Monthly Archives: August 2022

Road Reports Aug 31, 2022

Please share road reports. Most back country roads are not maintained. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: Dust abatement was applied on main street June 29th, however, most other local streets are beat up, dry and VERY dusty. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Old report Sunday (Aug 21) “Hwy 55 wasn’t bad, but very busy.”
Update from ITD August 26, 2022
With Labor Day approaching and higher traffic volumes anticipated, both lanes of State Highway 55 near Smiths Ferry will be open noon Friday, September 2, through Monday, September 5, to accommodate holiday travel.
Starting Tuesday, September 6, the Smiths Ferry project will transition to the fall construction schedule. Drivers should plan for one-way alternating traffic with 15-minute delays, Monday through Friday and weekends as needed.
Crews will start paving work on September 6. Drivers can expect a gravel highway surface for a few weeks, and the first layer of asphalt completed by the end of September.
To learn more about the construction schedule, visit link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (Aug 31) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Old report Sunday (Aug 21 around 530pm): “The South Fork Salmon River road is open for traffic. Be cautious while driving in areas that are prone to slides, such as those that have burned in previous wildfires, and during and following thunderstorms.” – Payette NF
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Old report Monday (Aug 1) “The EFSF looks like it had been graded recently, pot holes filled in and no rocks to dodge.
Note: The county did not do dust abatement this season.

Johnson Creek Road: Opened June 18th
Graded August 17th by the county.
Report Wednesday (Aug 31) Mail truck driver says “bumpy.”
Old report Monday (Aug 22) “Washboards were already coming back in the canyon climb.” – CEP
Old report Sunday (Aug 21) “Johnson creek was in great condition. No sign of rain damage from Friday & Saturday storms. Johnson creek was running dirty/murky from the storms.”
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Quartz Creek Road:
Old report July 30: “Saturday I cleared Quartz Creek Road of trees. At the top (upper loop) I cleared the left fork but on the right fork there was a widowmaker tree that I left as I was working by myself and didn’t feel comfortable removing it without help.” – SA

Old Thunder Mountain Road:
Old report July 16: “Saturday the Yellow Pine Escapades rode to Meadow Creek Lookout without any issues. Had a great lunch, then half the group returned to Yellow Pine via the Old Thunder Mountain Road while the other half returned through Stibnite. A group of four motorcycles came through the Old Thunder Mountain Road. I’m assuming they cut the four or five recently cut trees we saw.” – SA

Lick Creek: Opened June 23rd
Old report from late June: “Rough as usual.”
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open July 1st
Report Wednesday (Aug 24): “Profile being worked today.”
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open – watch for heavy equipment traffic.
Old report: road graded during the first 2 weeks of June. No current repot.
Starting in July cleanup work at Stibnite will “cause some delay in travel through the area, it won’t be closed but there will be flaggers.”
“There will still be a lot of traffic coming through for the next 1.5 years while the “Burnt Log Route” is being built, a lot of the equipment will have to come in on the burnt log route so until then JC and the current Stibnite route will be used.”
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open
No current report on conditions. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Monumental Creek Trail Report:
Old report July 23: Trail past Roosevelt Lake is disaster. Beaver swamp at Trap Cr on 1/4 mile of trail, hard scramble around. Treed in below awful. Slide is Bad.
Topo Map near Trap Creek (link):

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open
No report on current conditions. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Opened June 22nd
Old report Thursday (June 30) rough, not graded. (See Landmark to Stanley report.)
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Landmark to Stanley: Open
Old report from Valley County: “We have a crew working in the Deadwood/Bear Valley area blading. They should be done August 8th-9th.”
Old report Thursday (June 30) “Good with a few significant potholes to Bruce Meadows, then bad washboard to the highway.” – DP

Warren Wagon Road: Open
No report on current conditions, travel at your own risk.

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:
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Aug 28, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

Aug 28, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Note: If you are not receiving the YPTimes emails, check your spam folder.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
2022
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit Season
May 15 thru Nov 30 – Firewood Season
June 1 – 6-day mail delivery starts
Sep 3 – YPFD Breakfast at Community Hall 8am-10am
Sep 3 – Labor Day Golf Tourney 1030am
Sep 6 – YPFD Budget Meeting 10am at Community Hall
Sep 10 – YP Escapade Ride
Sep 10 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
Sep 28 – YPFD Training 10am at Fire Hall
(details below)
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Local Events:

Sep 3rd – YPFD Breakfast

We will be having breakfast, the 3rd from 8 to 10 at the community hall.
— — — —

Labor Day Weekend Golf Tourney

The Fire Dept. is doing the golf tournament on September 3rd. Sign up at 10am start at 1030am.
— — — —

Sep 6th – YPFD Budget Meeting

The fall YPFD Budget Meeting has been rescheduled to September 6th, 10am at the Community Hall. See Agenda posted under YPFD News below.
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Sep 10th – Yellow Pine Escapade

Join us for a loop ride with a BBQ at North Shore Lodge. $30/person. Fundraiser for the Yellow Pine Community Hall. Sign up early at (link)
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Sep 10th – VYPA Meeting

2pm at Community Hall
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Sep 28th – YPFD Training

We will be having a training day on the 28th of Sept. at 10am at the fire hall.
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Village News:

Community Thank You

Adam Pellegrini will be donating a new system (Facebook Portal device) to the community hall that will be for any council to use for Zoom meetings.
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YPFD Truck Maintenance

Mike Amos has volunteered to do our maintenance on our fire trucks but asked to do them at his house so he could use his own tools. Mike plans to start next week. The yellow fire truck will be at his house all next weekend for maintenance.
Fire Chief
Tim Rogers
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Planned Water Shutoff Aug 26th

On Friday, August 26th, at 9am, the YPWUA shut the water off to the lower part of Yellow Pine for about an hour for repairs.
— — — —

Aug 27th Water Meeting 12pm

The meeting was well attended, both in person and zoom.

Thanks to Adam P for technical assistance.

Unofficial Meeting Notes:

YP Water User informational meeting 8/27/2022
No voting at this meeting.
Important takeaway is:
#1 At least $18.10/mo. increase; method for monthly or quarterly payments has not been figured out.;
#2 YP water will continue on boil order until we consistently reduce use from 60,000/gal day to 30,000gal/day. Lawn watering is main impact;
#3 Board will make decision which alternative and your input helps them decide;
#4 Grant applications due in October so give Board your comments soon;
#5 Doing nothing or delaying work is not an option. We will be borrowing money and all water users will have an increase in use charge to pay back the loan;
#6 Some line repairs and leaks being done now. 2022-23 planning, contracts, approvals, funding, then start work.
— — — —

Light Smoke 7pm Aug 28th

20220827YellowPineNorth-aCourtesy Eye-n-Sky
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Watkins Pharmacy Update June 23rd

To the community: the insurance claims are ongoing… We are still working on the temporary pharmacy/store going in at Across the Tracks. We wish we could move everything along faster, but unfortunately we have no control over that as much as we wish we did! … Thank you for those who have reached out for updates. – Watkins Pharmacy
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Arnold Aviation News:

Arnold’s will no longer will offer grocery shopping services. (D9 now has online shopping – see below.) However, Arnolds will still pick up orders in Cascade from D9, auto parts, feed, and hardware, etc. for delivery to Yellow Pine. You will only be charged for freight from the Airport to YP.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
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D9 News:

You will be able to start ordering online directly from D9 on May 24th. Go to their website at link. Phone (208-382-4215) if you need assistance.

Orders must be placed before 10am Monday (Arnolds will pick up on Tuesday for Wednesday delivery.) It is important that upon checkout, you click the box marked “Gift” – and type in the order is for Arnolds to pick up and deliver to Yellow Pine. Otherwise they will think it is a local personal pickup.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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May 15 thru Nov 30 – Firewood Season

Firewood permits are available at The Corner.
— — — —

State Burn permits required May 10th to Oct 20th

Closed fire season begins May 10, which means Idahoans outside city limits will need a burn permit before burning any debris. The closed fire season lasts until Oct. 20.
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Notice – Yellow Pine Times Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
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Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Hwy 55 Update from ITD August 26, 2022
With Labor Day approaching and higher traffic volumes anticipated, both lanes of State Highway 55 near Smiths Ferry will be open noon Friday, September 2, through Monday, September 5, to accommodate holiday travel.
Starting Tuesday, September 6, the Smiths Ferry project will transition to the fall construction schedule. Drivers should plan for one-way alternating traffic with 15-minute delays, Monday through Friday and weekends as needed.
Crews will start paving work on September 6. Drivers can expect a gravel highway surface for a few weeks, and the first layer of asphalt completed by the end of September.
To learn more about the construction schedule, visit link:

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
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Critters

Be Wasp Wary

Long legged wasps are building nests under eves and any small crack they can enter under roofs, behind shutters, under propane tank lids and even inside truck mirrors.
* Wear light-colored, smooth-finished clothing.
* Avoid perfumed soaps, shampoos, and deodorants. …
* Wear clean clothing and bathe daily. …
* Wear clothing to cover as much of the body as possible.
* Avoid flowering plants when possible.
* Keep work areas clean
Check for wasp nests either early morning or late evening when it is cooler and they are less active.

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be wary of mosquitoes spreading West Nile Virus

* Wear repellent containing DEET, Picaridin or Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus (all EPA-approved repellents) according to the label.
* Remove standing water around your home – this is where mosquitoes like to breed.
* Cover up your skin with clothing between dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active.
* If you have livestock, also remember to change out their troughs every three days to keep the mosquito population down.

Be Elk and Deer Aware

It is spring “baby” season – watch your dogs, mama elk and deer can be very aggressive towards dogs. There have been a few dogs injured up here over the years.
Cows and Does are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Moose Aware

* Be aware of your surroundings and be especially careful around creeks and in areas with dense brush.
* Travel in groups whenever possible and make noise to alert animals to your presence.
* If you encounter a moose, give it lots of space and don’t approach it. Always keep dogs under control.
* If a moose charges or chases you, take cover behind something solid, such as a tree.
* In some situations, bear spray has been known to be an effective defense tool in moose encounters.
Fourth of July weekend traffic on Johnson Creek. One more reason to drive slow.

courtesy Yellow Pine FB group

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard. F&G confirms there is a pack of 6 wolves in our valley.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

courtesy YP resident

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat was hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Aug 27: “Bins have been emptied recently, road is OK.”

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

Summer Water Usage update July 30

The last three days we have been above 60,000 gallons of water consumed per day with yesterday’s usage over 65,000 gallons.

Unless we have another huge leak, lawn watering is the cause. Please limit your water usage and do not leave your water on all night. If someone notices a leak please let us know.

Thank you – YPWUA

The YPWUA is happy to announce that Clint Limbaugh has accepted the new position of Community Water Maintenance Coordinator.

Clint will be the contact person (208-631-3221) and advise the YPWUA board on Maintenance issues within the YPWUA district. He will be responsible for turning on and off property owners water, diagnose and troubleshoot shoot issues within the water district and then report to the board. Work with our water operator Warren when needed.

Thank you Clint for taking this much needed position.

Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at (link).

Water Use

08/18/22 27475944 41826 24 1743 29 T 3130
08/19/22 27516592 40648 24 1694 28 F 1178
08/20/22 27554524 37932 24 1581 26 S 2716
08/21/22 27591663 37139 24 1547 26 S 793
08/22/22 27630871 39208 24 1634 27 M 2069
08/23/22 27674908 44037 24 1835 31 T 4829
08/24/22 27720237 45329 24 1889 31 W 1292
08/25/22 27758224 37987 24 1583 26 T 7342
08/26/22 27802758 44534 24 1856 31 F 6547
08/27/22 27840362 37604 24 1567 26 S 6930
08/28/22 27872363 32001 24 1333 22 S 5603

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

As of April 17th 2020, Yellow Pine is under a “Boil Order”. This boil order will be in effect until further notice.

DRINKING WATER WARNING
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST. Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 8-10-22..

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

Aug 27, 2022 Special Water Meeting 12pm at Community Hall
YPWUA 2022 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 3, 2022 (minutes to follow)
YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 5, 2020 link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Tim Aldridge
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
Warren Drake – Water Operator
Clint Limbaugh – Community Water Maintenance Coordinator (208-631-3221)
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VYPA News:

Minutes July 9, 2022
Yellow Pine Village Association
Officers present: Hailey Harris, Chr.; Ronda Rogers, Treas.; Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large
Officers absent: Josh Jones, Vice Chr.; Jenny Aldrich, Acting Secretary

Approval of June Minutes: Lorrine Munn requested that Treasurer’s detailed report be added.

Treasurer’s Report:
General Fund $11,292.02;
HC/Music Festival ($5,720.52);
Infrastructure $1,957.38;
Community Hall $429.95:
VYPA Total $12,222.75
Yellow Pine Pioneer Cemetery: $4,263.92

Harmonica/Music Festival Report: Josh Jones, Committee Chr. Absent, Rhonda Egbert reporting.
The committee is aware that expenses have created an approximately $5,000 deficit in the $12,000 budget. As usual some bills have not yet been received (e.g. porta-potties, T shirts, vendors). Cash donations are processed through YPAC which allows non-taxable donations. Rhonda Egbert reported that Josh Jones has told her he is willing to cover any deficit spending amounts and will share in the cost of porta-potties because they will be used by his motorcycle event following the festival. $12,000 will be set aside for the 2023 festival as required by Village By Laws. Money will be set aside for next year’s dust abatement; Perpetua has contributed one half of that expense in past years. Josh Jones has more details to be provided at next month’s meeting. (note: August meeting was cancelled)
Willie Sullivan made a motion that VYPA require Josh Jones post a bond to cover $12,000 to assure next year’s festival. Kat Amos, seconded. Discussion: the HC/Music Festival committee has the responsibility to oversee spending, therefore, shouldn’t the committee also be included. W. Sullivan amended his motion to include the committee members. Motion passed with one opposed. VYPA officers will meet with the committee and Josh Jones.

Dust Abatement: Lorrine Munn reported that North American will apply dust abatement solution to the main roads in the Village. Tim Rogers will compile a list of individuals wanting abatement, Rhonda Egbert will follow up. Comments included: “back” road needs abatement to edge of Village, need for pilot cars for some loads, up -hill driver has the right of way. Possible use of road in-bound before noon and out-bound after noon.

YP Fire Dept.: Lorrine Munn, Commissioner, reported that the YPFD wants a contract signed by the search and rescue unit to allow use of the rescue/medical equipment. Tim Rogers and Jeff Forster are to inventory the equipment.

Yellow Pine Water Users’ Assoc. Willie Sullivan reporting: June 21st was closing date for bids to install some replacement lines. Granite Construction was low bidder ($630,000) and will start on the upper section, working down to Bennett’s house replacing main lines. The Board is working with Granite to cut costs and do as much as possible with the $450,000 available. Mountain Water Works is continuing to seek more grants from Federal and State agencies. New Federal money becomes available for grants in October. Tim Aldrich is now on the YPWUA board as Secretary and the Board has contracted with
Clint Limbaugh to serve as the local contact person for service problems. His phone number and contact information will be provided.

Election of Officers: Vice Chairman, Treasurer and Secretary
Willie Sullivan commented that if more than one person is nominated there should be a secret ballot. Election of officers takes place at the July meeting. Secretary position will be open for election July 2023, but is presently vacant. Vice Chairman and Treasurer positions are open for election. Lorrine Munn and Kat Amos were nominated. Lorrine Munn was elected Treasurer by secret ballot, 10/16. Lynn Imel was nominated by Ann Forster to fill the vacant Secretary position until July 2023, no other nominees. Lynn Imel was elected by unanimous approval. Josh Jones was nominated as Vice Chairman by Lorrine Munn, seconded by Willie Sullivan. No other nominees, elected for two- year position.
Willie Sullivan moved that an audit be performed prior to September to provide protection for out-going Treasurer and new Treasurer. Seconded by Lynn Imel. This is a common practice and need not be done by a CPA. Willie Sullivan was appointed audit committee chairman and will select two or three others to assist and report.
Anne Forster suggested that the incoming Treasurer work with the outgoing Treasurer through the Harmonica/Music Festival.

Adjournment 3:00
Hailey Harris thanked everyone for participating in a good meeting.

Dear Yellow Piners,

Effective immediately, I will be stepping down from my position as Chairman of the VYPA Council.

While it was a pleasure to serve our wonderful community, I am not able to fulfill this role to the best of my ability at this time. Although, I still plan on being involved as much as possible in volunteering in our community improvement projects.

Please direct all future questions/concerns regarding the VYPA to our current officers. Thank you all for your support!

Warm wishes,
Hailey Harris
Dated Aug 23, 2022

Community Hall Update: To ensure proper scheduling of the community hall usage and to avoid scheduling conflicts, we are asking that if you would like to use the community hall to contact Rhonda Egbert (member at large). With increased usage requests, we need to ensure that everyone is able to use it without conflict/overlap of events. Rhonda is taking point to schedule those individuals who want to use the community hall. Please also read the Community Hall Usage Guidelines-this outlines the etiquette required for usage.

Village Association Meeting Update: In the past as a courtesy, a Zoom video conference was an option for the individuals who were not able to attend the meeting(s) in person. However, I will not be providing this option going forward. I’m sorry for the inconvenience this may cause some. Also, if you have a request for a meeting agenda item, please contact me (Hailey Harris) no later than 7 days before the upcoming meeting. We are not able to add agenda items without approval of the Chairman.

