Monthly Archives: December 2021

Updated: Winter Storm Warning until Decr 31, 11am

Winter Storm Warning and Special Weather Statement until Dec 31, 11am

Yellow Pine Forecast

Today Snow. High near 24. West southwest wind around 6 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. Total daytime snow accumulation of 2 to 4 inches possible.

Tonight Snow. Low around 12. West southwest wind 5 to 9 mph becoming calm. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 3 inches possible.

Friday Snow likely, mainly before 11am. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 20. Northwest wind around 6 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New snow accumulation of around an inch possible.

Friday Night Partly cloudy, with a low around -7. Northwest wind around 5 mph becoming calm in the evening.

New Year’s Day Mostly sunny, with a high near 20. Calm wind becoming west around 5 mph in the afternoon.

link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Winter Storm Warning

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
1044 AM MST Thu Dec 30 2021

West Central Mountains-Boise Mountains-
1044 AM MST Thu Dec 30 2021

...WINTER STORM WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 11 AM MST
FRIDAY...

* WHAT...Heavy snow expected. Total snow accumulations of 6 to
  14 inches, except up to 18 inches over the mountains.

* WHERE...West Central Mountains and Boise Mountains zones.

* WHEN...Until 11 AM MST Friday.

* IMPACTS...Travel could be very difficult.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

If you must travel, keep an extra flashlight, food, and water in
your vehicle in case of an emergency.

The latest road conditions can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.

Special Weather Statement

Special Weather Statement
National Weather Service Boise ID
223 PM MST Thu Dec 30 2021

West Central Mountains-Lower Treasure Valley ID-Boise Mountains-
Upper Treasure Valley-Southwest Highlands-Western Magic Valley-
Camas Prairie-Owyhee Mountains-Southern Twin Falls County-
Upper Weiser River-Harney County-Baker County-Malheur County-
Oregon Lower Treasure Valley-
Including the cities of McCall, Cascade, Nampa, Caldwell,
Idaho City, Lowman, Garden Valley, Pine, Boise, Mountain Home,
Grasmere, Riddle, Murphy Hot Springs, Twin Falls, Jerome,
Fairfield, Silver City, Hollister, Rogerson, Council, Cambridge,
Midvale, Buchanan, Burns, Crane, Dunnean, New Princeton, Venator,
Diamond, Baker, Malheur City, Ontario, and Nyssa
223 PM MST Thu Dec 30 2021 /123 PM PST Thu Dec 30 2021/

...VERY COLD TEMPERATURES EXPECTED OVER THE HOLIDAY WEEKEND...
ESPECIALLY SATURDAY MORNING...

Skies will clear and temperatures will become very cold late
Friday night into Saturday morning. Low temperatures in the
valleys are expected to be from around 5 above zero to 10 below
zero, with mountains generally in the 5 below zero to 20 below
zero range. Sunday will be not be as cold, but most locations will
be in the 5 above to 5 below zero range in the morning.

Fortunately, most winds will stay below 10 mph during the coldest
periods. However, the Camas Prairie will have dangerous wind
chills down to 35 below zero Saturday morning, with a significant
risk of frostbite. Other areas will have lighter winds and will
not be quite so cold, but even light winds can lead to frostbite
at those temperatures.

Road Reports Dec 29, 2021

Please share road reports. Winter travel conditions. Most back country roads are not maintained. This time of year there is deep snow in higher elevations. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: This morning an average of 15″ snow on the ground. Local streets are snow covered, most of the main paths had been plowed before this latest storm. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Construction on ID-55 near Smiths Ferry has been suspended for the winter. Crews have winterized the work zone and removed equipment from the area for the season. All lanes on ID-55 are now open and will stay completely open until construction resumes mid-March 2022.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (Dec 29) mail truck driver reports about 10″ new snow on Big Creek summit. County crew was plowing, but plow broke down.
Big Creek summit SNOTEL shows 63″ snow this morning.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Dec 29) mail truck driver reports about 5″ new light fluffy snow on upper road. Not plowed.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Dec 29) mail truck driver reports snow covered road, didn’t notice any obstructions. Not plowed.

Upper Johnson Creek Road: Closed Travel not advised.
Lower Johnson Creek Road: Last report plowed on Monday (Dec 13) may have been plowed again on Friday Dec 24th.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Link: to Big Creek Webcam North (check date on image)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open – Likely deep snow up high.
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Deadwood summit SNOTEL shows 88″ this morning.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard

Link: Payette Avalanche Center
——————

Winter Weather Advisory Dec 28, 11pm to Dec 29, 11am

Winter Weather Advisory Dec 28, 11pm to Dec 29, 11am

Yellow Pine Forecast

This Afternoon A 20 percent chance of snow. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 16. Light west northwest wind.

Tonight Snow likely, mainly after 11pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 8. West wind around 5 mph becoming calm in the evening. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 3 inches possible.

Wednesday Snow, mainly before 11am. High near 22. Calm wind becoming northwest 5 to 7 mph in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 3 inches possible.

Wednesday Night Mostly cloudy, with a low around 1. West wind around 5 mph becoming calm.

Thursday Snow. High near 23. West southwest wind 3 to 7 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of 2 to 4 inches possible.

Thursday Night Snow. Low around 10. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 3 inches possible.

Friday A 40 percent chance of snow, mainly before 11am. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 20. Little or no snow accumulation expected.

Friday Night Partly cloudy, with a low around -1.

link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Winter Weather Advisory

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
121 PM MST Tue Dec 28 2021

West Central Mountains-
121 PM MST Tue Dec 28 2021

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 11 PM THIS
EVENING TO 11 AM MST WEDNESDAY...

* WHAT...Snow expected. Total snow accumulations of 3 to 5 inches,
  except 5 to 8 inches over the mountains.

* WHERE...West Central Mountains zone.

* WHEN...From 11 PM this evening to 11 AM MST Wednesday.

* IMPACTS...Plan on slippery road conditions.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Slow down and use caution while traveling.

The latest road conditions can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.

Dec 26, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

Dec 26, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
Oct 27 – Transfer Station on Winter Schedule
Nov 1 – Winter Mail Delivery Starts
Dec 31 – McIntosh’s Bonfire

(details below)
———-

Local Events:

New Year’s Eve

You are all invited to McIntosh’s for their annual New Year’s Eve Bonfire at dusk.
———

Village News:

Main Street Dec 18, 2021

20211218YPMainStreet-a
photo courtesy Scott A
— — — —

Christmas Potluck

26 folks got together [at the Community Hall] for great food, company, and reindeer games.

20211225XmasPotluck-a
photo courtesy DF
— — — —

YP West Webcam Dec 26, 2021

20211226YellowPineWest-a
— — — —

Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
— — — —

Road News

Hwy 55 is Open – construction suspended for winter.

Link: to current road reports.

Upper Johnson Creek road at Landmark, Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Elk Summit, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are closed with snow now. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
— — — —

Critters

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat has been hanging around the upper part of the village recently. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

Bats

While bats are an important part of our ecosystem and most do not carry rabies, CDH offers the following tips to protect yourself and pets:
* Never touch a bat with your bare hands.
* If you have had an encounter with a bat, seek medical attention.
* If you come in contact with a bat, save the bat in a container without touching it and contact your health department to arrange testing for rabies. Whenever possible, the bat should be tested to rule out an exposure to rabies. During regular business hours in Ada, Boise and Elmore Counties, call 208-327-7499 and in Valley County, call 208-634-7194. After business hours in all counties, call 1-800-632-8000.
* Always vaccinate your pets for rabies, including horses. Pets may encounter bats outdoors or in the home.
* Bat-proof your home or cabin by plugging all holes in the siding and maintaining tight-fitting screens on windows. Bats can enter through holes the size of a quarter.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started November 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Dec 1st: Dumpsters are about half full. The outside is clean and burn pile gone.

Dump update October 27th: It was [last] emptied today and we are now in winter mode. When it gets fairly full we will call to have it dumped. Contact Cecil.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

Dec 11, 2021 Water Update

Water usage over the past month has increased about 12,000 gallons per day. We know that many are keeping water running to prevent their pipes from freezing, that’s understandable. Everyone please conserve water and watch your property for any unusual leaks. Thank you
– Steve H

DRINKING WATER WARNING December 9, 2021
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 180 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059 Date distributed: 12-9-21.

YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 at the Community Hall at 10am. Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting held July 5, 2020 at the Community Hall 2pm. link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
— — — —

VYPA News:

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link: (see document at link for attachments)
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Hailey Harris, Secretary
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
— — — —

YPFD News:

If you have an emergency, please call 911.

Chimney cleaning brushes are available to borrow from the YPFD.

Sept 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting (no minutes yet.)
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss upcoming election (no minutes yet.)
July 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
June 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:

Sept 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Lorinne Munn
Deputy Fire Chief: Merrill Saleen
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Phil Jensen – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Nikki Saleen
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Open – New Owners
Winter hours:
Monday and Wednesday 10am-8pm
Fridays 5pm-10pm
Sundays 10am-6pm
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Winter Hours at the Tavern
Open Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat: 9am-2pm 4pm-8pm
Open Sunday 9am-2pm
Closed Tues & Thurs
Call the Tavern 208 633-2233 or Cell 208 739-7086 for other arrangements
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed for the winter.
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Our Elk & Deer hunts are booked for our 2021 season, we do have a couple openings for our 2022 Elk & Deer hunts. We Also have a couple openings for Mountain Lion hunts December 2021 through February 2022 and Spring Bear hunts May of 2022. Please see our Website site for further details.
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 452-4361
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Dec 20) overnight low of 31 degrees. Snow and rain Sunday then more snow Monday morning gave a measurement of 3 1/2″ new (SWE=0.46″) and an average of 10 1/2″ snow on the ground (pillowy and hard to measure.) Squirrel tracks, hairy woodpecker calling and jays visiting. It appears to have stopped snowing at lunch time, low clouds w/foggy belts low on the hills. Overcast and slight breeze mid-afternoon, above freezing and melting, high of 35 degrees. Snowed pretty good for half an hour before sunset, put down at least a fat quarter inch. Cloudy before midnight.

