Idaho History Dec 26, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 86

Idaho Newspaper Clippings March 12-16, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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March 12

Montpelier Examiner. March 12, 1920, Page 1

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19200312ME2Native of Bear Lake Dies At Afton, Wyo.

The Star Valley Independent of last Saturday chronicles the death in Afton a week ago Sunday of Leona Rich Gardner, wife of Bishop Franklin Gardener of that city. Mrs. Gardener had been ill for three weeks, the original cause being an attack of influenza.

An extremely sad feature of the death of Mrs. Gardner is that she leaves three small children besides her husband to mourn her loss. The oldest of the children is less than three years.

Leona Angelia Rich was born in St. Charles, Idaho, on February 17, 1891, being just a little more than 29 years of age at the time of her death. Four years ago she was united in marriage to Franklin R. Gardner of this city, to which union were born three children.

Mrs. Gardner was a graduate of the Fielding Academy of Paris, and after graduating from that school came to Star Valley and taught in both the grade and district school of Star Valley. She was always active in church work, and for a time was president of the Mutual.

Aside from a heart broken husband and three children, Mrs. Gardner leaves a father, mother, six sisters and three bothers to mourn her loss.
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Many School Truants Have Been Reported

Truant Officer E. J. Phelps asked The Examiner to call the attention of parents to the urgent need of sending written excuses in every instance where their children are kept out of school. There is a law requiring this. Many complaints have been received by Mr. Phelps from the teachers of the various schools of numerous cases of absence, and in a number of cases investigated by the officer, these boys have been found loitering about the city, and when approached regarding their absence from school would offer some kind of flimsy excuse. Mr. Phelps has inaugurated a campaign that will do much to reduce truancy or unwarranted absence of young boys.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 12 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. March 12, 1920, Page 4

[Editorial]

Some of the business men of the city are wondering if the people generally realize that all the dangers attendant upon the last epidemic of flu are now passed into oblivion. Some of the professional men in particular complain of slackness in business, which they believe is due to the fact that people in outlying districts are still fearful of the flu. We believe that the flu has completely vanished from this section of the state and that business can go on unhampered.
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Paris Notes

Funeral services for Mrs. Anna Nate Passey were held here in the Second ward chapel last Saturday afternoon. Speakers were Robert Shepherd, President Wm. L Rich, L. Tracy Shepherd and other friends of the deceased. All the speakers extolled highly the live of Mrs. Passey, of her faith, her many good works, her qualities as a wife and mother. Music was furnished by the ward choir. …

(ibid, page 4)
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Montpelier Examiner. March 12, 1920, Page 9

St. Charles Notes

We are very pleased to learn that Mr. Johnnie Pugmire who has been ill for the past month is now on the road to recovery.

Mrs. Thomas Michaelson’s little daughter is reported to be much improved also.

Brother Blade is very sick. He has been laying very low the past two months and is seriously sick at the present.

(ibid, page 9)
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American Falls Press. March 12, 1920, Page 2

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Correspondence
News of Interest From Nearby Towns and Settlements

Rockland

Little Logan Ewing, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert I. Ewing, has been very ill with pneumonia but is now on the road to recovery.

Roy and Vicinity

Mrs. Berl Byerley was called to Seattle last week by the serious illness and death of her sister, Miss Eva Shields, who died from the effects of influenza. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. S. Shields of Milton and visited with her sister, Mrs. Byerley last summer and made a number of friends during her stay here. The heartfelt sympathy of the community is extended to Mrs. Byerley in her bereavement.

Mrs. J. D. Lower and Miss Claire Lower came in from the Falls Saturday. Mrs. Lower has been taking medical treatments at American Falls.

Prosperity

Mrs. W. Wetzel was ill last week, but is recovering.

Jack Walters, who has been seriously ill with pneumonia, is slowly recovering.

Many of the Prosperity farmers are out of straw and are buying hay for their stock.

Arbon Central School Notes

There was no school Tuesday due to the stove smoking.

Arbon and Vicinity

Eynon Davis returned home last week from near Jerome where he was called by the illness of his father.

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Houck, has been quick sick the past week.

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Perry Howell is very ill at their home here.

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Perry Howell is quite ill with pneumonia.

The dance was well attended at Central hall Friday evening especially by a crowd of drunken men and young men, some of them from Pauline. The boys were merely boys who have been attending school There is a strong suspicion where the liquor was obtained.

