death Takes Five From Our Midst This Week
Husband and Wife and Grandson Taken from One Home at Keuterville – Kuther of Ferdinand and Grandma Kopzcynski of Cottonwood Also Taken Away

The Dead Are

Frank Winkler, Keuterville, age 70; death due to old age and general breakdown.

Mrs. Frank Winkler, age 65; death due to influenza followed by pneumonia.

Arthur Romain, Keuterville, grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Winkler, age 13; death due to influenza followed by pneumonia.

Mrs. Mary Anna Kopczynski, Cottonwood; age 65, death due to leakage of the heart.

Henry Kruther, Ferdinand, age 28; death due to influenza followed by pneumonia.

Death again visited our immediate community during the past week and took from us five well known citizens, and pioneers of the country who all faced the hardships of the early days to make this country what it is. In chronicling events of this kind it is with the deepest heartfelt sympathy for the bereaved relatives and friends, who did everything possible to restore them back to health but of no avail, as the hand of their creator reached out and picked them from the garden of flowers.

Kuther First One Called

Henry Kuther, a prosperous young farmer residing near Ferdinand was the first one to answer the call and died at his home Monday of influenza followed by pneumonia. Mr. Kuther had been ill for only a short time and everything possible in the medical science was done to save his life, but with out avail.

Henry Kuther was born at Keuterville 28 years ago and has been a life long resident of the county.

Surviving him are his sorrowful wife, three children and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Kuther of Lewiston, a brother Joe Kuther of Ferdinand and five sisters, Mrs. Joe Busher, Mrs. Nick Kinzer, Mrs. Henry Stricker, Mrs. Henry Sprute and Mrs. Josephine Swearmine.

The funeral services were held from the Catholic church at Ferdinand Wednesday morning and was attended by some 35 Knights of Columbus of Cottonwood, of which council he was a member. The remains were laid to rest in the Ferdinand cemetery.

Two Pioneers Called

On Thursday morning Cottonwood was shocked to hear of the death of two old pioneers of the Keuterville section, Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Winkler, who both died in their home in Keuterville Wednesday evening. Mrs. Winkler was the first one to pass into the great beyond having been called by her creator at 6:30 and at 11:15 the husband was also summoned.

These sturdy old pioneers who have lived at Keuterville for the past 24 years were born in Austria and came to the U. S. in 1876. The death of Mrs. Winkler was due to influenza followed by pneumonia while her husband died of old age, having been in poor health for some time. At the time of their deaths Mrs. Winkler was 65 years of age and her life partner had reached his 70th milestone.

Surviving them are four children, Frank Winkler of Cottonwood, Mrs. C. Andre of Keuterville, Henry Winkler of Camas, Mont., Mrs. M. Ritter of Kalispell, Mont.

The remains of Mr. and Mrs. Winkler were laid to rest in the Keuterville cemetery today, services having been conducted from the Catholic church of that place with Rev. Fr. Martin in charge of the services.

Grandson Also Dies

Within less than 24 hours from the time of the death of Mr. and Mrs. Winkler, their little grandson Arther Romain also died from influenza followed by pneumonia, having passed away Thursday evening at 8:05. Arthur was the 13 year old son of John Romain, who had made his home with his grandparents since the death of his mother some time ago. He is survived by his sorrowing father and a sister. John Romain, father of the young boy, has also been very ill with influenza but at the present time is well on the road to recovery. The funeral arrangements for the young boy have not been completed, it is presumed he will be laid to rest beside his grandparents Saturday.

Grandma Kopczynski Dead

Mrs. Mary Anna Kopczynski, a resident of Idaho since 1887, passed away at the home of her son, August, two miles east of Cottonwood Wednesday evening after a lingering illness of almost two years from leakage of the heart, being 65 years old at the time of her death.

Mrs. Kopczynski was born in Germany and came to this country in 1872. Her husband, August preceding her in death some 12 years ago.

Mrs. Kopczynski was the mother of 10 children, five of whom survive their mother. They are: August Kopczynski, Mrs. Enoch Crosby, Mrs. Lloyd Crosby, Mrs. Jake Welte all of Cottonwood and Mrs. H. J. Moran of St. Ignatius, Mont.

The funeral services were held from the Catholic church this morning, of which faith she has been a most devot [sic] member all her life with Rev. Fr. Willibrord officiating. The services were attended by a large number of friends and truly shows the high esteem in which she was held. The remains were laid to rest in the Catholic cemetery.

A. H. Hau supplied funeral furnishes for all the above named persons and was assisted by A. J. Maugg of Grangeville at the Kuther home in preparing the body for burial.
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Fire At School House

Monday evening, an electric iron, which had not been turned off, in the domestic science bungalow, near the public school, caused the same to burn through a table upon which it had been placed. The fire department was called out, and while the fire did only a small damage, the greater damage was accomplished by the fire fighters, consisting of broken windows and doors. The loss is estimated at $100 which was fully covered by insurance.
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News Around The State
Items of Interest From Various Sections Reproduced for Benefit of Our Readers

Dr. E. H. Lindley, president of the University of Idaho, has the influenza in mild form. His condition is not regarded as at all serious, but he is confined to his home.

Mrs. Maud May Leighty, wife of G. W. Leighty of Pocatello, and sister of Governor D. W. Davis, died in a hospital at Pocatello Thursday morning. Pneumonia, following influenza, was the cause of death. Governor Davis, who had been summoned from Boise, arrived too late to see his sister alive.

Announcement that there will be no general extension of time for filing income tax returns has been made by the bureau of internal revenue and Deputy Collector Haight of the northern counties of Idaho, who maintains offices in the federal building at Lewiston, has been so advised.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 20 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Cottonwood Chronicle. February 20, 1920, Page 2

School Notes

(By Wm. A. Lustie)

School opened Monday with an attendance about 80 per cent normal. There were absent from: The High School 11; Seventh and Eighth grades 2; Fifth and Sixth grades 7; Third and Fourth grades 4; First and Second 4.

