Monthly Archives: February 2022

Feb 27, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

Feb 27, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
Oct 27, 2021 – Transfer Station on Winter Schedule
Nov 1, 2021 – Winter Mail Delivery Starts
Mar 1 – Blazing Saddles
Mar 8 – Mamma Mia
Mar 13 – Daylight Saving Time begins
Mar 27 – YPFD meeting at 2pm

(details below)
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Local Events:

Tuesday Movie Nights

Movie nights are still on. Come join us at the community hall at 4:30 pm every Tuesday. Snacks, drinks, and pajamas welcome.

February 22: The Great Outdoors
March 1: Blazing Saddles
March 8: Mamma Mia
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March 13th Spring Ahead

Daylight Saving Time begins March 13th. Don’t forget to check the battery in your smoke alarms.
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Village News:

Sunday’s Snow

20220227YellowPineWest-a

945am Feb 27, 2022 Yellow Pine West Webcam
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Tuesday’s Helicopter

Tuesday we heard a helicopter flying back and forth around our area for a few hours. Jon Hunter, our local Conservation Officer says, “… the helicopter contracted by the Fish and Game to count elk. These elk are part of the McCall elk zone. Basically, it is an area that stretches from Yellow Pine all the way to Riggins. About every 5 years we try to do an extensive aerial survey to monitor the numbers in the herds. We probably have another 4 days left flying in the Yellow Pine area.”
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The Star-News

Only a few days left to renew your subscription early to beat the March 1 rate increase. It’s easy! Just after you log on to read this week’s edition, look for the link “Renew” under your name in the upper right corner (iPad, laptop or work station) or at the top of the screen (cellphone). Activate the link to the subscription form and choose from the menu options. Then follow the prompts to pay.
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Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at wicap.org.
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Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
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Arnold Aviation News:

Customers New Deadline – Please email your shopping list by Sunday evening so they are ready to print early Monday morning.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
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Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Upper Johnson Creek road at Landmark, Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Elk Summit, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are closed to wheeled vehicles. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
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Critters

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be Elk Aware

Elk are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat has been hanging around the upper part of the village recently. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started November 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Thurs, Feb 16th, the trash in the bins has been compacted to make some room until they can get a truck in to empty them. Please flatten your empty boxes!

Report the road and dump plowed Jan 17th.

Report Jan 7th: Bins were emptied about a week and a half ago. Road plowed Jan 5th.

Dump update October 27th: We are now in winter mode. When it gets fairly full we will call to have it dumped. Contact Cecil.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

Water Use

02/17/22 20675868 47480 23.5 2020 34 T 121
02/18/22 20724135 48267 24 2011 34 F 787
02/19/22 20764974 40839 24 1702 28 S 7428
02/20/22 20806624 41650 24 1735 29 S 811
02/21/22 20846425 39801 24 1658 28 M 1849
02/22/22 20885577 39152 24 1631 27 T 649
02/23/22 20925944 40367 24 1682 28 W 1215
02/24/22 20966560 40616 24 1692 28 T 249
02/25/22 21006914 40354 24 1681 28 F 262
02/26/22 21047456 40542 24 1689 28 S 188
02/27/22 21089483 42027 24 1751 29 S 1485

Water Update Feb 26th

Hello Yellow Piners,

On Tuesday the 22nd of February I traveled to Yellow Pine, completed regular system checks, collected monthly and annual compliance samples, and cleaned Filter #1 to restore adequate flow.

Mike Amos again assisted by shuttling his 4-wheeler up to McIntosh’s place ahead of my arrival which made it easier to get pumps, hoses and equipment up to the plant. Winter water plant access needs to be improved and should be planned for going into next winter. Vehicle access to at least the filtration plant should be part of the plan.

Nicki’s reliable and consistent daily recording of data indicates that even after the recent leak repair completed in town, system demand exceeds 40K gallons per day which continues to exceed system capacity and therefore necessitates the continuation of the Boil Order.

Just for information’s sake, the filters have the following capacity. Please keep in mind that the system is designed to be able to run on one filter at a time while the other filter is offline for cleaning or maintenance.

Design filtration rate is .1 gpm/sq ft of filter surface area during warm weather and .05 gpm/sq ft of surface area when below 5 degrees C (41 degrees F)

Filter #1 is 215 sq ft
Warm Weather
215 x 0.1= 21.5 gpm
21.5 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 30,960 gallons per day
Cold Weather
215 x 0.05= 10.75 gpm
10.75 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 15,480 gallons per day

Filter #2 is 256 sq ft
Warm Weather
256 x 0.1= 25.6 gpm
25.6 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 36,864 gallons per day
Cold Weather
256 x 0.05= 12.8 gpm
12.8 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 18,432 gallons per day

Flow rates explained above are optimal and are only to be expected from clean filters. Flow rates diminish rapidly as the filter media becomes “plugged” with dirt and debris from Boulder Creek. High system demand equates to increased water volume through the filters which in turn causes filters to become dirty faster reducing flow accordingly.

Every time the filters are cleaned, a portion of the sand filter media is removed. Over time and after repeated cleanings, the level of sand in the filters becomes low and must be replenished. A plan for cleaning and replacement of the used sand or purchase and installation of new sand needs to be developed.

Additionally, there are a number of deferred maintenance items and miscellaneous equipment purchases that need to be considered in order to help assure continued and uninterrupted water supply to the community. A plan to address these issues needs to be developed as well.

I am available to answer questions or can attend a water board meeting to assist in discussion and planning as needed.

Best Regards,
Warren

Water Update Jan 19th

Hello Yellow Piners,

After the news went out about high water use, the demand went down about 10,000 gallons per day by the following five days. That seems to indicate that the message was heard and action was taken.

Mike Amos was a huge help when I came in on Sunday 1/16/2022 to clean filter #2. He provided a four-wheeler and shuttled it up close to Nicki’s place for me which was extremely helpful. I loaded it up with tools and pumps etc., and hauled it all up to the plant. Filter #2 was then cleaned and flow has been restored to an acceptable level. Please keep in mind that daily demand still exceeds the design capacity of the system by approximately 30%.

I also took the necessary DEQ compliance samples and took care of regular maintenance issues while there. Aside from the high demand, everything else seems to be normal.

Regards, Warren Drake

Water Usage Jan 9, 2022

In the past few days our water usage has jumped to over 61,000 gallons per day. In November we were consistently around the 27,000 gallons per day. I am thinking a water line has frozen and broke somewhere in town. Please let me know if someone hears or suspects major water leaks. – Steve Holloway

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

DRINKING WATER WARNING February 10, 2022
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 2-10-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 at the Community Hall at 10am. Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting held July 5, 2020 at the Community Hall 2pm. link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
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VYPA News:

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Chairman – vacant
Vice Chairman – Josh Jones
Treasurer – Ronda Rogers
Secretary – Hailey Harris
Member-at-large – Rhonda Egbert

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Ron Earl

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Special Meeting of the Board of YPFPD Commissioners
Yellow Pine Fire Protection District (YPFPD), Valley County, Idaho
Meeting Notes, 24th day of February 2022, at 10:00 a.m. at Community Hall
Attendees: Fire Commissioners Bill McIntosh, Tom Lanham, Lorinne Munn. Meeting called to order at 10:01 a.m. by Chairman Bill McIntosh.
To add an item to the Agenda of the need to purchase replacement batteries for Defibrillators located at the Tavern and Corner a motion was made by Lorinne seconded by Tom unanimously voted by Bill, Tom and Lorinne to add the item to the Agenda. Agenda approval motion was made by Lorinne seconded by Tom, unanimously voted to approve the Agenda by Bill, Tom and Lorinne.
First Action Item addressed. Idaho State Fire Commissioners’ Association 2022 40th Annual Conference March 24-27 at the Riverside Hotel in Boise. Tom made a motion for the Fire Department to pay the annual membership fee of $50.00 to qualify for the Member District discount to attend the Conference. Motion seconded by Lorinne. Unanimously voted to approve the motion by Bill, Tom and Lorinne.
Bill made a motion for the Fire Department to provide the funds for 6 attendees for the Friday March 25th Session. He had conferred with Chris Hinkle, in charge of the Boise Area registration that Friday should be required of our Fire Department: the Commissioners and Staff. So it was identified that Tim, Rhonda, Ron, Tom, Bill, Lorinne should go. A total of $900.00 at $150.00 apiece. Tom seconded the motion and it was unanimously voted to approve the motion by Bill, Tom and Lorinne.
Tom made a motion for the Fire Department to provide the funds for 2 overnight stays at the Riverside Hotel 2900 W. Chinden, Boise (208) 343-1871 for Bill, Tim and Rhonda, and Ron if necessary. Tom and Lorinne do not need these accommodations. The cost for this is $882.00 at $147.00 each night for a room. The motion was seconded by Lorinne and it was unanimously voted to approve the motion by Bill, Tom and Lorinne.
Lorinne wants to attend the Saturday Session and offered to pay the $150.00 for it. Tom said he may want to attend and would also pay. Tim and Rhonda might also benefit. Lorinne made a motion for the Fire Department to pay the total of $600.00 or $150.00 apiece if Lorinne, Tom, Tim, Rhonda should wish to attend Saturday. Tom seconded the motion and it was unanimously voted to approve the motion by Bill, Tom and Lorinne.
Tom made a motion to approve the total bill of $2432.00. It was determined we have a balance of $25,535.91 per our last Meeting Minutes of January 30, 2022. Bill seconded the motion and it was unanimously voted to approve the motion by Bill, Tom and Lorinne.
The second agenda item was brought up and a motion made by Lorinne to purchase from Fire Department Funds replacement batteries at $175.00 apiece or total of $350.00 for the Defibrillators located at the Tavern and Corner. Bill seconded the motion and it was unanimously voted to approve the motion by Bill, Tom and Lorinne.
A motion was made by Bill to adjourn the meeting. The motion seconded by Tom and unanimously voted to adjourn by Bill, Tom and Lorinne. Meeting adjourned at 10:34 a.m. by Chairman Bill McIntosh.
Minutes submitted by Lorinne N. Munn/District 1 Fire Commissioner and temporary acting Secretary

link to minutes:

Response to Yellow Pine Fire District Open Meeting Complaints from Valley County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, dated February 10, 2022
link:

Meeting Minutes

January 30, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting (no minutes yet.)
November 23, 2021 Special meeting Link:
November 8, 2021 AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
October 31, 2021 Special meeting Link:
October 14, 2021 Special meeting Link:
September 27, 2021 Special meeting Link:
September 18, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sept 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
July 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
June 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sept 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 11, 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Winter hours:
Open Wednesday 11-6
Fridays 11-9
Saturdays 9-6
Sunday’s 10-6
Closed Monday, Tuesday and Thursday
Exceptions are by appointment and we’ll be open on Mondays of Holiday weekends.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Winter Hours at the Tavern
Open Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat: 9am-2pm 4pm-8pm
Open Sunday 9am-2pm
Closed Tues & Thurs
Call the Tavern 208 633-2233 or Cell 208 739-7086 for other arrangements
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
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Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed for the winter.
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Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Our Elk & Deer hunts are booked for our 2021 season, we do have a couple openings for our 2022 Elk & Deer hunts. We Also have a couple openings for Mountain Lion hunts December 2021 through February 2022 and Spring Bear hunts May of 2022. Please see our Website site for further details.
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 452-4361
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watikns can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

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Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Feb 21) overnight low of 14 degrees. Yesterday’s snow tally 1 1/5″ (SWE=0.15″) and an average of 22″ on the ground. This morning light snow 950am-1050am out of a mostly clear sky and 19 degrees. Lots of fox tracks. Pine squirrel, hairy woodpecker, nuthatch and jays visiting. Getting a little breezy before lunch time, then partly cloudy at lunch time. Breezy and overcast by early afternoon. Overcast, breezy and below freezing mid-afternoon and snowing lightly, high of 33 degrees. Socked in to the valley floor and snowing pretty good at dusk and calmer. Still snowing after dark and stacking up. Fox visiting. Stopped snowing before midnight.

Tuesday (Feb 22) overnight low of 8 degrees. Yesterday’s snow tally 1 3/4″ (SWE=0.09″) and an average of 23″ on the ground. This morning mostly high thin haze, light breeze and 15 degrees at 10am. Helicopter flying around and around to the north east. Snowmobile traffic. Pine squirrel, jays, nuthatches and dark-eyed juncos visiting. Getting breezy before lunch time. Breaks in the (thicker) clouds mid-day and light breezes. Helicopter made another pass around 1225pm and again at 130pm. Short snow flurry around 140pm. Overcast, cold and light breeze mid-afternoon, high of 24 degrees. Mostly clear at dusk, cold light breeze and temperature down into the teens. Appeared to be clear before midnight.

Wednesday (Feb 23) overnight low of -11 degrees. Recorded a “Trace” from the little snow flurry yesterday. This morning clear sky, -8 degrees at sunrise and an average of 23″ snow on the ground. Where the ground has been shoveled and gets sun, Frost Flowers “blooming.” Jays active, hairy woodpecker calling, downy woodpecker and pine squirrel visiting. Bright sunshine and clear sky at lunch time. Mail truck was on time and no troubles reported, but watch for rocks. Getting a little breezy early afternoon and still below freezing. Almost clear mid-afternoon (a few small “cotton ball” clouds over VanMeter) cold and breezy, high of 26 degrees. Clear sky at dusk, calmer and temperature in the teens. Mostly clear before midnight and getting cold. Light snow fell before sunrise.

Thursday (Feb 24) 24 hour low of -8 degrees from Wednesday morning. This morning overcast and fine light snow falling, by 10am a fat 1/4″ (SWE0.03″), 13 degrees and an average of 23″ on the ground. Junco tracks in the new snow, jays, pine squirrel, red-breasted nuthatches, hairy and downy woodpeckers visiting. Stopped snowing just after lunch time and overcast. Breezy at times early afternoon. Overcast mid-afternoon, below freezing and light cold breeze, high of 25 degrees. Thinning clouds and patches of hazy clear sky at dusk, temperature in the teens and a cold light breeze. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Friday (Feb 25) overnight low of -11 degrees. Yesterday’s snow was just a Trace, and an average 23″ on the ground. This morning at 10am clear very blue sky and -6 degrees. A few juncos, red-breasted nuthatch, downy woodpecker, pine squirrel and several jays visiting. Snowmobile traffic. Clear sky at lunch time. Clear blue sky and just a hair below freezing mid-afternoon, high of 31.8F and slight cold breeze. Snowmobile traffic. Clear and cold at dusk. Snowmobile traffic. Lots of stars before midnight. Hazy after midnight and down to zero F.

Saturday (Feb 26) 24 hour low of -6 degrees from Friday. This morning at 10am 1 degree, clear sky, slight breeze and an average of 23″ snow on the ground. Snowmobile traffic. Fresh fox tracks. Jays, juncos, nuthatches and pine squirrel visiting. A little thin haze in a mostly clear sky at lunch time. Mostly hazy mid-afternoon and warmer with a slight breeze, high of 43 degrees. Mostly clear at sunset and below freezing. Lots of stars out before midnight. Snowing before sunrise.

Sunday (Feb 27) started snowing early morning, 24 hour low of 1 degree from Saturday. This morning it was 18 degrees at sunrise, low overcast, slight breeze and steady snowfall, measured 7/8″ new snow so far (SWE=0.04″) and an average of 23″ on the ground. Raven calling to the north, jays, juncos, nuthatches and pine squirrel visiting. Stopped snowing by lunch time, likely 1/8″ then melting. Small airplane flying over at 258pm. Overcast, breezy and a few drops of rain mid-afternoon, high of 37 degrees. Overcast, clouds sitting down on top of VanMeter and misting at dusk.
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Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 2,051 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths

Feb 25, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 2,051 new COVID-19 cases and 8 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 423,638.

The state reports data for the most recent 2-week period are incomplete. Due to the recent surge in cases, approximately 17,000 outstanding positive laboratory results are pending local public health district review and follow-up.

There are a total of 332,088 confirmed cases and 91,550 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state.

The state said 106,615 people have received one dose of a two dose series, and 392,833 people have received an additional or booster dose. 2,285,108 total doses have been administered. 921,690 people are fully vaccinated.

The state said 35 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 15,702 and 10 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,663.

8 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,730.

full story: [Valley County 2,470 cases, 16 deaths.]
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New Valley County COVID-19 cases keep falling

13th death in county confirmed from virus

By Tom Grote The Star-News February 24, 2022

New cases of COVID-19 reported in Valley County last week continued to fall, according to the county’s two hospitals.

A total of 17 new cases were reported by the county’s two hospitals, down from the 22 new cases the previous week and down from 62 cases the prior week.

The two hospitals have reported 2,644 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started nearly two years ago.

A 13th death in Valley County confirmed from COVID-19 was reported this week by Central District Health. No details were a available.

Three other deaths in Valley County have been ruled as “probable” from the virus.

Clinics & Tests

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine is now offering the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older. Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines continue to be offered for anyone age 5 and older.

Also available are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine boosters for ages 12 to 15 and to moderately or severely immunocompromised youths age 5 to 11.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link) or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results for COVID-19 in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital is also providing free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which allow people to do more testing without coming into the hospital.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

Cascade Medical Center offers a walk-in vaccination clinic from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster.

The Pfizer vaccine for those ages 5 and older is available in Cascade on Wednesdays.

full story: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — — — — — — — —

Need help paying utilities during the cold? There are local resources available

by Kristen McPeek Wednesday, February 23rd 2022 CBS2

According to the US Energy Information Administration, Idaho and Washington have the least expensive electricity costs.

Although these costs are comparatively low, people still need help paying those power bills right now.

There are a few places people can get help here in the Treasure Valley:

Idaho Department of Health and Welfare has a ‘low-income home energy assistance program.’ This includes Home Weatherization Assistance and Telephone Assistance. There are certain criteria that need to be met to get the assistance on a first-come-first-serve basis. There is also crisis heating assistance that aims to be solved within 48 hours.

[Note: In Valley County, contact WICAP (link)]
continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

This is one of Boise’s driest Februarys, NWS says

by CBS2 News Staff Friday, February 25th 2022

It’s a dry, dry February according to the National Weather Service in Boise.

“Total precipitation so far this February is 0.08 inch. If no more precipitation falls before March 1, it will be the driest February ever at the airport, and it will be the second driest February since records began in 1878.”

Officials say the driest February was in 1889 where Idaho only received 0.04 inches.

source:

Note: Yellow Pine Feb precipitation as of Feb 27th:
Water: 0.74″ Snow: 9.7″
February Precipitation History:
Year: Water / Snow
2021: 2.91″ / 35.8″
2020: 3.33″ / 43.7″
2019: 4.21″ / 38.2″
2018: 1.43″ / 12.0″
2017: 6.27″ / 10.0″
2016: 1.70″ / 6.7″
2015: 2.05″ / 1.5″
2014: 3.05″ / 24.8″
2013: 0.69″ / 9.1″
2012: 1.97″ / 12.5″
2011: 1.56″ / 13.9″
2010: 0.60″ / 3.5″
——————–

Scam Alert:

Ada County plagued by ‘jury duty,’ ‘fake arrest warrant’ phone scams

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, February 24th 2022

Ada County continues to be plagued by scammers pretending to be local officials and telling them about future jury duty or an active arrest warrant on their name.

“Ada County Sheriff’s Office deputies will never call and threaten to arrest you because you have an outstanding arrest warrant — or civil judgment — or have a tax bill due — or missed jury duty — or anything like that,” Ada County Sheriff’s Office says.

Giving out sensitive information over the phone — both personal and financial — can put you at risk for fraud.

Some scammers will call and tell individuals that they have an active arrest warrant and they need to place funds on a pre-paid card to cancel it.

continued:
————–

Mining News:

Stibnite mine study delayed until summer

Payette review had been due to be released next month

By Drew Dodson The Star-News February 24, 2022

The latest federal study of Perpetua Resources’ proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine will not be released until this summer, the Payette National Forest said.

The study was originally set for release in March, but more time was needed to complete water studies and environmental analysis of changes proposed by Perpetua, Payette spokesperson Brian Harris said.

“There are important environmental aspects that need to be reviewed extensively, and we need to take the time necessary to do that,” Harris said.

The study will focus on an updated mining plan submitted by Perpetua in December 2020, or four months after the Payette’s original environmental study was released.

“We are eager to show how our improvements are designed to leave water quality and overall habitat in this historic mining district in better shape than they are in today,” Perpetua President Laurel Sayer said.

A public comment period will follow the release of the study, but the length of the comment period is still to be determined, Harris said.

The public comments will help determine if a final decision on the project will be delayed, Harris said. A decision is currently projected for June 2023.

The changes to the mining plan reduce the size of the project and go beyond previous plans to protect water quality in the Stibnite area after the mine is closed, according to Perpetua.

The changes were made in response to additional analysis and over 11,000 public comments submitted on the Payette’s original study, said Mckinsey Lyon, a Perpetua spokesperson.

Hangar Flats

Perpetua’s updated mining plan would reduce the size of the proposed Hangar Flats pit, one of three open pit mines planned at Stibnite, from 140 acres to 66 acres, or by about 53%.

That would improve water quality and fish habitat by allowing the pit to be lined and filled with rock after mining. The new plan would eliminate a lake previously proposed for Hangar Flats.

Water studies in the Payette’s draft study released last August showed exposed rock in the pit walls would leach toxic metals in the lake water and could require permanent water treatment.

