Idaho History Apr 17, 2022

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 102

Influenza “Cures” from Idaho Newspapers 1920
Patent Medicines, Advertising, Home Remedies and Misinformation

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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1920

January 1, 1920

Payette Enterprise., January 01, 1920, Page 2

[Editorial]

What is true of influenza is true of most diseases. Fear, fright, a mental condition, is responsible for most of them. Those cities that declared a quarantine last year on account of the epizootic or influenza epidemic – making a great hullabaloo and frightening emotional people – all showed a larger fatality list than Yew York, where no quarantine was declared and all schools and public meetings went on as usual.

– Rutland (Vt.) News

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 01 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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January 15, 1920

The Emmett Index. January 15, 1920, Page 119200115EI2

To Parents

There are a few cases of influenza in this community. Are you willing to help fight this epidemic? If so, take the following precaution: Have the children use Dobell’s gargle twice a day. If unable to procure this immediately, use salt and water – a teaspoonful of salt to a glass of warm water – Minnie C. Pipher, school nurse.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 15 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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January 16, 1920

The Caldwell Tribune. January 16, 1920, Page 1

19200116CT2
According to latest advices from Dr. F. M. Cole, city physician, the only case of alleged influenza in Caldwell, that of H. G. Morris, resolved itself into a case of smallpox. There is no influenza in Caldwell.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 16 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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January 29, 1920

The Nezperce Herald., January 29, 1920, Page 1

19200129NH3For Preventing Influenza

The Herald republishes the following article from its issue of November 7, 1918, by request:

Geo. P. Christenson submits the following as coming from a doctor with whom he was well acquainted back in his old home state and whom he knows to be capable and reliable:

Goldfield, Ia., Oct. 9. — Believing I have an effective preventative for grippe or influenza, and hoping it may be considered important enough to warrant publication, I herewith submit my remedy which I have used for years to my own satisfaction.

Let any one go to a drug store and buy a four drachm homeopathic vial and fill it loosely with absorbent cotton. Pour into this vial enough of the ordinary commercial 40 percent formaldehyde to thoroughly saturate the cotton. Stop the vial with a well-fitted cork and you have a remedy that will prevent or destroy any infection that is communicated by inspiration thru the air passages.

Respectfully yours, A. S. Cunningham, M. D.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 29 Jan. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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General Hospital, Pocatello, Idaho, ca. 1913 (1)

courtesy: The Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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February 10, 1920

The Idaho Republican. February 10, 1920, Page 2

19200210TIR4
Prevent The Flu

The influenza is less dangerous this year than last because people are happier and better nourished. The best health insurance is health.

All disease becomes less dangerous and less frequent in its attacks as all people go more hand in hand with laws of nature. So long as some of the people contract disease just so long will they transmit it to others who are healthy and ought to escape it.

There are reasons for everything, including the flu. Every human body carries around a lot of germs capable of causing disease if their number becomes large enough, and every healthy human body carries also enough anti-disease elements to keep the germs down, unless they be augmented by an incoming horde from the outside.

The powers of darkness work in the dark, and germs live in dirt. The first thing to do to prevent disease then is to prevent accumulations of dirt and waste and let plenty of clean fresh air and sunshine in. Lack of these things breaks down resistance to any disease attack.

Disease and health are as opposite as crying and laughing, as sorrow and joy, as dark and light. Sunshine, joy and health are allies. Disease spreads under the favorable conditions of darkness, unhappiness and foul air by contact just as rot spreads in a barrel of apples. Sickness is the penalty of a disregard for nature’s self-evident rules. And they not only suffer who invite disease, but they also who are nearby.

Altho [sic] in treating all troubles of the lungs plenty of fresh air is always insisted on by the best physicians yet only a small part of the people believe that fresh, cold air is not harmful. There was great uproar in some of the army hospitals two years ago when owing to scarcity of housing space many men were put out-of-doors on verandas and in tents, and yet the death rate of out-door patients was not much more than half that of in-door patients. Even the nurses who caught the flu kicked at being put out of the house and having their lives saved thereby.

When the public is finally convinced of the healing power of fresh air and sunshine public epidemics will lose their kick.

The American public has almost, but not quite, been taught that filth produces typhoid fever, and that form of disease has been reduced to a minimum. At the same time lung diseases, and foremost among them, pneumonia, are in the increase because of filthy air. One of the greatest checks the army put upon epidemics two years back was a thinning out of the men so that only a half dozen should live in one tent instead of nine, ten and twelve. At the same time it was next to impossible for the authorities to make the men leave the cap off their tent peaks at night and their windows open if they lived in barracks. The love of close, stuffy air in inborn in Americans, and possibly in the whole human race, for the French are yet worse. The French death rate is very high too.

The best flu preventions are: Fresh air, sunshine, clean houses, clean clothes, clean bodies and cheerful minds. This will be confirmed by any first rate medical authority.

– F. C. K.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 10 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. February 10, 1920, Page 5

19200210BFH3
Sick Room Necessities at Standard Prices

Kantleek Hot Water Bottles and Syringes
The finest hot water bottle made. We guarantee them for three years.

Fever Thermometers
Absolutely necessary in all sickrooms. standard makes at from $1.25 to $2.00 each.

Atomizers
For use with both oil and water; for spraying the nose or throat we feature the Derilbliss line.

Bed and Douche Pans, Porcelain and Enamel Ware.

Fumigation – Sulfur and Formaldehyde. Do not give the germs a single chance.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 10 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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February 13, 1920

Clearwater Republican. February 13, 1920, Page 4

19200213CR4War is Declared on

Disease And Pestilence

Prepare for the emergency by Securing

Affleck’s Home Medicine Case
(U. S. Patent)

You pay no money now, but are always prepared to meet accidents, disease and epidemics. You never buy anything you don’t use, but always have it for every emergency.

Come in and Let Us Explain

Affleck, The Druggist

“At Ye Sign of Ye Red Globe”
Orofino, Idaho

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 13 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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February 17, 1920

The Idaho Republican. February 17, 1920, Page 5

19200217TIR5
After-the-Flu Cough

or any cough should be treated and eliminated.

It isn’t the cough that carries you off, but the coughing, coughing, coughing.

Good Cough Syrups

Cherry Bark and White Pine
35c and 65c

Kantleek Can’t Leak
The latest in good hot water bottles, seamless and leak-less
$2.00 to $4.75

Palace Drug Store

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 17 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., February 17, 1920, Page 1

Cheating Two “Industries”

A Star-Mirror reporter overheard the following conversation on the street this morning:

First citizen: — “I had the flu, but I didn’t call a doctor. I watched my temperature, and kept quiet.”

Second citizen — “And cheated some doctor out of a job!”

Third citizen — “And the undertaker, also.”

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 17 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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February 19, 1920

The Filer Record., February 19, 1920, Page 11

19200219FR2— —

19200219FR3Your Catarrh My Lead To Consumption
Dangerous to Use Treatment for Only Temporary Relief

There is a more serious stage of Cararrh than the annoyance caused by the stopped-up air passages, and other distasteful features.

The real danger comes from the tendency of the disease to continue its course downward until the lungs become affected, and then dreaded consumption is on your patch. Your own experience has taught you that the disease cannot be cured by sprays, inhalers, atomizers, jellies and other local applications.

