Monthly Archives: May 2022

May 29, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

May 29, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Note: If you are not receiving the YPTimes emails, check your spam folder.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
Oct 27, 2021 – Transfer Station on Winter Schedule
Nov 1, 2021 – Winter Mail Delivery Starts
2022
May – Spring Rx burns
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit Season
May 15 thru Nov 30 – Firewood Season
May 20 – Local Campgrounds Open
May 27 – J & R Septic
May 27 – Big Creek Lodge open for fly-ins
May 28 – Memorial Potluck 2pm Community Hall
May 29 – 1pm meeting Community Hall re: EMS/SAR
May 29 – YPFD meeting at 2pm Community Hall
Week of June 8 – Amerigas Delivery
Jun 8-11 – Spring Free Dump Days
Jun 11 – VYPA Meeting 2pm Community Hall
Jun 18 – YP Vet Clinic
Jul 2 – 4th of July golf tournament
Jul 3 – YPWUA Shareholders Meeting
Jul 9 – VYPA Meeting 2pm Community Hall
(details below)
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Local Events:

Amerigas Delivery Week of June 8th

Note from Amerigas that they plan to come to Yellow Pine the “week of June 8th.” They are putting together a list and ask people to call 1-800-427-4968 to make sure no one is missed.
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Spring Free Dump Days

June 8, 9, 10, and 11 for Valley County
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Yellow Pine Vet Day June 18

Cascade Veterinary Clinic will be coming to Yellow Pine Saturday June 18th. Please call (208) 382-4590 to get on the list. They will need to bring charts and vaccines.
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Krassel RD Prescribed Burns Spring 2022

The Krassel Ranger District plans to apply fire to approximately 2,500 acres within the Bald Hill project area (east of Yellow Pine); 2,000 acres in the Four Mile project area along the South Fork of the Salmon River near the Miners peak trail, and 70 acres around Krassel Work Center.
Ignitions may occur over 2-7 days in the months of March through May Flame, smoke and hazards may be present in the area until significant precipitation or season ending weather is received. If you have any questions or comments please contact Dave Hogen Krassel District Ranger at 208-634-0600

(Same map from last fall.)
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Golf Tournament July 2nd

The annual 4th of July golf tournament will be on Saturday, July 2nd at 10(ish). All proceeds will be used to improve the golf course (improving the greens, signs and tees. More information to follow. Contact Joel or Marj Fields with questions, sponsorships or donations at fieldsmarjie @ yahoo.com


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YPWUA Shareholders Meeting July 3rd

The yearly shareholders meeting will be Sunday July 3rd at 10am. There will be two positions up for elections.

There has been some question on who can vote and can run for office. You must be a shareholder with the Yellow Pine Water Users Association to be able to vote and run for office. If you have any questions about being a shareholder, please contact me.

Thank you – Steve Holloway
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Village News:

J & R Septic

They came to Yellow Pine May 27th to pump tanks. If you missed this chance you can still sign up for the next trip by calling them in Cascade at (208) 382-8727. They can fit 4 tanks per trip. Please have your clean out dug up and ready, or you can ask them about digging.
20220527Septic
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Big Creek Lodge

The lodge opened for fly-ins May 27th.
20220529BigCreekSW-a
courtesy Eye-n-Sky webcam
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Yellow Pine Pioneer Cemetery

Memorial Day Flags
20220526YPCemetery-a
courtesy MF
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Memorial Potluck Saturday May 28th

Memorial Potluck was held at the Community Hall. Burgers and Brats provided.
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EMS Meeting May 29

There was a meeting at 1pm at the Community hall to address the needs and answer questions about Search and Rescue and EMS in the Yellow Pine area.
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YPFD meeting May 29

There was a Fire Commissioners Meeting May 29 at 2pm at the Community Hall. See agenda below under YPFD News.
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Arnold Aviation News:

Arnold’s will no longer will offer grocery shopping services. (D9 now has online shopping – see below.) However, Arnold’s will still pick up orders in Cascade from D9, auto parts, feed, and hardware, etc. for delivery to Yellow Pine. You will only be charged for freight from the Airport to YP.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
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D9 News:

You will be able to start ordering online directly from D9 on May 24th. Go to their website at link. Phone (208-382-4215) if you need assistance.

Orders must be placed before 10am Monday (Arnold’s will pick up on Tuesday for Wednesday delivery.) It is important that upon checkout, you click the box marked “Gift” – and type in the order is for Arnold’s to pick up and deliver to Yellow Pine. Otherwise they will think it is a local personal pickup.

Tips: After you sign in to your account, look at the top left of the webpage for “Shop departments” – it will show categories of items. For instance, if you want butter, click on “Dairy” – then when the page comes up, look for the row that says Butter, look over to the right side and click on “see more” and it will come up with every type and size of butter (and margarine) available. Click on “add to cart” under the item you want, there you can adjust the amount using the plus and minus symbols. When you are done, click on “check out” near the top right corner. That is where you can click “gift” to leave instructions before you enter your card number.
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Local Campgrounds Opened May 20

Ice Hole Campground
Golden Gate Campground
Yellow Pine Campground
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May 15 thru Nov 30 – Firewood Season

Firewood permits are available at The Corner.
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State Burn permits required May 10th

Closed fire season begins May 10, which means Idahoans outside city limits will need a burn permit before burning any debris. The closed fire season lasts until Oct. 20.
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Watkins Pharmacy Update April 20th

Greetings! We will be painting the temp pharmacy in two weeks. There have to be some structural changes inside the space to ensure the pharmacy is secured and satisfy state regulations. In order to do that the new owner of the building, with his architect, have to have his building permit and plans approved by the city before we can modify anything under the permit. So we are probably looking at a date around June 1st at this point. Thank you for asking! Amber Watkins
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Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at wicap.org.
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Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
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Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Construction closures will end May 27 on Idaho 55 near Smiths Ferry.
One-way alternating traffic is set to replace closures from 10 a.m. to noon on Mondays through Fridays.
Both lanes will be open Friday mornings through Sundays.
link:

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.

Upper Johnson Creek road at Landmark, Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Elk Summit, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are closed to wheeled vehicles. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
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Critters

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be Elk Aware

Elk are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard. F&G confirms there is a pack of 6 wolves in our valley.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

Bears are out of hibernation and hungry.

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat had been hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started November 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report May 26: Bins were emptied Wednesday, May 25th.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

Water Use

05/19/22 23802659 26489 24 1104 18 T 7438
05/20/22 23829855 27196 24 1133 19 F 707
05/21/22 23858427 28572 24 1191 20 S 1376
05/22/22 23890387 31960 24 1332 22 S 3388
05/23/22 23922011 31624 24 1318 22 M 336
05/24/22 23954171 32160 24 1340 22 T 536
05/25/22 23986099 31928 24 1330 22 W 232
05/26/22 24018476 32377 24 1349 22 T 449
05/27/22 24049437 30961 24 1290 22 F 1416
05/28/22 24084622 35185 24 1466 24 S 4224
05/29/22 24117804 33182 24 1383 23 S 2003

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

DRINKING WATER WARNING April 11, 2022
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 5-10-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

YPWUA 2022 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 3, 2022
YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 5, 2020 link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
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VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association:
Hailey Harris, Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Jen Aldrich, Secretary
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Ron Earl

April 6, 2022 Village Council meeting to fill vacant chairperson position (no minutes.)
Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.
2022 Meeting dates:
June 11
July 9
August 13
September 10

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Department

Yellow Pine Volunteer Fire Protection District Fire Commissioners Meeting May 29, 2022, 2:00 p.m., at Community Hall
Amended Agenda
Call to Order
Bill McIntosh – Chairperson
Roll Call of Commissioners Ronda Rogers – District Secretary
Report – Meeting Notice and Agenda Posting Ronda Rogers – District Secretary
Action Item
Approval of Amended Agenda Motion to accept the Amended Agenda.
Pledge of Allegiance Led by Chairperson Bill McIntosh.
Action Item
Approval of Prior Meeting Minutes April 3, 2022 Meeting Minutes
Commissioner Discussion National Forest Meeting update – Lorinne Munn
Action Items
Business Items
Sending two individuals to Backcountry First Aid – Tim Rogers
Harmonica Festival Booth, order of t-shirts– Ronda Rogers
Safe at the firehouse – Ronda Rogers
Reports
Fire Chief – Tim Rogers
District Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers
Budget Report – Ronda Rogers
District Attorney – White Peterson, by Marc Bybee
Public Comments
Members of the public may address the Board at this time to bring matters relevant to the fire district to the Board’s attention.
Please limit comments to three (3) minutes. The Chairperson may permit additional time in their discretion.
No action may be taken on items presented during this section. The Board may respond to comments, but are not required to.
Action Item
Adjournment
Meeting Conduct: Meeting attendees are expected to respect the professional purposes of meetings by respecting the rights, privacy, safety, and dignity of all persons; exercising professionalism, consideration, and respect in their speech and actions; and refraining from harassing speech and other harassing behavior. Failure to conduct oneself in accordance with these expectations may result in removal of the offending person or adjournment of the meeting.

The Forest Service has requested a meeting with the Yellow Pine Fire Board on May 20, 2022 in Cascade at 1:30 PM. As a follow up to the POD’s (Potential Operational Delineations). The PODs process is more than drawing containers on a map; it is a cross-boundary, collaborative engagement that translates into operational strategies once fire is on the ground. PODS are fire management and planning units.

The Forest Service will set up a presentation to be given to the Village of Yellow Pine community at a later date.

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Meeting Minutes
May 29, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting (forthcoming)
Apr 3, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Feb 24, 2022 Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD New Commissioner’s Transition Meeting Link:
Nov 23, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Nov 8, 2021 – AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
Oct 31, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Oct 14, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Sep 27, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Sep 18, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Sep 11, 2021 – YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
Jul 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Jun 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sep 30, 2020 – YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 11, 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Spring hours: Wednesday thru Monday (closed Tuesdays) 8am-8pm
Firewood permits Available May 15th
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Closed May 15th for renovation
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Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Due to open in early June.
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Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Availability for 2022
*Note can book Idaho Residents now for Archery or put on a waiting list for Non Residents, will find out final allocations by April 18th.
2 on 1 Archery August 29th to September 4th *Lodge hunt / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Archery September 6th to September 12th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Rifle September 24th to September 30th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Wolf.
Spring Bear Hunt June 3rd to June 9th Group of 2 to 3 hunters *Lodge Hunt / Black Bear and Wolf.
See our website for more details. Or give us a call 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: 1-800-427-4968
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Cascade:
Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
D9 Groceries: 208-382-4215 Website link to order:
Upon “checkout” click on “gift” and write “Arnold’s to pick up and deliver to (your name) in Yellow Pine” so they know who will pick it up and where it goes.
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204 (Closed)
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watkins can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
Please help support local journalism and subscribe.
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

J & R Septic
Cascade (208) 382-8727

Valley Roofing Idaho
Meridian (208) 830-4890 email:
Facebook:

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473) Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (May 23) overnight low of 27 degrees. No new precipitation. This morning it was 43 degrees by 930am, mostly hazy sky and light breeze. Tree swallows, robins, jays, finches, pine siskins, black-headed and evening grosbeaks, quail, mourning doves, hummingbirds, female hairy woodpecker visiting along with pine, golden mantled and ground squirrels. Overcast at lunch time. Mostly cloudy, fairly warm and light breeze mid-afternoon, high of 64 degrees. Partly clear and calmer just after sunset. Partly clear before midnight.

Tuesday (May 24) overnight low of 35 degrees. This morning it was 48 degrees by 930am, partly cloudy, light breeze and heavy dew. Morning air traffic (a couple loud ones.) Tree swallows, robins, jays, finches, pine siskins, cowbirds, mourning dove visiting along with pine, golden mantled and ground squirrels. Mostly cloudy and a bit breezy after lunch time. Partly cloudy to mostly clear mid-afternoon and light breezes, high of 66 degrees. Mostly cloudy (almost overcast) just after sunset and calm. Looked cloudy before midnight.

Wednesday (May 25) overnight low of 44 degrees. This morning it was 58 degrees by 930am, mostly hazy with wispy clouds and light breeze. More grosbeaks showing up (evening and black-headed), swallows swooping, robins chirping, finches, hummingbirds, pine siskins along with pine and ground squirrels observed. Mostly hazy and warm at lunch time. Very warm and mostly cloudy mid-afternoon and a bit breezy, high of 75 degrees. Mostly cloudy (thicker haze and wispies) after sunset and light breeze. A few stars out before midnight.

Thursday (May 26) overnight low of 38 degrees. This morning it was 53 degrees by 930am and mostly hazy sky. Robins, tree swallows, jays, grosbeaks, hummingbirds, ground squirrels and a pine squirrel visiting. Increasing street traffic (roads are getting dusty.) Hazy overcast at lunch time and warm. Very warm mid-afternoon, overcast and gusty breezes, high of 80 degrees. Overcast, warm and breezy just after sunset. Partly clear before midnight, and rain after midnight. Likely a short shower early morning.

Friday (May 27) overnight low of 47 degrees. Rain total = 0.13″. This morning it was 57 degrees by 930am, the sky was mostly cloudy with patches of blue. Robins, tree swallows, jays, finches, pine siskins, black-headed and evening grosbeaks, mourning dove, cowbirds, hairy woodpecker, hummingbirds, a pair of quail, ground squirrels and 2 pine squirrels observed. Mostly cloudy and light breeze at lunch time. Bigger leaves on aspen trees. Warm and dark overcast mid-afternoon and light breezes. Dark clouds, gusty breezes and rain early evening. Just after sunset thick dark clouds, steady rain and calmer. Raining lightly before midnight. Likely rained on and off all night.

Saturday (May 28) overnight low of 43 degrees, 24 hour rain total = 0.24″. This morning it was 44 degrees by 930am, low overcast (VanMeter socked in) and light rain continues to fall. Rivers rising. Robins, grosbeaks and jays calling, hummingbirds, finches, pine siskins and pine squirrels visiting. Everything is very green. Overcast and not raining at lunch time, a bit breezy. The river is up and roaring. By mid-afternoon we had breaks in the overcast and a bit breezy. Just after sunset it was mostly cloudy and calm. Cloudy at midnight and had not rained. Rain likely started some time after 2am.

Sunday (May 29) overnight low of 41 degrees, 24 hour rain total = 0.11″. This morning it was 43 degrees by 930am, low overcast sitting down on peaks and ridges, and light rain continues to fall. River gauges indicate the rivers are dropping. Raven and robins calling, jays, finches, pine siskins, grosbeaks, hummingbirds visiting along with 2 pine squirrels and a ground squirrel. Aspen leaves getting bigger. Stopped raining by lunch time, top of VanMeter still socked in. Gusty breezes brought short showers on and off mid-afternoon, high of 53 degrees. Short rain shower early evening.
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Idaho News:

Highway 55 project near Smiths Ferry to begin summer construction schedule

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, May 25th 2022

The massive construction project near Smiths Ferry on Highway 55 is about to begin its summer schedule.

And that will impact drivers heading up to McCall, or returning to the Treasure Valley during the week.

The Idaho Transportation Department says beginning on Tuesday, the highway will be reduced to one lane of alternating traffic Monday through noon on Fridays. The weekends will be fully open to make room for travelers.

This schedule will be in place through early September.

continued:
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COVID-19 Updates: 620 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

May 27, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 620 new COVID-19 cases and 1 new death Friday. State-level case and hospital data are now being updated on the state dashboard on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, excluding holidays.

The age group with the most cases is 18-29 with 103,988 cases.

The state said 3 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 17,223, and 1 new case has been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,944.

1 new death was reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,940.

full story: [Valley County 2,686 cases, 16 deaths.]
— — — —

New Valley County COVID-19 cases nearly double to 26

Surge in cases expected as variant spreads

By Tom Grote The Star-News May 26, 2022

The number of new cases of COVID-19 reported in Valley County nearly doubled over the last week to 26 cases, the county’s two hospitals reported.

The 26 new cases compared to 14 new cases reported the previous week and five new cases reported the prior week.

All of the new cases were reported by St. Luke’s McCall, which has been expecting a surge in the BA-2 variant throughout the state, Chief Operating Officer Amber Green said.

“Throughout the pandemic Idaho has lagged behind during the surges,” Green said.

No new cases were reported by Cascade Medical Center, but CEO Tom Reinhardt said new cases were being informally reported by residents after using home tests.

Reinhardt predicts the countywide spike will continue. “Over the past three years we had very low positives in the spring, and then a surge right around the first day of summer,” he said.

The two hospitals have reported 2,742 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started in March 2020.

Thirteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health.

Clinics & Tests – McCall

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine offers the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines are offered for anyone age 5 and older.

Also available are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine boosters for ages 12 to 15 and to moderately or severely immunocompromised youths age 5 to 11.

Second booster doses are available for adults ages 50 years and older, people ages 12 years and older who are moderately or severely immunocompromised.

Patients should talk to their health care provider about their medical condition, and whether getting an additional primary shot is appropriate for them.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link) or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

Clinics & Tests – Cascade

Cascade Medical Center no longer offers the Pfizer vaccine. Those wishing to be given the Pfizer vaccine should contact St. Luke’s McCall or a local pharmacy.

The Cascade hospital offers a second booster shot of the Moderna vaccine to those over age 50 who received their first booster shot at least four months ago.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster. Call 208-382-4285 to schedule a time.

Take-Home Tests

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital also provides free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

full story: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
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Courses in CPR, first aid to be offered in Donnelly in June

The Star-News May 26, 2022

Courses on CPR/AED as well as First Aid will be offered in June at the Donnelly Fire Station in Donnelly.

The CPR/AED course will begin at 6 p.m. Monday, June 6, while the First Aid course will begin at 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 8.

The CPR session will provide training on performing CPR on adults, children and infants with the assistance of a portable defibrillator, or AED.