Re-filling the Hangar Flats Pit with 18 million tons of waste rock would eliminate the need to pile the rock on 168 acres in the mostly undisturbed Fiddle Creek Drainage, under Perpetua’s new plan.

The Fiddle waste rock site would have required permanent water treatment to remove toxic metals from water seeping through the waste rock, according to the Payette’s original study.

Stibnite Lake

The updated plan would also create Stibnite Lake within the historic Yellow Pine Pit, which is currently a pit lake that Perpetua would drain to mine the highest-grade ore in the Stibnite deposits.

The pit would be partially re-filled with waste rock, re-shaped and then lined to prevent toxic metals from contaminating the lake, through which the East Fork South Fork Salmon River would flow.

Stibnite Lake would lower downstream water temperatures in the East Fork and improve fish habitat at the Yellow Pine pit lake, the most prominent remnant of historic mining at Stibnite, Perpetua claims.

Perpetua’s previous mining plans would have filled the pit with rock after mining and re-established the East Fork in a lined channel over the site with no lake.

The updated plan would also reduce the amount of toxic arsenic left in the mine’s tailings, or the slurry left over after gold and silver is removed from rock.

The changes would allow water treatment at the site to end about 25 years after mining instead of being needed indefinitely, according to Perpetua.

Two Plans

Perpetua’s updated plan is one of two versions of the project currently being studied by the Payette.

The other plan would route mine traffic through Yellow Pine using Johnson Creek Road instead of building 13.5 miles of new roads to Stibnite.

The route used in Perpetua’s updated plan would cross undisturbed Forest Service land, but would pose less risk of spills contaminating waterways, the Payette’s original study said.

source: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — —

Background: Perpetua has been working to mine Stibnite since 2009

By Drew Dodson The Star-News February 24, 2022

Perpetua Resources’ proposed gold and antimony mine is located in the Stibnite Mining District about 40 air miles east of McCall.

Exploration of the Stibnite Mining District began with drilling in 2009. Since then, Perpetua has spent more than $250 million studying the mine site and collecting environmental data.

Perpetua, formerly known as Midas Gold, hopes to extract about $6 billion in gold and other minerals from Stibnite, the site of historic mining operations during World War II and as far back as 1899.

Perpetua needs approval on 50 different permits from local, state and federal agencies before mining can begin. Approval could come as soon as June 2023.

The Boise company’s original mining proposal was submitted in 2016 and is currently being reviewed by the Payette National Forest, the lead permitting agency.

Approval of the project would trigger a three-year construction phase that Perpetua estimates would cost about $1.26 billion, followed by 12 to 15 years of mining.

Gold, silver and antimony would be extracted from three open pit mines totaling about 473 acres.

An on-site ore processing facility would then remove gold and silver from about 20,000 tons of rock per day in a contained cyanide circuit, according to Perpetua’s operating plan.

The mine is expected to produce 100 million pounds of antimony and 4 million ounces of gold, which is expected to account for 94% of the mine’s estimated $6 billion in lifetime revenue.

Stibnite would become the only U.S. source of antimony and would supply an estimated 30% of the annual demand for the mineral in the United States, according to Perpetua.

Antimony is used in the renewable energy industry and to make flame-proofing materials, paint, glass, defense munitions and ceramics.

source: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
—————–

Tips & Advice:

Are you prepared for a power outage?

Feb 21, 2022 Local News 8

Power outages can occur anytime due to factors such as storms, animals and accidents.

When outages occur, you don’t know how long the power will be out, so it’s important to be prepared for both before the outage and during the outage.

Idaho Falls Power suggests the following:

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Take immediate measures to prevent frozen waterlines

Feb 22, 2022 Local News 8

… If pipes do freeze, do not use a torch to thaw the pipes. Applying too much heat too fast can cause the ice inside the pipe to fracture and rupture. Rather, safely use a hairdryer, space heater, or rags soaked in warm water to gradually warm the frozen pipe until a little flow of cold water is restored to the faucets.

“Space heaters should be used with extreme caution, in a well ventilated area, and according to the manufacturer’s guidelines,” Idaho Falls Fire Marshal Scott Grimmett said. “We’ve responded to several structure fires this year caused by inappropriate use of space heaters. They should always be placed at least 3 feet away from anything combustible. Purchase a model that automatically shuts off if tipped over, and never leave a space heater unattended while in use.”

full story:
—————-

Public Lands:

IDL asks Legislature to allow hazard pay for its wildland firefighters

By Anna Azallion Feb 24, 2022 KIVI

Yet another state agency is facing staffing challenges and drought conditions aren’t helping.

Earlier this month we told you about the possibility of a multi-year drought in Idaho, which could increase wildfire risks.

Now, the Idaho Department of Lands is hoping a new bill will help address staffing challenges on the firelines.

IDL manages the state’s endowment land, which makes money for Idaho’s public schools and other beneficiaries. Managing this land includes fighting wildfires on private, state and federal land. The department is asking for help from the state to make sure they’re equipped to handle this.

continued:
—————

Critter News:

Reminder: Clean up after your pet on public trails

Feb 23, 2022 Local News 8

… Cleaning up after our fur friends not only preserves the beauty of our natural environment, but it also protects human health, dog health, and our waters. Erskine says that Emily’s Pond and Cache Creek are especially susceptible to watershed contamination from animal waste.

Many diseases are also transferred between dogs through fecal matter/oral transmission, such as intestinal parasites like roundworms and hookworms. Bacterial and viral infections, such as Parvovirus, can also spread through fecal matter.

Trail etiquette starts with being mindful of sharing public trails with others. When pet fecal matter is not picked up, it can diminish the outdoor experience for others: It smells; it can be stepped in; it is visually unpleasant; it carries diseases. Please be respectful of shared trails by controlling your pet, picking up after them, and properly disposing the bag. Please do not leave a bag behind for others to pick up.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho animal shelter sees increase in animals suffering from botched home treatments

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, February 23rd 2022

West Valley Humane Society says they’ve seen an uptick in animals who are in pain from being treated by someone without the proper experience.

“We have been seeing an increased number of ‘home medical treatment’ cases at the shelter,” WVHS says. “These animals are being medically ‘treated’ at home with no veterinary supervision and unfortunately are suffering as a result.”

The Caldwell animal shelter shared two recent cases of this.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

‘Keep wildlife wild’: Feeding wildlife can do more harm than good

By Lynsey Amundson Feb 25, 2022 KIVI

‘Keep wildlife wild.’ That is Idaho Fish and Game’s message to Idahoans after a recent problem they’ve seen with people feeding wildlife.

“These animals have survived without us for a long time, and they can get through winter without our help,” Roger Phillips, IDFG Public Information Supervisor said. “They survive on their fat stores and they can last quite a while.”

In McCall, deer have no fear of visitors interested in feeding them. The deer were not scared of humans and were taking food right out of their hands. IDFG said this is a problem and no matter how cute people think they may be, feeding wild animals is not acceptable.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Young hatchery sturgeon tested before release into Snake River in Magic Valley

Sturgeon raised at the Niagara Springs Sturgeon Hatchery are almost ready to be stocked in the Snake River.

KTVB Staff February 25, 2022


Credit: Terry Thompson/Idaho Fish and Game

Young white sturgeon raised in the new Niagara Springs Sturgeon Hatchery south of Wendell will soon be stocked into the Snake River in South Central Idaho. Before releasing the fish, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Idaho Power test them to make sure they’re capable of reproducing.

IDFG said the white sturgeon are unique from typical hatchery fish, which are typically sterile when they’re stocked so they can’t spawn with wild fish. The main goal of sturgeon conservation efforts at the Niagara Springs hatchery is to ensure sturgeon populations in the Snake River can continue to support recreational fishing.

Eggs for the hatchery program are collected from naturally spawning sturgeon between Bliss Dam and CJ Strike Reservoir, then brought back to the hatchery to be reared for one year.

continued:
—————-

Letter to Share:

Hello from The Gamebird Foundation!

We at The Gamebird Foundation have so many folks to thank for the pheasants, Red-leg Chukars and the many other birds that you are seeing this tough winter and spring. The very important membership of this group; those that raise the chicks, build the brooders and the other equipment, and those that cannot raise chicks, but dig down deep in their pockets to help buy the feed and supplies to get birds from day old chicks to adult birds that we release into some of the best habitat that is provided by farmers and landowners for the birds to survive in for the public enjoyment.

We want to thank IDFG for purchasing the chicks for TGBF to raise and release for the benefit of us and the many others. TGBF had a great fall working with youth and their mentors on our Youth Access Yes area where all can come and enjoy viewing pheasants, taking some of the best photos that you can get in the wild. Kids and parents getting to handle live birds and turning them loose. Being able to visit with young hunters and their mentors, just the excitement that is generated by the hunt and the birds, some hunting with great dogs, some just enjoying a great hike.

IDFG purchased about 450 live rooster pheasants for TGBF to work with youth to release and hunt. We hope to have more Access areas for youth and their mentors this next year. We had sportsmen and women donate and loan TGBF 20 gauge shotguns so that we could help some of the kids get started hunting. Those folks also really need to be thanked. To our knowledge every youth that had the use of a loner gun now are a proud owner of their own, thanks to some parents, grandparents, uncles and just good folks that stepped up and donated a gun for a kid.

TGBF really thanks our State and corporate sponsors. These folks are really stepping up and have been a big help getting TGBF going. Potlatch Deltic Corp. CCI/Speers. Whiteman lumber. Cabalas Sporting stores. Idaho Fish and Game. Little Canyon Shooting Sports. The farmers, storage warehouses and seed plot operators that have donated cull grains for maintenance feed for the adult birds that are released.

If you would like to join us to find out more of what TGBF is doing we will meet Tuesday March 8th at The Farm Bureau Board room in Moscow Idaho. 220 farm road. If you need more information you can give us a call or email. We are a 501©3 non-profit corp.

Winter Feed for Winter Survival

The next month is a critical month for survival. Fat reserves are low on most species who have survived the winter.

If you released pheasants or red legged partridge this year or need to help birds in your area, we have some winter feed available for you. Please call to set up a time to pick up your feed, (208)883-3423 or email us.

We are looking forward to another great year and will be contacting all of our bird rearers soon.

Thanks!
The Gamebird Foundation
—————

Fish and Game News:

Shed hunt responsibly to protect big game animals

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Tuesday, February 22, 2022


James Brower Idaho Fish and Game

Just because snow has melted doesn’t mean winter is over for elk and deer

On Feb. 2, Punxsutawney Phil – aka, the fuzzy little varmint that miraculously forecasts the winter-spring transition on Groundhog’s Day – indicated there would be six more weeks of winter this year. The bigger takeaway from Mr. Phil is an important reminder that winter is not over for wintering deer and elk, so keep that in mind before you start shed hunting.

Shed hunting is a popular activity and an exciting remedy for cabin fever. Armed with nothing more than a good set of eyes, looking for a deer or elk’s shed antlers in late-winter and early-spring is a highly accessible hobby for those squirming like birddogs for the next outdoor adventure.

Shed hunting is accessible for all types of folks, hunters and nonhunters, youngsters, etc. You can bring your friends, your family and enjoy a day outdoors and maybe come home with a natural prize.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

F&G seeking information about mule deer illegally killed in Boise

By Brian Pearson, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, February 24, 2022

Fish and Game conservation officers are asking the public for information regarding a two-point mule deer buck that was illegally killed in Boise on February 12, 2022.

Fish and Game conservation officer Joshua Leal responded to a report of a dead deer on Goddard St., near Capital High School, on the morning of February 13. Evidence collected at the scene and during a necropsy led officers to believe that the animal was illegally shot sometime the night before.

“This deer was shot near the high school and in an area that is surrounded by residences and frequently has a lot of vehicle traffic,” Leal said. “We are asking people who may have seen suspicious activity around Capital High School on the night of Feb. 12 to contact us with that information.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Lake Cascade and Payette Lake ice conditions – Feb. 23, 2022

By Mike Thomas, Regional Fisheries Biologist
Thursday, February 24, 2022

On Wednesday, February 23 we checked conditions on Cascade and Payette Lakes. Surface and ice conditions remain favorable for travel on both lakes. However, on Payette Lake, surface conditions have become slightly less favorable with a layer of slush forming over the ice. Snow is forecasted later this week which may change current conditions.

Reminder: On Lake Cascade, we do not recommend using wheeled ATVs or UTVs due to unpredictable slush development and on Payette Lake we do not recommend any motorized forms of travel.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Hank the Tank, a 500-pound bear, was blamed for Lake Tahoe break-ins. But DNA evidence tells a different story

By Aya Elamroussi Feb 25, 2022 Local News 8

The massive black bear, known as Hank the Tank and blamed for breaking and entering more than two dozen homes in California’s Lake Tahoe area, is no longer the sole suspect, according to officials.

Authorities had believed the 500-pound bear was acting alone as he roamed the streets in the Tahoe Keys area of South Lake Tahoe, about 100 miles east of Sacramento.

But DNA evidence gathered by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife suggests several bears may have been responsible for the break-ins. The statement Thursday did not clarify if Hank was to blame for at least some of the incidents.

“While recent incidents of bears invading homes were originally thought to be a single bear, DNA evidence collected from the most recent incident as well as prior incidents over the past several months prove that at least three bears were responsible for breaking into numerous residences,” the statement said.

continued:
—————

Seasonal Humor:

BearBB-a

WinterArthritis-a

CovidForgotMask-a
—————

Idaho History Feb 27, 2022

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 95

Idaho Newspaper Clippings April 20-23, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

April 20

Bonners Ferry Herald. April 20, 1920, Page 4

19200420BFH1

Local Pick-ups

A half carload of monuments arrived here this week, shipped from the Inland Monument Company to local people. The monuments are now being placed over graves in the Bonners Ferry cemetery.

Mrs. L. N. Brown underwent an operation on Thursday at the Sacred Heart hospital in Spokane. At last reports she was recovering as fast as could be expected, the operation being a successful one.

The members of the recently reorganized Bonners Ferry Band are holding regular weekly rehearsals in the Christian church building which they have rented for each Friday night. All bandmen are urged to come out to these rehearsals.

Congressman Burton L. French recently sent the Herald a quantity of garden seeds for distribution in the county. Also a number of booklets on gardens and fruit canning, etc., and these will be given free to any one calling at the Herald office.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 20 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. April 20, 1920, Page 5

Local Pick-ups

Alvin Bush has accepted a position with the New England Undertaking Co., in Spokane. He has been in Spokane the past three weeks.

Nearly all of the ladies of the St. Ann’s Catholic church has signed a pledge to refrain from immodesty in dress. This action was taken last Sunday at the close of the regular service, following a talk given on the subject by Rev. Fr. Ryan. Reform in this regard has been taken up through many of the Catholic churches of the country and is meeting with a ready response. [* see footnote 1]
— —

Card of Thanks

The undersigned wish to express to their many friends in Meadow Creek and Bonners Ferry, sincere thanks for the kind help and assistance given in their recent bereavement of a loving and kind wife and mother. We wish to especially thank Mrs. J. J. Archer and Mr. Orville Archer, of Meadow Creek

Fred Hartman and Children
Mrs. E. W. Hartman
Frank McGill

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. April 20, 1920, Page 7

Round Prairie News Notes

On account of influenza there has been a shortage of men at the Addie mill the past week.

Arthur Rond is sick with influenza at the home of his parents near Addie.

C. N. Ward went to Bonners Ferry Wednesday for medical treatment.

Miss Dorothy Dunn finished her term of school at Addie on Friday and left that evening for Spokane. Her sister, Miss Pauline Dunn, accompanied her to Spokane where she will spend a short vacation before finishing her school term at Round Prairie.
— —

19200420BFH2

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. April 20, 1920, Page 8

Funeral Held Wednesday

The funeral of Mrs. Fred Hartman who died April 11 at her home at Meadow Creek, was held at the Methodist church Wednesday afternoon. The services were conducted by Rev. J. F. Gibson and many friends of the deceased attended. Beautiful flowers were brought by the friends of the deceased as expressions of their esteem for her. Interment was had in the local cemetery.
— —

Postpone Interchurch Drive

Rev. G. H. Wilbur, chairman of the Interchurch Wold Movement drive in Boundary county, announces that the drive will be postponed until about the Middle of May on account of the condition of the roads making it impossible to carry on a campaign in the rural districts.
— —

For Sale

1150 pound, 10 year old mare. Or would exchange her with harness and top buggy for a good heavy horse. Also a fine young Holstein bull calf, would trade for a pig weighing not less than 100 pounds, if taken at once. Phone or write H. C. Ward, Addie Idaho. (adv.)

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Winchester, Idaho nestled in the Craig Mountains (1)

WinchesterFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

April 21

The Challis Messenger., April 21, 1920, Page 1

19200421CM1

District Court Convenes 22nd

The spring term of District Court will convene in this city Thursday, April 22nd, but owing to the inability of Judge Cowen to arrive that date the court will be opened and adjourned until the following day at 10 o’clock in the morning. …
— —

Many Cattle Are Dying

Owing to the extreme length of the past winter and the great shortage of hay, many cattle are reported to be dying of starvation. For some time it was hoped that an early spring would relieve the situation but the grass has hardly started to break through the ground on the ranges at this late date and many cattle were so poor when turned out on the range that their weakened condition could not sustain them in their struggles for forage.
— —

Bayhorse Breezes

Hugh Patrick, Editor

The postoffice at Bayhorse is now serving the people here and we find it to be a great convenience.

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 21 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Challis Messenger., April 21, 1920, Page 2

19200421CM4Weak And Worn?

Has winter left you dull, tired; all worn out? Do you have constant backache, with headaches, dizzy spells, sharp, shooting pains, or annoying kidney irregularities? Influenza and grip epidemics have left thousands with weak kidneys and failing strength. Don’t wait until serious kidney trouble develops. Help the weakened kidneys with Doan’s Kidney Pills. Doan’s have helped thousands and should help you. Ask your neighbor!

An Idaho Case

James N. Thompson, Sixth and W. Idaho Sts., Weiser, Idaho, says: “I was troubled with a dull, constant ache through the small of my back. It hurt me so at times I could hardly keep up. I had always read about Doan’s Kidney Pills, so I got a box to try. I was helped so much I kept on using Doan’s until I was cured. I have never had any return of kidney trouble.”

Get Doan’s at Any Store, 60c a Box
Doan’s Kidney Pills
Foster – Milburn Co., Buffalow, N. Y.
(ad)

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Challis Messenger., April 21, 1920, Page 3

Idaho And Idahoans

The recent church census made of the state of Idaho has developed some rather startling facts and among them are that there are great sections of the state without religious influences of any kind, with no church organization, pastor, minister, or priest and no Sunday school.

J. Robb Brady has received authority from Washington to carry mail from Pocatello to Idaho Falls by airplane, and the postmaster has been authorized to dispatch the mail in this manner, by telegrams from Washington.

The city council has decided on drastic action against speeders in Buhl. A driving limit of fifteen miles an hour is fixed, and the town marshal ordered to do his duty in bringing to justice violators of this law.

The chamber of commerce at Nampa is endeavoring to devise means to care for the school needs of the town next season, which according to statistics, will call for accommodations for 500 additional pupils.

The question of bonding Adams county for $125,000 to assist in the completion of the north and south state highway was carried at the recent election.

School district no. 40, comprising of the Pingree-Rich precincts, has voted a bond issue of $15,500 for school construction purposes.

State school authorities propose to definitely determine how many defective children there are in the schools of Idaho. It is estimated there are 200. To verify these figures each county superintendent is asked to make a report.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Challis Messenger., April 21, 1920, Page 5

Items About People You Know

To Pocatello — J. H. Van Camp left the fore part of the week to Pocatello, where he will enter the Lynn Brothers Hospital to submit to an operation for throat trouble. Mrs. Van Camp accompanied him as far as his destination and continued on her way to Boise for a visit with relatives.

To Mackay — D. M. Burnett and wife were called to Mackay the latter part of last week by the death of Mr. Burnett’s father. The old gentleman was one of the pioneers of the West and numbered his friends by his acquaintances. Interment was made in the Mackay cemetery on Saturday afternoon. The many friends of the family here extend their sympathy.
— —

19200421CM2

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Challis Messenger., April 21, 1920, Page 6

Harmful Early Spring Grazing
Carrying Capacity of Ranges Has Been Materially Reduced by Practice
Season Will Be Shortened
Forage Plants Cannot Be Grazed the Instant They Begin to Show – Density and Luxuriance of Plants Are Decreased

(Prepared by the United States Department of Agriculture.)

Early spring grazing in Western ranges has so materially reduced the carrying capacity and forage resources that the forest service, United States department of agriculture, has found it necessary on many of the national forests to shorten the present grazing season from two to four weeks. This cut will be put into effect this spring.

“It is the purpose of the forest service,” states an official in charge of grazing, “to place the live stock industry on the national forests on a substantial, permanent basis. To do this it is necessary to produce a maximum cover of vegetation on all ranges. The first precaution is to avoid too early grazing. Every stockman interested in his business knows that forage plants cannot be grazed the instant they begin to show above the ground. Such early spring use of the range not only decreases the density and luxuriance of plant growth, but also reduces the carrying capacity and the fertility of the soil, and if continued, ultimately results in waste range.

