Author Archives: The Yellow Pine Times

About The Yellow Pine Times

The Yellow Pine Times is a not for profit newsletter dedicated to sharing news and events.

Road Reports May 18, 2022

It is Rock Migration Season. Please share road reports. Spring travel conditions. Most back country roads are not maintained. This time of year there is deep snow in higher elevations. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: Local streets were “dragged” Tuesday (May 17th.) Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Hwy 55 Construction Update from ITD May 12, 2022
Starting Monday, May 16, closures on SH-55 between Smiths Ferry and the Rainbow Bridge will shorten from 4-hour closures to 2-hour closures. The new schedule will be 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Monday – Thursday, and will continue through Thursday, May 26. Outside of those closures, there will still be one-way, alternating traffic with 15-minute delays.
Drivers should still anticipate longer delays once the road reopens at 12 p.m. to allow flaggers to clear queues on either side of the work zone. Once those lines are cleared, there should not be wait times longer that 15 minutes.
We appreciate your patience as we move through another spring season of construction work. To learn more about the spring construction schedule, visit link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (May 18) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Wednesday (May 18) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Wednesday (May 18) mail truck driver reports the road is clear and good.

Upper Johnson Creek Road (Trail): Closed to wheeled vehicles.
No current report.
Lower Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (May 11) the county graded most of the lower end.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled travel
Report Wednesday (May 11) a backhoe is working on the lower end on this side.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images) Working again!!
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Closed to full sized vehicles at the junction with Profile Creek.
Old report Wednesday (April 6): from Perpetua “As Spring has arrived, snow and ice on the Stibnite road are beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Perpetua Resources crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Perpetua Resources crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
“We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road starting week of March 21st. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.” – Sam
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:
Valley County Road & Bridge Announcements
Road Break-Up Limits in Effect Until further notice, break-up limits are now in effect:
* 7 tons per axle,
* 80,000 lbs maximum
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May 15, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

May 15, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Note: If you are not receiving the YPTimes emails, check your spam folder.
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Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
Oct 27, 2021 – Transfer Station on Winter Schedule
Nov 1, 2021 – Winter Mail Delivery Starts
2022
May – Spring Rx burns
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit Season
May 15 thru Nov 30 – Firewood Season
May 28 – Memorial Potluck 2pm Community Hall
May 29 – YPFD Pancake Breakfast 830am Community Hall
May 29 – YPFD meeting at 2pm Community Hall
Jun 8-11 – Spring Free Dump Days
Jun 11 – VYPA Meeting 2pm Community Hall
Jul 2 – 4th of July golf tournament
Jul 3 – YPWUA Shareholders Meeting
Jul 9 – VYPA Meeting 2pm Community Hall
(details below)
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Local Events:

May 15, through Nov. 30, 2022 Firewood Season

Personal use fuelwood permits for the Boise National Forest will be available for sale at The Corner beginning May 15, through Nov. 30, 2022.
— — — —

Memorial Potluck Saturday May 28th

Memorial Potluck at the Community Hall. Burgers and Brats provided. Please bring a side dish if you would like.

Stay tuned for more details…


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YPFD Pancake Breakfast May 29

YPFD will have a Pancake Breakfast, “Come Meet Your Commissioner” May 29, 2022 at 8:30 AM at the Community Hall
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YPFD meeting May 29

There will be a Fire Commissioners Meeting May 29 at 2pm at the Community Hall.
— — — —

Krassel RD Prescribed Burns Spring 2022

The Krassel Ranger District plans to apply fire to approximately 2,500 acres within the Bald Hill project area (east of Yellow Pine); 2,000 acres in the Four Mile project area along the South Fork of the Salmon River near the Miners peak trail, and 70 acres around Krassel Work Center.
Ignitions may occur over 2-7 days in the months of March through May Flame, smoke and hazards may be present in the area until significant precipitation or season ending weather is received. If you have any questions or comments please contact Dave Hogen Krassel District Ranger at 208-634-0600

(Same map from last fall.)
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Spring Free Dump Days

June 8, 9, 10, and 11 for Valley County
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Golf Tournament July 2nd

The annual 4th of July golf tournament will be on Saturday, July 2nd at 10(ish). All proceeds will be used to improve the golf course (improving the greens, signs and tees. More information to follow. Contact Joel or Marj Fields with questions, sponsorships or donations at fieldsmarjie @ yahoo.com


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YPWUA Shareholders Meeting July 3rd

The yearly shareholders meeting will be Sunday July 3rd at 10am. There will be two positions up for elections.

There has been some question on who can vote and can run for office. You must be a shareholder with the Yellow Pine Water Users Association to be able to vote and run for office. If you have any questions about being a shareholder, please contact me.

Thank you – Steve Holloway
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Village News:

Mother’s Day Brunch

The Mother’s Day brunch was held at the Community Hall on Sunday May 8 at 12 noon. Food was provided. Donations appreciated. All donations will contribute to the village’s funds.

“Thank you to everyone who came to brunch! A big happy Mother’s Day to all of the wonderful mothers in our community!”

20220508MothersDay-aphoto courtesy HH

And Thank you to the folks who put on the brunch.
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Tuesday morning’s snow

20220510YellowPineWest-a

photo courtesy Eye-n-Sky

We had an inch and a half of snow on the ground Tuesday morning (May 10th) and another half an inch on Thursday morning (May 12th.)
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Yellow Pine Veterans’ Memorial

Spring cleanup time for our Yellow Pine Veterans’ Memorial. The elk had spent quite a bit of time visiting over the winter… now, if they’d just leave the flowers alone.

20220513VetsMemorial-aphoto courtesy CN
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State Burn permits required May 10th

Closed fire season begins May 10, which means Idahoans outside city limits will need a burn permit before burning any debris. The closed fire season lasts until Oct. 20.
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Watkins Pharmacy Update April 20th

Greetings! We will be painting the temp pharmacy in two weeks. There have to be some structural changes inside the space to ensure the pharmacy is secured and satisfy state regulations. In order to do that the new owner of the building, with his architect, have to have his building permit and plans approved by the city before we can modify anything under the permit. So we are probably looking at a date around June 1st at this point. Thank you for asking! Amber Watkins
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Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at wicap.org.
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Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
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Arnold Aviation News:

Customers New Deadline – Please email your shopping list by Sunday evening so they are ready to print early Monday morning.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
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Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Valley County Road & Bridge Announcements
Road Break-Up Limits in Effect Until further notice, break-up limits are now in effect:
* 7 tons per axle,
* 80,000 lbs maximum

Hwy 55 summer road closures reduced to 2 hours May 16, 2022
link:

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Closed to full sized vehicles at the junction with Profile Creek
from Perpetua “As Spring has arrived, snow and ice on the Stibnite road are beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Perpetua Resources crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Perpetua Resources crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
“We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road starting week of March 21st. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.” – Sam

Upper Johnson Creek road at Landmark, Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Elk Summit, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are closed to wheeled vehicles. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
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Critters

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be Elk Aware

Elk are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard. F&G confirms there is a pack of 6 wolves in our valley.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

Bears are out of hibernation and hungry.

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat had been hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started November 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report April 23: Bins emptied and transfer station cleaned by locals.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

Water Use

05/05/22 23427016 26439 24 1102 18 T 1114
05/06/22 23453555 26539 24 1106 18 F 100
05/07/22 23479603 26048 24 1085 18 S 491
05/08/22 23504902 25299 24 1054 18 S 749
05/09/22 23530420 25518 24 1063 18 M 219
05/10/22 23556919 26499 24 1104 18 T 981
05/11/22 23582736 25817 24 1076 18 W 682
05/12/22 23639804 27068 24 1128 19 T 1251
05/13/22 23636178 26374 24 1099 18 F 694
05/14/22 23663120 26942 24 1123 19 S 568
05/15/22 23689417 26297 24 1096 18 S 645

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

DRINKING WATER WARNING April 11, 2022
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 5-10-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

YPWUA 2022 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 3, 2022
YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 5, 2020 link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
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VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association:
Hailey Harris, Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Jen Aldrich, Secretary
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Ron Earl

April 6, 2022 Village Council meeting to fill vacant chairperson position (no minutes.)
Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.
2022 Meeting dates:
June 11
July 9
August 13
September 10

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Department

The Forest Service has requested a meeting with the Yellow Pine Fire Board on May 20, 2022 in Cascade at 1:30 PM. As a follow up to the POD’s (Potential Operational Delineations). The PODs process is more than drawing containers on a map; it is a cross-boundary, collaborative engagement that translates into operational strategies once fire is on the ground. PODS are fire management and planning units.

The Forest Service will set up a presentation to be given to the Village of Yellow Pine community at a later date.

Yellow Pine Fire Commissioners Meeting April 3, 2022

Officers In Attendance:
Bill McIntosh #3, Lorinne Munn #1, Tom Lanham #2, Tim Rogers Fire Chief, Ron Basabe Assistant Fire Chief, Ronda Rogers Secretary/Treasurer.
Others:  Sarah Lanham, Christy Harris Cecil Dallman, Tim and Jen Aldrich, Ginny Bartholomew, Leslie Jensen, Lynn Imel.

Meeting called to order at 2 PM; Visitors notified that there would be a comment period after the Commissioners Meeting.

Action Item: Approved of minutes from Prior meetings 2/24/2022 and 1/30/2022,    3/3 vote

Treasurer’s Report: 3/1/22 4 Battery For the Red Fire Truck $476.00, 3/3/22 Ed Staub Sons $39.72, 3/4/22 MTE letter $1.94, 3/18/22 MTE $95.16, 3/25/22 ICRMP 2nd payment $1245.00, 3/24/22 Conference & Membership $1700.00, Hotel $1328.00, 3/1/22 Deposit taxes $2008.97, 3/23/22 Deposit Taxes $174.29, Donation 500.00
Balance $23,131.73

Action Item: Commissioners approved all expenses, 3/3 vote

Discussion: Memorial Day Plans, Chairman Mclntosh would like to have brunch so the people of Yellow Pine could come and meet their Commissioner and talk to them about their concerns.

Discussion: Lorinne reported on the Commission Conference. Stronger Leadership For Resiliency and Challenging Times; by Silouan Green. Silouan was a very powerful speaker and talk about the Character of Leadership. The borad agreed that the Conference was very informational and important for them all to attend.

Discussion: Boise National Forest update; PODs overview. The PODs process is more than drawing containers on a map; it is a cross-boundary, collaborative engagement that translates into operational strategies once fire is on the ground. PODS are fire management and planning units.

Fire Chief’s Report:
The Red Truck has 4 new batteries and is back in working order.
Two fuel tanks have been found and can be purchased for $400.00 for both; just working on a place to put them.
Plans to have a website for the Fire Department to post all our activity, meetings, and trainings.
Training classes are in the planning stage; there will be 2 trainings per month in the summer months and 1 a month in the winter. There is also online training class also.
Cecil said we could make our own racks to dry our hoses after we use them. He is willing to help us build them.
Radios – need to locate all of the radios and have Alex Pellegrini condition them. Alex will be giving a training class on the radios and will be handing them back out.

Discussion: A safe at the firehouse – need a small safe at the firehouse to keep vehicle titles, other important documents.  Mike Amos said that he had one he would donate but his safe is too big. Chief Rogers will check on prices to purchase one.

Meeting Adjourned at 2:45 PM

Comment period started after the meeting.

Note: Minutes from the January 9th meeting have been submitted. See below for link to document.

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Meeting Minutes

Apr 3, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Feb 24, 2022 Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD New Commissioner’s Transition Meeting Link:
Nov 23, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Nov 8, 2021 – AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
Oct 31, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Oct 14, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Sep 27, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Sep 18, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Sep 11, 2021 – YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
Jul 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Jun 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sep 30, 2020 – YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 11, 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Spring hours:
Wednesday thru Monday (closed Tuesdays) 8am-8pm
Fire wood permits Available May 15th
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Winter Hours at the Tavern until May 15th
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Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed for the winter.
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Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Availability for 2022
*Note can book Idaho Residents now for Archery or put on a waiting list for Non Residents, will find out final allocations by April 18th.
2 on 1 Archery August 29th to September 4th *Lodge hunt / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Archery September 6th to September 12th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Rifle September 24th to September 30th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Wolf.
Spring Bear Hunt June 3rd to June 9th Group of 2 to 3 hunters *Lodge Hunt / Black Bear and Wolf.
See our website for more details. Or give us a call 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 452-4361
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watkins can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

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Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (May 9) overnight low of 25 degrees. Yesterday’s snow and hail melted to 0.05″ water (may be under-catch due to breezes.) This morning it was 30 degrees at 930am, cracks in the overcast and patches of old snow and hail in the shade. A few finches, a hairy woodpecker and a male colombian ground squirrel visiting. Overcast and flaking snow at noon for a few minutes, then did it again an hour and a half later. Overcast, cool and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 46 degrees, about a 15-20 minuet graupel shower (little snow balls.) A few snowflakes falling at sunset, clouds sitting down on VanMeter Hill and light cold breezes. Overcast and light snowfall at sunset, cold breezes. Still snowing before midnight, about half an inch or more and socked in low. Still snowing after midnight, about an inch so far and below freezing.

Tuesday (May 10) overnight low of 26 degrees, yesterday’s snow measured 1 1/2″, melted to 0.11″ of water. This morning it was 32 degrees at 930am and partly cloudy with generous portions of blue sky and sunshine, new snow melting rapidly. Finches calling from the trees, 2 pine squirrels and a chipmunk visiting. Increasing clouds and new snow melted by lunch time. Overcast early afternoon and getting breezy. Mostly cloudy mid-afternoon (large dark cloud coming in from the west and patches of blue sky to the east) with lighter breezes, high of 50 degrees. Mostly cloudy just after sunset. Partly or mostly clear before midnight.

Wednesday (May 11) overnight low of 23 degrees. This morning it was 36 degrees at 930am, partly hazy, light breeze and heavy frost melting. Robins and finches calling, woodpecker drumming and vocal pine squirrel visiting. Mostly cloudy and warm at lunch time and light breezes. Mail truck made it in on time. Light sprinkles of rain for about half an hour mid-afternoon and low dark overcast. About half a dozen hummingbirds showed up with the rain. Patches of blue sky opened up about 20 minutes after the rain stopped and some sunshine, high of 55 degrees. Elk in the neighborhood at sunset. Mostly cloudy and breezy after sunset. Cloudy before midnight. Snow and possibly rain early morning.

Thursday (May 12) overnight low of 32 degrees. Early morning snow (and possibly rain) gave us 0.22″ of water in the gauge, there was still about half an inch of snow in the shade (possibly more?) and it was melting quickly. This morning it was 39 degrees at 930am and mostly cloudy with fog belts mid-mountain. Robins and a few finches calling. Colombian ground squirrels emerging from burrows. Dozens of finches and a few pine siskins along with 2 pine squirrels visiting. Hawk in the neighborhood chasing song birds. Mostly cloudy with cool breezes mid-afternoon, high of 52 degrees. Strong gust of wind hit around 7pm. Mostly cloudy and cool breezes after sunset. Cloudy before midnight with filtered moonlight. Rain after midnight.

Friday (May 13) overnight low of 32 degrees. Rain during the night and early morning added up to 0.18″ of water. This morning at 930am it was 42 degrees, partly clear sky and breezes gusting up at times. Lots of finches, several hummingbirds (including 1 black-chinned male,) and a mourning dove visiting. Partly cloudy and breezy after lunch time. Warm with chilly flag flapping breezes mid-afternoon and mostly cloudy, high of 53 degrees. After sunset it was mostly cloudy, calmer and robins calling. Cloudy before midnight. Raining by morning.

Saturday (May 14) overnight low of 38 degrees. Morning rain (so far) measured 0.04″. This morning it was 42 degrees at 930am, overcast with fog sitting on higher ridges and light rain containues to fall. Several finches, hummingbirds (a couple of male rufus and females and a black-chinned male,) a couple of male black-headed grosbeaks, a male evening grosbeak, a couple of male Lazuli Buntings, a small flock of brown-headed cowbirds, a few mourning doves and 2 arguing pine squirrels visiting, robins calling all over the neighborhood. Overcast and still raining at lunch time ending around 3pm. Hawk nailed a mourning dove, feathers scattered for several feet. Partly clear mid-afternoon. Jays calling from the trees. Clouded up and light rain for about half an hour late afternoon and breaks in the clouds, high of 57 degrees. Robins chirping. Warm and mostly cloudy with a few sprinkles after sunset. Some tree swallows have returned. Partly clear before midnight.