The First Aid session is for anyone age 10 and older who wants to learn skills such as splinting and bandaging. The sessions also will train those attending to react to medical and environmental emergencies and how to recognize symptoms of stroke and heart attack.

continued:
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Historic Roseberry opens for summer with exhibits, events

The Star-News May 26, 2022

Historic Roseberry near Donnelly has opened for the summer, with the Valley County Museum and Roseberry General Store open Fridays and Saturdays from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Nearly two dozen other buildings on the site can be viewed at any time with the help of interpretive signs. The complex is located one mile east of Donnelly on East Roseberry Road.

Historic Roseberry is operated by the Long Valley Preservation Society, which was established in 1973 to collect, preserve, interpret and display Valley County history at the complex.

Many of the buildings were moved to the site from other locations in Valley County. Others, like the Roseberry General Store built in 1905, stand on their original site.

full story:
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Public Lands:

Payette forest to shorten maximum camping days to 14 days

The maximum number of days camping on one site on the Payette National Forest has been shortened from 18 days to 14 days, the Payette said in a news release.

The maximum stay was shortened to make the limited number of campsites available to more people, the release said.

The limits apply to camping inside the Payette’s 32 designated campgrounds and any undeveloped campsites on the forest.

“The previous stay limit allowed for a person or group to stay in the same spot over a three-weekend time frame,” Payette Recreation Specialist Emily Simpson said. “In recent years, this often led to people not being able to find an available camping spot.”

A 14-day maximum is the standard rule for most campgrounds across the country, including neighboring national forests and state campgrounds, the release said.

For more information, contact Simpson at emily.simpson@usda.gov

Published: The Star-News May 26, 2022
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Critter News:

Grizzly sow and yearling euthanized in Island Park after becoming food-conditioned

May 23, 2022 Local News 8

Island Park, Idaho (KIFI) – On Saturday, Idaho Fish and Game in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service euthanized a sow grizzly and a yearling male after they had become food-conditioned and increasingly sought out human food sources.

The sow and yearling began frequenting residential neighborhoods where they became habituated to human food sources after receiving multiple food rewards from porches, unsecured garbage cans and vehicles.

The sow grizzly was originally captured and relocated in 2020 following multiple food related conflicts. Subsequently, in 2021 the sow and cub were involved in multiple conflicts where food rewards were obtained. This spring, the pair displayed similar behavior. Due to the pair’s dependence on human food and habituation to residential areas, officials say they were captured and euthanized in the interest of human safety on May 21.

continued:
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Grizzly sow and yearlings euthanized in Island Park after aggressive behavior towards humans

May 25, 2022 Local News 8

Fish and Game in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service euthanized a sow grizzly and two yearlings in Island Park on Wednesday after the bears exhibited aggressive behavior and showed no fear towards humans after becoming food-conditioned and habituated to human food sources from residential areas.

This is the second incident in less than a week where grizzly bears had to be euthanized after gaining access to unsecured garbage and other attractants. Residents and visitors in bear country are strongly encouraged to store all residential garbage containers inside a garage or locked shed.

full story:
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During the spring wildlife baby boom, young animals are better off left alone

May 23, 2022 Local News 8

Spring is here, and so is the peak of baby wildlife season. People are bound to see young wildlife when they venture outdoors during the spring and early summer, and there is a pretty good chance that they will see a baby animal that appears to be alone, with mom nowhere in sight.

While a well-intentioned human’s first instinct might be to rescue these cute, cuddly and seemingly helpless creatures, Fish and Game officials have a simple suggestion to people who discover baby animals that appear to be abandoned: The best thing you can do for them is to leave them be.

Every spring, Fish and Game receives calls from well intentioned humans who have “rescued” baby animals that they assume have been lost, abandoned or orphaned. While these people typically mean well, they are often doing more damage than good when they intervene, and typically, mom was not far away to begin with.

continued:
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Letter to Share:

Gamebird Foundation

20220526Pheasant

This is what we have been looking for. The attachment is a rooster pheasant and his flock. There was nine hens but Joel could not get them in a frame with a clear shot. Joel raises about 800 chicks a year to adult hood and releases them into some great habitat that covers about 700 to 800 acres. He sees many pheasants and Red-legs but it is not very often that you can get a picture like this. We do love your pictures of the pheasants and other ground nesting birds that you see or hear. Just send them to us and we will get them on our face book for all to enjoy. Have a great Memorial Day Weekend. God Bless and be safe.

“The Pheasant Guy”
Jim Hagedorn
208-883-3423
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Fish and Game News:

F&G to host ‘Fish Idaho Fest – McCall’ on June 10

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game will host “Fish Idaho Fest – McCall’” from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Friday, June 10 at Broken Horn Brewery, 201 Mission St. in McCall.

The event will include live music, fly casting and fly tying demonstrations, food trucks, booths from nonprofits and government agencies involved with fisheries.

“This is a party for those who want to learn more about the management of their fisheries,” said Jordan Messner, regional fisheries manager for Fish and Game’s McCall office.

“We are hoping that the public comes for the festivities and leaves with a better understanding of the work all of these groups do to make fisheries better in the McCall area,” Messner said.

Scheduled exhibitors include Fish and Game, the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality, Nez Perce Tribe, Payette National Forest, Boise National Forest, Lake Cascade State Park, Ponderosa State Park, Trout Unlimited, Friends of Lake Cascade, Big Payette Water Quality Council, and Backcountry Hunters and Anglers.

Published: The Star-News May 26, 2022
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The deadline for big game/fall turkey controlled hunt applications is fast approaching

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, May 26, 2022

Hunters have until 11:59 p.m. (MDT) on June 5 to apply

The application period for fall 2022 deer, elk, pronghorn, fall black bear and fall turkey controlled hunts ends June 5. Hunters can also apply for the first Super Hunt drawing through May 31.

continued:
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Here’s a reminder of fishing season and rule changes for 2022

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Monday, May 23, 2022

Enjoy fishing during Memorial Day weekend and beyond

There were about 23 changes to seasons and bag limits throughout the state that took effect on Jan. 1. With many anglers taking their first fishing trips to some of their favorite fishing spots, here’s a reminder of rule changes that are new for 2022.

continued:
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Weekly Salmon Fishing Update – May 26, 2022

By Chris Sullivan, Anadromous Fisheries Coordinator
Thursday, May 26, 2022

Welcome to our weekly Chinook Salmon Fishing Update. Throughout the next several months we will provide updates on changes to seasons and rules and share data from dam counts, creel surveys, and hatchery returns to help anglers plan their salmon fishing trips.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Seasonal:

MemorialDayUSMilitary-a
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Idaho History May 29, 2022

Idaho Elk Hunting

1898

Sportsman Edward Maberly

by Evan Filby – South Fork Companion

In 1894, Maberly graduated from a dental college located in Kansas City and practiced briefly in Nebraska. He moved to Boise in 1895.

An “ardent sportsman,” Maberly helped organize a state-wide sportmen’s organization. Through that body, he urged the passage of laws for wiser fish and game management. He sent a photograph of elk in the Teton foothills to Recreation magazine, with the statement that the herd numbered “some 1,500” and had just been shooed away from stacks of hay in the valley.

1898Elk-acaption: Maberly Elk photo. Recreation magazine, 1898.

He went on, “We rarely see so large a band of elk now; yet there are enough left to stock a vast territory if properly protected and judiciously hunted.”

Maberly served several terms as President of the Intermountain Gun Club. He won many awards at shooting contests in Boise and around the Northwest, remaining competitive well into his sixties.

References: E. H. Maberly, “Elk in the Teton Foot Hills,” Recreation, Vol. VIII. No. 2, G. 0. Shields, Publisher, New York (February 1898).

excerpted from: Sportsman and Idaho Dentistry Pioneer Edward Maberly
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1903

Elk hunting

1903ElkHunting-a

A hunter sits from a post high above the ground with a rifle waiting for elk. From Stonebraker photo collection.

source: William Allen Stonebraker Photographs, Digital Initiatives, University of Idaho Library
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1909

The Elusive Wapati

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist Monday, March 24, 2014

In 1909, the state of elk populations in Idaho was so alarming a moratorium on elk hunting was declared in parts of the state. What had happened to once plentiful herds of elk in Idaho is the story of western expansion across North America. Lewis and Clark described vast herds covering the grasslands as they made their way west in 1805. As settlers began changing the landscape with farms and ranches, and unregulated market hunters decimated populations through hunting, wildlife like elk disappeared except in secluded parts of the Rocky Mountains. Alarmed by the rapid disappearance of wildlife, national leaders such as Theodore Roosevelt and Idaho’s own Emile Grandjean took action. Roosevelt’s efforts led to the creation of Yellowstone National Park; Grandjean’s determination helped establish a 220,000-acre game preserve in the Payette River drainage west of the Sawtooth Mountains. Elk herds protected in Yellowstone National Park would later be transplanted to preserves to restore elk in Idaho and throughout the West.

Idaho’s elk population today is a direct result of elk transplanted from Yellowstone National Park. Elk were first moved to Idaho in 1915 by railcar and other transplants happened until 1940. Since then, elk have flourished in Idaho and other intrastate transplants have been conducted by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game to establish elk in unoccupied range. Today, an estimated 107,000 elk roam the state from the forests of North Idaho to the sagebrush country in the south. To learn more about Fish and Game’s current Elk Management Plan, check out this IDFG video:

To read more about Idaho’s elk population and other 75th Celebration stories, visit the Fish and Game website at (link):

source: Idaho Fish and Game
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“Live-captured Northern Range [Yellowstone] elk were the source for most elk transplant efforts throughout North America. More than 13,500 live elk were shipped from the Northern Range inside YNP to Canada, Mexico, and 38 US states.”

source: History and Status of Wild Ungulate Populations on the Northern Yellowstone Range
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1915

Game Laws for 1915

By Theodore Sherman Palmer, William Frederick Bancroft, Frank L. Earnshaw 1915

Game Refuges and Preserves

… Legislation affecting refuges was enacted in at least 14 States, and included not only provisions for new refuges, but changes to boundaries and elimination of several of those already created. … Idaho established the Lewiston Orchards preserve in Nez Perce County and the Black Lake game refuge in Adams and Idaho Counties (which was stocked with 50 elk from the Yellowstone National park), and renewed protection for five years on big game and game birds in seven counties in the southeastern corner of the State.

New Laws Passed in 1915

Idaho — Eight acts: Creating the Black Lake game preserve in Adams and Idaho counties (ch. 9); protecting quail in Lemhi County for four years (ch.33); closing season for five years on big game, quail, and Mongolian pheasants in Bannock, Bear Lake, Cassia, Franklin, Oneida, Power, and Twin Falls Counties (ch. 72); prohibiting hunting of mountain sheep and of females (and young under 1 year of age) of deer and elk (ch. 90); closing the State to elk hunting except for male elk in Fremont, Bonneville, Teton, and Bingham Counties (ch. 90); requiring written consent to hunt elk inclosed [sic] and posted lands (ch. 152); petitioning Congress to create the Sawtooth National Park.

source: Google Books
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Historical Perspective

Accounts from trappers and miners in the 1870s and 1880s indicate that elk occurred in the zone but were not as numerous as deer. Excessive use by livestock during the late 1800s and early 1900s severely damaged the Boise River and Big Wood River watersheds and reduced the area’s ability to support high numbers of elk. Additionally, heavy unregulated hunting by miners, market hunters, and local settlers drastically reduced big game populations during the late 1800s.

By 1905, it was difficult to find camp meat. Elk had been all but eliminated and deer observations were rare in the Boise River Basin and Big Wood River drainage.

In 1915, a reintroduction effort began with a release of elk from Yellowstone National Park into the Boise River drainage just above Arrowrock Dam. In 1930, the elk population in the Soldier Mountain area was estimated at 135 head. Reintroduction efforts continued in 1935 and 1936 with elk releases near Ketchum in the Big Wood River drainage.

Elk were abundant in McCall Zone prior to European settlement in the late 1800s. The proliferation of mining due to the gold rush in the late 1800s and early 1900s led to widespread slaughter of these animals to supply meat and hides for mining camps. As a result, elk became increasingly rare to see, and at one time were thought to be eliminated from the area. Remnant populations relegated to the more remote rugged portions of the zone survived. Translocation of elk from Yellowstone to places in McCall Zone such as New Meadows occurred in the late 1930s.

source: Idaho Department of Fish and Game
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1915IdahoElk-aFish and Game (Courtesy photo, Idaho Department of Fish and Game) “Import elk from Yellowstone 1915. In 1915 Idaho Fish and Game began importing elk into Idaho from Yellowstone National Park.” (via pinterest)
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“Grangeville Globe,” March 4, 1915

19150304GGShip Two Carloads of Elk Into State From Montana

The settlers over In the Chamberlain Basin and Mallard Creek sections will be surprised to learn that the state has just had 50 elk shipped in from the National Perk and Jackson Hole country for the purpose of “propagating and perpetuating the species” and that corrals and feeding grounds have been prepared for their reception over in the Black lake country. The few settlers in the sections mentioned have had some experience with elk during the past few years, as well as with the state officials and game warden’s department, which has taught them a sad and expensive lesson along that line.

Edward C. Harpison lives on Mallard Creek, some 25 miles south of Elk City, where he owns a ranch from which he has been trying to earn a living. The elk, which are abundant in that country form in herds and break down his fences and overrun his crops, not infrequently destroying his season’s labor. They come in at certain seasons and mingle with his domestic cattle and tramp out his meadows from which he cuts hay for his own animals. In severe winters he has fed and preserved the elk and has thus helped to carry out the efforts of the state which has had laws enacted preventing the killing of the same by hunters.

Mr. Harpison was out to Grangeville last season and was a guest of the local Commercial club at the regular weekly luncheon while here. Mr. Harpison related some of his experiences in dairying and “elk raising” which were very interesting. When the elk became so numerous under his fostering care as to be burdensome and destructive of crops, Mr. Harpison applied to the state asking that in view of the part he had taken in preserving the elk In that section, that he be supplied by the state with sufficient wire to fence his place against the elk invasions, but his petition was ignored. Yet the state can go to the trouble and expense of shipping elk in from another state, building corrals and employing persons to care for and feed them, but cannot see the wisdom or economy in co-operating with the pioneer settler who has helped protect and preserve the elk already here, and who has suffered loss and expended labor in doing so. This is all wrong in principle, as anyone with the least bit of sense or fairness must see, and should be corrected. The ‘Weiser Signal’ of last week contains the following account of the arrival of the recent elk shipment at that place and the interest shown in the same:

Two car loads of elk direct from their native health in the National Park and the Jackson Hole country were shipped Into Weiser Monday night and were transferred to the P. & I. N. Tuesday noon and taken to Council. While the animals were in this city there were more than 500 people visited the two cars and inspected the animals. In order to ship them in stock cars they had to be dehorned and much of their beauty was spoiled for the sight seers. The horns would have been shed shortly anyway and the loss of them is only for the time being. By the coming autumn they will be spread again in all of their seven or eight feet of glory.

Most of the animals were two year [olds but some were three. In all there] were 50 of which 15 were males and 35 female.

The intention of the man in charge was to have the elk taken off at Council where they are to be crated and then hauled over to The Bear river country and around through the Black Lake country. Corrals and feeding grounds have been prepared and there is little doubt about the elk ever straying far from the grounds where they will winter the first year.

Council Record: The 60 elk for the Black Lake preserve arrived Tuesday evening in two cars attached to the passenger train, and nearly the whole town was down at the depot to see them. They were taken to New Meadows to unload and two of them escaped and took to the hills at that point. From there they are to be driven to the preserve via Little Salmon and the head waters of Deep creek.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 04 March 1915.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.

Note: The position of State Fish and Game Warden was created in 1899. (Idaho Blue Book)

source: Transcribed and posted to ID AHGP:
[ht SMc]
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Elk Hunting in Idaho

Timeline by Idaho Fish and Game

1915ElkTransport-a
1915: Elk transplanted to Idaho from Yellowstone Park.

1921: Women required to buy hunting and fishing license.

1938: Idaho’s first successful voter initiative passes creating the Idaho Fish and Game Commission and establishing Commission Districts.

1947: Controlled hunts first used to limit the number of sportsmen hunting a given area. Game preserves are opened to hunting. The Idaho Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit established at the University of Idaho.

1976: First general bucks-only deer and bulls-only elk hunting season.

1978: Burdette Prince property bought, to become part of Craig Mountain WMA. 11,527 acres of deer and elk range.

1997: Nancy Hadley Hanson of Sandpoint became the first female member of the Fish and Game Commission. A reorganization of elk hunting seasons was announced for public input, with implementation in 1998. … Commission proposes a fee increase on deer and elk tags to fund enforcement, wildlife surveys, a mandatory hunter report card and telephone survey.

1998: A system of 28 elk hunting zones was established, requiring hunters to choose a single hunting area and decide between an “A” and “B” tag defining season dates and weapons. Deer and elk tags fees were increased by $6. Mandatory hunter harvest reports were required from all deer, elk, and antelope hunters. A new elk license plate was offered to Idaho motorists.

excerpts from: Fish and Game History
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Elk Herd Challis Idaho

ElkHerdChallisIdaho1-a

Undated photo postcard

source: The Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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Further Reading

Link to Deer Hunting
Link to Idaho Hunting Stories
Link to The Carlin Party Tragedy
Link to Idaho History Table of Contents
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Road Reports May 29, 2022

It is Rock Migration Season. Please share road reports. Spring travel conditions. Most back country roads are not maintained. This time of year there is deep snow in higher elevations. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: Local streets wet from recent rain. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Hwy 55 Construction Update from ITD May 19, 2022
Construction closures will end May 27 on Idaho 55 near Smiths Ferry.
One-way alternating traffic is set to replace closures from 10 a.m. to noon on Mondays through Fridays.
Both lanes will be open Friday mornings through Sundays.
To learn more about the spring construction schedule, visit link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
No current report.
Report Friday (May 20) road was clear.
Report Wednesday (May 18) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open – weight limits are no longer in effect.
No current report.
Report Friday (May 20) road was clear, hardly any rocks and no debris.
Report Wednesday (May 18) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
No current report.
Report Friday (May 20) road was clear and smooth.
Report Wednesday (May 18) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.

