Monthly Archives: October 2022

Oct 30, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 30, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Note: If you are not receiving the YPTimes emails, check your spam folder.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
2022
May 15 thru Nov 30 – Firewood Season
June 1 – 6-day mail delivery starts
Oct 31 – Halloween at The Tavern
Nov 2 – Festival Committee meeting at 3pm
Nov 6 – Fall Back (Time Change)
Nov 27 – YPFD Meeting at 2pm
(details below)
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Local Events:

Oct 31st – Halloween at The Tavern

A Halloween Potluck Happening this year will be at The Tavern after ‘shooting hours’ on Oct 31st. Tom Wood brings down Alaska fish every year to share with locals during hunting season.
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Nov 2 – Festival Committee meeting

Next Meeting will be Wednesday, November 2, at 3:00pm at the Community Hall. The meeting purpose is to review what progress has been made so far and next steps.
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Nov 6 – Fall Back (Time Change)

Sunday, November 6th: Time to change your clocks back an hour and replace the batteries in your smoke alarms.
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Nov 27, 2022, YPFD Meeting Sunday at 2pm
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Village News:

Perpetua Pig Roast Oct 21

Thank you Perpetua Resources for the incredible roasted pig potluck yesterday, held in YP! Had 62 people show up.

Such a great gathering of friends, family, and newcomers! The Village of Yellow Pine truly appreciates our wonderful neighbors in our mutual support of each others mission! A great time was held by all.

20221021PigRoast-a

20221021PigRoast2-a
courtesy Ronda
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YPFD Training Oct 23

from YPFD: Training this [last] weekend with Dave Williams went great. Learned a lot about what to do if we have a chemical spill and safety in taking care of it. The fun part was practiced an rescue over the bank with the crew at Stibnite. Thank you

20221023HazwoperTraining-a
Courtesy YPFD

from Perpetua: This weekend, our Stibnite crew practiced an angle rescue on belay with the Yellow Pine Fire Department

As one of our core values, we take safety very seriously at Perpetua and we are lucky to include our local communities whenever possible.

20221023StibniteTraining-a
Courtesy Perpetua Resources
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Snow Oct 24

Snow fell in Yellow Pine Monday afternoon and evening, giving us our first measurable snow.

YP Webcam Tuesday morning
20221025YellowPineWest-a

Wednesday morning we had 4″ of snow fall in just a few hours. Most if it had melted by Thursday afternoon.
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Snow at Stibnite

20221026StibniteSnow-a
courtesy Perpetua Oct 26th
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YPWUA News – Oct 24

1. The YPWUA currently has an opening on the board. If interested in serving on the YPWUA board, please contact any board member.

2. The YPWUA currently has an opening for the Maintenance Advisor position. This position will be the community representative working closely with the Board, Warren Drake of Drake Diversified and Nicki Harnar to identify problems and lead in the repairs.

3. The YPWUA has voted to delay the increase in the yearly fees for the grant share. Note: the approximate amount of $220.00 per year will added beginning with the 2023 bill.

Thank you
YPWUA Board
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News from Big Creek / Edwardsburg

Amerigas notified all of BC they won’t serve it anymore; Valley Wide is gaining customers there and has been great to work with.
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News from The Corner

As many of you know Thechef Paddy is covering for us for a few months. His current hours are:
Thursday 4-9pm
Friday/Saturday: Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
Sunday Brunch: 9am – 1pm
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Watkins Pharmacy Update June 23rd

To the community: the insurance claims are ongoing… We are still working on the temporary pharmacy/store going in at Across the Tracks. We wish we could move everything along faster, but unfortunately we have no control over that as much as we wish we did! … Thank you for those who have reached out for updates. – Watkins Pharmacy
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Arnold Aviation News:

Arnold’s will no longer will offer grocery shopping services. (D9 now has online shopping – see below.) However, Arnolds will still pick up orders in Cascade from D9, auto parts, feed, and hardware, etc. for delivery to Yellow Pine. You will only be charged for freight from the Airport to YP.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
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D9 News:

You will be able to start ordering online directly from D9 on May 24th. Go to their website at link. Phone (208-382-4215) if you need assistance.

Orders must be placed before 10am Monday (Arnolds will pick up on Tuesday for Wednesday delivery.) It is important that upon checkout, you click the box marked “Gift” – and type in the order is for Arnolds to pick up and deliver to Yellow Pine. Otherwise they will think it is a local personal pickup.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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May 15 thru Nov 30 – Firewood Season

Firewood permits are available at The Corner.
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Notice – Yellow Pine Times Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
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Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Hwy 55 Update from ITD August 26, 2022
Starting Tuesday, September 6, the Smiths Ferry project will transition to the fall construction schedule. Drivers should plan for one-way alternating traffic with 15-minute delays, Monday through Friday and weekends as needed.
Crews will start paving work on September 6. Drivers can expect a gravel highway surface for a few weeks, and the first layer of asphalt completed by the end of September.
To learn more about the construction schedule, visit link:

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
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Critters

Be Moose Aware

* Be aware of your surroundings and be especially careful around creeks and in areas with dense brush.
* Travel in groups whenever possible and make noise to alert animals to your presence.
* If you encounter a moose, give it lots of space and don’t approach it. Always keep dogs under control.
* If a moose charges or chases you, take cover behind something solid, such as a tree.
* In some situations, bear spray has been known to be an effective defense tool in moose encounters.
Fourth of July weekend traffic on Johnson Creek. One more reason to drive slow.

courtesy Yellow Pine FB group

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard. F&G confirms there is a pack of 6 wolves in our valley.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

courtesy YP resident

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat was hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Oct 29: The bins must have been emptied recently, they were about a third full on Saturday. Road from YP to the dump is good.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

YPWUA Board resignation

It is with regret that I must inform the community that I have resigned my position on the Yellow Pine Water Users Association as of September 24, 2022. I had hoped to serve until the improvement projects were at least underway, but unexpected circumstances have precipitated my decision to leave the Board. Thank you to those community members who have trusted me to serve you in this important position and for your appreciated support.
– Willie Sullivan

YPWUA Grants

On August 27th many water users attended a presentation from Mountain Waterworks on the future of our water system. Many also called in on Zoom. The YPWUA Board, over the last three years, has worked alongside Mountain Water Works to obtain grants to replace our failing drinking water system.

Mountain Waterworks gave an excellent presentation on the status of our current system. The slow sand filters have been damaged by an earthquake and are cracked, our inlet water system is very crude and open to contamination, our chlorine injection building is below ground level and dangerous to our operator, it is also leaning and could fall into Boulder Creek, and our leaking distribution lines need to be replaced and increased in size.

We have been granted over 7 million dollars with the potential for additional no match money. Of that amount, the agencies granting this money are requiring the water users to repay $500,000 over a 30 year period. That amount is approximately $18.10 per month, per user or about an additional $217 per year. Mountain Waterworks explained that Yellow Pine is the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s number one priority for grants this year. Many communities in Idaho are fighting for this money for their projects. Yellow Pine received more money by population and also the lowest required payback of any community.

In 2007 the DEQ imposed a $100 per day fine on the YPWUA for not complying with the 1995 court order to repair our system. That fine was dropped by the court but a new date was established for 2026. If this project is not completed by 2026, that $100 Per day fine is reinstated. That calculates to $30 per month, per user, so we either pay $18.10 per month now and get our system fixed or pay $30 per month on fines and get nothing.

During discussion with those attending the meeting the group determined that we don’t have a choice. This project needs to be done to insure the community of Yellow Pine will continue to exist. The group was asked if there was objection to the project, by a show of hands, no one objected. So the board decided to approve this project.

Some at the meeting agreed to the additional costs but wanted to know if there was a way to pay either monthly or quarterly. We are in the process of looking into payment options.

Thank you,
YPWUA Board

Update: YP Water Users. Clarification regarding bids for facility and water lines improvements. Bids were considerably higher than expected and the work will NOT be started until grant money and users’ fees are adequate.

Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at (link).

Water Use

10/20/22 29752061 24721 24 1030 17 T 13475
10/21/22 29775955 23894 24 996 17 F 827
10/22/22 29800088 24133 24 1006 17 S 239
10/23/22 29824573 24485 24 1020 17 S 352
10/24/22 29848730 24157 24 1007 17 M 328
10/25/22 29870053 21323 24 888 15 T 2834
10/26/22 29891458 21405 24 892 15 W 82
10/27/22 29911993 20535 24 856 14 T 870
10/28/22 29933500 21507 24 896 15 F 972
10/29/22 29954471 20971 24 874 15 S 536
10/30/22 29975835 21364 24 890 15 S 393

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

As of April 17th 2020, Yellow Pine is under a “Boil Order”. This boil order will be in effect until further notice.

DRINKING WATER WARNING
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST. Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 10-10-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

Aug 27, 2022 Special Water Meeting 12pm at Community Hall
July 3, 2022 YPWUA 2022 Annual Shareholder Meeting (minutes to follow)
July 4, 2021 YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
July 5, 2020 YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
(vacant)
Tim Aldridge
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
Warren Drake – Water Operator
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VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association

I Lorinne Munn hereby resign as Treasurer of the Village of Yellow Pine Association on this day October 11, 2022 at 5:30 PM. Kat Amos has agreed to take over that position until the next election in 2024. I have agreed to assume the position of Chairman of the Village of Yellow Pine Association for the rest of that term, at the request of the other council members Josh Jones, Lynn Imel, and Rhonda Egbert.
Lorinne N. Munn

Notes from 10/12/22 Festival Committee Meeting

Josh explained his vision for the 2023 festival.

* 2022 was a baseline for future festivals
* In 2023
– looking to improve quality of the event;
– Bring in more funds;
– Be less dependent on local volunteers.
* Evolve the festival to gain support from the County level administration.

Josh requested committee members not discuss festival details that have not been finalized outside the committee, as it can end up setting expectations that don’t get met and costing more money.
Reviewed sections of how the festival work is broken down. Each section will need a lead; subsection team members will work with the lead.
Committee focus is on the tasks for October & November, of obtaining Sponsors/Donors.
Reviewed Sponsorship Tiers and Sponsor presentation.
Bill agreed to be lead on this section.
Work in each section can affect at least one or more of other sections – need to work as a whole team.
Kat agreed to be lead on the Committee Communication section. Kat will also do some research on possible security people.
Lorinne agreed to be lead on the Product Sales Section.
Deb agreed to be lead on the Financials section.
Ronda agreed to lead the Vetting process.
Next Meeting will be Wednesday, November 2, at 3:00pm at the Community Hall. The meeting purpose is to review what progress has been made so far and next steps.

Yellow Pine Community Hall General Use Procedures

Hall General Usage:
* All events must be scheduled through the Community Hall Committee and approved by the Committee Chairman
* No property shall be removed from the Community Hall without approval of the Community Hall Committee Chairman.
* Responsible alcohol usage is permitted.
* No smoking is allowed in the hall. Pick up any butts scattered outside.
* Building and grounds are not a storage area. Do not leave personal items in or around the Community Hall without approval of the Community Hall Committee Chairman.
* Notify a committee member if problems are encountered.

After each event using the hall:
* Sweep/vacuum hall floor and restroom floor
* Wipe down toilet
* Empty garbage cans and take garbage to the transfer station
* Fold tables
* Stack chairs
* Turn off lights, ceiling fans, heater (if applicable)
* Put away any kitchen items after they are cleaned

After each event using the kitchen:
* Sweep/mop kitchen floor
* Wash, dry, and store all used dishes, utensils, pans, coffee pots, etc.
* Clean and wipe down sinks
* Thoroughly clean griddles, if used, and turn off propane to griddles
* Remove any unused food/beverages from the refrigerators/freezers
* Clean up any spilled food or beverage
* Empty garbage cans and take garbage to the transfer station
* Notify a committee member if problems are encountered

Using the Community Hall and/equipment for non-Yellow Pine events:
* A refundable, $50 deposit is required seven (7) days prior to the event
* After the event, a Community Hall Committee member will inspect the premises prior to the deposit being refunded
* A $150/day donation is requested for the use of the Hall
* A $200/day donation is requested for the use of the Kitchen

No deposit or use donation is needed for use by Yellow Pine community members, committees, or groups.

Yellow Pine Community Hall Committee:
Rhonda Egbert – Chairman
Members: Ronda Rogers, Deb Filler, Hailey Harris

Village of Yellow Pine Association:
Lorinne Munn, Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Lynn Imel, Secretary
Kat Amos, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Joel Fields

Oct 12, 2022 Festival Committee Meeting minutes Link:
Sept 10, 2022 VYPA Meeting minutes (20220910VYPAAgenda-MinutesSummary.txt)
Aug 13, 2022 VYPA Meeting cancelled due to lack of quorum.
July 9, 2022 VYPA Meeting minutes Link:
June 11, 2022 VYPA Meeting minutes link:
April 6, 2022 Village Council meeting to fill vacant chairperson position (no minutes.)
Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.
2022 Meeting dates:
June 11
July 9
August 13
September 10

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Department

Chimney cleaning brushes are available to borrow at the Fire Hall.

