Monthly Archives: June 2022

Road Reports June 29, 2022

Please share road reports. Most back country roads are not maintained. There is still snow in some higher elevations, especially north facing area. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: Dust abatement is being applied today (June 29th) on main street, however, other local streets are dry and very dusty. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Update from ITD May 19, 2022
Construction closures will end May 27 on Idaho 55 near Smiths Ferry.
One-way alternating traffic is set to replace closures from 10 a.m. to noon on Mondays through Fridays.
Both lanes will be open Friday mornings through Sundays.
To learn more about the spring construction schedule, visit link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (June 29) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
No current report. (Wind gusts up to 33mph Tuesday, June 28th.)
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
No current report.

Johnson Creek Road: Opened June 18th
Report Wednesday (June 29) Mail truck driver says the upper end was graded as far as Wapiti Meadow Ranch recently. The lower part of the road is developing a few pot holes.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened June 23rd
No current report on road conditions. (Likely not graded yet.)
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel???
No current report, likely to open by 4th of July weekend?
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
Graded during the first 2 weeks of June.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Old report Saturday (June 18) from motorcycle riders seeing how far they could get towards Monumental summit: “We made it to the turn at upper Fern Creek towards Cinnabar. Which is about a mile before the turn for Meadow Creek Lookout. It was solid snow floor from that point on.” – SA

courtesy SA
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Opened June 22nd
No current report on conditions. (Likely not graded.)
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Open
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:
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June 26, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

June 26, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Note: If you are not receiving the YPTimes emails, check your spam folder.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
2022
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit Season
May 15 thru Nov 30 – Firewood Season
June 1 – 6-day mail delivery starts
Jun 18 – Upper Johnson Creek Open
Jun 22 – Deadwood Summit Open
Jun 23 – Lick Creek Road Open
Jul 2 – 4th of July golf tournament 10am
Jul 2 – 4th of July parade 3pm
Jul 2 – BBQ special at The Corner
Jul 3 – YPWUA Shareholders Meeting
Jul 9 – VYPA Meeting 2pm Community Hall
Jul 16 – Ride to Meadow Creek Lookout
(details below)
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Local Events:

Independence Weekend

Golf Tournament July 2nd

There are still some slots available for the golf tournament. Checks or cash only. Call Joel or Marj at 208-633-4666 or email us at fieldsmarjie @ yahoo.com See you there.

The annual 4th of July golf tournament will be on Saturday, July 2nd at 10(ish). All proceeds will be used to improve the golf course (improving the greens, signs and tees. More information to follow. Contact Joel or Marj Fields with questions, sponsorships or donations at fieldsmarjie @ yahoo.com


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4th of July Parade July 2nd

Come join or watch the Independence Day parade. July 2nd at 3pm. Meet in front of the fire house at 2pm to participate.
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The Corner

BBQ Special at The Corner
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YPWUA Shareholders Meeting July 3rd

The yearly shareholders meeting will be Sunday July 3rd at 10am at the Community Hall. There will be two positions up for elections.

There has been some question on who can vote and can run for office. You must be a shareholder with the Yellow Pine Water Users Association to be able to vote and run for office. If you have any questions about being a shareholder, please contact me.

Thank you – Steve Holloway

Agenda for YPWUA Yearly Shareholders Meeting

July 3rd 10 AM Yellow Pine community center

1. Financial Report Candy
2. Operations Report Warren or Steve
3. Grants. Steve
4. Election of two board members
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July 9 – VYPA Meeting

The next Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting will be July 9th at 2pm Community Hall.
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July 16 Ride to Meadow Creek Lookout

Ride to Meadow Creek Lookout with us for a day of fun, stories, and a BBQ in the forest. Details and Sign-up at (link)
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Big Creek News:

Big Creek Crash Injures Two

20220610BCPlaneCrash-aPhoto by Carrie Ellie Pitts

Two people suffered minor injuries when their single-engine airplane, shown in photo, crashed on take-off at the Big Creek Airstrip about 1 p.m. on June 10. Witnesses said the Aviat Husky was caught by the wind, pulled right and went through two rail fences before flipping at the airstrip located about 25 miles northeast of Yellow Pine. The National Transportation Safety Board filed an initial report on the crash, but did not provide the identifies of the occupants, the extent of their injuries or whether they were taken to a local hospital.

Photo caption provided by The Star-News June 23, 2022
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Village News:

Pioneer Cemetery Note

“Volunteer wanted to mow the cemetery before next Friday, the 1st. Call Marj at 633-4666. I will join you to rake up. Thank you!”

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Summer Water

The board is asking that property owners that water their lawns, to be conservative and water on an even/odd day schedule. Meaning if you address end with an even number, water on even numbered days. If your address ends with an odd number, water on odd numbered days. Also refrain from watering on holidays and during Harmonica Festival.
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Deadwood and Lick Creek Summits Open

A note from Valley County on June 22nd said Deadwood Summit was open.

Update that Lick Creek road opened June 23rd.
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The Corner

The Corner Pub will be changing its hours this coming Friday the 24th new hours will be 9AM to 7PM.
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Buck Horn Outfitters

Buck Horn Outfitters is offering trail rides out of Yellow Pine, anything from an hour ride to day trips and fully catered camping / pack trips to high mountain lakes or DIY camp trips where you can enjoy Idaho’s back country to yourself.
Give us a call 208-633-3614

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J & R Septic

They are coming back to Yellow Pine to pump tanks in a couple of weeks. The have a 3rd list started, so there is time to get in on the list for the 3rd trip. Please call them in Cascade at (208) 382-8727. They can fit 4 tanks per trip. Please have your clean out dug up and ready, or you can ask them about digging.
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Arnold Aviation News:

Arnold’s will no longer will offer grocery shopping services. (D9 now has online shopping – see below.) However, Arnolds will still pick up orders in Cascade from D9, auto parts, feed, and hardware, etc. for delivery to Yellow Pine. You will only be charged for freight from the Airport to YP.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
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D9 News:

You will be able to start ordering online directly from D9 on May 24th. Go to their website at link. Phone (208-382-4215) if you need assistance.

Orders must be placed before 10am Monday (Arnolds will pick up on Tuesday for Wednesday delivery.) It is important that upon checkout, you click the box marked “Gift” – and type in the order is for Arnolds to pick up and deliver to Yellow Pine. Otherwise they will think it is a local personal pickup.

Tips: After you sign in to your account, look at the top left of the webpage for “Shop departments” – it will show categories of items. For instance, if you want butter, click on “Dairy” – then when the page comes up, look for the row that says Butter, look over to the right side and click on “see more” and it will come up with every type and size of butter (and margarine) available. Click on “add to cart” under the item you want, there you can adjust the amount using the plus and minus symbols. When you are done, click on “check out” near the top right corner. That is where you can click “gift” to leave instructions before you enter your card number.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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May 15 thru Nov 30 – Firewood Season

Firewood permits are available at The Corner.
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State Burn permits required May 10th

Closed fire season begins May 10, which means Idahoans outside city limits will need a burn permit before burning any debris. The closed fire season lasts until Oct. 20.
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Watkins Pharmacy Update June 23rd

To the community: the insurance claims are ongoing… We are still working on the temporary pharmacy/store going in at Across the Tracks. We wish we could move everything along faster, but unfortunately we have no control over that as much as we wish we did! … Thank you for those who have reached out for updates. – Watkins Pharmacy
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Notice – Yellow Pine Times Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
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Road News

June 18: Johnson Creek road opened. June 22: Deadwood Summit and Warm Lake Summit are open. June 23 Lick Creek open.

The road to Big Creek is still closed to wheeled vehicles. A report from June 13th saying about 4 feet of snow on top. Probably open by 4th of July weekend?

photo courtesy Darren Vaughn

Link: to current road reports.

Construction closures will end May 27 on Idaho 55 near Smiths Ferry.
One-way alternating traffic is set to replace closures from 10 a.m. to noon on Mondays through Fridays.
Both lanes will be open Friday mornings through Sundays.
link:

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.

Profile Gap, Elk Summit and Thunder Mountain roads are closed to wheeled vehicles. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
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Critters

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks came out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be Elk and Deer Aware

It is spring “baby” season – watch your dogs, mama elk and deer can be very aggressive towards dogs. There have been a few dogs injured up here over the years.
Cows and Does are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Moose Aware

* Be aware of your surroundings and be especially careful around creeks and in areas with dense brush.
* Travel in groups whenever possible and make noise to alert animals to your presence.
* If you encounter a moose, give it lots of space and don’t approach it. Always keep dogs under control.
* If a moose charges or chases you, take cover behind something solid, such as a tree.
* In some situations, bear spray has been known to be an effective defense tool in moose encounters.

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard. F&G confirms there is a pack of 6 wolves in our valley.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

Bears are out of hibernation and hungry.

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat was hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report June 10: Bins were about half full. Road is in good shape.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

2021 Water Bills Due June 15th

July 3, 2022 – YPWUA Shareholders Meeting at the Community Hall at 10am.

Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at wicap.org.

Water Use

06/16/22 24658143 29765 24 1240 21 T 980
06/17/22 24688664 30521 24 1272 21 F 756
06/18/22 24724973 36309 24 1513 25 S 5788
06/19/22 24763018 38045 24 1585 26 S 1736
06/20/22 24794385 31367 24 1307 22 M 6678
06/21/22 24824356 29971 24 1249 21 T 1396
06/22/22 24858485 34129 24 1422 24 W 4158
06/23/22 24891673 33188 24 1383 23 T 941
06/24/22 24927839 36166 24 1507 25 F 2978
06/25/22 24961598 33759 24 1407 23 S 2407
06/26/22 24996118 34520 24 1438 24 S 761

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

As of today April 17th 2020, Yellow Pine is under a “Boil Order”. This boil order will be in effect until further notice.
DRINKING WATER WARNING issued June 10, 2022
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST. Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 6-10-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

YPWUA 2022 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 3, 2022
YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 5, 2020 link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
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VYPA News:

Community Hall usage procedures

Community Hall Update: To ensure proper scheduling of the community hall usage and to avoid scheduling conflicts, we are asking that if you would like to use the community hall to contact Rhonda Egbert (member at large). With increased usage requests, we need to ensure that everyone is able to use it without conflict/overlap of events. Rhonda is taking point to schedule those individuals who want to use the community hall. Please also read the Community Hall Usage Guidelines-this outlines the etiquette required for usage.

Village Association Meeting Update: In the past as a courtesy, a Zoom video conference was an option for the individuals who were not able to attend the meeting(s) in person. However, I will not be providing this option going forward. I’m sorry for the inconvenience this may cause some. Also, if you have a request for a meeting agenda item, please contact me (Hailey Harris) no later than 7 days before the upcoming meeting. We are not able to add agenda items without approval of the Chairman.

I will also be enforcing a meeting conduct, effective immediately: Meeting attendees are expected to: Uphold professional purpose of meetings by respecting the rights, privacy, safety, and dignity of all persons; exercise professionalism, consideration, and respect in their speech and actions; refrain from harassing speech and other harassing behavior. Failure to conduct oneself in accordance with these expectations may result in removal of the offending person(s) or adjournment of the meeting.
-Hailey Harris

Yellow Pine Community Hall General Use Procedures

Hall General Usage:
* All events must be scheduled through the Community Hall Committee and approved by the Committee Chairman
* No property shall be removed from the Community Hall without approval of the Community Hall Committee Chairman.
* Responsible alcohol usage is permitted.
* No smoking is allowed in the hall. Pick up any butts scattered outside.
* Building and grounds are not a storage area. Do not leave personal items in or around the Community Hall without approval of the Community Hall Committee Chairman.
* Notify a committee member if problems are encountered.

After each event using the hall:
* Sweep/vacuum hall floor and restroom floor
* Wipe down toilet
* Empty garbage cans and take garbage to the transfer station
* Fold tables
* Stack chairs
* Turn off lights, ceiling fans, heater (if applicable)
* Put away any kitchen items after they are cleaned

After each event using the kitchen:
* Sweep/mop kitchen floor
* Wash, dry, and store all used dishes, utensils, pans, coffee pots, etc.
* Clean and wipe down sinks
* Thoroughly clean griddles, if used, and turn off propane to griddles
* Remove any unused food/beverages from the refrigerators/freezers
* Clean up any spilled food or beverage
* Empty garbage cans and take garbage to the transfer station
* Notify a committee member if problems are encountered

Using the Community Hall and/equipment for non-Yellow Pine events:
* A refundable, $50 deposit is required seven (7) days prior to the event
* After the event, a Community Hall Committee member will inspect the premises prior to the deposit being refunded
* A $150/day donation is requested for the use of the Hall
* A $200/day donation is requested for the use of the Kitchen

No deposit or use donation is needed for use by Yellow Pine community members, committees, or groups.

Yellow Pine Community Hall Committee:
Rhonda Egbert – Chairman
Members: Ronda Rogers, Deb Filler, Hailey Harris

Village of Yellow Pine Association:
Hailey Harris, Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Jen Aldrich, Secretary
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Ron Earl

June 11, 2022 VYPA Meeting (minutes to follow)
April 6, 2022 Village Council meeting to fill vacant chairperson position (no minutes.)
Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.
2022 Meeting dates:
June 11
July 9
August 13
September 10

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Department

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Meeting Minutes
May 29, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting (no minutes yet)
May 20, 2022 Meeting in Cascade with Forest Service (no minutes?)
Apr 3, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Feb 24, 2022 Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD New Commissioner’s Transition Meeting Link:
Nov 23, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Nov 8, 2021 – AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
Oct 31, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Oct 14, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Sep 27, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Sep 18, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Sep 11, 2021 – YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
Jul 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Jun 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sep 30, 2020 – YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 11, 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
The Corner Pub will be changing its hours this coming Friday the 24th new hours will be 9am to 7pm.
Summer hours: Wednesday thru Monday (closed Tuesdays) 9am to 7pm
Fire wood permits Available May 15th
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Closed May 15th for renovation
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Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Open
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Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $4/doz
No longer taking scrap metal
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Buck Horn Outfitters is offering trail rides out of Yellow Pine, anything from an hour ride to day trips and fully catered camping / pack trips to high mountain lakes or DIY camp trips where you can enjoy Idaho’s back country to yourself.
See our website for more details. Or give us a call 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:
Opened May 27, 2022 for Fly-ins

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: 1-800-427-4968
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Cascade:
Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
D9 Groceries: 208-382-4215 Website link to order:
Upon “checkout” click on “gift” and write “Arnolds to pick up and deliver to (your name) in Yellow Pine” so they know who will pick it up and where it goes.
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watkins can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

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Cascade (208) 382-8727

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Meridian (208) 830-4890 email:
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(208) 365-PIPE (7473) Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Jun 20) overnight low of 42 degrees, 24 hour rain total = 0.02″. This morning it was 46 degrees by 9am, cracks in the overcast and foggy clouds draped across peaks and ridges. Tree swallows, robins, finches and a raven calling. Pine squirrel yelling. Light air traffic. Dark overcast and short light sprinkles just before lunch time. Breezy and cloudy after lunch. Rain showers and sprinkles on and off mid-afternoon, mostly cloudy, cool and calmer, high of 62 degrees. More showers and sprinkles on and off late afternoon into early evening. Mostly cloudy (small white clouds) at sunset and nearly calm. Twilight after 10pm.

Tuesday (Jun 21) overnight low of 34 degrees, 24 hour rain total = 0.05″. This morning it was 47 degrees by 9am, clear sky and light breeze. Tree swallows, robins, hummingbirds, finches and squirrels observed. Partly cloudy at lunch time. Dozens and dozens of tiger swallowtail butterflies. Warm by mid-afternoon and mostly clear, high of 76 degrees. Clear sky and cooling off after sunset. Clear at midnight.

Wednesday (Jun 22) overnight low of 38 degrees, no new precipitation. This morning it was 53 degrees by 9am, clear sky and heavy dew. Early air traffic. Tree swallows, robins, finches and jays. Clear sky and variable breezes at lunch time. Doe running from 4-wheelers on Westside. Mail truck came in via Johnson Creek. Very warm by mid-afternoon, almost clear sky and light breezes, high of 83 degrees. Partly cloudy and warm after sunset and nearly calm. Clear at midnight.

Thursday (Jun 23) overnight low of 42 degrees, no new precipitation. This morning it was 57 degrees by 9am and clear sky. Power out 904am. Tree swallows, finches, robins, jays, hummingbirds and squirrels observed. Early air traffic (from daylight to around lunch time.) Clear sky at noon. Warm and and a few clouds early afternoon and breezy, gusty at times. Warm and partly cloudy mid-afternoon and breezy, high of 83 degrees. Power restored at 545pm. Partly clear at sunset (high wispies) and light breeze. Mostly clear (thin haze) at midnight.

Friday (Jun 24) overnight low of 42 degrees, no new precipitation. This morning it was 61 degrees by 10am, breezes and partly cloudy. Early and constant air traffic for a few hours. Tree swallows, robins, finches and jays calling, more hummingbird visitors, and various squirrels running about. Partly cloudy, warm and light breezes at lunch time. Doe cautiously wandering up Westside. Partly cloudy mid-afternoon and a bit breezy, high of 75 degrees. It was almost clear just after sunset and cool breezes. Clear at midnight.

Saturday (Jun 25) overnight low of 36 degrees, no rain. This morning it was 50 degrees by 9am and clear sky. Early and constant air traffic for a few hours. Tree swallows, robins, finches and jays calling, several hummingbirds of all varieties and various squirrels observed (looks like young ground squirrels have emerged from burrows.) Clear and a bit breezy at lunch time. Loud “boom” at 248pm. Increasing street traffic (and dust.) Warm and clear mid-afternoon with a slight breeze, high of 82 degrees. A few more loud “booms” before 4pm. Quiet late afternoon. Clear and light breeze after sunset. Clear at midnight.