Upper Johnson Creek Road (Trail): Closed to wheeled vehicles.
No current report.
Lower Johnson Creek Road: Open
No current report.
Report Wednesday (May 11) the county graded most of the lower end.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled travel
Report Wednesday (May 11) a backhoe is working on the lower end on this side.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel
Report Sunday (May 29) “Solid snow floor from Missouri Ridge Trailhead to Belvedere. About 7-8 miles of continuous snow with about 5 ft on top.” – SA
Report Wednesday (May 25) “Overall the roads & trails were in great shape. The trip from BC to Yellow Pine was “easy peasey” on a tracked ATV. For snowmobiles this travel gets a little complicated. Details for today are: Edwardsburg to Belvedere Creek mostly clear & easy for ATV/UTV travel. Belvedere to Missouri Ridge trail – snow on road is continuous & easy ride for snowmobiles/tracked ATVs. If temperatures turn cold it might make ATV & UTV travel possible. Missouri to Profile Creek/EFSF – Snow & tree free, but lots of small rocks that would make pulling a trailer difficult. Profile Creek to Yellow Pine – Excellent condition, recently spot graded & rock free. Gate on EFSF road just beyond Profile Creek is open. The creeks are running full & the snow is rapidly melting so the snow line will be moving higher with normal weather for this time of year, but there is still deep snow on Profile Gap (> 7′). I would not rule out Profile open to normal traffic in early July.” – C&L
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
Report from Perpetua (May 25) “The Valley County Road department instructed us to take down the gate on the Stibnite Road above Profile Creek on May 18th.
“We have road grading of the Stibnite Road scheduled to begin on June 6th, the grading should take about two weeks.”
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Will not be plowed open before Memorial Weekend.

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:
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Road Reports May 26, 2022

It is Rock Migration Season. Please share road reports. Spring travel conditions. Most back country roads are not maintained. This time of year there is still deep snow in higher elevations. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are drying out and getting dusty. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Hwy 55 Construction Update from ITD May 12, 2022
Starting Monday, May 16, closures on SH-55 between Smiths Ferry and the Rainbow Bridge will shorten from 4-hour closures to 2-hour closures. The new schedule will be 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Monday – Thursday, and will continue through Thursday, May 26. Outside of those closures, there will still be one-way, alternating traffic with 15-minute delays.
Drivers should still anticipate longer delays once the road reopens at 12 p.m. to allow flaggers to clear queues on either side of the work zone. Once those lines are cleared, there should not be wait times longer that 15 minutes.
To learn more about the spring construction schedule, visit link:
Update from ITD May 19, 2022
Construction closures will end May 27 on Idaho 55 near Smiths Ferry.
One-way alternating traffic is set to replace closures from 10 a.m. to noon on Mondays through Fridays.
Both lanes will be open Friday mornings through Sundays.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
No current report.
Report Friday (May 20) road was clear.
Report Wednesday (May 18) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open – weight limits are no longer in effect.
No current report.
Report Friday (May 20) road was clear, hardly any rocks and no debris.
Report Wednesday (May 18) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
No current report.
Report Friday (May 20) road was clear and smooth.
Report Wednesday (May 18) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.

Upper Johnson Creek Road (Trail): Closed to wheeled vehicles.
No current report.
Lower Johnson Creek Road: Open
No current report.
Report Wednesday (May 11) the county graded most of the lower end.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled travel
Report Wednesday (May 11) a backhoe is working on the lower end on this side.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
Report from Perpetua (May 25) “The Valley County Road department instructed us to take down the gate on the Stibnite Road above Profile Creek on May 18th.
“We have road grading of the Stibnite Road scheduled to begin on June 6th, the grading should take about two weeks.”
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Will not be plowed open before Memorial Weekend.

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:
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May 22, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

May 22, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Note: If you are not receiving the YPTimes emails, check your spam folder.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
Oct 27, 2021 – Transfer Station on Winter Schedule
Nov 1, 2021 – Winter Mail Delivery Starts
2022
May – Spring Rx burns
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit Season
May 15 thru Nov 30 – Firewood Season
May 20 – Local Campgrounds Open
May 26 – J & R Septic
May 27 – Big Creek Lodge open for fly-ins
May 28 – Memorial Potluck 2pm Community Hall
May 29 – YPFD Pancake Breakfast 830am Community Hall
May 29 – YPFD meeting at 2pm Community Hall
Week of June 8 – Amerigas Delivery
Jun 8-11 – Spring Free Dump Days
Jun 11 – VYPA Meeting 2pm Community Hall
Jun 18 – YP Vet Clinic
Jul 2 – 4th of July golf tournament
Jul 3 – YPWUA Shareholders Meeting
Jul 9 – VYPA Meeting 2pm Community Hall
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

May 15, through Nov. 30, 2022 Firewood Season

Personal use fuelwood permits for the Boise National Forest will be available for sale at The Corner beginning May 15, through Nov. 30, 2022.
— — — —

Local Campgrounds Open May 20

Ice Hole Campground
Golden Gate Campground
Yellow Pine Campground
— — — —

May 26 Septic Pumping

J & R Septic from Cascade (208) 382-8727 is coming to Yellow Pine to pump tanks May 26. If more people are interested, they will return the next Thursday, June 2nd. They can fit 4 loads per trip. If they need to dig up your clean out, it will be an extra $100.
— — — —

Memorial Potluck Saturday May 28th

Memorial Potluck at the Community Hall. Burgers and Brats provided. Please bring a side dish if you would like.

Stay tuned for more details…


— — — —

YPFD Pancake Breakfast May 29

YPFD will have a Pancake Breakfast, “Come Meet Your Commissioner” May 29, 2022 at 8:30 AM at the Community Hall
— — — —

YPFD meeting May 29

There will be a Fire Commissioners Meeting May 29 at 2pm at the Community Hall.
— — — —

Week of June 8th

Note from Amerigas that they plan to come to Yellow Pine the “week of June 8th.” They are putting together a list and ask people to call 1-800-427-4968 to make sure no one is missed.
— — — —

Spring Free Dump Days

June 8, 9, 10, and 11 for Valley County
— — — —

Yellow Pine Vet Day June 18

Cascade Veterinary Clinic will be coming to Yellow Pine Saturday June 18th. Please call (208) 382-4590 to get on the list. They will need to bring charts and vaccines.
— — — —

Krassel RD Prescribed Burns Spring 2022

The Krassel Ranger District plans to apply fire to approximately 2,500 acres within the Bald Hill project area (east of Yellow Pine); 2,000 acres in the Four Mile project area along the South Fork of the Salmon River near the Miners peak trail, and 70 acres around Krassel Work Center.
Ignitions may occur over 2-7 days in the months of March through May Flame, smoke and hazards may be present in the area until significant precipitation or season ending weather is received. If you have any questions or comments please contact Dave Hogen Krassel District Ranger at 208-634-0600

(Same map from last fall.)
— — — —

Golf Tournament July 2nd

The annual 4th of July golf tournament will be on Saturday, July 2nd at 10(ish). All proceeds will be used to improve the golf course (improving the greens, signs and tees. More information to follow. Contact Joel or Marj Fields with questions, sponsorships or donations at fieldsmarjie @ yahoo.com


— — — —

YPWUA Shareholders Meeting July 3rd

The yearly shareholders meeting will be Sunday July 3rd at 10am. There will be two positions up for elections.

There has been some question on who can vote and can run for office. You must be a shareholder with the Yellow Pine Water Users Association to be able to vote and run for office. If you have any questions about being a shareholder, please contact me.

Thank you – Steve Holloway
———

Village News:

The Corner

The Corner Pub has switched to its new summer hours starting this week, we are currently going to be open from 8am to 8pm Wed-Monday and closed on Tuesdays. This week on Thursday the 19th we will be closing early at 4pm.
— — — —

Lunar Eclipse

Yellow Pine had thick dark clouds during the recent Lunar Eclipse on Sunday, May 15th. Subscribers sent photos to share from their locations.

20220515EclipseBoise-a
Boise, Idaho

20220515EclipseQuartzburg-a
Quartzburg, AZ

20220515EclipseIllinois-a
Darien, Illinois
— — — —

Big Creek Webcams are working again

20220522BigCreekSE-aCourtesy Eye-n-Sky
— — — —

State Burn permits required May 10th

Closed fire season begins May 10, which means Idahoans outside city limits will need a burn permit before burning any debris. The closed fire season lasts until Oct. 20.
— — — —

Watkins Pharmacy Update April 20th

Greetings! We will be painting the temp pharmacy in two weeks. There have to be some structural changes inside the space to ensure the pharmacy is secured and satisfy state regulations. In order to do that the new owner of the building, with his architect, have to have his building permit and plans approved by the city before we can modify anything under the permit. So we are probably looking at a date around June 1st at this point. Thank you for asking! Amber Watkins
— — — —

Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at wicap.org.
— — — —

Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
— — — —

Arnold Aviation News:

Dear Customers,

We are writing to update you on some changes. Our wonderful shopper, Carolyn, is moving on to new adventures. She is selling her home in Cascade, and will not be working for us this summer.

We are sorry to see her go, and wish her all the best.

In this time of transition, we have decided to not replace her. As technology has advanced, grocery ordering has also. We have looked over the books this past year and determined that the shopping fees do not cover the shopper’s wages, so we have been subsidizing the shopping service.

Rather than increase the shopping fees, we’ve decided to simplify operations here in the office, and no longer will offer grocery shopping services. We did not make this decision lightly, and we have other options to suggest for you.

D9 is planning to offer online shopping services! We encourage you to order your groceries through D9. We’d love to keep the money here in Cascade, and support them, as a small “Mom & Pop” store. We’re so excited that they are making changes to accommodate the ever-changing needs of our community, which includes all of you.

We will plan to pick up any backcountry orders at D9, on Tuesday afternoons for free, bring them back to the airport to weigh, and deliver via plane or truck on Wednesday. You will only be charged freight fees from us.

The grocery stores in McCall (Ridley’s & Albertson’s) currently offer online shopping services. They are also good options for you, if you have a friend or employee who can pick up your order in McCall and deliver it to Arnold Aviation.

We are still happy to pick orders up at the other businesses in Cascade as you need them.

It sounds like you’ll be able to start ordering online directly from D9 on May 24th. Please check their website for a link.

You can also call them (208-382-4215) and speak with their manager. We’re happy to help with the transition as the new system gets figured out by all.

Thank you for your faithful business, we appreciate you. We look forward to continuing to provide freight services for you.

Sincerely,
Mike Arnold

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Hwy 55 summer road closures reduced to 2 hours starting May 16, 2022
link:
Construction closures will end May 27 on Idaho 55 near Smiths Ferry.
One-way alternating traffic is set to replace closures from 10 a.m. to noon on Mondays through Fridays.
Both lanes will be open Friday mornings through Sundays.

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Closed to full sized vehicles at the junction with Profile Creek
from Perpetua “As Spring has arrived, snow and ice on the Stibnite road are beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Perpetua Resources crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Perpetua Resources crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
“We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road starting week of March 21st. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.” – Sam

Upper Johnson Creek road at Landmark, Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Elk Summit, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are closed to wheeled vehicles. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
— — — —

Critters

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be Elk Aware

Elk are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard. F&G confirms there is a pack of 6 wolves in our valley.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

Bears are out of hibernation and hungry.

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat had been hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started November 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report April 23: Bins emptied and transfer station cleaned by locals.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

Water Use

05/12/22 23639804 27068 24 1128 19 T 1251
05/13/22 23636178 26374 24 1099 18 F 694
05/14/22 23663120 26942 24 1123 19 S 568
05/15/22 23689417 26297 24 1096 18 S 645
05/16/22 23716066 26649 24 1110 19 M 352
05/17/22 23742243 26177 24 1091 18 T 472
05/18/22 23776170 33927 24 1414 24 W 7750
05/19/22 23802659 26489 24 1104 18 T 7438
05/20/22 23829855 27196 24 1133 19 F 707
05/21/22 23858427 28572 24 1191 20 S 1376
05/22/22 23890387 31960 24 1332 22 S 3388

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

DRINKING WATER WARNING April 11, 2022
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 5-10-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

YPWUA 2022 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 3, 2022
YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 5, 2020 link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
— — — —

VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association:
Hailey Harris, Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Jen Aldrich, Secretary
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Ron Earl

April 6, 2022 Village Council meeting to fill vacant chairperson position (no minutes.)
Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.
2022 Meeting dates:
June 11
July 9
August 13
September 10

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
— — — —

YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Department

The Forest Service has requested a meeting with the Yellow Pine Fire Board on May 20, 2022 in Cascade at 1:30 PM. As a follow up to the POD’s (Potential Operational Delineations). The PODs process is more than drawing containers on a map; it is a cross-boundary, collaborative engagement that translates into operational strategies once fire is on the ground. PODS are fire management and planning units.

The Forest Service will set up a presentation to be given to the Village of Yellow Pine community at a later date.

Note: Minutes from the January 9th meeting have been submitted. See below for link to document.

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Meeting Minutes

Apr 3, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Feb 24, 2022 Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD New Commissioner’s Transition Meeting Link:
Nov 23, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Nov 8, 2021 – AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
Oct 31, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Oct 14, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Sep 27, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Sep 18, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Sep 11, 2021 – YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
Jul 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Jun 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sep 30, 2020 – YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 11, 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Spring hours: Wednesday thru Monday (closed Tuesdays) 8am-8pm
Fire wood permits Available May 15th
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Closed?
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed for the winter.
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Availability for 2022
*Note can book Idaho Residents now for Archery or put on a waiting list for Non Residents, will find out final allocations by April 18th.
2 on 1 Archery August 29th to September 4th *Lodge hunt / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Archery September 6th to September 12th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Rifle September 24th to September 30th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Wolf.
Spring Bear Hunt June 3rd to June 9th Group of 2 to 3 hunters *Lodge Hunt / Black Bear and Wolf.
See our website for more details. Or give us a call 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: 1-800-427-4968
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watkins can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe: Please help support local journalism and subscribe.
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

J & R Septic
Cascade (208) 382-8727

Valley Roofing Idaho
(208) 830-4890 valleyroofingidaho@gmail.com
Facebook:

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (May 16) overnight low of 44 degrees, rain after midnight measured 0.02″. This morning it was 52 degrees by 930am, partly cloudy with light breezes. Jays and robins calling, hummingbirds, grosbeaks and finches, hairy woodpecker, mourning dove, plus all the local squirrel species (ground, pine, golden mantled and chipmunk) visiting. Mostly cloudy by lunch time. Very warm by mid-afternoon, nearly overcast and a bit humid with flag flapping breezes, high of 71 degrees. Lots of shooting west of the neighborhood for a few hours this afternoon. Warm and light breezes after sunset and nearly overcast. River sounds like it is coming up. Hazy sky before midnight.

Tuesday (May 17) overnight low of 33 degrees. This morning it was 48 degrees by 930am, almost clear sky (a little thin haze) and light breeze. Tree swallows are back, robins calling and woodpecker drumming. Jays, hummingbirds, a few finches, a couple of cowbirds, mourning dove, golden mantled, ground and pine squirrels visiting. Aspens have tiny green leaves breaking out. Mostly hazy by lunch time. Very warm by mid-afternoon, milky-blue sky (thin haze) and light cool breezes, high of 70 degrees. Hazy sky after sunset and still warm. Robins chirping. Hazy sky before midnight.

Wednesday (May 18) overnight low of 34 degrees. This morning it was 46 degrees by 930am, overcast and light breeze. A few swallows calling, lots of robins, some jays, a few cowbirds, pine siskins and finches, hummingbirds, evening and black-headed grosbeaks, pine squirrel and chipmunk visiting. Cloudy at lunch time. Mail truck was on time. Breezy and a few sprinkles early afternoon. Still raining mid-afternoon, dark overcast, breezy and cooler temperatures, high of 58 degrees. A raven was calling from the edge of the golf course late afternoon. Still raining lightly after sunset and calmer. Stopped raining before 920pm. Cloudy but not raining before midnight.

Thursday (May 19) overnight low of 39 degrees. Yesterday’s rain total = 0.08″. This morning it was 44 degrees by 930am, mostly cloudy and breezy. The river sounds like it is ripping along. A few tree swallows, finches, hummingbirds and jays around. Flock of cowbirds and a mourning dove came by later. Hawk in the neighborhood terrorizing the song birds and a few ground squirrels out. Overcast, cool and breezy at lunch time. Socked in and snowing by 245pm, snow lasted about 10 minutes, no accumulation. Cold gusty breezes mid-afternoon, dark clouds and about a 10 minute graupel shower (little snow balls), then clouds breaking up. Another short round of graupel late afternoon, high of 48 degrees. Flaking snow and mostly cloudy after sunset with light breezes. Cloudy before midnight.

Friday (May 20) overnight low of 32 degrees. Yesterday’s snow flurries didn’t amount to enough to measure = Trace. This morning it was 40 degrees by 930am, mostly cloudy and light breeze. River is dropping a bit. Some tree swallows, robins and jays calling. Finches, hummingbirds, pine siskins, cowbirds, hairy woodpecker, pine squirrel and ground squirrels visiting. Mostly cloudy and a bit breezy at lunch time. Mostly cloudy, warmer and almost calm mid-afternoon, high of 57 degrees. Dark overcast and cool breezes after sunset. Cloudy before midnight.

Saturday (May 21) overnight low of 31 degrees. This morning it was 42 degrees by 930am, dark overcast and a bit breezy. Things look really green, the rivers are running at the 30 year average mark. Tree swallows, quail, robins, jays, cowbirds, finches, pine siskins, hummingbirds and 3 pine squirrels visiting. Short rain shower a little after lunch time, enough to make things damp. Another short sprinkle and breezy early afternoon, then breaks in the clouds by 2pm. Dark overcast, breezy and steady rain mid-afternoon, high of 53 degrees. Low (loud) airplane flew over the village about 330pm. Snow fall reported in the upper neighborhoods between 4pm and 6pm.. Misting and almost overcast after sunset. Looked cloudy before midnight.

