Monthly Archives: March 2022

Road Reports Mar 30, 2022

It is Rock Migration Season. Please share road reports. Winter travel conditions. Most back country roads are not maintained. This time of year there is deep snow in higher elevations. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: Most of our snow has melted, patchy snow remains in the shade. Local streets are mostly bare with a few spots of slush and ice in the shade. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Hwy 55 Construction Announcement from ITD 3/9/22
Starting Monday, March 14, construction on ID-55 near Smiths Ferry will resume. Drivers can expect one-way alternating traffic with 15-minute delays as crews anchor the hillside for long-term stability.
Full road closures are anticipated to start in mid-April through the end of May. Drivers can expect full closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Outside the full closure hours, drivers can expect one-way alternating traffic with 15-minute delays. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes.
Drivers should plan ahead to avoid delays and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route when possible. link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (March 30) Bare road going over the summit this morning, a bit icy in the shade.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Wednesday (March 30) bare road this morning, a bit of ice in the shade. Cut 1 tree out, a few scattred rocks.
Update Wednesday (March 23) “South Fork road is almost totally ice free and there’s very few rocks.”
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Wednesday (March 30) There is still one patch of icy road near YP, some small rocks and the usual pot holes.
Update Wednesday (March 23) “East Fork road has potholes, especially from Caton Creek to Yellow Pine. Ice floor patches, closer to Yellow Pine, are almost completely melted. There is a rock slide one mile upstream from Williams Peak trailhead. Two rocks at the “bowling alley” near Eiguren Ranch. Rocks are passable but the color blends with the road.”

Upper Johnson Creek Road (Trail): Closed to wheeled vehicles.
No current report.
Lower Johnson Creek Road: Open
Old report Tuesday (Mar 15) road is very slushy between YP and the Dump. A few spots have broken thru down to dirt, majority is slush on top of ice.
Lower end last plowed March 14th and 16th.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel
Report Sunday (March 27) “Today we came out of BC & in one mile stretch of road the conditions had changed a lot in 2 days. This portion of the trail is close to where Belvedere Creek enters Big Creek. The warming temps have released a lot of water running down the inside road drainage ditch. This creates a deep trench that runs parallel to the road until it hits a low spot & then crosses the road. These cross road trenches are difficult to cross & if this warm weather continues the situation will continue until the snow on the road has melted down a bunch. We spent a lot of time today getting through just a few of these trenches. Assuming the warm weather continues it will likely get worse for a while, but ultimately the snow depth will get low enough to eliminate the problem. In the meantime travelers should have shovels, chain saws (to cut through the ice) , winches or come-a-longs with lots of wire rope. Outstanding snowmobilers can probably boondock around this stretch, but because of the steep ground (sidehill) & dense trees that isn’t a viable option on tracked ATVs.” – C&L
Report Friday (March 25): “Profile Creek Road – EFSF to Profile Gap. There is a solid snow floor all the way that is packed down & shows a lot of travel – Based on the tracks left on the ground it indicates skiers traveling on tracked machines. All tracks ended at Profile Gap where skiers left the gap in all directions & the tracked machines turned around. There have been a few small snow slides in the first few miles, but everybody just goes over them.
“Profile Gap to BC – No recent travel on this section, 6-8 inches of fresh powder. Profile Gap to Big Creek Culvert was almost too easy. No sidehilling or snow slides. From BC Culvert to Edwardsburg there is a solid snow pack, but you do have to cross some spots where running water has made deep cuts (2-3 feet) in the snow on the road. This did liven up the ride a little bit. It is situations like this where you are glad to have winches on your machines – we didn’t use them today.” – C&L
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
Report Friday (March 25): “EFSR road – YP to Profile Creek. The road is snow/ice free over about 1/2 the distance, and is log free, smooth & rock free all the way. The snow clear parts are wet & our tracked ATVs kicked up a lot of mud on the ATVs. Definitely not for snowmobiles.” – C&L
With warmer and wetter weather, be aware that slides could come down.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:

Payette Avalanche Center Link:
——————

Mar 27, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

Mar 27, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
Oct 27, 2021 – Transfer Station on Winter Schedule
Nov 1, 2021 – Winter Mail Delivery Starts
Mar 25 – SF Rx Burn
Mar 29 – City Slickers
Apr 3 – YPFD meeting at 2pm
Apr 5 – Forrest Gump
Mar-May – Spring Rx burns

(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Tuesday Movie Nights

Come join us for Movie Night at the Community Hall every Tuesday at 4:30 p.m. Snacks, drinks, and comfy clothes welcome.

March 29: City Slickers
April 5: Forrest Gump
— — — —

PNF Rx Burn March 25th South Fork Salmon River

We are planning to start burning this Friday through the weekend in the four mile project area. Ignitions will primarily take place from noon to 4pm along the Miners Peak trail. Small scale hand ignition no more than 50 acres. Aerial ignitions are planned for mid-April.
Patrick Schon – Payette Forest Fire Management Specialist
— —

Krassel RD Prescribed Burns Spring 2022

The Krassel Ranger District plans to apply fire to approximately 2,500 acres within the Bald Hill project area (east of Yellow Pine); 2,000 acres in the Four Mile project area along the South Fork of the Salmon River near the Miners peak trail, and 70 acres around Krassel Work Center.
Ignitions may occur over 2-7 days in the months of March through May Flame, smoke and hazards may be present in the area until significant precipitation or season ending weather is received. If you have any questions or comments please contact Dave Hogen Krassel District Ranger at 208-634-0600

(Same map from last fall.)
———

Village News:

March 27 Johnson Creek Airstrip Snow

20220327JohnsonCrNorth-aJohnson Creek North webcam courtesy Eye-n-Sky
— — — —

Match 23 Satellite Map

Clear sky and Idaho snow
20220623IdahoSnow-acourtesy NOAA
— — — —

Watkin’s Pharmacy update

March 24, 2022: Watkins Pharmacy has not yet finalized plans to open in a new, temporary location and a date for when a new location would open was not set, pharmacy owner Amber Watkins said.
— — — —

Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at wicap.org.
— — — —

Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
— — — —

Arnold Aviation News:

Customers New Deadline – Please email your shopping list by Sunday evening so they are ready to print early Monday morning.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Hwy 55 summer road construction starts March 14, 2022
link:

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.

Upper Johnson Creek road at Landmark, Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Elk Summit, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are closed to wheeled vehicles. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
— — — —

Critters

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be Elk Aware

Elk are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard. F&G confirms there is a pack of 6 wolves in our valley.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

Bears will be coming out of hibernation soon and hungry.

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat had been hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started November 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report March 15th: Road from YP to the dump is very slushy. The bins are still fairly empty.

Road plowed March 16th.

Bins dumped March 5th. Please flatten your empty boxes!

Dump update October 27th: We are now in winter mode. When it gets fairly full we will call to have it dumped. Contact Cecil.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

Water Use

03/17/22 21962329 38224 24 1593 27 T 701
03/18/22 22000682 38353 24 1598 27 F 129
03/19/22 22038502 37820 24 1576 26 S 533
03/20/22 22077208 38706 24 1613 27 S 886
03/21/22 22115518 38310 24 1596 27 M 396
03/22/22 22153904 38386 24 1599 27 T 76
03/23/22 22193500 39596 24 1650 28 W 1210
03/24/22 22231380 37880 24 1578 26 T 1716
03/25/22 22269634 38254 24 1594 27 F 374
03/26/22 22303637 34003 24 1417 24 S 4251
03/27/22 22335585 31948 24 1331 22 S 2055

Water update March 13th

Last Wednesday a few residents in Yellow Pine were experiencing low water pressure. A leak was confirmed that day we had a problem. Yesterday that leak was found and contained.

We want to thank everyone involved including those out looking for leak to the ones actually capping it.

Thanks to the community volunteers for keeping our water system flowing.

Steve Holloway

Water update March 8th

Hello Yellow Piners,

As required by DEQ until the water demand issue is resolved, the monthly Boil Water Notification is attached for distribution [See below]. Notification should be posted at public places, distributed via email, included in the Yellow Pine Times and social media posts, and sent to residents by any other means appropriate.

Best Regards,
Warren

Water Update Feb 26th

Hello Yellow Piners,

On Tuesday the 22nd of February I traveled to Yellow Pine, completed regular system checks, collected monthly and annual compliance samples, and cleaned Filter #1 to restore adequate flow.

Mike Amos again assisted by shuttling his 4-wheeler up to McIntosh’s place ahead of my arrival which made it easier to get pumps, hoses and equipment up to the plant. Winter water plant access needs to be improved and should be planned for going into next winter. Vehicle access to at least the filtration plant should be part of the plan.

Nicki’s reliable and consistent daily recording of data indicates that even after the recent leak repair completed in town, system demand exceeds 40K gallons per day which continues to exceed system capacity and therefore necessitates the continuation of the Boil Order.

Just for information’s sake, the filters have the following capacity. Please keep in mind that the system is designed to be able to run on one filter at a time while the other filter is offline for cleaning or maintenance.

Design filtration rate is .1 gpm/sq ft of filter surface area during warm weather and .05 gpm/sq ft of surface area when below 5 degrees C (41 degrees F)

Filter #1 is 215 sq ft
Warm Weather
215 x 0.1= 21.5 gpm
21.5 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 30,960 gallons per day
Cold Weather
215 x 0.05= 10.75 gpm
10.75 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 15,480 gallons per day

Filter #2 is 256 sq ft
Warm Weather
256 x 0.1= 25.6 gpm
25.6 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 36,864 gallons per day
Cold Weather
256 x 0.05= 12.8 gpm
12.8 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 18,432 gallons per day

Flow rates explained above are optimal and are only to be expected from clean filters. Flow rates diminish rapidly as the filter media becomes “plugged” with dirt and debris from Boulder Creek. High system demand equates to increased water volume through the filters which in turn causes filters to become dirty faster reducing flow accordingly.

Every time the filters are cleaned, a portion of the sand filter media is removed. Over time and after repeated cleanings, the level of sand in the filters becomes low and must be replenished. A plan for cleaning and replacement of the used sand or purchase and installation of new sand needs to be developed.

Additionally, there are a number of deferred maintenance items and miscellaneous equipment purchases that need to be considered in order to help assure continued and uninterrupted water supply to the community. A plan to address these issues needs to be developed as well.

I am available to answer questions or can attend a water board meeting to assist in discussion and planning as needed.

Best Regards,
Warren

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

DRINKING WATER WARNING March 8, 2022
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 3-8-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 at the Community Hall at 10am. Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting held July 5, 2020 at the Community Hall 2pm. link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
— — — —

VYPA News:

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Chairman – vacant
Vice Chairman – Josh Jones
Treasurer – Ronda Rogers
Secretary – Hailey Harris
Member-at-large – Rhonda Egbert

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Ron Earl

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
— — — —

YPFD News:

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Apr 3 – YPFD meeting at 2pm

Meeting Minutes

Feb 24, 2022 Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting (no minutes yet.)
November 23, 2021 Special meeting Link:
November 8, 2021 AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
October 31, 2021 Special meeting Link:
October 14, 2021 Special meeting Link:
September 27, 2021 Special meeting Link:
September 18, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sept 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
July 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
June 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sept 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 11, 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Winter hours:
Open Wednesday 11-6
Fridays 11-9
Saturdays 9-6
Sunday’s 10-6
Closed Monday, Tuesday and Thursday
Exceptions are by appointment and we’ll be open on Mondays of Holiday weekends.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Winter Hours at the Tavern
Open Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat: 9am-2pm 4pm-8pm
Open Sunday 9am-2pm
Closed Tues & Thurs
Call the Tavern 208 633-2233 or Cell 208 739-7086 for other arrangements
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed for the winter.
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Availability for 2022
*Note can book Idaho Residents now for Archery or put on a waiting list for Non Residents, will find out final allocations by April 18th.
2 on 1 Archery August 29th to September 4th *Lodge hunt / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Archery September 6th to September 12th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Rifle September 24th to September 30th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Wolf.
Spring Bear Hunt June 3rd to June 9th Group of 2 to 3 hunters *Lodge Hunt / Black Bear and Wolf.
See our website for more details. Or give us a call 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 452-4361
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watikns can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
Please help support local journalism and subscribe.
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
— — — —

This is Dusty White. I was a vendor for many years for the Harmonica Festival many years ago: “The Lill Red Wagon + More”. I was born and raised in Idaho and as a child spent many summers with my parents and family in and around Yellow Pine and the Stibnite areas. My grandmother lived at Roosevelt as a child. I have just published my first book of my life, “Walking With An Open Heart” (link)
————–

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Mar 21) overnight low of 19 degrees. This morning it was 27 degrees by 1030am, high thin hazy overcast with filtered sun and light breeze. More open ground under trees and near buildings, but on the flat the undisturbed snow ranges 8-11″ deep. Several jays, nuthatches, a hairy woodpecker and the local pine squirrel visiting. Thin overcast and breezy at lunch time. Partly sunny mid-afternoon, warmer and breezy. Local streets have more bare (muddy) patches, high of 47 degrees. Mostly cloudy and calm at dusk and nearly 10 degrees above freezing. Looked cloudy before midnight.

Tuesday (Mar 22) 24 hour low of 27 degrees from Monday morning. This morning gray overcast, light breeze and 38 degrees at 1030am. More open ground but 6-11″ snow remains down on the flat by the school. Jays, nuthatches, hairy and downy woodpeckers visiting. Partly clear and breezy at lunch time. Warm, partly clear to mostly cloudy and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 57 degrees. The warm breezes melted quite a bit of snow this afternoon. First robin calling after sunset. Warm, partly cloudy and calm at dusk. Some stars out before midnight.

Wednesday (Mar 23) overnight low of 25 degrees. This morning it was 37 degrees at 1030am, clear very blue sky and frost melting. Measured 5-9″ snow, about 25% bare ground. Jays and robin calling. Clear, strong sunshine and warm at lunch time. Mail truck was a tad early. Very warm and mostly hazy mid-afternoon with a slight breeze, high of 66 degrees. Two intersecting contrails made an “X” over Golden Gate peak. Flock of Cassins Finches showed up late afternoon. A lot more snow has melted today. A bit hazy at dusk and warm. Some haze before midnight.

Thursday (Mar 24) overnight low of 27 degrees. This morning it was 40 degrees at 1030am with mostly clear sky. About 50% of the ground is bare down here on the flat, remaining snow between 4-8″ deep, South facing hills are getting bare. Jays, finches, nuthatches and pine squirrel visiting, also a flicker calling. A few clouds at lunch time and warm. Mostly clear mid-afternoon, light breeze and quite warm for this time of year, high of 63 degrees. Lots of snow melting today. Mostly cloudy at dusk, calmer and warm. About a dozen elk wandering through the neighborhood. Some stars out before midnight.

Friday (Mar 25) overnight low of 28 degrees. This morning it was 39 degrees at 1030am with an overcast sky. About 60% bare ground, snow is still over 6″ deep in the shade. Finches, jays, hairy woodpecker and nuthatches visiting. Overcast at lunch time. Very warm and overcast mid-afternoon, light breezes, high of 65 degrees. Warm and mostly hazy at dusk, light breezes. Robins calling. Looked hazy/cloudy after midnight.

Saturday (Mar 26) overnight low of 29 degrees. This morning it was 44 degrees at 1030am with mostly high thin haze and filtered sunshine. About 75% bare ground now. Robins and pine squirrel calling, jays, cassins finches, red-breasted nuthatches and downy woodpecker visiting. Hazy overcast and a bit breezy after lunch time. Warm and a bit breezy mid-afternoon, light gray overcast, high of 65 degrees. Mostly cloudy, warm and light breezes at dusk. Robins chirping. Clouds or haze before midnight.

Sunday (Mar 27) overnight low of 29 degrees. This morning it was 44 degrees at 1030am with mostly hazy sky and light breeze. About 80% bare ground, large patches of snow remain in the shade. Finches and robins calling, jays and rufous sided spotted towhee visiting. First swallows of spring! Cloudy with filtered sun at lunch time. Quite warm mid-afternoon and gray overcast, high of 67 degrees. Lots of melting. Three pine squirrels chasing each other around. Wind gusts late afternoon for a short while. At dusk it was quite warm, calm and mostly cloudy. Robins calling.
—————-

Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 70 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

March 25, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 70 new COVID-19 cases and 3 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 443,549.

The state said 104,832 people have received one dose of a two dose series, and 402,860 people have received an additional or booster dose. 2,310,548 total doses have been administered. 929,667 people are fully vaccinated.

The state said 25 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 16,637, and 4 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,872.

3 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,867.

full story: [Valley County 2600 cases, 16 deaths.]
— — — —

Latest hospital numbers as of 3/23 (Wednesday)

93 hospitalized with COVID-19
13 in ICU

source: KTVB (more info)
— — — —

New Valley County COVID-19 cases drop to two in past week

By Tom Grote The Star-News March 24, 2022

Two new cases of COVID-19 were reported in Valley County last week, according to the county’s two hospitals.

The three new reported cases are down from the 13 new cases reported the previous week and three cases the prior week.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 2,674 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started two years ago.

Thirteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health.

Clinics & Tests

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine is now offering the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older. Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines continue to be offered for anyone age 5 and older.

Also available are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine boosters for ages 12 to 15 and to moderately or severely immunocompromised youths age 5 to 11.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link)  or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital is also providing free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

Cascade Medical Center offers a walk-in vaccination clinic from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster.

The Pfizer vaccine for those ages 5 and older is available in Cascade on Wednesdays.

full story: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (Used w/permission.)
— — — — — — — — — —

Watkins Pharmacy Update

Watkins Pharmacy has not yet finalized plans to open in a new, temporary location and a date for when a new location would open was not set, pharmacy owner Amber Watkins said.

source: The Star-News March 24, 2022
— — — — — — — — — —

Cascade hospital seeks $19 million for new building

May 17 vote would replace current 50-year-old facility

By Max Silverson The Star-News March 24, 2022

2002CMCSitePlan-aGraphic shows a preliminary design for a proposed new Cascade Medical Center that would be built about one-half mile north of Cascade on the west side of Idaho 55. Image courtesy BWBR

Cascade Medical Center will ask voters to approve up to $19 million in new property taxes to help fund the construction of a new hospital in the May 17 election.

