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About The Yellow Pine Times

The Yellow Pine Times is a not for profit newsletter dedicated to sharing news and events.

July 12, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

July 12, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order until further notice.
The 2020 Harmonica Festival has been canceled.

Community Calendar:

April 17 – Boil water order issued
May 15 – Firewood Season starts
June 16 – Hard closure of South Fork Road (weekdays)
Community Hall Yard Sale ongoing
2020 Harmonica Festival Canceled
(details below)
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From Valley County

We need Your Help to protect the place and the people we all Love.
link:
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Valley County Covid-19 Response Page
link:
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Valley County Emergency Operations Center
link:
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Rebound – Idaho Governor’s phasing program
link:
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COVID 19: Recommendations and Resources for Safe Business Practices
link: (lots of info for businesses)
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Local Events:

Community Yard Sale

The community yard sale is now open in the community hall. Feel free to bring more items if you have them. Shop early and often. Pay Deb, Lynn or Ronda.
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2020 Festival is Cancelled

We have come to the decision that the 2020 Festival will be cancelled. We look forward to celebrating the 32nd year of the Festival August 5, 6, & 7, 2021.

Our decision was not made lightly. We had to consider the current situation we are in and examine the outlook for the coming months. This is the necessary and right decision for the safety of our community and all participants.

We all look forward to one big reunion with all of you in August 2021.
– DF
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Village News:

Please Return Borrowed Measuring Wheel

Would the person who borrowed the Village’s measuring wheel please return it to the Community Hall or one of the Council members? Thank you
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Update on the Golf Gathering

20200704YPGolf1-a

We have raised $916 so far and random donations are still coming in.

We had over 50 golfers at the gathering.

Everyone had an awesome time and were so happy to be able to give to the community.

Prizes were donated and consisted of hand painted rocks and antique golf clubs.

We didn’t keep the names of winners after (board got erased) so… everyone was a winner just for showing up.
– Dawn Brown
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Boil Water Order issued

Update June 12: The boil order is still on. We still are experiencing excessive water use because of leaks. Not sure when this will be lifted. We are applying for grants to repair the system.

Update June 2: The water plant is experiencing high water in Boulder Creek which brings more debris into the sand filter.

The high demand caused by leaks in the system plugs the sand filters prematurely. We will be on a boil order until further notice.

As of April 17th 2020, Yellow Pine is under another “Boil Order”

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance. .

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020
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2020 Census

The 2020 Census Impacts All Valley County Residents

Inching closer. Each of our communities and Valley County as a whole have increased our response rate by a few percentage points over the last few weeks – but we still have a lot of room to grow! We are still ranked #42 of 44 counties in Idaho for our Census response rate. Let’s get that number up! Responding to the Census takes less than 10 minutes and mean $1,483 per person in federal funding for Valley County.

It is recommended that we all fill out the census online.

If you spend 50% of your time in Valley County, you can consider it your home per the Census. Where you register with the Census is confidential and never linked to other governmental requirements such as property taxes or mailing address. The deadline for the 2020 Census has been extended until October 31st. They will probably not be sending census takers up to Yellow Pine.

Link: to online census

You do not need an ID number. Go to the link. Click on “start questionnaire”. Then on the next page scroll down to “If you do not have a Census ID, click here” – when you click on that line it will start the census. (see below)

2020Census-a
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Critters

Tick’s are still very plentiful in early July.

Mosquitoes and no-see-ums are hungry.

Bears are out of hibernation, protect your trash and pet food.

Watch out for aggressive mother does and cows, they will stomp your dogs – and you too.
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Road News

Link: to current road reports.
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Forest Info

All campgrounds and restroom facilities in the South Fork Corridor, Lick Creek/Secesh Corridor and along the East Fork South Fork Salmon River are open. -Krassel RD
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm (minutes forthcoming.)

New Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020. This could last until runoff is over.

Notice of Intent to File an Application with USDA, Rural Development

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an Application with USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG). Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG).

If any additional information is needed, please contact:
Willie Sullivan
Treasurer
ypwater@gmail.com

Distributed to Yellow Pine Water Users Association customers via Yellow Pine Times on June 12, 2020.

The last Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

2020 Festival has been canceled.

Yard Sale at Community Hall ongoing
If folks have items for the community yard sale, please place them by the north wall in the community hall. If you see items you would like to purchase, you can pay Deb, Ronda, or Lynn. All funds support the community hall.

Next VYPA meeting July 11th

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Agenda
July 11, 2020 2pm; at the Community Hall
As requested by VYPA members, this meeting will be recorded and kept to a 1-hour timeframe.
Agenda Item: Presenter Time Comments
Call to Order: Deb Filler 1 minute
Approval of Prior Meeting Minutes: Deb Filler 2 minutes Please read the June 2020 minutes before the meeting to expedite approval
Treasurer’s Report: Rhonda Egbert 2 minutes
Cemetery Written Report: Tim Rogers 2 minutes Please include progress since September and expected 2020 projects.
Community Hall Oral Report: Ronda Rogers 2 minutes Please include progress since September and expected 2020 projects.
Community Hall Toilets: Willy Sullivan 2 minutes Please include progress and expected completion date.
Infrastructure Oral Report: Clayton Egbert 2 minutes Please include progress and expected completion date.
Festival Oral Report: Dawn Brown 2 minutes
Stibnite Advisory Council Update: Ronda Rogers 2 minutes
Stibnite Foundation Update: Ronda Rogers 2 minutes
Nominations List Presentation: Rhonda Egbert 2 minutes Positions open for election: Vice Chairman, Secretary, Treasurer
Nominations from the Floor: Deb Filler 2 minutes
Election of New Council Members: Deb Filler 10 minutes
Old Business:
Update from Midas Gold Kyle Fend 3 minutes
Update from YPWA Steve Holloway (if available) 3 minutes
2nd Reading of Proposed Bylaws Changes Deb Filler 30 minutes
New Business:
Adjournment

Minutes from June 13, 2020 VYPA meeting
link: 20200613 VYPA Minutes.pdf

July 1 – Post Harmonica Meeting 2pm Community Hall
Note: at each meeting we simply add to info on the topic. That way, info from all meetings is included in a single document.
Linkto notes:

Heat was installed in the community hall on April 30th.

VYPA meeting schedule for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.
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YPFD News:

There was a YP Fire Commissioner meeting on June 27, 2020 at 10am at the Fire Station, minutes forthcoming.

YPFD COVID19 Policy

link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP.docx

link: Covid-19 EMS.pdf (May 23)

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Bring It, Don’t Burn It”, you can take your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
(TBA) – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Open 11am-8pm Closed Tuesdays
Calling ahead works best but not a huge deal. Groceries, Ice Cream, Beer and Soda. Our menu fluctuates but typically have Smoked Brisket, Tri Tip, Chicken, Burgers and Wings on hand.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Open Daily 8am to 10pm. Outside Dining and Bar. Breakfast and Bar Food.

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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open.
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Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300

The store is open now and will be open into October. Hours are 9 am to 6 pm Tuesday through Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday.
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Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins (208) 633-6677

Cabins are not available in 2020. RV Spaces $25/night; $150/week; $300/month. Tent spaces $10/night. Shower house is closed for 2020.
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (July 6) overnight low of 41 degrees, clear sky and light breeze this morning. A few early airplanes buzzed the village. Tree swallows hunting bugs, a few finches visiting and fat ground squirrels running about. Some clouds building up at lunch time and breezy. Pretty warm and gusty breezes early afternoon and partly cloudy, high of 87 degrees. Mostly clear, warm and a bit breezy early evening. Female hairy woodpecker visiting. Cooling off, mostly clear and slight breeze late evening before dusk. Skeeters are getting bad. Wind gusting up at midnight.

Tuesday (July 7) overnight low of 44 degrees, mostly cloudy, light breeze and a few drops of rain this morning. A couple of early loud airplanes. Swallows hunting and a few finches visiting. Mostly cloudy and light breezes at lunch time. Very nice, mostly cloudy and breezy early afternoon, high of 78 degrees. More cassin’s finches visiting. Partly cloudy/clear early evening, pleasant light breezes. Our local female hairy woodpecker paid a visit. It was mostly clear before dusk, swallows and a robin calling. Looked clear before midnight.

Wednesday (July 8) overnight low of 39 degrees, mostly clear sky and light breezes this morning. Several airplanes short-cutting right over the village. Swallows swooping and several jays calling, a few finches visiting. Mostly clear and light breeze at lunch time. Mail truck made it in on time, local streets are getting very dusty. Mostly clear, warm and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 79 degrees. Swallows, finches and robins calling. Mostly clear and light breeze mid-evening. A hummingbird was hunting gnats this evening. Cooling off and clear before dusk, robins and swallows calling. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Thursday (July 9) overnight low of 39 degrees, clear sky this morning. For a short time is was quiet enough to hear the river before the airplanes started buzzing over. Swallows and a flicker calling. Mostly clear and breezy after lunch time. Warm and mostly clear mid-afternoon with lighter breezes, high of 84 degrees. Clouds building up by mid-evening, warm and breezy. Clear sky before dark and almost calm. Swallows flying high or perched on power lines. Clear and lots of stars before midnight. Thunderstorm passed by with wind and rain early morning.

Friday (July 10) overnight low of 48 degrees, almost clear sky this morning and light breeze, rain total = 0.02″ from early morning thunderstorm. Airplanes started in early buzzing over the village. Swallows swooping for bugs to feed the hungry growing broods of helpless bling chicks in the nests. A few clouds at lunch time and a little breezy. Mostly clear and warm with light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 82 degrees. Quite a bit of OHV traffic on main street. Clear sky and slight breeze mid-evening, and air traffic, a few really loud ones. Clear sky and almost calm before dusk, a few robins calling and swallows busy hunting bugs. Clear before midnight, lots of stars.

Saturday (July 11) overnight low of 40 degrees, clear sky and light breezes this morning. A few early airplanes and a large truck raising dust around the neighborhood. Swallows hunting bugs and feeding growing hungry chicks, a lone robin hopping about. A few clouds coming in after lunch time and breezy. Higher than normal weekend street traffic, very dusty. Hot, blustery and sunny afternoon, high of 91 degrees. Still pretty warm mid-evening, 1 small cloud in the sky and lighter breezes. Clear sky, almost calm and cooling off slowly before dusk. Robins calling and swallows hunting bugs, no sign of the doe with twins lately. Looked clear before midnight.

Sunday (July 12) overnight low of 45 degrees, clear sky and light breeze this morning. Early air and road traffic, some rather loud. Swallows hunting, flicker and robins calling, pine siskins and cassin’s finches visiting. Mostly hazy, warm and a little breezy at lunch time. Warm and dark clouds over most of the sky mid-afternoon and a bit muggy, high of 83 degrees. A couple of ground squirrels chasing each other. Cooler mid-evening, overcast and light breezes.
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Idaho News:

The 2020 Yellow Pine Music Festival Has Been Cancelled for this year.

We are sharing this information on behalf of the Village of Yellow Pine.

Our decision was not made lightly. We had to consider the current situation we are in and examine the outlook for the coming months. This is the necessary and right decision for the safety of our community and all participants.

Yellow Pine is changing into more of a retirement community and due to the potential impacts of COVID19 on the residents – and with the historic annual attendance of 2,000+ people for the festival, it just wasn’t a wise thing to try and host this event this year.

Please respect the needs of the community and help us avoid a community spread situation. As far as I know there will be NO vendors, bands, or other events to entice people into town for the traditional music festival weekend.

However there will be other smaller events planned throughout the summer to assist in raising money to support the Village. Stay tuned!

Thanks, the Village of Yellow Pine.
— — — — — — — — — —

Donnelly Huckleberry Festival Canceled

It is with heavy hearts that The Donnelly Area Chamber of Commerce has decided to cancel this year’s Huckleberry Festival. We want to thank all of you who participated in meetings and/or shared your input concerning the 2020 Huckleberry Festival. The decision was incredibly difficult to make, however, we felt it would be almost impossible to follow Central District Health’s protocols for a festival that typically sees 8,000 to 10,000 people visiting Donnelly in a single weekend. We knew that whatever decision was made some people/businesses would be happy and some upset, and we are truly sorry for that. This situation does not create a win for anyone unless it keeps the spread of COVID at bay.

We would all like to keep the spirit of Huckleberry Festival alive and well, so if you would participate at the business level and decorate your store front so that the community is purple during the month of August that would be awesome! In addition, we are working on plans to promote Donnelly later in the year when things have calmed!

Enjoy this beautiful weather in our little slice of paradise. Be safe. Be kind.

(7/6 via FB) link:
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Watkins Pharmacy in Cascade Closed

July 9, 2020

Due to staff exposure of COVID-19, Watkins Pharmacy and store will be closed until further notice. We apologize for the inconvenience and short notice. Our staff and customer health is a top priority for us. If you have any questions about prescriptions, our pharmacist is accepting calls between 9-6pm Mon-Fri and 9-3 Sat @ +1 (208) 540-2223 to transfer prescriptions to the next most convenient pharmacy to you.

There will be an update on Monday, the 13th.

Thank you all and stay safe!

(from their FB page)

Update from Watkins Pharmacy 7/11:

We are working around the clock to keep you all informed. As we know you have many questions, our staff is very busy transferring prescriptions while also recovering.

Here are of few of the FAQs

Q: How do I get my prescription?
A: If you have a prescription that has already been filled or needs to be filled, you will need to transfer it to another pharmacy. Choose the pharmacy you would like to transfer to and give them a call. Please let them know the number to call for transfers is 1(208)-540-2223.

Q: What if I have pain meds or other controls that are at Watkins pharmacy?
A: These prescriptions CANNOT be transferred. Please contact your PCP (doctor) and inform them they must send a new copy to a pharmacy of your choosing.

Q: I was in there recently, should I be concerned that I am now exposed?
A: If you were in the store in the last two weeks, we recommend you follow the CDC guidelines for community exposure. Wear safety gear and refrain from excess exposure.

If you have any other questions on how this process works, please feel free to message us here directly or comment your concerns and we will try to reach you in a timely matter.

We hope to reduce the wait time for phone transfers and give our staff a little more time to heal.
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Thunder Mountain Burgers – Cascade

Due to possible covid exposure, we will be closing until next Friday. We will be assessing our staff during the week to assure they are healthy when they return. We want to make sure our team and customers are safe when they are with us. Thank you for understanding.

(7/11 via their FB)
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REO’s Pizza and Arcade – Cascade

Due to possible covid exposure, we will be closing until next Friday. We will be assessing our staff during the week to assure they are healthy when they return. We want to make sure our team and customers are safe when they are with us. Thank you for understanding.

(7/11 via their FB)
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Valley County hospitals report 37 COVID-19 cases

Health department lists 22 as county residents

By Tom Grote for The Star-News July 9, 2020

A total of 37 people have tested positive for COVID-19 at Valley County’s two hospitals, information from the hospitals said.

Central District Health on Tuesday listed 22 of those cases as Valley County residents, up from the 13 confirmed cases a week ago.

Some of those who tested positive but did not declare Valley County their primary residence could still be in Valley County under quarantine, spokespersons for both hospitals said.

As of last Friday, St. Luke’s McCall had tested 751 people since late March with 32 testing positive, figures from the hospital said.

Thirty of those positive tests were recorded after June 11, which is the same time as the phased reopening of the state as well as the return of summer visitors to the region, St. Luke’s McCall Chief Operating Officer/CNO Amber Green said.

Cascade Medical Center conducted 136 COVID-19 tests as of Monday, of which five were found to test positive for the virus, CEO Tom Reinhardt said.

Reinhardt noted that testing has been limited. “We know that there are asymptomatic people walking around, without masks, infecting others including those who may be immunocompromised and vulnerable,” he said.

A statement from St. Luke’s Health System, which operates St. Luke’s McCall, said the decision to disclose the testing information was made to help local leaders make informed decisions.

“Since Idaho’s first case of COVID-19 was diagnosed, St. Luke’s has been learning, evolving and adapting to respond to the disease in the communities we serve,” the statement said.

The test results from the two hospitals does not include testing done by Crush the Curve, a private initiative that offers testing to employees of local businesses.

A request sent by The Star-News to Crush the Curve for Valley County information was not returned as of Wednesday.

St. Luke’s McCall processes most of its tests at a health system laboratory in Boise. Results typically take 24 to 48 hours, Green said.

When a positive case is found, the provider that ordered the test contacts the patient with the results and provides instructions on isolation and quarantine, she said. Results also are sent to the health department where the patient lives.

St. Luke’s counsels each patient on emergency precautions and gives instructions on what to do should symptoms worsen.

At Central District Health, based in Boise, each patient who tests positive is interviewed and asked about travel history and contact exposure to other individuals while infectious, Program Manager Brandon Atkins said.

Anyone at risk of exposure to a known infected person is contacted by the health department and advised to be tested and go into self-quarantine for 14 days, Atkins said.

Exposure is defined as being within six feet of an infected person for more that 15 minutes.

“We have not issued a specific health advisory but rather noted that community transmission is actively occurring in Valley County,” he said.

“Community spread” is defined as transmission among individuals in a specific community without direct, known contact to an identified positive case.

“It suggests illness existing in a much larger portion of the population and potentially in any location,” Atkins said.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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McCall council orders masks in public places

Emergency decree continues until at least Aug. 1

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News July 9, 2020

The use of face masks to reduce the spread of COVID-19 virus is now mandatory in the City of McCall after an emergency order was adopted by the McCall City Council last week.

The order, which is tentatively set to expire Aug. 1, means masks are required in all indoor public spaces and in outdoor public spaces where social distancing cannot be practiced.

… For more information on the mask order, visit (link)

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Mask Force revs up sewing machines following McCall order

Home-made, surgical masks distributed around Valley County

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News July 9, 2020

Colby Rampton could almost hear the dull drone of sewing machines last week when the City of McCall moved to make wearing face masks in public mandatory.

“We’ve reached out to our mask force sewers and several of them have responded that they are revving their sewing machines back up,” said Rampton, part of the volunteer leadership team for the Valley County Mask Force

Last week the mask force disbursed 1,500 surgical masks for the public at drop-off bins staged at local fire stations in McCall, Donnelly, Cascade and New Meadows.

Another 500 surgical masks went to community food banks to give to people who may not have money to purchase a mask, said Rampton, of McCall.

The 2,000 surgical masks, along with a few hundred sewn by volunteers over the last two months, brings the mask force’s total to about 9,000 masks distributed into the community since it launched in April.

… Anyone who wants to donate to the mask force’s effort can do so at (link)

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Jars of Joy: Donnelly woman delivers gift cards, samples to non-medical essential workers

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News July 9, 2020

As an X-ray technician at St. Luke’s McCall, Rene Birkinbine knew she had to do something when she saw customers berating workers at the Donnelly Post Office in March.

“I don’t know how many times I went there at the very beginning of the shutdown that these ladies were in tears,” said Birkinbine, 56, of Donnelly..

“People were yelling at them, throwing things at them and accusing them of stealing their toilet paper that was in a box,” she said.

That led Birkinbine to join with 16 local businesses to fill jars with gift cards, coupons and sample products to give to non-medical essential workers who many people may not think to thank.

When she saw the abuse endured by the postal workers, it reminded her of the mistreatment she has taken from patients over the years and since the COVID-19 pandemic took root in Idaho in March.

“It’s just wrong when we mistreat others that serve us, when we mistreat them so badly that they have to go out and cry,” she said.

continued:
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500 new COVID-19 cases in Idaho reported Friday; 101 deaths

by CBS2 News Staff Friday, July 10th 2020

The state of Idaho again broke a record in the number of new confirmed and probable cases of COVID-19 on Friday: 500.

In total, the state has seen 9,928 confirmed and probable cases since the pandemic began in March.

There are 91 people in Idaho hospitals with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 as of July 6th, the most recent day where numbers are available. Of those 91, 22 are in an intensive care unit.

Since the pandemic began, 432 people have been hospitalized with the virus, and 137 of them have been in an ICU, according to the state’s data.

source:
— — —

Saturday, July 11

Idaho adds a record 505 confirmed cases, Canyon County reports another death

Idaho added 505 confirmed cases on Saturday, according to state health officials. Idaho’s statewide total number of confirmed and probable cases is now 10,505 cases.

The 505 confirmed cases on Saturday is now the most cases reported in a single day in Idaho since the pandemic began. It just beat Thursday’s record of 499 confirmed cases.