Sunday (May 22) overnight low of 30 degrees. Yesterday’s rain total = 0.26″. This morning it was 42 degrees by 930am, mostly clear sky with a big cloud sitting down on top of VanMeter hill and light breeze. Tree swallows, robins, jays, finches, black-headed grosbeak, hummingbirds, pine squirrel, golden mantled and ground squirrels visiting. Airplane traffic at 11am. Mostly cloudy at lunch time. Mostly cloudy mid-afternoon and variable breezes, high of 57 degrees. Mostly clear and a bit breezy after sunset.
——————-

Idaho News:

Idaho 55 closures at Smiths Ferry to be lifted May 27

The Star-News May 19, 2022

Construction closures will end May 27 on Idaho 55 near Smiths Ferry, the Idaho Transportation Department said.

One-way alternating traffic is set to replace closures from 10 a.m. to noon on Mondays through Fridays, a news release said.

Both lanes will be open Friday mornings through Sundays.

The project, which is scheduled to be completed this fall, will widen shoulders, reduce curves in the road and install guard rails on about one mile of road between Smiths Ferry and Rainbow Bridge.

For more information, visit (link).

source: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — — — — — — — —

Yellow Pine woman to be given ‘40 Under 40 In Cancer’ award

The Star-News May 19, 2022

A Yellow Pine woman has been selected to receive the 2022 “40 Under 40 in Cancer Award” presented by The Association for Value-Based Cancer Care.

Hailey Harris will be given the award in a ceremony to be held June 4 in Chicago.

The “40 Under 40 in Cancer Award” recognizes the contributions made across the field of cancer by “rising stars and emerging leaders” under age 40, the award’s website said.

Harris, 27, is a Certified Holistic Nutritionist for Jasper Health, an online company that connects cancer patients to caregivers, providers and other services.

She helps build nutrition and diet plans for newly diagnosed cancer patients and cancer survivors.

“Hailey . . . works every day to come up with new innovations . . to help patients in need,” said the nomination of Harris, which was submitted by a co-worker.

“She will hop on a call with a patient and go through all the factors . . . and come up with simple and unique approaches,” the nomination said.

Harris has lived in Yellow Pine full time for the last two years and is able to do her job in the remote community 40 miles east of McCall through online chats, emails and video calls.

“My dad grew up here and Yellow Pine has been close to my heart since I was a child,” she said.

source: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — — — — — — — —

Team formed in Yellow Pine to respond to medical emergencies

The Star-News May 19, 2022

A team of trained volunteers has been formed in Yellow Pine to provide quick response for medical emergencies and rescues.

The team, composed of both full-time and part-time residents of Yellow Pine, will respond to the estimated 50 to 70 calls received in and around the remote village 40 miles east of McCall.

The team will be part of Valley County Search and Rescue and associated with Cascade Fire & EMS, Capt. Larry Scarborough of the search and rescue service said.

The team was formed after the Cascade Fire & EMS lost the storage space for the ambulance it had stationed in Yellow Pine since 2014, said Scarborough, who is also a commissioner of for the Cascade Rural Fire Protection District.

Search and rescue will provide a vehicle to hold supplies and equipment provided by the Yellow Pine Fire District for use by rescuers for initial treatment of patients.

Cascade Fire will still need to send an ambulance if the patient needs to be taken to a hospital, Scarborough said. An air ambulance also can be called for life-threatening cases, Scarborough said.

The resident team can respond to an emergency within minutes, while it takes an ambulance from Cascade up to three hours to drive to Yellow Pine, he said.

Leading the team will be former Yellow Pine Fire Chief Jeff Forster, a trained paramedic, and his wife Ann, a nurse.

Other volunteers are already trained in medical response, and additional medical training will be provided as needed, Scarborough said.

The volunteers also will be trained to respond to the occasional call to rescue lost or injured hikers, bikers and hunters around Yellow Pine, he said.

source: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — —

It takes a team when responding to an emergency in rural Idaho

By Steve Dent May 19, 2022 KIVI

Idaho City, Idaho – My family and I was driving around Grimes Creek when we got stopped in an unusual traffic jam in rural Idaho, turns out a helicopter touched down to transport a patient to St. Luke’s in Boise.

In scenarios like these it takes a team to help someone in an emergency so the Clear Creek Volunteer Fire Department blocked traffic to give the helicopter a place to land on the road while East Boise County had an ambulance on scene.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

COVID-19 Updates: 511 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

May 20, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 511 new COVID-19 cases and 0 new deaths Friday. State-level case and hospital data are now being updated on the state dashboard on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, excluding holidays.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 449,265.

The age group with the most cases is 18-29 with 103,688 cases.

The state said 0 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 17,197, and 3 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,940.

0 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,936.

full story: [Valley County 2,665 cases, 16 deaths.]
— — — —

14 new Valley County COVID-19 reported during past week

By Tom Grote The Star-News May 19, 2022

A total of 14 new cases of COVID-19 were reported in Valley County last week by the county’s two hospitals.

The 14 new cases compared to five new cases reported the previous week and the nine new cases reported the prior week.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 2,716 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started in March 2020.

There are likely more cases in the Cascade area than the one new case confirmed by Cascade Medical Center, CEO Tom Reinhardt said.

“We have been very intentional about distributing at-home tests, which people are using,” Reinhardt said. “We’ve had people call and tell us they are positive so we give instructions to isolate and how to do home care.”

Anyone having severe symptoms, such as trouble breathing, are advised to seek immediate help, he said.

Thirteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health.

Clinics & Tests – McCall

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine offers the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines are offered for anyone age 5 and older.

Also available are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine boosters for ages 12 to 15 and to moderately or severely immunocompromised youths age 5 to 11.

Second booster doses are available for adults ages 50 years and older, people ages 12 years and older who are moderately or severely immunocompromised.

Patients should talk to their health care provider about their medical condition, and whether getting an additional primary shot is appropriate for them.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link) or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

Clinics & Tests – Cascade

Cascade Medical Center no longer offers the Pfizer vaccine. Those wishing to be given the Pfizer vaccine should contact St. Luke’s McCall or a local pharmacy.

The Cascade hospital offers a second booster shot of the Moderna vaccine to those over age 50 who received their first booster shot at least four months ago.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster. Call 208-382-4285 to schedule a time.

Take-Home Tests

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital also provides free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

full story: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — — — — — — — —

Cascade Medical Center bond fails

While a majority of residents voted in favor of the bond, it failed to reach a two-thirds majority needed to pass; nearly 57% voted in favor and 43% were against.

KTVB Staff May 18, 2022

The proposed Cascade Medical Center bond failed to get a 66% majority in the primary election Tuesday and did not pass.

continued:
— — — —

Cascade hospital bond vote falls short

By Max Silverson The Star-News May 19, 2022

Voters on Tuesday rejected a $19 million bond to help build a new Cascade Medical Center.

The vote was 564 in favor to 433 against. A majority, 56.6%, voted in favor, but a two-third majority, or 66.7%, was required to pass.

CEO Tom Reinhardt said he was “disappointed” with the outcome.

… The 50-year-old building on Lake Cascade Parkway still needs to be replaced, Reinhardt said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

2022 Republican Primary Election Results

Valley County Commissioner – District 2
Sherry Maupin 1,467 – 66%
Dania Haselton 767 – 34%

Idaho Senate – District 8
Geoff Schroeder 2,805 – 32%
Terry Gestrin 2,389 – 28%
Jon Krueger 2,231 – 26%
Gary Freeman 1,240 – 14%

Idaho House – Seat 8A
Matt Bundy 4,716 – 53%
Rob Beiswenger 4,122 – 47%

source: The Star-News May 19, 2022
—————

Letter to Share:

Thanks to community for considering CMC bond

We want to say a heartfelt thank you to our community for considering the Cascade Medical Center hospital bond. And while the bond did not pass, we are grateful for the discussion, participation, and support we have received.

As we look to the future, one thing will remain at the forefront of everything we do – our commitment to you. We are dedicated to providing the best care possible in the caring manner that comes naturally to our talented staff.

While our level of care will remain unchanged, the fact remains that our hospital is outdated. We will be evaluating how best to move forward and will continue to pursue options to construct a new facility.

That may include pursuing another bond in the future or looking at other means of financing. Our goal is to maintain the highest level of healthcare for this amazing community we serve.

Board of Trustees and Staff, Cascade Medical Center

source: The Star-News May 19, 2022
————–

Tips & Advice:

Knowing the signs of a stroke and getting help quickly can make all the difference, experts say

May 17, 2022 (Local News 8)

… Strokes are often identified by a sudden, severe headache, vision problems in one or both eyes, trouble walking, paralysis or numbness in the face or limbs, and trouble speaking or understanding others, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Experts use the acronym FAST (face, arms, speech, time to call the doctor) to describe what to do in the event of a stroke.

First, ask the person to smile and see if one side of their face drops. Then, ask them to lift both arms — note if one arm can’t raise or drifts downward. Third, check for slurred or strange speech by asking them to repeat a simple phrase.

If any of these raise concerns, seek emergency medical help immediately, the Mayo Clinic said.

full story:
—————

Scam Alert:

Scam emails demand Bitcoin, threaten blackmail

By Bridget Small US Federal Trade Commission

The FTC uses the information it gets from people who report scams to keep close watch on trends, so we can alert you to changes. Here’s one: reports of Bitcoin blackmail scams have taken a big jump in the last few weeks. The emails say they hacked into your computer and recorded you visiting adult websites. They threaten to distribute the video to your friends and family within hours, unless you pay into their Bitcoin account. Stop. Don’t pay anything. Delete the message. It’s a scam.

Based on the timing of this spike, you may get one of these messages because your email was exposed in a recent data breach. The scammers may say they have access to your computer or webcam, or installed clever software to defeat you. That’s all talk. But they may really know one of your old – or recent – passwords, and they include it in the message to prove it. When you see that, you know it’s time to update your password on that account, and consider updating other passwords, too.

If you, or someone you know, get a message like this, please report it to the FTC at (link).

source:
——————–

Public Lands:

Boise National Forest’s campground opening schedule

Recent weather conditions delay some campground openings.

Be safe and practice Leave No Trace Principles and Know Before You Go!

Boise, Idaho, May 16, 2022 — Boise National Forest visitors headed to the mountains should expect that spring conditions may be unpredictable! Recent snow may delay some campground openings and snow may be holding at higher elevations. Be prepared, take extra food, water and warm clothing. Remember, there is no cellphone service in the woods. Tell a friend or family member where you are going and when you plan to be back. Be safe and know before you go!

Please Practice Leave No Trace Principles:

* Plan Ahead and Prepare- know before you go. Do you have a Forest Map or Motor Vehicle Use Map?
* Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces
* Dispose of Waste Properly – whatever you pack in and pack out all trash
* Leave What You Find
* Minimize Campfire Impacts
* Respect Wildlife
* Be Considerate of Other Visitors

“We would like people to be patient as we work to open recreation sites. Recent weather has disrupted our schedules,” said Everardo Santillan, Boise National Forest Recreation program manager. “Campground openings may be delayed if they aren’t accessible for crews to inspect sites for public safety, take water samples, remove hazard trees and clean the sites.”

The Forest has more than 80 developed sites with the majority of campgrounds opening in time for the Memorial Day weekend. Campgrounds and roads in higher elevations are still closed due to remaining snowpack including Deadwood Reservoir, Bull Trout Campground and the Trinity Mountain Recreation area.

Maps can be purchased online at: (link); annual passes can be purchased online at: (link). Purchase Payette River Passes at (link).

Check the Alerts & Notices site for road and area closures: (link)  or the interactive Closure Story Map: (link).

Expected campground openings – weather and conditions permitting.

For reservations visit: (link). 1-877-444-6777

Idaho City Ranger District
208-392-6681
Scheduled Opening Reservation
Grayback Campground May 21 Yes
Grayback Campground Group Site May 21 Yes
Bad Bear Campground May 21 Yes
Hayfork Campground May 21 Yes
Edna Creek Campground May 21 Yes
Whoop Um Up Campground May21 No
Ten Mile Campground May 21 Yes
Black Rock Campground
(recent snow may delay opening)
May21 Yes
Riverside Campground May 21 No
Power Plant Campground
(recent snow may delay opening)
May21 No
Queens River Campground May 21 No
Willow Creek Campground May21 No
Lowman Ranger District
208-259-3361
Scheduled Opening Reservation
Pine Flats Campground May 21 Yes
Little Deadwood Campground May 21 No
Mountain View Campground May 21 Yes
Park Creek Campground May 21 Yes
Kirkham Hot Springs (Day Use Only 7 a.m.- 9 p.m.) May 21 NA
Helende Campground May 21 Yes
Bonneville Campground May 21 Yes
Bull Trout Campground June 19 Yes
Deer Flat Campground June 19 No
Bear Valley Campground June 19 No
Fir Creek Campground June 19 No
Barney’s Campground June 19 Yes
Cozy Cove Campground June 19 Yes
Hower’s Campground June 19 Yes
Riverside Campground June 19 Yes
Emmett Ranger District
208-365-7000
Scheduled Opening Reservation
Hot Springs Campground May 6 No
Hot Springs Group Campground May 27 Yes
Tie Creek Campground May 6 No
Rattlesnake Campground May 13 Yes
Peace Valley Group Campground May 27 Yes
Hardscrabble Campground May 13 No
Trail Creek Campground May 13 No
Boiling Springs Campground May 20 No
Big Eddy Campground May 6 No
Swinging Bridge Campground May 27 Yes
Canyon Creek Campground May 20 No
Cold Springs Group Campground May 27 Yes
Silver Creek Campground May 15 Yes
Antelope Campground May 27 Yes
Antelope Annex Campground May 20 No
Sage Hen Creek Campground May 27 Yes
Cartwright Ridge Campground May 23 No
Hollywood Campground May 20 No
Eastside Campground May 20 Yes

 

Mountain Home Ranger District
208-392-6681
Scheduled Opening Reservation
Curlew Creek Campground May 15 No
Pine Campground May 15 No
Castle Creek Campground May 15 No
Evans Creek Campground May 15 No
Spillway Campground May 15 No
Elks Flat Campground (sites may be impacted by timber sale cleanup through June) May 15 Yes
Dog Creek Campground (may be closed after Memorial Day for public safety through June) May 15 Yes
Tailwaters Campground May 15 No
Cottonwood Campground May 15 No
Willow Creek Campground May 15 No
Badger Creek Campground May 15 No
Troutdale Campground May 15 No
Shafer Butte Campground June 15 Yes
Big Trinity Lake Campground July 15 No
Little Roaring River Lake Campground July 15 No
Big Roaring River Lake Campground July 15 No
Cascade Ranger District
208-387-7400
Scheduled Opening Reservation
Amanita Campground May 20 Yes
Rainbow Campground May 20 Yes
French Creek Campground May 20 Yes
South Fork Salmon River Campground May 20 No
Penny Springs Campground May 20 No
Picnic Point Campground May 20 Yes
Shoreline Campground May 20 Yes
Shoreline Group Campground May 20 Yes
Warm Lake Campground May 20 No
Summit Lake Campground May 20 No
Penn Basin Campground May 20 No
Buck Mountain Campground May 20 No
Trout Creek Campground May 20 No
Ice Hole Campground May 20 No
Golden Gate Campground May 20 No
Yellow Pine Campground May 20 No

Boise National Forest offices are planning to reopen offices the second week in June. Until then, they continue to provide services virtually. Contact our Ranger District offices or 208-373-4100 for more information and please follow Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines.
— — — — — — — — — —

Camping Stay Limits Changed to 14 days on the Payette National Forest

McCall, Idaho, May 19, 2022 – The Payette National Forest has revised the camping stay limit from 18 days to 14 days. This 14-day stay limit is the norm for most campgrounds throughout the county and is consistent with neighboring National Forests and state land agencies.

Due to the increased number of outdoor visitors to the Forest, the revised stay limit is necessary to ensure camping opportunities are available for a greater number of people. The previous stay limit allowed for a person or group to stay in the same spot over a three-weekend timeframe. In recent years, this often led to people not being able to find an available camping spot. The reduce stay limit will enhance recreation experiences by providing more turnover in parking and camping opportunities, and more opportunities to use popular camping areas.

Forest staff will emphasize educating and informing forest visitors of the new stay limit duration in the hope of avoiding violations. Publications and signs will be updated over the course of the summer.

To view the 14-day Stay Limit Forest Order. Follow this link:
For more information, please email Emily Simpson, Recreation Specialist at emily.simpson@usda.gov
— — — —

Know Before You Go

Boise National Forest May 19, 2022

We are introducing our “Know Before You Go” series of posts, which will consist of weekly tips focused on how to recreate responsibly on the Boise NF.

The topic this week is the Camping Stay Limit Rule. This rule states that forest visitors may camp 14 days at a campsite within a 28-day period.

This applies regardless of whether the campsite is occupied with people (unattended camping equipment will still accrue days). Both dispersed and developed campsites are subject to this Stay Limit. In order to “reset” the Stay Limit, campers must move to a campsite at least 5 miles away, or 25 miles for NFS lands closer to urban interfaces (see Area 1 map on attached Order)

The Stay Limit Order is in place to manage the impact we have on the national forest. Even small-scale disturbances can have lasting effects in an area, and our job is to ensure the land remains healthy and enjoyable for the current and future generations.

link: to Order and map (FB)
— — — — — — — — — —

Bureau of Land Management fuelwood permits now available online

Date: May 16, 2022
Contact: Mike Williamson mwilliamson@blm.gov 208-384-3393

Boise, Idaho – Beginning May 16, personal use fuelwood cutting permits can be purchased online for use on the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Boise District. Permits can also be purchased in-person at either the Owyhee Field Office located at 20 1st Ave. W. in Marsing, ID or the Boise District Office located at 3948 Development Ave. in Boise. Those choosing to buy an online fuelwood permit must be able to print the regulations and load tags which are required to be attached to the fuelwood during transport.