I will also be enforcing a meeting conduct, effective immediately: Meeting attendees are expected to: Uphold professional purpose of meetings by respecting the rights, privacy, safety, and dignity of all persons; exercise professionalism, consideration, and respect in their speech and actions; refrain from harassing speech and other harassing behavior. Failure to conduct oneself in accordance with these expectations may result in removal of the offending person(s) or adjournment of the meeting.
-Hailey Harris

Yellow Pine Community Hall General Use Procedures

Hall General Usage:
* All events must be scheduled through the Community Hall Committee and approved by the Committee Chairman
* No property shall be removed from the Community Hall without approval of the Community Hall Committee Chairman.
* Responsible alcohol usage is permitted.
* No smoking is allowed in the hall. Pick up any butts scattered outside.
* Building and grounds are not a storage area. Do not leave personal items in or around the Community Hall without approval of the Community Hall Committee Chairman.
* Notify a committee member if problems are encountered.

After each event using the hall:
* Sweep/vacuum hall floor and restroom floor
* Wipe down toilet
* Empty garbage cans and take garbage to the transfer station
* Fold tables
* Stack chairs
* Turn off lights, ceiling fans, heater (if applicable)
* Put away any kitchen items after they are cleaned

After each event using the kitchen:
* Sweep/mop kitchen floor
* Wash, dry, and store all used dishes, utensils, pans, coffee pots, etc.
* Clean and wipe down sinks
* Thoroughly clean griddles, if used, and turn off propane to griddles
* Remove any unused food/beverages from the refrigerators/freezers
* Clean up any spilled food or beverage
* Empty garbage cans and take garbage to the transfer station
* Notify a committee member if problems are encountered

Using the Community Hall and/equipment for non-Yellow Pine events:
* A refundable, $50 deposit is required seven (7) days prior to the event
* After the event, a Community Hall Committee member will inspect the premises prior to the deposit being refunded
* A $150/day donation is requested for the use of the Hall
* A $200/day donation is requested for the use of the Kitchen

No deposit or use donation is needed for use by Yellow Pine community members, committees, or groups.

Yellow Pine Community Hall Committee:
Rhonda Egbert – Chairman
Members: Ronda Rogers, Deb Filler, Hailey Harris

Village of Yellow Pine Association:
(Vacant), Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Lynn Imel, Secretary
Lorrine Munn, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Joel Fields

Aug 13, 2022 VYPA Meeting cancelled due to lack of quorum.
July 9, 2022 VYPA Meeting minutes Link:
June 11, 2022 VYPA Meeting minutes link:
April 6, 2022 Village Council meeting to fill vacant chairperson position (no minutes.)
Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.
2022 Meeting dates:
June 11
July 9
August 13
September 10

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
— — — —

YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Department

If you have an emergency, please call 911

YPFD Budget Meeting Agenda for September 06, 2022, at 10am

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Budget For Fiscal Year 2022-2023

Notice has been given that the Yellow Pine Fire District will hold a public hearing for consideration of the proposed budget, including the estimated revenue for the fiscal year, October 1, 2022 to September 20, 2023, pursuant to Country Law chapter 14, Section 31-1419A. Said hearing will be held at the Yellow Pine Community Hall in Yellow Pine, Idaho on Tuesday September 06, 2022, at 10:00 am. At said hearing all interested persons may appear and show cause, if any they have, why said proposed budget should not be adopted.

Proposed Expenditures:

The following budget is an estimated set forth in said budget of the total proposed expenditures and accruing indebtedness of the Yellow Pine Fire District for the Fiscal Year.

Yellow Pine Fire District Budget for 2022-2023

* Fire Fighting; $2867.00
* Wages; $0
* Advertising; $1000.00
* Repairs and Maintenance; $4500.00
* Travel and Training; $3500.00
* Insurance; $3400.00
* Capital Outlay; $1000.00
* Utilities; $3500.00
Total; 19,767.00

I, Ronda Rogers, Secretary/Treasurer of Yellow Pine Fire District, Yellow Pine, Id. do hereby certify that the above is a true and correct statement of the proposed expenditures for the fiscal year 2022-2023. All have been tentatively approved and entered into district records. I further certify Yellow Pine Fire District did give notice for said hearing in two conspicuous places in the fire district, by order of the commissioners. Residents are invited to attend the budget hearing on Sept. 6, 2022 at 10 am and have the right to approve written or oral comments concerning the fire district budget. A copy of said proposed fire district budget in detail is available at 425 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine, Idaho 83677.

Dated this 23th day of August 2022
— —

After Action Report August 16, 2022

Johnson Creek Fatal (x2) Plane Crash

[from Valley County Sheriff’s Office]

On August 16, 2022, at approximately 1100 hrs., Valley County Sheriff Office (VCSO) personnel responded to a reported plane crash, located in Johnson Creek, several hundred yards north of the Johnson Creek Airport runway. Yellow Pine Fire Department (YPFD) initially responded to the location and determined that there were no survivors amongst the occupants of the plane.

VCSO personnel responded to the location and arrived at approximately 1330 hrs. We were met by YPFD personnel and briefed on the situation. The crash scene was turned over to VCSO, YPFD cleared the scene.

We began our investigation and recovery of the victims. As we began to work on extricating the victims from the aircraft, it was quickly evident that we would need equipment that was much more capable than the equipment we had.

We requested YPFD respond back to the scene with several pieces of equipment we needed for the extrication of the victims and fire suppression, due to the plane leaking fuel into the cockpit. Firefighter Ron Basabe responded without hesitation with the equipment that we had requested.

* Requested equipment- Chainsaw, Jaws of Life, Dewalt tools with saw blades and shears, ropes, and pullies, stokes basket, rigid backboard, six-wheel FD response UTV to be used for fire suppression.

Deputies familiarized themselves with the above equipment shortly after it arrived at the location and began the extrication process to remove the victims. UTV winch was used to remove the victims from the river bottom to the road via backboard (approx. 50 yards).

It took several hours to remove both victims and the dog. It was done while standing in Johnson Creek in thigh deep water. Valley County Coroner was at scene during this entire process and assisted with extrication.

Lessons Learned

Currently, we are awaiting funding for equipment that has been identified by deputies as needed for this type of operation. We were able to make do with current equipment and Valley County Search and Rescue (VCSAR) / YPFD equipment provided by Ron Basabe. Additional equipment, such as leather work gloves and eye protection were ordered the next day.

Had the above mentioned equipment not been at YPFD, it is questionable if we could have obtained it when needed. The YPFD building is optimal for storage of this equipment, it gives YPFD, VCSAR and VCSO deputies 24/7 access to the equipment. YPFD building also has a hardline phone in the building, giving Incident Commanders access to a reliable form of communication while in the back country.

Communication can always be better while in the backcountry. Some type of Garmin satellite device is preferable and will be ordered for future missions.

It will be suggested that deputies responding to future plane crashes, cover the tail number to the aircraft as soon as practical. This will hopefully limit possible identity of victims via tail number and postings on social media. This plane crash and identity of the occupants was known and posted on social media prior to VCSO arrival at scene.
— —

Meeting Minutes
Aug 16, 2022 VSCO After Action Report (plane crash) Link:
Aug 14, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Aug 5, 2022 YPFD Search and Rescue Mutual Aid Agreement Link:
Aug 3, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Special Meeting (no minutes yet)
May 29, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting (no minutes yet)
May 20, 2022 YPFD Meeting in Cascade with Forest Service (no minutes yet)
Apr 3, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting Link: to Amended minutes
Feb 24, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD New Commissioner’s Transition Meeting Link:
Nov 23, 2021 – YPFD Special meeting Link:
Nov 8, 2021 – YPFD AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
Oct 31, 2021 – YPFD Special meeting Link:
Oct 14, 2021 – YPFD Special meeting Link:
Sep 27, 2021 – YPFD Special meeting Link:
Sep 18, 2021 – YPFD Special meeting Link:
Sep 11, 2021 – YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
Jul 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Jun 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sep 30, 2020 – YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 6 (rescheduled), 2022, Sunday at 10am Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Summer hours: Wednesday thru Monday (closed Tuesdays) 9am to 7pm
Firewood permits Available May 15th
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
The Tavern will remain closed for renovations until further notice.
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The General Store will be closed Mondays, and open Tuesday-Saturday 10-6pm. Sunday 10-3pm
The motel rooms and the laundry room are available 7 days per week. Email:
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Open
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $4/doz
No longer taking scrap metal
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Buck Horn Outfitters is offering trail rides out of Yellow Pine, anything from an hour ride to day trips and fully catered camping / pack trips to high mountain lakes or DIY camp trips where you can enjoy Idaho’s back country to yourself.
See our website for more details. Or give us a call 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:
Opened May 27, 2022 for Fly-ins

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: 1-800-427-4968
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Cascade:
Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
D9 Groceries: 208-382-4215 Website link to order:
Upon “checkout” click on “gift” and write “Arnolds to pick up and deliver to (your name) in Yellow Pine” so they know who will pick it up and where it goes.
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watkins can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
Please help support local journalism and subscribe.
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

J & R Septic
Cascade (208) 382-8727

Valley Roofing Idaho
Meridian (208) 830-4890 email:
Facebook:

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473) Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
————–

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Aug 22) overnight low of 48 degrees, no rain. This morning it was 57 degrees by 9am, mostly small high thin hazy clouds and light smoke. Evening grosbeaks, cassins finches, pine siskins, jays, hummingbirds, pine squirrels, golden mantled and chipmunks observed. At lunch time mostly large chunky clouds and slight breeze. Partly clear mid-afternoon, warm, light smoke and variable breezes, high of 91 degrees. Dark clouds and gusty breezes early evening. Calmer and mostly clear after sunset.

Tuesday (Aug 23) overnight low of 48 degrees, no rain. This morning it was 56 degrees by 9am, partly clear/cloudy and light smoke. Jays, evening grosbeaks, finches, pine siskins, hummingbirds, pine squirrels and numerous chipmunks observed. Mostly cloudy and warm at lunch time. Hot by mid-afternoon, mostly cloudy. variable breezes and light haze of smoke, high of 90 degrees. Partly cloudy, haze of smoke and slight breeze after sunset.

Wednesday (Aug 24) overnight low of 48 degrees, no rain. This morning it was 55 degrees by 9am, partly clear/cloudy and better air quality. Evening grosbeaks, finches, pine siskins, jays, hummingbirds and several chipmunks observed. Warm and mostly cloudy at lunch time. Mail truck made it in on time. Increasing haze of smoke, mostly cloudy and hot mid-afternoon, variable breezes, high of 93 degrees. Cooling off just before dusk, smoky, mostly cloudy and calm.

Thursday (Aug 25) overnight low of 49 degrees, no rain. This morning it was 56 degrees by 9am, almost clear sky and light haze of smoke. Evening grosbeaks, jays, finches, pine siskins, hummingbirds, a golden mantled and lots of chipmunks observed. Warm, partly cloudy and increasing haze of smoke at lunch time. Mostly cloudy (with dark bottoms) and a minute of fine light mist (not enough to get wet) mid-afternoon and temperature dropping. Mostly clear and cooling off after sunset.

Friday (Aug 26) overnight low of 46 degrees, “trace” of mist recorded. This morning it was 54 degrees by 9am, good air quality and clear sky. Water off at 915am for about an hour for repairs. Jays, hummingbirds, finches, pine siskins and chipmunks observed. Warm and partly cloudy at lunch time. Local streets are very dusty. Hot, partly cloudy and breezy mid-afternoon, not much smoke, high of 90 degrees. Cooling off some by early evening. Partly cloudy after sunset and calm.

Saturday (Aug 27) overnight low of 46 degrees, no rain. This morning it was 54 degrees by 9am, partly cloudy and light haze of smoke. Juvenile and adult cassins finches, pine siskins, hummingbirds, jays, pine squirrel and chipmunks observed. Increasing street traffic adding dust to the smoke in the air. Water Meeting at Community Hall 12pm. Partly cloudy and warm at lunch time. Mostly cloudy and breezy mid-afternoon, haze of smoke (and dust), high of 84 degrees. Mostly hazy after sunset, slight breeze and cooler.

Sunday (Aug 28) overnight low of 40 degrees, no rain. This morning it was 46 degrees by 9am, clear sky, haze of dust and smoke and light cool breeze. Jays, finches, pine siskins, hummingbirds, a doe and chipmunks observed. Pleasant temperatures at lunch time and increasing haze. Warm and hazy mid-afternoon, light breeze and haze of smoke, high of 83 degrees. Cooling off before sunset, clear sky and light smoky haze.
——————-

RIP:

Rascal

2004-2022

We are sad to hear that old Rascal passed away on Wednesday, August 24, 2022 at the ripe old age of 18. He was the oldest and last of the “Waller Dogs” from Badger and Sarah. He loved to ride in the car and go on walks down by the Devil’s Bathtubs.

Mother Sarah and puppies 2004
— — — — — — — — — —

Steven Earl DavisRIPStevenEarlDavis-a
1950 – 2022

Steven Earl Davis, 71, of Idaho City, Idaho, died on August 10, 2022 near his home in a motor vehicle accident. He was born on August 24, 1950 to Earl Kay and Florence Davis in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Steven graduated from Bonneville High School and joined the National Guard 1970. After his service in the National Guard, he joined the Army in 1973 reaching the rank of E-6 Staff Sargent before honorable discharge for completing his service.

Steven married Diane McCall in March 1971 and they had three children, Jason, Jacob, and Jessica.

He worked as a commercial vehicle driver, miner, and had various management positions and was currently enjoying his retirement. Steven was an avid outdoorsman. He loved small and big game hunting, fishing, camping with his family.

Steven is survived by his children: Jason A. Davis (Janae), Jacob A. Davis (Jocelyn), Jessica A. Davis-Shaffer (John). He is also survived by nine grandchildren and one great grandchild and he has seven surviving siblings.

He was preceded in death by his parents Kay and Florence Davis, brother David Davis, and grandson Simon Davis.

Funeral services will be August 26, 2022 at 9:30am at Summers Funeral Home (3629 E Ustick Rd, Meridian, ID 83646).

Interment will follow at 11:00pm at the Idaho State Veterans Cemetery (10100 N. Horseshoebend Rd, Boise, ID 83714) with luncheon following at Summers.

Honorary Pallbearers: Jason Davis, Jacob Davis, John Shaffer, Isaac Barton, Hunter Davis, Marshall Barton, Dalton Davis, Blaine Davis, Kevin Davis, Mark Davis, Scott Davis and Timothy Davis.

To send flowers to the family or plant a tree in memory of Steven Davis, please visit Tribute Store

source: Summers Funeral Home

Note: “Father was a miner up at Stibnite in the 90’s. Yellow Pine was one of his favorite places.”
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Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 738 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 7 new deaths

August 26, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 738 new COVID-19 cases and 7 new deaths Friday. State-level case and hospital data are now being updated on the state dashboard on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, excluding holidays.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 488,067.

The age group with the most cases is 18-29 with 110,865 cases.

The state said 23 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 17,879, and 6 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 3,018.

7 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 5,107.

full story: [Valley County 2,916 cases, 16 deaths.]
— — — —

20 new Valley County COVID-19 cases reported in last week

By Tom Grote The Star-News August 25, 2022

A total of 20 new cases of COVID-19 were reported in Valley County in the past week by the county’s two hospitals.

The 20 new cases compared to 23 new cases reported the previous week and 36 new cases reported the prior week.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 3,133 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started in March 2020.

Spokespeople for both hospitals said the number of new reported cases are likely far lower than the actual number of new cases.

Both hospitals distribute home tests for COVID-19 and some patients may choose not to be tested, they said.

Thirteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health since the start of the pandemic.

A total of 608 cases in Adams County linked to COVID-19 have been reported by Southwest District Health, which is one more case than reported last week.

A total of 15 confirmed deaths from the virus have been recorded in Adams County by the health district.

Clinics & Tests – McCall

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine now offers Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccines for children age 6 months to 4 years. Children 5-17 years old already may receive the Pfizer vaccine.

The McCall clinic also offers the Moderna and Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older, but the Moderna vaccine is not available for youths under age 18.

Second booster doses are available for adults ages 50 years and older, people ages 12 years and older who are moderately or severely immunocompromised.

Patients should talk to their health care provider about their medical condition, and whether getting an additional primary shot is appropriate for them.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link) or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

Clinics & Tests – Cascade

Cascade Medical Center no longer offers the Pfizer vaccine. Those wishing to be given the Pfizer vaccine should contact St. Luke’s McCall or a local pharmacy.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Thursdays only along with the Moderna booster. Call 208-382-4285 to schedule a time.

The Cascade hospital offers a second booster shot of the Moderna vaccine to those over age 50 who received their first booster shot at least four months ago

Take-Home Tests

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital also provides free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade

source: © Copyright 2009-2021 · Central Idaho Publishing Inc. · All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — — — — — — — —

Paving projects proposed in 2023 Valley budget

County sheriff seeks two deputies to focus on back country

By Max Silverson The Star-News August 25, 2022

The Valley County Road Department budget will increase by about $1.7 million to about $9.7 million under the county’s proposed budget for 2023.

The road department budget is part of the county’s $38 million total budget, which will be considered at a public hearing before Valley County Commissioners on Monday at 2 p.m. at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade.

The overall proposed budget increased by about $4.2 million from about $33.7 million this year. The budget takes effect Oct. 1.

Sheriff’s Office

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office will add two “recreation deputies” to focus on backcountry roads and remote areas that take hours to access with current staffing.

“In the past several years there has been a continual uptick in incidents requiring law enforcement response to the backcountry,” VCSO Chief Deputy Dave Stambaugh said.

When this happens, deputies are pulled off the valley floor and sent in to handle the incident, which can include drownings, plane crashes, snowmobile wrecks or general complaints at remote campgrounds, Stambaugh said.

The new deputies will be trained as emergency medical technicians and attend various backcountry skills schools to ensure they can provide the service needed for backcountry incidents, he said.