Pupils who are yet compelled to stay away from school for a week or two should not become discouraged. Ample time to make up work and individual help will be given to all such students. All the written material in the first eight grades can be read in forty hours. Work can be made up and made up effectively.

What is happening to the teaching profession?

22 per cent going into industry each year.

8 per cent fewer graduates from teacher training schools.

The school board of the Nez Perce public schools has granted to its teachers a bonus to be given at the end of the school year equivalent to 10 per cent of his or her salary. – Idaho Teacher.

No one ought to forget that the raising of salaries is not only for the sake of the teachers now at work, but also for the sake of getting other and better teachers in the future, and thus eliminating the in-efficient, the unfit, and the misfit teacher. We don’t want the teaching profession to be an asylum for people who have failed in everything they have undertaken. Low standards and low salaries makes the profession just such a place of refuge.

(ibid, page 2)
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Cottonwood Chronicle. February 20, 1920, Page 4

County Seat News Items

Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Knox will leave some time next week for a few weeks or a month’s sojourn at points in California. Mr. Knox recently got out after a severe attack of the influenza and it is expected the California climate will assist him in recuperating and aid his health generally.

Miss Elsie Stanbery was an arrival Friday evening from Berkeley, Cal., where she was attending college. Miss Stanbery was called here by the sickness and subsequent death of her father, Geo. D. Stanbery.

(ibid, page 4)
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Cottonwood Chronicle. February 20, 1920, Page 8

Cottonwood And Vicinity
Personal Mention and Local Happenings of the Week in This Vicinity

Mrs. F. M. Bowman of Grangeville, a sister of Mrs. Olie Rhett has been waiting on her sister this past week. Mrs. Rhett has been ill with the influenza but at the present time is able to set up.

Sheriff William Eller was in Cottonwood Tuesday on official business. This is Mr. Eller’s first visit to Cottonwood since his recent attack with the flu. Although somewhat weak, Mr. Eller states he is feeling pretty well.

A large number of members of the Knight of Columbus attended the funeral of Henry Kuther at Ferdinand Wednesday, he having been a member of the local council.

A. J. Maugg of Grangeville was a business visitor in Cottonwood Tuesday.

Miss Ruby Lunstrum who was called to Clarkston by the serious illness and death, of her sister, returned Thursday evening to again resume her duties at the Leggett Mercantile Co.

Ash Wednesday, the first day of Lent was fittingly commemorated at the Catholic Church Wednesday morning.

The small boy with his baseball, the grown-ups with their automobiles and a clear sky above are all indications that spring has arrived – for a short time at least. The weather the past two weeks has simply been “grand.”

(ibid, page 8)
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The Kendrick Gazette. February 20, 1920, Page 1

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19200220KG2Flu Ban Lifted

The ban will be lifted on public meetings Sunday. This is the order of the local health officers. The regular church services will be held in the churches. School will open Monday morning. Yesterday afternoon it was reported that Kendrick was entirely free from influenza, so it was believed to be safe to lift the ban on public gatherings, beginning Sunday.
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Banks Closed Monday

The local banks will be closed all day Monday in observance of Washington’s birthday, which is a legal holiday.
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19200220KG3Death of Martin Norman

Martin Norman of Big Bear Ridge, age 21 years, passed away at the Bovill hospital after a short illness caused by influenza which later resulted in pneumonia. The young man is well known on Bear Ridge where he has made his home for a number of years. He is survived by his father, a sister and two brothers.
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Over the County

Juliaetta Record: Baby chicks this early in the season is something quite unusual, but Mrs. C. S. Biddison has a Rhode Island Red hen which has just hatched out 14 fine healthy chicks, which is believed to be the first hatched in this part of the country this year. Mrs. Biddison has a good warm place to keep them and believes she will be able to raise all of them.
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Music by Henry Ford

For Sale – One Ford car with Piston rings; two rear wheels, one front spring.
Has no fenders, seat or plank; burns lots of gas. Hard to crank.
Carburetor busted, half way through. Engine missing; hits on two.
Three years old; four in the spring. Has shock absorbers and everything.
Radiator busted, sure does leak. Differential’s dry; you can hear it squeak.
Ten spokes missing. Front all bent. Tires blowed out. Ain’t worth a cent.
Got lots of speed; will run like the deuce; burns either gas or tobacco juice.
Tires all off; been run on the rim. A dam good Ford for the shape it’s in.
– Ex.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 20 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. February 20, 1920, Page 2

Big Bear Ridge

There are no influenza cases on the ridge at this writing.

Miss Wilson and Miss Hupp resumed their school work at Steele and Fern Hill, Monday.

P. A. Norman went to Bovill the first of the week to be with his son Martin, who is seriously ill at the hospital there with pneumonia following influenza.
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Linden News

The Gold Hill school is closed on account of the “flu” and scarlet fever in neighboring communities. There is only one home quarantined in this vicinity that being McAllister’s.

Jim Farrintgon is suffering from pleurisy, following an attack of influenza.

Miss Leah Smith is assisting the Fred Darby family at Crescent. Mrs. Darby has pneumonia following the “flu” and Mr. Darby and Mr. Trail have the flu. All are getting along nicely.

Dr. Kelly of Kendrick was called to the Weaver home last Saturday.

Miss Eva Smith is staying with Mrs. Ed Fonberg who recently returned from the hospital at Moscow.
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Southwick Items

School opened again Monday. Southwick and vicinity had quite a siege of the epidemic, so school was closed for a time on account of it.