Hospitalizations ticked up, with 768 people hospitalized, up from 449 on Friday.

Canyon County reported a new death, bringing the statewide COVID-19 death toll to 102.

Recoveries increased slightly to 3,114, up from 3,066 on Friday.

source: KTVB
— — — — — — — — — —

Can Boise businesses refuse service if someone doesn’t wear a mask?

“It’s not much of an extension to include “no mask, no service” in Boise, and that is lawful,” former Idaho Attorney General David Leroy explained.

Chase Biefeldt (KTVB) July 10, 2020

Many Boise businesses have put signs on their storefronts requiring facemasks to be worn to comply with Boise Mayor Lauren McLean’s public health order issued on July 2.

The order states that people must wear masks indoors and outdoors in “public places” where social distancing cannot be maintained.

A “public place”, as defined in the order, is “any place open to all members of the public without specific invitation, including but not necessarily limited to, retail business establishments.”

… It is similar to the common business refusal of service, “no shirt, no shoes, no service.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Massive boulders crash down on highway overnight near earlier rockslide

The Idaho Transportation Department says the area on US-95 is still unstable and unsafe for traffic as well as rock removal crews.

July 10, 2020


Credit: Courtesy of ITD

US Highway 95 will be closed for even longer after huge boulders broke off of the hillside above and crashed down on the roadway south of Riggins, the Idaho Transportation Department said.

The rockfall happened in the same location as a major rockslide that blocked the road earlier this week, burying the highway in a debris field 120 feet long and 40 feet deep.

ITD says the new slide happened sometime overnight Thursday into Friday morning. It’s unclear whether a series of overnight earthquakes – the strongest of which hit near Stanley shortly after 2 a.m. Friday – had any effect on the latest movement.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More earthquakes hit mountains near Stanley

The two strongest quakes, at 4.0 magnitudes, came just seconds apart Friday morning.

July 10, 2020 KTVB

Stanley, Idaho — Four earthquakes shook the ground near Stanley Thursday night and early Friday morning, as aftershocks continue months after a major quake hit Idaho.

The first earthquake, measured at a 3.0 magnitude, happened about six miles northwest of Stanley along Idaho 21 at about 8:04 p.m. Thursday.

It was followed by two stronger earthquakes – at 4.0 each – which came seconds apart at about 2:15 a.m. Friday. The 4.0 quakes were recorded about eight miles southwest of Stanley in the area of Baron Peak.

The final earthquake, another 3.0 magnitude, also shook the same area southwest of Stanley a few minutes later.

continued:
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Scam Alert:

Tech support scams on the rise in Idaho, Attorney General says

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, July 9th 2020

The Attorney General’s Office is joining the Boise Police Department in issuing a warning, after seeing a spike in scams related to technical support, especially among seniors.

Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden says three seniors lost a total of $14,700 in the past several weeks due to the scams. The office says local cashiers prevented another $6,000 in losses by stopping potential victims who went to purchase gift cards.

Here’s how these types of scams work: it starts with a pop-up window on a computer, or a phone call, text, or email. The message says your computer has a virus or your account has been compromised. The scammer offers to fix the “issue” after you pay them. They ask for your bank account information and access to your computer in order to pay the initial fee, typically between $300 and $500, the Attorney General says.

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Mining News:

Midas Gold logistics facility faces July 16 P&Z hearing

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News July 9, 2020

Midas Gold Idaho will air plans for a logistics facility on Warm Lake Road during a public hearing at the Valley County Planning and Zoning Commission’s meeting next Thursday at 6 p.m.

Anyone who wants to comment on the application in person or via telephone should call (208) 382-7115 or email P&Z Administrator Cynda Herrick at cherrick@co.valley.id.us before 4 p.m. on Thursday.

Written comments over one page long should be submitted to Herrick by 5 p.m. today, while written comments under one page long will be accepted until Wednesday at 5 p.m.

Plans for the Midas Gold’s Stibnite Logistics Facility call for four buildings that would serve the company’s proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine.

However, the facility would only be built if the mine is granted approval from local, state and federal regulatory agencies, Midas Gold officials said.

The four buildings would total about 64,000 square feet on a 25-acre site about 8.5 miles east of Idaho 55 on Warm Lake Road.

One building would serve as administrative offices and an assay laboratory to study mineral compositions, which would provide normal five-day workweek jobs for local residents, according to the application.

Other buildings would include a warehouse for supplies needed at the mine site, a hazardous materials storage building and another storage building for rock core samples and other items.

The purpose of the facility is to reduce traffic to and from Stibnite by maximizing freight efficiency and providing a shuttling point for the operations workforce of about 600 employees, the application said.

The parking area at the facility would include about 350 parking spaces for employee vehicles, which would remain on the site for the duration of employees’ two-week shifts.

However, a traffic study showed intersections on Idaho 55 at Warm Lake Road in Cascade and Deinhard Lane and Boydstun Street in McCall would need to be improved whether the logistics facility is built or not.

Midas Gold is currently working with the Idaho Transportation Department on designs to add turn lanes and expand the intersections to accommodate increased traffic.

Under Midas Gold’s updated plan submitted to the Payette National Forest last May, daily traffic associated with the project would be about 53 vehicles per day, or less than a 1% increase over current Idaho 55 traffic.

The study estimates that about a third of that traffic, or 18 vehicles, would travel north from Warm Lake Road, while the other two thirds, or 35 vehicles, would travel south toward Boise.

Mine traffic would be a mix of semitrucks and ordinary vehicles, all of which would only operate Monday through Friday.

Midas Gold says mining operations could end in 2037 and clean-up work could end by 2040, but it plans to keep the building beyond the life of the mine, the application said.

Currently, the company remains in the permitting process for the mine, with the next action expected to be the release of a draft environmental study in August.

Once the draft study is released, a final decision on the project would be expected about a year later, at which point Midas Gold could begin construction on its proposed gold and antimony mine, including the logistics facility.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Public Lands:

Safety Alert: French Creek Road is not an official, nor a recommended detour for Highway 95.

July 10, 2020

Contrary to an evening news report from a Boise TV station, French Creek Road on the Payette National Forest is not a recommend, nor an official detour route for highway 95.

French Creek Road is a high clearance road (not for two wheel drive vehicles) that is not recommended for travel by inexperienced mountain road drivers. Many drivers have had a difficult time traversing this road and have placed themselves in peril. Many vehicles have been driven off the road, and fortunately have been able to be recovered before a serious accident took place.

The road is rough with drop offs of 1000+ feet. If you do not have experience driving high mountain roads, or are an inexperienced driver, the Forest Service advises you to not use this road.

Trailers are not recommended as the switchbacks do not have room for trailers to maneuver.

It is a single lane, dirt road that has not been graded, and has limited pull outs. Two way traffic is taking place on this road and the limited number of pull outs makes it challenging for drivers to pass each other.

Travel at your own risk, and again, French Creek Road is not an official, nor a recommended detour for highway 95.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
— — — — — — — — — —

Proposed plan would privatize public lands around McCall and Payette Lake

The investment firm said they plan to keep the access open to the public forever, while working on smart growth.

Joey Prechtl July 6, 2020 KTVB

Payette Lake is a getaway destination for many Idahoans and people from throughout the Northwest.

But the future of the land surrounding the lake could soon look different.

A private investment company wants to swap land with the state. If approved, the company would get 28,000 acres in Valley County and the state would more profitable timberland up in North Idaho.

continued:
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Domestic Sheep Grazing to Take Place in Bear Basin Area

McCall, Idaho, July 8, 2020 – Although Bear Basin, located on the McCall Ranger District, is a popular recreation area today, it has historically been, and continues to be a place for sheep grazing and trailing. On Friday, July 10, Sunday, July 12 and Tuesday, July 14 over 3,000 ewes accompanied with lambs, will arrive in Bear Basin and the surrounding area to using those historic sheep trails, and continuing the tradition.

The sheep will use these trails to arrive at their designated allotments. Three bands of sheep will make their way northwest of the Little Ski Hill, through the stock driveway to Bear Basin. One of the bands will stay in the area for two weeks grazing on the Brundage allotment, another will move to the Cougar Creek allotment, and a third band will make its way to the Slab Butte allotment. A fourth band of sheep will trail through the south end of McCall on their way towards the south side of Jughandle Mountain on July 10 and move onto the Forest. When the sheep move to these locations, and arrive in those areas, they will be accompanied by guard dogs, herder dogs and herders leading pack strings.

As these dogs have been trained to protect these sheep, it is important that when near the location of the sheep to remain cautious and vigilant. If you encounter domestic sheep or cattle while on National Forest lands, make the animals aware of your presence and pass by without startling them. As a Forest visitor, it is up to you to maintain control of your own dogs in these areas and keep them on a leash. Bicyclists are cautioned to dismount their bikes and to move slowly around guard dogs. Motorcyclists are also encouraged to travel at very slow speeds while passing the bands.

Under no circumstances should Forest users attempt to pet stock or guard dog. These are working animals, not pets and their first duty is to protect their livestock from predators which can include human beings and other dogs. See a list of tips from the Idaho Rangeland Resources Commission for what to do if you encounter sheep here.

Grazing sheep on National Forest land is an Important part of our local economy and can also be beneficial for fuels reduction, thus preventing the spread of wildfires.

If you have any questions or want to know if grazing occurs at your forest destination, please call your local Ranger District Office. If you have concerns about the grazing occurring in Bear Basin, call the McCall Ranger District office at (208) 634-0400.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
— — — — — — — — — —

U.S. ends sheep grazing in parts of Idaho wilderness areas

The 140 squares miles contained in the allotments are northeast of Ketchum in the Sawtooth National Forest and Salmon-Challis National Forest.

Keith Ridler (AP) July 9, 2020

Ketchum, Idaho — U.S. officials have permanently closed four sheep and goat grazing allotments in and near central Idaho wilderness areas that are important habitat for wolves, bighorn sheep and other wildlife.

The 140 squares miles contained in the allotments are northeast of Ketchum in the Sawtooth National Forest and Salmon-Challis National Forest. The area is also a big draw for backcountry enthusiasts.

The Sagebrush Habitat Conservation Fund and Lava Lake Land & Livestock announced the agreement last week. The deal involved a negotiated payment from the conservation group to the sheep grower to end the grazing, but terms weren’t released. The U.S. Forest Service has signed off on the deal as well to permanently close the grazing allotments.

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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Heat stroke in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Jul 10, 2020 IME

Heat stroke can occur when canine body temperatures rise to 104-106 degrees. As dogs cannot rely on sweat glands to dissipate heat, they can be prone to heat stroke when exposed to high environmental temperatures. Any temperatures above 70 degrees combined with exercise and poor access to water can facilitate heat stroke. Exertional heat stroke occurs when internal heat generated by strenuous exercise is not adequately dissipated and body temperatures rise to dangerous levels.

Signs vary depending on the degree and duration of temperature elevation. Panting and hyperthermia are the most common signs. The animal may be dull, weak and wobbly, collapsed, convulsing or in a coma. Respiratory and heart rates are usually high. Gums of the mouth may be bright red. Pulses may be weak. Vomiting and diarrhea may occur. Decreased urine production (kidney failure) and jaundice (liver failure), infection and widespread bleeding can also occur. Diagnosis is based on finding an extremely high body temperature, a history of exposure to heat and compatible clinical signs.

Common laboratory changes caused by heat stroke include dehydration, prolonged blood clotting, abnormal kidney and liver tests and electrolyte abnormalities.

Heat prostration is an emergency!

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— — — — — — — — — —

Dog rescued from river

July 9, 2020 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The King family witnessed a rescue in the works on the Greenbelt Wednesday afternoon. You can watch the rescue in the video above.

“It was pretty amazing,” Dan King said as he described the rescue to us.

continued: w/video
— — — — — — — — — —

IDFG: Be on the lookout for wildlife while you’re recreating

By Natasha Williams Jul 09, 2020 KIVI


Credit IDFG

Idaho Fish and Game has been getting reports of black bears and mountain lions along trails in the Wood River Valley area.

Fish and Game says there have been no negative interactions with the wildlife, but say it’s a good reminder to be alert when you’re outside recreating.

Over the past several weeks a non-aggressive black bear has been seen several times by hikers on the Adams Gulch Trail north of Ketchum, Fish and Game says. While this bear is reported to be non-aggressive, black bears can be unpredictable and should never be approached.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

9th Circuit upholds endangered species protections for Yellowstone grizzlies

July 8, 2020 KIVI

The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals today upheld the Montana District Court’s opinion that reinstated Endangered Species Act protections for the Yellowstone region’s grizzly bear population. The decision spares the grizzlies from plans for trophy hunts in the states of Wyoming and Idaho.

Earthjustice, representing the Northern Cheyenne Tribe, Sierra Club, Center for Biological Diversity and National Parks Conservation Association, argued for restoring protections to Yellowstone grizzly bears.

“This is a tremendous victory for those who care about Yellowstone and its grizzly bears,” said Tim Preso, Earthjustice attorney.

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Mountain goats create traffic jam on Idaho highway

The goats decided to step off the mountain and stop in the middle of Highway 21 between Grandjean and Stanley.

Brian Holmes July 8, 2020 KTVB


Credit: Ricky Mouser

Boise County, Idaho — Holiday weekends aside, traffic jams in Idaho’s mountains are rare but they do happen, and usually naturally.

Avalanches, landslides, fires — they’ve all been known to shut down roads. And so, too, have animals, something that is so Idaho.

It happened Tuesday about four in the afternoon when these greatest of all time mountain beasts decided to step off the mountain and stop in the middle of Highway 21.

continued: w/more photos
— — — — — — — — — —

Peregrine falcon hitches a ride in downtown Boise

“It made eye contact with me then flew to the hood of my car. I sat through a green light as we checked each other out.”

July 10, 2020 KTVB


Credit: Zealandia Designs

BOISE, Idaho — “Excuse me, are you my Uber?” one peregrine falcon probably said after it landed and stood on a car in downtown Boise on Thursday.

The incredible moment was shared in a now-viral Facebook post by Boise-based jeweler Zealandia Designs.

The post, which now has nearly 2,000 shares and over 1,500 reactions as of 3:30 p.m. Friday, was written by Jenny Byrne.

continued: w/more photos
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Fish & Game News:

After promising early results from lake trout suppression, kokanee stocking resumes in Payette Lake

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Tuesday, July 7, 2020


All rights reserved. Dylan Smith

F&G biologists are working to bring Payette Lake back into balance and provide quality fishing for both species

For the first time since 2014, Idaho Fish and Game has stocked kokanee salmon into Payette Lake in McCall. Hatchery staff stocked a total of about 400,000 kokanee into the lake in late June, and will continue to stock that many kokanee every year until at least 2024.

Resuming kokanee stocking follows two years of successful lake trout suppression efforts, which Fish and Game fishery managers are using to restore Payette Lake’s status as both a trophy lake trout fishery and kokanee destination. Managing the Payette Lake fishery is a challenge that Idaho Fish and Game fisheries managers have been wrestling with for some time.

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Boise man catches new catch/release state record grayling from mountain lake in the Sawtooths

By Martin Koenig, Natural Resource Program Coordinator
Wednesday, July 8, 2020

Fish topped old record by more than 2 inches


Brian Brooks for IDFG

Brian Brooks released this 16.2-inch Arctic grayling over the July 4 holiday to earn a new catch/release state record!

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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Oh shell! 65-pound alligator snapping turtle captured in Virginia

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EalBMC3WkAEjCGt?format=jpg
Fairfax County Police

by Samantha Mitchell, WJLA Staff Tuesday, June 16th 2020

Fairfax County, Va. (WJLA) — Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries reflected on the moment it says its staff captured one “shell” of an animal.

According to the Fairfax County Police Department, animal protection was called to respond to a large turtle in a residential area of Alexandria.

That’s when they say they came across, to their surprise, a 65-pound alligator snapping turtle.

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Seasonal Humor:

CovidOathSolitude-a

NinjaSquirrel-a
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Idaho History July 12, 2020

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 13

Idaho Newspaper clippings November 15-19, 1918

1918WearAMask-a
One Oregon newspaper clip reads: “We appeal to your civil patriotism to co-operate with us in our effort to stamp out the Spanish Influenza or “Flu” Plague in Portland by wearing a mask.” A newspaper clip from January 1919. University of Oregon

source: Katie Canales Jul 2, 2020, Business Insider
— — — — — — — — — —

Nov 15

The Rathdrum Tribune., November 15, 1918, Page 1

19181115TRT1-headline
Celebration In Rathdrum
Victorious End of the War Proclaimed
Awakened Holiday Spirit.

Rathdrum celebrated the end of the war Monday with manifestations of gladness that crystallized into an organized street parade and stated program of music and speeches, a bonfire and barbecue. From the time the joy bells announced the signing of the armistice that brought a cessation of hostilities, about 3:30 in the morning, until the barbecue was over and the bonfire had burned low, the holiday spirit pervaded the entire town and vicinity.

The ringing of the bells, honking of auto horns and firing of guns got out a large crowd before daylight, and sunrise found the town in gala attire with its flags and bunting displayed in profusion down both sides of the main street. Early in the day O. G. Farnsworth, chairman of the local advisory committee started arrangements for the evening celebration. Committees were appointed and speakers secured. Forty-two dollars were raised and a trip made to Spokane to purchase fireworks. Another committee was assigned the work of preparing the barbecue, and another to gather fuel for the bonfire at the school grounds and to install the necessary lights on the stairway and porches.

In the afternoon a large crowd assembled down town to receive and give vociferous welcome to some twenty-six auto loads of Coeur d’Alene citizens who came over to return the visit made to their town by people of Rathdrum and vicinity the evening of Nov. 7.

The evening parade consisted of a long line of autos appropriately decorated headed by four individuals on horseback, Miss Edna Layton, representing the Goddess of Liberty; Art Foster, soldier; Clark Hill, sailor, and Miss Stella Hurrell, Red Cross nurse. The line of the parade started at the bank corner, east to Idaho street, thence to Crenshaw’s addition, back to First street by Coeur d’Alene street and thence to the school grounds. The band played prior to the starting of the parade and also had a part in the program at the school grounds.

H. H. Mitchell had charge of the program in front of the high school building. Speakers were Frank A. Morris, County Sup’t R. C. Egbers, Professor W. E. Chandler [?], E. G. Greenup and M. B. Layton. The speaking was interspersed with selections by the Liberty chorus, the band, and the male quartet which consisted of Superintendent L. O. Swenson, L. J. Hartlerode, N. H. Taylor and O. G. Farnsworth.

Mr. Morris, In his address, referred to the event being celebrated, as the harbinger or forerunner of peace to be followed by a difficult period of reconstruction work. The peace treaty, he reminded the audience, has yet to be drawn up and signed. In the meantime hostilities have ceased and America is to be congratulated for having escaped the horrors visited by the Germans upon the unfortunate inhabitants of Belgium, France and other European countries.

Mr. Egbers referred briefly to the fact that since the American army stopped the Germans at Chateau Thierry last July the allies had been winning on all fronts.

Mr. Chandler made humorous references to the kaiser’s vaunted versatility and omniscience and the disaster to which his talents have brought him. He also spoke of this as the first great international or world holiday that the world has ever knows, that, will be celebrated by every liberty loving people henceforward.

Mr. Greenup also made a hit with the crowd by his witty remarks concerning the kaiser’s downfall and his flight to Holland in an effort to escape punishment for his crimes. He said the present peace marks a new phase in the world’s progress, the overthrow of autocracy and the ascendancy of government by the people.

Mr. Layton devoted his remarks chiefly in behalf of the united war work campaign, reminding his hearers that, although peace had come, the boys would be in Europe and in the camps for many months and would need the helpful work of these good agencies as much as ever.
— —

Idaho State News Items.

Boyd Kelly Frazier, the Jerome young man who died three days after he had returned home from the S. A. T. C. at Moscow suffering from lack of medical attention for a severe case of Spanish influenza, failed to report to officials at the university that he was sick, although he had every opportunity to receive medical attention, according to a letter written [by] Dr. E. A. Bryan, commissioner of education, by E. H. Lindley, president of the university, explaining the results of an investigation by two Jerome citizens, one of them the boy’s father.
— —

From Over The County

Harrison

Earl Wark returned from Camp Jefferson on account of the flu. He had lost twenty pounds.