Plants Grazed Too Early

“Studies carried on at the Great Basin experiment station in Utah have proved that where plants are continually cut back or cropped, the root system loses its vitality and the plant soon dies. On some of the national forest ranges, which are grazed early and heavily, the forage plants are showing similar signs of serious damage, and will rapidly go from bad to worse if remedial measures are not put in force. The old grasses, with their root systems weakened by repeated cropping, are almost exterminated and are being replaced by worthless weeds. Erosion of the soil has also started in many places and threatens serious erosion. Experiments have shown that off a ten-acre tract, heavily overgrazed, as much as 25 tons of earth and rock have frequently have been washed down after a few minutes of heavy rain. These are some of the things which follow in the wake of too early use of the range and from overgrazing.

Later Season Is Best

“A grazing season that starts late in the spring, thus giving the forage plants a chance to develop, and more careful management of the range, will do much toward bettering and eventually eliminating such conditions.”
— —

Catarrh is a Real Enemy and Requires Vigorous Treatment
Do Not Neglect it.

When you use sprays, atomizers and douches for your Catarrh, you may succeed in unstopped the choked-up air passages for the time being, but this annoying condition returns, and you have to do the same thing over and over again.

Catarrh has never yet been cured by these local applications. Have you ever experience any real benefit from such treatment?

Throw these makeshift remedies to the winds, and get on the right treatment. Get a bottle of S. S. S., and begin a treatment that has been praised by sufferers for half a century.

S. S. S. gets right at the source of Catarrh, and forces from the blood the germs which cause the disease. Special medical advice regarding your own case free. Address Medical Director, 106 Swift Laboratory, Atlanta, Ga.
[* see footnote 2]
— —

19200421CM3

(ibid, page 6)
— — — — — — — — — —

Main Street, Winchester, Idaho

WinchesterMainStreetFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

April 22

The Grangeville Globe. April 22, 1920, Page 1

19200422GG1

Gideon Unzicker Dead
Well Known Farmer of Joseph Plains Passed Away on April 13

Gideon Unzicker one of the well known citizens of the Joseph Plains country passed away at the family home on Tuesday, April 13, at the age of 62 years and three months. His remains were taken to Westlake for interment.

Deceased was born in Hickory county Missouri, January 13, 1858. At the age of 27 years he was united in marriage to Miss Ella Wilhelm, at Emporia, Kansas. They moved [to] Westlake in 1896, where they resided until the fall of 1910, when they sold their property and moved to Joseph, engaging in farming and cattle raising. About three years ago the family moved up on the Eva Canfield place, working for James Aram until taken ill with the “flu” about a week before his death.

Surviving him are his widow and six children, all with the exception of one child that was sick being at the bedside when death came.
— —

Returned From California
Evan Evans, While Spending Winter in California, Had Severe Illness

Evan Evans, who is a member of the state board of education, returned home last Saturday evening after spending the winter with relatives in lower California.

Enroute home Mr. Evans visited Boise and attended a very important meeting of the state board of education, and when at Lewiston gave his attention to some normal school matters.

While in California Mr. Evans suffered an attack of the influenza and for a time was a very sick man and is just now regaining his normal condition.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 22 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Grangeville Globe. April 22, 1920, Page 2

Among The Farm Bureaus Of Idaho

2,000 Doses For Blackleg

Last month 2000 doses of blackleg vaccine were distributed by farm bureau committeemen in Fremont county.

1025 Animals Vaccinated

There were 1025 head of cattle vaccinated in Madison county last month through the efforts of the farm bureau.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Grangeville Globe. April 22, 1920, Page 5

Whitebird News

Mr. Unzicker of Joseph, who died [of “flu”] Thursday evening was taken to Westlake for burial.

Dr. Fosket was called to Spring Camp this week by illness of Walter Lemmons.

Mrs. Lou Brust of Joseph, is reported quite ill, with “flu,” this being the second attack.

The dance given at Zeris’ Hall Friday night was reported very successful.

The steam shovel at Camp No. 1 is repaired and reported to be running again.
— —

To Trade

A Ford truck for good team. See Albert Fray
— —

19200422GG2

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Grangeville Globe. April 22, 1920, Page 8

Local Happenings

E. C. Adkinson of Ferdinand, was an arrival on last evening’s train and is spending the day in the city. Mr. Adkinson, who recently suffered a very severe illness, is slowly regaining his former robust condition.

D. H. Sasenbery, who has been confined to his home in this city for the past couple of weeks with rheumatism, was able to be at his place of business for a short time today. He is still pretty much of a cripple, however.

Alvin, the little son of Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Kennedy, had the misfortune to break his arm last week while wrestling with a small playmate.

Mrs. Walter Rape last week took charge of the Idaho hotel, to the rear of the Grangeville Savings & Truck Co. bank and has been having the place renovated throughout. As heretofore meals will be served at the Idaho.

(ibid, page 8)
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Idaho County Free Press. April 22, 1920, Page 1

19200422ICFP1

Gideon Unzicker Is Dead of Pneumonia

Gideon Unzicker, for many years a resident of Idaho county, died on April 13 in his home on Joseph plains, as a result of pneumonia. He was 62 years of age.

Mr. Unzicker was born on Jan. 13, 1858, in Hickory county, Mo. When 27 years old, he was married to Miss Ella Wilhelm, at Emporia Kas. In 1896 removed to Idaho, settling at Westlake,m where they resided until the autumn of 1910, when they sold their place and removed to the Joseph country, where they since rsided. Mr. Unzicker was taken ill with influenza a week before he died. Influenza developed into pneumonia.

Surviving him are his widow and six children. All the children except one were with him at the time of death. Burial took place in the cemetery at Westlake.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 22 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Idaho County Free Press. April 22, 1920, Page 2

Whitebird

(Special Correspondence)

Everett Taylor has been ill the past week with the grippe, but is reported to be better now. He is staying with his aunt, Mrs. P. O. Chamberlin.

Miss Doris Reeves has been ill with the grippe.

A dance was given Friday night at the Zerr hall. Proceeds went to Gilbert Daley. Every one reported a delightful time.

Mr. Daley will soon leave for Spokane where he will have his eyes treated.

After the dance Friday night, Harry Zerr, while taking a few road men back to the road camp, slid with his car over the bank just below the steam shovel. No one was hurt. The car was not damaged as it was not overturned.

“Doc” Warden and family, who have been living in Whitebird for the winter, are removing to Rice creek, between Doumecq and Joseph.
— —

Card Of Thanks

We wish to thank our many kind friends and neighbors for their kindness, sympathy and assistance during the lingering illness and death of our beloved brother.

Charles Hensley,
Mrs. Ada Desgranges,
Mrs. Ethel Boughton,
Mrs. Myrtle Wilson,
Edwin Hensley
— —

19200422ICFP2

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

Idaho County Free Press. April 22, 1920, Page 4

Obituary Sketch of Maude Ellenor Wyatt

The Free Press has received the following obituary sketch of Miss Maude Ellenor Wyatt, who died in Montana, and mention of whose death was made last week:

What proved to be the most severe shock of the year to the Wisdom community and school was the untimely death of Miss Maude Ellenor Wyatt, a freshman in the Wisdom high school and daughter of Mrs. Laura Culley, a former resident of Whitebird, Idaho. She had recently experience an attack of pneumonia, but was considered beyond danger when heart disease suddenly took her on the morning of April 8.

Miss Wyatt was born in Whitebird, Aug. 11, 1905. She lived there with her parents and attended school until three years ago, when she removed to Wisdom, Mont., with her mother. Since her residence there, she advanced rapidly in school and made a multitude of very close friends who mourn the loss. The simple but beautiful funeral services held at the Wisdom church were attended by the whole community. Appropriate music was rendered and many beautiful floral pieces adorned the casket. the occasion seemed praticularly [sic] sad, since the deceased was so young, and only a few days previous had been so full of vigor and life, so the sudden end seemed almost unbelievable. The bereaved relatives have the whole-hearted sympathy of the entire community.

Miss Wyatt is survived by her mother, Mrs. Laura Culley, half-brother and sister, Burton and Clarissa, and her grandmother, Mrs. Garrett, who reside in Wisdom, Mont., and her father, E. G. Wyatt, her grandfather and her grandmother, Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Wyatt.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

Idaho County Free Press. April 22, 1920, Page 5

James E. Hensley, Riggins, Is Called By Death

James. E. Hensley, a pioneer of Idaho county and prominent millwright, carpenter and cabinet maker, died at his home in Riggins on April 12. Word of his death though not unexpected came as a shock to his many friends. It had been known for some time that he was critically ill, having suffered intensely with rheumatism more than a year. He bore his illness cheerfully and with patience. Public funeral services were conducted at the Riggins cemetery, where the remains were laid to rest.

James E. Hensley was born in Walla Walla, Wn., Jan. 9, 1858, and came to Idaho when a young man. He served as a government scout in the Indian war of 1877. He also served the government as forest guard and trapper, bought furs in the north, and was among the prominent residents of Florence and Coeur d’Alene during the great booms and mining excitements.

In 1905 he removed to the Riggins district of Salmon river, where he later took up a homestead on Race creek, but illness compelled him to leave the ranch which he sold and removed to Riggins, where he resided until the time of his death.

Immediate relatives left to mourn the death are one son, and two daughters, Edwin Hensley, of Kellogg, Ida., who served in the late war, Mrs. Ethel Boughton and Mrs. Byrtle Wilson, of Wallace, Ida.; one sister and two brothers, Mrs. Ada Desgrages of Kennewick, Wn.; J. F. Hensley of Sweet, Ida., and Charles Hensley of Rockford, Wn., who was at his bed side when death came.

James Hensley was regarded as a man with many warm friends and no enemies. He was peaceable, upright and honest, and well liked and respected by all who knew him.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

Idaho County Free Press. April 22, 1920, Page 8

Local News In Brief

Boy Hurt — Alvin Kennedy, 10-year-old son of A. D. Kennedy, of the Hub store, is recovering from a fracture of a bone in one of his fingers. The injury was incurred while the boy was wrestling with a playmate.

No More Dances — To permit the various committee of the Cowboy band to arrange the hall for the Days of ’49 next week, there will be no more dances at the Deramland hall until Wednesday evening, April 28, the first evening of the three nights’ show.

Wanted — Housekeeper in family of four, one who will take full charge. Apply, Western Union.
— —

Personal

While the winter has been hard on cattle in the Spring Camp country said Mr. Smith, spring has opened and cattle are beginning to gain.
— —

Secure some post card pictures of the Cowboy band at Lamm’s drug store and mail them to your friends and invite them to the Days of ’49, April 28, 29, and 30.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Payette Enterprise., April 22, 1920, Page 1

19200422PE1

Public Health Nursing Service

A few representative people from different parts of the county met in the Methodist Church for a conference in the interest of Public Health. The proposition is to organize a Public Health Association and employ a County Nurse. The funds are to be sought from the Red Cross. The executive committee of the Red Cross held a meeting Monday evening to consider the Red Cross part of the program. A meeting is called for Friday evening which should be in the nature of a mass meeting and all who have an interest in the matter should make known their desires. The meeting Friday evening will be held in the Court House at 8 o’clock p.m.

At the close of the meeting an election of officers for the Red Cross chapter will be held. Chairman, Vice Chairman, Secretary and Treasurer to be elected.
— —

J. R. Banks, Jr. Improving

J. R. Banks has been at Boise for the last end days where his son, John Jr., underwent an operation for rupture caused from a kick by a mule while in the service in France. His condition was quite serious for some time, but we are pleased to announce he is now recovering nicely.
— —

Personal And Local Mention

Mrs. M. F. Albert and Mrs. Lester Albert are both slowly improving at the hospital in Boise, but it will be some time before either will be able to return home.

Andy Maneman returned last week from Rochester, Minn., where he went some time ago and underwent an operation for stomach trouble. The operation was successful and he is now much improved. Mr. Maneman says the people here don’t know anything about storms or bad weather as compared to what they have back there.

John M. DenBoer who went to Council last week as district fruit inspector, is writing to have the Enterprise sent to his address at Council, states it is very cold with a 60-mile wind and plenty of snow on the hills near by.

J. O Tunnell and Earl Coats of French were in Payette Wednesday. They report the Willow Creek country looking good with prospects of a good crop. Some of the ranchers are already irrigating their crops, utilizing the water now coming down below the reservoir.

So far April has been a very unfavorable month for orchardists to do their spraying. It has been exceptionally cold and windy for the Payette Valley, but the cool weather holding back the buds is a good indication for a sure crop. Some of the growers are complaining that the Jonathan trees will put out a light blossom this year, but it is rather soon to predict. Usually this variety requires a great deal of thinning, and a half crops of blossoms is ample for a full crop.

There are two things that don’t go well together – whiskey and gasoline, especially when the gasoline is in the automobile and the whiskey in the driver. What would it be at the present time if we had wide open saloons?
— —

19200422PE2

Looses Two Fingers

Clarence Dunn met with a serious accident Wednesday afternoon while working at the Prindle Planning [sic] Mill. He was running some small timbers through the planning [sic] machine with small buzz saw attached for cutting grooves, and in some manner caught his left hand in the saw, badly lacerating the hand and fingers. He was taken to the Doctor’s office where it was found necessary to amputate the two middle fingers near the second joint.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 22 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Payette Enterprise., April 22, 1920, Page 7

Fruitland Department
Mrs. Cosie Branthoover

Mrs. John Wilson passed away at her home south of Fruitland Saturday evening. Death was due to complications following the flu. The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon at the Christian Church in Payette.

Mr. Davis passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Louise Ward Saturday evening at 8:00 o’clock. He was 65 years of age. Had lived here two years, coming here from Utah. Mrs. Davis died just before they moved here. The body was shipped to Jerome Sunday evening. Mrs. Ward and family and Ted Davis left Monday morning for that place and the funeral was held Tuesday afternoon.

Mrs. Ward will go to Mayo Bros for an operation for double goitre before returning to Fruitland. Mrs. Beehler entertained Mrs. Ward and family and Ted Davis at dinner Sunday. Sympathy is extended to the whole family.

L. G. Hooley left Sunday morning for Welland, Wyoming, called there by the illness of his brother who had a stroke of paralysis and is very low.

While in Boise last week, Alma Reins had her tonsils and adenoids removed. She is recovering nicely.

Harland Polly met with a serious and painful accident while out fishing. He found a box with powder in it and to make sure it was powder he lit a match and it flashed in his face burning quite badly However the Doctor thinks his eyesight will not be injured.
— —

North Payette
By Mrs. F. G. Harland

School election was held in District No. 1 Monday afternoon. Mr. Suplee was reelected.

Last Friday forenoon the students of Dist. No. 1 cleaned their school yard and in the afternoon a Bird and Arbor Day Program was enjoyed by many patrons of the school.
— —

Little Willow

William Stirm is the man of the hour, on the big grader down in the valley.

How much is the two Willow creek valleys going to get for their proportion of the funds for road work this year? Will we have good graded roads out of it as we hoped we would. Being a Star Route we are entitled to some good work. Now don’t all guess at once.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — — — — — — — —

High School, Winchester, Idaho

SchoolHighWinchesterFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

April 23

Cottonwood Chronicle. April 23, 1920, Page 1

19200423CC1

News Around The S1ate
Items of Interest From Various Sections Reproduced for Benefit of Our Readers

Four of the five teachers of the Reubens schools are quarantined for measles. Many of the pupils have been exposed and an epidemic of the disease is feared. The four teachers referred to occupy a teacherage and only one of them – Miss Rongsted – came down with the disease and is quite ill.

Dr. S. A. Herrington of Plummer was given a preliminary hearing Tuesday afternoon before Probate Judge Mitchell at St. Maries on the charge of practicing medicine without a state license. He was bound over to district court in the sum of $500.

Rose Smith and R. T. Garrett, pickets for the Cooks’ and Waiters’ union at Boise, were arrested Saturday upon the complaint of the proprietor of the Silver Grill, for flashing from a hand mirror, the reflection of the sun in patrons’ faces.

Barney Netler, resident of the Lewiston county for many years is in a serious condition at the White hospital as a result of poisoning by olives eaten in a Lewiston restaurant. Mr. Netler was seized with cramps shortly after eating the olives and was in a critical condition when taken to the hospital.

An extensive survey made to determine the supply of farm labor indicated that the present supply is only 3 per cent less than a year ago. In several counties reporters indicate labor is being attracted to saw mills, factories and public and private construction by the shorter hours and better checks.

A storm of protest from organized labor in Idaho has been aroused by the announcement that Secretary of Labor Wilson has “suspended the immigration laws to admit Canadian and Mexican laborers for the exclusive purpose of cultivating, and harvesting the beet crop in Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Idaho and Nebraska.”

Governor Davis and approximately 100 other state officials and employees, signed the overall pledge. This makes nearly 600 signed in two days. The supreme court is considering signing in a body.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 23 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. April 23, 1920, Page 4

County Seat News Items

E. S. Sweet came in Monday night from Moscow where he had been in a hospital for a short time. Mr. Sweet has not been well for some time past and at Moscow was placed on a diet which it is hoped will afford him relief.

Reports received by Don C. Fisher, deputy state fish and game warden, from licensed trappers, of their catches, indicate a successful season, Mr. Fisher asserts. Under the law, trappers are required to report the number and species of animals caught. With high prices for furs, the trappers’ harvest this year had been big.
— —

School Notes

(By Wm. A. Lustie)

It’s too much to expect of any man or woman!

The average salaries paid to teachers are ridiculously low.

The demands made upon them by the general public are extremely exacting.

The teacher works not six hours a day as the program would indicate, but ten or twelve or more, because her day is not over when the last class is dismissed.

Teaching is nerve-racking work, it undermines health and vitality and brings early physical deterioration. Of course, somebody much teach school and there are teaching positions that properly challenge the finest efforts of our greatest educators, but it is not fair to any teacher to expect her to serve a lifetime in a mediocre teaching position under present conditions. It is fair enough, perhaps, for the young woman or young man to devote two or three years to community service, but it is equally fair that sacrifice should be equitably distributed and no one person should be called upon for an excessive share.

The above is taken from an advertisement by a prominent business college. These advertisements are sent to thousands of teachers thru-out [sic] the Northwest. At the top of the advertisement this evolution of the teacher is pictured:

End of First Year – Tired – But Happy.

End of Second year – Very Tired – Fairly Happy.

Sometime, Sooner or Later – Worn out – Unhappy.

Is there any other profession that can be appealed to in this manner? Are the American people willing to let the teaching profession remain such that it can be appealed to as in the above advertisement? Think of the shame of it!

Are the good citizens of America willing to stand for such insults, as the above, to be heaped upon the teaching profession? or are they not insults but just plain unvarnished facts? Whichever they are, you, Mr. Citizen have a duty to perform.

High School students should do some home study. Parents, are you helping us teachers in seeing to it that your boy and that your girls is not loafing on the job.

In a spelling contest in English I conducted by Miss Sully, Louise spelled the class down on the word elimination.

On Thursday afternoon, April 29th there will be held in the Gymnasium a display of the work done during the year by the Domestic Science and Manual Training classes of the High School. The Domestic Science girls are also planning a food sale.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. April 23, 1920, Page 5

Brief General News

The “overalls club” movement, intended as a protest against the high price of clothing, is spreading rapidly over the country. City officials, bankers, doctors, students, judges, dramatists, preachers, merchants and business men generally are rising en masse. In a sense official sanction has been given the movement, for the petition of the employees in the Norfolk navy yard to wear denim has been allowed.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. April 23, 1920, Page 6

Do You Now?

Do you know that since the organization of “overall” clubs throughout the country in an effort to bring down the high cost of clothing that overalls have raised in some sections from $3 a pair to $8.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. April 23, 1920, Page 8

Cottonwood And Vicinity
Personal Mention and Local Happening of the Week in This Vicinity

Reports are out that the moving picture show will again be put in operation within a very short time. The show has been closed since the influenza epidemic.

After an illness of several weeks H. G. Agnew made his appearance on the streets of Cottonwood Thursday for the first time since being confined to his bed. His many friends were glad to see him up and around again.

Mrs. Gus Kopczynski was reported quite ill the first of the week but is reported much better at this writing which is indeed welcoming news to her friends.

Little Miss Helen Hodges, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Plen Hodges of Cloverland Wash., had her tonsils and adenoids removed this week by Dr. Orr. The little lady is getting along nicely from the effects of the operation.

Mrs. T. C. Keith returned Tuesday evening from Eugene, Oregon where she was called some two weeks ago on account of the serious illness of her father. Mrs. Keith reports that her father was somewhat improved when she left his bedside.

Phil Wagner, Gus Maugg, Henry Hattrup and Ira Robertson were visitors at Grangeville Sunday going over in the Hattrup car. Returning home the boys got stuck in a mud hole near Fenn and while they are all of the opinion that the Dodge is a good puller when given an even break in the mud, they have little praise for it as a bed, as they were compelled to spend the night in the car returning home from Fenn on the morning train. The car was mired in the mud to the bed and had to be dug out with shovels.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Oakley Herald. April 23, 1920, Page 1

19200423OH1

In The Gem State

A number of cases of smallpox are reported at Burley. The disease has been hard to control owing to the fact that many cases are so light that those having it never know it until others have been exposed.

Memorial trees were planted in honor of Meridian’s dead soldier boys on Arbor day, April 14.

M. F. Albert, of Payette, who lost both his legs in France, has been elected adjutant of the Idaho department of the American Legion.

Notice is given that the United States hospital at Boise barracks will be opened to patients April 19.

For the first time in the history of Twin Falls county a jury composed entirely of women was empaneled last week to hear testimony in a criminal trial.