S. S. S. has proven a most satisfactory remedy for Catarrh because it goes direct to its source. Get a bottle today, begin the only logical treatment that gives real results. For free medical advice write Medical Director, 47, Swift Laboratory, Atlanta, Ga.
— —

19200219FR4

source: The Filer Record. (Filer, Idaho), 19 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. February 20, 1920, Page 2

19200220KG4

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 20 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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February 26, 1920

The Nezperce Herald., February 26, 1920, Page 8

19200226NH2What Spreads Influenza?
Doctors, Boards of Health and Newspapers May Spread Influenza by Mental Suggestion

A well known citizen treats this important subject pointedly and interestingly as follows:

Common sense, supporting the doctrine of the church, affirms the golden mean between the extremes of co-called Christian Science (Mind Monism) and the Materialism (Matter Monism). It affirms the real existence of both mind and matter, but it also affirms the superiority of mind over matter. Common sense, confirmed by experience insists that mind is over matter.

Because mind is over matter, a clever doctor can, by mere mental suggestion, make you sick enough to die. Hypnotists can put some persons to sleep by mental suggestion. I have heard of medical fraternity initiations in which the victim almost died under the mental suggestion that blood was gushing from his arteries and veins. On the other hand, even in cases of pneumonia, patients sometimes fight their way back to health by sheer will power.

In view of these generally admitted facts, it is not improbable that much of the influenza epidemic is due to mental suggestion. I do not deny the germ theory. I believe that corn grows only where it is planted. But every farmer knows that corn will not grow, even if it is planted, unless the soil is also fit for it. Now medical men assure us that the pneumococci and other germs are nearly always present in the mouth of everyone. Lowered physical, and probably much more lowered mental resistance, makes the soil fit for the rapid growth of pneumococci. Doctors admit that they know little about the matter. But some of them hold that colds, la grippe, influenza and pneumonia are merely stages in such growth favored by the right mental and physical conditions in the patient.

It is my contention, therefore, that many disease epidemics are greatly promoted, if not even caused by mental suggestion. If newspapers from the very beginning would make no mention of the flu, and if no one started or repeated or exaggerated rumors about it, there would be far fewer persons suffering from such diseases.

Even boards of health are the victims of misguided mental suggestion. To a certain extent they are also, no doubt innocently, contributing to the spread of the disease by mental suggestion.

Doctors and health experts disagree as to the value of the drastic bans. In the fall of 1918, when in the city of New York the flu was a prevalent and virulent as elsewhere, no ban was proclaimed. The death rate there was less than elsewhere. It must make many of the doctors smile in their sleeves to observe how the public, once having worn the yoke of a ridiculous and valueless ban, clamor for the same or a similar yoke upon the reappearance of the flu even in a mild form. Like many other characteristics in our mental life, it makes a man think, if he thinks at all, that this “land of the free” has become the land of bunc.

The present epidemic was only mild all over the country. Except in this or that locality the death-rate was scarcely above the normal. Of course “it is decreed unto all men once to die, and after this the judgement.” But why worry about a death-rate that is scarcely above the normal? What would the public demand and the boards of health decree if we were undergoing a really serious disease epidemic, in which the death would take 10 to 25 percent of the population? I hope that the boards would become hysterical and do nothing. Otherwise we would probably be ordered to burn down our houses and cremate our clothes and our bodies.

If, then, this epidemic is largely due to mental suggestion, it must largely be overcome by mental suggestion. Newspapers should avoid headlines and sensationalism. They should publish the full truth and show that the present death-rate is not so very alarming.

If boards of health were one-tenth as zealous in proclaiming bans on suggestive films in the movies, on suggestive and immoral dances and fashions that corrupt morals and invite the spread of venereal diseases, as they are in giving sensational interviews to newspapers on the flu, they would become veritable towers of moral and physical strength in their respective communities.

(Not be misunderstood or misinterpreted in my intentions, I feel impelled to state expressly and emphatically that this article from start to finish was meant only for general application, not with any particular reference to our local board of health or out local doctors; every one of whom is held by the writer of these lines in the highest and most sincere esteems.) — A Citizen

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 26 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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February 27, 1920

The Rathdrum Tribune., February 27, 1920, Page 3

19200227RT3Seven Flu Preventatives

Eat good, wholesome food.
Chew what you do eat well.
Sleep eight hours every night.
Work ten hours every day.
Boost instead of knocking.
Wear a good pleasant smile
Buy everything to eat and drink at the Ivy Store. – Trueblood.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 27 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lake View Hospital, Harrison, Idaho ca. 1919 (1)

courtesy: The Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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March 4, 1920

Idaho County Free Press. March 04, 1920, Page 6

19200304ICFP2Why Colds Are Dangerous

It is the serious diseases that colds lead to that makes them dangerous. They prepare the system for the reception and development of the germs of influenza, pneumonia, tuberculosis, diphtheria, scarlet fever, whooping cough and measles. You are much more likely to contract these diseases when you have a cold. For that reason you should get rid of very cold as quickly as possible. Chamberlain’s Cough Remedy will help you. It is widely known as a cure for bad colds.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 04 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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March 17, 1920

The Challis Messenger., March 17, 1920, Page 4

19200317CM2Warning!
Beware of Auto Flu

If your car has a fever, sneezes and coughs, and then lays down – call a specialist. Phone 28, (3 rings) Challis, Ida, specialists in troubleshooting.

Preventative of Auto Flu

See that your car has a full outfit of our new rubbers on its feet. Have it examined and adjusted here and you will be ready for a good, healthy, summer’s work.

Transcontinental Garage
Challis, Idaho
Edwin Woffinden – Albert Woffinden, Mgr.

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 17 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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March 18, 1920

The Wallace Miner. March 18, 1920, Page 6

19200318WM2Drinking Water in Mines

The drinking water used by miners underground is of as much importance as that in use on the surface. The water used for drinking purposes underground should be free from filth or contamination. Many diseases are spread in this manner, among which are common colds, influenza, pneumonia and syphilis. Where drinking water is piped underground a simple sanitary device may be arranged by means of a pipe with a union on the end too big to be placed in the mouth. It is better so to place this union on the end of the pipe that the water will not come in an upright stream, but pour out on the side.

source: The Wallace Miner. (Wallace, Idaho), 18 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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March 19, 1920

The Caldwell Tribune. March 19, 1920, Page 11

19200319CT2For colds, Catarrh or Influenza

Do you feel weak and unequal to the work ahead of you? Do you still cough a little, or does your nose bother you? Are you pale? Is your blood thin and watery? Better put your body into shape. Build strong!

An old reliable blood-maker and herbal tonic made from wild roots and barks, is Dr. Pierce’s Golden Medical Discovery. This “nature remedy” comes in tablet or liquid form. It will build up your body and protect you from disease germs which lurk everywhere. One of the active ingredients of this temperance alternative and tonic is wild cherry bark with stillingia, which is so good for the lungs and for coughs; also Oregon grape root, blood root, sone root, Queen’s root, – all skillfully combined in the Medical Discovery. These roots have a direct action on the stomach, improving digestion and assimilation. These herbal extracts in the “Discovery” aid in blood-making and are best for scrofula. By improving the blood they fortify the body against an attack of grip or colds.

Catarrh should be treated, first, as a blood disease, with this alternative. Then in addition, the nose should be washed daily with Dr. Sage’s Catarrh Remedy.

Send 10c for trial pkg. of Medical Discovery Tablets or Catarrh Tablets to Dr. Pierce’s Invalids’ Hotel, Buffalo, N. Y.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 19 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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March 25, 1920

Idaho County Free Press. March 25, 1920, Page 2

19200325ICFP2She States It Mildly

While suffering with a severe attack of the grip and threatened with pneumonia, Mrs. Annie H. Cooley, of Middlefield, Conn., began using Chamberlain’s Cough Remedy and was very much benefited by its use. The pains in the chest soon disappeared, the cough became loose, expectoration easy and in a short time she was as well as ever. Mrs. Cooley says she cannot speak too highly in praise of this remedy.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 25 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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March 26, 1920

The Oakley Herald. March 26, 1920, Page 4

19200326OH3Facts for Sick Women
Reliable Information

All American women know of the great success of Lydia E. Pinkham’s Vegetable Compound in restoring to health women who suffered from ailments peculiar to their sex, yet there are some who are skeptical and do not realize that all that is claimed for it is absolutely true – if they did, our laboratory would not be half large enough to supply the demand, though today it is the largest in the country used for the manufacture of one particular medicine.

