Idaho History Dec 19, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 85

Idaho Newspaper Clippings March 8-12, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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March 8

The Idaho Republican. March 08, 1920, Page 1

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Remove Patients From Local Asylum
Forty Are Taken to the Home for Feeble-Minded at Nampa

Forty inmates of the Blackfoot asylum have been removed to the state institution for the feeble-minded at Nampa. A number of those moved to the Nampa institution were “railroaded” to the asylum and were never insane.

The transfer was made for the purpose of relieving the crowded condition of the state asylum. So crowded had the asylum become that the violently insane and the mild cases were housed together under the most pitiful circumstances. These conditions existed through no fault of the asylum and state health authorities but because of inadequate housing facilities and because of the increased burden of caring for the railroaded cases, coupled with the fact that no patients are permitted to be cured unless by medical practice, the chiropractors and osteopaths being barred from treating the patients at all.

It was stated, following an official investigation, that the asylum had been “loaded up” with mildly insane or eccentric persons by relatives who did not wish to care for them and passed the burden to the state.

A private car was used for the transfer of the forty patients from Blackfoot to Nampa and the trip was made under the direction of Dr. D’Orr Poynter, superintendent of the Nampa institution.

Dr. Hoover states that he has a 250-egg incubator operating at the asylum under electric heat. He says the current is absolutely steady and has not varied more than a tenth of one degrees in the ten days it has been operating.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 08 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. March 08, 1920, Page 4

Shelley

Mrs. Grover T. Bennett has been teaching in the grade schools for the last two weeks or so during the recent illness of Miss Van Aken. Miss Van Aken is back at her duties again as teacher of the fourth grade.

Holger Christensen has been ill for some time with the flu and complications. It is thought he is getting along as well as could be expected under the circumstances.

We are sorry to state the death of Earl G. Frandsen of pneumonia following a severe case of influenza. Mr. Frandsen lived near Monroe but was well and favorable known in this community and his death was indeed a surprise to the entire vicinity.
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Clinic Has Proved Worth
Organization Established by Boston Firm Well Worthy of Imitation by Other Employers

A pioneer medical clinic, established 15 years ago to protect the health of 600 employees, and gradually enlarged and expanded until it now cares for a total of 2,700 — that is the record proudly held today by a well-known Boston firm. At the time of its organization the medical director was in charge of of the clinic in the capacity of director and visiting nurse. Now the clinic is in charge of a practicing physician and surgeon, assisted by three full-time graduate nurses.

During the influenza epidemic of last winter, over 350 employees were treated per day, with only six deaths during the entire course of the dreaded disease. All cases were given careful individual attention and, in instances where no family doctor was in attendance, immediate arrangements were made for medical care.

It is the policy of the nurses in the clinic to advise all employees with whom they come in contact to be insured, an activity which the firm itself handles through an employees’ organization. The purpose of such advice is to secure insurance for all employees in order that they may receive its benefits after one week’s illness.

This arrangement does not place a premium upon the employees’ being ill, and at the same time the clinic cooperates in the matter of insurance.

A dental clinic is in a formative state and, no doubt, will be established in a short time. The plan and method of administration and organization is simply in the making, but is safe to say that the dental clinic will be as efficient as the medical clinic.

The Modern Hospital, in describing the clinic, says that it has fully proved its value in protecting the health of the employees of this particular company and merits the commendation and imitation of other mercantile and industrial establishments.

(ibid, page 4)
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The Idaho Republican. March 08, 1920, Page 5

Earl Frandsen

Earl Frandsen son of Erastus and Annice McArthur Frandsen, was born at Mt. Pleasant, Utah, October 25, 1884. He moved to Basalt in April, 1903, and married Mabel Porter February 20, 1907. He is survived by his wife and five children, whose ages range from sixteen months to ten years. His father died June 20, 1918, and those of his brothers and sisters living are Aurella Stewart, Victor, Perry, Raymond, Athol, There Nielson, Loomis, Burke, Allen, Buelah, Blenda and Lyle. Three brothers and two sisters have died.

Earl was an honorable man and his word was reliable with all who knew him. He was very sincere in his church work. The many flowers at his funeral bespoke in silence of the esteem in which he was held.

(ibid, page 5)
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Idaho Sanitarium for the Feeble-minded and Epileptic

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Idaho State School and Hospital was built in Nampa in 1910, for the state’s developmentally challenged population. It opened in 1918. The institution was largely self sufficient. It had a large farm which was worked by the residents. The higher functioning residents also cared for residents who couldn’t do anything for themselves. Much has changed in the care of persons with developmental disabilities from the time of the state school’s opening. The old farm has been sold as a golf course, and residents no longer give primary care to other residents. The institution is much more modern and remains in operation, though a few of the old buildings are now used to house juvenile offenders.

source: Wikipedia
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March 9

The Caldwell Tribune. March 09, 1920, Page 1

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College Notes

Sidney McLaughlin of Voohrees hall is ill at him home in Ten Davis.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 09 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Caldwell Tribune. March 09, 1920, Page 5

Local And Personal

William Ballard, who has been ill for some time with influenza, is able to be out again.