The bond would be paid for over 30 years and cost $68 per $100,000 in assessed taxable property value per year. A two-thirds majority, or 66.7%, is required for passage.

The bond would fund about half of the expected cost of the new hospital.

The rest of the cost is expected to funded with $2 million the hospital has saved for the project as well as loans, grants and fundraising by the Cascade Medical Center Foundation, CEO Tom Reinhardt said.

“We hope not to need all $19 million and intend to actually use less,” Reinhardt said.

The district plans to build the new 32,000 square foot health-care facility on about eight acres of land about a half-mile north of Cascade on the west side of Idaho 55.

For more information, visit (link).

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley to ask public how to spend federal funds

$2.2 million received from 2021 stimulus bill

By Max Silverson The Star-News March 24, 2022

Valley County commissioners will ask the public what to do with $2.2 million in federal money from the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021.

Commissioners plan to conduct an online survey about how to spend the funds and hold community meetings specifically addressing the topic.

The survey is not yet available and public meetings have not yet been scheduled.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Tamarack Resort plans expansion, revitalization

Morgan Romero March 23, 2022 KTVB

In Idaho’s west-central mountains, a resort with a checkered past is not just bouncing back – it’s on the verge of booming.

The Boise National Forest accepted Tamarack Resort’s special use application for its proposal to expand its footprint and develop the area, the first step in a long public process.

The owners are hoping to grow year-round recreation as it continues to pump millions of dollars into revitalizing and reviving the resort.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

New ownership at Brundage continues Judd DeBoer’s legacy with a new ten-year plan

By Steve Dent Mar 23, 2022 KIVI

This is part one of a two-part series on Brundage Mountain, but before we take an in-depth look at Brundage’s new ten-year plan we wanted to understand the history behind the changes on the horizon for Brundage.

Brundage opened in 1961 after Warren Brown and Norwegian ski champion Corey Engen were able to convince Jack Simplot to invest in the mountain.

After the DeBoer family, a direct descendant of Warren Brown bought out Simplot, long-time owner Judd DeBoer had a vision for the future of Brundage.

continued:
— — — —

Taking a closer look at Brundage’s 10-year development plan

By Steve Dent Mar 24, 2022 KIVI

Brundage Mountain will break ground on a new base lodge this summer kicking off its new 10-year plan.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Gov. Brad Little signs bill into law to help rural EMS with funding

By Jake Garcia Mar 23, 2022 KIVI

Gov. Brad Little signed HB561 into law Monday, helping to free up money in the state’s Emergency Medical Services Fund III.

The existing fund only allowed for vehicle and equipment purchases, but the new law opens up what the money can be used for. This law allows funding to be used for training, licensing, communication technology, dispatch services and other costs that does not include personnel salaries.

Around 65% of EMS providers in Idaho are volunteer-based. Some of those providers are in a small taxing district they can’t get an increase in property taxes before voters, in Idaho a small portion of property taxes help fund EMS, but some of those percentages have not changed in decades. This law allows for those districts to have access to state funds to help.

Idaho Law does not guarantee Emergency Medical Services as it is not an Essential Government Service. Only eleven states have laws that deem EMS as “essential. ”

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Census Data: Idaho is 6th youngest state

March 23, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho remains one of the youngest states in the nation while the state’s population growth and home pricing increases top national rates, according to the recently released results from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2016-2020 American Community Survey.

The release includes new tables on the civilian-employed population (age 16 and older), along with data on computer and internet use.

Some of the statistically significant changes for Idaho include:

continued:
——————-

Fire News:

PNF Rx Burn March 25th South Fork Salmon River

We are planning to start burning this Friday through the weekend in the four mile project area. Ignitions will primarily take place from noon to 4pm along the Miners Peak trail. Small scale hand ignition no more than 50 acres. Aerial ignitions are planned for mid-April.

Patrick Schon – Payette Forest Fire Management Specialist
— — — — — — — — — —

BLM to conduct prescribed burning along fencelines in Southwest Idaho

March 22, 2022
Jared Jablonski 208-384-3210

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management will be conducting prescribed burns throughout southwest Idaho to reduce unsafe accumulations of tumbleweeds along fencelines from late March through April, depending on weather, vegetation, and ground conditions.

Burnings will include approximately six miles of fenceline south of Boise within the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area and about 15 miles along the Owyhee Front between Marsing and Wilson Creek.

“Most of the area’s fires are human caused and begin along roadways,” said Lance Okeson, Boise District Assistant Fire Management Officer Fuels. “Burning these large volumes of tumbleweeds under controlled conditions will reduce both a hazardous fuel source and possible obstruction of the roadways themselves.”

During the prescribed burns, the public can expect to see smoke from a distance, fire vehicles on roadways, and possible short-term travel delays on secondary roads. For public and firefighter safety, traffic flaggers from the Idaho Transportation Department may be used.

For more information contact the BLM Boise District Fire Information at 208-384-3210.
— — — — — — — — — —

Hazard pay for Idaho wildland firefighters could help with recruiting efforts

House Bill 588 passed the house and senate. It would pay wildland firefighters 25% above their hourly wage while working at an active fire.

Andrew Baertlein March 22, 2022 KTVB

Boise, Idaho — They can’t clock a regular 9 to 5 timecard – Monday through Friday – and expect the week to be over.

Wildland firefighting isn’t like other jobs.

“I’ve put in 52-hour shifts before,” Idaho Department of Lands (IDL) Fire Management Bureau Chief Josh Harvey said. “I’m not gonna say you’re on call all the time, but when the phone rings, the expectation is you’re gonna answer it and you’re gonna respond.”

Recruiting people to answer those calls is getting harder, according to Harvey. Partly because Idaho wildland firefighters currently make $12.55 per hour.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Volunteers plant shrubs to help rehabilitate land burned by wildfires

by Deni Hawkins Friday, March 25th 2022 CBS2


Volunteers plant native plants along a hillside near Lucky Peak where the Lucky Fire burned in 2019. This is part of a larger effort to rehabilitate lands burned by wildfires in southwest Idaho. (CBS2 Photo)

Idaho Fish and Game is working to rehabilitate land in southwest Idaho that’s been burned by wildfires in recent years, and they’re asking for volunteers to help!

One local group spent part of their weekend planting about 3,000 bitterbrush plants on and around the Lucky Fire burn scar out near Lucky Peak. That fire burned about 150 acres in brush and steep terrain back in 2019.

Idaho Fish and Game is hosting two additional planting days in April: one on April 9, and the other on April 23. IDFG will provide volunteers with any needed tools and equipment.

continued:
——————–

Public Lands:

Clear Creek Forest Health Project: Opportunity to Comment on the EA-FONSI

March 23, 2022

The Mountain Home Ranger District of the Boise National Forest has published the Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact (EA-FONSI) for the Clear Creek Forest Health (CCFH) Project. This project meets the requirements as part of the insect and disease treatment program in accordance with Title VI, Section 602, of the Healthy Forests Restoration Act (HFRA), as amended by the Agricultural Improvement Acts of 2014 and 2018 (2014 and 2018 Farm Bills). The EA-FONSI can be found on the project webpage at (link).

We welcome your comments on the content of the EA-FONSI. We are particularly interested in comments that address one or more of the following: new information that would affect the analysis, or information or evidence of flawed or incomplete analysis. Specific comments are the most useful. Only those who submit timely and specific written comments regarding the proposed project during an instance where the responsible official seeks written comments are eligible to file an objection. HFRA EAs must provide an opportunity for public comment and this opportunity to comment satisfies this requirement. To have standing to object your written comments must be submitted to our electronic web form, post-marked by the Postal Service, or otherwise submitted (for example, by express delivery service) by 11:59 p.m. in the time zone of the receiving office on Monday, April 25, 2022.

Comments received in response to this solicitation, including names and addresses of those who comment, will be considered part of the public record for this project and will be available for public inspection. The following options are available for submitting comments.

How to Comment

Written and electronic comments concerning this project will be accepted. Comments can be submitted as follows:

Electronic Web Form:
Comments may be submitted on the project website at (link). To submit comments using the web form select “Comment/Object on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s webpage.

Mailed to:
Boise National Forest, Mountain Home RD
Attn: Brian Lawatch
3080 Industrial Way Mountain Home, ID 83647
(Specify comments are for the “Clear Creek Forest Health Project”)

Additional information about this project may be obtained from Brian Lawatch, Environmental Protection Specialist, at brian.lawatch@usda.gov, or Josh Newman at joshua.newman@usda.gov.
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County applies to set aside 1,218 acres of state land

Lease would prevent development, allow recreational uses

By Drew Dodson The Star-News March 24, 2022

2022EndowmentLand-aMap shows the locations, in blue and in red, of the state endowment lands being sought by Valley County to lease for public use. Star-News illustration by Tomi Grote

An application to conserve 1,218 acres of state land on both sides of Payette Lake has been submitted to the Idaho Department of Lands by Valley County.

About 1,051 acres are along Warren Wagon Road near McCall, while 167 acres are along Eastside Drive south of Lucks Point.

If approved by the state land board, the lease would prevent development on the lands, but still allow public access for camping, hiking, berry picking and other recreational activities.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

District Rangers Named to the Council/Weiser and New Meadows Ranger Districts

McCall, Idaho, March 23, 2022 – Payette National Forest Supervisor, Linda Jackson is pleased to announce that Jeff Jones has been selected as the Council/Weiser District Ranger and Dana Harris has been selected as the New Meadows District Ranger. Jones replaced Ronda Bishop who moved to a position at Forest Supervisor’s Office as the Administrative & Planner Staff Officer. Harris replaced Erin Phelps who accepted a promotion to the Washington Office as the National Branch Chief of Fire Operations Risk Management.

“I want to thank Erin and Ronda for their dedicated service and valued work in moving the Forest forward with forest restoration,” said Linda Jackson, Forest Supervisor. “I am so pleased to announce that Jeff and Dana have joined the Forest in these key leadership roles. Both are bringing knowledge and career experiences that will play a vital role in our Forest management.”

Incoming Ranger Dana Harris (New Meadows Ranger District) was raised in Idaho and attended Idaho State University where she received a Bachelor of Arts in English Writing. She then completed coursework at Oregon State University in Forestry and Fire Management.

Dana began her federal career on the Caribou-Targhee National Forest in 2001 working in range management and fuels management. She moved into fire dispatch at East Idaho Interagency Fire Center and then served as the center manager for three years at the Texas Interagency Coordination Center. In 2019 she moved back to the Intermountain Region in Ogden, Utah as a fire management planning specialist.

“I am excited to join the Payette National Forest and be back in my home state,” said Harris. “I grew up recreating in Idaho forests – cutting firewood, camping, fishing, hiking, and picking huckleberries. I look forward to learning the landscape of the New Meadows district and supporting the forest restoration work already being implemented here as well as additional restoration work across the District.”

Incoming Ranger Jeff Jones (Council/Weiser Ranger Districts) also has a long history in Idaho, having attended elementary and Junior high in Idaho prior to his family relocating to Washington state. Jeff has been on the Payette since October of 2018 as the Timber Management Assistant/Forest Service Representative for the Council/Weiser Ranger Districts before accepting this new position as District Ranger.

He began his Forest Service career in 1987 on the Wenatchee National Forest working in Timber Management and worked on all but one National Forest in the state of Washington. While most of his career has been in timber management, he also spent ten years in Fire & Aviation management on the Colville National Forest along with supporting Recreation Management when available.

“As a teenager in Idaho, I had the opportunity to spend time in the Payette and Boise National Forests camping, motorcycling, hiking, fishing and hunting,” said Jones. “I have always wanted to return to Idaho and specifically to further my career by joining the Payette National Forest. Over the past 3 years of working here we have accomplished a great deal of forest restoration work and I look forward to continuing this effort in my new role.”

Payette National Forest
— — — — — — — — — —

Winter restrictions remain in effect on forest land

March 23, 2022 Local News 8


USFS

As we prepare to change out our snow boots for tennis shoes and skis to mountain bikes, the Teton Basin Ranger District wants to remind individuals to educate themselves on closures to ensure the backcountry stays open, accessible, inclusive and protected.

“Rules are in place to keep people and natural resources safe, and make sure everyone has an enjoyable experience on their public lands, including wildlife,” Teton Basin District Ranger Jay Pence said. “Please do not recreate or horn hunt on south facing slopes until after April 15. Human intrusion stresses wintering wildlife and can have negative effects on their winter survival.”

continued:
[“Know before you go” – check road conditions for the Payette and Boise NFs – many higher elevation roads still have several feet of snow.]
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise Co. Search and Rescue frees man stranded on snow-covered road

When visiting the mountains, “it is important to let people know where you are going,” the sheriff’s office said after the rescue of an “extremely lucky” man.

KTVB Staff March 22, 2022


Credit: Boise County Sheriff’s Office

It’s March, but Idaho’s mountain roads still have a lot of snow on them and can be hazardous, the Boise County Sheriff’s Office reminds drivers after crews rescued an “extremely lucky” man on St. Patrick’s Day.

The sheriff’s office received a 911 call at about 12:30 p.m. on March 17 from a man who had gotten stuck southwest of Boise Peak on Boise Ridge Road, which is a Forest Service road. The man said he was driving up the road when his pickup became stuck in the snow. A deputy on duty activated a call for Boise County Search and Rescue members. After loading a trailer with a UTV and rescue and medical equipment, and a briefing meeting on the situation, the deputy and BCSAR 2313 headed out toward the stranded man within an hour of getting the call.

The deputy and Search and Rescue team determined the stranded driver’s location by a cell-phone ping off a cell tower when he called 911. They drove almost 7 miles on a snow-covered road before locating the stranded man, who was not injured. The rescuers drove the man off the mountain and back to Boise on the UTV. His truck was left behind.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

BLM extends review period on proposed land purchase near Boise

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has extended the public review period on the Harris Acquisition Environmental Assessment which analyzes a proposed purchase of a 275-acre private land parcel, located 5 miles east of downtown Boise, that has been directly offered to the BLM by the owner.

The purchase would help maintain open space in the Boise Foothills, preserve intact big game winter range and enhance protection of wildlife habitat and recreation access. Purchasing funds would come from the Land and Water Conservation Fund. “Healthy public lands are important for many reasons. As places of solitude and beauty, they provide invaluable opportunities for recreation, conservation, and wildlife habitat,” said acting Boise District Manager Tanya Thrift.

This review period allows the public, agencies, and other interested parties to review the Environmental Assessment and provide comments. Comments will now be accepted through April 21 and are most helpful if they provide pertinent information about the impacts of the proposed action and alternatives.

Maps and information about the project are available at: (link) (case sensitive).

Comments will be accepted through the following means:
* Email: BLM_ID_FourRiversOffice@blm.gov
* Fax: (208) 384-3326
* Surface mail: Brent Ralston, Four Rivers Field Manager, 3948 Development Ave, Boise, ID 83705

Please note that before including their personal identifying information (address, email, phone number), commenters should be aware that their entire comment – including their personal identifying information – may be made publicly available at any time. While those commenting can ask in their comments to withhold this information from public review, the BLM cannot guarantee that they will be able to do so.

For more information, contact the BLM Four Rivers Field Office at 208-384-3300.
————–

Critter News:

Dog killed by wolves in eastern Oregon

KTVB Staff March 21, 2022

The Baker County Sheriff’s Office is urging residents to remain vigilant after a dog was attacked by wolves in eastern Oregon’s Halfway Valley last week.

The dog’s owner did not see the attack, officials said, but noticed something was wrong with his dog. An examination revealed multiple severe punctures and swelling on the pet’s neck.

The owner called a veterinarian, but the dog had to be put down due to the severity of the wounds.

continued:
—————

Fish and Game News:

As bears emerge from hibernation, people need to be ‘bear aware’

By James Brower, Regional Communications Manager
Friday, March 25, 2022

Being outdoors means you may be among bears, so be prepared and take precautions

This information is courtesy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service:

As grizzly bears begin to emerge from their dens this spring in search of food, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reminds the public to remain vigilant and encourages people to take proactive actions to avoid bear conflicts. Male grizzly bears tend to emerge from their dens in March and April, and females with cubs typically appear in April and May. Knowing how to be Bear Aware can reduce your chance of encountering a grizzly bear.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

F&G Commission approves changes to 2022 deer and elk hunting seasons

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, March 24, 2022

The season changes are in response to disease outbreaks that occurred in 2021

Idaho Fish and Game Commission modified fall deer and elk hunts during its March commission meeting in Boise in response to the detection of chronic wasting disease and an outbreak of Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease in 2021. Commissioners also mandated CWD testing for deer, elk and moose taken in Units 14 and 15.

Chronic wasting disease was detected for the first time ever in Idaho in deer and elk in Unit 14, and Fish and Game staff developed a plan to keep the percentage of animals infected with the CWD low (less than 5 percent), and slow the geographic spread of it. Fish ad Game Director Ed Schriever described changes as a “measured response” to managing CWD.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

McCall area ice conditions – final update

By Mike Thomas, Regional Fisheries Biologist
Friday, March 25, 2022

On Wednesday, March 23, I checked surface and ice conditions at Lake Cascade, Horsethief Reservoir, and Payette Lake. Unfortunately, recent warm temperatures have significantly reduced ice thickness around the edges of Cascade and Payette Lakes – making them both unsafe for ice fishing. On Lake Cascade, I visited each public access area from Blue Heron to Poison Creek and observed only a very thin layer of ice along the shoreline. On Payette Lake, I visited the Mile High Marina boat ramp area and observed similar conditions. With continuing warm weather in the forecast, it looks like ice fishing season is wrapping up in Valley County. However, Horsethief Reservoir is still accessible. I measured 8 inches of ice below 8.5 inches of white ice (compact slush) with little to no snow on the surface. This measurement was taken roughly 30 feet out from the King’s Point boat ramp.