The Facts contained in the following two letters should prove of benefit to many women:

Buffalo, N. Y. – “I suffered with organic inflammation and displacement. When lifting I had such pain and bearing down that I was not able to stand up, and it hurt me to walk or go up or down stairs. I was going to a doctor without any results and he said the safest thing would be to have an operation. I met a lady who told me she had three operations and was not well until she took Lydia E. Pinkham’s Vegetable Compound.

I felt relief after taking two bottles of Vegetable Compound and I kept on with it until I was cured. I always use Lydia E. Pinkham’s Liver Pills and they are fine. Everything used to turn sour on my stomach and the Liver Pills relieved that.” – Mrs. A Rogers, 593 Fargo Avenue, Buffalo, N. Y.

Sacramento, Calif. – “I had organic trouble and had such terrible pain and swelling in the lower part of my side that I could not stand on my feet or even let the bed clothes touch my side. I gave up my work thinking I would not be able to go back for months. My mother advised me to take Lydia E. Pinkham’s Vegetable Compound as it had saved her life at one time, and it put me in a wonderful condition in a couple of weeks, so I can keep on working. I work in a department store and have to stand on my feet all day and I do not have any more pains. I surely recommend your Vegetable Compound to all my friends and you may use these facts as a testimonial.” – Bertha J. Parker, 3320 M. St., Sacramento, Calif.

The fact is, the Best Medicine for Women is Lydia E. Pinkham’s Vegetable Compound.

Lydia E. Pinkham Medicine Co., Lynn, Mass.
19200326OH4— —

19200326OH2Take Aspirin With Water

If your Aspirin tablets have the name “Bayer” stamped on them, they are genuine “Bayer Tablets of Aspirin,” proved safe by millions of people. The name “Bayer” identifies the true wold-famous Aspirin prescribed by physicians for over eighteen years.

Always drink one or two glasses of water after taking the tablets.

Each unbroken “Bayer package” contains proper directions for Colds, Headache, Toothache, Earache, Neuralgia, Lumbago, Rheumatism, Neuritis, and for Pain.

Always say “Bayer” when buying Aspirin. Then look for the safety “Bayer Cross” on the package and on the tablets.

Handy tin boxes of twelve tablets cost but a few cents. Druggists also sell larger packages.

Aspirin is trace mark of Bayer Manufacture Monoaceticacideater of Sallcyllcacid

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 26 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Josephine Hospital, Weiser, Idaho

courtesy: The Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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April 1, 1920

The Nezperce Herald., April 01, 1920, Page 3

How Diphtheria is Contracted

One often heard the expression, “My child caught a severe cold, which developed into diphtheria,” when the truth was that the cold had simply left the little one particularly susceptible to the wandering diphtheria germ. If your child has a cold when diphtheria is prevalent you should take him out of school and keep him off the street until fully recovered, as there is a hundred times more danger of his taking diphtheria when he has a cold. When Chamberlain’s Cough Remedy is given it quickly cures the cold and lessens the danger of diphtheria or any other germ disease being contracted.
— —

How is Your Complexion?

A woman should grow more beautiful as she grows older and she will with the due regard to baths, diet and exercise, and by keeping her liver and bowels in good working order. If you are haggard and yellow, your eyes losing their lustre and whites becoming yellowish, your flesh flabby, it may be due to indigestion or to sluggish liver. Chamberlain’s Tablets correct these disorders.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 01 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Nezperce Herald., April 01, 1920, Page 5

19200401NH3Slow Death

Aches, pains, nervousness, difficulty in urinating, often means serious disorders. The world’s standard remedy for kidney, liver, bladder and uric acid troubles –

Gold Medal Haarlem Oil Capsules

bring quick relief and often ward off deadly diseases. Known as the national remedy Holland for more than 200 years. All druggists, in three sizes.

Look for the name Gold Medal on every box and accept no imitation.

(ibid, page 5)
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April 2, 1920

The Caldwell Tribune. April 02, 1920, Page 9

19200402CT2Spring Fever
Following Colds, Grip or Flu, Thin, Watery or Poisoned Blood
(By Dr. Valentine Mott)

At this time of year most people suffer from what we term “spring fever” because of a stagnant condition of the blood, because of the toxins (poisons) stored up within the body during the long winter. We eat too much meat, with little or no green vegetables.

Bloodless people, thin, anemic people, those with pale cheeks and lips, who have a poor appetite and feel that tired, worn or feverish condition in the spring-time of the year, should try the refreshing tonic powers of a good alternative and blood purifier. Such a tonic as druggists have sold for fifty years, is Dr. Pierce’s Golden Medical Discovery. It is a standard remedy that can be obtained in tablet or liquid form. Made without alcohol from wild roots and barks.

Baker City, Oregon: — I was taken with influenza and also had a nervous breakdown. My stomach was so bad I did not retain my food for three or four weeks and I was troubled with sourness and gas. I doctored with my two favorite doctors and a Chiropractor. One day I sent for a copy of Dr. Pierce’s Medical Adviser (price, 50c.), which I read and decided to make a trial of the “Medical Discovery.” At that time I was only able to stay up a few minutes at a time. After taking two bottles I was able to be on my feet all day. I am now able to eat anything without discomfort and never have the dryness in my mouth in the morning nor any bowel troubles. I walk 18 or 19 blocks at a time now and feel no ill effects.” Mrs. Wm. Hoggard, 2630 Church St.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 02 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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April 16, 1920

The Caldwell Tribune. April 16, 1920, Page 10

19200416CT2Needed Protection

Keep your body well nourished and strong and there is little danger. It’s essential that you keep up your resistance. There are thousands of families who would not dream of being without the protection that

Scott’s Emulsion

affords. The right idea is to start in the fall with Scott’s Emulsion and be protected for a strenuous winter.

It’s Scott’s you ask for.

The Norwegian cod-liver oil used in Scott’s Emulsion is super-refined in our own American Laboratories.

Its purity and quality is unsurpassed.

Scott & Brown, Bloomfield, N. J.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 16 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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April 21, 1920

The Challis Messenger., April 21, 1920, Page 2

19200421CM4Weak And Worn?

Has winter left you dull, tired; all worn out? Do you have constant backache, with headaches, dizzy spells, sharp, shooting pains, or annoying kidney irregularities? Influenza and grip epidemics have left thousands with weak kidneys and failing strength. Don’t wait until serious kidney trouble develops. Help the weakened kidneys with Doan’s Kidney Pills. Doan’s have helped thousands and should help you. Ask your neighbor!

An Idaho Case

James N. Thompson, Sixth and W. Idaho Sts., Weiser, Idaho, says: “I was troubled with a dull, constant ache through the small of my back. It hurt me so at times I could hardly keep up. I had always read about Doan’s Kidney Pills, so I got a box to try. I was helped so much I kept on using Doan’s until I was cured. I have never had any return of kidney trouble.”

Get Doan’s at Any Store, 60c a Box
Doan’s Kidney Pills
Foster – Milburn Co., Buffalow, N. Y.
— —

19200421CM5After La Grippe
Troubles of Stomach and Liver

Los Angeles, Calif, — “I will gladly tell of the relief and cure Dr. Pierce’s Golden Medical Discovery gave me. I was sick with troubles of stomach, liver, etc., and La Grippe with all its attending ailments. When all else failed Dr. Pierce’s Golden Medical Discovery did the good work. I also took Dr. Pierce’s Pleasant Pellets for biliousness with grand success. I write with gratitude to tell others of the relief that is in store for them. Do not delay but hasten to get the above remedies if suffering from any indisposition.” – Samuel Kalisky, 978 Euclid Ave.