In addition to the additional staff and training, the VCSO budget includes equipment like motorcycles, snowmobiles and four-wheel drive trucks to support the deputies.

The county plans to take the entire 3% property tax increase allowed by law and would receive about $110,000 in property taxes from new development.

excerpted from:
— — — — — — — — — —

Eagle man hurt when tree falls on Ponderosa Park camp

By Drew Dodson The Star-News August 25, 2022

An Eagle man suffered what was described as life-threatening injuries last Friday after being pinned by a tree that fell in Ponderosa State Park last Friday night during a storm, according to McCall Fire & EMS.

The 39-year-old man was struck by a tree at about 8:06 p.m. while at his campsite in the park’s Aspen Loop, Fire Chief Garrett de Jong said.

The tree was one of eight that fell in the park during Friday’s storm, Park Manager Matt Linde said.

Warren Wagon Trees

McCall Fire was also dispatched shortly after 8 p.m. last Friday night to clear seven trees that fell across Warren Wagon Road and snarled nearby powerlines.

“We removed all of the trees and kept the road closed until Idaho Power got on scene to secure power at 10:30 p.m.,” de Jong said.

Weather equipment at the McCall Municipal Airport registered wind gusts of up to 45 miles per hour between 8 p.m. and 8:10 p.m., according to the National Weather Service.

Weather equipment at the McCall Municipal Airport registered wind gusts of up to 45 miles per hour between 8 p.m. and 8:10 p.m., according to the National Weather Service.

Overall, about 422 customers in McCall were without power due to downed trees and limbs on power lines, said Jordan Rodriguez, a spokesperson for Idaho Power.

South Fork Road

South Fork Road east of McCall was closed over the weekend after heavy rains from the storm caused two mud slides that covered parts of the roadway with two feet of debris, said Brian Harris, a spokesperson for the Payette National Forest.

The road re-opened on Sunday night at about 5:30 after crews cleared debris using heavy equipment, Harris said.

excerpted from:
— — — — — — — — — —

Cascade Fire seeks to add $2,900 fee to new homes

Fee would fund equipment purchases but not salaries

By Max Silverson The Star-News August 25, 2022

A public hearing will be held Monday on adopting a $2,900 fee on new homes in Cascade to fund improvements for firefighting and ambulance services.

The joint hearing will take place before the Cascade City Council and commissioners of the Cascade Rural Fire Protection District at 6 p.m. Monday at Cascade City Hall

The fee would apply only to new development and would be paid when a building permit is issued. Current homes and businesses as well as new garages, sheds and additions would not pay a fee.

Another hearing would be required before Valley County commissioners to consider fees for the fire district outside of city limits.

continued:
—————–

Fire Season:

Idaho Smoke Aug 26th

20220826GOES18-a
courtesy NOAA
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho is reporting the most active large fires in the country

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, August 23rd 2022

According to a report from the National Interagency Fire Center, Idaho is reporting more active large wildfires than any other state in the country.

Of the states currently reporting large fires, the only one that comes close to Idaho’s 11 fires is Montana at 9. The other states include Oregon at 6, Alaska and California at 5 and Washington at 2. Utah, North Carolina, Wyoming and North Dakota all reported 1 large active fire.

The active large fires reported in Idaho are:

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise National Forest Fire Update

August 26, 2022

August 26th Boise National Forest Fire Summary

The lightning storms from last weekend ignited 16 new fires on the Boise National Forest. Of those sixteen, twelve have been called out, three are fully contained, and one is being monitored. The Bearcub Fire is being checked every other day by aerial reconnaissance and is currently showing no smoke with sparse burnable vegetation and low probability to spread from its current location. If conditions hold, this will be the last update on those fires currently staffed.

Weather conditions continue to be hot and dry during the day, with some cooler temps in the evenings. This weekend winds are projected to come from the West/Northwest traveling between 10 and 20 mph. With this hot, dry weather comes the need for hyper vigilance in fire prevention. Fire restrictions are not in affect on the Boise National Forest currently, but it remains important to take precautions against wildfires.

As fire activity slows, crews will be pulled from the following fires and made available for other incidents. Those that remain on each fire will continue to monitor any increase in fire activity and mop up any residual heat, securing the fire from the outside in. Mop up is an important part of wildland firefighting as this process ensures that the wildfire is DEAD OUT and will not reignite with aggressive winds. Just like you ensure your campfire is cool to touch, so do those crews working to mop up wildland fires.

The following fires remain burning, but are contained:

Wet Fire Started on 8/19 (11.5 acres): Has been holding at current acreage for several days with crews being demobilized. One Wildland Fire Module is staying on to continue securing and mopping up any heat. (Contained 8/24)

Oxtail Fire Started 8/21 (15 acres): Has been holding at 15 acres for several days. Burning in an old burn scar with subalpine fir and a plethora of snags and dead and down. 14 smokejumpers were flown off it yesterday, with 2 hotshot crews remaining on it for the next couple days. Following that, it will be monitored by air and staffed as needed. (Contained 8/25)

Canyon Fire Started 8/22 (10 ¼ acres): Has been holding for several days. Burning in subalpine fir. Wildland Fire Modules will fly off today, leaving a hotshot crew and Type 2 IA Crew to continue mop-up. (Contained 8/25)

The following fire is burning with 0% containment but with low probability of spread:

Bearcub Fire (.1 acres): Located within the footprint of the Rabbit Fire, meaning fuels are sparse and the exposure to firefighters is high. No smoke showing on 8/24, resources will fly every other day to check for progress.

Thank you to crews from near and far who jumped on this string of fires and kept spread to a minimum! Your work is greatly appreciated by those communities within the Boise National Forest.

(via Facebook)
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise District [BLM] Fire Update

Date: August 23, 2022
Contact: Chad Cline (208) 384-3378

Boise District BLM Fire and Aviation resources were able to make excellent progress in fire suppression efforts overnight and active fire spread has been stopped on all fires. Crews will continue to and mop up any remaining hot spots and will monitor throughout the day.

Doubletapp Fire

* Located near I-84 and Simco Road southeast of Boise
* Mapped at 710 acres
* Fire cause is under investigation
* Fire burned in grass and brush
* Fire progression has been stopped and fire crews will continue to mop up and monitor fire behavior throughout the day
* Boise BLM fire resources: 4 overhead, 4 engines, 1 dozer and 1 water tender
* Last night multiple resources from Boise City Fire, Orchard Fire and Mountain Home Rural Fire Protection Association aided in fire suppression
* Contained on August 22, 2022, at 8 p.m.
* Estimated control at 6 p.m. August 23, 2022

Bonny Fire

* Located south of Bonneville Point, at the intersection of East Blacks Creek and Upper Blacks Creek Road
* Mapped at 4 acres
* Fire Burned in grass and brush
* Fire cause is under investigation
* Crews continue to mop-up hotspots and monitor
* Resources on scene: 1 USFS engine and 1 Mountain Home RFPA water tender
* Contained on August 22, 2022, at 8:48 p.m.
* Estimated control at 2 p.m. August 23, 2022

Neal Fire

* Located northeast of Bonneville Point, north of East Blacks Creek Road
* Mapped at 11 acres
* Fire cause is under investigation
* Fire Burned in grass and brush
* Fire crews continue to mop-up hotspots and monitor
* Fire resources include: 2 Boise BLM overhead, 4 Boise BLM engines and 1 USFS engine
* Contained on August 22, 2022, at 11 p.m.
* Estimated control at noon August 23, 2022

For More Information Contact,

Boise District Fire Information Hotline, 208.384-3378
Or visit (link)
— — — — — — — — — —

Four Corners Fire
Payette National Forest
Location: Payette and Boise National forests. The fire is location a half mile to the north of Lookout Point, 2 miles west of Cascade high along the ridgeline. (Cascade is not threatened by this fire).
Current as of 8/27/2022
Total Personnel 762
Size 10,179 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 18%
InciWeb Link:
— —

Four Corners Fire Update

Sunday, August 28, 2022
Contact Fire Information: 208.207.7417

Tonight, Sunday, August 28 at 5 PM, a Facebook live virtual meeting will be held to share an update on the Four Corners Fire and evacuations. The meeting can be openly accessed on the Payette National Forest Facebook page, (link).

The arrival of shifting winds gusting up to 33 mph from a cold front shaped events at the Four Corners fire yesterday. The fire grew by just over 1,000 acres and now has a 117-mile perimeter. The southeast side of the fire was very active, and firefighters focused on fire activity in the Hazard Creek and Willow Creek drainages. As firefighters worked in heavy smoke and dense vegetation, water scooping planes and helicopters – including a Chinook helicopter capable of flying in adverse conditions – dropped water along the ridges of Hazard Creek and on smaller fires ignited by falling embers within a half-mile of structures in Campbell Creek.

Despite challenging winds and smoke in all areas of the fire, good progress continues on the western and northern edges of the fire where firefighters are increasing containment lines. Fire crews constructing handline have reached Wilson Peak from the west side and will continue progressing to the east directly along the fire perimeter as safe and practicable and evaluating additional actions to limit fire spread.

For Sunday, crews will continue to maintain structure protection efforts on the east side. To the south, fire managers expect little fire spread to the west. Fire crews will continue to build fireline and to prevent spread to heavy vegetation in the area. Calmer conditions will prevail across the fire area with drier conditions and light southwest winds up to 10 mph. A low- to mid-level inversion layer will hold smoke but lift by mid-morning. Sunday and Monday, fire activity is expected to be slower due to cooler temperatures in the 70s with light winds. Fire activity overall will pick up as temperatures and higher winds gradually increase starting Tuesday then peaking on Thursday. Fire managers expect critical fire weather conditions by the end of week.

Air Quality: A heavy inversion is expected Sunday morning as stable conditions will limit air movement. Those with sensitivities should limit outdoor activities at least until the inversion lifts, which is expected to occur mid to late morning. Specific information about local smoke levels, forecasts, and possible health impacts is available at (link).

Evacuation Information: Valley County Sheriff has issued evacuation orders (Go) for area residents of Campbell Creek, God’s Acres, and French Creek. Others in the vicinity are encouraged to consider evacuation preparations (Ready). Please visit (link) for information on packing and preparing for evacuations. For more information on evacuations and local support, call the Valley County Sheriff’s Office at 208.382.5160.

Closure Information: The complete closure order for the Boise and Payette National Forests – including a full description and an accompanying map – is available at (link).
— —

Homes escape Four Corners Fire

8,400-acre blaze on West Mountain 11% contained

By Max Silverson The Star-News August 25, 2022

Kevin McNamara was reflective as he was evacuating from his home on French Loop last Friday while watching the Four Corners Fire creep down West Mountain.

“We live in the West, one of the things you have to accept is that there are going to be wildfires,” McNamara said.

As of Wednesday, McNamara’s home and all other homes on the west side of Lake Cascade threatened by the fire were still standing.

The fire, about four miles west of Cascade did not receive the high winds forecast for Monday, allowing firefighters to focus on improving fire lines and protecting homes along West Mountain Road.

The fire was started by lighting on Aug. 13 and grew to about 8,400 acres with 11% containment as of Wednesday.

continued:
— —

Immediate evacuation for Campbell Creek due to Four Corners Fire

The Cascade Rural Fire Department is collecting funds for fire-related community needs.

KTVB Staff August 27, 2022

Due to increased activity on the Four Corners Fire, the Valley County Sheriff’s Office has raised the evacuation status for homes in the Campbell Creek area south to Raspberry Road to “GO” — leave the area immediately — the sheriff’s office announced Saturday morning.

The Four Corners Fire has burned 10,179 acres and is 18% contained as of Saturday, August 27. Active fire spread to the south and east Friday night and early Saturday morning, growing about one mile south toward Wilson Peak. Torching of individual trees and groups of trees and uphill runs with spotting of up to a quarter-mile were observed, officials with the Payette National Forest said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Porphyry Fire
Payette National Forest
Location: West of Porphyry Creek high along the ridge from the South Fork of the Salmon River.
Current as of 8/27/2022
Total Personnel 57
Size 2,286 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 10%
InciWeb Link:
— —

Fire along south Fork Salmon grows to 1,800 acres

By Max Silverson The Star-News August 25, 2022

The Porphyry Fire about nine miles east of Warren along the South Fork of the Salmon River grew to about 1,800 acres as of Wednesday.

The fire was started by lightning on Aug. 11 in designated wilderness on the Payette National Forest.

The “initial attack” of the fire included two helicopters dropping water on the fire in an attempt to put it out.

Because of the steep and rugged terrain water drops were the only option. Firefighters could not safely drive, parachute or rappel to the fire, said Payette National Forest Public Information Officer Brian Harris.

The fire started near the west bank of the South Fork of the Salmon River. The river remained open to boaters as of Wednesday, but the fire area as well as a portion of the Porphyry Creek Trail were closed.

On Aug. 18, the fire expanded to the west, and out of the wilderness area towards the nearby Hettinger Ranch.

“Additional firefighters and engines were placed at the ranch to implement structure protection measures and look for opportunities to steer the fire to the north away from the ranch and act as a containment line to stop progression up-river,” Harris said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Payette Wilderness Fires
Payette National Forest
Dismal Fire
Cold Meadows Area
Current as of 8/27/2022
Size 1,836 Acres
InciWeb Link:
— — — — — — — — — —

Woodtick Fires
Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location: Approximately 27 miles west of Challis, Idaho
Current as of 8/27/2022
Total Personnel 26
Size 5,751 Acres
InciWeb Link:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Fang Fire
Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location: 35 miles northwest of Salmon, ID
Current as of 8/27/2022
Total Personnel 1
Size 1,502 Acres
InciWeb Link:
— — — — — — — — — —

Moose Fire
Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location: 17 miles north of Salmon, ID
Current as of 8/26/2022
Total Personnel 777
Size 96,681 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 42%
InciWeb Link:
— — — — — — — — — —

Norton Fire
Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location: approximately seven (7) miles northwest of Lower Loon in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Middle Fork Ranger District.
Current as of 8/27/2022
Total Personnel 2
Size 1,665 Acres
InciWeb Link:
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Critter News:

Upcoming wild horse adoption events to be held in Boise and Blackfoot

BLM Boise and Idaho Falls Districts
Aug. 25, 2022

Boise, Idaho — The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is hosting wild horse adoption events in Boise and Blackfoot in August and September. Both events will offer 4-H handled wild horse yearlings for adoption.

Since 2009, the BLM Idaho Wild Horse and Burro Program, in concert with the University of Idaho 4-H Extension Program, has successfully paired youth with young wild horses for gentling and training. Nearly 400 wild horses have been adopted into good homes, 600 4-H members have developed wild horse handling skills and more than $65,000 has been raised for Idaho 4-H Clubs.

Wild horses and burros available for adoption have been removed from overpopulated herds roaming western public rangelands. A BLM-approved application, which may be completed at the event, is required to adopt.

Following are the upcoming opportunities available to adopt a 4-H handled young wild horse in Idaho:

Western Idaho Fairgrounds
5610 Glenwood, Boise, ID 83714

Aug. 26
* 10 a.m. – 8 p.m. Meet the Mustangs in the Draft Horse Barn
* 6 – 7:30 p.m. 4-H handled wild horse yearlings to compete in trail challenge

Aug. 27
* 10 a.m. – 8 p.m. Meet the Mustangs in the Draft Horse Barn

Aug. 28
* 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Meet the Mustangs in the Draft Horse Barn
* 1 – 2 p.m. Two 4-H handled wild horse yearlings available for adoption by competitive bid.

Eastern Idaho Fairgrounds
97 Park Street, Blackfoot, ID 83221

Sept. 2
* 11 a.m. 4-H handled wild horse yearlings to compete in trail challenge in the infield east of the arena
* 6 p.m. – 8 p.m. Meet the Mustangs in the Goat Pavilion

Sept. 3
* 11:30 a.m. – noon in the Grandstands
* As many as eight 4-H handled wild horse yearlings available for adoption by competitive bid.

For more information about the events and locations, visit (link)
or contact the national information center at 866-468-7826 or (link).
— — — — — — — — — —

F&G asks grouse hunters to put wings in collection barrels

Grouse hunters can help biologists and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game track population trends by donating forest grouse wings in collection barrels throughout the area.

Grouse wings are used to determine a bird’s age and gender, allowing biologists to track population trends over time.

Hunters should detach the right wing from each ruffed, spruce and dusky or blue grouse and deposit them into the slot on top of the barrel. Instructions will be on the barrels.

Wing collection barrels will be at No Business Road, East Fork Weiser River Road, Brundage Mountain Road, Warren Wagon Road at the French Creek intersection and Lick Creek Road at the Rowland Pond parking area.

They also will be located at Paddy Flat Road, Gold Fork Road, Middle Fork Weiser River Road and Mill Creek Road.

There may be wing barrels at Anderson Creek Road and Snowbank Road, depending on the status of the Four Corners Fire.

Hunters may also drop wings off at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game office at 555 Deinhard Lane in McCall.

source: The Star-News August 25, 2022
— — — — — — — — — —

Rabies confirmed in Adams County bat that came in contact with cat

So far in 2022, rabid bats have been found in eight Idaho counties.

KTVB Staff August 24, 2022

Idaho health officials are again urging caution around all bats, as they may be carrying the rabies virus.

Southwest District Health on Wednesday announced that a bat found in Adams County has tested positive for rabies. the bat was found inside a home where it had contact with a cat. It’s the first rabid bat discovered this season in the SWDH jurisdiction, which includes Adams, Canyon, Gem, Owyhee, Payette and Washington counties.

The cat that was in contact with the bat inside the Adams County home has been vaccinated against rabies in the past, and was given a booster after the encounter. People who were staying at the home are being assessed for potential exposure, SWDH said in a news release.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

West Nile carrying mosquitoes discovered in Twin falls County

KTVB Staff August 22, 2022

Over the weekend, Twin Falls County Pest Abatement District (TFCPAD) found several mosquitos that tested positive for West Nile Virus north of Filer, along the Snake River.