Mrs. J. M. McFadden and little daughter, Leola, are on the sick list at present.

Mrs. Fred Darby has been seriously ill from an attack of the epidemic.

William Stump and family have all been sick and little Harry is quite ill yet.

Dr. Truitt has been a hero thru our hard time of sickness, staying with his patients all night if necessary, losing his own much needed rest, to bring the sick folks thru. He has been kept on the go both night and day for some time.

Mrs. Lock is enjoying a period of rest as most of the sick people are recovering. Mrs. Lock put thru calls for the doctors at all seasons of the night for a time. But she is still on the job, if she did get pretty tired.
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19200220KG4

(ibid, page 2)
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The Kendrick Gazette. February 20, 1920, Page 7

[Local News]

There are a good many “wobblies”* in Kendrick these days, since the flu epidemic.

Old timers marvel at the new fangled diseases such as the flu, and wonder why it is that diseases, like other things seem to go out of date. It is seldom you hear of anyone outside of Missouri ever having the itch**, and yet our fathers in their boyhood days seemed to be quite familiar with the disease. Inflammatory rheumatism and St. Vitus Dance used to be considered a combination of diseases that would bring considerable discomfort to an individual if he were visited with both at one and the same time. However, since the flu, an equally disastrous visitation would be the combination of flu and the itch. Anyone with as little energy as a flu convalescent could get very little peace of mind if he had the itch and couldn’t scratch.

* see: Industrial Workers of the World

** see: Life and Death on the Oregon Trail, the Itch to Move West, a Half Million Pioneers Struggled West Seeking a Better Life Pamphlet
By James L Gibbons, Boyd & Amos January 1, 1986
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Leland Idaho

Mrs. Enoch Harrison has been seriously ill of pneumonia following influenza, but is some better at present.

(ibid, page 7)
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The Kendrick Gazette. February 20, 1920, Page 8

Gleanings

J. T. Schmitt of Leland returned from Lewiston Tuesday where he spent a week in a hospital with a severe case of pneumonia.

Lester Crocker, who has been attending business college in Spokane, returned home Tuesday to recuperate after an attack of the flu.

Mrs. Sylvia Jenks of Lewiston arrived Thursday morning. She went from here to Cedar Creek ridge to nurse Mrs. Lester Hill.

Harry Stanton went to Troy Tuesday to attend the funeral of Harry Robinson, section boss of Troy. Mr. Robinson died from pneumonia. He was section boss in Kendrick a few years ago.

It is said that a counterfeit dollar was circulating around in this community last week. One man, so the story goes, “sloughed” it twice before he got it out of circulation here. The last time he took particular pains to see that a traveling man got it, so it is probably beating its way through the world at some distant place. A dollar doesn’t buy anything these days so it doesn’t make much difference whether it is counterfeit or not.

(ibid, page 8)
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High School, Kendrick, Idaho

SchoolHighKendrickFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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The Idaho Recorder. February 20, 1920, Page 1

19200220IR1

Doctors Confer at May

Dr. Kirtley went to Pahsamaroi the later part of last week for a conference with Dr. Hanmer, county physician for Lemhi county relative to the flu situation. Dr. Hanmer assured Dr. Kirtley that the board of health of Lemhi county and he, as its executive official, were heartily in accord with our quarantine and that the county commissioners of Lemhi county had instructed him to use every effort to keep the disease out of Salmon this year. We are not, it seems, entirely alone in our desire for a rigid quarantine against infected districts. — Messenger.
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[School Notes]

News items from the fifth and sixth grades, east side school.

Fifth and sixth grades east side, have had four absent on account of bad colds. – Jean Turnbull

Four children of the fifth grade have left school. They are Bonita and Gilmore Denny and John and George Young. Bonita and Gilmore are leaving town; George and John are leaving on account of the flu. We will miss them very much. — Mary Abbot

Charles Beers has just recovered from a sick spell. We are glad to have him with us again. — William White

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 20 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. February 20, 1920, Page 2

Idaho State News

Mrs. Cynthia Mann, founder of the state children’s home in Boise, died February 6 of pneumonia, following influenza. She was 68 years of age and one of the leading benefactors in the state for homeless children.

A Chinaman, who runs a restaurant at Boise was fined $50 for furnishing dirty towels for use of guests.

The total population of Idaho in 1919, according to census figures was 325,594. Estimated, the population is now 538,639.

Ada county, in which Boise City is located, gained 37.64 per cent on school census since 1910. The county population in 1910 was 29,088; estimated for this year 40,036.

Taking figures of the school census in 1909 and those of 1919 as a basis, the population increase of the school eligibles in Twin Falls county in ten years was 276 per cent. In 1909 the school population was 2226. In 1919 it was 8374.

The third quarter of the State Normal school opened at Lewiston last week with an increased attendance, many former students returning to complete their preparation for teaching.
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Northwest Notes

Federal veterinary surgeons, after inquiry into the mysterious malady that has been carrying off stock in Northern Montana, are said to have decided that it is influenza or hemorrhagic septicemia.

(ibid, page 2)
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The Idaho Recorder. February 20, 1920, Page 3

19200220IR2

(ibid, page 3)
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The Idaho Recorder. February 20, 1920, Page 5

Salmon Locals

Numerous Flu Cases at Challis

Numerous cases of flu are reported from Challis, with one death, that of Ray Tracht.

School Notes

Miss Straud is still ill and will not be able to resume her studies for several days.

Two children were sent home Wednesday because they showed symptoms of the flu.