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Meeting Minutes
Sep 6, 2022 YPFD Budget Meeting (no minutes yet.)
Aug 16, 2022 VSCO After Action Report (plane crash) Link:
Aug 14, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Aug 5, 2022 YPFD Search and Rescue Mutual Aid Agreement Link:
Aug 3, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Special Meeting (no minutes yet)
May 29, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting (no minutes yet)
May 20, 2022 YPFD Meeting in Cascade with Forest Service (no minutes.)
Apr 3, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting Link: to Amended minutes
Feb 24, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD New Commissioner’s Transition Meeting Link:
Nov 23, 2021 – YPFD Special meeting Link:
Nov 8, 2021 – YPFD AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
Oct 31, 2021 – YPFD Special meeting Link:
Oct 14, 2021 – YPFD Special meeting Link:
Sep 27, 2021 – YPFD Special meeting Link:
Sep 18, 2021 – YPFD Special meeting Link:
Sep 11, 2021 – YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
Jul 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Jun 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sep 30, 2020 – YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 6, Sunday at 10am Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Our winter hours are:
Thursday 4-9pm
Friday/Saturday: Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
Sunday Brunch: 9am – 1pm
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
The Tavern will remain closed for renovations until further notice.
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Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The General Store will be closed Mondays, and open Tuesday-Saturday 10-6pm. Sunday 10-3pm
The motel rooms and the laundry room are available 7 days per week. Email:
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Open through the end of hunting season.
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Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $4/doz
No longer taking scrap metal
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:
Closed Oct 9, 2022 for winter

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: 1-800-427-4968
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Cascade:
Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
D9 Groceries: 208-382-4215 Website link to order:
Upon “checkout” click on “gift” and write “Arnolds to pick up and deliver to (your name) in Yellow Pine” so they know who will pick it up and where it goes.
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watkins can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

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A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

J & R Septic
Cascade (208) 382-8727

Valley Roofing Idaho
Meridian (208) 830-4890 email:
Facebook:

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473) Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 24) overnight low of 23 degrees and yesterday’s trace of snow melted. This morning it was 25 degrees by 10am with broken overcast. A few jays, a flock of starlings and a pine squirrel observed. Breaks in the clouds and bits of sunshine mid-morning. Overcast and calm at lunch time, high of 40 degrees. Gusty breezes early afternoon, flaking snow and overcast. Socked in down to the valley floor by mid-afternoon and steady snowfall. A trace of snow on the ground late afternoon. Still snowing at sunset, fat trace on the ground, can see Golden Gate through the foggy low clouds. Looks like it stopped snowing around 10pm, an inch or more accumulation.

Tuesday (Oct 25) 24-hour low of 25 degrees (from Monday.) Yesterday’s snow measured just shy of 1 1/4″ and SWE = 0.10″. This morning it was 31 degrees by 10am and overcast. A few jays and squirrel tracks in the snow observed. Breaks in the clouds before lunch time and a little sunshine at times. Mostly cloudy after lunch time and nearly all of the new snow has melted. Mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, chilly light breeze and snow had all melted, high of 44 degrees. Mostly cloudy and calm at sunset. Not snowing at midnight. Snowed pretty good early morning.

Wednesday (Oct 26) overnight low of 28 degrees. Started snowing early this morning and by 10am measured 3 1/2″ (SWE = 0.15″) low overcast socked in down to the valley floor. By 11am lighter snowfall and probably another 1/2″ new added. A few jays and a chipmunk observed. Snowing very lightly at lunch time, trees starting to drop “snow bombs.” Mail truck made it in on time, reported 9″ of snow at Landmark and snowing hard when he came through. Snowing lightly early afternoon and higher overcast (just the top of VanMeter fogged in.) Higher overcast mid-afternoon, peaks visible, some snow melting, occasional flake of snow or misty rain drops and cold light breeze, high of 39 degrees. A sucker hole late afternoon let in a spot of sun while thicker lower clouds to the north. Breaks in the overcast just before dusk and hovering just above freezing.

Thursday (Oct 27) overnight low of 19 degrees. Yesterday’s snow = 0.05″ water. This morning it was 21 degrees by 10am and overcast. Jays visiting. Thinning overcast and filtered sunshine at lunch time. Partly hazy mid-afternoon with light cold breezes, high of 47 degrees. Partly hazy and above freezing at dusk.

Friday (Oct 28) 24-hour low of 21 degrees (from Thursday) about half the old snow has melted. This morning it was 25 degrees by 10am and overcast, measured 1/2″ old snow on the board, but calling it a trace due to so much bare ground. A few jays and a flock of starlings visiting. Thinner overcast at lunch time and filtered sunlight. Thin overcast and cold breezes mid-afternoon, high of 48 degrees. Looked like a thin overcast at dusk, calm and not too cold yet. A few stars out at 10pm.

Saturday (Oct 29) overnight low of 23 degrees, no precipitation. It was 27 degrees by 10am, a trace of old snow in the shade, broken overcast and frosty. Bigger breaks in the clouds before lunch time and scattered sunshine. A few jays around. Overcast after lunch. Mostly cloudy with patches of blue sky mid-afternoon, warmer and light breezes, high of 52 degrees. Partly cloudy at dusk.

Sunday (Oct 30) overnight low of 23 degrees, no precipitation. This morning it was 28 degrees by 10am, mostly cloudy, frosty and traces of old snow in the shade. Inversion – smell of vehicle exhaust in the air. A few jays visiting. Broken overcast at lunch time. Warmer mid-afternoon, broken overcast and nearly calm, high of 53 degrees. Loud echoing gunshot around 315pm. Mostly cloudy at dusk.
—————–

RIP:

Norman E Rogers

October 2, 1928 ~ October 20, 2022 (age 94)

Norman E. Rogers, age 94 years old, of Boise, Idaho, died Thursday, October 20th of pancreatic cancer at home with his family by his side. He is now reunited with the love of his life D. Marie Rogers. They met at school and fell in love immediately and were married on March 20, 1948.

Norman and Marie had four children, Danny Lee who passed away in 1967, Debra Lynn who lives in College Place, Washington, Gaylene Rae living in Boise, Idaho, and Timothy Lloyd living in Yellow Pine, Idaho.

link to full obituary:
—————-

Idaho News:

Important Valley County Election Ballot Information:

October 26, 2022 Valley County (via FB)

Voters in the Nov. 8, 2022 general election can expect to see a correction on the ballot when they go to the polls. “We were made aware that the term for the District 3 Valley County Commissioner race included a misprint,” says Doug Miller, Valley County Clerk. “The ballot notes a term of four years when that term should be two years.”

The Clerk’s Office verified with the Idaho Secretary of State that the misprint does not invalidate the ballot and a simple correction can be made for election day. Voters can expect to see a one-line strike-through of the four-year term and a handwritten two-year term added next to the District 3 candidates. Absentee ballots that have already been mailed will not include the correction, but those ballots are still valid. Any absentee ballots requested after Oct. 26, 2022 will include the correction.

To vote in the Nov. election, you may request an absentee ballot by Oct. 28, vote early at the Valley County Clerk’s office until Nov. 4, or vote in person at your polling location on Nov. 8. Absentee ballots must be received Nov. 8, 2022 at 8 p.m. Ballots may be mailed or dropped off at the Valley County Clerk’s office or the McCall Annex. There will also be designated absentee ballot boxes at each polling location on election day only.

In-person voting will also take place at polling locations across the county from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Nov. 8. For those in the Alpha, Cascade, and West Mountain Precincts, voting will take place at the American Legion Hall located at 105 E. Mill St. in Cascade. For those in the Donnelly and Rosebery precincts, voting will take place at the Donnelly Bible Church at 159 FW Gestrin Street in Donnelly. For those in the McCall and Payette precincts, voting will take place at Idaho First Bank located at 475 Deinhard Ln. in McCall.

For more election information, visit

[Note: Yellow Pine is designated a vote by mail precinct.]
— — — — — — — — — —

COVID-19 Updates: 1,041 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 13 new deaths

October 26, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 1,041 new COVID-19 cases and 13 new deaths in the last week. State-level case and hospital data are now being updated on the state dashboard on Wednesday excluding holidays.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 499,849.

The state said 36 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 18,438, and 6 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 3,097.

13 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 5,216.

[Valley County 3,003 cases, 17 deaths.]
link
— — — —

Six new Valley County COVID-19 cases reported in last week

By Tom Grote The Star-News October 27, 2022

A total of six new cases of COVID-19 were reported in Valley County in the past week by the county’s two hospitals.

The six new cases compared to nine new cases reported the previous week and 10 new cases reported the prior week.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 3,223 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started in March 2020.

Spokespeople for both hospitals said the number of new reported cases are likely far lower than the actual number of new cases as some patients may choose not to be tested.

Fourteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health since the start of the pandemic.

In Adams County, 16 deaths have been reported since the pandemic started, with the most recent death reported on June 17, Southwest District Health reported.

A total of 615 cases of COVID-19 were reported this week in Adams County since the start of the pandemic, which is no increase over the previous week, the health department said.

Clinics & Tests – McCall

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine is now scheduling and administering Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccines for children 6 months and older. Parents or guardians can make appointments in MyChart.

Patients may now schedule bivalent mRNA COVID-19 vaccine boosters through MyChart or by calling St. Luke’s Connect, 208-381-9500.

According to new federal guidelines, St. Luke’s will no longer provide monovalent boosters. This includes the Pfizer booster for ages 5 and older and the Moderna booster for age 6 and older.

Schedule an appointment through MyChart at stlukesonline.org/mychart or you can call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at stlukesonline.org

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

Clinics & Tests – Cascade

Cascade Medical Center offers the Moderna Bivalent Booster on Tuesdays and Thursdays between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. at the center’s Family Medicine Clinic.

The vaccine is available to anyone 5 and older who has completed their primary vaccination series more than two months ago, has not had another booster within the past two months, and has not had COVID in the last three months. Call 208-382-4285 to schedule an appointment.

Take-Home Tests

Cascade Medical Center has take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital also provides free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

St. Luke’s McCall no longer offers take-home tests.

source: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — — — — — — —

Donnelly residents urged to take part in Dark Sky Festival Nov. 5

The Star-News October 27, 2022

Donnelly residents are encouraged to turn out their lights for the inaugural Dark Sky Festival on Saturday, Nov. 5, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Historic Roseberry Barn.

The event will include a raffle, food vendors, astrological presentations from Boise State University students and stargazing during the Taurids meteor shower.

Live music will be provided by the bluegrass band Wheelhouse.

source 
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Fire Season:

Boise National Forest begins pile burning

Boise, Idaho, October 28, 2022, — With the change in weather conditions the Boise National Forest is beginning pile burning operations throughout the forest. Pile burning is planned beginning Oct. 31 in areas around the Bogus Basin ski resort, Lowman, south of High Valley and north of Crouch, Idaho. For updates please visit the Forest’s Facebook page at: (link)

Pile burning is designed to reduce hazardous vegetation (fuels) generated from logging, non-commercial thinning operations and administrative site clearing. Piles burning will generate smoke, but they have low probability of fire spread beyond the footprint of the piles due to time of year, weather and adjacent fuels conditions.

Prescribed burns may affect people sensitive to smoke and may impact access to burn areas and travel routes. Fire officials strongly advise forest visitors and homeowners to prepare and plan activities around the proposed dates and locations of burns and to use extreme caution near prescribed fire areas.

Please be aware of firefighters and equipment in the area and on roadways, comply with posted notices and drive slowly in areas with decreased visibility.

Public and firefighter safety is always the top priority in all public land fire operations. Fire managers develop burn plans with prescriptions that account for safety, specific fuels/weather conditions and potential smoke impacts. All prescribed burns are closely evaluated and are only approved when favorable conditions are present.

Information and signs will be posted on roads that access burn areas in advance of ignitions and remain in place through burn completion.

Visit the interactive map with the latest planned areas of prescribed fire treatments:  (link)
Zoom into your areas of interest to get the latest information. The Idaho Department of Lands and Boise, Payette, and Sawtooth National Forests’ planned prescribed fire treatments will be featured.

Venetia Gempler
Public Affairs Officer
Boise National Forest
— — — — — — — — — —

Fire season still ongoing, 5 wildfires in Idaho continue to burn

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, October 25th 2022

The fall season is well on its way, but wildfires continue to rage across the country, some of which are still in Idaho.

According to the National Interagency Fire Center, Idaho has five active large fires burning as of Oct. 25.

The two biggest active fires in Idaho are the Ross Fork Fire at 38,013 acres and the Kootenai River Complex Fire at 25,401 acres. The Ross Fork Fire is 85% contained while the Kootenai River Complex Fire is 87% contained.

The Woodtick and Norton fires are at a similar size, 9,834 and 9,278 acres, respectively. The Woodtick Fire is 50% contained while the Norton Fire is 60 % contained.

continued 
— — — — — — — — — —

Moose Fire burning for 100 days

The Moose Fire has burned more than 130,000 acres and is 95% contained.

KTVB Staff October 28, 2022

The Moose Fire, still burning after 100 days northwest of Salmon, is 95% contained and has scorched more than 130,000 acres.

The expected containment date is approaching on Oct. 31 due to snow. All 130,00 acres are not still burning, but there are several hotspots that still need containment.

Public Affairs Officer for the Salmon-Challis National Forest, Amy Baumer, says 37 personnel are still working on the fire. Baumer doesn’t anticipate the fire to last through the winter.

continued 
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Mining News:

Stibnite Gold Project Draft Supplemental EIS: Notice of Availability

October 28, 2022 USDA Forest Service

Greetings,

Please see information below regarding the Notice of Availability for the Supplemental Draft EIS (SDEIS) for the Stibnite Gold Project. You are receiving this notification because you expressed interest in the subject project and provided scoping input or comments on the DEIS which led to the preparation of the SDEIS.

Stibnite Gold Project Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement

On October 28, 2022, the SDEIS will be published in the Federal Register initiating a 75-day comment period that goes through January 10, 2023. The SDEIS will be available on the Project Website, as shown below, in the Analysis folder.

How to Comment

Public comments concerning the adequacy and accuracy of this SDEIS will be accepted until January 10, 2023 and may be submitted by the following methods:

Project Website: (link)

Mail: Linda Jackson, Payette Forest Supervisor
Stibnite Gold Project
500 N. Mission Street, Building 2, McCall, Idaho 83638

Fax to Attn: Linda Jackson, Payette Forest Supervisor, 208-634-0744

Public Meetings: Written comments may be submitted

All comments received during the public comment period will be fully considered and evaluated for preparation of the Final EIS. All comments received will be published with authorship information in the public reading room on the project webpage. Only those who submit timely and specific written comments regarding the proposed project during a public comment period established by the responsible official are eligible to file an objection. Questions can be directed to Brian Harris, Public Affairs Officer, Payette National Forest, 500 N. Mission Street, Building 2, McCall, Idaho 83638; phone (208) 634-0784; email: brain.d.harris@usda.gov

Public Meetings

Public open-house style meetings have been scheduled for December 2022 and are shown below.