Mrs. Richardson is convalescing.

J. E. Proctor, who has been suffering from sepsis infection is out now.

The condition of Benjamin Calvert, who has been ill with typhoid fever, is greatly improved.

Clark Travis, who died late Sunday evening of pneumonia and complications, was buried Friday at 2:00. Rev. H. H. Hayman conducted the funeral services.

Mrs. H. R. Cleaver is recovered from a case of mumps.

According to advices received here by Dr. G. D. Bishop, hog cholera specialist with bureau of animal industry, the department of agriculture is making a cut from $642,045 to $422,045 in the federal appropriation for control of hog cholera, sheep scab and tuberculosis. According to Dr. Bishop, this reduction in the appropriation will mean and abandonment of the work now being conducted in at least 11 states. This situation is regarded as a serious one by livestock men interested in matters pertaining to the control of these diseases.

A little son of Mr. and Mrs. Moore of south Kimball ave. rode home from school on the back part of a wagon Thursday, when he reached home, he jumped off and started towards the house, thinking he could cross the road ahead of a car he saw coming, but it caught him and ran over him, broke his leg, and cut his face badly, it was thought at first when taken to the hospital that he could not live, but last reports are more favorable.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Caldwell Tribune. March 09, 1920, Page 6

Midway News

The Midway P. T. A. met at the school house Friday afternoon, the first meeting since January 9, owing to sickness in the community. There was a good attendance, 37 ladies being present. … A letter was read from Dr. Laubaugh, of the state board of health, and pamphlets distributed to those present. …

(ibid, page 6)
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The Caldwell Tribune. March 09, 1920, Page 7

Ten Davis News

Mrs. Enoch Ashcraft was called to Hyde Park, Utah last week on account of the illness of her mother.

Ruth Miller has gone to her home in Nampa. It will be some time before she will be able to come back and teach again.

Miss Byerly was unable to attend school Tuesday.
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Fruit Cake

Wash and cream 1 pound of butter, add 1 pound of brown sugar and cream thoroughly. Then beat in 12 eggs, adding 1 at a time. Mix and sift 4 cups (1 pound) flour with 1 teaspoon baking powder, 2 teaspoons cinnamon, 1 teaspoon cloves and 1 grated nutmeg. Mix 6 pounds seeded raisins with 3 pounds currants, 2 pounds citron, 2 pounds candied cherries, 2 pounds candied apricots and 2 pounds pineapple. Combine mixtures, beat thoroughly, add 1 cup loganberry juice and turn into well greased and floured pans. Steam 5 or 6 hours then bake in a slow over 1 hour.

(ibid, page 7)
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The Caldwell Tribune. March 09, 1920, Page 8

Claytonia

March came in smiling but soon proved it was subject to winds and rain.

The influenza patients are improving nicely. Harry Reynolds is able to sit up and the sick ones at the Garrity home are all doing nicely.

Velda and Maurine Lindh and Violet Bruno and Maurine Lindh from the Gem school are taking care of the mumps.

(ibid, page 8)
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Bonners Ferry Herald. March 09, 1920, Page 1

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No Liquor On Prescriptions

The national prohibition law has practically no effect in Idaho so far as actual theoretical prohibition of the use of intoxicating liquor is concerned, according to a recent article in the Boise Evening News. This is brought about by the fact that the Idaho law makes it a felony even to possess liquor, so that there is no way in which the thirsty Idaho citizen may take advantage of the few exceptions under the federal law by which one may possess liquor.

Where the state law is stricter than the federal law, the state law takes precedence, says Lewis Williams, the collector of internal revenue, when the question was propounded to him recently.

The possession clause in the Idaho law leaves no chance of any exception by which one may have liquor in his possession, says Attorney General Roy L. Black.

It is possible, by reason of the difference between the state and federal laws, for the operator of a still in Idaho to stand trial on two charges, one in the state courts for having liquor in his possession and the other in the federal courts for operating a still without license.

Not even when one is sick can he get liquor on the prescription of a physician. This question was recently raised by the Sunny Brook Distillery Co., of Chicago, in a letter to Attorney General Black, who made the following reply:

“Under yours of the 13th inst you submit the following question: May druggists or pharmacists in the state of Idaho dispense liquors on physician’s prescriptions provided they comply with the federal requirements?

“Answering same will say that they cannot do so under the Idaho law.