Miss Olive Hettinger is a substitute teacher for Miss Strand.
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May

The flu situation in the upper part of the valley around Patterson is improving. The families of Ed Miller and Will Miller were very sick for a time but are better, and no new cases have developed in this section since early last week. In May the cases are confined to two families, those of Jack Grubb and Arthur Grubb, the entire families being down. Mr. Shorett is recovering. Some new cases have developed below May, the entire family of George Hammond being sick and John Rose at his ranch. Lafe Frost is also sick at George Hammond’s. Dr. Gilman is taking every precaution to keep the disease from spreading and is going day and night. The schools of the valley are closed until the epidemic is under control. Mark Howe is the quarantine officer and guards the health of the community faithfully.

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Thompson received the sad news the first of this month of the death of their son, Lee in Kansas City from pneumonia. Lee left May in October to attend an automobile school and had been very unfortunate ever since his arrival there. On his first day at school some chemical was thrown in his eyes and for some weeks it was feared he would lose his sight. Then he was ill with smallpox, and finally while in this weekended condition he contracted influenza and pneumonia, which resulted in his death. He was buried in Bramer, Mo., near his grandparents. Lee was a general favorite in the valley and his death was a shock to the whole community.

Miss Florence Shultz is spending the interval while the schools are closed at the ranch home of her mother on the Salmon river.

(ibid, page 4)
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The Idaho Recorder. February 20, 1920, Page 8

Leadore And Upper Lemhi

Leadore Personal

Loy H. Lee was on the sick list last week for a few days.

Little Virginia Allhands was confined to the home for a few days last week with a slight attack of grippe.

Leadore Local Lines

Jaunita Williams was absent from school during the week on account of sickness but will be in ship-shape for next week.

A meeting was held last Tuesday evening in which out coming brass band was well represented and the project thoroughly launched and we will have home made patriotic music for the Fourth.

Leadore School Notes

Ruth Barrows, our reporter, is sick and unable to be at school.

Forest Stewart is ill with yellow jaundice.

Merie Hays has chicken pox.

Lillie Benedict was absent from school two days last week on account of illness.

Delaphine Smith, also of the class of ’19, and attending school at Salt Lake, is recovering from an attack of the flu.

Fred Purcell was sick Monday and not at school.

There will be a masquerade ball pie social at the school house this Friday night. Proceeds to help pay for the light plant.

Call for Nurse Service

The Lemhi chapter of the Red Cross has issued a call for nurses or those who will aid in caring for the sick. Places in which flu is raging or prevalent have sent requests for this help,. Those who volunteer will be paid for their services. Register or telephone to Mrs. Theodore Ketchum, Salmon, who is chairman of the committee having this relief work in charge.
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So-called Flu

We are thoroughly convinced that the scare heads and exaggerated publicity of the newspapers is responsible for more deaths during the epidemic than any other one cause or feature in the case. The unscrupulous druggist and patent medicine vendor come next, for all three of them assist in spreading terror through the rank and file of the gullible public. Constant fear and worry will break down the constitution of a polar bear and make the human being ten times more susceptible to disease. The newspaper throws the scare into the people and the patent medicine faker holds it there with scare-head ads. As a result nine-tenths of the patients meet the disease half way. If our forefathers could see what a soft, susceptible, nervous bunch has been the outgrowth of their struggle to make an American nation they would probably consider their efforts wasted. A cold is a cold now just the same as it was a hundred years ago, and we hope people who have a little gumption will not let newspapers and calamity howlers manufacture more than half of the epidemic for them.
– Dr. Safford
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Spring Creek

School opened again after a week’s recess on account of flu.

The people of Ulysses and vicinity were greatly shocked and saddened by the death of Wilda Leabo. She was an excellent woman, deeply loved by all who knew her, and will be greatly missed by relatives and many friends. Mr. Leabo and five children are left to mourn her loss. Her sister, Mrs. Will Sharkey, came up from Salt Lake, but arrived too late to see her sister.

W. E. McCracken is taking the federal census hereabouts.

(ibid, page 8)
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Montpelier Examiner. February 20, 1920, Page 1

19200220ME1

19200220ME2William H. Smith Succumbs to Pneumonia

Wm. H. Smith died in this city last Tuesday morning after a two week’s illness with pneumonia, resulting from influenza.

The deceased was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Al Smith. He was born in Evanston, Wyo., but his parents came to Montpelier when he was a babe and he has made his home here ever since. For the past two years or more he has been working with one of the bridge and building outfits on the Oregon Short Line.

Besides his parents he is survived by three brothers and three sisters.

His funeral services were held from the Third ward meeting house yesterday morning at 11 o’clock.
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400 Idahoans Gave Lives In World War

Idaho’s total casualties during the war with Germany numbered 1351, of which 409 lost their lives and 933 were wounded. Detailed figures showed the casualties to be as follows: Killed in action, ten officers and 189 men; died of wounds, one officer and seven men; died of disease, three officers and 110 men; died of accident, one officer and seven men; drowned, one; suicide, one; died of other cause one; died, cause undetermined, eight; presumed dead, two. Nine Idaho men were taken prisoners and later recovered. The lightly wounded numbered eight officers and 400 men; severely wounded, seven officers and 367 men; wounded, degree undetermined, one officer and 148 men. …

When the secretary of war reports to congress on decorations conferred upon members of the American Expeditionary forces, he will state that the distinguished service cross was conferred upon sixteen Utah soldiers, twenty-two from Idaho and four from Wyoming, and that the medal of honor, the highest of all army awards were conferred up on two Idaho men, the only two such awards in the group of states named.
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School Boards Raising Salaries Of Teachers

The school boards in most of the towns throughout Southeastern Idaho are meeting the needs of the teachers by granting them additional pay in the form of bonuses and raising their salaries for the coming year.