Personal fuelwood permits for BLM-managed lands south of the Snake River cost $10 and allows for removal of up to 10 cords. Permits for the BLM-lands north of the Snake River cost $25 for a total of two cords, with the option to purchase additional one cord permits for $12.50 each. All fuelwood permits are valid until Nov. 30, 2022, a one-month extension from previous years to be more in-line with adjoining land management agencies.

Personal use fuelwood permits are only valid for BLM lands administered by the Boise District and are not valid on US Forest Service lands.

To purchase a fuelwood permit online:
1. Go to (link)
2. Click on Idaho
3. Select either the Owyhee Field Office for BLM lands south of the Snake River, or Four Rivers Field Office for BLM lands north of the Snake River up to New Meadows.
4. Select Fuelwood.
5. Complete and submit the application.
6. Enter your credit/debit card information. Your payment will be processed within minutes, and you will then print your permit, regulations, and tags.

Maps will be provided upon purchase depicting harvest areas for and certain special use areas where firewood harvesting is prohibited. No resale or other commercial use of the wood is allowed.

As a reminder, campers may collect a small amount of “dead and down” wood for immediate use at a campsite without a permit.

To minimize the risk of starting a wildfire, permittee must comply with current fire restrictions. Woodcutters must have a shovel and fire extinguisher ready for immediate use and chainsaws must be equipped with a functioning spark arrestor.

For more information call the BLM Boise District Office at 208-384-3300
——————–

Critter News:

Wildlife Warning: Bears, mountain lions making the rounds in parts of Blaine County

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, May 19th 2022

The bears. The mountain lions.

They are out and about roaming the hills and mountains in Blaine County. A black bear has been making frequent calls to neighborhood trash cans. And there have been several reports of pet cats being killed by mountain lions.

Oh, and aggressive coyotes, too.

… Fish and Game says Idaho residents who live close to wildlife have a responsibility.

“Allowing wildlife like moose, bears, and lions to become comfortable living in your neighborhood inevitably results in conflict and often leads to unfavorable outcomes for wildlife we all treasure here in Idaho,” Fish and Game says. “When a bear or lion learns that walking across your yard or deck is OK, it will continue that behavior. By doing nothing, wildlife learns that people are harmless and that making daily walks around your house is both acceptable and potentially rewarding if they find food or shelter.”

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Avian flu moving through Idaho, kills more than 50 birds at Kuna animal sanctuary

Avian influenza is killing birds across the state, according to Idaho Fish and Game. Dominifarm Animal Sanctuary in Kuna has seen the severity first hand.

Andrew Baertlein May 19, 2022 KTVB

… Bird flu is moving through Idaho, and is especially prevalent in the Treasure Valley, Idaho Fish and Game wrote in a press release. The virus has no treatment or vaccine and must run its course.

“We are aware sick and dead birds are being seen by the public in many ponds, irrigation ditches, etc., especially in the Treasure Valley, and we do not know how long this avian influenza outbreak will last,” said Fish and Game’s Wildlife Health Program Coordinator Stacey Dauwalter. “Infected geese, ducks, and other birds will continue to be found until the outbreak has abated.”

People should leave sick birds alone and wash their hands if they touch any bird, according to Fish and Game. It is not common for people to catch the avian flu.

… Fish and Game encourages the public to report sick or dead wild birds in an effort to monitor the avian flu spread.

full story:
— — — —

see also:

F&G aware of numerous wild bird die-offs related to Avian Influenza

link: (F&G website)
— — — —

World Center for Birds of Prey adjusting to protect endangered species from bird flu

The avian influenza is spreading through the Gem State, according to Idaho Fish and Game. The raptors at Birds of Prey are at risk of catching the deadly virus.

Andrew Baertlein May 20, 2022 KTVB

The World Center for Birds of Prey (WCBP) has removed wild bird feeders from their property in an effort to keep their rare and endangered species safe from the avian influenza outbreak making its way through Idaho.

“We are really relying on the Idaho Department of Fish and Game to be our guide as we move through this process,” WCBP Vice President of Education and Outreach, Erin Katzner said. “Nothing is coming up on the hill that we don’t want up here.”

Idaho Fish and Game (IDFG) has not declared any formal guidance to remove bird feeders; however, it can be a good idea out of an abundance of caution to remove bird feeders in an effort to mitigate virus spread.

continued:
——————

Fish and Game News:

During the spring wildlife baby boom, young animals are better off left alone

By Brian Pearson, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, May 19, 2022

Spring is here, and so is the peak of baby wildlife season. People are bound to see young wildlife when they venture outdoors during the spring and early summer, and there is a pretty good chance that they will see a baby animal that appears to be alone, with mom nowhere in sight.

While a well-intentioned human’s first instinct might be to rescue these cute, cuddly and seemingly helpless creatures, Fish and Game officials have a simple suggestion to people who discover baby animals that appear to be abandoned: The best thing you can do for them is to leave them be.

Every spring, Fish and Game receives calls from well intentioned humans who have “rescued” baby animals that they assume have been lost, abandoned or orphaned. While these people typically mean well, they are often doing more damage than good when they intervene, and typically, mom was not far away to begin with.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Results available for moose, bighorn sheep and mountain goat controlled hunt drawing

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, May 19, 2022

Hunters can check results immediately online

Hunters who applied for controlled hunts for moose, bighorn sheep and mountain goat hunts can see if they drew a tag by going to the controlled hunt results webpage. Any hunter may also still apply for moose through the Super Hunt drawing, and the deadline to apply for the first Super Hunt drawing is May 31.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Bears are out of their dens and mountain lions continue to be seen throughout the Wood River Valley

By Terry Thompson, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, May 19, 2022

It’s everyone’s responsibility to keep wildlife wild by not allowing wildlife to take up residence inside communities

Fish and Game has begun to get increasing reports of black bears looking for and finding food in residential neighborhoods. The key to keeping Idaho bears wild is to not allow them to access human food around neighborhoods, homes or your campsite.

After spending the winter months hibernating, black bears have now emerged from their dens. Once out of their dens, they are very hungry. Bears will immediately start looking for food, mostly spring grasses, but in reality, they will pretty much eat anything that can provide easy calories.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Weekly Salmon Fishing Update – May 18, 2022

By Chris Sullivan, Anadromous Fisheries Coordinator
Thursday, May 19, 2022

Welcome to our weekly Chinook Salmon Fishing Update. Throughout the next several months we will provide updates on changes to seasons and rules and share data from dam counts, creel surveys, and hatchery returns to help anglers plan their salmon fishing trips.

Fishing is picking up in the Clearwater and Lower Salmon Rivers so be sure to check out this week’s update.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Are Crows the Ultimate Problem Solvers?

BBC Earth


—————

Seasonal Humor:

CampingHomeless-a
[h/t CP]

CovidDating
[h/t CP]
——————

Idaho History May 22, 2022

Mysterious Death at Cabin Creek

Orlando Mel Abel

(Lower Big Creek)

Cabin Creek Area Map

MapCabinCreek-a

“Cabin Creek is listed in the Streams Category for Valley County in the state of Idaho. Cabin Creek is displayed on the “Vinegar Hill” USGS topo map quad.”

source: TopoZone Valley County, Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

Cabin Creek

The Caswell Brothers, Lu, Ben, Dan and Cort established the Cabin Creek ranch 15 miles west of the mouth of Big Creek where it joins the Middle Fork of the Salmon. The Caswells sold the ranch to John Conyers in 1902 and returned to mining at Thunder Mountain. In 1910, Conyers sold the ranch to O.M. Ables [sic] and John Routson. Ables [sic] eventually patented the land in 1913. Two other homesteads were established before 1920: Elizabeth Bellingham and Archie Bacon.

O.M. Ables [sic] met with a mysterious death in 1920, after sufferings a blow to the head. A bloody hay knife was found in a nearby beaver dam, but no one was accused nor convicted. The Payette Lake Star reported a story in Dec. 1919, that Mr. Ables [sic] was gored to death by a bull.

from: “Backcountry Homesteads” by C. Eugene Brock, “Valley County Idaho Prehistory to 1920”, Valley County History Project
— — — — — — — — — —

Mel Abel

In December 1919 Mel Abel was found dead at his ranch. “Four men were sent to retrieve the body. It took them 19 days, using skis and snowshoes to reach Cabin Creek and pull a sled with the body back to civilization.”

from: Ron Water’s review of “Cabin Creek Chronicle”

MelAbelBody-aMel Abel’s body (Idaho Historical Society)
— — — — — — — — — —

Orlando Mel Abel

Abel and Routson bought the Cabin Creek place in 1910, but disagreements caused Routson to move up to the Yardley/Beal/Moore Ranch. O.M. (Orlando Mel) Abel retired from the Rail Road and was a 32 degree Mason. He protested his sister’s filing on the upper Cabin creek homestead. He was killed in 1920.

The Masons hired men to bring Abel’s body to Cascade. They were Claude Jordan, Glen Morris, and Johnny Williams from Big Creek.

from: “The Big Creek Area”, by Catherine M. Gillihan, “Valley County Prehistory to 1920” by the Valley County History Project
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho County Free Press. February 05, 1920, Page 1

19200212ICFPAbel1High Railroad Man Murdered on Big Creek, Claim

19200212ICFPAbel2Body Of Official Hidden In Stack Of Hay, Is Report From Valley Co.
O. B. Able, Prominent Mason of San Jose, Cal., Is Said to Have Met Foul Death
Killing Is Declared to Have Occurred on Big Creek, Just Across Idaho County Line

O. B. Able [sic], a prominent railroad official of San Jose, Cal., and a high Mason, is reported to have been foully murdered on Big creek, in Valley county, just across the Idaho county line, and his body hidden in a hay stack. Reports of the killing were received by way of Cascade, from which town a party has set out to penetrate the mountain wilderness and determine whether the story of the killing is authentic, and whether the body of Able is in such condition that it can be taken to Walla Walla, Wn., for burial.

The place where Able is declared to have met death is ninety miles north and east of Cascade, and at this season of the year is to be reached only by use of snowshoes and sledges.

First Report of Death

Six weeks ago word was received in Cascade that Able was killed by being gored to death by a bull, but recent developments indicate that he was murdered. Name of the alleged murder has not been revealed.

Dr. Ben F. Hall, a Mason, of Walla Walla, last week was sent to Cascade to investigate the killing of Able.

Able was prominently connected with railroad affairs in the west, and had offices in San Jose, Cal. For perhaps seven years he had owned a ranch in the Big creek country, in the almost inaccessible interior of Idaho, and was accustomed to spend his winters on the ranch, caring for his purebred cattle, of which he was a breeder. He went to his ranch last fall.

Several weeks ago word was received at Cascade that Able had been killed by a bull. Rigorous winter weather, however, prevented those who were said to have found the body from packing it to Cascade.

Sister Demands Probe

Recently a sister of Able [sic] arrived at Cascade from San Jose, and arranged for a crew, headed by Dan Drake and John Williams, of Knox, to start for the interior on snowshoes and bring out the body. The crew at last reports had not returned to Cascade, though long overdue.

Since departure of the searchers from Cascade, the murder theory has been advanced, perhaps due to rumors received at the Valley county seat from the interior country.

Walla Walla Masons, who were well acquainted with Able, have assumed the burden of the investigation for the fraternity.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 05 Feb. 1920.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho County Free Press. February 12, 1920, Page 1

19200212ICFPAbel3Abel’s Body Taken From Hiding Place in Big Creek Region
Corpse Of Rancher And Rail Road Man Conveyed To Walla Walla

Mystery surrounding the death of O. M. Abel, railroad man and rancher, whose body was found in a stack of hay, on Big creek, in Valley county, just across the Idaho county line, has not been cleared.

Abel was believed by some to have been murdered, while others are of the opinion he was gored to death by a bull.

In a telegram received by the Free Press, late Wednesday from the Cascade News, at Cascade, it is said the body of Abel had been removed to Cascade and from there transported to Walla Walla, Wa., for burial.

Text of Telegram

“A letter signed by three men, one of whom found the body,” the telegram reads, “says death of Abel is believed to have been caused by a bull. No inquest was held in Valley county. The body was taken from here to Nampa and prepared for shipment from there to Walla Walla, Wa., for burial. In an autpsy [sic] was held at Nampa, we have not been able to learn the facts. The body was turned over at Cascade to a representative of Abel’s Masonic lodge and the dead man’s sister.”

Abel was a friend and old school mate of L. M. Harris of this city. The article in last week’s Free Press concerning the death of Abel was the first word Mr. Harris had received of the tragedy.

Harris Has Photograph

Mr. Harris and Abel resided in Villisea, Ia., in their younger days. They attended dances together and were the best of friends. Mr. Harris has a photograph taken of Abel many years ago.

After Abel acquired the ranch on Big Creek, Mr. Harris received letters from him.

“I am not satisfied with the story that Abel was killed by a bull,” asserted Mr. Harris, Wednesday. “I know he had trouble with ranchers in the Big Creek country over the grazing of livestock, and I am of the opinion that he was murdered.

Once Lived in Baker

Abel left Iowa in the 90s, and engaged in railroad work in the west. He was for a number of years located at Baker City, Ore.

If Abel was murdered, as is the opinion of many familiar with the difficulties he had with ranchers in the Big Creek country, an effort is being made to cover up the matter. Probably the manner in which he met death will never be known.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 12 Feb. 1920.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho County Free Press. February 19, 1920, Page 1

19200212ICFPAbel4Blame Stranger For Abel Death; Rancher Slain By Blunt Instrument
Struck Three Times Over The Forehead and Once Near Ear Examination of Body Shows
Corpse, Frozen Solid, Thawing When Taken to Undertaking Parlors in Nampa

That O. M. Abel, rancher and railroad man, who met mysterious death in the Big creek section, just across the Idaho county line in Valley county, was killed by four blows from a blunt instrument, inflicted by a stranger with whom Abel had trouble, is the belief expressed following examination of the body recently in an undertaking establishment in Nampa. The body, frozen, was packed from Abel’s ranch on Big creek ninety miles to Cascade, and thence was taken to Nampa, for preparation for transportation to Walla Walls, where it was buried. Early reports were that Abel had been gored to death by a bull.

Warrants For Arrests

Reports reaching the Free Press within the last few days declare a case has been built up around circumstantial evidence, and that warrants have been issued for arrests in connection with the killing of Abel.

Dr. Ben F. Hill, who was sent to Cascade by Masons of Walla Walla to investigate the killing and take charge of the body, met at Cascade the party of men who went to Big Creek to remove the body. The body was thawed out in the establishment of a Nampa undertaker, and after eight hours was in perfect condition, appearing as though life had become extinct only a few hours before.

Information given authorities in south Idaho indicates that Abel was murdered, instead of having been killed by a bull. It is reported that an old-time mountaineer, residing near Abel’s cabin, told of an altercation between Abel and a stranger, who entered the Big creek country last summer on the pretense of cooking for fire fighters. The man was seen leaving Abel’s cabin on the day of Abel’s death.

Relates “Bull” Story

On the same day the man went to the nearest neighbor’s place and said that Abel had been killed by a bull. Two men then went to Abel’s ranch and found the body just inside the open gate of the feedyard. Investigation showed that death was caused by a narrow blunt instrument, with which Abel had been hit three times over the forehead, and one blow over one of his ears had pierced the skull. A hayknife, laying near where the body was discovered, was believed to have been the weapon used to kill Abel, as its width exactly corresponds with width of indentations on the victim’s skull.

Warrants are out for arrests, which it is expected will be made within a few days. Abel was a high Mason.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 19 Feb. 1920.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho County Free Press. April 08, 1920, Page 1

19200408ICFP3On Death Of Abel

While in the mountain country [taking the federal census], Mr. Davis had the opportunity of informing himself on the mysterious killing of O. M. Abel, last winter, on Big creek. Mr. Abel, a rancher, was reported to have been killed by a bull, but circumstances pointed to murder. The bull, which is said to have gored Mr. Abel to death, was a yearling and was dehorned, said Mr. Davis. A man in the employ of Mr. Abel was arrested and taken to Cascade, seat of Valley county, for a hearing. Rumor has it in the mountains that more than one man was implicated in the killing of Abel.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 08 April 1920.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Oakley Herald. April 09, 1920, Page 1

In The Gem State

19200409OH2
C. A. McDermand has been arrested charged with the murder of O. M. Abel, who was found with his head beaten to a pulp on December 15 near Deep Creek [Big Creek] McDermand denies killing Able.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 09 April 1920.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Bull or Murder?

[Archie] Bacon had been living on and homesteaded above Abel on Cabin Creek, but went out to educate his two girls, Ruth and Mary. Ed James, a famed cougar hunter and guide, moved onto the place with his wife.

Ed James was accused of Abel’s murder.

Ed James said every time Abel passed that bull he would jab it with pitch fork or shovel, and the bull pawed the ground every time Abel approached. James said Abel was the meanest man that he ever met.

from: “The Big Creek Area”, by Catherine M. Gillihan, “Valley County Prehistory to 1920” by the Valley County History Project
——————

Further Reading

Valley County Idaho Prehistory to 1920” by the Valley County History Project Link: book at Amazon:
Link: Cabin Creek History
Link: Big Creek – Edwardsburg History (Table of Contents)
——————-

page updated September 17, 2022

Road Reports May 22, 2022

It is Rock Migration Season. Please share road reports. Spring travel conditions. Most back country roads are not maintained. This time of year there is deep snow in higher elevations. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: Local streets were “dragged” Tuesday (May 17th.) Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Hwy 55 Construction Update from ITD May 12, 2022
Starting Monday, May 16, closures on SH-55 between Smiths Ferry and the Rainbow Bridge will shorten from 4-hour closures to 2-hour closures. The new schedule will be 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Monday – Thursday, and will continue through Thursday, May 26. Outside of those closures, there will still be one-way, alternating traffic with 15-minute delays.
Drivers should still anticipate longer delays once the road reopens at 12 p.m. to allow flaggers to clear queues on either side of the work zone. Once those lines are cleared, there should not be wait times longer that 15 minutes.
To learn more about the spring construction schedule, visit link:
Update from ITD May 19, 2022
Construction closures will end May 27 on Idaho 55 near Smiths Ferry.
One-way alternating traffic is set to replace closures from 10 a.m. to noon on Mondays through Fridays.
Both lanes will be open Friday mornings through Sundays.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Friday (May 20) road was clear.
Report Wednesday (May 18) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open – weight limits are no longer in effect.
Report Friday (May 20) road was clear, hardly any rocks and no debris.
Report Wednesday (May 18) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Friday (May 20) road was clear and smooth.
Report Wednesday (May 18) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.