“You will find the Idaho statutes set forth as Chapter 126, new Idaho compiled statutes, 1919 edition, being sections 2604 to 2649. These are lengthy and I have no pamphlet which I can send you, but you can find them in your public library perhaps.”

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 09 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. March 09, 1920, Page 3

Round Prairie News Notes

Mr. and Mrs. Stoneklift and daughter, Ruby, and Gus Anderson have been laid up with influenza for the past week but all are recovering and expect to be out again soon.

The friends of Dee Chapen, of the Round Prairie district, will be sorry to hear of the serious illness of Mrs. Dee Chapen, at Sandpoint, with pneumonia.

Nels Jeydstaup went to Bonners Ferry Monday for a few days rest and treatment for a lame back which, however, he did not consider serious enough to prevent him from attending the dance at Round Prairie hall on Saturday evening.

A. Stoneklift started for Addie Friday with the intention of taking the train for Spokane. At the Settler’s hall his horse became sick. He was able to get the animal back to Tuttle’s barn but has little hope of its recovery.
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Copeland News Notes

Mrs. Erickson, mother of William Bailey, is reported to be seriously ill.

(ibid, page 3)
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Bonners Ferry Herald. March 09, 1920, Page 4

Local Pick-ups

Dr. H. M. Dummitt and family plan to leave in the near future for southern Idaho where they will visit with relatives and where Dr. Dummitt will investigate business openings. He intends to open an office for the practice of dentistry and may decide to go to Nez Perce. Dr. and Mrs. Dummitt will leave as soon as Dr. Severns recovers from an attack of the influenza.

County Superintendent of Schools, Mrs. Caroline W. Flood, is visiting the McRae and McKinley schools today and tomorrow she will visit the Porthill schools.

Owning to the condition of the roads in springtime the school wagon at Porthill will be discontinued and the remaining term for the Van Etten school will be taught by Miss Goodal.

(ibid, page 4)
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Bonners Ferry Herald. March 09, 1920, Page 5

Local Pick-ups

Dr. W. S. Severns has been confined to his bed the past week with an attack of influenza.

Mrs. Minnie Jarvis is quite sick with Spanish influenza, the second attack she has suffered this winter.Mrs. W. M. Meader was on the sick list last week with influenza but is now able to be up and around again.

Frank B. White, one of the proprietors of the store of White & White, has been ill since Saturday with an attack of Spanish influenza.

City Marshall [sic]  J. A. Worley is one of the latest victims of the Spanish influenza. Mrs. Worley and son are just recovering from an attack of the same illness.

Frank Inoue, proprietor of the International hotel, is on the sick list with influenza. This is the second attack within the last few weeks and Mr. Inoue has been seriously ill for several days.

County Commissioner G. S. Collins, and wife, returned on Thursday from a several months visit with friends and relatives in middle west states. Mrs. Collins has been seriously ill and was forced to submit to operations. She is still weak but her health is improving rapidly.

(ibid, page 5)
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Bonners Ferry Herald. March 09, 1920, Page 8

Mrs. Harry Nugent Dead

Word was received here Sunday of the death of Mrs. Harry Nugent last Saturday at her home at Inchelium, Wash., after illness with Spanish influenza. The deceased is a daughter of Mrs. I. J. Brant and a niece of Mrs. A. E. Bunting.

Mrs. Nugent was well known here and many sorrowing friends join with the bereaved relatives in mourning her untimely death.
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Olaf Dahlen Goes To Norway

Olaf Dahlen left Wednesday for his old him at Urskog, Norway, where he will live with relatives.

Dahlen has lived here for several years and for some time past has been a cripple. Neighbors made up a purse of about $30 and gave him a number of presents to help make his trip back to the old country a happy one. Mr. Dahlen desires to thank all these friends through the columns of the Herald and to express to them his appreciation of the many kindnesses extended.

(ibid, page 8)
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Challis Public School, Challis, Custer County. Idaho

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Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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March 10

The Challis Messenger., March 10, 1920, Page 1

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More Flu In Pahsamaroi

Word reached this city the latter part of last week to the effect that another epidemic of flu had appeared in Pahsamaroi valley, there being at this time 14 cases in all. It is also reported that Dr. Gilman, the only physician in the valley has been taken ill with the disease.

To date no serious cases have been reported and it is hoped that the spread of the disease is checked.

The quarantine guard at the Watt Bridge has been put on duty again.

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 10 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Challis Messenger., March 10, 1920, Page 5

Items About People You Know

Income Tax Man — The representative of the internal revenue department, who was to have been here in the interests of the income tax drive from the 23rd to the 26th of this month, advises us that his visit has been postponed to around the 11th of this month on account of the flu quarantine.

Down from Bayhorse — Messrs. Patrick and Merritt were down from Bayhorse last week, the first time since the flu epidemic. They reported everything as running along smoothly there now.

