Author Archives: The Yellow Pine Times

About The Yellow Pine Times

The Yellow Pine Times is a not for profit newsletter dedicated to sharing news and events.

Red Flag Warning Sept 17, 1pm to Sept 18, 9pm

Red Flag Warning Sept 17, 1pm to Sept 18, 9pm

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions rescinded today.

Yellow Pine Forecast

Today Widespread haze after noon. Sunny, with a high near 74. East southeast wind 7 to 15 mph becoming west southwest in the afternoon.

Tonight Mostly clear, with a low around 50. West southwest wind 6 to 13 mph becoming southeast after midnight.

Saturday Widespread haze before noon. Sunny, with a high near 71. South southeast wind 7 to 16 mph becoming southwest in the afternoon.

Saturday Night Showers. Low around 44. West southwest wind 6 to 14 mph becoming south after midnight. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New precipitation amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch possible.

Sunday Showers, with thunderstorms also possible after noon. High near 51. South wind 5 to 8 mph becoming calm. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New rainfall amounts between a quarter and half of an inch possible.

Red Flag Warning

URGENT - FIRE WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
836 AM MDT Fri Sep 17 2021

...RED FLAG WARNING FOR GUSTY WINDS AND LOW RELATIVE
HUMIDITIES...

.Gusty winds and low relative humidities ahead of an upper level
system and accompanying cold front will produce dangerous fire
weather conditions this afternoon through Saturday evening.

Eastern Payette National Forest-Northern Boise National Forest-
Southern Boise National Forest/Western Sawtooth National Forest-
836 AM MDT Fri Sep 17 2021

...RED FLAG WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 1 PM THIS AFTERNOON TO
9 PM MDT SATURDAY FOR GUSTY WINDS AND LOW RELATIVE HUMIDITIES FOR
EASTERN PAYETTE NATIONAL FOREST...NORTHERN BOISE NATIONAL FOREST
AND SOUTHERN BOISE NATIONAL FOREST/WESTERN SAWTOOTH NATIONAL
FOREST... WHICH ARE FIRE WEATHER ZONES 402...403 AND 421...

* WINDS...Gusts to 30 mph today and 40 mph Saturday.

* RELATIVE HUMIDITY...10 to 15 percent.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A Red Flag Warning means that critical fire weather conditions
are either occurring now, or will occur shortly.

Moderate smoke this morning, low of 27 degrees.

Road Reports Sept 15, 2021

Please share road reports. Most back country roads have not been graded this season and are rough. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are VERY dusty. No dust abatement applied on main street this summer. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting Wednesday, Sept. 8, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
Project link:
Donnelly to Deinhard Project: Construction on Highway 55 between Donnelly and McCall. This is a much-needed project to repair potholes and cracks in the roadway and will include placing a new layer of pavement on the highway for smoother driving conditions.
What to expect:
* Idaho 55 will be reduced to one lane with pilot cars midweek (Monday – Thursday)
* All lanes will be open on weekends (Friday – Sunday)
* Roadway surface will be uneven for several weeks
* Speed limit will be reduced and 12-foot restrictions will be in place
* Construction is expected to be complete in September.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Monday (Sept 13) road is in good shape.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Monday (Sept 13) the road has been graded and dust abatement applied.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Sept 15) mail truck driver reports the county has nearly completed the grading, road is in pretty good shape.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened June 7
No current report.
Last report Wednesday (Aug 18) “Zena bridge is finished and looks great! Road is very rough. I would not recommend taking a car or camp trailer over.” – JB
Watch for ATV and UTV traffic.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Opened June 13
No current report.
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Profile has seriously rocky sections that are washing out worse than usual. Some are sharp. Carry a saw whether its windy or not — roots of beetle kill trees are now quite rotten and fall easily.” – CP
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Quartz Creek
No current report.
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Cleared Quartz Creek of trees last weekend.” – SA

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open, travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open. Travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Opened June 9
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Opened by May 27
No current report.

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
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Sept 12, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 12, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Because of our [water] situation lawn watering is discouraged. No watering after 2pm. If you are asked to turn your water off, it’s because the system is in danger of running out. Please be respectful. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays weekends.

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions are still in Effect

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit season
May 15 – Firewood Season, permits at The Corner
May 25 – Johnson Creek road fully open
June 7 – Lick Creek road open
June 13 – Profile road open
July 16 – Stage 1 Fire Restrictions
Sept 18 – ATV-UTV Ride to Thunder Mountain
Sept 18 – Jim Adkins Retirement 2pm at YP Tavern
(details below)
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Local Events:

ATV-UTV Ride to Thunder Mountain

Saturday, September 18, 9am – 4pm

Meet at the Community Hall

Ride with us through the fabulous back-country to the historic Thunder Mountain area and support the Yellow Pine Community Hall. This out-and-back ride is rated as intermediate. Participants ride from Yellow Pine Community Hall up Stibnite Road to Thunder Mountain. BBQ Lunch will be served to participants at the end of the road. The timeframe of this event is estimated to be from 9am to 4pm. $25 for online sign up and $30 at the event.

Sign up link:
— — — —

Sept 18th Pot Luck – Yellow Pine Tavern

Yellow Pine Friends, Neighbors and Family

Please join us for a pot luck at the Yellow Pine Tavern on Saturday September 18th at 2:00 P.M.

After 60 years in Yellow Pine, Stibnite and Zena Creek Ranch Jim Adkins has decided to start his next great adventure.

Please join us to wish Jim luck on his new adventure and to meet the new co-owners of the ranch
Shannon and Boyd
Katy and Dave
Debra and Eric
Beth and Bob

Kathy will be providing burgers and brats. Please stop by to wish Jim good luck and meet your new Zena Creek neighbors. Please bring one of your specialty foods to go with the burgers and brats.
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Stage 1 Fire Restrictions still in Effect

Under the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions, the following acts are prohibited on state and federally managed or protected lands, roads, and trails:
* Building, maintaining, attending, or using a fire, campfire or stove fire except within a designated recreation site and in a permanent concrete or metal fire ring, or on private land, and only within an owner-provided structure.
* Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle, building, or designated recreation site or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials.
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Village News:

Donation to Yellow Pine Area Coalition

First come, first served for the price of a YPAC donation of $20 minimum (see neighbor -Deb); You haul off! 230 Yellow Pine Ave.

20210911Outhouse-a
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Internet and Phone Outage update

Sunday, Sept 5th, approximately 330pm, the phone line was accidentally dug up and cut next to Yellow Pine Avenue.

Fire Chief Tim and Cecil used the radio at the Fire Hall to call dispatch to report the outage Sunday afternoon. Dispatch contacted MTE. Nate headed down from Stanley Sunday night and they had a crew and equipment ready to leave Midvale early Monday morning (Labor Day.) Slow internet and landline phones restored by around 6pm on Monday.

The slow (dial up speeds) persisted on Tuesday until around 7pm then just the internet went out – along with cell service via the internet, but our landlines still worked. MTE said the slow speeds was not due to the cable cut – it was a much wider issue.

Internet was restored by 7am Wednesday morning, Sept 9th.
— — — —

Notice – New Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sundays.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
— — — —

Life Flight

It is a very good idea to have Life Flight insurance if you live or recreate in the back country. If you already have Life Flight, consider it as a gift to a loved one.
— — — —

Road News

Local streets are dusty – no dust abatement this year on main street. Please slow down!

Link: to current road reports.

Johnson Creek road was recently graded, but is already getting rough again.

Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are Open. These roads have not been bladed and are rough. Travel at your own risk.

Hwy 55 projects
Smith’s Ferry area: Starting Tuesday, Sept. 7, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route. Project Website link:
Donnelly to McCall: One lane during the week and two lanes on weekends. Project is slated to last until September.
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Critters

Be Mountain Lion Aware

Note: A report of a mountain lion hanging around the upper end of the village early summer.

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!

Be Bear, Fox & Coyote Aware

* Do not feed them human food
* Secure your trash
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Bats

While bats are an important part of our ecosystem and most do not carry rabies, CDH offers the following tips to protect yourself and pets:
* Never touch a bat with your bare hands.
* If you have had an encounter with a bat, seek medical attention.
* If you come in contact with a bat, save the bat in a container without touching it and contact your health department to arrange testing for rabies. Whenever possible, the bat should be tested to rule out an exposure to rabies. During regular business hours in Ada, Boise and Elmore Counties, call 208-327-7499 and in Valley County, call 208-634-7194. After business hours in all counties, call 1-800-632-8000.
* Always vaccinate your pets for rabies, including horses. Pets may encounter bats outdoors or in the home.
* Bat-proof your home or cabin by plugging all holes in the siding and maintaining tight-fitting screens on windows. Bats can enter through holes the size of a quarter.

Ticks

* Know where to expect ticks. Many ticks live in grassy, brushy, or wooded areas. When possible, avoid wooded and brushy areas with tall grass and leaf litter. Walk in the center of trails, particularly in spring and summer when ticks feed.
* Wear appropriate clothing. When in tick habitats, wear light-colored, tightly woven long pants and long-sleeve shirt. Tuck your pant legs into socks or boots, and your shirt into your pants. This helps keep ticks on the outside of your clothing where you can spot them more easily.
* Use tick repellent when necessary, and carefully follow instructions on the label. Apply an EPA-registered repellent effective against ticks, such as those containing DEET to clothes and exposed skin, and permethrin to clothes and gear. Take care when applying repellent on children. EPA’s search tool can help you find the repellent that best suits your needs.
* Check clothing, gear, and pets after being areas with ticks. Ticks can hitch a ride into your home on clothing and pets, then attach to you or a family member later. Carefully examine coats, camping gear, and daypacks. Don’t forget your dog, see CDC’s where to check your pet for ticks.
* Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming can reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease and may be effective in reducing the risk of other tick-borne disease. Showering can wash off unattached ticks and it is a good opportunity to do a tick check.
* Check your body, your child and pets thoroughly for ticks. Carefully inspect areas in and around the hair, head, neck, ears, under arms, inside the belly button, around the waist, between the legs, and behind the knees. Ticks can be very small before they feed—look for what may appear like a new freckle or speck of dirt. Continue checking for two to three days after returning from areas with ticks.

Mosquitoes – West Nile

* Remove standing water
* Wear long sleeves and pants during morning/evening hours
* Use a good repellent with DEET (our bugs laugh at “backyard” formulas.
* Vaccinate your horses and mules! West Nile can be fatal to equines.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

Starting Aug. 29, USPS will raise prices of first-class postage stamps to 58 cents from 55 cents.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Saturday (Sept 4) The dumpsters are being emptied on Wednesdays.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water. No outside watering after 2pm, nor on holiday weekends and especially not during the festival.

July 25, 2021 Update:

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association Board asks that individuals refrain from using domestic water to dampen the road. The Water Corporation is doing its best to provide water for domestic use during the low water period but as the supply becomes more limited, it is incumbent upon each of us to be judicious with its use. Thank you for your cooperation in ensuring that all community members have an adequate supply of water.

The corporation has received the first $150k grant of the anticipated $450k. We are hoping to have some of the supply lines replaced by winter. Thanks to those who wrote letters of support. They were very beneficial in securing the grants. – Willie Sullivan

Sept 10, 2021 Update

DRINKING WATER WARNING
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059
BOIL WATER ADVISORY
Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST. Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted.
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 180 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059 . Date distributed: 9-10-21.

YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 at the Community Hall at 10am
Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes.rtf

YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting held July 5, 2020 at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
— — — —

VYPA News:

September 11 Meeting Agenda

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Agenda
September 11, 2021; 2pm; at the Community Hall
As requested by VYPA members, this meeting will be recorded and kept to a 1-hour timeframe.
Agenda Item Presenter Time Comments
Call to Order Deb Filler
Approval of Prior Meeting Minutes Deb Filler 2 minutes Please read the prior meeting minutes before the meeting to expedite approval
Treasurer’s Oral Report Ronda Rogers 2 minutes
Community Hall Oral Report Rhonda Egbert 2 minutes Accomplishments since last meeting. Progress on project. Update on grant.
Cemetery Oral Report Ron Basabe 2 minutes Please include progress and expected completion date on sign
Infrastructure Oral Report Tim Rogers 2 minutes Please include upcoming plans for infrastructure work
Festival Written Report Deb Filler 10 minutes Please bring several copies of the report for attendees
Stibnite Advisory Council Update Lynn Imel 2 minutes
Stibnite Foundation Update Ronda Rogers 2 minutes
YPFPD Update If anyone available 2 minutes
YPWUA Update If anyone available 2 minutes Update on grants
Perpetua Resources Update If anyone available 2 minutes
Old Business
Fireworks Research update Rhonda Egbert 3 minutes
New Business
Community Representatives Named Deb Filler 2 minutes 2022 Stibnite Advisory Council and Stibnite Foundation representatives
2022 Festival Chairman named Ronda Rogers 2 minutes
Adjournment

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Hailey Harris, Secretary
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

Fire Truck No. 1
20100410FireTruck-aphoto by Local Color Photography 2010

Remember to clean your chimney before lighting that first fall fire, and check the fittings.

[Note: Due to internet outage this info was received too late for last Sunday’s paper.]

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District (YPFPD)
Fire Commissioner’s Budget Hearing and Meeting Agenda
Saturday, September 11, 2021 at YPFPD Station

AGENDA:
* Fire Chief Update –Tim Rogers – INFORMATIONAL
* Begin Annual Budget Hearing – PUBLIC COMMENT – Nikki Saleen/Willie Sullivan
– Budget Compilation and background– Nikki Saleen – Informational
– Open public comment on the proposed budget for the year October 1, 2021 to September 30, 2022. Accepting oral testimony of witnesses on the proposed budget, limit statements to 3 – 5 minutes, Fire Commissioners may ask questions of witnesses. Then END OF HEARING.

Proposed Yellow Pine Fire District Budget for Fiscal Year 2021-2022

Fire Fighting/Support: $9,000
Insurance: $3,000
Wages: $0.0
Advertising: $200
Utilities: $3,000
Repairs and Maintenance: $2,250
Total: $19,471
Note: The above amount is the allocation we receive each year from the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District property owner’s tax dollars. We have received an increase of $659 from last year ($18,812).

Can use additional $1,152 from Forgone Account which will require a 3% increase in property taxes. Under Idaho law, a taxing district is able to raise property tax 3 percent per fiscal year to fund the budget. Should the Commissioners choose not to raise the property tax rate, those funds are considered “forgone.” However, Commissioners can later pass a resolution to reclaim those funds.