* December 6 (Tue) Best Western Plus, McCall, ID 5-8 pm
* December 7 (Wed) American Legion Hall, Cascade, ID 5-8 pm
* December 9 (Fri) Holiday Inn Express Airport Sawtooth Rm, Boise, ID 2-5 pm
* December 9 (Fri) Holiday Inn Express Airport Sawtooth Rm, Boise, ID 5-8 pm

Stibnite Story Map

The Stibnite Story Map is a supplemental experience that provides a virtual format for exploring the concepts and alternatives described in the SDEIS. The Story Map information will be available on the project website starting at the time of the Public Meeting dates and can be used to explore the different alternatives with interactive maps and visual aids.
— — — — — — — — — —

Perpetua notes progress on Stibnite clean-up

Work done to prevent pollution at previous mining areas

By Drew Dodson The Star-News October 27, 2022

The first part of a $12 million project to clean-up old mining waste polluting the East Fork South Fork Salmon River at Stibnite has been completed, according to Perpetua Resources.

Crews completed work for the season earlier this week, with more work to remove 325,000 tons of old waste from the river corridor slated for next summer the company said.

Work completed this year included re-routing and installing liners beneath streams that were flowing across historic mining waste, leaching toxic metals into the water before it flows into the East Fork.

Crews also moved about 15,000 tons of waste rock away from an unnamed stream that flows into the East Fork.

“Isolating streams away from historically contaminated materials is a first step in fulfilling our goal of leaving the area better than it is today,” Perpetua CEO Laurel Sayer said.

Water quality in the East Fork and other streams at the proposed mine site do not currently meet federal drinking standards due to high concentrations of arsenic and antimony.

Work next summer is expected to include moving 325,000 tons of old mining waste away from the East Fork to stop metal particles from leaching into the water, Perpetua said.

About 200,000 tons of waste would be moved from streambanks and floodplains where it was dumped by the Bradley Mining Company between the 1930s and 1950s.

Another 100,000 tons of waste dumped by Bradley would be moved from within the East Fork. That work would include bank stabilization to reduce erosion and downstream sedimentation.

The final 25,000 tons of waste would be moved away from areas near the confluence of Meadow Creek with the East Fork, according to plans by Perpetua, which has its headquarters in Boise.

The work was authorized last year by an agreement with the Forest Service and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which worked with Perpetua to plan the clean-up work.

The agreement allows Perpetua to clean up mining waste left from operations during World War II and the Korean War without inheriting liability for the waste.

About 5% of old waste at Stibnite would be cleaned up under the EPA agreement. More clean-up work could be done if Perpetua is allowed to operate a gold and antimony mine at the site.

All work outlined by the agreement will be paid for and conducted by Perpetua, but overseen by the EPA and other regulatory agencies.

The agreement has no effect on the Payette National Forest’s permitting process for the company’s proposed mine about 14 miles southeast of Yellow Pine.

Potential water quality improvements resulting from clean-up work outlined in the agreement are not factored into water studies in the Payette’s study of the project.

The soonest a decision could be made on the project is December 2023, according to the Payette Forest, the lead permitting agency.

The Process

Perpetua began exploration for its Stibnite proposal in 2009 under the General Mining Law of 1872, which allows anyone to stake claims to minerals discovered on federal public lands.

In 2016, an operating plan was submitted to the Payette forest, the lead agency on a permitting process that requires 50 different permits from local, state and federal agencies before mining can begin.

The mine would operate on about 1,425 acres within the Payette Forest, which requires the proposal to be reviewed under the National Environmental Policy Act.

The federal law requires all projects that could affect land, water, wildlife or other public resources to be studied to assess environmental consequences.

In 2020, the Payette released an environmental study of four project designs and existing site conditions. Later that year, Perpetua submitted project changes to the Payette.

The Payette is now studying the updated mining plan and an alternative plan that would use existing roads for mine traffic instead of building new roads.

Perpetua’s proposal could be denied if the Payette finds that significant harm to natural resources cannot be avoided under any project alternative.

source: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
—————

Public Lands:

USDA Forest Service Seeks Public Comments on the Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Stibnite Gold Project

McCall, Idaho, October 28, 2022 – The Payette and Boise National Forests are seeking comments on the Perpetua Resources (formerly Midas Gold Idaho, Inc,) proposed Stibnite Gold Project supplemental draft environmental impact statement (SDEIS). The SDEIS can be found on the project webpage at (link)
and is available today, October 28, 2022.

In addition to the formal commenting period, the Payette and Boise National Forests will be host public meetings. Public meetings are scheduled for:

· December 6, 2022: McCall Idaho, Best Western Plus Lodge, 211 South 3rd Street; 5:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

· December 7, 2022: Cascade, Idaho, American Legion Hall, 105 W. Mill Street; 5:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

· December 9, 2022: Boise, Idaho, Holiday Inn Express Airport, 3050 South Shoshone Street; 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

The SDEIS updates information from the draft environmental impact statement released in August of 2020, and the notice of intent originally published on June 5, 2017. The SDEIS analyzes project design changes made by Perpetua Resources and provides additional information on project-related amendments to the Payette and Boise National Forest’s Land & Resource Management Plans that may be needed.

The Stibnite Gold Project is a surface mining project proposed by Perpetua Resources. The project is located east of McCall, Idaho, in Valley County, on the Payette National Forest, with a portion of the project on the Boise National Forest. Approximately 500 acres of patented mining claims and 2,900 acres of unpatented claims are involved.

The Forest Service is preparing an environmental impact statement under the National Environment Policy Act as required by law. Preliminary issues identified can be referenced in the project document.

Perpetua Resources is estimating a project life of approximately 21-28 years, including redevelopment and construction (2-3 years), mining and processing (12-15 years), initial closure and reclamation (2-3 years), and post-closure and monitoring (5-7 years). Their plan of operations proposes surface mining and recovery of gold, silver, and antimony. Additional details of the full mining plan can be found in the project document.

The forest supervisor cannot categorically prohibit Perpetua Resources operations proposed on National Forest System lands and conducted pursuant to the General Mining Act of 1872. Forest Service Locatable

Mineral Regulations at 36 CFR 228, subpart A requires the agency to review and approve a plan of operations that includes reasonable terms and conditions to minimize adverse environmental impacts, including requirements for reclamation and complies with all applicable federal and state laws.

How to Comment and Timeframe

The Environmental Protection Agency published a notice of availability for the supplement draft environmental impact statement in the Federal Register on October 28, 2022. The publication of the notice of availability initiates the public involvement process for the SDEIS. Public comments may be submitted to the Payette National Forest via electronic commenting, hand-delivery and by mail concerning this action for 75 days.

The preferred method to submit comments is electronically via the project webpage and can be submitted to: (link).
Simply click on “how to comment” on the right side of the page and fill out the web form with your comments.

Written comments must be submitted to Linda Jackson, Forest Supervisor, Stibnite Gold Project, Payette National Forest, 500 North Mission Street Building 2, McCall, Idaho 83638 or by fax to 208-634-0744. The office business hours for those submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 am to 4:30 pm Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.

All comments must have an identifiable name attached or verification of identity will be required. A scanned signature may serve as verification on electronic comments. For objection eligibility each individual or representative from each entity submitting timely and specific written comments regarding the proposed project must either sign the comments or verify identity upon request.

All comments received will be published with authorship information in the public reading room on the project webpage. Only those who submit timely and specific written comments regarding the proposed project during a public comment period established by the responsible official are eligible to file an objection.

The project file is posted on the Payette National Forest web site at: (link).
For additional information, please contact Brian Harris, Payette National Forest Public Affairs Officer, 208-634-6945, brian.d.harris@usda.gov

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Tribal Liaison
DFO – Southwest Idaho RAC
Payette National Forest
—————-

Critter News:

Boise resident’s dog taken from backyard by wild animal

by CBS2 News Staff Friday, October 28th 2022

Idaho Fish and Game Southwest Region staff received a report Monday morning from a Boise resident that their dog had been taken from their back yard on Sunday by a wild animal.

The resident stated that after letting their 18-pound miniature labradoodle out, they went to get the dog and found a blood trail leading up over a 4-foot retaining wall and to the open foothills.

A Fish and Game Conservation Officer investigated the area and found bobcat and coyote tracks and a collar left about 100 yards from the residence.

continued 
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho finds another deer with chronic wasting disease

October 24, 2022 Local News 8

The first confirmed case this year of chronic wasting disease has been detected in a deer in Idaho County in north-central Idaho, state wildlife officials said.

Idaho Fish and Game on Friday said a white-tailed deer found dead along the side of the road tested positive for the disease. The agency said the cause of the deer’s death is unknown.

continued 
— — — — — — — — — —

‘Bird flu’ infects flock of domestic geese south of McCall

Disease is carried by wild birds, harmless to humans

By Max Silverson The Star-News October 27, 2022

Christie Grob noticed something was wrong when one of her geese was acting strange and holding her eyes closed. A week later, nearly half of her 30-bird flock was dead.

On Oct. 19, her veterinarian received test results confirming the birds had become infected with highly pathogenic avian influenza, also known as “bird flu.”

The disease is carried by many wild birds and is deadly to domestic birds, but cases in humans is rare.

Grob, who lives about five miles south of McCall, raised geese, chickens, ducks and pigeons. Because of the positive test result, the rest of the flock had to be killed.

No domestic birds can be raised on the property for about four months, according to Idaho Department of Agriculture rules.

… The case marks the first case of the virus in Valley County, said Idaho State Department of Agriculture Deputy State Veterinarian Dr. Christie Hammons.

continued 
— — — — — — — — — —

Turkey troubles: Local farmers explain multiple factors impacting this year’s turkey supply

By: Nicole Camarda Oct 27, 2022 KIVI

Thanksgiving is four weeks away and due to the recent cases of bird flu, plus inflation and weather changes, turkey farmers are left with not as many turkeys as normal.

Cabalo’s Orchard and Garden in Kuna is one of the main local farms in the Treasure Valley that offers locally grown turkeys each year for Thanksgiving.

“We started off the year as normal at our normal time with 600 birds. They had not even left the rooting barn yet, and the bird flu came into the area,” owner Cathy Cabalo said.

continued 
—————

Fish and Game News:

State of Deer and Elk: Counting herds, and how hunters help through mandatory hunter reports

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, October 26, 2022

Biologists use a variety of methods to know the health of the herds, and hunters play an important role

Deer and elk live throughout Idaho in habitats ranging from desert to mixed conifer forests, and a big part of a wildlife manager’s job is to estimate how many are out there.

What role do hunters play in that?

continued 
— — — — — — — — — —

Returned nonresident big game tags go on sale Nov. 3 and are available to residents as second tags

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Friday, October 28, 2022

A list of available tags will be listed on Nov. 1 on the Nonresident License and Tag webpage

Fish and Game will sell returned nonresident, general-season big game tags starting at 10 a.m. MDT on Nov. 3. Tags can be purchased on a first-come, first-served basis at Fish and Game offices during normal business hours, at license vendors, online at (link)
GoOutdoorsIdaho.com
or by calling (800) 554-8685.

A list of available tags will be listed on Nov. 1 on the Nonresident License and Tag webpage. A reminder that returned controlled hunt tags cannot be purchased as second tags.

continued 
— — — — — — — — — —

Know the difference between a bull elk and bull moose before you squeeze the trigger

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, October 27, 2022

In almost all of the state’s elk zones, there is a possibility that elk hunters could encounter a moose while out in the field

Know your target. That’s one of the first rules taught in hunter education curriculums in every state. Yet, every year, a small percentage of hunters ignore this principal — or possess very poor observation skills — and down an unintended big game animal.

With the general elk season upon us, Fish and Game officials are reminding elk hunters to “know their target” before pulling the trigger, especially if there are moose in the area.

continued 
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Seasonal Humor:

HalloweenCatPumpkin-a
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Idaho History Oct 30, 2022

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News February 18, 1905

courtesy Idaho State Historical Society

[Note: to view the old ads, turn off your ad blocker. There are no commercial ads on this page. Click an ad to start a slide show.]


(link to larger size image of banner)

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News

Roosevelt, Idaho February 18, 1905 Volume 1 Number 10

19050218Pg1-banner

19050218Pg1-headline1
Ramey Ridge
One of the many Districts in the Vicinity of Thunder Mountain which Has a Brilliant Future
By Jack Cassel

A great deal has been written of Thunder Mountain and her many properties, while but little has been told of her surrounding camps or tributaries. Ramey Ridge, of which I am about to write is but one of many of the good things of Idaho county, which in time, with the advent of wagon roads and transportation facilities, and last but not least, legitimate and practical methods, will astonish the world.

As one travels down Monumental Creek in a northwesterly direction from Thunder Mountain, about the time he reaches the confluence of that stream with Big Creek, at a distance of 25 miles, if he be a man of “formation” he will notice the change in formation and he will say to himself or perhaps those why may be fortunate to be with him, “Here is the place to prospect” or “This country looks good to me” for his past experience teaches him that there is a great possibility of finding ore there. You see the formation which incase [sic] the veins of the great veins of gold bearing rock of the world, viz.: The quartzites, diorites, chists, pegmatites and porphyries asserted with that kind of all primeval formations, granite, which change looks good to a prospector from Thunder Mountain. Ramey Ridge proper, at present, is that district between the head of Ramey and Beaver Creeks, the heart of which is about 35 miles in a northwesterly direction from Roosevelt. The elevation is 8,500 feet above sea level.