Ice conditions and thickness can vary greatly in a given area. Drill holes and check for yourself – use caution and don’t go alone. Ice can be very thin along cracks as ice sheets expand and contract, as well as near any current from rivers or creeks entering the lake. Be careful out there and watch out for each other!

continued:

Note: North Shore Lodge reports the ice is breaking up on Warm Lake.
— — — — — — — — — —

F&G Commission sets Chinook season to open April 23 for the Clearwater, Snake and Salmon rivers

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Thursday, March 24, 2022


Photo by Roger Phillips/Idaho Fish and Game

Forecast for Chinook could be best return since 2015

Idaho Fish and Game Commission approved spring Chinook fishing seasons for the Snake, Clearwater and Salmon River drainages, which will open April 23.

* Fishing for Chinook will be open daily in the Lower Salmon River, Little Salmon River, Snake River in the mainstem Clearwater River, Middle Fork of the Clearwater River and South Fork of the Clearwater River.

* Fishing for Chinook will be open four days per week in the North Fork Clearwater River, Thursday through Sunday.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Lion and wolf evacuated from Ukraine with no tranquilizers or vet

Stephen McGrath and Eldar Emric (Associated Press) [KTVB] March 23, 2022


Credit: AP

Simba the lion and a wolf named Akyla have been evacuated from a zoo in war-torn Ukraine and brought to safety in Romania in what an animal rights group involved in the operation says was a four-day mission “full of dangers” further hampered by border entry bureaucracy.

The adult male lion and the gray wolf, who were fully awake during the dangerous journey due to lack of tranquilizers in Ukraine, arrived Monday at a zoo in Radauti, from a zoo in Zaporizhzhia in southeast Ukraine.

Now at a safe distance from the conflict and after spending four days in cages in the back of a van, the two animals were recovering from the journey in their new enclosure Wednesday, regaining their strength as they lounged in the shade.

continued:
—————–

Seasonal Humor:

Snowflakes-s

CovidFeedStore-a
—————

Idaho History Mar 27, 2022

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 99

Idaho Newspaper Clippings May 21-28, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

May 21

Clearwater Republican. May 21, 1920, Page 3

19200521CR1

19200521CR219200521CR3Hit Influenza at Its Source
Dr. Simon Flexner Proposes Combating Dread Disease at Its Origin.
Eastern Europe Plague Spot
Many Recorded Epidemics Shown to Have Emanated From That Area – Disease Claims More Victims Than European War

New York — According to Dr. Simon Flexner, Director of Laboratories of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, further recurrences of the influenza epidemic can be prevented only by wiping out the disease at its source. In a recent address before the Congress of American Physicians and Surgeons, later published by the American Medical Association, he outlined the path of the disease through its different stages.

“There are excellent reasons for regarding the endemic home of influenza to be Eastern Europe,” he said, “and in particular the border regions between Russia and Turkestan. Many recorded epidemics have been shown more or less clearly to emanate from that area,” while the epidemics of recent history have been traced there with a high degree of conclusiveness. From this Eastern home, at intervals of two or three decades, a migrating epiemic influenza begins, moving eastward and westward, with the greater velocity in the latter direction.

Uncanny in Action

“To the casual observer there is something uncanny in the way influenza strikes down its victims. While other epidemics proceed from bad to worse, with at least progressive increases in intensity, influenza seems to overwhelm communities over even wider stretches of territory as by a single, stupendous blow. While in the one case the gradually accelerating rate of speed of extension may be taken to indicate personal conveyance of the provoking micro-organism, in the other the sudden wide onset appears the very negation of personal communication.

“Hence the invoking of mysterious influences, the revival of the notion of miasm and similar agencies, to account for this phenomenon. Indeed, the public mind in general lends itself readily to such formless concepts, for the reason that there still resides in the mass of the people, even in the more enlightened countries, a large uneradicated residue of superstition regarding disease. One does not need to look far or dig deep in order to uncover the source of this superstition. We have only recently emerged from a past in which knowledge of the origin of disease was scant, and such views as were commonly held and exploited were mostly fallacious. It is, indeed, very recently, if the transformation can be said to be perfect even now, that the medical profession as a whole has been completely emancipated. All this is very far from being a matter of remote importance only, since in the end the successful imposition of sanitary regulations involves wide cooperation; and until the majority of individuals composing a community is brought to a fair level of understanding of and belief in the measures proposed, serious and sustained endeavor to enforce them is scarcely to be expected.

Douting a Bugaboo

“And yet no better instance of a communicable disease could perhaps be invoked than influenza to exercise the false idea of the mysterious origin of epidemics. To dwell solely on the sudden and overwhelming stroke of the disease in wholly to overlook the significant incidents that precede the mass infection, because they are of such ordinary nature and lack all dramatic quality. Accurate observers noted long ago that influenza in its epidemic form did not constitute an exception to the common rule governing epidemic diseases, which were obviously associated with persons and their migrations. What the early students made out by tracing the epidemic backward to its point of departure, more modern observers have confirmed by carefully kept records, often graphically compiled, as in the excellent instance of the Munich records covering the epidemic of 1880-92, which can now be supplemented by a number of similarly constructed records of the epidemic just passed. These detailed records show convincingly a period of invasion during which there is a gradual rise in the number of cases to culminate, within a period variously estimated at from one to three weeks, in a widespread, so-called ‘explosive’ outbreak of the disease.

“It happens that the early cases of epidemic influenza tend not to be severe, chiefly because they rarely are attended by pneumonia and hence are frequently mistaken, and the confusion in diagnosis is resolved only when the full intensity of the epidemic is realized. In the meantime, rich opportunity has been afforded for the free and unrestricted commingling of the sick and the well, of doubtless healthy carriers of the inciting agent and others, until so high a degree of dissemination of the provoking microorganism has been secured as to expose the entire susceptible element of the population, which happens to be large, to an almost simultaneous response to the effects of the infecting microbe.

“Deductions of the like import can be drawn from the geographic movements of influenza epidemics. In Eastern Russia and Turkestan, influenza spreads with the pace of a caravan, in Europe and America with the speed of an express train, and in the world at large with the rapidity of an ocean liner; and if one project forward the outcome of the means of intercommunication of the near future, we may predict that the next pandemic, should one arise, will extend with the swiftness of an airship.

“Moreover, not only is this rate of spread determined by the nature of the transportation facilities of the region or the era, but towns and villages, mainland and island, are invaded early or late or preserved entirely from attack according as they lie within or without the avenues of approach or are protected by inaccessibility, as in instances of remote mountain settlements and of islands distant from ocean lanes or frozen in during winter periods.

To Avert Recurrences

“It is desirable, in the interest of clear thinking, to carry this consideration of the characteristics of epidemic influenza a step further. A feature of the epidemic disease of particular significance is the tendency to recur, that is, to return to a stricken region after an interval, usually of months of relative quiescence.

“Thus the beginning of the last pandemic in Europe and the United States has been traced to sporadic cases appearing in April, May and June, possibly even earlier in certain places, while the destructive epidemic raged during September, October and November of 1918. There are very good reasons for believing that in itself influenza is not a serious disease, but that its sinister character is given by the remarkable frequency with which it is followed, under particular circumstances by a concomitant or secondary pneumonic infection to which the severe effects and high mortality are traceable.”

The manner in which to fight disease of this nature is, according to Dr. Flexner, one of “central rather than peripheral control,” that is, fighting the disease at its source rather than waging a series of campaigns against it after it has spread to distant centers. To quote:

“According to this proposal, an effort at control amounting even to eventual eradication of the diseases in the regions of their endemic survival would be undertaken, an effort, indeed, not occasional and intensively spasmodic, as during the pandemic excursions but continuous over relatively long periods, in the hope that the seed beds, as it were, of the disease might be destroyed.

“That such an effort at the eradication of s serious epidemic disease may be carried through successfully, the experience with yellow fever abundantly proves. In attacking that disease, the combat was not put off until its epidemic spread had begun and until new territory, such as New Orleans, Jacksonville and Memphis, had been invaded; but the attack was made on its sources at Havana, Panama and now Guayaquil, to which endemic points the extensions into new and neutral territory had been traced.

More Victims Than War

“In proposing to strive for the high achievement, not merely of parrying the blows struck by destructive epidemics, but of rendering them impotent to strike in the future, we may pause for a moment to reflect on the different ways in which peoples react to great calamities, such as those brought by war and by disease. As the results of a cruel and devastating war, revolutions in governments supposed the most stable may occur; no such result follows on still more devastating epidemics. The recent epidemic of influenza claimed, possibly, more victims than did the great war, and the losses to the world in emotion spent, treasure consumed, and progress impeded are incalculable; yet, through a fortuitous circumstance of psychology, from the one calamity the world may emerge chastened perhaps even bettered, while from the other, because of a depth of ignorance amounting often to fatalism, mankind may largely miss the deep meaning of the lesson.”

[* see footnote 1]
— —

Mules Show “Horse Sense”

Owensboro, Ky. — G. W. Potts, farmer, owes his life to his mules. Uprooted by the wind, a giant maple crashed across the seat of Potts’ wagon. The mules saw what was coming, bolted and jerked Potts out of the seat in time.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 21 May 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Clearwater Republican. May 21, 1920, Page 9

What Your Friends And Neighbors Are Doing

The Atherton Blacksmith Shop established some record this week when 44 head of government mules belonging to the Forest Service were shod at that place by two men in less than twelve hours. The animals, which wintered in the Reparia country, were brought to Orofino Monday from that place by King Mooers and were taken on to the Oxford Thursday morning. They will be used for packing purposes during the coming fire season.

(ibid, page 9)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. May 21, 1920, Page 8

19200521KG1

Gleanings

Mrs. Robert Cain of American ridge, who has been ill for a number of weeks, does not seem to gain much. Her condition is still quite serious. Mrs. Lafayette Keene, a former resident of the ridge is also dangerously ill at a Spokane hospital.

Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Hartinger went to Lewiston this week. Mrs. Hartinger has not been well and went to Lewiston for the purpose of consulting a physician.

Jack Bechtol says that he would like to have the party who took his suit of clothes from the line at his home, Wednesday evening, either bring the suit back or come and get the belt that goes with it, as he cannot very well use the belt without the suit.
— —

Leland Items

Dr. Rothwell was in Leland this week.
— —

Warning to Automobile Owners and Drivers

The Sheriff’s Office has just been notified by the Department of Law Enforcement of the State that there are quite a number of cars in the State operating with but one license plate.

The law requires that a license plate shall be conspicuously displayed both at the front and at the rear of the automobile; and it is just as much a violation of law to run with but one license plate as to run without any. Sufficient warning has already been given in regard to operating without a 1920 license, and so from this time on, if you haven’t both of the 1920 license plates ON your car, you had better keep it off the public highways, except as to new cars legally operated under the dealer’s license, because if you are caught violating the law, you will be arrested and fined. Your receipt for license applied for, will be no shield for you whatever.

All the peace officer of the country are urged to strictly enforce the automobile license law.

John L. Woody, Sheriff of Latah County

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 21 May 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Recorder. May 21, 1920, Page 4

19200521IR1

Spring Creek

Hubert Harder was absent from school two days on account of a bad cold.
— —

Boyle Creek

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Neimann returned home Friday from Idaho Falls. Their little son is getting along nicely after his operation and all are glad to see them back again.
— —

The organizers of the overall club are somewhat discouraged now that the price of overalls has shot up from $3 to $6 per pair. Some one suggests that the next thing in order is to organize and Adam and Eve club.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 21 May 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. May 21, 1920, Page 5

Salmon Locals

J. T. Watkins, whose school at Forney [closed] last Friday, May 14, came home Sunday. On the same day Milt Merritt also arrived from the same place. Measurements of the snow depth on the Leesburg summit showed four to five feet.
— —

19200521IR2Suggestion for a Camping Trip

Buy a bottle of Chamberlain’s Colic and Diarrhoea Remedy before leaving home. As a rule it cannot be obtained when on a hunting, fishing or prospecting trip. Neither can it be obtained while on board the cars or steamships and at such times and places it is mostly likely to be needed. The safe way is to have it with you. For sale by Hettinger Salmon druggist.

– Adv. [* see footnote 2]

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. May 21, 1920, Page 8

Leadore and Upper Lemhi

Leadore

Last week Weldon Bowman was bitten on the leg by a woodtick, the leg becoming so badly inflamed that lancing was necessary a few days later. The danger point has passed for tick fever to set in, which had been the special worry of Weldon.
— —

19200521IR3

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Meridian Times., May 21, 1920, Page 1

19200521MT1

[Idaho News]

Public Health Commissioner J. K. White, one of the best known citizens of Idaho, died Sunday in Boise of tuberculosis. He has been a prominent figure in the campaign against the ravages of the white plague in the state and his interest no doubt has been prompted by personal sympathy with the efforts along this line.
— —

Newsy Items from McDermott

Miss Eva Records is quite ill at this writing.

Mrs. Chas. Ayers is still on the mend from her recent illness.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 21 May 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Meridian Times., May 21, 1920, Page 7

Health Notes

It might be well to arrange a compromise between men and women on the clothes question. If man would wear less heavy things, and women more sensible outfits, we all might live to a greater age and be more comfortable en route to our ultimate destination.

Three-fourths of all our ailments occur, or are kept in continuance, by improper eating, and by preventing the daily food, which is eaten, from passing out of the body, after its substance has been extracted by the living machinery, for the purpose of renovation and growth.

When a man eats too fast the food is not chewed well enough. It is passed into the stomach in such large pieces that so much time is required for the gastric juice to dissolve it from without inwards that that it begins to rot, to turn sour, causing a lot list of physical and mental maladies.

If a meal is eaten with great deliberation, an expanding, heating, liquefying process begins and keep pace with the meal, and the man does not feel like a gorged anaconda.

That we all eat more than we can assimilate is unquestionable. How can we determine the right quantity? Instinct should guide us, but an abnormal appetite often leads us astray. Nature’s plans are perfect if her laws are obeyed. Disease follows disobedience.

Be regular at meals. All functions of life occur in regular cycles, and are never performed well when these cycles are disturbed. Whatever the interval or number of meals regularity should be preserved.
— —

19200521MT2In the death of William Dean Howells, which was the result of influenza, the dean of American letters passed. He was generally ranked as the foremost novelist of this country, and his essays and criticisms were among the best.

[* see footnote 3]

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

The Meridian Times., May 21, 1920, Page 8

Meridian News Notes

The two younger children of Guy Humphrey are ill with scarlet fever.

Mrs. R. H. Asburry who has been seriously [ill] at her home with scarlet fever is improving.

The Seventh grade, chaperoned by Mrs. Harry Tolleth and Mrs. Hartman, motored to the tourist park in Boise, for a school picnic last Friday. All went well until two hours after a hearty lunch was eaten when some of the boys were taken with violent pains. This was not, however, until they reached home, and a doctor was called to see the more serious ones. He pronounced it ptomaine poisoning. Saturday morning, however, the children were all right. Pat Dougherty and Paul Moreland were the boys were seems to have been affected the most.

Clyde Ball went to Baker City, Ore. Wednesday night where he will enter the employ of Mr. Baker who runs a bake shop in Baker. Clyde expects to make some dough for Mr. Baker and also make some dough for himself.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

St. Lukes Hospital, Boise, Idaho ca. 1912 (1)

HospitalStLukesBoise1912Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

May 25

The Caldwell Tribune. May 25, 1920, Page 1

19200525CT1

[Local News]

Mrs. Cecil Weeks is very ill at her home on Belmont street.

H. D. Hanna is nursing a badly bruised left hand which he injured Saturday while trying to crank his car. J. H. Chambers didn’t get off so lightly with a similar accident, suffering a broken arm as a result of his auto’s misbehavior.

Mrs. T. S. Jackson Saturday underwent a serious operation at a local hospital. She is understood to be progressing favorably.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 25 May 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Bovill Hospital, Bovill, Idaho

HospitalBovillFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

May 27

The Grangeville Globe. May 27, 1920, Page 1

19200527GG1

19200527GG2Former Court House For Hospital
Dr. R. J. Alcorn Finds Present Quarters in Allen and Telcher Block Inadequate

A movement was put in motion this week by Dr. R. J. Alcorn to transform the city’s building, formerly occupied by the county as a court house, which was turned back to the city at the last session of the board of commissioners, into a modern hospital, and the doctor states that he would expend $10,000, the sum estimated to put the building in shape for hospital purposes, thereby giving the People of this neck of the woods the advantage of one of the most modern institutions in the west – provided the people of Grangeville, thru their city council, will present him with a deed to the property.

Present Quarters Inadequate

Some few months ago Dr. Alcorn secured a lease on the upper floor of the Allen and Telcher blocks on Main street where he has something like sixteen rooms. At times every room is occupied and difficulties arise for lack of space.

There are arguments in favor of a movement of this kind. The building as it stands is of little value to the city and produces no revenue, while if it should revert to private ownership the property would at least be required to bear its proportion of the tax levy according to valuation. It stands in an isolated location and is of value only for the material contained therein, except for such a proposition as suggested.

Some few years ago Dr. Alcorn successfully promoted an enterprise of this character at Ferdinand which is now being operated by himself and Mrs. Alcorn.

With the proper safeguarding of the city’s interests the consummation of such a project would undoubtedly prove of great benefit to the people of this section of the country as a whole.

All reputable physicians would have access to the institution, Dr. Alcorn has stated, thereby eliminating the criticism of its being a one man venture.

[* see footnote 4]

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 27 May 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Hospital, Gooding, Idaho

HospitalGoodingFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

May 28

The Idaho Recorder. May 28, 1920, Page 3

19200528IR1

Idaho State News

Poultry study in Bannock county has revealed that one farmer has a flock of 150 hens that are plentifully infected with tuberculosis, conveyed to the yard by the sparrows.

[* see footnote 5]

Losses from disease and exposure of live stock the past year exceeded those of 1919 and 1918, but were somewhat lower than the heavy losses of the winter of 1916 and 1917.

The Gooding county farm bureau has announced that that section of the state is short of farm help and that harvest hands will be badly needed about the first of June.