Sick-Headache, Indigestion, Biliousness

Stockton, Calif., – “For constipation, for sick headache, for an inactive liver, for indigestion and biliousness, there is nothing to equal Dr. Pierce’s Pleasant Pellets. I have tried other things but like the ‘Pellets’ best of any.” – Mrs. F. Canfield, 329 S. Grant St.

19200421CM6— —

19200421CM7Bad Breath
Often Caused by
Acid-Stomach

How can anyone with a sour, gassy stomach, who is constantly belching, has heartburn and suffers from indigestion have anything but a bad breath? All of these stomach disorders mean just one thing – Acid-Stomach.

EATONIC, the wonderful new stomach remedy in pleasant tasting tablet form that you eat like a bit of candy, brings quick relief from these stomach miseries. EATONIC sweetens the breath because it makes the stomach sweet, cool and comfortable. Try it for that nasty taste, congested throat and “heady feeling” after too much smoking.

If neglected, Acid-Stomach may cause you a lot of serious trouble. It leads to nervousness, headaches, insomnia, melancholia, rheumatism, sciatics, heart trouble, ulcer and cancer of the stomach. It makes its millions of victims weak and miserable, listless, lacking in energy, all tired out. It often brings about chronic invalidism, premature old age, a shortening of one’s days.

You need the help that EATONIC can give you if you are not feeling as strong and well as you should. You will be surprised to see how much better you will feel just as soon as you begin taking this wonderful stomach remedy. Get a big 50 cent box from your druggist today. He will return your money if you are not satisfied.

19200421CM8

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 21 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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April 22, 1920

Idaho County Free Press. April 22, 1920, Page 2

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 22 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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April 23, 1920

The Oakley Herald. April 23, 1920, Page 4

Camphor And Witchhazel Help Weak Eyes

Oakley people are astonished at the quick results produced by simple witchhazel, camphor, hydrastis, etc., as mixed in Lavoptic eye wash. In one case of weak and nearsighted eyes a few days use brought great improvement. In another case it stopped eye pains and inflammation. We guarantee a small bottle of Lavoptic to help ANY CASE weak, strained or inflamed eyes. Aluminum eye cup FREE. W. W. Quillian, Druggist.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 23 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

April 30, 1910

Montpelier Examiner. April 30, 1920, Page 3

19200430ME2Prominent Folks Testify
After Influenza Heart and Circulation Bad

Baker City, Oregon: — “I was taken with Influenza, January 4th and also had a nervous breakdown. My stomach was so bad I did not retain any food for three or four weeks and I was troubled with gas and sourness. I doctored with my two favorite doctors and a Chiropractic who said my nerves were so badly deranged that I was on the verge of hysteria. My heart was bad and circulation so bad that my limbs were almost paralyzed. One day I sent for a copy of Dr. Pierce’s Common Sense Medical Adviser, which I read and decided to make a trial of Dr. Pierce’s medicines. At that time I was only able to stay up for a few minutes at a time. After taking two bottles I was able to be on my feet all day. I am now able to eat anything without discomfort and never have the dryness in my mouth in the morning or any bowel trouble. The ‘Pleasant Pellets’ and the ‘Medical Discovery’ according to directions, and the salt baths as directed in the ‘Medical Adviser’ were all I used. I walk 18 or 19 blocks at a time now and feel no ill effects.

“Will always recommend Dr. Pierce’s remedies.” – Mrs. Wm. Hoggard, 2630 Church St.
— —

19200430me3Perfect Health is Yours If the Blood is Kept Pure
Almost Every Human Ailment Is Directly Traceable to Impurities in the Blood

You should pay particular heed to any indication that your blood supply is becoming sluggish, or that there is a lessoning in its strong and vital force.

By keeping your blood purified, your system more easily wards off disease that is ever present, waiting to attack wherever there is an an opening. A few bottles of S. S. S., the great vegetable blood medicine, will revitalize your blood, and give you new strength and a healthy, vigorous vitality. Everyone needs it just now to keep the system in perfect condition. Go to your drug store and get a bottle to-day, and if you need any medical advice, you can obtain it without cost by writing to Medical Director, Swift Specific Co., 112 Swift Laboratory, Atlanta, Ga.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 30 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. April 30, 1920, Page 9

19200430CT2
On The Defensive!

During the aftermath of influenza or its debilitating complications, there is more than ordinary need that you nourish and protect every avenue of your strength.

Scott’s Emulsion

because of its efficient tonic-nutrient properties, daily helps tens of thousands to renewed strength. Those who are fearful or rundown in vitality should use the means that help build up a healthy resistance.

What Scott’s does for others it will do for you. – Try it!

The exclusive grade of cod-liver oil used in Scott’s Emulsion is the famous “S. & B. Process,” made in Norway and refined in our own American Laboratories. It is a guarantee of purity and palatability unsurpassed.

Scott & Browne, Bloomfield, N. J.
— —

19200430CT3How’s Your Blood?
Pimples and Eruptions Mean Bad Blood

People who have impure or impoverished blood should be careful to take only a temperance remedy made of wild roots and barks, such as Doctor Pierce’s Golden Medical Discovery is and has been for nearly 50 years. Ingredients printed on wrapper.

The first day you start to take this reliable medicine, impure germs and accumulations begin to separate in the blood and are then expelled through the eliminative organs.

In place of the impurities, the arteries and veins gradually get fresh vitalized blood and the action of this good blood on the skin means that pimples, boils, carbuncles, eczema, rash, acne and many skin blemishes will disappear. Then you must remember that when the blood is right, the liver, stomach, bowels and kidneys become healthy, active and vigorous and you will have no more trouble with indigestion, backache, headache.

Get Doctor Pierce’s Golden Medical Discovery to-day at any medicine dealers, in tablet or liquid form, or send 10c for trial package to Dr. Pierce’s Invalids’ Hotel, Buffalo, N. Y.

Oakland, Calif. – “A relative was poisoned, her blood turned to water; the doctors gave her up, said she could never be cured. She finally took Dr. Pierce’s Golden Medical Discovery, and it cured her. I have had six operations, which left me in a nervous state, with loss of sleep and appetite. Doctor Pierce’s Golden Medical Discovery and Pleasant Pellets cured me. I gained 30 pounds.” – Mrs. Mae Trudow, 4034 Sutter Street.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 30 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

St. Alphonsus Hospital, Boise, Idaho

courtesy: The Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

May 14, 1920

The Caldwell Tribune. May 14, 1920, Page 5

19200514CT2
For Colds, Catarrh or Influenza

Do you feel weak and unequal to the work ahead of you? Do you still cough a little, or does your nose bother you? Are you pale? Is your blood thin and watery? Better put your body into shape. Build strong!

An old reliable blood-maker and herbal tonic made from wild roots and barks, is Dr. Pierce’s Golden Medical Discovery. This “nature remedy” comes in tablet or liquid form. It will build up your body and protect you from disease germs which lurk everywhere. One of the active ingredients of this temperance alternative and tonic is wild cherry bark with stillingia, which is so good for the lungs and for coughs; also Oregon grape root, blood root, sone root, Queen’s root, – all skillfully combined in the Medical Discovery. These roots have a direct action on the stomach, improving digestion and assimilation. These herbal extracts in the “Discovery” aid in blood-making and are best for scrofula. By improving the blood they fortify the body against an attack of grip or colds.