Sunday (May 15) overnight low of 31 degrees. Yesterday’s rain total = 0.14″. This morning it was 46 degrees at 930am and mostly clear. Tree swallows, jays, brown-headed cowbirds, black-headed and evening grosbeaks, hummingbirds, mourning dove, a pine squirrel, big fat ground squirrels and a chipmunk visiting. Mostly high thin haze at lunch time and warm. Gusty breezes early afternoon. Very warm by mid-afternoon, mostly hazy and breezy, high of 74 degrees! Dark overcast after sunset, slight breeze and feels a bit humid. Robins calling.
—————-

Idaho News:

VCSAR Press Release

May 13, 2022

Beginning June 1st, 2022 there will be a Valley County Search and Rescue and EMS Team stationed in Yellow Pine. This Team will be comprised of a Nationally Registered Paramedic, a RN, EMT, and an EMR with others trained at different levels of basic Rescue Operations. Local volunteer team members have applied and been approved by the following agencies: VCSAR Board and membership, Valley County Sheriff’s Office, Cascade Rural Fire/EMS and in some cases, the State of Idaho Health and Welfare Division.

This Team will be a Part of Valley County Search and Rescue (VCSAR), it will also be associated with Cascade Rural Fire/EMS and will be providing responses to Search and Rescue, EMS, Technical Rescue, High and Low angle rope work, Extrication and limited SWIFT water rescue and other needed emergency services when available.

Jeff Forster is on the board with VCSAR and is the East Lieutenant. All Rescue apparatus and donated equipment from Yellow Pine Fire will be based at his home in Yellow Pine. There will not be an ambulance based out of Yellow Pine and no mechanism for transporting patients until a Paramedic ambulance arrives from Cascade. Should a patient need transport, response will continue to be coordinated with Life Flight and Ambulance through Cascade 911 Dispatch. Cascade’s Paramedic ambulance will continue in route to transport patients to the Yellow Pine’s Helispot should Life Flight be requested or to the hospital.

This Team will respond to 911 calls in Yellow Pine when available. Due to the limited number of qualified responders, their abilities and availability, we will not be able to guarantee a local response to calls for assistance 100% of the time. It’s important to dial 911 for any Emergency as soon as possible, allowing dispatch to notify the emergency responders to respond as soon as they receive the call for assistance. If a local team is not available in Yellow Pine to respond, the call will default to Cascade Rural Fire EMS to respond or Life Flight who are all dispatched through the 911 system if warranted.

Larry Scarborough
VCSAR Captain
208-860-8346
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Hwy 55 Update

Message from the Idaho Transportation Department (via the Valley County Sheriff’s Office FB page May 12, 2022)

Starting Monday, May 16, closures on SH-55 between Smiths Ferry and the Rainbow Bridge will shorten from 4-hour closures to 2-hour closures. The new schedule will be 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Monday – Thursday, and will continue through Thursday, May 26. Outside of those closures, there will still be one-way, alternating traffic with 15-minute delays.

Drivers should still anticipate longer delays once the road reopens at 12 p.m. to allow flaggers to clear queues on either side of the work zone. Once those lines are cleared, there should not be wait times longer that 15 minutes.

We appreciate your patience as we move through another spring season of construction work. To learn more about the spring construction schedule, visit (link).
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COVID-19 Updates: 373 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

May 13, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 373 new COVID-19 cases and 3 new deaths Friday. State-level case and hospital data are now being updated on the state dashboard on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, excluding holidays.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 447,913.

The state said 87 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 17,187, and 0 new case have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,934.

3 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,933.

full story: [Valley County 2,642 cases, 16 deaths.]
— — — —

Five new Valley County COVID-19 reported during week

By Tom Grote The Star-News May 12, 2022

Five new cases of COVID-19 were reported in Valley County last week by the county’s two hospitals.

The five new cases compared to nine new cases reported the previous week and the four new cases reported the prior week.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 2,702 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started in March 2020.

Thirteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health.

Clinics & Tests – McCall

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine offers the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines are offered for anyone age 5 and older.

Also available are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine boosters for ages 12 to 15 and to moderately or severely immunocompromised youths age 5 to 11.

Second booster doses are available for adults ages 50 years and older, people ages 12 years and older who are moderately or severely immunocompromised.

Patients should talk to their health care provider about their medical condition, and whether getting an additional primary shot is appropriate for them.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link) or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

Clinics & Tests – Cascade

Cascade Medical Center no longer offers the Pfizer vaccine. Those wishing to be given the Pfizer vaccine should contact St. Luke’s McCall or a local pharmacy.

The Cascade hospital offers a second booster shot of the Moderna vaccine to those over age 50 who received their first booster shot at least four months ago.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster. Call 208-382-4285 to schedule a time.

Take Home Tests

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital also provides free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

full story: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
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CMC bond promises more room for more services

$19 million proposal goes to voters Tuesday

(Note: This is the second of a two-week series on the $19 million bond issue proposed by Cascade Medical Center in Tuesday’s election.)

By Max Silverson The Star-News May 12, 2022

Leonard Isbell of Cascade recently met with cardiologist Dr. Steven Writer at the Cascade Medical Center, a visit that saved Isbell a trip to Boise.

Isbell, 70, previously visited Writer at the St. Alphonsus Heart Institute in Boise, but the doctor now makes monthly visits to Cascade to visit patients closer to home.

Writer typically sees about a dozen patients during each visit but would like to be able to make more visits to see more patients.

The hospital does not have the space to host more visits from Writer, or the other traveling clinics the center could provide, hospital CEO Tom Reinhardt said.

On Tuesday, voters in the hospital’s taxing district will be asked to approve a $19 million bond issue to help build a new hospital north of Cascade.

With more room, the hospital would provide clinics for dermatology, neurology, urology and specialized outpatient procedures, Reinhardt said.

The hospital currently provides primary care, family medicine, 24-hour emergency care, inpatient and rehabilitation services, mental health and physical therapy.

The hospital needs to be about twice its size to meet current demands, according to a study conducted by the consulting firm Wipfli. In addition, the population of Cascade and the surrounding area is expected to grow by as much as 14% in the next five years, the Wipfli study said.

The current hospital has two private rooms and four semi-private rooms that can fit two people each. The proposed facility would have six private rooms and two shared rooms.

The current clinic at the hospital has five examination rooms, while the proposed clinic would have 12 rooms.

Clinic visits have increased from 3,829 in 2016 to 5,333 in 2019, the Wipfli study said.

“We always find room for ER patients, but we rely on hospital rooms to host visiting specialists like Dr. Writer and that limits our ability to add specialists for visits,” Reinhardt said.

“That explains why we are now booking patients out farther to be seen for non-urgent issues,” he said.

The new hospital would add services like mammograms, colonoscopies, cataract surgeries and improved mental health services.

“We want people to be able to get what they need here locally, and not have to drive to Boise or even McCall, if they don’t have to,” Reinhardt said.

The board chose to expand only in areas that are in demand by residents of the area, he said.

“Our demographics are not maternity demographics, our community in Cascade and southern Donnelly, we are older,” he said.

About 43% of the City of Cascade population is over 60 years old, according to the 2020 US Census.

“When it comes to things like cataract surgeries and podiatry and colonoscopies, there’s absolutely enough volume in our end of the valley to support that,” Reinhardt said.

A study by Health Facilities Planning & Development estimated the Cascade hospital would see demand outpatient procedures like colonoscopies and cataract surgeries grow from 2,957 this year to 3,355 per year by 2030.

The current imaging department is 747 square feet, or about 25% smaller than it should be to meet current demand, according to the Wipfli study.

The number of total X-rays and other imaging services is estimated to grow by 690 scans per year over the 5,100 scans expected to be done this year, the Health Facilities study said.

The new hospital also would have a “safe room” for mental health patients where all items they could use to hurt themselves would be removed.

The facility would also include a decontamination room for patients exposed to fuel, pesticides, herbicides or other chemicals.

“Although infrequent, the standard of care is to include a decontamination room near the ER,” Reinhardt said.

The new building would see an expansion to the physical therapy department with six rooms and a large communal space.

Speech therapy and occupational therapy services would have their own rooms for the first time in the new building.

According to the Wipfli study, physical therapy appointments increased from 3,284 in 2016 to 3,825 in 2019.

The proposed hospital also would include space for a surgery suite that would not be finished.

“Depending on the end-cost of the project, there may be room in the bond to finish and equip the operating rooms,” Reinhardt said.

source: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
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Cascade hospital vote Tuesday will require 66.7% majority

The Star-News May 12, 2022

Cascade voters go to the polls Tuesday to decide on whether to fund a $19 million bond to build a new 32,000 square foot Cascade Medical Center.

Voters in the Cascade Medical Center Hospital District can cast their ballots at American Legion Post No. 60 at 105 West Mill Street in Cascade or the Donnelly Bible Church at 159 Gestrin Street in Donnelly from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. depending on their precinct.

Ballots can also be cast early at the Valley Count Clerk’s Office at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade until Friday.

… The cost of the proposed bond would be in addition to the district’s current property taxes, which cost taxpayers about $69 per $100,000 in taxable assessed value per year. The taxing district which owns the hospital extends from Smiths Ferry on the south to south of Donnelly on the north and from Tamarack and West Mountain to Yellow Pine.

full story:
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Absentee ballots must be returned by 8 p.m. on Election Day

By Nicole Camarda May 10, 2022 KIVI

Ada County Elections is reminding voters to get their absentee ballots in the mail by May 11 in order for them to be processed and received by the Ada County Elections Office next week.

Absentee ballots for the Primary Election on May 17 must be returned to Ada County Elections by 8 p.m. on Election Day.

continued: [Note: Deadline is 8pm May 17 for Valley County.]
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ATV stolen from construction site near Smith’s Ferry

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, May 10th 2022


Stolen ATV. (Courtesy Valley County Sheriff)

An ATV was stolen from the construction site on Highway 55 near Smiths Ferry.

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office on Tuesday says the vehicle was taken sometime after 9 p.m. on Monday night. It belongs to a local contractor.

Anyone with information is asked to call 208-382-5160.

source:
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Valley County to continue discussion on Roseberry Park development

Valley County Planning and Zoning public hearing drew about 118 people in opposition last week. Another meeting is set for Thursday evening.

Tristan Lewis May 11, 2022 KTVB

Opposition against the proposed Roseberry Park development in Valley County continues.

The Valley County Planning and Zoning Commission held a public hearing last Thursday which drew about 118 people in opposition to the proposed bid by California-based developer Roseberry Park, LLC.

The developer is looking to obtain a permit to build a mobile home community park west of Donnelly. It’s something they’re pitching as “necessary workforce housing.” If approved, it would bring 201 manufactured homes to the area on about 40 acres near the intersection of Roseberry and Norwood Road.

continued:
— — — —

Valley County denies Roseberry Park proposal

Council members stated concerns from public testimony, affordability, and property rights; among other concerns.

The Valley County Planning and Zoning Commission unanimously voted to deny the proposed bid by California-based developer Roseberry Park, LLC.

Valley County Planning and Zoning held the follow-up hearing after last week’s initial hearing received a greater public testimony turn out than previously expected.

continued:
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Wanted Georgia man, 11-year-old son found in Idaho’s Clearwater National Forest

Unprepared for the rugged backcountry and unable to start a fire in the wet conditions, the pair had resorted to eating snails and insects.

Katie Terhune May 13, 2022 KTVB

A missing Georgia boy and the father who took him on the run have been found after officials say they spent more than a week in Idaho’s rugged backcountry.

continued:
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Letters to Share:

Viewpoint: New Cascade hospital needed to serve all patients

By Dr. Ron Ellsworth and Tom Reinhardt

Cascade Medical Center is an independent, nonprofit hospital. It is locally owned and governed by citizens within our tax district. The appointed and elected members of the Board of Trustees are full-time residents, living within our community.

On May 17, Cascade Medical Center will ask the voters in our hospital district to support a $19 million bond to help us build a new facility so that we can keep pace with the growing demand for healthcare in our community.

The strong financial performance of the medical center will enable CMC to fund at least $15 million of the project ourselves between our savings, loans and grants, but we still need help from the citizens we serve to fund the $34 million project.

The need for a new facility (not just a remodel of the current facility) was determined to be necessary based upon several studies and site surveys. In 2020, Cascade Medical Center hired Wipfli to conduct a needs assessment to determine how we can best serve the needs of our community.

Those findings showed our facility is approximately 13,500 square-feet too small to meet contemporary standards, and that the current site does not provide adequate expansion room to build in the same location.

The results of this study were used to correctly size each department in the planned new facility. We invite you to read the full report and findings of this analysis on our website at (link).

Once the Wipfli findings were compiled, we asked a healthcare architect review their conclusions and provide consultation on a renovation versus a replacement project. Their recommendation, after reviewing all the data was to pursue a replacement facility.

Finally, Cascade Medical Center hired a consultant to study projected growth and volume of services needed in our hospital district. Both the opinion of the architect, as well as the summary of the service volume study, are available on our website at cmchd.org.

All of this due diligence has lead us to this point, the point where we need to replace our facility in order to continue serving all of our patients. To do that, we need to ask for your support as a taxpayer.

If the bond does not pass, the need for a new facility will not go away. Our options would be somewhat limited – try again to pass a bond in November or look to be absorbed into a larger health-care system.

Becoming part of a larger system means local control and autonomy will be lost, and the services we offer may be reduced rather than expanded.

We invite you to learn more and ask questions so you can make an informed decision when you vote on May 17h. Please visit our website for FAQs, to review studies and reports, and see a breakdown of the financials.

We also have two virtual public forums scheduled Thursday, May 12, where you can ask questions and get answers. The links to those forums are on the home page of our website.

It is a pleasure to serve this community and we hope to continue the tradition of independent hometown healthcare for generations to come.

(Dr. Ron Ellsworth is Medical Director of Cascade Medical Center. Tom Reinhardt is CEO of Cascade Medical Center.)
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Viewpoint: Cascade hospital bond cost small compared to going elsewhere

By Christine Murphy

I am writing to give you my perspective on Cascade Medical Center and the bond they are asking for. There are a few reasons why the bond is needed that I am going to describe.

I know that our money is becoming less valuable due to inflation, so the thought of having our taxes go up can be a turn-off. It is my understanding that the amount that taxes will increase is so minimal that almost anyone can make it work.

If we feel like we don’t have the money, then let’s make the decision to stop spending that $5 on non-essentials and put it in an envelope for paying the extra taxes instead. If we would save $5 a day it would be $1,825 that you would save in a year.

The next reason why I feel it is important to pass the bond is that with a bigger and up-to-date hospital we can have more of our appointments here in Cascade instead of having to go to McCall or Boise. I know of some who have to travel to Boise multiple times a week for doctor appointments and tests that could be handled here if we had the space to have specialists come to Cascade.

Some of them include MRI, ultrasound, EEG, echocardiogram, and many other tests. Some blood tests have to be sent out that depending on the results could mean life or death because of having to wait 24-plus hours instead of one to two hours for results. We would also be able to have the CAT scans in the same building, instead of being taken outside to get to the machine.

There was an event when a one-year-old child was diagnosed with RSV and the wonderful staff here had to choose between using medical transportation to move patients from Cascade to another facility at extreme costs or keeping him in Cascade with staff that was capable of treating him Like they are with almost 100% of non-trauma and trauma patients if we had the room and equipment to do so.

Knowing that they were qualified to care for the child they saved the family the cost of Life Flight to Boise. There was only one problem, the hospital was not large enough to have infant/children’s accommodations, including cribs, toys, oxygen cannulas/masks, oximeters, children’s menu, Pedialyte, sippy cups, or bottles.

Because of this, the child had to have an adult in the bed holding the child and the equipment to accommodate the child’s needs. Their kitchen was, and is, too small to do more than one meal at a time and if you have a special diet they can’t accommodate it.

We could also serve multiple people suffering from mental health issues at the same time, which would mean less expenses for treatment of self-harm and suicide attempts or completion.

I wonder when all the housing that is planned to be built is finished we will not be able to keep up with the demand. CMC has served our community of 900-1,000 people in the past because many people chose to go elsewhere for care. But now that we have a fantastic medical team and homes being built, we are having more patients moving their care from McCall and Boise to Cascade.

Part of the reasoning being, our doctors take the time to talk to you and treat you as important as you are and not like just another number/patients to get in and out so they can get more patients seen and make more money.

For example, last month a toddler was brought to the ER because the child’s G-tube came out and the family didn’t have an extra button on hand to replace it. The ER did not have a button because that is not a normal piece of medical equipment to have on hand.

The staff took the time to find a way to make the hole/port stay open that night until the family could make it to Boise to get a new button. Doctor Ellsworth then ordered a button to have on hand just in case. This is not the service you get at other locations!

I hope you can see that we as a community need to vote yes for the bond for Cascade Medical Center to build a new facility so we can meet the needs of our community. The extra taxes are pennies compared to the thousands of dollars it cost for us to be sent to other places for services, that could be handled if we just had the room to accommodate.