Tuesday (Dec 21) overnight low of 24 degrees. Measured a fat quarter inch of snow from Monday (SWE=0.03″) and an average of 10″ on the ground, mostly hazy to partly clear sky. Solstice sunrise at 1044am. Pine squirrel visiting. Mostly hazy at lunch time, icicles dripping. High overcast and slight breeze mid-afternoon, high of 35 degrees. Overcast at dusk, feels a bit humid. Partly cloudy before midnight, bright waning moon. Snow fell early morning.

Wednesday (Dec 22) overnight low of 20 degrees. Measured a quarter inch of snow from earlier this morning (SWE=0.03″) and an average of 10″ on the ground, mostly cloudy sky. Squirrel tracks in the fresh snow, jay calling from the trees. Overcast at lunch time. Downy woodpecker visiting. Started snowing before 130pm, lasted less than 30 minutes. Mail truck was a bit late, no problems reported. Kind of a light rain/snow mix mid-afternoon that didn’t last long, above freezing and overcast, afternoon high of 35 degrees. Overcast and above freezing at dusk. Loud gun shot at 524pm. Light rain before 930pm and likely rained on and off all night, temperature rising to 37 degrees.

Thursday (Dec 23) 24 hour low of 28 degrees from Wednesday morning. Measured 0.19″ of water (rain and trace of melted snow) in the rain gauge and an average of 9″ old snow on the ground. Paths are solid ice this morning. Hairy woodpecker visiting, pine squirrel has a tunnel thru the snow. Socked in and rain/snow mix after lunch time. Socked in, breezy and rain/snow mix mid-afternoon, high of 35 degrees. At dusk low overcast, very gusty breezes and more rain than snow falling. South Fork station recorded 52mph gust. Slick paths and slushy on the street. Snowing after dark and quite breezy. Looks like half an inch before midnight, breezy and light snowfall. Probably done snowing before 4am.

Friday (Dec 24) overnight low of 21 degrees. Yesterday’s rain and snow = 0.27″ water. Measured 1 1/4″ new snow and an average of 10″ on the ground. With snow frozen to the wet ice, paths are no longer slick. Downy woodpecker and pine squirrel visiting. Started snowing just before lunch time and breezy, lasted a little over an hour and trace accumulation. Report the local plow driver is out clearing travel routes. Cold, cloudy, breezy and a few flakes of snow mid-afternoon, high of 30 degrees. Lightly flaking at dusk, overcast and cold light breeze. Snowing and stacking up after dark. Moderate snowfall before midnight, about an inch so far. At 2am partly clear and bright moon. More snow towards morning.

Saturday (Dec 25) overnight low of 21 degrees. Yesterday’s snow measured 3″ (SWE=0.17″) and 13″ total on the ground. This morning low overcast and snowing lightly. Jay calling and woodpecker drumming. Just a flake or two falling at noon, overcast and breezy. Dark-eyed junco and hairy woodpecker visiting. Overcast with occasional flakes of snow and cold gusty breezes mid-afternoon, high of 30 degrees. Low overcast and fine light snow falling at dusk, calmer. Still snowing before midnight, about an inch so far. Looks like it snowed all night.

Sunday (Dec 26) overnight low of 20 degrees. The 24 hour snow total is 3″ (SWE=0.16″) and an average of 15″ on the ground. This morning overcast, light snowfall and breezy. A small patch of blue over VanMeter hill at 1045am then the wind blew a huge plume of snow up off the mountain into the sky! Then the wind hit down here blowing snow out of the trees and total whiteout for a few minutes. Hairy woodpecker drumming, squirrel tracks in the snow. Light snowfall at lunch time, socked in low and lighter breezes. Downy woodpecker visiting. Just the peaks and ridges in the fog by mid-afternoon, light snowfall (1/4″ so far) and very cold breezes, high of 22 degrees. At dusk higher thinner clouds, light breeze and not snowing (1/2″ so far.)
—————

RIP:

Connie Babe Longman

RIPConnieLongman2-aFebruary 15, 1939 – December 11, 2021

Connie Babe Longman, age 82, of Newport, Washington passed away on Saturday, December 11, 2021. Connie was born February 15, 1939.

Connie lived in Yellow Pine for many years and is missed.

source:
— — — —

Donald William Bork

RIPDonBork-aFebruary 1, 1939 – November 1, 2021

Donald William Bork passed away in Tucson, Arizona, on Monday, November 1, 2021, at the age of 82.

Don was born in La Grande, Oregon, on February 1, 1939, to Lillian Blecha Bork and William John Bork. He attended Greenwood Elementary School and graduated from La Grande High School, with the class of 1957.

While in his youth, many hours were spent hunting with his father in the Blue Mountains of Oregon. Those mountains soon became Don’s passion for prospecting for gold with his childhood friend Larry Red. He was a miner in the making. In high school, every summer at harvest time, Don drove truck for Claude Anson and the Bork family ranch located in Island City, Oregon. It was these four years of harvest work that paid for Don’s college tuition.

Don attended the Montana School of Mines, in Butte, Montana. He received his B.S. in Mining Engineering in 1962. It was there that Don met and married his wife, Barbara Jean Sessions.

Starting his career, Don went to work in the Engineering Department for the Anaconda Mining Company, in Butte, Montana. In 1963 he went to work for Hecla Mining Company at the Mayflower Mine at Park City, Utah. During the Spring of 1966, Don left the U.S. with his young family to live and work in Honduras, Central America. He was employed with the New York, Honduras Rosario Mining Company, at the El Mochito Mine, Santa Barbara, Honduras. From 1966 to 1977 Don developed gold mines in Honduras, Nicaragua, and the Dominican Republic, as well as traveling and working in Spain, Portugal and Algiers, Algeria, North Africa, where he worked with the Russians to develop Algeria’s mining industry. Returning to the U.S. in 1978, Don developed gold mines in Idaho at Stibnite, and Thunder Mountain, at the edge of the Idaho Wilderness area, until 1994. Don’s heart was always with the people of Central America where he was able to speak Spanish fluently, and he returned to Nicaragua where he worked for several Canadian mining companies before returning to the States and retirement in 1997.

While living in Idaho, Don purchased a cabin on the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River, near the little town of Yellow Pine, Idaho. The cabin is in close proximity to the gold mines he had developed in 1978. The cabin on the river remained one of the greatest joys in Don’s life and the lives of his family.

Don’s presence will be missed, but he will not be forgotten. Known as “Poppa” to his grandchildren and great-grandchildren, he will be remembered for his “encyclopedia” brain, his razor-sharp memory, his legacy to the mining industry, and the huge impact and influence he had on his family both conservatively and politically in his outlook.

Don is preceded in death by his parents, Lillian and William Bork. He is survived by his brother, Robert L. Bork of La Grande, Oregon. Don is survived by his wife of 58 years, Barbara Bork; his four children, Victoria Lee (Michael), Jessyka Lavern, Jocelyn Christina, Benjamin Leslie Diego Bork (Yara), and his daughter, Patricia Eden Pauls (Edward). Although not born to Don and Barb, Patsy has always been true family. Don leaves behind eleven grandchildren, Bradley, Jordan, Kyle, Mallorie, Justin, Zane, Enzo, Nathaniel, Derek, Dryden and Olivia, and twelve great-grandchildren.

A celebration of life will be held at a later date in the Summer of 2022. Memorial cards or messages can be sent to Barbara Bork, 9937 N. Woodstone Trail, Tucson, Arizona 85742.

source: LaGrande Observer
——————

Idaho News:

Valley County software glitch puts personal information online

Blacked out information did not get transferred to site

By Max Silverson The Star-News December 23, 2021

Valley County has sent letters to nearly 4,300 people saying their personal information on file with the county was inadvertently made public for more than a year due to a software glitch.

There is no evidence any attempt was made to misuse the personal information, Valley County Clerk Doug Miller said.

The records were available on an online search tool posted on the county’s website between January 2020 and April 2021.

To access documents, people could search by name or document number to access recorded, public documents free of charge instead of visiting the office in person, Miller said.

Title companies and banks were the most frequent users when searching for deeds and other home related documents, he said.

The search tool was used about 25,000 times, Miller said.

Documents that could be viewed on the site were supposed to not contain personal information or have personal information blacked out.

There is a feature on the software that allows personal information to be noted and redacted but an error in software removed the black-outs when the documents were posted.

Personal information that was revealed included names, birth dates, Social Security numbers and information on marriage and death certificates, Miller said.

The documents that were available on the site were those required to be formally recorded, Miller said.

They included marriage affidavits, death certificates, certificates of release or discharge from active-duty military service, mortgage documents, deeds and liens, Miller said.

Documents and official copies are recorded at the county clerk’s office to maintain a permanent record. Records recorded at the clerk’s office dating back to 1997 were accessible through the portal.

The records of about 4,620 people were available over the 16 months the site was started until the flaw was found by county employees in April, he said.