The Blackfoot school board has adopted the following salary schedule for the coming year:

Grade teachers will receive $120 per month for the first year and an increase of $10 per month for each year in the schools until $150 is reached. Special teachers will receive $140 per month the first year and an increase of $5 per month for each year in the schools until $160 is reached. High school teachers are to receive $150 per month for the first year and an increase of $5 per month for each year until a maximum of $170 is reached. Manual training and agricultural teachers will receive $2000 for twelve months. High school principal, $2000 to $2,200 for ten months.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 20 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. February 20, 1920, Page 3

In The Gem State

The city council has rejected a plea for the opening of picture shows at Twin Falls on Sundays. An effort was made to have the issue put to a vote at the special election, but this also failed.

The roads throughout southern Idaho are reported to be drying up rapidly, and in some sections they are being dragged and put in shape for heavy travel.

Sheriffs of the different counties of the state, at a recent meeting held in Boise, went on record as favoring higher salaries for the various peace officers.

Demands made upon the board of county commissioners of Twin Falls early in January for an increase of salary for deputies in courthouse departments have been rejected.

(ibid, page 3)
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Montpelier Examiner. February 20, 1920, Page 4

Paris Items

Paris, [Idaho] Feb, 18. — During the past two weeks death has claimed six persons from Paris. Three deaths have resulted from influenza-pneumonia. The six funeral services were held within six days. The first occurring was that of James Davis, one of the oldest and most highly respected residents of this place. His death followed an illness of several weeks, and resulted from neuritis. Mr. Davis was born in London, England on August 9, 1840. He spent his early life there and in 1854 after meeting Mormon missionaries and being converted to their religion, was baptized. He took an active part in the mission branch in England until 1862, when he emigrated to the United States. He first settled in Cedar City, Utah, where he established himself as a farmer. He there met, and in 1864 married, Miss Mary E. Fretwell. In 1874 Mr. Davis was called by the church on a mission to settle the San Juan, Arizona country. He unhesitatingly disposed of his flourishing property and moved his family to the new country. He struggled with the conditions there until, in 1884, a flood drove the settlers from their homes. In that year he came to Bear Lake valley, where he lived until the time of his death, which occurred Feb. 7. Mr. Davis’ life was an exemplary one, and his faithfulness and sterling character cannot be spoken of too highly. Funeral services were held in front of the public school building on the 11th. President Roy A. Welker, ex-Bishop James Poulson and Bishop Morris D. Low were the speakers. All spoke highly of the life of the deceased. His wife and a large family survive him. Interment was in the Paris cemetery.

On Thursday afternoon services were held at the family residence for Leland George, the two-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Morgan Rich, who died Wednesday of complication following the flu. The services were held on the lawn under the direction of Bishop Ezra Stucki. On Friday morning another shock came to this household in the death of the wife and mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Rich. Not only the bereaved husband and children will feel the loss of Mrs. Rich, but the entire community will join in sincerely mourning her untimely death. Mrs. Rich was an active church worker, true and delightful friend and a faithful wife and mother. She was born in Derbyshire, England, 33 years ago. She there accepted the gospel. Ten year ago she came to Paris. Her mother and father in England, her husband and two small children, Sargent and Harriet, are left to mourn her loss.

Funeral services were held at the home Sunday.

At 12:30 o’clock Saturday many friends gathered at the stake tabernacle to do honor to Miner Wilcox, one of the earliest settlers of this valley. The death of Mr. Wilcox occurred in Nampa, Idaho, where he had been visiting for some time. He was born 85 years ago in Franklin county, Ohio. As a boy he mingled in the stirring events of early Mormon history in the east, and had the honor of being a personal acquaintance of the prophet Joseph Smith. In 1894 he emigrated to Utah, where he took an active part in the activities of the territory. In both the Black Hawk and Indian wars he did active service. He married Miss Julia A. Allread in 1860, and in 1864 they came and settled in Bear Lake valley. He was an active citizen and church worker here, being a member of the first High Council of this stake. He filled an honorable mission to the Southern states. His wife and nine children survive him.

On Friday last, a telegram received here notified his parents of the accidental death of John Scheidegger by a switch engine at Kemmerer, Wyoming. The body was brought to Paris Saturday and the funeral services were conducted Sunday under the direction of the local post of the American Legion. Mr. Scheidegger was 24 years of age, and has been a resident of Paris most of his life. He enlisted in 1917 for service in the late war and served as a gunner in the 52nd ammunition train. He did active service in the Argonne and Meuse offensives and was 18 months overseas. His wife, formerly Miss Oxenbein of Montpelier, a two weeks old babe, his parents, six sisters and one brother survive him.

Under the direction of Bishop Morris D. Low, services were held Monday for Edith Idell, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ezra Lewis. The baby’s death followed an attack of influenza. …

All activities and public gathering are to be resumed Monday. The flu situation is now cleared up, and it is considered safe to hold public meetings in Paris again.
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Georgetown Notes

Georgetown, [Idaho[ Feb. 19. — The flu is a thing of the past here and we are all truly thankful, for it certainly hit us hard while it lasted.

Mrs. Frank Bacon who is ill with typhoid fever is now improving.
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Cards Of Thanks

We wish to thank the people of Montpelier for the acts of kindness during the illness and after the death of our daughter, pearl Arline.

Mr. and Mrs. Milford Birch

We wish to extend our thanks to all of our friends and neighbors who so kindly helped us during the sickness and after the death of our beloved son and brother, Kendrick.

J. R. Shupe and Family

We wish to extend our sincere thanks to all of our friends for their many acts of kindness during the illness and after the death of our beloved daughter and sister, Mrs. Geo. A Sparks.

Mrs. Nellie Lewis and Family

We wish to express our sincere thanks to all how rendered assistance during the illness and after the death of our beloved son and brother. We especially thank the railroad men for the beautiful floral offerings, and the members of the Third ward choir.