The first locations made on Ramey Ridge were those known as the Tip Top group, and were made by Butcher and Cassett in the summer of 1903. They discovered and opened up a vein of gold bearing quartz ten feet wide which carried values assaying from $5 to $50 per ton in gold.

This group consists of three full claims or about 62 acres, at the head of the West Fork of Mulligan creek. At the present time the development work consists of a shaft 60 feet deep and a tunnel 100 feet driven on the vein. The breast of this tunnel shows a well defined vein 14 feet wide having a granite hanging wall and pegmatite foot wall. The trend of the vein is east and west and it has a dip to the north of about 35 degrees. The values range from $15 to $75.

The second locations were those made by Thos. Lynch, Jr., Chas. Mahon and L. G. Stephenson of the Little Gem and Gold Bug groups. The Little Gem group consists of six claims and the Gold Bug group of eight claims.

The Little Gem group is situated on the divide between Mulligan and Beaver creeks. The present development work on this property consists of a tunnel 40 feet driven on the vein which discloses a well defined vein between walls, 12 feet in width, with values ranging from $3 to $150 per ton in gold. The character of the quartz is the same as that of the Tip Top group and the walls are the same.

On the Gold Bug group which has the extension of the Tip Top vein, the development work consists of a 36 foot shaft on the vein and an 80 foot crosscut tunnel. At the bottom of the shaft is disclosed a well defined vein 11 feet wide, which averages $8 per ton in gold. Some very rich specimens have been taken from this vein which would assay better than $1000 per ton.

The Mildred group was the next location made by Thomas and Herzog and consists of five claims located at the head of East Mulligan creek. This property [page torn] most excellent showing and a large well defined vein of oxidized quartz is exposed in the workings. A tunnel of 40 feet, driven on the ledge and numerous open cuts have been made on the surface disclosing the vein in place. The vein is about ten feet wide and assays have been had ranging from $4 to $1800 per ton. Some very rich free gold specimens have been taken from this property.

In the spring of 1904, M. B. Merritt and Geo. Sheppard in following up the snow, discovered a “big thing” when they located the Florence A group of five claims adjoining the Mildred group on the south. This is a parallel vein or veins to the Mildred vein and they have uncovered the veins for a distance of 2500 feet. The south vein or large vein is from 10 to 15 feet wide. Running parallel and 100 feet north is a small vein, which varies from 6 inches to 2 feet in width. The average values obtained from numerous samples taken from these veins shows $10 per ton in gold. I might say here that owing to the locations of this group as well as the Mildred group as to the sun exposure and situated as to drainage the conditions are very favorable tor deep oxidization and it is probably that the oxidized zone will extend to a vertical depth of at least 500[?] feet from the surface. This property is well situated. As to the development or owing to the abruptness of the mountain a tunnel can be driven on these veins which in 1000 feet would give them a vertical depth of 700 feet. At the present time practically only the necessary location work has been done but it is the intention of the owners, the coming summer, to do considerable development work on the property. They have quite a number of other locations in the camp, all of which show ell defined veins in place, carrying values in gold, but lack of space prevents me from going further into details regarding them.

On the divide between Mulligan & Beaver creeks and adjoining the Gold Bug group on the east is situated the Big Four group of four claims located and owned by Sam Martin, a large ledge about 40 feet in width is exposed here which assays from $5 to $20 per ton in gold. Very little work out of the necessary location has been done but it is the intention of the owner to do considerable development work the coming summer.

Adjoining and on the west side of the Gold Bug group is the Badger group of four claims located and owned by George Barnes. Here is also a promising showing. The workings expose a well defined vein between porphyry and granite, about 30 feet wide, that assays from $3 to $15 per ton in gold. This vein has been opened up for a distance of 1000 feet on the surface by various shafts and cross-cuts.

Adjoining the Mildred group on the north is the Santa Rosa group of four claims owned by Jas. C. Cawley. This property shows a well defined vein of gold bearing quartz 6 feet wide which assays from $6 to $40 per ton in gold. Only the necessary location work has been done on this claim.

R. D. Almond has a good thing in the Schley claim which adjoins and is an extension of the Florence A vein on the east. He has a well defined vein 6 feet wide which assays $8 per ton in gold. He also has a very promising showing on the 20th Century No. 1 which adjoins the Mildred on the east and appears to be an extension of that vein. The workings disclose a well defined vein of gold bearing quartz 5 feet wide and also a parallel vein 4 feet in width. Assays taken from these veins returned from $4 to $12 per ton in gold. The formation being in granite and pegmatite.

On the divide between Mulligan and Ramey creeks Yates and McGregor are the locators and owners of a very promising group of claims on which considerable development work has been done in the way of several tunnels and crosscuts and they have opened up several large and well defined veins of gold quartz. These assays I am told have been more than satisfactory, running from $3 to as high as $300 per ton in gold.

Near the head of Beaver creek and on the west side Goldman and Lyden have located a large group of claims and have been amply rewarded by discovering and opening up several veins of gold bearing quartz. A 6 foot vein disclosed in one of their tunnels returned an average assay of $28 per ton from 36 assays.

Dan McInerney and L. A. Wayland have some of the good things of the district. On the Gem No. 1 and Gem No. 2 which adjoin the Florence A claim on the south they have opened up a well defined vein betwren walls of granite and pegmatite about 8 feet in width. Assays from this gave returns from $5 to $38 per ton in gold.

On the 4th of July, Nos. 1 and 2, they have also opened up a strong ledge of gold bearing quartz 6 feet wide which gave returns of from $4 to $25 per ton in gold.

They also have a very promising showing on the 88 No. 1 and 88 No. 2 which is situated between the West Fork of the Northwest Fork of Ramey creek. They have opened up a vein here from 4 to 8 feet wide in several places along the vein. Assays from this ledge gave a return of from $7 to $18 per ton. They intend to do extensive work the coming summer and are certainly justified in doing so by the strong surface showing on the various properties.

There are a number of other promising locations in the camp but for the present these mentioned will suffice. There is an abundance of water for mill and power purposes as well as an inexhaustible supply of timber for mining purposes.

One of the great draw backs to this new district is the lack of transportation facilities, but with the advent of the wagon road to Roosevelt it is but a question of time when it will be continued on to the Ramey Ridge. Legitimate mining capital is needed badly there but that is bound to come. In my mining experience through Colorado, Black Hills, Alaska and Central Idaho I have never seen surface showing that can compare with those of Ramey Ridge and to me it has all the “ear marks” of becoming the greatest cold camp in the state of Idaho and I am sure that with the assistance of capital that this assertion will be borne out by the production of the “yellow metal” within the next three years. Watch Ramey Ridge and to all mining men who desire legitimate investments I will say “Go and see for yourself” and I assure them that they will be amply repaid for the trouble in getting there by the immense ore bodies exposed and above all it is “quartz.”
— — — —

Messrs. Wertz and Whitaker, who are working at the Standard mine, were down Wednesday and say that the mine is showing up better than ever.
— — — —

19050218Pg1-headline2
Welcome Visitors
5,000 Pounds of Freight Arrived in Roosevelt on the 14th Inst.

Al Kreps and Al Wood arrived in town Tuesday night with the automatic tramway grips and hangers for the great Sunnyside mine and mill. They stopped over night in town and with the assistance of the good people of the district celebrated St. Valentine’s day in good shape. Wednesday morning bright and early they pulled their freight for the mine, about four miles from town.

Mr. Kreps brought in sixteen horses and three sleighs loaded with five thousand pounds of freight besides feed, grub, and camping outfit. This was not only a sight that suggested business but it was beautiful as well. The sixteen big fat horses wearing snowshoes walking on top of the snow pulling their heavy load with all ease, exhibiting so much intelligence as any sixteen men could, was the cynosure of all eyes. Mr. Kreps returned Thursday to the transfer after another load. By the time he gets back to the mine with the second load he thinks that the ore crusher will be at the transfer (that is in about seven or eight days) ready to be brought in.

The Sunnyside company was so well pleased with the result of the mill run, made prior to the breakdown of the tramway, that it has spared neither pains nor expense to repair the break in order to go ahead with the work. Supt. Abbott thinks that the tramway and mill will start up again not later than the first of April.

The company has a mountain of milling ore in sight and as soon as it can will proceed to reduce it. This will give employment to probably one hundred men. The company has a good mine and knows it and is acting accordingly. It has no stock for sale. The company has two towns on its works. Sunnyside at the mine and Belleco at the mill. They are three miles apart by the wagon road, one and a half by the tramway.
— — — —

Mr. Frost, “Scottie” as he is familiarly known in the town, is in a bad way o far as health is concerned. He is suffering with something to the throat in the nature of a cancer. He has been in the camp for three years and has made many friends who will hate to see him leave, but for the fact that his leaving will be a benefit to himself, it is to be hoped that his health will improve and that he will be back soon. Mr. Frost left with Al Kreps Thursday morning.
— — — — — — — — — —

Page 2

19050218Pg2-header

19050218Pg2-headline1
A Warning

While the News does not claim to know everything or to have sense enough to advise anyone on general principles, yet it feels that there is a duty incumbent upon it to warn all who contemplate buying property in this district against such extravagant claims as have been made concerning the camp. There is no place in this camp where a man can load a four-mule team with pure gold, not is there any claim in the district where a man can load a wagon with ore that would average fifty dollars per ton, but there are mountains of ore here that will assay from $10 to $30 per ton and this is good enough. It is wonderful that the people can be made to believe such false statements. The bonafide prospectors and miners of this district do not want it misrepresented. The truth is all that is needs to make it the best camp in the United States.

People in the east who think of buying property in Thunder Mountain would do well to get some reliable man to investigate the property and report on it. There are plenty of honest men here who would be willing to give any outsider all the information he would need in order to enable him to invest his money intelligently. Some of the reports sent out by unprincipled men (of the get rich quick stripe) are calculated to injure rather than benefit the camp. They are not only enemies of the men in the East, whom they bleed, but they are enemies of the camp. Regard not their extravagant statements but come and see for yourselves.
— — — —

The other day a lot of the most prominent business men of New York City declared themselves opposed to the enlargement of the powers of the inter-state commerce commission. Of course they were dominated by the railroads, but President Roosevelt has determined to give the commission the power to regulate freight rates in spite of the people of his own city, and there is little doubt of his final triumph. Surely the time has come “when a man’s worst enemies shall be those of his own household.” His best friends are to be found in the party that opposed his election. Whether the President succeeds in all of his undertakings or not, remains to be seen, but he has certainly brought the Standard Oil people to their senses. They have made about three reductions in so many months.
— — — —

The Czar has wisely concluded to put off his encroachments on China while the grape shots are flying so thick around his winter palace in St. Petersburgh. He has something else to do at present and is doing it. He is moving himself and family to Copenhagen. The best thing that he could do for Russia would be to stay there until he can make peace with Japan, and then frame a government at home that his people can live under. He has more enemies at home than he has in Japan. It is reported now, sub rosa, of course, that General Kuropatkin is trying to negotiate peace with General Oyama.
— — — —

Samuel Wilson, better known as “Profile Sam,” one of the best known miners in the Thunder Mountain district, the discoverer of the famous Glasgow and Dundee claims, has been judged insane and has been take from Warrens to Blackfoot. Wilson has been acting queerly for some time but lately has become violent. He received considerable money for his mines a year or so ago, but it is all gone now. He was a heavy drinker. Ellis, who brought him out, is his partner in mining property.
— — — —

What Roosevelt needs more than anything else that we can think of at present is a bank. There is an immense amount of business done in this district and it is nearly all done with checks, which makes it very annoying and disagreeable. There is certainly business enough done here to justify some live man in putting one in this spring.
— — — —

Paris has the biggest debt of any city in the world. It amounts to $400,000,000.
— — — —

19050218Pg2-headline2
Will Build a Temple

The Grangeville Free Press:

The Knights of Pythias of this city are figuring on the erection of a fine hall during the coming year. Efforts are now being made to negotiate for a valuable piece of property on Main street and if secured a brick lodge room costing $7000 or $8000 will be erected. Grangeville has her full share of fraternal societies and is greatly in need of more lodge rooms as meeting night are now often conflicting.
— — — —

The “Ads” in these columns represent the State Lines, Wayhouses, etc., with rodometer distances from Boise and Emmett to Roosevelt.
— — — —

— — — — — — — — — —

Page 3

19050218Pg3-header

19050218Pg3-headline1
An Important Decision

The Supreme Court of Utah recently handed down a decision that is of the utmost importance to the mining interests of that and other states; a synopsis of which was published by the Mining World:

According to the decision the construction and operation of roads and tramways for the development of mines is a public use, and the statute which gives the right to condemn such property by right of eminent domain is declared to be constitutional. The opinion handed down says among other things that the construction and operation of irrigating ditches in Utah has been held to be a public use; therefore, “since the mining industry is second in importance to the people that the coal as well as other hidden resources of the state be opened up and developed and that the mining industry in general, which has been the source of so much wealth to the people of this and other Western States, be conducted on the same extensive scale in the future that has characterized its operations in the past,” it is “therefore the public policy of the state to encourage the people to open up and exploit the mines with which the state abounds, and thereby not only give to the state the wealth which will enable other industries to be created, but furnish thousands of laborers with renumerative [sic] employment.”

It is well to say in connection herewith that it is and should be also the “public policy” of this state o assist and encourage the mining industry in this state by enacting a systematic state roads law; and such law so provided that branch roads could be built into different mining districts (to give an outlet for the products of that district), and yet connect with and form a part of the state systems of public highways.

These branch roads would benefit the entire public, and would not become in any sense a private road, for a main road opened into any new mining district would help many mining companies into speedy development. Such a road would materially assist the lumbering and other industries in that particular district as well, and it would mean an outlet for a great wealth of natural products.