The problem was discovered when an employee showing someone how to find documents on the portal noticed that information was not blacked out, Miller said. …

“While we are unaware of any attempt or actual misuse of your information, we are providing you with information about the event, our response and steps you may take to better protect against the possibility of identity theft and fraud,” the notice said.

“Upon learning of this incident, we moved quickly to investigate and respond,” it said.

The notices included the specific records affected for each person and the county has set up a dedicated call center to assist those affected.

The center can be reached at 888-994-0269 from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday to Friday and 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

full story: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County COVID-19 cases rise to 16 in past week

By Tom Grote The Star-News December 23, 2021

New cases of COVID-19 in Valley County in the past week totaled 16 as reported by the county’s two hospitals in the past week.

The 16 new cases compare to 12 new cases reported the previous week and 29 new cases the prior week.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 1,687 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started in March 2020.

A total of 11 deaths confirmed from COVID-19 and two probable deaths from the virus have been reported among Valley County residents, according to Central District Health.

Clinics & Tests

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine is offering the Pfizer vaccine to anyone 5 and older.

For youths age 5 to 17 and adults 18 and older wanting a booster, appointments are required. Schedule online through MyChart or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at stlukesonline.org.

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine welcomes walk-ins for those 18 and older seeking their initial dose of the vaccine from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results for COVID-19 in two to three days.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

Cascade Medical Center offers a walk-in vaccination clinic from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster.

The Pfizer vaccine for those ages 5 to 11 is available in Cascade on Wednesdays.

full story:
— — — —

COVID-19 Updates: 456 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

Dec 24, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 456 new COVID-19 cases and 2 new deaths Thursday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 315,726.

The state said 101,810 people have received one dose of a two dose series, and 308,485 people have received an additional or booster dose. 2,122,415 total doses have been administered. 886,904 people are fully vaccinated.

The state said 13 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 13,915, and 1 new case has been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,343.

2 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,099.

full story: [Valley County 1624 cases, 13 deaths.]
— —

Second case of Omicron reported in Idaho

By Linda Larsen December 22, 2021 Local News 8

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released data showing the Omicron variant makes up 90-percent of new covid-19 cases in the United States.

Idaho health officials are reporting two confirmed cases of the Omicron variant in the state. Both are in Ada county.

Maggie Man, Southeast Idaho Public Health Director, said Idaho tends to lag slightly behind national trends. But they warn, because the variant is extremely contagious, it is just a matter of time before it’s the dominant strain in Idaho as well.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County recycling center reopens after baler repaired

By Max Silverson The Star-News December 23, 2021

The Valley County Recycling Center reopened last week when a baler that broke for more than a week prior was repaired.

“This is an old and tired machine,” Valley County Commissioner Dave Bingaman said of the baler, which compresses and bales materials to be recycled in order to prepare them for transport.

The county is considering purchasing a second baler to speed up processing at the center and also to provide a backup in case of a failure,” Bingaman said

The county is also considering expanding the building that houses the baler and enclosing the recycling center, which is currently uncovered, Bingaman said.

The center, located at 48 East Lake Fork Road, was opened in December 2020 as a centralized location to replace recycling depots in Cascade, Donnelly and McCall.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho 21 closed between Lowman and Stanley due to avalanche danger

The 12-mile stretch of highway from Grandjean to Banner Summit is nicknamed “avalanche alley,” as 90% of avalanches that affect Idaho highways occur there.

KTVB Staff December 23, 2021

Idaho Highway 21 is closed in both directions between the Grandjean junction and Banner Summit because of avalanche danger, the Idaho Transportation Department reported Thursday.

ITD plans to reassess the danger at 7 a.m. Friday, but the road is currently closed until further notice.

The affected area is between the towns of Lowman and Stanley, 23 to 35 miles from Stanley if heading toward Lowman, Idaho City or Boise on Highway 21.

continued:
—————-

Public Lands:

2nd lawsuit targets large west-central Idaho forest project

By Associated Press Dec 22, 2021

A conservation group has filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Forest Service to stop a 105-square-mile logging and restoration project in west-central Idaho.

The Idaho Conservation League in the lawsuit filed Monday says the Forest Service violated environmental laws in approving the 20-year Sage Hen Project in the Boise National Forest. The Alliance for the Wild Rockies and other groups filed a similar lawsuit last month.

Both lawsuits request a more thorough environmental study before the project goes forward. The Forest Service says the project approved in April will reduce wildfire fuel hazards, making it safe for firefighters and the public.

source:
——————-

Critter News:

Nampa firefighters, officers save puppy that got stuck in pipe

The teamwork put a smile on the face of a little boy.

KTVB Staff December 24, 2021


Credit: Nampa Fire Department

Idaho firefighters, police officers, paramedics and dispatchers go to work every day knowing they might have to respond to car crashes, house fires, crimes or a major disaster.

However, for those who stand ready to help in big emergencies, no job is too small. One example: an incident that unfolded Thursday in Nampa.

The Nampa Fire Department got a call about a puppy named Tico, accidentally trapped in a small pipe in front of a house.

With the help of Nampa Police dispatchers and an animal control officer, firefighters were able to save Tico, who they’ve dubbed “Tico the Christmas dog.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Shelter dogs from New Orleans transported to the Idaho Humane Society

By KIVI Staff Dec 22, 2021

It’s a busy time for travelers at the Boise Airport, both humane and canine. This week, more than 35 shelter dogs were airlifted from New Orleans to Boise.

The dogs will be adopted into homes in the City of Trees thanks to the Greater Good Charities flights program. The furry travelers will be evaluated and receive any follow-up care at the Idaho Humane Society.

“We’re hoping to get all 37 dogs adopted and give them the best chance and typically an animal is in the shelter for about 24 to 48 hours once they hit that adoption floor,” said Laurien Mavey of the Idaho Humane Society.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Make-A-Wish Idaho grants Nampa girl a horse in time for the holidays

By Isabella Bright Dec 24, 2021 KIVI


Photo by: Make-A-Wish Foundation of Idaho. Addie Farley and her new horse Pablo

Nine-year-old Addie Farley has an immune system disorder, but that hasn’t stopped her from pursuing her love of horseback riding.

Farley’s wish of having a horse of her very own came true after she showed up for her riding lesson and received her new horse Pablo. The four-year-old appaloosa comes from Montana, after a search to find her perfect match.

“We worked with a breeder, a stable, a boarder, a veterinarian, and Make-A-Wish magic happened and we were able to find the absolute perfect horse for Addie,” said Janie Best, President and CEO of Make-A-Wish Foundation of Idaho.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

UTEP research team finds evidence of COVID-19 in deer

by KFOX Staff Thursday, December 23rd 2021

A University of Texas at El Paso research team said they found evidence of COVID-19 in Texas deer.

Research conducted by Douglas Watts, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences at UTEP, has found COVID-19 in white-tailed deer in Texas.

A report on the discovery was published recently in Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, a peer-reviewed journal focusing on diseases transmitted to humans by animals.

The UTEP team found the first reported evidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in deer from Texas, which widens the previously reported geographical range of COVID-19 among deer in the United States, further confirming that infection is common among the species.

continued: CBS2 Idaho
————-

Fish & Game News:

Lake Cascade and Horsethief Reservoir ice conditions – Dec. 22, 2021

By Mike Thomas, Regional Fisheries Biologist
Thursday, December 23, 2021

Update by Justin Furby, Fisheries Technician

On Wednesday, December 22nd we checked surface and ice conditions on Lake Cascade and Horsethief Reservoir. In general, Cascade is not yet safe for fishing, but Horsethief is in play. Although air temperatures will be dropping over the weekend, Valley County is forecasted to receive heavy snowfall in the coming days, which will likely result in a longer period of waiting for Cascade to build ice, and may result in unfavorable conditions at Horsethief as well. We’ll plan to issue another ice condition update next week. STAY TUNED!

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Hunt and fish 2022 worry-free by renewing your hunting and fishing license today

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Wednesday, December 22, 2021

Don’t miss out on these wintertime hunting and fishing opportunities

Don’t be caught flatfooted this January when that next fishing trip or late-winter hunting opportunity presents itself. Renewing your annual Idaho hunting and/or fishing license is quick and easy, and can be done right from your computer or cellphone. So pull the trigger on that 2022 Idaho hunting and fishing license and take advantage of these year-round opportunities.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Do your part to protect wintering wildlife by leaving animals undisturbed

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Tuesday, December 21, 2021

For some wildlife, being left alone during winter can make a life-or-death difference

Winter is a challenging season for Idaho’s wildlife, especially for big game animals that migrate to lower elevations and spend winter closer to people than during other seasons. People can help animals by leaving them undisturbed so they have a better chance to survive winter.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

F&G Commission approves agreement with Wyoming and Montana to manage grizzly bears

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Saturday, December 18, 2021

Grizzly population in Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem met recovery goals in the early 2000s

Idaho Fish and Game Commission on Dec. 16 approved an updated “Memorandum of Agreement” between Idaho, Wyoming and Montana regarding state grizzly bear management commitments in support of delisting the bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Wyoming and Montana’s commission have also approved the MOA.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Troop of fat, bold squirrels force park to scale back holiday lights

by Associated Press Tuesday, December 21st 2021 (CBS2 Idaho)


The squirrels in Mears Park in St. Paul, Minn, like these on Monday, Dec. 20, 2021, are fat, bold, and accustomed to being fed by people. (Scott Takushi/Pioneer Press via AP)

A troop of fat, hungry squirrels has put the kibosh on a downtown St. Paul park’s holiday lights display.