Please for the health and wellness of our community. Vote “yes.”

(Christine Murphy lives in Cascade.)

source: The Star-News May 12, 2022
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Scam Alert:

Don’t Buy Gift Cards to Pay Someone

From Valley County Sheriff’s Office May 10, 2022

We know we have said it before, but we are going to say it again. This is a scam. They are not traceable and you WILL LOSE YOUR MONEY! These people are super aggressive and extremely bossy. They will stay on the phone with you, tell you where to go, they look up local stores in your area and tell you where to go buy the gift cards, in fact the last one we had, stayed on the phone with the person the entire time they bought the cards. They are smart and manipulative, they do their homework and they are very hard to impossible to trace or track down. The last person lost out on $3,000. Please don’t judge people by their naivety, it happens, believe it or not, some people don’t have social media. The scammers are extremely convincing and prey on older people. Spread the word, tell your parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, etc… Share this post. Don’t buy a gift card for anyone unless you know who it is 100%.
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Public Lands:

Personal use fuelwood sales begin May 15, at local vendors

Exception: Fuelwood sales in the Visitor Center not available until end of June

Boise, Idaho, May 10, 2022 — Personal use fuelwood permits for the Boise National Forest will be available for sale beginning May 15, through Nov. 30, 2022. The Boise National Forest is offering multiple choices to purchase personal fuelwood permits. For information about fuelwood cutting on surrounding National Forests, please contact them directly.

The Mountain Home Ranger District office is open now and the Idaho City, Emmett, Lowman and Cascade Ranger District offices will be reopening May 16. The Visitor Center in Boise, Idaho, will not be selling fuelwood permits until the end of June.

1. Vendors in surrounding communities will be selling personal use fuelwood permits
2. Visitor Information Center, 1387 S. Vinnell Way, Boise, Idaho, (Not available for purchase until the end of June)
3. All mail-in applications will be processed at the Cascade Ranger District

1. Vendors -May 15, 2022: Fuelwood permits can be purchased at the following commercial vendor locations:

Caldwell: East Cleveland Beverage (208) 459-6442
Emmett: B & W Fuels (208) 365-2291
Horseshoe Bend: Ray’s Corner Market (208) 793-2391
Garden Valley: Garden Valley Chevron (208) 462-3869
Placerville: Donna’s Place (208) 392-9666
Idaho City: Idaho City Grocery (208) 392-4426
Idaho City: Seasons (208) 392-9777

2. Visitor Information Center – 208-373-4100 (Fuelwood permits will NOT be available for purchase until the end of June) Located at – 1387 S. Vinnell Way, Boise, Idaho; Monday thru Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

3. The Mail-in application process are for the continued safety of the public and our front-line employees. Mail-in application forms are available to print. Mail-in applications with check or money order payable to USDA (No Cash) to:
Cascade Ranger District / Attn: Fuelwood Program / P.O. Box 696 / Cascade, ID 83611.

For questions contact the Cascade Ranger District Office 208-382-7400; Monday – Friday: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
(Business Operations may be impacted by COVID-19 Restrictions and Closures, or Forest Fire Operations.)

For more information:

* Boise National Forest fuelwood webpage.
* Motor Vehicle Use Maps to ensure you are cutting in areas open to motor vehicle use.
* To see current forest closures, visit the interactive Forest Closure story map.

Cutting fuelwood within a closed area is prohibited.

* Ranger District offices.

– Mountain Home Ranger District 208-587-7961
– Idaho City Ranger District 208-392-6681
– Cascade Ranger District 208-382-7400
– Lowman Ranger District 208-259-3361
– Emmett Ranger District 208-365-7000

Fuelwood permit prices remain at $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum, and a 10-cord maximum per household. Please note, we cannot sell permits for only 2 cords. If you want all 10 cords, permits purchased will need to be 5 cords and 5 cords, or 4 cords and 6 cord, or all 10 cords at once. Pick up your 2022 fuelwood brochure with tags when you purchase the fuelwood permit

Permit holders are encouraged to cut fuelwood early in the year because fire restrictions may impact the cutting season later in the summer. Early season fuelwood cutters are asked to use caution to avoid wet muddy roads where travel may cause resource damage. Fuelwood cutting is not allowed within riparian areas (adjacent to creeks and rivers).

There is no cutting of Larch (Tamarack) after Nov. 1. Larch lose their needles every fall and appear to be dead, resulting in too many live trees being accidently cut. This new regulation is to prevent the cutting of live Larch trees after they have lost their needles in the fall.
— — — —

Fuelwood Season Starts May 15 on the Payette National Forest

McCall, Idaho, May 10, 2022 – Personal use fuelwood permits for the Payette National Forest will be available beginning May 15, through November 30, 2021. We will be selling permits with curbside service only at our Forest Service offices until offices are fully open to employees and the public. Permits are not sold at the Forest Supervisor’s Office in McCall.

Fuelwood permits can be purchased in person at these vendor locations beginning Sunday, May 15:

* Weiser: Ridley’s Food and Drug (208) 549-1332
Open: Everyday 7 a.m. – 11 p.m.

* Weiser Farmer’s Supply Cooperative (208) 549-0654
Open: Everyday 5 a.m. – 10 p.m.

* Cambridge: Jay’s Sinclair (208) 257-5000
Open: Everyday 6 a.m. – 10 p.m.

* Council: Farmer’s Supply Co-op (208) 253-4266
Open: Everyday 6 a.m. – 10 p.m.

* McCall: Albertsons (208) 634-8166
Open: Everyday 6 a.m. – 11 p.m.

* New Meadows: C&M Lumber (208) 347-2194
Open: Monday – Saturday 8 a.m. – 6 p.m.

* Yellow Pine: The Corner (208) 634-3325
Open: Wednesday thru Monday (closed Tuesdays) 8am-8pm.

The prohibition of cutting Western larch (known locally as Tamarack) after November 1 remains in place. Larch lose their needles every fall and appear to be dead, resulting in too many live trees being accidently cut. This regulation is to prevent the cutting of live Larch trees after they have lost their needles in the fall. Regulations also prohibit the cutting of dead or living Whitebark pine trees due to decline in this tree species, and their critical importance to wildlife.

Fuelwood permit prices remain at $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum, and a 10-cord maximum per household. Please note we cannot sell permits for only 2 cords. If you want all ten cords, permits purchased will need to be 5 cords and 5 cords, or 4 cords and 6 cord, or all 10 cords at once.

The Payette National Forest has a free-use area located in the Big Creek area. A free-use permit is required for this area, and can be obtained by calling the McCall Ranger District office. Specifics of the free-use location and requirements will be explained to people seeking free-use permits. Free-use fuelwood counts as personal use toward the 10-cord maximum per household.

Cutting fuelwood within a closure area is prohibited. Check on the Alerts and Notices page of Forest websites for closure information.

Check this year’s fuelwood brochure and current Motor Vehicle Use Maps to make sure you are cutting in an area open to fuelwood gathering and pay special attention to closed areas and roads with restoration project areas.

Fuelwood permits are valid within the Boise, Payette and Sawtooth Forests. All motorized travel related to fuelwood gathering must be in full accordance with Forest Service travel regulations for the area as shown in the Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM), unless specifically exempted in the fuelwood permit. For information about fuelwood cutting on surrounding National forests, please contact them directly.

Permit holders are encouraged to cut fuelwood early in the year because fire restrictions may impact the cutting season later in the summer. Early season fuelwood cutters are asked to use caution to avoid wet muddy roads where travel may cause resource damage. Fuelwood cutting is not allowed within riparian areas (adjacent to creeks and rivers).

For additional information, contact the local Ranger District offices, or visit the Forest website and Payette National Forest Facebook page.

Weiser Ranger District, Monday through Friday, 8a.m. to 4:30p.m. 208-549-4200

Council Ranger District, Monday through Friday, 8a.m. to 4:30p.m. 208-253-0100

McCall Ranger District, Monday through Friday, 8a.m. to 4:30p.m. 208-634-0400

New Meadows Ranger District, Monday through Friday, 8a.m. to 4:30p.m. 208-347-0300
— — — — — — — — — —

Bureau of Land Management seeks input on fence improvements north of Emmett

Date: May 13, 2022
Contact: Mike Williamson mwilliamson@blm.gov 208-384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is seeking public comment on a proposed fencing modification plan for the Linson Creek grazing allotment located 20 miles northeast of Emmett.

An environmental assessment will analyze the proposed construction of a total of one mile of fencing to reduce recreation and livestock conflicts. The current layout of fences has led to instances of gates being left open and livestock wandering into sensitive streamside vegetation to feed.

The BLM will accept scoping comments through May 27, 2022.

“This scoping period will allow the public and other interested parties to identify potential issues for the BLM to consider,” said Four Rivers Assistant Field Manager Ammon Wilhelm. “Comments are most helpful if they provide specific actions, resources or issues that should be addressed.”

Maps and information about the project are available at: (link) (case sensitive).

Comments will be accepted through the following means:
* Email: BLM_ID_FourRiversOffice@blm.gov
* Fax: 208-384-3326
* Surface mail: Brent Ralston, Four Rivers Field Manager, 3948 Development Ave, Boise, ID 83705

Please note that before including their personal identifying information (address, email, phone number), commenters should be aware that their entire comment – including their personal identifying information – may be made publicly available at any time. While those commenting can ask in their comments to withhold this information from public review, the BLM cannot guarantee that they will be able to do so.

For more information, contact the BLM Four Rivers Field Office at 208-384-3300.
—————

Critter News:

BLM seeks comments on proposed wild horse management plan for southwest Idaho

May 11, 2022 Local News 8

As part of its mission to manage and protect wild horses and burros on public lands, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is seeking input from the public on a proposed 10-year management plan for wild horses within the Sands Basin, Hardtrigger and Black Mountain Herd Management Areas located along the Owyhee Foothills.

The BLM plans to prepare an environmental assessment for the plan analyzing a variety of wild horse gather and fertility control options to maintain wild horse populations at the appropriate management level within each herd management area as required by the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act. The action is needed to reduce impacts to rangeland health and wildlife habitat within the herd management area boundaries and to protect animal and herd health.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Second illegally-stocked walleye caught in Lake Cascade in past four years

Walleyes are “incompatible” with the perch in Lake Cascade and its fisheries downstream, according to Idaho Fish & Game.

KTVB Staff May 10, 2022

Idaho Fish & Game confirmed the second illegally-stocked walleye was caught in Lake Cascade since 2018 on Saturday, May 7.

Off-duty Regional Fisheries Biologist, Mike Thomas, was fishing Lake Cascade with local angler, Chris Weber, when Weber landed the fish. According to Idaho Fish & Game (IDFG), the mature male walleye measured 20-inches in length and weighed nearly 3 pounds.

Back in 2018, an angler reported catching a 19-inch Walleye near Lake Cascade’s Crown Point. The walleye caught on May 7 was near the Boulder Creek arm of Lake Cascade.

“We know that the only way walleye could have gotten into Lake Cascade is through one or more individuals illegally transplanting them there,” Regional Fisheries Manager, Jordan Messner said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

New ‘citizen science’ opportunity hits Boise area: Bee Watch

By Geneva Zoltek May 10, 2022 KIVI

At 14 spots around the Treasure Valley, new installments invite you to take part in science.

Bee Watch, a brand new program to the City of Boise’s Parks and Recreation Department, encourages community scientists to help collect data on native bee species.

“There isn’t enough time and capacity in the scientific community to be everywhere all at once. And so by utilizing community scientists, we can maybe understand a larger breadth of bee diversity,” said Martha Brabeck, Parks & Rec Foothills Restoration Specialist.

continued:
—————-

Trivia:

A Group of Hummingbirds is called a charm, a glittering, a shimmer, a tune, a bouquet, or a hover.
————–

Fish and Game News:

F&G hosting “Fish Idaho Fest – McCall” on June 10

By Brian Pearson, Regional Communications Manager
Tuesday, May 10, 2022

The event will be a party bringing anglers, conservation groups and resource management agencies together

If you are interested in learning about and getting more involved with fisheries and aquatic resources management in the McCall area, and having some fun while you are at it, mark your calendars for June 10, 2022 and join Idaho Fish and Game and our various partners for “Fish Idaho Fest – McCall.”

Idaho Fish and Game is hosting the event from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Friday, June 10 at Broken Horn Brewery, 201 Mission St. in McCall. The event includes live music; fly casting and fly tying demonstrations; food trucks; booths from nonprofits and government agencies involved with fisheries and aquatic resources management; and more.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Spring Chinook Salmon Fishing Update 5/10/2022: Rapid River Run, Hells Canyon, and Clearwater River Fisheries

By Joe DuPont, Fisheries Regional Manager
Tuesday, May 10, 2022

Hi everybody.

It is time for my weekly spring Chinook Salmon update (May 10, 2022). So, let’s get right to it and discuss what we have learned since my last update.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Learn skills early western frontier people needed to survive at “Living History Rendezvous”

By Brian Pearson, Regional Communications Manager
Wednesday, May 11, 2022

This unique outdoor skills course provides students an opportunity to develop multiple primitive outdoor skills

Curious how the trappers, explorers and mountain men of Idaho lived in the early 1800s? Idaho Fish and Game, in partnership with Idaho Free Trappers, is hosting a “Living History Rendezvous” to teach people many of the skills that these early western frontier people and their families needed to survive.

The free, family-friendly event is scheduled for 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on May 21 and May 22 at Black’s Creek Public Shooting Range, 2420 E Kuna Mora Road in Kuna.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Spring Newsletter-Idaho Naturalist News

By Sara Focht, Wildlife Educator
Friday, May 13, 2022

The spring edition of the Idaho Naturalist News (seasonal newsletter of the Idaho Master Naturalist Program) is available. Read about the 2022 Rendezvous, the ice age floods of north Idaho, see great nature photography, and more!

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

A robot lives in this Antarctic penguin colony. It’s trying to save them

April 29, 2022 Local News 8

Thousands of emperor penguins cluster on the ice of Atka Bay in Antarctica, mostly unaware that an interloper lives among them.

Slightly shorter than the average adult emperor, the 3-foot-tall (1-meter-tall) autonomous robot sits silently within the colony, nondescript compared with humans who sometimes emerge from a nearby research station.

The birds occasionally notice ECHO, an unmanned and remote-controlled ground vehicle, because “they exhibit curiosity to everything that they don’t know,” said Dan Zitterbart, associate scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts.

But it’s a passing fascination for the emperors, who quickly move on from the static object. The penguins are unphased by the robot, which acts like a mobile antenna for an observatory monitoring about 300 of them each year.

continued: w/video
———-

Seasonal Humor:

MayWeather-a
— —

May

It’s May in the Idaho mountains.
And what can we expect?
There may be snow,
there may be sun,
or we may just be wet.
We may be wearing shorts and tees.
We may be wearing dungarees.
We may be in our overcoats.
We may stay in or be in boats.
We may be digging in our yards or staring at the blooms.
But no matter what it’s like we just can’t wait for June.

– shared by a local lady.
— — — — —

Rock Migration Season

RockMigrationSeason-a
————

Idaho History May 15, 2022

A Stibnite Story

John D Nicholson

by Bob Clarkson

During the years that I worked with Johnny, he related quite a bit about himself to me. However, many of the details and dates have slipped from my memory.

He was of Icelandic origin and in many respects was an unusual personality. He possessed a lot of talent and was a very intelligent person – but with a weakness. That weakness prevailed during young manhood in the days of moonshine and bootlegging, perhaps with a measure of gambling fever thrown in.

Anyway, that is the substance of his college days and perhaps for a time after, finally leading to his sinking quite far down into the gutter. Some of his classmates at the University of Idaho College of Mines, like Otto Brown and Jim Lange, sometimes commented on Johnny’s particular and sort of resourcefulness in getting through college – with poker winnings.

I don’t have dates available, but he was in and around the Cascade area during the middle twenties. He was first married to John Croco’s daughter and worked with his father-in-law for a time mushing dog team service into the back country. A son was born of that marriage. The Croco girl was his “one and only”, but her untimely death apparently led to still more drinking and the subsequent wrath of her family. Little was known of his son.

Johnny told me this story of taking a sled load of moonshine along with the mailsack into Deadwood Mine for the holiday season. Cy Garber was then running the camp and got wind of the plan. On the day Nicholson was scheduled to arrive, Cy was ready and waiting up the trail. He stopped the outfit, checked the contents of the load, removed the mail, and proceeded to bash the jugs of booze against a big granite boulder. Then Cy allowed as how the likes of Nicholson had better not show in those parts ever again and sent Johnny and his dogs a-packin’ with an empty sled and pocketbook!

Johnny used to worry that Cy would remember that occasion when he came to Stibnite from Kellogg some years later.

In those earlier years, he is credited with helping Hennessy stake his claims on the East Fork above Sugar Creek – he and Hennessy must have been a pair!