Sunday (Jun 26) overnight low of 39 degrees, no rain. This morning it was 56 degrees at 9am and clear sky. Early air traffic that lasted for several hours. Tree swallows taking feathers to nesting boxes, finches, robins and jays calling. lots of tiger swallowtail butterflies and various squirrels observed. Clear and warm at lunch time. Very warm mid-afternoon, clear sky and light breeze, high of 88 degrees. Clear and warm before sunset.
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Idaho News:

Valley County Independence Weekend

Summer in Valley County has officially arrived and with it, the need for a reminder about fireworks safety and fire prevention. While fire danger is always of concern in the summer months, this year we are seeing increasing drought conditions, unseasonably hot weather, and a large influx of new visitors and forest users to our area who may not be well versed in fire prevention measures.

We urge you to use caution as you celebrate the Fourth of July holiday and keep these things in mind:

• Possessing or lighting any firework on U.S. Forest Service, Idaho Department of Lands, and Bureau of Land Management lands is illegal.
• Idaho allows “safe and sane” fireworks to be purchased and ignited on private land.
• Only light one firework at a time and maintain a safe distance after lighting.
• Keep a bucket of water on hand to douse used fireworks.
• Only light fireworks in clear, open areas away from structures and people.
• Lighting any aerial firework is illegal and a misdemeanor offense in Idaho, even on private property.
• That one bears repeating…lighting any aerial firework is illegal in the state of Idaho, even on private property.

If you plan to recreate on public lands, please keep the following tips in mind to help prevent forest fire:

• Never leave a campfire unattended.
• Completely extinguish campfires using water or stirring with dirt or sand. If it is too hot to touch, it is too hot to leave.
• Prevent sparks by making sure vehicles are not dragging tow chains or loose tail pipes.
• Ensure off-road vehicles have spark arrestors.

Help us protect Valley County from fire.
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3FireworksForest-a
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COVID-19 Updates: 1,216 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 5 new deaths

June 24, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 1,216 new COVID-19 cases and 5 new deaths Friday. State-level case and hospital data are now being updated on the state dashboard on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, excluding holidays.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 460,741.

The state said 15 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 17,372, and 0 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,961.

5 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,966.

full story: [Valley County 2,766 cases, 16 deaths.]
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35 new Valley County COVID-19 cases reported in past week

By Tom Grote The Star-News June 23, 2022

The number of new cases of COVID-19 reported in Valley County totaled 35 last week, according to reports from the county’s two hospitals.

The 35 new cases compared to 38 new cases reported the previous week and 29 new cases reported the prior week.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 2,879 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started in March 2020.

Thirteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health.

Clinics & Tests – McCall

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine offers the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines are offered for anyone age 5 and older.

Also available are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine boosters for anyone age 5 and older.

Second booster doses are available for adults ages 50 years and older, people ages 12 years and older who are moderately or severely immunocompromised.

Patients should talk to their health care provider about their medical condition, and whether getting an additional primary shot is appropriate for them.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link) or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

Clinics & Tests – Cascade

Cascade Medical Center no longer offers the Pfizer vaccine. Those wishing to be given the Pfizer vaccine should contact St. Luke’s McCall or a local pharmacy.

The Cascade hospital offers a second booster shot of the Moderna vaccine to those over age 50 who received their first booster shot at least four months ago.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster. Call 208-382-4285 to schedule a time.

Take-Home Tests

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital also provides free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

full story: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
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Cascade hospital to add temporary building

Plan to build 4,500 s.f. building prompted by failure of bond issue

By Max Silverson The Star-News June 23, 2022

The Cascade Medical Center Board of Trustees last week approved a temporary 4,500-square-foot building on the east side of the current hospital in Cascade.

The action was taken in the wake of a failed $19 million bond issue last month that would have funded half of a new hospital building.

The bond issue received 57% of the vote in favor, but fell short of the 66.7% required to pass.

The temporary building is expected to cost between $1 million to $2 million, hospital CEO Tom Reinhardt said.

continued:
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Potential outbreak of toxic algae at Lake Cascade

Courtesy Central District Health)

Donnelly, Idaho (CBS2) — There is a potential outbreak of toxic algae at Lake Cascade, the Idaho Conservation League reports.

Officials are still waiting on results from state sampling.

“But… when in doubt, stay out,” the league says.

source:
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Dynamite found near Little Payette Lake

Four sticks found by hiker safely detonated

By Max Silverson The Star-News June 23, 2022

Four sticks of dynamite discovered near Little Payette Lake by a hiker were safely detonated last week, the Valley County Sheriff’s office said.

The Boise Police Department Bomb Squad on June 15 exploded the four sticks at the place they were found after deciding it was too dangerous to move them, Boise police public information officer Haley Williams said.

Jesse Defoort of McCall found the dynamite on June 14 while hiking and foraging for morel mushrooms.

continued:
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Idahoan Hayden Voorhees wins the North Fork Championship

By Steve Dent Jun 19, 2022 KIVI

The North Fork Championship brings the best kayakers in the world to our own backyard in Idaho to run the toughest rapid on the North Fork of the Payette River.

This year the best paddler was Meridian’s own Hayden Voorhees who bested a field of 30 of the top kayakers to earn the crown as king of the North Fork.

continued w/video:
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Meridian man dies in Warm Lake Road motorcycle crash

By Max Silverson The Star-News June 23, 2022

A 26-year-old Meridian man died Saturday after the motorcycle he was driving ran off Warm Lake Road and down a 20-foot embankment about 30 miles east of Cascade, according to the Idaho State Police.

Isaac Ebaugh died of massive blunt trauma to the chest, Valley County Coroner Scott Carver said.

Idaho State Police responded to the crash, which occurred at about 12:45 p.m.

continued:
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Truck crash blocks Highway 55 in southern Valley County

A semi rolled over early Thursday morning near Smiths Ferry.

KTVB Staff June 23, 2022

A seven-mile stretch of Idaho Highway 55 was closed for several hours Thursday morning because of an accident south of Smiths Ferry, the Valley County Sheriff’s Office reported.

The crash was reported at 6:13 a.m. The sheriff’s office said a semi truck rolled over at milepost 92. The Idaho Transportation Department closed the highway between mileposts 90 and 97 — between Sportsman Access and Stirrup Lane. This is also near a major ITD construction project along the highway.

The highway reopened shortly after noon.

source:
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Plane crashes near Snake River in Idaho County

There were no injuries to the two occupants of the plane, who were flown to Lewiston by Life Flight. The crash occurred near Dry Gulch on the Snake River.

A small Cessna plane carrying two people crashed near the Snake River Thursday, the Idaho County Sheriff’s Office reported.

In a Facebook post, the sheriff’s office said dispatch received a call from StateCom, who was advised of a mayday from the Cessna plane to the Air Force. The coordinates were along the Snake River, on the border of Oregon’s Wallowa County and Idaho County.

Thursday’s incident occurred around 12.5 miles from Riggins, near Dry Gulch on the Snake River. The location has landing strips on both sides of the river, according to the Idaho County Sheriff’s Office.

continued:
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Mining News:

Cleanup work will begin in July at Stibnite Mine

EPA June 22, 2022

Cleanup actions to address specific areas of contamination at Stibnite Mine will begin in July. Perpetua Resources and their contractors, under U.S. EPA and Forest Service oversight, will:

* Divert Hennessy Creek and construct an impermeable riverbed to prevent clean water from infiltrating the Northwest Bradley Waste Rock Dumps. The diversion is about 3,000 feet long. It will follow the existing channel as closely as possible and will not encroach on Stibnite Road.

* Divert an unnamed creek in the Smelter Flats area and construct an impermeable riverbed to prevent clean water from infiltrating the buried smelter and mining waste. The diversion is about 1,200 feet long and will follow the existing channel.

* Excavate about 10,000 cubic yards of waste rock from the DMEA Dump, place the excavated materials on top of the Northwest Bradley Waste Rock Dumps, and reconstruct the drainage and floodplain to match natural conditions.

Construction will begin after the July 4 holiday weekend and will likely continue through October 2022. Learn more at (link)
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Fire Season:

Idaho gears up for wildfire season with bolstered crews

A late wet spring has alleviated drought concerns in much of Idaho but spurred grass growth that could cause large rangeland wildfires as plants dry out this summer.

Keith Ridler (AP), Associated Press (KTVB) June 21, 2022

Cooler and wetter weather this spring has alleviated drought concerns in much of Idaho but spurred grass growth that could cause large rangeland wildfires in the southern part of the state as plants dry out this summer, wildfire forecasters told the Idaho Land Board on Tuesday.

Officials also told the board, which includes Republican Gov. Brad Little and four other statewide elected office holders, that the state is well-staffed with wildland firefighters following legislation approved earlier this year to increase firefighter starting pay to $15 an hour and also provide hazard pay up to 25% above their hourly wage.

“First it’s too dry, then it’s too wet and you’re going to have fuel,” Little said after the meeting. He said he felt the state is prepared for wildfire season but can never be 100% ready.

The Land Board directs the Idaho Department of Lands that is responsible for handling fire protection on 9,800 square miles (25,000 square kilometers) of state, federal and private land. The department had one of its worst wildfire seasons in 2021 with some 225 square miles (580 square kilometers) burned, six times the 20-year average and costing the state $75 million.

continued:
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Public Lands:


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Idaho to sell ‘high-end’ island in Payette Lake near McCall

The island has five lots, with one leased. State officials plan to offer the lots individually or the island as a whole and take whichever brings in the most money.

Keith Ridler (AP), Associated Press (KTVB) June 21, 2022

Idaho officials on Tuesday voted to sell at auction a 14-acre “high-end” island in Payette Lake near the vacation and second-home town of McCall.

Republican Gov. Brad Little and four other members of the Idaho Land Board voted 5-0 to reaffirm a previous board decision to sell the island, potentially this fall.

continued:
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Forest Service Invests $2,085,450 into Deferred Maintenance Projects on Payette National Forest

McCall, Idaho, June 22, 2022 – The USDA Forest Service is investing $2,085,450 into 4 projects addressing deferred maintenance on the Payette National Forest in Fiscal Year 2022. These investments are made from the National Parks and Public Land Legacy Restoration Fund (LRF) established by the Great American Outdoors Act (GAOA).

The four projects on the Payette National Forest are:

* Payette Bridge Repairs: To provide safe access, improve overall visitor experience, and improve resource conditions the Payette National Forest will repair three road bridges (Cottonwood, Little Weiser and Four Bit bridges).

* East Fork Trail Complex Deferred Maintenance Project: To improve overall experience and visitor access, this project will reduce deferred maintenance on approximately 50 miles of trails.

* South Fork Salmon River Road Pavement Rehabilitation: This project is necessary to improve access and protect critical Chinook Salmon Habitat in the South Fork Salmon River corridor. The project will provide a pavement leveling course where necessary and a chip seal pavement preservation on the roadway.

* West Zone Campground Reconstruction (Phase 1): To improve visitor services, reduce deferred maintenance, and improve accessibility at Horse Cabin Flat, Huckleberry and Cabin Creek campgrounds, this project will fund survey and design. Phase 2 will implement the design work completed in phase 1.

In addition to the projects listed above and as part of a multi-Forest project with the Boise, Salmon-Challis and Payette National Forests, deferred maintenance on several airstrips that serve the recreating public and Forest Service operations will be accomplished.

The funding authorized by the GAOA serves as a catalyst for rural economic development and employment opportunities through investments in land and water conservation. The investments will enhance recreational access to public lands, conserve working forests vital for local economies, and protect vital watersheds and wildlife habitat. These investments in rural infrastructure and conservation underscore the Forest Service’s commitment to managing public lands for all Americans.

Building on the LRF success the agency saw in FY 2021, the FY 2022 investments provide the Forest Service with an opportunity to address deferred maintenance backlog on four projects. When completed, the projects are expected to address $3,380,270 of deferred maintenance and significantly improve the recreation opportunity and safety for all visitors.

To view all GAOA projects nationally, please view this interactive map: (link). For 2021, the Payette National Forest had nine projects selected for GAOA funding, including a variety of deferred maintenance tasks such as road bridge repairs, trail maintenance, campground upgrades, and guard station refurbishment.

For additional details on all Payette National Forest GAOA projects visit: (link).

For additional information about the Forest Service implementation of the Great American Outdoors Act, visit: (link).

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Tribal Liaison
DFO – Southwest Idaho RAC
Payette National Forest
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Draft Decision Notice Released for the Rapid River Travel Management Project

New Meadows, Idaho, June 23, 2022 – The New Meadows Ranger District of the Payette National Forest announces the release of the draft decision notice (DN) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) for the Rapid River Travel Management Project. This marks the beginning of the administrative review (objection) period for the project.

The project area is located approximately fifteen miles northwest of the town of New Meadows, Idaho in Adams County. The project’s responsible official, New Meadows District Ranger Dana Harris, has selected the non-motorized use alternative that was analyzed in the environmental assessment as the selected alternative for the draft DN. The selected alternative will designate 25.7 miles of existing National Forest System trail as open to foot and horse traffic only, including sections of trail within the Rapid River Wild River corridor to comply with Wild River regulations. Mechanized and motorized use will not be allowed on the trails designated as open to foot and horse traffic only, except for certain management activity exceptions as allowed at under the regulations, such as chainsaw use to by Forest Service employees to clear trails. The trails affected by the decision include portions of Rapid River Trail 177, North Star Trail 183, Indian Spring Trail 184, Echols Ridge Trail 187, Black Lake Creek Trail 188, and Cub Creek Trail 362.

The decision is essentially an administrative change, as the decision does not include any other activities other than the designation of trail use on existing trails. The sections of trail included in this decision have been managed as non-motorized use since 2010 because of a settlement agreement that prohibited motorized use of the trails until further review could be completed.

“I appreciate the public involvement and carefully considered all comments as we align management direction and retain the unique experience in Rapid River. The next step will be to work with motorized users to find the right place on the New Meadows District to enhance the single-track motorized experience,” shared Harris.

The draft DN and FONSI provide more details on the selected alternative and decision. These documents, along with other project documents, are available online at (link). Questions regarding the project can be directed to Dana Harris at 208-514-5809 or dana.harris@usda.gov.

Objections on the draft DN and FONSI will be accepted for forty-five days from the publication of the legal notice in the newspaper of record, the Star News, which is anticipated to be published on June 23, 2022. The legal notice provides details on how to submit an objection. A copy of the legal notice is available on the project’s webpage.

A final decision on the project will not be made until after the objection process has been completed.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Tribal Liaison
DFO – Southwest Idaho RAC
Payette National Forest
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Cold July Forest Restoration Project on the Payette National Forest Moves Forward

McCall, Idaho, June 25, 2022 – Payette National Forest Supervisor Linda Jackson approved the Cold July Forest Restoration Project on the New Meadows Ranger District of the Payette National Forest. The project area is located just outside of New Meadows, Idaho in Adams County.

This decision approves the implementation of vegetation management activities and associated road related management activities across approximately 30,000 acres of the district. The project is designed to improve the health of forest stands; increase insect and disease resiliency; reduce tree densities and fuel loadings to result in less intense fire behavior. Once complete, the project will facilitate effective wildland fire response; and enhance habitat for the northern Idaho ground squirrel and white-headed woodpecker. The decision comes after extensive public involvement and environmental analysis over the past year.

“I want to thank members of the public who participated in the review of this project,” said Linda Jackson, Payette National Forest Supervisor. “This project will further increase the resiliency of the forest in the area, promote fire adapted communities such as New Meadows, Tamarack and the Meadows Valley, and assist our firefighters in addressing wildfires that may occur in this area, while also providing for and improving wildlife habitat for two key species.”

More information on the project’s activities and decision rationale are available in the final decision notice and associated at (link). Questions regarding the project can be directed to Dana Harris at 208-514-5809 or dana.harris@usda.gov.
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Critter News:

2FireworksPets-a
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F&G warns about aggressive deer during fawning season

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is advising people to leash their pets and give deer a wide berth as fawning season can lead to aggressive deer behavior.

Mule deer moms are protective of their fawns and sometimes act aggressively if they feel their fawn is in danger, said Regan Berkley, regional wildlife manager for Idaho Fish and Game in McCall.

Mothers often leave their fawns hidden while they go and forage, Berkley said. If the hiding place is near homes or bike paths, people and their pets can unwittingly walk very close to the babies.

“When a deer feels like her fawn is in danger, her two options are flight or fight,” she said

Although deer will typically choose to run away, some will confront and stomp at people and dogs they perceive as threats to their fawns.

Idaho Department of Fish and Game encourages the following practices;

* Always give deer a wide berth.
* Never intentionally approach a deer.
* Keep dogs on leashes.
* Leave deer fawns alone and move away promptly if one is sighted.

Contact the Idaho Department of Fish and Game in McCall at 208-634-8137 for more information.

source: The Star-News June 23, 2022
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Dog dies after being left in hot car in Meridian: ‘This death was completely preventable’

Last year, the Idaho Humane Society received more than 400 calls for pets locked in hot cars.

Shirah Matsuzawa June 23, 2022 KTVB

It’s something we hear about every year, hot days means hot cars for your pets. Communications Manager for the Idaho Humane Society, Kristine Schellhaas, said a dog died after its owner left it in a hot car in Meridian.

The truck was parked in the sun with the windows cracked. Schellhaas said at the time, it was 84 degrees outside, but inside the car was 147 degrees.

“This death was completely preventable. This person chose to put their dog in a car and we really recommend leaving your pets at home,” Schellhaas said.

continued:
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North Idaho hunters shoot grizzly bear in self-defense

The grizzly came out of the brush and approached the two hunters up to close range as they attempted to retrieve a harvested black bear in the Ruby Creek drainage.

KTVB Staff June 21, 2022

While black bear hunting in the Ruby Creek drainage June 8, two Idaho hunters shot and killed an approaching grizzly bear out of self defense, Idaho Fish and Game announced.

As the two hunters attempted to retrieve a black bear they just harvested, when the sub-adult male grizzly came out of the brush and approached the hunters. The pair backed away from the bear while yelling, but it continued towards them.

Idaho Fish and Game (IDFG) said one of the hunters shot and killed the bear at close range. Neither hunter was injured during the encounter.

continued:
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Remainder of Lower Salmon River set to close for Chinook fishing June 26

June 24, 2022 Local News 8

Fishing for Chinook salmon on the remainder of the Lower Salmon River will be closed effectively Sunday, June 26 at the end of fishing hours.