* Commissioners open the regular meeting to discuss and adopt the proposed budget – DECISION
* Budget –Nikki Saleen – INFORMATIONAL
– Stibnite Foundation Grant Update– Rhonda Rogers – INFORMATIONAL
– Current budget Status – Nikki Saleen – INFORMATIONAL
– Commissioner discussion on Carryover Expenditures – DECISION
* Update on Meeting with Representative Russ Fulcher’s aide, Matthew Keenan – Merrill Saleen – INFORMATIONAL
* Open Meeting Laws and Executive Sessions complaint, plus request for all financial records – INFORMATIONAL – Phil Jensen
* Proposal for YPFPD Webpage and possible automated outgoing emergency calling platform, plus need for YPFPD laptop with software – Phil Jensen – INFOMATIONAL, POSSIBLE DECISION
* Executive Session per Idaho Code 74-206 1(b): Personnel

Elections for Commissioners for both District 2 and 3 will be held in November 2021.

August 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss upcoming election (no minutes yet.)

July 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
June 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:

Sept 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

2021 Meeting schedule for the YPFD. All meetings are at the YPFD Station
Sat. May 15 at 10am
Sat. June 12 at 10am
Sat. July 10 at 10am
Sat. September 11 at 10am Budget Meeting

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by a escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021.pdf

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Phil Jensen, Acting – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Tim Rogers – Fire Chief
Secretary – Ronda Rogers
Treasurer – Nikki Saleen
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
Hours: 1pm-8pm, closed on Tuesdays
We offer smoked tri tip, brisket, and chicken sandwiches and also burgers and chicken wings.
Firewood Permits available May 15th.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Open daily: 8am to 9pm
Sunday 8am to 2pm
Indoor Dining and Outdoor Dining Available.
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Opened June 12th for Summer
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Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
Store hours: 10am to 5pm, Monday – Sunday. Gas and Diesel now available. The Liquor Store is now reinstated. Now Selling Black Rifle Coffee.
The store is stocked with basic convenience store items such as food, fuel, liquor, beer, wine, tobacco, ice, non alcoholic beverages, snacks, ice cream. New Yellow Pine branded shirts, hats and koozies have arrived. We are going through the process of installing a propane dispenser and bottle exchange service.
For any particular store item requests, please call 208-633-3300 or Email
For room reservations, please call 208-633-3300 or Email for reservations
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Our Elk & Deer hunts are booked for our 2021 season, we do have a couple openings for our 2022 Elk & Deer hunts. We Also have a couple openings for Mountain Lion hunts December 2021 through February 2022 and Spring Bear hunts May of 2022. Please see our Website site for further details.
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:

Garden Mountain Contractors
We would like to extend our services into the Yellow pine area if there may be a need. We dig alot of dirt! If you need this give us a shout on our FB page below. – Larry Williamson
Garden Valley, Idaho FB Page:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Sept 6) overnight low of 38 degrees. This morning clear above haze of smoke – poor air quality. Phones and internet still out. Loud dirt bike and 4-wheeled traffic kicking up dust on the main road. Jays visiting. Warm, clear and smoky at lunch time. Two hairy woodpeckers visiting. Pretty warm by mid-afternoon, breezy, clear sky, haze of smoke and poor air quality, high of 90 degrees. Northern Flicker whooping it up in the neighborhood. Phone service restored around 6pm, internet is back but very slow (0.33Mbps.) Calmer and warm before sunset, clear sky and haze of smoke (and dust) – yellow air quality. Cooling off quickly after dark. Thinner haze before midnight – stars shining.

Tuesday (Sept 7) overnight low of 43 degrees. This morning some high hazy streaks of clouds above the haze of smoke – Yellow air quality. Light air and street traffic. Internet still very slow (0.49Mbps.) Thicker smoke at lunch time, warm and worse air quality. Jays, hairy woodpecker and pine squirrel visiting. Light traffic and heavy dust. Hot by mid-afternoon, slight breeze, moderate smoke and quite poor air quality, high of 91 degrees. Northern flickers whooping it up around the neighborhood. Internet (and cell phones) out before 7pm. Quite warm and mostly cloudy before sunset, moderate smoke and poor air quality. Cooling off quickly after dark and smoky. The brightest stars shining thru the smoke before midnight. Internet still out.

Wednesday (Sept 8) overnight low of 43 degrees. This morning it is likely clear over moderate smoke – Orange air quality – reduced visibility. Internet back on before 7am (6.32Mbps.) Light street traffic and dust. Jays and a pine squirrel visiting. Thicker smoke by lunch time, reduced visibility and worse air quality. Mail truck was on time. Hot and breezy by mid-afternoon, seems to be clear above the smoke, somewhat improved visibility and air quality (high end of Yellow AQ), high of 94 degrees. Warm and really murky looking before sunset, appears partly cloudy, dusty and smoky, very poor air quality. Cooling off after dark and smoky. Cloudy or hazy before midnight.

Thursday (Sept 9) overnight low of 47 degrees. This morning it is possibly clear or mostly clear above moderate smoke – Orange air quality – reduced visibility. The sun was ruby red and the morning light cast an orange glow on things. Street traffic and dust. Jays and hairy woodpeckers visiting. Sky covered with smoke at lunch time, might be some clouds? By early afternoon we had Red Air Quality. Hot by mid-afternoon, sky covered with smoke and breezy, high of 92 degrees. Pretty warm before sunset, light breezes, a bit thinner smoke. Very red sun setting in the notch. Cooling off after dark. Looked cloudy before midnight.

Friday (Sept 10) overnight low of 51 degrees. This morning, light breezes and it appears to be mostly cloudy above a haze of some – Yellow air quality. Northern flicker whooping, hairy woodpecker and jays visiting. Light street traffic kicking up dust. Cloudy and smoky at lunch time. Dark clouds, breezy, mild temperatures and lighter haze of smoke by mid-afternoon, high of 80 degrees. Big hawk in the neighborhood – even the jays are upset. Light rain shower for about 30 minutes late afternoon. Much cooler before sunset, mostly patchy high clouds and much better air quality. Much cooler at dusk, mostly cloudy and fairly good air quality. Short shower after dark and cloudy. Looked cloudy before midnight. May have rained a little early morning.

Saturday (Sept 11) overnight low of 42 degrees. This morning mostly clear blue sky and great air quality. First rain of Sept totaled 0.05″ – enough to barely settle the road dust. Hairy woodpeckers and jays visiting. Light street traffic but so far no dust. Mostly clear at lunch time, light breezes and good air. Warming up and drying out by mid-afternoon, clear blue sky and breezy, high of 77 degrees. Blue dragonflies and more grasshoppers. Mild temps, clear sky, calm and smoke settling in before sunset – AQI PM2.5 = 52 (Yellow). Stars out before midnight.

Sunday (Sept 12) overnight low of 36 degrees. This morning partly cloudy (high wispy), light breeze, and light haze of smoke – Yellow air quality. Jays visiting. Mostly cloudy before lunch time. Light street traffic. Mostly cloudy, light breeze, haze of smoke and Yellow air quality mid-afternoon, high of 77 degrees. Flicker whooping it up in the neighborhood. Mostly cloudy, warm, slight breeze and haze of smoke before sunset – Yellow air quality.
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RIP:

JR VanHoover Celebration of Life Postponed

It is with great regret that I want to let everyone know we, as a family, have decided to err on the side of caution and postpone the celebration of life for J.R. VanHoover that was scheduled for this Saturday. Members of our own family have recently tested positive for covid and we simply cannot take the chance this gathering could in any way be responsible for further spread of Covid to any of you. We want to thank you all for the outpouring of love and support we have felt. We will schedule a gathering at a later time.
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Idaho News:

Valley hospitals report 67 new COVID-19 cases in past week

By Tom Grote for The Star-News September 9, 2021

A total of 67 new cases of COVID-19 were reported in the past week by Valley County’s two hospitals. That compares to 42 new cases reported the previous week and 57 new cases the prior week.

St. Luke’s McCall reported 55 new cases in the last week, while Cascade Medical Center reported 12 new cases.

The two hospitals have reported a total of 1,118 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic arrived in Valley County in March 2020.

Information on the number of new cases among those not vaccinated for COVID-19 are not available for the two hospitals, but the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare reported on Tuesday 90% of new cases statewide are among unvaccinated people.

St. Luke’s McCall offers walk-in COVID-19 vaccines from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at St. Luke’s Clinics – Payette Lakes Family Medicine, 211 Forest Street, McCall.

Appointments also can be scheduled online through St. Luke’s myChart or calling 208-381-9500 or by calling 208-634-2225.

Cascade Medical Center offers a daily walk-in vaccination clinic Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

COVID-19 Updates: 1,574 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 13 new deaths

Sept 10, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 1,574 new COVID-19 cases and 13 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 232,630.

The state said 840,746 people have received the vaccine, and 1,528,899 total doses have been administered. 750,553 people are fully vaccinated.

The state said 61 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 10,311, and 7 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 1,715.

13 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 2,460.

full story: [Valley County: 1135 cases, 6 deaths]
— — — —

Idaho patients in hospital halls amid COVID rationed care

by Rebecca Boone Associated Press Sept 9, 2021

Amid the Idaho coronavirus surge that prompted officials to authorize hospitals to ration health care, Army soldiers sent to one hospital have traded their fatigues for personal protective equipment to help treat a flood of infected patients.

The conference center at Kootenai Health hospital in the city Coeur d’Alene has been converted into a field hospital of sorts — with some of its classrooms filled with hospital beds where patients receive oxygen or get monoclonal antibody treatment, hospital officials said.

At the nearby main hospital building in the city of about 50,000, some emergency room patients receive care in a converted lobby and others get it in hallways. Urgent surgeries have been put on hold and some patients in critical condition are facing long waits for intensive care beds.

continued:
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Gov. Little activates National Guard again, directs hundreds of new medical personnel to help Idaho hospitals overwhelmed with unvaccinated COVID-19 patients

Tuesday August 31, 2021 Press Release

Boise, Idaho – Governor Brad Little announced today a last-ditch effort to avoid the first-ever activation of statewide crisis standards of care by adding hundreds of new medical personnel for Idaho hospitals, but he said the real solution to the crisis is more Idahoans choosing to receive the safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine.

Nearly all Idaho hospitals are overwhelmed with unvaccinated COVID-19 patients. There are more Idahoans in Intensive Care Units (ICU) with COVID-19 than ever before. The vast majority of them are unvaccinated.

“On a daily call with hospitals this morning, we heard there are only FOUR adult ICU beds available in the entire state, out of close to 400. Where hospitals have converted other spaces to be used as contingency ICU beds, those are filling up too,” Governor Little said. “We are dangerously close to activating statewide crisis standards of care – a historic step that means Idahoans in need of healthcare could receive a lesser standard of care or may be turned away altogether. In essence, someone would have to decide who can be treated and who cannot. This affects all of us, not just patients with COVID-19.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Trident sues Idaho over McCall swap rejection; asks for Land Board to reconsider alleging ‘bias’

September 8, 2021 By Don Day – BoiseDev editor

A Boise firm that hoped to trade 26 square miles of land in and around McCall with the State of Idaho’s land endowment isn’t taking no for an answer.

The Idaho Department of Lands denied Trident’s application last month. It said, among other things, that the value of timberland it hoped to buy in North Idaho then trade was worth $292 million less than the McCall area land it wants to take possession of.

Yesterday, Trident took two separate actions in hopes it could reverse the decision, according to public records obtained by BoiseDev.

Trident sued for judicial review – asking a judge to step in while also asking that the Idaho Land Board hold a contested case hearing on its swap proposal.

continued:
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West Nile virus activity rising across the state, health officials say

September 8, 2021 Local News 8

Human West Nile virus (WNV) infections as well as positive mosquito pools and infections in horses are on the rise in Idaho.

Detection of the virus has been reported in 13 counties, primarily in south and southwestern Idaho, but also in the Salmon area of Lemhi County and Franklin County, areas that don’t often report WNV activity.

Six human WNV infections, all severe neurologic disease, including one death, have been reported in Idaho this year, as of Sept. 1. Only one human infection had been reported in Idaho last year by Sept. 1.

continued:
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Public Lands:

DEQ says Toxins found in lakebed of Payette Lake

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 9, 2021

Laboratory tests found low levels of toxins from cyanobacteria in the lakebed of North Beach, the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality said last week

The tests were made after a dog fell ill after swimming in Payette Lake last month.

The cyanobacteria and toxins found in Payette Lake are a different variety from the type that has triggered a public health advisory on Lake Cascade the last four years, the DEQ said.

The toxins are from bottom-dwelling cyanobacteria and are considered most dangerous if directly consumed, the agency said.

continued:
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Grimes Creek Closure Renewed for Another Year

Sept 7, 2021 Boise National Forest (via FB)

The Idaho City Ranger District of the Boise National Forest has renewed the closure to all public entry along National Forest System road and area 364 (Grimes Creek.)

This Order will be in effect from September 3, 2021 and shall remain in effect until September 01, 2022, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor.

Boise County Sheriff’s Department, Residents, Volunteer Fire Departments and Emergency Managers in partnership with the Idaho City Ranger District will continue to address issues involving the heavy recreation use along the seven-mile strip of land adjacent to Grimes Creek through 2022.

View the closure and map on the Boise NF Alerts and Notices web page. (link)
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Helicopter Making Low-Level Flights over North-Central Idaho

Sept 9, 2021 USGS


Map shows the airborne helicopter survey west of nearby Salmon, just south of Montana-Idaho border (bold black line). Surveys will be conducted within/near the boundary margins (red polygon). Planned flight lines and survey information can be found online. (USGS map; Public domain.)

Residents and visitors should not be alarmed to see a low-flying helicopter over Lemhi and Custer Counties west of Salmon, Idaho from September 6 to October 18, 2021.

The U.S. Geological Survey and Idaho Geological Survey are co-leading the effort to conduct a helicopter-assisted airborne survey over approximately 1,160 square miles of the Salmon National Forest west of Salmon, Idaho. The instrumentation aboard the helicopter is passive, meaning it receives but does not emit signals for detection, and poses no health concerns or risks to humans, pets or wildlife.

The survey aims to study cobalt and other important mineral resources concealed in ancient rock layers beneath the rugged landscape of north-central Idaho. Aerial coverage will extend north near the Idaho-Montana border and continue about 40 miles south through Lemhi and Custer Counties.

continued:
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Fire Season:

Sept 8, 2021 Satellite Map

20210908SatSmokeMap-a
Cropped to show Idaho fires/smoke – the big plume is the Boundary fire.
— — — — — — — — — —

Brush fire near Blackhawk doused by crews

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News September 9, 2021

A brush fire on West Mountain Road near McCall on Monday was put out before it could endanger nearby homes, the Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association said.