South Central Public Health District (SCPHD) and TFCPAD are warning residents to act now to avoid catching the virus.

“We’re late in the season, but this is a good reminder that mosquitoes are still active and can make you sick,” said Brian Simper, TFCPAD Manager. “It’s a great time to take steps to reduce mosquito habitat and avoid mosquitoes when they are most active at dusk and dawn.”

continued:
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Fish and Game News:

Collaborative graduate study with University of Idaho looks into perch, bass and pikeminnow interactions in Lake Cascade

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Wednesday, August 24, 2022

The study will inform fisheries managers on what tools may be available to maintain or improve fishing at the lake.

Fisheries managers in the Southwest Region and University of Idaho graduate student Bryce Marciniak kicked off a study looking into the interactions between perch, pikeminnow and bass populations to determine their influence on the survival of juvenile perch.

continued
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
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Seasonal Humor:

HotMooseBabies-a

OldGeezersMayErupt-a
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Idaho History Aug 28, 2022

A Tenderfoot on Thunder Mountain

Temderfoot3-1(Part 3 of 4)

by William Allen White Saturday Evening Post November 22, 1902
Temderfoot3-2

The Foot Of The Rainbow — Concluded

Temderfoot3-3The Steep Hills of Idaho

Temderfoot3-4The miners of Thunder Mountain this year are picked men. The mere fact of their presence there argues that they are men of grit and perseverance and industry. Although the newspapers that reach Thunder Mountain are from four to ten days old, they are read like old-fashioned Bibles, line upon line, precept upon precept. These miners are up to the times. They can tell you the latest funny thing from Mr. Dooley and what George Ade said of the fellows and the girl. A miner’s pay is two dollars and a half for eight hours’ work, and board and keep. And the board is good. Considering that freight into Thunder Mountain adds about eighty per cent. to the first cost of any article, the fare of the miners in the new gold-field is remarkably good. We ate breakfast at the Fairview mine with the miners and had beefsteak – a “T” bone each, broiled — potatoes, evaporated fruit, hot biscuit, bacon, pancakes and oatmeal or mush of some sort. For dinner at the Dewey mine the cook served soup, rare roast beef, potatoes, rutabagas, peas, hot bread, pie and tapioca pudding. Of course, tea and coffee are served at all meals. The men cannot complain that the operators are making money on the mess table, for flour brings twenty dollars a hundred in Roosevelt, meat thirteen cents on the hoof, and butter a dollar a pound. At a restaurant any sort of a meal costs fifty cents and a good rib-spreader costs a dollar or a dollar and a half. The miners are housed in warm log cabins and their bunks are just as clean as their occupants care to keep them. But there is one odd thing about the population of Thunder Mountain: there is not a fat man in the district. Climbing up and down the hills takes the adipose off a man better than any “treatment” or system in the world. The men are bronzed and lean, and many of them are bewhiskered. The barber of Roosevelt starved out with the price of a shave at fifty cents and a haircut seventy-five. When man leaves his mate he reverts rapidly to the simian. There is but one laundress in the town and she is not overworked. When one stops to think that one woman does the washing for two hundred and fifty men it gives him an idea of the situation. Two years of that kind of life and men will pin on fox tails and run wild!

This also is a strange thing about the men of Thunder Mountain: the urban type and not the rural type prevails. It raises the question whether or not the type of the efficient American citizen is changing, whether or not the daily newspaper, the rural free-delivery system, the suburban street-car system, and the suburban telephone have not removed many of the differences that mark the two American types. If there are farmers here or if there are city men here, they merge into the common mountain type which is distinctive and peculiar. Into this type has come a shade of the melodramatic. Perhaps it is the influence of their hill clothes, or perhaps it is the absence of women, but something makes the mountain men more direct of speech and gives them an unconscious recklessness of thought and action. The scenery of the mountains seems to be a stage setting for melodrama, and any mining camp, the Wisdom outfit, the Sunnyside or the Dewey, would make an excellent scene for one of Joaquin Miller’s old-fashioned plays. Across the foreground runs the mountain stream. R. U. E. is the bunk-house; L. U. E. is the mess cabin. Between are the stumps on which men sit or beside which they stand, with one foot on the stump, gesticulating with one hand, and resting the other on the crooked knee. In the background is the hill, with the pack-train zigzagging down it, and far up the hill is the white dump where the mine gophers have kicked out the earth behind them. Men in laced boots and flannel shirts and slouch hats come and go across the stage, and the Chinese cook flits through the scene like a frightened jaybird, making the comedy. The mine foreman, handsome, well-dressed, in corduroys and a hat with the gambler’s three dents in it; the mine owner, nonchalant, suave, superior; and the lank, loose-jointed packer — maybe Mexican, maybe half-breed — made up for the villain of the piece, furnish a fine cast of characters for what the old-fashioned show-bill used to call “the full strength of the company” — except the women. Still, those who are there need no make-up.

The whole place seems charged with the atmosphere of the stage and the citizens talk in that conscious “character tone” that actors use on street cars and in public places. Yet nothing dramatic has occurred in Roosevelt nor on Thunder Mountain. The only surprising thing that ever happens to a man is to go up there and find some old friend, who left home a year before, running a “game” at one of the saloons. No great fortunes have been made suddenly. The plot is entirely lacking in the place to justify so much stage setting and such a cast of characters. Yet here the whole “business” is, and it is so raw and undisguised that one passing through and failing to become part of it all wonders whether it is natural and inevitable, or the unconscious reflection of “M’Liss” and “My Partner” upon the minds of mature men, who have seen these plays twenty years ago and have forgotten them. It may be the natural attitude of men in their crude stage. Has man the artist imitated Nature in the old mountain plays? or has man unconsciously gone to imitating art? It is a question for the psychologist, and it is immaterial how he answers it; for next year women will come into the camp and change the life there. Either they will inject plot into the play, or bring men back to normal living and break up the show.

Temderfoot3-5To prove that Roosevelt is entirely in tune with the times it may be well to record that at the first political meeting held in the town the two candidates nominated were McNair and McMahon, and Johnnie Conyers of the Congress saloon was the boy who “done the trick.” The spirit of liberty does not die in the true Irishman’s breast no matter how his environment may change. And the difference between Thunder Mountain and the Borough of the Bronx is only skin-deep. The millionaire who comes whizzing down Fifth Avenue out of Thunder Mountain, next year, in his automobile, may be sitting on a candle-box at a hand-made table, at this minute, eating canned corn with a three-tined fork; but when he arrives in New York he will not have to be curried nor be fed condition powders to put him in the thoroughbred class. For Thunder Mountain differs from nearly every other gold-mining camp in this: the big strikes have all been made by experienced mining men. Cripple Creek, Colorado, to-day the great gold-mining camp in America, is typical of the other sort. The men who made the big strikes there were men who barely knew the difference between a tunnel and a writ of mandamus. The element of what is called “bull-luck” governed in most of the big strikes in Cripple Creek. In Thunder Mountain, after the Dewey had been established as a real mine, the work of finding mines and developing them was in the hands of real miners. Cripple Creek when it was discovered was a day’s tramp over the mountains from Manitou; naturally a vast crowd of youths stumbled into Cripple Creek who had barely enough sense to tell you how many toes they had if you looked hard at them and asked them quickly. In the law of averages some of these fellows had to win. But to Thunder Mountain the road is long and steep, and so crooked that a horse on the trail often tangles his tail in the throat-latch of his own bridle, and the man who gets into the country has some good stuff in him. He is usually a man of mining experience. And that means a good deal. He has seen more and has experienced more and had more hard sense ground into him by good fortune and bad than men in any other trade or calling. For the trail to Thunder Mountain is a year’s post-graduate work in the knockabout university, from which the degree of O. K. means business.

Every Man His Own Columbus

This, of course, does not mean that every one in the Thunder Mountain country is a model of honesty and perspicacity. There is one outfit from the East that is going to be most hilariously fooled next spring. The members of this outfit leased a claim back of the Dewey and did some work on it. They ran fifty or seventy-five feet of tunnels and struck some first-class ore. But they said nothing about it, and walked down to Roosevelt and said they were tired and wanted to quit. They said there was nothing in the country and that Thunder Mountain was a false alarm. The men from the Wisdom and from the Sunnyside tried to buy the tools and kit of the Easterners, but the tools and kit were not for sale. This was suspicious. The owner of the mine heard of these things, and putting two and two together made five. He went into the workings, saw what the gentlemen from the East had struck, and let out a reef in his price. They expect to come back from the East next spring and get the mine for a pleasant look and perhaps a chew of good eating tobacco. They will meet Mr. Owner, with his arms akimbo, his feet wide apart in an attitude of satisfaction, and a merry squint in his eye. The mine will bring the contract price or he will ask for his letter and his ring and his copy of Lucile, and it will never be The Same Again.

The trouble with most people is that they look more than they know. Once in a while out in the mountains one runs across a man whose education has been from men, not from books, who knows more than he looks. The gentlemen from the East will find when they come back in the spring that though there are no chairs in Thunder Mountain, and though the people sleep behind doors on wooden hinges, fastened with latch-strings, a man may think as deeply on a four-legged bench as on a revolving chair. Some way in making these discoveries men don’t trust to the map of human experience. Every man has to be his own Columbus.

Temderfoot3-6The Stamp Mill of Dewey Mine

The People Who are Dissatisfied

Three or four thousand people have gone into the Thunder Mountain country since last March and less than three hundred of these will spend this winter there. Most of those who go out will complain about the country. There are three kinds of complainers: those who did not get clear into the heart of the district, but turned back at some hard place on the trail; those who went in, but were improperly equipped to stay in, having no provisions, or no money with which to buy them at the prevailing high prices; and thirdly, those who went in with other men’s money as grub-stakes, or as money to invest, and failed to get adequate returns for their time or their investments. Naturally it follows that men of any of these classes will have to condemn Thunder Mountain to justify themselves, and they will not hesitate about twisting facts to make a plausible case for themselves. That is not lying in the exact sense of the word – it is human nature. And with such a battalion of croakers attacking it the wonder is that Thunder Mountain has stood siege even this long. But every mining camp has to go through just that kind of a trial. During the first three years of the history of every mining centre in the world more money is put in than is taken out. Every year dozens of camps rise and fall in a few months and pass into the world’s experience. Unless a district can overcome its growing pains and its infantile ailments it disappears. The law of the survival of the fittest governs mining camps as well as the men in them. For, being human contrivances, these camps are amenable to human laws. It would be folly to say that a camp with but one mine in it, and a dozen good prospects and a big cage of wild-cats, is bound to become a great mining region. And yet in view of the facts, and especially considering the great discoveries and marvelous — and this word is used conservatively and with due reflection — the marvelous surface indications in that part of the Thunder Mountain country known as Big Creek, it would be more than mad vanity for a man to condemn the country out of hand. The Big Creek region is of such wide area, and of such a different character from the region near Thunder Mountain, that although Big Creek is a part of the Thunder Mountain country, Big Creek seems destined to be the greater part, and should be considered in a separate paper. Until that paper is before him the reader, if he is a fair man, will suspend judgment. For the case is not ready for the jury till the evidence of things seen on Big Creek is in.

Temderfoot3-7The Dewey Mine

By the time these words are printed Nature will have put her eight months’ time-lock on Thunder Mountain. From now until June all news that comes out and all that goes in must travel on snowshoes and at the traveler’s peril. Mails are uncertain, and reports will be vague, and probably exaggerated, for both good and bad. Men are staking much money, and some men their lives, that there is gold in these steep, earth-covered hills, and when the stakes are high in a game the excitement is so great that truth is shy and does not come out boldly. But this much is sure: mining is an ancient trade and men have learned little about it, with all their science. All they know of gold is that it is where you find it. This Job knew thousands of years ago. For did he not write:

“Iron is taken out of the earth, and brass is molten out of the stone. Surely there is a vein for the silver, and a place for gold where they fine it.”

Editor’s Note — This is the third paper in the series, and continues Mr. White’s description of The Foot of the Rainbow. The fourth and concluding paper, The Pot of Gold, will appear next week.

source: Saturday Evening Post November 22, 1902 (requires subscription)
Courtesy Sandy McRae
Pt3CoverNovember22-a——————-

Further Reading

Link to Thunder Mountain / Roosevelt History Index Page
Link to A Tenderfoot on Thunder Mountain (part 1)
Link to A Tenderfoot on Thunder Mountain (part 2)
Link to A Tenderfoot on Thunder Mountain (part 3)
Link to A Tenderfoot on Thunder Mountain (part 4)
——————–

Weather Reports Aug 21-27, 2022

Aug 21 Weather:

At 9am it was 55 degrees and clear. At 130pm it was 89 degrees and partly cloudy. At 3pm it was 93 degrees, mostly cloudy (big and chunky with dark bottoms) and slight breeze. At 820pm it was 78 degrees and clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 22, 2022 at 09:00AM
Mostly high hazy clouds, light smoke
Max temperature 94 degrees F
Min temperature 48 degrees F
At observation 57 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Aug 22 Weather:

At 9am it was 57 degrees, mostly high thin hazy small clouds and light smoke. At 1245pm it was 84 degrees, mostly big chunky clouds and slight breezes. At 250pm it was 87 degrees, partly clear, light smoke and variable breezes. At 5pm it was 89 degrees. Getting gusty and dark clouds at 630pm. At 810pm it was 77 degrees, mostly clear and calmer.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 23, 2022 at 09:00AM
Partly clear/cloudy, light smoke
Max temperature 91 degrees F
Min temperature 48 degrees F
At observation 56 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Aug 23 Weather:

At 9am it was 56 degrees, partly clear/cloudy and light smoke. At 1215pm it was 80 degrees and mostly cloudy (bigger clouds, some with dark bottoms.) At 230pm it was 87 degrees, mostly cloudy, variable breezes and light smoke. At 630pm it was 87 degrees, cloudy and smoky. At 815pm it was 80 degrees, partly cloudy, slight breeze and haze of smoke.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 24, 2022 at 09:00AM
Partly clear/cloudy
Max temperature 90 degrees F
Min temperature 48 degrees F
At observation 55 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Aug 24 Weather:

At 9am it was 55 degrees, partly clear/cloudy and good air quality. At 1pm it was 87 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 3pm it was 93 degrees, increasing smoke, mostly cloudy and variable breezes. At 630pm it was 87 degrees and cloudy. At 830pm it was 73 degrees, mostly cloudy, haze of smoke and calm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 25, 2022 at 09:00AM
Almost clear, light smoke
Max temperature 93 degrees F
Min temperature 49 degrees F
At observation 56 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Aug 25 Weather:

At 9am it was 56 degrees, almost clear sky and light smoke. At 12pm it was 81 degrees, partly cloudy and increasing smoke. At 250pm it was 88 degrees, mostly cloudy, light breeze and haze of smoke. At 310pm it was 85 degrees and sort of misting lightly – not getting wet. At 530pm it was 84 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 8pm 76 degrees and mostly clear. At 9pm it was 68 degrees.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 26, 2022 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 90 degrees F
Min temperature 46 degrees F
At observation 54 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

Aug 26 Weather:

At 9am it was 54 degrees and clear. At 1245pm it was 84 degrees and partly cloudy. At 3pm it was 86 degrees, partly cloudy, pretty good air quality and a bit breezy at times. At 630pm it was 82 degrees. At 8pm it was 76 degrees, partly cloudy and calm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 27, 2022 at 09:00AM
Partly cloudy, light smoke
Max temperature 90 degrees F
Min temperature 46 degrees F
At observation 54 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Aug 27 Weather:

At 9am it was 54 degrees, partly cloudy and light haze of smoke. Partly cloudy and warm at noon. At 330pm it was 81 degrees, mostly cloudy, breezy and haze of smoke. At 630pm it was 73 degrees and mostly high thin hazy clouds. At 755pm it was 70 degrees, mostly hazy, light smoke and light breeze.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 28, 2022 at 09:00AM
Clear, light smoke, light breeze
Max temperature 84 degrees F
Min temperature 40 degrees F
At observation 46 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
————————

Road Reports Aug 28, 2022

Please share road reports. Most back country roads are not maintained. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: Dust abatement was applied on main street June 29th, however, most other local streets are beat up, dry and VERY dusty. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Report Sunday (Aug 21) “Hwy 55 wasn’t bad, but very busy.”
Update from ITD August 26, 2022
With Labor Day approaching and higher traffic volumes anticipated, both lanes of State Highway 55 near Smiths Ferry will be open noon Friday, September 2, through Monday, September 5, to accommodate holiday travel.
Starting Tuesday, September 6, the Smiths Ferry project will transition to the fall construction schedule. Drivers should plan for one-way alternating traffic with 15-minute delays, Monday through Friday and weekends as needed.
Crews will start paving work on September 6. Drivers can expect a gravel highway surface for a few weeks, and the first layer of asphalt completed by the end of September.
To learn more about the construction schedule, visit link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (Aug 24) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Sunday (Aug 21 around 530pm): “The South Fork Salmon River road is open for traffic. Be cautious while driving in areas that are prone to slides, such as those that have burned in previous wildfires, and during and following thunderstorms.” – Payette NF
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Old report Monday (Aug 1) “The EFSF looks like it had been graded recently, pot holes filled in and no rocks to dodge.
Note: The county did not do dust abatement this season.