This closure is for the portion of the Lower Salmon River from the Hammer Creek boat ramp upstream to the uppermost boat ramp at Vinegar Creek.

The Little Salmon River will remain open.

continued:
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Fish and Game News:

June 21, 2022 – South Fork Salmon River Chinook Fishery Update

By Jordan Messner, Fisheries Regional Manager
Tuesday, June 21, 2022

The South Fork Salmon fishery is officially open, but not a whole lot has changed since last week regarding run progress. The graph below shows estimated number of South Fork Salmon adult Chinook Salmon that have passed the respective dams so far this year.

continued:
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Upper Salmon River Chinook Salmon Season Update: 6/22/2022

By Greg Schoby, Regional Fisheries Manager
Wednesday, June 22, 2022

Hi everybody, here’s the weekly upper Salmon River Chinook update:

The 2022 Upper Salmon River Chinook Salmon fishery opened up this past Saturday, June 18th. The fishery is now open from 100 yards upstream of the North Fork Salmon River confluence to the posted boundary 100 yards downstream of the Sawtooth Hatchery weir and trap. The daily bag limits are four (4) adipose fin clipped salmon per day, of which only two (2) may be adults. The possession limit is twelve (12) adipose fin clipped salmon, of which only six (6) may be adults, and the statewide season limit is twenty (20) adult Chinook Salmon. Please visit the Chinook Salmon Seasons and Rules webpage for more details.

continued:
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Two yearling bull moose captured in Twin Falls and relocated near Fairfield

By Terry Thompson, Regional Communications Manager
Wednesday, June 22, 2022

Two yearling bull moose wandered into Twin Falls only to be relocated to an area north of Fairfield

On Saturday, June 18, 2022 the Twin Falls County Sheriff reported that they received multiple reports of two moose in close proximity to Highway 30 west of Twin Falls. Fish and Game officers were unable to locate the moose until Sunday evening, June 19, when a decision was made to relocate the moose in the interest of public safety.

continued:
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Two yearling moose captured and removed from Pocatello

By Jennifer Jackson, Regional Communications Manager
Friday, June 24, 2022

At approximately 10 am on Thursday, June 23, Idaho Department of Fish and Game received reports of two moose in the vicinity of Mountain View Cemetery on the south end of 5th Avenue in Pocatello.

Idaho Fish and Game personnel responded and were able to dart and transport the two moose to a more remote location in the region. Both moose were yearling females and appeared to be in good condition. It is not known if the moose were twins or simply traveling together, but yearling moose are often

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Seasonal Humor:

SummerSolsticeHappy-a


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Idaho History June 26, 2022

1979 Mining History of Yellow Pine, Stibnite and Cinnabar

(Part 2 Stibnite)

A Historical Summary And Cultural Resource Study Of Yellow Pine, Stibnite, and Cinnabar, Valley County, Idaho, Stibnite Mining Project

Prepared By Arthur A. Hart, Director Idaho State Historical Society 1979 Chapter 2

Introduction

During the 1979 summer season an intensive literature review, interviews, and field reconnaissance were performed by this investigator under a subcontract with James M. Montgomery, Consulting Engineers, Inc. (JMM) as a subelement of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Stibnite Mining Project Gold Mine and Mill. The Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) was prepared by JMM under a “third party” agreement between the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Payette National Forest, and Canadian Superior Mining (U.S) Ltd.

The report prepared by this investigator is intended to serve as a support document to the DEIS, and be utilized by JMM to meet the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 and Executive Order 11593. These directives require that federal agencies consider the effects of federal, federal-assisted, and federally licensed projects on properties included or eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. The regulations also require that the Advisory Council of Historic Preservation be offered the opportunity to comment on such undertakings. Approval of a cultural resources assessment which includes a historical and archaeological resources evaluation by the Agency Official (Forest Service) and State Historic Preservation Officer is also required.

Information from this report was used by JMM in preparing the DEIS. The results will also be incorporated into the Operating Plan which is currently being developed by JMM. This will ensure that adequate mitigation is implemented where potential adverse effects are determined so that historical/cultural resources are adequately protected.

Methodology

Historic cultural resources in the Stibnite area were inventoried and studied using the following procedures:

1. All available literature on the history of mining in the Stibnite area was searched and studied. Sources used (and cited in the report) include:
a. H.D. Bailey, Stibnite 1978.
b. The Engineering and Mining Journal 1903
c. Prospectus of the Golden Gate Mine 1902
d. The Stibnite Miner 1942-45
e. U.S. Geological Surveys Reports 1921-50
f. Idaho State Mine Inspector’s Reports 1921-50
g. Other serials used included The Idaho County Free Press, Saturday Evening Post, Idaho Power Company Bulletin.

2. Photographs in the collection of the Idaho State Historical Society were used for descriptions of structures no longer extant. Private collections of photographs, including those of Hubert Martin and Ernest Oberbillig were also of great value in reconstructing early Meadow Creek Mine, Yellow Pine Mine, Cinnabar, and the town of Yellow Pine, as well as Stibnite itself at various stages of its development.

3. Field work included on-site inspection of every extant structure known to the most experienced and knowledgeable residents:
a. Ernest E. Oberbillig, whose father J.J. Oberbillig pioneered the claims in the area, personally conducted the author over every road and jeep trail shown on U.S.G.S. maps of the area, and over a number not shown. Oberbillig, whose resume is attached, has known the area for more than 50 years. He personally built a number of the roads in the area.
b. Warren Campbell, Roy Smith, and E. Fay Kissinger also supplied information and suggestions on sites to be investigated.
c. Aerial inspection of the area was made with Oberbillig and pilot Ray Arnold of Cascade, Idaho.

4. Oral history was collected from a number of informants who had known the area in its early days and especially during the 1940’s boom period. Five hours of tapes were made from interviews with Ernest Oberbillig and Hubert Martin. These tapes are on file at the Idaho Historical Society.

5. Documentation of sites and structures was made on film. About 750 existing photographs are on file at the Idaho State Historical Society, in addition to those included in the report.

6. Maps dating from 1902 until the present were studied to establish early trails and wagon roads, mine locations, and sites of structures.

7. Special attention was focused on areas which might be impacted by proposed mining activities in the area. These were found to be minor, but are discussed in the recommendations following the Stibnite section of the report.

History Of Stibnite, Idaho

The town of Stibnite was located 14 miles east of Yellow Pine near the junction of Meadow Creek and the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River. The average elevation of the camp is about 6500 feet above sea level. The past tense must be used to describe the town, since all of the structures which housed Stibnite’s World War II population of more than 1000 people have been moved away or torn down. Only the ruins of the mines and their buildings remain.

Most of the discoveries of gold, mercury, and antimony can be dated from the Thunder Mountain gold rush of 1902, but J.J. Oberbillig, who was in the area in 1917, and who eventually succeeded in consolidating many of the claims, was of the opinion that part of the network of trails in the area dated back as far as 1864 when most of Central Idaho was prospected. He said there was a trail up the East Fork as early as 1891. (2)

According to Oberbillig, the old-timers rarely forgot to prospect for other minerals as well as gold, but at the turn of the century there was no way antimony or mercury could be mined profitably. For this reason, prospector’s chief interest was in gold. Even at Meadow Creek, where much gold and silver ore was found, it was too difficult to mill economically in the early days. A man named Baker dug the first hole in the hill just west of where the Stibnite store was located, according to Oberbillig, writing in 1942. He also credited a Mr. Bartholomy and J. Pringle Smith with the discovery of what were later called the Hennessy claims on the East Fork. He says that Bartholomy worked at the head of Cinnabar Creek from 1896 until 1904. (3) These were primarily quicksilver claims.

In 1919 Al Hennessy organized the Meadow Creek Silver Mines Co., with J.L. Niday, a Boise attorney and Oberbillig, a mining engineer and assayer, as partners. In 1921 Oberbillig formed the United Mercury Mines Co., made up of Hennessy’s Meadow Creek mine and Pringle Smith’s Hermes Mercury mine on Cinnabar Creek. In building trails to connect these mines, two of Oberbillig’s workers discovered tungsten in scheelite, associated with the antimony float rocks. (4) The significance of these discoveries was not realized at the time. The State Mine Inspector’s report lists as work done by United Mercury in 1921 construction of a new camp, and about 930 feet of tunnels. An average of 11 men were employed. Mercury was extracted at Cinnabar using a 6 cylindrical tube retort. (5) Between 1921 and 1925 Fred Franz, George Kennedy, and George Brewer had driven hundreds of feet of tunnel at Meadow Creek, opening up an ore body with half a million tons of antimony-silver-gold ore. (6) The company had a total of 7,000 feet of tunnel by 1924. (7) In 1926 a small tonnage of high-grade antimony ore was produced from the Babbitt Metal Group. (8)

In 1925 the Homestake Mine, largest gold producer in the United States, seriously considered purchase of the Meadow Creek mine, but the company’s metallurgists turned it down as the ores were to complex to separate economically. (9)

The turning point carne on May 17, 1927 when United Mercury Mines optioned Cinnabar and Meadow Creek mines to F.W. Bradley for $1.5 million. Bradley, called by J.J. Oberbillig “the most outstanding and the most fearless mine operator in the world,” (10) was then president of half a dozen companies, including the Bunker Hill & Sullivan Mining Company of Wallace, Idaho, the Alaska Juneau Gold Mining Company, and the Alaska Treadwell Gold Mining company. (11)

In 1927 there was only one small duplex cabin at Meadow Creek, according to State Mine Inspector Stewart Campbell, and the old Thunder Mountain road to the south was nearly impassable. In 1928 two large boilers, steam engines, a complete sawmill, a compressor and other mining equipment were hauled to the head of Meadow Creek and lowered down the steep mountain side from the summit a distance of 4 miles. Over much of this distance, Campbell reported, “It was necessary to let the equipment down by means of snubbing blocks and tackle.” (12)

Monday Camp was established 2 miles below the Meadow Creek camp at Stibnite. Two long tunnels were to be driven from this point — the Cinnabar and the Monday. A land strip was constructed at Meadow Creek and a new road was built 10 miles down the East Fork to connect with 4 miles built cooperatively with the Forest Service out of Yellow Pine. This road opened to automobile and truck traffic for the first time in the spring of 1929, replacing pack and saddle horses. (13)

The ore produced in 1929 from the three independent mining operations at Meadow Creek, Cinnabar and Monday tunnels was of high enough value to warrant further expansion. In 1930 massive amounts of capital were poured into the Stibnite operation by the Bradley Company. A large hydroelectric power plant was built, fed from an 11,000 foot redwood-stave pipe, and a 1620 foot steel pipe to a Pelton wheel. Unfortunately, ice built up inside this pipe, diminishing flow. (14)

H.D. Bailey, who was actively engaged in the Bradley Company operations at Stibnite from June, 1928, until May, 1950, recalled that he and Jim Leahy “climbed the hill with snowshoes many times to drill the pipe and see how the ice was building up. Eventually a shut down occurred and we had to wait for warmer spring weather. Insulation was added after that.” (15)

Bailey wrote and printed an excellent short history of Stibnite for his friends in 1978. Since he was manager from before the war until 1950, his observations and memories are both reliable and entertaining.

Electric power made possible much faster development of the tunnels at Meadow Creek and Monday Camp. A 400 foot shaft was dug at Meadow Creek. In 1931 a 150 ton-per-day crushing, concentrating, and treatment plant was constructed. The difficult problem was to separate by flotation the extremely fine Stibnite (antimony, sulphur) from the gold-bearing Pyrite-Arsenopyrite (iron, sulphur, arsenic). (16) “They hoped to market the Stibnite concentrate and they expected to recover the gold, as it had been done in other mines, by roasting and cyaniding the iron concentrate.” (17)

The operation lost over $100,000, even after it was concluded that it was cheaper to ship the gold-bearing concentrate to the Salt Lake City lead smelters for processing. (18) Altogether, the Meadow Creek mine between 1932 and 1938 produced $1,547,000 worth of gold, $116,000 of silver, and $215,000 of antimony. (19) Since the company had invested $1,300,000 by 1931, (20) these later losses, in addition to further development costs, made the entire operation about a break-even venture. Bailey points out that by 1937 most of the economic ore at Meadow Creek had been mined out, with a profit of less than 80 cents per ton.

After the death of F.W. Bradley, the company continued under new leadership within the family. According to J.J. Oberbillig, Jack Bradley’s leadership was of critical importance to the later success of Stibnite. (21) Jack Bradley was executive vice president and had full responsibility for the Idaho operations. H.D. Bailey was made manager of the Stibnite operation at this time, and in 1939 the Yellow Pine mine made a small profit.

War had broken out in Europe with Hitler’s invasion of Poland on September 1, 1939. The U.S. Bureau of Mines decided at once to develop the nation’s strategic reserves of antimony. Diamond drilling revealed enormous reserves of antimony ore on East Fork, and and tungsten as well. The tungsten was found with calcium in a mineral called Scheelite which has a blue fluorescence, visible under ultraviolet light.

Bradley confesses to being unimpressed at first, but tungsten became one of the chief strategic products of the mine in World War II. Stibnite produced nearly half of the tungsten mined in the United States during the war, and 95 percent of the antimony. (22) Tungsten is used as a hardener with other metals to make them able to withstand extremely high temperatures. It was used during the war in armor-piercing shells, and in the filaments of lamps, radio, radar and x-ray tubes.

Antimony also was used as an alloy to strengthen other metals. Mixed with lead it was used in storage batteries. It has strong flame-resistant qualities which were used during the war to treat wooden flight decks on aircraft carriers. Antimony oxide is used to make textiles, paints, and plastics flame resistant.

Because of the war-time rush to get into production, Stibnite became a boom town on a scale Idaho mining had never known. With plenty of investment money, the great camp was pushed forward as fast as humanly possible. “World War II had started and suddenly what had been a struggling small gold mine with antimony that no-one wanted became the leading tungsten producer and it was one of the metals needed for the war effort,” wrote H. D. Bailey. (23)

Vertical shafts driven in the stream bed of the East Fork in 1941 had revealed a high grade body of tungsten oxide 80 feet thick. Further digging showed no tungsten but lots more antimony. To get some production fast an underground mine was started, even though an open pit mine was projected. To divert the East Fork of the South Fork of Salmon river to clear the way for open pit mining, the Bailey Tunnel was dug in 1942-43. This 4000 foot tunnel drained the river from Monday Camp into Sugar Creek.

Its completion on March 16, 1943 was hailed with a banner headline in the Stibnite Miner of March 24. The two crews digging from opposite ends scored “a perfect hit,” according to mine foreman Tom Fleming. (24) With the river out of the way, the problems of the underground miners were somewhat relieved. Bailey recalled that the mine under the river was “one of the wettest ever,” and that even after the river had been diverted, the power shovel crews cursed the square sets from the underground mine when they had to dig them out of the open pit. (25)

By 1945 a half million tons of tungsten ore had been removed from the deposit at the big pit. Its total value was $32 million, but after all deductions for capital, operating expenses, and previous losses, the net profit was about $4 million. (26) More important than the profit was the contribution Stibnite made to the war effort. “A supply services general reported that without Stibnite’s tungsten the war might have lasted another year and cost 1,000,000 more lives.” (27)

After the war the tungsten was gone, but the Bradley company continued expansion to mill the low grade gold and gold-antimony ores. There had already been accumulated a large stockpile of antimony concentrates from the years when tungsten was the more important product of the pit operation. It was now planned to mine additional antimony with power shovels, move it through two crushers by conveyors to bunkers at the top of the pit, and then truck it 2 miles to the mill at Meadow Creek. The new plant was put into operation in the fall of 1946 and by the spring of 1947 was running smoothly at the planned capacity of 600,000 tons a year. (28)

To overcome inflating costs, with the price of gold fixed at $35 an ounce, the company decided to build its own smelter at Meadow Creek rather than ship out the concentrate to Salt Lake City. Tests run at the Bradley’s Bunker Hill and Sullivan electric smelting furnace proved favorable. In May, 1948, work on the smelter began, and again new housing had to be built for construction crews and additional employees.

Bailey recalls 1949 as a very bad year for Stibnite. The electric furnace didn’t work very well and had to be rebuilt, the crushing plant at the pit burned down and also had to be rebuilt, and the heaviest snow in years buried the camp. The smelter continued to give problems, and although these were worked out by 1951, the market for antimony oxide collapsed. June of 1952 saw the end of production, (29) and by 1955 the dismantling of the plant and the moving away of the houses had begun. Today not one house remains and most mine structures are in ruins.

Tests conducted in the 1970s indicated that there are still several million tons of gold and antimony ore in the valley of the East Fork where the wartime Stibnite operation took place. Both metals are now bringing prices on the world market which makes further development of the Stibnite ore bodies likely.

An Architectural History Of Stibnite

Throughout the entire history of the Stibnite area, its man-made structures have been in a continuous process of change. In addition to natural decay, accelerated rapidly in a region of deep winter snows, sub-zero temperatures, and periods of thaw and frost heaves, the architecture of Stibnite has been subjected to periods of extreme growth and change brought about by World War II and the feverish demand for tungsten and antimony. Houses have been built as rapidly as humanly possible, used for a few boom years, and hauled away for useful lives elsewhere. Mine and mill buildings, their usefulness over, have been torn down for salvage or left to decay.

Figure 2-4 shows the Meadow Creek camp as it existed in the early 1920’s and 1930’s. H.D. Bailey recalled his first sight of the camp in 1928: “There was only one building at Meadow Creek when I arrived. It had been built of logs and was about fifteen by sixty feet in size. Part of it was old even then and was being used as a cook shack. The newer part served as an office, commissary and staff bunk room (attic).” (30)

Figure 2-4. Early Meadow Creek Mining Camp
Figure2-4Two earlier photographs of this building in the collection of the Idaho Historical Society (31) show it to have been of the classic “double crib” plan used for barns in the east: two rectangular cabins of equal or nearly equal size are separated by an open “threshing floor” covered by the continuous roof of the two cribs. At Meadow Creek an additional open sided porch extends to the north and a smaller log addition, with lower roof, is on the south end. Each crib of the main structure contains a window on the visible east front, apparently consisting of two square 4-pane sashes, one of which slid aside for ventilation. The “threshing floor” portion between the cribs was apparently walled with logs on the back and open in front. Due to the span of the roof in this section, post supports have been added.