The city of Rupert is planning on a brick building to store all of the city equipment.

Word has been received at Challis that sheep in the valley are dying in great numbers on account of lack of feed and continued cold weather.
— —

Leslie Koch A Bum Weather Prophet

Last Saturday Leslie Koch said that he was the best weather prophet in the United States, Canada or Mexico, and that he knew we were going to have fair weather, and nothing but fair weather. We did not believe it at the time and now we know there was no truth in it. Just remember the snow yesterday, – that grand and glorious snow that fell so beautifully in spite of Leslie’s predictions.

Well, Leslie, we hope you will not become discouraged. Just keep on predicting clear weather, and if things turn out as they have in the past, every one of your predictions will be worth thousands of dollars to the farmers.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 23 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Oakley Herald. April 23, 1920, Page 4

In And Around Town

Mrs. C. W. Ryan and children returned to Oakley yesterday. For several weeks she has been with her mother, who has been seriously ill.

A mass meeting was held in the American Legion room Monday night to protest against the overall movement, which injures the welfare of our town by damaging the wool market. A committee was appointed to draft resolutions expressing the sentiment of the meeting. These resolutions were adopted Wednesday night.

For Sale – one millch cow, 40 good hens and 74 small chicks. See C. Oscar Eklund.
— —

Camphor And Witchhazel Help Weak Eyes

Oakley people are astonished at the quick results produced by simple witchhazel, camphor, hydrastis, etc., as mixed in Lavoptic eye wash. In one case of weak and nearsighted eyes a few days use brought great improvement. In another case it stopped eye pains and inflammation. We guarantee a small bottle of Lavoptic to help ANY CASE weak, strained or inflamed eyes. Aluminum eye cup FREE. W. W. Quillian, Druggist. (Adv.)

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. April 23, 1920, Page 1

19200423ME1

Public Hospital For Montpelier

Montpelier is to have a city and county hospital. This was agreed upon at a recent meeting of the board of county commissioners and city officials in this city. The need of such an institution has long been felt by both the city and county officials, and the matter was favorably discussed at the meeting and a committee named to make preliminary arrangements for the hospital. This committee is composed of County Physicians Dr. H. H. Kind, representing the county board, and the city board of health with Dr. George F. Ashley, chairman of the board, acting as chairman of the committee.

Whether this hospital shall be located outside the city limits or within, is the matter occupying the attention of the committee. The most feasible move, as fully agreed upon at the meeting, is to erect the hospital as an addition to the Montpelier hospital in order that the institution may be under the surveillance of the hospital staff at all times and the institution receive proper attention, instead of being neglected when not in use, as would probably be the case were the hospital built outside the city. There is a point of law to be overcome as to whether the institution can be maintained within the city, and as soon as this is decided, work on the hospital will be started.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 23 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. April 23, 1920, Page 2

Local Brevities

The Montpelier public library will hereafter be open to the public Wednesday afternoons from 1:30 to 4:00. This action was found necessary owing to the rush experienced by the librarian on Saturday afternoons.

Buy the Thomson Glove-Fitting Corsets. They are the best. Also call and see our line of new Brassieres. H. B. Whitman

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. April 23, 1920, Page 3

Paris Notes

(Special Examiner Service.)

Miss Ethel E. Redfield, state superintendent of public instruction, spent Monday in Paris. While here Miss Redfield addressed the students at Fielding academy and visited the Emmerson school. She commended highly the school building and spoke in highest terms of the educational facilities here.

With the convening of court here Monday morning, many cases are to be opened, and a large number of visitors in town are reported.

Shipments of phosphate from Paris are increasing rapidly. Work on the mine of the Bear Lake Phosphate company is being pushed further rapidly, while the output of the Western Phosphate mine is increasing rapidly. A cave-in on the mine tunnel caused delay last week, but the damage is being quickly repaired.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. April 23, 1920, Page 4

Painfully Bruised In Fall

Mrs. H. M. Nelson suffered a badly bruised neck through a fall on the kitchen floor of her home a week ago. An x-ray photo of the injured parts was necessary, and so far her injuries are undetermined, although not considered serious.
— —

Taken To Hospital

Theodore Closner of this city has been taken to the L. D. S. hospital in Salt Lake City where he will undergo treatment for blood poisoning in his foot.

He was removed to the Salt Lake institution Wednesday morning.
— —

Next thing we know these new fangled critters who are burning to “save daylight” will be trying to turn the sun back an hour.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. April 23, 1920, Page 5

Nounan News Items

Many of the people here are having a very serious time obtaining feed for their stock.

The students of the eighth grade have just taken their final examinations. Mr. Wright says he is quite confident that they will pass with glowing marks. One student who is especially strong in spelling received 100 per cent in the recent contest in that subject.

The Old Folks of Nounan were given an entertainment Thursday. A very delicious tray luncheon was served. Games and dancing were enjoyed by all.
— —

Plan to Order All Idaho Sheep Dipped

At the suggestion of leading sheepmen of the state, says the Boise Statesman, Miles Cannon, state commissioner of agriculture, announced last week that he has called a meeting of sheepmen at his office April 24 to plan for a general dipping order.

“The plan is to dip all sheep and thereby eradicate scabbies, root and branch, from the whole state,” said the commissioner.

The advice of the advisory committee made up of 34 prominent sheepmen of the state will be especially sought on the plan of a general dipping campaign, said Mr. Cannon.

Some sheepmen in the state, find it better to dip their sheep in the spring, others in the summer. A workable plan to which all can conform will be the object of the conference.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. April 23, 1920, Page 10

Commissioners Proceedings

Commissioners met pursuant to law this 12th day of April, 1920, at ten o’clock a.m. Present Ezra J. Howell, chairman, J. T. Peterson and Silas L. Wright, Commissioners, D. C. Kunz, Prosecuting Attorney, Dr. H. H. King, County Physician, and S. H. Rich, Clerk, and the following proceedings were had to wit:

In the matter of considering the purchase of a site and the building of a Pest House, the Board being fully advised regarding the health conditions, it was decided that the Board meet with the City Council of Montpelier on Thursday, next, with the view of cooperating with the City in the establishment of a Pest House. … [* see footnote 3]

In the matter of the application of Josephine C. Blade, of St. Charles to be placed on the Widow’s Pension list of the County, it appearing to the Board that she is worthy, and on the recommendation and order of the Probate Judge, it is hereby ordered that she be placed on the Widow’s Pension list of the County, and the County Auditor is hereby directed to draw his warrant in favor of said Josephine C. Blade in the amount of $15.00 per month. …

Current Expense

[excerpts]

LeRoy Loveland, quarantine services… $23.85
Modern Drug Co., mdse. for Co. Indigent… $1.50
Nettie Hillier, nursing county sick… $70.00
W. J. Crockett Merc. Co. Mdse. for indigent… $7.40
Mrs. Wm. T. Severn, care of indigent… $116.00
Childrens Home Finding & Aid Society of Idaho, care of homeless children… $32.50
Hyrum Nelson, quarantine services… $78.75
Riter Bros. Drug So., three fumigators… $1.50
Dr. R. H. Munson, dental services for indigent…$59.00
Bert Orr, quarantine services… $33.00
Hotel Paris, meals for prisoners… $34.00
Adeliae Tueller, nursing influenza patients…$64.00
A. S. Dimick, quarantine services… $53.90
Henry Nate, quarantine services… $178.50
Mrs. Wm. T. Severn care of indigent… $124.00
Motel Paris, board for prisoners… $4.00
Grand Restaurant, meals for indigents & prisoners… $13.50
Isaac Johnson, quarantine services… $20.55
Stafford Cleveland, quarantine services… $40.00
The Nielsen Furniture Co., mdse. for indigent… $34.00

(ibid, page 10)
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. April 23, 1920, Page 12

19200423ME2

(ibid, page 12)
——————-

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Modesty

And why is it that while men and women both wear shirts today, with very few exceptions, men do not wear shirts that are lowcut or left unbuttoned, or sleeveless, or fit the body so tight that they reveal every form of their upper torso. Yet women constantly do this. Men keep their neckline essentially closed, but women regularly wear clothing that directs the eyes to the breasts and is sufficiently disclosing that when they bend over, it leaves little need for imagination. Women wear tops that are so tight that, again, little imagination is needed. Men have enough trouble as it is with their thoughts and feelings without women blatantly provoking them.

Furthermore, pants for men have always been utilitarian. That’s the way of a true man. They’re functional and thereby loose in fit. But what does a women do to men’s pants? She makes them so tight and skimpy and low cut that they take on an entirely different purpose – to advertise her body – which should be fully hidden under God’s substitutionarly covering of clothing. Women took a sign of authority and corrupted it.

Men wear swimwear that is immodest, but it is no comparison to the virtual nudity of women. Men’s undergarments are generally modest and functional, but women’s undergarments are sensual, near non-existent, or even non-existent.

Why do women want to advertise their bodies? It is quite evident that since 1920 women have dressed to lead men into sin (to miss the mark). Why? Because once “Eve” ate from the forbidden fruit, she wanted the man to join in her fall, to enter into her level of demise, to enter into her “nakedness,” and thus, one again, she hands the forbidden to the man to cause him to equally sin. This she has effectively done with her clothing as well.

Considering the way women dress today – evidencing the major departure of women from modest dress following the Curse of 1920 – one clearly sees that Eve is passing along the forbidden fruit to get men to sin as well, to miss the mark. And where does this leave the man? As with Adam, he is now forced to either accept or deny the forbidden fruit liberally offered to him by women. And this fruit is not just offered by their immodest and sensual dress, but as we are seeing, by their corrupted ideas of home and civil government, by their desire to enter the man’s workplace, by taking on his appearance, but all these things and more that are direct consequences of the women’s rights movement. The women’s rights movement is the sin of Eve!

Even Christian women dress the way of immodesty and rebellion, tempting men as well, and giving absolutely no thought to it at all (other than the thought of how to look attractive and sensual). Is the woman entirely mindless about her actions? Where is her shame? One again they prove that they are the weaker vessel that is easily deceived. When are women going to wake up to the wrong they are doing, return to their places, and cover themselves?

Ladies, you are the ones who were used by Satan to get us into this cursed state, and you can help get us out. Consider what you are doing, have shame and sorrow and do what is right. Women need to:

Repent and get out of men’s clothing and the place of the man and find their place in the home under their husband’s authority, covering themselves in modest women’s clothing. This is your hope of overturning the destruction that has taken place through you. This is our hope as a nation.

This concludes the matter of the women’s rights movement, the first and the most significant prong of the Curse of 1920 …

source: pages 133-135 “The Curse of 1920” By Gary D. Naler April 1, 2007
— — — — — — — — — —

Footnote 2

Catarrh

The word “catarrh” was widely used in medicine since before the era of medical science, which explains why it has various senses and in older texts may be synonymous with, or vaguely indistinguishable from, common cold, nasopharyngitis, pharyngitis, rhinitis, or sinusitis. The word is no longer as widely used in American medical practice, mostly because more precise words are available for any particular disease. Indeed, to the extent that it is still used, it is no longer viewed nosologically as a disease entity but instead as a symptom, a sign, or a syndrome of both. The term “catarrh” is found in medical sources from the United Kingdom. The word has also been common in the folk medicine of Appalachia, where medicinal plants have been used to treat the inflammation and drainage associated with the condition.

from: Wikipedia
— — — —

Catarrhal Diseases of the Nose and Throat

J. D. Albright, M.D. October 24, 1896 JAMA

Abstract

To any careful observer, and all physicians should be such, it must have become apparent that catarrhal diseases of the nose and throat are becoming more and more frequent and play a most important part in the practice of every physician who gives more than passing attention to their treatment.

There seems to be a prevailing opinion in the minds of many of our profession that the correct treatment of these diseases involve the use of special and expensive instruments and require a more than ordinary degree of skill to use them properly, so that these cases are allowed to drift to the specialist, who, by the way, is often no more than a physician who keeps posted and has the courage to apply his knowledge.

By a moderate amount of study and diligent practice, by perseverance in the use of the methods at hand the general practitioner may overcome imaginary difficulties that seem to stand between him and success and he will be richly rewarded for his time and labor so spent. The instruments that may be called necessary are: A good light, a head mirror, a nasal speculum, a tongue depressor and a laryngeal mirror. With these as aids in diagnosis, if the examination is conducted carefully, we are certainly in a position to diagnosticate the existing conditions and therefore treat them intelligently. Among the laity there is much termed “catarrh” that bears no relation whatever to it, and in this disease more than in any other these people glory in making their own diagnosis, so that the physician is often taken off his guard and is led to treat catarrh on the strength of his patient’s words instead of a careful examination. …

continued: (pay wall)
— — — —

Nasal Instruments

NasalInstruments-aPublished in “Price List of Physicians Supplies” Chas Truax & Greene Co. 1893.

[Listed on Ebay]
— — — — — — — — — —

Footnote 3

Pest House

A pest house, plague house, pesthouse or fever shed was a type of building used for persons afflicted with communicable diseases such as tuberculosis, cholera, smallpox or typhus. Often used for forcible quarantine, many towns and cities had one or more pesthouses accompanied by a cemetery or a waste pond nearby for disposal of the dead.

More info: Wikipedia
——————-

Further Information

Masks

1918FancyMasks-a

Possibly 1930’s. No info, from unknown sources. Found on Twitter:
— — — — — — — — — —

Video: We Heard the Bells – The Influenza Pandemic of 1918

In 1918-1919, the worst flu in recorded history killed an estimated 50 million people worldwide. The U.S. death toll was 675,000 – five times the number of U.S. soldiers killed in World War I. Where did the 1918 flu come from? Why was it so lethal? What did we learn?

Public Domain. Department of Health and Human Services
Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services.
————

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports Feb 27, 2022

Note: Forecast calls for warmer weather and rain.

Please share road reports. Winter travel conditions. Most back country roads are not maintained. This time of year there is deep snow in higher elevations. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: Average snow depth Feb 27th is 23″. Local streets are snow packed, icy in some places, and the main paths have been plowed. Watch out for elk in the road. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Construction on ID-55 near Smiths Ferry has been suspended for the winter. Crews have winterized the work zone and removed equipment from the area for the season. All lanes on ID-55 are now open and will stay completely open until construction resumes mid-March 2022.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (Feb 23) mail truck driver says snow floor is breaking up in spots and getting a little rough.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Sunday (Feb 27) “Fairly good, bare some on SF and a little icy other spots, lots of rock fall going on.”
Report Wednesday (Feb 23) mail truck driver says snow floor on the upper end is staring to break up and get a little rough. Watch for rocks mostly on the lower end.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Sunday (Feb 27) watch for rocks.
Report Wednesday (Feb 23) mail truck driver says snow floor starting to break up – watch for rocks littering the road.

Upper Johnson Creek Road (Trail): Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Old report from weekend (Jan 22-23) “Thanks to the cold weather and good snow, for the first time in many years snowmobilers are crossing Johnson Creek Creek up close to Landmark & playing on those wide open slopes east of Johnson Creek, although there was one spot where a snowmobile had broken through the ice when crossing Johnson Creek – that must of been a chilling experience.” – C&L
Report Monday (Jan 17) “watch for a small slide toward the top of Landmark, on Warm Lake Rd.” Video posted on YP General Store’s FB page. Looks like you can get around it.
Report Wednesday (Jan 12) report the county groomer worked the trail between Warm Lake and Wapiti Meadow Ranch
Lower Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Thurs (Feb 16) “Johnson creek is smoothed up to the Cox ranch. still good snow floor for snow machines.”
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel
Report Feb 10: “Traveling the EFSF [Stibnite Road] 2/10 3pm to Profile Creek, just east of the bridge, there was a small snow slide across the road. Required about 20 mins of shoveling (2 people) to get pickup across. Carry shovel.” – MG
Trail report (Feb 4) “[We] came into BC this afternoon on tracked ATVs. The trail from the mouth of Profile Creek to BC is fast & smooth. There is about 7 feet of snow at Profile Gap with a little less than a 1 foot of fresh powder on top.” C&L
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
Feb 23rd report: “Road to Stibnite is good. We have been leaving snow cover for snowmobiles. No real slide activity right now.” – Dave W
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:

Payette Avalanche Center Link:
——————

Weather Reports Feb 20-28, 2022

Feb 20 Weather:

At 10am it was 34 degrees, slight breeze, overcast (clouds sitting down on VanMeter) and lightly flaking snow. Stopped snowing and filtered sun by 11am. At 1230pm it was 39 degrees, light breeze and starting to snow pretty good, socked in to valley floor. At 155pm tapering off to light snow, clouds lifting mid-way up the hills. At 230pm clouds above the ridges and not snowing. At 345pm it was 36 degrees, overcast and breezy. At 415pm it was 32 degrees and looks like it is snowing up on VanMeter – headed our way. Snowing pretty good at 430pm. Not snowing at 520pm. At 6pm it was 26 degrees, Measured 1 1/2″ new snow, breezy, overcast and light snow starting to fall – probably didn’t last long. At 845pm no new accumulation. At 1045pm foggy and had been snowing pretty good for a while and breezy. A break in the snow around midnight. Snowing very lightly around 130am, probably didn’t last long. Snowing lightly at 950am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 21, 2022 at 10:00AM
Mostly clear, light snowfall
Max temperature 41 degrees F
Min temperature 14 degrees F
At observation 19 degrees F
Precipitation 0.15 inch
Snowfall 1.5 inch
Snow depth 22 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 21 Weather:

Snow started 950am. At 10am it was 19 degrees, mostly clear and snowing lightly (weird!) Stopped snowing around 1050am and getting a bit breezy. At 1230pm it was partly cloudy and getting breezy. At 2pm it was overcast and breezy. At 315pm it was 29 degrees, overcast and breezy. Started snowing lightly just before 4pm. Steady snow at 430pm. At 6pm it was 23 degrees, calmer, socked in to the valley floor and steady snow. Light snow falling at 745pm. Not snowing at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 22, 2022 at 10:00AM
Mostly high thin haze, light breeze
Max temperature 33 degrees F
Min temperature 8 degrees F
At observation 15 degrees F
Precipitation 0.09 inch
Snowfall 1 3/4 inch
Snow depth 23 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 22 Weather:

At 10am it was 15 degrees, mostly high thin haze and light breeze. At 1225pm some patches of blue sky, thicker clouds and a bit breezy. Light snow falling at 140pm (didn’t last long), overcast and light breeze. At 320pm it was 24 degrees, overcast and chilly light breeze. At 555pm it was 17 degrees, mostly clear and cold light breeze. At 11pm it looked clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 23, 2022 at 10:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 26 degrees F
Min temperature -11 degrees F
At observation -8 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 23 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 23 Weather:

At 10am it was -8 degrees and clear. At 1215pm it was clear with strong sunshine. Getting a little breezy by 130pm. At 345pm it was 25 degrees, nearly clear (a few small “cotton balls” to the north) and very cold breezes. At 605pm it was 17 degrees, clear and calmer. At 11pm it looked mostly clear. Light snow fell some time before 930am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 24, 2022 at 10:00AM
Overcast, fine light snow falling
Max temperature 26 degrees F
Min temperature -8 degrees F <– previous AM
At observation 13 degrees F
Precipitation 0.03 inch
Snowfall 1/4 inch
Snow depth 23 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 24 Weather:

At 10am it was 13 degrees, overcast and fine light snow falling. Not snowing at 1220pm and overcast. Breezy at times early afternoon. At 330pm it was 24 degrees, overcast and light cold breezes. At 555pm it was 19 degrees, mostly cloudy (thinner) and hazy patches of blue sky with a light cold breeze. At 11pm lots of stars out and cold. At 2am looked clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 25, 2022 at 10:00AM
Clear very blue sky
Max temperature 25 degrees F
Min temperature -11 degrees F
At observation -6 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 23 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 25 Weather:

At 10am it was -6 degrees and clear very blue sky. At 1230pm clear and cold. At 320pm barely 32 degrees, clear sky and slight breeze. At 610pm it was 17 degrees and clear. Some very thin haze around the edges at 630pm. At 1045pm lots of stars. At 1am 0 degrees and some haze.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 26, 2022 at 10:00AM
Clear, slight breeze
Max temperature 32 degrees F
Min temperature -6 degrees F <– previous AM
At observation 1 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 23 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 26 Weather:

At 10am it was 1 degree, clear sky and slight breeze. At 1230pm a little bit of haze in a mostly clear sky. At 330pm it was 42 degrees, mostly hazy and slight breeze. At 605pm it was 25 degrees and mostly clear (a little thin haze.) At 1030pm it looked clear. Stars out at 1am. Snow started way before 930am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 27, 2022 at 10:00AM
Low overcast, steady snow
Max temperature 43 degrees F
Min temperature 1 degrees F <– previous AM
At observation 18 degrees F
Precipitation 0.04 inch
Snowfall 7/8″ inch
Snow depth 23 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 27 Weather:

At 10am it was 18 degrees, low overcast, slight breeze and steady snowfall. Stopped snowing by 12pm. At 320pm it was 37 degrees, overcast and breezy. At 335pm a few drops of rain. At 610pm it was 34 degrees, low overcast, a bit breezy and misting, roofs wet. Breezy at 7pm, gusty winds at 8pm. At 930pm it was 33 degrees and had been snowing for a while, about 1/4″. At 1045pm it was 32 degrees and about 1/2″ of slush, wet snow falling almost rain. Didn’t appear to be snowing at 145am, and previous snow melting. Probably rained during the night some. Started raining after 8am this morning.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 28, 2022 at 10:00AM
Low overcast, steady rain
Max temperature 37 degrees F
Min temperature 18 degrees F <– previous morning
At observation 35 degrees F
Precipitation 0.11 inch
Snowfall 0.5 inch
Snow depth 22 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 28 Weather:

At 10am it was 35 degrees, low overcast and steady rain. At 12pm overcast and raining. Just a few sprinkles at 1pm. Light rain at 2pm. At 315pm it was 36 degrees, low overcast and a bit foggy at ground level, steady light rain continues. At 615pm it was 34 degrees, low overcast and light fog, slight breeze and not raining. At 840pm light rain falling. Likely raining at 10pm. Raining lightly at 12am. Rain during the night.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 01, 2022 at 09:30AM
Low overcast, steady rain
Max temperature 39 degrees F
Min temperature 33 degrees F
At observation 35 degrees F
Precipitation 0.67 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 22 inch
——————————

Road Reports Feb 23, 2022

Please share road reports. Winter travel conditions. Most back country roads are not maintained. This time of year there is deep snow in higher elevations. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: Average snow depth Feb 23rd is 23″. Local streets are snow packed, icy in some places, and the main paths have been plowed. Watch out for elk in the road. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Construction on ID-55 near Smiths Ferry has been suspended for the winter. Crews have winterized the work zone and removed equipment from the area for the season. All lanes on ID-55 are now open and will stay completely open until construction resumes mid-March 2022.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (Feb 23) mail truck driver says snow floor is breaking up in spots and getting a little rough.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Feb 23) mail truck driver says snow floor on the upper end is staring to break up and get a little rough. Watch for rocks mostly on the lower end.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Feb 23) mail truck driver says snow floor starting to break up – watch for rocks littering the road.