Decorate Pastime — During the quarantine Messrs. Wilcox & Kirk, proprietors of the Pastime Pool Hall, have had the interior of their place painted and other improvements made.

Broken Leg — Wn. McGinn, a miner in the employ of the Ramshorn Mining Company at Bayhorse, suffered a broken leg when a portion of the tunnel in which he was at work, caved in. He was brought to this city last Friday night and the fracture was reduced by Dr. Kirtley. The patient is getting along nicely now.
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(ibid, page 5)
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The Challis Messenger., March 10, 1920, Page 7

Idaho And Idahoans

The public schools of Lewiston have been reopened after having been closed for two weeks because of the influenza.

Pocatello will have a free tuberculosis clinic and a clinic for crippled children for several weeks at the end of the Red Cross and anti-tuberculosis census, which was begun Feb. 16.

Squire Hepworth, aged 83, residing with his son near Elba, arose from his bed at night and wandered into the mountains south of town. He was found thirty-six hours later almost frozen to death. He was clad only in his night garments.
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Many Westerners Lose Lives
Report of Loss to Idaho, Utah and Wyoming Forces in France.

Washington. — Three hundred and two Utah men laid down their lives for their country during the war against Germany, seven being officers and 295 enlisted men. In addition seventeen officers and 680 men from Utah were wounded, and seven taken prisoner by the enemy, making Utah’s total casualty list 1006.

Idaho’s total casualties numbered 1361, of which number 409 lost their lives, and 933 were wounded.

Wyoming casualties numbered 676, of whom 233 gave up their lives and 440 were wounded, three being taken prisoners and later repatriated.

(ibid, page 7)
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L D S Hospital, Idaho Falls, Idaho

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Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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March 11

The Filer Record., March 11, 1920, Page 1

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Mourn Death Of Editor’s Child

Katherine, the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Barry, of Buhl died Sunday February 29, when but four days old. Mr. Barry is editor of the Buhl Herald.

The baby became ill on Wednesday evening from which illness she never recovered. The little body was laid to rest in the Buhl cemetery on Sunday evening at four o’clock following a brief funeral ceremony at the grave, which was conducted by the Reverend M. M. Van Patten.

source: The Filer Record. (Filer, Idaho), 11 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Filer Record., March 11, 1920, Page 5

In The Gem State

Doctors declare that Bernard Sandgren of Buhl, who has slept practically all the time since January 20, has a pronounced case of sleeping sickness. The boy shows signs of consciousness early in the morning, but soon lapses into a stupor.

Plans are being formulated for the construction of a $300,000 L. D. S. Hospital at Idaho Falls.

Acting upon the recommendation of the Idaho nurses’ examining committee, the state department of law enforcement has reduced the age requirement for probationary nurses to 18 years.

Pocatello jails are classed as dirty, unsanitary and relics of bygone days by the investigating committee of the Red Cross survey. The county jail is said to be slightly better than the city jail.

(ibid, page 5)
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Idaho County Free Press. March 11, 1920, Page 1

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John Romain Dies At Keuterville

John Romain, aged about 40 years, and a long-time resident of the Keuterville section, died Sunday evening in his home at Keuterville, as a result of influenza. Mr. Romain had practically recovered from the disease, when he suffered a relapse.

Mr. Romain is the fourth member of the family to die from influenza in the last month. His father-in-law and mother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Winkley, and his son, Arthur, died of the disease in February.

Mr. Romain is survived by two daughters, Laura and Beatrice; by two brothers, Dominic Romain, of Keuterville, and Fred Romain, of Montana; by a sister, Miss Annie Romain, in Montana, and is father, Frank Romain, also of Montana. His wife died ten years ago.

Funeral services were held Tuesday morning, from the Catholic church in Keuterville. Burial was at Keuterville. A. J. Maugg, Grangeville funeral director, was called to Keuterville owning to the death of Mr. Romain.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 11 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. March 11, 1920, Page 2

Whitebird

(Special Correspondence)

Miss Dorothy Chamberlin is suffering a relapse from influenza.

The up-river road was closed near the Doumeecq ranch last Sunday, for an indefinite period. A large blast carried the entire bluff away, completely blocking the road. The mail will be carried over the high trail by mean of pack horses.

(ibid, page 2)
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Idaho County Free Press. March 11, 1920, Page 4

She States It Mildly

While suffering with a severe attack of the grip and threatened with pneumonia, Mrs. Annie H. Cooley of Middlefield, Conn., began using Chamberlain’s Cough Remedy and was very much benefited by its use. The pains in the chest soon disappeared, the cough became loose, expectoration easy and in a short time she was as well as ever. Mrs. Cooley says she cannot speak too highly in praise of this remedy.

(Adv.)