Some of the telephone lines have been down during the recent storm and are being repaired.
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source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 12 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. March 12, 1920, Page 5

Local Briefs

Miss Goldie Drake has been confined to her home this week with a severe attack of bronchitis.

Mary G. Fisher, the school mistress at Bonanza Bar, has been visiting in American Falls this week.

Phillip and Philo Stilson stopped last week-end in American Falls to visit with Mr. and Mrs. Jack Stuart and family, and many other old friends from eastern Washington. They were on their way home following a trip to eastern Washington to attend the funeral of their sister and mother, both of whom died suddenly.

(ibid, page 5)
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American Falls Press. March 12, 1920, Page 8

Hospital Notes

Ora Kramer who has been ill with influenza and pneumonia returned to Rockland today.

Mrs. Frank J. Winzel of Aberdeen, who was operated upon about ten days ago returned home today.

Mrs. N. W. Chapman of Raft River was operated upon yesterday and is getting along nicely.

Miss Annie Schroeder of Aberdeen is a patient at the hospital, suffering from an ear affection.
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Eight Arrests Made For Violation Of Speed Laws

Eight auto drivers were arrested Sunday for exceeding the speed limit of 15 miles an hour within the city limits. These arrested were C. Lee French, W. H. Philbrick, W. L. Newton, H. F. Fitzpatrick, U. R. Smith, W. H. Griswold, Calvert Sallee and George Bowman. All paid the fine of $5 and costs.

The sudden decent of the speed “cop” on the main thoroughfare of the city caught the drivers totally unawares. It was the first recent effort of the city council to curb the recklessness of auto drivers who dash through town at forbidden speeds. Joe Watts held the watch on the drivers and in a few hours had made arrests that will pay for several yards of graveling during the spring months.

(ibid, page 8)
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The Idaho Republican. March 12, 1920, Page 3

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Idaho State News

Joe Auola, a sheepman, was fined $110 and costs in Mountain Home for exposing range to sheep scab.
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Shelley

Last Monday N. R., Lambert demonstrated the Fordson tractor by hooking on to a road drag and dragging Main street and some of the other business streets of the town.

No more teams will be allowed to tie on Main street by order of the village board. A long row of hitching posts just north of the postoffice has been put up for the accommodation of the farmers and others who wish to tie up their teams while in town. A severe penalty will be enforced on those who disregard the signs on the telephone posts on Main street to this effect.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 12 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. March 12, 1920, Page 5

Local News

Dr. Bernhisel is reported on the sick list.

Mrs. Maude Turman has returned from Hamer, Idaho, where she attended the funeral of her brother.

Sheriff A. H. Simmons returned yesterday from Vancouver, where he was called to the bedside of his brother who was seriously ill. The sheriff reports his brother much improved at the present time.
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Cheering. — “Did the doctor seem encouraged about your condition?”

“Yes,” said Mr. Grabcoin, “I have an idea he thinks I’m going to be one of the most profitable patients he ever had.”

— Birmingham Age-Herald.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Idaho Republican. March 12, 1920, Page 6

Firth

William Jolley is at his place of business after a week’s absence due to influenza.

Mr. Scarborough wishes to thank the many friends who so kindly assisted him during the illness of his beloved wife, also for the many beautiful floral offerings.

Mrs. L. J. Firth is improving after a week’s illness.

Miss Gertrude Berquist has charge of the Y. W. C. A. drive here. Everyone should respond to this good cause, “The betterment of conditions for the working girl.”
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Rose

Bishop J. S. Gardner, while chasing sheep last Sunday, fell and cut a severe gash in his head. Dr. Mitchell was called and the wounds were dressed.

Mrs. J. S. Gardner, who has been ill, has recovered sufficiently to enable her to resume her duties.

(ibid, page 6)
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The Idaho Republican. March 12, 1920, Page 7

Centerville

Little Hazel Haynes is listed among the sick this week.
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Minors May Be Pinched For Smoking In Public

Minors under eighteen who smoke or use cigarettes, cigars or tobacco in any form upon public highways or other public properties may be declared “delinquent” and committed to a reformatory, according to a ruling made by Attorney General Black in answer to a Paris, Idaho inquiry.