A SITPA fire patrol reported the fire at 2:15 p.m. Monday near Blackhawk on the River five miles south of McCall on West Mountain Road.

Crews cleared the scene at about 10 p.m. after dousing the brush fire with an estimated 85,000 gallons of water and 3,000 gallons of fire retardant, Fire Warden Paul Wagner said.

About 30 personnel, five vehicles, three airplanes and a helicopter were deployed to prevent the fire from growing. The blaze was kept to less than an acre.

Water trucks from McCall Fire & EMS and Cascade Fire & EMS supplied ground crews.

The helicopter dipped a bucket into the North Fork of the Payette River and dropped water on the flames.

Meanwhile, two single-engine air tankers based at the nearby McCall Airport rotated dumping fire retardant onto the flames, Wagner said.

The cause of the fire was under investigation Wednesday.

full story:
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2021 Payette Wilderness Fires
Three fires are burning in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Payette National Forest. The Club, Rush Creek, and Vinegar fires were started by lightning on July 15, 2021. A Type 3 Incident Management Team took over the fires on July 19th. A closure order for trails has been put in place in and around these fires for public and firefighter safety to prevent any interference with suppression and response operations.
Lightning on July 15, 2021 ignited multiple fires on the Payette National Forest. The Rush Creek Fire was detected on 7/16. The Club and Vinegar fires were detected on 7/17. One additional fire from the July 15th lightning remained small and was called out on 7/18. Lightning on 7/19 also ignited 3 more fires, all of which have remained small.

InciWeb: Maps and closure orders

Rush Creek Size 7,945 Acres

Vinegar Fire Size 2,998 Acres

Club Fire Size 2,331 Acres

— — — —

Boundary Fire grows to 49,784 acres

Sept 10, 2021 Local News 8

InciWeb

The lightning-caused Boundary Fire, less than two miles W of Boundary Creek Boat Launch, was detected on August 10.

It has burned 49,784 acres and is 38% contained.

The Boundary Fire is burning in steep, inaccessible terrain in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. Firefighter and public safety are the number one priority for the Boundary Fire. On Thursday, the fire was active with uphill runs, group torching, and short-range spotting. The fire continues to back in the Fall Creek drainage to the south. Crews are continuing to snag out the Boundary Creek road and are mopping up and securing the fire’s edge at the Boundary Creek administrative sites. Mop-up was completed around Morgan Ranch. Firefighters conducted a burnout operation west of the airstrip at Sulphur Creek Ranch, the fire continues to back to the south towards Sulphur Creek. Fire is established in Sulphur Creek, east of the Middle Fork of the Salmon River, and is backing down the south side of the drainage.

continued:
— —

Boundary Fire
Salmon-Challis National Forest
The lightning-caused Boundary Fire ~2 miles W of Boundary Creek Boat Launch was detected on August 10.
Size 50,963 Acres

InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — —

Scarface Fire grows to 7,241 acres

Sept 10, 2021 Local News 8

InciWeb

The lightning caused Scarface Fire that started on August 7 has burned 7,241 acres.

It is 20% contained and is burning 2½ miles southeast of the Middle Fork Lodge; Middle Fork Ranger District; Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

The fire is active with running, torching and fire backing down slopes. Firefighters are continuing point protection actions which include burning out above the private land in the area. On Friday, as conditions allow, firefighters will continue those burnout operations with the overall object to bring fire down and tie into the Middle Fork of the Salmon River. Fire has crossed into the Little Soldier Creek drainage to the northwest of Thomas Creek. To the south, the fire continues to flank towards Little Creek. Smoke conditions allowed firefighters to access the Cougar Ranch area yesterday. Firefighters are assessing and preparing values at risk in that area so that point protection strategies can be initiated if they become necessary.

continued:
— —

Scarface Fire
Salmon-Challis National Forest
The lightning fire detected on August 7 is approximately 2 1/2 miles southeast of the Middle Fork Lodge; Middle Fork Ranger District; Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.
Size 7,806 Acres

InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — —

Mud Lick, Haynes, and Iron Fires
Salmon-Challis National Forest
Mud Lick Fire Size 20,857 Acres

InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
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Nez Perce-Clearwater Lightning Fires
Nez Perce – Clearwater National Forests
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
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Some useful links:

InciWeb Fire info link:
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Air Quality McCall link:
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National Fire Heat Map link: (zoom in to our area)
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Fire Heat Map (Slow to load – be patient)

Zoom Earth (weather and smoke map)

Real Time Lightning Map (zoom to our area)

GOES-West – Satellite Maps: Pacific Northwest
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Critter News:

Fish & Game notes reports of bears coming into McCall

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is beginning to receive more reports of bears in town, Regional Wildlife Biologist Nathan Borg of the McCall office said.

“Don’t let your trash can or bird feeder become a bear’s food source! “ Borg said. “Once a bear has learned to eat human food, it can be hard to convince them to leave.”

Fish and Game ends up killing bears in McCall every year because they’ve become dangerous to humans, he said.

“Please make sure that your trash is kept inside and is in a bear proof trash can, keep pet food secured or inside, and don’t feed birds during spring, summer and fall,” Borg said.

For questions or to report a nuisance bear, call 208-634-8137.

source: The Star-News September 9, 2021
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2021 Four Mile Wild Horse Gather

The Bureau of Land Management Boise District, Four Rivers Field Office, on or about September 14, 2021, will begin the capture of approximately 189 wild horses and remove approximately 173 excess wild horses within and outside of the boundaries of the Four Mile HMA. The current population is approximately 210 wild horses. The Appropriate Management Level is 37-60 wild horses. The BLM expects the helicopter gather to take approximately 3-5 days.

The purpose of the gather is to prevent undue or unnecessary degradation of the public lands associated with excess wild horses, and to restore a thriving natural ecological balance and multiple-use relationship on public lands, consistent with the provisions of Section 1333(b) of the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act and the Cascade Resource Management Plan. The primary issue in this HMA is the availability of water and forage.

Forage is allocated for 37 wild horses or 444 Animal Unit Months (AUMs) in the Four Mile Herd Management Area (HMA). Monitoring data indicate that when the total horse population begins to reach the upper limit of 60 animals (720 AUMs), resource conditions begin to decline, especially in areas near water sources.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Valley County residents can help avoid bear conflicts by storing food and garbage properly

By Brian Pearson, Regional Conservation Manager
Wednesday, September 8, 2021


rokopix/Shutterstock.com

With fall approaching, Idaho’s black bears are on the move and preparing for denning season, seeking out and gobbling up food to help them pack on the pounds.

This annual race to put on as much weight as possible before going into hibernation begins in mid-summer and lasts into early fall. Not coincidentally, this time of year is when Fish and Game staff receive the most reports of black bears causing problems in Valley County neighborhoods. This year is no exception.

“We’ve had a ton of reports of problem bears coming in from all over the Valley County in the past few weeks,” said District Conservation Officer Marshall Haynes. “And the majority of these bear problems are created by bad human habits in our communities.” …

* Valley County residents can report bear problems to Fish and Game staff in McCall so that they can monitor the situation: (208) 634-8137

continued:
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Traps, snares and pets can be a bad combination, and here’s how to avoid a problem

By Brian Pearson, Regional Conservation Manager
Tuesday, September 7, 2021

Dog owners are reminded that it’s year-round wolf trapping season on private land

With many wolf trapping seasons open, and many bird hunters taking to the field in the fall, bird hunters and other people recreating with off-leash dogs are reminded to avoid traps and be prepared to act quickly in the event their hunting or hiking companion becomes trapped.

Most traps and snares are simple in design and easy to operate if you know what to do. Some of the larger foothold and body-gripping traps can be challenging because they require more effort to open, but the principles are the same.

continued:
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A citizen’s tip helped to solve a case of an illegally-killed mule deer in Southern Idaho

By Terry Thompson, Regional Communications Manager
Wednesday, September 8, 2021

Tips from the public are often key to solving cases of illegally-killed big game.

On August 29, 2021 Idaho Fish and Game Officers Trevor Meadows and Philip Stamer, both stationed in the Magic Valley Region, received a tip from a concerned citizen that someone had illegally shot a mule deer a day before the deer season opened. Both officers responded to the scene but the suspect had left the immediate area. After an unsuccessful initial search for the deer carcass, officers called in one of Idaho Fish and Game’s K-9 teams, Officer Craig Mickelson and K-9 officer Blue who are stationed in Fish and Game’s Southwest Region.


Idaho Fish and Game

K-9 officer Blue and Officer Mickelson were able to locate the deer carcass and Blue also led officers to additional crucial evidence. Using the information gathered by officers Mickelson and Blue, officers Meadows and Stamer were able to find the suspect who was subsequently charged with multiple violations.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Recognizing & Avoiding Wildlife Traps while Walking your Dog

Idaho Fish & Game Wildlife Biologist Jennifer Struthers takes viewers into the field to demonstrate how wildlife traps are disguised. The idea is to aid viewers in making decisions about leashing dogs or leaving the area.


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Releasing your Dog from a Trap

Dog owners should be aware that traps may be present on the landscape. Dogs will be attracted to foothold trap sets due to the scent and bait, and they may also encounter snares and body grip traps. This is an instructional video explaining a variety of traps and how to release your dog from traps.


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Seasonal Humor:

GolfTrap2-a

Covid2020Tpaper-a
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Idaho History Sept 12, 2021

Central Idaho Volcanoes

Idaho and Valley Counties

Mount Idaho

1881 Idaho Territory Map

1881-Idaho-MtIdaho— — — — — — — — — —

August 16, 1881
Idaho_SpokaneTimes_08-16-1881-a
Volcano In Idaho

Lewiston, I.T., Aug. 16. — A volcanic eruption occurred in the mountains about twenty miles east of Mt. Idaho on the 9th inst, sending forth fire and smoke hundreds of feet in hight [sic], and throwing rocks into the air which lit several miles from the scene of eruption. A column of black smoke is said to be still rising from the mouth of the volcano, which is visible fifty miles away. The shock attending the eruption was distinctly felt on Salmon river, seventy-five miles from the place. No one has as yet approached the scene of eruption.

— Blake. Spokane Times

— Newspaper Source found at: Washington Secretary of State Website Database, 2007
source: U.S. Volcanic Eruptions: “Non-Volcano Eruptions” Newspaper Clippings
— — — — — — — — — —

Daily Gazette – New Jersey August 18, 1881

A Volcano in Idaho

A dispatch from Lewiston, Idaho, says that there was a volcanic eruption in the mountain south of the South Fork of the Clearwater, about twenty miles east of Mt. Idaho, on the 9th instant. The mountain sent forth a column of fire and smoke several hundred feet in height, and a rock, which fell at a distance of several miles from the place of eruption. The shock was distinctly felt at Mt. Idaho, on the extreme west of the Camas Prairie, and at the mouth of Salmon River, a distance of about 75 miles.

Later news from Camas Prairie says that a column of smoke is coming from the opening, which is distinctly visible from the prairie. No one as yet has approached the place. Evidence of volcanic action at some former periods exist in many places in the immediate vicinity. So far as appears the opening is less than a thousand feet above the bed of the South Fork of the Clearwater, and within three miles of the Milner trail, between Mt. Idaho and Florence.
— — — —

Northern Christian Advocate – New York August 25, 1881

Volcano

There are reports of a volcanic eruption in Idaho. August 9th a column of fire and smoke is said to have burst from a mountain summit about 1000 feet above the south fork of the Clearwater, about 20 miles east from Mt. Idaho; the smoke continued to pour forth in great volume and to rise several hundred feet. A rock of considerable size was also thrown a number of miles from the mountain’s base. There were in the region distinct evidences of former volcanic action.
— — — —

The Owyhee Avalanche September 10, 1881

Idaho Volcano

The Nez Perce News of the 1st instant says: “Our big brother, Col. F.J. Parker, returned from the inside last night, and says that the supposed volcano is simply a chemical eruption at the head of a ridge of high altitude known as Devil’s back, a divide between the waters of the Salmon and Clearwater rivers. The trees on the mountain sides are shattered into kindling wood by the force of the explosion, and also set the woods on fire. The formation in the vicinage of the eruption is quartzite and limestone, and is terribly broken up. There were two explosions, the last twenty hours after the other, but not so loud.”

source: © PBC Idaho County GenWeb – Miscellaneous Published Articles and Newspaper Items From Idaho County and the Vicinity, compiled by Penny Bennett Casey
— — — — — — — — — —

Spokane Times – September 13, 1881 Idaho

Journalistic Push

— Fortunate is Walla Walla in the possession of a live journalist. Such an one is Col. Frank J. Parker, editor of the “Statesman.” He doesn’t allow nature to put on too much style without giving a pen picture of the “very latest.” On a recent occasion, a volcano was reported away over in Idaho, an account of which was first sent to THE TIMES by telegraph. We hadn’t time to run over and investigate the matter, and are very sorry to say that we were compelled to leave our readers in dreadful suspense till Brother Parker had resolved to be “the first to be there.” Always ready to go where duty calls, this enterprising journalist tore himself away from the endearments of civilization and pushed rapidly toward the frontier. His speed was like that of the wind. Passing Dayton, Lewiston and Pharoah’s Hill, he made the quickest time to Mt. Idaho. From there he traveled with a pack horse, and wore out the seat of a government pack-saddle. No one but an enterprising newspaper man would have suffered thusly. When Col. Parker reached the ragged edge of the greatest labyrinth of tangled forests ever designated on map or chart, and where no white man had ever been, he could learn less about the volcano than while at Walla Walla. Here he left the remnants of his pack train, and crawled into and through the primeval forest, with glory only seventeen miles away. On and on, manfully he climbed the mountain side, sparring himself onward and upward with the encouraging word, “Excelsior!”. He became weary, yet fainted not; lost the soles to his boots, yet halted not; hungry, and ate naught; but still he pressed manfully on with that peculiar trait of hoping against hope — so common with newspaper men — leading him on.

When Col. Parker had reached the summit of the mountains, where the volcano was supposed to be, imagine his great astonishment to find right before his eyes the very spot which might be the one he was looking for, and yet it might not. The mountain was charred and torn, was steaming a little, and sent up a peculiar and unpleasant odor. “Bravo! bravo!” shout Stanley; “Whooplah! it is the Devil’s Hole!” and as such it is known to this day.