Influenza caused one death at Medimont.
— —

Coeur D’Alene

Judge Alfred Budge canceled the session of the supreme court of Idaho which was to have been held in Coeur d’Alene beginning November 11.

The third member of the Knute Swanson family to succumb to influenza was Theodore, age 21, who died Nov. 9.

A forth member of the Knute Swanson family, Iona, age 12, died of influenza Sunday.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Rathdrum Tribune., November 15, 1918, Page 3

Local Paragraphs.

Twenty-seven autos loads of Rathdrum people joined in the trip to Coeur d’Alene Thursday night of last week to celebrate. They were well received and the Liberty chorus made quit a hit.

The first of the week Rathdrum was free from influenza, but on Wednesday two new cases were reported, coming from other communities. Many cases are reported in Spokane, Spirit Lake and Coeur d’Alene.

The teachers of the Rathdrum schools were granted leave until after Thanksgiving and several of them have done to their homes. It is expected that school will be resumed about Dec. 1, if not sooner.

The abdication of the kaiser was celebrated in Rathdrum last Saturday afternoon and evening. The fallen potentate was hung in effigy by a hilarious crowd. Bells were rung and the Liberty chorus sang stirring selections on the street in various parts of town.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 15, 1918, Page 1

19181115TIR1-headline
Blackfoot Sure Did Celebrate
Announcement of War’s End Aroused Local People to Intense Activity on Monday.

There was shouting and singing and jubilant ringing in Blackfoot early Monday morning when word was received that the armistice had been signed, which meant that the world war was over. As soon as the glad tidings were received the bells of the city were set to ringing and loud, shrill whistles let open so that the early morning air was a confusion of joyful sound. At the early hour of 4:30 the city fire engine, loaded with men, wild with enthusiasm, all shouting, raced up and down the residential streets waking the slumbering townfolk. It reminded one somewhat of the famous midnight ride of Paul Revere on the eighteenth of April, 1775, only it was realized that it was world wide.

At early dawn many autos decorated in national colors and flags had fallen in line behind the fire engine and a parade formed. Business people tried to collect themselves sufficiently to take their respective places, but in most cases upon arriving at headquarters found doors locked and their managers decorating the buildings in flags and bunting – so business houses remained closed all day to more fully do justice to the occasion.

At 2 o’clock in the, afternoon a parade of some 250 citizens carrying flags, marched thru the business district, over to Judicial street and to the court house grounds, where they assembled to listen to addresses by the Rev,. Colver, Judge Anderson and J. T. Carruth. The festivities lasted until dark.

November 11 will go down thru the ages as perhaps the greatest day in history for this old world of ours, and it would seem fitting to always observe it as the real Thanksgiving day.
— —

Miss Dorothy Belville and her friends had a fine looking coyote in the celebration Monday. He was kept on a chain, and was as busy celebrating as anybody.
— —

War Summary

November 12

Greater portions of U. S. army to remain for the present overseas. Much naval work yet to be done. Will take over, and guard all of the enemy’s warships.

Calls to army are cancelled. All draft work cancelled. No more inductions, will return men who have been entrained, but not yet reached training camps. …

November 13

Teutons to surrender all divers. Starvation facing the German people.

… The danger of famine in Germany was the reason for early peace negotiations.

U. S. needs four billion dollars yearly to carry on the reconstruction work… AcAdoo taxes will be high for many years. More loans are also required to pay off the war debt.

November 14

… President promises Germany food aid. Everything possible will be done.

… U. S. forming plans for future of army.
— —

Died at Camp Lewis

Richard Phillips of Aberdeen died of influenza at Camp Lewis about three weeks ago, after a four days illness.

The body was sent to Aberdeen for burial.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 15, 1918, Page 2

The influenza epidemic caused a ban to be put upon public gatherings of all kinds, hence the oratory of the different candidates was lost to the Idaho citizenry. But there was no lack of interest in the campaign. Being denied the privilege of addressing the voters of the state in person, many of the candidates resorted to newspaper publicity, and many columns of campaign arguments were published in the press of the state, to the gratification at least of the publisher. How the public appreciated the innovation is a question open to debate.

The prevalence of influenza was responsible for a much lighter vote than would have been cast had health conditions throughout the state been normal. Many did not vote because they were confined to their homes with the disease, while others doubtless did not go to the polls because they desired to avoid coming in contact with some who were probably afflicted with the disease.
— —

19181115TIR2
Moreland

Miss Revella Wray, the clerk at the Lindsay store, is staying at the home of Mrs. Blanche Wray, because her folks have the influenza.

Miss Blanche and Locloe Ribbins have been ill for a few days, it is reported that they have the flu.

Joice Hudson, the eight year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hudson, died Saturday night. The little girl had the Spanish influenza.

All the members of the John Hall family are ill with the influenza except one small boy.
— —

19181115TIR3
Sterling

The Holmquist family are down with the influenza.

Claude Parsons is confined to his bed with the influenza.

The Tanner family, who are ill with the flu, are improving.

Miss Adeline Nelson came home Saturday from Provo to stay until school reopens. She has been ill with influenza.
— —

19181115TIR4
Grandview

Luther Satterfield is the latest victim of the flu.

The Quigley family are reported a great deal better this week.

Joe Cosgrove returned from the hospital [in] Pocatello Saturday.
— —

19181115TIR5
Rose

Alma Jackman and family are going to move to their new home in Aberdeen as soon as they recover from the influenza.

Mrs. J. G. Waring had word that Willie Johnson has been quarantined on board a ship for five weeks, but thought the company would be able to sail soon.,

John Norman is slowly improving, after his second attack of the influenza.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 15, 1918, Page 3

Wanted Contraband Booze

A body of three or four hundred men gathered at the court house Monday forenoon and asked to be given the contraband booze then in the custody of the sheriff.

The request was refused and they were told to have as good a time as they could, but not to bring any booze into play.
— —

Ill With Influenza

Miss Gertrude Kinney, who has been seriously ill with the influenza at her home in Pocatello is now much improved.

During Miss Kinney’s illness her sister Miss Whilden Kinney has charge of the Kinney Art Studio …. (page cut off)

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 15, 1918, Page 5

Local News

Fisher Hearing Postponed

On account of the illness of the county stenographer Mrs. Maurine White, the Fisher preliminary examination was postponed until some time next week. Announcements will be made later.
— —

Infant Baby Dies

William, the seventeen months old baby of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Quigley passed away Monday morning after a few days’ illness with pneumonia. …
— —

Stores No Longer Close at 6 O’clock

On account of the subsidence of the influenza epidemic locally, the ruling for stores closing at 6 o’clock was lifted today, Thursday.

This, however, does not apply to the state order pertaining to public gatherings, school and picture shows.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 15, 1918, Page 8

Influenza Situation.

The influenza situation in Blackfoot is much improved, and there are only a very few cases.

However the disease is more prevalent in Shelly and Presto, than any other part of the county.

And with people still taking precautions it is though that the epidemic will soon be wiped out.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Oakley Herald. November 15, 1918, Page 1

19181115TOH1
In The Gem State

Ralph Gouchnour of Burley, son of D. M. Gouchour [sic?], a member of the vocational section, died at Moscow of typhoid pneumonia.

On account of there being no slackening of the influenza epidemic in the Pocatello district, it was decided to postpone the date of holding federal court there to November 18.

Owing to the influenza epidemic, and a drizzling snow during the entire day, less than 50 per cent of the vote was cast at the election at Idaho Falls. The new style of ballot also made it tedious in making the count.

The Caldwell general hospital closed last week for good. Those in charge of the hospital refused to say anything in regard to the closing, but it is known that it has had a stormy financial career because of the lack of cooperation it deserved.

The influenza epidemic has been making rapid strides in Idaho Falls and Bonneville county and stringent measures are being taken to overcome it. Every person has been ordered to wear a mask over the nose and mouth and all business houses, except drug stores and cafes, are closed at 6 p.m.
— —

Locals and Personals.

Benjamin Judd is ill this week.

Rosel Hale is back again on Route 1 after a brief illness.

Miss Violet Cummins, who is at Camp Lewis, has recovered from an attack of ‘flu’.

Leland Peterson has recovered from a severe attack of ‘flu’ and is ready to assume his duties on Route 2 again.
— —

Joseph H. Boren

The funeral of Joseph H. Boren who died last week from influenza, was held Friday. He was 52 years of age and was born in Provo, Utah.

His mother and six brothers attended funeral services. He is survived by his wife and six children: Mrs. Dell Chipman of Provo, Utah, Jesse, Wesley, Estella, Etta, and Addie Boren.
— —

Churchill

There are no new cases of ‘flu’ in Churchill.

Lloyd Oldham received word last week of the death of his brother with the ‘flu’.

Eugene Berrell who recently moved from Churchill to Burley is very ill with the ‘flu’.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. November 15, 1918, Page 4

19181115AFP1
People and Events

Mrs. Sailing is reported to be ill with influenza.

Miss Walsh, who has been ill for the past two weeks with influenza, is able to be about once more.

Ernest Jones came up from Rockland yesterday. He is not strong yet, but his appetite indicates that he is making a good recovery.

The family of P. A. Friezen, who were reported ill with influenza last week, have been brought to the hospital here. They are reported to be quite sick.

Miss Hazel Lower of Roy is recovering from a siege of influenza and pneumonia. For a time the young lady was very ill and it was doubtful if she would recover.

The influenza epidemic appears to be checked in American Falls and the near vicinity. It is also reported to be less frequent in outlying parts of the county. However, the ban on public meetings and on schools has not been raised. The state board of health has decided to be slow about raising the ban, believing that a little caution is the better policy.

A. A. Friezen was in from cedar Creek settlement Wednesday and reports an experience that was common to many people in all parts of the county. Seven members of his family were down with influenza at the same time, leaving him the only one to be up. He had their care and the care of the family as well, as it was impossible to get anyone to assist at that time.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 15, 1918, Page 1

19181115IR1
One Quarantine Made Effective

A letter from Challis describes how the citizens of that locality determined to make an effective quarantine against influenza, as follows:

The court and the county board of health and council of defense have clashed in the Challis or Salmon river watershed section of Custer county over Spanish influenza quarantine. To prevent carriers taking the disease into the Challis section, all road and highways leading thereto were picketed. In the night, however, parties passed the pickets, and when discovered, were placed in quarantine. They applied to the courts for help, and Judge F. J. Cowen issued a writ for the release of the parties so detained and cited Sheriff Huntington and Dr. C L. Kirtley, chairman of the Custer county board of health, to appear before him at Arco on November 11, to show cause why they should not be punished for contempt of court for refusing to release them.

Resolution Explains Situation.

The Custer county council of defense met and passed the following resolution, which was forwarded to Governor Alexander, the state board of health, the state council of defense and Judge Cowen:

“Whereas, a dangerous and infectious disease known as the Spanish influenza has become epidemic through the United States, and has infected many places within the state of Idaho, and the affliction often causing death, and the Custer county board of health under the authority and rules and regulations of the state board of health, have quarantined the Salmon river watershed in Custer county against infected district, said Salmon river watershed being free from said epidemic by reason of such quarantine, and proper stations and guards having been placed on roads and ways of ingress to this section, and one of them being placed on the public road between Mackay and Challis at Willow creek summit, the Lost river and Salmon river divide, and

Run the Blockade.

“Whereas, persons from an affected district did willfully and unlawfully in the night time and after being instructed by Dr. C. L. Kirtley, chairman of the county board of health, not to do so, steal by such guard and quarantine station and expose people in this district to said disease, and under the direction of said board of health, such persons were arrested and detained under quarantine by W. K. Huntington, sheriff of Custer county, until time for the development of the disease and danger of the infection had passed, and

Court Steps In.

“Whereas, F. J. Cowen, judge of the Sixth judicial district court, did, on the fifth day of November, 1918, issue a writ directing the sheriff and health board to immediately release said persons so quarantined and also make an order appointing T. R. Jones to serve said writ and for Chase A. Clark to accompany him, both of said persons being from an infected district, armed with such order and writ, willfully passed said quarantine station and guard and came to Challis and served said papers, said judge directing that they be not interfered with in making such service; that said judge had issue an order directing W. K. Huntington, sheriff, and Dr. Cl. L. Kirtley, chairman of the Custer county board of health, to appear before him at Arco, Idaho on the 11th day of November and show cause why they should not be punished for contempt of court for refusing to release parties from quarantine; that we are reliably informed that said Judge F. J. Cowen has issued further orders to permit other persons from affected district to pass quarantine station and guard and thereby permitting them to expose persons in this district to infection, although said judge has been fully informed as to all conditions recited there in.

Uphold Officials.

Therefore, be it resolved that each and every act of W. J. Huntington, sheriff, and Dr. C. L. Kirtley, chairman of Custer county board of health, in enforcing said quarantine is hereby approved and they are assured of the united support of this council of defense and are directed and requested to instruct all quarantine guards to permit no one to pass such guards from infected districts unless they are supplied with order to do so from the state board of health or the Custer county board of health, and to disregard all orders coming from any other source; that said Judge F. J. Cowen is respectfully requested to issue no more orders or writ for persons to violate the quarantine regulations of the Custer county or state board of health; that Honorable M. Alexander, governor, the state council of defense, the state board of health, th Honorable F. J. Cowen, district judge, be appealed to and requested to give this council of defense and the Custer county board of health their support and co-operation in using all necessary force to maintain said quarantine; that a copy of this resolution be mailed to Honorable M. Alexander, governor, the state council of defense, the state board of health and Honorable F. J. Cowen, district judge, and that this resolution be signed by the chairman and secretary of this council and members.”
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19181115IR2
Posse Resists This Federal Agent

A secret service agent in soldier uniform was forcibly ejected from the Pahsimaroi valley by an angry bunch of citizens for running the quarantine blockade at the line between Custer and Lemhi counties last Sunday night.

This agent had run the blockade on the Willow creek summit between Mackay and Challis Sunday morning and was escorted back without legal proceeding. He associated himself with a cattle buyer and took the first branch road to the Pahsimaroi. As soon as the occurrence was reported to the citizens the exposed community assembled 50 strong and rounded up the intruding pair and afforded transportation and escorts to the county line. There a Custer county escort took the army officer and the cattle buyer and delivered them to the guards at the Double Spring pass.

That army officer stripped his soldier coat and challenged the crowd to battle, but he could find no vulnerable spot in the column of 50 that advanced to use force in the process of ejectcment. He cussed and pleaded tho, but he wet along just the same as a common man would go in response to unanimous sentiment. This army officer evidently had Uncle Sam behind him, but too far behind just then.
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19181115IR3
More Victims of Prevailing ‘Flu’

A. Roy Buchanan

A. Roy Buchanan died at the Tendoy home of his mother-in-law, Mrs. Margaret Kirkham, on Monday last, November 11, after a week’s illness from complications that usually follow influenza. From the beginning his case was considered a bad one. He was a giant in strength yet the disease quite mastered him within a short time, when one of his lungs became involved in pneumonia. …

William Humphreys

William Humphreys, known as “Smokey Bil, died in Salmon, at a city hotel, on Sunday. His case was another of the influenza attacks. In the community Mr. Humphreys was well known as a successful angler.

Mrs. Billy Withington

Mrs. Maggie Richardson Withington died at the Hamner hospital last Sunday morning. She was the wife of William Withington of Sandy creek. This entire family was stricken with attacks of influenza at the same time, Mr. Withington also having been extremely ill. He reached the home of Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Thirlkill in Salmon where he has received the all needed care and attention. … Their home is at the Harry Hover ranch, further up Sandy creek. This lady hovered between life and death for several days. All of the other Withington family except one who still remains at the hospital have been cared for in the homes of relatives.

Mrs. May Withington Hill died at the Hoover farm on Sandy creek early Wednesday morning from the influenza. She left a babe which was born in the midst of the young mother’s fatal illness. The child is living. The father and husband, Herbert Hill, was very sick and it seemed, hardly probable at one time that he would recover. Mrs. Hill was the daughter of Mrs. Withington who died at the Hanmer hospital last Sunday morning, and whose father is recovering from the same disease at the Salmon home of Mr. and Mrs. Thirlkill.

Harry Yost

Harry Yost died yesterday at the works of the Drilling Development company where he had been employed as foreman. His fellow workmen knew him as a man of fine character and among all who knew him he was highly esteemed. He had suffered from influenza twelve days. …

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 15, 1918, Page 5

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Dr. and Mrs. W. B. Hart were called to Butte by the illness of their son, Frederick Shenon.

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Smith and their children are all recovered from their attack of the epidemic, Mr. Smith being out and around this week.

The regular teachers’ examination has been indefinitely postponed y order of the state board of education, according to notice published by the county superintendent.

Mr. and Mrs. Homer Harris arrived on Sunday last by special stage from Armstead. They had visited Chicago, where Mr. Harris stayed, the epidemic raged with terror to the people until the fall rains came.

Joe Moodie has been home in Salmon from the sheep camp for two weeks nursing an attack of the prevailing malady from which he came off all right. Mr. Moodie is associated with L. T. Ramsey in business at Lemhi.

The G. H. Monk family expect to leave Salmon next week for California. Mrs. Whitcomb, who expected to go along, will defer her trip on account of the effects of an attack of influenza, from which, however, she is recovering.

Seth Ball, prominent rancher of the Lemhi valley, was in Salmon Wednesday for the first time in a month. He returned from the east last week. He was disabled for a little while with a tussle with the influenza while away from home but pulled out of the encounter without difficulty.

Decidedly better conditions prevail among the sick and afflicted from the visitation of influenza, as reported by Salmon physicians. The change seems to have started with a rainfall on Saturday night. Travelers say that wherever in the stricken localities there has been rain a falling off of the disease has been noticeable, particularly where a drought has prevailed. The ravages of the epidemic are reported exceedingly alarming, however, in Portland, where rains are frequent, possibly a daily occurrence in some seasons of the year.

Numbers of the afflicted people of Salmon will remember as long as they live little John Keyes, who, though not yet 12 years of age, has been the help of many a home besides that of his mother, where every member of the family but himself was on the sick list. John as been doing chores for everybody who needs his help – feeding chickens, emptying slops, starting fires, bringing water, washing dishes, chopping wood, cooking food and doing pretty good nursing besides. Talking about busy people that little fellow is one of them.
— —

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Dan Chase was able to be out of the house yesterday morning for the first time since his influenza attack.

Art Simrs, the divorced husband of Ethel Fowler, died at Stockton, Utah, last Friday of the flu.

Gert Goodell was taken sick with the flu at the pope-shenon mine Monday night and was brought to Salmon Tuesday.

Dr. C. F. Hanmer goes to Ft. Arden, Washington, next Tuesday, for training as an army surgeon. Mrs. Hanmer and their son Ferguson will accompany Dr. Hanmer as far as Butte, stopping enroute t Dillon to visit Mr. and Mrs. Harry Pierce, who have been ill in a Dillon hospital with influenza.

In the alarm over the ravages of the epidemic many erroneous reports were circulated. Two of these came from Idaho Falls according to Mrs. N. O. Ward in Salmon from her mother, Mrs. A. H. Boomer, in that city. The mother writes that neither Harry Holden nor Mrs. Milt Stover succumbed to the disease as reported but are now well on the road to recovery, the writing having met them both on the street.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 15, 1918, Page 6

19181115IR4
World News In Condensed Form

Since October 1 there have been 204,639 cases and 32,398 deaths from influenza and pneumonia, reports of the Pennsylvania state health department say.

Home products only on the Thanksgiving dinner table this year is the program of the food administration. Hotels, restaurants and other eating places have been asked to save transportation by using only food produced locally and the administration has issued an appeal to households to observe the same rules.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 15, 1918, Page 7

Around The Mines

Western oil fields have been hit hard by the prevailing disease. It is declared that the spread of the Spanish influenza among the workers caused many drilling operations to be suspended, and also handicapped the handling of the leases.

Most of the Alta mines have had a double handicap to contend with the past few weeks. Added to the frequent storms’ with their consequent muddy highways comes the inroad of the insidious little influenza germ. Already some of the husky miners have succumbed, and many others are down with the disease.
— —

Inland Northwest

Seattle’s stores may be closed in an effort to prevent the spread of Spanish influenza, City Health Commissioner J. S. McBride has announced.

Arrangements have been made whereby nutritious soup and other food will be taken to homes in Lewiston, Mont., where the influenza has made the preparation of good food for any patient difficult.