Catarrh should be treated, first, as a blood disease, with this alternative. Then in addition, the nose should be washed daily with Dr. Sage’s Catarrh Remedy.

Send 10c for trial pkg. of Medical Discovery Tablets or Catarrh Tablets to Dr. Pierce’s Invalids’ Hotel, Buffalo, N. Y.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 14 May 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
——————

Whiskey for Influenza

1918 Influenza Rx for Whiskey

1918RxWhiskeyFritz-b

“A prescription from December 1918, in [the] middle of Spanish Influenza pandemic. This doctor/drug store was in Malad, Idaho. But this was common across the U.S. at this time. Also, was a legal way to get alcohol during prohibition.”

courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

The Nezperce Herald., February 05, 1920, Page 4

How to Get a Drink

Collector Edwards has announced the rules under which liquor may be procured, for medicinal purposes, under the revised, revamped, and reinforced prohibition amendment. The complete proceeding follows:

1. Patient develops a slight cold.

2. Speaks to wife about it; expresses opinion that hot whiskey might cure it, and suggests hurry call for the doctor.

3. Wife suspects faking, and administers white pine syrup and hot lemonade.

4. Patient develops grippe.

5. Wife becomes alarmed and sends for family physician.

6. Family physician satisfies self that patient is not camouflaging, but calls in nine other physicians, as required by law, to verify his findings and indorse [sic] the prescription for a half-pint.

7. Bertillion expert is called to take finger prints, foot prints, nose prints and breath prints of patient, all of which must be affixed to prescription for purposes of identification.

8. Patient is then required to fill out whiskey prescription questionnaire, giving date of birth, color of father’s hair, number of cousins who where addicted to drink, date on which he took first sip of intoxicating liquors, number of times arrested for drunkenness, complete list of every colds, etc., etc., etc.

9. Patient develops Spanish influenza.

10. Physicians then send finger prints, questionnaire, etc., to Washington to the Senate committee for the investigation of prescriptions for colds in the head and lungs.

11. Committee will summon patient to Washington for a Congressional hearing.

12. Congress will hold two-weeks’ quiz, and then require a two-thirds vote before prescription can be endorsed.

13. Patient will develop diphtheria.

14. Senate and House will finally endorse prescription, but send it to the War Department, Navy Department, Post Office Department, and Committee on Indian Affairs for filing purposes.

15. Patient will then return to home town on a stretcher, and present finger prints, prescription and photographs, questionnaire and Congressional papers to druggist.

16. Druggist will then require eleven good-character witnesses.

17. Druggist will then notify local revenue agents that prescription has been presented, and revenue agents will require carbon copy for card indexing.

18. Patient will develop pneumonia.

19. Druggist will go to cellar to fill prescription and find that his stock is exhausted.

20. Anti-Saloon League will raid drug store.

21. Patient will expire.

— New York Globe.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 05 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 11, 1920, Page 5

Texas Whiskey to Be Pure

Austin, Texas. — Whiskey, under the new prohibition law, is classed as a drug, and R. H. Hoffman, pure food and drug commissioner, has announced that he is “going after” retail druggists who are watering their whiskey. The law requires that medicinal whiskey be 44 to 50 per cent ethyl alcohol, he said, and druggists are now paying $1.70 a gallon, plus a $3 tax, for whiskey and selling it for $2 a pint, or $16 a gallon. Mr. Hoffman is of the opinion that they make enough profit without adding water to their stock.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 11 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Grangeville Globe. February 12, 1920, Page 4

Can Prescribe Whiskey
Doctors and Druggists Required to Secure Permits

The Bureau of Internal Revenue has issued a statement relative to the regulations governing the use and procurement of intoxicating liquors for medical purposes.

Both the physician who prescribes and the pharmacist or druggist who sells liquor for medical purposes must have a permit. Application for the permits should be made to the Federal prohibition director. In States where prohibition directors have not been appointed application should be made to the Collector of Internal Revenue. In the case of residents of the District of Columbia application should be made to Collector of Internal Revenue, Joshua W. Miles, Baltimore, Md.

Blank forms – 1403 – for prescribing liquors are being printed and distributed among Federal prohibition directors assistant directors and collectors of internal revenue. Where such blanks are not yet available, physicians holding permits may issue prescriptions on blanks regularly used by them.

Following is the Bureau’s statement:

“Any physician duly licensed to practice medicine and actively engaged in the practice of such profession may obtain a permit to prescribe intoxicating liquor and may then issue prescriptions for distilled spirits, wines or certain alcoholic medicinal preparations for medical purposes for persons upon whom his in attendance in cases where he believes that the use of liquor as a medicine is necessary. In no case may spirituous liquor be prescribed by one or more physicians in excess of one pint for the same person within any period of ten days.

“No specific limitation is placed upon the quantity of wines which may be prescribed for medical purposes. The regulations merely require that no prescription be issued for a greater quantity than is necessary for use as a medicine. Physicians who do not hold permits to prescribe intoxicating liquor are under no circumstances permitted to issue prescriptions.

“All prescriptions for intoxicating liquor are required to be written on prescription blanks prescribed by the regulations (Form 1403), and to be provided by the Bureau, except that in emergency cases physicians may use their regular prescription blanks provided the same contain the date of issue, amount prescribed, to whom issued, and directions for use, stating the amount and frequency of dose.Pending an adequate supply of the official blanks being printed and distributed to directors and acting directors, physicians holding permits have been authorized to issue prescriptions on blanks regularly used by them.

“Prescriptions for intoxicating liquor may be filled only by registered pharmacists who hold permits authorizing them to do so, or who are employed by retail druggists holding such permits. Pharmacists and druggists holding such permits will procure their supplies of intoxicating liquor from manufacturer or other persons holding permits authorizing them to sell liquor.

“Persons to whom prescriptions for intoxicating liquor are issued by physicians may procure the liquor prescribed through pharmacists or druggists holding permits without obtaining a permit.

“Physicians may also obtain permits entitling them to procure not more than six quarts of distilled spirits, wines or certain alcoholic preparations during any calendar year for administration to their patients in emergency cases where delay in procuring liquor on a prescription through a pharmacist might have serious consequence to the patient.

“Provision is also made in the regulations for issuing permits to hospitals and sanatoriums to enable them to procure intoxicating liquor to be administered for medicinal purposes to patients at such institutions and also for issuing permits to manufacturing industrial, and other establishments maintaining first aid stations, authorizing them to procure liquor for administration to their employees for medical purposes in emergency cases.

“All applications for permits above referred to should be made on Form 1404 in triplicate and forwarded to the local Collector of Internal Revenue.

“Section 27 of the National Prohibition Act provides that any intoxicating liquor seized under section 25 or section 26 thereof, and subject to be destroyed, may upon application of the United States Attorney, be ordered by the court to be delivered to any person holding a permit to purchase liquor. All liquor seized under such sections of law may be diverted through regular channels for medicinal purposes under the procedure above described.

“Any intoxicating liquor seized under Federal Law prior to October 28, 1919, if not claimed within sixty days from such date, may likewise upon order of the court be delivered to any person holding a permit to purchase and be diverted to medicinal or other non-beverage purposes.”

Complaints of exorbitant charges for liquor for medicinal purposes which place dispensers thereof in the class of profiteers will be investigated.”

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 12 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. February 13, 1920, Page 2

[Editorial Page]

Whiskey gets another jolt! A prominent physician in the east says that whiskey does not assist in any manner in fighting the flu. He goes on to show that according to statistics there were 71 deaths from alcohol pneumonia during this dry year as against 230 during the preceding wet year. If the good doctor would only be fair and give both sides of the question he could make these figures look less favorable by giving the total number of those who died of thirst during the past year.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 13 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Challis Messenger., February 25, 1920, Page 2

19200225CM4Would Fight Flu With Whisky
Representative Sabath Proposes Temporary Suspension of Dry Measure.