Two 13-year-ld boys of Pocatello are charged with having purloined a number of old tires and auto radiators from a second-hand store and a few hours later returned to the same store and attempted to sell them.
— —

19200528IR2

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 28 May 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. May 28, 1920, Page 4

Gilmore

Notes on Moonshine

Drayloads of beer bottles are being hauled through the streets as in ye good old brewery days.

Moonshine is being sold at from 50 dents a drink over the bar to $40 per gallon wholesale.

Judging from the number of men seen on the streets bors-de-combat, the sale of moonshine is unlimited as well as unrestricted.

Reports says that considerable prospecting is being done in the hill at night for cached moonshine.

It is alleged that about 15 bootleggers and moonshiners are plying their trade in this vicinity.

Mr. A Moonshiner recently moved his manufacturing plant from the left to the right hand fork of Silver Moon gulch.

The lid seems to be off at Gillmore and pretty badly shattered, and from present indications it will be some time before it is repaired.

– Sunny Jim

(ibid, page 4)
———————–

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Simon Flexner

Simon Flexner, M.D. ForMemRS (March 25, 1863 in Louisville, Kentucky – May 2, 1946) was a physician, scientist, administrator, and professor of experimental pathology at the University of Pennsylvania (1899–1903). He served as the first director of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research (1901–1935) (later developed as Rockefeller University) and a trustee of the Rockefeller Foundation. He was also a friend and adviser to John D. Rockefeller Jr.

Among Flexner’s most important achievements are studies into poliomyelitis and the development of serum treatment for meningitis. Among his lab assistants were Hideyo Noguchi and Cornelius Rhoads, later directors of Memorial Hospital and the Sloan-Kettering Institute, respectively.

The bacteria species Shigella flexneri was named in recognition of Flexner. In addition, Flexner was the first to describe Flexner-Wintersteiner rosettes, a characteristic finding in retinoblastoma, a type of cancer.

continued: Wikipedia
— — — — — — — — — —

Footnote 2

Chamberlain’s Colic and Diarrhoea RemedyChamberlainsColicDiarrhoea-a

Physical Description
alcohol, 45% (drug active ingredients)
ether, 10.7% (drug active ingredients)
chloroform, 19 minums (drug active ingredients)
tri-chlor-tertiary-butyl-alcohol, 3 grains (drug active ingredients)
paper; cardboard (packaging material)
glass (container material)

source: Smithsonian National Museum of American History
— — — — — — — — — —

Footnote 3

William Dean Howells

William Dean Howells (March 1, 1837 – May 11, 1920) was an American realist novelist, literary critic, and playwright, nicknamed “The Dean of American Letters”. He was particularly known for his tenure as editor of The Atlantic Monthly, as well as for his own prolific writings, including the Christmas story “Christmas Every Day” and the novels The Rise of Silas Lapham and A Traveler from Altruria.

continued: Wikipedia
— —

From “A Cruel Wind: Pandemic Flu in America, 1918–1920”

by Dorothy A. Pettit and Janice Bailie

March [1920] began with frigid temperatures plaguing much of the country. The Northeast had to dig itself out from another blizzard as the month wore on. Such bitter, raw weather did little to help the influenza sufferers. And, although the epidemic had already reached its peak, new cases continued to erupt in many of the nation’s communities. On the day in early March when Senator Bankhead’s death was reported, came the announcement that the dean of American letters, William Dean Howells, age eighty-three, was ill with influenza in Savannah, Georgia, and was passing his birthday m bed. Another March victim was Secretary of Labor William B. Wilson, who, because of his illness, was unable to attend the Seventh Anniversary Dinner of the Department of Labor on the fourth. The Secretary had been scheduled to be the guest of honor at the affair.

excerpted: page 255 Oxford Academic – Social History of Medicine
— — — — — — — — — —

Footnote 4

Dr. R. J. Alcorn

DrsAlcorn1913-aThis circa 1913 Alcorn family portrait shows Dr. R. J. Alcorn, his son Argie, his daughter Wilma, and his wife, Dr. Cora E. Alcorn. (Photo from Ancestry.com)
source: The Dr. Alcorn story Pt. 1

Alcorn, according to numerous newspaper stories, also accomplished many good things as a medical professional. He opened hospitals. He mended broken bones. He traveled far to tend to ailing patients, including the many sick and dying during the influenza epidemic of 1918-19. And in 1919, he provided Idaho County with its first-ever x-ray machine.

He died Feb. 18, 1937, in Los Angeles. He was 70 years old.

excerpted from: The Dr. Alcorn story Pt. 2
— — — — — — — — — —

Footnote 5

Avian Tuberculosis

Poultry DVM

Other Names: Avian Mycobacteriosis, Mycobacterium Infection Avian mycobacteriosis, also known as avian tuberculosis, is a contagious, slow-developing, chronicgranulomatous disease primarily caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA) and less commonly, Mycobacterium genavense. The disease occurs in all avian species (domestic and wild) and sporadically in mammals. Chickens are more susceptible than other animal species.

Avian tuberculosis can have several different clinical presentations, depending on which organs are involved. In chickens, the intestinal tract and liver are the primary organs affected, with dissemination to other organs such as the spleen, bone marrow, air sacs, lungs, and skin. The infection results in the development of large tubercles or granulomas on the organ(s).

The most common form of avian tuberculosis, the intestinal form, typically causes progressive loss in body condition in the bird. Loss of body fat will cause the chicken’s breast muscles to atrophy, resulting in a prominent keel bone. Their face may appear smaller than normal, due to loss in body fat. Other signs observed include weight loss, white diarrhea sticking to vent feathers (“pasty butt”), dull and ruffled feathers, increased thirst, lethargy, and depression. The chicken’s comb, wattles, and earlobes often become very dry and pale in color.

If granulomas develop in the bone marrow of the bird’s leg bones or joints, the clinical signs often include an abnormally stiff and jerky hopping gait which sometimes leads to complete paralysis. This form is called tuberculous arthritis.

continued:
———————-

Further Reading

Spanish Influenza of 1918, Part 2: The Rapid Spread of the Epidemic in the United States, Oct. to Dec. 1918

by William Stearns 3/30/2020

While the Boston area reeled under the burden of the epidemic, the influenza outbreak was spreading rapidly. On the same date, October 21, 1918, the Belleville News Democrat called the Illinois city of Mascoutah “the Center of Influenza Epidemic in St. Clair County with Three Hundred Cases …” and the Aberdeen Daily News announced “Influenza Epidemic Checked in Boston.” The article in the Aberdeen newspaper continued:

Normal conditions were resumed in this city today when places of public assembly were allowed to reopen by health officials. The places had been closed for nearly three weeks because of the epidemic of influenza which caused nearly 1,000 deaths here.

Meanwhile, the article in the Belleville paper declared:

Influenza has invaded Mascoutah and today it is reported that there are about 300 cases in the city. Three deaths have already been reported and many more of those afflicted with the disease are said to be seriously ill. New cases are reported hourly.

The Illinois city had begun to establish some prophylactic measures.

… schools, churches and all meeting places have been closed for some time past. The saloons are still open but congregating in them or playing cards is forbidden.

Some physicians found that alcohol was a useful palliative in treating influenza patients, but many places in the country were dry. In Atlanta, as reported by the Macon Telegraph on October 25, 1918: “‘Flu’ Epidemic Strikes Snag in Bone-Dry Law.’” In presenting local medical views, the Telegraph reported “there are other methods of treatment the doctors do not deny, but their claim for the liquor is on the basis that its use under directions is the best thing we know of.” The matter was referred to the chief of police, but the article stated “there is no prospect, legally, of the relief thus sought.” However,

As a matter of cold fact, despite the bone-dry law, there is a considerable quantity of liquor being used in “flu” cases in Atlanta — and quite some of it where there are no cases: “just to keep it off.”

Liquor may have had a valid use in treatment, but snake oil salesmen were attempting to cash in on the tragedy. On Oct. 27, 1918, the Colorado Springs Gazette warned its readers that the

Use of vaccines in combating or treating Spanish influenza has not gone beyond the experimental stage so far as the United States public health service has been able to learn.

The article included a statement from Rupert Blue, the U.S. Surgeon General, with a warning:

The health service urges the public to remember that there is no specific cure for influenza and that many of the alleged “cures” and remedies being recommended by neighbors, nostrum vendors and others do more harm than good.
InfluenzaColoradoSpringsGazetteOctober271918-a

One particularly opportunistic manufacturer promoted Oil of Hyomei, which was sold with an inhaler. Its maker induced many newspapers across the country to run an identical article, unattributed, with the same headline: “Spanish Influenza Is Epidemic Here. Many Cases Develop Into Deadly Pneumonia. Easier to Prevent than Cure. How to Avoid.” Of course, the cure was their product. Decades later the Journal of the American Medical Association concluded: “This mixture never cured anything, unless it was impecuniosity in its exploiter.”

The planted advertisement disguised as a news article concluded with an exhortation.

Hundreds of people in [insert name of newspaper’s location] and vicinity keep a Hyomei outfit with inhaler on the bathroom shelf for regular winter use. If you have one get it out now and use it. If you haven’t, go to the nearest drug store and get one today. It is the duty of every person, not only for his own sake but for the community to do all in his power to prevent further spread of this epidemic and to stamp it out.

Across the nation more events and amusements were banned. In New Orleans, Halloween celebrations were forbidden. The Times-Picayune reported

Hallowe’en parties are proscribed. Dr. Corput and Dr. Robin have declared that such gatherings are included in the inhibition of the resolution of the Board of Health … Instead of spooks and goblins riding broomsticks through the air there is a mysterious demon distributing sickness and death throughout the land and it must not be permitted to spread its deadly germs where the young may gather for innocent pleasures of the mysterious Hallowe’en.

On Oct. 30, 1918, the Idaho Statesman’s headline was “Stricter Rules May Be Needed To Curb Influenza.” The epidemic was spreading in Idaho, and its state board of health sent telegrams to Surgeon General Blue,

… urging that travel be restricted during the epidemic of Spanish influenza to persons who can furnish affidavits that it is necessary for them to be upon the railroads for business or urgent reasons, and suggesting that all travelers be required to wear masks …

The issue of community quarantine in Idaho was on the boil.

Dr. S.F. Wright of Salmon had advised that the local board of health there had tried to quarantine the county against the outside, especially Butte, Mont., but that the superintendent of the G. & P. railroad had refused to comply with the order …
InfluenzaIdahoStatesmanOctober301918-a

Also, on Oct. 30, the Oregonian had only bad news, including the fates of specific individuals.

The Spanish influenza epidemic yesterday showed no signs of a let-down. New cases for the past 24 hours were 203, while deaths reported were 27. In the 48 hours previous 30 deaths and 212 new cases were reported. Portland’s death list total is now 172. Conditions in the city undertaking establishments are slightly improved. Additional men are being put on by nearly every big downtown establishment …

The same paper further stated that “city laboratories” were working assiduously to manufacture enough anti-influenza serum. The article concluded by personalizing the grim statistics.

Death of Mrs. Wendle Ulrich, of Bridgeton, Or., at the Good Samaritan Hospital yesterday followed that of her husband, Charles Ulrich, a fisherman, the day before. Both succumbed to influenza.

Burial of the body of L. Williamson, who died from influenza last week, awaits the arrival of bodies of his wife and two children, all of whom were victims of the epidemic in Salt Lake City.

The article concluded with a long list of names, ages, and occupations of many other victims.

Many articles appeared across the country in the first two weeks of November reporting the ebb of the epidemic in some locations and the alarming wave of infections in others. One of the Oregonian’s headlines during this period was “Epidemic Takes Athletes.” It recounted the names of some of “the nearly score of men who were well known.”

Despite the easing of bans on public gatherings in some communities, the city of Spokane was intent on maintaining the bans, as reported by the Oregonian on Nov. 15:.

The influenza ban is still on. There is little prospect of its being lifted for a week or 10 days, at least. All prospects of a resumption of business and social activity in Spokane were dispelled today in the face of unanimous recommendations by physicians, ministers, school patrons and other citizens that the lid remain on for at least a week longer.

By late Nov. 1918 some retrospective and “lessons learned” articles began to appear. Perhaps inevitably, bigotry crept into the analyses. The Lexington Herald in Kentucky published an article on Nov. 26 “from The Medical Council.” It focused on the infection and death rates in Boston, especially as they pertained to hygiene.

In a district in Boston largely occupied by foreigners and the houses swarming with people, conditions were so bad there was difficulty in procuring a sufficient supply of caskets in which to bury the dead.

In contrast to the tenements, “in true American homes, with one family only, the incidence was comparatively light and but a small proportion developed serious complications.”

Beyond the deaths, economic losses, and public expense, there were other consequences of the influenza epidemic. On December 18, 1918, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported that 50,000 orphans had been created in Pennsylvania and were in need of placement.

Dr. Royer believes that when the canvass is complete it will be found that the influenza has left in its wake between forty and fifty thousand orphans throughout the State, in addition to thousands of saddened homes from which at least one parent is missing.

The next day, the San Jose Mercury News had dispiriting information. There were 94 new influenza cases, 35 new pneumonia cases, and one death. Citizens were encouraged to wear masks which have proven to be

… a most efficacious weapon against the spread of influenza … .The corps of inspectors which is scouring the city in an effort to stamp out the epidemic reported yesterday that generally speaking the women of San Jose are wearing the mask more conscientiously than the men. In many instances there is a pronounced carelessness. Filthy masks, which are a menace not only to the wearers but also to the public, are being worn on the street according to the health department. These will not be tolerated.

By Dec. 24, 1918, the members of the American Public Health Association predicted that a new epidemic, perhaps “even more virulent than [the] recent outbreak,” was to be expected in 1919. In a report published by the Philadelphia Inquirer, the APHA further surmised that even greater tolls could be expected in 1920.

Also it is pointed out that in previous epidemics the second and third outbreaks have been more virulent and attended by a higher mortality rate then were the initial manifestations.

On New Year’s Eve, the Fort Wayne News Sentinel in Indiana published an article with a headline and two sub-headlines:

INFLUENZA MAY COME BACK.

Public Health Service Says Epidemic Caused 350,000 Deaths in United States Since Sept. 15.

Grip Is Breaking Out Again In Many Sections.

This was true, but the article quickly shifted into an explicit advertisement for Father John’s Medicine.

San Jose was one of many cities to have repurposed buildings to serve as temporary hospitals. Although the disease was by no means finished within the United States, the end of the old year also concluded with a brighter note in some locations. The San Jose Mercury News reported:

The conditions for San Jose and adjoining territory seem to be on a direct road to improvement as far as influenza is concerned … At all the local hospitals, the conditions were reported as better, nearly all those ill were doing nicely and the percentage of new cases had dropped to a very small number …

excerpted from: Readex Part 2

link: Part 1
——————

1918MaskCartoon-a

Flu Stories – Masks’ 1918 a cartoon created during the early 20thc influenza pandemic, by Fay King. US journalist Fay (1889 – 1954?) was one of the few female cartoonists of the era.

source #WomensArt [h/t SMc]
——————-

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports Mar 27, 2022

It is Rock Migration Season. Please share road reports. Winter travel conditions. Most back country roads are not maintained. This time of year there is deep snow in higher elevations. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: Lots of snow melted this week. Local streets are mostly bare with some slush and ice in the shade. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Hwy 55 Construction Announcement from ITD 3/9/22
Starting Monday, March 14, construction on ID-55 near Smiths Ferry will resume. Drivers can expect one-way alternating traffic with 15-minute delays as crews anchor the hillside for long-term stability.
Full road closures are anticipated to start in mid-April through the end of May. Drivers can expect full closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Outside the full closure hours, drivers can expect one-way alternating traffic with 15-minute delays. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes.
Drivers should plan ahead to avoid delays and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route when possible. link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (March 23) going over the summit rough frozen slush this morning.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
PNF Rx Burn March 25th: We are planning to start burning this Friday through the weekend in the four mile project area. Ignitions will primarily take place from noon to 4pm along the Miners Peak trail. Small scale hand ignition no more than 50 acres. Aerial ignitions are planned for mid-April. Patrick Schon – Payette Forest Fire Management Specialist
Update Wednesday (March 23) “South Fork road is almost totally ice free and there’s very few rocks.”
Report Wednesday (March 23) rough frozen slush on the upper end. Lower end bare and some new rocks to dodge. Rocks had been cleared recently.
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Update Wednesday (March 23) “East Fork road has potholes, especially from Caton Creek to Yellow Pine. Ice floor patches, closer to Yellow Pine, are almost completely melted. There is a rock slide one mile upstream from Williams Peak trailhead. Two rocks at the “bowling alley” near Eiguren Ranch. Rocks are passable but the color blends with the road.”
Report Wednesday (March 23) Lower end getting dusty, upper end rough frozen slush this morning. Pot holes and a few rocks to dodge.