It was probably after that time when he graduated from Shadel’s cure in the alcoholic sanitarium of that name in Seattle.

He often spoke admiringly of an uncle in Minnesota who was a mechanical genius, a very successful inventor of early food packaging machinery (the first of which was a measuring and wrapping device for Blue Goose cheese, all done mechanically.)

It was shortly before returning to Stibnite that he was married to Lucia. They were a pair, to say the least, and it was interesting to contemplate how much different personalities got along so well together.

It must have been after Shadel’s, and, of course, prior to returning to Stibnite, that he put in a hitch as a design engineer for Boeing in Seattle (the early World War II years). One of his constant complaints with us was that the project was always finished before his drawings could be completed!

Nevertheless, Johnny was a rare person! Invariably had his thoughts working to organize something for pleasure or service to others in need.

That year when work was somewhat off, he took leave, so that he and Lucia could winter in Bear Valley. The desire was to have a winter of solitude, Johnny to fur trap and write, at both of which he was adept. Another objective was to soak out some of the old poison in the hot spring flowing nearby their lodgepole cabin.

That winter of ’46/’47 made some interesting story material in itself.

Another time he organized and carried out a project to restore, with an appropriate bronze marker, some semblance of dignity to the old Roosevelt Cemetery. With the help of those still around who had knowledge of names and events of Thunder Mountain’s heyday, the bronze marker was obtained and placed at the site. That was done along with other improvements to preserve the historic value of an old goldrush graveyard.

The foregoing is quite typical of Nicholson’s ever-busy mind. That, coupled with his being an insatiable coffee drinker and loving to play the odds, gives one a picture of the person.

From Stibnite, when the decline was settling in, Johnny and Lucia moved on, as mining people do. Their next and final stay was in the Henderson area of Nevada. While there, the drafting tools and slide rule were put aside for retirement, but unfortunately, the latter was of short duration, and a lot of planning went unfulfilled.

Thus it was a keen loss of a special sort of friend to many when Johnny, in words he would likely use, ”cashed in his chips”.
— — — —

JohnDNicholsonBook-aWhite buffalo and Tah-tank-ka by John D Nicholson
Published: January 1, 1941

link: Amazon

from Sandy McRae (courtesy Scott Amos)
— — — — — — — — — —

Stibnite Photos

New-Doc-2018-04-06_7-aCaption: Harry Whithers w/ pole, John Croco, about 1929, lead dog named Streak

New-Doc-2018-04-06_7-b(zoom of above photo)

Stibnite Mine Photos

New-Doc-2018-04-06_2-aStibnite Hospital

New-Doc-2018-04-06_10-a

New-Doc-2018-04-06_6-aMill Machinery

New-Doc-2018-04-06_3-a

New-Doc-2018-04-06_8-a

New-Doc-2018-04-06_9-a(Marked 56-11-2)

photos from Sandy McRae (courtesy Scott Amos 4/6/2018)
————–

Further Reading

Link to Back County Mail Carriers
Link: to Roosevelt Cemetery
Link to Deadwood (part 1 Mining)
Link: to Stibnite History (table of contents)
Link: to Thunder Mountain & Roosevelt history
Link: to The History of Schick Shadel Hospital in Seattle
—————–

Road Reports May 15, 2022

It is Rock Migration Season. Please share road reports. Spring travel conditions. Most back country roads are not maintained. This time of year there is deep snow in higher elevations. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: YP received rain Friday and Saturday. Local streets are bare and damp. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Hwy 55 Construction Update from ITD May 12, 2022
Starting Monday, May 16, closures on SH-55 between Smiths Ferry and the Rainbow Bridge will shorten from 4-hour closures to 2-hour closures. The new schedule will be 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Monday – Thursday, and will continue through Thursday, May 26. Outside of those closures, there will still be one-way, alternating traffic with 15-minute delays.
Drivers should still anticipate longer delays once the road reopens at 12 p.m. to allow flaggers to clear queues on either side of the work zone. Once those lines are cleared, there should not be wait times longer that 15 minutes.
We appreciate your patience as we move through another spring season of construction work. To learn more about the spring construction schedule, visit link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (May 11) no snow on the road this morning.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Saturday (May 14) road was clear. Traffic and campers.
Report Wednesday (May 11) mail truck driver said the road is clear.
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Saturday (May 14) road was clear.
Report Wednesday (May 11) mail truck driver says the road is in great shape after the county graded it.

Upper Johnson Creek Road (Trail): Closed to wheeled vehicles.
No current report.
Lower Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (May 11) the county graded most of the lower end.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled travel
Report Wednesday (May 11) a backhoe is working on the lower end on this side.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Closed to full sized vehicles at the junction with Profile Creek.
Old report Wednesday (April 6): from Perpetua “As Spring has arrived, snow and ice on the Stibnite road are beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Perpetua Resources crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Perpetua Resources crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
“We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road starting week of March 21st. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.” – Sam
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:
Valley County Road & Bridge Announcements
Road Break-Up Limits in Effect Until further notice, break-up limits are now in effect:
* 7 tons per axle,
* 80,000 lbs maximum
————-

Weather Reports May 8-14, 2022

May 8 Weather:

At 930am it was 31 degrees, socked in low and snowing (ended at 945am.) A few cracks in the overcast by 10am and filtered sunshine, but low foggy clouds in the valley. At 1040am dark clouds to the south, socked in to the north. At 1215pm dark clouds to the south, patches of blue sky to the north over the fog on VanMeter hill, most of the new snow has melted. At 1225pm snowing lightly. At 1pm stopped snowing and breaks in the clouds, no new accumulation. Overcast at 2pm, foggy ridges. Overcast and a bit breezy after 2pm. Snowing pretty good at 240pm, not snowing at 3pm. At 340pm it was 40 degrees, mostly cloudy with patches of blue sky and light breezes. From 445pm-5pm mostly pea sized hail coming down hard, nearly an inch accumulation before melting. Partly clear at 650pm. At 8pm it was 35 degrees and mostly cloudy – patches of clear sky. At 11pm some high haze.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 09, 2022 at 09:30AM
Cracked overcast
Max temperature 42 degrees F
Min temperature 25 degrees F
At observation 30 degrees F
Precipitation 0.05 inch
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

May 9 Weather:

At 9am it was 30 degrees, cracks in the overcast, small patches of snow in the shade. Flaking snow at 12pm, lasted about 10 minutes. Flaking snow at 130pm for a few minutes and mostly cloudy with patches of clear sky. At 320pm it was 40 degrees, overcast and breezy. Graupel shower from approximately 325pm to around 345pm – trace. At 750pm dark overcast and snowing lightly. At 8pm it was 34 degrees, low overcast sitting halfway down VanMeter, light breeze and still flaking snow. At 930pm still snowing lightly, scant trace. At 11pm socked in low and steady snow, up to half an inch or more. At 1am it was 30 degrees, light snowfall and about an inch. At 2am not snowing, clouds had lifted.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 10, 2022 at 09:30AM
Partly cloudy, melting
Max temperature 46 degrees F
Min temperature 26 degrees F
At observation 32 degrees F
Precipitation 0.11 inch
Snowfall 1 1/2 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

May 10 Weather:

At 930am it was 32 degrees, partly cloudy and snow melting quickly. New snow melted by noon, increasing clouds. Overcast by 2pm and getting breezy. At 340pm it was 45 degrees, increasing dark clouds to the west (patches of blue to the east) and lighter breezes. At 8pm it was 37 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 11pm it looked at least partly (or mostly) cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 11, 2022 at 09:30AM
Partly hazy, light breeze, frost melting
Max temperature 50 degrees F
Min temperature 23 degrees F
At observation 36 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

May 11 Weather:

At 930am it was 36 degrees, partly hazy, light breeze and frost melting. Mostly hazy before 11am. At 1245pm it was 53 degrees, mostly cloudy (chunkier) and light breezes. At 330pm it was 43 degrees, started raining lightly, and low dark overcast (sitting down on VanMeter.) Not raining at 408pm and little sucker hole letting in sunshine. By 420pm patches of blue sky. At 8pm it was 47 degrees, mostly cloudy (chunky and dark) and breezy. Cloudy at 1130pm. Snow (and maybe rain?) early morning (estimate 5am-7am?)

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 12, 2022 at 09:30AM
Mostly cloudy, fog belts, snow melting
Max temperature 55 degrees F
Min temperature 32 degrees F
At observation 39 degrees F
Precipitation 0.22 inch
Snowfall 1/2 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

May 12 Weather:

At 930am it was 39 degrees, mostly cloudy with fog belts mid-mountain and new snow melting quickly. At 340pm it was 50 degrees, mostly cloudy with small patches of blue sky and cool breezes. Wind gust hit around 7pm. At 8pm it was mostly cloudy and chilly breezes. At 1030pm it looked cloudy with filtered moonlight. Breezy after 11pm. At 1225am had been raining long enough to be wet. Not raining at 130am. Raining at 5am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 13, 2022 at 09:30AM
Partly clear, breezy
Max temperature 52 degrees F
Min temperature 32 degrees F
At observation 42 degrees F
Precipitation 0.18 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

May 13 Weather:

At 930am it was 42 degrees, partly clear and breezy at times. At 1pm it was partly cloudy and breezy. At 330pm it was 53 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy. At 815pm it was 47 degrees, mostly cloudy and calmer. At 11pm it looked overcast, only a little bit of filtered moonlight. Rain likely started around 7am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 14, 2022 at 09:30AM
Overcast, light rain
Max temperature 53 degrees F
Min temperature 38 degrees F
At observation 42 degrees F
Precipitation 0.04 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

May 14 Weather:

At 930am it was 42 degrees, overcast with fog on high ridges and light rainfall. At 12pm overcast and still raining. Rain stopped around 3pm. At 340pm it was 50 degrees and partly clear. At 4pm overcast and sprinkling. Not raining at 435pm and breaks in the clouds. At 8pm it was 52 degrees, mostly cloudy and a few sprinkles that didn’t last long. At 11pm partly clear and bright moon.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 15, 2022 at 09:30AM
Mostly clear
Max temperature 57 degrees F
Min temperature 31 degrees F
At observation 46 degrees F
Precipitation 0.14 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
—————————

Road Reports May 11, 2022

It is Rock Migration Season. Please share road reports. Spring travel conditions. Most back country roads are not maintained. This time of year there is deep snow in higher elevations. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: YP received over an inch of snow Tuesday morning but it has all melted. Local streets are bare and damp. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Hwy 55 Construction Announcement from ITD 4/5/22
Full road closures on ID-55 near Smiths Ferry will begin on April 11, 2022. Drivers can expect closures Mon.-Thurs. from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Outside of those hours, the road will be open to one-way alt traffic.
Drivers should plan ahead to avoid delays and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route when possible. link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Report Wednesday (May 11) no snow on the road this morning.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Wednesday (May 11) mail truck driver said the road is clear.
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Wednesday (May 11) mail truck driver says the road is in great shape after the county graded it.

Upper Johnson Creek Road (Trail): Closed to wheeled vehicles.
No current report.
Lower Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (May 11) the county graded most of the lower end.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled travel
Report Wednesday (May 11) a backhoe is working on the lower end on this side.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Closed to full sized vehicles at the junction with Profile Creek.
Old report Wednesday (April 6): from Perpetua “As Spring has arrived, snow and ice on the Stibnite road are beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Perpetua Resources crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Perpetua Resources crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
“We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road starting week of March 21st. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.” – Sam
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:
Valley County Road & Bridge Announcements
Road Break-Up Limits in Effect Until further notice, break-up limits are now in effect:
* 7 tons per axle,
* 80,000 lbs maximum
————-

May 8, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

May 8, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
Oct 27, 2021 – Transfer Station on Winter Schedule
Nov 1, 2021 – Winter Mail Delivery Starts
2022
Mar-May – Spring Rx burns
May 8 – Mother’s Day Brunch Community Hall
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit Season
May 28 – Memorial Potluck 2pm Community Hall
May 29 – YPFD meeting at 2pm
Jun 8-11 – Spring Free Dump Days
Jun 11 – VYPA Meeting 2pm Community Hall
Jul 2 – 4th of July golf tournament
Jul 3 – YPWUA Shareholders Meeting
Jul 9 – VYPA Meeting 2pm Community Hall
(details below)
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Local Events:

Mother’s Day Brunch May 8th

Mother’s Day brunch will be held at the Community Hall on Sunday May 8 at 12 noon. Food will be provided. Donations appreciated. All donations will contribute to the village’s funds.
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State Burn permits required by May 10

Closed fire season begins May 10, which means Idahoans outside city limits will need a burn permit before burning any debris. The closed fire season lasts until Oct. 20.
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Memorial Potluck Saturday May 28th

Memorial Potluck at the Community Hall. Burgers and Brats provided. Please bring a side dish if you would like.

Stay tuned for more details…


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Krassel RD Prescribed Burns Spring 2022

The Krassel Ranger District plans to apply fire to approximately 2,500 acres within the Bald Hill project area (east of Yellow Pine); 2,000 acres in the Four Mile project area along the South Fork of the Salmon River near the Miners peak trail, and 70 acres around Krassel Work Center.
Ignitions may occur over 2-7 days in the months of March through May Flame, smoke and hazards may be present in the area until significant precipitation or season ending weather is received. If you have any questions or comments please contact Dave Hogen Krassel District Ranger at 208-634-0600

(Same map from last fall.)
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Spring Free Dump Days

June 8, 9, 10, and 11 for Valley County
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Golf Tournament July 2nd

The annual 4th of July golf tournament will be on Saturday, July 2nd at 10(ish). All proceeds will be used to improve the golf course (improving the greens, signs and tees. More information to follow. Contact Joel or Marj Fields with questions, sponsorships or donations at fieldsmarjie @ yahoo.com


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YPWUA Shareholders Meeting July 3rd

The yearly shareholders meeting will be Sunday July 3rd at 10am. There will be two positions up for elections.

There has been some question on who can vote and can run for office. You must be a shareholder with the Yellow Pine Water Users Association to be able to vote and run for office. If you have any questions about being a shareholder, please contact me.

Thank you – Steve Holloway
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Village News:

The Great Chicken Roundup

A good neighbor noticed loose chickens on main street early this week. She found an experienced assistant at the Tavern and using goodies donated by a bear hunter the great chicken roundup began. Most of the hens willingly went back in the gate, but a few stragglers resisted, so it took some expert wrangling to convince them to join their sisters in the pen.

ChickenHerding-a
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Tuesday Morning’s Snow

Woke up to half an inch of melting snow.
20220503YellowPine-West-a
Yellow Pine West – courtesy Eye-n-Sky
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Great Jab

A big Thank You to Cascade Medical center for sending in a vial of Moderna and especially to Jeff for his efforts to reach out and boost our elderly population on May 5th. Great “Jab” Jeff.
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Cinco de Mayo

A Cinco de Mayo party was held at the Community Hall at 3pm on May 5. The food was provided by the VYPA Council as an appreciation for our village community.
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Lattes at The Corner

After a long anticipated wait, lattes are live at the corner! Come on in for a delicious coffee.
20220506Lattes-a
courtesy The Corner
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Saturday Morning’s Snow

Rained Friday turning to snow Saturday morning.
20220507JohnsonCrNorth-a
Johnson Creek North courtesy Eye-n-Sky
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Sunday Morning’s Snow

Three and a quarter inches of snow fell during the night.
20220508YellowPineNorth-a
Yellow Pine North – courtesy Eye-n-sky
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Watkins Pharmacy Update April 20th

Greetings! We will be painting the temp pharmacy in two weeks. There have to be some structural changes inside the space to ensure the pharmacy is secured and satisfy state regulations. In order to do that the new owner of the building, with his architect, have to have his building permit and plans approved by the city before we can modify anything under the permit. So we are probably looking at a date around June 1st at this point. Thank you for asking! Amber Watkins
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Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at wicap.org.
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Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
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Arnold Aviation News:

Customers New Deadline – Please email your shopping list by Sunday evening so they are ready to print early Monday morning.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
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Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Valley County Road & Bridge Announcements
Road Break-Up Limits in Effect Until further notice, break-up limits are now in effect:
* 7 tons per axle,
* 80,000 lbs maximum

Hwy 55 summer road construction starts March 14, 2022
link:

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Closed to full sized vehicles at the junction with Profile Creek
from Perpetua “As Spring has arrived, snow and ice on the Stibnite road are beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Perpetua Resources crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Perpetua Resources crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
“We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road starting week of March 21st. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.” – Sam

Upper Johnson Creek road at Landmark, Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Elk Summit, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are closed to wheeled vehicles. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
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Critters

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be Elk Aware

Elk are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard. F&G confirms there is a pack of 6 wolves in our valley.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

Bears will be coming out of hibernation soon and hungry.