— Newspaper Source found at: Washington Secretary of State Website Database, 2007

source: U.S. Volcanic Eruptions: “Non-Volcano Eruptions” Newspaper Clippings
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Fire (Not Volcano)

The fire having the widest repercussions for the area was one that occurred in August 1881 near Buffalo Hump. A settler accidentally got a patch of timber burning and, being all alone, he decided that the best way to attract attention and get help would be to set off a powder blast. The earth-shaking explosion and the leaping flames apparently brought him the assistance he wanted, but it probably attracted more attention than he had bargained for. In due course, the rumor had found its way into various newspapers throughout the West that there had been a volcanic eruption and an earthquake at Buffalo Hump.

source: A History of the Nez Perce Forest, page 71.  [h/t Kelsey McCartney FB]
see also:  Sister M. Alfreda Elsonsohn’s book “Pioneer Days in Idaho County” – per Kevin Norwood FB
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Thunder Mountain

1902 Thunder Mountain Mining District Map

1902-Idaho-ThunderMtn— — — — — — — — — —

Thunder Mountain Caldera

TowardsThunderMountain2016Looking towards Thunder and Red mountains showing the rim of the old caldera.

Photo: by Local Color Photography August 2016.
— — — — — — — — — —

Thunder Mountain Cauldron Complex 50-30 million BCE

ThunderMountainCauldronComplex(Cropped from Table 1 From Link and Janecke, 1999.)

citation: Challis Magmatic Episode By Laura DeGrey and Paul Link of Idaho State University Digital Geology of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

Temporal Evolution of the Thunder Mountain Caldera and Related Features, Central Idaho

by B. F. Leonard and R. F. Marvin USGS 1982

Abstract

The eruption of latite ash flows 50 million years ago began an episode of volcanic activity that lasted about 7 million years. Ash flows and minor lava flows, first latitic, then rhyolitic, built the Thunder Mountain field of Challis Volcanics to a height of 1,500 meters before subsidence of a nearly circular cauldron block 60-65 kilometers in diameter. Subsidence of the Quartz Creek cauldron, dated at 47 million years, was accompanied by development of the Cougar Basin caldera, within which the Sunnyside rhyolitic ash flow (an informal, locally recognized unit) was erupted from a central vent 46-47 million years ago. The eruption of the Sunnyside rhyolite was attended by development of the Thunder Mountain caldera, to which most of the Sunnyside was confined. The caldera was filled to shallow depth with volcaniclastic sediments containing plant remains of Eocene age. The caldera floor was tilted, perhaps by diapiric(?) emplacement of the Casto pluton about 44 million years ago. A minor vent near the caldera edge spilled latite lava across the tilted caldera floor. The highest latite flow has a date of about 43 million years: younger dates obtained from the flow very likely reflect argon loss from glass. The outpouring of latite lava is the last volcanic event recorded in the caldera. The dates of the earliest intrusives (47-million-year-old dikes of the cauldron margin) and of the latest (37-million-year-old dike of the Little Pistol swarm) indicate that intrusive activity began within the explosive stage of local volcanism and apparently ceased some few million years after extrusion of the youngest lavas of the field. Within this interval, the eastern margin of the cauldron was invaded by the Casto pluton, and myriad small stocks and dikes of rhyolite and latite were emplaced, mainly along the margins of the cauldron and its nested calderas. Twenty-eight new potassium-argon dates document the history summarized here.

Introduction

The Thunder Mountain caldera is the central feature of an irregular field of Challis Volcanics (Figure 1) that formed during the Eocene at the geographic center of the Idaho batholith. The caldera is old, has been deformed repeatedly almost from its inception to the present, and is virtually indistinguishable topographically from the jumbled fault blocks of the Salmon River Mountains in which it lies. Nevertheless, the caldera has evolved in much the same way as the better exposed and better studied calderas of Oligocene to Pleistocene age in the western United States. We present here a geologic sketch of the local volcanic field and an outline of the temporal evolution of the Thunder Mountain caldera and related features. The main conclusions of this report were given earlier as an abstract (Leonard and Marvin, 1975).

Formality requires the naming of two subsidence features that were glossed over in the abstract. The Thunder Mountain caldera nests within a larger caldera, here named the Cougar Basin caldera (Figure 1). The northern and eastern sectors of the Cougar Basin caldera are hard to reach and poorly known, and our attempts to date the subsidence of the caldera isotopically have been frustrated by the difficulty of preparing suitable mineral separates. For these reasons, the Cougar Basin caldera receives little more than its name in this report. Both calderas are outlined by remnants of their wall rocks, but part of the subcircular outline of the calderas is now masked by a northeast-trending linear structure, too complex to be labeled a medial graben, that passes through the calderas and ends near the north margin of the cauldron. The cauldron – the large volcanic subsidence structure that delimits the Challis Volcanics of the Thunder Mountain field – is here named the Quartz Creek cauldron (Figure 1). The northern sector of the cauldron nearly coincides with the principal trough of the 1,800-gamma contour of the aeromagnetic map of Cater and others (1973, plate 1). The southwest sector coincides approximately with the smoothed 1,600-gamma contour of an aeromagnetic map kindly made available by Don R. Mabey, U. S. Geological Survey.

Figure1Geologicsketch-aFigure 1. Geologic sketch of Thunder Mountain caldera and related features. Compiled by B. F. Leonard from mapping at various scales by Cater and others (1973, plate 1), B. F. Leonard (unpublished), and J. G. Brophy and Gordon May (unpublished).
(for larger size go to link to paper)

Principal place names used in the text are shown on published topographic maps of the U. S. Geological Survey, chiefly on the Big Creek and Yellow Pine 15-minute quadrangles and the Challis and Elk City 2-degree quadrangles. The name Land Monument Mesa is not shown on published maps. The name is for the mesa 1.7 kilometers north-northeast of the Dewey mine, Thunder Mountain district. Most of the sample locations (Figure 2) are referred to maps available when the fieldwork was done. Since then, new maps have replaced or supplemented some of the old ones. As anyone who wishes to visit the sample sites will soon find only the newer maps available, the principal changes are noted here. The former 15-minute quadrangles have been subdivided into the Wolf Fang Peak, Big Creek, Edwardsburg, Profile Gap, Yellow Pine, Stibnite, Big Chief Creek, and Chilcoot Peak 7 1/2 minute quadrangles; the Monument, Safety Creek, and Rainbow Peak 7 1/2 minute quadrangles now supplement the 2-degree quadrangles for the area northeast and east of Thunder Mountain. The elevations of sample sites are reported in feet because elevations are so shown on the topographic maps of the region. Horizontal distances have been converted from English to metric units. Plate 1 of Cater and others (1973) shows reconnaissance geologic information for all but the western part of the area treated in our report.

Figure2Locationofsamples-aFigure 2. Location of samples. Hare from topographic map of the 3late of Idaho, U. S. Geological Survey, scale 1.500,000
(for larger size go to link to paper)

Geologic Sketch

The Quartz Creek cauldron that delimits the Thunder Mountain field is crudely circular in plan, 60-65 kilometers in diameter, bounded on the west and northwest by a system of ring faults and an attendant swarm of dikes, and along its eastern sector invaded by the Eocene Casto pluton (Figure 1). Radial faults and subsidiary ring fractures dissect the cauldron block, but their pattern is largely obscured by a host of younger faults produced by regional rotational stress and by recent regional and local subsidence. Within the cauldron block, vertical displacement along major subsidence faults exceeds several kilometers, causing plutonic Precambrian intrusives, low- to high-grade Precambrian metamorphic rocks, and various facies of the Cretaceous Idaho batholith to lie in disarray against one another and against the Challis Volcanics.

The Challis Volcanics of the Thunder Mountain field comprise (1) two units of regional extent, (2) a pyroclastic and volcaniclastic filling unit, confined to the Thunder Mountain caldera and its environs, and (3), as a minor part of the filling unit, late flows confined to the caldera but separated from other components of the caldera filling by an erosion surface of at least local extent. The Thunder Mountain caldera and its environs, and (3), as a minor part of the filling unit, late flows confined to the caldera but separated from other components of the caldera filling by an erosion surface of at least local extent.

The units of regional extent are a lower, latitic unit and an upper, rhyolitic unit. Both are largely ash-flow tuffs and their welded equivalents. The lower unit of latite tuff and breccia is 400-500 meters thick. It rests on rocks of the Idaho batholith and older metamorphic complexes, locally contains consolidated mudflow debris rich in blocks of batholithic granodiorite and grus derived therefrom, contains at least two thin flows of latite, and in composition ranges without evident order from latite to quartz latite. The latitic unit is exposed only at the cauldron edge and at the periphery of the main area of Challis Volcanics; its extent throughout the field is conjectural. The upper unit of rhyolite tuff and welded tuff is 1,000 – 1,100 meters thick. It rests on the latite unit but laps onto the adjacent plutonic and metamorphic terrane. In addition to the predominant rhyolitic pyroclastics, the upper, rhyolitic unit contains one or more thin flows of rhyolite, two or more of andesite, and a few lenses of volcanic sandstone and granodiorite-bearing mudflow debris. The disposition of the two units of regional extent (Figure 1) indicates that they were formed before major subsidence of the cauldron, but the vent or vents from which they issued have not been identified.

The filling unit, confined to the Thunder Mountain caldera and its environs, has three subunits. The lowest is the Sunnyside rhyolite.

The informal name Sunnyside rhyolite is adopted in this report for a subunit of local interest in the Challis Volcanics of the Thunder Mountain field. Mining men and geologists familiar with the Thunder Mountain district customarily use the name Sunnyside rhyolite, and it is appropriate to accede to their custom. The informal name Sunnyside rhyolite corresponds to the equally informal rhyolite of Sunnyside (Leonard, in Cater and others, 1973, p. 46) and to the Sunnyside rhyolite crystal tuff, Sunnyside rhyolite tuff, Sunnyside tuff, and Sunnyside welded tuff of Shannon and Reynolds (1975).

The Sunnyside rhyolite is a crystal-rich tuff, evidently the product of a single ash flow more than 200 meters thick, that is dominantly a single cooling unit with local, thin cooling units near the top. The major cooling unit is thought to have a thin, basal vitrophyre (seen only as slivers along faults), a thick medial zone of welded tuff with discontinuous vapor-phase zones near its upper contact, and a capping of nonwelded tuff, perhaps 10-20 meters thick, that thickens northeastward toward the distal end of the flow. The distribution of pumice fragments and biotite flakes in the Sunnyside rhyolite suggests that the ash flow issued from a vent near Thunder Mountain, at the center of the volcanic field.

Current work by E. B. Ekren and Gordon May (oral communication, 1982) leads them to conclude that the Sunnyside rhyolite of Leonard’s usage comprises deposits from two major ash flows, and that multiple cooling units may be present in the lower ash flow. Thus our treatment of the Sunnyside rhyolite in this report may be too simple.

The Sunnyside rhyolite is overlain by the Dewey beds. The informal name Dewey beds is adopted in this report for a subunit of local interest in the Challis Volcanics of the Thunder Mountain field. Mining men and geologists familiar with the Thunder Mountain district customarily use the name Dewey beds, and their name for the subunit is conveniently adoptable here. The name corresponds to the volcaniclastic subunit of Leonard (in Cater and others, 1973) and to the Dewey beds, Dewey conglomerate, Dewey conglomerates, Dewey strata, Dewey unit, Dewey volcaniclastic beds, and Dewey volcaniclastics of Shannon and Reynolds (1975).

The Dewey beds consist of water-laid volcanic conglomerate, volcanic sandstone, mudstone, carbonaceous shale, a little lignite, and at one place lake beds of laminated carbonaceous mudstone and airfall(?) tuff. This largely volcaniclastic subunit, rich in material eroded from the Sunnyside rhyolite, is well exposed only at the Dewey mine, where its drilled thickness exceeds 90 meters. The outcrop, near site 5 of Figure 2, is too small to show on Figure 1. Fragmentary plant fossils from the volcaniclastic subunit are Eocene (J. A. Wolfe, written communication, 1967; oral communication, 1968, 1981). Associated with the volcaniclastic rocks is a black, carbonaceous breccia of uncertain stratigraphic position and irregular distribution, interpreted as ancient mudflow debris. Carbonaceous mudstone, perhaps representing an ancient swamp deposit, was exposed by mining in 1981, after fieldwork for this report was finished.

An angular unconformity of a few degrees separates the Dewey beds from a pair of thin, vesiculartopped, anomalously young-looking latite flows derived from a small volcanic center within the caldera at Lookout Mountain, 10 kilometers northeast of Thunder Mountain. The flows are indicated on Figure 1 as flows of Lookout Mountain.

The part of the filling unit below the latite flows is economically significant, for the upper part of the Sunnyside rhyolite, undetermined parts of the Dewey beds, and some of the black breccia contain the low-grade gold deposits of the Sunnyside and Dewey mines (Leonard, in Cater and others, 1973, p. 45-52).

Much younger than the Tertiary filling unit is water-laid Pleistocene gravel that may once have formed a thin veneer on the southern half of the caldera floor. The gravel is now found only as relics along minor faults that dissect the complex graben of the Thunder Mountain district.

Deposition of the gravel marked the end of the caldera as a topographic depression. Most of the former sump is now a high, rolling upland, a few hundred meters lower than the fringing alpine peaks and mostly separated from them by canyons formed in narrow grabens. The caldera floor is perched 1,500 meters above the main drainage from the Thunder Mountain district.

Tertiary intrusives of the area comprise dikes, stocks, and a plutonic mass of batholithic dimensions – the Casto pluton – which dominates the southeast sector of the cauldron. The dikes range in width from less than 1 meter to more than 100 meters, and in length from a few meters to more than 1 kilometer. Most of the dikes stand vertically. They are dominantly rhyolitic or latitic in composition, and commonly they are porphyritic, but their fabric varies widely. The dikes, if counted, would surely number several thousand, most of them concentrated in swarms, and most of them external to the two calderas. Two swarms, Smith Creek and Little Pistol, are labeled on Figure 1, but they are merely parts of larger arrays of dikes that extend beyond the limits of the illustration. Locally within these swarms the dikes lie side by side, without intervening relics of country rock, yet no dike is seen to cut its neighbors.

A few stocks are present within the dike swarms, but many more are clustered within the Challis Volcanics between the margins of the Thunder Mountain and Cougar Basin calderas, at sites 12 kilometers southwest and 15 kilometers northeast of Thunder Mountain (Figure 1). The stocks are nonequant in shape, seldom more than a few hundred meters in mean diameter, variable in fabric, commonly fault bounded, locally riddled by dikes, and – like the dikes – dominantly rhyolitic or latitic in composition. A few stocks, dikes, and less simple intrusives are dioritic or quartz dioritic.