LogCabin1

LogCabin2

Large Douglas fir logs were used in this cabin, with “V” notching (sometimes called steeple notching) locking the corners together. This technique, known for centuries, was used in Idaho log cabins at least as early as 1863. (32)

In 1929, after the Bradley Company had begun developing the Meadow Creek mine, a steam sawmill was skidded in over the old Thunder Mountain road. From then on the mine, mill, bunkhouse and other buildings in the camp were made of sawn lumber. Bailey says “there was an excellent stand of large fir trees nearby,” (33) presumably Douglas fir. These first buildings of lumber were all of board and batten construction. There were also a number of house tents on wooden platforms during the active construction periods at Stibnite, both in the late 1920s and again in the early 1940s. These were of a type traditionally called “sheepherder tents” in Idaho, made of 10 oz canvas. Those used for sleeping usually measured only 8 x 10 feet. (34)

By 1930 there were more than a dozen buildings at Meadow Creek including a large horse and dairy barn (35) and a post office. H.D. Bailey had applied for a post office, submitting Meadow Creek, Bradley, and Stibnite as possible names. Since the first two names were already in use, Stibnite was chosen by the Post Office department and Bailey became the first postmaster. He recalls that his average income from the government for this responsibility was $25 a month. Mail delivery was once a week, by ski-equipped plane in winter, using the new landing strip, and by truck the rest of the year. (36)

Monday camp, two miles below Meadow Creek Camp, also was the site of much building in this period. An excellent photograph (37) made in 1931 (Figure 2-5) shows the portals of the Cinnabar and Monday tunnels, a trestle over the river built of sawn timbers rather than logs, and ten buildings. The largest of these is a three story bunk house and mess hall with horizontal siding. The ruin of this structure still stands, its walls covered with the brick-patterned asphalt siding added by Martin Construction Company in 1942. All but one or two of the rest of these buildings are of board and batten construction. Galvanized iron roofing was used for strength as well as to shed snow.

Figure 2-5. Early Monday Camp (1931) showing Cinnabar and Monday Tunnels.
Figure2-5The war-induced boom in construction at Stibnite produced almost continuous expansion and change for half a dozen years. Every available old building from the 1930s period was expanded or modified for new uses. At first, even the old log buildings of the 1920s were pressed into service, but by 1945, all had been torn down.

Hubert Martin, of the Martin Construction Company which built most of Stibnite’s 160 houses and many of the mine and mill buildings as well, recalls what it was like when the pressure was on in 1941 and 1942 to house more than 1000 people in a few months. (38) Because lumber could not be obtained fast enough to keep up with demand, Martin had to buy Fay Kissinger’s sawmill at Yellow Pine and operate all through the winter of 1941-42. “We cut her down one day and sawed it in the mill the next day, and hauled it to Stibnite the next day, and beat it into the buildings the next day.” (39) Since snows were over five feet deep that winter, Martin usually had to have half his people shoveling to keep the other working.

Most buildings at Stibnite were sheathed diagonally with green one-inch boards to give lateral bracing to the 2 x 4 balloon framing. Because buildings were often erected on frozen ground, leveling and blocking up was necessary each spring. Only a few houses at Meadow Creek ever had poured concrete foundations.

Martin’s first contract was for only 5 houses at the mouth of Midnight Creek, but he eventually built over 150 more. A few of the first he put up were prefabricated in part in Tacoma, Washington. These prefab units were for the exterior walls, and were made of 2 x 2 studs sandwiched between plywood. Despite their thinness, the insulation (40) inside these walls was good enough to make them quite warm In winter. (40)

Several expedients were employed to create the “instant housing” needed for construction crews, mill workers, truck drivers, miners, and supervisory personnel. Like all small cities, Stibnite soon had a large number of people performing specialized services which required special buildings as well as housing. There was a series of bunkhouses (Figure 2-6) four-room school, a service station, a general store, a hospital with surgical facilities, a large recreation hall with a movie theater-auditorium, bowling lanes, restaurant, and eventually even a night club.

Figure 2-6. Bunkhouses and ruins of dumping bunkers at Stibnite.
Figure2-6Too many people had been killed driving the treacherous mountain road to Yellow Pine, 14 miles away. (41) There was also a city hall and fire department. (42)

Some of the construction crews had to be housed in platform tents, even into winter. Martin built 100 “box car houses,” so-called because they were 12 x 24 feet with rounded roofs made by bending 16 foot boards over a timber ridge-beam. Later, most of these were combined to make 24-foot square houses with conventional roof trusses added. Whenever possible, Martin Construction prefabricated trusses, walls, and other elements for these buildings at its plant in Cascade, Idaho. (43)

Although Hubert Martin drew nearly all of the plans for Stibnite houses himself, he used the services of Boise-Payette Lumber Company’s planning department for some o£ the other buildings, such as the school and hospital. (44) The recreation hall (Figure 2-7), largest of the service buildings, was designed by Martin himself. Nearly all of the mill work, including sash and doors, was purchased from Boise-Payette Lumber Company at Cascade. The siding on most of the houses also came from outside, and was applied over the diagonal sheathing of green lumber sawed at Yellow Pine a few days before use.

Figure 2-7. Ruins of Recreation Hall destroyed for salvage.
Figure2-7In addition to one and two-bedroom houses, duplexes were built at Stibnite. The clusters of houses in the lodgepole pine were laid out like residential neighborhoods anywhere else. In its very first issue September 16, 1942, the Stibnite Miner announced a contest to name sections of the camp and the new streets. The names the paper used to head its local news columns were apparently already in common use, however, and they are the ones that lasted: Midnight Creek, Fiddle Creek, Lower Camp, Upper Camp, and Sugar Creek. (45)

The last major construction at Stibnite occurred after the war. The crushing plant in the big pit and an enlarged mill were built in 1946-48. A rod mill was the most important addition to the mill equipment at this time. The building of the big electric smelter in 1948-49 and its troubled operation, which came to an end in 1952, was Stibnite’s final chapter. (46) The smelter, a large and impressive complex of structures at Meadow Creek, was framed in steel and sheathed in corrugated iron coated with asphalt to prevent acid corrosion from the smelter fumes (Figure 2-8). (47)

Figure 2-8. Photograph showing ruins of the mill and smelter destroyed for salvage.
Figure2-8The most striking features of the smelter visible from the outside were the tall open-work condenser towers. A series of 26 huge pipes, shaped like hairpins condensed the antimony concentrate from gas back into a fine powder for packing in drums or bags. From there it was shipped to a final smelting operation elsewhere. Most of the new smelter was dismantled and shipped to Kellogg in 1958. (48)

Stibnite’s houses have had an interesting subsequent history. Between 1950 and 1964 Warren Campbell moved all but 5 of these buildings to other Idaho towns. Yellow Pine got 12, McCall about 30, and some went as far north as Whitebird and others as far south as Bruneau. Emmett, Payette, Donnelly, Cascade, Riggins, New Meadows, Council, Cambridge, Hornet Creek, and Big Creek all contain tangible souvenirs of one of Idaho’s most remarkable boom towns. (49)

Recommendations On Potential Significance For Stibnite

The potential historical significance of the Stibnite area is primarily related to the production of strategic minerals needed in World War II. Stibnite produced nearly half the tungsten and 95 percent of the antimony mined in the United States during the war.

Although once of considerable architectural and engineering interest, Stibnite today is either in an advanced state of decay and ruin, or has been dismantled and hauled away. The impact of rapid wartime development of the area on older mining artifacts and sites was considerable, virtually obliterating them. The only architectural resources in the drainage of the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River which are close to their original condition are two log cabins at some distance from the site of Stibnite itself. (The Mountain Chief and Olson cabins are discussed separately later in this report.)

The landing strip built at Meadow Creek camp in 1928 was one of the early ones in the Idaho mountains. However, the present strip is enlarged and altered, and actually dates back only to the 1950’s.

Potential Eligibility For The National Register Of Historic Places

Stibnite is potentially eligible for the National Register as an historic site. Architecturally, the two cabins mentioned above would appear to be eligible only as part of possible historic district whose theme was the mining history of the area. Such a district could logically be divided into two parts: 1) An area from the 6800 foot level, on Meadow Creek north to USLM 3246 on Sugar Creek, encompassing all mining sites within the drainage of the East Fork and its tributaries, and 2) An area from the 6800 foot level in Cinnabar Creek south to the 7360 foot level on Fern Creek (Figure 2-9). [*Note Figure 2-9 was not in the document.] This area could include the Cinnabar mine, the remains of Fern mine, and the Mountain Chief cabin on Fern Creek.

On the basis of oral history, only one extant structure in the potential district meets the National Register age criterion of 50 years — the Mountain Chief cabin. However, mining activity in the area is considerably older, and its sites and artifacts are eligible on historical rather than architectural grounds.

Additional Recommendations For Consideration

Because of its recognized historic significance, the Stibnite area should be 1) further documented with drawings and photographs; and 2) studied for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. The Olson and Mountain Chief cabins should be preserved for their historic and architectural values, and a preservation and restoration program developed. Since most of the other buildings and structures in the Stibnite area have either been removed or are in an advanced state of ruin, documentation of their present state is probably adequate.

Mining activities proposed by Canadian Superior in the area do not appear to have any significant impact on historic resources, with the exception of the Meadow Creek landing field which would become the site of a leach plant. The field in its present state is considerably less than 50 years old; thus, its use for this purpose will have to be measured against environmental impacts resulting from an alternative site selection. Adequate documentation of the original field exists, and of the later, alterations to it. Further documentation of its present condition and form could be done before construction of the leach plant. The landing field could also be restored to its original use at the completion of the project.

Notes on Stibnite

1. The Stibnite Miner on 2 October 1942, p. 2, estimated the population as 2000. This undoubtedly included a large number of transient and temporary residents engaged in building the mill structures and urgently needed housing. Martin Construction Co. alone had about 200 men at work in Stibnite at this time. By 1945 the resident population of Stibnite was “almost 600” according to H.D. Bailey, manager at the time. 1000 is probably a fair average for the war years.
2. J.J. Oberbillig, annual report to stockholders of the United Mercury Mines Co. (Boise, Idaho, 31 December 1943) p. 1.
3. J.J. Oberbillig, The Stibnite Miner 28 October 1942, p. 1.
4. J.J. Oberbillig. Ibid.
5. 23rd Annual Report on the Mining Industry of Idaho for the Year 1921, p. 124.
6. Ernest Oberbillig. “Two Funerals for Al Hennessy”, True west (October 1976) p. 9.
7. Mining Industry, 1924, p. 213.
8. Ibid. 1926, p. 235.
9. Ibid. 1933, p. 34.
10. J.J. Oberbillig, The Stibnite Miner.
11. Mining Industry 1933, p. 32.
12. Ibid. p. 35.
13. Ibid. p. 35.
14. H.D. Bailey Stibnite, Idaho (1978) p. 4.
15. Ibid. p. 4.
16. Ibid. p. 4.
17. Ibid. p. 4.
18. Ibid. p. 4.
19. The Stibnite Miner, 12 May 1942, p. 1.
20. Mining Industry, 1933, p. 38.
21. J.J. Oberbillig., The Stibnite Miner.
22. George C. Young. “Stibnite”, Idaho Power Company Bulletin (Boise, Idaho, November 1950) p. 3.
23. Bailey, p. 14.
24. The Stibnite Miner 24 March 1943, p. 1.
25. Bailey, p. 14.
26. Ibid. p. 17.
27. Neil M. Clark, “Want to Get Away From it All?”, Saturday Evening Post (8 December 1951) p. 33.
28. Bailey, p. 19.
29. Ibid. p. 22.
30. Ibid. p. 2-3.
31. Idaho State Historical Society photos (63-160. 265 C and 76-179. 6. (hereafter cited as ISHS).
32. Arthur A. Hart. Historic Boise (Boise, Idaho, 1979)., p. 14.
33. Bailey, p. 3.
34. ISHS photos 60-99.31 and 63-160. 106.
35. Ibid.
36. Bailey, p. 4.
37. ISHS photo 66-72. 1.
38. Hubert Martin, interview with the author 21 November, 1979.
39. Ibid.
40. Ibid.
41. Bailey, p. 27.
42. The Stibnite Miner (Stibnite, Idaho, 2 June 1943) p. 1.
43. Martin, Ibid.
44. Ibid.
45. The Stibnite Miner, 16 September 1942, p. 1.
46. Bailey, p. 22.
47. Martin, Ibid.
48. Ernest Oberbillig, Ibid.
49. Warren Campbell, Ibid.

source: AHGP – Valley County Idaho
[h/t SMc]
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Full Text: “A Historical Summary and Cultural Resource Study Of Yellow Pine Stibnite and Cinnabar Valley County Idaho Stibnite Mining Project”
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Photos

Redwood Pipeline

5Pic3PipelineOfRedwood-a

photo by George Nock
Back of photo: “Water Line From Ceder Wood Circa 1931. 2 1/2 Miles Long.”
courtesy: Sandy McRae (personal correspondence.)
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Stibnite – Looking into the Pit

StibnitePit-a

from: Idaho State Historical Society, Copyright Undetermined (Undated)
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Stibnite photo c. 1951-1953

Stibnite6-a-a

photo shared by Sandy McRae courtesy Jim Collord (personal correspondence.)
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Moving a Stibnite House

StibniteHouse-a

House being moved along the East Fork Road from Stibnite. 1 mile north of Yellow Pine.

Hat tip to Garrel Hathaway for sharing this photo. Thanks to: Old Gem County Photos.
courtesy Sandy McRae and Leiana Rogers Knight
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Stibnite c. mid-1970s

stibnite3-a

source: Carol and Jim photo album – “My summer in Stibnite salvaging barn wood in the mid 1970’s.”
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Further Reading

Link to 1979 Mining History of Yellow Pine, Stibnite and Cinnabar Pt 1
Link to 1979 Mining History of Yellow Pine, Stibnite and Cinnabar Pt 2
Link to 1979 Mining History of Yellow Pine, Stibnite and Cinnabar Pt 3
Link to Winter of 1948-1949
Link to Stibnite History table of contents
Link to Mid-1970’s Carol and Jim photo album: “My summer in Stibnite salvaging barn wood in the mid 1970’s.”
Link to Idaho State Historical Society Mining [Photo] Collection
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page updated July 30, 2022

Road Reports June 26, 2022

Jun 18 – Upper Johnson Creek Open
Jun 22 – Deadwood Summit Open
Jun 23 – Lick Creek Road Open

Please share road reports. Most back country roads are not maintained. This time of year there is still deep snow in some higher elevations, especially north facing area. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are dry dusty. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Update from ITD May 19, 2022
Construction closures will end May 27 on Idaho 55 near Smiths Ferry.
One-way alternating traffic is set to replace closures from 10 a.m. to noon on Mondays through Fridays.
Both lanes will be open Friday mornings through Sundays.
To learn more about the spring construction schedule, visit link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (June 22) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Note: South Fork salmon seasons opens June 18th. Watch for increased traffic and pedestrians.
Old report Wednesday (June 15) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Old report Wednesday (June 15) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.

Johnson Creek Road: Opened June 18th
Report Wednesday (June 22) Mail truck driver says the upper end is a little rough, county grader is working today.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened June 23rd
No current report on road conditions. (Likely not graded yet.)
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report, likely to open by 4th of July weekend.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
Report from Perpetua (May 25) “The Valley County Road department instructed us to take down the gate on the Stibnite Road above Profile Creek on May 18th.
“We have road grading of the Stibnite Road scheduled to begin on June 6th, the grading should take about two weeks.”
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
Report Saturday (June 18) from motorcycle riders seeing how far they could get towards Monumental summit: “We made it to the turn at upper Fern Creek towards Cinnabar. Which is about a mile before the turn for Meadow Creek Lookout. It was solid snow floor from that point on.” – SA

courtesy SA
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Opened June 22nd
No current report on conditions. (Likely not graded.)
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Likely open
No current report.
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:
————-

Weather Reports June 19-25, 2022

Jun 19 Weather:

At 9am it was 55 degrees, dark clouds – nearly overcast and a breeze. At 1pm light gray overcast and light breeze. At 325pm it was 56 degrees, darker overcast and blustery breezes. Misty sprinkles started just before 350pm. Steady rain at 410pm and done by 430pm, then a few little sprinkles on and off. At 815pm it was 50 degrees and dark overcast. At 1030pm it looked cloudy. Shower likely before 8am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 20, 2022 at 09:00AM
Cracked overcast, foggy peaks
Max temperature 61 degrees F
Min temperature 42 degrees F
At observation 46 degrees F
Precipitation 0.02 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Jun 20 Weather:

At 9am it was 46 degrees, cracks in the overcast and fog belts on peaks and ridges. At 1150am dark overcast and a short light sprinkle. Breezy at 1230pm. Rain shower started 3pm for maybe 10 minutes. At 325pm it was 56 degrees, mostly cloudy and starting to rain – for about 10-15 minutes, then another short sprinkle around 350pm. Showers and sprinkles on and off late afternoon ending around 7pm. At 825pm it was 54 degrees and mostly cloudy (small white clouds.) Still light out at 10pm, perhaps some thin haze?