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat had been hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started November 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report April 23: Bins emptied and transfer station cleaned by locals.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

Water Use

Date Flow Used Hours gph gpm dow more less
05/01/22 23321007 26349 24 1098 18 S 130
05/02/22 23348164 27157 24 1132 19 M 808
05/03/22 23375252 27088 24 1129 19 T 69
05/04/22 23400577 25325 24 1055 18 W 1853
05/05/22 23427016 26439 24 1102 18 T 1114
05/06/22 23453555 26539 24 1106 18 F 100
05/07/22 23479603 26048 24 1085 18 S 491
05/08/22 23504902 25299 24 1054 18 S 749

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

DRINKING WATER WARNING April 11, 2022
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 4-11-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

YPWUA 2022 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 3, 2022
YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 5, 2020 link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
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VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association:
Hailey Harris, Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Jen Aldrich, Secretary
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Ron Earl

April 6, 2022 Village Council meeting to fill vacant chairperson position (no minutes.)
Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.
2022 Meeting dates:
June 11
July 9
August 13
September 10

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Commissioners Meeting April 3, 2022

Officers In Attendance:
Bill McIntosh #3, Lorinne Munn #1, Tom Lanham #2, Tim Rogers Fire Chief, Ron Basabe Assistant Fire Chief, Ronda Rogers Secretary/Treasurer.
Others: Sarah Lanham, Christy Harris Cecil Dallman, Tim and Jen Aldrich, Ginny Bartholomew, Leslie Jensen, Lynn Imel.

Meeting called to order at 2 PM; Visitors notified that there would be a comment period after the Commissioners Meeting.

Action Item: Approved of minutes from Prior meetings 2/24/2022 and 1/30/2022, 3/3 vote

Treasurer’s Report: 3/1/22 4 Battery For the Red Fire Truck $476.00, 3/3/22 Ed Staub Sons $39.72, 3/4/22 MTE letter $1.94, 3/18/22 MTE $95.16, 3/25/22 ICRMP 2nd payment $1245.00, 3/24/22 Conference & Membership $1700.00, Hotel $1328.00, 3/1/22 Deposit taxes $2008.97, 3/23/22 Deposit Taxes $174.29, Donation 500.00
Balance $23,131.73

Action Item: Commissioners approved all expenses, 3/3 vote

Discussion: Memorial Day Plans, Chairman McIntosh would like to have brunch so the people of Yellow Pine could come and meet their Commissioner and talk to them about their concerns.

Discussion: Lorinne reported on the Commission Conference. Stronger Leadership For Resiliency and Challenging Times; by Silouan Green. Silouan was a very powerful speaker and talk about the Character of Leadership. The broad agreed that the Conference was very informational and important for them all to attend.

Discussion: Boise National Forest update; PODs overview. The PODs process is more than drawing containers on a map; it is a cross-boundary, collaborative engagement that translates into operational strategies once fire is on the ground. PODS are fire management and planning units.

Fire Chief’s Report:
The Red Truck has 4 new batteries and is back in working order.
Two fuel tanks have been found and can be purchased for $400.00 for both; just working on a place to put them.
Plans to have a website for the Fire Department to post all our activity, meetings, and trainings.
Training classes are in the planning stage; there will be 2 trainings per month in the summer months and 1 a month in the winter. There is also online training class also.
Cecil said we could make our own racks to dry our hoses after we use them. He is willing to help us build them.
Radios – need to locate all of the radios and have Alex Pellegrini condition them. Alex will be giving a training class on the radios and will be handing them back out.

Discussion: A safe at the firehouse – need a small safe at the firehouse to keep vehicle titles, other important documents. Mike Amos said that he had one he would donate but his safe is too big. Chief Rogers will check on prices to purchase one.

Meeting Adjourned at 2:45 PM

Comment period started after the meeting.

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Meeting Minutes

Apr 3, 2022, Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Feb 24, 2022 Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting (no minutes yet.)
Nov 23, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Nov 8, 2021 AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
Oct 31, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Oct 14, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sep 27, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sep 18, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sep 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
Jul 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Jun 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sep 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 11, 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Winter hours:
Open Wednesday 11-6
Fridays 11-9
Saturdays 9-6
Sunday’s 10-6
Closed Monday, Tuesday and Thursday
Exceptions are by appointment and we’ll be open on Mondays of Holiday weekends. New Latte machine.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Winter Hours at the Tavern until May 15th
Open Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat: 9am-2pm 4pm-8pm
Open Sunday 9am-2pm
Closed Tues & Thurs
Call the Tavern 208 633-2233 or Cell 208 739-7086 for other arrangements
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
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Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed for the winter.
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Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Availability for 2022
*Note can book Idaho Residents now for Archery or put on a waiting list for Non Residents, will find out final allocations by April 18th.
2 on 1 Archery August 29th to September 4th *Lodge hunt / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Archery September 6th to September 12th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Rifle September 24th to September 30th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Wolf.
Spring Bear Hunt June 3rd to June 9th Group of 2 to 3 hunters *Lodge Hunt / Black Bear and Wolf.
See our website for more details. Or give us a call 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 452-4361
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watkins can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

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Please help support local journalism and subscribe.
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (May 2) overnight low of 29 degrees. This morning it was 44 degrees at 930am and mostly cloudy. A few tree swallows have returned, robins chirping, finches and jays calling from the trees. Report of 2 hummingbirds in the neighborhood. Gusty before lunch time. Dark clouds, warm and breezy by early afternoon. Gusty, overcast and a freckle of rain mid-afternoon, then temperature dropping. Couple of brief showers around 5pm. Dark overcast and calmer just before dusk with steady light rain. Still raining after midnight. Snowed early morning before 7am.

Tuesday (May 3) overnight low of 32 degrees. New snow measured 1/2″ and melting, rain+snow = 0.38″ of precipitation. This morning it was 37 degrees at 930am, mostly cloudy with a blue patch of sky overhead, new snow melting rapidly. Swallows must have left, robins calling, jays shrieking, pine squirrel chittering. Lots of finches visiting. Mostly cloudy at lunch time. Breezy by early afternoon. Warm and breezy mid-afternoon, mostly cloudy with dark bellies, high of 57 degrees. Just after sunset it was calmer, warm and mostly cloudy. Partly clear before midnight.

Wednesday (May 4) overnight low of 28 degrees. This morning it was 39 degrees at 930am, partly clear (high thin haze) and grass wet with melted frost. Tree swallows are back. Robins and finches calling, pine squirrel chittering. At lunch time thin high haze and filtered sunshine. Internet is slow mid-day. Mail truck was on time. Helicopter flew over at 229pm. Mostly clear with a few patches of thin haze mid-afternoon, light breezes and very warm, high of 71 degrees. Just after sunset it was nearly overcast with high haze and still fairly warm. Robins chirping at dusk. Frogs croaking after dark.

Thursday (May 5) overnight low of 37 degrees. This morning it was 49 degrees at 930am and overcast. Tree swallows and robins calling, dozens of finches, a pair of evening grosbeaks and a pine squirrel visiting. Getting breezy before 1030am. Thicker darker clouds and gusty breezes at lunch time. Warm and windy with dark clouds early afternoon, high of 67 degrees. Daffodils beginning to bloom. Blustery and started to sprinkle a little just after 3pm and dark clouds. Steady rain 6pm. Still raining just after sunset, dark overcast and the top of VanMeter in the clouds. Elk in the neighborhood. Still raining after midnight. Likely rained most of the night.

Friday (May 6) overnight low of 41 degrees. Rain total = 0.32″. This morning it was 44 degrees at 930am, clouds breaking up and patches of blue to the south, pockets of fog mid-mountain. Robins calling. Pine squirrel and a few finches visiting, swallows have departed again. Breezy before 1030am. Mostly cloudy and quite breezy at lunch time. Dark overcast, windy (estimate up to 20mph) and rain mid-afternoon on and off, high of 61 degrees. Rain and thunder around 630pm, ending before sunset. After sunset partly clear. About a dozen elk grazing their way up the street. Dark overcast at dusk. Rain after dark. Gusty rain after midnight. Turned to snow early morning, ground white by 7am.

Saturday (May 7) overnight low of 32 degrees. Half inch new snow plus rain = 0.54″ of precipitation. This morning it was 35 degrees at 930am, dark overcast, sprinkles and flakes of snow, new snow melting, fog belt across lower VanMeter. Robins calling (no swallows.) Dozens and dozens of pine siskins and finches along with a mourning dove and a noisy pine squirrel vising. Sprinkling before lunch time, low foggy clouds down on the ridges. Big fat flakes of snow falling with the rain mid-afternoon for about half an hour and cooling off, socked in nearly to the valley floor, high of 46 degrees. Socked in and raining again early evening, then rain/snow mix, then all snow for nearly an hour making the ground white by sunset. Low foggy clouds down to mid-mountain but not raining after sunset, and just above freezing. Snowing big flakes and stacking up before midnight. Looks like it snowed most of the night.

Sunday (May 8) overnight low of 29 degrees. Measured 3 1/4″ new snow, melted plus rain = 0.52″ of precipitation. This morning socked in low, snow squall 930am-945am and 31 degrees. Raven and flicker calling, a few finches and a pine squirrel visiting. At lunch time most of the new snow had melted, dark clouds to the south and patches of blue sky above the fog on VanMeter hill. Snowing for a little over half an hour after lunch time, no new accumulation. Snowing at an angle (breezy) early afternoon for a short while. Mid-afternoon patches of blue in a mostly cloudy sky and light breezes, high of 42 degrees. Big hail storm late afternoon, only lasted about 15 minutes but nearly an inch accumulation before melting. Partly clear an hour before sunset. Mostly cloudy after sunset and cooling off.
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Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 307 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

May 6, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 307 new COVID-19 cases and 0 new deaths Friday. State-level case and hospital data are now being updated on the state dashboard on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, excluding holidays.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 446,856.

The state said 9 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 17,161, and 0 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,933.

0 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,928.

full story: [Valley County 2,630 cases, 16 deaths.]
— — — —

New Valley County COVID-19 rise to nine during week

By Tom Grote The Star-News May 5, 2022

Nine new cases of COVID-19 were reported in Valley County last week by the county’s two hospitals.

The nine new cases compared to four new cases reported the previous week and just one new case in each of the prior three weeks.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 2,697 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started in March 2020.

Thirteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health.

Clinics & Tests – McCall

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine offers the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines are offered for anyone age 5 and older.

Also available are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine boosters for ages 12 to 15 and to moderately or severely immunocompromised youths age 5 to 11.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link) or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

Clinics & Tests – Cascade

Cascade Medical Center no longer offers the Pfizer vaccine. Those wishing to be given the Pfizer vaccine should contact St. Luke’s McCall or a local pharmacy.

The Cascade hospital offers a second booster shot of the Moderna vaccine to those over age 50 who received their first booster shot at least four months ago.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster. Call 208-382-4285 to schedule a time.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital also provides free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

full story: © Copyright 2009-2021 · Central Idaho Publishing Inc. · All rights reserved (used with permission.)
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CMC bond issue called cure for cramping

Current building too small, has problems, hospital officials say

(Note: This is the first of a two week series on the $19 million bond issue proposed by Cascade Medical Center in the May 17 election. Next Week: Services for the future.)

By Max Silverson The Star-News May 5, 2022

Every time a patient at the Cascade Medical Center needs a CT scan, they need to be taken outside through the ambulance bay to an annex that houses the machine, whether it’s a sunny day or below freezing with blowing snow.

CMC Chief Nursing Officer Teri Coombs recalled a patient in her 80s having to make the frigid trip outside this winter in a hospital gown as wind whipped falling snow through the bay.

Coombs said a nurse brought her to the door and began covering her in blankets as she protested, perplexed and uncomfortable, “why do we have to go outside?”

The outdoor trip is one of several shortcomings that would be solved if Cascade voters approve a $19 million bond to build a new Cascade Medical Center, hospitals officials said.

Voters go to the polls May 17 to cast ballots on whether to fund the bond to help build a new 32,000 square foot facility north of Cascade. The total cost to develop the facility is expected to be about $34 million.

The 50-year-old building is less than half the size that it should be for the number of patients that visit the hospital, CEO Tom Reinhardt said.

“Without a replacement hospital, we will be unable to accommodate the constantly growing demand for local health care at the standard of care expected of us by our patients, community, and staff,” Reinhardt said.

A study conducted by the consulting firm Wipfli found that the hospital should be more than 23,500 square feet to meet current standards, compared to the 13,500 square feet of the current facility on Lake Cascade Parkway.

The study said building an addition to the current facility would cost as much as $7 million but still not provide the space needed.

A new building would be required within 10 years even if the center was expanded, the Wipfli study said.

Remodeling the current building is impossible, Reinhardt said.

“There just isn’t enough physical room on the property to double or triple the size of the hospital,” he said.

Additionally, the center would have to close down entirely in order to rebuild, which is not an option, he said.

“This building would require such a massive renovation, and we don’t have other space that we can work in the meantime, so it’s just not feasible,” he said.

The hospital’s physical therapy department can only accommodate two or three patients at a time due to limited space.

“We have already opened up on Saturdays to add more time, but that is already being used up,” Reinhardt said.

Some physical therapy patients use the pool at the Cascade Aquatic and Recreation Center, but expanding services to the center isn’t practical, he said.

“Our PT staff provides inpatient therapy as well as outpatient, and driving back and forth between locations won’t work,” he said.

The building cannot accommodate additions like ceiling rails, bathrooms built to current standards or an in-wall oxygen supply.

Ceiling rails are standard in hospitals so that heavier patients can be safely supported when being transferred from beds to wheelchairs, Reinhardt said.

“On several occasions, patients had to be transported out for this reason alone,” he said.

Cascade has one inpatient room with in-wall oxygen. When patients in other rooms require oxygen, large, heavy tanks need to be brought in.

Each tank only lasts about three hours, said CMC emergency room RN Chad Kreider.

The oxygen system could be upgraded, but that would not solve the other problems with the building, Reinhardt said

Last year, the hospital expanded the bathroom connecting two patient rooms only to find that the flooring contained toxic asbestos. Removing the asbestos caused the project to take twice as long and run over budget, Reinhardt said.

“We don’t know how extensive asbestos is in the facility,” he said.

The heating and cooling systems are original from 1974 and are beginning to fail, Reinhardt said.

Replacement parts are not available and it is difficult to maintain a comfortable temperature for patients and staff, he said.

Like adding an oxygen system, a new heating system could be added if it was the only problem, Reinhardt said.

“But the big issue is that we don’t have enough space and a new heating system won’t fix that,” he said.

source: © Copyright 2009-2021 · Central Idaho Publishing Inc. · All rights reserved (used with permission.)
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Cascade hospital vote May 17 will require 66.7% majority

The Star-News May 5, 2022

Cascade voters go to the polls Tuesday, May 17 to decide on whether to fund a $19 million bond to build a new 32,000 square foot Cascade Medical Center.

Voters in the Cascade Medical Center Hospital District can cast their ballots at American Legion Post No. 60 at 105 West Mill Street in Cascade or the Donnelly Bible Church at 159 Gestrin Street in Donnelly from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. depending on their precinct.

Ballots can also be cast early at the Valley Count Clerk’s Office at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade until May 13.

Ballots were sent to Yellow Pine residents on April 25.

continued:
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Valley County residents oppose mobile home park proposal

Tristan Lewis May 5, 2022 KTVB

Valley County Planning and Zoning held a public hearing Thursday evening for a pitched affordable housing option, a proposed mobile home park near Donnelly.

A Californian developer, Roseberry LLC, wants a permit to build “Roseberry Park.” If approved, it would bring 201 manufactured homes to the area on about 40 acres near the intersection of Roseberry and Norwood Road. The developer said it would bring more necessary work force housing to the area.

Monthly rent for the units could range from $1,700 to $2,000. Rent increases would be capped at 4% for each owner. As part of their development agreement, the developer said it would not allow short term rentals. Owners must live there or rent out long term and all homes have to be new construction.

continued:
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State Burn permits required by May 10

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, May 3rd 2022

Closed fire season begins May 10, which means Idahoans outside city limits will need a burn permit before burning any debris.

The closed fire season lasts until Oct. 20.

“The burn permit system reduces the number of false alarms and allowing fire crews to respond only when truly needed. Having a burn permit on record means fire managers can also respond more quickly to fires that escape,” said Dustin Miller, Idaho Department of Lands director. “Obtaining a free burn permit can also potentially reduce the liability of the burner if their fire escapes.”

Central Idaho faces a significant risk of wildfires in 2022, so permits are particularly essential to preventing wildland firefighters from wasting resources.

continued:
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Idaho mountain snowpack levels get big boost in April

by Roland Steadham, Chief Meteorologist Monday, May 2nd 2022 CBS2

April has been amazing for the entire state as far as temperatures and precipitation were concerned. Our temperatures have been cooler than normal and we have seen enough snow in the mountains to bump our snowpack levels up.