Al Smith and Family

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. February 20, 1920, Page 7

Local News

The free public library which has been closed for several weeks on account of health conditions will be open tomorrow afternoon at the usual time.

Funeral services of the late Loren Headley will be held at the Methodist church next Sunday morning at 11 o’clock. They will be conducted by Rev. J. E. Barton.

Mrs. J. W. McDonald and her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Loren Headley, arrived last Monday night from Colorado. Mrs. Headley is feeling as well as could be expected by one who had just recovered from the flu and lost her husband.

Mrs. R. E. Ricks died at her home in Pocatello last Tuesday morning, following a week’s illness with pneumonia. Deceased was born and raised in Paris, and was a sister of Dr. H. Smith Wolley. The remains were taken to Salt Lake for interment.

Wm. Shupe who was called here two weeks ago by the illness of his father and the death of his brother, Kendrick, returned last Sunday to his home [in] Wallula, Wash.

Mrs. Elva Bagley wishes to thank her friends and neighbors for their kindness during the illness of her sons, Roland and Linden.

Albert Beutler of Sharon and Otto Rohner of Paris, are in the Kackley hospital at Soda Springs, where they have undergone operations.

Mrs. Wm. Galbraith, who was shot by her husband ten days ago, is getting along nicely and every indication is that she will recover from the wounds.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — — — — — — — —

High School, Montpelier, Idaho (1)

SchoolHighMontpelierFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 20, 1920, Page 1

19200220CT1

19200220CT2Local Medical Men Announce New Rates

According to an announcement made Thursday, Caldwell physicians will increase their rates beginning March 1. This move has been under discussion for some time and is considered as entirely just. Medical men in other towns in this section have already increased their rates until Caldwell physicians are charging less than doctors in any of the immediately surrounding towns.

After March 1, all day calls will be $2.50 instead of $2 as now charged, night calls will be $5 instead of $3, country calls will be charged $1 mileage in addition to the town rates and confinement cases will be $35 plus $1 mileage instead of $25 as now charged.

The following physicians signed the petition, Dr. G. W. Montgomery, Dr. F. M. Cole, Dr. R. G. Young, Dr. C. M. Kaley, Dr. John Meyers, Dr. T. D. Farrer and Dr. J. W. Gue.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 20 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 20, 1920, Page 3

Locals And Personal

Influenza in Caldwell is rapidly subsiding, according to local physicians. The emergency hospital was closed last week after every patient had recovered. Only a few straggling cases are now on record. In several rural communities, where the disease ran in true epidemic form, conditions are reported as greatly improved.

Bert Northrop who experienced an attack of influenza and pneumonia recently, is convalescent.

Mrs. Charles Sprague is recovering from a severe attack of tonsillitis, following influenza.

Clarence Sloan is back on the job at the Commercial bank after a serious attack of influenza.

W. H. Jesse’s daughter is seriously ill at the family home on Denver St. The child, who is only four years of age, suffered a relapse following an attack of influenza.

Miss Mary Meeks began teaching again at the Washington school last Monday, after a closing of two weeks on account of her being ill with influenza.

Lewis Post is convalescing from an attack of pneumonia.

John Evans is improved after his recent severe illness with pneumonia.

Donald Cleaver recovered last week from an attack of mumps.

Funeral services for Charles E. Knapp of Nampa who died Sunday were held Tuesday.

The Washington school Parent Teachers association met Wednesday afternoon. The first half of the meeting was given to a program by the children of the school. Discussion centered about the serious situation arising from the lack of housing accommodations in the city for teachers who are coming to Caldwell.

Robert Hertig, farmer of Greenleaf, who is now in the General hospital suffering from injuries received last Monday from a runaway, is reported to be improving. Mr. Hertig was thrown from his wagon when his horses, frightened by the discharge of blasting powder on the Black canyon road, run away in panic. A dislocated knee and a bruised leg are the chief injuries sustained.

The automobile, belonging to Dr. W. F. Gigray, which was stolen from in front of the Palm confectionery store a few days ago, was recovered Tuesday by Sheriff George Froman. It had been left near Nampa and was not damaged.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 20, 1920, Page 5

Arena Valley Items

Carl Packwood is still laid up with the influenza.

Rev. Welch was unable to hold his … (cut off.)

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 20, 1920, Page 6

College Notes

Lewis S. Dille was taken ill Monday with influenza. In his absence Mrs. Robert R. McCormick is acting secretary-treasurer.

Harley Philpot was ill Wednesday with a severe cold.

Miss Alta Elmers condition is greatly improved.

The student body has been active the past week in preparing for the benefit dinner and supper which will be held in the basement of the Methodist church Saturday noon and evening February 21.
— —

Pleasant Ridge

Mrs. Willard Ross returned home from Weiser Sunday leaving her brothers family recovering from their recent attack of the influenza.

Mrs. C. T. Howard was called to Nampa Monday to the bedside of her daughter, Mrs. Dugdale, who is seriously ill.
— —

Maple Grove

News last week was scarce save for sickness. Therefore no report from us.

The Hill and Chambers families were released from quarantine Sunday.

Most of the sick of our neighborhood are improving or well, so most of the children are back in school and Miss Jacobson has a room full to overflowing.

The funeral of Mrs. Stoddard Judd was largely attended last Thursday, a good representation of our neighborhood being present.

We are all enjoying this lovely February weather. The sunshine after so much fog is certainly grand.
— —

Baptist Church

After an interruption of two weeks on account of the influenza the study of the “survey” has been taken up again by the family groups on Tuesday evening. Most of the leaders were able to give a fine report of last week’s meeting.
— —

Carnegie Library Notes

A number of magazines have been donated to the library recently and after sorting out the ones needed for the library files there are still some left for distribution among the sick and for those who live too far out to patronize the library.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 20, 1920, Page 8

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Lake Lowell

Miss Francis Traughber has the influenza.