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 21, 2022 at 09:00AM
Clear, light breeze
Max temperature 62 degrees F
Min temperature 34 degrees F
At observation 47 degrees F
Precipitation 0.05 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Jun 21 Weather:

At 9am it was 47 degrees, clear sky and light breeze. At 1230pm it was partly cloudy and warm. At 330pm it was 75 degrees and mostly clear. At 830pm it was 63 degrees, clear and calm. At 12am it was clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 22, 2022 at 09:00AM
Clear sky, heavy dew
Max temperature 76 degrees F
Min temperature 38 degrees F
At observation 53 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Jun 22 Weather:

At 9am it was 53 degrees, clear very blue sky and heavy dew. Warm, clear and variable breezes at noon. At 1240pm it was 79 degrees and almost clear. At 330pm it was 82 degrees, almost clear and light breezes. At 840pm it was 69 degrees and partly cloudy. At midnight it was clear and slight breeze.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 23, 2022 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 83 degrees F
Min temperature 42 degrees F
At observation 57 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Jun 23 Weather:

At 9am it was 57 degrees and clear. Power out 904am. At 115pm it was 81 degrees and clear. By 2pm a few clouds and breezy. At 350pm it was 82 degrees, partly cloudy and light breezes. At 445pm breezes gusting up. At 545pm power restored. At 825pm it was 69 degrees, partly clear – mostly high thin wispies, and light breeze. At midnight a little thin haze.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 24, 2022 at 10:00AM
Partly cloudy, breezes
Max temperature 83 degrees F
Min temperature 42 degrees F
At observation 61 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Jun 24 Weather:

At 10am it was 61 degrees, light breeze and partly cloudy. At 115pm it was 70 degrees, partly cloudy and light breezes. At 340pm it was 74 degrees, partly cloudy and a bit breezy. At 830pm it was 62 degrees, almost clear and cool breezes. At 1220am it was 51 degrees and clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 25, 2022 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 75 degrees F
Min temperature 36 degrees F
At observation 50 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Jun 25 Weather:

At 9am it was 50 degrees and clear. At 12pm clear and breezy. At 330pm it was 81 degrees, clear sky and slight breeze. At 835pm it was 66 degrees, clear sky and light breeze. Clear at midnight.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 26, 2022 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 82 degrees F
Min temperature 39 degrees F
At observation 56 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
—————————-

Road Reports June 22, 2022

Please share road reports. Most back country roads are not maintained. This time of year there is still deep snow in some higher elevations, especially north facing area. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are dry and getting dusty with increased traffic. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Update from ITD May 19, 2022
Construction closures will end May 27 on Idaho 55 near Smiths Ferry.
One-way alternating traffic is set to replace closures from 10 a.m. to noon on Mondays through Fridays.
Both lanes will be open Friday mornings through Sundays.
To learn more about the spring construction schedule, visit link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (June 22) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Note: South Fork salmon seasons opens June 18th. Watch for increased traffic and pedestrians.
Old report Wednesday (June 15) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Old report Wednesday (June 15) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.

Johnson Creek Road: Opened June 18th
Report Wednesday (June 22) Mail truck driver says the upper end is a little rough, county grader is working today.
Report Saturday (June 18) road is open, upper Johnson Creek is rough going.
Report Saturday (June 18) “From YP to Donnelly via the Johnson Creek Road travel was typical summer conditions with lots of vehicles.” – C&L
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled travel
Lick Creek should be open by July 4th weekend per the county.
Report Saturday (June 18) “it is definitely not passable.” JB

Lick creek [road] today below Duck Lake campground. – JB
Report late Saturday (June 18) A group has beat their way over the top, lots of snow, not recommended for small vehicles, travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel (likely open by the 4th of July.)
Report Saturday (June 18) “From Edwardsburg to Big Creek Culvert the road is snow free, but lots of trees down that were not cut wide enough to allow passage of larger vehicles/trailers. From the Big Creek Culvert to the intersection with Red Metal Mine road the road is mostly snow bound. From the Red Metal Mine Road to the EFSF road and on to Yellow Pine the roads are travelable by full sized vehicles with trailers. The section from the Big Creek Culvert to the Red Metal Mine intersection is of particular interest to some. This section is snow bound, but not uniformly. There are patches of bare road, and patches of deep snow. There are no major issues with the road other than the snow. So.. The obvious factor controlling when this section will be open to normal highway vehicles is the weather. We did video this section of road, and the link to the video is: (here)” – C&L
Report “Road report for Profile Gap from Monday June 13th. Walked over the top from BC to Yellow Pine. Solid snow floor from the Big Creek culvert on the BC side to just above the switch back on the Yellow Pine side. About 4 feet on top.” – Darren Vaughn

photo courtesy Darren Vaughn
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
Report from Perpetua (May 25) “The Valley County Road department instructed us to take down the gate on the Stibnite Road above Profile Creek on May 18th.
“We have road grading of the Stibnite Road scheduled to begin on June 6th, the grading should take about two weeks.”
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
Report Saturday (June 18) from motorcycle riders seeing how far they could get towards Monumental summit: “We made it to the turn at upper Fern Creek towards Cinnabar. Which is about a mile before the turn for Meadow Creek Lookout. It was solid snow floor from that point on.” – SA

courtesy SA
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Open
Note from Valley County June 22 “Deadwood Summit Open.”
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road:
Report June 6: “the road to Burgdorf, Secesh Meadows and Warren is open! Beyond Warren is still closed, but crews are working to open that this week as well.”

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:
————-

June 19, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

June 19, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Note: If you are not receiving the YPTimes emails, check your spam folder.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
2022
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit Season
May 15 thru Nov 30 – Firewood Season
June 1 – 6-day mail delivery starts
Jun 21 – Bids due for YPWUA project
Jun 21 – deadline to pay Valley Co property taxes
Jun 23 – Planned Power Outage 9am-3pm
Jul 2 – 4th of July golf tournament 10am
Jul 2 – 4th of July parade 3pm
Jul 2 – BBQ special at The Corner
Jul 3 – YPWUA Shareholders Meeting
Jul 9 – VYPA Meeting 2pm Community Hall
Jul 16 – Ride to Meadow Creek Lookout
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Planned Outage June 23rd

Idaho Power plans to shut our power off from 9am to 3pm for maintenance, to replace a “switch” near Warm Lake that also serves Yellow Pine – per Dylan.
— — — —

Independence Weekend

Golf Tournament July 2nd

The annual 4th of July golf tournament will be on Saturday, July 2nd at 10(ish). All proceeds will be used to improve the golf course (improving the greens, signs and tees. More information to follow. Contact Joel or Marj Fields with questions, sponsorships or donations at fieldsmarjie @ yahoo.com


— —

4th of July Parade July 2nd

Come join or watch the Independence Day parade. July 2nd at 3pm. Meet in front of the fire house at 2pm to participate.
— —

The Corner

BBQ Special at The Corner
— — — —

YPWUA Shareholders Meeting July 3rd

The yearly shareholders meeting will be Sunday July 3rd at 10am at the Community Hall. There will be two positions up for elections.

There has been some question on who can vote and can run for office. You must be a shareholder with the Yellow Pine Water Users Association to be able to vote and run for office. If you have any questions about being a shareholder, please contact me.

Thank you – Steve Holloway
— — — —

July 9 – VYPA Meeting

The next Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting will be July 9th at 2pm Community Hall.
— — — —

July 16 Ride to Meadow Creek Lookout

Ride to Meadow Creek Lookout with us for a day of fun, stories, and a BBQ in the forest. Details and Sign-up at (link)
———

Village News:

Plane Wreck at Big Creek

Correction: On Friday June 10th, a pilot experienced a “mishap near the Big Creek Airstrip. Plane was taking off and was grabbed by the wind on the ground, never got up. Minor injuries reported.

Photos of recovery received June 15th.
20220615BCplane1-a

20220615BCplane2-a
courtesy – CEP
— — — —

Yellow Pine Vet Day June 18th

We had a great turn out for the Vet Clinic on Saturday. Dr. Ruble and his Tech, Nick, examined, vaccinated and wormed (as needed) 14 dogs and 6 cats before heading up to The Corner for lunch and had 4 more dogs to see on Main Street. Then the afternoon was spent at Buck Horn Outfitters taking care of a herd of horses. We had beautiful weather for the event.

Dogs: Zeva, Abby, Benjie, Willie, Hank, Bec, T.C., Scout, Mini, Daisy, Bella, Valley, Chicka and Gordie. (Romeo showed up to watch.)
Cats: Brrrrt, Stripe, Dancer, Augress, Cletus and Itty Bitty Kitty (who isn’t so itty-bitty anymore.)

P1000747-20220618VetDay
Dr. Ruble and Vet Tech Nick examining Itty Bitty Kitty

P1000745-20220618Mini
This is Mini, patiently waiting to see Dr. Ruble

20220618Buckhorn-a
Floating teeth at Buck Horn Outfitters
— — — —

Yellow Pine Fire Department Training June 18, 2022

Yellow Pine Fire department hosted a training on Saturday June 18th at 11am.
— — — —

June 18th Chinook season South Fork Salmon River

Summer Chinook salmon seasons for the South Fork Salmon River opened Saturday, June 18 and will remain open seven days a week until harvest goals are met.
— — — —

Father’s Day Brunch at The Corner

The Corner had a biscuits and gravy for Sunday Brunch on June 19th from 10am-Noon.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Country Club

Thank you, Perpetua, for donating a load of sand for golf course course improvements. Old signs are being replaced. Contact Margie Fields if you have opinions on uses for them, e.g. sell, give, auction. Perhaps there’s one that you want.
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters

Buck Horn Outfitters is offering trail rides out of Yellow Pine, anything from an hour ride to day trips and fully catered camping / pack trips to high mountain lakes or DIY camp trips where you can enjoy Idaho’s back country to yourself. Give us a call 208-633-3614
2022SummerBuckHorn-a
— — — —

J & R Septic

They are coming back to Yellow Pine to pump tanks in a couple of weeks. The have a 3rd list started, so there is time to get in on the list for the 3rd trip. Please call them in Cascade at (208) 382-8727. They can fit 4 tanks per trip. Please have your clean out dug up and ready, or you can ask them about digging.
— — — —

Amerigas Propane Delivery

Amerigas was in Yellow Pine Tuesday, June 7th, with the Spring fuel delivery.
— — — —

Arnold Aviation News:

Arnold’s will no longer will offer grocery shopping services. (D9 now has online shopping – see below.) However, Arnolds will still pick up orders in Cascade from D9, auto parts, feed, and hardware, etc. for delivery to Yellow Pine. You will only be charged for freight from the Airport to YP.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
— — — —

D9 News:

You will be able to start ordering online directly from D9 on May 24th. Go to their website at link. Phone (208-382-4215) if you need assistance.

Orders must be placed before 10am Monday (Arnolds will pick up on Tuesday for Wednesday delivery.) It is important that upon checkout, you click the box marked “Gift” – and type in the order is for Arnolds to pick up and deliver to Yellow Pine. Otherwise they will think it is a local personal pickup.

Tips: After you sign in to your account, look at the top left of the webpage for “Shop departments” – it will show categories of items. For instance, if you want butter, click on “Dairy” – then when the page comes up, look for the row that says Butter, look over to the right side and click on “see more” and it will come up with every type and size of butter (and margarine) available. Click on “add to cart” under the item you want, there you can adjust the amount using the plus and minus symbols. When you are done, click on “check out” near the top right corner. That is where you can click “gift” to leave instructions before you enter your card number.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

May 15 thru Nov 30 – Firewood Season

Firewood permits are available at The Corner.
— — — —

State Burn permits required May 10th

Closed fire season begins May 10, which means Idahoans outside city limits will need a burn permit before burning any debris. The closed fire season lasts until Oct. 20.
— — — —

Watkins Pharmacy Update June 5th

Still working on it! The only hold up for opening has been how slow the insurance is moving and dragging their feet! Its been frustrating for us to say the least. They have to cover us opening, it’s just them moving at a snails pace. We are sorry! We wanted to be open a long time ago! Amber Watkins
— — — —

Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at wicap.org.
— — — —

Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
— — — —

Road News

Johnson Creek road “officially” opened June 18th.

Lick Creek should open by the 4th of July per Valley County.

The road to Big Creek is still closed to wheeled vehicles. Likely open by 4th of July.

See today’s road reports for more info.

Link: to current road reports.

Construction closures will end May 27 on Idaho 55 near Smiths Ferry.
One-way alternating traffic is set to replace closures from 10 a.m. to noon on Mondays through Fridays.
Both lanes will be open Friday mornings through Sundays. link:

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.

Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Elk Summit, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are closed to wheeled vehicles. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
— — — —

Critters

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be Elk Aware

It is spring “baby” season – watch your dogs, mama elk and deer can be very aggressive towards dogs. There have been a few dogs injured up here over the years.
Elk are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Moose Aware

* Be aware of your surroundings and be especially careful around creeks and in areas with dense brush.
* Travel in groups whenever possible and make noise to alert animals to your presence.
* If you encounter a moose, give it lots of space and don’t approach it. Always keep dogs under control.
* If a moose charges or chases you, take cover behind something solid, such as a tree.
* In some situations, bear spray has been known to be an effective defense tool in moose encounters.

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard. F&G confirms there is a pack of 6 wolves in our valley.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

Bears are out of hibernation and hungry.

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat had been hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report June 10: Bins were about half full. Road is in good shape.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

2021 Water Bills Due June 15th

July 3, 2022 – YPWUA Shareholders Meeting at the Community Hall at 10am.

Public Works Construction Advertisement for Bids

Owner: Yellow Pine Water Users Association
Facilities and Mailing Addresses: PO Box 11, Yellow Pine, ID 83677-0011
Call for Bids from the Yellow Pine Water Users Association for sealed bids to be received at Mountain Waterworks, 616 Third St, Ste 114, McCall, Idaho 83638, until 3:00 PM local time on Tuesday, June 21, 2022 for the Project identified as the “Yellow Pine Waterline Replacement Project”. The Project includes replacement of approximately 2,000 feet of steel or cast iron piping with new 6-inch AWWA C900 PVC piping and ductile iron fittings, reconnection of existing customer services and installation of new isolation valves, post hydrants, and one pressure reducing valve vault. The Project is located in Yellow Pine, Idaho approximately 2.5 hours northeast of Cascade, Idaho.
The Project is funded by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality, the US Department of Agriculture-Rural Development, and the Idaho Department of Commerce. The construction contractor must comply with equal employment opportunity, American Iron and Steel, and Davis-Bacon prevailing wage requirements.
Date and time of bid opening: Tuesday, June 21, 2022 at 3:05 PM local time at which time the bids will be publicly opened and read. Tallied results will be provided to all bidders by end of business the next day. Bids will not be accepted by email or fax. A pre-bid meeting will take place at Mountain Waterworks, 616 Third St, Ste 114, McCall, Idaho 83638, on Monday, June 13, 2022 at 10:00 AM. Requests for information on the documents should be directed to Ed Stowe, P.E. at estowe@mountainwtr.com (208) 780-3992.
Contract Documents: Digital copies of the plans, specifications, and contract documents, may be obtained at (link) upon payment of $20.00. Log on to Quest CDN and enter Project Number 8226190. Any addenda will be issued electronically and available at the same Quest CDN Project Number. Please contact Quest CDN at (952) 233-1632 or info@questcdn.com for assistance in free membership registration, downloading, and working with this digital project information.
A bid bond in the amount of 5% of the total bid amount, including any add alternates, shall be submitted with the sealed bid. All bids submitted shall be in compliance with applicable public works construction laws for the State of Idaho, including but not limited to Idaho Code 67-2310 and Idaho Code 54-1902. The Yellow Pine Water Users Association reserves the right to reject any and all bids and the right to waive any informalities contained in any bid.

Water Use

06/09/22 24448326 29432 24 1226 20 T 341
06/10/22 24479772 31446 24 1310 22 F 2014
06/11/22 24512100 32328 24 1347 22 S 882
06/12/22 24541594 29494 24 1229 20 S 2834
06/13/22 24569664 28070 24 1170 20 M 1424
06/14/22 24599593 29929 24 1247 21 T 1859
06/15/22 24628378 28785 24 1199 20 W 1144
06/16/22 24658143 29765 24 1240 21 T 980
06/17/22 24688664 30521 24 1272 21 F 756
06/18/22 24724973 36309 24 1513 25 S 5788
06/19/22 24763018 38045 24 1585 26 S 1736

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

As of today April 17th 2020, Yellow Pine is under a “Boil Order”. This boil order will be in effect until further notice.
DRINKING WATER WARNING issued June 10, 2022
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST. Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 6-10-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

YPWUA 2022 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 3, 2022
YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 5, 2020 link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
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VYPA News:

Community Hall usage procedures

Community Hall Update: To ensure proper scheduling of the community hall usage and to avoid scheduling conflicts, we are asking that if you would like to use the community hall to contact Rhonda Egbert (member at large). With increased usage requests, we need to ensure that everyone is able to use it without conflict/overlap of events. Rhonda is taking point to schedule those individuals who want to use the community hall. Please also read the Community Hall Usage Guidelines-this outlines the etiquette required for usage.

Village Association Meeting Update: In the past as a courtesy, a Zoom video conference was an option for the individuals who were not able to attend the meeting(s) in person. However, I will not be providing this option going forward. I’m sorry for the inconvenience this may cause some. Also, if you have a request for a meeting agenda item, please contact me (Hailey Harris) no later than 7 days before the upcoming meeting. We are not able to add agenda items without approval of the Chairman.

I will also be enforcing a meeting conduct, effective immediately: Meeting attendees are expected to: Uphold professional purpose of meetings by respecting the rights, privacy, safety, and dignity of all persons; exercise professionalism, consideration, and respect in their speech and actions; refrain from harassing speech and other harassing behavior. Failure to conduct oneself in accordance with these expectations may result in removal of the offending person(s) or adjournment of the meeting.
-Hailey Harris

Yellow Pine Community Hall General Use Procedures

Hall General Usage:
* All events must be scheduled through the Community Hall Committee and approved by the Committee Chairman
* No property shall be removed from the Community Hall without approval of the Community Hall Committee Chairman.
* Responsible alcohol usage is permitted.
* No smoking is allowed in the hall. Pick up any butts scattered outside.
* Building and grounds are not a storage area. Do not leave personal items in or around the Community Hall without approval of the Community Hall Committee Chairman.
* Notify a committee member if problems are encountered.