Washington. — Representative Sabath, Democrat, Illinois, has offered a resolution declaring that whisky is needed as a “cure for influenza, which is alarming [sic] increasing,” and proposing suspension for ninety days of provisions of the national prohibition law requiring special permits and reports from druggists, doctors and others as to the use of liquor for medicinal purposes.

The resolution declared its purpose was to the “end that whisky may be prescribed and obtained for medicinal purposes without unnecessary hindrances and delay.”

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 25 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Emmett Index. February 19, 1920, Page 2

A Chicago doctor says whiskey will cure “flu” sufferers who have faith in it. If it’s a matter of faith, then castor oil will do as well and it’s cheaper.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 19 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Clearwater Republican. February 27, 1920, Page 5

19200227CR2No Liquor In Idaho

Boise, Idaho, Feb. 21. — The Sunnybrook Distillers company of Chicago has written to ask Attorney General Roy L. Black whether or not druggists or pharmacists in the state of Idaho may dispense liquor on a physician’s prescription provided they comply with the federal requirement. “They cannot do so.” The attorney general replied.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 27 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho County Free Press. March 04, 1920, Page 1

Can’t Sell Rum in Idaho, Even on U. S. Permit

Druggists in Idaho are not permitted to sell whiskey or other intoxicating liquors for medicinal purposes, under the federal permit system, according to a ruling issued by Roy L. Black, attorney general at Boise

Despite the prohibition amendment to the U. S. constitution, the government allows pharmacists to dispense liquors on a prescriptions from physicians, in states where the state laws to suppress the liquor traffic are not more drastic than federal regulations.

The question involving right of physicians to prescribe intoxicants in Idaho, and druggists to fill the prescriptions, was placed before the attorney general, who replied positively:

“They cannot do so under the Idaho law.”

Therefore, old-time imbibers in Idaho, who thought they could again quench their thirst from the cup that cheers, have suffered a decided setback.

Louis Williams, internal revenue collector for Idaho, has asserted that the state law governs, and that, in Idaho, the bone dry law, which is more severe in its terms than the federal law, abrogates that provision of the federal act relating to dispensing liquors on a physician’s prescription, for the state prohibits such action, and can prosecute offenders.

Governing provisions of the state law are cited as Sections 2604 and 2649, Chapter 125, complied statutes 1919 edition.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 04 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. March 09, 1920, Page 1

19200309BFH2No Liquor On Prescriptions

The national prohibition law has practically no effect in Idaho so far as actual theoretical prohibition of the use of intoxicating liquor is concerned, according to a recent article in the Boise Evening News. This is brought about by the fact that the Idaho law makes it a felony even to possess liquor, so that there is no way in which the thirsty Idaho citizen may take advantage of the few exceptions under the federal law by which one may possess liquor.

Where the state law is stricter than the federal law, the state law takes precedence, says Lewis Williams, the collector of internal revenue, when the question was propounded to him recently.

The possession clause in the Idaho law leaves no chance of any exception by which one may have liquor in his possession, says Attorney General Roy L. Black.

It is possible, by reason of the difference between the state and federal laws, for the operator of a still in Idaho to stand trial on two charges, one in the state courts for having liquor in his possession and the other in the federal courts for operating a still without license.

Not even when one is sick can he get liquor on the prescription of a physician. This question was recently raised by the Sunny Brook Distillery Co., of Chicago, in a letter to Attorney General Black, who made the following reply:

“Under yours of the 13th inst you submit the following question: May druggists or pharmacists in the state of Idaho dispense liquors on physician’s prescriptions provided they comply with the federal requirements?

“Answering same will say that they cannot do so under the Idaho law.

“You will find the Idaho statutes set forth as Chapter 126, new Idaho compiled statutes, 1919 edition, being sections 2604 to 2649. These are lengthy and I have no pamphlet which I can send you, but you can find them in your public library perhaps.”

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 09 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Republican. March 26, 1920, Page 11

19200326TIR3Hippocratean

First doctor: Did you have a large flu practice during the epidemic?

Second doctor: About a hundred gallons, I should say. And you?

First doctor: Oh, two or three hundred cases.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 26 March 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
————————

Patent Medicines

Pluto Water

PlutoWater-a

Description
The indications or uses for this product as provided by the manufacturer are: Purgative, laxative

Maker
French Lick Springs Hotel Company

Physical Description
silica (drug active ingredients)
iron and aluminum oxides (drug active ingredients)ammonium chloride (drug active ingredients)potassium chloride (drug active ingredients)sodium chloride (drug active ingredients)magnesium sulphate (drug active ingredients)sodium sulphate (drug active ingredients)calcium sulphate (drug active ingredients)calcium carbonate (drug active ingredients)

source: Smithsonian National Museum of American History
— —

Pluto Water

Pluto Water was a trademark for a strongly laxative natural water product which was very popular in the United States in the early 20th century. The water’s laxative properties were from its high native content of mineral salts, with the active ingredient listed as sodium and magnesium sulfate, which are known as natural laxatives. The water’s high native content of mineral salts generally made it effective within one hour of ingestion, a fact the company emphasized in their promotional literature. Company advertisements stated the laxative was effective from a half-hour to two hours after ingestion. The water was an extremely popular product. In 1919, it took 450 railroad cars to transport the bottler’s output.

continued: Wikipedia
— — — — — — — — — —

Calcidin Tablets

Calcidin1-a

Patent Medicines; Drugs; Non-Liquid
Abbott Alkaloidal Company

source: Smithsonian National Museum of American History
— —

Calcidin2-a

For years, the A.A. Co. had grown exponentially, using its own grass roots campaigns to convince doctors to embrace alkaloidals. This had included increasingly over-the-top editorial claims and eye-catching advertisements like the one below for Calcidin, featuring a skeletal grim reaper strangling a child. CROUP KILLS. CALCIDIN SAVES LIVES. Wallace Abbott sometimes offered his own commentary with that ad, writing, “Dear Doctor, I know this is a gruesome illustration, enough to give one the shivers; but, well, you have seen it more than once. You know how it is yourself, and I don’t want you to forget.”

source: Made In Chicago Museum
— — — — — — — — — —

Dr. A. Boschee’s Syrup of Tar and Wild Cherry

BoscheesSyrup-a
The indications or uses for this product as provided on its packaging:

For coughs due to colds, soothes throat, promotes expectoration

Physical Description

alcohol 1.75% per fluid oz. (drug active ingredients)
morphine sulp. 24/100 grain per fluid oz. (drug active ingredients)

source: National Museum of American History
— — — — — — — — — —

Dr. Pierce’s Alterative Extract or Golden Medical Discovery

DrPiercesAlterativeExtract-a

Description

The indications or uses for this product as provided on its packaging:

For the cure of all severe, chronic or lingering coughs, bronchitis, laryngitis, weak lungs, bleeding from lungs, public speaker’s sore throat, hoarseness and suppression or loss of voice. A remedy for torpor of liver (generally termed “liver complaint” or “biliousness”) and for habitual constipation of the bowels. For loss of appetite, indigestion and dyspepsia, and for general nervous disability or prostration, in either sex. An alterative, or blood purifier; valuable in all forms of scrofulous and other blood diseases. For skin diseases, eruptions, pimples, rashes and blotches, boils, ulcers, sores, and swellings, arising from impure blood.