The returns which the state and its citizens will receive from the money spent in building such roads would be many times greater than the original costs of such roads, and must not be considered as a piece of charity work in any sense. It is a good business proposition for the state to encourage mining as well as any other industry of this state; for there is no other industry with greater possibilities in wealth production that that of mining.
— — — —

Mr. Van Welch, the proprietor of the Wellington Cafe, is having sawdust hauled from the 20th Century mill preparatory to putting up ice for the summers use. Van thinks that there is nothing like keeping cool in warm weather and keeping warm in cool weather.
— — — —

— — — — — — — — — —

[Note: Only 3 pages of this paper were available.]

source: Idaho State Historical Society
Link to Page 1
Link to Page 2
Link to Page 3
—————————

Further Reading

Link to Thunder Mountain and Roosevelt index page
Link: Public folder with images of the old newspapers
—————–

Road Reports Oct 30, 2022

Note: The high country received heavy snow earlier this week. Travel at your own risk.

Please share road reports. Most back country roads are not maintained. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road. Do NOT rely on your GPS.

Yellow Pine: Most of the recent snow has melted except in the shade, local streets are mostly bare now. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open with delays for construction.
Update from ITD August 26, 2022: Starting Tuesday, September 6, the Smiths Ferry project will transition to the fall construction schedule. Drivers should plan for one-way alternating traffic with 15-minute delays, Monday through Friday and weekends as needed.
Crews will start paving work on September 6. Drivers can expect a gravel highway surface for a few weeks, and the first layer of asphalt completed by the end of September.
To learn more about the construction schedule, visit link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 26) mail truck driver reports about 4″ of snow on the road going over Big Creek summit.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
No current report, likely the lower part of the road is bare by now.
Oct 26: Likely heavy snow in the higher elevations.
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
No current report. Probably bare or tracks through the old snow.
Oct 26: Likely snow covered this morning on the upper end.
Last report Friday (Oct 6) road is not too bad, gets a little rough on the YP end.

Johnson Creek Road: Open? – Travel at own risk.
Report Wednesday (Oct 26) Mail truck driver reports about 9″ of snow at Landmark.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open? Travel at own risk.
Oct 26: Likely snow on the summit.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open? Travel at own risk.
Report Sunday (Oct 30) “Many tracks over, plus snow settled into better than the rotten stuff at first. A slidey near the top as usual. Yesterday 1 (experienced) pickup got over w/o chains or studs, another had studs, ours had chains, then our quad w chains hauled us both back in great. Trailers would be dicey, 3 turned back yesterday after 1 unhooked to try the road and got in the ditch (N side) b4 switchback; there are at least 8 places people have tussled with the ditch, esp Tucker Point (S), even tracked quads.” – CP
Report Friday (Oct 28) a foot of snow at Profile. Truck tracks on the BC side and UTV tracks on the YP side.
Report Sunday (Oct 23) “11” on Profile Summit at 4pm today. Two 4WD trucks over summit, one with chains. Dicey from BC Culvert to summit. One 12” tree down by Belvedere.” – MG
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open? Travel at your own risk.
Heavy snow the morning of Oct 26th.
Report Saturday (Oct 22) “Elk Summit had substantially more snow and deeper drifts. Some drifts over two ft deep at Goldman’s Cut.” – SA
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open – road plowed by Perpetua Resources.
Old report: road graded during the first 2 weeks of June. No current repot.
Starting in July cleanup work at Stibnite will “cause some delay in travel through the area, it won’t be closed but there will be flaggers.”
“There will still be a lot of traffic coming through for the next 1.5 years while the “Burnt Log Route” is being built, a lot of the equipment will have to come in on the burnt log route so until then JC and the current Stibnite route will be used.”
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open? Travel at own risk.
Oct 26: Likely heavy snow.
Report Oct 8: “Road over the summit is very rough, especially nearing Stibnite.” – CP
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Open – Travel at own risk.
Oct 26: Likely heavy snow.
Report from Deadwood Outfitters Saturday (Oct 22) Snow at the summit.

Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Landmark to Stanley: Open? Travel at own risk.
Oct 26: Likely heavy snow.

Warren Wagon Road: Open? – Travel at own risk.
Oct 26: Summits likely have heavy snow. No report on current conditions.

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:
————-

Road Reports Oct 26, 2022

Note: The high country received heavy snow this morning.

Please share road reports. Most back country roads are not maintained. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road. Do NOT rely on your GPS.

Yellow Pine: Wednesday morning Yellow Pine received 4 inches of new snow. Streets are snow covered but starting to settle early afternoon. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open with delays for construction.
Various reports of black ice early this morning (Oct 26.)
ITD Update Oct 19: IDT is wrapping up the project to repave State Highway 55 between Round Valley Road and Clear Creek in Valley County.
Update from ITD August 26, 2022: Starting Tuesday, September 6, the Smiths Ferry project will transition to the fall construction schedule. Drivers should plan for one-way alternating traffic with 15-minute delays, Monday through Friday and weekends as needed.
Crews will start paving work on September 6. Drivers can expect a gravel highway surface for a few weeks, and the first layer of asphalt completed by the end of September.
To learn more about the construction schedule, visit link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 26) mail truck driver reports about 4″ of snow on the road going over Big Creek summit. .
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Oct 26: Likely heavy snow in the higher elevations.
Last report Friday (Oct 6) road is clear, hunting traffic.
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Oct 26: Likely snow covered this morning on the upper end.
Last report Friday (Oct 6) road is not too bad, gets a little rough on the YP end.

Johnson Creek Road: Open? – Travel at own risk.
Report Wednesday (Oct ) Mail truck driver reports about 9″ of snow at Landmark this morning and snowing hard.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open? Travel at own risk.
Oct 26: Likely heavy snow on the summit.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open? Travel at own risk.
Oct 26: Likely heavy snow today.
Report Sunday (Oct 23) “11” on Profile Summit at 4pm today. Two 4WD trucks over summit, one with chains. Dicey from BC Culvert to summit. One 12” tree down by Belvedere.” – MG
Report Saturday (Oct 22) “Profile Summit had continuous snow floor from Missouri Ridge Trailhead to two miles north of the Big Creek culvert, with about 8 inches on top. Drifts in excess of one ft deep on the north side of the pass.” – SA


photos courtesy Scott Amos
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open? Travel at your own risk.
Heavy snow the morning of Oct 26th.
Report Saturday (Oct 22) “Elk Summit had substantially more snow and deeper drifts. Some drifts over two ft deep at Goldman’s Cut.” – SA
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open – watch for heavy equipment traffic.
Old report: road graded during the first 2 weeks of June. No current repot.
Starting in July cleanup work at Stibnite will “cause some delay in travel through the area, it won’t be closed but there will be flaggers.”
“There will still be a lot of traffic coming through for the next 1.5 years while the “Burnt Log Route” is being built, a lot of the equipment will have to come in on the burnt log route so until then JC and the current Stibnite route will be used.”
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open? Travel at own risk.
Oct 26: Likely heavy snow.
Report Oct 8: “Road over the summit is very rough, especially nearing Stibnite.” – CP
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Open? – Travel at own risk.
Oct 26: Likely heavy snow.
Report from Deadwood Outfitters Saturday (Oct 22) Snow at the summit.

Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Landmark to Stanley: Open? Travel at own risk.
Oct 23: Likely heavy snow.

Warren Wagon Road: Open – Travel at own risk.
Oct 26: Summits likely have heavy snow. No report on current conditions.

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:
————-

Oct 23, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 23, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Note: If you are not receiving the YPTimes emails, check your spam folder.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
2022
May 15 thru Nov 30 – Firewood Season
June 1 – 6-day mail delivery starts
Oct 23 – YPFD Training at Stibnite
Oct 31 – Halloween
Nov 2 – Festival Committee meeting at 3pm
Nov 6 – Fall Back (Time Change)
Nov 27 – YPFD Meeting at 2pm
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Oct 23 – YPFD Training at Stibnite

We will be having Training Sunday Oct 23, 2022 at 11 AM, at Perpetua Resources, up at site with Dave Williams. Dave will be going over hazwoper refresher, and a rescue over the bank. We will meet at the fire house at 9:45 AM then head up to site together at 10 AM. Hope to see you Sunday.
Tim Rogers – Fire Chief
— — — —

Oct 31st – Halloween

(No events listed yet)
— — — —

Nov 2 – Festival Committee meeting

Next Meeting will be Wednesday, November 2, at 3:00pm at the Community Hall. The meeting purpose is to review what progress has been made so far and next steps
— — — —

Nov 6 – Fall Back (Time Change)

Sunday, November 6th: Time to change your clocks back an hour and replace the batteries in your smoke alarms.
— — — —

Nov 27, 2022, YPFD Meeting Sunday at 2pm
————

Village News:

News from The Corner

As many of you know Thechef Paddy is covering for us for a few months. His current hours are:
Thursday 4-9pm
Friday/Saturday: Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
Sunday Brunch: 9am – 1pm
— — — —

Fall Colors Oct 17

20221017YellowPineNorth-a
courtesy Eye-n-Sky
— — — —

Oct 19 – Rocky Mountain Mechanical

Levi and Robert from Rocky Mountain Mechanical came up from Emmett to service a furnace in Yellow Pine.

P1000784-20221019RMM
— — — —

Oct 20 – Rx Burn South Fork

We are looking at a potential for Rx fire along the South Fork in the Four Mile area as early as this weekend. No planned road closures – but be cautious with smoke in the area while traveling the roadway. – Brian Harris Payette National Forest

Map for PNF fall 2022 Rx burns

— — — —

Oct 21 – Perpetua Pig Roast 130pm

Perpetua Resources held a pig roast at the community hall on October 21st at 1:30pm. Feel free to bring a side dish to share!
— — — —

Oct 21-22 First “Winter” Storm

It started raining on Friday late in the afternoon. The power went out just before midnight and raining pretty good. By 10am Saturday morning we had received 0.78″ of rain, ridges and peaks socked in and it looked like the snow line was around 6500 feet. Must have been a heck of a storm, the Idaho Power recording listed towns from Pocatello to Boise with outages. Rain stopped here just before 11am. Power restored by 112pm.

YP Webcam Saturday evening
20221022YellowPineNorth-a
courtesy Eye-n-Sky

Big Creek Webcam Saturday evening
20221022BigCreekSW-a
courtesy Eye-n-Sky

Deadwood Summit Oct 22, 2022

shared by Deadwood Outfitters
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Watkins Pharmacy Update June 23rd

To the community: the insurance claims are ongoing… We are still working on the temporary pharmacy/store going in at Across the Tracks. We wish we could move everything along faster, but unfortunately we have no control over that as much as we wish we did! … Thank you for those who have reached out for updates. – Watkins Pharmacy
— — — —

Arnold Aviation News:

Arnold’s will no longer will offer grocery shopping services. (D9 now has online shopping – see below.) However, Arnolds will still pick up orders in Cascade from D9, auto parts, feed, and hardware, etc. for delivery to Yellow Pine. You will only be charged for freight from the Airport to YP.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
— — — —

D9 News:

You will be able to start ordering online directly from D9 on May 24th. Go to their website at link. Phone (208-382-4215) if you need assistance.

Orders must be placed before 10am Monday (Arnolds will pick up on Tuesday for Wednesday delivery.) It is important that upon checkout, you click the box marked “Gift” – and type in the order is for Arnolds to pick up and deliver to Yellow Pine. Otherwise they will think it is a local personal pickup.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

May 15 thru Nov 30 – Firewood Season

Firewood permits are available at The Corner.
— — — —

Notice – Yellow Pine Times Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
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Road News

Link: to current road reports. It is looking like winter in the high country.

Hwy 55 Update from ITD August 26, 2022
Starting Tuesday, September 6, the Smiths Ferry project will transition to the fall construction schedule. Drivers should plan for one-way alternating traffic with 15-minute delays, Monday through Friday and weekends as needed.
Crews will start paving work on September 6. Drivers can expect a gravel highway surface for a few weeks, and the first layer of asphalt completed by the end of September.
To learn more about the construction schedule, visit link:

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
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Critters

Be Wasp Wary

Long legged wasps are building nests under eves and any small crack they can enter under roofs, behind shutters, under propane tank lids and even inside truck mirrors.
* Wear light-colored, smooth-finished clothing.
* Avoid perfumed soaps, shampoos, and deodorants. …
* Wear clean clothing and bathe daily. …
* Wear clothing to cover as much of the body as possible.
* Avoid flowering plants when possible.
* Keep work areas clean
Check for wasp nests either early morning or late evening when it is cooler and they are less active.

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be wary of mosquitoes spreading West Nile Virus

* Wear repellent containing DEET, Picaridin or Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus (all EPA-approved repellents) according to the label.
* Remove standing water around your home – this is where mosquitoes like to breed.
* Cover up your skin with clothing between dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active.
* If you have livestock, also remember to change out their troughs every three days to keep the mosquito population down.

Be Elk and Deer Aware

It is spring “baby” season – watch your dogs, mama elk and deer can be very aggressive towards dogs. There have been a few dogs injured up here over the years.
Cows and Does are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Moose Aware

* Be aware of your surroundings and be especially careful around creeks and in areas with dense brush.
* Travel in groups whenever possible and make noise to alert animals to your presence.
* If you encounter a moose, give it lots of space and don’t approach it. Always keep dogs under control.
* If a moose charges or chases you, take cover behind something solid, such as a tree.
* In some situations, bear spray has been known to be an effective defense tool in moose encounters.
Fourth of July weekend traffic on Johnson Creek. One more reason to drive slow.

courtesy Yellow Pine FB group

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard. F&G confirms there is a pack of 6 wolves in our valley.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

courtesy YP resident

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat was hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Oct 21: The bins are really full. The doors close better now since the local guys worked on them. Road from YP to the dump is good.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

YPWUA Board resignation

It is with regret that I must inform the community that I have resigned my position on the Yellow Pine Water Users Association as of September 24, 2022. I had hoped to serve until the improvement projects were at least underway, but unexpected circumstances have precipitated my decision to leave the Board. Thank you to those community members who have trusted me to serve you in this important position and for your appreciated support.
– Willie Sullivan

YPWUA Grants

On August 27th many water users attended a presentation from Mountain Waterworks on the future of our water system. Many also called in on Zoom. The YPWUA Board, over the last three years, has worked alongside Mountain Water Works to obtain grants to replace our failing drinking water system.