Upper Johnson Creek Road (Trail): Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Old report from weekend (Jan 22-23) “Thanks to the cold weather and good snow, for the first time in many years snowmobilers are crossing Johnson Creek Creek up close to Landmark & playing on those wide open slopes east of Johnson Creek, although there was one spot where a snowmobile had broken through the ice when crossing Johnson Creek – that must of been a chilling experience.” – C&L
Report Monday (Jan 17) “watch for a small slide toward the top of Landmark, on Warm Lake Rd.” Video posted on YP General Store’s FB page. Looks like you can get around it.
Report Wednesday (Jan 12) report the county groomer worked the trail between Warm Lake and Wapiti Meadow Ranch
Lower Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Thurs (Feb 16) “Johnson creek is smoothed up to the Cox ranch. still good snow floor for snow machines.”
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel
Report Feb 10: “Traveling the EFSF [Stibnite Road] 2/10 3pm to Profile Creek, just east of the bridge, there was a small snow slide across the road. Required about 20 mins of shoveling (2 people) to get pickup across. Carry shovel.” – MG
Trail report (Feb 4) “[We] came into BC this afternoon on tracked ATVs. The trail from the mouth of Profile Creek to BC is fast & smooth. There is about 7 feet of snow at Profile Gap with a little less than a 1 foot of fresh powder on top.” C&L
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
Feb 23rd report: “Road to Stibnite is good. We have been leaving snow cover for snowmobiles. No real slide activity right now.” – Dave W
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:

Payette Avalanche Center Link:
——————

Feb 20, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

Feb 20, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
Oct 27, 2021 – Transfer Station on Winter Schedule
Nov 1, 2021 – Winter Mail Delivery Starts
Feb 22 – The Great Outdoors
Mar 1 – Blazing Saddles
Mar 8 – Mamma Mia
Mar 13 – Daylight Saving Time begins
Mar 27 – YPFD meeting at 2pm

(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Tuesday Movie Nights

Movie nights are still on. Come join us at the community hall at 4:30 pm every Tuesday. Snacks, drinks, and pajamas welcome.

February 22: The Great Outdoors
March 1: Blazing Saddles
March 8: Mamma Mia
———

Village News:

Feb 19th Pie Contest at the Tavern

Great time at our Annual Pie Contest. This must be about our 17th Year. We got to meet our new family on Johnson Creek Justin was one of our Judges. Lynn placed First with her Pecan Pie, Lorinne Second with Lemon Meringue, Cindy Third with Cherry

20220219TavernPieContest-a
— —

Arnold Aviation Customers New Deadline

Please email your shopping list by Sunday evening so they are ready to print early Monday morning.
— —

Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at wicap.org.
— — — —

Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Upper Johnson Creek road at Landmark, Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Elk Summit, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are closed to wheeled vehicles. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
— — — —

Critters

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be Elk Aware

Elk are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat has been hanging around the upper part of the village recently. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started November 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Thurs, Feb 16th, the trash in the bins has been compacted to make some room until they can get a truck in to empty them. Please flatten your empty boxes!

Report the road and dump plowed Jan 17th.

Report Jan 7th: Bins were emptied about a week and a half ago. Road plowed Jan 5th.

Dump update October 27th: We are now in winter mode. When it gets fairly full we will call to have it dumped. Contact Cecil.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

Water Use

02/11/22 20391695 46463 24 1936 32 F 493
02/12/22 20438419 46724 24 1947 32 S 261
02/13/22 20486312 47893 24 1996 33 S 1169
02/14/22 20533210 47898 24 1954 33 M 5
02/15/22 20581029 47819 24 1992 33 T 79
02/16/22 20628388 47359 24 1973 33 W 460
02/17/22 20675868 47480 23.5 2020 34 T 121
02/18/22 20724135 48267 24 2011 34 F 787
02/19/22 20764974 40839 24 1702 28 S 7428
02/20/22 20806624 41650 24 1735 29 S 811

Water Update Jan 19th

Hello Yellow Piners,

After the news went out about high water use, the demand went down about 10,000 gallons per day by the following five days. That seems to indicate that the message was heard and action was taken.

Mike Amos was a huge help when I came in on Sunday 1/16/2022 to clean filter #2. He provided a four-wheeler and shuttled it up close to Nicki’s place for me which was extremely helpful. I loaded it up with tools and pumps etc., and hauled it all up to the plant. Filter #2 was then cleaned and flow has been restored to an acceptable level. Please keep in mind that daily demand still exceeds the design capacity of the system by approximately 30%.

I also took the necessary DEQ compliance samples and took care of regular maintenance issues while there. Aside from the high demand, everything else seems to be normal.

Regards, Warren Drake

Water Usage Jan 9, 2022

In the past few days our water usage has jumped to over 61,000 gallons per day. In November we were consistently around the 27,000 gallons per day. I am thinking a water line has frozen and broke somewhere in town. Please let me know if someone hears or suspects major water leaks. – Steve Holloway

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

DRINKING WATER WARNING February 10, 2022
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 2-10-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 at the Community Hall at 10am. Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting held July 5, 2020 at the Community Hall 2pm. link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
— — — —

VYPA News:

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Chairman – vacant
Vice Chairman – Josh Jones
Treasurer – Ronda Rogers
Secretary – Hailey Harris
Member-at-large – Rhonda Egbert

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Ron Earl

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
— — — —

YPFD News:

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Meeting Minutes

January 30, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting (no minutes yet.)
November 23, 2021 Special meeting Link:
November 8, 2021 AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
October 31, 2021 Special meeting Link:
October 14, 2021 Special meeting Link:
September 27, 2021 Special meeting Link:
September 18, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sept 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
July 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
June 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sept 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 11, 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Winter hours:
Open Wednesday 11-6
Fridays 11-9
Saturdays 9-6
Sunday’s 10-6
Closed Monday, Tuesday and Thursday
Exceptions are by appointment and we’ll be open on Mondays of Holiday weekends.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Winter Hours at the Tavern
Open Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat: 9am-2pm 4pm-8pm
Open Sunday 9am-2pm
Closed Tues & Thurs
Call the Tavern 208 633-2233 or Cell 208 739-7086 for other arrangements
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
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Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed for the winter.
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Our Elk & Deer hunts are booked for our 2021 season, we do have a couple openings for our 2022 Elk & Deer hunts. We Also have a couple openings for Mountain Lion hunts December 2021 through February 2022 and Spring Bear hunts May of 2022. Please see our Website site for further details.
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 452-4361
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watikns can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
Please help support local journalism and subscribe.
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Feb 14) 24 hour low of 11 degrees from Sunday morning. This morning it was 31 degrees at 10am, mostly cloudy and light breeze, measured an average of 20″ snow on the ground. Red-breasted nuthatches, jays and pine squirrel visiting. Thicker, darker clouds by lunch time. Blustery breezes by early afternoon and filtered sunshine. Dark overcast mid-afternoon, breezes melting snow, high of 51 degrees. Started raining late afternoon. Steady rain at dusk, above freezing, low clouds and calmer. Rain changed to snow after dark. Still snowing before midnight. Stopped snowing not long after midnight.

Tuesday (Feb 15) overnight low of 24 degrees. Snowing lightly before sunrise, then occasional flakes at 10am and 30 degrees. Overcast (top of VanMeter foggy) and occasional flakes, measured 1/2″ new snow (and frozen slush) and an average of 20″ on the ground (SWE=0.22″). Several jays calling and bopping around. Thinner clouds and filtered sunlight before lunch. Broken overcast and breezy after lunch time (clouds still sitting down on top of VanMeter.) Overcast, gusty breezes and flaking snow mid-afternoon for about half an hour, then breaks in the clouds to the east and calmer after 4pm, high of 39 degrees. Overcast and breezy at dusk, spitting snow and a hair below freezing. Partly clear before midnight. Snowing before daylight.

Wednesday (Feb 16) overnight low of 22 degrees. Early morning snow, low clouds nearly to the floor. By 10am we had 2″ new snow (SWE=0.09″) 25 degrees and an average of 22″ snow on the ground and still snowing. Snow tapering off and filtered sun before lunch time. Partly clear by noon and breezy. Mail truck made it in on time, no troubles. Overcast by 2pm, top of VanMeter foggy. Mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, breezy and a few snow pellets, high of 35 degrees. Snowmobile traffic. At dusk it was mostly cloudy, calmer and an occasional flake of snow. Partly clear before midnight.

Thursday (Feb 17) overnight low of 7 degrees. Yesterday morning’s snow stacked up 1/2″ (SWE=0.01″.) This morning at 10am it was 8 degrees, clear sky and 22″ snow on the ground. Woodpecker drumming on the power pole, fresh fox tracks and jays visiting. Clear blue sky at lunch time. Clouds moving in mid-afternoon, nearly overcast by 4pm and light breezes, high of 44 degrees. Snow flurry left a trace late afternoon. Overcast and above freezing at dusk. Mostly cloudy before midnight. Clearing during the night.

Friday (Feb 18) 24 hour low of 8 degrees from Thursday morning. This morning mostly clear sky, 17 degrees at 10am and measured an average of 21″ of snow on the ground. Jays calling. Loud snowmobile traffic. Mostly clear and strong sun at lunch time. Mostly clear, warm and light breeze mid-afternoon, high of 50 degrees. Mostly clear at dusk, above freezing and calm. Mostly cloudy at midnight with filtered moonlight.

Saturday (Feb 19) overnight low of 15 degrees. This morning clear sky and light frost, 17 degrees at 10am, measured an average of 21″ snow on the ground. Snowmobile traffic. Jays, pine squirrel, hairy and downy woodpeckers and nuthatches visiting. Mostly clear and light breeze at lunch time. Mostly hazy by early afternoon. Warm with gusty breezes mid-afternoon, and gray overcast, high of 53 degrees. Overcast and light breezes at dusk, still above freezing. Appeared mostly clear before midnight. Started snowing before daylight.

Sunday (Feb 20) 24 hour low of 17 degrees from Saturday morning. This morning warm (34F at 10am) slight breeze, overcast (clouds sitting down on the top of VanMeter Hill) and lightly flaking snow. Measured a scant 1/2″ new snow (SWE=0.02″) and an average of 21″ on the ground. Pine squirrel, red-breasted nuthatch, hairy woodpecker and jays visiting. Raven calling far off in the distance. Started snowing again after lunch time, low clouds and getting breezy. Socked in down to the valley floor, light breezes and snowing pretty good early afternoon for a little over an hour. Overcast and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 41 degrees and snowed pretty good for less than an hour. A bit breezy at dusk, overcast and light snow falling, measured 1 1/2″ of new snow so far today.
—————-

RIP:

Clem Lloyd Pope

1948 – 2022

Clem Lloyd Pope, a 47-year resident of McCall, career Forest Service employee, father of three, and denizen of the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, died at home in front of the fireplace on Feb. 2, 2022. He was 73.

The cause was brain cancer, diagnosed in late 2021.

Clem moved into a basement apartment at the Hotel McCall in 1975. After seven years working on the Moose Creek Ranger District of the Nez Perce National Forest, he had secured a job as animal packer on the Payette National Forest, based out of McCall.

Clem spent more than 40 field seasons traversing and working in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, either on foot or atop or horse or mule in his Ray Holes saddle, often with family, friends, colleagues, and a pack string in tow.

From packer, Clem moved to the role of resource assistant and set a new precedent for managing designated wilderness areas in Idaho and across the country, starting with the 800,000 acres under his purview.

Clem oversaw and participated in the decommission of more than one unused lookout tower, set resource management and trail maintenance objectives for the wilderness, and proposed that a well-utilized crosscut saw can outperform a chainsaw in the backcountry – wisdom imparted on his kids during long days clearing trail or cutting firewood with a crosscut.

Exacting interpretation and implementation of the 1964 Wilderness Act underscored Clem’s professional agenda, which set him apart from many contemporaries, earned him the Bob Marshall Award for Wilderness Stewardship – one of the Forest Service’s top national honors – and perhaps ruffled a few feathers along the way.

Born in Burns, Oregon, in 1948 to Clem Leroy Pope and Phyllis Ann Pope, nee Lloyd, Clem spent the first years of his life in Oregon, notably Horton – where his dad worked for Hult Lumber – and Eugene, where he graduated from North Eugene High School in 1966.

Clem earned his undergraduate degree from the University of Oregon in 1970 and master’s degree in Natural Resource Management from the University of Idaho in 1975.

His son, Clem Vance Pope, was born in 1979 in McCall to Mary Helen Pope while Clem was on a hitch in the wilderness. Clem flew to town for a couple of days upon receiving the news via radio call, then returned to the back country to collect his pack string.

Clem’s daughters Kathryn Lea Pope and Margaret Gene Pope were born in McCall to Jodie Lea in 1991 and 1994. He is also succeeded by his partner Diane Lang, of Eugene, Oregon, daughter-in-law, Sarah Altemus-Pope, three grandkids: Ailah, Clem Owen, and Eli Pope, and four younger siblings.

He is preceded in death by favorite mules Molly, Amy, Red, Bryona, and Bert, horses Princess and Nugget, and both parents.

Clem earned his private pilot’s license at age 16, but didn’t put it to use until 2019, when he added a sport pilot endorsement allowing him to fly a powered parachute.

Since then, Clem could often be seen aboard his powered parachute – Destiny N423LS – in the early morning hours of clear summer days, cruising above Long Valley, Payette Lake, and mountains surrounding McCall.

It would honor Clem for people to spend time and energy enjoying and appreciating wild places, personally letting decision-makers know how much they value wilderness, and speaking up when wilderness standards are not being met.

source: The Star-News February 17, 2022
————–

Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 2,214 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 20 new deaths

Feb 18, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 2,214 new COVID-19 cases and 20 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 413,372.

The state reports data for the most recent 2-week period are incomplete. Due to the recent surge in cases, approximately 26,300 outstanding positive laboratory results are pending local public health district review and follow-up.

The age group with the most cases is 18-29 with 96,540 cases.

The state said 33 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 15,525, and 3 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,626.

20 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,674.

full story: [Valley County 2,439 cases, 16 deaths.]
— — — —

New Valley County COVID-19 cases keep falling

12th death in county confirmed from virus

By Tom Grote The Star-News February 17, 2022

New cases of COVID-19 reported in Valley County last week continued to fall, according to the county’s two hospitals.

A total of 22 new cases were reported by the county’s two hospitals, down from the 62 new cases the previous week and down from 119 cases the prior week.

Cascade Medical Center reported no new cases during the past week, CEO Tom Reinhardt said.

The two hospitals have reported 2,627 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started nearly two years ago.

A 12th death confirmed from COVID-19 was reported this week by Central District Health.

Troy James Presler, 74, of Donnelly, died Jan. 23 of COVID-19 complications, according to obituary information provided to The Star-News.

Three other deaths in Valley County have been ruled as “probable” from the virus.

Clinics & Tests

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine is now offering the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older. Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines continue to be offered for anyone age 5 and older.

Also available are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine boosters for ages 12 to 15 and to moderately or severely immunocompromised youths age 5 to 11.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link)  or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results for COVID-19 in two to three days.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

Cascade Medical Center offers a walk-in vaccination clinic from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster.

The Pfizer vaccine for those ages 5 and older is available in Cascade on Wednesdays.

full story: © Copyright 2009-2021  Central Idaho Publishing Inc.  All rights reserved (used with permission)
— — — — — — — — — —

Watkin’s Pharmacy

The Cascade Fire Community Fund Board reached out to Ben and Amber at Watkins Pharmacy, Coffee, and Gift Shop to assess the needs. They have communicated their desires to set up a temporary location for a pharmacy and also support the employees that have been displaced which will require funding that is not yet available through insurance or unemployment.

Our burnout funds will be contributing towards their needs. We have had several individuals, companies, and community partners that have asked how they can support or donate.

We have created a special donation link through our nonprofit and are able to accept donations to then further disburse based on the needs that Ben and Amber identify they wish the funds to go towards.

If there are cash donations, please contact Brad Howlett who is our Burnout Funds Board of Directors and he can help to centralize donations to avoid overwhelming Ben and Amber while they work through the needs of the community. You can also email us at cascadefirecommunityfund@gmail.com.

If you would like to contribute a monetary donation, you can do that by visiting our website and donation link set up. (link)

Thank you to all those that have reached out to support. We will continue to keep everyone updated as we can.

Kind Regards,
Mindi Anderson, DrHA, LPN, EMT
Cascade Rural Fire Protection District
President, Cascade Fire Community Fund
Community Outreach
(607) 651-5908
— — — —

Cascade rallies to support Watkins customers, staff

Work underway to set up temporary pharmacy

By Max Silverson The Star-News February 17, 2022

Several Cascade community groups have stepped up to help Watkins Pharmacy customers and staff after a fire destroyed the business on Feb. 8.

Owners Ben and Amber Watkins said they are working to set up a temporary pharmacy and coffee bar in Cascade.

Ben Watkins did not say where the temporary pharmacy might be located or when it could open.

Cascade Medical Center will provide whatever support is needed to make sure a retail pharmacy stays in town, hospital CEO Tom Reinhardt said.

“Even though so much can be done through mail order, there is a personal component to many pharmacy transactions that is very important,” Reinhardt said.

continued:
— — — —

Watkins fire traced to rooftop heating unit

Security videos helped state fire marshal find cause

By Max Silverson The Star-News February 17, 2022

The fire that destroyed Watkins Pharmacy in Cascade on Feb. 8 started near a rooftop heating and cooling unit, according to a report from the Idaho State Fire Marshal Knute Sandahl.

Video from security cameras at nearby businesses showed the fire started “around” the unit and burned for about 2-1/2 hours until it was noticed by a passing Valley County Sheriff’s Deputy, Sandahl said.

… Patient files and prescription records were saved, Watkins said.

“We are actively transferring prescriptions for our customers as we did not lose our pharmacy files due to being stored at an off-site secure location,” he said.

Patients who need to transfer a prescription can call the pharmacy number at 208-382-4202 or call their prescribing doctor’s office, he said.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley dispatch gets new equipment, location

New devices allow better 9-1-1 services

By Max Silverson The Star-News February 17, 2022

New equipment and a new location has made it easier for the Valley County Sheriff’s Office dispatch center to connect with people needing help in an emergency.

The dispatch center was recently moved from the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade across West Spring Street to the county’s Emergency Operations Center.

With the change in location the service also received a technology upgrade to bring the service up to speed, Valley County Chief Deputy Dave Stambaugh said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley sheriff adds online feature for reporting crimes

The Star-News February 17, 2022

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office has added a new online feature for reporting crimes, traffic complaints and other incidents.

“This was developed to better serve our community members and make the Sheriff Office services more accessible to everyone,” Valley County Chief Deputy Dave Stambaugh said.

The online police reporting form can be found on the county’s website at (link) by selecting “departments,” “sheriff office” and then the link to “online police reporting.”

Reports can be made for lost property, traffic collisions, property requests, crime reports, crime information tips, narcotics tips, abandoned vehicles, fraudulent use of credit or debit cards or traffic complaint forms.

Crimes must have been committed within Valley County and outside the city limits of McCall.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

West Central Mountains Fiber Network Broadband Survey

from Valley County Commissioners

WCM Community Leaders are exploring the feasibility of deploying community owned fiber optic infrastructure throughout Valley and North Adams Counties. We are now at a point in the process where we need to know whether this is something the residents of the West Central Mountains region would be interested in and would support.

Help us understand your Internet needs by taking this short survey. Eight questions and 3 minutes is all it takes! (link)

[Caution: This survey requires your email address and physical address to complete.]
— — — — — — — — — —

Impacts of being underfunded, understaffed felt for rural EMS teams

By Jake Garcia Feb 17, 2022 KIVI

Rural Emergency Medical Services are feeling the impacts of underfunding and limited availability of staff.