After each event using the hall:
* Sweep/vacuum hall floor and restroom floor
* Wipe down toilet
* Empty garbage cans and take garbage to the transfer station
* Fold tables
* Stack chairs
* Turn off lights, ceiling fans, heater (if applicable)
* Put away any kitchen items after they are cleaned

After each event using the kitchen:
* Sweep/mop kitchen floor
* Wash, dry, and store all used dishes, utensils, pans, coffee pots, etc.
* Clean and wipe down sinks
* Thoroughly clean griddles, if used, and turn off propane to griddles
* Remove any unused food/beverages from the refrigerators/freezers
* Clean up any spilled food or beverage
* Empty garbage cans and take garbage to the transfer station
* Notify a committee member if problems are encountered

Using the Community Hall and/equipment for non-Yellow Pine events:
* A refundable, $50 deposit is required seven (7) days prior to the event
* After the event, a Community Hall Committee member will inspect the premises prior to the deposit being refunded
* A $150/day donation is requested for the use of the Hall
* A $200/day donation is requested for the use of the Kitchen

No deposit or use donation is needed for use by Yellow Pine community members, committees, or groups.

Yellow Pine Community Hall Committee:
Rhonda Egbert – Chairman
Members: Ronda Rogers, Deb Filler, Hailey Harris

Village of Yellow Pine Association:
Hailey Harris, Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Jen Aldrich, Secretary
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Ron Earl

June 11, 2022 VYPA Meeting (minutes to follow)
April 6, 2022 Village Council meeting to fill vacant chairperson position (no minutes.)
Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.
2022 Meeting dates:
June 11
July 9
August 13
September 10

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Department

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Meeting Minutes
May 29, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting (waiting for minutes)
May 20, 2022 Meeting in Cascade with Forest Service
Apr 3, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Feb 24, 2022 Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD New Commissioner’s Transition Meeting Link:
Nov 23, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Nov 8, 2021 – AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
Oct 31, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Oct 14, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Sep 27, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Sep 18, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Sep 11, 2021 – YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
Jul 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Jun 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sep 30, 2020 – YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 11, 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Spring hours: Wednesday thru Monday (closed Tuesdays) 8am-8pm
Fire wood permits Available May 15th
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Closed May 15th for renovation
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Due to open in early June.
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $4/doz
No longer taking scrap metal
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Buck Horn Outfitters is offering trail rides out of Yellow Pine, anything from an hour ride to day trips and fully catered camping / pack trips to high mountain lakes or DIY camp trips where you can enjoy Idaho’s back country to yourself.
See our website for more details. Or give us a call 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:
Opened May 27, 2022 for Fly-ins

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: 1-800-427-4968
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Cascade:
Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
D9 Groceries: 208-382-4215 Website link to order:
Upon “checkout” click on “gift” and write “Arnolds to pick up and deliver to (your name) in Yellow Pine” so they know who will pick it up and where it goes.
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watkins can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
Please help support local journalism and subscribe.
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

J & R Septic
Cascade (208) 382-8727

Valley Roofing Idaho
Meridian (208) 830-4890 email:
Facebook:

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473) Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Jun 13) overnight low of 38 degrees, 24 hour rain total = 0.78″. This morning it was 40 degrees by 9am and overcast. Finches, jays, a few pine siskins, grosbeaks and squirrels observed. Getting breezy before lunch time, low overcast and short rain showers on and off mid-day into early afternoon. Cool and a bit breezy mid-afternoon, no rain and cracks in the dark overcast, high of 51 degrees. Overcast and misting at sunset (didn’t last long.) Cloudy and dry before midnight. Possible early morning shower.

Tuesday (Jun 14) overnight low of 35 degrees, 24 hour rain total = Trace. This morning it was 41 degrees by 9am and mostly cloudy. Jays, finches, black-headed grosbeaks and all 4 species of squirrels observed. Overcast at lunch time. Loud airplane at 1241pm. Mostly cloudy and dry mid-afternoon, light breeze, high of 52 degrees. Partly to mostly cloudy after sunset and cooling off. Some swallows have returned. Partly clear/cloudy after midnight.

Wednesday (Jun 15) overnight low of 29 degrees, no precipitation. This morning it was 43 degrees by 9am with clear very blue sky. Airplane traffic. Robins, jays, tree swallow, pine siskins, finches and squirrels observed. Clear and warming up at lunch time. Increasing air traffic. Mail truck driver made it in on time, good road. Partly hazy/cloudy early afternoon. Clear, warm and gusty breezes mid-afternoon, high of 72 degrees. Mostly clear and calmer just after sunset. Clouds to the east after midnight.

Thursday (Jun 16) overnight low of 38 degrees, no new precipitation. Early air traffic for a few hours. This morning it was 56 degrees by 9am and mostly cloudy. Tree swallows, grosbeaks, finches, robins, hairy woodpecker, evening grosbeaks, and squirrels observed. Cloudy at lunch time and getting breezy. Warm, cloudy and gusty early afternoon. Quite warm and almost overcast mid-afternoon, feels muggy and lighter breezes, high of 83 degrees. Tiger swallowtail and white pine butterflies observed. Still pretty warm after sunset and mostly cloudy. Looked cloudy to the east after midnight.

Friday (Jun 17) overnight low of 42 degrees, no new precipitation. Early morning air traffic lasted quite a while. This morning it was 56 degrees by 9am, clear with overall thin haze (milky blue sky.) Tree swallows, evening grosbeaks, finches, hairy woodpecker, hummingbird and various squirrels observed. Mostly cloudy at lunch time with warm light breezes. Warm and a bit muggy mid-afternoon, gray overcast with 1 big dark cloud overhead and cool light breezes, high of 79 degrees. Thicker overcast before sunset, cooling off and calmer. Looked cloudy before midnight.

Saturday (Jun 18) overnight low of 43 degrees, no new precipitation. Early (and constant) air traffic. This morning it was 55 degrees by 9am and mostly clear sky. Tree swallows, robins, finches, jays, grosbeaks, hummingbirds, hairy woodpecker, tiger swallowtail butterflies, and various squirrels observed. Increasing street traffic, and main street getting dusty. Vet Clinic going well. Partly cloudy and light breeze at lunch time. Iris blooming. Increasing afternoon street traffic. Mostly cloudy and warm mid-afternoon with light pleasant breezes, high of 75 degrees. Partly clear/cloudy at sunset and breezy. Looked cloudy before midnight.

Sunday (Jun 19) overnight low of 43 degrees, no new precipitation. This morning it was 55 degrees by 9am, dark clouds – nearly overcast and a breeze. Yarrow starting to bloom. Tree swallows, robins, finches, jays, hummingbird, pine siskins and various squirrels observed. Gray overcast and light breeze at lunch time. Cool with blustery breezes mid-afternoon, and darker overcast, high of 61 degrees. A shower then sprinkles on and off into late afternoon.
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Idaho News:

Valley County Land Values go up 62%

Sharp rise may not be reflected in property taxes

By Max Silverson The Star-News June 16, 2022

Valley County property values increased by about 62% over last year, hitting a new high of about $10.3 billion compared to last year’s previous record of about $6.4 billion.

The rise in assessments does not mean property taxes will increase by the same amount, Valley County Assessor June Fullmer said in a letter that accompanied notices mailed last week to owners of 24,834 properties.

“A 50% change in value will not necessarily lead to a 50% change in property tax,” Fuller said in the letter.

A property owner can estimate 2022 tax rates by visiting (link).

Actual taxes will not be calculated until November, Valley County Treasurer Johanna Defoort said.

The sharp rise in values reflected the rise in sales prices of home and vacant land reported to the county last year, Fullmer said.

The median home price rose 40% to about $675,000 from $480,000 in 2020 based on 391 home sales last year, Fullmer said.

The median price of vacant land doubled in value, from $87,250 to $179,000, based on 485 land sales, she said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Motorcycle Accident on Warm Lake Hwy

Idaho State Police News Release
District 3 Patrol 700 S. Stratford Dr., Meridian, ID 83642 (208) 846-7550
Fax (208) 846-7520

For Immediate Release: 06/18/2022 5:56 P.M.
Please direct questions to the District Office

Idaho State Police is investigating a vehicle collision which occurred at 12:46 P.M. on Saturday, June 18, 2022, in Valley County.

A 26-year-old man from Meridian was traveling east on Warm Lake Road just east of Stolle Meadows Road on a 2022 Ducati motorcycle. He drove off the road and down a 20-foot embankment. The driver was transported by ground ambulance to Cascade Medical Center where he succumbed to his injuries. He was wearing a helmet.

This incident remains under investigation by the Idaho State Police.
— — — — — — — — — —

COVID-19 Updates: 881 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

June 17, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 881 new COVID-19 cases and 0 new deaths Friday. State-level case and hospital data are now being updated on the state dashboard on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, excluding holidays.

The state said 15 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 17,331, and 1 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,956.

80,875 vaccine breakthrough cases have been reported.

0 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,954.

full story: [Valley County 2,739 cases, 16 deaths.]
— — — —

38 new Valley County COVID-19 cases reported in past week

By Tom Grote The Star-News June 16, 2022

The number of new cases of COVID-19 reported in Valley County totaled 38 last week, accounting to reports from the county’s two hospitals.

The 38 new cases compared to 29 new cases reported the previous week and 36 new cases reported the prior week.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 2,844 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started in March 2020.

Thirteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health.

Clinics & Tests – McCall

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine offers the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines are offered for anyone age 5 and older.

Also available are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine boosters for anyone age 5 and older.

Second booster doses are available for adults ages 50 years and older, people ages 12 years and older who are moderately or severely immunocompromised.

Patients should talk to their health care provider about their medical condition, and whether getting an additional primary shot is appropriate for them.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link) or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

Clinics & Tests – Cascade

Cascade Medical Center no longer offers the Pfizer vaccine. Those wishing to be given the Pfizer vaccine should contact St. Luke’s McCall or a local pharmacy.

The Cascade hospital offers a second booster shot of the Moderna vaccine to those over age 50 who received their first booster shot at least four months ago.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster. Call 208-382-4285 to schedule a time.

Take-Home Tests

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital also provides free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

full story: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — — — — — — — —

‘Center of the Universe’: Town of Banks offers world-class whitewater and community

Tristan Lewis June 16, 2022 KTVB

The North Fork Championship kicks off Thursday and world-class white water kayakers will visit Idaho to test their skills on the Payette River. The three-day event brings people from all over the world, but for the community of Banks, the area can offer much more than premier whitewater sports.

“I mean the community is really what draws a lot of us to this place,” said Liam Kelly, a rafting guide with Bear Valley Rafting.

Within the whitewater world, the town of Banks is commonly referred to as the ‘Center of the Universe.’

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Little signs state disaster declaration for Nez Perce, Idaho Counties

June 17, 2022 Local News 8

Governor Brad Little signed a state disaster declaration Friday for Nez Perce and Idaho counties due to spring flooding.

The excessive rainfall and runoff throughout the North Central and Northeast regions of the state of Idaho is causing significant damage, as well as creating dangerous travel conditions in the region. Numerous roadways in the area are obstructed from the flooding.

This state disaster declaration will make funding available to the counties to assist with response and repair efforts. Today’s declaration is the first weather-related declaration this year in Idaho.

source:
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History:

The history of Ustick

Dr. Harlen P. Ustick, an ear, nose and throat doctor from Ohio, also had an eye for business and thoughts of building a town more than 115 years ago.

Brian Holmes June 17, 2022 KTVB

By the spring of 1863, just before the formation of Fort Boise there were about 100 non-native people living in the valley.

By 1900, 10 years after Idaho became a state, that population was above 19,000. The makeup was still very rural, with more than 1,600 farms on more than 113,000 acres of land, according to the Idaho State Historical Society.

About 896,000 of those acres were irrigated, thanks to the 568 miles of canals and irrigation ditches that spider-webbed across the valley.

continued:
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Mining News:

Perpetua to start Stibnite cleanup next month

Mining company to spend $12 million to restore streams

By Drew Dodson The Star-News June 16, 2022

About $12 million in work to clean up decades-old mining waste polluting the East Fork South Fork Salmon River at Stibnite will begin next month.

20220616Perpetua-aStaffers from Perpetua Resources look at a deposit of waste rock created during the 1950s at the Stibnite mining district near Yellow Pine. Perpetua plans to move the waste to allow an unnamed stream to be restored through the site and flow into the East Fork South Fork Salmon River.
Photo courtesy Perpetua Resources

The work will be done by Perpetua Resources, which wants to build a large gold and antimony mine at the Stibnite site east of Yellow Pine.

Work planned for this summer includes re-routing and installing liners beneath streams that now flow across mining waste left by previous operations.

The waste releases arsenic and other toxic metals into the water before it flows into the East Fork.

The clean-up is voluntary by Perpetua and has no connection to the application now pending with the Payette National Forest.

The work will also include removing about 15,000 tons of waste rock in and near an unnamed stream that feeds the East Fork.

That rock is part of the more than 325,000 tons of mining waste from operations during World War II and the Korean War that would be removed over the next few years.

About 200,000 tons of waste would be moved from streambanks and floodplains where it was dumped by the Bradley Mining Company between the 1930s and 1950s.

Another 100,000 tons of waste dumped by Bradley would be moved from the East Fork itself and streambanks would be shored up to reduce erosion.

Another 25,000 tons of waste would be moved away from areas near the confluence of Meadow Creek with the East Fork.

The work was authorized last year by an agreement between Perpetua, the Forest Service and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

The agreement allows Perpetua to clean up mining waste without inheriting liability for the waste.

About 5% of old waste now at Stibnite would be cleaned up under the agreement. More clean-up could be done if Perpetua is given the go-ahead for its mine.

All work will be paid for and conducted by Perpetua, but overseen by the EPA and other regulatory agencies.

Potential water quality improvements resulting from clean-up work outlined in the agreement are not factored into water studies in the Payette’s study of the project.

The Process

Perpetua began exploration for its Stibnite proposal in 2009 under the General Mining Law of 1872, which allows anyone to stake claims to minerals discovered on federal public lands.

In 2016, an operating plan was submitted to the Payette National Forest, the lead agency on a permitting process that requires 50 different permits from local, state and federal agencies before mining can begin.

The mine is being reviewed under the National Environmental Policy Act, which requires all projects that could affect land, water or wildlife to be studied for possible environmental harm.

The Payette is now studying an updated mining plan submitted by Perpetua and an alternative plan that would use existing roads for mine traffic instead of building new roads.

A draft of the study is expected to be released this summer. A public comment period will be held to help determine if anything was overlooked in the study.

The Payette will then respond to all meaningful comments in a draft decision on the project, scheduled for June 2023.

Perpetua’s proposal could be denied if the Payette finds that significant harm to natural resources cannot be avoided under any project alternative.

An objection period will be held before the Payette issues a final decision. Only people who previously submitted comments may object.

source: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — — — — — — — —

Perpetua Update

June 14, 2022 from Belinda Provancher

We have some exciting things happening at Perpetua Resources and I wanted to personally share the news with you.

What is new?

1. Perpetua is ready to take action to address historical impacts at Stibnite.

In early 2021, we signed an early action cleanup agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Forest Service to address legacy mine features that are negatively impacting Stibnite’s ground and surface water.

We are excited to announce that we will break ground this summer. In fact, we just selected IMCO to help us with this important project. (link)

Our cleanup work over the next few years will include removing 325,000 tons of historical tailings and waste away from the river as well as diverting streams away from legacy contamination on site and lining channels to prevent metal leaching.

We are proud to take these early cleanup actions and invest in improving water quality at Stibnite now, rather than waiting for our project to begin which is expected to further restore the area.

2. Congress is taking action on antimony.

In the last few days, we learned that the House Armed Services Committee included particular attention by Congress to the critical mineral antimony in their draft National Defense Authorization legislation. Growing concern regarding America’s reliance on China and Russia for antimony has Congress directing the Defense Logistics Agency for regular reporting on the national defense stockpile of antimony. (link)

You can read more here: (link)

“The US is heavily reliant on China and Russia for its ammo supply chain. Congress wants to fix that.” Defense News, June 9, 2022

3. Our team is making our sustainability goals known.

Earlier this Spring, we launched our Sustainability Roadmap, which outlined our goals toward responsible mining through the Stibnite Gold Project.

The 13 goals we identified will inform specific, measurable targets we plan to establish once we receive all of our permits and complete the final engineering on the project. The goals range from setting clear greenhouse gas emission targets to establishing economic partnerships that will sustain past the life of the mine.

If you haven’t reviewed our Sustainability Roadmap, I encourage you to take a look. (link)

4. We anticipate a comment period on our improved project late summer 2022.

After years of review and public feedback, the Stibnite Gold Project truly is a project we can all be proud of. We used your feedback on the 2020 Draft Environmental Impact Statement to help us find new ways to reduce our project footprint, improve water quality and water temperature and replace lost aquatic habitat.

Later this summer, the U.S. Forest Service will release a Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement (SDEIS) for public comment on the improvements we made to our proposed plan.

Once again, we will ask for your help making sure community support for the Stibnite Gold Project is heard. We will make sure to keep you informed as soon as we know the exact date the SDEIS will be released and when your comment is needed.

How to get involved?

1. Opt into important project text messages.

If you would prefer to receive a text message when our comment period opens, please text “Restore” to 208.428.6202.

2. Connect us.

With the upcoming comment period only a few months away, we want to make sure we are sitting down with as many people as possible. If you think there is someone we should talk to about our project, such as a community group or business, please let us know by emailing me directly. Additionally, if you know anyone who wants to stay up to date with our project, encourage them to sign up to receive our company emails. Tell them to use this (link) to sign up.

Finally, I want to make sure you know our team is always here to answer your questions and make sure you have the information you need on the Stibnite Gold Project. If you’d ever like to set up a meeting, feel free to send me an email.

Belinda Provancher
Belinda.Provancher@Perpetua.us
Community Relations Manager
— — — — — — — — — —

Barrick Gold sells its stock in Perpetua Resources

Company had owned 20% of proposed Stibnite gold Venture

By Drew Dodson The Star-News June 16, 2022

A Toronto-based mining company that was the second-largest shareholder of Perpetua Resources sold all of its stock in the company last week for $21.7 million.

Barrick Gold Corp. had owned 8.5% of Perpetua after investing $41 million into the company’s efforts to permit a gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine.