Mountain Waterworks gave an excellent presentation on the status of our current system. The slow sand filters have been damaged by an earthquake and are cracked, our inlet water system is very crude and open to contamination, our chlorine injection building is below ground level and dangerous to our operator, it is also leaning and could fall into Boulder Creek, and our leaking distribution lines need to be replaced and increased in size.

We have been granted over 7 million dollars with the potential for additional no match money. Of that amount, the agencies granting this money are requiring the water users to repay $500,000 over a 30 year period. That amount is approximately $18.10 per month, per user or about an additional $217 per year. Mountain Waterworks explained that Yellow Pine is the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s number one priority for grants this year. Many communities in Idaho are fighting for this money for their projects. Yellow Pine received more money by population and also the lowest required payback of any community.

In 2007 the DEQ imposed a $100 per day fine on the YPWUA for not complying with the 1995 court order to repair our system. That fine was dropped by the court but a new date was established for 2026. If this project is not completed by 2026, that $100 Per day fine is reinstated. That calculates to $30 per month, per user, so we either pay $18.10 per month now and get our system fixed or pay $30 per month on fines and get nothing.

During discussion with those attending the meeting the group determined that we don’t have a choice. This project needs to be done to insure the community of Yellow Pine will continue to exist. The group was asked if there was objection to the project, by a show of hands, no one objected. So the board decided to approve this project.

Some at the meeting agreed to the additional costs but wanted to know if there was a way to pay either monthly or quarterly. We are in the process of looking into payment options.

Thank you,
YPWUA Board

Update: YP Water Users. Clarification regarding bids for facility and water lines improvements. Bids were considerably higher than expected and the work will NOT be started until grant money and users’ fees are adequate.

Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at (link).

Water Use

10/13/22 29548873 29762 24 1240 21 T 982
10/14/22 29579115 30242 24 1260 21 F 480
10/15/22 29610649 31534 24 1314 22 S 1292
10/16/22 29636874 26225 24 1093 18 S 5309
10/17/22 29661638 24764 24 1032 17 M 1461
10/18/22 29689144 27506 24 1146 19 T 2742
10/19/22 29727340 38196 24 1592 27 W 10690
10/20/22 29752061 24721 24 1030 17 T 13475
10/21/22 29775955 23894 24 996 17 F 827
10/22/22 29800088 24133 24 1006 17 S 239
10/23/22 29824573 24485 24 1020 17 S 352

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

As of April 17th 2020, Yellow Pine is under a “Boil Order”. This boil order will be in effect until further notice.

DRINKING WATER WARNING
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST. Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 10-10-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

Aug 27, 2022 Special Water Meeting 12pm at Community Hall
July 3, 2022 YPWUA 2022 Annual Shareholder Meeting (minutes to follow)
July 4, 2021 YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
July 5, 2020 YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
(vacant)
Tim Aldridge
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
Warren Drake – Water Operator
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VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association

I Lorinne Munn hereby resign as Treasurer of the Village of Yellow Pine Association on this day October 11, 2022 at 5:30 PM. Kat Amos has agreed to take over that position until the next election in 2024. I have agreed to assume the position of Chairman of the Village of Yellow Pine Association for the rest of that term, at the request of the other council members Josh Jones, Lynn Imel, and Rhonda Egbert.
Lorinne N. Munn

Notes from 10/12/22 Festival Committee Meeting

Josh explained his vision for the 2023 festival.

* 2022 was a baseline for future festivals
* In 2023
– looking to improve quality of the event;
– Bring in more funds;
– Be less dependent on local volunteers.
* Evolve the festival to gain support from the County level administration.

Josh requested committee members not discuss festival details that have not been finalized outside the committee, as it can end up setting expectations that don’t get met and costing more money.
Reviewed sections of how the festival work is broken down. Each section will need a lead; subsection team members will work with the lead.
Committee focus is on the tasks for October & November, of obtaining Sponsors/Donors.
Reviewed Sponsorship Tiers and Sponsor presentation.
Bill agreed to be lead on this section.
Work in each section can affect at least one or more of other sections – need to work as a whole team.
Kat agreed to be lead on the Committee Communication section. Kat will also do some research on possible security people.
Lorinne agreed to be lead on the Product Sales Section.
Deb agreed to be lead on the Financials section.
Ronda agreed to lead the Vetting process.
Next Meeting will be Wednesday, November 2, at 3:00pm at the Community Hall. The meeting purpose is to review what progress has been made so far and next steps.

Yellow Pine Community Hall General Use Procedures

Hall General Usage:
* All events must be scheduled through the Community Hall Committee and approved by the Committee Chairman
* No property shall be removed from the Community Hall without approval of the Community Hall Committee Chairman.
* Responsible alcohol usage is permitted.
* No smoking is allowed in the hall. Pick up any butts scattered outside.
* Building and grounds are not a storage area. Do not leave personal items in or around the Community Hall without approval of the Community Hall Committee Chairman.
* Notify a committee member if problems are encountered.

After each event using the hall:
* Sweep/vacuum hall floor and restroom floor
* Wipe down toilet
* Empty garbage cans and take garbage to the transfer station
* Fold tables
* Stack chairs
* Turn off lights, ceiling fans, heater (if applicable)
* Put away any kitchen items after they are cleaned

After each event using the kitchen:
* Sweep/mop kitchen floor
* Wash, dry, and store all used dishes, utensils, pans, coffee pots, etc.
* Clean and wipe down sinks
* Thoroughly clean griddles, if used, and turn off propane to griddles
* Remove any unused food/beverages from the refrigerators/freezers
* Clean up any spilled food or beverage
* Empty garbage cans and take garbage to the transfer station
* Notify a committee member if problems are encountered

Using the Community Hall and/equipment for non-Yellow Pine events:
* A refundable, $50 deposit is required seven (7) days prior to the event
* After the event, a Community Hall Committee member will inspect the premises prior to the deposit being refunded
* A $150/day donation is requested for the use of the Hall
* A $200/day donation is requested for the use of the Kitchen

No deposit or use donation is needed for use by Yellow Pine community members, committees, or groups.

Yellow Pine Community Hall Committee:
Rhonda Egbert – Chairman
Members: Ronda Rogers, Deb Filler, Hailey Harris

Village of Yellow Pine Association:
Lorinne Munn, Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Lynn Imel, Secretary
Kat Amos, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Joel Fields

Oct 12, 2022 Festival Committee Meeting minutes Link:
Sept 10, 2022 VYPA Meeting minutes (20220910VYPAAgenda-MinutesSummary.txt)
Aug 13, 2022 VYPA Meeting cancelled due to lack of quorum.
July 9, 2022 VYPA Meeting minutes Link:
June 11, 2022 VYPA Meeting minutes link:
April 6, 2022 Village Council meeting to fill vacant chairperson position (no minutes.)
Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.
2022 Meeting dates:
June 11
July 9
August 13
September 10

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Department

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Meeting Minutes
Sep 6, 2022 YPFD Budget Meeting (no minutes yet.)
Aug 16, 2022 VSCO After Action Report (plane crash) Link:
Aug 14, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Aug 5, 2022 YPFD Search and Rescue Mutual Aid Agreement Link:
Aug 3, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Special Meeting (no minutes yet)
May 29, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting (no minutes yet)
May 20, 2022 YPFD Meeting in Cascade with Forest Service (no minutes.)
Apr 3, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting Link: to Amended minutes
Feb 24, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD New Commissioner’s Transition Meeting Link:
Nov 23, 2021 – YPFD Special meeting Link:
Nov 8, 2021 – YPFD AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
Oct 31, 2021 – YPFD Special meeting Link:
Oct 14, 2021 – YPFD Special meeting Link:
Sep 27, 2021 – YPFD Special meeting Link:
Sep 18, 2021 – YPFD Special meeting Link:
Sep 11, 2021 – YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
Jul 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Jun 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sep 30, 2020 – YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 6, Sunday at 10am Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Our winter hours are:
Thursday 4-9pm
Friday/Saturday: Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner
Sunday Brunch: 9am – 1pm
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
The Tavern will remain closed for renovations until further notice.
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Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The General Store will be closed Mondays, and open Tuesday-Saturday 10-6pm. Sunday 10-3pm
The motel rooms and the laundry room are available 7 days per week. Email:
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Open
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Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $4/doz
No longer taking scrap metal
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:
Opened May 27, 2022 for Fly-ins

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: 1-800-427-4968
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Cascade:
Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
D9 Groceries: 208-382-4215 Website link to order:
Upon “checkout” click on “gift” and write “Arnolds to pick up and deliver to (your name) in Yellow Pine” so they know who will pick it up and where it goes.
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watkins can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
Please help support local journalism and subscribe.
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

J & R Septic
Cascade (208) 382-8727

Valley Roofing Idaho
Meridian (208) 830-4890 email:
Facebook:

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473) Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 17) overnight low of 26 degrees, no rain. This morning it was 28 degrees by 10am, clear sky and light frost. A few jays observed. Mostly clear at lunch time with strong sunshine. Warm and almost clear sky mid-afternoon (a few wisps of haze) with light breezes, high of 78 degrees. Clear sky and calm at dusk.

Tuesday (Oct 18) overnight low of 28 degrees, no rain. This morning it was 30 degrees by 10am, clear sky and too dry for much frost. A few jays around. Light early air traffic. Clear sky and strong sunshine at lunch time. Warm mid-afternoon, clear sky and light breeze, high of 80 degrees. Clear sky at sunset and calm.

Wednesday (Oct 19) overnight low of 28 degrees, no rain. This morning it was 30 degrees by 10am, almost clear sky (a few small clouds to the east) and dry – no frost. A few jays observed. Rocky Mountain Mechanical in YP to service furnaces. Strong sunshine at lunch time, slight haze of smoke. Warm mid-afternoon, clear blue sunny skies and light breeze, high of 77 degrees. Clear sky at dusk and slight breeze. Motorcycle traffic headed out.

Thursday (Oct 20) overnight low of 27 degrees, no rain. This morning it was 30 degrees by 10am, clear sky and dry (no frost) and haze of smoke. Steller jays visiting. Clear sky with strong sunshine at lunch time with a light haze of smoke. Warm and mostly cloudy mid-afternoon with light breezes, high of 77 degrees and haze of smoke. Helicopter in the area around 315pm. Afternoon traffic on main street. Gray overcast at dusk, slowly cooling off, haze of smoke and nearly calm.

Friday (Oct 21) 24-hour low of 30 degrees (from Thurs AM), no rain. This morning it was 36 degrees by 10am, about half cloudy/clear, light breezes and dry – no dew. A few jays around. Nearly overcast by lunch time, filtered sunlight and light breezes. Cool mid-afternoon, gray overcast and getting a bit breezy, high of 62F. A few sprinkles late afternoon, then light rain for about half an hour. Dark overcast and light rain at dusk. Power off/on 1132pm, then out at 1155pm. Raining pretty good at midnight. Rained all night.

Saturday (Oct 22) overnight low of 36 degrees, rain total from 630pm-10am = 0.78″. This morning it was 36 degrees by 10am, low overcast (ridges socked in) and still raining, snow line looks to be around 6500 feet. A bear or large black dog running across the golf course. Stopped raining by 11am. A pine squirrel and 3 hairy woodpeckers observed. Overcast at lunch time and chilly breezes. Power back on at 112pm. Overcast and cold light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 41 degrees. Broken overcast and chilly light breeze at sunset. Trace of snow fell (and melted) after dark.

Sunday (Oct 23) overnight low of 26 degrees. Snowed a fat trace earlier + rain = 0.02″ of water. This morning it was 28 degrees by 10am, broken overcast and light snow fell for about 30 minutes. A few jays around. Breaks in the clouds at lunch time and scattered sunshine. Spitting snow at 240pm. Overcast mid-afternoon, chilly light breezes and flaking snow but not sticking, high of 40 degrees. Thinning overcast at dusk.
—————-

RIP:

Kirtland K. Kitchen

Kirt Kitchen passed away October 13, 2022

Yellow Pine has lost another old-timer.
————-

Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 726 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 5 new deaths

October 19, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 726 new COVID-19 cases and 5 new deaths Wednesday. State-level case and hospital data are now being updated on the state dashboard on Wednesday excluding holidays.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 498,808.

The state said 51 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 18,402, and 5 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 3,091.

102,451 vaccine breakthrough cases have been reported.

5 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 5,1203.

continued:
— — — —

9 new Valley County COVID-19 cases reported in last week

By Tom Grote The Star-News October 20, 2022

A total of nine new cases of COVID-19 were reported in Valley County in the past week by the county’s two hospitals.

The nine new cases compared to 10 new cases reported the previous week and 20 new cases reported the prior week.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 3,217 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started in March 2020.

Spokespeople for both hospitals said the number of new reported cases are likely far lower than the actual number of new cases.

Both hospitals distribute home tests for COVID-19 and some patients may choose not to be tested, the spokespeople said.

Thirteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health since the start of the pandemic.

In Adams County, 16 deaths have been reported since the pandemic started, Southwest District Health reported.

A total of 615 cases of COVID-19 were reported this week in Adams County since the start of the pandemic, which is no increase over the previous week. the health department said.

Clinics & Tests – McCall

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine is now scheduling and administering Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccines for children 6 months and older. Parents or guardians can make appointments in MyChart.

Patients may now schedule bivalent mRNA COVID-19 vaccine boosters through MyChart or by calling St. Luke’s Connect, 208-381-9500.

According to new federal guidelines, St. Luke’s will no longer provide monovalent boosters. This includes the Pfizer booster for ages 5 and older and the Moderna booster for age 6 and older.