Upper Johnson Creek Road (Trail): Closed to wheeled vehicles.
No current report.
Lower Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (May 11) the county graded most of the lower end.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled travel
Report Wednesday (May 11) a backhoe is working on the lower end on this side.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Closed to full sized vehicles at the junction with Profile Creek.
Old report Wednesday (April 6): from Perpetua “As Spring has arrived, snow and ice on the Stibnite road are beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Perpetua Resources crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Perpetua Resources crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
“We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road starting week of March 21st. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.” – Sam
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:
————-

Weather Reports May 15-21, 2022

May 15 Weather:

At 930am it was 46 degrees and mostly clear. At 1215pm it was mostly hazy and warming up. Getting breezy by 125pm. Strong gusty at 230pm. At 3pm it was 71 degrees, mostly hazy and breezy. At 8pm it was 65 degrees, dark overcast and slight breeze, feels a bit humid. At 11pm thick dark clouds and light breezes. At 120am raining pretty good, it had been raining for a while. Not raining at 430am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 16, 2022 at 09:30AM
Partly cloudy, light breeze
Max temperature 74 degrees F
Min temperature 44 degrees F
At observation 52 degrees F
Precipitation 0.02 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

May 16 Weather:

At 930am it was 52 degrees, partly cloudy and light breeze. At 12pm mostly cloudy. At 3pm it was 69 degrees, nearly overcast, a bit humid and flag flapping breezes. At 815pm it was 60 degrees, lighter breezes and nearly overcast. At 11pm the sky looked hazy. At 130am looked like thicker clouds.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 17, 2022 at 09:30AM
Almost clear, light breeze
Max temperature 71 degrees F
Min temperature 33 degrees F
At observation 48 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

May 17 Weather:

At 930am it was 48 degrees, almost clear sky (a little thin haze) and light breeze. At 1230pm it was mostly hazy. At 245pm it was 68 degrees, milky-blue sky (thin haze) and light cool breezes. At 810pm it was 60 degrees and hazy sky. At 11pm it looked hazy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 18, 2022 at 09:30AM
Overcast, light breeze
Max temperature 70 degrees F
Min temperature 34 degrees F
At observation 46 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

May 18 Weather:

At 930am it was 46 degrees, overcast and light breeze. At 1pm it was 55 degrees, overcast, breezy and a few sprinkles. Pretty good gusts around 220pm. At 325pm it was 47 degrees, dark overcast, steady light rain continues and breezy. At 755pm it was 47 degrees, dark overcast, still raining lightly and calmer. Not raining at 925pm. At 1045pm it was 44 degrees, cloudy but not raining.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 19, 2022 at 09:30AM
Mostly cloudy, breezy
Max temperature 58 degrees F
Min temperature 39 degrees F
At observation 44 degrees F
Precipitation 0.08 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

May 19 Weather:

At 930am it was 44 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy. At 1pm it was 44 degrees, overcast and breezy. Socked in to the floor and snowing at 245pm for about 10 minutes. Ridges visible by 3pm. At 4pm it was 43 degrees, quite gusty, nearly overcast and spitting graupel for about 10 minutes. Another short episode of graupel around 520pm. At 820pm it was 37 degrees, mostly cloudy, flaking snow (probably started earlier and didn’t last long) and light breeze. At 1030pm it looked cloudy, ridges visible.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 20, 2022 at 09:30AM
Mostly cloudy, light breeze
Max temperature 48 degrees F
Min temperature 32 degrees F
At observation 40 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

May 20 Weather:

At 930am it was 40 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breeze. At 1230pm mostly cloudy and a bit breezy. At 340pm it was 54 degrees, mostly cloudy and nearly calm. At 8pm it was 49 degrees, overcast and a bit breezy. At 1030pm it looked cloudy, ridges visible.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 21, 2022 at 09:30AM
Dark overcast, breezes
Max temperature 57 degrees F
Min temperature 31 degrees F
At observation 42 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

May 21 Weather:

At 930am it was 42 degrees, dark overcast and a bit breezy. Started raining before 1220pm, not raining at 1240pm (things are damp.) Short light sprinkle around 130pm. Breaks in the clouds by 2pm. At 315pm it was 52 degrees and overcast. By 335pm getting breezy, lower clouds and rain shower commenced. Raining pretty good at 4pm. Not raining and sucker hole at 630pm with fog belts mid mountain (not sure when it stopped) At 8pm it was 42 degrees, starting to mist a little, nearly overcast and slight breeze. At 11pm it looked cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 22, 2022 at 09:30AM
Mostly clear to partly cloudy, light breeze
Max temperature 53 degrees F
Min temperature 30 degrees F
At observation 42 degrees F
Precipitation 0.26 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
—————————–

Road Reports May 18, 2022

It is Rock Migration Season. Please share road reports. Spring travel conditions. Most back country roads are not maintained. This time of year there is deep snow in higher elevations. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: Local streets were “dragged” Tuesday (May 17th.) Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Hwy 55 Construction Update from ITD May 12, 2022
Starting Monday, May 16, closures on SH-55 between Smiths Ferry and the Rainbow Bridge will shorten from 4-hour closures to 2-hour closures. The new schedule will be 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Monday – Thursday, and will continue through Thursday, May 26. Outside of those closures, there will still be one-way, alternating traffic with 15-minute delays.
Drivers should still anticipate longer delays once the road reopens at 12 p.m. to allow flaggers to clear queues on either side of the work zone. Once those lines are cleared, there should not be wait times longer that 15 minutes.
We appreciate your patience as we move through another spring season of construction work. To learn more about the spring construction schedule, visit link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (May 18) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Wednesday (May 18) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Wednesday (May 18) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.

Upper Johnson Creek Road (Trail): Closed to wheeled vehicles.
No current report.
Lower Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (May 11) the county graded most of the lower end.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled travel
Report Wednesday (May 11) a backhoe is working on the lower end on this side.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images) Working again!!
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Closed to full sized vehicles at the junction with Profile Creek.
Old report Wednesday (April 6): from Perpetua “As Spring has arrived, snow and ice on the Stibnite road are beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Perpetua Resources crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Perpetua Resources crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
“We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road starting week of March 21st. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.” – Sam
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:
Valley County Road & Bridge Announcements
Road Break-Up Limits in Effect Until further notice, break-up limits are now in effect:
* 7 tons per axle,
* 80,000 lbs maximum
————-

May 15, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

May 15, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Note: If you are not receiving the YPTimes emails, check your spam folder.
—————————

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
Oct 27, 2021 – Transfer Station on Winter Schedule
Nov 1, 2021 – Winter Mail Delivery Starts
2022
May – Spring Rx burns
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit Season
May 15 thru Nov 30 – Firewood Season
May 28 – Memorial Potluck 2pm Community Hall
May 29 – YPFD Pancake Breakfast 830am Community Hall
May 29 – YPFD meeting at 2pm Community Hall
Jun 8-11 – Spring Free Dump Days
Jun 11 – VYPA Meeting 2pm Community Hall
Jul 2 – 4th of July golf tournament
Jul 3 – YPWUA Shareholders Meeting
Jul 9 – VYPA Meeting 2pm Community Hall
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

May 15, through Nov. 30, 2022 Firewood Season

Personal use fuelwood permits for the Boise National Forest will be available for sale at The Corner beginning May 15, through Nov. 30, 2022.
— — — —

Memorial Potluck Saturday May 28th

Memorial Potluck at the Community Hall. Burgers and Brats provided. Please bring a side dish if you would like.

Stay tuned for more details…


— — — —

YPFD Pancake Breakfast May 29

YPFD will have a Pancake Breakfast, “Come Meet Your Commissioner” May 29, 2022 at 8:30 AM at the Community Hall
— — — —

YPFD meeting May 29

There will be a Fire Commissioners Meeting May 29 at 2pm at the Community Hall.
— — — —

Krassel RD Prescribed Burns Spring 2022

The Krassel Ranger District plans to apply fire to approximately 2,500 acres within the Bald Hill project area (east of Yellow Pine); 2,000 acres in the Four Mile project area along the South Fork of the Salmon River near the Miners peak trail, and 70 acres around Krassel Work Center.
Ignitions may occur over 2-7 days in the months of March through May Flame, smoke and hazards may be present in the area until significant precipitation or season ending weather is received. If you have any questions or comments please contact Dave Hogen Krassel District Ranger at 208-634-0600

(Same map from last fall.)
— — — —

Spring Free Dump Days

June 8, 9, 10, and 11 for Valley County
— — — —

Golf Tournament July 2nd

The annual 4th of July golf tournament will be on Saturday, July 2nd at 10(ish). All proceeds will be used to improve the golf course (improving the greens, signs and tees. More information to follow. Contact Joel or Marj Fields with questions, sponsorships or donations at fieldsmarjie @ yahoo.com


— — — —

YPWUA Shareholders Meeting July 3rd

The yearly shareholders meeting will be Sunday July 3rd at 10am. There will be two positions up for elections.

There has been some question on who can vote and can run for office. You must be a shareholder with the Yellow Pine Water Users Association to be able to vote and run for office. If you have any questions about being a shareholder, please contact me.

Thank you – Steve Holloway
———

Village News:

Mother’s Day Brunch

The Mother’s Day brunch was held at the Community Hall on Sunday May 8 at 12 noon. Food was provided. Donations appreciated. All donations will contribute to the village’s funds.

“Thank you to everyone who came to brunch! A big happy Mother’s Day to all of the wonderful mothers in our community!”

20220508MothersDay-aphoto courtesy HH

And Thank you to the folks who put on the brunch.
— — — —

Tuesday morning’s snow

20220510YellowPineWest-a

photo courtesy Eye-n-Sky

We had an inch and a half of snow on the ground Tuesday morning (May 10th) and another half an inch on Thursday morning (May 12th.)
— — — —

Yellow Pine Veterans’ Memorial

Spring cleanup time for our Yellow Pine Veterans’ Memorial. The elk had spent quite a bit of time visiting over the winter… now, if they’d just leave the flowers alone.

20220513VetsMemorial-aphoto courtesy CN
— — — —

State Burn permits required May 10th

Closed fire season begins May 10, which means Idahoans outside city limits will need a burn permit before burning any debris. The closed fire season lasts until Oct. 20.
— — — —

Watkins Pharmacy Update April 20th

Greetings! We will be painting the temp pharmacy in two weeks. There have to be some structural changes inside the space to ensure the pharmacy is secured and satisfy state regulations. In order to do that the new owner of the building, with his architect, have to have his building permit and plans approved by the city before we can modify anything under the permit. So we are probably looking at a date around June 1st at this point. Thank you for asking! Amber Watkins
— — — —

Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at wicap.org.
— — — —

Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
— — — —

Arnold Aviation News:

Customers New Deadline – Please email your shopping list by Sunday evening so they are ready to print early Monday morning.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
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Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Valley County Road & Bridge Announcements
Road Break-Up Limits in Effect Until further notice, break-up limits are now in effect:
* 7 tons per axle,
* 80,000 lbs maximum

Hwy 55 summer road closures reduced to 2 hours May 16, 2022
link:

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Closed to full sized vehicles at the junction with Profile Creek
from Perpetua “As Spring has arrived, snow and ice on the Stibnite road are beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Perpetua Resources crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Perpetua Resources crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
“We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road starting week of March 21st. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.” – Sam

Upper Johnson Creek road at Landmark, Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Elk Summit, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are closed to wheeled vehicles. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
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Critters

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be Elk Aware

Elk are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard. F&G confirms there is a pack of 6 wolves in our valley.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

Bears are out of hibernation and hungry.

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat had been hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started November 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report April 23: Bins emptied and transfer station cleaned by locals.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

Water Use

05/05/22 23427016 26439 24 1102 18 T 1114
05/06/22 23453555 26539 24 1106 18 F 100
05/07/22 23479603 26048 24 1085 18 S 491
05/08/22 23504902 25299 24 1054 18 S 749
05/09/22 23530420 25518 24 1063 18 M 219
05/10/22 23556919 26499 24 1104 18 T 981
05/11/22 23582736 25817 24 1076 18 W 682
05/12/22 23639804 27068 24 1128 19 T 1251
05/13/22 23636178 26374 24 1099 18 F 694
05/14/22 23663120 26942 24 1123 19 S 568
05/15/22 23689417 26297 24 1096 18 S 645

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

DRINKING WATER WARNING April 11, 2022
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 5-10-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

YPWUA 2022 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 3, 2022
YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 5, 2020 link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
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VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association:
Hailey Harris, Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Jen Aldrich, Secretary
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Ron Earl

April 6, 2022 Village Council meeting to fill vacant chairperson position (no minutes.)
Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.
2022 Meeting dates:
June 11
July 9
August 13
September 10

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Department

The Forest Service has requested a meeting with the Yellow Pine Fire Board on May 20, 2022 in Cascade at 1:30 PM. As a follow up to the POD’s (Potential Operational Delineations). The PODs process is more than drawing containers on a map; it is a cross-boundary, collaborative engagement that translates into operational strategies once fire is on the ground. PODS are fire management and planning units.

The Forest Service will set up a presentation to be given to the Village of Yellow Pine community at a later date.

Yellow Pine Fire Commissioners Meeting April 3, 2022

Officers In Attendance:
Bill McIntosh #3, Lorinne Munn #1, Tom Lanham #2, Tim Rogers Fire Chief, Ron Basabe Assistant Fire Chief, Ronda Rogers Secretary/Treasurer.
Others:  Sarah Lanham, Christy Harris Cecil Dallman, Tim and Jen Aldrich, Ginny Bartholomew, Leslie Jensen, Lynn Imel.

Meeting called to order at 2 PM; Visitors notified that there would be a comment period after the Commissioners Meeting.

Action Item: Approved of minutes from Prior meetings 2/24/2022 and 1/30/2022,    3/3 vote

Treasurer’s Report: 3/1/22 4 Battery For the Red Fire Truck $476.00, 3/3/22 Ed Staub Sons $39.72, 3/4/22 MTE letter $1.94, 3/18/22 MTE $95.16, 3/25/22 ICRMP 2nd payment $1245.00, 3/24/22 Conference & Membership $1700.00, Hotel $1328.00, 3/1/22 Deposit taxes $2008.97, 3/23/22 Deposit Taxes $174.29, Donation 500.00
Balance $23,131.73

Action Item: Commissioners approved all expenses, 3/3 vote

Discussion: Memorial Day Plans, Chairman Mclntosh would like to have brunch so the people of Yellow Pine could come and meet their Commissioner and talk to them about their concerns.

Discussion: Lorinne reported on the Commission Conference. Stronger Leadership For Resiliency and Challenging Times; by Silouan Green. Silouan was a very powerful speaker and talk about the Character of Leadership. The borad agreed that the Conference was very informational and important for them all to attend.

Discussion: Boise National Forest update; PODs overview. The PODs process is more than drawing containers on a map; it is a cross-boundary, collaborative engagement that translates into operational strategies once fire is on the ground. PODS are fire management and planning units.

Fire Chief’s Report:
The Red Truck has 4 new batteries and is back in working order.
Two fuel tanks have been found and can be purchased for $400.00 for both; just working on a place to put them.
Plans to have a website for the Fire Department to post all our activity, meetings, and trainings.
Training classes are in the planning stage; there will be 2 trainings per month in the summer months and 1 a month in the winter. There is also online training class also.
Cecil said we could make our own racks to dry our hoses after we use them. He is willing to help us build them.
Radios – need to locate all of the radios and have Alex Pellegrini condition them. Alex will be giving a training class on the radios and will be handing them back out.

Discussion: A safe at the firehouse – need a small safe at the firehouse to keep vehicle titles, other important documents.  Mike Amos said that he had one he would donate but his safe is too big. Chief Rogers will check on prices to purchase one.

Meeting Adjourned at 2:45 PM

Comment period started after the meeting.

Note: Minutes from the January 9th meeting have been submitted. See below for link to document.

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Meeting Minutes

Apr 3, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Feb 24, 2022 Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD New Commissioner’s Transition Meeting Link:
Nov 23, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Nov 8, 2021 – AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
Oct 31, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Oct 14, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Sep 27, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Sep 18, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Sep 11, 2021 – YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
Jul 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Jun 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sep 30, 2020 – YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 11, 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Spring hours:
Wednesday thru Monday (closed Tuesdays) 8am-8pm
Fire wood permits Available May 15th
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Winter Hours at the Tavern until May 15th
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Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed for the winter.
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Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Availability for 2022
*Note can book Idaho Residents now for Archery or put on a waiting list for Non Residents, will find out final allocations by April 18th.
2 on 1 Archery August 29th to September 4th *Lodge hunt / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Archery September 6th to September 12th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Rifle September 24th to September 30th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Wolf.
Spring Bear Hunt June 3rd to June 9th Group of 2 to 3 hunters *Lodge Hunt / Black Bear and Wolf.
See our website for more details. Or give us a call 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 452-4361
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watkins can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
Please help support local journalism and subscribe.
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (May 9) overnight low of 25 degrees. Yesterday’s snow and hail melted to 0.05″ water (may be under-catch due to breezes.) This morning it was 30 degrees at 930am, cracks in the overcast and patches of old snow and hail in the shade. A few finches, a hairy woodpecker and a male colombian ground squirrel visiting. Overcast and flaking snow at noon for a few minutes, then did it again an hour and a half later. Overcast, cool and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 46 degrees, about a 15-20 minuet graupel shower (little snow balls.) A few snowflakes falling at sunset, clouds sitting down on VanMeter Hill and light cold breezes. Overcast and light snowfall at sunset, cold breezes. Still snowing before midnight, about half an inch or more and socked in low. Still snowing after midnight, about an inch so far and below freezing.