The dikes, stocks, and pluton are related to structural settings or events in ways that make it desirable to treat the intrusives individually or as geographic and chronologic groups, according to the problems they present rather than as the class of all intrusives.

Two great silicified zones within the cauldron block but outside the Cougar Basin caldera contain many of the gold, silver, antimony, and tungsten deposits of the region. The silicified zones are some kilometers long and tens or hundreds of meters wide. The western zone is in part coextensive with the Smith Creek dike swarm and in part peripheral to the western margin of the cauldron. The eastern zone is associated with ring fractures of the Cougar Basin caldera (see subsequent discussion of the stocks of upper Indian Creek). The silicified zones and their mineral deposits receive scant attention in this report because they have not been adequately dated. …

Conclusion

The eruption of latite ash flows 50 million years ago began an episode of volcanic activity that lasted about 7 million years. Ash flows and minor lava flows, first latitic, then rhyolitic, built the Thunder Mountain field of Challis Volcanics to a height of perhaps 1500 meters before the subsidence of a nearly circular cauldron block having a diameter of 60-65 kilometers. Major subsidence, dated at 47 million years, was accompanied by development of the Cougar Basin caldera, within which the Sunnyside rhyolitic ash flow was erupted from a central vent 46-47 million years ago. Eruption of the Sunnyside ash flow was attended by development of the Thunder Mountain caldera, to which most of the Sunnyside ash flow was confined. Collapse of the Thunder Mountain caldera cannot be precisely dated. An upper limit is either the 47-million-year date of cauldron subsidence or more likely, we think, the 46 to 47-million-year date of eruption of the Sunnyside rhyolite. A likely lower limit is the 44.6-million-year date of the Century Creek stock, a small intrusive nearly central to the caldera. Water-laid volcaniclastic debris, derived mainly from the Sunnyside rhyolite, was spread thinly over the floor of the collapsed Thunder Mountain caldera, trapping plant remains of Eocene age. The floor of the Thunder Mountain caldera was tilted gently southwestward, perhaps by diapiric emplacement of the Casto pluton. A minor vent 8 kilometers northeast of the center of the caldera erupted latite cinders, bombs, and lava of the Lookout Mountain unit. Thin flows from this vent spread southwestward across the caldera floor. The highest latite flow has a date of about 43 million years; younger dates obtained from the flow very likely reflect argon loss from glass. The outpouring of latite lava is the last volcanic event recorded in the caldera, whose evolution extended from middle Eocene to late Eocene time. (The informal designations of Eocene time are keyed to the preferred radiometric dates, recalculated according to 1977 decay constants, of Harland and others, 1971.) During the Pleistocene, part of the defunct caldera again served as a depositional site, this time for gravels carried in by meltwater from small alpine glaciers of the bordering highlands.

At present levels of exposure, the earliest indication of Tertiary intrusive activity is given by quartz diorite and latite dikes of the outer ring-fracture zone of the Quartz Creek cauldron. The dikes have a date of 47 million years. The latest indication of intrusive activity is given by a latite dike, dated at 37 million years, from the Little Pistol dike swarm. Thus the evidence points to a beginning of intrusive activity during the explosive stage of local volcanism and a cessation some few million years after extrusion of the youngest lavas of the Thunder Mountain field. Between the extremes of 47 and 37 million years, the eastern margin of the cauldron was invaded by the Casto pluton, and myriad small stocks and dikes were emplaced along the margins of the cauldron and its nested calderas. Small rhyolite stocks grew near the center of the Thunder Mountain caldera.

The Casto pluton presents a special problem, different from that of the stocks and dikes. The most reliable date, analytically, for the pluton is 47.8 million years. That date may represent the time of crystallization of the core of the pluton at some considerable depth beneath the cover rocks. The pluton did not, we think, ascend to invade the cauldron margin till much later, perhaps 44-45 million years ago.

The dates of the Challis Volcanics of the Thunder Mountain field do not differ significantly from the dates reported by Armstrong (1974) for the Challis Volcanics of the type area near the town of Challis: about 43-50 million years for the former and about 45-50 million years (recalculated) for the latter. The comparison excludes dates of ours that we have discussed as aberrant and dates of Armstrong’s for which he expressed some reservations. However, the Challis Volcanics extend far beyond the areas whose rocks have been radiometrically dated in our study and in Armstrong’s Within the large expanse of the Challis Volcanics of central Idaho there are, we believe, at least seven major caldera-related volcanic fields whose extrusive products, similar in composition and locally lapping over from one field to another, may be nearly contemporaneous but not rigidly so. Until the local sequences have been established and dated, appropriate limits for “Challis time” are only approximately definable. Meanwhile, it is worth noting that although a good many Tertiary intrusives in central Idaho are coeval with the Challis Volcanics as currently datable, some intrusives are younger. The 37-million-year date of hornblende latite from the Little Pistol dike swarm, for example, is an Oligocene date if referred to Harland and others’ (1971) preferred date of 38 million years (39 million years, recalculated) for the base of the Oligocene, and is statistically excludable from the set of 43 to 50-million-year dates that represent reliably dated Challis Volcanics.

Acknowledgments

We thank these members of the U. S. Geological Survey for their contributions to our work: Jack A. Wolfe for examination of plant fossils; H. H. Mehnert and V. M. Merritt for assistance with potassiumargon analyses; and Alan J. Busacca, Bruce T. Brady, G. T. Cebula, Ezekiel Rivera, and Michael Sekulich for mineral separations. Mr. Busacca and former field associates Neil Dale, Stephen J. Reynolds, and John Schloderer helped collect the rock samples. Don R. Mabey provided supplementary geophysical data. E. Bartlett Ekren and David H. McIntyre examined a suite of thin sections. Mr. McIntyre and Frederick S. Fisher reviewed the report. Melvin and Jim Ed Biggers, Sweet, Idaho; Lafe Cox, Yellow Pine, Idaho; and Larry Rowe, Caldwell, Idaho, efficiently managed pack strings and provided support in base camps. Eleanor Leonard and Ruth Leonard O’Neil kindly served as unpaid camp cooks.

Full paper 19 pages:
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Geology Examples

Idaho Batholith Quartz Creek
092810Rock-b

Sunnyside Rhyolite – folded
111610Fold-in-Rhyolite-b

Tuff with quartz crystals
TuffQuartzCrystals2010

Photos: by Local Color Photography 2010
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Challis Magmatic Episode

By Laura DeGrey and Paul Link of Idaho State University

Extent and timing of the Challis Magmatic Episode

The Challis volcanic episode was active during the Eocene, between ~52-39 Ma, with the bulk of the eruption between 51-45 Ma. The Challis volcanic episode is part of a wide-spread Eocene volcanic belt that covered a large part of the Eocene northwestern United States and southwestern British Columbia

EoceneVolcanicBelt-aFigure 1. Eocene volcanic belt in the northwestern United States. From Moye et al.,1988.

Geologic History of the Challis Magmatic Episode

The Challis Volcanic Group covers approximately 25,000 square kilometers in Idaho , making it the largest of the Eocene volcanic fields (Figure 2). The Eocene geologic setting of the Challis volcanics is commonly accepted as an extensional basin related to the subduction of the oceanic Farallon Plate beneath the continental North American Plate. Prior to Eocene time, before ~60 Ma, the convergence rate of the Farallon and North American Plates was very fast.

ChallisVolcField-aFigure2. Extent of Challis volcanism in Idaho. From Link and Janecke, 1999.

The angle of subduction was shallow and the subducting slab of the Farallon Plate reached as far as eastern Wyoming underneath the North American Plate (Figure 3). This far-reaching subducting slab set the stage for widespread volcanism along the northwestern side of the United States and southwestern British Columbia.

Subduction-aFigure 3. Drawing showing shallow subduction and then migration and steepening of the subducting plate.

Around 56 Ma, the subduction rate slowed and the angle of subduction became much steeper. During the steepening of subduction, the subducting slab migrated westward (Figure 3). Following the westward migration of subduction, backarc extensional basins developed and triggered widespread igneous activity that youngs in a westward direction. The extensional zone is oriented northeast-southwest and contains many high-angle and low-angle normal faults, which commonly dip toward each other, and form rift-grabens (Figure 3). These normal faults make up the Trans-Challis Fault Zone.

Igneous activity occurred in two main phases. The first phase began around 52 Ma and included the intrusion of shallow granitic plutons 3 – 4 miles below the surface. The second phase included volcanic eruptions. The main phase of eruption occurred between 51 – 45 Ma, and consisted of effusive and voluminous intermediate and mafic lava flows as well as highly explosive silicic ash-flows. Less violent and less voluminous silicic eruptions continued until approximately 39 Ma. Intrusive activity in the form of rhyolitic domes, rhyolitic plugs, rhyolitic dikes, and rhyolitic stocks accompanied the later stage volcanism. The violent eruptions of rhyolitic ash tuffs and ignimbrites caused the collapse of many calderas between 49 – 45 Ma.

continued: Digital Geology of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

see also:

Regional Geologic Setting and Volcanic Stratigraphy of the Challis Volcanic Field, Central Idaho

Falma J. Moye / William R. Hackett / John D. Blakley / Larry G. Snider

Introduction

Early Tertiary geologic history of the northwestern United States was characterized by a short-lived but intense magmatic episode from 55 Ma to 40 Ma. That episode resulted in an areally extensive and compositionally diverse belt of volcanic and plutonic rocks extending from southern British Columbia across northeastern Washington and central Idaho and into Montana and Wyoming. Although the time equivalence of this belt of rocks has been recognized and some basic geologic, geochemical, and radiometric work has been completed, the Eocene magmatic event remains poorly understood within the context of Eocene tectonics of the northwest.

The Challis volcanic field of central Idaho is the largest and most diverse of the Eocene volcanic fields, both in composition and in variety of volcanic deposits. Because it is dissected to subvolcanic levels, geologists can study the geochemical relationships among cogenetic volcanic and intrusive units and the internal structures of volcanic and hypabyssal complexes.

In this paper we summarize current knowledge of the geology of the Challis volcanic field, including its regional stratigraphy, geochronology, and geochemistry.

continued: Guidebook to the Geology of Central and Southern Idaho
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Road Reports Sept 12, 2021

Please share road reports. Most back country roads have not been graded this season and are rough. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: Friday rain = 0.05″ settled the dust for a day, but local streets are getting dusty again. No dust abatement applied on main street this summer. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting Wednesday, Sept. 8, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
Project link:
Donnelly to Deinhard Project: Construction on Highway 55 between Donnelly and McCall. This is a much-needed project to repair potholes and cracks in the roadway and will include placing a new layer of pavement on the highway for smoother driving conditions.
What to expect:
* Idaho 55 will be reduced to one lane with pilot cars midweek (Monday – Thursday)
* All lanes will be open on weekends (Friday – Sunday)
* Roadway surface will be uneven for several weeks
* Speed limit will be reduced and 12-foot restrictions will be in place
* Construction is expected to be complete in September.
Project link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Note: Watch for trees down, Friday’s storm had a 41mph wind gust.
Old report Friday (Aug 13) “SF slide occurred (on Aug 6) in the middle of the [4-mile] controlled burn… Guessing 300’ on the road and filled the new grill-covered drain ditches.” – SL
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Sept 1) county has finished grading and applying Mag Chloride to the EFSF road.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Saturday (Sept 11) mail truck driver reported a couple of small trees down.
Report Wednesday (Sept 8) mail truck driver reports the county road crew is continuing up the road towards the upper end.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened June 7
No current report.
Last report Wednesday (Aug 18) “Zena bridge is finished and looks great! Road is very rough. I would not recommend taking a car or camp trailer over.” – JB
Watch for ATV and UTV traffic.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Opened June 13
No current report.
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Profile has seriously rocky sections that are washing out worse than usual. Some are sharp. Carry a saw whether its windy or not — roots of beetle kill trees are now quite rotten and fall easily.” – CP
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Quartz Creek
No current report.
Report Thursday (Aug 19) “Cleared Quartz Creek of trees last weekend.” – SA

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open, travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open. Travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Opened June 9
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Opened by May 27
No current report.

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Weather Reports Sept 5-11, 2021

Sept 5 Weather:

At 930am it was 50 degrees, clear over smoke – Yellow AQ. At 1230pm it was 77 degrees, likely clear above the smoke – poor air quality. Gusty breezes at 225pm. At 250pm it was 90 degrees, breezy, appears clear above haze of smoke and Yellow air quality. At 630pm it was 81 degrees, calmer, poor air quality and might be some high flat clouds above the smoke? At 845pm it was 64 degrees and smoky.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 06, 2021 at 09:30AM
Clear, smoky (Yellow AQ)
Max temperature 91 degrees F
Min temperature 38 degrees F
At observation 50 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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Sept 6 Weather:

At 930am it was 50 degrees, clear over smoky haze – poor air quality. At 1230pm it was 84 degrees, light breezes, clear and smoky. At 245pm it was 89 degrees, breezy, clear and haze of smoke – poor air quality. At 630pm it was 83 degrees, calmer, clear over haze of smoke (and dust) – Yellow AQ. At 830pm it was 55 degrees. Looked like clear sky and thinner haze at 1045pm – more stars out.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 07, 2021 at 09:30AM
Partly cloudy, smoky (Yellow AQ)
Max temperature 90 degrees F
Min temperature 43 degrees F
At observation 55 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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Sept 7 Weather:

At 930am it was 55 degrees, partly cloudy (high thin hazy streaks) and smoky – Yellow AQ. At 12pm it was 72 degrees, thicker smoke and worse air quality. At 230pm it was 90 degrees, can’t tell if there are any clouds, moderate smoke cover and quite poor air quality. At 630pm it was 85 degrees, appears to be mostly cloudy above moderate smoke – poor air quality. At 9pm it was 65 degrees and smoky. Partly clear at 1045pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 08, 2021 at 09:30AM
Clear? Smoky! (Orange AQ)
Max temperature 91 degrees F
Min temperature 43 degrees F
At observation 53 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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Sept 8 Weather:

At 930am it was 53 degrees, probably clear above moderate smoke and Orange air quality. At 1230pm it was 74 degrees, thicker smoke, worse air quality and reduced visibility. At 230pm it was 93 degrees, breezy, seems to be clear above the smoke, improving visibility and air quality (now the upper end of Yellow AQ.) At 630pm it was 81 degrees, partly cloudy, moderate smoke and very light breeze. At 940pm it was 65 degrees. At 1045pm it was cloudy or hazy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 09, 2021 at 09:30AM
Clear? Smoky! (Orange AQ)
Max temperature 94 degrees F
Min temperature 47 degrees F
At observation 56 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Sept 9 Weather:

At 930am it was 56 degrees, could be clear or mostly clear above opaque smoke layer and Orange air quality, reduced visibility. Light traffic and dusty. Sky covered with smoke at noon, might be some clouds. At 2pm Red air quality, PM2.5 = 155. At 3pm it was 90 degrees, sky covered with smoke and breezy. At 615pm it was 86 degrees, light breezes, appears to be partly cloudy above the smoke and better visibility. At 830pm it was 67 degrees. At 1045pm it looked cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 10, 2021 at 09:30AM
Mostly cloudy, light breeze, haze of smoke (Yellow AQ)
Max temperature 92 degrees F
Min temperature 51 degrees F
At observation 60 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Sept 10 Weather:

At 930am it was 60 degrees, light breeze, appears mostly cloudy above the haze of smoke – Yellow air quality. At 1210pm it was 69 degrees, thicker clouds (less sunlight) and smoky. At 3pm it was 79 degrees, dark overcast, breezy and lighter haze of smoke. Couple drops of rain around 320pm. Light shower 530pm-6pm. At 7pm it was 61 degrees, mostly cloudy (high and thin) and much better air quality. At 830pm it was 56 degrees and mostly cloudy, fairly good air quality. Rain falling just before 930pm, didn’t last long. At 1130pm it was 54 degrees, looked cloudy and calm. May have rained a little early morning.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 11, 2021 at 09:30AM
Mostly clear (Green AQ)
Max temperature 80 degrees F
Min temperature 42 degrees F
At observation 48 degrees F
Precipitation 0.05 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Sept 11 Weather:

At 930am it was 48 degrees, mostly clear blue sky and really good air quality. At 1230pm it looked mostly clear and light breeze. At 3pm it was 75 degrees, breezy, clear blue sky and good air quality. At 7pm it was 68 degrees, calm, clear sky and light haze of smoke settling in along the river – Yellow air quality. At 830pm it was 57 degrees. Stars out at 1115pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 12, 2021 at 09:30AM
Partly cloudy, light breeze, light smoke (Yellow AQ)
Max temperature 77 degrees F
Min temperature 36 degrees F
At observation 45 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
—————————–

Shrimp Scampi with Linguini

Food Network Magazine
Yield: 4 to 6 servings

Ingredients

1 pound linguini
4 tablespoons butter
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
2 shallots, finely diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
Pinch red pepper flakes, optional
1 pound shrimp, peeled and deveined
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup dry white wine
Juice of 1 lemon
1/4 cup finely chopped parsley leaves

Directions

For the pasta, put a large pot of water on the stove to boil. When it has come to the boil, add a couple of tablespoons of salt and the linguini. Stir to make sure the pasta separates; cover. When the water returns to a boil, cook for about 6 to 8 minutes or until the pasta is not quite done. Drain the pasta.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet, melt 2 tablespoons butter in 2 tablespoons olive oil over medium-high heat. Saute the shallots, garlic, and red pepper flakes (if using) until the shallots are translucent, about 3 to 4 minutes.

Season the shrimp with salt and pepper; add them to the pan and cook until they have turned pink, about 2 to 3 minutes.

Remove the shrimp from the pan; set aside and keep warm.

Add wine and lemon juice and bring to a boil. Add 2 tablespoons butter and 2 tablespoons oil. When the butter has melted, return the shrimp to the pan along with the parsley and cooked pasta. Stir well and season with salt and pepper. Drizzle over a bit more olive oil and serve immediately.
——————–

Road Reports Sept 8, 2021

Please share road reports. Most back country roads have not been graded this season and are rough. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are VERY dusty. No dust abatement applied on main street this summer. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting Wednesday, Sept. 8, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
Project link:
Donnelly to Deinhard Project: Construction on Highway 55 between Donnelly and McCall. This is a much-needed project to repair potholes and cracks in the roadway and will include placing a new layer of pavement on the highway for smoother driving conditions.
What to expect:
* Idaho 55 will be reduced to one lane with pilot cars midweek (Monday – Thursday)
* All lanes will be open on weekends (Friday – Sunday)
* Roadway surface will be uneven for several weeks
* Speed limit will be reduced and 12-foot restrictions will be in place
* Construction is expected to be complete in September.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open – Slides cleared
Old report Friday (Aug 13) “SF slide occurred (on Aug 6) in the middle of the [4-mile] controlled burn… Guessing 300’ on the road and filled the new grill-covered drain ditches.” – SL
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Sept 1) county has finished grading and applying Mag Chloride to the EFSF road.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Sept 8) mail truck driver reports the county road crew is continuing up the road towards the upper end.
Report Friday (Sept 3) “Johnson Creek is fair, and lots of bear scat.” – GB
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened June 7
Last report Wednesday (Aug 18) “Zena bridge is finished and looks great! Road is very rough. I would not recommend taking a car or camp trailer over.” – JB
Watch for ATV and UTV traffic.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Opened June 13
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Profile has seriously rocky sections that are washing out worse than usual. Some are sharp. Carry a saw whether its windy or not — roots of beetle kill trees are now quite rotten and fall easily.” – CP
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Quartz Creek
Report Thursday (Aug 19) “Cleared Quartz Creek of trees last weekend.” – SA

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open, travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open. Travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Opened June 9
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Opened by May 27
No current report.

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Air Quality Alert Red Flag Warning Sept 8, 12pm to Sept 8, 9pm

Air Quality Alert Red Flag Warning Sept 8, 12pm to Sept 8, 9pm

All outdoor open burning is prohibited by the Department of Environmental Quality.

Orange Air Quality PM2.5 = 119

Sept 8 Smoke Map

Yellow Pine Forecast

Today Areas of smoke. Sunny, with a high near 88. East wind 6 to 11 mph becoming west southwest in the afternoon. Winds could gust as high as 24 mph.

Tonight Areas of smoke. Mostly clear, with a low around 58. West southwest wind 5 to 9 mph becoming east after midnight. Winds could gust as high as 22 mph.

Thursday Areas of smoke. Mostly sunny, with a high near 86. East wind 5 to 13 mph becoming west southwest in the afternoon. Winds could gust as high as 29 mph.

Thursday Night A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms after midnight. Patchy smoke. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 59. West wind 5 to 10 mph becoming light and variable in the evening. Winds could gust as high as 22 mph.

Air Quality Alert

IDC001-003-015-027-039-045-073-075-085-087-091900-
Ada-Adams-Boise-Canyon-Elmore-Gem-Owyhee-Payette-Valley-Washington-
934 AM MDT Wed Sep 8 2021

...AIR QUALITY FORECAST AND CAUTION FROM THE IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF
ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY FOR ADA, ADAMS, BOISE, CANYON, ELMORE, GEM,
OWYHEE, PAYETTE, VALLEY, AND WASHINGTON COUNTIES...

The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality has issued an Air
Pollution Forecast and Caution to notify residents of Ada, Adams,
Boise, Canyon, Elmore, Gem, Owyhee, Payette, Valley, and Washington
Counties of degraded air quality. Due to smoke from wildfires health
impacts may occur. Air quality is currently in the Unhealthy-for-
Sensitive-Groups category and is forecast to continue through 1 PM
MDT Friday. The pollutant of concern is Fine Particulate Matter
(PM2.5).

Health Impacts and Recommended Actions: When air quality is
unhealthy for sensitive groups, sensitive persons may experience
health effects and should limit prolonged or heavy exertion and
limit time spent outdoors.  The general public is unlikely to be
affected.

Contact: For more information, contact DEQ`s Regional Office in the
Treasure Valley, at (208) 373-0550. For real-time air monitoring
information, visit DEQ`s website at airquality.deq.idaho.gov. For
more information concerning local ordinances contact your local city
or county.

Woodstove Burning Restrictions: Voluntary burn ban for residential
wood burning activities

Outdoor Burning Restrictions: All outdoor open burning is prohibited
by the Department of Environmental Quality in accordance with local
ordinances

Red Flag Warning

URGENT - FIRE WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
113 PM MDT Tue Sep 7 2021

IDZ402-403-082100-
/O.NEW.KBOI.FW.W.0015.210908T1800Z-210909T0300Z/
Eastern Payette National Forest-Northern Boise National Forest-
113 PM MDT Tue Sep 7 2021

...RED FLAG WARNING IN EFFECT FROM NOON TO 9 PM MDT WEDNESDAY FOR
GUSTY WINDS AND LOW RELATIVE HUMIDITIES FOR EASTERN PAYETTE
NATIONAL FOREST AND NORTHERN BOISE NATIONAL FOREST...WHICH ARE
FIRE WEATHER ZONES 402 AND 403...

The National Weather Service in Boise has issued a Red Flag
Warning, which is in effect from noon to 9 PM MDT Wednesday.

* WINDS...Gusts up to 35 mph.

* RELATIVE HUMIDITY...8 to 15 percent.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A Red Flag Warning means that critical fire weather conditions
are either occurring now, or will occur shortly.

Sept 5, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 5, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit season
May 15 – Firewood Season, permits at The Corner
May 25 – Johnson Creek road fully open
June 7 – Lick Creek road open
June 13 – Profile road open
July 16 – Stage 1 Fire Restrictions
Sept 11 – YPFD Budget Meeting 10am at Fire Hall
Sept 11 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
Sept 18 – ATV-UTV Ride to Thunder Mountain
Sept 18 – Jim Adkins Retirement 2pm at YP Tavern
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

ATV-UTV Ride to Thunder Mountain Saturday, September 18, 9am – 4pm

Meet at the Community Hall. Ride with us through the fabulous back-country to the historic Thunder Mountain area and support the Yellow Pine Community Hall. This out-and-back ride is rated as intermediate. Participants ride from Yellow Pine Community Hall up Stibnite Road to Thunder Mountain. BBQ Lunch will be served to participants at the end of the road. The timeframe of this event is estimated to be from 9am to 4pm. $25 for online sign up and $30 at the event.

Sign up link:
— — — —

Sept 18th Pot Luck for Jim Adkins – Yellow Pine Tavern

Yellow Pine Friends, Neighbors and Family

Please join us for a pot luck at the Yellow Pine Tavern on Saturday September 18th at 2:00 P.M.

After 60 years in Yellow Pine, Stibnite and Zena Creek Ranch Jim Adkins has decided to start his next great adventure.

Please join us to wish Jim luck on his new adventure and to meet the new co-owners of the ranch
Shannon and Boyd
Katy and Dave
Debra and Eric
Beth and Bob

Kathy will be providing burgers and brats. Please stop by to wish Jim good luck and meet your new Zena Creek neighbors. Please bring one of your specialty foods to go with the burgers and brats.
— — — —

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions still in Effect

Under the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions, the following acts are prohibited on state and federally managed or protected lands, roads, and trails:
* Building, maintaining, attending, or using a fire, campfire or stove fire except within a designated recreation site and in a permanent concrete or metal fire ring, or on private land, and only within an owner-provided structure.
* Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle, building, or designated recreation site or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials.
———

Village News:

Cut Off From The Outside

Literally cut off – on Sunday, Sept 5th, at approximately 330pm, the phone line for Yellow Pine was accidentally dug up and damaged. Our phone lines were dead and of course there was no internet. Early Monday morning, Sept 6th (Labor Day,) MTE came to the village to work on restoring the line. Phones and (slow) internet restored around 6pm.
— — — —

Notice – New Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sundays.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
— — — —

Labor Day Golf Tournament and Potluck Sept 4th

The cannon went off at 1018am to start the annual Labor Day Golf Tournament to benefit the Fire Department.

The winners from our golf tournament fundraiser for the fire department.
First: Tera and Brian
Second: Steve and Jonathan
Third: Luna and Ryan
Closest to the pin: Peter

20210904GolfTourey-a
Prizes!

A potluck at the Yellow Pine Tavern followed at 4pm with Lasagna and Brauts provided by the Tavern, Cory’s and Sullivan’s.
— — — —

Community Hall Repair Project

The first step of the Community Hall Repair Project was completed on Sept. 1st when the new service door was installed in the kitchen. This should keep varmints and weather out of the kitchen.

Before
20210901RecHallDoor1-a

After
20210901RecHallDoor2-a
— — — —

New Cook at the Yellow Pine Tavern

A great Birthday Party was held at the Tavern for Jake, our new Bartender and Cook. Come by and meet him on weekend evenings.
20210901YPTavernJakeCake-a
— — — —

Yellow Pine Avenue

A report that the county grader did the lower end of Yellow Pine Ave (main street) at least as far as the veteran’s memorial on Tuesday, August 31st.
— — — —

Road News

Local streets are very dusty – no dust abatement this year on main street. Please slow down!

Link: to current road reports.

Johnson Creek road was recently graded, but is already getting rough again.

Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are Open. These roads have not been bladed and are rough. Travel at your own risk.

Hwy 55 projects
Smith’s Ferry area: Starting Tuesday, Sept. 7, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route. Project Website link:
Donnelly to McCall: One lane during the week and two lanes on weekends. Project is slated to last until September.
— — — —

Critters

Be Mountain Lion Aware

Note: A report of a mountain lion hanging around the upper end of the village early summer.

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!

Be Bear, Fox & Coyote Aware

* Do not feed them human food
* Secure your trash
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Bats

While bats are an important part of our ecosystem and most do not carry rabies, CDH offers the following tips to protect yourself and pets:
* Never touch a bat with your bare hands.
* If you have had an encounter with a bat, seek medical attention.
* If you come in contact with a bat, save the bat in a container without touching it and contact your health department to arrange testing for rabies. Whenever possible, the bat should be tested to rule out an exposure to rabies. During regular business hours in Ada, Boise and Elmore Counties, call 208-327-7499 and in Valley County, call 208-634-7194. After business hours in all counties, call 1-800-632-8000.
* Always vaccinate your pets for rabies, including horses. Pets may encounter bats outdoors or in the home.
* Bat-proof your home or cabin by plugging all holes in the siding and maintaining tight-fitting screens on windows. Bats can enter through holes the size of a quarter.