Section 8363 of the complied statutes, to which he called attention in his ruling, provides that “every minor person who shall smoke, etc., shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.” Section 1010, also quoted, provides that children under the age of eighteen years “who violate any law of this state” may be declared “delinquent.”

(ibid, page 7)
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Shoshone Journal. March 12, 1920, Page 1

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An (Un)important Announcement

The Journal shop is now takin [sic] its turn with “unavoidable circumstances” the same as some of the rest of ’em.

Last week one of the printers heard “the call of the wild” – only in this case it was the call of the mother-in-law, which is the same as far as results go, and forwith [sic] departed. Another man was scheduled to take his place but was prevented from showing up on account of sickness or something else – anyway he has not yet appeared. Early in the week the Chief Cause of the Journal publication flew home with the flu and went to roost. Not dangerous but plenty sick enough to obey orders with no back talk when the doctor told him to go to bed for several days.

Naturally this leaves the Journal force somewhat crippled, whether above or below is left for the reader to decide, but we’ll do our best, angels can do no more, and hope for better working conditions before next issue.
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Additional Local News

The meeting of the home nursing class has been postponed. The date of meeting will be announced later.

Joe Riley, Janitor at the County Court House is sick at his home with influenza and Pearl Burns is attending to his duties at the Court House.

Miss Brooks, one of the teachers in the Shoshone public schools, was able to resume her duties Monday morning after an absence of about three weeks caused by illness with the influenza.

Mrs. Frank Clem, returned last Friday from Hot Lake, Oregon, where she had been with her husband, who was quite ill for some time, but is now recovering.
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High School Notes

Only nine more weeks of school!!

Miss Brooks is back in school after several weeks absence.

Martha Bernard is back in school after several weeks vacation with the “flu.”

The term examinations are to be held this week. Watch for the list of “Flunkies.”

Some of the “flunkers” are in hopes that the “flunkers class” will be discontinued after Friday’s examinations. We hope so.
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Dietrich Precinct Notes

Jens Jorgensen living out in the southwest corner of the tract is suffering with a hard case of the flu.

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Morrow have had a hard struggle fighting the flu that has been attacking their several little children. On Thursday the fourth instant their little baby girl, Mary, passed away a victim of the dread disease.
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Card of Thanks

We wish to thank our friends and neighbors for their kindness during the illness and death of our dear baby Elizabeth Anne.

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Morrow
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Dietrich School Notes

Quarterly examinations are held this week, Thursday and Friday. Mary Crist was substitute cook Tuesday on account of the illness of Mary Brennen.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 12 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. March 12, 1920, Page 5

Local Items
I can not say what the truth may be, I tell the tale as ’twas told to me.

Miss Stella Cook, County Treasurer, is back in her office after being confined to her home for several days with a severe cold.

Dr. H. G. Baugh for the past several [days] has been confined to his bed suffering from a severe attack of sciatica rheumatism. He is slowly improving and hopes soon to be at his office.

C. W, Wernicke is able to be out after being confined to his home for two weeks with an attack of influenza. A part of the time he was severely ill.

Mrs. Stephens of the Colonial Hotel, is able to be out of the house for the first time since she became ill two months ago, and underwent a serious operation. She is now rapidly recovering her health.

L. M. Zug, who served two terms as sheriff in Lincoln County, for the past few weeks has been very ill at his home in Jerome. He has had a severe attack of rheumatism, but last reports were somewhat improved.

The first air plane visited Shoshone Wednesday afternoon and attracted much attention. It flew above the town at a low altitude for a few minutes after which it departed toward Richfield. The plane was recently bought by the Furcht company of Gooding and will be used by them to carry passengers either on business or pleasure. Friday, March 13th, has been designated by Gooding as aviation day and it is understood that quite a celebration is to be held at that place featuring air plane flight.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Idaho Recorder. March 12, 1920, Page 1

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May

The May school reopened a week ago Wednesday, with small attendance.

Last Thursday the little two-year-old baby of Mr. and Mrs. James Artie died of the flu. All the other members of the family were quick sick at the time but are able to be up now.

Dr. and Mrs. Gilman are both down with the flu. These seem to be the only new cases in the upper valley.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 12 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. March 12, 1920, Page 5

Idaho State News

Shoshone is to have a new, well equipped hospital.

The mining companies in the Coeur d’Alene district announced last week an increase in wages to all employees of 50 cents per day.