Johnson Creek Road: Opened June 18th
Graded August 17th by the county.
Report Wednesday (Aug 24) Mail truck driver says the wash boards are coming back on the hills.
Report Monday (Aug 22) “Washboards were already coming back in the canyon climb.” – CEP
Report Sunday (Aug 21) “Johnson creek was in great condition. No sign of rain damage from Friday & Saturday storms. Johnson creek was running dirty/murky from the storms.”
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Quartz Creek Road:
Old report July 30: “Saturday I cleared Quartz Creek Road of trees. At the top (upper loop) I cleared the left fork but on the right fork there was a widowmaker tree that I left as I was working by myself and didn’t feel comfortable removing it without help.” – SA

Old Thunder Mountain Road:
Old report July 16: “Saturday the Yellow Pine Escapades rode to Meadow Creek Lookout without any issues. Had a great lunch, then half the group returned to Yellow Pine via the Old Thunder Mountain Road while the other half returned through Stibnite. A group of four motorcycles came through the Old Thunder Mountain Road. I’m assuming they cut the four or five recently cut trees we saw.” – SA

Lick Creek: Opened June 23rd
Old report from late June: “Rough as usual.”
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open July 1st
Report Wednesday (Aug 24): “Profile being worked today.”
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open – watch for heavy equipment traffic.
Old report: road graded during the first 2 weeks of June. No current repot.
Starting in July cleanup work at Stibnite will “cause some delay in travel through the area, it won’t be closed but there will be flaggers.”
“There will still be a lot of traffic coming through for the next 1.5 years while the “Burnt Log Route” is being built, a lot of the equipment will have to come in on the burnt log route so until then JC and the current Stibnite route will be used.”
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open
No current report on conditions. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Monumental Creek Trail Report:
Old report July 23: Trail past Roosevelt Lake is disaster. Beaver swamp at Trap Cr on 1/4 mile of trail, hard scramble around. Treed in below awful. Slide is Bad.
Topo Map near Trap Creek (link):

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open
No report on current conditions. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Opened June 22nd
Old report Thursday (June 30) rough, not graded. (See Landmark to Stanley report.)
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Landmark to Stanley: Open
Old report Thursday (June 30) “Good with a few significant potholes to Bruce Meadows, then bad washboard to the highway.” – DP

Warren Wagon Road: Open
No report on current conditions, travel at your own risk.

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:
————-

Road Reports Aug 24, 2022

South Fork road is open.

Please share road reports. Most back country roads are not maintained. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: Dust abatement was applied on main street June 29th, however, most other local streets are beat up, dry and VERY dusty. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Report Sunday (Aug 21) “Hwy 55 wasn’t bad, but very busy.”
Update from ITD May 19, 2022
Construction closures will end May 27 on Idaho 55 near Smiths Ferry.
One-way alternating traffic is set to replace closures from 10 a.m. to noon on Mondays through Fridays.
Both lanes will be open Friday mornings through Sundays.
To learn more about the spring construction schedule, visit link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (Aug 24) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Sunday (Aug 21 around 530pm): “The South Fork Salmon River road is open for traffic. Be cautious while driving in areas that are prone to slides, such as those that have burned in previous wildfires, and during and following thunderstorms.” – Payette NF
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Old report Monday (Aug 1) “The EFSF looks like it had been graded recently, pot holes filled in and no rocks to dodge.
Note: The county did not do dust abatement this season.

Johnson Creek Road: Opened June 18th
Graded August 17th by the county.
Report Wednesday (Aug 24) Mail truck driver says the wash boards are coming back on the hills.
Report Monday (Aug 22) “Washboards were already coming back in the canyon climb.” – CEP
Report Sunday (Aug 21) “Johnson creek was in great condition. No sign of rain damage from Friday & Saturday storms. Johnson creek was running dirty/murky from the storms.”
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Quartz Creek Road:
Old report July 30: “Saturday I cleared Quartz Creek Road of trees. At the top (upper loop) I cleared the left fork but on the right fork there was a widowmaker tree that I left as I was working by myself and didn’t feel comfortable removing it without help.” – SA

Old Thunder Mountain Road:
Old report July 16: “Saturday the Yellow Pine Escapades rode to Meadow Creek Lookout without any issues. Had a great lunch, then half the group returned to Yellow Pine via the Old Thunder Mountain Road while the other half returned through Stibnite. A group of four motorcycles came through the Old Thunder Mountain Road. I’m assuming they cut the four or five recently cut trees we saw.” – SA

Lick Creek: Opened June 23rd
Old report from late June: “Rough as usual.”
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open July 1st
Report Monday (Aug 22) Rough: “All the rocks are more exposed than I can remember, potholes where seeps are getting big.” – CEP
Old report Sunday (Aug 14) “Profile side of Big Creek down trees all over. Yellow Pine side pot holes and rocks.” – B
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open – watch for heavy equipment traffic.
Old report: road graded during the first 2 weeks of June. No current repot.
Starting in July cleanup work at Stibnite will “cause some delay in travel through the area, it won’t be closed but there will be flaggers.”
“There will still be a lot of traffic coming through for the next 1.5 years while the “Burnt Log Route” is being built, a lot of the equipment will have to come in on the burnt log route so until then JC and the current Stibnite route will be used.”
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open
No current report on conditions. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Monumental Creek Trail Report:
Old report July 23: Trail past Roosevelt Lake is disaster. Beaver swamp at Trap Cr on 1/4 mile of trail, hard scramble around. Treed in below awful. Slide is Bad.
Topo Map near Trap Creek (link):

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open
No report on current conditions. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Opened June 22nd
Old report Thursday (June 30) rough, not graded. (See Landmark to Stanley report.)
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Landmark to Stanley: Open
Old report Thursday (June 30) “Good with a few significant potholes to Bruce Meadows, then bad washboard to the highway.” – DP

Warren Wagon Road: Open
No report on current conditions, travel at your own risk.

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:
————-

Red Flag Warning Aug 22, 12pm to Aug 22, 6pm

Red Flag Warning Aug 22, 12pm to Aug 22, 6pm

Yellow Pine Forecast

Today Isolated showers and thunderstorms, then showers likely and possibly a thunderstorm after noon. Some of the storms could produce gusty winds. Partly sunny, with a high near 87. Calm wind becoming south around 5 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%.

Tonight Mostly clear, with a low around 56. East wind 5 to 7 mph becoming calm after midnight.

Red Flag Warning

URGENT - FIRE WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
743 AM MDT Mon Aug 22 2022

...SCATTERED THUNDERSTORMS EXPECTED ACROSS THE PAYETTE NATIONAL
FOREST MONDAY AFTERNOON...

.An upper level trough will move through eastern Oregon and
central Idaho today. This will result in scattered thunderstorms
across the Payette National Forest this afternoon with abundant
lightning possible. Dry lower levels of the atmosphere will not
allow much rain to reach the surface but will allow for very gusty
outflow winds in the vicinity of these storms. Greatest
thunderstorm coverage is expected to be north and east of the
McCall area.

Western Payette National Forest-Eastern Payette National Forest-
743 AM MDT Mon Aug 22 2022

...RED FLAG WARNING IN EFFECT FROM NOON TODAY TO 6 PM MDT THIS
EVENING FOR LIGHTNING FOR WESTERN PAYETTE NATIONAL FOREST AND
EASTERN PAYETTE NATIONAL FOREST...WHICH ARE FIRE WEATHER ZONES
401 AND 402...

The National Weather Service in Boise has issued a Red Flag
Warning, which is in effect from noon today to 6 PM MDT this
evening. The Fire Weather Watch is no longer in effect.

* DRY LIGHTING

* OUTFLOW WINDS...40-50 mph.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A Red Flag Warning means that critical fire weather conditions
are either occurring now, or will occur shortly.

Aug 21, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

Aug 21, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Note: If you are not receiving the YPTimes emails, check your spam folder.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
2022
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit Season
May 15 thru Nov 30 – Firewood Season
June 1 – 6-day mail delivery starts
Aug 27 – Water meeting 12pm at Community Hall
Sep 3 – YPFD Breakfast at Community Hall 8am-10am
Sep 6 – YPFD Budget Meeting at 2pm
Sep 10 – YP Escapade Ride
Sep 10 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
Sep 28 – YPFD Training 10am at Fire Hall
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Aug 27th Water Meeting 12pm

Attention all Yellow Pine Water Users:

Meeting with all water users on August 27th at 12 noon at the community center in Yellow Pine.

Mountain Waterworks will be here to do a presentation on the progress of the available grants to completely repair our water system. This is a multi year project that will ensure the future of good quality water for years to come.

About half of the money needed comes from free grants but the other half requires all users to pay a small fee added onto their yearly bill. Mountain Waterworks will explain the details.

There will be a vote to either accept or deny the added charges to our bill. A vote will be taken by the shareholders. According to our Bylaws, only shareholders can vote.

Please remember, this is an investment in the future of Yellow Pine. Our current water system is frail and could fail in the future years.

Thank you
YPWUA Board
— — — —

Sep 3rd – YPFD Breakfast

We will be having breakfast, the 3rd from 8 to 10 at the community hall.
— — — —

Sep 6th – YPFD Budget Meeting

The fall YPFD Budget Meeting has been rescheduled to September 6th.
— — —

Sep 10th – Yellow Pine Escapade

Join us for a loop ride with a BBQ at North Shore Lodge. $30/person. Fundraiser for the Yellow Pine Community Hall. Sign up early at (link)
— — — —

Sep 10th – VYPA Meeting

2pm at Community Hall
— — — —

Sep 28th – YPFD Training

We will be having a training day on the 28th of Sept. at 10am at the fire hall.
———

Village News:

Aug 15 Johnson Creek Tragedy

A small plane crashed near the Johnson Creek Airstrip on Monday, August 15th.

Thank you YPFD crew for responding.
— — — —

The Corner Update Aug 19th

Hi Everyone – Update on equipment status. Currently our prep cooler is still down, we have a date for it to be repaired on Friday 8/26/2022.
Starting tomorrow, Saturday 8/20, we will be open from 9-11am for coffee and pastries then 5-7pm for a dinner special. We will run this everyday through Thursday 8/25. Then we will be closed on Friday 8/26 to take the equipment to be repaired and back open on Saturday 8/27 – provided all goes well!
If you have made prior arrangement for meals we will honor those arrangements. We apologies for the inconvenience this has caused anyone and it is our intention to be open as much as possible and help service the community. Thank you so much for your support!
— — — —

Aug 18 Power Outage 5am-10am

On Thursday, August 18th, Idaho Power shut our power off at 5am to replace some equipment out near Cascade. Power restored at 10am.

Thank you Idaho Power crews for working in the smoke.
— — — —

Storm Aug 19th

Thunderstorms moved through the area during the evening. Lots of wind, thunder and lightning but only 0.02″ of rain received in Yellow Pine, estimate gusts of up to 20 mph. Power blipped off and on at 737pm.

August 20th at approximately 11am the Valley County Sheriff’s office reported the South Fork Salmon River Road closed due to 2 mud slides in the Poverty Flats area. The South Fork weather station reported gusts of over 50mph during Thursday evening’s storm. Road reopened late Sunday afternoon, Aug 21st.
— — — —

Celebration for Don Waller August 20th

On Aug 20, 2022 there was quite a turn out to celebrate the life of Don Waller, last of the Mountain Men, at the Golden Gate campground.
At a later date, a memorial tombstone will be placed at Donnie’s grave and another will be put in the Yellow Pine Cemetery at Sally Ann’s grave.
— — — —

Summer Water Usage update July 30

The last three days we have been above 60,000 gallons of water consumed per day with yesterday’s usage over 65,000 gallons.

Unless we have another huge leak, lawn watering is the cause. Please limit your water usage and do not leave your water on all night. If someone notices a leak please let us know.

Thank you – YPWUA
— — — —

Watkins Pharmacy Update June 23rd

To the community: the insurance claims are ongoing… We are still working on the temporary pharmacy/store going in at Across the Tracks. We wish we could move everything along faster, but unfortunately we have no control over that as much as we wish we did! … Thank you for those who have reached out for updates. – Watkins Pharmacy
— — — —

Arnold Aviation News:

Arnold’s will no longer will offer grocery shopping services. (D9 now has online shopping – see below.) However, Arnolds will still pick up orders in Cascade from D9, auto parts, feed, and hardware, etc. for delivery to Yellow Pine. You will only be charged for freight from the Airport to YP.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
— — — —

D9 News:

You will be able to start ordering online directly from D9 on May 24th. Go to their website at link. Phone (208-382-4215) if you need assistance.

Orders must be placed before 10am Monday (Arnolds will pick up on Tuesday for Wednesday delivery.) It is important that upon checkout, you click the box marked “Gift” – and type in the order is for Arnolds to pick up and deliver to Yellow Pine. Otherwise they will think it is a local personal pickup.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

May 15 thru Nov 30 – Firewood Season

Firewood permits are available at The Corner.
— — — —

State Burn permits required May 10th to Oct 20th

Closed fire season begins May 10, which means Idahoans outside city limits will need a burn permit before burning any debris. The closed fire season lasts until Oct. 20.
— — — —

Notice – Yellow Pine Times Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
— — — —

Road News

June 18: Johnson Creek road opened. June 22: Deadwood Summit and Warm Lake Summit opened. June 23: Lick Creek opened. July 1: Profile Gap rough but open. Reports that Monumental and Elk summits finally opened.

Link: to current road reports.

Construction closures will end May 27 on Idaho 55 near Smiths Ferry.
One-way alternating traffic is set to replace closures from 10 a.m. to noon on Mondays through Fridays.
Both lanes will be open Friday mornings through Sundays.
link:

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
— — — —

Critters

Be Wasp Wary

Long legged wasps are building nests under eves and any small crack they can enter under roofs, behind shutters, under propane tank lids and even inside truck mirrors.
* Wear light-colored, smooth-finished clothing.
* Avoid perfumed soaps, shampoos, and deodorants. …
* Wear clean clothing and bathe daily. …
* Wear clothing to cover as much of the body as possible.
* Avoid flowering plants when possible.
* Keep work areas clean
Check for wasp nests either early morning or late evening when it is cooler and they are less active.

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be wary of mosquitoes spreading West Nile Virus

* Wear repellent containing DEET, Picaridin or Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus (all EPA-approved repellents) according to the label.
* Remove standing water around your home – this is where mosquitoes like to breed.
* Cover up your skin with clothing between dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active.
* If you have livestock, also remember to change out their troughs every three days to keep the mosquito population down.

Be Elk and Deer Aware

It is spring “baby” season – watch your dogs, mama elk and deer can be very aggressive towards dogs. There have been a few dogs injured up here over the years.
Cows and Does are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Moose Aware

* Be aware of your surroundings and be especially careful around creeks and in areas with dense brush.
* Travel in groups whenever possible and make noise to alert animals to your presence.
* If you encounter a moose, give it lots of space and don’t approach it. Always keep dogs under control.
* If a moose charges or chases you, take cover behind something solid, such as a tree.
* In some situations, bear spray has been known to be an effective defense tool in moose encounters.
Fourth of July weekend traffic on Johnson Creek. One more reason to drive slow.

courtesy Yellow Pine FB group

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard. F&G confirms there is a pack of 6 wolves in our valley.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

courtesy YP resident

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat was hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Aug 21: “Dump is good.” Road is good..

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

Summer Water Usage update July 30

The last three days we have been above 60,000 gallons of water consumed per day with yesterday’s usage over 65,000 gallons.

Unless we have another huge leak, lawn watering is the cause. Please limit your water usage and do not leave your water on all night. If someone notices a leak please let us know.

Thank you – YPWUA

The YPWUA is happy to announce that Clint Limbaugh has accepted the new position of Community Water Maintenance Coordinator.

Clint will be the contact person (208-631-3221) and advise the YPWUA board on Maintenance issues within the YPWUA district. He will be responsible for turning on and off property owners water, diagnose and troubleshoot shoot issues within the water district and then report to the board. Work with our water operator Warren when needed.

Thank you Clint for taking this much needed position.

Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at (link).

Water Use

08/11/22 27178908 43962 24 1832 31 T 7292
08/12/22 27217781 38873 24 1620 27 F 5089
08/13/22 27263876 46095 24 1921 32 S 7222
08/14/22 27306998 43122 24 1797 30 S 2973
08/15/22 27343983 36985 24 1541 26 M 6137
08/16/22 27389162 45179 24 1882 31 T 8194
08/17/22 27434118 44956 24 1873 31 W 223
08/18/22 27475944 41826 24 1743 29 T 3130
08/19/22 27516592 40648 24 1694 28 F 1178
08/20/22 27554524 37932 24 1581 26 S 2716
08/21/22 27591663 37139 24 1547 26 S 793

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

As of April 17th 2020, Yellow Pine is under a “Boil Order”. This boil order will be in effect until further notice.

DRINKING WATER WARNING
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST. Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 8-10-22..

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

Aug 27, 2022 Special Water Meeting 12pm at Community Hall
YPWUA 2022 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 3, 2022 (minutes to follow)
YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 5, 2020 link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Tim Aldridge
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
Warren Drake – Water Operator
Clint Limbaugh – Community Water Maintenance Coordinator (208-631-3221)
— — — —

VYPA News:

Community Hall Update: To ensure proper scheduling of the community hall usage and to avoid scheduling conflicts, we are asking that if you would like to use the community hall to contact Rhonda Egbert (member at large). With increased usage requests, we need to ensure that everyone is able to use it without conflict/overlap of events. Rhonda is taking point to schedule those individuals who want to use the community hall. Please also read the Community Hall Usage Guidelines-this outlines the etiquette required for usage.

Village Association Meeting Update: In the past as a courtesy, a Zoom video conference was an option for the individuals who were not able to attend the meeting(s) in person. However, I will not be providing this option going forward. I’m sorry for the inconvenience this may cause some. Also, if you have a request for a meeting agenda item, please contact me (Hailey Harris) no later than 7 days before the upcoming meeting. We are not able to add agenda items without approval of the Chairman.