(ibid, page 4)
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Idaho County Free Press. March 11, 1920, Page 6

Local News In Brief

Old Resident Leaves — “Uncle” Joe Greenfield left last Thursday for an indefinite stay with relatives at Kennett, Mo., his home of many years ago. Thirty-five years ago Joe first arrived at Cottonwood, having made the journey from Dayton, Wn., then the nearest railway point for this section of the country. Since first coming to Idaho county in the early 80’s Joe has watched the country develop and has seen numerous changes. At all times during his long residence here, Joe has been identified with those who have stood for progress and betterment in the community. Very naturally, his friends regret to have him leave. About three months ago, while attending his duties at the Imperial hotel, he had the misfortune to be severely injured by falling down the stairs. This accident, together with failing eyesight, made a change desirable. However, during the late influenza epidemic Joe proved himself equal to the emergency successfully by nursing a family of four persons through two weeks’ illness. Friends of Mr. Greenfield hope the change of climate and surroundings may prove beneficial, and that he may again decide to sojourn in our community. — Contributed.

Will the person who took Wikoff’s wagon tongue from the rock quarry please return the tongue at once?
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Personal

W. J. Soltman and small son were in Lewiston the first of the week, to consult with a specialist regarding an ailment of the boy’s ear.

Lem Neal and family have returned from Lewiston, where they spent a month while their small daughter received treatment for an ailment of the ear.

Mrs. S. P. Gray of Puyallup, Wn., arrived in the city Saturday evening to visit her sister, Dr. E. Bingham-Davis, who is convalescing from a serious illness of five weeks.

(ibid, page 6)
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The Nezperce Herald., March 11, 1920, Page 1

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… Stories Briefly Told
… of Interest Gleaned From … Daily Life of Home … Folks in Town and County.

Mr. and Mrs. Vern Swartz are … the flu. [edge of page cut off]

Mrs. and Mrs. Frank Arment returned last Friday from California, where they spent the winter. Mr. Arment is just recovering from an attack of the flu, and made the remark that that pesky ailment seems to be no respecter of places or people.
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Morrowtown News

There are still a few scattered cases of the flu around Morrow and Westlake.

Mrs. M. E. Jobe is at Orofino attending her daughter, Mrs. Sam Snyder, who is ill.
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Central Ridge News

(Covering the past two weeks)

All the flu patients will soon be out again.

The Liberty school opened Monday, after three weeks’ vacation on account of the flu. The Steele school was closed one week.

Ira Coon was called to his home in Clarkston on account of the illness of his son, Merrian. Mr. Coon was helping to care for his sister, Mrs. Ben Powell, and family, who were ill of the flu.

John Parsons returned to his farm from Orofino last Saturday. Mrs. Parson is still with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Willoughby, at Orofino, not having sufficiently recovered from a recent illness to return.

Mrs. Aaron Tetzlaff, of Kamiah, was called to the Ridge on account of the serious illness of her mother and brother.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 11 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Nezperce Herald., March 11, 1920, Page 5

Don’t Be Scared of Grip

“The surest way to precipitate an evil is to become obsessed in the anticipation of it,” says the Medical Press and Circular (London), in deprecating the too oft-repeated warnings against influenza. Which means that there is not likely to be a recurrence of last year’s epidemic unless people get scared into it.

(ibid, page 5)
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Chamberlain’s Cough Remedy

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Chamberlain’s Cough Remedy Advertisement (The Hamilton Spectator January 10, 1905

source: Research Gate uploaded by D. Ann Herring. Content may be subject to copyright.
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March 12

The Oakley Herald. March 12, 1920, Page 1

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Vipont News

By The Kitten

We are glad to report the return to Vipont of our wandering Tom Henry. Tom left here last fall, afflicted with cold feet and overgrown bank account. He wintered in Salt Lake, on Easy street. But he says the browsing now looks good up here.
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Boulder News

Cluff Little and his two children are just recovering from flu.
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Churchill News

It seems that the gray hairs accumulated by worry regarding shortage of irrigation water this year are all in vain. Authentic reports claim a heavy snowfall on the headwaters of our streams. Such worry will be eliminated to a great extent after we get those Artesian Wells.
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In The Gem State

More than 800 delegates attended the recent Shriners’ convention at Burley.

Harry Smith, senior at the Pocatello high school, won first prize awarded by the local army recruiting for the best essay written to stimulate army recruiting.

Nearly $1500 worth of morphine and other “hop” was taken into custody as the result of a raid staged at Pocatello by officials, the “dope” being found in a woman’s room at a hotel.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 12 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. March 12, 1920, Page 3

Locals

Mayor George A. Day is up and about this week, the first time for almost a month. He left for Boise on business Tuesday.

There will be preaching at the Union church next Sunday, morning and evening.