Upper Johnson Creek Road (Trail): Closed to wheeled vehicles.
No current report.
Lower Johnson Creek Road: Open
Old report Tuesday (Mar 15) road is very slushy between YP and the Dump. A few spots have broken thru down to dirt, majority is slush on top of ice.
Lower end last plowed March 14th and 16th.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel
Report Friday (March 25): “Profile Creek Road – EFSF to Profile Gap. There is a solid snow floor all the way that is packed down & shows a lot of travel – Based on the tracks left on the ground it indicates skiers traveling on tracked machines. All tracks ended at Profile Gap where skiers left the gap in all directions & the tracked machines turned around. There have been a few small snow slides in the first few miles, but everybody just goes over them.
“Profile Gap to BC – No recent travel on this section, 6-8 inches of fresh powder. Profile Gap to Big Creek Culvert was almost too easy. No sidehilling or snow slides. From BC Culvert to Edwardsburg there is a solid snow pack, but you do have to cross some spots where running water has made deep cuts (2-3 feet) in the snow on the road. This did liven up the ride a little bit. It is situations like this where you are glad to have winches on your machines – we didn’t use them today.” – C&L
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
Report Friday (March 25): “EFSR road – YP to Profile Creek. The road is snow/ice free over about 1/2 the distance, and is log free, smooth & rock free all the way. The snow clear parts are wet & our tracked ATVs kicked up a lot of mud on the ATVs. Definitely not for snowmobiles.” – C&L
With warmer and wetter weather, be aware that slides could come down.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:

Payette Avalanche Center Link:
——————

Weather Reports Mar 20-26, 2022

Mar 20 Weather:

At 1030am it was 31 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breeze. Mostly cloudy and breezy at 1pm. At 430pm it was 37 degrees, partly clear and light breezes. At 740pm it was 32 degrees, mostly clear and light cold breeze. At 1045pm only a few brightest stars to the east. At 1am thin haze and fuzzy moon.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 21, 2022 at 10:30AM
Thin hazy overcast, light breeze
Max temperature 39 degrees F
Min temperature 19 degrees F
At observation 27 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 10 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Mar 21 Weather:

At 1030am it was 27 degrees, thin hazy overcast, filtered sun and light breeze. At 1pm it was a bit breezy, thin overcast and filtered sunlight. At 335pm it was 44 degrees, partly sunny (poofy clouds) and breezy. At 735pm it was 41 degrees, mostly cloudy and calm. At 1045pm it looked cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 22, 2022 at 10:30AM
Gray overcast, light breeze
Max temperature 47 degrees F
Min temperature 27 degrees F <– previous AM
At observation 38 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 8 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Mar 22 Weather:

At 1030am it was 38 degrees, gray overcast and light breeze, 6-11″ snow depth. At 12340pm partly clear, scattered sunshine and breezy. At 350pm it was 53 degrees, partly clear to mostly cloudy and breezy. At 740pm it was 47 degrees, partly cloudy and calm. At 1045pm some stars out.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 23, 2022 at 10:30AM
Clear, frost melting
Max temperature 57 degrees F
Min temperature 25 degrees F
At observation 37 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 5 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Mar 23 Weather:

At 1030am it was 37 degrees, very clear blue sky and frost melting. About 1/4 of the ground is bare and robin calling. At 1pm clear, sunny and warm. At 430pm it was 65 degrees, mostly hazy and slight breeze. At 755pm it was 45 degrees, calm and a bit hazy. At 1045pm it looked hazy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 24, 2022 at 10:30AM
Mostly clear
Max temperature 66 degrees F
Min temperature 27 degrees F
At observation 40 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 4 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Mar 24 Weather:

At 1030am it was 40 degrees and mostly clear. About 50% of the ground is bare, remaining snow 4-8″ deep. A few clouds at 1230pm. At 4pm it was 51 degrees, mostly clear and light breeze. At 745pm it was 48 degrees, mostly cloudy and calmer. At 1045pm some stars out.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 25, 2022 at 10:30AM
Overcast
Max temperature 63 degrees F
Min temperature 28 degrees F
At observation 39 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 3 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Mar 25 Weather:

At 1030am it was 39 degrees and overcast. About 60% bare ground. At 12pm it was overcast. At 1pm it was 55 degrees and overcast. Getting gusty after 330pm. At 415pm it was 64 degrees, overcast and light breeze. At 745pm it was 49 degrees, mostly hazy and light breeze. Robins calling. At 130am it looked hazy/cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 26, 2022 at 10:30AM
Mostly high thin haze
Max temperature 65 degrees F
Min temperature 29 degrees F
At observation 44 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 2 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Mar 26 Weather:

At 1030am it was 44 degrees, mostly high thin haze and filtered sunshine. Patchy snow cover. At 1pm thin overcast and a bit breezy. At 410pm it wa 63 degrees, light gray overcast and a but breezy. At 735pm it was 53 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breeze. Robins chirping. At 1130pm it looked mostly hazy or cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 27, 2022 at 10:30AM
Mostly hazy, light breeze
Max temperature 65 degrees F
Min temperature 29 degrees F
At observation 44 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 1 inch
—————————–

Updated Road Reports Mar 23, 2022

It is Rock Migration Season. Please share road reports. Winter travel conditions. Most back country roads are not maintained. This time of year there is deep snow in higher elevations. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: Average snow depth March 23rd is 5″. Local streets are a mix of bare mud and slush. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Hwy 55 Construction Announcement from ITD 3/9/22
Starting Monday, March 14, construction on ID-55 near Smiths Ferry will resume. Drivers can expect one-way alternating traffic with 15-minute delays as crews anchor the hillside for long-term stability.
Full road closures are anticipated to start in mid-April through the end of May. Drivers can expect full closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Outside the full closure hours, drivers can expect one-way alternating traffic with 15-minute delays. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes.
Drivers should plan ahead to avoid delays and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route when possible. link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (March 23) going over the summit rough frozen slush this morning.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
PNF Rx Burn March 25th: We are planning to start burning this Friday through the weekend in the four mile project area. Ignitions will primarily take place from noon to 4pm along the Miners Peak trail. Small scale hand ignition no more than 50 acres. Aerial ignitions are planned for mid-April. Patrick Schon – Payette Forest Fire Management Specialist
Update Wednesday (March 23) “South Fork road is almost totally ice free and there’s very few rocks.”
Report Wednesday (March 23) rough frozen slush on the upper end. Lower end bare and some new rocks to dodge. Old rocks had been cleared recently.
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Update Wednesday (March 23) “East Fork road has potholes, especially from Caton Creek to Yellow Pine. Ice floor patches, closer to Yellow Pine, are almost completely melted. There is a rock slide one mile upstream from Williams Peak trailhead. Two rocks at the “bowling alley” near Eiguren Ranch. Rocks are passable but the color blends with the road.”
Report Wednesday (March 23) Lower end getting dusty, upper end rough frozen slush this morning. Pot holes and a few rocks to dodge.

Upper Johnson Creek Road (Trail): Closed to wheeled vehicles.
No current report.
Lower Johnson Creek Road: Open
Old report Tuesday (Mar 15) road is very slushy between YP and the Dump. A few spots have broken thru down to dirt, majority is slush on top of ice.
Lower end last plowed March 14th and 16th.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
With warmer and wetter weather, be aware that slides could come down.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:

Payette Avalanche Center Link:
——————

PNF Rx Burn March 25, 2022

PNF Rx Burn March 25, 2022
We are planning to start burning this Friday through the weekend in the four mile project area. Ignitions will primarily take place from noon to 4pm along the Miners Peak trail. Small scale hand ignition no more than 50 acres. Aerial ignitions are planned for mid-April.
Patrick Schon
Payette Forest Fire Management Specialist

Mar 20, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

Mar 20, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
Oct 27, 2021 – Transfer Station on Winter Schedule
Nov 1, 2021 – Winter Mail Delivery Starts
Mar 20 – Spring Equinox 933am MDT
Mar 22 – Seven Brides for Seven Brothers
Mar 29 – City Slickers
Apr 3 – YPFD meeting at 2pm
Apr 5 – Forrest Gump
Mar-May – Spring Rx burns

(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Tuesday Movie Nights

Come join us for Movie Night at the Community Hall every Tuesday at 4:30 p.m. Snacks, drinks, and comfy clothes welcome.

March 22: Seven Brides for Seven Brothers
March 29: City Slickers
April 5: Forrest Gump
— — — —

Krassel RD Prescribed Burns Spring 2022

The Krassel Ranger District plans to apply fire to approximately 2,500 acres within the Bald Hill project area (east of Yellow Pine); 2,000 acres in the Four Mile project area along the South Fork of the Salmon River near the Miners peak trail, and 70 acres around Krassel Work Center.
Ignitions may occur over 2-7 days in the months of March through May Flame, smoke and hazards may be present in the area until significant precipitation or season ending weather is received. If you have any questions or comments please contact Dave Hogen Krassel District Ranger at 208-634-0600

(Same map from last fall.)
———

Village News:

March 17th Potluck at The Corner

St Patty day potluck at The Corner. The Corner provided the corned beef and cabbage and others brought in a potluck dish to share.
— — — —

Buckhorn Outfitters

Just a neat picture caught on one of our game cams.

20220318BuckHornEagles-acourtesy Buckhorn Outfitters
— — — —

Watkin’s Pharmacy update

As of March 16th they have not yet found a place for a temporary pharmacy.
— — — —

Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at wicap.org.
— — — —

Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
— — — —

Arnold Aviation News:

Customers New Deadline – Please email your shopping list by Sunday evening so they are ready to print early Monday morning.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Hwy 55 summer road construction starts March 14, 2022
link:

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.

Upper Johnson Creek road at Landmark, Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Elk Summit, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are closed to wheeled vehicles. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
— — — —

Critters

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be Elk Aware

Elk are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

Bears will be coming out of hibernation soon and hungry.

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat had been hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started November 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report March 15th: Road from YP to the dump is very slushy. The bins are still fairly empty.

Road plowed March 14th.

Bins dumped March 5th. Please flatten your empty boxes!

Dump update October 27th: We are now in winter mode. When it gets fairly full we will call to have it dumped. Contact Cecil.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

Water Use

03/09/22 21511822 68525 24 2855 48 W 29243
03/10/22 21591890 80068 24 3336 56 T 11543
03/11/22 21674045 82155 24 3423 57 F 2087
03/12/22 21755277 81232 24 3385 56 S 923
03/13/22 21807935 52658 23 2289 38 S 28574
03/14/22 21826624 18689 24 779 13 M 33969
03/15/22 21886582 59958 24 2498 42 T 41269
03/16/22 21924105 37523 24 1563 26 W 22435
03/17/22 21962329 38224 24 1593 27 T 701
03/18/22 22000682 38353 24 1598 27 F 129
03/19/22 22038502 37820 24 1576 26 S 533
03/20/22 22077208 38706 24 1613 27 S 886

Water update March 13th

Last Wednesday a few residents in Yellow Pine were experiencing low water pressure. A leak was confirmed that day we had a problem. Yesterday that leak was found and contained.

We want to thank everyone involved including those out looking for leak to the ones actually capping it.

Thanks to the community volunteers for keeping our water system flowing.

Steve Holloway

Water update March 8th

Hello Yellow Piners,

As required by DEQ until the water demand issue is resolved, the monthly Boil Water Notification is attached for distribution [See below]. Notification should be posted at public places, distributed via email, included in the Yellow Pine Times and social media posts, and sent to residents by any other means appropriate.

Best Regards,
Warren

Water Update Feb 26th

Hello Yellow Piners,

On Tuesday the 22nd of February I traveled to Yellow Pine, completed regular system checks, collected monthly and annual compliance samples, and cleaned Filter #1 to restore adequate flow.

Mike Amos again assisted by shuttling his 4-wheeler up to McIntosh’s’ place ahead of my arrival which made it easier to get pumps, hoses and equipment up to the plant. Winter water plant access needs to be improved and should be planned for going into next winter. Vehicle access to at least the filtration plant should be part of the plan.

Nicki’s reliable and consistent daily recording of data indicates that even after the recent leak repair completed in town, system demand exceeds 40K gallons per day which continues to exceed system capacity and therefore necessitates the continuation of the Boil Order.

Just for information’s sake, the filters have the following capacity. Please keep in mind that the system is designed to be able to run on one filter at a time while the other filter is offline for cleaning or maintenance.

Design filtration rate is .1 gpm/sq ft of filter surface area during warm weather and .05 gpm/sq ft of surface area when below 5 degrees C (41 degrees F)

Filter #1 is 215 sq ft
Warm Weather
215 x 0.1= 21.5 gpm
21.5 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 30,960 gallons per day
Cold Weather
215 x 0.05= 10.75 gpm
10.75 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 15,480 gallons per day

Filter #2 is 256 sq ft
Warm Weather
256 x 0.1= 25.6 gpm
25.6 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 36,864 gallons per day
Cold Weather
256 x 0.05= 12.8 gpm
12.8 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 18,432 gallons per day

Flow rates explained above are optimal and are only to be expected from clean filters. Flow rates diminish rapidly as the filter media becomes “plugged” with dirt and debris from Boulder Creek. High system demand equates to increased water volume through the filters which in turn causes filters to become dirty faster reducing flow accordingly.

Every time the filters are cleaned, a portion of the sand filter media is removed. Over time and after repeated cleanings, the level of sand in the filters becomes low and must be replenished. A plan for cleaning and replacement of the used sand or purchase and installation of new sand needs to be developed.

Additionally, there are a number of deferred maintenance items and miscellaneous equipment purchases that need to be considered in order to help assure continued and uninterrupted water supply to the community. A plan to address these issues needs to be developed as well.

I am available to answer questions or can attend a water board meeting to assist in discussion and planning as needed.

Best Regards,
Warren

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

DRINKING WATER WARNING March 8, 2022
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 3-8-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 at the Community Hall at 10am. Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting held July 5, 2020 at the Community Hall 2pm. link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
— — — —

VYPA News:

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Chairman – vacant
Vice Chairman – Josh Jones
Treasurer – Ronda Rogers
Secretary – Hailey Harris
Member-at-large – Rhonda Egbert

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Ron Earl

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
— — — —

YPFD News:

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Notice Of Cancellation And Reschedule Of Meeting Of The YPFPD Board Of Commissioners
Yellow Pine Fire Protection District (YPFPD), Valley County, Idaho
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the meeting on 3/27/2022 of the Board of Fire Commissioners of the above named Fire District will be Canceled and be Rescheduled for the 3th day of April 2022, at 2:00 pm at Yellow Pine Community Hall, 210 Yellow Pine Ave., Yellow Pine, Idaho 83677
Dated this 6th day of March 2022
Lorinne Munn, District 1 Fire Commissioner
Tom Lanham, District 2 Fire Commissioner
Bill McIntosh, District 3 Fire Commissioner

Meeting Minutes

Feb 24, 2022 Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting (no minutes yet.)
November 23, 2021 Special meeting Link:
November 8, 2021 AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
October 31, 2021 Special meeting Link:
October 14, 2021 Special meeting Link:
September 27, 2021 Special meeting Link:
September 18, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sept 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
July 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
June 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sept 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 11, 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Winter hours:
Open Wednesday 11-6
Fridays 11-9
Saturdays 9-6
Sunday’s 10-6
Closed Monday, Tuesday and Thursday
Exceptions are by appointment and we’ll be open on Mondays of Holiday weekends.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Winter Hours at the Tavern
Open Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat: 9am-2pm 4pm-8pm
Open Sunday 9am-2pm
Closed Tues & Thurs
Call the Tavern 208 633-2233 or Cell 208 739-7086 for other arrangements
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed for the winter.
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Availability for 2022
*Note can book Idaho Residents now for Archery or put on a waiting list for Non Residents, will find out final allocations by April 18th.
2 on 1 Archery August 29th to September 4th *Lodge hunt / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Archery September 6th to September 12th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Rifle September 24th to September 30th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Wolf.
Spring Bear Hunt June 3rd to June 9th Group of 2 to 3 hunters *Lodge Hunt / Black Bear and Wolf.
See our website for more details. Or give us a call 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 452-4361
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watikns can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
Please help support local journalism and subscribe.
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
— — — —

This is Dusty White. I was a vendor for many years for the Harmonica Festival many years ago: “The Lill Red Wagon + More”. I was born and raised in Idaho and as a child spent many summers with my parents and family in and around Yellow Pine and the Stibnite areas. My grandmother lived at Roosevelt as a child. I have just published my first book of my life, “Walking With An Open Heart” (link)
————–

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Mar 14) overnight low of 26 degrees. Yesterday’s snow and rain showers only amounted to a trace in the gauge. This morning it was 40 degrees at 1030am, mostly cloudy and breezy, average snow depth now 16″. Blackbirds calling. Rufous sided spotted towhee, hairy woodpecker, pine squirrel, jays and juncos visiting. Gray overcast and breezy at lunch time. Gray overcast, warm and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 45 degrees. Overcast and breezy at dusk, way above freezing. Gusty breezes, broken cloud cover and filtered moonlight before midnight. Rain early morning.

Tuesday (Mar 15) overnight low of 34 degrees, rain likely started around 7am. This morning it was 35 degrees at 1030am, low overcast and steady rain. Measured 0.15″ of rain in the gauge so far and down to an average of 14″ old snow on the ground. Jays, towhee, hairy woodpecker, red-winged blackbird and pine squirrel visiting. Overcast and sprinkling at lunch time. Break in the rain early afternoon. Gusty breezes and 20-30 minute rain shower mid-afternoon, high of 44 degrees. Rain/snow mix started at dusk (not sure how long it lasted), low foggy overcast, breezy and above freezing. Low clouds and a bit foggy around 930pm. Higher overcast before midnight. Trace of snow fell early morning.

Wednesday (March 16) overnight low of 30 degrees, trace of new snow. This morning it was 33 degrees at 1030am, low overcast, light breeze and flaking snow. Rain and (melted) snow = 0.14″ and an average of 13″ on the ground. Fresh fox tracks. Jays, hairy woodpecker, red-breasted nuthatch and pine squirrel visiting. Patches of blue sky at lunch time. Mail truck was a little early. A few flakes of snow after lunch time. Low foggy clouds, breezy and snowing sideways before 130pm (lasted less than 30 minutes.) Clouds lifted and patch of blue sky over VanMeter Hill by early afternoon. Melt water is starting to soak in where the ground receives sunshine. Partly sunny, warm and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 43 degrees. Calmer and partly cloudy at dusk, fat moon rising north of GG. Looked clear before midnight, big bright moon.

Thursday (March 17) overnight low of 13 degrees. Yesterday’s breezy snowfall missed the collection gauge and melted. This morning it was 22 degrees at 1030am, clear sky, light breeze and frosty. Snow depth ranges from 11-15″ – average 13″. Downy and hairy woodpeckers, pine squirrel, nuthatch and jays visiting. Mostly sunny with a little high thin haze at lunch time. High thin overcast mid-afternoon, warm and a bit breezy, high of 49 degrees. Overcast at dusk, above freezing and calmer. Thin overcast and fuzzy moon before midnight. Tiny trace of graupel (snow balls) fell during the night.