I will also be enforcing a meeting conduct, effective immediately: Meeting attendees are expected to: Uphold professional purpose of meetings by respecting the rights, privacy, safety, and dignity of all persons; exercise professionalism, consideration, and respect in their speech and actions; refrain from harassing speech and other harassing behavior. Failure to conduct oneself in accordance with these expectations may result in removal of the offending person(s) or adjournment of the meeting.
-Hailey Harris

Yellow Pine Community Hall General Use Procedures

Hall General Usage:
* All events must be scheduled through the Community Hall Committee and approved by the Committee Chairman
* No property shall be removed from the Community Hall without approval of the Community Hall Committee Chairman.
* Responsible alcohol usage is permitted.
* No smoking is allowed in the hall. Pick up any butts scattered outside.
* Building and grounds are not a storage area. Do not leave personal items in or around the Community Hall without approval of the Community Hall Committee Chairman.
* Notify a committee member if problems are encountered.

After each event using the hall:
* Sweep/vacuum hall floor and restroom floor
* Wipe down toilet
* Empty garbage cans and take garbage to the transfer station
* Fold tables
* Stack chairs
* Turn off lights, ceiling fans, heater (if applicable)
* Put away any kitchen items after they are cleaned

After each event using the kitchen:
* Sweep/mop kitchen floor
* Wash, dry, and store all used dishes, utensils, pans, coffee pots, etc.
* Clean and wipe down sinks
* Thoroughly clean griddles, if used, and turn off propane to griddles
* Remove any unused food/beverages from the refrigerators/freezers
* Clean up any spilled food or beverage
* Empty garbage cans and take garbage to the transfer station
* Notify a committee member if problems are encountered

Using the Community Hall and/equipment for non-Yellow Pine events:
* A refundable, $50 deposit is required seven (7) days prior to the event
* After the event, a Community Hall Committee member will inspect the premises prior to the deposit being refunded
* A $150/day donation is requested for the use of the Hall
* A $200/day donation is requested for the use of the Kitchen

No deposit or use donation is needed for use by Yellow Pine community members, committees, or groups.

Yellow Pine Community Hall Committee:
Rhonda Egbert – Chairman
Members: Ronda Rogers, Deb Filler, Hailey Harris

Village of Yellow Pine Association:
Hailey Harris, Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Lynn Imel, Secretary
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Joel Fields

Aug 13, 2022 VYPA Meeting cancelled due to lack of quorum.
July 9, 2022 VYPA Meeting minutes (not released yet.)
June 11, 2022 VYPA Meeting minutes link:
April 6, 2022 Village Council meeting to fill vacant chairperson position (no minutes.)
Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.
2022 Meeting dates:
June 11
July 9
August 13
September 10

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
— — — —

YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Department

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Special Yellow Pine Fire Commissioners Meeting
August 14, 2022

Officers In Attendance: Bill McIntosh #3, Lorinne Munn #1, Tom Lanham #2, Tim Rogers Fire Chief, Ron Basabe Assistant Fire Chief, Ronda Rogers Secretary/Treasurer.

Others: Leslie Jensen, Merrill Saleen, Nikki Saleen, Susan Matlock,

Meeting called to order at 10:00 AM

Welcome and Approval of Agenda

Discussion: Search and Rescue Equipment Contract with Valley County Sheriff Office. Commissioner’s discussion was about the 3.1.1 part of the contract where the Sheriff Office, charged. VCSO didn’t want the equipment on the truck but in the firehouse so it was easy access to everybody. Commissioners all agree the contract is important to have with the VCSO so the Equipment can be used.
Decision: Equipment will be placed in the firehouse for everybody to use and check out as needed, and return with-in 24 hour after each use. Vote 3/3 approval of the contract with the Valley County Sheriff’s Office and the Resolution #2022-01

Discussion: Budget for 2022-2023 with 3% yearly increase, going to try and recover-forgone amount for $201, total does not reflect this amount.
* Fire Fighting; $2867.00
* Wages; $0
* Advertising; $1000.00
* Repairs and Maintenance; $4500.00
* Travel and Training; $3500.00
* Insurance; $3400.00
* Capital Outlay; $1000.00
* Utilities; $3500.00
Total; $19,767.00

Commissioner’s discussed the need to change the date of public hearing date because the L-2 report needs to be in on September 8, 22 Vote: 3/3 approval of budget for public hearing and date change for September 6, at 10:00 am

* Discussion: Over Ride Levy, Tim went over the 5-year plan for the Fire Dept.

New Turn out suits, Water storage tanks, Big pump repair and placed, Continued education for volunteers, Newer water tender, Replace big Red fire truck with a type 3-fire truck, Add on to the firehouse for more room.

With the 5-year plan there is a need for a permanent over ride levy. Vote 3/3 approval to put the over ride levy on the Ballot for November election.

Meeting Adjourned at 10:29 am
— —

Meeting Minutes
Aug 14, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Aug 5, 2022 YPFD Search and Rescue Mutual Aid Agreement Link:
Aug 3, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Special Meeting (no minutes yet)
May 29, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting (no minutes yet)
May 20, 2022 YPFD Meeting in Cascade with Forest Service (no minutes yet)
Apr 3, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting Link: to Amended minutes
Feb 24, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD New Commissioner’s Transition Meeting Link:
Nov 23, 2021 – YPFD Special meeting Link:
Nov 8, 2021 – YPFD AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
Oct 31, 2021 – YPFD Special meeting Link:
Oct 14, 2021 – YPFD Special meeting Link:
Sep 27, 2021 – YPFD Special meeting Link:
Sep 18, 2021 – YPFD Special meeting Link:
Sep 11, 2021 – YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
Jul 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Jun 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sep 30, 2020 – YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 6 (rescheduled), 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Summer hours: Wednesday thru Monday (closed Tuesdays) 9am to 7pm
Firewood permits Available May 15th
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
The Tavern will remain closed for renovations until further notice.
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The General Store will be closed Mondays, and open Tuesday-Saturday 10-6pm. Sunday 10-3pm
The motel rooms and the laundry room are available 7 days per week. Email:
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Open
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $4/doz
No longer taking scrap metal
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Buck Horn Outfitters is offering trail rides out of Yellow Pine, anything from an hour ride to day trips and fully catered camping / pack trips to high mountain lakes or DIY camp trips where you can enjoy Idaho’s back country to yourself.
See our website for more details. Or give us a call 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:
Opened May 27, 2022 for Fly-ins

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: 1-800-427-4968
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Cascade:
Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
D9 Groceries: 208-382-4215 Website link to order:
Upon “checkout” click on “gift” and write “Arnolds to pick up and deliver to (your name) in Yellow Pine” so they know who will pick it up and where it goes.
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watkins can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
Please help support local journalism and subscribe.
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

J & R Septic
Cascade (208) 382-8727

Valley Roofing Idaho
Meridian (208) 830-4890 email:
Facebook:

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473) Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
————–

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Aug 15) overnight low of 44 degrees, no rain. This morning it was 52 degrees by 9am, clear sky (a bit of thin haze) and light breeze. Jays, finches, pine sksins, hummingbirds, pine squirrels and chipmunks observed. Clear and warm by lunch time, light breeze. Hot and mostly clear mid-afternoon with nice breeze, high of 94 degrees. Looked like hazy smoke to the south early evening. Warm with clear sky after sunset.

Tuesday (Aug 16) overnight low of 45 degrees, no rain. This morning it was 54 degrees by 9am, clear sky with haze of smoke – likely from fires near Cascade and the lower South Fork Salmon River. Jays, finches, pine siskins, a few ground squirrels, a couple of pine squirrels and chipmunks observed. Clear sky, haze of smoke and quite warm by lunch time. Hot, smoky and no clouds mid-afternoon, high of 97 degrees. Clear sky and haze of smoke right after sunset and 20 degrees cooler.

Wednesday (Aug 17) overnight low of 47 degrees, no rain. Some early (loud) air traffic. This morning it was 56 degrees by 9am and high haze of thin clouds and smoke. Air quality a bit poor. Rivers running at their 30 year average. Jay, finches, pine siskins, humming birds and chipmunks observed. Hot with hazy sky at lunch time. Mail truck made it in on time, no problems reported. Very hot, breezy and blue sky mid-afternoon, better air quality but there is a cloud of smoke to the south, high of 101 degrees. Still in the 90s by early evening. Clear sky and still warm after sunset.

Thursday (Aug 18) overnight low of 47 degrees, no rain. Planned power outage 5am to 10am. Increased air traffic. This morning it was 55 degrees by 9am, no clouds and haze of smoke, poor air quality. Jays, finches, pine siskins, hummingbirds, chipmunks and golden mantled squirrels observed. Sunny and quite warm at lunch time, haze of smoke. Very hot mid-afternoon, mostly cloudy, breezy and smoky, high of 100 degrees. Overcast after sunset and still plenty warm, feels a bit muggy.

Friday (Aug 19) overnight low of 55 degrees, no rain. This morning it was 63 degrees by 9am, a few small clouds above an opaque layer of smoke, and poor air quality. Evening grosbeaks, jays, finches, pine siskins, hummingbirds, several chipmunks, pine and golden mantled squirrels observed. Slow internet at times. More clouds before lunch time, warm and smoky. Hot, smoky and mostly cloudy mid-afternoon with light breezes, high of 93 degrees. Overcast, thunder and cooler early evening. Dark clouds, gusty breezes up to 20mph, thunder and splatters of rain mid-evening. Power off and back on at 737pm. Closer thunder, flashes of lightning and short showers before sunset, much calmer. Not raining and quiet at dark, humid, better air quality and slight breeze.

Saturday (Aug 20) overnight low of 50 degrees, yesterday’s thunderstorm = 0.02″ of rain. This morning it was 56 degrees by 9am, partly clear, good air quality, heavy dew and slight breeze. Evening grosbeaks, jays, finches, pine siskins, hummingbirds, a dozen chipmunks and a golden mantled squirrel observed. Report received at 11am that the South Fork Road is closed due to mudslides. Warm and partly clear at lunch time. Breezy and distant thunder early afternoon. Warm, breezy and mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, high of 89 degrees. Thundering on and off late afternoon, dark overcast and cooling off. About 30 minutes of gentle rain early evening. Just after sunset we had broken overcast, humid and light breeze.

Sunday (Aug 21) overnight low of 49 degrees, yesterday’s rain = 0.06″. Early loud air traffic. This morning it was 55 degrees by 9am and clear sky. Jays, evening grosbeaks, finches, pine siskins, hummingbirds and lots of chipmunks observed. Warm and partly cloudy after lunch time. Low flying helicopter at 232pm. Hot mid-afternoon, mostly cloudy (big and chunky with dark bottoms) and slight breeze, high of 94 degrees. Report South Fork Road reopened by 530pm. Warm and partly cloudy early evening.
———————-

Idaho News:

Valley County Sheriff’s Office Press Release

On August 15, 2022, at 1120 hrs., the Valley County Sheriff Office (VCSO) received a call from Johnson Creek Airport staff, that there had been a single engine plane crash. A pilot flying into Johnson Creek Airport, observed the plane in the river as he made his approach to land and reported to airport staff.

Cascade Ambulance and Yellow Pine Fire Department were dispatched to the location. Yellow Pine Fire Department personnel were able to quickly locate the plane in Johnson Creek several hundred yards from the end of the runway. It was determined by fire personnel at scene, the two occupants of the plane did not survive the crash.

Valley County Sheriff Deputies recovered pilot Daniel Harro and passenger Mark Harro from the wreckage. The occupants are 38-year-old twin brothers, from Bend, Oregon. A small dog was recovered from the wreckage and transported by Valley County Sheriff Deputies to Boise for medical attention.

National Transportation and Safety Board (NTSB) was notified and has taken over investigation of the accident.

If you have further information on the accident, please call NTSB at 844.373.9922.
— —

Oregon brothers die in plane crash near YP

Mark and Daniel Harro were on camping trip

By Drew Dodson The Star-News August 18, 2022

Twin brothers from Bend, Oregon, were killed in a single-engine airplane crash near Yellow Pine on Monday morning, according to the Valley County Sheriff’s Office.

Mark and Daniel Harro, both 38, were on a camping trip in the area when their airplane crashed shortly after take-off from Johnson Creek Airport, Chief Deputy Dave Stambaugh said.

The Aviat A-1A airplane the brothers were flying in crashed while maneuvering near the airstrip on Monday at 11:20 a.m., said Eric Weiss, a National Transportation Safety Board spokesman.

The NTSB is investigating the crash and expects to release preliminary findings in about two weeks, Weiss said.

Both brothers died from blunt force trauma to the head and chest, Valley County Coroner Scott Carver said.

Cascade Fire & EMS, the Yellow Pine Fire District and Valley County deputies all responded to the crash scene Monday afternoon.

The crash was reported by a pilot flying into the airstrip who saw the wreckage in Johnson Creek, the sheriff’s office said.

Two Valley County deputies transported a small dog that survived the crash to Boise for medical care.

Daniel Harro, an “avid flight enthusiast,” was piloting the airplane at the time of the crash, according to a news release from Bend Fire & Rescue.

Harro had been a firefighter/paramedic with the central Oregon agency since 2014, the release said.

“This is a devastating loss for our family,” Bend Fire Chief Toddy Riley said. “Daniel was well-loved and well-respected by everyone who worked with him.”

Mark Harro owned an online arts and crafts business called Homespun Harros with his wife, Kelly.

source: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— —

Bend firefighter and his twin brother killed in small-plane crash in Idaho

August 15, 2022 KTVZ

A Bend firefighter and his twin brother were killed Monday morning in the crash of a small plane near Yellow Pine, Idaho, the agency announced.

Bend Fire & Rescue Engineer Daniel Harro, 38, was killed in the crash, Bend Fire officials said. The cause of the crash is unknown at this time and is under investigation by local authorities, they said.

Harro and his twin brother, Mark, also a Bend resident, were returning to Bend from a backcountry camping trip near McCall, Idaho. Both men were killed, fire officials said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

COVID-19 Updates: 612 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 9 new deaths

August 19, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 612 new COVID-19 cases and 9 new deaths Friday. State-level case and hospital data are now being updated on the state dashboard on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, excluding holidays.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 486,100.

The state said 14 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 17,803, and 1 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 3,009.

9 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 5,090.

full story: [Valley County 2,904, 16 deaths.]
— — —

23 new Valley County COVID-19 cases reported in last week

By Tom Grote The Star-News August 18, 2022

A total of 23 new cases of COVID-19 were reported in Valley County in the past week by the county’s two hospitals.

The 23 new cases compared to 36 new cases reported the previous week and 13 new cases reported the prior week.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 3,113 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started in March 2020.

Spokespeople for both hospitals said the number of new reported cases are likely far lower than the actual number of new cases.

Both hospitals distribute home tests for COVID-19 and some patients may choose not to be tested, they said.

Thirteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health since the start of the pandemic.

A total of 607 cases in Adams County linked to COVID-19 have been reported by Southwest District Health, which is three more cases than reported last week.

A total of 15 confirmed deaths from the virus have been recorded in Adams County by the health district.

Clinics & Tests – McCall

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine now offers Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccines for children age 6 months to 4 years. Children 5-17 years old already may receive the Pfizer vaccine.

The McCall clinic also offers the Moderna and Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older, but the Moderna vaccine is not available for youths under age 18.

Second booster doses are available for adults ages 50 years and older, people ages 12 years and older who are moderately or severely immunocompromised.

Patients should talk to their health care provider about their medical condition, and whether getting an additional primary shot is appropriate for them.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link) or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

Clinics & Tests – Cascade

Cascade Medical Center no longer offers the Pfizer vaccine. Those wishing to be given the Pfizer vaccine should contact St. Luke’s McCall or a local pharmacy.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Thursdays only along with the Moderna booster. Call 208-382-4285 to schedule a time.

The Cascade hospital offers a second booster shot of the Moderna vaccine to those over age 50 who received their first booster shot at least four months ago

Take-Home Tests

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital also provides free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

source: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
————-

Fire Season:

Aug 16 Idaho Smoke

20220816GOES18-a
Courtesy NOAA
— — — — — — — — — —

Four Corners Fire
Payette National Forest
Location: Payette and Boise National forests. The fire is location a half mile to the north of Lookout Point, 2 miles west of Cascade high along the ridgeline. (Cascade is not threatened by this fire).
InciWeb Link:

Current as of 8/20/2022, 9:51:17 AM
Total Personnel 419
Size 7,603 Acres
Four Corners Fire Map 8/20/22

— —

Four Corners Fire Update

Sunday, August 21, 2022

Contact Fire Information: 208.207.7417

Today, Sunday, August 21 at 7 PM, a Facebook live virtual meeting will be held to share an overview of the fire situation and expected actions. The meeting can be accessed on the Payette National Forest Facebook page at (link)

Yesterday, favorable weather gave firefighters the advantage, leading to minimal fire growth. Most of yesterday’s fire growth occurred late in the day when passing thunderstorm winds pushed the fire south through Greenfield Flat. More growth in this area is expected as the fire burns through dry subalpine firs and moth-killed trees. Helicopter repelling firefighters and ground fire crews are working in that area to limit fire spread and protect property and infrastructure to the south of the fire.

Today, warmer and drier conditions are expected to continue. The fire has been slowly backing down slope near French Creek, allowing firefighters the opportunity to dig handline, reduce vegetation, and create dozer line adjacent to private property for additional structure protection in anticipation of the fire continuing to the east. There has been no reported loss of structures.

On the north end of the fire, the dozer line is holding well, and minimal fire growth occurred to the west. Firefighters will continue efforts to construct and secure fireline where it is safe to do so. This may include existing natural and manmade features – such as meadows, rocky areas, and roads – as well as fireline constructed by crews and equipment.