At the end of March, our snowpack levels were averaging 65 percent of normal with no significant relief in sight. It was getting scary and water officials were often using the word “drought” to describe an almost certain bleak water year for Idaho. Then, all of a sudden, high pressure got out of the way and the storms started rolling in one after another. No one particular storm was earth-shattering, but it was a slow and steady pace that was winning the race.

So how did our snowpack levels jump to above 100 percent of normal in many snowpack basins in just one month? It’s not so much that we had a lot of precipitation, it was the cooler than normal temperatures that preserved our snow. So instead of a spring runoff, we held on to what snow we had. That, plus 5 inches of snow here and there certainly helped.

continued: w/map
— — — — — — — — — —

Rock slide reported in Idaho County; closures reported

by CBS2 News Staff Friday, May 6th 2022

A rock slide has been reported in Idaho County.

Deputies say the slide occurred on Big Salmon Road between French Creek and Fall Creek Friday afternoon.

Officials say one lane of travel is open at this time, but it may be closed to all traffic depending on the weather. Vehicles hauling jet boats will not be able to make it through the one-lane, the sheriff’s office says.

The Idaho County Sheriff’s Office and road department responded to the scene.

source: [Note: Idaho Co. Sheriff also reports rock fall on Hwy 95, use caution.]
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Public Lands:

Central Idaho faces ‘significant’ wildfire potential in July, August, officials say

by CBS2 News Staff Monday, May 2nd 2022

Central Idaho faces significant wildfire potential in July and August, the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise says.

This is largely because of droughts in the state. “Severe to extreme drought is ongoing across the southern two-thirds of the Great Basin, with severe drought across Idaho and western Wyoming,” the fire center said. “The drier and warmer weather expected in late May into June will likely allow the drought to persist or worsen over the next few months.”

“Parts of central and eastern Idaho into Wyoming will also see above-normal potential by July and August once the snow melts,” the fire center added.

continued: w/map
—————

Critter News:

Officials issue warning as elk calving season begins soon

May 5, 2022 Local News 8

Yellowstone National Park officials have issued a warning as elk calving season will begin soon.

Cow elk are much more aggressive towards people during the calving season and may charge or kick.

Officials say to stay alert. Look around corners before exiting buildings or walking around blind spots: cow elk may bed their calves near buildings and cars.

Keep at least 25 yards from elk at all times, and if an elk charges you, find shelter in your vehicle or behind a tall, sturdy barrier as quickly as possible.

source: [Note: cow elk can be very aggressive towards dogs too.]
— — — — — — — — — —

Spring chinook salmon season looks promising for Idaho anglers

By Steve Dent May 05, 2022 KIVI

So far more spring chinook salmon have made it to the Bonneville Dam than the ten-year average creating a promising outlook for the season in Idaho.

While the numbers are much lower than past decades, 51,480 fish have made it to first dam on the Columbia River and that is the most since 2016.

continued:
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Migratory Bird Day to be celebrated May 14 at Ponderosa park

The Star-News May 5, 2022

The Payette National Forest will celebrate World Migratory Bird Day with activities on Saturday, May 14, from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Ponderosa State Park Activity Center.

The event will also include an information booth and a Junior Park Rangers program.

At 11:30 a.m., a great horned owl from Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary near McCall will be shown by Snowdon Facility Manager Sierra Pederson.

The theme for this year’s event is “Dim the Lights for Birds at Night,” as night skies typically provide calmer air space and fewer predators for migrating birds, a news release said.

Simple actions that people can take to help birds along their way include reducing the amount of light outside their home or business by using motion detectors and minimum wattage as well as directing light downward, the release said.

continued:
————-

Fish and Game News:

F&G Commission meeting May 18-19 in McCall

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Friday, May 6, 2022

Public hearing will be held the night of May 18

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission will hold its public hearing and business meeting at the Holiday Inn Express at 210 N. 3rd St. in McCall. A public hearing will begin on May 18 at 7 p.m. MDT at the same location.

Those wishing to speak to the Commission during the public hearing will have a three-minute time limit, with additional comments accepted in writing. People can address the commission on any topic pertaining to Fish and Game matters.

continued:
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Winter survival estimates for mule deer fawns, elk calves show slight increase from 2021

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Tuesday, May 3, 2022

F&G biologists use collars to track the young animals throughout winter and early spring

Statewide survival of collared mule deer fawns and elk calves was above average through April, which bodes well for hunters: Above-average survival grows herds and provides more young bucks for hunters in the fall. Fish and Game biologists will continue monitoring through May, but traditionally less than 5 percent of the mortalities occur after April.

“In years with milder winters, like the last two we’ve had, we tend to see the number of mortalities drop off in May,” said Toby Boudreau, Deer and Elk Program Coordinator. “We anticipate seeing some additional mortalities by the end of the month, however the statewide survival of mule deer fawns and elk calves is likely to end up being above average this year, barring any unusual events.”

continued:
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Great-horned owl in Custer County tests positive for avian influenza

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Tuesday, May 3, 2022

This is the first confirmed positive case in 2022 of avian influenza in Idaho wildlife

A great-horned owl in Custer County has tested positive for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza, and people are asked to report any dead or sick wild birds on Fish and Game’s Wildlife Health webpage.

The recent detection follows a trend seen in other parts of the country where sporadic deaths of migrating waterfowl and other birds provided the first indication that HPAI is present in an area.

continued:
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Weekly Salmon Fishing Update – May 4, 2022

By Chris Sullivan, Anadromous Fisheries Coordinator
Wednesday, May 4, 2022

Welcome to our weekly Chinook Salmon Fishing Update. Throughout the next several months we will provide updates on changes to seasons and rules and share data from dam counts, creel surveys, and hatchery returns to help anglers plan their salmon fishing trips.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Zeus, a Great Dane from Texas, is the world’s tallest dog

May 6, 2022 Local News 8 By Toyin Owoseje


Guinness World Records
Zeus eats 12 cups of dog food a day.

A Great Dane has been crowned the world’s tallest living dog by Guinness World Records.

Two-year old Zeus from Bedford, Texas stands at a whopping 1.046 meters (3 feet, 5.18 inches), making him the tallest dog in the world.

He officially received the paw-some plaudit on March 22, after his height was measured and confirmed by his vet.

continued:
—————-

Seasonal Humor:

SpringFlower1-a

CovidLeaches-a
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Idaho History May 8, 2022

Idaho Hunting Stories

Idaho Newspaper Clippings

Elk Hunting 1903

1903ElkHunting-aA hunter sits from a post high above the ground with a rifle waiting for elk.

source: William Allen Stonebraker Photograph Collection, Digital Initiatives, University of Idaho Library
— — — — — — — — — —

1890

1890TrappingIdahoCity-a1890 Oct – Trapper on Middle Boise in town (Idaho City)

A hunter and trapper from Geo. Alexander’s place, on Middle Boise, was in town yesterday with deer and bear hides, and also muskrat, mink, martin and beaver hiders. One of the black bear hides is of enormous size. Gus Schlosser bought the whole outfit.

Idaho Semi-Weekly World, Idaho City, October 28 1890
source: AHGP
[h/t SMc]
— — — — — — — — — —

Hunting near Big Creek 1903

1903HuntingNearBigCreek-aPack horses have deer carcasses strapped to them.

source: William Allen Stonebraker Photograph Collection, Digital Initiatives, University of Idaho Library
— — — — — — — — — —

1891

1891MooseProtected-aIdaho Moose

The Governor may and probably will sign the bill for the protection of the great American moose in Idaho. But where is the moose? There are hundreds of men who have traveled all over the wildest parts of Idaho since its earliest settlement and have never yet for once feasted their eyes upon a moose track. It is said that one was seen in the Teton basin some years ago but that it had escaped from a traveling show. The crocodiles of the Snake and the royal Bengal tigers of Idaho should come in for their share of protection.
– Boise Democrat.

The Democrat is mistaken. There have been quite a number killed in Idaho, and a few in this county. A good many years ago one was killed on the South Fork of the Payette, not far from Banner, and his big, flat horns remained for a number of years to mark the spot where he fell, and as undeniable evidence of the fact that the animal was a moose. During the summer of the Yellow Pine excitement and the stampede for the alleged gold fields of Long valley, a boy slew a moose near the head of Long valley, and it was said that the animal weighed 1,800 pounds. One passed through Garden valley a few years ago. Dave Bunch, the veteran Nimrod of that valley, got on the track and did not give up the chase until he reached the North Fork. Dave says the animal made a track larger than a big ox’s, and he went through a rugged, rocky country that a footman could scarcely get through. Moose have been seen and killed in different sections of Central Idaho, but they are not very numerous. For that reason it is well that a law has been enacted for their protection. Idaho, although not as prolific in this species of big game as in other kinds, still our young State is not entirely mooseless. These big animals are said to be quite numerous, however, near the head of Snake river, in Idaho. Two were seen between this place and Silver Mountain last fall.

Idaho Semi-Weekly World, Idaho City, February 13, 1891
source: AHGP
[h/t SMc]
— — — — — — — — — —

Stonebraker hunting camp 1905

1905StonebrakerHuntingCamp-aView of the camp with tents and men in the Chamberlain Basin.

source: William Allen Stonebraker Photograph Collection, Digital Initiatives, University of Idaho Library
— — — — — — — — — —

1904

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News November 12, 1904

Locals

There are a good many parties out hunting just now and venison is not hard to find.

Bud Davis and M. B. Merritt returned the 6th inst. from ten day’s hunting. They each secured two large bucks and saw many mountain sheep, of which latter they could not get in good shooting distance.

source: Sandy McRae and Jim Collord
— — — — — — — — — —

Hunting near Big Creek 1905

1905HuntingNearBigCreek-aTwo hunters hold rifles staring out into the distance. Three horses stand with supplies packed to their backs.

source: William Allen Stonebraker Photograph Collection, Digital Initiatives, University of Idaho Library
— — — — — — — — — —

1905

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News April 1, 1905

19050401Pg3-txt1headline1a
Idaho’s Game Law.

During the session of the last legislature, considerable attention was given to the fish and game law. The law as it now stands is a good one and all good citizens of the state will unite in upholding it. We are too apt to disregard the value of the wild animals of our forests. There is perhaps the finest hunting ground in the world right here in Idaho. Elk, deer, bears of several varieties, mountain sheep, beaver, martin, grouse and all small game abound in our great mountain fastnesses. Nothing but wanton disregard of all decent and sportsmanlike hunting will ever despoil our forests. The only game which really needs protection at the present time is Elk, deer and mountain sheep.

Three great evils menace the increase, and even the continuance of these fine species of game in this section of the country, namely:

Destruction by cougars,
Wanton slaughter,
And sale of wild game.

The first named is perhaps the worst evil of till. Few people realize the terrible destruction of deer caused by the cougar, or American lion. Many mountaineers estimate that every full grown cougar kills not less than thirty deer each year, and so the wisdom of the late legislature is shown, in offering a bounty of $15 for every cougar killed – the cougar is of absolutely no use – a sneaking, cowardly beast which stealthily crawls upon his prey and springing from his lair sets his jaws in death grip on the throat of his victim.

The second evil, wanton slaughter, is fast disappearing from this section, though we have suffered from it in the past. It seems hardly credible that any man would stand and deliberately shoot a wild deer of the forest for the pleasure of seeing it fall in death throes. Unfortunately such has been the case and right here in Thunder Mountain.

There are men, God grant they are few, so deeply depraved that a living mark is preferable to a target for rifle practice, even though it be the finest specimen of wild game for which they have not the slightest use except the morbid satisfaction of seeing it give up its life.

Last year three fine elk were killed in the Chamberlain Basin – they weighed from 300 to 500 pounds each. Two teeth were taken from each elk and the carcasses were left to rot. The State Game Warden, Van Irons, used every means to bring the dastard who killed them to justice; he failed because the two witnesses who could testify for the prosecution were too cowardly to do so, and left the state.

But perhaps the least excusable and most disgraceful of all the agencies of destruction of wild game animals is claudestine [sic] sale of the meat. We believe there is not a state in the union where deer or elk may be legally sold – there is certainly not one where any attention is given to the preservation of game. No good citizen will sell a deer or elk. It is legally as well as morally wrong; and no man who has respect for himself and interest in his community and those who are to come after him, will, for a few paltry dollars, so degrade himself.

No restaurant or hotel keeper who is honorable and does a legitimate business will serve a piece of deer meat at his table unless it is furnished by his guest.

The state of Maine has the finest hunting and fishing of any or the older states. Why? Because it has the most stringent laws, and because every citizen upholds them.

Maine’s revenue from her game and fish probably amounts to $1,000,000 a year. That amount is brought into the state. A man may leave Boston in the morning and be in the very heart of a great game country at night.

On the shores of Rangely Lake, is situated a hotel property worth not less than $100,000 – the “Rangely Lake House,” which is supported by the fish and game resources. There, a man may be given six months in jail for killing a deer out of season and at the Parsons Hotel on Dead River where the deer may be seen any sunny morning at the edge of the wood, you can not get venison served unless you legally kill it yourself.

The preservation of the game makes revenue to every man in the country, farmer, guide, boatman, liveryman and hotel keeper.

The time is not too distant when the same conditions may exist here if every citizen will do his own honest part in strengthening the arm of the law. We owe it to ourselves; we owe it to those who come after us.
— — — —

On the Middle Fork of the Clearwater River, B. F. Cressler recently had a most marvelous escape from death says the Stites Journal. He was hunting and had chosen a sunny spot on which to eat his lunch. He took a cup of coffee and walked to the edge of a cliff a few feet away where stood a lone fire tree fully 325 feet above the rocks below. Hearing a slight noise he turned and saw a huge black bear eating the bacon he had just left. His rifle stood leaning against a tree very near Mr. Bear who after finishing the bacon, came defiantly toward him. Nothing could be done but climb the tree; this Mr. Cressler did, and did it quickly. The bear came also but with exasperating deliberation. The man had climbed as high as e dared to go. The rocks under the cliff were fully 400 feet below him. He felt pitch on the limb he clasped and with perfect self possession he cut a small limb, split the end and fastened in a piece of the pitch The bear was now within five feet of him; with his only match he lighted the pitch and allowed the scalding drops to fall on the bears face. One burning drop fell into the nostril and the bear, crazed with the pain, raised both front paws to scratch away the fiery torture, lost his hold and fell with a dull thud to the rocks below. Mr. Cressler made haste to desend [sic] and in recounting the adventure modestly said “that was a close call.”

source: Sandy McRae and Jim Collord
— — — — — — — — — —

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News April 15, 1905

19050415Pg3-txt1headline-aNew Fish and Game Law.
Provisions of Enactment of the Last Legislature Put into Paragraphs

The following is a digest of the fish and game law enacted by the last legislature, which has been prepared in response to numerous inquires from sportsmen:

Licenses under the provisions of this act are of four classes, namely:

1. For a bona fide male resident (over 12 years of age) for six months prior to issuance, costing $1, entitling the holder to fish and hunt all kinds of game subject to the restrictions of this act.

2. For non-residents of Idaho, a big game license, costing $24, entitling holder to hunt the animals hereinafter mentioned, subject to the restrictions of this act.

3. For non-residents of Idaho, costing $5, entitling holder to hunt birds, subject to the restrictions of this act.

4. For non-residents, costing $1, entitling holder to catch fish with hook and line only, subject to the restrictions of this act (required of all non-residents, regard less of sex.)

Females and children under 12, residents of Idaho, are not required to procure license to fish and take game.

All licenses expire January 31 next following date of issuance.

The open season is as follows:

Trout, grayling, bass and sunfish may be caught at any time with hook and line.

Salmon, sturgeon, carp, mullet, sucker, whitefish, Bear Lake trout and charr may be caught with seine, net or spear.

Quail, Nov. 1 to Dec. 1; sage hen, July 15 to Dec. 1; turtle dove, snipe and plover, Aug. 1 to Nov. 1; partridge, pheasant, grouse, prairie chicken and fool hen, Aug. 15 to Dec. 1; duck, Sept. 1 to Feb. 1; geese and swans, Sept. 1 to Feb. 1.

Elk, deer, mountain sheep, mountain goat, Sept. 1 to Dec. 31.

Not more than 20 pounds of trout, bass, catfish, grayling, or sunfish may be caught in any one day, and not more than 30 lbs. to be had in possession at any time.

Unlawful to kill or destroy, or have in possession at any time trout or black bass of less than four inches in length.

Unlawful to take fish by means of any deleterious drug or by means of an explosive.

Snag hook fishing is absolutely prohibited.

The taking of Mongolian pheasants is absolutely prohibited for four years next following the passage of this act.