Druggists will be permitted under certain restrictions to refill prescriptions calling for morphine, codeine or heroin, written by registered practitioners for patients suffering from influenza and any pulmonary or bronchial afflictions, according to notice received at Helena.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 15, 1918, Page 8

19181115IR5
Leadore

Miss Irene Yearian, who is teaching in Albany, Oregon, and Will Yearian at Ft. Warden, Wash., are both recovering from an attack of influenza.

C. H. Benson, Lee Reamy, Harry Pierce and John Edwards, who have been delivering stock in the east returned to their homes in Leadore last week. All are well but precautions were taken for a few days that no influenza germs should be scattered.

Horace Ecker, who is quite well known here, has been transferred from Camp Dick, at Dallas, Texas, to the Flying Field near Lonoke, Arkansas. He has just recovered from a severe case of influenza.

Friends of the Carlson family will be glad to learn that the cases of influenza in that home are improving rapidly.
— —

19181115IR6
Leesburg

Miss Lewis, who came over from Salmon to visit at the Caples camp, is recovering from an attack of influenza. Miss Rovers is also a guest of Mrs. Caples.

The O’Conner family have all been ill with influenza but are now on the convalescent list.

Hilliard Grieber is also another influenza patient in this district sick with influenza. He is at the Italian mine.
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19181115IR7
Gilmore

We are still very fortunate, no case of influenza has put in an appearance. We have our masks ready, our signs out that we are in quarantine against the outside world and profoundly hope to come forth unscathed. We were all sorry to learn of the death of Mrs. Geo. Johnson at Salt Lake this past week. Mrs. Johnson spent the summer in Gilmore and had only recently gone to Salt Lake to live for the winter.

The Weirs, who went a couple of weeks ago to Idaho Falls to attend a funeral, are held there by the quarantine.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. November 15, 1918, Page 2

19181115KG1
Idaho News Paragraphs
Recent Happenings in This State Given in Brief Items for Busy Readers

The epidemic of influenza is on the increase at Elk River.

If no further cases of influenza develop the Sandpoint schools may resume Nov. 18. The ban on picture houses and public gathering will probably be removed at the same time.

Miss Catherine Lansing, age 42, died recently at Lewiston from the “Flu.” Miss Lansing was among the most devoted of Red Cross workers, and for the last year had given practically off of her time to this work.

The influenza epidemic has run its course in Lewis county, no new cases having been reported for nearly two weeks. In all 23 deaths occurred in Lewis county from the epidemic, 15 being at Nez Perce and eight at Ilo-Vollmer.

One doctor in Kellogg reported 400 cases of Spanish influenza. In some families six and seven members are in bed from the disease – all regulations are closely followed, but it seems to be on the increase. Eight have died Friday and Saturday.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. November 15, 1918, Page 3

Leland Items

Leland people gathered on Monday evening in an impromptu manner, rang bells, fired guns, exploded dynamite, in fact they made use of anything that would make a noise to celebrate the canning of the Kaiser.

The Fred Wegner family, who have been quarantined with influenza are all well again.

Linden Items

Word was received that Mrs. Granvill Wall is recovering from the influenza and that Granvill just got out of the hospital in California.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. November 15, 1918, Page 8

Gleanings

Howard and Dick Fenton were taken suddenly ill with influenza last Saturday afternoon. A. E. Wilcox was away on a hunting trip at the time and had to be called home to take charge of the depot here. Until his arrival H. P Hull looked after the interests of the N. P. here. Howard and Dick are getting along very well and it is believed will soon be entirely recovered.

Mrs. J. B. Helpma arrived Wednesday from Northport, Wash. She came to take care of her daughter Helen, who is ill with influenza.

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Fentron and two children and Dick Fenton were taken ill with influenza the first of the week. All are getting along nicely except Howard who has a very severe attack. He has had a high fever for several days but it is hoped that his condition will improve very soon.

There are a number of cases of influenza in Kendrick this week but no serious cases except Howard Fenton, who has been very ill. An accurate list is rather hard to procure as there are a number of cases that have not developed decided symptoms. …
— —

Big Bear Ridge

A large number stopped their various kinds of work Monday to join in celebrating the long-to-be-remembered day of Peace, in Kendrick and Deary. The ring of church bells was heard far and near.

The A. W. Jones family have been on the sick list but are improving at this writing.
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Southwick Items

The sick people of this neighborhood are reported to be improving.

Edwin Wetmore and Marion McClelland are stationed at Mare Island, Cal. The boys say they have not caught the “flu” yet.
— —

Night Work Discontinued

Nineteen out of twenty night trips made by the doctor could be avoided if people show the proper consideration for his welfare. It is also a great advantage to the sick person to begin treatment before night comes on.

As a matter of personal protection, I have discontinued night work, excepting confinement cases.

— Dr. R. C. Faust.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 15, 1918, Page 5

19181115ME1
Local News

Dr. King is confined to his home with a mild attack of the influenza. Mrs. King also has it in mild form.

On November 1st Bear Lake county stood 23rd in the sale of war savings stamps. That is, 22 counties in the state had a better record than Bear Lake.

If any one thinks it an easy matter to get out a newspaper with the town quarantined “tighter than beeswax” we will gladly give them a chance to try it.

The body of John Olson who died in San Francisco last Saturday, was brought here for burial Monday. Death was caused from pneumonia. Deceased was a son of Mrs. B. Olson of this city. For some time past he had been employed as a brakeman on the Southern Pacific, and was a member of the B. of R. T. He was buried on his thirty-second birthday.

A daughter was born last Tuesday to Mr. and Mrs. N. A. Myers of this city. Mrs. Myers is ill with the influenza at the Montpelier hospital but she and the babe are getting along nicely.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 15, 1918, Page 8

Fish Haven Notes.

Fish Haven, Nov. 13. – Funeral services were held at the Fish Haven cemetery on Nov. 7 for Henry Smith, who died at Aberdeen, on Oct. 31. Death was caused from diphtheria, following the influenza. The loving sympathy of the entire community goes out to the widowed mother in her terrible bereavement.

The news that “the war is over” was received here with cheers and rejoicing, firing of guns and driving decorated autos through the street with the boys and girls waiving hats and handkerchiefs. At night a great bonfire was built and the kaiser was burned in effigy at nearly every home as well as in public. A number of autos drove up from Paris, all decorated with flags and bunting. Loud cheers and greetings were exchanged with the people of Fish Haven and the visitors raced back as thought they were afraid they would not get a chance to fire a shot at the kaiser if they didn’t hurry. The frolic kept up until a late hour, when all retired with hearts filled with joy that the terrible was was over and suspense ended at last.

Mrs. L. S. Coley received word this morning that her daughter, Mrs. O. L. Schenck, who lives near Randolph, was very low with influenza and that other members of the family were also ill with it.

So far, there are no cases of the “flu” here, for which we are truly thankful.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., November 15, 1918, Page 1

19181115MT1

Editorial Mention.

According to reports from health officials the Spanish influenza is under control in Ada county. It is said that the quarantine will be lifted, if all things are favorable, in two weeks unless there is an increase of cases in the meantime. Crowds gathered to celebrate the end of the war and up to date there are no bad effects noted.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., November 15, 1918, Page 8

Meridian News Notes

Mr. and Mrs. D. W. Holman have received word that their son William is recovering from an attack of the Spanish influenza at the Moscow state university.

Arthur Grrett [?] has received word from his sister Miss Vivian, who is teaching at the state agricultural college at Pullman, that she is just out of quarantine from the Spanish influenza.

Ward has been received from Miss Winnie Baird, who is teaching at Spokane Wash that she is recovering after two weeks illness with the Spanish influenza. She says there are many cases, some fatal, in Spokane, but that the situation looks better this week.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. November 15, 1918, Page 1

19181115SJ1

O. H. Truman Victim of Influenza

O. A. Truman received the sad news a few days ago of the death of his twin brother, at Long Beach, Cal., Monday, November fourth. Mr. Truman left Shoshone but a few weeks ago. Recently he contracted influenza, which developed into pneumonia, which resulted in his death. The body was shipped for burial to Mr. Truman’s daughter at La Cross, Kansas, the old family home. …
— —

Wood River Center Grange

Will Ivie is very ill at the present writing.

The Fawn Mills’ are all ill with the influenza. They are getting along as fine as can be expected.
— —

Big Wood River News

Every one on Big Wood river rejoices because the war is ended.

Mrs. Burdett has been quite ill with the flu.

The family of A. M. Gomes have all recovered from the Flu.

Master Ward Mills is suffering with the Flu at present.
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Dietrich News

The force of Idaho Irrigation Company workmen engaged in concrete work were badly left out when the flu struck all the restaurant people and left the workmen short of provender. Some good Samaritans came to the rescue and are filling the place left vacant by Mr. and Mrs. Bailey in good shape.

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin R. Gage and two employees on the big Gage farm are sick with the prevailing epidemic, greatly to the interruption of much work now on hand there.

This week Dietrich has been receiving its share of influenza. So far the disease has been rather light in its form here. The big hotel is put to a good use after several years of rest, and is now doing good work as an improvised hospital. L. P. Mustard, James W. Patterson, R. J. Soper, Homer Turner, Mrs. Crist and Mary Crist are all well taken care of there. At the restaurant building J. A. Bailey, Mrs. Bailey, Mrs. Bailey’s sister and her father are sick with the disease. So far there have developed no cases of pneumonia, and all the sick people are said to be prospering. Dietrich is, however, exceeding slow on business and news just now.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 15, 1918, Page 3

19181115DSM1
University Will Open Next Monday
Quarantine To Be Raise Tomorrow – No County Schools Next Week

Permission has been granted the University of Idaho to resume its work next Monday and, unless more cases of influenza develop in university circles the quarantine will be lifted tomorrow and school work will be resumed Monday. Students living in the dormitories and at the barracks will be permitted to attend classes. Students living outside of these will have to have certificates from the city or county health officers and Dr. E. H. Lindley, president of the university, has requested all Moscow students who live at home to see Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer before Monday and secure certificates. He is anxious to have as nearly a full attendance as possible at the university classes Monday.

No new cases have developed in the university circles in two days and only two new cases had developed in the two preceding days, and the situation is regarded as very favorable for university people.

Conditions are not so good in town. It is believed that the disease was spread in Moscow as a result of the victory celebration Monday. The people gathered on the streets in large crowds, regardless of influenza, and it was predicted that many new cases would result.

Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, says “More new cases have developed in Moscow in the past 24 hours than in several days prior to that time. People are clamoring to have the schools opened but I think it is dangerous. I know of influenza developing in the homes of four families in Moscow who have a number of children who would have been in school had school been open and this would have given the spread of the disease a new start. There are many new cases among children in town and I think it would be dangerous to open the schools in Moscow before a week from next Monday.”
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19181112DSM2

City News

Mrs. Emma Peterka of Republic, arrived this morning to visit her son, Frank Peterka of the S. A. T. C., who is ill of influenza. Mrs. Peterka is a sister of O. H. Swartz of this city.

Dr. McBryde has been quite ill this week.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 15, 1918, Page 4

19181115DSM2-headline
Armed Mob Holds Up District Judge
Refused to Permit Judge to Enter County to Hold Term of Court

Boise, Idaho, Nov. 14. – Judge J. F. Cowen of the Custer county district court today telegraphed to the governor an appeal for state troops to help him force his way into Custer county, which is closed by a quarantine regulation designed to debar Spanish influenza.

Citizens of the Challis section of the county have barricaded all highways and are on guard with shotguns and rifles. The attorney general has held that the quarantine is legal, and that court dates are not of sufficient importance to justify calling state troops to aid the judges and court attaches to enter the county. The court is seeking to serve removal papers of the sheriff for failure to enforce what he claims are the civil laws.

Judge Cowen asserts that the citizens are thwarting law enforcement and bloodshed was feared.
— —

Prepare to Reopen the University

Capt. Luther B. Felker, university commandant, issued orders today that since the danger from influenza is decreasing, strict military discipline would be put into effect.

All men will be required to report to formation unless they have a written permit from the surgeon general. Any indisposition is to be reported to medical authorities at once.

The influenza situation continues to improve. Capt. Felker expects to lift the quarantine Saturday. This will apply only to the university. Moscow’s quarantine will not be lifted until ordered by the state board of health.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918ManInMask-a
A man wearing a mask in 1918. Western Neighborhoods Project OpenSFHistory.org

source: Katie Canales Jul 2, 2020, Business Insider
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Nov 16

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 16, 1918, Page 1

19181116DSM1
Another Death From Influenza
Young Soldier Lays Down Life This Morning After a Brave Struggle

Frank J. Paterka, of Spokane, a member of class A, of the S. A. T. C., at the University of Idaho, died this morning of pneumonia, following influenza. He had been in a critical condition for several days. His mother, Mrs. I. J. Paterka, was with him when the end came. He will be buried at Moscow tomorrow afternoon. …

Word reached here today that Howard Fenton, of Kendrick, died there last night of pneumonia, making the first death in Kendrick as a result of the “flu.” He was well known here, his wife, formerly Miss Mabel Grice, having lived in Moscow several years.

There has been a new outbreak of influenza in town, believed to be a result of people massing together the day of the celebration, last Monday. More new cases have been reported in town during the past 48 hours than in the previous week. There are several quite serious cases in town.

The first girls to develop the disease in the university, were quarantined in the Aldrich house today. Three girls, who show symptoms of the disease in a very mild form were taken from their boarding houses, where they have been quarantined and placed in the Aldrich house.

They are Manilla Reed, and Marie Freehafer, of Boise, and Ernestine Rose, of Salmon, Idaho.

The quarantine at the university was raised at noon today and more than 1000 young men and women who have been in quarantine were released. The men will be permitted to come down town but will not be permitted to loaf in pool rooms or any place where a crowd is likely to gather. All of the S. A. T. C. men and many girls were out to see the foot ball game this afternoon and enjoyed it immensely.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 16 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 16, 1918, Page 2

Peter Swenson, Farmer of Near Deary is Dead

Peter Swenson, a farmer living on Little Bear ridge, died Wednesday from influenza. His wife and daughter, Miss Mable, had just returned last Tuesday from a visit at Spirit Lake. It is thought she brought the disease home with her. Three other children are in bed with the flu.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 16 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 16, 1918, Page 3

19181112DSM2
City News

Miss La Vern Savage returned home yesterday from Pullman suffering from an attack of influenza.

Miss Sabra Hardy, a Red Cross nurse, died in France, Nov. 4, of influenza. Her father, Rev. Hardy, was for several years pastor of the Baptist church at Moscow.

The Aldrich house, near the university, is being used as a hospital for the girls of the university.

Miss Helen Long left this morning for Spokane to assist in the care of her sister, Mrs. John Drury, and family, who are ill of influenza.

Miss Pearl Heise arrived today from Colfax to assist in nursing at the Inland Hospital.

Otis Smith is sick of influenza at his home in southeast Moscow.

Mrs. D. M. Scott has gone to the Armstrong home east of Moscow to relieve Miss Suma Hall, who has been nursing the family during a siege of influenza.

Isaac Spitler, age 18 years of age, son of O. M. Spitler, who lives near Cornwall, died at Lewiston yesterday of pneumonia. The body was brought to Moscow today for burial.

Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Wood of South Almond street are just recovering from attacks of influenza.

The family of J. Jabora are ill with influenza.

Miss A. H. Lampert, one of the nurses from Potlatch, is sick of influenza at the Idaho hotel.

Lloyd Bassett, who has just recovered from the influenza, went to Canada yesterday on account of the illness of his father.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 16 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 16, 1918, Page 4

19181116DSM2
Influenza Calls For More Nurses
Situation in Moscow Worse Than Several Days Ago – Nurses Are Needed

Can you nurse? Will you nurse? That is the question which every conscientious woman in Moscow is invited to ask herself at once. Will it be possible for you to devote the next few days or even a part of them to the task of nursing some new cases of influenza? If you can make a favorable answer to this urgent appeal for volunteer nurses, notify Mrs. E. T. Baker, Telephone 243, at once. You are needed. And you are badly needed. Unless some help is forthcoming immediately there is grave danger that the influenza situation will again be a serious menace to the health of the community.

To those in charge of the nursing problem for the civilian population, it does not appear that the disease has by any means been stamped out. There are a number of families where deaths will surely occur unless nurses can be furnished. In one family eight are down with the disease. If these patients have to get up to wait on themselves or on other members of the family, cases which are now mild will surely be changed into dangerous ones.

Mrs. William Hunter, who has been working tirelessly for the past few days to obtain nurses for influenza cases, stated last night that she was at the end of her resources and had not been able to find volunteers who would help out the families now so much in need of assistance. “If we can get this help and get it right away,” said Mrs. Hunter, “we can reasonably hope to save the lives of all the patients. But if they do not expect anything else than fatalities. The crisis so far as the nursing problem is concerned has not passed in Moscow, and if any woman can respond to this appeal to meet a public necessity, she will earn the gratitude of the people at large as well as of the Red Cross and the particular families who are down with the disease.” It is not necessary that the women have a nurse provided, we can hardly who respond should be trained nurses, with diplomas. Any practical woman who has any skill at all at the bedside will he very welcome in the ranks of the volunteer nurses.

Having done her part so nobly for the past few weeks, Moscow, it would seem to those in charge, should not fall down now and neglect to do her full share of merciful work for the benefit of those recently stricken.

It is hoped that as soon as this notice is read tonight a number of women will offer themselves as nurses to meet the impending crisis.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 16 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918WomanInMask-a
Photo contributed by the Indiana Historical Society, P0173
An unidentified woman wears a face mask during the 1918 flu epidemic.

source: What Indianapolis was like during the 1918 pandemic April 8, 2020 – by Noah Crenshaw
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Nov 18

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 18, 1918, Page 1

19181118DSM1
University Exonerated for Death of Boyd Frazer

Shortly after school opened at the University of Idaho, Boyd Frazer of Jerome, who had applied for entrance into the S. A. T. C., was discharged owing to a minor physical disability, he being unable to pass the physical examination. He returned to his home at Jerome, Idaho and soon after died. It was thought at the home of the young man that he had been released from the university and sent home while sick. Much indignation was expressed there and there was much talk and ill feeling. When Dr. Lindley, president of the University of Idaho, learned of this he requested that a committee be sent from Jerome to investigate the matter.

A. C. Alexander, publisher of the Lincoln County Times, of Jerome, and R. S. Frazer, father of the young man, came to Moscow to make an investigation. On the train they met F. A. David, who was returning from southern Idaho, and he accompanied them to Moscow and assisted them in getting at the facts. They made a thorough investigation, going into every detail of the matter, visiting every place information might be obtained, and were fully convinced that no blame attached to any one. While in Moscow Mrs. Alexander called at the office of The Star-Mirror and wrote a statement showing that the investigation had proved that no fault could be attached to any one here. Upon his return home he published in his own paper, the Lincoln County Times, the following report, which completely exonerates every one in Moscow with any responsibility for the death of the young man. …
— —

University of Idaho is Again Holding Classes

The University of Idaho opened today in a limited way, after being closed three weeks by the influenza quarantine. All S. A. T. C. classes and work has been renewed, but the classes for girls were not resumed owing to the fact that there are a few very mild cases of influenza among the girls students. These are being carefully watched and guarded. If no new cases develop the girls’ classes will be resumed within a few days. Individual instruction in music has never been stopped at the university as the girls were taught individually and not in classes.

There have been no new cases of influenza reported among S. A. T. C. men for several days and the situation in the university is regarded as very good. The men came down town Saturday evening for the first time since the quarantine was ordered, but they were given rigid instructions not to congregate in large numbers in store or other places. The privilege of coming down town will not be granted to the men from now on until the quarantine is raised.

President Lindley insists upon a rigid observance of this rule for several reasons, the chief being that he does not want to add anything to the situation in town, which is not as good as it should be. There are many new, although mild, cases in town. The students will not be permitted to mingle with the towns people. …

The siege has been a long and hard one and everyone is worn out. President Lindley is especially anxious to prevent any further spread of the disease in town, owing to the marked shortage of nurses. Many nurses who volunteered to take care of the sick when the epidemic was at its worst, have been taken down with the disease or are so worn out with continued work that they could not stand another siege. Appeals for nurses have been sent out every where, but none can be had. Every community is short of nurses and appeals continue to come to Moscow from other places, but Moscow has not enough nurses to care for her own sick if there should be any increase.