In December, a report by the Idaho Office of Performance Evaluations found EMS in Idaho are underfunded and understaffed. Under Idaho law, EMS is not considered an essential government service, which means it’s not guaranteed to residents under state law. Only 11 states have laws that make EMS essential.

According to the report, the average response time is 20-30 minutes in rural parts of Boise County.

“It takes more time for us to get to people, and so when you choose to live out here, you’re also accepting the fact that your emergency response is going to take a little bit longer than it does in town, and that just adds to the burden if you will on both the patient and the responder to do our job.” said, Carrie Wiss, EMS captain for Wilderness Ranch Fire Protection District.

continued:
—————-

Public Lands:

Lowman Ranger District is Hosting a Public Meeting for Kirkham Recreation Site Improvements

Feb 14, 2022

Forest Service officials are hosting a community meeting in Lowman, Idaho, to begin public scoping for new Kirkham Hot Springs proposals that protect natural resources, offer positive visitor experiences and support the local community.

Date: February 24, 2022
Location: Lowman Inn, 7600 ID-21, Lowman, Idaho
Time: 6:00-7:30 p.m.

“Over the years we have tried different solutions to minimize destructive behavior at this popular hot springs with minimal success,” said Traci Weaver, Lowman District Ranger. “We met with the community to brainstorm ideas and now we have a basic design, funded by the Great American Outdoors Act, to improve trails and accessibility, address parking and protect the fragile vegetation found around hot springs.

Besides feedback on the design and improvements the Forest Service is hoping to generate interest in establishing a concessionaire to manage the site. “Having a concessionaire on-site would improve public safety and curb damaging behavior,” said Weaver. “Recreation use contributes greatly to the local economy, and we want to continue to offer a safe and memorable visitor and community experience.”

The Boise National Forest continues to have a substantial increase in visitor use at all developed sites, but particularly at Kirkham Hot Springs. As a result, increased littering and resource damage have occurred at this popular location. Visitors are still encouraged to pack in, pack out, be responsible and respectful of others and have a safe and enjoyable time exploring the Boise National Forest.

To follow this project as it develops visit the Project webpage at Forest Service project 61601. (link)

If you would like to provide ideas or suggestions use the Forest web form by selecting “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the Project’s webpage. Written comments may be submitted to: Boise National Forest, Lowman Ranger District, 7359 Highway 21, Lowman, ID 83637 Attention: Traci Weaver.

Note: Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection in the Public Comment Reading Room on the project webpage and will be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act.
————–

Critter News:

“Where’s The Fish” Ice Fishing Tournament

February 26, 2022 at 8am-3pm Cascade, Idaho

Info from Cascade Camber of Commerce
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho wildlife boss: State’s wolves won’t be wiped out

Ed Schriever, director of Idaho Fish and Game, says liberalized hunting and trapping rules won’t lead to elimination of canid

By Eric Barker, Of the Lewiston Morning Tribune, Feb 18, 2022

Idaho’s top wildlife manager is pushing back at critics who claim the state is on course to exterminate gray wolves.

Ed Schriever, director of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, does want to significantly reduce the state’s wolf population. But he says those who claim Idaho is marching toward a 90% lobo reduction are wrong or pushing an agenda.

“The Fish and Game Department has a responsibility to manage the state’s wildlife. We are meeting that responsibility. Nobody is wiping wolves off the landscape,” he said. “We are trying to balance healthy, sustainable wolf populations with other needs, desires and uses. That is an incremental in the iterative process and it’s science-based. We do monitor. We do know what is going on.”

Last month the agency announced the state had about 1,500 wolves, the third consecutive year the state’s wolf numbers have hovered around that mark. The population — measured Aug. 1 shortly after the peak of annual wolf abundance — likely dips into the 800s in early spring just before pups are born. But it also indicates the state’s wolf population is stable.

continued:
————-
Fish and Game News:

Lake Cascade and Payette Lake ice conditions – Feb. 16, 2022

By Mike Thomas, Regional Fisheries Biologist
Thursday, February 17, 2022

On Wednesday, February 16 we checked conditions on Cascade and Payette Lakes. Surface and ice conditions remain favorable for travel on both lakes. Please be aware of warm daily highs leading into the weekend, followed by some snow forecasted on Sunday. On Lake Cascade, we do not recommend using wheeled ATVs or UTVs due to unpredictable slush development. On Payette Lake we do not recommend any motorized forms of travel.

Anglers are have been seeing a lot of chironomid larvae (AKA “Bloodworms”) in Yellow Perch stomachs throughout the last month or so. Larvae of these common, non-biting midge flies are an important part of fishes diets in Lake Cascade. These larvae typically burrow into the bottom substrate (mud/sand) and feed on decomposing organic matter (old weed beds, decaying wood, etc). Some anglers have found success by down-sizing presentations and covering a lot of ground (and depths) searching for active fish. Best of luck to all anglers heading out this weekend! Another ice update will be posted next week. STAY TUNED!

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Anglers: Give your input for the proposed 2022 spring and summer Chinook salmon seasons

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, February 17, 2022

Idaho Fish and Game is seeking public input on management strategies for spring and summer Chinook salmon for the Rapid River (lower Salmon and Little Salmon rivers), Hells Canyon, Clearwater Basin and South Fork Salmon River fisheries. Fish and Game will be setting new seasons for upcoming spring and summer Chinook salmon and gathering public input on the upcoming season proposals from Feb. 17 to Feb. 27.

The public can view and comment on the proposed seasons online at Idaho Fish and Game’s Chinook page.

There are also still opportunities to attend public meetings where you can enjoy complimentary pizza, listen to presentations on the state’s Chinook salmon fisheries, and discuss a number of important topics in salmon management. The four in-person meetings start at 5:30 p.m. and are still available to attend on the following dates and locations:

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Armadillo pup is so tiny it fits in the palm of your hand

by Lee Bullen Zenger News Wednesday, November 17th 2021

An armadillo has been born to first-time parents Vespa and Scooter at a Washington State zoo. In video footage, the pup can be seen crawling on a blanket, so small it fits in the palm of a hand.

The Southern three-banded armadillo, also known as Azara’s domed armadillo, was born at Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium in Tacoma, Washington, in late October. Females give birth to a single pup.

Yet to be named, the pup takes her first steps in the video, with her eyes still closed. At one point, the tiny creature is seen curling up into a ball. In fact, it’s the only species of armadillo that can roll into a complete ball to defend itself.

continued: CBS2 Idaho
——–

Seasonal Humor:

WinterBearTV-a

CovidCasualFridays-a
—————-

Idaho History Feb 20, 2022

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 94

Idaho Newspaper Clippings April 13-16, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

April 13

Bonners Ferry Herald. April 13, 1920, Page 1

19200413BFH1

19200413BFH2Nursing Course In September
Teach Home Hygiene and the Care of the Sick In Their Homes

Classes in home hygiene and care of the sick will be conducted in Boundary county during September and October under the auspices of the Red Cross. It was impossible to start the course in March as had been planned because of the inability of Miss Durkin, director of nursing activities of the northwest division, to send an instructor at that time. Miss Durkin advised Mrs. Faucett that they were obliged to suspend work in many places during January and February on account of the influenza and as that work had to be finished first she had no instructor available before the first of April.

The committee here decided it would be better to postpone the course until September so that the high school pupils might have the privilege of enrolling.

This course is designed to instruct women in personal and household hygiene; to aid in the prevention of all sickness and in the care of the sick in their own homes. It should appeal to every woman who is interested in maintaining the health of her own home and the community.
— —

Get Ready – “Clean-Up Week”
Civic League and City Authorities Will Co-operate To Make City Clean

Next week, beginning Monday, will be “clean-up” week in Bonners Ferry and the Civic League will co-operate with the city officials in an effort to make all parts of the town spick and span.

Mrs. F. A. Shultis will act as chairman of the Civic League workers. The city will provide wagons to haul away all the trash that has accumulated the past winter, which cannot be easily burned. Residents are urged to get their yards and streets cleaned up and to place the rubbish in boxes or sacks so that it can be quickly disposed of.

City Marshall Worley will make his usual spring sanitary inspections in the near future and all places that are not cleaned up will be cleaned at the expense of the property owner and if necessary charges of violations of the state sanitary laws will be preferred.
— —

[Schools]

Mrs. Caroline W. Flood, county superintendent of schools, reports that several more schools of the county have chosen new names, selected from the names of great men of the United States. District No. 19, at Porthill, has selected the name “Roosevelt”; the Paradise Valley school has selected the name “Lincoln”; the school at Naples has selected the name “Pershing.”
— —

Must Carry A Idaho License
Game Warden Issues a Warning To All Sportsmen

New and stringent rules put out by State Game Warden Otto M. Jones, require all hunters and fishermen to carry their licenses with them or to chance arrest for hunting or fishing without a license. All deputies have been instructed to ignore the wellworn excuse: “I left my license at home,” and the license and gun or rod must stick together.

W. H. Heathershaw, deputy game warden for Boundary and Bonner counties, states that he will enforce the new rule without fear or favor and that all violators will be prosecuted.
— —

Fireman Wing Seriously Hurt
Struck On Head By Arm of a Mail Crane at Samuels, Thursday

Claude Wing, a fireman employed by the Great Northern Railway Co., met with a serious accident Thursday morning at Samuels, Idaho, when he was struck on the head by the arm of a mail crane. He was pulled out of the engine cab and fell about thirty feet from the crane, suffering a fracture of the skull. When Wing was struck by the mail crane he was leaning out of the cab to watch a hot box that had developed on his engine.

Wing was brought to Bonners Ferry and taken to the Bonners Ferry hospital where an operation was immediately performed for the removal of a piece of the skull pressing against the brain. There seems to be a good chance for the recovery of the injured man unless complications set in.

Mr. Wing is a resident of Hillyard. He has been employed as a fireman on the Great Northern railway for about two years. He is 27 years old.

Thursday evening two members of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen came here to help take care of Mr. Wing. For a while he was delirious and would try to tear off the bandages on his head. His father arrived on Friday from Rockford, Wash.
— —

Wreck On S. I. Railway

The east-bound Spokane International passenger train was wrecked yesterday morning at Milepost 62, 15 miles west of Sandpoint. As a result the train was four hours late.

Baggageman Whitney was quite seriously injured, it is reported, suffering several broken ribs and severe bruises about the head. He was taken to a hospital in Sandpoint.

The cause of the wreck is not known. The baggage car, the smoker and the chair car went off the tracks but the engine was not derailed. The rear trucks of the engine tender left the track.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 13 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. April 13, 1920, Page 7

Local Pick-ups

H. E. Brown, of the Brown Timber Company, operating near Porthill, was in town yesterday. He plans to leave Wednesday for California, with his wife and son, who live at Sandpoint, and may remain a month. Mrs. Brown and her son have both been in poor health of late and are in hopes of recuperating in California.

Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Kinnear left today for Rochester, Minn., to be with their son, Emers, who has been in the Mayo Bros.’ hospital for several weeks, taking treatment and who will undergo an operation on Friday for tumor of the brain.

The members of the Reader’s Club held their regular meeting this afternoon at the home of Mrs. S. C. Witwer, on the Northside. Dr. E. E. Fry was on the program for a paper entitled “Modern Surgery.”

Fish and Game Licenses for Sale at the Hawks Drug store. (adv.)

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. April 13, 1920, Page 8

Local Pick-ups

S. E. Henry left Thursday for Hot Lakes, Oregon, where he will take treatment for rheumatism.

Eighth grade examinations were held last week in the short term schools of the county. State examinations will be held at the middle of May in the long term schools.

A small fire in the Bonner Bakery was discovered last Tuesday morning and was put out before any great damage had been done. Proprietor Buteau is having the repairing done in such a manner as to prevent future trouble and so as to make the bakery building fireproof.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. April 13, 1920, Page 10

Round Prairie News Notes

M. C. Gentry and family are all ill with the influenza.

Mrs. Bradley, who has been seriously ill at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Gudbaur, for some time, is slowly improving. Mrs. Gudbaur is just recovering from an attack of influenza and Mr. Gudbaur is now ill with the same disease.

There was quite a little excitement Thursday morning when it was reported that the Round Prairie school was afire. A water line was formed but it was soon discovered that there was more smoke than fire. The stove pipe had slipped together leaving an opening near the roof though which the smoke passed from a freshly kindled fire. There was only a small blaze which did but little damage and which was quickly put out. The teachers and the pupils used the water to scrub the place.
— —

Copeland News

(Received too late for last week.)

Mr. Donehoo is very sick with the “flu.”

Mrs. H. E. Dehlbom was in Bonners Ferry last week having dental work done.

Mrs. Leonard Pierson was in Bonners Ferry last week having dental work done.

Friday, April 16, is the closing day of the Addie school. Miss Dunn expects to leave on the afternoon train for Spokane where she will wait for her sister’s school to close when they will both return to their home in Texas.
— —

Round Prairie Notes

(Received too late for last week.)

Mrs. A. Gudbaur was taken suddenly ill Monday evening of last week. Her mother had been ill previous to this, but both are improving.

Last Friday afternoon Frank Dysart was kicked by one of Mr. Robinson’s mules. Fortunately he was not seriously injured.

(ibid, page 10)
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Street Looking South, Wendell, Idaho ca. 1909

Wendell1909Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

April 16

Clearwater Republican. April 16, 1920, Page 2

19200416CR1

19200416CR219200416CR3Has Cure For Tuberculosis
Physician Declares He Has Found New Way to Fight Disease
Attacks The Germ Capsule
Increase Power of Blood to Digest Wax of Tuberculosis – Claims a Large Record of Recoveries Even in Advanced Stages

New York. — Many physicians of this city have shown interest in a treatment for all forms of tuberculosis developed by Dr. Benjamin S. Paschall, formerly of Seattle, now of New York, and asserted by him to be more effective than quinine is for malaria.

Tuberculosis is not thrown off easily by the body as many other infections are, according to Doctor Paschall, because the germ manufactures for itself a capsule of wax which gives it a high degree of protection from the natural powers of the blood to digest and destroy germs and other foreign substances.

The problem which confronted him at the beginning of his research in 1907, according to Doctor Paschall, was to find a method of increasing the power of the blood to digest the wax of tuberculosis germs.

The theory which Doctor Paschall finally adopted was analogous to the use of iron as a tonic. The blood does not digest iron. But iron, treated with certain acids, makes a compound which the blood can digest. Doctor Paschall set out, he said, to combine the wax with chemicals into a substance which the blood could absorb. His object was to cause the blood to manufacture digestive juices which after absorbing this compound, would remain in the blood to break up and expel the wax of the tuberculosis germs.

Doctor Paschall, then according to his statement, devoted himself to the study of waxes and sent all over the world for different types. The analysis of the tubercule wax showed that a great many substances enter into its composition.

Asserts Self-Cure

He produced his first treatment in 1908. After various experiments on guinea pigs and other animals he became satisfied that he had discovered a valuable therapeutic agency, and his first human patient was himself. He had been a sufferer from tuberculosis, and he believes that he cured himself with injections of the compound which he had then made.

The theory on which the treatment was worked out resembles that on which salvarsan was developed, although differing in some particulars. Doctor Ehrlich, who announced his discovery in 1910, found a coal-tar compound which stained the parasite which he sought to destroy, but did not stop its activity. He combined that chemical with arsenic constituents. This compound, in staining the parasite, released the poison which destroyed its action, without hurting the human body. This process is reversed by Doctor Paschall, who possessed the latent enemy of tuberculosis in the wax, but had to find chemicals combinations which would make it available. His “mycoleum” differs also in that it is a combination of chemical and bacteriological products, whereas salvarsan is a union of chemicals only. And, while salvarsan attacks the parasite directly, the mycoleum is supposed to excite the blood to make the attack.

He at first used the treatment only in the case of persons in advanced stages of tuberculosis, who asked for it. Even in the advanced stages Doctor Paschall claims a large record of recoveries.

Doctor Paschall had scores of letters from former patients and physicians on the Pacific coast testifying to the successful use of mycoleum. One is from a physician who said that he was cured within a week of tuberculosis of the eyes, which had threatened to destroy his sight, after a long treatment by other methods. In this case Doctor Paschall asserted that he had treated the man when he was in a hospital, almost blind, and when surgeons were preparing to remove one of his eyes in the hope of saving the other. On the following afternoon, according to Doctor Paschall, he found the man on the outside of the hospital cranking up his automobile and preparing to ride home. In cases of tuberculosis of the eyes, throat or kidneys or other forms, in which the diseased part is in close communication with the blood stream, the beneficial results are manifest in a few hours, it was stated. In the case of tuberculosis of the lungs the germs diffused through the body are said to be digested within a few hours after the first treatment, and the patient regains much of his energy and feeling of wellbeing. Bone and joint tuberculosis are said to yield readily to the treatment.

Because mycoleum is in a laboratory stage of manufacture, only a small quantity is in existence and its present cost is between $1,000 and $2,000 a pound, each pound containing about 150 doses. Enormous quantities of tuberculous germs have to be grown in order to obtain a small amount of the wax. [* see footnote 1]

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 16 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Clearwater Republican. April 16, 1920, Page 5

What Your Friends And Neighbors Are Doing

Harry Stevens, an inmate of the Northern Idaho Sanitarium since November 6th, 1915, died at that institution Tuesday, April 13th, from pneumonia following influenza. He was 29 years old. The body was shipped to Genesee Wednesday for burial.

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Eller accompanied by Dr. Horswill went to Lewiston Wednesday morning to place Mrs. Eller in a hospital for medical treatment. Mrs. Eller is suffering from lung trouble and it was necessary to have a X ray examination made to locate and diagnose the ailment.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

Clearwater Republican. April 16, 1920, Page 7

19200416CR4Death Rate for 1918 Was Highest in History of the Country, Statistics Show

The death rate of 18 for each 1,000 of population in the death registration area of 30 states and 27 cities, with a total estimated population of 81,868,104 for 1918 was the highest on record, according to the census bureau’s annual mortality statistics, which show 1,471,367 deaths for the year.

Of the total deaths, 477,467, or more than 32 percent, were due to influenza and pneumonia, 380,996 having occurred in the last four months of the year when an epidemic of these diseases prevailed. The rate for influenza and pneumonia was 583.2 for each 1000,000. Influenza caused 244,681 deaths and pneumonia 232,786, showing rates of 289.9 and 284.3 for each 100,000, respectively, the highest rates which ever have appeared for these causes. The rate in 1917 for influenza was 17.2 and for pneumonia 149.8.

The other principal causes of deaths were organic diseases of the heart, tuberculosis, acute nephritis, Bright’s disease and cancer, which together were responsible for 391,381 deaths , or nearly 27 per cent of the total during the year.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — — — — — — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. April 16, 1920, Page 1

19200416CC1

News Around The State
Items of Interest From Various Sections Reproduced for Benefit of Our Readers

According to a report made to the directors of the children’s home at the monthly meeting held Saturday in Lewiston there are now 47 children in the home. Eight children were received during the month, four coming from a home made motherless by the recent influenza epidemic.

Increases allowed the teachers of the Lewiston public school will amount to $19,000. The average increase in salary amounted to approximately 35 per cent.

To Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Holbrook of Wendell, Idaho has come the unique distinction of celebrating their seventieth wedding anniversary, the rare event having taken place at Wendell March 23, with Mrs. Holbrook in her eighty-eighth year and Mr. Holbrook in his ninety-first year.

The city council of Lewiston has been petitioned to employ a woman policeman, or welfare worker, to safeguard the youth. The request was made by a delegation representing the women’s organization of that city. Mrs. Charles Smith was chairman of the delegation with Mrs. James E. Babb, Mrs. W. J. Jordan and Mrs. F. S. Randall.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 16 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. April 16, 1920, Page 4

County Seat News Items

Tillie Ketron, 2 1/2-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Ketron, died Wednesday morning in the family home in Denver. Death was caused from pneumonia. Burial took place Thursday in the Denver cemetery. A. J. Maugg furnished the funeral.

Snow is fifteen feet deep at Mountain House and thirty-three inches of snow lies at Elk City, according to William Noble of the forest service, who has just returned to Grangeville from Elk City. Snow of such depth at the present time is unusual, it is said.
— —

School Notes

(By Wm. A. Lustie)

“On her arrival in the town of her destination, she is informed that all reservations at the hotels are taken but is invited to sit in the lobby for the night. The following day she canvasses the town for a permanent rooming place. She wanders from house to house like a street vendor and is told again and again by the lady of the house, that though she is very sorry, it would be quite impossible for her to accommodate a teacher in this respect. Finally she is informed that “No doubt Mrs. Jones will room a teacher.” The Jones have a large home on the next corner with no children, and the teacher is directed to the Jones residence. On making her wants known the teacher is informed with considerable emphasis by Mrs. Jones, “No, indeed,” she never has roomed a teacher, never intends to room a teacher, and very curtly bids here “good afternoon.” –

At last she is located for better or for worse but too often in a place which is unattractive and unfit, with none of the privileges of the comforts, or of the atmosphere of home environment.

— From an article in the Idaho Teacher on why Teachres Leave the Profession.
— —

19200416CC2

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. April 16, 1920, Page 8

Cottonwood And Vicinity
Personal Mention and Local Happenings of the Week in This Vicinity.

Mrs. George Poler is reported on the sick list this week.

Dr. Orr was called to Ferdinand the first of the week on professional business.