Schedule an appointment through MyChart at (link) or you can call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

Clinics & Tests – Cascade

Cascade Medical Center offers the Moderna Bivalent Booster on Tuesdays and Thursdays between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. at the center’s Family Medicine Clinic.

The vaccine is available to anyone 5 and older who has completed their primary vaccination series more than two months ago, has not had another booster within the past two months, and has not had COVID in the last three months. Call 208-382-4285 to schedule an appointment.

Take-Home Tests

Cascade Medical Center has take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital also provides free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

St. Luke’s McCall no longer offers take-home tests.

source: © Copyright 2009-2021 · Central Idaho Publishing Inc. · All rights reserved (used with permission.)
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H&W issues warning over L. Cascade algae

Dog dies, horse sickened after drinking tainted water

By Max Silverson The Star-News October 20, 2022

The death of a dog in Gem County and a horse that became sick has prompted health officials to warn people and animals to avoid Lake Cascade and the North Fork of the Payette River.

The agencies stopped short of issuing an official health advisory, which is only done when toxin levels in the water exceed a threshold that is harmful to people.

The dog’s death was linked to drinking water from the Payette River at the Plaza Bridge Recreation Area in Emmett, Idaho Department of Health and Welfare Public Information Officer Greg Stahl said.

The horse became sick after drinking from the river near the Cabarton Bridge south of Cascade and at an unknown location in Lake Cascade, Stahl said.

… The warning includes Lake Cascade, the North Fork and the main Payette River from between Cascade and Payette.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Eight earthquakes in Idaho in last 30 days

by CBS2 Staff Wednesday, October 19th 2022

There have been eight earthquakes in the last 30 days in Idaho with a magnitude 2.5 or higher.

All of them have been in the Sawtooth or Salmon River mountains in Central Idaho.

Idaho’s Public Health Preparedness and Response Section Manager, Denise Kern, says most of Central Idaho’s seismic activity consists of aftershocks following the magnitude 6.5 earthquake that shook the Stanley area on March 31st, 2020.

continued:
—————-

Fire Season:

Four Mile Rx

On Thursday, October 20, 2022, the Krassel Ranger District plans to do prescribed burning in the Four Mile project area. Aerial ignitions will last one day, although smoke and flames may present until the next significant weather or season ending event. Please be aware of your surroundings if driving or recreating in the area, watching for debris on roads and trails. Traffic delays along the South Fork Road (FSR 674) may occur during ignitions. See map below.

The purpose of the Four Mile Prescribed Fire project is to restore and maintain wildlife habitat with vegetative conditions that are within their historic fire regimes of mixed severity. Implementing the proposed action would help fulfill Forest Plan direction to retain and improve winter range habitat for elk, as well as to manage vegetation to enhance ecosystem resiliency and reduce the amount of hazardous fuels.

For further information or questions please call the Krassel District Office at 208-634-0600

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Tribal Liaison
DFO – Southwest Idaho RAC
Payette National Forest
— — — — — — — — — —

Special Report: Aftermath of the four corners fire

by Roland Steadham Sunday, October 16th 2022

An in-depth special report on the devastation of the four corners fire, covered by air and land by Chief Meteorologist Roland Steadham.

video:
— — — — — — — — — —

University of Idaho studies wildland firefighter’s nutritional needs

By: Nicole Camarda Oct 18, 2022 KIVI TV

Multiple wildfires burned in Idaho this year and some still continue to burn across the state. For months, firefighters have been trying to control them. Being a wildland firefighter seems to be turning into an around-the-clock job as more wildfires are burning year-round.

On top of the physical demands of wildland firefighters, they also need to make they are fueling themselves properly. A group from the University of Idaho teamed up to make sure while they are fighting these fires, they have the proper fuel and nutrition in mind.

“They were re-evaluating the large fire food contract and wanted a dietician perspective,” said Annie Roe, assistant professor and extension specialist and director of Eat Smart Idaho.

continued:
—————–

Public Lands:

Idaho officials approve easement to protect working timberlands

In all, the Idaho easements open 140 square miles to the public in perpetuity for recreation, free of charge.

Keith Ridler (AP), Associated Press October 19, 2022 KTVB

Idaho Gov. Brad Little and other statewide elected officials have approved a northern Idaho conservation easement as part of a program that has protected from development about 156 square miles (400 square kilometers) of private timberland.

The Republican governor and other Land Board members on Tuesday unanimously approved the deal giving Idaho the easement title to 166 acres (67 hectares) in northern Idaho under the federal Forest Legacy Program.

In return for the easement, the non-industrial family landowner, Hartland LLC, will receive a $275,000 payment. That money comes from the Land and Water Conservation Fund, a popular federal program that supports conservation and outdoor recreation projects across the country. The program is funded using royalties from offshore oil and gas drilling.

continued:
—————-

Critter News:

Elk population healthy as any-weapon season opens

by CBS2 News Staff Monday, October 17th 2022

Idaho’s general, any-weapon elk seasons are getting underway. Idaho Fish and Game report that elk herd populations are healthy and stable throughout most of the state, and hunters should look forward to plenty of elk.

Elk populations tend to swing less drastically than deer, and last year marked eight straight years with elk harvest numbers topping 20,000. That has only happened one other time on record, back in the 1930s.

Fish and Game Deer/Elk Coordinator Toby Boudreau believes this trend will continue this fall for elk. “Elk populations are stable-to-increasing. With better science and more camera estimates, I think we are trending to more elk than we’ve ever seen in Idaho,” says Boudreau.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Bull moose removed from neighborhood in American Falls

October 19, 2022 Local News 8

A large moose has been relocated after it was found wandering around an American Falls neighborhood Tuesday.

Idaho Fish and Game says the American Falls Police Department and the Power County Sheriff’s Office were able to coral the roughly 1,000 pound animal.

Then fish and game showed up and tranquilized it and took it to a better, remote location to be released.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Alligator caught in New Plymouth Thursday

By Cooper Waytenick Oct 21, 2022 KIVI TV


Photo by: Idaho Fish and Game

An alligator was caught in New Plymouth Thursday and taken in by Idaho Fish and Game.

According to Idaho Fish and Game, a New Plymouth resident was walking down a road Thursday night and saw something moving in the brush. After identifying the animal as an alligator, the resident caught the animal and held it until Fish and Game was able to retrieve it from them.

The Alligator is about 3 and a half feet long.

source:
—————-

Fish and Game News:

10 tips for firearm handling safety while out hunting this fall

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Tuesday, October 18, 2022

While firearm accidents are rare, human error or inattention is the leading cause

Statistics from the National Shooting Sports Foundation show that hunting with firearms is actually one of the safest recreational activities in the country. That’s not to say that accidents can’t happen, and practicing safe firearm handling can greatly reduce the risk.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Hunting doesn’t just happen in the mountains…it starts in your closet

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, October 20, 2022

Here’s how your hunting attire can make or break your late-fall hunting trip

Regardless if you’re a greenhorn or seasoned hunter, assessing the weather and dressing accordingly can be a bit of a tightrope walk. Those pre-dawn hours while you’re waiting for the propane stove to fire up might have you reaching for that thick down jacket, but 100 yards into your hike you may be shedding like a husky in August.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Hunters using e-bikes are reminded to be aware of motor vehicle use restrictions on public lands

By Brian Pearson, Regional Communications Manager
Friday, October 21, 2022

With hunting season now in full swing, conservation officers in Southwest Idaho and in other parts of Idaho are noticing a trend of hunters running afoul of motor vehicle use restrictions on public lands. In a number of cases, hunters have been using e-bikes and making an incorrect assumption that motorized vehicle restrictions do not apply to them.

It is ultimately a hunter’s responsibility to know and abide by vehicle use restrictions on public lands. Hunters should be aware of the land management agency for the property they are hunting, as well as that agency’s policy for motorized vehicle use within the district they are hunting, and whether it applies to e-bikes. Policies can and do differ, depending on the land management agency.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Seasonal Humor:

HuntingDog-a
——————

Idaho History Oct 23, 2022

Roosevelt Post Office

1901

Carrying Mail to Roosevelt

CurleyBrewerMailRun-aCurley Brewer
Idaho Historical Society Photo
“(FP December 26, 1901) Curley Brewer, of Warrens, is packing the mail into Thunder Mountain this winter, the miners paying him each two dollars per month for semi-monthly trips, and the Dewey company contributing enough to pay [him] $100 per month for the arduous task. He takes the old Elk Creek trail by way of Logan creek.”
Courtesy Sharon McConnel (personal correspondence.)
— — — —

[News From Warren]

On May 24th, 1901, Wm. Hill, Curly [sic] Brewer and Wm. Wolfe crossed Elk Creek summit, each instance being the being the first attempt to take horses over the trail.

[Thunder Mountain]

Curly [sic] Brewer carries the mail. He left on the 6th [December] and arrived here the 9th at noon afoot.

19011219WSheadlineThunder Mountain
Winter Has Set in and Traffic Suspended Until Spring

The mail during the winter will be carried on snowshoes to Thunder Mountain from Warren. The miners have made arrangements with Curley Brewer to make the trip twice a month with mail. They were to pay him $2 a month each and the company is to make up the balance.

The Weiser Signal. December 19, 1901, Christmas Number, Page 4
source: Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

1902

Roosevelt Post Office

RooseveltPO-aThe post office has a canvas roof.
source: Idaho State Historical Society
— — — —

Roosevelt Post Office established February 19, 1902, William L. Cuddy
Joseph B. Randall, September 6, 1902
Warren M. Dutton, June 9, 1905
Harry S. Austin, December 15, 1906
Benjamin T. Frances, March 20, 1907, declined
Gertrude P. Wayland, September 27, 1907
Tirza J. Wayland, July 1, 1908
Ester H. Busby, December 21, 1911
discontinued September 30, 1915, mail to Yellow Pine
about 18 m. NE of Stibnite, 23 m. NE of Yellow Pine
SE Sec. 24, T19N, R10E

source: Valley County GenWeb
[h/t SMc]
— — — — — — — — — —

1903

Wagon Road to Roosevelt

The Emmett Index May 7, 1903

Frank E. Johnesse, superintendent of construction of the Thunder Mountain Wagon Road, to be built from Long Valley to Roosevelt, expects to leave about May 15 for a trip over the route in company with a party of prospective contractors. The contract will be awarded soon and work will be resumed as soon as weather conditions will permit. Under the provisions of the law passed by the last legislature appropriating $20,000 to aid in constructing this road, a similar amount was to be raised on the outside. Colonel Dewey and his associates have already placed $10,000 at the disposal of the state and arrangements have been made to deposit the remaining $10,000 on May 10.

source: AHGP Copyright © 2013 – – 2022 Sharon McConnel. All Rights Reserved.
— — — — — — — — — —

1905

Boise to Thunder Mountain

1905FreightBoiseThunderMtn-aTeams prepared to haul supplies from Boise to Thunder Mountain, circa 1905.

courtesy Justin Smith
— — — —

Roosevelt Post Office Notes

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News February 4, 1905

Since the new mail contractor has succeeded in getting his men straightened out the mail service is giving good satisfaction.
—-

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News March 18, 1905

The Mail Service to Be Improved.

The sub contract taken by E. P. Stickney for carrying the mail from Thunder City [Long Valley] to Roosevelt has been given up and Mr. Barnes, the government contractor, has again sub let the route to Messrs. Wootan & McLaughlin, a livery firm of Boise. The price paid for a service of 60 days, commencing about March 10th, is $3000.

Wootan & McLaughlin have again sublet the route from Knox to Roosevelt to a Mr. Ailport, he to receive $1500 for the tri-weekly service of 24 trips.

Mr. Ailport himself will bring the mail from Reardon Creek to Roosevelt which is the worst part of the whole route from Boise to this point. He will have the mail here on time three times a week. The irregularity of the arrivals during the past winter, which has caused so much annoyance, is probably over and regular service may reasonably be expected.
—-

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News April 1, 1905

The reason we have such an irregular mail service is simply the fact of underbidding for the contract to carry the mail. Any branch of federal service carries with it prestige and responsibilities – many federal officials remember the prestige and forget the responsibility.
—-

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News April 22, 1905

Bert Ailport arrived Wednesday with the mail. Coming down Southwest Fork of Monumental creek, he was endeavoring to remove a large log from the road when he was caught by one end and quite severely hurt. He left with the outward bound mail Saturday morning.
—-

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News April 29, 1905

Henry Kinsinger and Dave Sillivan arrived from Boise this noon having made a quick trip. Mr. Kinsinger says the mail is scattered along the road and that little effort is being made to get it in. The mail service here this winter has been abominable — it might be nearer the truth to prefix that adjective with a big damn.

Mr. Kinsinger says that Bert Ailport’s contract is completed and that a new contract is let to Al. Austin of Boise, who has a livery barn there with plenty of stock so that the prospect of a better service seems bright — each change we have had this winter has been hailed with joy only to be turned into disappointment as the mail service has continued to be absolutely wretched.

If the department at Washington would make the fines for nondelivery so high as to make it absolutely imperative to get the mail here, then the cheap bidding would cease and a price would be paid that would insure the arrival of the mail on time and its consequent departure on time. Such service as we have had is exasperating and the government contractors have apparently had no thought or desire to give a decent mail service.
—-

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News May 6, 1905

Fine Mail Service.

Thomas Naighbors came in Friday evening from Knox, where he had been in telephonic communication with outside parties concerning the properties now in his charge.

We learn from him that U. S. mail sacks are on the route to Roosevelt — hanging on trees by the wayside — they will doubtless arrive in a few years. Many people in Thunder Mountain are saying Blank Blank such mail service as has been given this district during the past winter. It is absolutely abominable — there is little effort on the part of the contractors, or sub contractors or sub-sub contractors to get the U. S. mail to the postoffice here.
—-

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News May 13, 1905

A Daily Mail Service.