Ticks

* Know where to expect ticks. Many ticks live in grassy, brushy, or wooded areas. When possible, avoid wooded and brushy areas with tall grass and leaf litter. Walk in the center of trails, particularly in spring and summer when ticks feed.
* Wear appropriate clothing. When in tick habitats, wear light-colored, tightly woven long pants and long-sleeve shirt. Tuck your pant legs into socks or boots, and your shirt into your pants. This helps keep ticks on the outside of your clothing where you can spot them more easily.
* Use tick repellent when necessary, and carefully follow instructions on the label. Apply an EPA-registered repellent effective against ticks, such as those containing DEET to clothes and exposed skin, and permethrin to clothes and gear. Take care when applying repellent on children. EPA’s search tool can help you find the repellent that best suits your needs.
* Check clothing, gear, and pets after being areas with ticks. Ticks can hitch a ride into your home on clothing and pets, then attach to you or a family member later. Carefully examine coats, camping gear, and daypacks. Don’t forget your dog, see CDC’s where to check your pet for ticks.
* Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming can reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease and may be effective in reducing the risk of other tick-borne disease. Showering can wash off unattached ticks and it is a good opportunity to do a tick check.
* Check your body, your child and pets thoroughly for ticks. Carefully inspect areas in and around the hair, head, neck, ears, under arms, inside the belly button, around the waist, between the legs, and behind the knees. Ticks can be very small before they feed—look for what may appear like a new freckle or speck of dirt. Continue checking for two to three days after returning from areas with ticks.

Mosquitoes – West Nile

* Remove standing water
* Wear long sleeves and pants during morning/evening hours
* Use a good repellent with DEET (our bugs laugh at “backyard” formulas.
* Vaccinate your horses and mules! West Nile can be fatal to equines.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

Starting Aug. 29, USPS will raise prices of first-class postage stamps to 58 cents from 55 cents.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Saturday (Sept 4) The dumpsters are being emptied on Wednesdays.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

August Water Usage

date flow used hours gph gpm more less
08/01/21 13372547 47365 24.5 1933 32 S 6162
08/02/21 13410349 37802 23.5 1609 27 M 9563
08/03/21 13446269 35920 24 1497 25 T 1882
08/04/21 13480953 34684 24 1445 24 W 1236
08/05/21 13525686 44733 24 1864 31 T 10049
08/06/21 13563217 37531 24 1564 26 F 7202
08/07/21 13599798 36581 24 1524 25 S 950
08/08/21 13640054 40256 24.5 1643 27 S 3675
08/09/21 13677619 37565 23.5 1599 27 M 2691
08/10/21 13728899 51280 24 2137 36 T 13715
08/11/21 13770218 41319 24 1722 29 W 9961
08/12/21 13808848 38630 24 1610 27 T 2689
08/13/21 13854512 45664 24 1903 32 F 7034
08/14/21 13891073 36561 24 1523 25 S 9103
08/15/21 13930241 39168 24 1632 27 S 2607
08/16/21 13974252 44011 24 1834 31 M 4843
08/17/21 14015490 41238 24 1718 29 T 2773
08/18/21 14052616 37126 24 1547 26 W 4112
08/19/21 14080768 28152 24 1173 20 T 8974
08/20/21 14108902 28134 24 1172 20 F 18
08/21/21 14146329 37427 24.5 1528 25 S 9293
08/22/21 14176943 30614 24 1276 21 S 6813
08/23/21 14202033 25090 24 1045 17 M 5524
08/24/21 14229216 27183 24 1133 19 T 2093
08/25/21 14254825 25609 24 1067 18 W 1574
08/26/21 14282739 27914 24 1163 19 T 2305
08/27/21 14327687 44948 24 1873 31 F 17034
08/28/21 14366935 39248 24 1635 27 S 5700
08/29/21 14402064 35129 24 1464 24 S 4119
08/30/21 14440908 38844 24 1619 27 M 3715
08/31/21 14470808 29900 24 1246 21 T 8944
1145626 1539.82

— —

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water. No outside watering after 2pm, nor on holiday weekends and especially not during the festival.

July 25 Update:

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association Board asks that individuals refrain from using domestic water to dampen the road. The Water Corporation is doing its best to provide water for domestic use during the low water period but as the supply becomes more limited, it is incumbent upon each of us to be judicious with its use. Thank you for your cooperation in ensuring that all community members have an adequate supply of water.

The corporation has received the first $150k grant of the anticipated $450k. We are hoping to have some of the supply lines replaced by winter. Thanks to those who wrote letters of support. They were very beneficial in securing the grants. – Willie Sullivan

July 8, 2021 Update

DRINKING WATER WARNING
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059
BOIL WATER ADVISORY
Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST. Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 180 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake@drakediversified.com. .
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc. .
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 7-8-21.

YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 at the Community Hall at 10am
Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes.rtf

YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting held July 5, 2020 at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
— — — —

VYPA News:

September 11 Meeting Agenda

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Agenda
September 11, 2021; 2pm; at the Community Hall
As requested by VYPA members, this meeting will be recorded and kept to a 1-hour timeframe.
Agenda Item Presenter Time Comments
Call to Order Deb Filler
Approval of Prior Meeting Minutes Deb Filler 2 minutes Please read the prior meeting minutes before the meeting to expedite approval
Treasurer’s Oral Report Ronda Rogers 2 minutes
Community Hall Oral Report Rhonda Egbert 2 minutes Accomplishments since last meeting. Progress on project. Update on grant.
Cemetery Oral Report Ron Basabe 2 minutes Please include progress and expected completion date on sign
Infrastructure Oral Report Tim Rogers 2 minutes Please include upcoming plans for infrastructure work
Festival Written Report Deb Filler 10 minutes Please bring several copies of the report for attendees
Stibnite Advisory Council Update Lynn Imel 2 minutes
Stibnite Foundation Update Ronda Rogers 2 minutes
YPFPD Update If anyone available 2 minutes
YPWUA Update If anyone available 2 minutes Update on grants
Perpetua Resources Update If anyone available 2 minutes
Old Business
Fireworks Research update Rhonda Egbert 3 minutes
New Business
Community Representatives Named Deb Filler 2 minutes 2022 Stibnite Advisory Council and Stibnite Foundation representatives
2022 Festival Chairman named Ronda Rogers 2 minutes
Adjournment

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Hailey Harris, Secretary
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
— — — —

YPFD News:

Elections for Commissioners for both District 2 and 3 will be held in November 2021.

August 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss upcoming election (no minutes yet.)

July 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes.
Link: to 20210710 YPFD Meeting.docx

June 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes.
Link to minutes: 2021 June 12 YPFD meeting minutes.docx

May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes.
Link: to 20210515 YPFD MeetingNotes_Final.docx

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30, 2020 at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

2021 Meeting schedule for the YPFD. All meetings are at the YPFD Station
Sat. May 15 at 10am
Sat. June 12 at 10am
Sat. July 10 at 10am
Sat. September 11 at 10am Budget Meeting

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by a escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful.
link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021.pdf

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Phil Jensen, Acting – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Tim Rogers – Fire Chief
Secretary Ronda Rogers
Treasurer Nikki Saleen
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
Hours: 1pm-8pm, closed on Tuesdays
We offer smoked tri tip, brisket, and chicken sandwiches and also burgers and chicken wings.
Firewood Permits available May 15th.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Open daily: 8am to 9pm
Sunday 8am to 2pm
Indoor Dining and Outdoor Dining Available.
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Opened June 12th for Summer
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
Store hours: 10am to 5pm, Monday – Sunday. Gas and Diesel now available. The Liquor Store is now reinstated. Now Selling Black Rifle Coffee.
The store is stocked with basic convenience store items such as food, fuel, liquor, beer, wine, tobacco, ice, non alcoholic beverages, snacks, ice cream. New Yellow Pine branded shirts, hats and koozies have arrived. We are going through the process of installing a propane dispenser and bottle exchange service.
For any particular store item requests, please call 208-633-3300 or Email
For room reservations, please call 208-633-3300 or Email for reservations
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Our Elk & Deer hunts are booked for our 2021 season, we do have a couple openings for our 2022 Elk & Deer hunts. We Also have a couple openings for Mountain Lion hunts December 2021 through February 2022 and Spring Bear hunts May of 2022. Please see our Website site for further details.
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation – (208) 382-4844

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:

Garden Mountain Contractors
We would like to extend our services into the Yellow pine area if there may be a need. We dig alot of dirt! If you need this give us a shout on our FB page below. – Larry Williamson
Garden Valley, Idaho FB Page:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Aug 30) overnight low of 40 degrees. This morning clear sky and light haze of smoke. A few jays, a pine squirrel and a hummingbird visiting. Increased air and street traffic. Clear, warm, breezy and smoky at lunch time – the southern sky is opaque, to the north is milky blue, and you can smell the smoke. Getting pretty warm mid-afternoon, breezy and smoky, high of 89 degrees. Increasing smoke, Yellow air quality before sunset and calmer. Smoky before midnight – just the brightest stars and Jupiter shining.

Tuesday (Aug 31) overnight low of 40 degrees. This morning likely clear above the smoke, poor air quality. A couple of jays visiting. Increased street traffic. Less smoke and better air quality at lunch time, no clouds and getting breezy. Warm mid-afternoon, clear sky, breezy at times, thin haze of smoke and a little better air quality, high of 80 degrees. Grasshoppers clacking about, pine squirrel trilling, a distant dog barking and street traffic on and off. Clear and calmer before sunset, Green air quality. Cooling off quickly after dusk, clear sky and not too bad of air quality.

Wednesday (Sept 1) overnight low of 31 degrees. This morning clear very blue sky and good air quality. A couple of robins calling and jays shrieking. Sunny clear and good air at lunch time, a bit breezy. Mail truck was a little late, no problems reported. Mild temperatures, clear blue sky, light breezes and good air mid-afternoon, high of 79 degrees. Clear, warm and good air quality before sunset. Clear and cooling off at dusk, good air. Clear before midnight.

Thursday (Sept 2) overnight low of 32 degrees. This morning clear sky above thin haze of smoke – Yellow air quality. Increasing street traffic. Sunny and warming up at lunch time and haze of smoke. Jays visiting, a hairy woodpecker and a pine squirrel calling, grasshoppers clacking about, a few white pine butterflies. Pleasantly warm and partly cloudy mid-afternoon, thicker haze of smoke, high of 78 degrees. Warm, partly cloudy and moderate smoke before sunset. Gusty breezes at dark. Only the brightest stars and Jupiter shining to the east before midnight.

Friday (Sept 3) overnight low of 33 degrees. This morning light breeze, clear sky over smoky haze – Yellow air quality. Early air traffic. Female hairy woodpecker and a jay visiting. Clear sky and smoky haze at lunch time. Warm with light breeze mid-afternoon, light haze of smoke (lower end of Yellow AQ), high of 80 degrees. Warm and light breeze before sunset, clear sky and light haze of smoke (Green air quality.) Bright Jupiter above Antimony Ridge before midnight.

Saturday (Sept 4) overnight low of 34 degrees. This morning partly cloudy (small scattered clouds) and light haze of smoke – Green air quality. Light street traffic raising clouds of dust on main street – even those driving slowly. Cannon shot at 1018am. Increasing smoke before lunch time – smell of smoke in the air. Several gunshots at 125pm. Female hairy woodpecker, jays and a pine squirrel visiting. Pretty warm by mid-afternoon, mostly clear, breezy and haze of smoke and dust – poor air quality, high of 86 degrees. Scarlet clouds to the west before sunset, warm, mostly cloudy, calm and haze of smoke and dust. Cooling off after dark and still smoky. Jupiter looking rather red through the smoke before midnight.

Sunday (Sept 5) overnight low of 38 degrees. This morning clear above haze of smoke – Yellow air quality. Light early air and street traffic – getting dusty. Jays, a hairy woodpecker, a hummingbird and a pine squirrel visiting. Warm and smoky at lunch time. Rapid loud gunfire just before 3pm. Pretty warm mid-afternoon, appears clear above the haze of smoke (Yellow AQ) and breezy, high of 91 degrees. Internet and phones went down around 330pm (line cut.) Quite a bit of street traffic (and dust) this afternoon. Very warm before sunset, smoky and dusty – poor air quality, might be some high flat clouds above the smoke? Ruby red sun setting at 737pm. Pretty hazy after midnight. Internet and phones still out…
———–

RIP:

JR VanHoover
7/27/75 – 8/27/21
RIPJRVanHoover2-a

Leo Edward VanHoover Jr., a true Yellow Pine native, passed away unexpectedly at his home in Mexico on Friday August 27th, 2021.

It is always a shock to lose someone so young so unexpectedly… Someone with so much life left to live. J.R. was a unique spirit with a gypsy soul. He lived his life on his own terms and added friends where ever his travels took him.

When we lose someone, friends and loved ones can be at a loss for words. They often say, “We are so sorry, if there is anything we can do please let us know.” Finding a response to this can often be just as elusive. When someone passes on they can never be truly gone, not as long as we keep them with us in our hearts and minds. So if you truly want to honor J.R., take him with you… Take his sense of humor, his laughter, his wild unpredictable spirit and share it with those you love and care about. Share your favorite J.R. stories and “remember whens”. By doing this, keeping him in your hearts, he will never be truly gone. He will live on forever in the memories and hearts of all of us. We can think of no greater tribute. Remember to take every opportunity to tell those you care about how much they mean to you, hug your babies, say “Yes” as often as you can, and cherish every moment you are given.

J.R. is survived by his wife and best friend Erendira, his five sons David, Kason, Spirit, Leo, and Jess, his parents Leo Sr and Lois, and his four sisters Angela and her husband Don, Cindy and her husband Scott, Stacy and her husband Jay, and Tess and her wife Shane. He is also survived by his grandchildren, many nieces and nephews, and of course all of you…his many, many friends.

We will have a Celebration of Life gathering for J.R. VanHoover on Saturday Sept.11th, 2021 at 3:30 pm at the Eagle Senior Center 312 E. State Street Eagle Idaho. We can come together to comfort each other, reminisce, laugh, and share our memories. We look forward to seeing anyone who would like to come. *Please note* Masks are required inside the center; however, there is also an outdoor area we can gather for socially distanced visiting.
————–

Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 1,388 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

Sept 3, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 1,388 new COVID-19 cases and zero new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 225,544.

The state said 828,284 people have received the vaccine, and 1,505,574 total doses have been administered. 739,156 people are fully vaccinated.

The age group with the most cases is 18-29 with 55,568 cases.

The state said 50 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 9,992, and 7 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 1,661.

Zero new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 2,379.

full story:
— — — —

McCall Golf Course employees test positive for COVID-19

By Tom Grote for The Star-News September 2, 2021

Two employees at the McCall Golf Course’s Pro Shop recently tested positive for COVID-19, said McCall Police Chief Justin Williams, who heads up virus response for the city.