So many arrests have been made at Gooding in the past few days that the jail is crowded to the limit. If malefactions continue, additional bastile quarters will be needed.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Idaho Recorder. March 12, 1920, Page 6

Fourth Of July

Mrs. Theodore Gautier, Sr., who has been suffering with a cold for some time, is on the mend at this writing.
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Boyle Creek News

The eighth grade pupils of the Boyle creek school passed their mid-year examinations with high grades.

(ibid, page 6)
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The Idaho Recorder. March 12, 1920, Page 7

Salmon Locals

Mell Howe was misquoted about the prospects of oil and gas in the Salmon country and wishes to disavow saying what the reporter attributed to him in that connection. Howe says the Salmon country has plenty of wealth without claiming for it gas and oil.
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Spring Creek

Snowed every day this week which is a sure sign of spring, but they say this is fine for the range.

Last Sunday a team of Charles Hull’s horses ran away. No one was hurt except the harness and the bobsled, these were scattered along the road through the lane.

(ibid, page 7)
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The Idaho Recorder. March 12, 1920, Page 8

Northwest Notes

Every inhabitant of a Paiute Indian village in the Inyo county, Cal., near Dyer, Nev., has been stricken with influenza, according to a report brought to Tonopah by a rural mail carrier. He said there had been more than 100 deaths and none had received medical attention.

The official report of the department of agriculture indicates that the elk in Jackson’s Hole are in no danger of extermination, thanks to the co-operation of residents of that section with the state and government officials.

In a shooting, which took place at the Erickson ranch, six miles west of Glasgow, Mont., Ernest Erickson was killed, presumably by his son, Ben, who is thought to be insane.

(ibid, page 8)
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The Idaho Recorder. March 12, 1920, Page 10

Leadore And Upper Lemhi

Leadore

Mrs. Bernard Allhands and little daughter Virginia left last Tuesday for Yakima, Wash., where they expect to remain several months. Mrs. Allhands has suffered considerably this winter with bronchitis and it is thought a lower altitude will be very beneficial to her health.

Jack Hain was taken violently sick while driving his engine and was conveyed at once to Dillon. Indications point to pneumonia.

The ice harvest is in full blast this week. The Keating ice house is full and carpenters are busy putting the roof on and otherwise inclosing the building. The crop this season was of the fine quality, thick and clear, most of it being cut from the Bert Wilson lake.

Jim Potter, the sawmill man from Ten-Mile, is in town again for a few days. Jim’s auto still stands marooned in the snow where he got stuck trying to reach here last month for the masquerade. He says it will keep for some time as it is well covered with snow.

Leadore School Notes

Marguerite Saline is back in school again after a two week’s absence. She is taking a course in typewriting alone.

Yes, and here’s Genevieve Smith. Just walked in. All our school will be back soon at this rate. Daisy Yearian is also here.

Ethel Maes has the appendicitis.

A number of us who are not in the domestic science class would like to know where to find Prof. Adams at 3:30 p.m. We know he’s fond of lemon pie and cookies but he won’t confess. And Mrs. Burr, why does she run to the water fountain after eating blackberry pie cooked in the domestic science department. Salty?

(ibid, page 10)
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The Caldwell Tribune. March 12, 1920, Page 5

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Local And Personal

Mrs. Katherine Hammond, age 23 years, died at her home Wednesday evening at 5 o’clock after a lingering illness. She leaves a husband and ten months old baby. Funeral services will be held Friday morning at ten …

Dr. J. W. Boone’s Ford car, which was stolen Sunday evening from the street in front of the Presbyterian church, was found Monday morning by H. D. Blatchley near the sawmill west of town. The car suffered considerable damage.
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College Notes

In an exposition in class the other day on heathen health rules, Prof. Hayman suggested that people stay awake at night to see that they sleep properly and that mustard plasters on the brain be substituted for chiropractic treatment.

Mrs. Vance, who has been seriously ill the past week from nervous prostration is recovering slowly.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 12 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Caldwell Tribune. March 12, 1920, Page 9

Midway News

Mrs. T. R. Lupton of Lone Star whose husband died recently is keeping house for J. H. Pack and sons.
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Marble Front

Mrs. Arthur Randolph who has been ill for some time was taken to Mercy hospital in Nampa Thursday and underwent an operation Saturday. She is doing nicely. Mr. Randolph is also a patient at the hospital suffering from inflammatory rheumatism.