Tuesday (May 10) overnight low of 26 degrees, yesterday’s snow measured 1 1/2″, melted to 0.11″ of water. This morning it was 32 degrees at 930am and partly cloudy with generous portions of blue sky and sunshine, new snow melting rapidly. Finches calling from the trees, 2 pine squirrels and a chipmunk visiting. Increasing clouds and new snow melted by lunch time. Overcast early afternoon and getting breezy. Mostly cloudy mid-afternoon (large dark cloud coming in from the west and patches of blue sky to the east) with lighter breezes, high of 50 degrees. Mostly cloudy just after sunset. Partly or mostly clear before midnight.

Wednesday (May 11) overnight low of 23 degrees. This morning it was 36 degrees at 930am, partly hazy, light breeze and heavy frost melting. Robins and finches calling, woodpecker drumming and vocal pine squirrel visiting. Mostly cloudy and warm at lunch time and light breezes. Mail truck made it in on time. Light sprinkles of rain for about half an hour mid-afternoon and low dark overcast. About half a dozen hummingbirds showed up with the rain. Patches of blue sky opened up about 20 minutes after the rain stopped and some sunshine, high of 55 degrees. Elk in the neighborhood at sunset. Mostly cloudy and breezy after sunset. Cloudy before midnight. Snow and possibly rain early morning.

Thursday (May 12) overnight low of 32 degrees. Early morning snow (and possibly rain) gave us 0.22″ of water in the gauge, there was still about half an inch of snow in the shade (possibly more?) and it was melting quickly. This morning it was 39 degrees at 930am and mostly cloudy with fog belts mid-mountain. Robins and a few finches calling. Colombian ground squirrels emerging from burrows. Dozens of finches and a few pine siskins along with 2 pine squirrels visiting. Hawk in the neighborhood chasing song birds. Mostly cloudy with cool breezes mid-afternoon, high of 52 degrees. Strong gust of wind hit around 7pm. Mostly cloudy and cool breezes after sunset. Cloudy before midnight with filtered moonlight. Rain after midnight.

Friday (May 13) overnight low of 32 degrees. Rain during the night and early morning added up to 0.18″ of water. This morning at 930am it was 42 degrees, partly clear sky and breezes gusting up at times. Lots of finches, several hummingbirds (including 1 black-chinned male,) and a mourning dove visiting. Partly cloudy and breezy after lunch time. Warm with chilly flag flapping breezes mid-afternoon and mostly cloudy, high of 53 degrees. After sunset it was mostly cloudy, calmer and robins calling. Cloudy before midnight. Raining by morning.

Saturday (May 14) overnight low of 38 degrees. Morning rain (so far) measured 0.04″. This morning it was 42 degrees at 930am, overcast with fog sitting on higher ridges and light rain containues to fall. Several finches, hummingbirds (a couple of male rufus and females and a black-chinned male,) a couple of male black-headed grosbeaks, a male evening grosbeak, a couple of male Lazuli Buntings, a small flock of brown-headed cowbirds, a few mourning doves and 2 arguing pine squirrels visiting, robins calling all over the neighborhood. Overcast and still raining at lunch time ending around 3pm. Hawk nailed a mourning dove, feathers scattered for several feet. Partly clear mid-afternoon. Jays calling from the trees. Clouded up and light rain for about half an hour late afternoon and breaks in the clouds, high of 57 degrees. Robins chirping. Warm and mostly cloudy with a few sprinkles after sunset. Some tree swallows have returned. Partly clear before midnight.

Sunday (May 15) overnight low of 31 degrees. Yesterday’s rain total = 0.14″. This morning it was 46 degrees at 930am and mostly clear. Tree swallows, jays, brown-headed cowbirds, black-headed and evening grosbeaks, hummingbirds, mourning dove, a pine squirrel, big fat ground squirrels and a chipmunk visiting. Mostly high thin haze at lunch time and warm. Gusty breezes early afternoon. Very warm by mid-afternoon, mostly hazy and breezy, high of 74 degrees! Dark overcast after sunset, slight breeze and feels a bit humid. Robins calling.
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Idaho News:

VCSAR Press Release

May 13, 2022

Beginning June 1st, 2022 there will be a Valley County Search and Rescue and EMS Team stationed in Yellow Pine. This Team will be comprised of a Nationally Registered Paramedic, a RN, EMT, and an EMR with others trained at different levels of basic Rescue Operations. Local volunteer team members have applied and been approved by the following agencies: VCSAR Board and membership, Valley County Sheriff’s Office, Cascade Rural Fire/EMS and in some cases, the State of Idaho Health and Welfare Division.

This Team will be a Part of Valley County Search and Rescue (VCSAR), it will also be associated with Cascade Rural Fire/EMS and will be providing responses to Search and Rescue, EMS, Technical Rescue, High and Low angle rope work, Extrication and limited SWIFT water rescue and other needed emergency services when available.

Jeff Forster is on the board with VCSAR and is the East Lieutenant. All Rescue apparatus and donated equipment from Yellow Pine Fire will be based at his home in Yellow Pine. There will not be an ambulance based out of Yellow Pine and no mechanism for transporting patients until a Paramedic ambulance arrives from Cascade. Should a patient need transport, response will continue to be coordinated with Life Flight and Ambulance through Cascade 911 Dispatch. Cascade’s Paramedic ambulance will continue in route to transport patients to the Yellow Pine’s Helispot should Life Flight be requested or to the hospital.

This Team will respond to 911 calls in Yellow Pine when available. Due to the limited number of qualified responders, their abilities and availability, we will not be able to guarantee a local response to calls for assistance 100% of the time. It’s important to dial 911 for any Emergency as soon as possible, allowing dispatch to notify the emergency responders to respond as soon as they receive the call for assistance. If a local team is not available in Yellow Pine to respond, the call will default to Cascade Rural Fire EMS to respond or Life Flight who are all dispatched through the 911 system if warranted.

Larry Scarborough
VCSAR Captain
208-860-8346
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Hwy 55 Update

Message from the Idaho Transportation Department (via the Valley County Sheriff’s Office FB page May 12, 2022)

Starting Monday, May 16, closures on SH-55 between Smiths Ferry and the Rainbow Bridge will shorten from 4-hour closures to 2-hour closures. The new schedule will be 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Monday – Thursday, and will continue through Thursday, May 26. Outside of those closures, there will still be one-way, alternating traffic with 15-minute delays.

Drivers should still anticipate longer delays once the road reopens at 12 p.m. to allow flaggers to clear queues on either side of the work zone. Once those lines are cleared, there should not be wait times longer that 15 minutes.

We appreciate your patience as we move through another spring season of construction work. To learn more about the spring construction schedule, visit (link).
— — — — — — — — — —

COVID-19 Updates: 373 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

May 13, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 373 new COVID-19 cases and 3 new deaths Friday. State-level case and hospital data are now being updated on the state dashboard on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, excluding holidays.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 447,913.

The state said 87 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 17,187, and 0 new case have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,934.

3 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,933.

full story: [Valley County 2,642 cases, 16 deaths.]
— — — —

Five new Valley County COVID-19 reported during week

By Tom Grote The Star-News May 12, 2022

Five new cases of COVID-19 were reported in Valley County last week by the county’s two hospitals.

The five new cases compared to nine new cases reported the previous week and the four new cases reported the prior week.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 2,702 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started in March 2020.

Thirteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health.

Clinics & Tests – McCall

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine offers the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines are offered for anyone age 5 and older.

Also available are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine boosters for ages 12 to 15 and to moderately or severely immunocompromised youths age 5 to 11.

Second booster doses are available for adults ages 50 years and older, people ages 12 years and older who are moderately or severely immunocompromised.

Patients should talk to their health care provider about their medical condition, and whether getting an additional primary shot is appropriate for them.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link) or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

Clinics & Tests – Cascade

Cascade Medical Center no longer offers the Pfizer vaccine. Those wishing to be given the Pfizer vaccine should contact St. Luke’s McCall or a local pharmacy.

The Cascade hospital offers a second booster shot of the Moderna vaccine to those over age 50 who received their first booster shot at least four months ago.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster. Call 208-382-4285 to schedule a time.

Take Home Tests

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital also provides free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

full story: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
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CMC bond promises more room for more services

$19 million proposal goes to voters Tuesday

(Note: This is the second of a two-week series on the $19 million bond issue proposed by Cascade Medical Center in Tuesday’s election.)

By Max Silverson The Star-News May 12, 2022

Leonard Isbell of Cascade recently met with cardiologist Dr. Steven Writer at the Cascade Medical Center, a visit that saved Isbell a trip to Boise.

Isbell, 70, previously visited Writer at the St. Alphonsus Heart Institute in Boise, but the doctor now makes monthly visits to Cascade to visit patients closer to home.

Writer typically sees about a dozen patients during each visit but would like to be able to make more visits to see more patients.

The hospital does not have the space to host more visits from Writer, or the other traveling clinics the center could provide, hospital CEO Tom Reinhardt said.

On Tuesday, voters in the hospital’s taxing district will be asked to approve a $19 million bond issue to help build a new hospital north of Cascade.

With more room, the hospital would provide clinics for dermatology, neurology, urology and specialized outpatient procedures, Reinhardt said.

The hospital currently provides primary care, family medicine, 24-hour emergency care, inpatient and rehabilitation services, mental health and physical therapy.

The hospital needs to be about twice its size to meet current demands, according to a study conducted by the consulting firm Wipfli. In addition, the population of Cascade and the surrounding area is expected to grow by as much as 14% in the next five years, the Wipfli study said.

The current hospital has two private rooms and four semi-private rooms that can fit two people each. The proposed facility would have six private rooms and two shared rooms.

The current clinic at the hospital has five examination rooms, while the proposed clinic would have 12 rooms.

Clinic visits have increased from 3,829 in 2016 to 5,333 in 2019, the Wipfli study said.

“We always find room for ER patients, but we rely on hospital rooms to host visiting specialists like Dr. Writer and that limits our ability to add specialists for visits,” Reinhardt said.

“That explains why we are now booking patients out farther to be seen for non-urgent issues,” he said.

The new hospital would add services like mammograms, colonoscopies, cataract surgeries and improved mental health services.

“We want people to be able to get what they need here locally, and not have to drive to Boise or even McCall, if they don’t have to,” Reinhardt said.

The board chose to expand only in areas that are in demand by residents of the area, he said.

“Our demographics are not maternity demographics, our community in Cascade and southern Donnelly, we are older,” he said.

About 43% of the City of Cascade population is over 60 years old, according to the 2020 US Census.

“When it comes to things like cataract surgeries and podiatry and colonoscopies, there’s absolutely enough volume in our end of the valley to support that,” Reinhardt said.

A study by Health Facilities Planning & Development estimated the Cascade hospital would see demand outpatient procedures like colonoscopies and cataract surgeries grow from 2,957 this year to 3,355 per year by 2030.

The current imaging department is 747 square feet, or about 25% smaller than it should be to meet current demand, according to the Wipfli study.

The number of total X-rays and other imaging services is estimated to grow by 690 scans per year over the 5,100 scans expected to be done this year, the Health Facilities study said.

The new hospital also would have a “safe room” for mental health patients where all items they could use to hurt themselves would be removed.

The facility would also include a decontamination room for patients exposed to fuel, pesticides, herbicides or other chemicals.

“Although infrequent, the standard of care is to include a decontamination room near the ER,” Reinhardt said.

The new building would see an expansion to the physical therapy department with six rooms and a large communal space.

Speech therapy and occupational therapy services would have their own rooms for the first time in the new building.

According to the Wipfli study, physical therapy appointments increased from 3,284 in 2016 to 3,825 in 2019.

The proposed hospital also would include space for a surgery suite that would not be finished.

“Depending on the end-cost of the project, there may be room in the bond to finish and equip the operating rooms,” Reinhardt said.

source: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — —

Cascade hospital vote Tuesday will require 66.7% majority

The Star-News May 12, 2022

Cascade voters go to the polls Tuesday to decide on whether to fund a $19 million bond to build a new 32,000 square foot Cascade Medical Center.

Voters in the Cascade Medical Center Hospital District can cast their ballots at American Legion Post No. 60 at 105 West Mill Street in Cascade or the Donnelly Bible Church at 159 Gestrin Street in Donnelly from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. depending on their precinct.

Ballots can also be cast early at the Valley Count Clerk’s Office at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade until Friday.

… The cost of the proposed bond would be in addition to the district’s current property taxes, which cost taxpayers about $69 per $100,000 in taxable assessed value per year. The taxing district which owns the hospital extends from Smiths Ferry on the south to south of Donnelly on the north and from Tamarack and West Mountain to Yellow Pine.

full story:
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Absentee ballots must be returned by 8 p.m. on Election Day

By Nicole Camarda May 10, 2022 KIVI

Ada County Elections is reminding voters to get their absentee ballots in the mail by May 11 in order for them to be processed and received by the Ada County Elections Office next week.

Absentee ballots for the Primary Election on May 17 must be returned to Ada County Elections by 8 p.m. on Election Day.

continued: [Note: Deadline is 8pm May 17 for Valley County.]
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ATV stolen from construction site near Smith’s Ferry

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, May 10th 2022


Stolen ATV. (Courtesy Valley County Sheriff)

An ATV was stolen from the construction site on Highway 55 near Smiths Ferry.

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office on Tuesday says the vehicle was taken sometime after 9 p.m. on Monday night. It belongs to a local contractor.

Anyone with information is asked to call 208-382-5160.

source:
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Valley County to continue discussion on Roseberry Park development

Valley County Planning and Zoning public hearing drew about 118 people in opposition last week. Another meeting is set for Thursday evening.

Tristan Lewis May 11, 2022 KTVB

Opposition against the proposed Roseberry Park development in Valley County continues.

The Valley County Planning and Zoning Commission held a public hearing last Thursday which drew about 118 people in opposition to the proposed bid by California-based developer Roseberry Park, LLC.

The developer is looking to obtain a permit to build a mobile home community park west of Donnelly. It’s something they’re pitching as “necessary workforce housing.” If approved, it would bring 201 manufactured homes to the area on about 40 acres near the intersection of Roseberry and Norwood Road.

continued:
— — — —

Valley County denies Roseberry Park proposal

Council members stated concerns from public testimony, affordability, and property rights; among other concerns.

The Valley County Planning and Zoning Commission unanimously voted to deny the proposed bid by California-based developer Roseberry Park, LLC.

Valley County Planning and Zoning held the follow-up hearing after last week’s initial hearing received a greater public testimony turn out than previously expected.

continued:
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Wanted Georgia man, 11-year-old son found in Idaho’s Clearwater National Forest

Unprepared for the rugged backcountry and unable to start a fire in the wet conditions, the pair had resorted to eating snails and insects.

Katie Terhune May 13, 2022 KTVB

A missing Georgia boy and the father who took him on the run have been found after officials say they spent more than a week in Idaho’s rugged backcountry.

continued:
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Letters to Share:

Viewpoint: New Cascade hospital needed to serve all patients

By Dr. Ron Ellsworth and Tom Reinhardt

Cascade Medical Center is an independent, nonprofit hospital. It is locally owned and governed by citizens within our tax district. The appointed and elected members of the Board of Trustees are full-time residents, living within our community.

On May 17, Cascade Medical Center will ask the voters in our hospital district to support a $19 million bond to help us build a new facility so that we can keep pace with the growing demand for healthcare in our community.

The strong financial performance of the medical center will enable CMC to fund at least $15 million of the project ourselves between our savings, loans and grants, but we still need help from the citizens we serve to fund the $34 million project.

The need for a new facility (not just a remodel of the current facility) was determined to be necessary based upon several studies and site surveys. In 2020, Cascade Medical Center hired Wipfli to conduct a needs assessment to determine how we can best serve the needs of our community.

Those findings showed our facility is approximately 13,500 square-feet too small to meet contemporary standards, and that the current site does not provide adequate expansion room to build in the same location.

The results of this study were used to correctly size each department in the planned new facility. We invite you to read the full report and findings of this analysis on our website at (link).

Once the Wipfli findings were compiled, we asked a healthcare architect review their conclusions and provide consultation on a renovation versus a replacement project. Their recommendation, after reviewing all the data was to pursue a replacement facility.

Finally, Cascade Medical Center hired a consultant to study projected growth and volume of services needed in our hospital district. Both the opinion of the architect, as well as the summary of the service volume study, are available on our website at cmchd.org.

All of this due diligence has lead us to this point, the point where we need to replace our facility in order to continue serving all of our patients. To do that, we need to ask for your support as a taxpayer.

If the bond does not pass, the need for a new facility will not go away. Our options would be somewhat limited – try again to pass a bond in November or look to be absorbed into a larger health-care system.

Becoming part of a larger system means local control and autonomy will be lost, and the services we offer may be reduced rather than expanded.

We invite you to learn more and ask questions so you can make an informed decision when you vote on May 17h. Please visit our website for FAQs, to review studies and reports, and see a breakdown of the financials.

We also have two virtual public forums scheduled Thursday, May 12, where you can ask questions and get answers. The links to those forums are on the home page of our website.

It is a pleasure to serve this community and we hope to continue the tradition of independent hometown healthcare for generations to come.

(Dr. Ron Ellsworth is Medical Director of Cascade Medical Center. Tom Reinhardt is CEO of Cascade Medical Center.)
— — — —

Viewpoint: Cascade hospital bond cost small compared to going elsewhere

By Christine Murphy

I am writing to give you my perspective on Cascade Medical Center and the bond they are asking for. There are a few reasons why the bond is needed that I am going to describe.