Friends of Mears Park had to forego the usual display this year because squirrels chewed through the lights’ wires last year and the vendor refused to put up with the headache and cost again this year, the St. Paul Pioneer Press reported Tuesday.

The wires, it turns out, were coated with polylactic acid, a derivative of corn sugar, an appealing appetizer for squirrels spoiled by park visitors who won’t stop feeding them, said Ann LaBore, co-chair of the friends group.

continued:
—————

Seasonal Humor:

axialtilt-a
YP Winter Solstice Sunrise at 1044am.

CovidBook-a
————

Idaho History Dec 26, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 86

Idaho Newspaper Clippings March 12-16, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

March 12

Montpelier Examiner. March 12, 1920, Page 1

19200312ME1

19200312ME2Native of Bear Lake Dies At Afton, Wyo.

The Star Valley Independent of last Saturday chronicles the death in Afton a week ago Sunday of Leona Rich Gardner, wife of Bishop Franklin Gardener of that city. Mrs. Gardener had been ill for three weeks, the original cause being an attack of influenza.

An extremely sad feature of the death of Mrs. Gardner is that she leaves three small children besides her husband to mourn her loss. The oldest of the children is less than three years.

Leona Angelia Rich was born in St. Charles, Idaho, on February 17, 1891, being just a little more than 29 years of age at the time of her death. Four years ago she was united in marriage to Franklin R. Gardner of this city, to which union were born three children.

Mrs. Gardner was a graduate of the Fielding Academy of Paris, and after graduating from that school came to Star Valley and taught in both the grade and district school of Star Valley. She was always active in church work, and for a time was president of the Mutual.

Aside from a heart broken husband and three children, Mrs. Gardner leaves a father, mother, six sisters and three bothers to mourn her loss.
— —

Many School Truants Have Been Reported

Truant Officer E. J. Phelps asked The Examiner to call the attention of parents to the urgent need of sending written excuses in every instance where their children are kept out of school. There is a law requiring this. Many complaints have been received by Mr. Phelps from the teachers of the various schools of numerous cases of absence, and in a number of cases investigated by the officer, these boys have been found loitering about the city, and when approached regarding their absence from school would offer some kind of flimsy excuse. Mr. Phelps has inaugurated a campaign that will do much to reduce truancy or unwarranted absence of young boys.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 12 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. March 12, 1920, Page 4

[Editorial]

Some of the business men of the city are wondering if the people generally realize that all the dangers attendant upon the last epidemic of flu are now passed into oblivion. Some of the professional men in particular complain of slackness in business, which they believe is due to the fact that people in outlying districts are still fearful of the flu. We believe that the flu has completely vanished from this section of the state and that business can go on unhampered.
— —

Paris Notes

Funeral services for Mrs. Anna Nate Passey were held here in the Second ward chapel last Saturday afternoon. Speakers were Robert Shepherd, President Wm. L Rich, L. Tracy Shepherd and other friends of the deceased. All the speakers extolled highly the live of Mrs. Passey, of her faith, her many good works, her qualities as a wife and mother. Music was furnished by the ward choir. …

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. March 12, 1920, Page 9

St. Charles Notes

We are very pleased to learn that Mr. Johnnie Pugmire who has been ill for the past month is now on the road to recovery.

Mrs. Thomas Michaelson’s little daughter is reported to be much improved also.

Brother Blade is very sick. He has been laying very low the past two months and is seriously sick at the present.

(ibid, page 9)
— — — — — — — — — —

American Falls Press. March 12, 1920, Page 2

19200312AFP1

Correspondence
News of Interest From Nearby Towns and Settlements

Rockland

Little Logan Ewing, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert I. Ewing, has been very ill with pneumonia but is now on the road to recovery.

Roy and Vicinity

Mrs. Berl Byerley was called to Seattle last week by the serious illness and death of her sister, Miss Eva Shields, who died from the effects of influenza. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. S. Shields of Milton and visited with her sister, Mrs. Byerley last summer and made a number of friends during her stay here. The heartfelt sympathy of the community is extended to Mrs. Byerley in her bereavement.

Mrs. J. D. Lower and Miss Claire Lower came in from the Falls Saturday. Mrs. Lower has been taking medical treatments at American Falls.

Prosperity

Mrs. W. Wetzel was ill last week, but is recovering.

Jack Walters, who has been seriously ill with pneumonia, is slowly recovering.

Many of the Prosperity farmers are out of straw and are buying hay for their stock.

Arbon Central School Notes

There was no school Tuesday due to the stove smoking.

Arbon and Vicinity

Eynon Davis returned home last week from near Jerome where he was called by the illness of his father.

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Houck, has been quick sick the past week.

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Perry Howell is very ill at their home here.

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Perry Howell is quite ill with pneumonia.

The dance was well attended at Central hall Friday evening especially by a crowd of drunken men and young men, some of them from Pauline. The boys were merely boys who have been attending school There is a strong suspicion where the liquor was obtained.

Some of the telephone lines have been down during the recent storm and are being repaired.
— —

19200312AFP2

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 12 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

American Falls Press. March 12, 1920, Page 5

Local Briefs

Miss Goldie Drake has been confined to her home this week with a severe attack of bronchitis.

Mary G. Fisher, the school mistress at Bonanza Bar, has been visiting in American Falls this week.

Phillip and Philo Stilson stopped last week-end in American Falls to visit with Mr. and Mrs. Jack Stuart and family, and many other old friends from eastern Washington. They were on their way home following a trip to eastern Washington to attend the funeral of their sister and mother, both of whom died suddenly.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

American Falls Press. March 12, 1920, Page 8

Hospital Notes

Ora Kramer who has been ill with influenza and pneumonia returned to Rockland today.

Mrs. Frank J. Winzel of Aberdeen, who was operated upon about ten days ago returned home today.

Mrs. N. W. Chapman of Raft River was operated upon yesterday and is getting along nicely.

Miss Annie Schroeder of Aberdeen is a patient at the hospital, suffering from an ear affection.
— —

Eight Arrests Made For Violation Of Speed Laws

Eight auto drivers were arrested Sunday for exceeding the speed limit of 15 miles an hour within the city limits. These arrested were C. Lee French, W. H. Philbrick, W. L. Newton, H. F. Fitzpatrick, U. R. Smith, W. H. Griswold, Calvert Sallee and George Bowman. All paid the fine of $5 and costs.

The sudden decent of the speed “cop” on the main thoroughfare of the city caught the drivers totally unawares. It was the first recent effort of the city council to curb the recklessness of auto drivers who dash through town at forbidden speeds. Joe Watts held the watch on the drivers and in a few hours had made arrests that will pay for several yards of graveling during the spring months.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Republican. March 12, 1920, Page 3

19200312TIR1

Idaho State News

Joe Auola, a sheepman, was fined $110 and costs in Mountain Home for exposing range to sheep scab.
— —

Shelley

Last Monday N. R., Lambert demonstrated the Fordson tractor by hooking on to a road drag and dragging Main street and some of the other business streets of the town.

No more teams will be allowed to tie on Main street by order of the village board. A long row of hitching posts just north of the postoffice has been put up for the accommodation of the farmers and others who wish to tie up their teams while in town. A severe penalty will be enforced on those who disregard the signs on the telephone posts on Main street to this effect.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 12 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. March 12, 1920, Page 5

Local News

Dr. Bernhisel is reported on the sick list.

Mrs. Maude Turman has returned from Hamer, Idaho, where she attended the funeral of her brother.

Sheriff A. H. Simmons returned yesterday from Vancouver, where he was called to the bedside of his brother who was seriously ill. The sheriff reports his brother much improved at the present time.
— —

Cheering. — “Did the doctor seem encouraged about your condition?”

“Yes,” said Mr. Grabcoin, “I have an idea he thinks I’m going to be one of the most profitable patients he ever had.”

— Birmingham Age-Herald.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. March 12, 1920, Page 6

Firth

William Jolley is at his place of business after a week’s absence due to influenza.

Mr. Scarborough wishes to thank the many friends who so kindly assisted him during the illness of his beloved wife, also for the many beautiful floral offerings.

Mrs. L. J. Firth is improving after a week’s illness.

Miss Gertrude Berquist has charge of the Y. W. C. A. drive here. Everyone should respond to this good cause, “The betterment of conditions for the working girl.”
— —

Rose

Bishop J. S. Gardner, while chasing sheep last Sunday, fell and cut a severe gash in his head. Dr. Mitchell was called and the wounds were dressed.

Mrs. J. S. Gardner, who has been ill, has recovered sufficiently to enable her to resume her duties.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. March 12, 1920, Page 7

Centerville

Little Hazel Haynes is listed among the sick this week.
— —

Minors May Be Pinched For Smoking In Public

Minors under eighteen who smoke or use cigarettes, cigars or tobacco in any form upon public highways or other public properties may be declared “delinquent” and committed to a reformatory, according to a ruling made by Attorney General Black in answer to a Paris, Idaho inquiry.

Section 8363 of the complied statutes, to which he called attention in his ruling, provides that “every minor person who shall smoke, etc., shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.” Section 1010, also quoted, provides that children under the age of eighteen years “who violate any law of this state” may be declared “delinquent.”

(ibid, page 7)
— — — — — — — — — —

Shoshone Journal. March 12, 1920, Page 1

19200312SJ1

An (Un)important Announcement

The Journal shop is now takin [sic] its turn with “unavoidable circumstances” the same as some of the rest of ’em.