Friday (March 18) 24 hour low of 22 degrees from Thursday morning. Tiny trace of graupel melting, this morning it was 38 degrees at 1030am and broken cloud cover. Snow depth ranges from 10-14 inches, tree wells growing larger. Mystery bird singing sweetly this morning, jays, nuthatch and hairy woodpecker visiting. Mostly cloudy at lunch time (smaller clouds.) Blustery “snow-eater” breezes, warm and mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, high of 50 degrees. High flat overcast at dusk, calmer and warm. Full “worm” moon rising in hazy sky at 1025pm. Thinner haze after midnight, bright moonlight.

Saturday (March 19) overnight low of 27 degrees. This morning clear to the north and hazy sky to the south, breezy and 41 degrees at 1030am. Snow depth on the open flat ranges from 10-13 inches. Larger open spots under the trees and near buildings, more open patches on local streets. Pine squirrel, jays, hairy woodpecker and nuthatches visiting. Mostly cloudy and breezy at lunch time. Warm and blustery mid-afternoon, light gray overcast with a big dark cloud in the middle of the sky, high of 54 degrees. Short early evening rain shower and a little mist on and off. Still above freezing at dusk, dark overcast and calm. Rain after dark, turned to snow before morning.

Sunday (March 20) overnight low of 27 degrees, rain from last evening plus trace of snow early morning = 0.12″ precipitation. This morning it was 31 degrees at 1030am, mostly cloudy and light breezes. Undisturbed snow on the flat ranges from 8-12″ deep. Pine squirrel, jays, nuthatches and hairy woodpecker visiting. Mostly cloudy and breezy at lunch time. Cool, partly sunny and lighter breezes mid-afternoon, high of 39 degrees. Mostly clear at dusk, just a hair below freezing and light cold breezes.
————–

Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 563 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

March 18, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 563 new COVID-19 cases and 0 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 441,938.

The state reports data for the most recent 2-week period are incomplete. Due to the recent surge in cases from Jan. 10 to Feb. 5, approximately 400 outstanding positive laboratory results are pending local public health district review and follow-up.

The state said 44 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 16,423 and 7 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,824.

0 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,834.

full story: [Valley County 2,597 cases, 16 deaths.]
— — — —

Latest hospital numbers as of 3/16 (Wednesday)

98 hospitalized with COVID-19
18 in ICU

more info: KTVB March 16, 2022
— — — —

13 new Valley County COVID-19 cases reported in week

By Tom Grote The Star-News March 17, 2022

Thirteen new cases of COVID-19 were reported in Valley County last week, according to the county’s two hospitals.

The 13 new cases reported is up from the three new cases reported the previous week and after being down from 12 cases the prior week.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 2,672 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started two years ago.

Thirteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health.

Clinics & Tests

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine is now offering the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older. Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines continue to be offered for anyone age 5 and older.

Also available are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine boosters for ages 12 to 15 and to moderately or severely immunocompromised youths age 5 to 11.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link) or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital is also providing free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

Cascade Medical Center offers a walk-in vaccination clinic from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster.

The Pfizer vaccine for those ages 5 and older is available in Cascade on Wednesdays.

full story: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used w/permission.)
— — — —

Idaho continues to test wastewater for COVID-19

By Nicole Camarda Mar 16, 2022 KIVI

Idaho is entering a new phase in the COVID-19 pandemic, one that looks a little more normal. Testing positivity rates are low, but public health officials say the pandemic is not over and COVID-19 is here to stay for the foreseeable future.

One way states and cities are testing for early signs of COVID-19 activity is through wastewater samples.

Two of the five regional laboratories are up and running in the state and collecting samples from communities in Idaho.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho City water back on after broken water main

by CBS2 News Staff Monday, March 14th 2022

The water is back on in Idaho City.

Earlier Monday, a broken water main has caused officials to shut off water to the entire city until it can be repaired.

It’s unclear what led to the broken line.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho needs more active weather to build up snowpack

By Geneva Zoltek Mar 19, 2022 KIVI

Right on schedule as spring ski season officially starts at Bogus Basin, active weather brought 4 fresh inches of spring conditions last Tuesday.

Above 5,000 ft. the snow was lighter, but below that elevation the precipitation came down more as of rain/snow mix.

But what was this system’s ultimate impact on regional snowpack? Well it helped, but not by much.

full story:
—————–

Mining News:

Stibnite Advisory Council 2021 Progress Report

In late 2018, eight communities from across the West Central Mountains came together to sign a Community Agreement with Perpetua Resources (then Midas Gold). A key component of the Community Agreement was the creation of the Stibnite Advisory Council. This report highlights the work of the Stibnite Advisory Council since the Community Agreement was signed.

The Stibnite Advisory Council is made up of a representative appointed annually from Adams County, Cascade, Council, Donnelly, Idaho County, New Meadows, Riggins, Yellow Pine, Perpetua Resources Idaho and Perpetua Resources Corp. The Council meets monthly and serves as the communities’ principal forum for communication regarding the Stibnite Gold Project with management of Perpetua Resources, now and throughout the life of the Project. Representatives are tasked with the responsibility of working through shared issues with Perpetua Resources, providing key information back to the communities they serve and overseeing the implementation of the Community Agreement.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Lawsuit filed over eastern Idaho gold mine

KTVB Staff March 16, 2022

Local conservation groups filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Forest Service over the agency’s approval to expand mining in the Centennial Mountains.

Canadian mining company Excellon Resources plans to build a gold mine in a 16,700-acre area of national forest north of Kilgore.

The Idaho Conservation League and the Greater Yellowstone Coalition are opposed to the mining company’s five-year plan. They say Excellon will extract the gold with a cyanide heap leach mining technique, which could pose a risk to the nearby waterways that supply drinking water for the Eastern Snake Plain aquifer.

continued:
————–

Public Lands:

Payette seeks comments on 30,000 acre forest project

The Payette National Forest is seeking comments on the 30,000-acre Cold July Forest Restoration Project.

The project is located on the New Meadows Ranger District about five miles west of New Meadows. Comments are due April 23.

The project seeks to increase resistance to disease and insects as well as thin trees to reduce the threat of intense wildfires and improve forest habitat for the northern Idaho Ground squirrel and white-headed woodpecker.

Work within the project includes logging, thinning, prescribed burns and other brush reduction projects as well as tree planting.

Details of the project are available (link).

For additional information, contact Jeffery Kincaid, Acting District Ranger, at 865-924-2476 or jeffery.kincaid@usda.gov, or Rita Bennett, District Environmental Coordinator, at 208-271-6296 or rita.l.bennett@usda.gov.

source: The Star-News March 17, 2022
— — — — — — — — — —

Seedlings available for reforestation and habitat improvement

Boise, Idaho, March 17, 2022 — Landowners who need trees and shrubs to create windbreaks, improve wildlife habitat, and enhance forests on their property are encouraged to come to the Boise National Forest Lucky Peak Nursery’s annual surplus seedling sale.

The surplus seedling sale will begin Saturday, April 2, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Seedlings will not be available on Sunday. The seedling sale will continue through the end of April, Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., as supplies last. The price is $30.00 for 50 seedlings.

The minimum quantity that can be purchased is 50 seedlings of each species. Each customer will be able to purchase a maximum of 500 seedlings. First come-first served, no presales.

All sales Saturday, April 2, will be drive up. CASH or CHECK only.

This year’s available species are Douglas-fir, Engelmann spruce, ponderosa pine, Antelope bitterbrush and Wyoming big sagebrush. Seedlings will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. Sagebrush is highly desirable for improving big game habitat in the Foothills. In forested areas, ponderosa pine is typically found on drier sites.

The seedlings are best suited for landowners with property in rural areas. They are not intended for homeowners in urban areas to plant in their backyards. Landowners who purchase the one-year-old trees can expect the majority of them to grow and thrive if planted correctly. Written planting instructions and technical assistance will be available.

Each year, the Lucky Peak Nursery produces over three million one and two-year old trees and shrubs. These seedlings are used for public land reforestation activities in the intermountain west disturbed by wildfire, timber sales, or other events. When the Nursery has produced more seedlings than is customers need, that surplus becomes available to rural landowners for conservation plantings.

The Lucky peak Nursery is located 16 miles northeast of Boise on Highway 21. For more information about the annual seedling sale, call (208) 343-1977.
— — — — — — — — — —

Sawtooth National Forest receives more than $1.6 million for Badger Fire recovery

KTVB Staff March 17, 2022


Credit: Sawtooth National Forest

The Sawtooth National Forest announced Thursday it will receive $1,659,000 in disaster relief funding to support recovery from the Badger Fire.

The Badger Fire started on Sept. 12, 2020 and was declared 100% contained on Oct. 15, 2020 and out Jan. 4, 2021, according to the National Wildfire Coordinating Group (NWCG). The final acreage of the fire was 90,190.

Through the Extending Government Funding and Delivering Emergency Assistance Act of 2021, the Sawtooth Nation Forest requested the disaster relief funding for projects to restore infrastructure and for ecological recovery.

continued:
————

Critter News:

Garden Valley and Cascade Veterinary Clinic.

This [last] weekend the Garden Valley Clinic had a busted water pipe inside the clinic and we have complete water damage. The Garden Valley Clinic will be closed for at least 10 days while we repair the damage. Please be patient with our staff members as we are having to reschedule everyone. Sorry for any inconvenience to our Clients.

source: Cascade Vet Clinic FB March 14, 2022
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County 4-H to host livestock field day March 26

Valley County 4-H will host a Horse and Large Livestock Field Day on Saturday, March 26, from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Donnelly Elementary School.

4-H members from Valley and Adams counties can learn about the different species of large animals as well as some tips on showmanship.

Registration is required via Zsuites or by calling the Extension office at 208-382-7190.

The event will be held in the gym at Donnelly Elementary, located at 327 W. Roseberry Road.

source: The Star-News March 17, 2022
— — — — — — — — — —

F&G: Protect trash cans from bears waking from hibernation

Hungry bears are emerging from hibernation and are looking for trash cans to raid, the McCall office of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game said.

“Last year, our first reports of bears getting into trash cans came in on March 31,” Regional Wildlife Manager Regan Berkley said.

Bears emerge hungry in the spring, and are drawn to town by smells of food and trash, Berkley said.

“They’ll often knock over trash cans a few times, hoping to find something to eat,” she said.

McCall City Code requires that all waste be stored in a properly secured and latched bear-proof container unless personally attended.

“Many of the refuse violations we see in town can be traced back to overfilled and unlatched containers, which make an easy target for hungry animals,” City of McCall Code Enforcement Officer Krystal Giessen said.

Bears should not be rewarded for this behavior, Berkley said.

“If they find even one trash can, cooler, or freezer with food, they’re likely to stick around and keep trying,” she said.

Berkley advises the following to help prevent bear problems this spring and summer:

• Use bear resistant trash containers properly: don’t overfill them, and don’t tamper with latches.
• Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
• Businesses should not prop open bin lids.
• Take down bird feeders in the spring.
• Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

Bears that have become too accustomed to human food sources cannot responsibly be relocated, Berkley said.

The bears can become dangerous, and in some cases IDFG needs to trap and lethally remove them. For questions, call 208-634-8137.

source: The Star-News March 17, 2022
— — — — — — — — — —

Flock of red-winged blackbirds shot near Aberdeen

March 15, 2022 Local News 8

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is seeking information regarding the illegal killing of 17 male and four female red-winged blackbirds near Aberdeen in Power County. …

It is both against state and federal laws to kill protected non-game birds with four exceptions: European starlings, Eurasian-collared doves, house sparrows, and rock pigeons. These species are nonnative and can be taken outside city limits year-round with a hunting license. …

A reward is available for information that leads to an arrest. Callers can remain anonymous.

full story:
—————–

Fish and Game News:

Winter survival for mule deer fawns and elk calves tracking slightly above average

By Brian Pearson, Regional Communications Manager
Monday, March 14, 2022

84 percent of fawns and 92 percent of calves with tracking collars have survived through February

Statewide winter survival for mule deer fawns and elk calves fitted with tracking collars was average to slightly above average through the end of February.

“From a statewide perspective, winter survival is tracking very close to what we saw in past two years,” said Toby Boudreau, deer and elk program coordinator for Fish and Game. “If we continue on that trajectory, that’s good news because we ended up with above-average winter survival in both 2019-20 and 2020-21. And every mild winter we can stack together is another step in the right direction for our mule deer herds.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

F&G Commission special meeting March 23-24 in Boise

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Monday, March 14, 2022

People can address the commission on any topic pertaining to Fish and Game matters

The Commission will hold the public hearing and business meeting at the Fish and Game Headquarters Office at 600 S. Walnut St. in Boise. A public hearing will begin on March 23 at 7 p.m. MDT in the Sawtooth Room. Those wishing to speak to the Commission during the public hearing will have a three-minute time limit, with additional comments accepted in writing. People can address the commission on any topic pertaining to Fish and Game matters.

The business meeting will resume at 8 a.m. MDT March 24 at the same location. Public comments are not accepted during the business meeting, but it is open to the public, and available via Zoom.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Lake Cascade and Payette Lake ice conditions – March 17, 2022

By Mike Thomas, Regional Fisheries Biologist
Thursday, March 17, 2022

On Thursday, March 17 we checked surface and ice conditions on Cascade and Payette Lakes. Recent warm temperatures have compacted the ice layer into a uniform layer of clear ice. We did not observe very much, if any, snow on top of the ice which can make travel (on foot and motorized) more difficult. Please be careful out there. While conditions remain safe for ice fishing at both lakes, we urge anglers to use caution if accessing Cascade Lake at Van Wyck and Payette Lake at Mile High due to deteriorating edge conditions (see pictures below). Remember, on Payette Lake we do not recommend any motorized forms of travel, as ice thickness can vary widely. If you are planning on taking a snowmobile out on Lake Cascade, we highly recommend using “scratchers” or air-cooled machines to avoid overheating.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Audubon Zoo Animals Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day


————

Seasonal Humor:

StPatrickDrivingSnakes-a
[h/t SMc]

StPaddyIrishCreamFarm-a
[h/t TM]


—————

Idaho History Mar 20, 2022

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 98

Idaho Newspaper Clippings May 5-21, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

May 5

The Idaho Republican. May 05, 1920, Page 5

19200505TIR1

Sterling

Ed Hutchinson has returned from the hospital at Blackfoot, where he was been for some time. Mr. Hutchinson was ill with influenza-pneumonia.

The baby of Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Clouch passed away Saturday morning after a brief illness of pneumonia.
— —

Wicks

We are sorry to report that Hester Thompson is on the sick list this week.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 05 May 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Academy, Oakley, Idaho ca. 1912 (1)

SchoolAcademyOakley1912Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

May 7

The Oakley Herald. May 07, 1920, Page 1

19200507OH1

Boulder News

Charles Yacoby is very sick and has gone to Oakley for medical treatment.
— —

In The Gem State

Idaho schools won third place in the good health contest of the National Tuberculosis association, open to schools of the whole United States.

An Idaho Falls resident put on a “moonshine” party one night last week, all the guests being in a very merry mood when officers appeared upon the scene. The originator of the evening’s entertainment has just paid a fine of $50.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 07 May 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Oakley Herald. May 07, 1920, Page 6

Locals

Miss Viola Hale is again able to be about after her recent serious illness.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — — — — — — — —

Shoshone Journal. May 07, 1920, Page 5

19200507SJ1

Local Items

Mrs. Tom Alley has been sick and confined to her room the last few days.

Frank Clem is able to be around town once more after being confined to his home for the past two or three weeks with a severe attack of rheumatism.

Miss Nell Smith of Boise, who has been spending a couple of weeks with her sister Mrs. Gilbert J. White, recuperating from an attack of Smallpox, returned to Boise Tuesday evening. Miss Smith is an employee in the government revenue office at that place.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 07 May 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Shoshone Journal. May 07, 1920, Page 8

Alvin Butler Dead

Tuesday the distressing news was wired to Shoshone from Walla Walla, Washington, that Alvin Butler had committed suicide by shooting himself. No cause is known for the deed except ill health for the past two or three years and the further fact that since the death of his wife from influenza in January 1919, he has brooded greatly over her loss and has appeared despondent. A year ago he leased his ranch and moved to Walla Walla where he purchased a home and has resided ever since, although he has been back to Shoshone once, or twice on a visit. He was about 45 years old and has resided in Idaho since he was a small boy. He owned two well improved farms about 6 miles Northwest of Shoshone, one of which he took up as a homestead and highly improved. He was well to do, was a good farmer and most highly respected by all who knew him. His family of several children were grown with the exception of one boy about 16 years old.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Shoshone High School, Shoshone, Idaho ca. 1911 (1)

SchoolHighShoshone1911Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

May 10

The Idaho Republican. May 10, 1920, Page 4

19200510TIR1

19200510TIR2Flu Takes Toll

Paris — Last year’s influenza epidemic in Paris cost 10,281 lives, official figures just published show. Expectant mothers paid the heaviest share to this total. Mortality was five times greater than in previous epidemics.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 10 May 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Public School, Blackfoot, Idaho (1)

SchoolPublicBlackfootFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

May 11

The Caldwell Tribune. May 11, 1920, Page 1

19200511CT1

19200511CT2Arthur Robinson, who resides near Canyon Hill, is quarantined at his home with the smallpox. This is the first case near Caldwell but it is understood that there have been several cases in Middleton recently.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 11 May 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. May 11, 1920, Page 5

Ten Davis News

Anna Tucker has been unable to attend school this week. She is just recovering from an attack of measles.

Artie Newport was unable to attend school a couple of days last week.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. May 11, 1920, Page 6

Local And Personal

Funeral services for Marie Shuee, the eighteen-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dan Shuee was held from the family home on Cleveland boulevard Sunday afternoon, the Rev. W. F. Fance conducted the services. Burial was in Canyon hill cemetery.

Mrs. Moore and daughter Nellie and son Harry from Nampa were in town Sunday to attend the funeral of Marie Shuee.

Mrs. Beryl Turner of Boise came down Sunday to attend the funeral of Miss Marie Shuee.