Dr. W. F. Orr was a professional business visitor at the county seat Monday. The Dr. made the trip in his car and stated the roads were none too good for motoring.

Dr. H. B. Blake was called to Winchester Thursday morning on professional business. He returned home again Thursday evening.

Dr. and Mrs. L. A. Truitt who have made their home at Southwick for the past year where the doctor was engaged in his profession have returned to Cottonwood to make their future home.

Miss Anna Peterson, who has been teaching school near Vollmer for the past eight months returned home Saturday evening to spend the summer vacation with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Peterson. Miss Peterson closed her school last Friday. From reports Miss Peterson has conducted a very successful term of school and was offered the position for the next year with an increase in salary but at the present time has not signed up for the coming year.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Recorder. April 16, 1920, Page 1

19200416IR1

Mrs. Albina Blake

This well known lady passed away at her Salmon home, in Brooklyn, on the morning of April 13, aged about 65 years. She had been ill for several months. her daughter, Mrs. Stella Custer of Seattle was with her. At one time Mrs. Blake lived at Gibbonsville and later was lessee of a hotel in Salmon. A rooming house in this city which she successfully conducted for a number of years was recently sold by her to Mrs. Jessie Daniels.

The funeral is to take place from the Methodist church this Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock.
— —

Heavy Cattle Losses

County Commissioner George W. Yearian, who is attending the regular meeting of his board this week, says he fears 20 per cent of the cattle of the upper Lemhi valley will be lost to the ranchers from the prolonged winter. The unusual snow in that locality is barely gone.
— —

Restaurant Keepers Leave

The restaurant conducted in Salmon for a month by the Harps was found to be closed to its patrons on Sunday morning last, when it was ascertained that the managers had left town for parts unknown. Inquiries by the sheriff’s department failed to locate or intercept them in their flight. It was understood that they departed under their own steam, leaving a number of merchants and others to mourn the loss of credits given them in their restaurant business.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 16 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. April 16, 1920, Page 2

Don’t Whine In Sick Room
Remember to Carry Cheer, Not Sympathy to Those Who Are Temporarily “Shut In”

Every one is called upon now and then to visit the sick room. Conditions surrounding the bedside visitations present a wide variation. There is one rule that holds good under all conditions, and that is to carry cheer and sunshine – not a long face, but a smile. If the patients are able, talk to them of what is going on outside. Help them to forget themselves. A man who for over twenty years had been paralyzed, was visited by a friend who was profuse in expressing his sympathy and regret at the sick man’s helplessness. As he was about to leave, the afflicted man said, “Come again, won’t you, but when you do, please forget to tell me that you are sorry for me as every one tells me that. I’ve heard it every day for twenty years. Help me to forget it. Bring me a breath of the outside world.”

Flowers are always a gracious help in making the sickroom a place of cheer. A book or a magazine also helps.

– Thrift Magazine.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. April 16, 1920, Page 5

Salmon Locals

A letter from Mr. and Mrs. James [?] Sinclair, who are now at Cedar Grove, Mo., tells of the arrival of a [baby] boy for them on March 1, which [is] mentioned as overbalancing the actions that came to all of the family with an attack of the flu for all of them [since] leaving Salmon last fall. They will remain at Cedar Grove for the summer.

Mrs. Hagen finds herself again in the restaurant business with the departure of the buyers of her popular eating place in Salmon. With a competent force she opened Hagen’s again yesterday evening.

The report of treasure trove in the finding of a bottle of old stock out among the accumulated weeds and trash in the business district in Salmon has started a general cleaning-[?] among the townspeople. Let the good work proceed.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. April 16, 1920, Page 8

Leadore And Upper Lemhi

Leadore

Dr. H. H. Scarborough, the Eye Specialist, will be in Leadore, Tuesday, April 27, until 4 p.m. (Ad)

Mark Finley is nursing a sore hand the past few days. Blood poison is the cause.

Charley Maes has been laid up for several days with a bruised hand but will soon be out and at it again.

Mill Closed

Most of the force at the Sunset has been laid off and the mill closed for the time at least. We understand that the boys are having trouble again to draw their pay. This seems to be the main trouble at the Sunset. They paid the men for the few days worked in April but left March to look out for itself.

Horse Feed

Several of our ranchers will be unable to put in crops this spring owing to the weakness of their horses. Many of the horses have had a hard time to stretch the brittle thread to the present time, and the impossibility to get feed now makes the poor animals useless. Now is the time for the government to act if she has any action left and get seed to the farmer and assist him in getting it in.

Postmaster In Bad

Charles Denny registers a kick against the new postmaster but it is thought things can be fixed up so as to avoid a serious hitch.

In Denny’s complaint he alleges that he took a pair of shoes to the postmaster and made it known that he wanted to send them to Salmon by parcel post to have them half-soled. The postmaster weighed them and accepted the stamps for mailing, but later refused to send them until the owner had them fumigated. A number of the people who smelled the shoes are taking sides with Chase. Charlie is afraid that the publicity of the affair will tend to hurt his trade, so the less said on the subject the better.

A Sure Sign

Last Monday the train got in at 12:30 p.m., a sure enough sign of spring. Besides there are other indications, for instance, it rained last week and we have no snow and the weather is much warmer.

Leadore School Notes

The county nurse visited our school today. She says that Leadore High as an average has a very good record of healthful pupils.

Even though Miss Vedder is away the domestic science girls have class.

Hayden Creek Basin

Because the examination questions were not received in time last week Miss Lonita Tobias and Miss Verlin Holbrook are taking their examinations this week.

Tendoy

The Tendoy school was visited by the county nurse last week. We are proud to state that 7 out of 21 were perfect, which makes 33 1/3 per cent. Several more passed 98 and 99.

We have had a few nice days this week and every one is taking advantage and plowing, getting ready to put in their crops. Some have their sheep on their ranges but the grass is pretty short yet, and other feed, such as hay and grain, is being used. If the strike isn’t ended soon the stockmen will suffer serious loss on account of not being able to ship in feed from the outside. The range will not be in condition to turn stock on for three weeks. We have been reading some of the compliments (?) paid the railroad in our little valley but I wonder what would have been the consequences if we had had no railroad here at all. If that “crawling thing” hadn’t crawled in here with hay and corn time after time through endless hours of toil, hardships and suffering where would our financial support of our county have been? Our fields would have been strewn with dead carcasses of sheep and cattle. That the winter was an unusual one we all admit, and having had the drouth before it caught people unprepared, but I am sure that every man who had stock depending on feed from the outside are more than grateful to the “crawling thing” that proved their lifesaver.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Montpelier Examiner. April 16, 1920, Page 1

19200416ME1

Teachers In City School Get 33 Percent Raise

It will be good news to the friends of the public schools in Montpelier to learn that the teachers have been granted a 33 per cent increase in salaries. The teaching profession has long been one of the poorest paid of any public workers and the matter of wage increase has been given state wide attention. The action of the Montpelier school board in granting the increase is commendable and strictly in keeping with the action taken by other communities, and should receive the whole-hearted endorsement of every individual.

Three new teachers will be added to the local schools next season, making a total of 30 instructors in the city schools.
— —

City Water High In Chemical Tests

Montpelier’s water supply has recently undergone state and federal tests, and the various chemicals pronounce the water pure, having passed all tests. This is regardless of the fact that the water at present is not altogether clear.
— —

Feed Shortage Still Serious Star Valley

Instead of hauling hay and such other feed as is available into Star Valley for the relief of starving live stock, may of the cattlemen now are driving their cattle this way and they will be fed within a few miles of Montpelier.

The Star Valley Independent says:

“Through the efforts of Bert Linford, secretary of the Lincoln county farm bureau and Sheriff D. C. Oakley, the inspection of cattle going into Idaho has been lifted, and cattle that are to be taken there for feeding in this emergency may not be held up by not being inspected as the law provides. Sheriff Oakley telephoned the governor and explained the situation, who in turn gave orders to let the stock across the state line without the formalities of an ‘official inspection.'”
— —

Forest Service Notes

The continuation of storm is working a great hardship on the stockmen of Star Valley, who are practically out of feed and unable to secure any on the account of the shortage and the poor condition of the roads. Some stock have already been turned out in that vicinity, but unless spring opens up speedily there will be a heavy loss.
— —

Georgetown Notes

Gean Hays was called here from Oregon last week to attend his brother David’s funeral, which was held Friday. A large attendance and many beautiful flower.

The funeral of Mrs. Alice Hayes which was held Wednesday, was a most beautiful funeral. The speakers, audience and flowers all spoke of Mrs. Hayes’ goodness.

The hay question is getting mightily serious around here. There are a number pretty low on hay.
— —

Paris Notes

(Examiner Special Service.)

A lively party was given Tuesday evening by the members of the Emerson Seventh grade sewing club. The boys and girls present enjoyed to the fullest extent the lively games and delicious refreshments.

Miss Gladys Horsley, teacher at the Emerson school, spent the weekend at her home in Soda Springs.

Through the agency of the Farm Bureau several cars of hay and grain have been shipped in to relieve the feed situation. Several Star Valley farmers have been here to procure hay for their stock in Star Valley.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 16 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. April 16, 1920, Page 10

In The Gem State

Idaho’s first annual motor car show was held at Pocatello last week.

Teamsters at Boise have gone on strike, demanding $5 per day for eight hours.

The second annual state convention of the American Legion was held at Twin Falls last week. Five hundred delegates were present.

Paul Coats, who was bitten by a rabid coyote at his ranch near Fish creek a few days ago, has gone to Salt Lake for a special pasteur treatment.

Contracts have been let for the new resort structure at Lava Hot Springs. Contract for the building calls for the expenditure of $33,908 and for the plumbing and heating, $7,368.

The Natatorium at Boise has again passed into the hands of the Boise Artesian Hot and Cold Water company, the original owners. The original cost of the plant was $95,000. When the Boise Railway company bought the property it paid $150,000.

Federal officials are in possession of a complete distilling outfit thought to be the largest taken in the state, and some 500 gallons of corn and bran mash. The still was located about twelve miles northeast of Blackfoot, in a pocket in the lava flow.

(ibid, page 10)
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. April 16, 1920, Page 12

Local News

Mrs. Laverne Jones of this city is confined in a Salt Lake hospital where she is recovery [sic] splendidly from a serious operation recently performed.

Mrs. Fred Sarback, Sr., is spending a few days in Salt Lake visiting her son Walter Sarback, who is confined in a Salt Lake hospital.

(ibid, page 12)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Republican. April 16, 1920, Page 1

19200416TIR1

19200416TIR2Campaign To Rid County Of Flies Is Taking Form
Five Days, April 26 to 30, Will Be Devoted to Cleaning Up Community
“Swat The Fly”
Clean-Up Program Is in Charge of Miss Stockard

The “Swat the Fly” campaign is rapidly taking form under the direction of Miss Chloe Stockard, boys’ and girls’ county club leader. From April 26 to 30 is to be devoted to the campaign and at that time all filth, refuse and other breeding places of the fly will be cleaned up. In an article on the work, Miss Stockard says:

This is the time to begin the war on the flies. Don’t wait until they are already here as you give them a chance to begin their deadly work. Get rid of their favorite places of breeding, such as the manure pile and the garbage heap. Flies not only breed in filth, but they feed on it and then contaminate everything they lay their hairy little legs on. Let’s see that Blackfoot has a decided decrease in its fly population this summer.

Descendants from a single overwintering female fly by September would number 5,598,720,000,000.

A well infested manure pile may contain from 1,200 to 2,000 maggots per pound of manure. Not all of a large pile of manure is infested to this extent.

A single fly may carry 6,600,000 bacteria.

The fly may carry the following disease bacteria: Typhoid fever, tuberculosis, cholera, dysentery and “summer complaint.”

The house fly exists only thru the toleration of men – a toleration which, were it not ignorant, would be criminal.

The house fly is the most terrible single enemy that mankind has among living creatures. Beasts of the jungle have slain their thousands, but this prowler in the household has slain his tens of thousands. Of all vermin he is the most filthy; of all purveyors of disease the most deadly.

The house fly is born in offal – nowhere else. All his life is in the manure pile, the cuspidor and the cesspool are his home.
— —

Plane Carries Mail to Falls

Pocatello — The first aerial mail in Idaho was delivered Wednesday by Pilot Barker, when a large mail sack of first and second class mail was taken in Barker’s airplane to Idaho Falls. The mail was addressed “via airplane,” according to regulations, and left here at 12:20. Barker made the trip without mishap and returned to Pocatello to take up some passengers who were prevented from flying last week on account of a light break in the machine.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 16 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. April 16, 1920, Page 2

Big Game Census Shows Increase
Plenty of Deer, Elk and Mountain Goats Says Jones

Federal forest service officials, submitting to Otto M. Jones, state game warden, their 1919 game census for southern Idaho, Thursday reported rapid increase in big game in the state.

Here are the present totals reported by forest supervisors of game in the Boise, Cache, Caribou, Idaho, Lemhi, Minidoka, Payette, Salmon, Sawtooth, Targhee and Weiser national forests: Deer, 16,575; elk, 1200; mountain goats, 2861; mountain sheep, 1134; moose, 70; antelope, 284.

In the same territory there were killed during the year 1090 deer, 30 elk and 80 mountain goats.

“Nearly all the supervisors report an increase in big game,” said R. C. Gery, acting district forester at Ogden. This is generally attributed to the game preserves, to destruction of predatory animals and better enforcement of laws.

A continuous closed season for mountain sheep is recommended, however. Mr. Gery said: “In spite of the closed season, the mountain sheep do not seem to be more than holding their own. The total number of sheep is very small considering the area involved and it is evident that a continuous closed season is necessary.”

Other excerpts from the report are here given:

“There is an increase of moose on the Targhee forest and it is hoped that a more rapid spread of this excellent game animal will result. It is apparent that it will survive more adverse winter conditions of snow and forage than either deer or elk.

“On several forests, September 15 is believed to be too early for the deer season to open and one is recommended opening October 15. If the number of hunters continues to increase, a shortening of the season will be necessary, and in that case it could begin October 1 and extend to November 15.

“The present season for elk in the counties adjoining Wyoming was apparently based on the former season in Wyoming and is too long. The supervisor of the Targhee forest recommends a season from October 15 or November 1 to November 15. September 15 is too early for it to open, since it is the running [sic] season and too warm for the meat to be utilized.

“It is apparently desirable to make an adjustment of the game preserve in Twin Falls and Cassia counties. The deer range in Nevada, Utah and Idaho, the greater number of them being in Idaho during the summer season. These two counties in Idaho are closed to deer hunting, but there is an open season of ten days in Utah and thirty days in Nevada. Local sentiment will not support protection under these conditions. The law is weakened where residents of Idaho are prohibited from killing deer which may cross the state lines and be killed in Nevada or Utah. It is very probable that a smaller area designated as game preserve in Idaho would allow Idaho residents an equal opportunity with those of Nevada and Utah to hunt and still obtain the objects of the game preserve.

“The condition of game birds is not nearly as satisfactory as that of big game. There is practically a unanimous report that the three grouse – dusky, ruffled and Franklin’s, are decreasing, in most cases rapidly. Wherever protected the sage hens have increased and there is a general belief that the supply can be maintained with a short season and small bag limit.

“The destruction of predatory animals is of particular importance in connection with game production since there is a far greater loss from this source than by poaching, even under very lax enforcement of the laws. On several of the game preserves, the losses of game from predatory animals or eagles is preventing a proper increase. Encouragement should be given to trapping by responsible parties within game preserves.

“In view of the exceptionally high prices of furs, it is probable that the supply of fur bearing animals will be redued to a point where the production and value of furs obtainable will be much lower than it should be. In the case of predatory animals, this will be beneficial, but it appears that it will be necessary to designate game preserves in order to maintain a supply of fur bearing animals not excessively destructive to game. All the forests report a decrease in fur bearing animals except those generally considered predatory.

“There is reported a very general and decided decrease in the fish supply from all waters except those which are inaccessible. There has been an immense increase in the number of fishermen and the decrease can be expected in spite of the increase in distribution of fish for stocking purposes. The reasons are (1) the heavy fishing, (2) the loss in unscreened ditches and (3) low water resulting from drouths.”

The forestry department recommends increases in the number of game preserves and bird sanctuaries and heavy restocking of fishing streams.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. April 16, 1920, Page 3

Rose

Delbert Taylor is ill with the small pox.

George Wareing is unable to attend school on account of the small pox.

The children of the eighth grade took the examinations in geography and history last week.
— —

Shelley

A number of Shelley business men attended the boxing match at Idaho Falls Monday evening.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. April 16, 1920, Page 4

19200416TIR4Last Influenza Epidemic Cost $5,000,000 Insurance

The influenza-pneumonia epidemic, now virtually ended, has cost the life insurance companies of the United States about $5,000,000, according to an estimate made by an official of one of the big eastern companies.

This figure is about one-quarter of the insurance paid out to influenza and pneumonia victims during the epidemic of 1918-1919, he said.
— —

No Airplane Patrol For Idaho Forests

Idaho’s hopes of forest airplane patrols were very weak Tuesday following a receipt of a telegram from Addison T. Smith, member of congress, who has been asked to take up with executive officials the reported army plan to limit the patrol to California and Oregon only.

The congressman said:

“Western members are co-operating towards securing if possible additional appropriations to permit extending aerial patrol forest service. Secretary of War Baker contends that under existing appropriation it is impossible for him to extend the service to Idaho, Washington and Montana.
— —

Red-Haired Old Maids Scarce, Says Briton

London — “Have you noticed that there are very few red-haired old maids?” said an authoritative anthropologist. “Red-haired people are of a very high order of intelligence. Consequently red-haired girls have many admirers and marry young.”

His opinion was expressed relative to the statement of a cinema producer that brunettes are cleverer than blondes. Several scientists agree generally that both men and women of dark complexion are quick-witted and imaginative, while the great majority of fair people are more hardheaded but a little slower in mental response.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. April 16, 1920, Page 5

Local News

Mrs. W. R. Young of Goshen is reported to be very ill.

Miss Grace Faulconer, county superintendent of schools, inspected the schools at Goshen and Jamestown Thursday.

Dr. W. W. Beck returned Tuesday night from the east, where he has been taking post graduate work in surgery and attending clinic. Mrs. Beck met him at Cheyenne on his way home.
— —

19200416TIR5

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. April 16, 1920, Page 8

19200416CT1

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Arena Valley Items

The Moore boys have recovered from the mumps, but Mr. Moore is ill again.

Several in the Klan family are on the sick list this week.

The Circle met last Wednesday at the Carl Case home with Mrs. Oates as hostess. A short business session was held at which a letter from county health headquarters was read urging the community to see that each home is put in the very best sanitary condition on or before the week of April 19-24, which is “county cleanup” week to try and reduce the fly question to a minimum. Inspectors will be out to see how well the law has been complied with. A program of music and recitations followed and a delicious cake and coffee were served by the hostess. The next meeting will be with Mrs. Al Ewing April 21.

Water is now in the ditch for the season’s irrigation.

Wilder Items

Miss Russell, assistant at the post office is quite ill at the Patterson hotel.

Dr. and Mrs. W. W. Bauer took Sunday dinner with Dr. and Mrs. A. B. Boeck.

Rev. L. G. Black, who has been at the Mayos for a short time, having a physical examination has returned and is hopeful of being relieved of his suffering without an operation.

North Sunny Slope

Bert Spencer had the misfortune to get his arm broken when he was thrown off a horse recently.

Sam Vanhyning got his wrist broke and Lorin Wallace his leg broke this week. Sunny Slope is quite a bone breaking place lately.

Miss Ruth Hammer has been giving the eighth grade pupils their examinations the past week.

Marble Front

Mr. Van McElwain is recovering from the measles.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 16 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. April 16, 1920, Page 10

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Notus Items

Thos. Gillam has purchased a Ford Truck and will run a butcher shop and meat route this summer.

Briar Rose

The neighborhood is sorry to hear of the serious illness of Maie Shue.

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Hobson have returned from California where they have been the past year for Mrs. Hobson’s health.

Kyle Wittel attended the military funeral for Roscoe Merrick Sunday.

Midway News

A. C. Laster is on the sick list this week.

The Midway P. T. A. will hold a sale of cakes, doughnuts and cinnamon rolls Saturday April 17th at the Nampa Department store.

Fairview

W. W. Vail’s children have been having measles but are getting along nicely.

Mrs. S. W. Vail was called to Colorado Springs the past week on account of sickness. Miss Blanch has been in Colorado Springs for several months for her health and was not as seriously ill as her mother expected to find her. They are expecting to return home soon.

Mrs. Lillie Spencer attended the Myers funeral in Caldwell Thursday.

The drainage election was held last Thursday and defeated by a large majority.
— —

19200416CT2

(ibid, page 10)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. April 16, 1920, Page 11

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Lake Lowell

Mr. Fred Davis has been ill with the scarlet fever. His brother Earl of Nampa is doing chores.

James Matlock’s baby has been ill the past week.

Mrs. Spraug is on the sick list the past week.

The weather prophet reports a shower on Wednesday afternoon of this week at the home of Mrs. Frank Weeks. The shower is supposed to fall on Miss Marguerite Wharton of Middleton.

Sunny Slope

Loren Wallace had the misfortune to sustain a very painful injury one day last week when a hay slip attached to a team of horses overturned and pinned him underneath. The blow caused a bad break of the bones in his thigh and the patient will be laid up for some time.