This morning, heavy smoke will linger throughout Valley County. For information on local area smoke levels health impacts, visit (link). Aerial resources will assist crews on the ground, although a heavy smoke inversion may impact their ability to fly this morning. Lake Cascade is open; however, boaters should be cautious on the water and aware that the aircraft may use any area of the lake as needed to draw water. Additionally, use caution when along Lakeshore Drive due to the increase in traffic.

Evacuation Information: Residences in God’s Acres and French Creek are under evacuation status (Go). The Campbell Creek area is under pre-evacuation notice (Set). Others in the vicinity are encouraged to consider evacuation preparations (Ready). Please visit (link) for information on packing and preparing for evacuations. Kelly’s Whitewater Park is open to evacuees. For more information on evacuations and local support, call the Valley County Sheriff’s Office at 208.382.5160.

Closure Information: The Payette and Boise National Forests have extended the closure area to account for the recent fire growth. The complete closure order – including a full description of the trails, roads, and areas closed and an accompanying map – is available at (link).
— —

Evacuations ordered after Four Corners Fire breaches ridge

KTVB Staff August 19, 2022

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office has issued evacuation orders because of the Four Corners Fire along the western shore of Lake Cascade — using the “READY, SET, GO” system.

The Four Corners Fire has burned 5,560 acres as of Friday, Aug. 19. It’s located a half-mile north of Lookout Point and two miles west of Cascade in parts of Adams and Valley counties, and is burning in steep, rocky terrain. The Valley County Sheriff’s Office announced Thursday evening that the east side of the fire had breached a ridge and began moving toward homes and toward the lake. The sheriff’s office is sharing evacuation information on Facebook and sending emergency notifications through CodeRED. Click here for CodeRED on Apple App Store and Google Play Store.

The area from Campbell Creek Road to Black Bear Drive on West Mountain is closed to all traffic, including homeowners. While no homes have been burned by the fire, if you have property in that area, you will no longer be able to access it.

continued:
— —

Multiple road closures result of Four Corners Fire emergency

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, August 18th 2022

They Valley County Sheriff’s Office has issued evacuation orders for residents in the God’s Acres and French Creek due to the Four Corners Fire near Lake Cascade and multiple roads are being closed in the area.

Officials say activity from the 5,560-acre Four Corners Fire increases as hot and dry conditions continue to impact the region.

The US Forest Service has closed on Snowbank Rd. It will be closed to all traffic except emergency personnel.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Porphyry Fire
Payette National Forest
Location: West of Porphyry Creek high along the ridge from the South Fork of the Salmon River.
InciWeb Link:

Current as of 8/20/2022, 10:39:50 AM
Total Personnel 37
Size 2,000 Acres
Map, Porphyry Fire, August 18, 2022

— — — — — — — — — —

Payette Wilderness Fires
Payette National Forest
InciWeb Link:

Dismal Fire
Current as of 8/19/2022, 1:07:29 PM
Size 1,750 Acres
Map, Dismal Fire, August 18, 2022

— — — — — — — — — —

Woodtick Fires
Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location: Approximately 27 miles west of Challis, Idaho
InciWeb Link:

Current as of 8/20/2022, 9:15:48 AM
Total Personnel 42
Size 5,698 Acres
Woodtick Fire Infrared Map 8/18

— — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Fang Fire
Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location: 35 miles northwest of Salmon, ID
InciWeb Link:

Current as of 8/20/2022, 9:47:38 AM
Total Personnel 1
Size 1,444 Acres
Wolf Fang Fire Overview Map 8/19

— — — — — — — — — —

Moose Fire
Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location: 17 miles north of Salmon, ID
InciWeb Link:

Current as of 8/19/2022, 9:25:00 PM
Total Personnel 776
Size 89,344 Acres
Moose Fire Progression Map August 20

— —

Salmon River Road to be closed intermittently

Aug 15, 2022 Local News 8

Due to active fire behavior and fire growth along the Main Salmon River from Pine Creek to Panther Creek, starting immediately there is a high probability a portion of the Salmon River Road (#030) between Spring Creek and Panther Creek will be closed intermittently.

This potential closure is due to hazards associated with the increased fire activity which includes rolling material such as large rocks, logs and other debris.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Norton Fire
Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location: approximately seven (7) miles northwest of Lower Loon in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Middle Fork Ranger District.
InciWeb Link:

Current as of 8/20/2022, 9:16:07 AM
Total Personnel 15
Size 1,020 Acres
Norton Fire Infrared Map 8/18

— — — — — — — — — —

Ross Fork Fire

Sawtooth National Forest
Near Atlanta
Update for August 16, 2022

Fire is now 200 acres and 5% contained. The fire is active with group torching and short crown run activity. The primary fuel is subalpine fir. West winds continue to push towards the confluence of the Gold Run drainage. 6 Smokejumpers are assigned to the incident.

Please know that this fire is NOT the 6,400-acre Ross Fork grass fire near Pocatello.

Lightning sparks fire near Alturas Lake

By Emily Jones Express Staff Writer Aug 15, 2022

A naturally ignited 260-acre wildfire is burning in northern Camas County about 8 miles southwest of Alturas Lake, according to the U.S. Forest Service.

The Ross Fork Fire was detected by satellite around 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Lightning is suspected to be the cause, the Sawtooth National Forest reported Monday.

Six smokejumpers are currently assigned to the incident.

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Dry Creek Fire

Brush fire grows to 300 acres in south-central Idaho

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, August 16th 2022

The Bureau of Land Management is on scene of a brush fire that has grown to roughly 300 acres near Carey.

Officials say the Dry Creek Fire is about five miles northwest of the small town. Structures were threatened for a time but crews conducted a back burn to create containment lines and slow the spread.

Containment is expected Wednesday evening.

source: w/photo
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Public Lands:

Update – South Fork Road Reopened

From the Payette NF around 530pm Sunday August 21st:

The South Fork Salmon River road is open for traffic. Be cautious while driving in areas that are prone to slides, such as those that have burned in previous wildfires, and during and following thunderstorms.
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South Fork Salmon River Road Closed Aug 205h

Message from Valley County Sheriff’s office

There are two mud slides on the South Fork Rd between Poverty Flats Campground and Four mile Campground covering the entire Rd making it impassable.

The slide by Poverty Flats is 2 feet deep and stretches approximately 30-40 feet wide. Payette National Forest will be working on the clearing the slides. It will be closed for an undetermined amount of time.

We will update when information is available.

Johnson Creek Rd is open for an alternate route to Yellow Pine. Please remember this is a dirt road that can be one lane at times, drive responsibly and share road.
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Critter News:

Full crowds watch Valley County Rodeo

The Star-News August 18, 2022

The stands at the Valley County Fairgrounds in Cascade were full of spectators last weekend to watch the Valley County Rodeo.

A total of 192 contestants were entered from Washington, Oregon and Idaho.

The non-sanctioned event was organized by Bar X Ranches of Davenport, Washington, with stock provided by Shamrock Rodeo of Chehalis, Washington, and Olson’s Miniature Bucking Bulls of Cascade.

This was the first year the rodeo was held on a separate weekend from the Valley County Fair, which was held the prior week.

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Rabies confirmed in bat caught in Blaine County

South Central Health urges people to make sure their dogs, cats and horses are vaccinated for rabies.

A bat caught in Blaine County has tested positive for rabies, the South Central Public Health District announced Thursday.

The bat is the first this year to test positive for rabies in south central Idaho, but rabid bats have been found in other parts of the state, including downtown Boise and Bannock County.

The rabies virus can cause a disease that, if left untreated, is almost always fatal for people and pets. South Central Public Health urges getting dogs, cats and horses are vaccinated, and advises taking these precautions around bats:

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Fish salvage issued on Big Lost River from Beck Diversion downstream to Moore Diversion

August 17, 2022 Local News 8

Fish and Game was recently notified the Big Lost Irrigation District will be dewatering the lower Big Lost River downstream of the Beck Diversion in the Big Lost Valley over the next week.

This action will result in little to no habitat available for fish in the lower Big Lost River, and it is expected that most fishes will ultimately die due to those circumstances.

To maximize the utilization of these fish, Fish and Game has enacted a fish salvage order for the many wild-origin fish that are likely to be influenced by these water management actions.

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West Nile Virus found in Canyon County Mosquitos

by CBS2 News Staff Friday, August 19th 2022

West Nile Virus has been detected in mosquitoes near Middleton, Idaho. “This is the 5th Treasure Valley County reporting positive mosquito pools,” said Jim Lunders, Director of Canyon County Mosquito Abatement District.

Lunders explained that the Canyon County Mosquito Abatement District sets traps at over 100 locations throughout Canyon County to monitor adult mosquito populations. To date, the District has tested over 750 mosquito pools this season for West Nile virus. Thursday’s pool was the first to test positive.

The area where the mosquitoes were collected has been treated for both larval and adult mosquitoes. The District has increased control measures in response to the increased public health threat.

source:
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Tips and Advice:

Do you know how to protect your pet in emergencies?

August 19, 2022 Local News 8

In the event of a wildfire, earthquake, house fire or other emergency, would you know what to do to protect your pet?

Teton County Emergency Management and PAWS of Jackson Hole want you to know how to keep pets safe in disasters and everyday emergencies.

If you take some simple preparedness actions now, you will encounter less difficulty, stress and worry when you need to make quick decisions during an emergency.

Follow the tips below to help keep your furry family members safe:

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Fish and Game News:

Big game hunters should see good hunting in 2022 with a few exceptions

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Friday, August 19, 2022

Here’s everything deer and elk hunters need to know heading in to the 2022 big game season

Deer and elk hunters should be optimistic and concerned about the 2022 hunting seasons. They will have mostly healthy, stable elk herds and potential growth in mule deer herds and harvest, but white-tailed deer hunting in portions of Clearwater area are unlikely to have recovered from a disease die off last year, and chronic wasting disease was detected for the first time ever in Idaho last year, which will have to be managed.

That’s a brief summary of what lies ahead for fall elk and deer seasons, and elk and mule deer hunters can safely anticipate hunting similar or slightly better than last year.

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Hunters should check for wildfires in their hunting areas before their trips

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Thursday, August 18, 2022

Large wildfires can affect hunts and access, even after the fires are out

Hunters planning their first trips want to pay close attention to fire closures and be prepared to alter their plans if necessary.

Large fires are common in Idaho and are often burning when archery season opens at the end of August. Fires can created large closure areas that temporarily curb hunters’ access to some areas. To see current area closures and fire boundaries go to Fish and Game’s Idaho Fire Map.

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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Seasonal Humor:

HotHorse-a

SurvivalTip-a
[h/t CP
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Fire Weather Watch Aug 22, 12pm to Aug 22, 6pm

Fire Weather Watch Aug 22, 12pm to Aug 22, 6pm

Yellow Pine Forecast

Monday A 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms after noon. Partly sunny, with a high near 85. Calm wind becoming southwest 5 to 8 mph in the afternoon.

Monday Night Patchy smoke after midnight. Mostly clear, with a low around 57. West wind 5 to 7 mph becoming calm after midnight.

Fire Weather Watch

URGENT - FIRE WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
210 PM MDT Sun Aug 21 2022

...SCATTERED THUNDERSTORMS EXPECTED ACROSS THE PAYETTE NATIONAL
FOREST MONDAY AFTERNOON...

.An upper level trough will move onshore over the Pacific
Northwest on Monday. This will result in scattered thunderstorms
across the Payette National Forest Monday afternoon with abundant
lightning possible. Greatest thunderstorm coverage is expected to
be north and east of the McCall area.

Western Payette National Forest-Eastern Payette National Forest-
210 PM MDT Sun Aug 21 2022

...FIRE WEATHER WATCH IN EFFECT MONDAY AFTERNOON FOR LIGHTNING
FOR WESTERN PAYETTE NATIONAL FOREST AND EASTERN PAYETTE NATIONAL
FOREST...WHICH ARE FIRE WEATHER ZONES 401 AND 402...

The National Weather Service in Boise has issued a Fire Weather
Watch, which is in effect Monday afternoon.

* THUNDERSTORMS...scattered.

* OUTFLOW WINDS...40-50 mph.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A Fire Weather Watch means that critical fire weather conditions
are possible. Listen for later forecasts and possible Red Flag
Warnings.

Idaho History Aug 21, 2022

A Tenderfoot on Thunder Mountain

(Part 2 of 4)

by William Allen White Saturday Evening Post November 15, 1902

Tenderfoot2-1

II — The Foot Of The Rainbow
Tenderfoot2-2
Roosevelt, Idaho County, Idaho, is a town of two hundred and fifty souls, a string of log frames with canvas tops, set beside and across a trout stream. It lies in a crease in the mountains like a tear in the folds of an accordion bellows. It is without sidewalks, without streets, without officers, without export commerce, without a wagon road, without benefit of clergy, almost “without form, and void.” Yet it was the Mecca of thousands this summer, and to-day it is the journey’s end of ten thousand who expect to brave the hardships of the trail and go into the Thunder Mountain gold-fields next spring. For Roosevelt, with two hundred and fifty people, is the metropolis of the Thunder Mountain country. It has no rivals; it has destroyed them. Time was when Thunder Mountain City was a town of prospects. It rose to the dignity of a Fourth of July celebration this year, with a sack race and a greased pole; but to-day not a soul lives in Thunder Mountain City, and the chipmunk, the camp-robber and the owl own the place by quit-claim from its former human inhabitants. The town is one with “Nineveh and Tyre.” And the procession of pilgrims near the end of their week’s journey over the trail from the railroad to Thunder Mountain passes by the ruins of the town that rose and fell and passed into history in half a year. They do things with a rush in Idaho; the Old Settlers’ Association of Roosevelt will be drawing the line at newcomers next spring, though the town has not seen its first Christmas. Nothing better illustrates the domination of commercialism in the world than the peaceful conquest by Roosevelt of Thunder Mountain City. In the days of Homer it would have cost the lives of a thousand men, and would have given birth to an epic. A generation ago there would have been a county-seat war at least and a formidable display of pocket-artillery. Gentlemen from one town would have visited the other town, to return in such desultory fragments as an overworked coroner had time to patch up. But the mere announcement that the one-hundred-stamp mill of the Dewey mine was to be located next year at Roosevelt and not at Thunder Mountain City caused that town to crawfish into its past while the moon was changing. Not a drum was heard, not a funeral note, nor the bark of a protesting pistol. Capital merely shut one eye and jerked its head toward the town site of Roosevelt and Thunder Mountain City became a pile of interesting ruins.

The topography of the town of Roosevelt, like many other things in this world, is best described by its enemies. They call it the beaver dam. The town lies at the base of two almost perpendicular mountains rising from Monumental Creek. The enemies of Roosevelt further say that it will be food for a snow-slide some of these fine days. For the hills on both sides of the town are bald, porphyry drifts where slides have delighted to caper, and if a slide does not come down and dislocate the town site, it will be due to the firm belief of the Roosevelt boomers in the power of mind over matter. For they declare most convincingly that there is no danger. But if a snow-slide or a water-spout should come tripping down the valley it would have easy picking, as Roosevelt is about a mile long and one hundred feet wide. It is one of the largest towns in the world that has never seen a wagon or a wheeled vehicle of any kind. Though it is a horseman’s town there is no livery stable in the place, and no herder and no pasture near. Oats bring from fifteen to thirty cents a pound, and the feed of man or beast for a day at Roosevelt costs the same. But when a man gets into the goldfields who desires to stay any length of time he turns his horse loose on the mountains, and when he gets ready to go he takes two or three days to find it — or buys another horse of a newcomer. This plan is cheaper than tying a horse to a tree and feeding it with oats at a dollar a “feed.” Provision for the entertainment of man is not better than that for his beast; there are no hotels in Roosevelt and few restaurants. At these the bills-of-fare run along the hard path of the third-class railway lunch counter. It is presumed that if a man is in Roosevelt he is there to work, and expects to live as cheaply as his system will permit. Life there is the simple life raised to the nth power. The only members of the leisure classes in the town are six saloon-keepers and the Chicago Kid, a tin-horn gentleman. Every one else works, and works till he is dog-tired at night. Steady work and baking powder bread will keep men in the path of rectitude when sermons fail.

Tenderfoot2-3The Raw Material For a Western Novel

By day the white string of a thoroughfare in the crack of the cañon is deserted save when a pack-train comes in or when some newly arrived pilgrim waddles up the street with that bow-legged walk peculiar to horsemen who have ridden far. By day even the saloons are deserted and the cloth signs flap in the wind over the log stores lonesomely and no one reads them. But at night the miners gather in the cloth-topped, earth-floored saloons and talk in subdued tones, and those who are not too weary risk a quarter or so on faro or “studpoker,” and then listlessly leave the game to others. There is just as much wild abandon about a Roosevelt saloon and gambling hell as there is about a deaf and dumb prayer-meeting. At Klondike Kate’s, the leading saloon in the town, there is a phonograph to keep the customers awake. It grinds out the newest popular songs, and as the machine is supplied with fresh records only two weeks old from New York every few days, the young blades from Thunder Mountain, when they go back to eat the fatted calf, will not embarrass their relatives by whistling the Washington Post March nor the Sextette from Florodora. The crowd was enjoying a ditty called Take Me Back to Herald Square this September and was complaining because the music of the new comic operas and the new jokes from the Rogers Brothers were not in the shipment of records that arrived the day before. Not enough drinks were sold that evening to pay for the candles which stood in empty beer bottles along the pine bar. The miner of the new school and John Barleycorn may speak as they pass by, but they no longer smile with the fervor of the days of ‘forty-nine. The Rum Fiend in Roosevelt is mangy. Saloon after saloon has failed, and one whole mining crew of three shifts passed two pay-days this September without sending a check to a saloon for cash. The town has been running six months without an officer and without even a misdemeanor committed to give a constable a fee, if there had been a constable in town. The men of Roosevelt are young men. A majority of them are men of some education and attainment. The hard-rock miners, many of them, are college men, working in the mines to get the lay of the land, saving their money and all of them flirting with opportunity. There is no hurrah, no yip and kiyoodle, nobody wild and woolly and full of fleas in Roosevelt. No one carries a gun and no one fears robberies. Thousands of dollars’ worth of gold is blocked out in the mines on the hills and left unguarded. No ore thief, no horse thief, has ever appeared in the place. Each man is his own policeman. And yet certainly, if occasion should come for the individual police force to organize, the American instinct for law and order would organize the town as naturally as affinities unite.