L. A. Rucker of Caldwell visited Sunday with his sister, Mrs. H. E. Harshman who is ill.

(ibid, page 9)
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The Caldwell Tribune. March 12, 1920, Page 10

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Wilder

Smallpox and whooping cough seem to be having their own way around Wilder. No one is seriously ill.

Rev. J. T. Ford of Boise is occupying the pulpit at the Baptist church for a few Sundays while the pastor, Rev. L. G. Black and family are in quarantine with small pox.

The public schools were dismissed Monday and Tuesday this week to give opportunity for oiling the floors.

Claytonia

We yet have some influenza in our neighborhood. Clarence Aden and Helen Garrity are down this week. Bill Jackson is quite sick with pneumonia at his sisters, Mrs. Smith of Homedale and Ed. Molton, near the Gem school, is down with it.

A Mr. Deal family that lately moved to one of Mr. Walter’s places has been quarantined for small pox.

Quite a number of children were attacked by the mumps during school last week, but no bad cases are reported. Roy Hansbrough is also a mump patient.

Ben Lindh was not able to move all of his family to Wilder last week due to three of the little girls having the mumps.

Many farmers have been busy burning weeds and thistles during last week.

Sunny Slope

Miss Alta Rogers has been quite ill for several days with the mumps.

(ibid, page 10)
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The Caldwell Tribune. March 12, 1920, Page 11

Fairview

Mrs. Anna Spencer is getting some batter from her recent attack of rheumatic fever.

Grandma Nichols has been very sick but is improving slowly.

Mrs. Connell is able to be up again.

(ibid, page 11)
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The Meridian Times., March 12, 1920, Page 8

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Meridian News Notes

Miss Frances Bryce arrived home last Thursday night from Corvalis, Oregon, where she has been attending college. She visited Portland and Walla Walla while enroute home. Illness of her father and her own recent recovery from the influenza, were reasons for her return from Corvallis sooner than she had planned.

Mrs. Amos Whiteley was in Boise Wednesday. She says little Floyd Adams continues to improve and has a big appetite.

A meeting of the teachers of the county at Boise recently favored a minimum of $100 per month for new contracts next fall.

A box social is being planned for next Wednesday, the 17th, for the Meridian Cemetery association. The program will be interesting and boxes will be auctioned off to the highest bidder, except that children’s boxes will be 50c. The Odd Fellows hall is the place and next Wednesday evening – St. Patrick’s day in the evening – is the time. Everybody come and help a good cause.
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Obituary

Virgil Morris Sooter, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Elbert M. Sooter, of Eagle, died March 9, 1920. The funeral service was conducted Thursday March 11, at 2:30 from the Mateer undertaking parlors, Carman E. Mell officiating. Burial took place at the Meridian cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Sooter were formerly of Dietrich, Idaho, having recently come to the Boise valley.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 12 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. March 12, 1920, Page 1

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School Notes

Owning to the crowded condition in the primary room it was found necessary to secure assistance. In order to have an accredited high school it is necessary to have accredited elementary work as a foundation. The crowded condition in the primary room has been relieved by fitting up a room in the basement and putting it in charge of Mrs. Keller, who has been secured for the remainder of the year at a small salary.

The large number of children in the lower grades is due to the fact that many of the younger children were not returned to school last year after the influenza epidemic. This condition will probably not exist next year.
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Big Bear Ridge

Miss Neva Nelson is at the Sam Monk home in Deary. Mr. and Mrs. Monk and Miss Betty Randall are recovering from an attack of influenza.

The rain Monday night delayed plowing for some time.
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Southwick Items

In a letter to his mother, Elton McCoy states that the flu in Canada is still raging. He and the Grant family have avoided taking it however.

Mrs. Claud King is steadily improving in health, we are glad to say.

Mr. Hewett of Sunnyside, Wash., recently visited us and told us his family and himself included, all had the flu recently.

Mrs. Fred Darby is recovering from a severe attack of the flu. The elder Mrs. Darby is also better.
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Dr. Rothwell returned from Spokane last Sunday, where he spent a week or more. He worked very hard here during the recent flu epidemic and needed a rest.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 12 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. March 12, 1920, Page 8

Gleanings

Herman Meyer of Potlatch ridge was taken to Lewiston Thursday afternoon to undergo an operation for pleural pneumonia. Dr. Stoneburner accompanied him to Lewiston and he said he believed it would be necessary to tap the lung. This case of pneumonia followed an attack of influenza, which Mr. Meyer contracted some time ago.