Unlawful to snare or trap any protected birds.

Unlawful to kill more than 18 of each of the following kinds of birds in one day, namely, quail, sage hen, partridge, grouse, prairie chicken or fool hen.

Unlawful to take in any one day more than 24 ducks, three geese or three swans.

Unlawful to take fish by means of any deleterious drug or by means of explosive.

Unlawful to destroy nest, eggs, or the young birds of any game bird, or to molest such birds or their young, during breeding season.

The hunting or killing of moose, antelope, buffalo, beaver and caribou is absolutely prohibited.

Unlawful to hunt deer, elk, mountain sheep, or mountain goats with dogs or by means of a pitfall, trap or snare.

Unlawful to kill or capture more than one elk, two deer, one mountain sheep, one ibex, and one goat during the open season.

It is unlawful to sell any protected fish or animals at any time of the year.

Unlawful to hunt any song, insectivorous or innocent bird, except English sparrow, magpie or bee bird, at any time of the year.

Unlawful to cause to be set on fire any timber, underbrush, or grass upon the public domain.

Unlawful not to totally extinguish any fire near any forest, timber or other inflammable material, before leaving the same.

The possession of game or fish unlawfully taken is a misdemeanor.

All devices and nets used in unlawfully taking fish or game are subject to confiscation.

Any and all persons violating any of the provisions of this act are guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof shall be fined in a sum not to exceed $300 and costs, or by imprisonment in the county jail not to exceed six months, or by both such fine and imprisonment.

– Statesman.

source: Sandy McRae and Jim Collord
— — — — — — — — — —

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News April 29, 1905

Hunting and Fishing Grounds of Thunder Mountain.

Many inquiries have been received concerning the Thunder Mountain country as an outing ground and in answer to these many questions we publish a brief description of the country from a sportsman’s standpoint. Is safe to say that no other section in the United States presents a more pleasing prospect for the hunter and the angler than does this section of Central Idaho within a radius of twenty-fire or thirty miles from Roosevelt, the metropolis of the district.

In the very heart of the world-famed Bitter Root Range nestles the unique town of Roosevelt with the canyon walls fairly overhanging its streets.

This little city, a mining camp in the midst of one of the world’s richest mineral deposits, is also a center of one of the finest hunting and fishing grounds to be found in any land.

Marble creek, a brook six miles east of town, empties its waters into streams that flow to the sea. The creek is literally full of brook trout from six to ten inches in length.

Salmon trout are also very plentiful; this is a beautiful fish, and one of the best ever eaten, and varies in size from 5 to 22 pounds. Then there is the Red-side trout, weighing a pound to a pound and a half — from eleven to fourteen inches in length. All of these are fresh water fish and in winter go down the creek through the Middle Fork to the Salmon, perhaps even to the Snake river.

The last of July the Steelhead Salmon appears, having completed its long journey from the sea. This is a most remarkable salt-water fish. After maturing in the Pacific Ocean till three years of age, it starts on its inland passage to spawn.

Leaving the salt water and entering the Columbia it seems to have but one instinct: to go up stream to the very limit of depth. It passes through the Columbia to the Snake river, on through the Salmon to the Middle Fork and up Marble creek even to Belleco where the waters are so shallow that the fish’s back often protrudes from the water in its struggles to overcome the inborn instinct, sometime pitiful of reaching the source of the crystal mountain stream which seems to give life and vigor for the close of its thousand mile journey. When this fish reaches the mountain streams it is in fine condition — the meat is hard and delicious. But here the spawning is begun and the fish begin to fight. The males have continued and protracted fights, and shortly after their arrival begin to be wounded in these contests which may be seen from the bank of the stream — the water is thrown into foam in these struggles and the individual fish are rendered unfit to eat; for these reasons the Steelhead is good only upon his arrival.

Few of the Steelheads ever get back to the sea. The spawn is deposited and the little myriads of their young go down the tortuous channel to the sea and after maturing the same process of nature is repeated.

All tributaries of the Middle Fork receive this school as it comes from the lower rivers — the Salmon and Snake. The Monumental creek is now debarred on account of the waters being roiled by the operations of the Dewey mill. Some fish do come up this creek but the majority turn back and go … (page torn) … streams which remain … clear.

Big creek and other streams flowing into the Middle Fork get the full benefit and in return send back their myriads of young Salmon to the sea.

We have mentioned the fish, but for the hunter there is still greater attraction. Moose, Elk, deer, mountain sheep, mountain goats and small game abound.

No moose can be killed — they are protected by law and no true sportsman will kill this “Monarch of the Glen” while its species is being propagated. The legislature this winter placed a time limit of five years in order that the moose be given time to multiply.

Some of the largest elk heards [sic] in the world are within five miles of Roosevelt. This beautiful animal, which is the most perfect of all the horned species, is to be found within a days journey of town.

Deer are very plentiful. This graceful little denizen of the forest is found on every hand. When packers go out in the morning to get the stock, it is not an uncommon occurrence to see the deer among the horses. Thousands of deer are in these mountain resorts, and roam at will over vast ranges of the finest natural deer park in the world.

Mountain sheep are getting scarce. In summer they are found on the highest and roughest crags in this rugged country. Occasionally they are brought in and heads, with horns 13 to 16 inches in diameter, are gathered every year.

Wild goats, too, are hard to get; they live in the very highest altitudes of any animal in the Northwest. For a time in spring they come down to get fresh green grass after they have been living on the (?) of the peaks, but as the grass springs up on the mountain side they climb higher and can be found only on the very tops of high ranges.

The snowshoe rabbit, so called, is the best small game in the county. The thickets are full of them and they are delicious eating.

The above mentioned constitutes all the game animals. Grouse innumerable (?) found in all the woods as there are no sheep herds here to ruin their nests. Coyotes, which generally follow sheep ranges, are scarce in this country though not unknown — stray bands are sometimes heard by the prospector in the hills.

Foxes are not uncommon but most difficult to get. The rugged nature of the country gives them ample hiding, and the hunter seldom gathers one.

Black bears and brown bears are very plentiful. They are found sometimes within a few … (page torn) … to get. J. P. Bradner, of St. Paul, shot two last summer with a six shooter. R. C. Schofield killed a very fine grizzley, a year ago about thirty miles from here. The bear weighed not less than 800 pounds.

The mountain lion, the worst curse of all game destroying animals, is very plentiful. A contemptible, sneaking beast, it destroys vast numbers of deer and rabbits. The State legislature last winter established a bounty of $15.00 on each lion killed and this will lead to their destruction. For mounting or for rugs the mountain lion or cougar is a splendid specimen. They are often 12 or 14 feet from tip to tip and the skin makes a fine souvenir of the hunter’s skill. They very seldom attack man but will kill almost any wild animal of the forest.

In the issue of THE NEWS of April 15 we published a digest of the new game law of Idaho. All true sportsmen are welcome here and they will find royal sport. And by “sportsman” we mean the men who will fish and hunt according to law. That includes every man who is visiting the county; it includes every prospector in the hills. But it absolutely excludes the man who will ruthlessly slaughter the beautiful wild game of our forests. Nothing more like that will be tolerated. Public sentiment can always en-bone law and every man in Roosevelt and every miner and prospector in the hills will stand together in this matter and THE NEWS will give its assistance in bringing to justice any such vandal of the forest.
— — — —

As mentioned on another page, we have frequent inquiries from people on the outside concerning the hunting and fishing grounds here. The postmaster also receives many letters of this nature, and so for the benefit of all, we have endeavored to give authentic information concerning the fish and game of this locality. Roosevelt and the surrounding country is easily accessible from outside points. The trip can be made from Boise in four days over the newly completed wagon road and … (page torn) … through and the drive is a most enjoyable one. Good roadhouse accommodations may be found each evening and there will be no shortage of feed for animals. We have endeavored to give a good list of roadhouses which may be found in the advertising columns with distances shown, and tourists will find no privation or difficulty attached to a journey into this sylvan and virgin wild, where game and fish abound and where the bluest skies and clearest mountain streams give welcome to the dusty traveler. A growing sentiment exists to preserve the game. The State law is such that any true sportsman may gather his fish and game legally and yet see the county grow richer each year in the natural increase of the finest wild game to be found in the world.
— — — —

For much of the information contained in the front page article — the “Hunting and Fishing Grounds of Thunder Mountain,” we are indebted to Chas. L. Myers, one of the pioneers of this district and a very successful hunter and fisherman.

source: Sandy McRae and Jim Collord
— — — — — — — — — —

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News July 15, 1905

Behind the Times

Recently there appeared in the Boise Statesman an item referring to a communication sent to that paper by a certain citizen of Roosevelt, the burden of which having been a complaint relative to alleged violation of the game laws in this section of Idaho. It was claimed that no deputy game warden was in here and no hunting or fishing licenses could be procured. It was also alleged that elk and deer were being ruthlessly and wantonly slaughtered in open violation of the law.

This no doubt makes fine reading for a person posing as a would-be friend and protector of the game and fish, and who perhaps is so situated that he can leisurely search out the game laws and provisions, and according to their requirement, sit placidly back awaiting their fulfillment and then go forth with a copy of the said laws in one hand and mayhap a rapid fire, smokeless, telescope rifle in the other, to wage warfare on the helpless game for pleasure only. Yes, perhaps.

But what of the rough and ready prospector, of him who penetrates the trackless wiles of these almost inaccessible hills, and blazes and pioneers the way that such as the aforementioned friend and protector might profit and be benefited? These men that cut loose from bases of supplies and are swallowed up for weeks or months in the tangled environment of mountain and forest and rushing steam, and rarely meeting others of their kind, must of necessity carry but scanty supply of provisions, and it has long been a custom of the wilderness to allow them the privilege of taking game at any time as their necessity demanded. This, of course, is not an adherence to the exact letter of the law, but we know of cases in which latitude was sometimes extended by the law to apply to certain conditions.

We do not mean to be understood as upholding the unlawful slaughter of game or of its wanton destruction for sport, but when conditions are such as to render imperative the taking of game and that quickly to maintain life, as is often the case with prospectors, then it should, we believe, be an occasion for the exercise of a little latitude.

As to the impossibility of procuring fish and game licenses at Roosevelt, we can say that the Statesman’s correspondent manifests much ignorance of things most commonly known. Our resident justice of the peace, Jas. McAndrews, is empowered to issue the licenses whenever required. It might be well for the above mentioned correspondent to post up a little before he again attempts to butt in.

source: Sandy McRae and Jim Collord
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Hunting And Fishing 1915

1915HuntingFishing-a3 men posing with the catch from a hunting and fishing trip. They have all the fish and fowl hanging from a pole. George Edward Tonkin and 2 unidentified men.
Photo: P1998-28-076, George Edward Tonkin, ISA

source: Idaho State Historical Society
— — — — — — — — — —

1919

1919BarHuntingFromPlanes-aBar Hunting From Planes
Shooting of Wild Fowl by Airmen With Machine Guns prohibited.

Washington — Shooting of wild fowl with machine guns from airplanes, the latest device employed by sportsmen along the Atlantic coast, has been forbidden by order of the director of military aeronautics. Instructions have been issued by the director to conduct all flights along the coast wherever migratory wild fowl may be found in such a manner to interfere as little as possible with the birds.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. Page 3 (Moscow, Idaho), 05 March 1919.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Hunting near Thunder Mountain 1926

1926HuntingNearThunderMtn-aA hunter (W.A. Allen Stonebraker) holds the antlers of an elk trophy.

source: William Allen Stonebraker Photograph Collection, Digital Initiatives, University of Idaho Library
— — — — — — — — — —

1920

Idaho and Idahoans

The state game warden will complete his plans for shipment of 200 Wyoming elk into Idaho at a conference to be held with eastern Idaho deputies.

source: The Challis Messenger. Page 7 (Challis, Idaho), 04 Feb. 1920.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

19200214StarvingElk-aSeek To Save Starving Elk
Two Principal Herds in Country in Danger of Serious Depletion
Special Fund To Buy Hay
Officials of Department of Agriculture Making Every Effort to Procure the Needed Feed – Scarcity of Forage

Washington – The two principal herds of elk in the United States – one of which is under the protection of the biological survey of the United States department of agriculture – are in danger of such serious depletion, due to early severe weather and feed shortage, that special funds have been set aside for the purchase of hay for these animals whose home is in and near Yellowstone national park. Department officials are making every possible effort to procure the needed feed despite the serious scarcity of hay and forage in the region. Approximately 40,000 elk roam this section of the country. They are divided into two groups, known as the northern and southern herd, respectively. The latter, which winters in the vicinity of the Jackson Hole, to the south of Yellowstone park, is the one for which the department of agriculture is seeking to make provision.

Ranchmen Slow to Part With Hay

Reports have recently been received from government representatives in the region of Yellowstone national park stating that many elk are destined to starve if the present severe weather continues and if no additional supplies of feed are provided. On the winter elk refuge in Jackson Hole the department has in store approximately 1,300 tons of hay which normally would be sufficient to carry the southern herd through the winter. But cold weather and heavy snows came so early that there is grave danger that the animals will be without feed before many weeks have passed. Ranchmen in the region are confronted with a serious condition and are reluctant to part with any of their hay.

Largest Herds in Country

The northern elk herd is under the supervision of the national park service of the department of the interior, which is also making every effort possible to prevent loss of these animals.

These two herds are the largest elk herds remaining in this country though at one time elk were to be found in large numbers as far east as the Blue Ridge mountains. These animals, like the buffalo and antelope, have now been reduced to a mere fraction of their former numbers. The few herds that remain besides those in the vicinity of the Yellowstone park are relatively small. Loss of many of the animals in the larger herds might be irreparable, say government officials.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. Page 4 (Moscow, Idaho), 14 Feb. 1920.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

State Game Census

The game census of the forests in the fourth district, comprising the states of Idaho, Utah, Wyoming, Nevada and Arizona, as been made public. It shows that Idaho is the only state in the district that has all varieties of same listed. The census of this states is as follows: Deer, 20,140; elk, 1,721; mountain goats, 4,275; mountain sheep, 1,018; moose, 200; antelope, 324. Wyoming has 20,256 elk, which is the largest number in any state. Dr. Scarbourough has published a statement to the effect that elk are holding their own very well.

source: The Idaho Recorder. Page 1 (Salmon City, Idaho), 27 Feb. 1920.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Northwest Notes

Game hunting has taken on more the characteristics of a business than of a pleasure pursuit in Idaho, if judged by profits. The West Palisade stockgrowers in the Targhee forest have offered a bounty of $25 a head for wolves.

About 50 per cent of the 40,000 elk in Wyoming are in the Jackson Hole country. Of those less than 7000 were fed in the feed grounds this winter.

source: The Idaho Recorder. Page 3 (Salmon City, Idaho), 19 March 1920.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

2230 Deer and 135 Elk Killed in Idaho, 1919

Idaho hunters in 1919, killed 2230 deer, 135 elk and seventy-seven mountain sheep, according to a report made to Governor Davis by Robert O. Jones, state commissioner of law enforcement.

Discussing the work of the state game department, the report says in part:

“During the big game season, Game Warden Otto M. Jones, instructed all assistant chiefs and local deputies to keep careful check on all big game killed and taken out of their districts. The reasons for so doing were to prevent as far as possible violations of the game laws; that is the killing of more than the limit for one person of large game. It was also desired to have a record of approximately the amount of game killed during the hunting or open season. Various reports now on file with the bureau as received from game wardens and also the forestry service, which cooperated with this department in every respect, indicate that during the year 1919, there were 2230 deer killed in Idaho, 136 elk and seventy-seven goats. These figures of course, are not absolutely authentic.”

source: Idaho County Free Press. Page 1 (Grangeville, Idaho), 25 March 1920.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Demand Change In Game Laws

From all over the state some demands for changes in the Idaho game law so as to permit individuals or associations to propagate fowls and fish. Several Idaho newspapers have taken up the case for the public, pointing out that there should be no legal prohibition placed on the individual or an association raising fowl and fish on their or its own property the same as they can raise chickens. These editors see no interference whatever with the prerogatives of the sportsman. In fact, the avenues for replenishing wild game life are increased, they declare.