Schools will open in Latah county next Monday. Mrs. R. B. Knepper, county school superintendent, today received a telegram from the state board of health notifying her that the quarantine will be raised next Sunday, November 24, in Idaho, and that schools may open on Monday, November 25. Should local conditions be such that it is thought not advisable for the opening of schools at that time, the situation will be handled by the county or city health officers. Moscow churches are expected to hold services next Sunday.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 18 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 18, 1918, Page 2

Carey Smith Comes Home.

Carey Smith, who is attending the naval unit of the Washington State university at Seattle, came home Saturday evening to spend a week’s furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. P. L. Smith. Carey and Orval Garrison, who is in the same school from Moscow, have just recovered from attacks of influenza. In the entire school of several thousand men there was a small percentage of deaths from influenza.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 18 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 18, 1918, Page 3

19181112DSM2
City News

Mrs. Howard Frazee and daughter, Maxine and Kathleen, arrived Sunday from Spokane to visit Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Frazee. Mrs. Frazee is just recovering from quite a severe attack of influenza.

Mrs. Worth Rogers, who lives east of Moscow, is sick with influenza.

Mrs. Andrew Hagan went to Spokane Sunday to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Urton, who are just recovering from the influenza.
— —

Miss Genevieve Davis Dead.

Word has come to Moscow that Miss Genevieve Davis died at Pocatello, Nov. 14 with influenza. Miss Davis was a former student of the university and a sister of J. D. Davis and Ellsworth Davis, who are well known in Moscow. Mrs. J. D. Davis is now in Moscow visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Bratton. She was teaching school at Pocatello.
— —

Women Work at Bremerton.

Frank Burch returned Saturday from Bremerton. Mr. Burch says Bremerton is a busy place. In the Puget Sound shipyards, where he was employed, there were 6300 persons on the payroll and 1000 of these were women. The women drove trucks, drove cranes, were machinists’ helpers, besides being employed in office work.

The influenza at Bremerton has been quite serious, the fatalities being largely among the sailors.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 18 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

1918FamilyMasks
A family in Dublin, Calif. wears masks during the novel influenza pandemic that ranged from 1918 to 1920 (Courtesy City of Dublin, Calif.)
(click image for larger size)

source: COVID-19 mask recommendations echo 1918 orders, By K. Cathey, Lodi News Apr 14, 2020
— — — — — — — — — —

Nov 19

American Falls Press. November 19, 1918, Page 1

19181119AFP1Flu Is Increasing.
Relaxing of Precautions Results in Unexpected Spread of Epidemic – Help Needed to Care for Sick.

There has been a material increase in the number of flue cases within the past four days. Among them are the family of A. O. Garten, eight members; children of Mr. and Mrs. Adolf Claassen, S. L. Upham, Mrs. C. W. Dahlberg, J. S. Abercrombie, Mr. Wilcox and G. S., Wennstrom at the First National Bank, Pat Field, Mrs. A. H. Barton, the Kennedy family, Waren Grothe, and Mrs. Soell.

There are said to be a number of others, who are caring for themselves and have not reported. The Red Cross is seeking aid in the care of some of the sick. Anyone willing to nurse the sick, to go in and straighten up the homes, or to prepare food, are requested to phone Miss Florence Barber at the county offices during the day or at 115J evenings.
— —

The influenza epidemic has been checked in army camps.
— —

19181119AFP2
Pleasant Valley.

Andrew Neu has been on the sick list for several weeks and is improving very slowly.

Some of our patriotic farmers are selling their wheat and buying barley to feed their stock, thus going to lots of trouble to save wheat for human consumption.

After a serious work of nursing in Rockland, Grandpa Hetch has returned safely and is ready to take up his duties in the Pleasant Valley school house.

Misses Sophia and Emelia Radke have been looking after the farm of their mother while she was nursing her son Emanuel in the hospital, who has been very sick. Much to the joy of his friends, he passed through the danger zone and arrived home Saturday last.

Influenza has almost left the valley. The worst cases were at the homes of Robert Radke, Jacob Neu, John Tiede, Mrs. M. Radke, Louie Adolf and Emmanuel Radke.

Dan Rast is enjoying health again after a week of illness,
— —

19181119AFP3
Arbon News.

Fred Richards is quite ill with the influenza at the home of E. H. Davis.

The two oldest boys of L. B. Evans are very ill with pneumonia following influenza. All of the family had the flu but are getting along fine.

Bert Noble, the 11-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Noble, died at the family home of pneumonia due to influenza, after a few days’ illness. Interment at the Pauline cemetery. This is the third child in the Noble family to die in a little less than two years.

John Bowen is ill at Malad with influenza. He was returning home from his daughter’s funeral when taken ill.

Mrs. Albert Poppie is sick with influenza.

Mrs. Heber Woods is still very ill.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

American Falls Press. November 19, 1918, Page 4

People and Events.

Mrs. A. H. Barton is confined to her home by an attack of influenza.

Mrs. C. W. Dahlberg has been quite ill with influenza but is improving.

G. A. Brahmstadt was here from Arbon Monday. He reports the flu situation there somewhat better.

The families of D. J. Wiens and Peter Boldt of Pleasant Valley, have been victims of the flu epidemic.

Emanuel Radke left the Bethany Deaconess Hospital last Saturday, fully recovered from an attack of influenza.

Warren Grothe, Jesse Smith, Mrs. P. A. Friesen, Miss Ida Tracy and Mrs. Butler of Arbon valley, are influenza patients at the hospital.

The family of Charles Johnson have recovered from the flu with the exception of Mrs. Johnson, whose lungs are affected. She has been ill for three weeks.

There seem to be quite a number of new influenza cases this week, and there is a prospect that the opening of schools and churches will be delayed a little while.

Reports from Pocatello yesterday were that there were 1500 cases of influenza. Furniture has been removed from hotel lobbies so that people are not encouraged to congregate and loaf.

Herman Barnard, 11 years old, who has been at Bethany Deaconess Hospital nearly seven weeks suffering from typhoid fever, has so far recovered that he will be able to return home this week.

People who have dishes which they do not know where to return, are requested to leave them at the Red Cross rooms. During the recent epidemic many dishes were sent to the homes of the sick, and in many cases the recipients do not know where they came from.

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Rudeen were in town from their Sunbeam ranch Monday. Mr. Rudeen stated that the flu epidemic out his way had come to an end. Nearly all his neighbors, as well as his household, were afflicted with the disease. …

Peter A. Friesen, a resident of the Cedar Creek locality, in Bingham county, died at Bethany Deaconess Hospital last Friday of influenza. He had been an inmate of the hospital for five days. He and Mrs. Friesen and their little child all had fallen victims to the disease. When they were visited by neighbors Mr. Friesen was in a delirious state and as quickly as it was possible, the family were removed to the hospital. Attention was attracted to the Friesen home by a message over the phone from Mr. Friesen. The party to whom he phoned noted an unnatural tone of voice and queer expressions, and feared there was something wrong. A telephone call was sent to Dr. MacKinnon at Aberdeen, and word soon was received that the fears were justified. For a time the life of Mrs. Friesen was despaired of but she is now out of danger. Mr. Friesen is survived by his wife and child and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Friesen, who reside in the same locality. The family of A. A. Friesen were all down at the same time. Funeral services were held at the place of interment, the Mennonite cemetery west of Aberdeen.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

American Falls Press. November 19, 1918, Page 2

1918119AFPcartoon

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 19, 1918, Page 2

19181119TIR1
Upper Presto

The Howel boy was taken ill with influenza at Brush Creek, and was brought to Basalt for treatment.

Everything was closed yesterday and everyone took the advantage of celebrating the good news, of the war being over.

The Tolmie family report that Mrs. Hans Hansen and John Vasatkia are getting along nicely, after having the flu.

The two children of R. P. Hansen, Alta and Ammos, have the flu.
— —

19181119TIR2
Grandview

Marvin Thompson came down with the flu Monday morning.

Miss Hazel Quigley came home from the Crystal Springs ranch Monday. The family have all recovered from the flu.
— —

19181119TIR3
Sterling

Luther Satterfield and all of the family are confined to their beds with the influenza.

Mrs. Morrison is quite ill with the influenza.

The Smith and Cornforth families are victims of the “flu” at present.

The news of Germany’s downfall was joyfully, and enthusiastically received here Monday morning, and there was much cheer and as much celebrating as could be carried out on account of the “flu.” Everyone that could went to Blackfoot to join in the fun, while those at home celebrated a more sound thanksgiving. Far into the night blasts could be heard thundering and crashing off like the cannon shots fired at sunrise on Independence Day. It was indeed a happy day.

The Larkin Club meeting was indefinitely postponed on account of the influenza epidemic.

Miss Hazel Quigley returned home Sunday from the Crystal Springs ranch, where she has been for some time. She is just convalescing from a severe attack of influenza and pneumonia.

The Holmquest family are recovering nicely from their attack of the “flu.”
— —

19181119TIR4
Shelley

Shelly People Celebrate.

Everybody here was hilariously happy when news was received last Monday morning that the war was over All sort of effigies of the Kaiser were displayed, he was hanged, drug over the streets, etc. Firewater seemed to be in abundance and the majority of people who were celebrating seem to have had a taste of it. Whistles blew repeatedly here for several hours. All stores and business houses were ordered closed by the mayor. Te sugar factory closed down for the day to let its employees celebrate the most important day in all history. Cars rambled thru town all day with joy-mad occupants, yelling at the top of their voices. Extremely loud blasts were heard here all day Monday and far into the night. Many people here attended the celebrations both at Idaho Falls and Blackfoot. Last Monday could be said to be the liveliest day that Shelley has seen in years.

Many of our boys who were called by the local draft board were notified that their calls had been cancelled.

Mrs. R. B. Waller is reported ill with the flu, her condition being reported as not serious.

Two of H. L. Malcom’s girls who have the influenza are recovering nicely at the present time.

The influenza is reported to be slowly subsiding in Shelley, few people are now wearing masks as it is thot [sic] that they are of no particular advantage in avoiding the flu.

Farmers should be reminded that all stores here close at 6 o’clock for the present time.

It is not definitely known yet when the schools will be re-opened here.

So completely did some of the people here celebrate last Monday, that they have hardly gotten over their celebration yet.

Now that this great war is over, the Shelley people should receive their boys when they come with the greatest of enthusiasm and with the greatest of honor. It is reported that up to present date there has not been a Shelley boy killed in battle in France. Several of our boys have been wounded in action, but not seriously. Two Shelley boys who were wounded in the big spring drive were Joseph Patterson and Earl Schureman, the latter is reported on his way to Shelley. Two Shelley boys died of the influenza in training camps; they were Barney Johnson and Piercel Humphreys.

May all our boys who are in France come safely home.

Continue to buy War Savings Stamps for the money is needed for our boys over there.

Give with a whole heart to the Y. M. C. A. and the Red Cross.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 19, 1918, Page 3

Families Ill With Influenza Now Recovering

The influenza seems to affect certain localities more seriously than others.

In Moreland the disease was more prevalent, but the afflicted families are now out of danger and on the high road to recovery. Some of the families are the following: Brig Robinson, O. C. Johnson, Hyrum Grimmit Jr., J. H. Hall and A. J. Akers.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 19, 1918, Page 5

Influenza Ban Lifted in the State of Idaho

The influenza ban will be lifted in the state of Idaho, Sunday, Nov. 24.

On that date all public assemblages such as churches, picture shows, schools, etc. will be opened.

School will start Monday, Nov. 25.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 19, 1918, Page 7

Idaho Budget

The University of Idaho, at Moscow, celebrated the peace rumors Thursday by a military parade, in which all the members of both sections of the S. A. T. C. participated and by the firing of military salutes just outside of town.

The validity of the state and county boards of health closing order during the present influenza epidemic as against business colleges, is questioned in a suite filed by M. S. Hoover, proprietor of the Gregg Business college, Twin Falls.

While participating in the celebrations taking place over the ending of the world war, Mrs. J. O. Marquess was thrown from an automobile driven by C. Smith and instantly killed on the road between Meridian and Nampa, about four miles from Nampa.

Indiscreet peace celebrations caused raids on two stills in Latah county. One of them was in the basement of a building in the center of Moscow business district, the other in the timber between Troy and Avon. Steve Weller and Charles Thrys were arrested.

Judge J. F. Cowen of the Custer country district court telegraphed to the governor an appeal for state troops to help him force his way into Custer county, which was closed by a quarantine regulation designed to debar Spanish influenza. The attorney general held that the quarantine was legal and that court dates are not of sufficient importance to justify calling state troops to aid the judge and court attaches to enter the county.

Health conditions are not such yet as to justify and relaxing of precautions against the epidemic of Spanish influenza, and reports being circulated in some parts of the state that the order against holding of public meetings is soon to be lifted are false.

The influenza situation in Pocatello reached a point where Mayor A. B. Bear asked the citizens to subscribe to a $5000 fund to be used in caring for the numerous victims who are suffering with the disease. The money will be disbursed by the civilian relief committee.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 19, 1918, Page 8

Olive Evans Passes Away.

Miss Olive Evans died at Kellogg, Idaho, Thursday, after suffering an attack of the influenza.

Miss Evans was an employee of the Mountain States Telephone Co. here about three years ago. She was working for the same company up to the time of her death.

The remains were shipped to Moore for burial.
— —

19181119TIR5
Taber

A dozen cases of flue are reported in Taber.

Dr. Patrie was called to Taber Monday to attend Miss Mary King, who is very ill with pneumonia.

Taber people celebrated until a late hour Monday over the glad tidings of the war.

Herman Stuffins and family and the Delzer family are quite sick with the flu.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. November 19, 1918, Page 1

19181119BFH1
Ban In Idaho Will be Raised
State Board of Health Will Lift Influenza Ban on November 24
May Continue Longer Here
Local Schools Will Probably Not Open Until December 2nd

The Spanish influenza ban which has been in force and effect in Idaho since Oct. 10 for public gatherings and Oct. 21 for the public schools, will be lifted on Sunday. Nov. 24. A decision to this effect was reached by the state board of health Thursday and the order so directing was issued to all the county health officials of the state by Dr. Biwer, secretary of the board.

After reviewing the returns from the various counties on the spread of the disease as they came in Thursday the board came to the conclusion that it would be safe to set a date when the influenza ban could be lifted. This was accordingly authorized. The officials are convinced that the epidemic is on the wane and that while it is severe in some spots in a majority of the sections of the state hardest hit, the serious stage of the epidemic has been passed.

In the event the epidemic should take a sudden change for the worse and should spread, Dr. Biwer states it will become necessary to suspend the date set for lifting the ban, but he does not believe that such a situation is likely to occur.

The order of the state board of health in regard to lifting the Spanish influenza ban gives the county health officer full authority to maintain the ban in localities where in his opinion there is danger of the disease spreading. In this county the Spanish influenza epidemic has abated somewhat but is yet serious and it is a question whether or not Health Officer Dr. Fry will raise the ban and permit the schools to open on Monday, November 25th. Many members of the school board of Independent School District No. 4 do not think it advisable to try to open the schools of the city until Monday, December 2. The long, enforced vacation will mean that school will continue later this coming spring. There will be no Christmas or New Year holidays and it is probable that the teacher’s institute week will be done away with.

Following is the order of the state board of health lifting the Spanish influenza ban in the state:

“You are hereby advised that all restrictions of the state board of health for the control of the epidemic of influenza, are to be removed at 1 a. m., Sunday, November 24, insofar as is safe within your jurisdiction.

“Reports received by this office indicate that for the state as a whole, the incidence of influenza is rapidly diminishing, which explains the foregoing order.

“While sporadic cases will doubtless develop for a considerable period, and while in some isolated sections influenza may still attain epidemic proportions, we believe that the present stringent requirements may be done away with.

“You are directed, however, to use all care in handling the situation within your jurisdiction and if in the judgment of the local board of health the time Is not ripe for removal of restrictions, you are authorized to maintain them for the present.

“I wish to thank you, and through you, the public generally, for the splendid cooperation which has been given the state board of health during this abnormal situation.”

During the past week there have been many new cases of the Spanish influenza develop and there have been two deaths resulting from the disease.

In various parts of the county there are those whose condition is serious. Most of the influenza cases are convalescing nicely.

The percentage of new cases of the influenza in the county this week is considerably less than for the past four weeks.

Mrs. E. Boileau and Miss Edmire Boileau are, confined to their beds with Spanish influenza. Miss Eva Boileau, nurse at the Wallace city hospital, is expected here today to take care of the sick folks.

Miss Dollie Bruce is seriously ill with the influenza. Other members of the Bruce family who have been sick with the disease, are recovering.
— —

Virginia Worley Passes Away
Died Monday Morning of Pneumonia Following Spanish Influenza

Virginia Worley, the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D. B. Worley, residents of the Cow creek district, died Monday morning of pneumonia contracted following an attack of the Spanish influenza, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. M. McNichols. Funeral services where held at the cemetery this afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, Rev. G. H. Wilbur conducting the services. The funeral was attended by a large company of the friends of the deceased and her family and many beautiful floral tributes were banked on the grave of the deceased. …

She is survived by her father and mothers and four brothers and two sisters. She is a niece of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Worley. …
— —

19181119BFH2
War Work Campaign Moves Slowly in Boundary

According to all reports now in the hands of T. S. Kerr, secretary and treasurer of the United War Work campaign, less than $1,000 of Boundary county’s quota of $2,700 has been subscribed. About $600 has been subscribed in Bonners Ferry but not more than half the population of the town has been solicited. But few of the country districts have made reports to-date. Most of the camps of the county have been visited by Chairman Kent and his committee of solicitors and the men have, in most cases, given freely.

Most of the counties of Idaho have more than raised their quotas and they did this early last week. Some counties, like Boundary, are way behind in their subscriptions. In this county the campaign for United War Work funds has been seriously hampered on account of so many being ill with Spanish influenza. It has not been possible for the workers to solicit in many homes and half or more of the workers themselves have been sick. …
— —

Little McNichols Baby Dies
Kathleen, Three Years Old, Died This Morning of Influenza

Kathleen Marie, the three year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. McNichols, died this morning of Spanish influenza and whooping cough with which she had been sick for about a week. The funeral will be held at the cemetery tomorrow at noon and Rev. Fr. Kelly will conduct the services.

The deceased was three years and three days old. She is survived by her parents and two brothers. …

Both Mr. and Mrs. McNichols have been very sick with the influenza for several days and both their boys are sick with the disease and have the whooping cough besides. Both Mr. and Mrs. McNichols are convalescing. Mrs. G. A. Elliott, of Coeur d’Alene, a sister of Mrs. McNichols, arrived here last night and is taking care of the sick folks. She has been taking care of her son Robert, for several weeks in his sickness with influenza and pneumonia.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. November 19, 1918, Page 3

19181119BFH3
Idaho News Paragraphs
Recent Happenings in This State Given in Brief Items for Busy Readers.

There has been a new outbreak of influenza at Moscow.

Howard J. Fenton died recently at Kendrick of pneumonia following an attack of influenza.

Per Svenson, early settler, recently died at his farm home two miles south of Deary from influenza.

The funeral of Dr. Alexander Cairns, who succumbed to pneumonia, was held at Coeur d’Alene Sunday.

Judge Wallace N. Scales announces that the fall term of the district court will be postponed until Monday, December, because of the influenza epidemic.

Fred George, alias Gruber, and harry Hinton, escaped from the Idaho penitentiary at Boise Sunday morning by scaling a 20-foot wall with the aid of a 24-foot rope braided from yearn furnished the inmates by the Red Cross for knitting sweaters for soldiers. George is under a life sentence for murder, and Hinton a five to 15-year sentence for robbery. They have not been captured.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. November 19, 1918, Page 4

19181119BFH4
Local News

Pend d Oreille Review, Sandpoint, Idaho – Mrs. Cleam Gorsline and babies are at the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Whitaker, parents of Mrs. Gorsline. They came down from Porthill the first of the week, accompanied by Mrs. Whitaker who had been at Porthill nursing the Gorsline family through a siege of influenza.