Last week one of the printers heard “the call of the wild” – only in this case it was the call of the mother-in-law, which is the same as far as results go, and forwith [sic] departed. Another man was scheduled to take his place but was prevented from showing up on account of sickness or something else – anyway he has not yet appeared. Early in the week the Chief Cause of the Journal publication flew home with the flu and went to roost. Not dangerous but plenty sick enough to obey orders with no back talk when the doctor told him to go to bed for several days.

Naturally this leaves the Journal force somewhat crippled, whether above or below is left for the reader to decide, but we’ll do our best, angels can do no more, and hope for better working conditions before next issue.
— —

Additional Local News

The meeting of the home nursing class has been postponed. The date of meeting will be announced later.

Joe Riley, Janitor at the County Court House is sick at his home with influenza and Pearl Burns is attending to his duties at the Court House.

Miss Brooks, one of the teachers in the Shoshone public schools, was able to resume her duties Monday morning after an absence of about three weeks caused by illness with the influenza.

Mrs. Frank Clem, returned last Friday from Hot Lake, Oregon, where she had been with her husband, who was quite ill for some time, but is now recovering.
— —

High School Notes

Only nine more weeks of school!!

Miss Brooks is back in school after several weeks absence.

Martha Bernard is back in school after several weeks vacation with the “flu.”

The term examinations are to be held this week. Watch for the list of “Flunkies.”

Some of the “flunkers” are in hopes that the “flunkers class” will be discontinued after Friday’s examinations. We hope so.
— —

Dietrich Precinct Notes

Jens Jorgensen living out in the southwest corner of the tract is suffering with a hard case of the flu.

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Morrow have had a hard struggle fighting the flu that has been attacking their several little children. On Thursday the fourth instant their little baby girl, Mary, passed away a victim of the dread disease.
— —

Card of Thanks

We wish to thank our friends and neighbors for their kindness during the illness and death of our dear baby Elizabeth Anne.

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Morrow
— —

Dietrich School Notes

Quarterly examinations are held this week, Thursday and Friday. Mary Crist was substitute cook Tuesday on account of the illness of Mary Brennen.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 12 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Shoshone Journal. March 12, 1920, Page 5

Local Items
I can not say what the truth may be, I tell the tale as ’twas told to me.

Miss Stella Cook, County Treasurer, is back in her office after being confined to her home for several days with a severe cold.

Dr. H. G. Baugh for the past several [days] has been confined to his bed suffering from a severe attack of sciatica rheumatism. He is slowly improving and hopes soon to be at his office.

C. W, Wernicke is able to be out after being confined to his home for two weeks with an attack of influenza. A part of the time he was severely ill.

Mrs. Stephens of the Colonial Hotel, is able to be out of the house for the first time since she became ill two months ago, and underwent a serious operation. She is now rapidly recovering her health.

L. M. Zug, who served two terms as sheriff in Lincoln County, for the past few weeks has been very ill at his home in Jerome. He has had a severe attack of rheumatism, but last reports were somewhat improved.

The first air plane visited Shoshone Wednesday afternoon and attracted much attention. It flew above the town at a low altitude for a few minutes after which it departed toward Richfield. The plane was recently bought by the Furcht company of Gooding and will be used by them to carry passengers either on business or pleasure. Friday, March 13th, has been designated by Gooding as aviation day and it is understood that quite a celebration is to be held at that place featuring air plane flight.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Recorder. March 12, 1920, Page 1

19200312IR1

May

The May school reopened a week ago Wednesday, with small attendance.

Last Thursday the little two-year-old baby of Mr. and Mrs. James Artie died of the flu. All the other members of the family were quick sick at the time but are able to be up now.

Dr. and Mrs. Gilman are both down with the flu. These seem to be the only new cases in the upper valley.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 12 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. March 12, 1920, Page 5

Idaho State News

Shoshone is to have a new, well equipped hospital.

The mining companies in the Coeur d’Alene district announced last week an increase in wages to all employees of 50 cents per day.

So many arrests have been made at Gooding in the past few days that the jail is crowded to the limit. If malefactions continue, additional bastile quarters will be needed.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. March 12, 1920, Page 6

Fourth Of July

Mrs. Theodore Gautier, Sr., who has been suffering with a cold for some time, is on the mend at this writing.
— —

Boyle Creek News

The eighth grade pupils of the Boyle creek school passed their mid-year examinations with high grades.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. March 12, 1920, Page 7

Salmon Locals

Mell Howe was misquoted about the prospects of oil and gas in the Salmon country and wishes to disavow saying what the reporter attributed to him in that connection. Howe says the Salmon country has plenty of wealth without claiming for it gas and oil.
— —

Spring Creek

Snowed every day this week which is a sure sign of spring, but they say this is fine for the range.

Last Sunday a team of Charles Hull’s horses ran away. No one was hurt except the harness and the bobsled, these were scattered along the road through the lane.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. March 12, 1920, Page 8

Northwest Notes

Every inhabitant of a Paiute Indian village in the Inyo county, Cal., near Dyer, Nev., has been stricken with influenza, according to a report brought to Tonopah by a rural mail carrier. He said there had been more than 100 deaths and none had received medical attention.

The official report of the department of agriculture indicates that the elk in Jackson’s Hole are in no danger of extermination, thanks to the co-operation of residents of that section with the state and government officials.

In a shooting, which took place at the Erickson ranch, six miles west of Glasgow, Mont., Ernest Erickson was killed, presumably by his son, Ben, who is thought to be insane.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. March 12, 1920, Page 10

Leadore And Upper Lemhi

Leadore

Mrs. Bernard Allhands and little daughter Virginia left last Tuesday for Yakima, Wash., where they expect to remain several months. Mrs. Allhands has suffered considerably this winter with bronchitis and it is thought a lower altitude will be very beneficial to her health.

Jack Hain was taken violently sick while driving his engine and was conveyed at once to Dillon. Indications point to pneumonia.

The ice harvest is in full blast this week. The Keating ice house is full and carpenters are busy putting the roof on and otherwise inclosing the building. The crop this season was of the fine quality, thick and clear, most of it being cut from the Bert Wilson lake.

Jim Potter, the sawmill man from Ten-Mile, is in town again for a few days. Jim’s auto still stands marooned in the snow where he got stuck trying to reach here last month for the masquerade. He says it will keep for some time as it is well covered with snow.

Leadore School Notes

Marguerite Saline is back in school again after a two week’s absence. She is taking a course in typewriting alone.

Yes, and here’s Genevieve Smith. Just walked in. All our school will be back soon at this rate. Daisy Yearian is also here.

Ethel Maes has the appendicitis.

A number of us who are not in the domestic science class would like to know where to find Prof. Adams at 3:30 p.m. We know he’s fond of lemon pie and cookies but he won’t confess. And Mrs. Burr, why does she run to the water fountain after eating blackberry pie cooked in the domestic science department. Salty?

(ibid, page 10)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. March 12, 1920, Page 5

19200312CT1

Local And Personal

Mrs. Katherine Hammond, age 23 years, died at her home Wednesday evening at 5 o’clock after a lingering illness. She leaves a husband and ten months old baby. Funeral services will be held Friday morning at ten …

Dr. J. W. Boone’s Ford car, which was stolen Sunday evening from the street in front of the Presbyterian church, was found Monday morning by H. D. Blatchley near the sawmill west of town. The car suffered considerable damage.
— —

College Notes

In an exposition in class the other day on heathen health rules, Prof. Hayman suggested that people stay awake at night to see that they sleep properly and that mustard plasters on the brain be substituted for chiropractic treatment.

Mrs. Vance, who has been seriously ill the past week from nervous prostration is recovering slowly.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 12 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. March 12, 1920, Page 9

Midway News

Mrs. T. R. Lupton of Lone Star whose husband died recently is keeping house for J. H. Pack and sons.
— —

Marble Front

Mrs. Arthur Randolph who has been ill for some time was taken to Mercy hospital in Nampa Thursday and underwent an operation Saturday. She is doing nicely. Mr. Randolph is also a patient at the hospital suffering from inflammatory rheumatism.

L. A. Rucker of Caldwell visited Sunday with his sister, Mrs. H. E. Harshman who is ill.

(ibid, page 9)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. March 12, 1920, Page 10

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Wilder

Smallpox and whooping cough seem to be having their own way around Wilder. No one is seriously ill.

Rev. J. T. Ford of Boise is occupying the pulpit at the Baptist church for a few Sundays while the pastor, Rev. L. G. Black and family are in quarantine with small pox.

The public schools were dismissed Monday and Tuesday this week to give opportunity for oiling the floors.

Claytonia

We yet have some influenza in our neighborhood. Clarence Aden and Helen Garrity are down this week. Bill Jackson is quite sick with pneumonia at his sisters, Mrs. Smith of Homedale and Ed. Molton, near the Gem school, is down with it.

A Mr. Deal family that lately moved to one of Mr. Walter’s places has been quarantined for small pox.

Quite a number of children were attacked by the mumps during school last week, but no bad cases are reported. Roy Hansbrough is also a mump patient.

Ben Lindh was not able to move all of his family to Wilder last week due to three of the little girls having the mumps.

Many farmers have been busy burning weeds and thistles during last week.

Sunny Slope

Miss Alta Rogers has been quite ill for several days with the mumps.

(ibid, page 10)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. March 12, 1920, Page 11

Fairview

Mrs. Anna Spencer is getting some batter from her recent attack of rheumatic fever.

Grandma Nichols has been very sick but is improving slowly.

Mrs. Connell is able to be up again.