On account of the illness of County Agent Fletcher, the meeting advertised to take place here Thursday afternoon was called off. It was impossible for Mr. Fletcher to be here.

Mrs. M. L. Anderson became quite ill last week but is much better at this time. Rev. Anderson was in Tacoma at the time but returned as soon as he received the telegram telling of his wife’s illness.

Charles Schultz of Potlatch ridge brought a hen’s egg to the Gazette office last Saturday that weighed 4 ounces. It is a double yolk egg and as large as a goose egg.

(ibid, page 8)
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Undertaker, American Falls, Idaho (1)

UndertakerAmericanFallsFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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March 16

The Caldwell Tribune. March 16, 1920, Page 1

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The Junior Promenade, the first all college dance which has been permitted since the lifting of the influenza quarantine, was given in the University gymnasium on Saturday night, March 6. The gymnasium, which was beautifully decorated in pink, white and green, made a fitting back ground for the young women in their lovely frocks. …

Ted Turner, freshman at the University of Idaho, has been hobbling around on crutches during the past week as a result of blood poisoning in his left foot. This is the second time Ted has been on the “casualty” list, as he but recently recovered from an attack of influenza.

Spring cleaning work on the ditches is well under way now. Superintendents E. M. Brown and John May are in charge of this work.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 16 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Caldwell Tribune. March 16, 1920, Page 3

Local And Personal

H. W. Van Dyke, who was reported ill Monday with influenza, is improving.

Miss Brenton, superintendent of the Caldwell sanitarium, as been sick the past few days but was able Saturday to again be on duty.

E. M. Hendon is unable to attend to his duties at the First National bank on account of illness.

Myrtha Langford, 11 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Langford, of Star, was brought to the sanitarium, Friday morning and operated upon Saturday morning at 9 o’clock. She is doing as well as can be expected. She had the influenza, then pneumonia, has suffered for five weeks, a drain tube had to be inserted into the left lung.

Mrs. Heddenburg of Provo, Utah is staying at the Edd Meek home, while Mrs. Meek is ill.

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Randolph who live north of this city, were taken to Nampa hospital Friday. Both are seriously ill.

Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the Peckham chapel for William Eames. The Rev. W. J. Boone conducted the services. Mr. Eames, a former resident of Melba, died Friday at Pleasant Ridge of tuberculosis. He was 38 years of age.

(ibid, page 3)
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The Caldwell Tribune. March 16, 1920, Page 5

Wilder Items

Mr. Black, who has been ill, resumed his work as manual training teacher in the schools Monday.

Mrs. E. M. Small received the sad news of the tragic death of her sister and her brother-in-law who lived in California. Mrs. Small left immediately for the coast.

Willie Hines came in contact with a base ball Tuesday necessitating 3 stitches over the right eye.
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Canyon News

D. B. Myers has been among the shut-ins, but is now improving.

Farm work is being pushed on all the ranches. Plowing is interfered with by the rain, but repairing of the fences, fertilizing, cleaning out the ditches and other necessary work is being done.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Caldwell Tribune. March 16, 1920, Page 6

Ten Davis News

Mrs. N. Nelson is quite sick.

Sidney McLaughlin has been sick this week and was unable to attend school

Mrs. Etta Stone is driving the school wagon at the Lower end of the district now.
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Midway News

Mrs. Ella Marks of Nampa is quite ill at the home of her daughter, Mrs. George R. Marks.

The community social at the school house, Friday evening, proved a success. There was a large crowd and all had a pleasant time. …

(ibid, page 6)
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The Caldwell Tribune. March 16, 1920, Page 7

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Arena Valley Items

Mr. and Mrs. Z. B. Barker and Burnard were Caldwell visitors last Saturday. Mrs. Barker called at the W. E. Owens home, where Miss Mildred is still bedfast with inflammatory rheumatism.

The literary Friday evening was held at the school house and was well attended. The general program was short but the lecture on the Panama canal was especially fine. John Johnson had with him a splendid photograph of the canal and used blackboard diagrams which made his descriptions of the locks very interesting. …

Roswell

W. H. Kneifle returned Tuesday from Lamoure, N. D., where he was called last week by the death of a brother’s wife. Mr. Kneifle reports a great deal of snow and wind with 28 degrees below zero temperature.