Mrs. Charles Sprakue is recovering from a serious attack of tonsillitis.

Ralph Sovereign has chicken pox.

Mrs. Edgar Meek and daughter Mary are listed with the sick.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. May 11, 1920, Page 8

College Notes

Word has been received to the effect that Jim Walsh is sufficiently recovered from the typhoid fever to leave St. Alphonsas hospital for the home of his uncle Dr. W. L. Frazier who has been attending him.

Miss Brenice [sic] Weymouth who has been sick at her home for the past two weeks is reported as much improved and recovering nicely.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. May 11, 1920, Page 9

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Claytonia

The Claytonia Sunday school will give a Mother’s day program next Sunday evening at the hall.

Fairview

Sick people in this vicinity are all better.

Velma Barnes is driving to Caldwell to school while her mother is so poorly.

The Upper Dixie school closed Friday.

Briar Rose

Sterling Brown has been ill at his home with the measles.

Mrs. Soloman has been on the sick list.

Mrs. Wedster [sic] and Dale have been under the weather but are better at the present writing.

Louise Meador has had to drop her school work on the account of ill health, we all hope she can continue again in the fall.

E. K. Corbett has started his stage to Jordan Valley again and made his first trip Monday.

Wilder News

Mother’s day services were held at the Methodist church Sunday morning.

It is quite a relief to have the street sprinkler attending to its usual summer job.

Canyon News

Mr. Trotter and son Roscoe have each been suffering from the after effects of the influenza.

The doctor now pronounces A. D. Roberton’s malady to be a clear case of small pox.

(ibid, page 9)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. May 11, 1920, Page 11

Lake Lowell

The Kimes children have been on the sick list the past week.

Floyd Bledsoe has the measles.

Dr. Kaley was called to the Carr home Friday to see Mrs. Carr, who has been suffering with rheumatism.

Alva Gragg, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Gragg, had his tonsils removed one day last week.
— —

Pleasant Ridge

The Talcott and Fred Brown children have the measles.

(ibid, page 11)
— — — — — — — — — —

Administration Building, College of Idaho, Caldwell, Idaho ca. 1915 (1)

SchoolCollegeofIdahoCaldwell1915Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

May 14

The Kendrick Gazette. May 14, 1920, Page 1

19200514KG1

News of Lenore

Mr. Pat Smith took his young son, Waine Jr., to Orofino for medical treatment last Saturday, coming back Sunday morning on the train. Waine has been in failing health for some time since having the influenza.

Jake Petterson has been very sick since January as a result of the flu, and does not seem to improve very rapidly.

Mrs. Frank Vaughan has been very sick for the past few days and has been compelled to get someone to help with the work for a week or so.

(Too late for last week)

Mrs. Harry Legate is very sick with a bad case of the measles. He has had the doctor a couple fo times. Friends will be very glad to learn of her improvement.

Mrs. Frank Carey is now home and doing very nicely after spending a time in Clarkston under the care of Dr. Foster.

William Green of Cream ridge went to Lewiston [to] attend the prize fight. It was such a success that Bill took sick and fearing he had the measles, he went to bed and took all measles prescriptions until he finally recollected he had had them when a small boy at home.

Miss Mary Pea has been suffering with an awful toothache but is much improved at this writing.

The mail carrier Mrs. Frank Nixon had what might have been a very serious runaway last Thursday when she attempted to drive a young colt. She was just ready to leave with the mail when the horses became uncontrollable, breaking the reach from the buggy. One horse went out on the railroad track and the other stopped on a pile of rocks. Believe me, the hull [sic] of Lenore was out to help in a minute.
— —

Over The County

Juliaetta Record: Jackson Sundown, a well known Indian of the Culdesac section, and winner of many prizes in various bucking contests at the Pendleton, Grangeville and many other round-up shows in various parts of the country was in Juliaetta last week to attend a gathering of quite a number of Indians at the Mox Mox home on the Potlatch creek below town last Saturday. This gathering is an annual affair with certain of the Indians and is for the purpose of recording the births and deaths of relatives during the year. The books for the names are kept at the Mox Mox place and the Indians meet there each year to make their reports of deaths and births and ascertain how many of their relatives are still living and how many have died during the year. [* see Footnote 1]

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 14 May 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. May 14, 1920, Page 2

Southwick Items

Miss Zelma Wright and Einor Wright are both sick with colds, at this writing.

Miss Winegardner has been suffering from a severe cold.
— —

Teakean and Cavendish

W. R. Smith closed an 8-months successful term of school at Cavendish, Friday. Those in the eighth grade passed and were given their diplomas.

The farmers around Teakean and Cavendish are very busy these days getting crops in. A few are nearly through but others will need two weeks of good weather to finish.
— —

Lealand Items

Clyde Daugherty contemplates moving into his new home soon. Clyde is convalescing at the home of his father, T. H. Daugherty.

The pie social at the Welker school was well attended. The proceeds go towards the purchase price of an organ.
— —

Big Bear Ridge

The Whybark children are recovering from an attack of the measles.

Mrs. Leon Ingle is holding the eighth grade examinations at the Steele school house this week.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. May 14, 1920, Page 8

Gleanings

Complaint has been made that certain parties are making a practice of taking flowers grown on private property. Those from whom the complaints have originated say they will not put up with this petty thievery much longer.

A Kendrick matron sent her little son to the store for a dollar’s worth of sugar. When he came back she looked at the package, and, greatly surprised, said: “Did you spill it?”

By proclamation Governor Davis has set aside the week from May 17 to 22, inclusive, as American Legion Week, and asks that all local posts be given every assistance in carrying out the plans which they have in view.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. May 14, 1920, Page 1

19200514CT1

Hard Contest Ends With Tie
Sensational Ninth Inning Rally Marks Opening Game of Series

Nine innings to a 5-5 tie was the net result of a fast game of baseball Wednesday evening between Caldwell and Paul before a crowd that was entirely too small both from the standpoint of the heavy guarantee given the visitors and that of a meritorious exhibition. The same two teams will conclude the three game series this afternoon at 5 o’clock at Recreation park. Unless attendance exceeds that of the first game, it is considered likely that no further effort will be made to bring in outside teams this summer for mid week games. …

Caldwell began early. In the second inning, three solid clouts netted as many runs. With Webb going strong, the lead looked imposing. It was not until the seventh inning that Webb, who recently suffered an attack of influenza, began to weaken and Paul club artists began to find him. …
— —

The rain of last Saturday night and Sunday morning was of inestimable value to farmers and stockmen of southern Idaho, according to reports received here. A late dry spring has proven a great handicap to stockmen. All forms of vegation [sic] were stimulated greatly by the warm, heavy rain. Farm work is generally reported to be progressing rapidly.
— —

Nampa Monday morning employed a motorcycle cop. Thursday it was reported that because of the large number of victims which had fallen heir to the cop’s speed and agility, the motorcycle bids fair to become a paying investment for Nampa.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 14 May 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. May 14, 1920, Page 5

19200514CT2
For Colds, Catarrh or Influenza

Do you feel weak and unequal to the work ahead of you? Do you still cough a little, or does your nose bother you? Are you pale? Is your blood thin and watery? Better put your body into shape. Build strong!

An old reliable blood-maker and herbal tonic made from wild roots and barks, is Dr. Pierce’s Golden Medical Discovery. This “nature remedy” comes in tablet or liquid form. It will build up your body and protect you from disease germs which lurk everywhere. One of the active ingredients of this temperance alternative and tonic is wild cherry bark with stillingia, which is so good for the lungs and for coughs; also Oregon grape root, blood root, sone root, Queen’s root, – all skillfully combined in the Medical Discovery. These roots have a direct action on the stomach, improving digestion and assimilation. These herbal extracts in the “Discovery” aid in blood-making and are best for scrofula. By improving the blood they fortify the body against an attack of grip or colds.

Catarrh should be treated, first, as a blood disease, with this alternative. Then in addition, the nose should be washed daily with Dr. Sage’s Catarrh Remedy.

Send 10c for trial pkg. of Medical Discovery Tablets or Catarrh Tablets to Dr. Pierce’s Invalids’ Hotel, Buffalo, N. Y.

(Adv.)

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. May 14, 1920, Page 6

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Briar Rose

Raymond Skidmore has been under the weather but is better at the present writing.

The community was sorry to hear of the death of Marie Shuee.

Pleasant Ridge

The eighth grade is finishing taking the final eighth grade examinations this week.

Wilder Items

Wilder is as healthy a place as is to be found in the Rocky mountain valleys and yet we have had “flu,” smallpox, whooping cough and now the mumps and measles are trying some people. We are hoping that this will be the last.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. May 14, 1920, Page 8

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Lake View Items

Miss Mabel Miller came home last week from George Johnson’s where she has been taking care of the sick.

The Mora ditch broke near the lower embankment Saturday and did great damage to crops near there.

A number of men and teams are engaged this week remodeling the spillway above here that was damaged Sunday morning by turning too much water out of the Mora ditch at once. It will take some time to complete the work.

Claytonia

We are sorry to report that Mrs. George Benson had to be taken to the sanitarium at Hot Lakes, Oregon last week to be treated for inflammatory rheumatism. The oldest child is now staying with Mrs. Garrity, the next two with Mrs. Preston and the baby with Mrs. Hoerler. We are hoping for a speedy recovery.

Mrs. D. G. Wilson helped Mrs. Hoag take care of her mother during her last illness.

The Claytonia Sunday school gave a Mother’s day program last Sunday night. Due to so many mothers being absent, not all of the program could be given. A very interesting talk was given by Mr. Gettes on how to make home convenient for mother.

Only two weeks until schools are closed. The Claytonia school had their picnic last Monday at Jump Creek Canyon. The Gem school will have their picnic on May 21 at Hot Springs and everybody is invited to bring their lunch and attend.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. May 14, 1920, Page 9

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Midway News

Leroy Robinson who recently moved here from Minnesota, underwent a serious operation for appendicitis at Mercy hospital, Nampa, Thursday morning.

Fairview

Essie Conklin is out again after having the measles. Mrs. Barnes is still quite poorly.

Mrs. Greer had a fall which bruised her up some but is getting along nicely.

The rain was a big help to farms in this vicinity it was better for pastures than irrigating.

Arena Valley Items

Mr. Nutter, brother of Mrs. Boston is ill at the Boston home with a case of small pox.

Dr. Waldrop called at the J. P. Butler home last Saturday on account of the prolonged illness of Mrs. Butler who is slowly improving at this writing.

Mrs. Al Ewing and little son Howard, returned last Monday from Nampa where they went for medical treatment and for Howard’s foot which had been badly bruised.

(ibid, page 9)
— — — — — — — — — —

Kendrick High School, Kendrick, Idaho

SchoolHighKendrick2Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

May 18

Bonners Ferry Herald. May 18, 1920, Page 1

19200518BFH1

Porthill Wins Modern Health Crusaders Pennant

This week the pennant trophy won by the Porthill school in the recent Modern Crusader’s Health campaign conducted in every county of each state of the Union, was sent to Mrs. Caroline W. Flood, county superintendent of schools, by Mrs. Athey, of Boise, who was in charge of the campaign in this state and who is executive secretary of the Red Cross Anti-Tuberculosis Association of Idaho. The pennant is on display in the window of the First National Bank building and will be sent this week to the school at Porthill whose pupils were so careful and faithful in fulfilling their pledges in the Crusader’s campaign.

Only 20 similar trophies were given in the entire United States and three of these came to Idaho, one to the Porthill school, one to a school in Benewah county and one to a school in Butte county.

The school children and the people of Porthill have reason to be proud of their achievement in the Modern Health Crusader’s contest. The results of the contests are being given national publicity and people who have heretofore known of heard little of Idaho, Boundary county, or Porthill, will hear of them now.

The Modern Health Crusader’s campaign was carried on through a fifteen week period. The contest consisted of an effort to closely observe and fulfill a list of rules tending to cleanliness, usefulness and industry, and simple hygienic practices.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 18 May 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. May 18, 1920, Page 6

19200518BFH2Influenza Takes Heavy Toll

Ketchikan, Alaska, May 13 — A special to the Chronicle from Fairbanks says all communication between Fairbanks and Nenana was suspended at 3:30 Tuesday afternoon. Forty are reported dead of influenza at Nenana.

The death list in Fairbanks numbers 12. Only two new cases were reported in Fairbanks Tuesday morning.

Three natives of an Indian village below Chena are reported to have fallen victims to the influenza epidemic. [* see Footnote 2]

(ibid, page 6)
— — — — — — — — — —

Bonners Ferry High School, Bonners Ferry, Idaho (1)

SchoolHighBonnersFerryFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

May 21

The Idaho Republican. May 21, 1920, Page 5

19200521TIR1

19200521TIR3Aged Editor Dies

Morristown, N. J. — Col. Dalton Mann, editor of the Town Topics died at his home here at the age of eighty-one years, succumbing to an attack of influenza.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 21 May 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. May 21, 1920, Page 7

Moreland

Nearly everyone has been visited in the interest of the electric light movement and those canvassing say that fair success is being met with. Only a very few are refusing to order lights.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Oakley Herald. May 21, 1920, Page 1

19200521OH1

Local Mention

Hector C. Haight suffered a relapse since his recent illness and is again bedfast, requiring the services of a trained nurse day and night. His mother also is ill.

Douglas McBride was sick a few days this week.

Mrs. Aaron McBride has sufficiently recovered from her recent illness to be up and about again.

Alan Bach has had to lay off from work on account of an injury to his hip sustained by a fall from a horse some time ago.
— —

Clean-Up Day A Success

There was a general response last Tuesday to the call for volunteers to clean up the city. While the business men and the Boy Scouts were busy on the public places, women and children raked, swept and cleaned about their own homes. Some of the vacant lots look a thousand per cent better.

An old resident of Oakley says the streets look better than they have in the last thirty-five years.

Yet we can’t deny there are still a few tin-can-strewn yards. The owners and tenants of these places ought to get ashamed of them and clean them up. If they don’t get ashamed of their yards, it is hard to see how they can escape getting ashamed of themselves – a dire calamity.

And say, – Come close, for we don’t dare speak this above a whisper, and we must enclose it in parentheses to keep it from getting out and making somebody mad. And you must promise never to tell a living soul.

(Wouldn’t it be fine to have a clean-up day of another sort? On this day anybody appearing on the streets with dirty face should be examined. If the examination disclosed the fact that the dirt had been on his face longer than two weeks, the individual or his parents should be subject to a fine for disfiguring the scenery of the town. This fine should go toward maintaining a fund to pay for an establishment where bathing is compulsory for those who don’t take to it voluntarily.

No town of this size has more good looking and clean children than Oakely. The high average is what makes the exceptions so visible.

And while we are improving the scenery, suppose some of us old men should shave and trim our whiskers. Wouldn’t that be great? The editor of the Herald promises to do this on condition the rest of the old fellers will do likewise.

Remember, you’re not to tell any body what I said.)
— —

For trade: new sewing machine for pig, chickens or cow. Enquire at Herald office. (Adv.)
— —

Boulder News

H. P. Nelson is on the sick list this week.
— —

In The Gem State

St. Anthony’s hospital has been standardized to meet the requirements of the American College of Surgeons and the American Medical association.

Charles Erickson is seriously ill in the hospital at Pocatello from drinking about twelve ounces of denatured alcohol.

It is estimated that before the season has closed, 75,000 automobile licenses will have been issued to owners of automobiles in the state of Idaho. Last year 42,200 licenses were issued.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 21 May 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Oakley Herald. May 21, 1920, Page 3

How Europe Can Escape Collapse
We Must Aid by Extending Credit, Says Davison
Grave Menace to U.S.A.
European Ruin Would Involve America – Starvation and Disease Rampant

Des Moines, Iowa. — Speaking before the General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal church, Henry P. Davison, chairman of the board of governors of the League of Red Cross Societies said:

As chairman of the convention of Red Cross Societies, composed of representatives of twenty-seven nations that met recently in Geneva, I am custodian of authoritive reports recording appalling conditions among millions of people living in Eastern Europe.

One of the most terrible tragedies in the history of the human race is being enacted in the broad belt of territory lying between the Baltic and the Black and Adriatic seas.

This area includes the new Baltic states – Poland, Czecho-Slovakia, the Ukraine, Austria, Hungary, Roumania, Montenegro, Albania and Serbia.

The reports which come to us make it clear that in these war-ravaged lands civilization has broken down. Disease, bereavement and suffering are present in practically every household, while food and clothing are insufficient to make life tolerable.

Men, women and children are dying by thousands, and over vast once civilized area there are to be found neither medical appliances nor medical skill sufficient to cope with the devastating plagues.

Wholesale starvation is threatened in Poland this summer unless she can procure food supplies in large quantities. There are now approximately 250,000 cases of typhus in Poland and in the area occupied by Polish troops.

Worst Typhus Epidemic in History

This is one of the worst typhus epidemics in the world’s history. In Galicia whole towns are crippled and business suspended. In some districts there is but one doctor to each 150,000 people.

In the Ukraines, we are told, typhus and influenza have affected most of the population.

A report from Vienna, dated February 12, said: “There are rations for three weeks; death stalks though the streets of Vienna and takes unhindered toll.”

Budapest, according to our information, is one vast city of misery and suffering. The number of deaths is double that of births. Of the 160,000 children in the schools, 100,000 are dependent on public charity. There are 150,000 workers idle.

Typhus and smallpox have invaded the four countries composing Czecho-Slovakia, and there is lack of medicines, soap and physicians.

In Serbia typhus has broken out again and there are but 200 physicians to minister to the needs of that entire country.

In Montenegro, where food is running short, there are but five physicians for a population of 450,000.

Returning to the United States a few weeks ago with all these horrors ringing in my ears, I found myself once more in a land whose granaries were overflowing, where health and plenty abounded and where life activity and eager enterprise were in the full flood.