“This doesn’t change anything for Perpetua,” said Mckinsey Lyon, a company spokesperson. “There were eager (stock) buyers on the other side of Barrick’s sale.”

Barrick plans to reinvest the $21.7 million from the stock sale into other companies and assets, according to a news release from the company, which Forbes estimates is worth $42.2 billion.

A Barrick spokesperson did not respond to a request for comment by The Star-News.

Barrick was founded in 1983 and has mining operations and projects in 10 countries that employ 11,000 people.

Barrick has its headquarters in Toronto, Canada. More than 75% of the company’s gold production comes from Argentina, Canada, Dominican Republic, Peru and the United States.

The company also has mining operations and projects in Australia, Chile, Papua New Guinea, Saudi Arabia and Zambia.

Perpetua had about $40 million in cash as of May 1 and spends about $2.3 million per month on a permitting process led by the Payette National Forest,.

Perpetua has spent about $300 million so far on its proposed Stibnite Gold Project, including for exploration, preliminary studies and the in-progress permitting process, she said.

The Payette is expected to release a new study of Perpetua’s proposed Stibnite Gold Project this summer. A decision on the project is expected in June 2023.

Barrick once controlled nearly 20% of Perpetua’s stock, but additional stock sales reduced its 5.4 million shares to about 8.5% of the company, which made it the second-largest shareholder.

Perpetua’s largest investor remains Paulson & Co., a New York City investment firm valued at $4 billion by Forbes. Paulson owns about 39.3% of Perpetua with about 24.7 million shares.

Paulson invested a total of about $85 million in 2016, 2020 and 2021 into Perpetua, which was known as Midas Gold until last year.

Midas Gold was re-named Perpetua Resources and relocated to Boise at the beginning of last year.

Sun Valley Gold, a Ketchum investment firm, owns about 8.2% of Perpetua and is now Perpetua’s second-largest shareholder with 5.1 million shares.

The third-largest Perpetua shareholder is B. Riley Financial, a Los Angeles investment firm that owns 4.3% of the company with 2.7 million shares.

source: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
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Public Lands:

Idaho officials close popular recreation area due to trash

Associated Press, Joe Parris (KTVB) June 14, 2022

A popular state-owned recreation area in southeastern Idaho will close to camping and utility terrain vehicles due to visitors leaving behind trash and human waste, state officials said Tuesday.

Idaho Department of Lands (IDL) officials also said UTV drivers have been going off trails and damaging the area, leaving it susceptible to erosion.

Department officials said the 40-acre (16-hectare) area 4 miles (6 kilometers) east of the small town of Rockland will close Wednesday to those activities.

continued:
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Forest Service, Nez Perce Tribe sign deal on Idaho forests

Keith Ridler (AP), Associated Press (KTVB) June 16, 2022

The Nez Perce Tribe and U.S. Forest Service have signed an agreement allowing the two to team up on projects in the 6,250-square-mile (16,000-square-kilometer) Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests in north-central Idaho.

The Forest Service said Wednesday that the agreement through the Good Neighbor Authority will initially focus on fuels reduction projects to reduce wildfire threats.

Plans include heritage surveys and other projects important to the federally-recognized tribe on lands it ceded to the U.S. in the 1800s. Tribal members retain hunting, fishing and gathering rights on the ceded lands.

continued:
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Flooding pummels Yellowstone region, leaving many stranded

Amy Beth Hanson (Associated Press) at KTVB June 14, 2022

Raging floodwaters that pulled houses into rivers and forced rescues by air and boat began to slowly recede Tuesday across the Yellowstone region, leaving tourists and others stranded after roads and bridges were knocked out by torrential rains that swelled waterways to record levels.

The flooding across parts of southern Montana and northern Wyoming forced the indefinite closure of Yellowstone National Park just as a summer tourist season that draws millions of visitors annually was ramping up.

Just north of the park, hundreds of people remained isolated after the Yellowstone River and its tributaries washed away the only roadways in and out of the area.

continued w/videos:
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Forest Service Websites get new look after Web Modernization

14, June 2022 – The USDA Forest Service has launched a new look for public websites for the forests in the Intermountain Region, it is the first of several web improvements in the works to align with the 21st Century Idea Act and Web Modernization efforts within the USDA.

The web modernization efforts helps the region’s websites align with the look and format of the Forest Service headquarters website and is consistent with the web design standards of other federal websites. It is part of a larger effort across the Forest Service to improve our customer experience by making our sites more easily identifiable as an official federal government website.

“While the refreshed look is what will catch your eye first, the larger impact is behind the scenes making sites more accessible to visitors that use screen readers and provide a responsive layout that will adapt to any device from a desktop to a mobile device,” said Strategic Communications Director Mike Richardson.

The new sites will integrate all our social media channels, allowing us to feature videos being produced within the Forest Service to be played more easily and reliably.

This design change is the first of several web improvements to come. For a complete listing of forest websites visit the Intermountain Region Forests page. (link)
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Bureau of Land Management issues decision to authorize expanded military training area in southwest Idaho

Date: June 17, 2022
Contact: Jennifer Jones jenniferjones@blm.gov 208-373-4016

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has issued a decision to enable the Idaho Army National Guard to conduct military training on an additional 44 square miles of Federal and State land located west of Mountain Home and adjacent to the existing Orchard Combat Training Center.

The BLM decision authorizes rights-of-way for the expanded military training area that the Idaho Army National Guard proposed to meet Department of Defense training requirements, ensure troop combat readiness, and offset loss of areas within the Orchard Combat Training Center where training is prohibited to protect native shrublands.

“Fire suppression and habitat restoration efforts by the Idaho Army National Guard within the Orchard Combat Training Center have resulted in an increase in shrublands over the years,” said Brent Ralston, BLM Four Rivers Field Manager. “Our Resource Management Plan for the area restricts heavy equipment training in shrublands and this was the primary reason the Guard looked to train in other areas.”

The expanded training area is currently dominated by invasive annual grasses, like cheatgrass, and is largely devoid of shrubs.

The BLM Four Rivers Field Office manages the proposed expanded military training area, a majority of which are located within the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area. The military has been using land in this vicinity for training since the 1940s.

An Environmental Assessment for the proposed expansion was completed to analyze possible impacts from proposed heavy maneuver training between March and November, construction and maintenance of 12.7 miles of dirt roadways, infrastructure development, and engineering practice areas. These actions were determined to be within acceptable levels outlined in the BLM’s Resource Management Plan for the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area. The expanded training area will not include live fire exercises.

The BLM and the Idaho Army National Guard are each issuing separate decisions based on the Environmental Assessment. While the BLM decision pertains to authorizing rights-of-way for the expanded military training area, the Idaho Army National Guard decision concerns whether to expand military training onto proposed Federal and State land.

The environmental assessment and decision record can be found at (link) and is subject to a 30-day appeal period. To file an appeal, submit in writing to Brent Ralston, Four Rivers Field Office, 3948 S Development Ave., Boise, ID 83705.

For more information, contact the BLM Four Rivers Field Office at 208-384-3300.
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Critter News:

Cascade bans feeding of deer

Prohibition spurred by ex-mayor’s feeding station

By Max Silverson The Star-News June 16, 2022

Feeding deer and some other wild animals in the City of Cascade was banned on Monday by the Cascade City Council.

The ban, adopted by a 3-1 vote, carries a penalty of $150. If the violation results in damage to property it would be a misdemeanor, punishable by a fine of up to $1,000 and up to six months in jail.

Feeding wildlife lures animals across busy roads, increasing the potential for accidents and contributes to conflicts between wild and domestic animals, she said.

Feeding also increases the spread of disease, attracts predators and harms wildlife by providing them unhealthy food.

full story:
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Chinook salmon seasons to start June 18

By Kelsie Rose Jun 14, 2022 KIVI

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission has approved the summer Chinook salmon seasons for the South Fork Salmon River, Upper Salmon Rivers and the Lochsa River.

The seasons will start Saturday, June 18 and will remain open seven days a week until harvest goals are met.

Idaho Fish and Game says this will be the first time a Chinook fishery has been open in the Upper Salmon River fishery since 2019, and the first for the section below the Pahsimeroi River since 2018.

continued:
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First rabid bat of the season found in Bannock County

June 17, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho public health officials confirmed the first rabid bat of the season in the state in Bannock County.

A man, his dog and numerous cats all were potentially exposed to the rabid bat. Public health officials are actively following up on exposures.

“Rabies is a fatal viral illness if not treated with proper medical management early after exposure. An Idaho man died last year after being exposed to a rabid bat,” said Dr. Leslie Tengelsen, state public health veterinarian. “People should call their healthcare providers promptly if they believe they may have been bitten or scratched by a bat to discuss the need for post-exposure shots, which are extremely effective in preventing rabies. It is extremely important for people to avoid all bats and other wild animals, particularly if they appear sick or are acting aggressively or abnormally.”

Tengelsen also strongly encourages owners to contact their veterinarian if they believe their pets, regardless of vaccination status, were in contact with a bat.

continued:
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Two Treasure Valley men sentenced after shooting golden eagle

The men were sentenced to two years of probation, 15 hours of community service and received two-year bans from hunting and possessing firearms.

KTVB Staff June 16, 2022

Two Treasure Valley men were charged with one count of unlawful taking a golden eagle and one count of unlawful taking a migratory bird of prey, the United States Department of Justice announced Wednesday.

20-year-old Colten R. Ferdinand of Boise and 23-year-old Wyatt G. Noe of Eagle shot and killed a golden eagle in April 2021, according to court records.

The two men also shot and killed five red-tailed hawks in the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area. Ferdinand and Noe both pleaded guilty to taking the golden eagle in March.

continued:
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Fish and Game News:

June 14, 2022 – South Fork Salmon River Chinook Fishery Update

By Jordan Messner, Fisheries Regional Manager
Tuesday, June 14, 2022

Summer Chinook seasons on the Lochsa, South Fork Salmon, and Upper Salmon rivers have just been set by the commission. All three fisheries are set to open this Saturday, June 18. To view full details, click HERE.

Since I manage the South Fork Salmon River fishery, I’ll cover that one in more detail here. For more detailed information on the Lochsa and Upper Salmon fisheries, stay tuned in to the IDFG website for blogs posted by Joe Dupont (Lochsa River) and Greg Schoby (Upper Salmon River).

South Fork Salmon River

The South Fork Salmon River will open to fishing for Chinook Salmon this Saturday, June 18, from 100 yards below the hatchery weir, to the posted boundary at the Jakie Creek bridge (more info on this boundary change, below). The daily limit will be 4 Chinook Salmon, only 2 of which may be adults. The season is open 7 days per week until a Closure Order is issued by the Director of IDFG or August 7th, whichever comes first. Here’s what the run is looking like.

Abundance:

The South Fork run is coming in slightly lower than the preseason forecast, but should still provide a great fishery this year. The current estimate over Bonneville Dam is around 3,200 adults so far, and they’re still coming. Since they’re still coming over Bonneville it’s tough to nail down an exact harvest share estimate, but we’re projecting harvest share will be somewhere between 700-1,000 hatchery adults for the sport fishery.

continued:
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Fish and Game officials remind recreational shooters that targeting protected nongame birds and protected ground squirrels is illegal

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Friday, June 17, 2022

Summer is a popular time of year, not just for recreational shooters but some ground squirrels and protected nongame birds nesting in Idaho’s flatlands

Temperatures are starting to climb and the days are long, and that’s good news for recreational shooters looking to get out of city limits to shoot guns. Summer is a popular season for recreational shooters across the state, but it’s also a critical time of year for some nongame bird species that nest in, or are commonly found in, popular shooting areas.

While the majority of hunters and recreational shooters follow the law, Fish and Game law enforcement officials remind shooters they are likely to encounter protected nongame wildlife, and there’s a heavy price to pay for pulling the trigger on a protected species.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Seasonal Humor:

VetClinicSurvey-a

CovidMaskHearingaids-a
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Trivia:

Father’s Day started in Spokane, Washington

Spokane resident Sonora Smart Dodd, whose father raised her and her five siblings after their mother died in childbirth, started Father’s Day in 1910.

Megan Loe June 17, 2022 KTVB

Whether you’re barbecuing, going out for a round of golf or having a family brunch, many families will celebrate Father’s Day on Sunday, June 19, as a time to appreciate the father figures in their lives.

Though it’s been an official federal holiday for only half a century, one Twitter user claimed that the first Father’s Day celebration was held in Spokane, Washington, more than 100 years ago in 1910.

continued:
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Idaho History June 19, 2022

1979 Mining History of Yellow Pine, Stibnite and Cinnabar

(Part 1 Yellow Pine)

A Historical Summary And Cultural Resource Study Of Yellow Pine, Stibnite, and Cinnabar, Valley County, Idaho, Stibnite Mining Project

Prepared By Arthur A. Hart, Director Idaho State Historical Society 1979 Chapter 2

Introduction

During the 1979 summer season an intensive literature review, interviews, and field reconnaissance were performed by this investigator under a subcontract with James M. Montgomery, Consulting Engineers, Inc. (JMM) as a subelement of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Stibnite Mining Project Gold Mine and Mill. The Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) was prepared by JMM under a “third party” agreement between the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Payette National Forest, and Canadian Superior Mining (U.S) Ltd.

The report prepared by this investigator is intended to serve as a support document to the DEIS, and be utilized by JMM to meet the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 and Executive Order 11593. These directives require that federal agencies consider the effects of federal, federal-assisted, and federally licensed projects on properties included or eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. The regulations also require that the Advisory Council of Historic Preservation be offered the opportunity to comment on such undertakings. Approval of a cultural resources assessment which includes a historical and archaeological resources evaluation by the Agency Official (Forest Service) and State Historic Preservation Officer is also required.

Information from this report was used by JMM in preparing the DEIS. The results will also be incorporated into the Operating Plan which is currently being developed by JMM. This will ensure that adequate mitigation is implemented where potential adverse effects are determined so that historical/cultural resources are adequately protected.

Methodology

Historic cultural resources in the Stibnite area were inventoried and studied using the following procedures:

1. All available literature on the history of mining in the Stibnite area was searched and studied. Sources used (and cited in the report) include:
a. H.D. Bailey, Stibnite 1978.
b. The Engineering and Mining Journal 1903
c. Prospectus of the Golden Gate Mine 1902
d. The Stibnite Miner 1942-45
e. U.S. Geological Surveys Reports 1921-50
f. Idaho State Mine Inspector’s Reports 1921-50
g. Other serials used included The Idaho County Free Press, Saturday Evening Post, Idaho Power Company Bulletin.

2. Photographs in the collection of the Idaho State Historical Society were used for descriptions of structures no longer extant. Private collections of photographs, including those of Hubert Martin and Ernest Oberbillig were also of great value in reconstructing early Meadow Creek Mine, Yellow Pine Mine, Cinnabar, and the town of Yellow Pine, as well as Stibnite itself at various stages of its development.

3. Field work included on-site inspection of every extant structure known to the most experienced and knowledgeable residents:
a. Ernest E. Oberbillig, whose father J.J. Oberbillig pioneered the claims in the area, personally conducted the author over every road and jeep trail shown on U.S.G.S. maps of the area, and over a number not shown. Oberbillig, whose resume is attached, has known the area for more than 50 years. He personally built a number of the roads in the area.
b. Warren Campbell, Roy Smith, and E. Fay Kissinger also supplied information and suggestions on sites to be investigated.
c. Aerial inspection of the area was made with Oberbillig and pilot Ray Arnold of Cascade, Idaho.

4. Oral history was collected from a number of informants who had known the area in its early days and especially during the 1940’s boom period. Five hours of tapes were made from interviews with Ernest Oberbillig and Hubert Martin. These tapes are on file at the Idaho Historical Society.

5. Documentation of sites and structures was made on film. About 750 existing photographs are on file at the Idaho State Historical Society, in addition to those included in the report.

6. Maps dating from 1902 until the present were studied to establish early trails and wagon roads, mine locations, and sites of structures.

7. Special attention was focused on areas which might be impacted by proposed mining activities in the area. These were found to be minor, but are discussed in the recommendations following the Stibnite section of the report.

History Of Yellow Pine, Idaho

The town of Yellow Pine takes its name from Yellow Pine Basin, a sheltered mountain valley above the junction of Johnson Creek and the East Fork of the South Fork of Salmon River, about 50 miles northeast of Cascade, Idaho. Boulder Creek and Quartz Creek enter the East Fork at the eastern end of the valley. The average elevation of the townsite is about 4750 feet above sea level. The area of gently sloping ground upon which the original town is located comprises about 40 acres; later additions are northeast on higher ground.

Yellow Pine Basin was known and named long before a town was located there. Prospectors, who covered nearly every square mile of the central Idaho mountains after gold was discovered in the north on Orofino Creek in 1860, were no doubt struck by the impressive stand of giant virgin Ponderosa pines in the sheltered basin.

An interesting early reference in print to Yellow Pine Basin appeared in the Idaho County Free Press of Grangeville on July 30, 1886. Norman B. Willey, a pioneer miner and legislator who would become Idaho’s second state governor in 1890, wrote from Warrens on July 20, 1886:

“A report has been in circulation this spring of the discovery of rich placer mines on some unknown tributary of the South Fork. Many parties went in, some over the snow from the south and west in search of it, but without avail so far as is known. Two men were caught in there by the approaching winter and managed to survive till spring losing their horses. One fell sick and his partner made his way out over the crust to the Basin after medicine and grub, having $700 in dust in his possession. Of course he had made it by some fortunate strike. He left notices in various places stating the facts and location of his sick pard. But his pard did not die. He entrapped various unwary squirrels and fool hens and got about again. In due time the other one returned, and they both left, supposably for supplies and equipments. Undoubtedly there must be very rich mines in that section. P.S. It appears that they had $700 apiece making $1400 for the little work they did. Since writing the foregoing I am reliably informed that the two men rocked all winter near the forks of the east branch of the South Fork and took out altogether twenty-seven dollars. How are the mighty fallen! N.B.W.”