Claytonia

Mr. Elmer Leesh was on the sick list last week. We do not know if it was the influenza or a bad cold.

(ibid, page 11)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. April 16, 1920, Page 12

Local And Personal

Dr. H. E. Spencer underwent a slight operation on his neck Tuesday morning at the Steensland hospital.

“Grandpa” Morrow is improving after a serious illness.

The children at the Cupp home on Kimball avenue have measles.

Mrs. J. W. Shepperd, who has been at the Caldwell sanitarium the past two weeks, suffering from a nervous breakdown, was able to return to her home Wednesday.

E. G. Rodefer was arrested Tuesday afternoon by Chief of Police Baker on the charge of being drunk. He appeared before Judge W. S. Maxey Wednesday morning and after pleading guilty was fined $10.

(ibid, page 12)
—————-

Footnotes

Footnote 1

PaschallBenjaminS-a

Photo of Benjamin Stuart Paschall with his sister Mary Paschall. Taken on 25 September 1903 in Seattle, Washington upon completion of hiking from San Francisco to Seattle along the Pacific Coast Trail. Photo courtesy of T. MacMillan.

source: Paschal/Paschall Genealogy
— — — —

Cure For Tuberculosis – Probably A Fake

A seven days wonder has been employing the atention of the writers of sensational newspaper articles in Seattle in the alleged discovery of an article to be called “Mycoleum” which is a sure cure of tuberculosis – according to its maker, Dr. Benjamine S. Paschall and his wife, Rose Garfield Paschall, are reported to have been working on the nostrum for years, and to have spent huge sums of money on its production. To add to the importance of the matter, Mrs. Paschall’s father was a first cousin of President Garfielld. Advanced stages of the disease of tuberculosis will need thirty doses. Although the newspapers say that the inventors of this baffler of the white plague have spent $300,000 in their work of discovering this great remedy, physicians are exceedingly dubious as to its merits. One Portland physician says that it sounds to him like awful humbuggery. The usual method adopted by the supposedly ethical discoverer of something that will alleviate suffering is for the discoverer to present its merits to an established medical society so that its members may give it a thorough investigation. If it is a genuine thing, there need be no fear that it will not be adopted.

source: (Google Books) Page 5-6 American Sentinel, Volume 29 – 1921
— — — —

History of Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis has existed since antiquity. The oldest unambiguously detected M. tuberculosis gives evidence of the disease in the remains of bison in Wyoming dated to around 17,000 years ago. However, whether tuberculosis originated in bovines, then transferred to humans, or whether both bovine and human tuberculosis diverged from a common ancestor, remains unclear. A comparison of the genes of M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in humans to MTBC in animals suggests humans did not acquire MTBC from animals during animal domestication, as researchers previously believed. Both strains of the tuberculosis bacteria share a common ancestor, which could have infected humans even before the Neolithic Revolution. Skeletal remains show some prehistoric humans (4000 BC) had TB, and researchers have found tubercular decay in the spines of Egyptian mummies dating from 3000 to 2400 BC. Genetic studies suggest the presence of TB in the Americas from about AD 100.

Before the Industrial Revolution, folklore often associated tuberculosis with vampires. When one member of a family died from the disease, the other infected members would lose their health slowly. People believed this was caused by the original person with TB draining the life from the other family members.

Although Richard Morton established the pulmonary form associated with tubercles as a pathology in 1689, due to the variety of its symptoms, TB was not identified as a single disease until the 1820s. Benjamin Marten conjectured in 1720 that consumptions were caused by microbes which were spread by people living in close proximity to each other. In 1819 René Laennec claimed that tubercles were the cause of pulmonary tuberculosis. J. L. Schönlein first published the name “tuberculosis” (German: Tuberkulose) in 1832. Between 1838 and 1845, John Croghan, the owner of Mammoth Cave in Kentucky from 1839 onwards, brought a number of people with tuberculosis into the cave in the hope of curing the disease with the constant temperature and purity of the cave air; each died within a year. Hermann Brehmer opened the first TB sanatorium in 1859 in Görbersdorf (now Sokołowsko) in Silesia. In 1865 Jean Antoine Villemin demonstrated that tuberculosis could be transmitted, via inoculation, from humans to animals and among animals. (Villemin’s findings were confirmed in 1867 and 1868 by John Burdon-Sanderson.)

Robert Koch identified and described the bacillus causing tuberculosis, M. tuberculosis, on 24 March 1882. He received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1905 for this discovery. Koch did not believe the cattle and human tuberculosis diseases were similar, which delayed the recognition of infected milk as a source of infection. During the first half of the 1900s the risk of transmission from this source was dramatically reduced after the application of the pasteurization process. Koch announced a glycerine extract of the tubercle bacilli as a “remedy” for tuberculosis in 1890, calling it “tuberculin”. Although it was not effective, it was later successfully adapted as a screening test for the presence of pre-symptomatic tuberculosis. World Tuberculosis Day is marked on 24 March each year, the anniversary of Koch’s original scientific announcement.

Albert Calmette and Camille Guérin achieved the first genuine success in immunization against tuberculosis in 1906, using attenuated bovine-strain tuberculosis. It was called bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG). The BCG vaccine was first used on humans in 1921 in France, but achieved widespread acceptance in the US, Great Britain, and Germany only after World War II.

Tuberculosis caused widespread public concern in the 19th and early 20th centuries as the disease became common among the urban poor. In 1815 one in four deaths in England was due to “consumption”. By 1918, TB still caused one in six deaths in France. After TB was determined to be contagious, in the 1880s, it was put on a notifiable-disease list in Britain; campaigns started to stop people from spitting in public places, and the infected poor were “encouraged” to enter sanatoria that resembled prisons (the sanatoria for the middle and upper classes offered excellent care and constant medical attention). Whatever the benefits of the “fresh air” and labor in the sanatoria, even under the best conditions, 50% of those who entered died within five years (c. 1916). When the Medical Research Council formed in Britain in 1913, it initially focused on tuberculosis research.

In Europe, rates of tuberculosis began to rise in the early 1600s to a peak level in the 1800s, when it caused nearly 25% of all deaths. In the 18th and 19th century, tuberculosis had become epidemic in Europe, showing a seasonal pattern. By the 1950s mortality in Europe had decreased about 90%. Improvements in sanitation, vaccination, and other public-health measures began significantly reducing rates of tuberculosis even before the arrival of streptomycin and other antibiotics, although the disease remained a significant threat. In 1946 the development of the antibiotic streptomycin made effective treatment and cure of TB a reality. Prior to the introduction of this medication, the only treatment was surgical intervention, including the “pneumothorax technique”, which involved collapsing an infected lung to “rest” it and to allow tuberculous lesions to heal.

Because of the emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), surgery has been re-introduced for certain cases of TB infections. It involves the removal of infected chest cavities (“bullae”) in the lungs to reduce the number of bacteria and to increase exposure of the remaining bacteria to antibiotics in the bloodstream. Hopes of eliminating TB ended with the rise of drug-resistant strains in the 1980s. The subsequent resurgence of tuberculosis resulted in the declaration of a global health emergency by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1993.

from: Wikipedia
—————

Further Reading

The 1918 flu didn’t end in 1918. Here’s what its third year can teach us.

By Jess McHugh February 6, 2022 Washington Post

1918NavyYard-aIn this photo from Oct. 19, 1918, a sign posted at the Naval Aircraft Factory in Philadelphia indicates the flu pandemic, known as Spanish Influenza, is extremely active. (U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command/AP) (Uncredited/AP)

In New York City in 1920 — nearly two years into a deadly influenza pandemic that would claim at least 50 million lives worldwide — the new year began on a bright note.

“Best Health Report for City in 53 Years,” boasted a headline in the New York Times on Jan. 4, 1920, after New York had survived three devastating waves of the flu virus. The nation as a whole, which would ultimately lose 675,000 people to the disease, believed that the end might finally be in sight.

Within a few weeks, however, those optimistic headlines began to change. Before the end of the month, New York City would experience a surge in influenza cases. Chicago and other urban centers reported the same.

Residents should prepare themselves for an “influenza return,” New York City health commissioner Royal S. Copeland warned. He predicted that the virus variant responsible for the surge would be milder and that those who had fallen ill the previous year would be immune. He was wrong, at least in part: While many places worldwide did not see a fourth wave of the great influenza pandemic, several metropolises — including New York City, Chicago and Detroit — had another deadly season in store.

The 1918 flu lasted far beyond 1918. Two years after it began, just as officials such as Copeland were declaring victory and cities were easing restrictions, a fourth wave hit parts of the country, bringing punishing caseloads that pushed some hospitals to the brink of collapse and left many more Americans dead.

The virus did not seem so menacing when it began: The first wave in the spring of 1918 was relatively mild. But it returned with a vengeance in the fall, probably having mutated. That second wave burned through patients around the world. Street cars were converted into hearses, and priests collected bodies with horse-drawn carriages.

During the second wave alone, more Americans were killed by the flu than died in the First World War, the Second World War, the Korean War and the Vietnam War combined.

The flu pandemic seemed to affect young people in particular, for reasons that historians and scientists are still debating. When the first recorded cases arrived, World War I was raging, and the cramped conditions of the trenches meant that the virus could pass rapidly from soldier to soldier, and the conditions in field hospitals often hastened the spread. Other experts have suggested that people in their 20s and 30s were less likely to have prior immunity to similar flu viruses.

Regardless, the virus alone lowered life expectancy in the United States by more than 12 years. As many as 10 percent of all young adults living through the time of the flu pandemic may have died of it, according to historian John M. Barry in his book “The Great Influenza.”

By the winter of 1919-1920, Americans were weary of the limitations on daily life. Nearly all of the public health restrictions — such as mask-wearing, social distancing and the closure of schools and churches — had been lifted. A hasty return to public gatherings led to an increase in case numbers. Politicians either blamed people’s carelessness for the reemergence of the virus or downplayed the seriousness of it.

The fourth wave was not front-page news in the way that prior spikes had been. The coverage was often relegated to small paragraphs deep inside newspapers, reporting thousands of new cases on a weekly or even daily basis. By February 1920, there was an epidemic in a state prison in New Jersey, and some courts were forced to halt proceedings because of illness.

One physician wrote a letter to the editor in the New York Times in the winter of 1920, begging people to avoid “needless exposure to influenza” through unnecessary social contact. The doctor warned that anyone who visited someone who was ill was then “capable of spreading the disease to any number of others who might have escaped, thereby putting an extra drain upon the already overburdened hospitals, nurses, and doctors.”

But if the fourth wave failed to generate the kinds of headlines and fear of its predecessors, it wasn’t for a lack of lethality. In New York City, more people died in the period from December 1919 to April 1920 than in the first and third waves, according to a research paper on influenza mortality in the city. Detroit, St. Louis and Minneapolis also experienced significant fourth waves, and severe “excess mortality” was reported in many counties in Michigan because of the flu.

Local governments’ public health interventions actually may have contributed to the fourth wave by limiting the virus’s spread in prior waves. Letting the virus run rampant, however, would not have been advisable either, said Wan Yang, an assistant professor of epidemiology at Columbia University and an author of the paper on New York City influenza mortality. “More infection could also lead to more mutation, so that could generate a new virus variant that can then erode your prior immunity, so it’s an interplay depending on how the virus is going to evolve, which is really unpredictable,” Yang said.

Influenza viruses and coronaviruses are genetically different, so it’s not possible to make a one-to-one comparison with the 1918 pandemic. Yang noted that the novel coronavirus appears to mutate far faster than the 1918 influenza virus. Management of the current pandemic also has benefited from many scientific developments that were not available a century ago, including more-sanitary hospital conditions, better access to clean water, and — perhaps what is most notable — a vaccine.

Still, we can get a glimpse into our future by looking at the past. The 1918 flu virus, after lingering in a deadly form for more than two years, eventually grew milder. Now it is “part of every seasonal flu we have,” said Ann Reid, the executive director of the National Center for Science Education, who helped sequence the genome of the 1918 influenza virus in the 1990s. Her research found that some genetic aspects of the 1918 virus continued to be present in new outbreaks, including pandemics in 1957 and 1968. People with immunity to the 1918 virus were therefore likely to have some protection from its genetic cousins.

excerpted from:
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Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports Feb 20, 2022

Please share road reports. Winter travel conditions. Most back country roads are not maintained. This time of year there is deep snow in higher elevations. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: We received 1/2″ new snow this morning, average snow depth 21″. Local streets are snow packed, icy in some places, and the main paths have been plowed. Watch out for elk in the road. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Construction on ID-55 near Smiths Ferry has been suspended for the winter. Crews have winterized the work zone and removed equipment from the area for the season. All lanes on ID-55 are now open and will stay completely open until construction resumes mid-March 2022.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (Feb 16) mail truck driver says snow on the road, covering previous bare spots.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Feb 16) mail truck driver says snow all the way, but likely to melt in the sunny spots in the lower canyon by afternoon.
Last plowed Monday (Feb 7)
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Feb 16) mail truck driver says snow floor floor all the way in.
Last plowed Monday (Feb 7)

Upper Johnson Creek Road (Trail): Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Old report from weekend (Jan 22-23) “Thanks to the cold weather and good snow, for the first time in many years snowmobilers are crossing Johnson Creek Creek up close to Landmark & playing on those wide open slopes east of Johnson Creek, although there was one spot where a snowmobile had broken through the ice when crossing Johnson Creek – that must of been a chilling experience.” – C&L
Report Monday (Jan 17) “watch for a small slide toward the top of Landmark, on Warm Lake Rd.” Video posted on YP General Store’s FB page. Looks like you can get around it.
Report Wednesday (Jan 12) report the county groomer worked the trail between Warm Lake and Wapiti Meadow Ranch
Lower Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Thurs (Feb 16) “Johnson creek is smoothed up to the Cox ranch. still good snow floor for snow machines.”
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel
Report Feb 10: “Traveling the EFSF [Stibnite Road] 2/10 3pm to Profile Creek, just east of the bridge, there was a small snow slide across the road. Required about 20 mins of shoveling (2 people) to get pickup across. Carry shovel.” – MG
Trail report (Feb 4) “[We] came into BC this afternoon on tracked ATVs. The trail from the mouth of Profile Creek to BC is fast & smooth. There is about 7 feet of snow at Profile Gap with a little less than a 1 foot of fresh powder on top.” C&L
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
Watch for slides, it has been unusually warm.
Jan 9th report (post slide cleanup): “The road is about 12 feet wide right now. Plowed and drivable. Most turn outs are open. Access to Profile creek turn around is plowed out also. We will keep working on it this week. Not perfect but passable.” – Dave
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:

Payette Avalanche Center Link:
——————

Weather Reports Feb 13-19, 2022

Feb 13 Weather:

At 10am it was 11 degrees and clear. At 1230pm clear blue sky and bright sunshine. At 215pm it was 49 degrees and clear. At 330pm it was 51 degrees and very clear. At 550pm it was 34 degrees and clear sky. At 11pm it looked clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 14, 2022 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloudy, light breeze
Max temperature 53 degrees F
Min temperature 11 degrees F <– previous AM
At observation 31 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 20 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 14 Weather:

At 10am it was 31 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breeze. At 1230pm thicker darker clouds. By 130pm blustery breezes. At 330pm it was 44 degrees, dark overcast and breezy (melting snow.) Started raining around 5pm. At 545pm it was 35 degrees, steady rain and low overcast sitting down on peaks and ridges, calmer. Rain chanted to snow before 7pm (fat trace by 710pm) socked in low. Lightly snowing at 9pm (wet slushy stuff) close to 1/2″ so far. Still snowing lightly at 1120pm, about the same amount. Stopped snowing before 130am. Light snow falling before 930am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 15, 2022 at 10:00AM
Overcast, flaking
Max temperature 51 degrees F
Min temperature 24 degrees F
At observation 30 degrees F
Precipitation 0.22 inch
Snowfall 0.5 inch
Snow depth 20 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 15 Weather:

At 10am it was 30 degrees, overcast (top of VanMeter foggy) and occasional flakes of snow. Thinner clouds and filtered sunlight by 11am. At 1230pm broken overcast (still sitting down on VanMeter) and breezy. At 340pm it was 34 degrees, overcast, gusty breezes and flaking snow. By 410pm breaks in the clouds, calmer and not snowing. At 555pm it was 32 degrees, overcast, breezy and spitting little snowballs, didn’t last long, trace accumulation. At 11pm it was partly clear. Snowing before daylight (an inch or so by 7am.)

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 16, 2022 at 10:00AM
Low overcast, steady snow
Max temperature 39 degrees F
Min temperature 22 degrees F
At observation 25 degrees F
Precipitation 0.09 inch
Snowfall 2.0 inch
Snow depth 22 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 16 Weather:

At 10am it was 25 degrees, low overcast nearly to the floor and steady snow falling. Tapering off and filtered sun at 11am. At 1230pm it was partly clear, breezy, melting and dripping. At 1pm it was 35 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 2pm overcast, top of VanMeter fogged in. At 340pm it was 34 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy. Snow pellets at 350pm for a few minutes. At 555pm it was 31 degrees, mostly cloudy, calmer and an occasional flake of snow. At 9pm cloudy. At 1120pm partly clear. At 2am mostly clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 17, 2022 at 10:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 35 degrees F
Min temperature 7 degrees F
At observation 8 degrees F
Precipitation 0.01 inch
Snowfall 1/2 inch
Snow depth 22 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 17 Weather:

At 10am it was 8 degrees and clear. At 1230pm it was clear and sunny. At 4pm it was 41 degrees and 95% overcast with light breezes. Snow flurry left a scant trace some time between 4pm-6pm. At 6pm it was 35 degrees and overcast. at 1130pm it was mostly cloudy. At 2am it was mostly clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 18, 2022 at 10:00AM
Mostly clear
Max temperature 44 degrees F
Min temperature 8 degrees F <– previous AM
At observation 17 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 21 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 18 Weather:

At 10am it was 17 degrees and mostly clear. At 1230pm it was mostly clear. At 330pm it was 48 degrees, light breeze and mostly clear. At 610pm it was 34 degrees, mostly clear (some high haze) and calm. At 9pm partly cloudy. At 12am mostly cloudy, filtered moonlight. At 2am mostly clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 19, 2022 at 10:00AM
Clear, light frost
Max temperature 50 degrees F
Min temperature 15 degrees F
At observation 17 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 21 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 19 Weather:

At 10am it was 17 degrees, clear with light frost. At 1230pm mostly clear, a bit of high haze and light breezes. At 220pm mostly hazy, small blue patches. At 4pm it was 45 degrees, gray overcast and breezy. At 555pm it was 39 degrees, overcast and light breezes. At 1045pm it appeared mostly clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 20, 2022 at 10:00AM
Overcast, slight breeze, flaking snow
Max temperature 53 degrees F
Min temperature 17 degrees F <– previous AM
At observation 34 degrees F
Precipitation 0.02 inch
Snowfall 1/2 inch
Snow depth 21 inch
—————————–

Road Reports Feb 16, 2022

Please share road reports. Winter travel conditions. Most back country roads are not maintained. This time of year there is deep snow in higher elevations. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: We received 2″ new snow this morning (report of more snow in YP than elsewhere,) average snow depth now 22″. Local streets are snow packed, icy in some places, and the main paths have been plowed. Watch out for elk in the road. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Update Feb 15: Expect up to 15 minute delays on Tuesday and Wednesday.
Construction on ID-55 near Smiths Ferry has been suspended for the winter. Crews have winterized the work zone and removed equipment from the area for the season. All lanes on ID-55 are now open and will stay completely open until construction resumes mid-March 2022.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (Feb 16) mail truck driver says snow on the road, covering previous bare spots.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Feb 16) mail truck driver says snow all the way, but likely to melt in the sunny spots by afternoon.
Last plowed Monday (Feb 7)
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Feb 16) mail truck driver says snow floor floor all the way in.
Last plowed Monday (Feb 7)

Upper Johnson Creek Road (Trail): Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Old report from weekend (Jan 22-23) “Thanks to the cold weather and good snow, for the first time in many years snowmobilers are crossing Johnson Creek Creek up close to Landmark & playing on those wide open slopes east of Johnson Creek, although there was one spot where a snowmobile had broken through the ice when crossing Johnson Creek – that must of been a chilling experience.” – C&L
Report Monday (Jan 17) “watch for a small slide toward the top of Landmark, on Warm Lake Rd.” Video posted on YP General Store’s FB page. Looks like you can get around it.
Report Wednesday (Jan 12) report the county groomer worked the trail between Warm Lake and Wapiti Meadow Ranch
Lower Johnson Creek Road: Open
The lower end last plowed on Jan 17th.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel
Report Feb 10: “Traveling the EFSF [Stibnite Road] 2/10 3pm to Profile Creek, just east of the bridge, there was a small snow slide across the road. Required about 20 mins of shoveling (2 people) to get pickup across. Carry shovel.” – MG
Trail report (Feb 4) “[We] came into BC this afternoon on tracked ATVs. The trail from the mouth of Profile Creek to BC is fast & smooth. There is about 7 feet of snow at Profile Gap with a little less than a 1 foot of fresh powder on top.” C&L
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
Watch for slides, it has been unusually warm.
Jan 9th report (post slide cleanup): “The road is about 12 feet wide right now. Plowed and drivable. Most turn outs are open. Access to Profile creek turn around is plowed out also. We will keep working on it this week. Not perfect but passable.” – Dave
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:

Payette Avalanche Center Link:
——————