(ibid, page 11)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Meridian Times., March 12, 1920, Page 8

19200312MT1

Meridian News Notes

Miss Frances Bryce arrived home last Thursday night from Corvalis, Oregon, where she has been attending college. She visited Portland and Walla Walla while enroute home. Illness of her father and her own recent recovery from the influenza, were reasons for her return from Corvallis sooner than she had planned.

Mrs. Amos Whiteley was in Boise Wednesday. She says little Floyd Adams continues to improve and has a big appetite.

A meeting of the teachers of the county at Boise recently favored a minimum of $100 per month for new contracts next fall.

A box social is being planned for next Wednesday, the 17th, for the Meridian Cemetery association. The program will be interesting and boxes will be auctioned off to the highest bidder, except that children’s boxes will be 50c. The Odd Fellows hall is the place and next Wednesday evening – St. Patrick’s day in the evening – is the time. Everybody come and help a good cause.
— —

Obituary

Virgil Morris Sooter, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Elbert M. Sooter, of Eagle, died March 9, 1920. The funeral service was conducted Thursday March 11, at 2:30 from the Mateer undertaking parlors, Carman E. Mell officiating. Burial took place at the Meridian cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Sooter were formerly of Dietrich, Idaho, having recently come to the Boise valley.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 12 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. March 12, 1920, Page 1

19200312KG1

School Notes

Owning to the crowded condition in the primary room it was found necessary to secure assistance. In order to have an accredited high school it is necessary to have accredited elementary work as a foundation. The crowded condition in the primary room has been relieved by fitting up a room in the basement and putting it in charge of Mrs. Keller, who has been secured for the remainder of the year at a small salary.

The large number of children in the lower grades is due to the fact that many of the younger children were not returned to school last year after the influenza epidemic. This condition will probably not exist next year.
— —

Big Bear Ridge

Miss Neva Nelson is at the Sam Monk home in Deary. Mr. and Mrs. Monk and Miss Betty Randall are recovering from an attack of influenza.

The rain Monday night delayed plowing for some time.
— —

Southwick Items

In a letter to his mother, Elton McCoy states that the flu in Canada is still raging. He and the Grant family have avoided taking it however.

Mrs. Claud King is steadily improving in health, we are glad to say.

Mr. Hewett of Sunnyside, Wash., recently visited us and told us his family and himself included, all had the flu recently.

Mrs. Fred Darby is recovering from a severe attack of the flu. The elder Mrs. Darby is also better.
— —

Dr. Rothwell returned from Spokane last Sunday, where he spent a week or more. He worked very hard here during the recent flu epidemic and needed a rest.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 12 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. March 12, 1920, Page 8

Gleanings

Herman Meyer of Potlatch ridge was taken to Lewiston Thursday afternoon to undergo an operation for pleural pneumonia. Dr. Stoneburner accompanied him to Lewiston and he said he believed it would be necessary to tap the lung. This case of pneumonia followed an attack of influenza, which Mr. Meyer contracted some time ago.

On account of the illness of County Agent Fletcher, the meeting advertised to take place here Thursday afternoon was called off. It was impossible for Mr. Fletcher to be here.

Mrs. M. L. Anderson became quite ill last week but is much better at this time. Rev. Anderson was in Tacoma at the time but returned as soon as he received the telegram telling of his wife’s illness.

Charles Schultz of Potlatch ridge brought a hen’s egg to the Gazette office last Saturday that weighed 4 ounces. It is a double yolk egg and as large as a goose egg.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Undertaker, American Falls, Idaho (1)

UndertakerAmericanFallsFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

March 16

The Caldwell Tribune. March 16, 1920, Page 1

19200316CT1

The Junior Promenade, the first all college dance which has been permitted since the lifting of the influenza quarantine, was given in the University gymnasium on Saturday night, March 6. The gymnasium, which was beautifully decorated in pink, white and green, made a fitting back ground for the young women in their lovely frocks. …

Ted Turner, freshman at the University of Idaho, has been hobbling around on crutches during the past week as a result of blood poisoning in his left foot. This is the second time Ted has been on the “casualty” list, as he but recently recovered from an attack of influenza.

Spring cleaning work on the ditches is well under way now. Superintendents E. M. Brown and John May are in charge of this work.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 16 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. March 16, 1920, Page 3

Local And Personal

H. W. Van Dyke, who was reported ill Monday with influenza, is improving.

Miss Brenton, superintendent of the Caldwell sanitarium, as been sick the past few days but was able Saturday to again be on duty.

E. M. Hendon is unable to attend to his duties at the First National bank on account of illness.

Myrtha Langford, 11 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Langford, of Star, was brought to the sanitarium, Friday morning and operated upon Saturday morning at 9 o’clock. She is doing as well as can be expected. She had the influenza, then pneumonia, has suffered for five weeks, a drain tube had to be inserted into the left lung.

Mrs. Heddenburg of Provo, Utah is staying at the Edd Meek home, while Mrs. Meek is ill.

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Randolph who live north of this city, were taken to Nampa hospital Friday. Both are seriously ill.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the Peckham chapel for William Eames. The Rev. W. J. Boone conducted the services. Mr. Eames, a former resident of Melba, died Friday at Pleasant Ridge of tuberculosis. He was 38 years of age.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. March 16, 1920, Page 5

Wilder Items

Mr. Black, who has been ill, resumed his work as manual training teacher in the schools Monday.

Mrs. E. M. Small received the sad news of the tragic death of her sister and her brother-in-law who lived in California. Mrs. Small left immediately for the coast.

Willie Hines came in contact with a base ball Tuesday necessitating 3 stitches over the right eye.
— —

Canyon News

D. B. Myers has been among the shut-ins, but is now improving.

Farm work is being pushed on all the ranches. Plowing is interfered with by the rain, but repairing of the fences, fertilizing, cleaning out the ditches and other necessary work is being done.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. March 16, 1920, Page 6

Ten Davis News

Mrs. N. Nelson is quite sick.

Sidney McLaughlin has been sick this week and was unable to attend school

Mrs. Etta Stone is driving the school wagon at the Lower end of the district now.
— —

Midway News

Mrs. Ella Marks of Nampa is quite ill at the home of her daughter, Mrs. George R. Marks.

The community social at the school house, Friday evening, proved a success. There was a large crowd and all had a pleasant time. …

(ibid, page 6)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. March 16, 1920, Page 7

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Arena Valley Items

Mr. and Mrs. Z. B. Barker and Burnard were Caldwell visitors last Saturday. Mrs. Barker called at the W. E. Owens home, where Miss Mildred is still bedfast with inflammatory rheumatism.

The literary Friday evening was held at the school house and was well attended. The general program was short but the lecture on the Panama canal was especially fine. John Johnson had with him a splendid photograph of the canal and used blackboard diagrams which made his descriptions of the locks very interesting. …

Roswell

W. H. Kneifle returned Tuesday from Lamoure, N. D., where he was called last week by the death of a brother’s wife. Mr. Kneifle reports a great deal of snow and wind with 28 degrees below zero temperature.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — — — — — — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. March 16, 1920, Page 4

19200316BFH1

Local Pick-ups

Mrs. J. T. Lawless left on Friday for Spokane to attend her daughter, Mrs. Rediger, who is reported to be seriously ill.

Miss Mae Nelson, stenographer for the First State Bank, has resumed her work after having been absent for a week on account of an attack of influenza.

Mrs. Mary Gallas and children returned Sunday from Portland, Oreg., where Mrs. Gallas has been having her little girl treated by a specialist for the past several months.

J. A. Walden has just received a large supply of pretty and novel St. Patrick’s Day shamrocks, one design for ladies and the other for men and one of these souvenirs will be given free to anyone calling at the store.

The thaw and rains of last week raised havoc with the roads in the city and country, particularly on the hill roads. Workmen are now repairing the worst of the damage done. In front of the Gleed residence in the east part of town a large part of the street washed out, the damage being due in part to a broken water main. Great Northern train service has been handicapped for several days on account of washouts in Montana and on Sunday and yesterday train No. 2 was sent over the Northern Pacific line from Sandpoint.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 16 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. March 16, 1920, Page 5

Local Pick-ups

Town Marshal Worley is able to be up and around again after a severe attack of the influenza.

A. Klockmann, president and general manager of the Idaho Continental Mining Company, was a business visitor in town Wednesday and Thursday, leaving Thursday for the mine at Klockmann. He was accompanied here from Spokane by his sister-in-law, Miss Selma Neitzel, who is at the Bonners Ferry hospital recovering from an operation for the removal of her tonsils, performed Saturday by Dr. S. T. Faucett.

John Frisch, one of the oldtimers of the Porthill district, was in town Wednesday on his way from Spokane to Porthill. Mr. Frisch has been taking treatments for asthma, of a specialist in Spokane.
— —

Cow Creek News

J. C. Parker was moved Sunday from the Bonners Ferry hospital to his Cow Creek home and is reported to be considerable improved in health.

Walter Parker has not been hauling logs the past week on account of the bad roads. He expects to resume his hauling in the near future.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. March 16, 1920, Page 8

Round Prairie News

The Traver children are sick with bad colds – probably influenza. The disease is appearing in a mild form in all parts of this vicinity.

The influenza has been an unwelcome guest at the H. C. Ward home this week but so far has not made its appearance at the Danquist home on the adjoining ranch.

Charles Wagner is recovering from an attack of the influenza.

Miss Dysart, of the Addie store, has been on the sick list this week.

The roads are getting soft and bad in places and on the Stoneklift hill it is impossible for a car to run owing to the heavy rains of Friday and Saturday.
— —

Copeland News Note

Eddie Cooper returned from Bonners Ferry last Saturday where he has been under the care of Dr. Fry.