S. E. Henry received a telegram on Sunday telling of the serious illness of his wife at Grafton, N. Dak., with Spanish influenza. Mrs. Henry was called to Grafton a couple of weeks ago by the serious illness of her parents. She was accompanied by her brother H. S. Swanson and he has also contracted the influenza.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. November 19, 1918, Page 5

19181119BFH5
Local Pick-ups

Mrs. F. E. Murray was called to Spokane Thursday by the serious illness of her sister.

Frank Ferraro, who has been sick for several weeks with the Spanish influenza, is back at work in his barber shop, the Pastimes.

Stookey’s Furniture Store was closed several days last week and this on account of the illness of the proprietor with Spanish influenza.

The First National Bank was doing routine business Saturday after having been partially closed up for several days on account of the officers and employees having the Spanish influenza.

Mrs. Dell Collins was arrested Sunday by Town Marshall Knight on the charge of being drunk and disorderly. The defendant plead guilty yesterday morning before Justice of the Peace King and was fined $25 and costs and was given a suspended jail sentence of 60 days.

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Gleed has been a regular Spanish influenza hospital for some time, Mr. Gleed, Miss Laiurel Gleed, Miss Ruth Lozier and Miss Kevill, all being sick with the disease at the same time. All the influenza patients are now able to be up and around again.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 19, 1918, Page 1

19181119DSM1
Idaho To Raise Quarantine Sunday Morning, Nov. 24

We can all go to church next Sunday. The announcement comes from Boise that the quarantine in this state will be raised Sunday morning. The state board of health, which declared the quarantine, makes this statement, which leaves no doubt of its authenticity. It is planned to hold regular services in all churches next Sunday at the usual hours.

Schools will open at 9 o’clock Monday morning. Every school in Latah county will be opened at that hour, unless a district develops influenza to such an extent that it is deemed unsafe. The county health officer will have authority to close the school if he deems it unwise to permit the holding of school in that district.

We can all go to the “movies” Monday night. There will probably be a rush to these on that date, for the people have been so long without this form of popular amusement that they will relish a good, clean show once more.

But we are cautioned against being careless when the quarantine is raised. The danger will not be over. Raising the quarantine does not kill germs of the disease that may be lurking, nor prevent contagion under favorable conditions. Physicians predict that we will have influenza for weeks to come and urge that the utmost care and diligence be used to prevent another outbreak of the epidemic here. They say that it is likely that persons living in the country, who have not been exposed may become exposed and contract the disease and others may have opportunity to spread it. It is urged that upon the first symptoms of the disease appearing the person afflicted retire from association with the public and that voluntary quarantine be established in every home where the disease appears. It is especially urged that children who may develop symptoms of the disease be kept out of school until it is ascertained whether they really have the influenza or merely a cold, as the early symptoms of both are quite similar.

We are prone to look upon the war as horrible and the long death list as terrible and shocking, yet we are told by the authorities that twice as many persons have died in the United States from influenza since it made its first appearance about two weeks ago, as have been killed in the American army since it began fighting Germany. This has been the worst scourge the United States has ever had and has resulted in a greater number of fatalities.
— —

19181119DSM2
All Classes At University Will Be Resumed Tomorrow

No new cases of influenza among either the S. A. T. C. men or the girls of the University of Idaho have developed. If Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, reports favorably all classes at the university will be resumed tomorrow.

Dr. E. H. Lindley, president, will require that all students living in Moscow, who have not been under quarantine at the university, will be required to bring certificates from the city or county health officer dated not earlier than today. The situation is very encouraging, but the greatest care will be used to prevent any spread of the contagion, either in the university circles or in town. The university people have asked to be permitted to co-operate with the town people in fighting the disease in town, as the town people did with them when the disease was so bad among university students.

Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, has consented to the opening of the university for all classes tomorrow, and will grant certificates to all students living in Moscow who are entitled to them. Without these certificates they will not be admitted to classes. Certificates dated prior to today will not admit them.

Dr. Adair will be in his office after 7 o’clock tonight and will examine all applicants and grant them certificates so they can enter school at the university tomorrow. He requests that all desiring certificates call this evening, if possible, as he will be waiting for them at his office tonight.

Dr. Adair says the situation in Moscow shows much improvement. Only two mild cases have been reported since last Friday and he thinks that with care and diligence the situation will soon be, under complete control.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 19, 1918, Page 3

19181112DSM2
City News

Russel Knapp has been on the sick list for a few days, but is improving.

J. W. Wilson is on the sick list with a slight attack of influenza.

Mrs. Audrey Herington, cashier of the Washington Water Power company, is ill of influenza.

Mrs. and Mrs. Chas. Rosnagle, who have been six weeks in Elk City visiting their daughter, Mrs. Otto Giles, came home today. Otto Giles is well again after an attack of influenza.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
————————

Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)

Road Reports July 12, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions can change quickly any time of year. Some high elevation roads still have snow. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Highway 95: Closed
20200710Hwy95Slide-a
(photo courtesy Mustang Towing)
US 95 in both directions: Road closed.
July 10 ITD update:
Massive boulders came down last night at the U.S. Highway 95 slide south of Riggins (milepost 188). The slope above the route remains too unstable to allow for traffic or rock removal crews in the area.
“The highway will remain closed until we are able to evaluate this new development and determine the best option to safely stabilize the slope.” Operations Engineer Jared Hopkins said.
The department had already built a temporary gravel road to detour traffic around the base of the slide, but continued significant movement on the slope closed it on July 8.
“The extensive rock fall that occurred last night confirmed that we had made the right decision to completely close that portion of US-95 to traffic,” Hopkins said.
continued:
ITD (link)
Old Pollock Road will continue to serve as a detour around the slide during daytime hours – 6 am – 8 pm PDT (7 am – 9 pm MDT). The detour will remain closed at night in order for crews to perform maintenance operations on the roadway, which typically does not see this amount of traffic.
French Creek Road is not an official, nor a recommended detour for Highway 95.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are dry and dusty except where people paid for dust abatement. Deer, dogs and kids are wandering around. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN. Report that a dog was hit injured on Main street in June.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: No problems reported.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Closed 7am to 4pm daily with no closures on weekends.
The closure sites will change on a weekly basis, and will not always be adjacent to the last closure site. Refer to the current weekly newsletter or the project website to determine the closure point and access for each week. South Fork Road Project page (link)
The closure [this] week will be at mile post 19 just north of the Reed Ranch airstrip.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Saturday (July 4) mail truck driver reports the road is getting rough in some spots.

Johnson Creek Road: Open.
Wednesday (July 8) mail truck driver (Kaleb) reports the road is pretty rough. He said a grader was starting to work on the upper end.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened by the county June 24th. Last reported to be really rough on the McCall side. May have been graded since then.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open and rough.
Summit was reported snow free on Sunday June 28.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Semi-open to the adventurous ATV riders. Travel at your own risk.
Report June 26: “Lots of rocks and trees. One little patch of snow 20 ft long. But otherwise Thunder Mountain is open for 4×4 vehicles … we cut over 30 trees. The other guy with me didn’t cut them full width for a car, just for his ATV. So any trees I didn’t cut will need to be trimmed to get full size vehicles through.” – SA

photo and report courtesy SA
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Cinnabar: Report received July 11: “UTV group made it into Cinnabar [via the upper road] about two days ago. Lots of snow drifts. Rough going. But they cut the trees out of the road.” -SA

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to vehicles.
Report July 3rd: “Goldman’s Cut is passable for highly motivated motorcycles… but it’s still going to be a good week or two before regular traffic can make it.” SA

Smith Creek Trees down from Avalanche

Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warrens Wagon Road: Construction update: The road is CLOSED from 8am-Noon and 1pm-5pm Monday-Friday. The road is OPEN with a PILOT CAR from Noon-1pm and after 5pm Monday-Friday. The road is OPEN without a pilot car on Saturday and Sunday.
Update June 4: be aware that the Long Gulch Culvert Installation Project along Warren Wagon Road from Chinook Campground to Steamboat Summit will begin on June 15 and end in mid-July. The project involves the installation of numerous cross drain culverts. Delays of under 1 hour can be expected. This area of Warren Wagon is between Secesh Meadows and Warren.

Deadwood Summit: Open, travel with caution.
Scott Mountain is also open.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
——————————-

Weather Reports July 5-11, 2020

July 5 Weather:

At 9am it ws 54 degrees, clear and light breeze. Clouds coming in at noon. At 430pm it was 81 degrees, partly cloudy and light breezes. At 615pm it was 79 degrees, mostly clear and breezy. At 9pm it was 64 degrees, clear sky and almost calm. At 11pm it looked clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 06, 2020 at 09:00AM
Clear, light breeze
Max temperature 82 degrees F
Min temperature 41 degrees F
At observation 53 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

July 6 Weather:

At 9am it was 53 degrees, clear sky and light breeze. Clouds coming in by noon. At 230pm it was 82 degrees, partly cloudy and gusty breezes. At 6pm it was 84 degrees, mostly clear and a bit breezy. At 8pm it was 75 degrees, mostly clear and slight breeze. At 9pm it was 65 degrees and mostly clear. Wind gusts at midnight.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 07, 2020 at 09:00AM
Mostly cloudy, light breeze, a few drops of rain
Max temperature 87 degrees F
Min temperature 44 degrees F
At observation 56 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

July 7 Weather:

At 9am it was 56 degrees, mostly cloudy, light breezes and a few drops of rain for a few minutes. At 1pm it was 76 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breezes. At 230pm it was 75 degrees mostly cloudy to partly clear and breezy. At 6pm it was 74 degrees, partly cloudy/clear and light breezes. At 9pm it was 62 degrees and mostly clear. Looked clear at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 08, 2020 at 09:00AM
Mostly clear, light breeze
Max temperature 78 degrees F
Min temperature 39 degrees F
At observation 51 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

July 8 Weather:

At 9am it was 51 degrees, mostly clear and light breeze. At 1230pm it was 69 degrees, mostly clear and light breeze. At 3pm it was 79 degrees, mostly clear and light breeze. At 615p it was 77 degrees, light breeze and mostly clear. At 9pm it was 60 degrees and clear sky. Clear and lots of stars at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 09, 2020 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 79 degrees F
Min temperature 39 degrees F
At observation 52 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

July 9 Weather:

At 9am it was 52 degrees and clear. At 130pm it was 79 degrees, mostly clear and breezy. At 3pm it was 82 degrees, mostly clear and lighter breezes. At 6pm it was 82 degrees, partly cloudy and breezy. At 9pm it was 66 degrees, clear and almost calm. Clear and lots of stars at 11pm. Thunderstorm, rain and wind early morning, possibly around 3am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 10, 2020 at 09:00AM
Almost clear, light breeze
Max temperature 84 degrees F
Min temperature 48 degrees F
At observation 59 degrees F
Precipitation 0.02 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

July 10 Weather:

At 9am it was 59 degrees, almost clear sky and light breeze. A few clouds and a little breezy at lunch time. At 3pm it was 81 degrees, mostly clear and light breezes. At 6pm it was 80 degrees, clear and slight breeze. At 9pm it was 64 degrees and clear. Looked clear at 11pm, lots of stars.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 11, 2020 at 09:00AM
Clear, light breeze
Max temperature 82 degrees F
Min temperature 40 degrees F
At observation 55 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

July 11 Weather:

At 9am it was 55 degrees, clear sky and light breeze. A few clouds coming in by 1pm and getting quite breezy by 2pm. At 230pm it was 87 degrees, mostly clear (a few small clouds) and gusty breezes. At 6pm it was 89 degrees, clear but for 1 small cloud and light breezes. At 725pm it was 85 degrees, clear and breezy. At 9pm it was 69 degrees, clear and almost calm. Hazy moon-rise at 1115pm, mostly clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 12, 2020 at 09:00AM
Clear, light breeze
Max temperature 91 degrees F
Min temperature 45 degrees F
At observation 59 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
—————————-

Pear and Dried-Cherry Crisp with Nutmeg-Walnut Streusel


Bon Appétit Test Kitchen
Makes 12 servings

Ingredients

Streusel

1 1/4 cups all purpose flour
3/4 cup sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons ground nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, cut into 12 pieces, room temperature
1 1/2 cups coarsely chopped walnuts

Filling

1/2 cup sugar
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
1/4 cup orange juice
2 teaspoons finely grated orange peel
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups dried tart cherries (9 ounces)
4 1/2 pounds ripe Bosc pears, peeled, cored, cut into 1-inch cubes (about 8 cups)
Lightly sweetened whipped cream or vanilla ice cream

Preparation

For streusel:

Whisk first 4 ingredients in medium bowl. Add butter; rub in with fingertips until mixture begins to clump together. Mix in walnuts. DO AHEAD Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover; chill.

For filling:

Place first 6 ingredients in medium skillet. Stir over medium-high heat until sugar dissolves and mixture comes to boil. Add cherries; reduce heat to medium and simmer until cherries begin to soften and liquid is slightly reduced, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and cool.

Preheat oven to 375F. Generously butter 13x9x2-inch glass baking dish. Toss pears and dried cherry mixture in large bowl; spread in baking dish. Sprinkle streusel mixture over. Bake until bubbling and golden, about 1 hour; cool. Serve warm or at room temperature with whipped cream or ice cream.
———————–

Sugar Snap Pea Salad


4 servings

Ingredients

3/4 cup buttermilk
3 Tbsp. plain whole-milk Greek yogurt
2 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice
1 small garlic clove, finely grated
A large pinch of kosher salt
8 oz. sugar snap peas, strings removed, thinly sliced
2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, plus more
1 tsp. finely grated lemon zest, plus more
Flaky sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper

Preparation

Whisk buttermilk, yogurt, lemon juice, garlic, and a large pinch of salt in a medium bowl.

Toss sugar snap peas, 2 Tbsp. oil, and 1 tsp. lemon zest in another medium bowl; season with salt and pepper.

Pour dressing into a shallow bowl and pile sugar snap peas in the center. Drizzle with more oil, season with more pepper, and top with more lemon zest.

– Bon Appetit
————————

Salmon and Asparagus Quiche


(makes 4 servings)

Ingredients:

1 refrigerated pie crust (e.g. Pillsbury)
8 ounces fresh cooked salmon or smoked salmon, cut into chunks
12-15 asparagus spears, trimmed and cut into 1 1/2-inch slices
4 eggs
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup Parmesan cheese, grated
1 teaspoon minced thyme
1 teaspoon minced dill
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

To cook the asparagus, steam it on the stove (using a steamer basket over a pot filled with an inch of water, or putting it directly in the pot, covered for 3-4 minutes until tender) or in the microwave (wrap a few bunches in damp paper towels and microwave for 3-4 minutes, until tender).

Line a 9-inch pie pan with the crust, trimming any excess and crimping the edges around the pan. Poke several holes in the bottom with a fork, and let it pre-bake for 3-5 minutes.

While the crust is baking, whisk together the eggs, cream, cheese, salt, pepper, and the herbs.

Take the crust out of the oven and fill it with the salmon and asparagus. Then, pour the egg mixture over the top.

Put the pie pan onto a baking sheet, and then place it in the oven. Bake for 20-25 minutes, or until set (poke with a knife and make sure it comes out clean). Let it rest for 5 minutes before serving.
————————

Updated Road Reports July 8, 2020

Note: Highway 95 is Closed
Please share road reports. Conditions can change quickly any time of year. Some high elevation roads still have snow. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Highway 95: US 95 in both directions: Road Closed.
Updated Today (7/8) at 1:15 PM MDT by ITD
Between Ranny Road and Pollock Road (3 to 7 miles south of the Riggins area). The road is closed. There’s been a rock fall. Truck restrictions are in force. Truck speed limit 25 MPH.
Comment: US 95 is currently closed from milepost 186 to milepost 190, which is approximately 2.5 miles north of Pollock to 1.5 miles south of Pollock. There are no local road detours at this time.   For additional information please refer to (link)

Yellow Pine: Local streets are bare and dusty, except where people paid for dust abatement. Deer, dogs and kids are wandering around. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN. Report that a dog was hit and mildly injured on Main street in June.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: No problems reported.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Closed 7am to 4pm daily with no closures on weekends.
The closure sites will change on a weekly basis, and will not always be adjacent to the last closure site. Refer to the current weekly newsletter or the project website to determine the closure point and access for each week. South Fork Road Project page (link)
The closure [this] week will be at mile post 19 just north of the Reed Ranch airstrip.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Saturday (July 4) mail truck driver reports the road is getting rough in some spots.

Johnson Creek Road: Open.
Wednesday (July 8) mail truck driver (Kaleb) reports the road is pretty rough. He said a grader was starting to work on the upper end.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened by the county June 24th. Last reported to be really rough on the McCall side. May have been graded since then.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open and rough.
Summit was reported snow free on Sunday June 28.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Semi-open to the adventurous ATV riders. Travel at your own risk.
Report June 26: “Lots of rocks and trees. One little patch of snow 20 ft long. But otherwise Thunder Mountain is open for 4×4 vehicles … we cut over 30 trees. The other guy with me didn’t cut them full width for a car, just for his ATV. So any trees I didn’t cut will need to be trimmed to get full size vehicles through.” – SA

photo and report courtesy SA
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Report July 3rd: “Goldman’s Cut is passable for highly motivated motorcycles… but it’s still going to be a good week or two before regular traffic can make it.” SA

Smith Creek Trees down from Avalanche

Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warrens Wagon Road: Construction update: The road is CLOSED from 8am-Noon and 1pm-5pm Monday-Friday. The road is OPEN with a PILOT CAR from Noon-1pm and after 5pm Monday-Friday. The road is OPEN without a pilot car on Saturday and Sunday.
Update June 4: be aware that the Long Gulch Culvert Installation Project along Warren Wagon Road from Chinook Campground to Steamboat Summit will begin on June 15 and end in mid-July. The project involves the installation of numerous cross drain culverts. Delays of under 1 hour can be expected. This area of Warren Wagon is between Secesh Meadows and Warren.

Deadwood Summit: Open, travel with caution.
Scott Mountain is also open.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
——————————-

July 5, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

July 5, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order until further notice.
The 2020 Harmonica Festival has been canceled.

Community Calendar:

The Corner is Open w/reservations
Yellow Pine Tavern is open for outside dining.
The General Store is open Tues-Sat
Yellow Pine Lodge Open
Murph’s RV park open (no cabins or showers)
April 17 – Boil water order issued
May 15 – Firewood Season starts
June 16 – Hard closure of South Fork Road (weekdays)
Community Hall Yard Sale ongoing
July 2 & 5 – Richter estate sale
July 5 – Annual YPWUA meeting 2pm Community Hall
2020 Harmonica Festival Canceled
(details below)
———-

From Valley County

We need Your Help to protect the place and the people we all Love.
link:
— —

Valley County Covid-19 Response Page
link:
— —

Valley County Emergency Operations Center
link:
— —

Rebound – Idaho Governor’s phasing program
link:
— —

COVID 19: Recommendations and Resources for Safe Business Practices
link: (lots of info for businesses)
——————-

Local Events:

Community Yard Sale

The community yard sale is now open in the community hall. Feel free to bring more items if you have them. Shop early and often. Pay Deb, Lynn or Ronda.
— — — —

Richter Estate Sale

Nancy is planning to have an estate sale from 11am to 2pm on the 2nd and the 5th of July. The address is 980 Boulder Creek Rd.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Water Users Association

Meeting July 5 at 2pm in the Community Hall. See agenda below under YPWUA News.
— — — —

2020 Festival is Cancelled

We have come to the decision that the 2020 Festival will be cancelled. We look forward to celebrating the 32nd year of the Festival August 5, 6, & 7, 2021.

Our decision was not made lightly. We had to consider the current situation we are in and examine the outlook for the coming months. This is the necessary and right decision for the safety of our community and all participants.

We all look forward to one big reunion with all of you in August 2021.
– DF
———-

Village News:

The Twins

She comes around 9pm nightly. We just started seeing the twins with her over the last few days.

20200629TwinFawns-a
courtesy JF
— — — —

Please Return Borrowed Measuring Wheel

Would the person who borrowed the Village’s measuring wheel please return it to the Community Hall or one of the Council members? Thank you
— — — —

4th of July Golf

The Golf Gathering started at 11am, Saturday, July 4th at the Yellow Pine Country Club. Donations to benefit the Community Hall. At press time a report that $600 in donations have come in.
— — — —

4th of July Parade

The parade started at 4pm at the Fire Hall and proceeded north up Yellow Pine Ave. (main street.) The town bell led the way followed by various ATVs, UTVs and SUVs, Valley County Deputies, 3 horses and a mule.