(ibid, page 3)
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The Oakley Herald. March 12, 1920, Page 6

Local Mention

Albert Watts returned to work at the mine this week. He has been down for some time on account of illness.

Arther Green, having recently been discharged from the army, returned home Monday. He had been stationed in Siberia.

The village hitching lot is rapidly materializing this week.

(ibid, page 6)
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The Rathdrum Tribune., March 12, 1920, Page 1

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From Over The County

Post Falls

Misses Corinne Wright and Hazel Lansing of Hauser Lake returned to Rathdrum to resume their studies in the high school.

Harrison

Ice in the small lakes made it so difficult to move logs that the Export Lumber company had to shut down its mill a few days.

Spirit Lake

Marshal Brown was instructed to collect the dog license which was fixed at $2 and $5.

Coeur d’Alene

The school board has raised Sup’t. Buck’s salary to $3600 for next year. A ten months term is to be held next year and the salaries paid in 12 equal installments.

James C. Evenden, commander of the local post of the American Legion, has been instructed that the French testimonial pamphlets have been received for distribution to all American soldiers who served with the American forces in France. Its purpose is stated as follows: “To state in a few words what your presence has meant to the French people, to express to you their gratitude, and to recount briefly the part you played in winning the war.”
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Teacher Problem
Acute Situation Reported By School Heads

Boise, Idaho. — America will suffer a shortage of school teachers in 1920-1921 even more serious than that now being experienced, predicted Dr. E. A. Bryan, state commissioner of education, on Monday as he summed up for Idaho instructors developments at the recent National Education association in convention in Cleveland.

“Not only did school superintendents generally report a very acute shortage of teachers this year,” the commissioner said, “but the presented figures showing that the crop of new teachers in the normal schools is far below the average and that the number of high school graduates intending to enter the teaching profession is far less than usual.

“The shortage of teachers is closely bound up with the problem of teachers’ salaries,” the commissioner added.

Maintenance of high teaching standards in American school vied with Americanization projects for first place in importance at recent educational conferences in Cleveland, according to Ethel E. Redfield, state superintendent of public instruction.

The state superintendent found the same sentiment everywhere to which Commissioner Bryan referred. States that have maintained teaching standards in the face of a shortage of teachers were highly commended, she said, while the states that had let down the bars to inferior teachers were unpleasantly criticized.

Americanization was an important subject, said Miss Redfield. Steps were taken at Cleveland to co-ordinate the work of the various states in the Americanization of foreigners to the end that no class or classes should be overlooked. It was generally admitted that this type of education deserves a place of high consideration in the educational world.
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Idaho State News Items

The public school teachers of Sandpoint have joined in a petition to the school board asking for a bonus of $200 each for the present school year. To grant the bonus would cost the district $8000 in excess of the budget fixed last September.

Returned service men are exempted from payment of the road poll tax, according to Roy L. Black, Idaho attorney general.
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World News In Brief

A “smokeless American by 1925” is the slogan and aim of the International Cigarette league organized in Chicago.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 12 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., March 12, 1920, Page 3

Personal Mention

E. W. Cady served as quarantine officer Sunday, Marshal G. W. Flemming taking the day off.

Mrs. Frank Vogl of the Rimrock district has been in town this week taking treatment for blood poisoning in the hand.
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Local Paragraphs

Several homes in Rathdrum are reported still on the influenza quarantine list.

Typical March weather this week, with rain, snow, wind and sunshine. The frost is coming out of the ground rapidly and roads are muddy.

(ibid, page 3)
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Clearwater Republican. March 12, 1920, Page 5

19200312CR1

What Your Friends And Neighbors Are Doing

R. H. Prettyman and wife of Kamiah came to Orofino a week ago, the former accepting a position with the Orofino Meat and Cold Storage Co. during the convalescence of Austin Luttropp, who has been slowly recovering from pneumonia following influenza.

Dr. Horswill left Wednesday morning for “somewhere” down the Clearwater. He didn’t say where, but suffice it to say that he had a full kit and was prepared for any emergency his profession might encounter.

Robert H. Weston went to Moscow on Saturday’s morning train, to receive further medical treatment at the Gritman Hospital.

The Ladies Aid will meet next Wednesday afternoon at two o’clock in the Methodist church. All are invited. Mrs. Lindgren and Mrs. Groves will serve.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 12 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater Republican. March 12, 1920, Page 7

Idaho News Paragraphs
Recent Happenings in This State Given in Brief Items for Busy Readers

To State Health Survey

Lewiston — Miss Minnie Huermann of Battle Creek, Neb., newly appointed public health nurse for Nez Perce county, began a health survey of the city schools Monday.

Latah Population Less

Moscow — Further evidence that Latah county has lost population has been received from Boise in the form of notice that the county loses one-third of its representation in the lower house of the state legislature because of the falling off of the vote in the last election.