(ibid, page 7)
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Bonners Ferry Herald. March 16, 1920, Page 4

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Local Pick-ups

Mrs. J. T. Lawless left on Friday for Spokane to attend her daughter, Mrs. Rediger, who is reported to be seriously ill.

Miss Mae Nelson, stenographer for the First State Bank, has resumed her work after having been absent for a week on account of an attack of influenza.

Mrs. Mary Gallas and children returned Sunday from Portland, Oreg., where Mrs. Gallas has been having her little girl treated by a specialist for the past several months.

J. A. Walden has just received a large supply of pretty and novel St. Patrick’s Day shamrocks, one design for ladies and the other for men and one of these souvenirs will be given free to anyone calling at the store.

The thaw and rains of last week raised havoc with the roads in the city and country, particularly on the hill roads. Workmen are now repairing the worst of the damage done. In front of the Gleed residence in the east part of town a large part of the street washed out, the damage being due in part to a broken water main. Great Northern train service has been handicapped for several days on account of washouts in Montana and on Sunday and yesterday train No. 2 was sent over the Northern Pacific line from Sandpoint.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 16 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. March 16, 1920, Page 5

Local Pick-ups

Town Marshal Worley is able to be up and around again after a severe attack of the influenza.

A. Klockmann, president and general manager of the Idaho Continental Mining Company, was a business visitor in town Wednesday and Thursday, leaving Thursday for the mine at Klockmann. He was accompanied here from Spokane by his sister-in-law, Miss Selma Neitzel, who is at the Bonners Ferry hospital recovering from an operation for the removal of her tonsils, performed Saturday by Dr. S. T. Faucett.

John Frisch, one of the oldtimers of the Porthill district, was in town Wednesday on his way from Spokane to Porthill. Mr. Frisch has been taking treatments for asthma, of a specialist in Spokane.
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Cow Creek News

J. C. Parker was moved Sunday from the Bonners Ferry hospital to his Cow Creek home and is reported to be considerable improved in health.

Walter Parker has not been hauling logs the past week on account of the bad roads. He expects to resume his hauling in the near future.

(ibid, page 5)
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Bonners Ferry Herald. March 16, 1920, Page 8

Round Prairie News

The Traver children are sick with bad colds – probably influenza. The disease is appearing in a mild form in all parts of this vicinity.

The influenza has been an unwelcome guest at the H. C. Ward home this week but so far has not made its appearance at the Danquist home on the adjoining ranch.

Charles Wagner is recovering from an attack of the influenza.

Miss Dysart, of the Addie store, has been on the sick list this week.

The roads are getting soft and bad in places and on the Stoneklift hill it is impossible for a car to run owing to the heavy rains of Friday and Saturday.
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Copeland News Note

Eddie Cooper returned from Bonners Ferry last Saturday where he has been under the care of Dr. Fry.

Boyd Stockton is on the sick list this week.

Orlando Kerr is suffering from an attack of rheumatism.

(ibid, page 8)
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Further Reading

Lessons of the 1918 Flu Pandemic and Today’s Homeland Security

By Thomas Beers, MPA, EMT-P, NHDP 3.15.20 Journal of Emergency Medical Services

1918NurseMask-aA nurse wearing a mask as protection against influenza. September 13, 1918. (Photo/National Archives)

Authors Note: This article was originally written in 2018, but never sought publication. In light of the recent events unfolding around COVID-19, this article serves as “food for thought” why pandemic diseases are such a vulnerability and why public safety leaders should be taking any epidemiological threat seriously. While reading, consider the lack of free travel, EMS services and even the concept of emergency rooms in 1918. That is why the current threat climate is, shall I say, “novel” to us as emergency responders. There are lessons to be learned.

Nearly one century ago, beginning in 1918, a disaster which the modern world had not experienced yet began to systematically kill an estimated 50-to-100-million people worldwide over the course of 24 months. Within the United States alone, low end estimates of 670,000 citizens were killed by the virus.1 To put that into modern perspective, this disaster killed the equivalent number of U.S. citizens as over two hundred 9/11 attacks. Today, the two most frightening aspects of this disaster are that the threat is still here and will happen again, and you cannot see it. This threat is pandemic influenza.