Anyone who visited the pro shop last Friday or Saturday should monitor themselves for symptoms of the virus, Williams said.

42 New Cases

A total of 42 new cases of COVID-19 were reported in the past week by Valley County’s two hospitals compared to 57 new cases reported the previous week.

St. Luke’s McCall reported 27 new cases in the last week, while Cascade Medical Center reported 15 new cases.

The two hospitals have reported a total of 1,051 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic arrived in Valley County in March 2020

Four confirmed deaths and two suspected deaths related to COVID-19 among Valley County residents have been reported by Central District Health.

St. Luke’s McCall offers walk-in COVID-19 vaccines from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at St. Luke’s Clinics – Payette Lakes Family Medicine, 211 Forest Street, McCall.

Appointments also can be scheduled online through St. Luke’s myChart or calling 208-381-9500 or by calling 208-634-2225.

Anyone receiving a vaccine on that day will also receive a free scenic chair lift ride or bike haul ticket good through the end of the summer season.

Cascade Medical Center offers a daily walk-in vaccination clinic Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.

full story:
— — — — —

Basin School District: 131 out of 363 students out sick or in quarantine

by CBS2 News Staff Friday, September 3rd 2021

Students in Idaho City will have an extra day off over the long weekend due to COVID-19.

The Basin School District said this week that 131 out of 363 students have been out sick with either the flu, COVID-19 or for quarantine measures. Of the students who tested for COVID, 15 percent tested positive.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley gives property taxes to road department

Commissioners dip into property-tax reserve fund

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 2, 2021

The Valley County Road and Bridge Department will receive funding from property taxes for the first time in its history in the new county budget that starts on Oct. 1.

Commissioners adopted the 2022 budget last week which included a provision to collect the entire “foregone” balance of about $1.23 million, of which about $787,000 would go to the road department.

The foregone balance refers to taxes that could have been collected in previous years but were not collected. Those funds will now be added to the tax roll to fund future year budgets, said Valley County Clerk Douglas Miller.

“There has been encouragement from the Valley County Road Advisory Committee to try to find alternative revenue sources for the road department,” Miller said.

Valley County failed to enact a road levy in a November 2019 vote and formed the advisory board in September 2020 to help advise road policy and funding strategies.

Historically, the road and bridge department received about $3 million per year from timber receipts on federal lands.

That program was dissolved in 2000 and replaced with the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act of 2000, but the program is not guaranteed, with Congress extending the act on a sporadic basis.

The department received only about $75,000 in SRS funds in 2017, and over $1 million from 2018 to 2020 as well as about $894,000 in 2021.

“At this time, we do not know if SRS will be reauthorized in Fiscal Year 2022,” Miller said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

DF Development to sell parcels between 30 to 1,000 acres

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News September 2, 2021

DF Development would sell off large pieces of its land near New Meadows under preliminary plans aired last week to the Adams County commission.

The Texas company hopes to create 56 parcels ranging in size from 30 acres to 1,000 acres, said Josh Leonard, a Boise Attorney who represents DF Development.

The parcels are part of 61,000 acres DF owns in Adams County. The large parcel sizes are aimed at preserving the county’s rural culture, Leonard said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Plane crash kills 2 east of McCall

Pilot survives crash; McCall man dead

By Tom Grote for The Star-News September 2, 2021

A McCall man and a Las Vegas man died and a McCall man was injured when a single-engine plane crashed about 60 miles east of McCall last Saturday, Valley County Coroner Scott Carver said.

Dead are James Robert Atkins, 56, of McCall, and Donald Scott MacRae, 62, of Las Vegas, who were passengers in the six-seat Cessna 206 airplane.

Injured was Brian Gray of McCall, the pilot of the plane who works for McCall Aviation, which owned the plane.

Gray was taken by air ambulance to St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, where he was listed in fair condition on Wednesday, a hospital spokesperson said.

The crash was reported about 1:30 p.m. Saturday near Big Soldier Mountain in far eastern Valley County. A preliminary report by the Federal Aviation Administration said the flight plan filed by the pilot said the purpose of the flight was “sightseeing.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

First West Nile virus death in 2021 is an Ada County man in his 50s

KTVB Staff August 30, 2021

Central District Health officials have confirmed the first West Nile virus death in Idaho his year is an Ada County man in his 50s who died last week. The man also contracted the virus in Ada County.

Health officials are urging the public to take proper precautions and use of prevention measures.

continued:
————-

Letter to Share

A small reminder to ATV/UTV/Dirtbike riders.

Boise County Sheriff’s Office Sept 1, 2021 (via FB)

1) Please wear a helmet. Many of the serious injuries we saw over the summer were not wearing helmets (even in utvs).

2) Roll cages on UTV’s are meant to provide safety for very low speed rollovers. The roll cages on UTV’s usually provide very hard surfaces for your unprotected head to bounce on. Please adhere to rule # 1.

3) Speed is going to be the # 1 factor in most motor vehicle injuries and deaths. We see many off road vehicles in Boise County traveling way to fast for mountain roads and trails.

4) UTV/ATV/Motorcycle Vs. passenger car is a very bad deal. Vs. Tree, Cliff, Rock, Large animals, and any stationary object is also a very bad deal.

5) Have some respect for the locals! You are usually riding near or around peoples houses and properties. P.S. The locals will be the people saving your life if you crash so please drive respectfully.

6) If recreating in Boise County we highly advise you get a life flight membership. Cost of a helicopter flight from here to Boise is approximately 20k dollars. Life Flight membership is less that $100 dollars.

7) Alcohol kills! The simple safety decisions you make or don’t make when drinking alcohol and driving can mean the difference between life and death.

8) Tell someone where you are, where you are going, and when you will be back. We often hear the following information from family explaining the location of their missing loved ones. “I would like to report my family missing, They are on a dirt road, near some trees, and I think there is a creek nearby.”

9) Seatbelts, don’t be silly! Wear your seatbelt!

Thank you,
Boise County Sheriff’s Office
———–

Public Lands:

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions

Reminder that campfires are prohibited in disbursed campsites on the national forest, only allowed in approved FS metal fire rings in campgrounds.

Central Idaho Fire Restrictions Area Implements Stage 1 Fire Restrictions

Stage 1 fire restrictions apply to campfires and smoking. Under Stage 1 restrictions, the following acts are prohibited:

* Igniting, building, maintaining, attending or using a fire outside a fire structure that is provided by the agency. Smoking outside an enclosed vehicle or building.

Under these restrictions, campfires are allowed only in recreation sites within metal/concrete fire pits. The restrictions will remain in effect until there is a significant change in fire danger.
——————–

Fire Season:

Idaho’s fire emergency declaration expiring on Saturday

By Katie Kloppenburg Sep 03, 2021 KIVI

The wildland fire emergency declaration issued by Gov. Brad Little in July is set to expire on September 4. The declaration made resources of the state available to help the Idaho Department of Lands in its firefighting efforts.

A news release from IDL says Little’s action and with help provided by the Idaho Office of Emergency Management and Idaho National Guard resources were vital this fire season.

The Idaho National Guard provided 6 UH Black Hawk helicopters and 45 service members supported aviation mission assignments. One Idaho National Guard Type 2 hand crew helped with fire suppression operations on the Cougar Rock Complex. 18 service members were part of the hand crew.

continued:

Note: This does not cancel the State 1 Fire Restrictions on Federal lands.
— — — — — — — — — —

2021 Payette Wilderness Fires
Three fires are burning in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Payette National Forest. The Club, Rush Creek, and Vinegar fires were started by lightning on July 15, 2021. A Type 3 Incident Management Team took over the fires on July 19th. A closure order for trails has been put in place in and around these fires for public and firefighter safety to prevent any interference with suppression and response operations.
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — — — — — — — —

Boundary Fire
Salmon-Challis National Forest
The lightning-caused Boundary Fire ~2 miles W of Boundary Creek Boat Launch was detected on August 10.
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders

Boundary Fire emergency area, road and trail closure expanded

Sept 3, 2021 Local News 8

The Salmon-Challis National Forest has expanded the Boundary Fire Emergency Area, Road and Trail Closure, Order Number: 04-13-21-015.

The lightning-caused Boundary Fire less than two miles W of Boundary Creek Boat Launch was detected on August 10.

It has burned 14,386 acres and is 15% contained.

On Thursday, the fire was active with group torching, short-range spotting and uphill runs.

full story:
— — — —

Mud Lick, Haynes, and Iron Fires
Salmon-Challis National Forest
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — — — — — — — —

Nez Perce-Clearwater Lightning Fires
Nez Perce – Clearwater National Forests
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — —

Dixie-Jumbo Fires
Nez Perce – Clearwater National Forests
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — — — — — — — —

Some useful links:

InciWeb Fire info
link:
— — — —

Air Quality McCall
link:
— — — —

National Fire Heat Map
link: (zoom in to our area)
— — — —

Fire Heat Map (Slow to load – be patient)

Weather Station at Stibnite

Real Time Lightning Map (zoom to our area)

GOES-West – Satellite Maps: Pacific Northwest
—————-

Critter News:

Fish & Game gets reports of bears coming into McCall

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is beginning to receive more reports of bears in town, Regional Wildlife Biologist Nathan Borg of the McCall office said.

“Don’t let your trash can or bird feeder become a bear’s food source! “ Borg said. “Once a bear has learned to eat human food, it can be hard to convince them to leave.”

Fish and Game ends up killing bears in McCall every year because they’ve become dangerous to humans, he said.

“Please make sure that your trash is kept inside and is in a bear proof trash can, keep pet food secured or inside, and don’t feed birds during spring, summer and fall,” Borg saiod.

For questions or to report a nuisance bear, call 208-634-8137.

source: The Star-News September 2, 2021
— — — — — — — — — —

Fish & Game asks grouse hunters to donate wings

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is asking grouse hunters to donate forest grouse wings in wing barrels located on West Mountain this fall.

The department uses grouse wings to determine a bird’s age and sex, allowing biologists to track population trends over time, Regional Wildlife Biologist Nathan Borg of the McCall office said.

“When you encounter a wing barrel, please detach and deposit the right wing from each of your ruffed, spruce, or dusky/blue grouse into the slot on top of the barrel.” Borg said.

Wing collection barrels are located at No Business Road, Anderson Creek Road, Snowbank Mountain Road, East Fork Weiser River Road, Mill Creek Road, Middle Fork Weiser River Road, Brundage Mountain Road, Warren Wagon Road At French Creek Road, Lick Creek Road at Rowland Pond parking area, Paddy Flat Road and Gold Fork Road.

Hunters may also drop wings off at the F&G office at 555 Deinhard Ln. in McCall.

source: The Star-News September 2, 2021
— — — — — — — — — —

Extreme heat impacting Idaho dairies

The record-breaking temperatures over the summer have not been good for dairy cows. Experts say heat is the most important factor that affects productivity.

Kim Fields August 29, 2021 KTVB

This summer’s blistering heat wave across the western U.S will be remembered as one of the worst in modern history.

The triple digit temperatures began early, in June. The temperatures didn’t just breaking records, they smashed them. July would go on to be the world’s hottest month ever recorded.

We’ve heard how the excessive heat is impacting our environment. In this Scorched Earth report, we take a look at how prolonged heat could is affecting Idaho’s dairy industry.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

IDFG reduces steelhead bag limit to one due to low return rates

By Lynsey Amundson Sep 02, 2021 KIVI

The steelhead season on the Snake, Clearwater, and Salmon rivers open to anglers on Friday, Sept. 3. But, with it being the lowest return of steelhead Idaho Fish and Game has seen in years they reduced bag limits to one fish per day.

“We typically expect a steelhead run daily count at Bonneville Dam to be over about 3,500 steelheads in a single day,” Lance Hebdon, Idaho Fish and Game Fisheries bureau chief, said during the Commission meeting. “Last year’s peak was under 2,500 and this year’s peak has been under 1,600.”

The return is the sixth-worst in history since 1980. By now, IDFG says they expect over 70% of the steelhead returning to be over the Bonneville Dam by now, but that hasn’t happened.

continued:
————–

Fish & Game News:

F&G alerting Idaho City residents of dog-aggressive coyotes on Buena Vista Trail near airport

By Brian Pearson, Regional Conservation Manager
Monday, August 30, 2021

On the morning of Aug. 30, Idaho Fish and Game staff received a report of coyotes acting aggressively towards a dog on the Buena Vista Trail near the airport in Idaho City.

According to the reporting party, a woman was hiking with her dog in the area on Monday morning when they were chased for approximately a quarter mile by two aggressive coyotes. Neither the woman nor the dog was bitten during the encounter, but given the aggressive behavior, Fish and Game officials are alerting people with dogs of the potential of an attack by the coyotes.

It is not uncommon for coyotes to be territorial with domestic dogs, particularly small dogs, and it’s possible that the coyotes were protecting their nearby young. Fish and Game will continue to watch closely for any further conflicts. For now, officials suggest recreationists may wish to walk their dogs somewhere else for a few days.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

White-tailed deer test positive for Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease throughout the Clearwater Region

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Communications Manager
Tuesday, August 31, 2021

Disease will likely persist until colder weather arrives

Fish and Game wildlife staff continues to monitor the extent of the disease causing deer to die across the region. Multiple samples taken from dead deer across the Clearwater Region have come back positive for the Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD) virus.

Outbreaks of EHD are not uncommon to white-tailed deer. Wildlife staff anticipated the potential for a disease outbreak due to this year’s extended hot and dry weather pattern. This summer created ideal conditions for deer to congregate at water sources where the disease-carrying biting gnat resides. The number of dead deer is expected to continue to increase a week or more after a first hard frost kills gnat populations.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Windows to Wildlife – Late Summer Edition

* Wolverines in the Hidden Alpine of Southeast Idaho
* On the Idaho Birding Trail: Carey Lake WMA
* Species Spotlight: Mountain Goats

link:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Yellowstone’s bull elk can be extremely dangerous during the rut

September 2, 2021 Local News 8


Yellowstone Facebook Page

Yellowstone National Park officials report the elk rut has begun in Yellowstone.

Bull elk can be extremely dangerous during this time.

Officials remind you to stay alert. People have been severely injured by elk who can run quickly and may change direction without warning.

Keep at least 25 yards from elk at all times, and if an elk charges you, find shelter in your vehicle or behind a tall, sturdy barrier as quickly as possible.

source:

The Dangers of the Elk Rut – Yellowstone


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Seasonal Humor:

BearDeerGut-a
[h/t SMc]

CovidCarGuy-a
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