John and Irene Blanksma returned home Sunday morning from Minnesota and Dakota. They report it very cold and stormy in the east. Both Mr. Blanksma and his sister are suffering from bad colds. Dr. Hunt of Caldwell called to see Mr. Blanksma Sunday night. As it was feared he had pneumonia.

The Duncan Blanksma family of Nampa, Pierre Blanksma and family of Upper Deer Flat, were Sunday visitors at the John Blanksma home.

Hiram Blanksma is chore boy for his brother John who is tussling with a hard cold.

Midway News

Mrs. J. H. Pack died very suddenly Thursday morning at the family home half a mile north of the Midway school. She was only ill about half an hour, and it is supposed her death was caused from heart trouble. Members of the family including Mrs. Pack had the influenza some time ago, but thought they were entirely recovered. Besides her husband Mrs. Pack leaves six children. Two sons who have been living at home, two married daughters and a son living at Parma, and a married daughter in Oregon. Funeral services where held Saturday morning at 9:30 at the home and interment was in Roswell. The Packs moved here from Roswell last fall, buying the farm formerly owned by L. A. Whittle, north of Midway.

Dale McVey who has been attending school at Arco, returned home Tuesday morning, school being closed on account of the influenza.

Midway friends of Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Haynes of Melba, formerly of Midway were very sorry to hear of the death of their daughter, Nora, which occurred last week as a result of the influenza.

The play ground equipment for the Midway school is being erected. The equipment consists of three teeters, a giantstride and several swings.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 20, 1920, Page 9

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Fairview

Most of the people in this vicinity were in Caldwell Monday.

Mr. Greers family are recovering from the influenza and Mr. Landeeth’s are all better.

North Sunny Slope

The influenza is still decreasing in this community.

Eugene Haworth is on the sick list this week.

Wilder

There are many new cases of the smallpox in Wilder and the adjoining community.

Marble Front Items

Lettie Weymouth returned Saturday, her school being closed at Bowmont on account of influenza.

(ibid, page 9)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 20, 1920, Page 10

Presbyterian Notes

Mrs. R. J. Sheppard has been ill this week with influenza.

(ibid, page 10)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Meridian Times., February 20, 1920, Page 1

19200220MT1

19200220MT2Flu Situation Here Is Much Improved

The influenza situation is much better in Meridian this week, although there are still quite a number ill. The people are more careful than they were last year, and many threatened attacks of pneumonia, which is the serious stage of the illness, have been averted and the patient is soon on the road to recovery.

With every case of pneumonia care must be taken to not get a backset, through exposure, or by getting up too soon.
— —

Due to the fact that in several instances pupils have attended school from homes where contagious or infectious diseases had existed, instructions have been given all teachers to demand a heath certificate or permit from each child who has been absent. Parents are kindly asked to bear this in mind and act accordingly. In cases where the local physicians have been called into a home a telephone message from either of them will be considered sufficient.
— —

How Ill is the President?
President Wilson’s Case One Of Deep Concern

There seems to be some measure of doubt as to the ability of the President to give that competent consideration of the affairs of state that is required of the nation’s chief executive, and the matter came up on congress this week as to the procedure in case it was necessary at some future time to delegate the work to another. The constitution clearly defines the procedure in case of the death of the president, when the vice-president takes charge, as did Roosevelt when McKinley was killed. But the degree of “incapacity through illness” necessary to demand a change is what is worrying the officials at Washington.

While President Wilson was sick, Secretary Lansing called the cabinet heads together for consultation. This the people of this nation, almost to a man, has approved. That one man is President Wilson, who has fired Secretary Lansing, and claims that he usurped the power of the president.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 20 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Meridian Times., February 20, 1920, Page 8

Meridian News Notes

The county welfare nurse was in Meridian Monday, investigating several cases of absence from school, where sickness was given as the cause.

Clint Waggoner has recovered after a severe attack of influenza.

Mr. and Mrs. Amos Whitely, who have both been ill with influenza, are improving nicely.

The sophomore class of the Meridian high school entertained the seniors at a valentine party Saturday evening and a delightful time was had.

A special service in commemoration of George Washington will be held at the Methodist church in Meridian next Sunday morning at 11 o’clock.

(ibid, page 8)
—————–

Further Reading

La Grippe

J. E. Gilcreest, M.D. December 9, 1899 JAMA

Abstract

Influenza, la grippe or epidemic catarrhal fever may be defined as a specific epidemic and contagious disease, caused by a specific bacillus. This disease spreads rapidly over wide districts of country, causing marked febrile symptoms, is often attended by serious complications and causes great and prolonged prostration of strength.

Various epidemics of influenza are on record, Parks tracing it back to the ninth century. The first epidemic in England was reported in 1510, and in the United States in 1647 and at various periods down to the present times. The epidemic described in 1847, in England, was very much like we now find it in America. It has been more prevalent since 1890 than during any previous decade, having spread nearly all over the country in 1890, in April and May, 1891, and in the winter of 1891-92. Only a few cases were reported during the winters of 1892 and 1893. In the early part of 1895 it prevailed epidemically, and again in 1897 and the fall of 1898; and up to this time, April 30, 1899, it is very prevalent in many portions of the country.