I ask myself: “What if the plague and famine were here in the great territory between the Atlantic seaboard and the Mississippi valley, which roughly parallels the extend of these ravaged countries, and that 65,000,000 of our own people condemned to idleness by lack of raw material and whose fields had been devastated by invasion and rapine were racked by starvation and pestilence and if we had lifted up our voices and invoked the attention of our brothers in happier Europe to our own deep miseries and our cries had fallen on deaf ears, would we not in our despair exclaim against their heartlessness.” … (continued)

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Oakley Herald. May 21, 1920, Page 6

Locals

Mrs. Clarence Tanner, who has been very ill, is slowly improving.

Dr. A. F. O. Neilson left Friday for Chicago to take a post graduate course in medicine and surgery.

Mrs. Irving D. Offer of Pocatello is here with her mother, Mrs. J. R. Price, to recuperate from a recent surgical operation.

(ibid, page 6)
————————

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Jackson Sundown

2/16/20190 by Rick Just – Speaking of Idaho

​Did you ever play cowboys and Indians as a kid? Today’s story is about a man who wasn’t playing. He was a cowboy and an Indian.

Waaya-Tonah-Toesits-Kahn was a nephew of Nez Perce Chief Joseph. He was 14 in 1877 when the flight of the Nez Perce took place across much of Idaho and parts of Oregon, Wyoming, and Montana. His uncle famously surrendered with the eloquent “I will fight no more forever” speech at Bear Paws Battlefield in Montana.

Meanwhile, Waaya-Tonah-Toesits-Kahn, wounded, went with a small group of Nez Perce into Canada where he lived for a couple of years with Sitting Bull’s Sioux.

He lived in Washington and Montana, gaining a reputation as a skilled horseman, and a new name, Jackson Sundown, before moving to Idaho in 1910. His skills atop a bucking bronco became so well-known that other riders would simply pull out of the competition when they heard Sundown had signed up. At least one rodeo manager solved that problem by paying Sundown $50 a day for exhibition bronc riding.

In 1911, Sundown along with George Fletcher, who was black, and John Spain, a white cowboy, competed at the Pendleton (Oregon) Roundup in a famous multi-racial showdown. Ken Kesey told that story in his 1995 book, Last Go Round.

In 1915, at the age of 52, Jackson Sundown came in only third in bronc riding at the Pendleton Roundup. He decided to retire. But the next year, Alexander Phimister Proctor, a noted sculptor who was working on a sculpture of Sundown at the time talked the man into riding just once more. Jackson won the saddle bronc competition that day at the age of 53. Many of his competitors were half that age or less.

Jackson Sundown died of pneumonia in 1923. He was buried at Slickpoo Mission Cemetery near Culdesac, Idaho. He was inducted into the Cowboy Hall of Fame in 2006.

jacksonsundownJust-aThe picture is Lora Remington Potvin with Jackson Sundown in traditional dress posing in front of the 1920 sculpture called “The Bronc Buster,” for which Jackson Sundown was the model. The sculpture is in Civic Center Park in Denver. The sculptor, Alexander P. Proctor, lived in Lewiston in 1916 and 1917, according to Steven Branting. The photo is courtesy of Steven Branting and Edmond and Lora Potvin Collection

source: Speaking of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

Footnote 2

The Flu Pandemic hit Nenana 100 Years Ago

Denali National Park & Preserve

1920NenanaCemetery-aThe Nenana cemetery on the southwest side of town contains numerous graves of those who perished during the 1920 flu pandemic.
NPS Photo

One of the great tragedies to strike one of our gateway communities occurred in May, 1920. If you stroll through the Nenana cemetery on the southwest side of town and read the dates on the graves or visit the Mitch Dementieff Tribal Hall on the west side and observe the photographs on the wall, evidence of its magnitude is tangible.

For nearly two years Nenana contemplated the arrival of the “Spanish” influenza (H1N1 Influenza A virus), and, in the lead-up to its onset, had contingency plans in place (such as repurposing the town’s new Cooney Hotel into a make-shift hospital space). In early April 1920, in the Nenana Daily News, the local health board issued a statement reassuring residents about the virus’s relatively insignificant threat in Interior Alaska. By the end of April, flu cases started to appear in Fairbanks, and Nenana officials quickly implemented closures of large gathering places including schools and churches.

Almost exactly a month after the Nenana Daily News statement was published telling town residents not to worry, the town was overrun by the flu. So many residents fell ill at once that Nenana was overwhelmed and effectively shut down. In early May 1920, the make-shift hospital was full, the newspaper shut down, the telegraph station shut, railroad travel suspended, and, according to the June 12, 1920 edition of the Cordova Daily Times, a fire department official pleaded with the community “to please not have any conflagrations” because he was unable to fight them single-handedly. In an account published by Reverend Robert Diven in June 1920, he described people dying because the local health care system was overloaded.

Whole Town has Flu in Alaska
Rev. Robert J. Diven Writes of Experiences During Epidemic

Albany friends of Rev. and Mrs. Robert J. Diven, formerly of the Grace Presbyterian church, will be interested in the following letter to C. M. Grigsby from their home in Nenana, Alaska:

Nenana Alaska, May 26, 1920.
Dear Friends:

We are all nearly well again. Mrs. Diven did not have the flu, but she nursed Lucile and me through it. There were nearly five hundred cases in town, which is more people than we thought we had here — almost every soul in town had it. Sixty odd died. Over two hundred were down at the same. We had great difficulty to keep the dead moving to the cemetery fast enough, for warm weather had set and the ground was thawer [sic] only a little below the surface. The graves took much work, even much blasting. We were short of help to nurse, and that is why some died, perhaps. It was pneumonia in each case that killed the folks. People exposed themselves to the air while sweating. They went quickly. We had a very malignant type of flu here. Fairbanks, with about twelve hundred people had over eight hundred cases and only twenty-some died. They had a very mild form and had all the advantages for handling a lot of people. That is an old-town, a home town. Our town is a new town and more of a camp than a really truly town. It is NOT a home town.

Lucile and I were kept in the chapel while we were sick. It made a dandy little hospital. We are weak yet, but both are eating and doing very well again.

It is difficult to get exact numbers, but during the first two weeks of May 1920, various reports showed that the majority of Nenana’s population was infected by the flu (between 50-90% depending on the report) and nearly 10% perished (around 60-65 people). Alaska Natives endured the majority of the deaths, and reports of this devastation circulated throughout the United States.

The “Spanish” influenza first arrived in southeast Alaska in the fall of 1918 about the same time that the “second wave” of the pandemic was afflicting the rest of the United States. Between 1918 and 1919, an estimated 51% of all deaths in the Alaska Territory were caused by the flu, and it disproportionately devastated Alaska Native communities, which suffered 82% of the deaths. On a per capita basis, Alaska suffered one of the pandemic’s worst death rates in the world. The near complete annihilation of the Brevig Mission near Nome has garnered recent attention not just because only eight of the village’s eighty residents survived the pandemic, but because the site became significant as scientists, with the cooperation of Inupiak elders, studied strains of the “Spanish” flu.

The fourth wave of the influenza that hit Interior Alaska in 1920 is often left out of the pandemic analyses, possibly because the world-wide deaths had fallen significantly by that point. As we grapple with our own pandemic, it is useful to look to the lessons of the past. What happened in our neighboring community occurred in numerous communities around the globe, but only arrived in this small town after the rest of the world endured devastation and was on the road to recovery. In 1920, like 2020, people came together to help the larger community and lessen the severity of the crisis. Quarantines were put into place, masks were required in certain places, and life changed dramatically for hundreds of millions of people. This week we remember those whose lives were lost and those whose lives were forever altered in Nenana 100 years ago.

1918AlaskaFlu-aHarry and Carrie Dott donned face masks during the 1918 “Spanish” influenza outbreak in Southeast Alaska.
Harry and Carrie Dott Photograph Collection, Alaska State Library Historical Collections, ASL-P593-009

List of Nenana Dead

William Lanshan
Mrs. Joe O’Connor, wife of one of the proprietors of the Terminal Hotel
Herman Roseberg, owner of the Coliseum moving picture house
Mrs. George Bennett
Lottie Cavanaugh
Mrs. Pat Carroll
Bob Smith, owner of the Portland block, including a large hotel and cigar store.
Mrs. Mike Cooney, owner of the largest Nenana hotel.
Ed Herber
Ralph Waechter, manager of the Nenana branch of Waechter Bros. Cold Storage Company
Axel Endstrom
Sam Tetrich
Mrs. Bert Johnson, wife of well known freighter
Mrs. Steele
Jack Forest
Mrs. McLain
D. Covington
Dan McGinnis
Mrs. Joe Burns
Mrs. George Harrington
Larry O’Keefe, formerly of Dawson and manager of the Northern Commercial Company’s store at Nenana

The situation there is reported still serious

excerpted from: National Park Service
—————-

Further Reading

Spanish Influenza of 1918, Part 1: The First Six Weeks of Epidemic in the United States, Sept. to Oct. 1918

by William Stearns 3/18/2020

1918TrolleyMask-aA conductor checks to see if potential passengers are wearing required masks in Seattle, in 1918. Library of Congress via AP, National Archives

The Spanish Flu, which swept the globe for more than two years and killed as many as 100,000,000, was misnamed. The origins of the 1918 pandemic have been debated, but it is generally accepted that the disease was prevalent among the troops from Germany, France, and Great Britain fighting World War I. Because of the war, the press was censored in those countries. Spain was neutral and the press was not censored. Hence, the early reports of the spread of infection suggested that Spain was the vector. It was not.

Whatever the source, Boston was the first location in the United States to experience an outbreak, probably because of the troop ships and merchant marine vessels returning from Europe. In 1918, between September 10 and October 21, the disease grew exponentially and spread throughout the U.S. as seen in this national news coverage.

On September 10, 1918, the Fort Wayne Sentinel announced in a headline: Epidemic of Influenza Among Sailors in Boston.

Nearly 100 sailors of the merchant marine suffering from influenza, who have been stationed aboard training vessels in Boston harbor, were removed for treatment today to tents pitched on the summit of Corey hill…

The next day the Pawtucket Times reported that

A campaign against spitting in public places to restrict the further spread of the epidemic of influenza, from which thousands of persons in and about Boston are suffering, was undertaken today by health authorities.

By mid-September, the disease was spreading and causing deaths. The Macon Daily Telegraph reported that

The epidemic of influenza among officers and enlisted men in the first naval district which began recently, continued to spread today, reports of 210 new cases reaching headquarters. A total of 1,693 cases had been discovered since the disease became prevalent, resulting in 34 deaths.

On September 18 the Duluth Sunday News Tribune reported that

Spanish influenza now has become epidemic in three army camps, Surgeon General Gorgas announced today. There are 1,500 cases at Camp Devens, Mass.; 1,000 at Camp Lee, Va., and 350 at Camp Upton, N.Y.

Immediately below, the same Minnesota paper also recorded that

Influenza and pneumonia caused more than 70 deaths in New England within the 24 hours ending tonight….In Brockton and nearby towns, where the shoe factories have been badly crippled by the spread of the disease, 12 deaths from influenza were reported.

A week later the Columbus Ledger of Georgia reported that the city of Boston was said to be “panic-stricken by the epidemic.” The article stated that the disease “is sweeping toward the west and south like a medieval plague and threatens to overwhelm the whole country.” The news was grim:

People are being stricken down in the street, offices, subway, theaters and shipyards….over 6,000 soldiers are down with the disease at Camp Devens, while civilian cases in the Boston district number at least 10,000….Whole families have been wiped out.

The article continues, suggesting Boston was slow to realize the dimensions of the threat.

Inclined at first to regard the epidemic as nothing worse than a visitation of bad colds, Boston has now bitterly learned that Spanish influenza is something far different….Having been aroused to the danger, Boston is now taking extraordinary precautions against the further spread of infection. Big placards posted all over the city threaten dire penalties to spitters. Telephone transmitters are being disinfected. Visiting at the prisons has been prohibited. Public schools are being closed down, over 500 pupils having been stricken. Wellesley college girls have been forbidden to visit Boston.

The health commissioner advised citizens

to keep away from crowds, to keep their feet warm and dry, not to let another person to sneeze or cough in their direction without protecting their mouth and nostrils, to gargle their throats three times a day, and to send for a doctor at the first sign of a cold.

The disease gained momentum, and by October 2 the Macon Telegraph published an account of the spread headlined

14,000 New Cases within 24 Hours. Spanish Influenza Epidemic is Growing Hourly. Pneumonia Also Causes 300 Deaths.

The article reported on the epidemic in army camps and included a collection of reports from around the country.

More than 14,000 new cases were reported to the office of the surgeon general during the twenty-four hours ending at noon today. This was an increase over yesterday [sic] 3,600 cases.

Indeed, it appears to have been a fourfold increase in one day.

The total number of influenza cases in all camps now is 88,000, while pneumonia cases number 6,769. Deaths since the epidemic began number 1,877.

These victims were almost all presumably healthy young men.

On October 4 the Idaho Statesman reported the further spread as “U.S. Authorities Take Drastic Action to Prevent Epidemic Sweeping Country.” Based on daily reports by “the public health service and at the office of the Surgeon General,” the article stated:

New cases developing in army camps totaled 12,004, with reports lacking from Camps Sheridan, Ohio; Taylor, Ky., and Jackson, S.C. where the disease has reached epidemic proportions.…The total number of influenza cases reported in the camps since the epidemic began Sept. 13, is 113,737. Pneumonia cases total 8575 and deaths 2479.

The Statesman also reported on civilian numbers and included reports from far-flung cities, including Chicago, Salt Lake, Washington, D.C., and Wilmington, Alabama.

The next day the same newspaper’s headline was

Country Sees Rapid Spread of Influenza. Disease Assumes Epidemic Proportions in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maine, Delaware, Virginia and Alabama.

According to the article, Philadelphia had decreed that

All places where liquors are sold, even private clubs, have been prohibited from dispensing intoxicants until further notice.

Further, “all amusement places have been closed and public gatherings, even outdoor Liberty Loan meetings, were suspended.” In New York City “health authorities Friday took steps looking toward a readjustment of the city’s business and industrial life until the epidemic has abated.” One strategy proposed by the city’s health commissioner called for employers to rearrange “business hours so as to prevent the massing of great numbers of people all intent upon arriving at their respective working places at the same hour in public conveyances.”

The same day the Oregonian reported on events in several cities, including Seattle where

Every place of indoor public assembly….including schools, theaters, motion-picture houses, churches and dancehalls have been ordered closed….Only public gatherings in the open air will be permitted.

On October 10 the Augusta Chronicle in Georgia declared, “Influenza In All Parts Of Country. Epidemic in Several New States and Spreads in Army Camps…” The paper reported that

Influenza is epidemic in Tennessee, Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas, North Carolina, Maryland, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Missouri, Nebraska, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, parts of Arizona and many other states….The disease is reported from many parts of California, while in Texas the malady has been reported from 77 counties….A slight decrease is noted in Massachusetts, but in the District of Columbia the malady is spreading rapidly, more than 2,000 new cases being reported.

Six weeks after the first reports of the initial outbreak in Massachusetts, the Aberdeen Daily News in South Dakota reported, “Influenza Epidemic Checked In Boston.” The good news was that

Normal conditions were resumed in this city today when places of public assembly were allowed to reopen by health officials. The places had been closed for nearly three weeks…

[To be continued in Part 2.]

excerpted from: Readex
———————–

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports Mar 20, 2022

It is Rock Migration Season. Please share road reports. Winter travel conditions. Most back country roads are not maintained. This time of year there is deep snow in higher elevations. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: Average snow depth March 20th is 10″. Local streets are breaking up, slushy on warm afternoons and some places down to mud. Watch out for elk in the road. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Report Wednesday (Mar 16) “Bare and dry from Boise to Cascade.”
Hwy 55 Construction Announcement from ITD 3/9/22
Starting Monday, March 14, construction on ID-55 near Smiths Ferry will resume. Drivers can expect one-way alternating traffic with 15-minute delays as crews anchor the hillside for long-term stability.
Full road closures are anticipated to start in mid-April through the end of May. Drivers can expect full closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Outside the full closure hours, drivers can expect one-way alternating traffic with 15-minute delays. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes.
Drivers should plan ahead to avoid delays and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route when possible. link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Saturday night new snow – likely a few inches up top.
Report Thursday (March 17) snow floor starts a mile this side of the summit and goes about 4 miles down the Cascade side. Plowed and smooth.
Update Wednesday (March 16) “Big Creek Summit has new snow, 6-7”, mushy, about a mile down on both sides of the summit. Two wheel drive not advised until it’s plowed.”
Report Wednesday (March 16) several inches new snow up high, watch for ice on the shady corners.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Saturday blustery, rain and snow. Watch for rocks.
Report Thursday (March 17) road is mostly bare, watch for rocks.
Update Wednesday (March 16) “SF is mostly bare from Poverty overlook to EF….but there are rocks and the usual snow in the shady spots. Lots of passable rocks.”
Report Wednesday (March 16) mail truck driver says the road is “pretty good,” a little new snow on the upper end, small rocks scattered but no problems.
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
Last plowed by county March 14th.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Saturday blustery, rain and snow. Watch for rocks.
Report Thursday (March 17) early morning frozen rough slush, afternoon soft slush. Couple of big rocks you can get around.
Update Wednesday (March 16) “East fork road is in full Spring breakup condition with snow floor from YP to Eiguren ranch. Lower half has potholes that were hiding under the snow floor. C. ran the county blade today, but there will be new rocks any minute.”
Local plow went out again March 16th to clear rocks.
Plowed rocks and slush Marth 14th, went out again on the 15th to clear more rocks.

Upper Johnson Creek Road (Trail): Closed to wheeled vehicles.
No current report.
Lower Johnson Creek Road: Open
Saturday blustery, rain and snow. Watch for rocks.
Report Tuesday (Mar 15) road is very slushy between YP and the Dump. A few spots have broken thru down to dirt, majority is slush on top of ice.
Lower end plowed March 14th and 16th.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
With warmer and wetter weather, be aware that slides could come down.
Old report Feb 23rd: “Road to Stibnite is good. We have been leaving snow cover for snowmobiles.” – Dave W
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:

Payette Avalanche Center Link:
——————