20200704Parade1-a

20200704Parade2-a

Grand Marshals the newlyweds Joe & Denise Ross from Keuterville, ID; Miss Yellow Pine Christy Petersen. Corey Phillips was ringing the town bell.

The basket raffle raised $327 for the village.

YP Tavern FB photo gallery link:
— — — —

Village of Yellow Pine Association Minutes June 13, 2020

Called to order at 2:02.
Officers present: Deb Filler, Chr.; Ronda Rogers, Vice Chr.; Rhonda Egbert, Acting Treas.; Lynn Imel, Sec.
Absent: Ron Noel, Mem. At Large.
Residents: 11, Guests: 2

Temporary Acting Treasurer: Due to the resignation of elected Treasurer, Lorraine McIntosh, the YPVA officers met January 22, 2020 and voted to have Rhonda Egbert serve as Acting Treasurer until elections at the July, 2020 meeting.

Approval of Minutes: There being no objections the Minutes of the September 21, 2019 meeting were approved as posted.

Treasurer’s Report: Rhonda Egbert provided written copies of the financial status. Report was approved. (see attached)

Community Hall: Ronda Rogers reported that the propane heater has been installed, a larger propane tank has been installed to serve the kitchen and the heater, work has been done to improve the kitchen floor, ceiling panels are being replaced to mitigate mold damage.

Composting Toilets: Willie Sullivan reported that no action has occurred on this project since the last report. Volunteers will be used for construction. A concrete floor will be installed, hopefully this summer. Cecil Dallman should be consulted soon if backhoe work is needed.

Cemetery: Carey Belsher reported the kiosk with information identifying grave locations was donated by Linda Welch and was vandalized years ago. Willie Sullivan, previous Cemetery Commissioner, removed it to make repairs. The present Cemetery committee is planning to make the repairs and suggested that it be re-located into Yellow Pine to prevent vandalism. Discussion of that proposal indicated that it should be repaired and placed at the previous location outside the cemetery gate. Candy Sullivan offered to contact Linda Welch and convey her comments to the committee.

Music & Harmonica Festival: Dawn Brown reported that at the open Committee meeting June 27th at the Community Hall, 2:00, all comments will be considered in making a decision regarding possible cancellation of the Festival. No vendors have cancelled. Idaho has begun Phase 4. The Committee has consulted with Valley County Sheriff and the National Forests as part of the planning. Jeff and Anne Forster, speaking as emergency response personnel for Yellow Pine area, conveyed their concern that they should be included in the Festival planning. They have consulted with Valley County authorities regarding Covid 19 impact by Forest/Yellow Pine visitors and plans for the Valley Co. Fair & Rodeo. The County has limited ambulances for Covid 19 transport and the local ambulance does not qualify for that use. The consensus of the membership present and the Committee is that people will come to Yellow Pine even if the event is cancelled; in that situation the Festival committee should advertise the closure and not provide a stage, electricity, or encourage the crowd to gather in Yellow Pine. Bill McIntosh is prepared to advertise a cancellation.

Election YPVA Treasurer, Secretary, Vice Chairman: Deb Filler explained that the Treasurer position is presently filled by an Acting Treasurer and the elected Treasurer will complete the term ending in one year. Rhonda Egbert expressed her opinion that that person should be available in Yellow Pine all year. Candidates should contact Rhonda Egbert, 208-633-1976 Iamcreative@hotmail.com . Nominations may also be made from the floor at the July 11th meeting. Members must be present to vote.

Proposed By-Laws Changes – First Reading: All proposed changes to the By-Laws submitted by the review committee were read aloud and discussed. See the copies posted on bulletin boards and websites or request a copy from the Council. Items of most concern included: 2.1.d use of Robert’s Rules of Order and use of a parliamentarian to insure order; 7.7 Selection of representatives to serve on Stibnite Advisory Board and Stibnite Foundation. Motion was made and approved that those representatives will be elected annually by the membership at the September meeting.

Dust Abatement: Dust abatement on local roads will take place June 22. Contact Deb Filler.

Community Agreement/Midas Gold Payment: Comments regarding the use of the $10,000 donation included: (1) Valley County Road Supervisor, Jeff McFadden, recently visited and assessed the roads within the Yellow Pine Township. Valley County property tax money is not used for road, ditch and alley maintenance. Valley County has ownership of all roads and alleys within the Township. All work on those roads, ditches and alleys must be pre-approved by the Valley County Road Dept.

(2) The Yellow Pine Water User’s Assoc. is applying for grants to cover the expenses for repairs to the water facilities.

(3) The committee that negotiated the Community Agreement with Midas Gold prioritized uses for the $30,000 donation. Those uses were the YP Water Users, the helicopter landing area, and the YP roads and ditches located on public property. Motion was made and approved that the 2020 grant of $10,000 be used for infrastructure maintenance of public access roads, alleys and ditches. That work will be organized by the Infrastructure Standing Committee headed by Clayton Egbert and Tim Rogers.

Yellow Pine Water Users: Willie Sullivan reported that recent earthquake activity has impacted the facilities and lines. The engineering firm has been replaced by Mountain Water Engineering and they are studying the conditions so grant applications can be written. Present water use is about 30,000 gal. per day and it should be approximately 5,000 per day. No timeline has been established for grant writing; a notice of intent to apply for grants has been filed. Water users can make arrangements for monthly payments. Each property in the Yellow Pine area is allowed one, $100, share which entitles the owner to one vote at meetings. Presently 55 shares are owned. Contact Willie Sullivan prior to the July YPWUA meeting to discuss payments and purchase of a share.

Stibnite Advisory Council: Lynn Imel reported that the representatives of the eight Valley County towns have met monthly to discuss potential impacts that could develop with the opening of Stibnite mine by Midas Gold. Water quality, hospital, school, traffic, housing, and employment are some of the topics addressed. Meetings are now moved to bi-monthly, second Thursdays, with Zoom access.

Stibnite Foundation: Ronda Rogers reported that the eight community representatives are reviewing the grant applications received and will be announcing the grants in August. The Foundation gave each community a donation to assist with food purchase for residents. In Yellow Pine, there being no agency for food distribution, each winter resident was given a one-hundred dollar gift card for use at a grocery store.

Midas Gold: Kyle Fend, Midas employee, answered questions regarding the Stibnite road and the status of the mine operation plans. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) results are expected in August and that will open a period of time for public comment. Midas currently rents three houses in the community for their employees and contractors and they are complying with all Covid 19 prevention plans.

Museum: Rhonda Egbert reported that the Yellow Pine Backcountry Museum has forms for each donor to complete if that have loaned or donated artifacts. The old fire truck, owned by the YPVA has been purchased by the Museum for $37.40. The plan is to repair the tires and move it to the Museum area. A volunteer is needed to cut wood plaques to be awarded to Festival winners. Festival promotion face masks are available at local businesses, $5. Supplies are needed for silent-auction baskets, particularly wine which enhances the sales.

Yard Sale Donations for the July 4th yard sale can be placed in the Community Hall.

Adjournment: 4:00
— — — —

From the YPFD Fire Commissioners;

On June 27, 2020, the Yellow Pine Fire District (YPFD) – Fire Commissioner’s meeting took place. Minutes will be forthcoming. Jeff Forster, Volunteer Fire Chief and Paramedic resigned as Volunteer Fire Chief from YPFD. His resignation was accepted by the Commissioners. Jeff plans to finally enjoy his retirement here in Yellow Pine. The YPFD will be in a restructuring period and will have limited, if any, availability or response during this time.

The Commissioners will be putting out an announcement for the Volunteer Fire Chief position along with requirements soon. Anyone interested in this position or in becoming a volunteer can request an application from one of your YPFD Fire Commissioners.

Sue Holloway District 1
Dan Stiff, District 2
Merrill Saleen, District 3
Secretary/Treasurer Nikki Saleen

Jeff’s resignation includes a resignation as Paramedic from Cascade Fire/EMS. Therefore, the Cascade Fire/EMS ambulance stationed in Yellow Pine will be out of service indefinitely. The EMS providers in Yellow Pine affiliated with this service are also resigning their positions. Yellow Pine will continue to be covered, in case of emergencies, through Cascade Rural Fire/EMS with the ambulance stationed in Cascade. Should you have an emergency or need medical assistance, please dial 911.
— — — —

2020 Census

The 2020 Census Impacts All Valley County Residents

Inching closer. Each of our communities and Valley County as a whole have increased our response rate by a few percentage points over the last few weeks – but we still have a lot of room to grow! We are still ranked #42 of 44 counties in Idaho for our Census response rate. Let’s get that number up! Responding to the Census takes less than 10 minutes and mean $1,483 per person in federal funding for Valley County.

It is recommended that we all fill out the census online.

If you spend 50% of your time in Valley County, you can consider it your home per the Census. Where you register with the Census is confidential and never linked to other governmental requirements such as property taxes or mailing address. The deadline for the 2020 Census has been extended until October 31st. They will probably not be sending census takers up to Yellow Pine.

Link: to online census

You do not need an ID number. Go to the link. Click on “start questionnaire”. Then on the next page scroll down to “If you do not have a Census ID, click here” – when you click on that line it will start the census. (see below)

2020Census-a
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Boil Water Order issued

Update June 12: The boil order is still on. We still are experiencing excessive water use because of leaks. Not sure when this will be lifted. We are applying for grants to repair the system.

Update June 2: The water plant is experiencing high water in Boulder Creek which brings more debris into the sand filter.

The high demand caused by leaks in the system plugs the sand filters prematurely. We will be on a boil order until further notice.

As of April 17th 2020, Yellow Pine is under another “Boil Order”

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance. .

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020
— — — —

Critters

Tick’s are still very plentiful in early July.

Bears are out of hibernation, protect your trash and pet food.

Watch out for aggressive mother does and cows, they will stomp your dogs – and you too.
— — — —

Road News

Highway 55 was closed for several hours Friday due to a wreck, and closed again this (Sunday) afternoon by Banks for another wreck. Flaggers at the Banks/Lowman intersection.

Highway 95 rockslide, closed near Riggins. Pollock Road is closed. Do not use French Creek road for a detour, Saturday reports of 10 vehicles off the road. (See news under Public Lands.)

South Fork: Hard closure will begin on Tuesday, June 16; 7am to 4pm daily with no closures on weekends.
Access to Yellow Pine during closure hours will only be via Johnson Creek. With the delay of the opening of Lick Creek Road, the contractor needs to start work that requires closures in order to keep his crews working.
The closure sites will change on a weekly basis, and will not always be adjacent to the last closure site. Refer to the current weekly newsletter or the project website to determine the closure point and access for each week. Road project link:

Lick Creek is open, the county bladed the last of the snow drifts and pushed downed trees off the road June 24th. Grading started on the lower end on the McCall side. Reported to be very rough over there.

Profile Report June 28: “Big Creek Road is snow-free over Profile Summit. ” – SA

Monumental Report Semi-open to the adventurous ATV riders. Travel at your own risk.
June 26: “Lots of rocks and trees. One little patch of snow 20 ft long. But otherwise Thunder Mountain is open for 4×4 vehicles … we cut over 30 trees. The other guy with me didn’t cut them full width for a car, just for his ATV. So any trees I didn’t cut will need to be trimmed to get full size vehicles through.” – SA

June 26, 2020

Elk Summit Report July 3rd: “Goldman’s Cut is passable for highly motivated motorcycles… but it’s still going to be a good week or two before regular traffic can make it.” SA

Trees down from Avalanche Smith Creek

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Forest Info

All campgrounds and restroom facilities in the South Fork Corridor, Lick Creek/Secesh Corridor and along the East Fork South Fork Salmon River are open. -Krassel RD
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report June 6 – with community support more repairs have been made to the doors, and cement has been poured to stop the bear from digging under the building. A brave volunteer also climbed up on the roof and secured the loose roofing. The burn pile has been sorted as people have been dumping inappropriate items.

Report June 1 – the bins have been emptied. South doors are a bit stiff. The road from YP to the dump is really good.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

July 5th 2020 meeting at the Community Hall 2pm

Agenda

1. Financial Report Willie
A. Current Balance
B. Delinquent Accounts

2. Operations Warren
A. Current Boil Order
B. Current condition of system
– Leaks
– Earthquake Damage

3. Grants Steve and Willie
A. Current awarded grant status
B. Discontinued use of SPF Engineering
C. New Engineering Company Mountain Water Works
D. By-law update terms of office, agent

4. Final Issues
A. Future rate increases
B. Summer lawn watering
C. Election of Board Members: Steve Holloway and Willie Sullivan positions

New Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020. This could last until runoff is over.

Notice of Intent to File an Application with USDA, Rural Development

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an Application with USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG). Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG).

If any additional information is needed, please contact:
Willie Sullivan
Treasurer
ypwater@gmail.com

Distributed to Yellow Pine Water Users Association customers via Yellow Pine Times on June 12, 2020.

The last Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

Last Village Meeting was June 13th, next meeting July 11th

Minutes from June 13, 2020 VYPA meeting
link: 20200613 VYPA Minutes.pdf

2020 Festival Meeting May 16, 2020 Notes
Note: at each meeting we simply add to info on the topic. That way, info from all meetings is included in a single document.
link: 2020 Festival Planning Notes.pdf

July 1 – Post Harmonica Meeting was 2pm Community Hall

Heat was installed in the community hall on April 30th.

If folks have items for the community yard sale, please place them by the north wall in the community hall. If you see items you would like to purchase, you can pay Deb, Ronda, or Lynn. All funds support the community hall.

VYPA meetings for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.
— — — —

YPFD News:

There was a YP Fire Commissioner meeting on June 27, 2020 at 10am at the Fire Station, minutes forthcoming.

YPFD COVID19 Policy

link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP.docx

link: Covid-19 EMS.pdf (May 23)

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Bring It, Don’t Burn It”, you can take your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
(TBA) – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Open 11am-8pm Closed Tuesdays
Calling ahead works best but not a huge deal. Groceries, Ice Cream, Beer and Soda. Our menu fluctuates but typically have Smoked Brisket, Tri Tip, Chicken, Burgers and Wings on hand.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Open Daily 8am to 10pm. Outside Dining and Bar. Breakfast and Bar Food.

— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open.
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300

The store is open now and will be open into October. Hours are 9 am to 6 pm Tuesday through Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday.
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Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins (208) 633-6677

Cabins are not available in 2020. RV Spaces $25/night; $150/week; $300/month. Tent spaces $10/night. Shower house is closed for 2020.
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Telehealth

Cascade Medical Center is set up for Telehealth.

If you want to schedule an appointment, call our clinic at 208-382-4285. Vicki or one of the MAs will ask you some questions to make sure that a tele-video visit is the right choice given your symptoms or need. If so, we will work with you to make sure you are set up on the Cascade Medical Center patient portal (with our EMR). We will also make sure that you are set up to be able to do a tele-video visit (laptop with camera, desktop with camera, or smart phone). We use the Zoom telemedicine system, which is confidential and secure (it works like Skype or Face-time). Before the appointment, we will email you a link for the tele-video visit. When it is time for your appointment, you will click on the link in the email and you will be connected with our provider and can begin your visit.

Regarding insurance coverage, the COVID legislation passed in March assures coverage of telemedicine visits for patients with Medicare, Medicaid, VA. Private insurers have also decided to provide coverage just as for regular in person visits, at least until the COVID epidemic crisis is declared over.

June 3rd Blue Cross extended telehealth services and reimbursement through the end of the year.

Tom Reinhardt, CEO
Cascade Medical Center


———————-

Local Observations:

Monday (June 29) overnight low of 41 degrees, low overcast and light rain since early morning. No swallows flying in the rain, a few robins calling. Still raining at lunch time. A few finches visited. Break in the rain early afternoon for an hour or so, then another shower mid afternoon, high of 53 degrees. More rain late afternoon, low clouds and cool temperatures. A break in the rain early evening and a few sucker holes letting in a spot of sunshine. Cassin’s finches visiting. 1st Swallow egg hatched today. Male rufus hummingbird hanging around. Dark clouds just before dusk and robins singing. Stars out before midnight. Rain during the night and early morning.

Tuesday (June 30) overnight low of 40 degrees, overcast with fog belts mid-mountain, 24 hour rain total = 0.38″. Finches and a few swallows singing, flicker calling. Small breaks in the clouds at lunch time, then short little rain shower early afternoon. Breezy, a tiny shower then partly cloudy mid-afternoon, high of 65 degrees. Female hairy woodpecker and finches visiting. Mostly cloudy and breezy mid-evening. Calmer and mostly cloudy before dusk. Local doe wandered by before dark, a few swallows hunting bugs and robins singing. A few stars out before midnight.

Wednesday (July 1) overnight low of 42 degrees and mostly cloudy this morning, 24 hour rain total = trace. Not many swallows flying this morning, a few finches and a pine squirrel visiting. Getting windy before lunch time and mostly cloudy. Mail truck made it in on time. Blustery early afternoon. Partly cloudy and gusty cool breezes mid-afternoon, high of 69 degrees. Partly clear to mostly cloudy mid-evening and light cool breezes. It was partly cloudy before dusk, a lone robin calling. Bright moon and partly cloudy before midnight.

Thursday (July 2) overnight low of 35 degrees, mostly clear and light breeze this morning. A couple of airplanes buzzed over and some street traffic this morning. Male swallows are back and taking feathers to nests. Wind gusting up before lunch time. Blustery and mostly clear mid-afternoon, high of 75 degrees. Almost clear and lighter breezes by early evening. Clear sky and cooling off quickly before dusk. Local population has increased steadily today. Bright almost full moon and clear sky before midnight.

Friday (July 3) overnight low of 37 degrees, mostly high very thin haze in the sky this morning. A few loud airplanes and some street traffic. Tree swallows swooping, a few finches and evening grosbeaks calling. Poofy clouds, light breeze and warm at lunch time. Increasing traffic. Gusty breezes early afternoon. Some big clouds and gusty mid-afternoon, high of 86 degrees. Partly cloudy and gusty breezes mid-evening. Barrage of gunfire started at 826pm, quiet at 845pm. Cooling off under clear skies before dusk. Appeared clear before midnight.

Saturday (July 4) overnight low of 41 degrees, wispy clouds covered most of the sky this morning. Several loud airplanes buzzed over early and street traffic. A few swallows and a robin calling. A few finches visiting before lunch time. Golfer out in the forest. Mostly cloudy and breezy early afternoon. Parade at 4pm. Mostly cloudy, warm and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 82 degrees. Holiday weekend traffic is a bit down from normal. Partly cloudy and milder breezes mid-evening. Firecrackers (gunfire?) at 935pm, bottle rockets started around 1005pm, followed by large mortars. Quiet at 1115pm, clear sky but poor air quality. Clear and ruddy full moon after midnight.

Sunday (July 5) overnight low of 42 degrees, clear sky and light breeze this morning. Swallows catching bugs, finches and a couple of pine siskins visiting. A few noisy morning airplanes. Clouds coming in at lunch time. Partly cloudy, warm and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 82 degrees. Mostly clear, warm and breezy mid-evening.
———————

Idaho News:

Yellow Pine music festival canceled due to COVID-19 worries

The Star-News July 2, 2020

The 2020 Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival scheduled for Aug. 5-7 has been canceled due to worries over the COVID-19 virus.

“We had to consider the current situation we are in and examine the outlook for the coming months,” said Deb Filler of the organizing committee. “This is the necessary and right decision for the safety of our community and all participants.”

The backcountry hamlet of Yellow Pine east of McCall has hosted the festival for the last 30 years.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Hwy 55 Closed July 5th South of Banks due to a wreck.

ITD link:
— —

Highway 55 near Smiths Ferry reopens after tractor-trailer crashed into Payette River

The crash is “a tricky one for two crews” to clear, as the truck and trailer are partially in the river.

July 4, 2020 KTVB


Credit: Idaho State Police

Smiths Ferry, Idaho — Update 6:16 p.m. July 4: Both lanes of the highway have reopened. The original story follows:

Idaho State Police are responding to a tractor-trailer after it crashed into the Payette River, causing Highway 55 north of Smiths Ferry to close down.

ISP says truck crashed into the river just before 8 a.m. and the crash sent two people – the truck driver and the passenger – to the hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. They were transported by air ambulance due to the remoteness of the area.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Highway 95 near Riggins will not reopen Sunday after 120-foot rock slide

ITD announced on Sunday that Highway 95 will remain closed due to a visible crack in the roadway.