Physical Description
pure water (drug active ingredients)
borate of soda (drug active ingredients)
golden seal root (drug active ingredients)
queen’s root (drug active ingredients)
stone root (drug active ingredients)
black cherrybark (drug active ingredients)
bloodroot (drug active ingredients)
mandrake root (drug active ingredients)
glycerine (drug active ingredients)

source: Smithsonian National Museum of American History
— —

Dr Pierce’s Irontic Tablets

DrPiercesIronticTablets-a

Patent Medicines; Non-Liquid

Each Table Contains
Ex. Nux Vomica 1/48 Grain
(Strichnine 1/640 Grain)
Iron Pyrophosphate
Ext. Cimchona

Manufactured Only By Pierce’s Medicines, Inc.

source: Smithsonian National Museum of American History
— — — — — — — — — —

Foley’s Honey and Tar Compound

FoleysHoneyandTarCompound-b

Foley’s Honey and Tar Compound bottle, ca. 1895, St. Albans
Contributed by St. Albans Historical Society

Foley’s popular “cough syrup” retailed during the late 1800’s until the mid-1960’s. It was made in Chicago, Illinois and boasted that it was “sold everywhere. “ O. W. Bigelow sold it in his store in St. Albans in the late 1800’s. During the 1918 influenza epidemic newspaper ads touted the mixture as the answer to those suffering from the flu. In the early days the syrup of 7% alcohol, along with other ingredients, was given to infants with a dose being five to ten drops.

source: Maine Memory Network
— —

Foley & Co., Chicago, IL

Posted on December 3, 2014 by Jessica

Foley & Co. of Chicago made a range of medicinal products starting in the 1870s, the most well known of which was Foley’s Honey and Tar Compound.

According to the Pocono Record,

“The use of Foley’s cough syrup was long-lived — it was retailed during the late 1800s until the mid-1960s. In the early days, Foley’s concoction was 7 percent alcohol mixed with a special solution of pine tar and honey, terpin hydrate, sodium benzyl succinate and gum arabic. The recommended dosage for adults was one teaspoon; for children, a half teaspoon; for infants, five to 10 drops, according to the directions on the label of another undated bottle. Foley’s mixture cleared the throat of phlegm and mucus, stopped the tickling, opened the air passages for easier breathing and coated inflamed surfaces with a soothing medicine, according to an advertisement published in The Evening Independent of St. Petersburg, Fla., in 1919.

Another ad in the Evening Independent boasted that Foley’s Honey and Tar was “sold everywhere,” which may be true since ads for the product can be easily found in old newspapers throughout the country. Even the Stroudsburg Daily Times carried an ad in 1889, promoting the “wonderful value” of the compound. Although newspaper ads for Foley’s Honey and Tar were common, the number grew during the flu epidemic of 1918, touting the mixture as the answer to those who were suffering.”

There isn’t much written history about the founder of Foley & Co or the inventor of Foley’s Honey and Tar but records do show that two men, John B. Foley and Harry B. Foley, were associated with the business. …

Around the turn of the century, there was a great deal of negative press surrounding patent medicines, which brought about passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906. In an attempt to dispel some of that negative association, Harry B. Foley wrote an article for Western Druggist, a trade magazine widely read by pharmacists and drug store merchants. Foley tries persuade retail druggists that patent medicines are a great deal for them commercially, as well as protecting them from any unhappy customers.

“A store that makes a specialty of selling no-secrets [non patent medicines] soon loses the confidence of the people and they will trade with the druggist who pushes advertised proprietary medicines, and if they are not satisfied, they do not hold the druggist responsible.”

excepted from: Artifacts from the Old Main building of Illinois State University
— — — — — — — — — —

Gold Medal Haarlem Oil Capsules

GoldMedalHaarlemOilCapsules-a

A diuretic to the kidneys

Gold Medal Haarlem Oil Co.
United States: New Jersey, Jersey City

Physical Description
sulphuretted oil of turpentine (drug active ingredients)
linseed oil (drug active ingredients)
oil of peppermint (drug active ingredients)

source: National Museum of American History
————————–

Further Reading

Influenza Pandemic Mortality In America and Europe During 1918 and 1919

1918-1919DeathChart-a

courtesy Justin Smith
source: History of Boise November 24, 2019 (FB) used with permission
see: Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1) for context
— — — — — — — — — —

The Great Ad-Demic: How Spokane’s businesses advertised in newspapers during the 1918 pandemic

By Daniel Walters Sep. 14, 2020

HorlicksMmaltedMilk-aDecember 11, 1918, Spokesman-Review ad

In 1918, the world was hit with one of the worst pandemics in American history. There was a shutdown then too.

While theaters and churches were closed in Spokane by order of the local health officers, restaurants and department stores largely continued to operate and continued advertising. Even as the death toll rose, the Spokane Daily Chronicle and the Spokesman-Review continued to pump out papers celebrating the virtues of toupees, Shredded Wheat, and Lucky Strike (“It’s toasted!”).

John Barry’s The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History, argues that newspapers shamefully underplayed the deadliness and the terror of the epidemic, largely shrugging it off as nothing more than the “nothing more or less than old-fashioned grippe.”

“As terrifying as the disease was, the press made it more so,” Barry writes, “They terrified by making little of it, for what officials and the press said bore no relationship to what people saw and touched and smelled and endured. People could not trust what they read. Uncertainty follows distrust, fear follows uncertainty, and, under conditions such as these, terror follows fear.”

The result in the pages was a rah-rah-we’re-all-in-this-together-chum mix of reasonable guidance (stay away from crowds! don’t put pencils in your mouth!), false assurances, and a steadily increasing death toll. If anything, it closely mirrored the tenor of the cheerleading “win one for our boys!” coverage of World War I, which was ending just as the epidemic ramped up in the fall of 1918.

In some cities, Barry writes, that even could even extend to wartime-level censorship.

“In Phoenix, even after the war ended, the ‘Citizens’ Committee’ that had taken over the city during the emergency continued to impose silence, ordering that ‘merchants of the city refrain from mentioning the influenza epidemic directly or indirectly in their advertising,'” Barry writes.

While there was no such order in Spokane, the number of advertisements that explicitly referenced the pandemic seemed to decline as it progressed. During the months following October 1918 in Spokane, however, numerous department stores, pharmacies and manufacturers found ways to turn the epidemic into profit.

Treatments and Snake Oils

Even before the pandemic hit, pharmacies were churning out a steady stream of advertisements promising miraculous results from emetics, weight loss drugs, and laxatives.

So once the Spanish flu began killing dozens of people in Spokane, savvy advertisers began tailoring their pharmaceutical message to the epidemics, hawking a slew of cures and tonics with names like “Wilson’s Solution or Anti-Flu” under newspaper-style headlines like “Has Deadly Influenza Germ Been Conquered?”

While this “terrible epidemic is on” another ad proclaimed, don’t “leave the house without a bottle of Mentho-Laxene handy.”

A particular big player in the local ad game was Joyner’s Original Cut-Rate Drug Stores, which sold their own branded Joyner’s Cold and Grip Capsules as a cure for influenza.

“Most of us, these busy days can not afford, if it can be avoided, to lose a week or more of work so it is all the more necessary that at the very first sign of grip or influenza that counteracting treatment should be taken,” Joyner’s insisted.

For coughs, they claimed “Glycerol Lobelia” was “absolutely harmless, but works like magic.” Foley’s Honey and Tar, similarly, was “just what every suffer of influenza or la grippe needs now.”

Denver Mud — a cream applied to the skin to open up the capillaries — purported to help people avoid the danger of pneumonia from flu.

Maybe the goofiest anti-influenza recommendation from Joyners was a bottle of Oil of Hyomei — made of alcohol, liquid paraffin and a lot of oil of eucalyptus — and a small rubber inhaler. Users were directed to drip a few drops of the oil into the inhaler and then breathe through the inhaler once every half hour.