[Note: the last election referred to was Nov 1918 during the height of the epidemic.]

(ibid, page 7)
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Cottonwood Chronicle. March 12, 1920, Page 1

19200312CC1

19200312CC2
Death Takes John Romain
Fourth Member Of Immediate Family To Pass Away

John Romain, who was known to practically every man, woman and child in Cottonwood passed away in his home at Keuterville Sunday evening at 5:15 p.m., being the fourth member of his immediate family to have answered the call within the last three weeks.

John, as he was better known to his many friends, contracted a severe case of influenza some three weeks ago and during the time he was bedfast witnessed the death of his father-in-law and mother-in-law, Mrs. and Mrs. Frank F. Winkler, who were raising his children, and his thirteen year old son, Arthur. Mr. Romain had been up and around for about a week when he was again taken down, the last sickness causing his death Sunday evening.

John Romain had been employed by the Hoene Hardware for the past seven years, as their head mechanic, and when it came to machinery he stood second to none.

The deceased is survived by two daughters, Laura age 12, Beatrice, age 14, two brothers, Dominic Romain of Keuterville and Fred Romain of Marias, Mont., a sister, Miss Anna Romain, of Maris, Mont. and an aged father, Frank Romain. He was born at Livelygrove, Ill., in 1878, where his mother died when he was a young boy. His wife died at Keuterville some 12 years ago at the time his youngest daughter was born.

Mr. Romain was a member of the Cottonwood Council No. 1389 Knights of Columbus.

The funeral services were conducted from the Catholic church at Keuterville Tuesday morning in charge of Rev. Fr. Martin, and was attended by a large number of friends and clearly shows the esteem in which he was held by his fellowmen. The remains were laid to rest in the Keuterville cemetery.

The two young daughters of Mr. Romain, Laura and Beatrice, have the heartfelt sympathy of the entire community, in the loss of their father, which now leaves them to grow up alone in the world without the care and sympathy that only a father and mother can give.
— —

School Notes

(By Wm. A. Lustie)

Mr. Hannon, principal of the High School, has been on the sick list for the past few days.

Basket Ball

The Grade girls defeated the High School girls in a score of 8 to 4.
— —

“Of the 110,000,000 citizens of this country 45,000,000 are physically imperfect, 15,000,000 die annually; 3,000,000 are in bed all the time; 1,000,000 have tuberculosis; 2,500,000 contract venereal diseases each year; from 2,000,000 to 3,000,000 are cases of hookworm and malaria. Only 37,500,000 are fairly healthy and 19,500,000 in full vigor.” Dr. W. S. Rankin president of the American Public Health Association.

“There are more persons in the insane asylums in this country than in all the colleges and universities and it costs more to maintain them (the asylums.)” – Dr. Rankin.
— —

Dr. Orr returned Saturday evening from Spokane where he consulted Dr. Hopkins a noted eye, nose and ear specialist.
— —

Want Cavalry Horses

The war department has just telegraphed the adjutant general of Idaho authority to purchase horses locally through Idaho for the regiment of cavalry now being organized in this state. Colonel Patch is now getting in touch with horse dealers and owners to secure desirable mounts of the cavalry type.
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News Around The State
Items of Interest From Various Sections Reproduced for Benefit of Our Readers

Idaho has 23,000,000 acres of forested land and 130,000,000,000 feet of merchantable timber says W. D. Humiston, secretary treasurer of the North Idaho Forestry association.

William H. Emery, constable of Priest River precinct and prominent citizen of that village where he has a soft drink establishment and barber shop, was arrested Saturday on the charge of bootlegging.

Minors under 18 who smoke or use cigarettes, cigars or tobacco in any form upon public highways or other public properties may be declared “delinquent” and committed to a reformator, according to a ruling made by Attorney General Black.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 12 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Cottonwood Chronicle. March 12, 1920, Page 7

19200312CC3Death Took Old and Young

During the war the London Times, either wittingly or unwittingly, published innumerable items about the very old men and women in the British empire who were dying off. Their great age, their longevity, formed a melancholy contrast to the slaughter of youth then going on in Europe. During six months in 1918, 312 persons over 100 hundred years old died in the British isles, but the figures of young men who fell during that time before the guns of the enemy and who died with influenza mounted towards a million. Not one of the old, be it said in passing, died from “flu.”

(ibid, page 7)
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Cottonwood Chronicle. March 12, 1920, Page 8

Cottonwood And Vicinity
Personal Mention and Local Happening of the Week in This Vicinity

Miss Regina Holthaus, who has spent some time in a hospital at Spokane returned home Saturday evening.