A month later the Free Press commented on Willey’s letter editorially, condemning “the Yellow Pine Humbug,” and some other newspapers which were still “booming the fraud as though they honestly believed in the reports they are circulating.” It said it would “burn the pants off anything or anybody that tries to beat its way into prominence under false pretenses.” 1

Real mineral developments of importance in the area of Yellow Pine were still years away when the item quoted above was written, but the incident had results of another sort. A mining engineer named George C. Catlin wrote and published a novel called “Yellow Pine Basin, the Story of a Prospector.” Catlin’s book was copyrighted in 1897 and published in Boston by Small, Maynard and Company in 1898. It was obviously based upon his own experiences and on the “Yellow Pine humbug” described in Willey’s letter. Its historical value is in the way it depicts the life of two prospectors in Yellow Pine Basin. Descriptions of topography, flora and fauna are too accurate for us not to believe that Catlin knew first-hand the country he wrote about. His description of Placerville, Idaho is another authentic note which suggests strongly that the author had been there. Since mining engineer Catlin had also served in the Civil War, the stories of the war worked into his narrative are also probably autobiographical. 2

Catlin’s novel deals with the adventures of two prospectors working in Yellow Pine Basin, Idaho in 1881 and 1882. Bud, a young man, learns the prospector’s trade from Zeb, a hardy old-timer with experience in California, the Fraser River of British Columbia, and in Montana, Arizona, Nevada and Mexico.

In long evenings over the campfire, or before the fireplace in the winter cabin they build, Zeb tells Bud about his adventures in prospecting, mining, and the Civil War. (All subjects the author knew first hand). The two work hard and strike it rich before Zeb is seriously injured and Bud decides to risk the journey alone to the nearest settlement in search of a doctor. Through deep snow and bitter cold, he finds his way to Placerville, in Boise Basin, more than 80 miles south. The townspeople are helpful and sympathetic. However, the doctor, whom Bud had counted on taking back with him, is too frail for the tough journey on snowshoes. Bud returns alone, after men from Placerville help him part of the way. He find Zeb dead, and a touching farewell note. The balance of the novel deals with Bud’s return east with a fortune in gold and his later adventures outside Idaho.

In 1897, the year Catlin wrote his novel about Yellow Pine Basin, news got out that the Caswell brothers had made a rich gold discovery at Thunder Mountain 20 miles to the east. By 1902 thousands of miners and prospectors had flooded the region. This influx indirectly led to the establishment of a permanent settlement at Yellow Pine. It was a sheltered spot, relatively milder in winter than the high country around, and at the crossroads of trails from Warrens, Pen Basin on upper Johnson Creek, and placer locations on the South Fork of Salmon River. 3

As was usually the case, prospectors who had no luck at the main strike fanned out over the surrounding country to try their luck. Golden Gate mine was located in 1902 on the ridge east of Johnson Creek just above the Basin. 4 This and other claims in the area led to the establishment of a general store and unofficial post office at Yellow Pine by A.C. Behne, traditionally regarded as the first settler and long called “Mr. Yellow Pine.” 5

Production of gold near Yellow Pine was negligible because of the difficulty of getting it out economically. Although John Oberbillig, a pioneer miner in the area, credited a Mr. Baker with the first discovery of antimony at an early date, 6 it would be years before there was much interest in this strategic metal, or before it could be produced economically. It was not until after 1927 that the Bradley operation at Stibnite, 14 miles from Yellow Pine, gave the smaller place some importance as well.

Mining continued on a small scale on a number of claims in the Yellow Pine area after Thunder Mountain declined. Pringle Smith and Albert Hennessy were pioneer miners who did annual assessment work on several claims from 1902 onward. Smith located the Cinnabar float with rich quicksilver possibilities, and in World War I the military need for mercury used in shell primers led to some small development and production. 7 The fuller development of Cinnabar had to await World War II, however, when it became profitable to greatly enlarge production there.

During all of this time Yellow Pine remained a small supply center and wintering place. A post office was officially established at Behne’s store, and a few new buildings were put up using sawn lumber. Photos of the World War I era show mostly log cabins.

The builders of mountain cabins in the Yellow Pine area used the largest logs they could handle. Figure 2-1 shows examples of these log structures. Lodgepole pine was plentiful and easy to work, but the thicker walls possible when Ponderosa pine was used reduced the amount of chinking needed and produced a better insulated structure, especially important in the sub-zero winters typical of that vicinity. 8 Several sawmills operated in Yellow Pine Basin, and from about 1918 on nearly all of the local buildings were made of lumber rather than logs.

Figure 2-1
Figure2-1Examples of pre-1920 built log structures in the town of Yellow Pine.
[*Note: this is a photo of the 2nd School in Yellow Pine which was built in 1922.]

Yellow Pine, Idaho Today

A curious feature of the present architecture of Yellow Pine is the large number of buildings which have been moved there from Stibnite. When the big war-time development was abandoned in the 1950’s, the town of Stibnite was dismantled. Although many structures were torn down for the materials in them, most of the houses were moved out by truck. Today perhaps a quarter of Yellow Pine is made up of Stibnite houses built between 1940 and 1945, and moved in the 1960’s. 9

One house was moved to Yellow Pine from Big Creek — a bungalow of 1924 now owned by Roy Smith. 10 Although there are a number of other buildings surviving from the 1920s, there is only one of unusual architectural quality. This is the log house-hotel on the hill to the east which dates from 1925-26. 11 An inventory of the architecturally or historically interesting buildings of Yellow Pine follows, keyed to the map shown on Figure 2-2. The original 1930 plat of the townsite is also shown on Figure 2-3.

Figure 2-2
Figure2-2Selected Architectural Inventory of Yellow Pine, Idaho.
[*Note: See document for larger size.]

Figure 2-3
Figure2-3Initial Plat of the Town of Yellow Pine, Idaho, November 16, 1930.
[*Note: See document for larger size.]

Recommendations On Potential Significance For Yellow Pine

The potential historical significance of Yellow Pine is derived from its role as a supply and social center for miners in the area following the 1902 rush to Thunder Mountain. Not until World War I was there enough activity to create a cluster of log buildings recognizable as a settlement in Yellow Pine Basin. It was 1930 before a plat was filed by Albert C. Behne. Greater accessibility of Yellow Pine by automobiles led to the establishment of a lodge, tourist park, and taverns in the 1930’s, even before the World War II boom at Stibnite. Elk hunters and fishermen came regularly to Yellow Pine, expanding a local economy basically dependent on the Bradley operation at Meadow Creek and Monday Camp.

Although some bootlegging had been done before 1932, the repeal of prohibition made taverns an important local attraction. Like mining camps on the Idaho frontier of an earlier day, Yellow Pine has always had more taverns than any other kind of business. Social life centers in them, although there is strong loyalty and participation by adults in the operation of the one room school.

Architecturally, the potential historical significance of Yellow Pine primarily associated with the Stibnite houses moved in after that town was dismantled. Yellow Pine is a potential historic district, but will not be clearly eligible for the National Register until the majority of its structures are 50 years old.

Proposed mining developments at Stibnite would not appear to have a significant impact at Yellow Pine, unless the decision is made to house employees there instead of at the Stibnite site. At present, the company (CSM) is not planning to house a major portion of the mine work force at Yellow Pine. The company is, however, negotiating with a local land owner for a small parcel of vacant land (approximately two acres) northeast of the townsite. Several pre-fabricated housing units would be located on the parcel if arrangements can be finalized. These units would house CSM administrative personnel. Growth at Yellow Pine will undoubtedly take place in any case, continuing the process by which living towns gradually change character in many ways. Increased summer/winter second home development is expected to occur regardless of whether the proposed Stibnite Mining Project is implemented.

Suggested Considerations For Mitigation Of Potential Impacts

The study of Yellow Pine history and architecture contained here should be continued. The Idaho State Historical Society and Long Valley Historical Society should be encouraged to record the life and times of this interesting community. Recommendations for mitigating potentially adverse effects on identified historical resources should be developed as elements of the EIS and the Cultural Resources Assessment, and submitted to the Forest Service Officer and State Historic Preservation Officer in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act and Executive Order 11593. A specific mitigation plan (if determined necessary) should then be developed for incorporation in the Operation Plan prior to approval of the project.

Notes on Yellow Pine

1. Idaho County Free Press (Grangeville, Idaho, 20 August, 1886) p.l.
2. Who Was Who in America (Chicago: Marquis-Who’s Who Inc. 1968). Volume IV, p. 162
3. The Engineering and Mining Journal (28 March, 1903), map p. 478.
4. Prospectus of the Golden Gate Mine (Boise, Idaho, 27 December, 1902), Original in Huntington Library.
5. Albert C. Behne and H.T. Abstein homesteaded at Yellow Pine before World War I. The townsite is on Behne’s original property, and was platted by him in 1930. (See page 14 of this report.)
6. J.J. OberIDillig, letter to the editor, The Stibnite Miner (Stibnite, Idaho 28 October 1942) p.l.
7. Esper S. Larsen and D.C. Livingston. Geology of the Yellow Pine Cinnabar Mining District, Idaho. United states Geological Survey, Bulletin 715 (Washington, D.C., 1921) p. 80.
8. Ernest Oberbillig, interview with the author 10 September 1979, (tape on deposit, Idaho Oral History Center, Idaho State Historical Society) Oberbillig’s father, J.J. Oberbillig, built several cabins in the area in the 1920s.
9. Warren Campbell, interview with the author, 27 November 1979. Ibd. Campbell moved the Stibnite houses. (See more in Stibnite chapter.)
10. Roy Smith, interview with the author, 9 November 1979. Ibid.
11. E. Fay Kissinger, interview with the author, 20 November 1979. Ibid. Kissinger was in Yellow Pine in the 1920s. He built a number of the buildings and ran a sawmill there later.

(To be continued – Part 2 Stibnite)

source: AHGP – Valley County Idaho
[h/t SMc]
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Full Text: A Historical Summary and Cultural Resource Study Of Yellow Pine Stibnite and Cinnabar Valley County Idaho Stibnite Mining Project.pdf
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Photos

Yellow Pine Hotel

OldYPHotelEarls-a

Now home of Donna Earl Valdez. At one time a hotel in Yellow Pine. Lee Earl collection.

courtesy: Alyce Ruth Milstead
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Yellow Pine Mid-1970’s

Mid1970sYellowPine1-aHeading to Yellow Pine
source:

Mid1970sYellowPine2-aYellow Pine
source:

Captioned: “Going to “town” for a night of partying.”

source: Carol and Jim photo album – “My summer in Stibnite salvaging barn wood in the mid 1970’s.” photo collection:
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Further Reading

Link to 1979 Mining History of Yellow Pine, Stibnite and Cinnabar Pt 1
Link to 1979 Mining History of Yellow Pine, Stibnite and Cinnabar Pt 2
Link to 1979 Mining History of Yellow Pine, Stibnite and Cinnabar Pt 3
Link Yellow Pine School Part 1
Link Yellow Pine History table of contents
Link Stibnite History table of contents
Link “Yellow Pine Basin: The Story of a Prospector” By Henry G. Catlin 1897 (entire book)
Link Idaho State Historical Society Mining Collection [photos]
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page updated July 30, 2022

Road Reports June 19, 2022

It is still Rock Migration Season. Please share road reports. Spring travel conditions. Most back country roads are not maintained. This time of year there is still deep snow in some higher elevations, especially north facing area. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are dry and getting dusty with increased traffic. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Flaggers will be at the Hwy 17 intersection Sunday June 19th.
Update from ITD May 19, 2022
Construction closures will end May 27 on Idaho 55 near Smiths Ferry.
One-way alternating traffic is set to replace closures from 10 a.m. to noon on Mondays through Fridays.
Both lanes will be open Friday mornings through Sundays.
To learn more about the spring construction schedule, visit link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (June 15) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.
Report of a fatal motorcycle wreck hear Stolle Meadows June 18th.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Note: South Fork salmon seasons opens June 18th. Watch for increased traffic and pedestrians.
Report Wednesday (June 15) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Wednesday (June 15) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.

Upper Johnson Creek Road: Open June 18th
Report Saturday (June 18) road is open, upper Johnson Creek is rough going.
Report Saturday (June 18) “From YP to Donnelly via the Johnson Creek Road travel was typical summer conditions with lots of vehicles.” – C&L
Report Thursday (June 16) the upper end is rough and has not been graded. The slide on upper Warm Lake road has been cleared.
Lower Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Friday (June 10) road is good out to Wapiti Meadow, then gets rough.
Old report Wednesday (May 11) the county graded most of the lower end.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled travel
Report Saturday (June 18) “it is definitely not passable.” JB
20220618LickCrk-a
Lick creek [road] today below Duck Lake campground. – JB
Lick Creek will be open by the 4th per the county.
Report late Saturday (June 18) A group has beat their way over the top, lots of snow, not recommended for small vehicles, travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel (likely open by the 4th of July.)
Report Saturday (June 18) “From Edwardsburg to Big Creek Culvert the road is snow free, but lots of trees down that were not cut wide enough to allow passage of larger vehicles/trailers. From the Big Creek Culvert to the intersection with Red Metal Mine road the road is mostly snow bound. From the Red Metal Mine Road to the EFSF road and on to Yellow Pine the roads are travelable by full sized vehicles with trailers. The section from the Big Creek Culvert to the Red Metal Mine intersection is of particular interest to some. This section is snow bound, but not uniformly. There are patches of bare road, and patches of deep snow. There are no major issues with the road other than the snow. So.. The obvious factor controlling when this section will be open to normal highway vehicles is the weather. We did video this section of road, and the link to the video is: (here)” – C&L
Report “Road report for Profile Gap from Monday June 13th. Walked over the top from BC to Yellow Pine. Solid snow floor from the Big Creek culvert on the BC side to just above the switch back on the Yellow Pine side. About 4 feet on top.” – Darren Vaughn
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photo courtesy Darren Vaughn
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
Report from Perpetua (May 25) “The Valley County Road department instructed us to take down the gate on the Stibnite Road above Profile Creek on May 18th.
“We have road grading of the Stibnite Road scheduled to begin on June 6th, the grading should take about two weeks.”
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
Report Saturday (June 18) from motorcycle riders seeing how far they could get towards Monumental summit: “We made it to the turn at upper Fern Creek towards Cinnabar. Which is about a mile before the turn for Meadow Creek Lookout. It was solid snow floor from that point on.” – SA
20220618Monumental-a
courtesy SA
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled travel
Report Friday (June 17) from Deadwood Outfitters: “Breaking through… or not.”
20220617Deadwood-a
courtesy Deadwood Outfitters
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road:
Report June 6: “the road to Burgdorf, Secesh Meadows and Warren is open! Beyond Warren is still closed, but crews are working to open that this week as well.”

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:
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Weather Reports June 12-18, 2022

Jun 12 Weather:

At 9am it was 50 degrees, gray overcast (foggy bits mid-mountain) and humid. Getting breezy at 10am. Started raining around 1215pm. Still raining at 220pm and 48 degrees, dark overcast. At 515pm still raining but less forceful. At 750pm it was 49 degrees, dark overcast and had just stopped raining. Started raining at 930pm. At 10pm steady rain continues. Still raining at 1130pm. At 1230am still raining lightly. A break in the rain before 2am. May have rained a bit before sunrise.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 13, 2022 at 09:00AM
Overcast
Max temperature 54 degrees F
Min temperature 38 degrees F
At observation 40 degrees F
Precipitation 0.78 inch
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Jun 13 Weather:

At 9am it was 40 degrees and overcast. Breaks and bits of blue sky by 945am. Getting breezy at 1150am and low overcast. Raining at 1155am. Not raining at 1210pm, low overcast. Sprinkling again at 1245pm, didn’t last long – done before 1pm. VanMeter socked in at 230pm but not raining. At 315pm it was 48 degrees, getting a bit breezy, no rain and cracks in the dark overcast. At 8pm it was 44 degrees, overcast and staring to mist for a little while. At 10pm cloudy and dry. Possible shower early morning?

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 14, 2022 at 09:00AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 51 degrees F
Min temperature 35 degrees F
At observation 41 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
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Jun 14 Weather:

At 9am it was 41 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 1230pm overcast. At 315pm it was 49 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breeze. At 830pm it was 47 degrees and partly to mostly cloudy. Partly clear/cloudy at 130am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 15, 2022 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 52 degrees F
Min temperature 29 degrees F
At observation 43 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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Jun 15 Weather:

At 9am it was 43 degrees and clear very blue sky. At 1240pm it was 63 degrees and clear sky. At 130pm partly hazy/cloudy. At 4pm it was 72 degrees, clear sky and gusty breezes. At 840pm it was 58 degrees, mostly clear (a few wispies to the south and east) and calmer. At 130am partly clear/cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 16, 2022 at 09:00AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 72 degrees F
Min temperature 38 degrees F
At observation 56 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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Jun 16 Weather:

At 9am it was 56 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 12pm it looks overcast and getting breezy. At 1250pm it was 77 degrees, overcast and gusty. At 315pm it was 82 degrees, feels humid, almost overcast and lighter breezes. At 830pm it was 70 degrees, mostly cloudy and calmer. Looked cloudy towards the east at 130am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 17, 2022 at 09:00AM
Clear w/thin haze
Max temperature 83 degrees F
Min temperature 42 degrees F
At observation 56 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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Jun 17 Weather:

At 9am it was 56 degrees, clear sky with overall thin haze. At 1230pm it was mostly cloudy with warm light breezes. At 325pm it was 73 degrees, gray overcast with 1 big dark cloud overhead and light cool breezes. At 745pm it was 61 degrees, thicker overcast and calmer. At 1030pm it looked cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 18, 2022 at 09:00AM
Mostly clear
Max temperature 79 degrees F
Min temperature 43 degrees F
At observation 55 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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Jun 18 Weather:

At 9am it was 55 degrees and mostly clear. At 1130am it was partly cloudy and light breezes. At 240pm it was 74 degrees, mostly cloudy and light pleasant breezes. At 825pm it was 60 degrees, partly clear/cloudy and breezy. At 10pm it looked cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 19, 2022 at 09:00AM
Nearly overcast, breeze
Max temperature 75 degrees F
Min temperature 43 degrees F
At observation 55 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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