A daily mail for the people of this town and the surrounding country will be an imperitive [sic] necessity the coming summer. From twelve to fifteen hundred people will get mail through the Roosevelt postoffice in the course of a couple of months. A petition to the postal department asking for a daily mail service will be circulated in a few days and should receive the signature of every one in the camp.

… That, this office has received no exchanges for five weeks. That, this works a hardship on the editor and regular exchange readers. That, the new mail contractor, A. W. Ostner, has placed 16 horses and four men on the route between this place and Thunder City [Long Valley] and that, we know Al will give us regular mail if men, money and horses can do the work. That, this office is equipped with one piece of a school dictionary, one last years almanac; and one Edison’s Hand Encyclodaedia [sic] and that, the same will not be loaned.

Our supplies shipped two months ago has failed to arrive. That, quite a number of men have come to town the last two weeks who haven’t gone to work yet. That, there will be lots of work here as soon as supplies and accommodations can be had on the ground at a number of the mines. That we advise workingmen at this time on the outside to come prepared to stay in town a couple of weeks and be able to pay their expenses. That, there is always room for a few first-class miners. That, every prospector is expected to visit this office when in town and tell us what is going on in the hills.
—-

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News May 20, 1905

Since the new mail contractor, Al. Ostner, has taken charge of the mail route we are now receiving our mail regularly. Mr. Ostner’s stock are all in good shape and he says that he is not going to work them unless he can feed them good. The people of Roosevelt and along the line can congratulate themselves on getting a man that takes pride in taking care of this stock and getting us a regular mail. As soon as the road is opened up Mr. Ostner will put on a regular stage and express line.
—-

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News July 1, 1905

When the mail arrived last Saturday there were seven extra sacks of old mail that had been strung along the road for three months. This mail belonged on the old contract. It consisted principally of old papers which were wet and useless.

Change of Mail Schedule.

The mail changes time today and will go on the following time until the 31st of October. It will leave Roosevelt Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6 p. m. It leaves Thunder City [Long Valley] for Roosevelt on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays not later than 7 p. m. It will make the trip in 26 hours.
— — — — — — — — — —

1907

January 17, 1907 Warren Times

– The mail service at Roosevelt is very irregular. The mail arrived twice last week and was taken in with a dog team. The paper mail arrived twice in about sixteen days brought in on a rawhide with a horse on snowshoes. There was eight feet of snow at Cabin Creek summit and the last snow added four more feet. Roosevelt is quieter this winter than before.

From “Yellow Pine Timeline” compiled by Sharon McConnel
— — — — — — — — — —

1909

Boise to Thunder Mountain

1909TeamsBoiseThunderMountain-aTeams leaving Boise for the Thunder Mountain mining districts, 1909.

courtesy Justin Smith
————

Further Reading

Link to Back Country Post Offices
Link to Back Country Mail Carriers
Link to Curley Brewer
Link to Thunder Mountain / Roosevelt History index page
—————–

Road Reports Oct 23, 2022

Note: Winter has arrived. The high country has received several inches of snow from this weekend’s storm and more is expected.

Please share road reports. Most back country roads are not maintained. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road. Do NOT rely on your GPS.

Yellow Pine: Rain Saturday and snow early Sunday, streets are damp. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open with delays for construction.
ITD Update Oct 19: IDT is wrapping up the project to repave State Highway 55 between Round Valley Road and Clear Creek in Valley County.
Update from ITD August 26, 2022: Starting Tuesday, September 6, the Smiths Ferry project will transition to the fall construction schedule. Drivers should plan for one-way alternating traffic with 15-minute delays, Monday through Friday and weekends as needed.
Crews will start paving work on September 6. Drivers can expect a gravel highway surface for a few weeks, and the first layer of asphalt completed by the end of September.
To learn more about the construction schedule, visit link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Oct 23: Likely a little snow at the summit.
Report Wednesday (Oct 19) mail truck driver reports the highway is clear and good.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Last report Friday (Oct 6) road is clear, watch for hunting traffic.
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Last report Friday (Oct 6) road is not too bad, gets a little rough on the YP end.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Oct 23: Likely some snow at Landmark.
Report Wednesday (Oct 19) Mail truck driver says the wash boards are coming back in some places.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open? Travel at own risk.
Oct 23: Likely some snow on the summit.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open? Travel at own risk.
Report Saturday (Oct 22) “Profile Summit had continuous snow floor from Missouri Ridge Trailhead to two miles north of the Big Creek culvert, with about 8 inches on top. Drifts in excess of one ft deep on the north side of the pass.” – SA
20221022BCculvert-a
20221022ProfileGap-a
photos courtesy Scott Amos
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open? Travel at your own risk.
Report Saturday (Oct 22) “Elk Summit had substantially more snow and deeper drifts. Some drifts over two ft deep at Goldman’s Cut.” – SA
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open – watch for heavy equipment traffic.
Old report: road graded during the first 2 weeks of June. No current repot.
Starting in July cleanup work at Stibnite will “cause some delay in travel through the area, it won’t be closed but there will be flaggers.”
“There will still be a lot of traffic coming through for the next 1.5 years while the “Burnt Log Route” is being built, a lot of the equipment will have to come in on the burnt log route so until then JC and the current Stibnite route will be used.”
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open? Travel at own risk.
Oct 23: Likely has several inches of snow on the summit.
Report Oct 8: “Road over the summit is very rough, especially nearing Stibnite.” – CP
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Monumental Creek Trail Report:
Report Oct 8: “The trail had at least 50 new trees down and no way can a horse get thru unless he’s good in rockslides. What a Mess.” – CP
Old report Sep 15: “Mon Tr also has 2 big trees lying in it & a spill in 1 rockslide w big rocks in Tr. But shale slide w gabion bastian clear.”
Old report July 23: Trail past Roosevelt Lake is disaster. Beaver swamp at Trap Cr on 1/4 mile of trail, hard scramble around. Treed in below awful. Slide is Bad.
Topo Map near Trap Creek (link):

Deadwood Summit: Open – Travel at own risk.
Report from Deadwood Outfitters Saturday (Oct 22) Snow at the summit.
20221022DeadwoodSummit-a
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Landmark to Stanley: Open? Travel at own risk.
Oct 23: Likely has snow.

Warren Wagon Road: Open – Travel at own risk.
Oct 23: Summits likely have several inches of snow.
No report on current conditions.

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:
————-

Weather Reports Oct 16-22, 2022

Oct 16 Weather:

At 10am it was 28 degrees, clear sky and light frost (dry.) At 1230pm clear sky and strong sunshine. At 3pm it was 73 degrees, clear very blue sky and light breezes. At 750pm it was 57 degrees, clear and calm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 17, 2022 at 10:00AM
Clear, light frost
Max temperature 76 degrees F
Min temperature 26 degrees F
At observation 28 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 17 Weather:

At 10am it was 28 degrees, clear sky and light frost (dry.) At 1230pm it was mostly clear (a few small thin clouds) and strong sunshine. At 3pm it was 75 degrees, almost clear (a few little wisps of haze) and light breeze. At 7pm it was 56 degrees and clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 18, 2022 at 10:00AM
Clear, dry, (no frost)
Max temperature 78 degrees F
Min temperature 28 degrees F
At observation 30 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 18 Weather:

At 10am it was 30 degrees, clear sky and too dry for much frost. At 1230pm it was clear with strong sunshine. At 3pm it was 73 degrees, clear sky and light breeze. At 645pm it was 59 degrees, clear and calm. At 10pm it looked clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 19, 2022 at 10:00AM
Mostly clear, dry (no frost)
Max temperature 80 degrees F
Min temperature 28 degrees F
At observation 30 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 19 Weather:

At 10am it was 30 degrees, almost clear sky (a few small clouds) and dry (no frost.) At 1230pm we had strong sunshine and slight haze of smoke. At 3pm it was 72 degrees, clear sky, light haze of smoke and light breeze. At 645pm it was 58 degrees, clear sky and slight breeze. At 1030pm haze of smoke.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 20, 2022 at 10:00AM
Clear, dry (no frost)
Max temperature 77 degrees F
Min temperature 27 degrees F
At observation 30 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 20 Weather:

At 10am it was 30 degrees, clear sky and dry (no frost.) At 1230pm strong sunshine with a little haze of smoke. At 3pm it was 76 degrees, mostly cloudy, haze of smoke and light breezes. At 630pm it was 64 degrees, gray overcast, haze of smoke and nearly calm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 21, 2022 at 10:00AM
Partly clear/cloudy, light breeze, no dew
Max temperature 77 degrees F
Min temperature 30 degrees F <– previous AM
At observation 36 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 21 Weather:

At 10am it was 36 degrees, about half clear half cloudy, light breeze and dry (no dew.) At 1230pm it looked overcast, filtered sunlight and light breeze. At 3pm it was 57 degrees, gray overcast and getting breezy. A few sprinkles at 415pm, light rain until 5pm. At 640pm it was 44 degrees, dark overcast and light rain falling. Steady rain at 9pm. Power off/on 1132pm, then out at 1155pm. Raining pretty good at midnight. Still raining at 4am. Rained all night.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 22, 2022 at 10:00AM
Overcast, light rain
Max temperature 62 degrees F
Min temperature 36 degrees F
At observation 36 degrees F
Precipitation 0.78 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 22 Weather:

At 10am it was 36 degrees, overcast and light rain (power still out.) Stopped raining right before 11am. At 12pm it was overcast, VanMeter still socked in, snow line looks to be around 6500′. At 1pm overcast and chilly breezes, power on at 112pm. At 330pm it was 39 degrees, overcast and cold breezes. At 615pm it was 39 degrees, broken overcast and cold light breezes. Some time between 7pm and 9pm it snowed a trace – mostly melted. Fat trace of snow fell some time before 930am. Snowing at 955am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 23, 2022 at 10:00AM
Broken overcast, snowing
Max temperature 41 degrees F
Min temperature 26 degrees F
At observation 28 degrees F
Precipitation 0.02 inch
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth Trace
———————–

Road Report Oct 20, 2022 South Fork

Four Mile Rx

On Thursday, October 20, 2022, the Krassel Ranger District plans to do prescribed burning in the Four Mile project area. Aerial ignitions will last one day, although smoke and flames may present until the next significant weather or season ending event. Please be aware of your surroundings if driving or recreating in the area, watching for debris on roads and trails. Traffic delays along the South Fork Road (FSR 674) may occur during ignitions. See map below.

Road Reports Oct 19, 2022

Please share road reports. Most back country roads are not maintained. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road. Do NOT rely on your GPS.

Yellow Pine: October has been dry and warm so far, local streets are starting to get dusty. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open with delays for construction.
ITD Update Oct 19: IDT is wrapping up the project to repave State Highway 55 between Round Valley Road and Clear Creek in Valley County.
Update from ITD August 26, 2022: Starting Tuesday, September 6, the Smiths Ferry project will transition to the fall construction schedule. Drivers should plan for one-way alternating traffic with 15-minute delays, Monday through Friday and weekends as needed.
Crews will start paving work on September 6. Drivers can expect a gravel highway surface for a few weeks, and the first layer of asphalt completed by the end of September.
To learn more about the construction schedule, visit link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 19) mail truck driver reports the highway is clear and good.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Possible Rx Burns in the 4-mile area in October
Last report Friday (Oct 6) road is clear, hunting traffic.
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Last report Friday (Oct 6) road is not too bad, gets a little rough on the YP end.
Note: The county did not do dust abatement this season.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 19) Mail truck driver says the wash boards are coming back in some places.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Quartz Creek Road:
Old report July 30: “Saturday I cleared Quartz Creek Road of trees. At the top (upper loop) I cleared the left fork but on the right fork there was a widowmaker tree that I left as I was working by myself and didn’t feel comfortable removing it without help.” – SA

Old Thunder Mountain Road: Open
Old report July 16: “Saturday the Yellow Pine Escapades rode to Meadow Creek Lookout without any issues. Had a great lunch, then half the group returned to Yellow Pine via the Old Thunder Mountain Road while the other half returned through Stibnite. A group of four motorcycles came through the Old Thunder Mountain Road. I’m assuming they cut the four or five recently cut trees we saw.” – SA

Lick Creek: Open
Old report Sept 19th: “Rough”
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open
Old report Tuesday (Sept 6): “The county did grade over Profile. It was much better than before. It looks like they graded from the mouth of Profile Creek over to Jacob’s Ladder Flat. The only section it appears they didn’t do was from the top down to the first Big Creek culvert. Of course some of the rougher spots are still there but overall a good improvement.” DV
Old report Wednesday (Aug 24): “Profile being worked today.”
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open – watch for heavy equipment traffic.
Old report: road graded during the first 2 weeks of June. No current repot.
Starting in July cleanup work at Stibnite will “cause some delay in travel through the area, it won’t be closed but there will be flaggers.”
“There will still be a lot of traffic coming through for the next 1.5 years while the “Burnt Log Route” is being built, a lot of the equipment will have to come in on the burnt log route so until then JC and the current Stibnite route will be used.”
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open
Report Oct 8: “Road over the summit is very rough, especially nearing Stibnite.” – CP
Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Monumental Creek Trail Report:
Report Oct 8: “The trail had at least 50 new trees down and no way can a horse get thru unless he’s good in rockslides. What a Mess.” – CP
Old report Sep 15: “Mon Tr also has 2 big trees lying in it & a spill in 1 rockslide w big rocks in Tr. But shale slide w gabion bastian clear.”
Old report July 23: Trail past Roosevelt Lake is disaster. Beaver swamp at Trap Cr on 1/4 mile of trail, hard scramble around. Treed in below awful. Slide is Bad.
Topo Map near Trap Creek (link):

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open
No report on current conditions. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Open
No current report. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Landmark to Stanley: Open
Old report from Valley County: “We have a crew working in the Deadwood/Bear Valley area blading. They should be done August 8th-9th.”

Warren Wagon Road: Open
No report on current conditions, travel at your own risk.

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:
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