About the only devilish diversion the town has is to watch Lawless John, the Horrible Example of Roosevelt, work the stranger for a drink. John is part of the human drift that floats on the crest of waves of gold excitement. Every camp has them. They like to tell about the winter of ‘forty-nine and the spring of ‘fifty. They were caught in the eddy at Leadville, and rose with the foam at Cripple Creek. In the San Juan country they were still driftwood. For two years this drift has been floating into Thunder Mountain and out again. For provisions get high in wintertime, and with bread at a dollar and a half a loaf and flour at eighty dollars a sack, men who are working within sight of the front elevation of the house of hunger don’t care to have relations with men who are rated as “low-grade” propositions. For there is this difference between ore and men: low-grade ore always has its rich streaks which make profits for the business, but a low-grade man runs low all the way. So there is little patience with Lawless John and his nightblooming inebriety at Roosevelt, and the men at Klondike Kate’s ignore him, and before the night is old they go to their bunk-houses, and by nine o’clock the town is asleep, and the lights are out by ten o’clock all over town. A late light makes as great a scandal in Roosevelt as it does in a New England town, and once this fall when the postmaster was sitting up enjoying a frugal game of draw the whole town stayed up, thinking that he was expecting the mail!

In the morning the miners scatter to their work on the hills and the day drones on in the deserted town. Within three miles of Roosevelt this fall there were half a dozen mines operating. The most important of these is the Dewey mine. Indeed it is the only real producing mine in the whole district. It is located near Mule Creek on Thunder Mountain, two miles from Roosevelt. The Dewey now employs over fifty men and has twelve or fifteen hundred feet of tunneling. It must be understood that in all the Thunder Mountain country there is not a shaft. The mountains are so steep and so small that all the work is tunneling. The Dewey tunnels, however, are now slanting downward. They run through porphyry reefs and the ore is rich. It is free-milling ore and runs as high as two hundred dollars to the ton, and the ore bodies are big and easily traceable. It is believed that as the reefs and dikes of Thunder Mountain and the district immediately around Thunder Mountain go downward they will run base, though now the ore is found free in talc or in porphyry, with sometimes a little quartz. The ore of the Dewey mine, as the tunnel slants down, is running green, indicating the approach of copper. The ore of the Wisdom and the Sunnyside, two mines on Thunder Mountain, is also found free in pure white talc that is unctuous to the touch and as soft as putty on the dump, but it hardens in a few hours to a chalklike substance. In the Fairview, which is across the gulch from Thunder Mountain, the talc is stained green fifty feet from the mouth of the tunnel. The ore in these three mines runs from sixteen to one hundred dollars the ton in free gold. The dikes of talc are broad and are often found at the points of contact with a ledge, or more commonly a fault. The ore is found in streaks or pockets.

Tenderfoot2-4Only a Little Stage-Setting is Needed to Make This Up For a Joaquin Miller Play

The Dewey people now are operating a little ten-stamp mill night and day, which they brought in by pack-train, and the marvel of it is that pack-mules could get it in. It was taken apart, but there are some parts of the mill that are as big as a horse. There was no wagon road within seventy-five miles of the mine when the mill came up, and yet there it stands, operating as a monument to the ingenuity of the mountain packer. The woodwork of this mill is hewn out by hand, and a photograph of the interior of the mill has a quaint Bradley poster effect. The Dewey people have a hundred stamp mill on the railroad at Emmet, one hundred miles from the mine. They are building a wagon road to the camp on which to transport the big mill. It will probably be in place next fall. In the mean time other strikes are being made almost every week in the country. It is a fact that not a tunnel fifty feet deep has been sunk in the Thunder Mountain district which has revealed a barren vein. The volcanic dust which covers Thunder Mountain will pan and show color that will assay over a dollar a ton. Of course all the creeks below Thunder Mountain, and all the creeks running out of the district, and all the rivers within two hundred miles of the mineral belt now known to extend fifty by thirty miles west of Thunder Mountain, have been worked by placer miners for nearly fifty years. There are dates on the trees as far back as ‘fifty-eight, and the records show placer entries in the early ‘sixties. It was at a placer mine that the Dewey was first discovered and developed. The history of the development of the mine is of interest.

They held a celebration of the fortieth anniversary of the first unfurling of the American flag at Warrens a few weeks ago. Warrens is seventy miles from Thunder Mountain, and it was a placer camp forty years ago. White men have been followed by Chinamen in those placer fields, and Chinamen by other Chinamen, and other Chinamen by white men with dredges, and all have taken out much gold from the placers. This is but one point; there are scores of such points, north, east, south, west; wherever rivers run away from the mountain of gold there are successful placer mines. Year by year the placer miners kept coming nearer the source of the deposits. In 1869 a gentleman known as Three-Fingered Smith crossed Snow-slide Summit with a rifle and some salt, and came out the next spring with the first showing of the white, fine, light gold peculiar to the district. Men wondered at it, and others went in — only one or two others — and Monumental Creek came to have a little local fame. In 1884 there was a placer excitement on what is now called Sugar Creek, and in 1893 the White Pine Basin was worked extensively. Little by little the crowd was edging toward the head of the golden stream. Then a curious thing was noticed. The placers would be cleaned out by the crowds; the crowds would leave, and in two years the placer discoveries would revive again on the very locations that bad been worked a season or two before.

Tenderfoot2-5In Hill Clothes

Then came the Caswell brothers and edged up much nearer to the fountain-head. They had a theory that the streams and basins were being replenished every year by some live source. They went up Monumental Creek to Mule Creek, and went up Mule Creek and found strange things. They found what is called the “Mysterious Slide.” Here on a comparatively level area, something over half a mile square, the trees slant in a dozen different directions, and so recent have been the changes that trees are standing split in three parts by the dropping and sliding of the earth over a talc deposit. It is believed by some mineralogists that auriferous talc veins are still rising, and that gold — to put it popularly — is not all “made” in the district. Not far from this “slide” the Caswells found a gold-bearing porphyry reef exposed. They went to work on the reef and took out many thousand dollars’ worth of free gold in a few months. They were not miners, but cattlemen, who were temporarily resting from their “loved employ.” They established what may be called a cowman’s mining outfit. Their cabins are in use on the Dewey properties now. All these cabins are lined with deerskins; deerskins keep out the cold from the door-cracks, deerskins cover the floor. The logs are rough-hewn and poorly chinked, but they sufficed in their day, and the Caswells worked their mine as best they could, taking out fifteen or twenty thousand dollars a year and bringing it down to Boise, where they deposited it in the banks. Other miners went into the country and worked — not over half a dozen for the first few years. Harvey G. Taylor, who located the town site of Roosevelt and discovered the Fairview mine, was one of these. The pioneer miners depended on hunting for most of their fare, and the loss of a mink skin or an otter, which meant cash with which to buy flour, was a loss too deep for tears. For they did not all find the mountain of gold. They were prospecting with scant pickings. They lived on venison until it was thin skating around the scurvy with them many times, and the hard winters ground them as in a mill.

In the mean time the Caswell brothers were trying to interest real mining men in their mine. After several years of failure they succeeded in getting Colonel Dewey, of Nampa, Idaho, to take the mine under a three-years’ bond for $100,000. And of this amount he was to pay $25,000 by building a wagon road into the district within a year from the beginning of the contract. Dewey put men to work on the reef. The year slipped away. His men told him what he had. The road had not been touched. Dewey had to put up the entire $100,000 in cash at the end of the first year or forfeit his bond. He paid the Caswells the cash and the Dewey mine became known to the mining world. There is no doubt that it is an unusually rich mine. It is at the head of the gold supply for all the streams. After the Dewey mine became a fact in the miner’s geography — and that was in 1900 — there was an influx of quartz miners to Thunder Mountain — hardly a rush, but a rapid growth of population. On Thunder Mountain men found that these intrusions of gold-bearing porphyry are almost of contemporaneous occurrence. They saw when they scraped off the surface of volcanic dust that this must have fallen during the present geological epoch, for under it are charred forests revealed by pick and shovel at the mouths of tunnels, and the trees are clearly like those that are standing rooted in the ashes to-day. It is curious to note that this charcoal or carbon from these tree-trunks will pan with exceptional richness, but the gold is as light as gold leaf, and unless one’s wrist is limber as a willow withe this light gold will float out of the pan with the refuse.

Tenderfoot2-6The Town of Roosevelt

The Danger of Development by Proxy

When the little Dewey stamp mill was shipped in, it established Thunder Mountain as a camp. There are now half a score of legitimate mining propositions in or near Thunder Mountain; the best of these are the Wisdom and the Sunnyside and the Fairview, the Rainbow group, and the Lava Creek outfit. A Kansas City company has thirty-seven claims and is shipping in supplies to prospect their properties this winter, and in the due course of nature should find something worth while. This summer considerable Pennsylvania capital was invested in Thunder Mountain, some carefully and profitable, and some not wisely but too well. Campbell and Moore, of the Wisdom, are types of the best sort of mine developers on Thunder Mountain. They “personally conduct” their operations and they have a property which the winter may turn into a great mine. The danger in doing development work by proxy and under the auspices of a corporation even a few hundred miles away is that the opportunities for deceiving even an honest manager, who is not actually on -the ground all winter, are as the stars in the sky. There are hundreds of Thunder Mountain mining companies which have no other basis of hope than a few gopher holes in the mud of a hillside. It should be remembered by prospective investors that but one real mine is now operating in Thunder Mountain, and that is the Dewey, and not over ten holes are actually being dug into Thunder Mountain by real prospectors who are trying to develop real mines, and the writer does not know that stock is for sale in any of the companies operating these ten holes. The tunnels are being run either by private individuals, or partners, or by close corporations. Next year, if these holes in the wall show real mines, probably thousands of companies will spring up peddling stock all over the East.

There is but one safe rule to follow when investing money in a new mining district. Either to go to the mine one’s self, or to hire a reputable mining expert to examine the mine or mines owned by the company in which one is inclined to invest. It may be suggested that this is an expensive business. To which reply may be made, that mining is a poor man’s vice and a rich man’s luxury. It should ever be borne in mind by investors of small holdings in mining property that a mine is a hole in the ground into which one is always putting money and sometimes taking it out. However, there may be readers of THE SATURDAY EVENING POST who fancy that if they could have an accurate, scientific description of the country by a practical mineralogist they might invest their money wisely. For such readers this statement was prepared by Newton R. Hibbs, of Roosevelt, at the writer’s request. Mr. Hibbs has been in the Thunder Mountain district for four years and in the Western mountains all his life. He says:

“It is the general conception of the public that the Thunder Mountain gold-field is of sedimentary origin. The fact is, no primary rocks are found in the free gold-belt. In an area of four hundred square miles, of which Thunder Mountain is a central figure, the primary rock formation has been entirely removed. Unlike the ordinary mountains, our high ranges are made up of intrusive dikes with no tilted schists or granites. While there is no evidence present of violent earth disturbances, there being only an occasional fragment of scoria found to indicate eruptions, the ridges and peaks are generally held up by from six to a dozen distinct intrusions, or distinct porphyry dikes. It is evident that an old system of water-courses at an old geological age was completely reversed in this whole mountain region by an intrusion of porphyry that broke the earth crust in an east and west trend, along the main river of this ancient water system, and reversed the course of the rivers and creeks. The primary schists and granites were evidently so much broken by the first disturbance that the reversed water-courses soon cut deep cañon leading at right angles from the east and west porphyry dike, the course of which is marked by Lightning Peak, Rainbow Peak and the basalt ‘Nigger-Heads.’ Later other intrusions broke the earth crust along cations formed by the new water-courses, making ridges with porphyry backbones where the cañons had been. These successive upheavals so crumbled the primary earth crust that the old formation was easily reduced to sand and soil by erosion. In the years of transformation the old, decomposed rocks all crumbled from the mountainside and slipped and rolled into the streams, and were disintegrated and distributed far below the present level of the little valleys. Then came successive intrusions along the line of the contacts, first of the porphyry and the old formation and then between the porphyry dikes. After the tilted primary rocks were broken and rolled away by successive uplifts, the older porphyries were tilted more and more till that formation is fast following the primary rocks into the creek beds. After many intrusions the newer porphyries have tilted the outside contacts beyond the perpendicular; and the mountains have split, as is the case at the Dewey mine, and formed horizontal reefs. These successive intrusions have had the effect of wedges, and they have in some instances turned the earth crust upside down, which is true of the Dewey reef. It is an accepted fact that porphyry intrusions are the source of all the gold of our mines. Though it may not have become thoroughly established that the porphyry of one age was more prolific of this precious metal than that of another, such a conclusion is not improbable. At any rate, the theory is well founded that the region which has the most various porphyry formations is the most prolific of gold. It is often remarked that the number of intrusions almost determines the importance of mineral belts. Thunder Mountain, with its succession of intrusions, has no primary or ‘country’ rock — only a porphyry bed-rock. The occasion of the general distribution of placer gold throughout this region is the excessive waste of broken, soft gold-bearing porphyries — broken by the uplift and subjected to erosion in the disturbed state. Primarily it is the disintegration of various kinds of porphyry that carry auriferous deposits in leads and ledges. One inquiry remains unanswered in relation to this district: Are the conditions favorable for the secondary enrichment of great ore bodies? A logical answer would be that large intrusive dikes, in accordance with scientific principles, form large contact cavities, and the waste from rich porphyries must afford rich vein-filling. And, so far as explored, even the surface fissures are filled with rich conglomerates. The wide contacts left in the process of cooling were surely filled to unexplored depths with breccia with which the gold was concentrated by the flow of hot solutions through the natural sluices. It is not a matter of surprise that the-porphyry bedrock of this whole region is seamed with gold-filled strata. Logically there should be here one of the most extensive systems of contact veins that could exist in any rock formation, and the conditions are favorable for the enrichment of this vein system. Not only should there be, in this district, large, rich, brecciate ore bodies, but the porphyry dikes should be rich. There should be encountered here, by exploration, large zones of telluride, phonolite, sylvanite and sulphide gold ores. In fact, it is well demonstrated that the free gold encountered here is a precipitation, and then a concentration from the liquid gold of the ores named above or from kindred natural deposits that have not been named in any laboratory.”

Tenderfoot2-7A Porphyry Outcrop on Monumental Creek

The Host of Jack Rabbit Millionaires

This is the “what should be” of the geologist. The “what is” of the miner will be reported next spring when the country opens and the result of this winter’s work is known. For, excepting the Dewey, the whole Thunder Mountain region is a prospect. It is where Colorado was twenty-five years ago. Last winter and the winter before men went in on skees and snowshoes, and because investors could not get in to examine what they were buying claims were sold that had no place on the map when the snow melted. For five miles from the Dewey last winter every foot of ground was staked off though there was ten feet of snow over it all, and surveys were as impossible as any real discoveries were. Yet these claims were sold, and the men who bought them as a rule never went into the country to investigate them ; they preferred to stay at home and abuse the district. This didn’t yield dividends, and yet it is a question whether or not there is not more real, unalloyed comfort in blaming others for our own negligence than there is in the mere sordid act of money-making. The real fun to be had in connection with money is not in actual ownership. It is in convincing ourselves that we should have it, by all rights, or that we are about to have it. The happiest men in all these Salmon River Mountains are the prospectors who lay out claims, and add a million dollars to the value of their properties every time they change the date on their stakes to save assessment work! These men are holding their claims for millions, and really fancy they are worth the money they hope to get, yet in the winter they go about chasing jack-rabbits to death through the snow to get something to eat, and every summer “lean up” all day in camp and spend the night in riotous living at some other man’s expense. And scarcely less happy is the miner who wears out ten pounds of shoe-leather to one of pick-steel, who prospects a mountain in an hour and a district in a week. It takes two men to drive his stakes fast enough to keep up with his location, and when he goes down to Boise he barters his golcondas to the barroom miners for a bluesky-and-thin-air bond, and goes on his way of dreams crowding Pierpont Morgan and Dave Moffat off the earth, as long as he is good for board at the Overland. Last winter untold millions were made and lost by jackrabbit millionaires in Boise. Every sheepherder was an expert, and because the snow was so deep on Thunder Mountain that many prospectors found it inconvenient to go down to the surface of the earth for samples, the mines of Trinity County, California, were stripped for speckled ore, and the pockets of the gentry of the barroom exchange bulged with evidences of wealth beyond-the dreams of avarice. Hot-foot miners were plenty, but hard-rock miners who had actually struck a pick in the new country were scarce.

Editor’s Note — This is the second paper by Mr. White on the newest-found gold-fields. The third will appear next week.

source: Saturday Evening Post November 15, 1902 (requires subscription)
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Further Reading

Link to Thunder Mountain / Roosevelt History Index Page
Link to A Tenderfoot on Thunder Mountain (part 1)
Link to A Tenderfoot on Thunder Mountain (part 2)
Link to A Tenderfoot on Thunder Mountain (part 3)
Link to A Tenderfoot on Thunder Mountain (part 4)
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