I know that our money is becoming less valuable due to inflation, so the thought of having our taxes go up can be a turn-off. It is my understanding that the amount that taxes will increase is so minimal that almost anyone can make it work.

If we feel like we don’t have the money, then let’s make the decision to stop spending that $5 on non-essentials and put it in an envelope for paying the extra taxes instead. If we would save $5 a day it would be $1,825 that you would save in a year.

The next reason why I feel it is important to pass the bond is that with a bigger and up-to-date hospital we can have more of our appointments here in Cascade instead of having to go to McCall or Boise. I know of some who have to travel to Boise multiple times a week for doctor appointments and tests that could be handled here if we had the space to have specialists come to Cascade.

Some of them include MRI, ultrasound, EEG, echocardiogram, and many other tests. Some blood tests have to be sent out that depending on the results could mean life or death because of having to wait 24-plus hours instead of one to two hours for results. We would also be able to have the CAT scans in the same building, instead of being taken outside to get to the machine.

There was an event when a one-year-old child was diagnosed with RSV and the wonderful staff here had to choose between using medical transportation to move patients from Cascade to another facility at extreme costs or keeping him in Cascade with staff that was capable of treating him Like they are with almost 100% of non-trauma and trauma patients if we had the room and equipment to do so.

Knowing that they were qualified to care for the child they saved the family the cost of Life Flight to Boise. There was only one problem, the hospital was not large enough to have infant/children’s accommodations, including cribs, toys, oxygen cannulas/masks, oximeters, children’s menu, Pedialyte, sippy cups, or bottles.

Because of this, the child had to have an adult in the bed holding the child and the equipment to accommodate the child’s needs. Their kitchen was, and is, too small to do more than one meal at a time and if you have a special diet they can’t accommodate it.

We could also serve multiple people suffering from mental health issues at the same time, which would mean less expenses for treatment of self-harm and suicide attempts or completion.

I wonder when all the housing that is planned to be built is finished we will not be able to keep up with the demand. CMC has served our community of 900-1,000 people in the past because many people chose to go elsewhere for care. But now that we have a fantastic medical team and homes being built, we are having more patients moving their care from McCall and Boise to Cascade.

Part of the reasoning being, our doctors take the time to talk to you and treat you as important as you are and not like just another number/patients to get in and out so they can get more patients seen and make more money.

For example, last month a toddler was brought to the ER because the child’s G-tube came out and the family didn’t have an extra button on hand to replace it. The ER did not have a button because that is not a normal piece of medical equipment to have on hand.

The staff took the time to find a way to make the hole/port stay open that night until the family could make it to Boise to get a new button. Doctor Ellsworth then ordered a button to have on hand just in case. This is not the service you get at other locations!

I hope you can see that we as a community need to vote yes for the bond for Cascade Medical Center to build a new facility so we can meet the needs of our community. The extra taxes are pennies compared to the thousands of dollars it cost for us to be sent to other places for services, that could be handled if we just had the room to accommodate.

Please for the health and wellness of our community. Vote “yes.”

(Christine Murphy lives in Cascade.)

source: The Star-News May 12, 2022
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Scam Alert:

Don’t Buy Gift Cards to Pay Someone

From Valley County Sheriff’s Office May 10, 2022

We know we have said it before, but we are going to say it again. This is a scam. They are not traceable and you WILL LOSE YOUR MONEY! These people are super aggressive and extremely bossy. They will stay on the phone with you, tell you where to go, they look up local stores in your area and tell you where to go buy the gift cards, in fact the last one we had, stayed on the phone with the person the entire time they bought the cards. They are smart and manipulative, they do their homework and they are very hard to impossible to trace or track down. The last person lost out on $3,000. Please don’t judge people by their naivety, it happens, believe it or not, some people don’t have social media. The scammers are extremely convincing and prey on older people. Spread the word, tell your parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, etc… Share this post. Don’t buy a gift card for anyone unless you know who it is 100%.
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Public Lands:

Personal use fuelwood sales begin May 15, at local vendors

Exception: Fuelwood sales in the Visitor Center not available until end of June

Boise, Idaho, May 10, 2022 — Personal use fuelwood permits for the Boise National Forest will be available for sale beginning May 15, through Nov. 30, 2022. The Boise National Forest is offering multiple choices to purchase personal fuelwood permits. For information about fuelwood cutting on surrounding National Forests, please contact them directly.

The Mountain Home Ranger District office is open now and the Idaho City, Emmett, Lowman and Cascade Ranger District offices will be reopening May 16. The Visitor Center in Boise, Idaho, will not be selling fuelwood permits until the end of June.

1. Vendors in surrounding communities will be selling personal use fuelwood permits
2. Visitor Information Center, 1387 S. Vinnell Way, Boise, Idaho, (Not available for purchase until the end of June)
3. All mail-in applications will be processed at the Cascade Ranger District

1. Vendors -May 15, 2022: Fuelwood permits can be purchased at the following commercial vendor locations:

Caldwell: East Cleveland Beverage (208) 459-6442
Emmett: B & W Fuels (208) 365-2291
Horseshoe Bend: Ray’s Corner Market (208) 793-2391
Garden Valley: Garden Valley Chevron (208) 462-3869
Placerville: Donna’s Place (208) 392-9666
Idaho City: Idaho City Grocery (208) 392-4426
Idaho City: Seasons (208) 392-9777

2. Visitor Information Center – 208-373-4100 (Fuelwood permits will NOT be available for purchase until the end of June) Located at – 1387 S. Vinnell Way, Boise, Idaho; Monday thru Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

3. The Mail-in application process are for the continued safety of the public and our front-line employees. Mail-in application forms are available to print. Mail-in applications with check or money order payable to USDA (No Cash) to:
Cascade Ranger District / Attn: Fuelwood Program / P.O. Box 696 / Cascade, ID 83611.

For questions contact the Cascade Ranger District Office 208-382-7400; Monday – Friday: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
(Business Operations may be impacted by COVID-19 Restrictions and Closures, or Forest Fire Operations.)

For more information:

* Boise National Forest fuelwood webpage.
* Motor Vehicle Use Maps to ensure you are cutting in areas open to motor vehicle use.
* To see current forest closures, visit the interactive Forest Closure story map.

Cutting fuelwood within a closed area is prohibited.

* Ranger District offices.

– Mountain Home Ranger District 208-587-7961
– Idaho City Ranger District 208-392-6681
– Cascade Ranger District 208-382-7400
– Lowman Ranger District 208-259-3361
– Emmett Ranger District 208-365-7000

Fuelwood permit prices remain at $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum, and a 10-cord maximum per household. Please note, we cannot sell permits for only 2 cords. If you want all 10 cords, permits purchased will need to be 5 cords and 5 cords, or 4 cords and 6 cord, or all 10 cords at once. Pick up your 2022 fuelwood brochure with tags when you purchase the fuelwood permit

Permit holders are encouraged to cut fuelwood early in the year because fire restrictions may impact the cutting season later in the summer. Early season fuelwood cutters are asked to use caution to avoid wet muddy roads where travel may cause resource damage. Fuelwood cutting is not allowed within riparian areas (adjacent to creeks and rivers).

There is no cutting of Larch (Tamarack) after Nov. 1. Larch lose their needles every fall and appear to be dead, resulting in too many live trees being accidently cut. This new regulation is to prevent the cutting of live Larch trees after they have lost their needles in the fall.
— — — —

Fuelwood Season Starts May 15 on the Payette National Forest

McCall, Idaho, May 10, 2022 – Personal use fuelwood permits for the Payette National Forest will be available beginning May 15, through November 30, 2021. We will be selling permits with curbside service only at our Forest Service offices until offices are fully open to employees and the public. Permits are not sold at the Forest Supervisor’s Office in McCall.

Fuelwood permits can be purchased in person at these vendor locations beginning Sunday, May 15:

* Weiser: Ridley’s Food and Drug (208) 549-1332
Open: Everyday 7 a.m. – 11 p.m.

* Weiser Farmer’s Supply Cooperative (208) 549-0654
Open: Everyday 5 a.m. – 10 p.m.

* Cambridge: Jay’s Sinclair (208) 257-5000
Open: Everyday 6 a.m. – 10 p.m.

* Council: Farmer’s Supply Co-op (208) 253-4266
Open: Everyday 6 a.m. – 10 p.m.

* McCall: Albertsons (208) 634-8166
Open: Everyday 6 a.m. – 11 p.m.

* New Meadows: C&M Lumber (208) 347-2194
Open: Monday – Saturday 8 a.m. – 6 p.m.

* Yellow Pine: The Corner (208) 634-3325
Open: Wednesday thru Monday (closed Tuesdays) 8am-8pm.

The prohibition of cutting Western larch (known locally as Tamarack) after November 1 remains in place. Larch lose their needles every fall and appear to be dead, resulting in too many live trees being accidently cut. This regulation is to prevent the cutting of live Larch trees after they have lost their needles in the fall. Regulations also prohibit the cutting of dead or living Whitebark pine trees due to decline in this tree species, and their critical importance to wildlife.

Fuelwood permit prices remain at $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum, and a 10-cord maximum per household. Please note we cannot sell permits for only 2 cords. If you want all ten cords, permits purchased will need to be 5 cords and 5 cords, or 4 cords and 6 cord, or all 10 cords at once.

The Payette National Forest has a free-use area located in the Big Creek area. A free-use permit is required for this area, and can be obtained by calling the McCall Ranger District office. Specifics of the free-use location and requirements will be explained to people seeking free-use permits. Free-use fuelwood counts as personal use toward the 10-cord maximum per household.

Cutting fuelwood within a closure area is prohibited. Check on the Alerts and Notices page of Forest websites for closure information.

Check this year’s fuelwood brochure and current Motor Vehicle Use Maps to make sure you are cutting in an area open to fuelwood gathering and pay special attention to closed areas and roads with restoration project areas.

Fuelwood permits are valid within the Boise, Payette and Sawtooth Forests. All motorized travel related to fuelwood gathering must be in full accordance with Forest Service travel regulations for the area as shown in the Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM), unless specifically exempted in the fuelwood permit. For information about fuelwood cutting on surrounding National forests, please contact them directly.

Permit holders are encouraged to cut fuelwood early in the year because fire restrictions may impact the cutting season later in the summer. Early season fuelwood cutters are asked to use caution to avoid wet muddy roads where travel may cause resource damage. Fuelwood cutting is not allowed within riparian areas (adjacent to creeks and rivers).

For additional information, contact the local Ranger District offices, or visit the Forest website and Payette National Forest Facebook page.

Weiser Ranger District, Monday through Friday, 8a.m. to 4:30p.m. 208-549-4200

Council Ranger District, Monday through Friday, 8a.m. to 4:30p.m. 208-253-0100

McCall Ranger District, Monday through Friday, 8a.m. to 4:30p.m. 208-634-0400

New Meadows Ranger District, Monday through Friday, 8a.m. to 4:30p.m. 208-347-0300
— — — — — — — — — —

Bureau of Land Management seeks input on fence improvements north of Emmett

Date: May 13, 2022
Contact: Mike Williamson mwilliamson@blm.gov 208-384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is seeking public comment on a proposed fencing modification plan for the Linson Creek grazing allotment located 20 miles northeast of Emmett.

An environmental assessment will analyze the proposed construction of a total of one mile of fencing to reduce recreation and livestock conflicts. The current layout of fences has led to instances of gates being left open and livestock wandering into sensitive streamside vegetation to feed.

The BLM will accept scoping comments through May 27, 2022.

“This scoping period will allow the public and other interested parties to identify potential issues for the BLM to consider,” said Four Rivers Assistant Field Manager Ammon Wilhelm. “Comments are most helpful if they provide specific actions, resources or issues that should be addressed.”

Maps and information about the project are available at: (link) (case sensitive).

Comments will be accepted through the following means:
* Email: BLM_ID_FourRiversOffice@blm.gov
* Fax: 208-384-3326
* Surface mail: Brent Ralston, Four Rivers Field Manager, 3948 Development Ave, Boise, ID 83705

Please note that before including their personal identifying information (address, email, phone number), commenters should be aware that their entire comment – including their personal identifying information – may be made publicly available at any time. While those commenting can ask in their comments to withhold this information from public review, the BLM cannot guarantee that they will be able to do so.

For more information, contact the BLM Four Rivers Field Office at 208-384-3300.
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Critter News:

BLM seeks comments on proposed wild horse management plan for southwest Idaho

May 11, 2022 Local News 8

As part of its mission to manage and protect wild horses and burros on public lands, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is seeking input from the public on a proposed 10-year management plan for wild horses within the Sands Basin, Hardtrigger and Black Mountain Herd Management Areas located along the Owyhee Foothills.

The BLM plans to prepare an environmental assessment for the plan analyzing a variety of wild horse gather and fertility control options to maintain wild horse populations at the appropriate management level within each herd management area as required by the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act. The action is needed to reduce impacts to rangeland health and wildlife habitat within the herd management area boundaries and to protect animal and herd health.

continued:
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Second illegally-stocked walleye caught in Lake Cascade in past four years

Walleyes are “incompatible” with the perch in Lake Cascade and its fisheries downstream, according to Idaho Fish & Game.

KTVB Staff May 10, 2022

Idaho Fish & Game confirmed the second illegally-stocked walleye was caught in Lake Cascade since 2018 on Saturday, May 7.

Off-duty Regional Fisheries Biologist, Mike Thomas, was fishing Lake Cascade with local angler, Chris Weber, when Weber landed the fish. According to Idaho Fish & Game (IDFG), the mature male walleye measured 20-inches in length and weighed nearly 3 pounds.

Back in 2018, an angler reported catching a 19-inch Walleye near Lake Cascade’s Crown Point. The walleye caught on May 7 was near the Boulder Creek arm of Lake Cascade.

“We know that the only way walleye could have gotten into Lake Cascade is through one or more individuals illegally transplanting them there,” Regional Fisheries Manager, Jordan Messner said.

continued:
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New ‘citizen science’ opportunity hits Boise area: Bee Watch

By Geneva Zoltek May 10, 2022 KIVI

At 14 spots around the Treasure Valley, new installments invite you to take part in science.

Bee Watch, a brand new program to the City of Boise’s Parks and Recreation Department, encourages community scientists to help collect data on native bee species.

“There isn’t enough time and capacity in the scientific community to be everywhere all at once. And so by utilizing community scientists, we can maybe understand a larger breadth of bee diversity,” said Martha Brabeck, Parks & Rec Foothills Restoration Specialist.

continued:
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Trivia:

A Group of Hummingbirds is called a charm, a glittering, a shimmer, a tune, a bouquet, or a hover.
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Fish and Game News:

F&G hosting “Fish Idaho Fest – McCall” on June 10

By Brian Pearson, Regional Communications Manager
Tuesday, May 10, 2022

The event will be a party bringing anglers, conservation groups and resource management agencies together

If you are interested in learning about and getting more involved with fisheries and aquatic resources management in the McCall area, and having some fun while you are at it, mark your calendars for June 10, 2022 and join Idaho Fish and Game and our various partners for “Fish Idaho Fest – McCall.”

Idaho Fish and Game is hosting the event from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Friday, June 10 at Broken Horn Brewery, 201 Mission St. in McCall. The event includes live music; fly casting and fly tying demonstrations; food trucks; booths from nonprofits and government agencies involved with fisheries and aquatic resources management; and more.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Spring Chinook Salmon Fishing Update 5/10/2022: Rapid River Run, Hells Canyon, and Clearwater River Fisheries

By Joe DuPont, Fisheries Regional Manager
Tuesday, May 10, 2022

Hi everybody.

It is time for my weekly spring Chinook Salmon update (May 10, 2022). So, let’s get right to it and discuss what we have learned since my last update.

continued:
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Learn skills early western frontier people needed to survive at “Living History Rendezvous”

By Brian Pearson, Regional Communications Manager
Wednesday, May 11, 2022

This unique outdoor skills course provides students an opportunity to develop multiple primitive outdoor skills

Curious how the trappers, explorers and mountain men of Idaho lived in the early 1800s? Idaho Fish and Game, in partnership with Idaho Free Trappers, is hosting a “Living History Rendezvous” to teach people many of the skills that these early western frontier people and their families needed to survive.

The free, family-friendly event is scheduled for 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on May 21 and May 22 at Black’s Creek Public Shooting Range, 2420 E Kuna Mora Road in Kuna.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Spring Newsletter-Idaho Naturalist News

By Sara Focht, Wildlife Educator
Friday, May 13, 2022

The spring edition of the Idaho Naturalist News (seasonal newsletter of the Idaho Master Naturalist Program) is available. Read about the 2022 Rendezvous, the ice age floods of north Idaho, see great nature photography, and more!

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

A robot lives in this Antarctic penguin colony. It’s trying to save them

April 29, 2022 Local News 8

Thousands of emperor penguins cluster on the ice of Atka Bay in Antarctica, mostly unaware that an interloper lives among them.

Slightly shorter than the average adult emperor, the 3-foot-tall (1-meter-tall) autonomous robot sits silently within the colony, nondescript compared with humans who sometimes emerge from a nearby research station.

The birds occasionally notice ECHO, an unmanned and remote-controlled ground vehicle, because “they exhibit curiosity to everything that they don’t know,” said Dan Zitterbart, associate scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts.

But it’s a passing fascination for the emperors, who quickly move on from the static object. The penguins are unphased by the robot, which acts like a mobile antenna for an observatory monitoring about 300 of them each year.

continued: w/video
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Seasonal Humor:

MayWeather-a
— —

May

It’s May in the Idaho mountains.
And what can we expect?
There may be snow,
there may be sun,
or we may just be wet.
We may be wearing shorts and tees.
We may be wearing dungarees.
We may be in our overcoats.
We may stay in or be in boats.
We may be digging in our yards or staring at the blooms.
But no matter what it’s like we just can’t wait for June.

– shared by a local lady.
— — — — —

Rock Migration Season

RockMigrationSeason-a
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