Boyd Stockton is on the sick list this week.

Orlando Kerr is suffering from an attack of rheumatism.

(ibid, page 8)
—————–

Further Reading

Lessons of the 1918 Flu Pandemic and Today’s Homeland Security

By Thomas Beers, MPA, EMT-P, NHDP 3.15.20 Journal of Emergency Medical Services

1918NurseMask-aA nurse wearing a mask as protection against influenza. September 13, 1918. (Photo/National Archives)

Authors Note: This article was originally written in 2018, but never sought publication. In light of the recent events unfolding around COVID-19, this article serves as “food for thought” why pandemic diseases are such a vulnerability and why public safety leaders should be taking any epidemiological threat seriously. While reading, consider the lack of free travel, EMS services and even the concept of emergency rooms in 1918. That is why the current threat climate is, shall I say, “novel” to us as emergency responders. There are lessons to be learned.

Nearly one century ago, beginning in 1918, a disaster which the modern world had not experienced yet began to systematically kill an estimated 50-to-100-million people worldwide over the course of 24 months. Within the United States alone, low end estimates of 670,000 citizens were killed by the virus.1 To put that into modern perspective, this disaster killed the equivalent number of U.S. citizens as over two hundred 9/11 attacks. Today, the two most frightening aspects of this disaster are that the threat is still here and will happen again, and you cannot see it. This threat is pandemic influenza.

While the exact origins of the 1918 to 1920 influenza pandemic are not agreed upon, what is for certain is that this strain of flu, colloquially referred to as The Spanish Flu, is exclusively a human pathogen known to scientists and physicians as the H1N1 viral strain.

The prevailing theory of how this virus was spread globally lies in the parallel history of world events. The first reported cases within the United States, based on records from the time, point toward an origin located in central Kansas at a U.S. Army training facility named Camp Funston. In March 1918. Camp Funston was an initial training center for U.S. Army troops who were deploying to Europe for World War I. After graduation, troops from Camp Funston were sent to their units across the United States before being dispatched to Europe.

Within weeks of the first reported cases of what was considered seasonal influenza at Camp Funston, 24 of the 36 large military bases began reporting outbreaks of influenza. By September of 1918 at Camp Devens, which was situated just outside of Boston, the base hospital was overwhelmed with influenza. In a single day that month, 1,543 soldiers reported being sick with influenza.

What was not known at the time in the United States was that infected soldiers had already deployed and had their boots on the ground in France. Many departed their ships and onto European soil complaining of what the soldiers themselves had termed “the three day fever” and suggested that it was due to the conditions in the merchant marine and military ships in which they were transported. From here, any and all ability to contain the virus was lost.

The numbers of deaths were staggering. No population within the United States was left unscathed. Native American tribes were hit especially hard and some Alaskan Inuit tribes became extinct. During this time period of the H1N1 pandemic, global life expectancy declined by 12 years.

Today, the Department of Homeland Security is tasked with preparing the nation for the next pandemic event. Almost everyone in the scientific community and those tasked with defending the homeland agree that the next pandemic flu or other viral outbreak is not a matter of if, but rather a matter of when. Comparing a snapshot of the nation today to its own image in 1918, experts note that the travel and spread of diseases, whether naturally occurring or weaponized for criminal intent, is much more complex and rapid today than a century ago.

The Spanish Flu spread across the globe via steamship and across the routes of conflict and war. Today, a small outbreak of a disease in nearly any part of the world can easily be transmitted to multiple points of the globe within hours due to air travel.1 Most recently in 2014, the deadly virus Ebola easily escaped the small African nations of Guinea and Sierra Leone despite the presence of the United Nations and other non-governmental organizations attempting to contain the virus. With a 50% mortality rate for those who contract the disease, it is the world’s most deadly virus.

In the 2014 outbreak, there were 36 cases reported outside of the African continent. Eleven of those cases were here in the United States and it was the first time Ebola was seen in North America. A 2018 poll showed that frontline responders, namely EMS and fire, were unprepared for an outbreak of Ebola, and therefore perhaps even a pandemic of any nature to include influenza. The poll, ran during EMS Week of 2018, showed 80% of first responders had done no additional training in pandemic response since the 2014 initial Ebola threat in the United States. Another 20% had no knowledge that Ebola was still a threat.

On a national scale, the Department of Homeland Security has taken dramatic efforts to combat influenza and other pandemic diseases because of the seriousness in which pandemics pose to the homeland based on the lessons of 1918’s Spanish Influenza. The Department of Homeland Security’s response leverages the capacity of the agencies under their command to monitor and prevent further outbreak. This includes, diverting flights inbound to the United States and its territories, additional screening by TSA agents at airports, using the U.S. Coast Guard to monitor vessels from effected nations, initiating FEMA’s response centers, and securing borders with various assets at its disposal. Further, during a pandemic disease outbreak, the DHS combines efforts with the Center for Disease Control and the National Heal Service.

In 2005, then DHS Secretary Michael Chertoff wrote: “A severe pandemic influenza presents a tremendous challenge as it may affect the lives of millions of Americans, cause significant numbers of illnesses and fatalities, and substantially disrupt our economic and social stability. It is imperative for government officials and business leaders to work together now to develop effective pandemic related business continuity plans and to implement successful preparedness and protective strategies.”

While homeland security is filled with many disasters and the lessons learned paid for with lives of the innocent, no other event in our nations or the modern world’s history has had such a dramatic impact as the 1918 Spanish Influenza Pandemic. The H1N1 virus and its variants are here still to this day. The Spanish Flu was never eradicated. Couple that fact with this staggering statistic: the average American is more than five times more likely to die from a human-extinction event than in a car crash, yet we still wear our seatbelts.

source: Journal of Emergency Medical Services
—————-

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports Dec 26, 2021

Winter Storm Warning until Dec 27, 5pm
Special Weather Statement Dec 25, 2021
Note: We have had 48 hours of snow and gusts winds since the last reports.

Please share road reports. Winter travel conditions. Most back country roads are not maintained. This time of year there is deep snow in higher elevations. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: Sunday morning an average of 15″ snow on the ground. Local streets are snow covered, most of the main paths have been or are being plowed. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Construction on ID-55 near Smiths Ferry has been suspended for the winter. Crews have winterized the work zone and removed equipment from the area for the season. All lanes on ID-55 are now open and will stay completely open until construction resumes mid-March 2022.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (Dec 22) mail truck driver reports snow floor all the way.
Big Creek summit SNOTEL shows 58″ snow this morning.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Sunday (Dec 26) 48 hours of snow and gusty winds since last report.
Report Friday (Dec 24) mail truck driver says local plow operator out working today.
Report Wednesday (Dec 22) mail truck driver reports snow floor on the upper end, ice floor and some bare patches on the lower end.
Report Wednesday (Dec 22) “South Fork from Warm Lake to about Goat Creek has a soft packed base topped with 6” of wet snow. Lower end is a thin firm ice/snow floor.”
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Sunday (Dec 26) 48 hours of snow and gusty winds since last report.
Report Friday (Dec 24) local plow operator plowing today.
Report Wednesday (Dec 22) mail truck driver reports a big rock had come down, able to get around it. Snow floor on the upper end and ice floor on the lower end.
Report Wednesday (Dec 22) “East fork has a deeper, softer base, a few rocks. No trees down.”
Note: The South Fork weather station recorded 44mph wind gusts this morning.

Upper Johnson Creek Road: Closed Travel not advised unless well prepared.
Lower Johnson Creek Road: Last report plowed on Monday (Dec 13) may have been plowed again on Friday Dec 24th.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Link: to Big Creek Webcam North (check dates)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open – Likely deep snow up high.
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Deadwood summit SNOTEL shows 90″ this morning.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard

Link: Payette Avalanche Center
——————

Weather Reports Dec 19-25, 2021

Dec 19 Weather:

At 10am it was 31 degrees, overcast – socked in low and moderate snowfall. At 1230pm socked in and moderate snowfall, nearly 1/2″ so far. At 3pm it was 32 degrees, low overcast, light snowfall, 3 1/2″ new so far and 10-11″ on the ground. At 530pm it was 32 degrees and light rain falling (getting slick.) At 11pm it was 32 degrees and likely misting (ridges look foggy on top.) Light rain and snow during the night.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time December 20, 2021 at 10:00AM
Overcast, light snow
Max temperature 32 degrees F
Min temperature 31 degrees F
At observation 32 degrees F
Precipitation 0.46 inch
Snowfall 3.5 inch
Snow depth 10.5 inch (avg.)
— — — — — — — — — —

Dec 20 Weather:

At 10am it was 32 degrees, low overcast sitting down on peaks and ridges and light snow continues to fall. At 1230pm it appears to have stopped snowing, low overcast w/fog belts mid-mountain. At 230pm it was 35 degrees, overcast and slight breeze. Moderate snowfall 330pm-4pm (fat 1/4″) At 5pm it was 31 degrees and overcast. At 11pm cloudy. At 1am it was 30 degrees and cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time December 21, 2021 at 10:00AM
Mostly hazy
Max temperature 35 degrees F
Min temperature 24 degrees F
At observation 25 degrees F
Precipitation 0.03 inch
Snowfall 1/4 inch
Snow depth 10 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Dec 21 Weather:

At 10am it was 25 degrees and mostly hazy (partly clear.) Sunrise 1044am. At 1230pm it was mostly hazy with bits of sunshine and icicles dripping. At 230pm it was 33 degrees and high overcast. At 5pm it was 30 degrees, overcast and feels humid. At 11pm it appeared partly cloudy with bright waning moon. Looked mostly clear at 2am. Trace of snow fell early morning.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time December 22, 2021 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 35 degrees F
Min temperature 20 degrees F
At observation 28 degrees F
Precipitation 0.03 inch
Snowfall 1/4 inch
Snow depth 10 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Dec 22 Weather:

At 10am it was 28 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 12pm it was overcast. Started snowing just before 130pm. At 150pm it was 34 degrees, overcast and a pause in the snowfall. At 340pm it was 34 degrees, overcast and starting light rain/snow mix – didn’t last long. At 5pm it was 34 degrees and overcast. At 930pm it was 36 degrees and light rain. At 1120pm neither rain or snow. At 1am it was 36 degrees and raining lightly. Probably rained on and off the rest of the night.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time December 23, 2021 at 10:00AM
Overcast, light breeze, misty
Max temperature 37 degrees F <– during night
Min temperature 28 degrees F <– previous AM
At observation 33 degrees F
Precipitation 0.19 inch
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 9 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Dec 23 Weather:

At 10am it was 33 degrees, overcast, light breeze and sort of misting. At 1240pm it was socked in low and starting to mix in snow with the rain. More snow in the mix at 240pm. At 3pm it was 33 degrees, socked in low, breezy and rain/snow mix starting to stick (maybe 1/4″ so far.) At 5pm it was 33 degrees, gusty breezes, low overcast and mostly rain falling. At 6pm it was 32 degrees, breezy and snowing. At 8pm it was 32 degrees, moderate snowfall (big balls and small hard flakes, maybe a few rain drops mixed in.) At 11pm breezy, snowing lightly, perhaps half an inch.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time December 24, 2021 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 35 degrees F
Min temperature 21 degrees F
At observation 23 degrees F
Precipitation 0.27 inch
Snowfall 1 1/4 inch
Snow depth 10 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Dec 24 Weather:

At 10am it was 23 degrees and mostly cloudy. Snowing lightly at 1157am and breezy. Stopped snowing by 120pm and breezy, trace so far. At 3pm it was 30 degrees, cracks in the overcast, breezy and occasional flakes of snow. At 5pm it was 28 degrees, overcast, cold light breeze and flaking snow. Appeared to be snowing lightly at 6pm. At 7pm light snow falling, light dusting so far. At 9pm it was still snowing and over 1/2″ so far. At 1130pm moderate snowfall (an inch or more so far), and low foggy clouds. At 2am partly clear (bright moon) and not snowing. Probably did not snow much during the night.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time December 25, 2021 at 10:00AM
Low overcast, light snow
Max temperature 30 degrees F
Min temperature 21 degrees F
At observation 23 degrees F
Precipitation 0.17 inch
Snowfall 3.0 inch
Snow depth 13 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Dec 25 Weather:

At 10am it was 23 degrees, low overcast and snowing lightly. At 12pm occasional flakes of snow, higher overcast and breezy. At 3pm it was 27 degrees, overcast, cold and breezy with occasional flakes of snow. At 5pm it was 26 degrees, low overcast, fine light snow falling and calmer. At 1145pm it was still snowing, about an inch so far. Low clouds and snowing at 2am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time December 26, 2021 at 10:00AM
Overcast, light snowfall, breezy
Max temperature 30 degrees F
Min temperature 20 degrees F
At observation 21 degrees F
Precipitation 0.16 inch
Snowfall 3.0 inch
Snow depth 15 inch
————————–

Special Weather Statement Dec 25, 2021

Special Weather Statement Dec 25, 2021

Yellow Pine Forecast

Monday Night A 20 percent chance of snow before 11pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around -7.

Tuesday Night A 20 percent chance of snow. Partly cloudy, with a low around 2.

Wednesday Night A 30 percent chance of snow, mainly after 11pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 4.

Special Weather Statement

Special Weather Statement
National Weather Service Boise ID
308 PM MST Sat Dec 25 2021

West Central Mountains-Lower Treasure Valley ID-Boise Mountains-
Upper Treasure Valley-Southwest Highlands-Western Magic Valley-
Camas Prairie-Owyhee Mountains-Southern Twin Falls County-
Upper Weiser River-Harney County-Baker County-Malheur County-
Oregon Lower Treasure Valley-
Including the cities of McCall, Cascade, Nampa, Caldwell,
Idaho City, Lowman, Garden Valley, Pine, Boise, Mountain Home,
Grasmere, Riddle, Murphy Hot Springs, Twin Falls, Jerome,
Fairfield, Silver City, Hollister, Rogerson, Council, Cambridge,
Midvale, Buchanan, Burns, Crane, Dunnean, New Princeton, Venator,
Diamond, Baker, Malheur City, Ontario, and Nyssa
308 PM MST Sat Dec 25 2021 /208 PM PST Sat Dec 25 2021/

...VERY COLD WEATHER EXPECTED LATE MONDAY NIGHT THROUGH THURSDAY...

After the snow ends Monday night skies will clear and temperatures
will become extremely cold late Monday night through Thursday.
Low temperatures in the Treasure and Magic Valleys Tuesday
through Thursday mornings will be in the single digits above and
below zero, while in the mountain valleys and basins lows will be
generally 5 below to 15 below zero, locally 20 below. High
temperatures on those days will be generally between 10 and 20
degrees above zero. Fortunately, winds will stay below 10 mph in
most areas, but with temperatures that cold even light winds will
create wind chill and possible frostbite.

Winter Storm Warning until Dec 27, 5pm

Winter Storm Warning until Dec 27, 5pm

Yellow Pine Forecast page

Christmas Day Snow showers likely. Cloudy, with a high near 28. Southwest wind 7 to 10 mph, with gusts as high as 24 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. Total daytime snow accumulation of around an inch possible.

Tonight Snow showers. Steady temperature around 23. Southwest wind 5 to 7 mph becoming calm in the evening. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 3 inches possible.

Sunday Snow showers. High near 24. West southwest wind 5 to 14 mph, with gusts as high as 26 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 3 inches possible.

Sunday Night Snow showers likely. Cloudy, with a low around 11. West southwest wind 5 to 10 mph becoming light and variable after midnight. Winds could gust as high as 21 mph. Chance of precipitation is 70%. New snow accumulation of around an inch possible.

Monday Snow likely. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 21. Calm wind becoming west around 6 mph in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Monday Night Mostly cloudy, with a low around 0.

link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Winter Storm Warning

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
252 AM MST Sat Dec 25 2021

West Central Mountains-Boise Mountains-
252 AM MST Sat Dec 25 2021

...WINTER STORM WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 5 PM MST MONDAY...

* WHAT...Periods of heavy snow continuing. Additional snow
  accumulation through Monday of 6 to 14 inches, except up to 20
  inches over higher mountains. Wind gusts to 25 mph will cause
  areas of blowing and drifting snow and reduced visibility.

* WHERE...West Central Mountains and Boise Mountains zones.

* WHEN...Until 5 PM MST Monday.

* IMPACTS...Travel will be difficult to impossible.

  PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

If you must travel, keep an extra flashlight, food, and water in
your vehicle in case of an emergency.

The latest road conditions can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.

Winter Storm Warning until Dec 25, 5pm

Winter Storm Warning until Dec 25, 5pm

Road Report Dec 22 (before the storm): “South Fork from Warm Lake to about Goat Creek has a soft packed base topped with 6” of wet snow. Lower end is a thin firm ice/snow floor. East fork has a deeper, softer base, a few rocks. No trees down. Chains or studded tires on the high end of South Fork, but not on the lower portion.”

Yellow Pine Forecast

Today Rain and snow showers. Snow level 5000 feet. High near 39. West southwest wind 7 to 11 mph, with gusts as high as 28 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. Total daytime snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Tonight Snow showers. Low around 19. West southwest wind 5 to 14 mph becoming north northwest after midnight. Winds could gust as high as 31 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 3 inches possible.

Friday Snow showers likely, mainly after 11am. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 30. West northwest wind around 5 mph becoming light and variable. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New snow accumulation of around an inch possible.

Friday Night Snow showers. Low around 19. Calm wind becoming west 5 to 7 mph after midnight. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New snow accumulation of 2 to 4 inches possible.

Christmas Day Snow showers. High near 30. South southwest wind 6 to 10 mph, with gusts as high as 28 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 3 inches possible.

Saturday Night Snow showers. Low around 17. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New snow accumulation of 2 to 4 inches possible.

Sunday Snow. High near 24. Chance of precipitation

link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Winter Storm Warning

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
303 AM MST Thu Dec 23 2021

West Central Mountains-
303 AM MST Thu Dec 23 2021

...WINTER STORM WARNING NOW IN EFFECT UNTIL 5 PM MST SATURDAY...

* WHAT...Periods of heavy snow showers expected. Total snow
  accumulations of 10 to 20 inches, but locally 24 to 30 inches
  over higher mountains through Saturday. Winds will be strong
  enough to cause blowing snow and significantly reduce
  visibilities at times.

* WHERE...West Central Mountains zone.

* WHEN...Until 5 PM MST Saturday.

* IMPACTS...Travel will be difficult to impossible.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A Winter Storm Warning for snow means there will be snow covered
roads and limited visibilities. Significant amounts of snow are
forecast that will make travel dangerous. Only travel in an
emergency. If you must travel, keep an extra flashlight, food, and
water in your vehicle in case of an emergency. The latest road
conditions can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.