R. A. Nims accompanied by his son, Raymond, departed for Lewiston Monday morning where they will spend some time for the benefit of their health. R. A. has not been in the best of health for some time and his son, who is just recovering from influenza is not doing as well as might be expected. Climatic conditions is hoped will restore them back to normal health. They expect to be gone about two weeks.

William Rooke was in Cottonwood Sunday for the first time since his recent severe attack with the flu in Lewiston. Mr. Rooke stated that he felt fairly well but that the disease left him weak. He departed Sunday evening for Grangeville on business and from there will return to Lewiston to take the boat for his stock ranch on Snake river.

Mrs. and Mrs. T. C. Keith departed Monday morning for Yakima, Wash., where they will spend several days visiting with relatives and also in the hopes that the change of climate will greatly improve Mr. Keith’s health. Mr. Keith whose life hung on a balance for almost a week with influenza, while recovering from the disease is left in a most weakened condition, and it is hoped by his friends that the trip will bring back to him health and vigor of former days.

(ibid, page 8)
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Further Reading

Wear a Mask and Save Your Life: The 1918 Flu Pandemic

April 15, 2020 By Jessie Kratz, Posted In – World War I

This post, by Megan Huang in the National Archives History Office, was originally published in 2018 marking the centenary of the 1918 influenza. It has been updated with additional images.

1918StreetCleaner-aMasks as protection against influenza. Street cleaner wearing the influenza mask, 10/16/1918. (National Archives Identifier 45499357)

The 1918 influenza pandemic was a pandemic in the truest sense possible, affecting not just major population centers but also the most remote communities in the Pacific Islands and among Inuits in the far north.

About 500 million people may have been infected at some point, with 675,000 deaths in the United States alone. Globally, more people were killed by the influenza than by World War I, a concurrent, global conflict that lasted twice as long as the pandemic.

The war, however, contributed to the disease’s rapid spread. Crowded wartime conditions and troop movements across the Atlantic and throughout the war zones carried the flu worldwide.

1918HospitalFrance-aInfluenza hospital ward in France, 12/28/1918. (National Archives Identifier 86697895)

The initial appearance of the disease in the United States was in the spring of 1918, but its effects were mostly benign and not much more severe than the seasonal norm.

It was not until autumn that the sickness made its most fatal strike — most of the estimated 20 to 100 million total deaths took place in a span of just several weeks in October and November.

Although medicine had made great strides since the end of the 19th century with the discovery of germ theory, doctors and scientists seemed to have been powerless against the flu, owing to the rapidly mutating nature of its virus. Responses instead focused on containing its spread. One of the most commonly promoted pieces of advice was to wear a mask.

1918RedCrossBostonMasksRed Cross workers of Boston, Massachusetts, removing bundles of masks for American Soldiers from table where other women made them, 1918. (National Archives Identifier 45499363)

The scale of the disease created mass panic. Churches and schools were closed, while local businesses and services that remained opened struggled with staff shortages. Too frightened to go out in public, people isolated themselves in their homes, leaving the streets nearly empty.

A medical student in normally bustling Philadelphia recalled, after driving 12 miles without passing a single other car, that “the life of the city had almost stopped.”

Yet the severe isolation was lamented by a strained medical community. The head of Philadelphia’s Emergency Aid turned bitter when desperate pleas for more volunteers went unanswered: “There are families in which the children are actually starving because there is no one to give them food. The death rate is so high and they still hold back.”

Among the people who stayed home were shipbuilders who were essential to the war effort. At L.H. Shattuck Co. in New Hampshire, only 54 percent of its workers showed up, and 41 percent at Connecticut’s Groton Iron Works.

Men on the front and would-be soldiers were also affected. One of the most alarming aspects of the 1918 flu was its penchant for targeting previously healthy young adults. Past flu outbreaks had killed more of the elderly and very young, but the 1918 strain targeted those who were in the prime of their life, who might have been on the battlefield if not for the illness.

The third wave began in early 1919 and ran through spring, which wasn’t as devastating as the fall but still caused significant illness and death. The outbreak finally ended in the summer of 1919. Scientists now know it was caused by an H1N1 virus, which continued as a seasonal virus for the next 38 years.

source: A blog of the U.S. National Archives
——————

Fun History:

Cheyenne Bans “Shimmy”

Cheyenne, Wyo. — There will be no more shimmy dancing in Cheyenne if the city administration has power to stop it, according to a statement by Mayor E. P. Taylor. “There is no intention to interfere with decent dancing,” said the mayor, “but we are not going to stand for anything else. If you want to see two insane-looking people, just watch a couple standing still on a dance floor and squirming, as they stare each other in the face.”

Clearwater Republican. March 12, 1920, Page 3
— —

Shimmy Dancing is Prohibited – 1920

A scandalous roaring 20s 2-Step. Small steps, close embrace, lots of body wiggle.


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Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)