While the exact origins of the 1918 to 1920 influenza pandemic are not agreed upon, what is for certain is that this strain of flu, colloquially referred to as The Spanish Flu, is exclusively a human pathogen known to scientists and physicians as the H1N1 viral strain.

The prevailing theory of how this virus was spread globally lies in the parallel history of world events. The first reported cases within the United States, based on records from the time, point toward an origin located in central Kansas at a U.S. Army training facility named Camp Funston. In March 1918. Camp Funston was an initial training center for U.S. Army troops who were deploying to Europe for World War I. After graduation, troops from Camp Funston were sent to their units across the United States before being dispatched to Europe.

Within weeks of the first reported cases of what was considered seasonal influenza at Camp Funston, 24 of the 36 large military bases began reporting outbreaks of influenza. By September of 1918 at Camp Devens, which was situated just outside of Boston, the base hospital was overwhelmed with influenza. In a single day that month, 1,543 soldiers reported being sick with influenza.

What was not known at the time in the United States was that infected soldiers had already deployed and had their boots on the ground in France. Many departed their ships and onto European soil complaining of what the soldiers themselves had termed “the three day fever” and suggested that it was due to the conditions in the merchant marine and military ships in which they were transported. From here, any and all ability to contain the virus was lost.

The numbers of deaths were staggering. No population within the United States was left unscathed. Native American tribes were hit especially hard and some Alaskan Inuit tribes became extinct. During this time period of the H1N1 pandemic, global life expectancy declined by 12 years.

Today, the Department of Homeland Security is tasked with preparing the nation for the next pandemic event. Almost everyone in the scientific community and those tasked with defending the homeland agree that the next pandemic flu or other viral outbreak is not a matter of if, but rather a matter of when. Comparing a snapshot of the nation today to its own image in 1918, experts note that the travel and spread of diseases, whether naturally occurring or weaponized for criminal intent, is much more complex and rapid today than a century ago.

The Spanish Flu spread across the globe via steamship and across the routes of conflict and war. Today, a small outbreak of a disease in nearly any part of the world can easily be transmitted to multiple points of the globe within hours due to air travel.1 Most recently in 2014, the deadly virus Ebola easily escaped the small African nations of Guinea and Sierra Leone despite the presence of the United Nations and other non-governmental organizations attempting to contain the virus. With a 50% mortality rate for those who contract the disease, it is the world’s most deadly virus.

In the 2014 outbreak, there were 36 cases reported outside of the African continent. Eleven of those cases were here in the United States and it was the first time Ebola was seen in North America. A 2018 poll showed that frontline responders, namely EMS and fire, were unprepared for an outbreak of Ebola, and therefore perhaps even a pandemic of any nature to include influenza. The poll, ran during EMS Week of 2018, showed 80% of first responders had done no additional training in pandemic response since the 2014 initial Ebola threat in the United States. Another 20% had no knowledge that Ebola was still a threat.

On a national scale, the Department of Homeland Security has taken dramatic efforts to combat influenza and other pandemic diseases because of the seriousness in which pandemics pose to the homeland based on the lessons of 1918’s Spanish Influenza. The Department of Homeland Security’s response leverages the capacity of the agencies under their command to monitor and prevent further outbreak. This includes, diverting flights inbound to the United States and its territories, additional screening by TSA agents at airports, using the U.S. Coast Guard to monitor vessels from effected nations, initiating FEMA’s response centers, and securing borders with various assets at its disposal. Further, during a pandemic disease outbreak, the DHS combines efforts with the Center for Disease Control and the National Heal Service.

In 2005, then DHS Secretary Michael Chertoff wrote: “A severe pandemic influenza presents a tremendous challenge as it may affect the lives of millions of Americans, cause significant numbers of illnesses and fatalities, and substantially disrupt our economic and social stability. It is imperative for government officials and business leaders to work together now to develop effective pandemic related business continuity plans and to implement successful preparedness and protective strategies.”

While homeland security is filled with many disasters and the lessons learned paid for with lives of the innocent, no other event in our nations or the modern world’s history has had such a dramatic impact as the 1918 Spanish Influenza Pandemic. The H1N1 virus and its variants are here still to this day. The Spanish Flu was never eradicated. Couple that fact with this staggering statistic: the average American is more than five times more likely to die from a human-extinction event than in a car crash, yet we still wear our seatbelts.

source: Journal of Emergency Medical Services
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Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)