“Every particle of air that enters your breathing organs will thus be charged with an antiseptic healing balsam,” Joyner’s insisted in Spokane newspapers. “A few cents spent now may easily prevent serious illness and save you many dollars and help stamp out the spread of the disease.”

Even back in olden times, doctors considered it quackery: In 1912, the Journal of the American Medical Association scoffed that “this mixture never cured anything, unless it was impecuniosity in its exploiter.”

Some ads were initially indistinguishable from straight news articles by the small “advertisement” disclaimer at the top: A Spokane Daily Chronicle item headlined “Influenza Claims More Victims Than German Bullets” turns out into an advertisement for Taniac tonics and laxative tablets sold by Murgittroyds’s.

Murgittroyds’s also sold Flu Mask of Antiseptic Gauze (“superior to the ordinary cheesecloth masks”) for 25 cents, to be paired with aromatic antiseptic drops.

But maybe the most successful ad campaign came from Vick’s VapoRub, which dedicated numerous ads in Spokane newspapers to celebrating the ways that the vapors could open up the linings of air passages and “throw off germs.”

“Vicks VapoRub advertisements in hundreds of papers danced down the delicate line of reassurance while promising relief, calling the epidemic, “Simply the Old-Fashioned Grip Masquerading Under a New Name,” Barry writes.

The ad campaign boosted sales by 300 percent.

“When the Spanish flu hit the U.S. from 1918 to 1919, Vicks VapoRub sales skyrocketed from $900,000 to $2.9 million in just one year,” the Vicks VapoRub website proclaims today. “Sales increased so dramatically that the Vicks plant operated day and night to keep up with orders.”

But did the VapoRub itself work? Over a century later, the verdict still isn’t entirely clear. The Mayo Clinic argues that Vicks’ isn’t actually effective for decongestion — it just makes it feel like your nasal passageways are being cleared because of the bracing sensations it creates.

For some young children, Vicks may even be dangerous — though another recent study is more encouraging.

Public Service Announcements

Responsible Spokane advertisers, of course, knew that a lot of the pharmaceutical ads were irresponsible. And so they ran their own rebuttals:

“Do not ‘fall’ for the many advertised ‘SURE CURES’ for influenza, or so-called tonics to build up body resistance,” an ad for the Crescent department store cautioned amid all the other ads for sure cures and body resistance. “Remember, FRESH AIR, REGULAR MEALS, and ABUNDANT REST are what are needed.”

This public service announcement, of course, had its own capitalist incentives: The flu advice was under an illustration of a handsome woman hawking “Charming Georgette Crepe Blouses for only $8.76.”

The Owl Drug co-published a PSA that advised, among other things, to “keep your bowels open. Intestinal congestion invites disease.” But it also sold brand names disinfectants like Platt’s Chlorides” and reminded readers that “all Owl Drug Co. salesmen are especially informed as to get able to give you advice on sanitary measures.”

Other ads were straight PSAs: On Oct. 22, 1918, 30 different Spokane businesses — including candy stores, dairies and four different undertaker companies — joined forces to fund a full-page ad in the Chronicle featuring the advice of the Spokane Health Department:

19181022SC
October 22, 1918 Spokane Chronicle
(link to full size ad)

In one sense, it sought to reassure, reiterating the idea that the Spanish flu wasn’t some scary new disease, “just the old-fashioned grippe.” But at the same time, it highlighted just how deadly the disease could be with a succession of recommendations.

A century before Make Your Own COVID-mask tutorials popped up on YouTube, these ads advised how to “Make Your Own Spanish flu” masks with four to six folds of cheesecloth or gauze.

“These masks must be kept clean, must be put on outside the sick room, must not be handled after they are tied on and must be boiled 30 minutes and thoroughly dried every time they are taken off,” the advertisement advised.

The announcement also served as a help-wanted ad, sounding the alarm for more nurses to volunteer to fight the epidemic.

And when the 1918 presidential election was approaching, the Wentworth Clothing Houses took a specific election-era tack, printing a health department notice pleading with voters to avoid influenza-spreading crowds by voting early.

“Crowds at polling places are just as dangerous as crowds in other places,” the Wentworth ad insisted.

Spokane’s John W. Graham and Co. used the same language, while also stressing that, according to the Council of National Defense, Christmas shopping should be spread out and focused on the early hours to avoid congesting stores and streetcars.

TelephonePSA
The PSA from the Home Telephone and Telegraph Company had an additional ask: Don’t use the telephone unless you absolutely have to.

The coronavirus may have slowed down internet speeds, but Spokane telephone companies had a bandwidth problem of a different sort: Turns out those rows of telephone operators packed close together got sick, handicapping the company.

“The larger number of operators now absent because of illness makes it necessary for us to appeal to our people to restrict the use of the telephone,” the ad reads “helping the service of war industries, hospitals and stricken homes of our cities.”

Not every advice the local businesses gave amid the pandemic was accurate or helpful. The Whitehouse Company gave “‘Flu’ Hints” before describing the wool winter fashions: “Do not get in a panic if a nurse or attendant on an influenza case comes near you. He or she will not give you the disease while they themselves remain well.”

The Influenza Angle

Other local businesses, however, found a way to use the epidemic to sell more than just drugs.

Life insurance companies used the looming threat of death to paint an image of orphaned children and widowed women

“What if things go wrong?” A Nov. 10, 1918, Western Union Life ad read, “Suppose you should die — of Spanish influenza and other ailments — could your wife pay the mortgages without your income?”

Horlick’s Malted Milk touted its “REAL Food-Drink” as the perfect “diet during and after INFLUENZA, and claimed it had been “endorsed by physicians everywhere.”

And clothing retailers worked with this simple pitch: Keeping warm can keep you from getting sick, right? So why not sell the latest fashions on the basis of their flu-fighting powers?

“Men avoid the flu by wearing good shoes that will keep your feet dry and warm,” Dolby’s Clothing explained.

“In a flu epidemic an ounce of preventive is worth a pound of cure,” Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes Shop explained in their ads for young men’s overcoats.

Another key tactic to prevent getting the flu? Imperial Coffee from Gray Manufacturing in Spokane, of course.

“It’s helpfulness as a preventative in infections and epidemical diseases under physicians’ orders is well-established,” the ad explained.

Of course, plenty of ads during the 1918 pandemic didn’t have anything to do with the flu at all.

“DON’T risk disappointing someone who expects and needs Corona,” an ad in November of 1918.

Of course, back then “Corona” didn’t refer to disease or beer. It was a personal typewriter that was all in the vogue in 1918.

“Order your gift Corona now if you wish it for Christmas,” the Corona Typewriter Sales Company advised in Spokane.

excerpted from: Inlander
— — — — — — — — — —

How the 1918 Pandemic Frayed Social Bonds

The influenza pandemic did long-lasting damage to relationships in some American communities. Could the mistrust have been prevented?

Noah Y. Kim March 31, 2020 The Atlantic

continued: The Atlantic (1 free click)
———————–

Science Papers:

“The Medical and Scientific Conceptions of Influenza”

by Molly Billings, June, 1997

link: Stanford University
— — — — — — — — — —

The State of Science, Microbiology, and Vaccines Circa 1918

John M. Eyler, PhD

link: National Library of Medicine – NIH
—————————-

Acknowledgments:

Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.

Search Terms: Idaho Newspapers 1819-1920 “Influenza”
link:
— — — — — — — — — —

The Mike Fritz Collection at History of Idaho

Old photos of Idaho towns, schools and hospitals
link:
————————–

Parting Shots

1918LaGrippeFr-a

Likely 1918 France. No info, from unknown source.

Found on Twitter:
— — — — — — — — — —

1955 Film “Sniffles & Sneezes”


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Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)