Etiology. — At the present time it is generally agreed by medical teachers and writers, that is grippe is a contagious, infectious disease caused by the specific bacillas [sic] discovered in the pus-cells of the tracheal mucus, by Pfeiffer, in 1892, and in the blood by Canon, the same year. …

continued: (JAMA subscription required)
— — — — — — — — — —

Robert Lansing

Secretary of State under President Woodrow Wilson from 1915 to 1920

Post-World War I

In 1919, Lansing became the nominal head of the US Commission to the Paris Peace Conference. Because he did not regard the League of Nations as essential to the peace treaty, Lansing began to fall out of favor with Wilson, for whom participation in the League of Nations was a primary goal. During Wilson’s stroke and illness, Lansing called the cabinet together for consultations on several occasions. In addition, he was the first cabinet member to suggest that Vice President Thomas R. Marshall assume the powers of the presidency. Displeased by Lansing’s independence, Edith Wilson requested Lansing’s resignation.[citation needed] Lansing stepped down from his post on February 12, 1920.

source: Wikipedia
— — — — — — — — — —

Cynthia Ann Pease Mann

CynthiaAnnPeaseMannFaG-a

Birth: 9 Aug 1853 Hardinsburg, Breckinridge County, Kentucky, USA
Death: 6 Feb 1920 (aged 66) Boise, Ada County, Idaho
Burial: Morris Hill Cemetery Boise, Ada County, Idaho

CynthiaAnnPeaseMannHeadstone-a

source: Find a Grave
— — — —

A little slice of history: The story of Cynthia Mann

By Rick Just – Speaking of Idaho September 22, 2021

CynthiaMannJust-aCynthia Mann arrived in Boise in 1879 in such poor health she was unable to stand. Over the next 41 years she would become known as “the children’s friend” and one of Idaho’s best-known philanthropists. This photo was taken of her when she was Cynthia Pease, age 16, in Lawrence, Kansas.
Courtesy of the Idaho State Historical Society

Cynthia Mann arrived in Boise an invalid in June 1879. Her journey across southern Idaho, lying on a pallet on the floor of a stagecoach, had been so brutal that at one point she begged to be left at a stage station so she could die beneath a roof.

Born in Kentucky, educated in Kansas, Cynthia Mann began teaching when she was just 18. At age 26 her husband, Samuel Mann, whom she would later divorce, brought her to Boise in the hopes that the change of climate might improve her health. Something did, for she became a dynamo in local affairs related to education, suffrage, politics and prohibition.

Mann taught at several schools in Boise and in nearby communities. She was often mentioned in early papers as a teacher at Cloverdale, Cole, Central School and Park School. She was one of the organizers of the Idaho State Teachers Association, and in 1906 ran for Superintendent of Public Schools on the Prohibitionist ticket.

“Lady Mann” was the affectionate nickname given to her by students, who were intensely loyal to her. She taught hundreds of children, and the children of those children, through the years.

She is best remembered as the teacher of the “ungraded” school at the Children’s Home Finding and Aid Society of Idaho. That organization began in 1908 as a residence and adoption center for homeless children. It exists today as the Children’s Home Society of Idaho, carrying on its mission of placing children in good homes, though it is no longer a residence institution.

The handsome stone building, designed by Tourtellotte and Company, for the Children’s Home Finding and Aid Society of Idaho is located at 740 E. Warm Springs Avenue. It is so located because of Cynthia Mann.

Never a wealthy woman, Mann was savvy about real estate and owned a fair amount of it. She donated almost the entire block where the society is located today, then went on to make many more donations large and small over the years.

Cynthia Mann was sometimes called a “club woman.” She tirelessly supported education and political reform as one of the early members of the Columbian Club and a founding member of the Boise chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. She was active in the YWCA, the Business Women’s Club, and the Council of Women Voters.

Mann spoke often on the history of suffrage in Idaho and went to Washington, D.C. more than once to lobby for national women’s suffrage. It was on a trip to D.C. to visit her brother in 1911 when she almost met her end.

Mrs. Mann was reading the inscription on a “Peace Monument,” erected in memory of soldiers and sailors when a woman driving a horse and buggy knocked her down and ran over her. Bleeding from severe facial injuries and dazed, she was taken to a local casualty hospital that had a shady reputation.

As she told the story, “I was badly cut about the face, in two places on my lip, sustained a bad gash in my forehead, and my feet were bruised. My head was bothering me more than any other portion of my anatomy, and it was just 24 hours after I begged for it that I got any ice to put on it, and this in the face of the terrible summer heat.”

To her good fortune, Addison T. Smith, secretary to Senator Weldon B. Heyburn of Idaho, read about her accident in the newspaper. “Mr. Smith came for me at once and insisted on taking me to his home and I feel that I owe my life to him and Mrs. Smith.”

The Idaho Statesman, in reporting about the incident, called Cynthia Mann “perhaps the greatest philanthropist in the state of Idaho.”

To, as they say, add insult to injury, Mann was robbed by a nurse while in the hospital. She got her $20 back only after Smith and a Congressman French put pressure on the institution.

Cynthia Mann continued her activism and her teaching until February of 1920. She qualified for a small pension, but at age 66 refused to quit teaching. Her health was starting to fail, so she got her affairs in order, which in her case meant creating a will that gave her remaining funds to her beloved clubs, for hospital work in South America, and $800 for the rehabilitation of a small village, Tilliloy, in northern France. She left most of the money for the construction of the Ward Massacre site monument to the Pioneer Chapter of the D.A.R.

On February 6, 1920, Cynthia Mann died of pneumonia following a bout of influenza.

Lady Mann planned her own funeral to the last detail. The following is a portion of what was read at the service, at her request.

“I had a dream which was not all a dream. I dreamed I was the children’s friend, that I loved them enough to give them pain, if by so doing, they might grow up good and true and beautiful in the sight of God. I loved them enough to go without what was unnecessary that they might have what would put good things into their lives: sweet thoughts and beautiful memories.”

Also at her request, Cynthia Mann’s body was carried by a group of her early pupils to be put to rest in Morris Hill Cemetery. Her marker reads: “It was Happiness to Serve.”

source: Speaking of Idaho
———————

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)