The issue was raised in the case of the Idaho Game Breeders’ Association. The state game warden permitted the association to engage fur raising but refused to grant a permit for game birds and fish.

while this does not interfere with the prime objects of the association it might rob it of one of the features as to its Hagerman valley farm, where it had been planned to place wild birds and water fowl as an attraction for visitors.

source: Payette Enterprise. Page 1 (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 01 April 1920.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho State News Items

Game licenses for 1920, valued at four hundred thousand dollars, are being distributed by Otto M. Jones, state game warden, and assistants to his department. The forest supervisors and all deputy game wardens in the state will receive quotas of the licenses, each man being held accountable for the money value of the licenses he receives. The licenses are similar in form to those issued in 1919 and will be issued for the same fees.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. Page 1 (Rathdrum, Idaho), 02 April 1920.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Local Pick-ups

Deputy Game Warden Heathershaw has received word of a ruling of the state attorney general to the effect that there is no closed season on bear in Idaho and that they nay be taken the year round if the hunter has a regular hunting license and a trapping license.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. Page 5 (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 06 April 1920.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Game Warden Here

W. C. Brooks of Moscow, deputy state game warden, was in Kendrick Tuesday morning. While here he appointed Charles McKeever game license vendor for Kendrick. Heretofore there have been three license vendors but Mr. Brooks says it eliminates considerable work for his office if there is but one vendor in a town. He has cut the number to one even in Moscow.

Mr. Brooks stated that a change in the game laws will require farmers who wish to shoot squirrels to buy hunting licenses. The law now reads that anyone who wishes to carry a gun in field or forest must first procure a license. According to the letter of the law anyone caught carrying a gun without a license is breaking the game laws of the state.

Mr. Brooks says he is going to plant large quantities of trout in the streams of Latah county. He has ordered the limit and expects to distribute them all over the county where they will be likely to thrive. He has ordered nothing but brook trout.

In regard to boys fishing out of season, he says he may have to use drastic measures, as this is one of the hardest problems the game department has to contend with. He expects to visit this territory often this spring and is going to keep a close watch to see that the closed season on fishing is not violated.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. Page 1 (Kendrick, Idaho), 09 April 1920.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

1920CarryLicense-aMust Carry A Idaho License
Game Warden Issues a Warning To All Sportsmen

New and stringent rules put out by State Game Warden Otto M. Jones, require all hunters and fishermen to carry their licenses with them or to chance arrest for hunting or fishing without a license. All deputies have been instructed to ignore the wellworn excuse: “I left my license at home,” and the license and gun or rod must stick together.

W. H. Heathershaw, deputy game warden for Boundary and Bonner counties, states that he will enforce the new rule without fear or favor and that all violators will be prosecuted.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. Page 1 (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 13 April 1920.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

19200416TIR3-aBig Game Census Shows Increase
Plenty of Deer, Elk and Mountain Goats Says Jones

Federal forest service officials, submitting to Otto M. Jones, state game warden, their 1919 game census for southern Idaho, Thursday reported rapid increase in big game in the state.

Here are the present totals reported by forest supervisors of game in the Boise, Cache, Caribou, Idaho, Lemhi, Minidoka, Payette, Salmon, Sawtooth, Targhee and Weiser national forests: Deer, 16,575; elk, 1200; mountain goats, 2861; mountain sheep, 1134; moose, 70; antelope, 284.

In the same territory there were killed during the year 1090 deer, 30 elk and 80 mountain goats.

“Nearly all the supervisors report an increase in big game,” said R. C. Gery, acting district forester at Ogden. This is generally attributed to the game preserves, to destruction of predatory animals and better enforcement of laws.

A continuous closed season for mountain sheep is recommended, however. Mr. Gery said: “In spite of the closed season, the mountain sheep do not seem to be more than holding their own. The total number of sheep is very small considering the area involved and it is evident that a continuous closed season is necessary.”

Other excerpts from the report are here given:

“There is an increase of moose on the Targhee forest and it is hoped that a more rapid spread of this excellent game animal will result. It is apparent that it will survive more adverse winter conditions of snow and forage than either deer or elk.

“On several forests, September 15 is believed to be too early for the deer season to open and one is recommended opening October 15. If the number of hunters continues to increase, a shortening of the season will be necessary, and in that case it could begin October 1 and extend to November 15.

“The present season for elk in the counties adjoining Wyoming was apparently based on the former season in Wyoming and is too long. The supervisor of the Targhee forest recommends a season from October 15 or November 1 to November 15. September 15 is too early for it to open, since it is the running season and too warm for the meat to be utilized.

“It is apparently desirable to make an adjustment of the game preserve in Twin Falls and Cassia counties. The deer range in Nevada, Utah and Idaho, the greater number of them being in Idaho during the summer season. These two counties in Idaho are closed to deer hunting, but there is an open season of ten days in Utah and thirty days in Nevada. Local sentiment will not support protection under these conditions. The law is weakened where residents of Idaho are prohibited from killing deer which may cross the state lines and be killed in Nevada or Utah. It is very probable that a smaller area designated as game preserve in Idaho would allow Idaho residents an equal opportunity with those of Nevada and Utah to hunt and still obtain the objects of the game preserve.

“The condition of game birds is not nearly as satisfactory as that of big game. There is practically a unanimous report that the three grouse – dusky, ruffled and Franklin’s, are decreasing, in most cases rapidly. Wherever protected the sage hens have increased and there is a general belief that the supply can be maintained with a short season and small bag limit.

“The destruction of predatory animals is of particular importance in connection with game production since there is a far greater loss from this source than by poaching, even under very lax enforcement of the laws. On several of the game preserves, the losses of game from predatory animals or eagles is preventing a proper increase. Encouragement should be given to trapping by responsible parties within game preserves.

“In view of the exceptionally high prices of furs, it is probable that the supply of fur bearing animals will be reduced to a point where the production and value of furs obtainable will be much lower than it should be. In the case of predatory animals, this will be beneficial, but it appears that it will be necessary to designate game preserves in order to maintain a supply of fur bearing animals not excessively destructive to game. All the forests report a decrease in fur bearing animals except those generally considered predatory.

“There is reported a very general and decided decrease in the fish supply from all waters except those which are inaccessible. There has been an immense increase in the number of fishermen and the decrease can be expected in spite of the increase in distribution of fish for stocking purposes. The reasons are (1) the heavy fishing, (2) the loss in unscreened ditches and (3) low water resulting from drouths.”

The forestry department recommends increases in the number of game preserves and bird sanctuaries and heavy restocking of fishing streams.

source: The Idaho Republican. Page 2 (Blackfoot, Idaho), 16 April 1920.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Destructive Wolf Killed

A female wolf that has inflicted much destruction on cattle in the Soda Springs district was killed by William E. Cozzens, one of eight hunters employed in the state by the United States bureau of biological survey. In trailing this wolf on the snow, and just before killing her, Mr. Cozzens found where she had killed a calf and made a meal. After finishing the old wolf, he back-tracked and found her den of seven pups, which he destroyed. This month’s total catch of the eight hunters was 82 pure predatory animals, including 57 coyotes, 17 bobcats and eight wolves, according to the monthly report of Luther J. Goldman, predatory animal inspector.

source: The Grangeville Globe. Page 2 (Grangeville, Idaho), 22 April 1920.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

County Seat News Items

Reports received by Don C. Fisher, deputy state fish and game warden, from licensed trappers, of their catches, indicate a successful season, Mr. Fisher asserts. Under the law, trappers are required to report the number and species of animals caught. With high prices for furs, the trappers’ harvest this year had been big.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. Page 4 (Cottonwood, Idaho), 23 April 1920.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

ChangeGameLaw-aChange Game Laws

Movement is on foot according to Don C. Fisher, deputy game warden, to change fish and game laws of Idaho. It is proposed to eliminate the closed season on salmon, to shorten the trapping season from March 31 to March 1, and to provide an all year closed season on quail in central Idaho.

source: Idaho County Free Press. Page 8 (Grangeville, Idaho), 29 April 1920.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

[Editorial]

According to the 1919 game census, submitted to O. M. Jones, state game warden, a rapid increase of big game has been recorded in the state. In eleven counties in the state the census states there are 16,575 deer. Now we do not wish to dispute the figures of the game census, but just how the game department has been able to count the deer so accurately is a mystery. The writer hunted four days last fall and only counted one deer. At that rate it would take quite a while to count the 16,575 deer without duplicating.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. Page 2 (Kendrick, Idaho), 30 April 1920.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Elk For Canada

Edmonton, Alta. — A herd of ninety-two elk have arrived here from Yellowstone Park, Montana, bound for Jasper park. This is a consignment of a large number purchased by the Dominion Parks department from the United States. Two hundred of these animals are already located at the Banff Park.

source: The Idaho Republican. Page 5 (Blackfoot, Idaho), 05 May 1920.
Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
—————–

More Hunting Photos

Stonebraker Photograph Collection

Ranching, Hunting, and Pack Train Operations in North Central Idaho, 1900-1931

link: to “hunting” photos

This collection consists of 540 photographs from the William Allen Stonebraker Collection, which was donated to the University of Idaho Library in 2003. Stonebraker took photographs in Central Idaho’s remote Salmon River and Frank Church-River of No Return areas at the turn of the twentieth century between 1900 and 1931. The collection contains images of the Stonebraker Ranch and homestead in the Chamberlain Basin, his businesses (dude ranch, pack train and dogsled operations, mining, big game hunting) as well as wildlife, scenic views, and early aircraft operation.
source: University of Idaho Library Digital Initiatives
————-

Further Reading

Link: to Deer Hunting
Link: to Del Davis
Link: to Wilbur Wiles (part 2 cougars)
Link: to Cougar Dave Lewis
Link to The Carlin Party Tragedy
Link: to Idaho History Page (table of contents)
—————-

Road Reports May 8, 2022

Weekend snow added a few inches. It is Rock Migration Season. Please share road reports. Spring travel conditions. Most back country roads are not maintained. This time of year there is deep snow in higher elevations. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for snow, ice, rocks and/or trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads, you are not the only vehicle on the one lane road.

Yellow Pine: We received over 3″ of snow by Sunday morning, rain and snow over the weekend giving us over 1.3″ of water. Local streets are mostly bare and damp, snow lingers in the shady places. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to YP North webcam
Link: to YP West webcam

Highway 55 Open
Hwy 55 Construction Announcement from ITD 4/5/22
Full road closures on ID-55 near Smiths Ferry will begin on April 11, 2022. Drivers can expect closures Mon.-Thurs. from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Outside of those hours, the road will be open to one-way alt traffic.
Drivers should plan ahead to avoid delays and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route when possible. link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Sunday (May 8) snowed 3″ or more up on Big Creek summit.
Report Wednesday (May 4) Road was clear over the top.
Report Tuesday morning (May 3) slushy going over the summit.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Sunday (May 8) likely snow on the upper end.
Report Wednesday (May 4) mail truck driver said the FS is working on clearing small rocks and ditches.
Note: starting March 15th the road maintenance goes back to the FS from the county. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Sunday morning (May 8) likely a little snow.
Report Wednesday (May 4) mail truck driver says the road is in great shape after the county graded it.

Upper Johnson Creek Road (Trail): Closed to wheeled vehicles.
No current report.
Lower Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (May 4) the county might be grading the lower part today.
Link: to Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: to Johnson Creek North Webcam (check date on image.)
Link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcams (check date on images)
Link: to Big Creek Webcam North
Link: to Big Creek Webcam South

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Closed to full sized vehicles at the junction with Profile Creek.
Sunday morning (May 8) looks like Stibnite got a few inches of snow.
Old report Wednesday (April 6): from Perpetua “As Spring has arrived, snow and ice on the Stibnite road are beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Perpetua Resources crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Perpetua Resources crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
“We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road starting week of March 21st. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.” – Sam
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled travel
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard Link:
Valley County Road & Bridge Announcements
Road Break-Up Limits in Effect Until further notice, break-up limits are now in effect:
* 7 tons per axle,
* 80,000 lbs maximum
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Weather Reports May 1-7, 2022

May 1 Weather:

At 930am it was 45 degrees, top of VanMeter foggy, overcast starting to break. At 1pm it was mostly cloudy. At 330pm it was 54 degrees, mostly cloudy and a bit breezy. At 8pm it was 50 degrees, mostly clear (one large dark cloud going by) and light breezes. At 11pm it looked partly clear. High thin haze and filtered sunlight at 1230pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 02, 2022 at 09:30AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 62 degrees F
Min temperature 29 degrees F
At observation 44 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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May 2 Weather:

At 930am it was 44 degrees and mostly cloudy. Gusty breezes kicking up at 1125am. At 1pm it was mostly (darker) clouds and breezy. Dark overcast by 3pm. At 340pm it was 57 degrees. Just before 350pm gusty and a “freckle” of rain drops for less than 5 minutes. By 425pm it was 52 degrees, dark overcast and breezy. Brief shower at 452pm and another just before 5pm. At 745pm drizzling. At 755pm it was 42 degrees, dark overcast, calmer and steady light rain. At 840pm raining lightly. At 1030pm steady rain. At 1240am light rain falling. Snow before 7am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 03, 2022 at 09:30AM
Mostly cloudy, snow melting quickly
Max temperature 65 degrees F
Min temperature 32 degrees F
At observation 37 degrees F
Precipitation 0.38 inch
Snowfall 1/2 inch
Snow depth Trace
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May 3 Weather:

At 930am it was 37 degrees, mostly cloudy with large patch of blue sky overhead, new snow melting rapidly. At 1pm mostly cloudy. At 250pm breezy. At 345pm it was 56 degrees, breezy and mostly cloudy (dark bellies.) At 805pm it was 48 degrees, calmer and mostly cloudy. At 1045pm two bright planets to the east, likely at least partly clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 04, 2022 at 09:30AM
Partly clear – high haze
Max temperature 57 degrees F
Min temperature 28 degrees F
At observation 39 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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May 4 Weather:

At 930am it was 39 degrees, partly clear with high thin haze, grass wet with presumably melted frost. At 1230pm it was mostly hazy and warm. At 4pm it was 69 degrees, almost clear except a few patches of thin haze and light breezes. At 8pm it was 59 degrees and nearly overcast with high haze. At 930pm it was 53 degrees and hazy sky. At 11pm looked like thin high haze.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 05, 2022 at 09:30AM
High overcast
Max temperature 71 degrees F
Min temperature 37 degrees F
At observation 49 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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May 5 Weather:

At 930am it was 49 degrees and high overcast. Breezy by 1025am. At 1pm thicker darker clouds and gusty breezes. At 2pm it was 64 degrees, dark clouds and gusty. At 305pm it was 57 degrees, dark clouds, blustery and just started sprinkling (only lasted long enough to get damp.) First daffodil bloom. Not raining 4pm. It had been raining for a while at 6pm, low foggy dark clouds. At 745pm it was 46 degrees, dark low clouds (VanMeter socked in) and light steady rain continues. At 930pm still raining. At 1230am light sprinkles. At 2am raining pretty good. Likely rained most of the night ending before 9am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 06, 2022 at 09:30AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 67 degrees F
Min temperature 41 degrees F
At observation 44 degrees F
Precipitation 0.32 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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May 6 Weather:

At 930am it was 44 degrees, clouds breaking and patches of blue sky to the south, patches of fog mid-mountain. Breezy before 1030am. At 12pm mostly cloudy and gusty breezes. At 330pm it was 57 degrees, windy (estimate gusts up to 20mph) dark overcast and spitting rain until before 4pm. Rain 5pm-545pm. Raining pretty good at 625pm with low dark clouds and clap of thunder 627pm. A few drops by 7pm and breaks to the west letting in a spot of sun. At 8pm it was 47 degrees, partly clear and calm. At 8pm dark overcast. Likely raining before 11pm. At 1am gusty and raining. Raining pretty good around 2am. Turned to snow early morning, ground white by 7am and ending before 9am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 07, 2022 at 09:30AM
Overcast, sprinkles and flakes, melting
Max temperature 61 degrees F
Min temperature 32 degrees F
At observation 35 degrees F
Precipitation 0.54 inch
Snowfall 1/2 inch
Snow depth Trace
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May 7 Weather:

At 930am it was 35 degrees, overcast, sprinkles and a few flakes of snow, previous snow melting, fog belt across VanMeter. Done by 10am. At 1030am thinner clouds and filtered sun, foggy ridges. Light rain around 1130am, foggy ridges. Not raining at 1pm, VanMeter socked in. Dark low clouds and rain at 3pm. At 315pm it was 37 degrees, big fat flakes of snow falling with the rain, socked in nearly to the floor. Not snowing or raining at 350pm. By 4pm clouds had lifted to the east (but not north.) Another shower started around 6pm and socked in low. Snow added to the mix by 630pm. All snow by 650pm, snowing hard at 7pm and sticking, then done snowing by 730pm – fat trace. At 8pm it was 33 degrees, low foggy clouds down to mid-mountain and not raining or snowing. At 1130pm it was snowing big flakes and about half an inch had stacked up. At 2am smaller flakes and looks like over an inch. Likely snowed most of the night, still snowing at 7am, ending before 9am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 08, 2022 at 09:30AM
Socked in, snowing, breeze
Max temperature 46 degrees F
Min temperature 29 degrees F
At observation 31 degrees F
Precipitation 0.52 inch
Snowfall 3 1/4 inch
Snow depth 3 inch
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