Misty Inglet, KTVB July 5, 2020


Idaho Department of Transportation

Riggins, Idaho — Update for 10 a.m. July 5: ITD announced that Highway 95 will not be opening Sunday due to concerns regarding the slide. Crews left the site on Saturday around 4:30 p.m. when a crack became visible in the roadway.

Anyone planning to travel US-95 near Riggins this weekend will have to find an alternate route.

The road is currently blocked in both directions from Milepost 186 near Pollock to MP 189 near Riggins. The Idaho Transportation Department is unsure when the road will be able to reopen.

continued:

Note: there is a video of the slide coming down posted to FB (link)
— —

Pollock Road Closure

From Idaho County Sheriff

Pollock road is not suitable to be used as a detour for hwy 95 traffic.

Pollock Road has been closed for years and is not suitable for travel. There are barricades and signs up advising of this.

Anyone caught driving on Pollock Road will be charged with failure to obey traffic control device and inattentive driving.

FB link:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County dispatch adds GPS locator for cellphones

System will help find those who cannot tell location

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 2, 2020

Valley County Dispatch has a new tool to help locate 911 callers that are lost, incapacitated or otherwise don’t know their location.

Valley County recently added a GPS program called RapidSOS that uses technology already built into smartphones to pinpoint the location of someone calling or texting 911.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

McCall warns of COVID-19 community spread: ‘Cases have more than tripled in two weeks’

by Deni Hawkins Wednesday, July 1st 2020

McCall, Idaho (CBS2) — If you look at the coronavirus data for Valley County, Idaho, it would be easy to assume that the virus was essentially non-existent there. But the city of McCall is warning that the virus has in fact reached the small tourist community often labeled as a ‘safe haven.’

In fact, a city spokeswoman says cases have more than tripled there in the last two weeks.

Community spread was confirmed in Valley County back on June 25, but health officials have since confirmed that case totals there are not accurately represented, largely because of the city’s tourist nature.

continued:

Note: This weekend they show 17 confirmed cases in Valley County residents.
— — —

McCall issues mandatory mask order with $100 fine for excessive violators

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, July 1st 2020


McCall Town Sign. (CBS2 News Staff)

McCall City Council passed an order Wednesday requiring masks be worn in public starting at midnight.

During the meeting, McCall’s chief of police suggested adding a $100 fine so his officers could first educate and then enforce if necessary.

“We are told to assume that everyone has the virus and to protect ourselves accordingly, said Mayor Bob Giles, “and we are advised by leading medical professionals that in addition to proper hygiene, masks are the single most effective way for everyone to stay safe and stop the spread of Coronavirus.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

McCall council seeks answers on COVID-19 cases

St. Luke’s, health department says data hard to pinpoint

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News July 2, 2020

Members of the McCall City Council grilled local public health officials about the spread of the COVID-19 virus during an emergency meeting on Tuesday.

“We are feeling like we’re in the dark,” McCall Mayor Bob Giles told officials from Central District Health, which oversees virus data for Ada, Boise, Elmore and Valley counties.

“We don’t know very much from the data that you have shared,” Giles said. “Is it really 10 people, or is it 150 (who tested positive)?”

Of particular worry for council members was how tourists, seasonal workers and part-time residents who test positive for the virus factor into case totals for Valley County.

As of Wednesday, the health department said it counted 13 confirmed cases of COVID-19 among Valley County residents.

During the online meeting, Central District Health Director Russell Duke told council members the only cases added to Valley County’s case total are that of full-time residents who test positive.

Everyone else who tests positive in the county is counted toward case counts for their home county, but health officials still do contact tracing work to alert local residents who may have been exposed, Duke said.

“I think we need to figure out how we can get beyond this because what I’m hearing from you is you will know how many true cases are in our county, but we will not,” council member Melanie Holmes said.

Duke called that a “fair request,” but said testing labs, not the health district, are the ones who report the positive cases to the patient’s home county.

The health district only receives word of those cases if health districts in other jurisdictions and even other states contact them for local contact tracing, Duke said.

“I think the only mechanism that I can see would be for the healthcare systems to report out positive tests from their facilities,” he said.

Holmes asked St. Luke’s McCall Chief Operating Officer Amber Green for that number, which she said she did not know.

“The real time numbers as far as positive tests aren’t even a great indicator of who now has been exposed and has the potential to be symptomatic and expose others,” Green said.

“If you are relying on the positive tests today, we’re already behind the curve as to how many people those positive tests may have exposed and spread amongst our community,” she said.

Council member Colby Nielsen also questioned why some local residents are driving to Boise to get tested if St. Luke’s has an adequate supply of tests.

“We cannot simply test anyone that comes into our building that feels that they may have been exposed, but does not have signs or symptoms,” Green said.

Green cautioned that testing anyone also could lead to a “false sense of security” since it is unknown at what point someone who has contracted the virus will test positive.

That testing policy is consistent among each St. Luke’s location, but organizations like Crush the Curve Idaho offer tests more readily for anyone.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
— — — — — — — — — —

More Shore Lodge workers test positive for COVID-19

Valley County cases rise from 3 to 13 in one week

By Tom Grote for The Star-News July 2, 2020

More employees at Shore Lodge and Whitetail Club in McCall have tested positive for COVID-19, resort President Tom Garcia said Monday.

The employees contracted the virus after being tested by Shore Lodge and Whitetail earlier this spring and found not to have the virus, Garcia said.

The number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Valley County surged from three last week to 13 as of Wednesday, according to Central District Health.

The new cases were the first in Valley County to be caused by community transmission, which is when the person who falls ill has not traveled recently or had contact with a known infected person, the health department said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

McCall physician’s task force outline COVID-19 protocols

Marcia Witte guides policy on ventilators, other equipment

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 2, 2020

Idaho doctors will have written guidance if life saving ventilators to treat COVID-19 come into short supply thanks to a task force led by a McCall physician.

Dr. Marcia Witte of McCall co-led a team at the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare in drafting a “crisis standards of care” plan that will help hospitals decide how to allocate scarce resources during a public health emergency.

The plan, approved mid-June, would be implemented during a state or federal emergency declaration, a lack of healthcare supplies or a disruption to the healthcare supply chain.

The protocols also can be used if trained staff become unavailable or overwhelmed and if patient transfers become impossible.

… The plan details rules for allocating services like oxygen, protective equipment, dialysis, emergency medical services and medication in addition to ventilators, Witte said.

… Patients would not be given a ventilator who are unlikely to survive even with immediate and aggressive medical attention, under the guidelines.

Factors like cardiac arrest, severe trauma and other conditions that could prove fatal also make a patient less likely to receive a ventilator under crisis conditions.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

St. Luke’s McCall offers COVID-19 testing for some patients

The Star-News July 2, 2020

St. Luke’s McCall said it will offer COVID-19 testing by appointment to the following high-priority patients using recommendations from the Idaho State Testing Taskforce:

• Patients with COVID-19 symptoms, as confirmed through MyChart self-triage, nurse triage by phone, or clinical evaluation.

• Asymptomatic for those with a planned surgery or procedure that meets criteria for COVID-19 testing.

• Discharge or transfer from a St. Luke’s hospital to a long-term care or skilled nursing facility.

St. Luke’s is unable to accommodate asymptomatic testing under any other circumstances due to limited testing capacity and supplies, a news release said.

This includes common requests from asymptomatic patients for pre-employment, return-to-work or travel purposes.

Call the St. Luke’s McCall COVID-19 hotline at 208-634-1776 for questions.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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New Meadows Community Farmers Market postponed

The Star-News July 2, 2020

The New Meadows Community Farmers Market has been postponed due to the recent spike in coronavirus infections in Idaho.

The market had been scheduled to make its debut on Saturday, but will be rescheduled later this summer if possible, organizers aid. For updates, check the market’s Facebook page (search “New Meadows Community Farmers Market”).

continued:
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Placerville Cancels Events

Boise Basin Boosters (in Placerville) reviewed all the available information and with the input from local authorities the decision was made to cancel the breakfast and kids games on the 4th. This means that all of our fundraisers for the year have been canceled. With no funds coming in from any events this means all future community events such as, Hot August Night, Children’s Christmas Party, Christmas Food Baskets, Support of Idaho City Schools and assistance to needy families in the Boise Basin are in jeopardy. In order to continue with some or all of these we will need to raise $3000. If you can contribute mail to Boise Basin Boosters, 115 Ranft Rd, Placerville, id 83666. So far we have received $250.

(6/30 via FB)
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Idaho breaks state record for most new COVID-19 cases in one day: 401

by CBS2 News Staff Friday, July 3rd 2020

Idaho is reporting a total of 6,994 confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases.

According to the state’s COVID-19 website, there were 401 new cases on Friday; 398 new cases were confirmed and three were probable.

On Tuesday, Idaho last set the state record for most new cases in a single day with 365. The state has reported a 430% increase compared to two weeks ago.

The state has reported over 200 cases every day for over a week

continued:
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Boise Mayor to sign public health order mandating face coverings

By Katie Kloppenburg Jul 02, 2020 KIVI

Boise Mayor Lauren McLean is going to sign a public health emergency order, effective July 4 at 12:01 a.m. requiring everyone to use face coverings in the city. The face coverings must completely cover the nose and mouth and are required in all indoor and outdoor public places. There will be some exceptions for children under five, on-duty first responders or those with health or communication concerns.

A recent study by Goldman Sachs shows mask mandates lower the infection growth rate relative to the average infection growth rate prior and suggests the economic benefit from a face mask mandate and increased face mask usage could be sizable. States that do not mandate face coverings account for 40 percent of total confirmed cases in the United States.

continued:
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Local History:

Fourth of July in Yellow Pine

By Ted Abstein

It really started about a week before when Sim Willey and his family would start for Yellow Pine from the Willey Ranch down the South Fork driving a steer for the old-fashioned barbecue. Then on the morning of the 3rd a couple of men with large canvas backpacks would go up Quartz Creek to the north cliffs where packed icy snow still lingered – they would overnite and then start back with a hundred pounds or so of ice for the once-a-year ice cream we enjoyed so. In the meantime the steer was spitted over a large barbecue pit in which there was a deep bed of glowing coals; men worked in shifts through the night, turning the spit and feeding the fire and basting the carcass.

About daybreak, or a bit before, the celebration began with a literal “bang”. Typical was Dad’s “alarm clock”: a quarter of a stick of dynamite on top of an anvil with another anvil inverted over it! The resultant bang-clang would be heard for miles.

The feast was something to behold on a long community picnic table near the barbecue pit. The ladies of the community vied mightily in a sort of gustatory Olympics of male approbation – that’s probably a very poor choice of words since the contest wasn’t all sportsmanlike; in fact, there were several resulting, long-lasting feuds which arose!

After the sumptuous repast and a few naps there would be the usual contests: sack races, three-legged races, etc. with a few coins to winning children – returns to the picnic table for snacks – and a makeshift local rodeo or ball game at the field below town. In those days it was a yearly highlight with attendance by many people from miles around. Looking back it doesn’t appear all that much – I guess it was easier to entertain us then!

pg 68 of the “Yellow Pine” book compiled by Nancy Sumner (available only in Yellow Pine. $15 – contact Marj)

source: Yellow Pine Holiday History
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4th of July in Roosevelt, Idaho

4th of July Roosevelt 1915

The citizens of Roosevelt are not only offering the people that visit this city a rare treat and a good time on the glorious Fourth but are spending more money to make it a financial success than any other town of its age in the State. There is no town offering more inducements for a good time than you will get here in the heart of the mountains.
— —

Glove Contests.

I challenge the “Terrible Swede” for a 15 round glove contest to a finish. Fight for a $100 purse, $50 a side on the 4th of July. Will come to an agreement at NEWS office.

– WM. Roe, of Boise.

I will challenge Jim Hoffman for a 10 round glove contest for $100 a side. Fight to take place in Roosevelt, if this challenge is accepted. I will meet you July 2nd at THUNDER MOUNTAIN NEWS office.

– Nick Dorsey, of Roosevelt.
— —

Grand 4th of July dinner at the Overland Cafe.

source: The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News July 1, 1905
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Letter to Share:

PSA Saturday

from Valley County Sheriff’s Office

We would like to take this opportunity to educate some folks on the usage of your UTV, ATV or Dirt Bikes on County roads in Valley County.

We get several questions and complaints during the spring, summer and fall on the use of these vehicles in neighborhoods and on County maintained roads, public and private. Remember, just because a road is marked private (blue signs), it’s still accessible to the public and you must still follow the rules of the road.

Use on City & County Roads (does not include private property)

The following requirements must be met on city, county, and highway district roads.

• Valid restricted vehicle license plate. [IC 49-402(4)]
• Valid IDPR OHV registration sticker affixed to restricted vehicle license plate. (IC 67-7122)
• Valid driver’s license. (IC 49-301) – Parents can be cited for allowing an unlicensed minor to operate an ATV or UTV. Please keep this in mind.
• Liability insurance or alternative insurance. (IC 49-1223 or IC 49-1232)
• A helmet under age 18. (IC 49-666) Please make sure it’s a DOT inspected helmet.
• Muffler and U.S. Forest Service approved spark arrestor. Your muffler has to pass 96 dB at the half-meter test, SAE J1287. The OHV cannot exceed 96dB. (IC 67-7125)
• If you are riding on a highway within city limits, you may NOT go beyond the 45 mph signs in Valley County. This may not be the case in other cities, please be sure to check city codes prior to operating an off road vehicle on state highways within other city jurisdictions, they vary.

For safe operation on roads the following equipment is recommended.

• Brake light.
• Headlight and taillight after dark/poor visibility.
• Horn audible at 200 feet.
• Mirror showing roadway 200 feet behind the OHV

License & Registration

Any OHVs being operated or transported on public lands, roads or trails of the state of Idaho must display a current IDPR OHV Registration Sticker. Idaho Code 67-7124. Registration has been extended until June 30th, due to COVID-19, however they are asking that you attempt to get this completed as soon as you can.

Non-resident Requirements

Non-residents are required to have either a valid OHV registration from their home state of residence or a valid IDPR OHV registration sticker. Nonresidents must purchase an Idaho restricted vehicle license plate with a valid IDPR OHV registration sticker if they don’t have a plate and wish to operate on Idaho’s local jurisdiction roads (i.e.county roads).

Please be courteous, pay attention to speed limits and remember when you are driving through neighborhoods there are lots of things going on, kids playing, family pets and people walking or biking their neighborhoods.

We are asking that if you would like to report traffic complaints in your neighborhood, to call at the time it’s occurring, get a good description of the vehicle, a plate would be great and a description of the occupants, if possible.

Some of the questions the dispatcher might ask you are; Which direction did they go? Do you know where they live? When did this occur?

All of this information helps us in assisting you in better serving your needs. A lot of these vehicles look the same and disappear quickly!

As always, Stay Safe, be healthy and practice social distancing.

(via FB May 23, 2020)
— — — — — — — — — —

Confused about where to get your recreation stickers and registration?


—————————–

Public Lands:

French Creek Road is NOT a recommended, nor an official detour for Highway 95!

July 4, 2020 Payette NF

French Creek Road is a high clearance road (not for two wheel drive vehicles) that is not recommended for travel by inexperienced mountain road drivers. Reports of at least ten cars off the road have been recorded already. Trailers are not recommended as the switchbacks do not have room for trailers to maneuver.

It is a single lane, dirt road that has not been graded, and has only a few pull outs. The road is rough with long drop offs of 1000+ feet. If you do not have experience driving high mountain roads, or are an inexperienced driver, the Forest Service advises you to not use this road.

Travel at your own risk, and again, French Creek Road is not an official, nor a recommended detour for highway 95.

Brian Harris
Payette NF
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Backer of Payette Lake land trade to make pitch to McCall council

Alec Williams wants to trade for 28,000 acres of state land

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News July 2, 2020

A proposal for a land exchange encompassing 28,000 acres of state land around Payette Lake and the City of McCall will be presented to the McCall City Council next week.

Alec Williams of Trident Holdings, a Boise real estate firm, will air the proposal during the council’s regular meeting next Thursday, July 9, at 5:30 p.m.

The meeting had been planned to be held at the McCall-Donnelly High School Commons but instead will be held via video conference.

Instructions on how to view the meeting can be found at (link)

continued:
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Horsethief Reservoir campgrounds to close July 7 for renovation

The Star-News July 2, 2020

Osprey Bay and Easter’s Cove camping loops at Horsethief Reservoir east of Cascade will be closed for the season starting Tuesday for renovation, according to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

The Osprey Bay loop, including the popular day-use fishing area, will be paved to help alleviate erosion caused by improper drainage during runoff, a Fish and Game news release said.

Easter’s Cove improvements will include re-graded roads and sites, but no pavement. All sites at both camping areas will be outfitted with spacious living pads, new picnic tables and fire rings.

Bear Knob and Timber Bay camping loops will receive improvements of their own in 2021. All improvements are funded by the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation RV Fund, a fund generated from recreational vehicle registration fees.

Horsethief Reservoir is managed by Fish and Game and the campgrounds are managed by the Treasure Valley YMCA.

continued:
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Personal use fuelwood season starts July 1 on the Boise National Forest

Boise, Idaho, June 29, 2020 -– Personal use fuelwood permits for the Boise National Forest will be available for sale beginning July 1, through Nov. 30, 2020. To reduce the risk of COVID-19 exposure to the public and employees the Boise National Forest is offering multiple choices to purchase personal fuelwood permits. Fuelwood permits are valid within the Boise, Payette and Sawtooth Forests.

1. Vendors in surrounding communities will be selling personal use fuelwood permits.
2. All mail-in applications will be processed at the Cascade Ranger District
3. Call-in applications will be processed at all Ranger District offices
4. Visitor Information Center/BLM Public Room, 1387 S. Vinnell Way, Boise, Idaho

The mail-in and call-in methods are innovative ways to provide customer service and continue social distancing guidelines without exposing people to additional risk. We will not be selling permits in Ranger District offices until further notice. We will be accepting fuelwood applications starting June 29. For information about fuelwood cutting on surrounding National Forests, please contact them directly.

Mail-in applications are available to print (link), or can be picked up outside Ranger District offices and mailed to the Cascade Ranger District.

Mail-in applications with check or money order payable to UDSA (No Cash) to:

Cascade Ranger District
Attn: Fuelwood Program
P.O. Box 696
Cascade, ID 83611

Call-in applications with a credit card will be processed at these Ranger District Offices.

Mountain Home Ranger District 208-587-7961
Idaho City Ranger District 208-392-6681
Cascade Ranger District 208-382-7400
Lowman Ranger District 208-259-3361
Emmett Ranger District 208-365-7000

Visit these links to preview:

This year’s fuelwood brochure (link)
Motor Vehicle Use Maps to ensure you are cutting in areas open to motor vehicle use. (link)
To see current forest closures visit the interactive Forest Closure story map. (link)
Cutting fuelwood within a closed area is prohibited.

Fuelwood permit prices remain at $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum, and a 10-cord maximum per household. Please note we cannot sell permits for only 2 cords. If you want all 10 cords, permits purchased will need to be 5 cords and 5 cords, or 4 cords and 6 cord, or all 10 cords at once.

The Boise National Forest offered Free -use Fuelwood Permits from May 15 thru June 30. Free-use fuelwood collected, counts as personal use toward the 10-cord maximum per household per year.

Permit holders are encouraged to cut fuelwood early in the year because fire restrictions may impact the cutting season later in the summer. Early season fuelwood cutters are asked to use caution to avoid wet muddy roads where travel may cause resource damage. Fuelwood cutting is not allowed within riparian areas (adjacent to creeks and rivers).

A new regulation for this year is no cutting of Larch (Tamarack) after Nov. 1. Larch lose their needles every fall and appear to be dead, resulting in too many live trees being accidentally cut. This new regulation is to prevent the cutting of live Larch trees after they have lost their needles in the fall.
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Earthquakes leave their mark in the Sawtooths

Old-growth trees pushed into Redfish Lake, boulders take out trail

Tony Evans Jul 3, 2020 IME

The impacts of a 6.5-magnitude earthquake that struck northwest of Stanley on March 31, and its aftershocks, are still being uncovered in the Sawtooth Mountains north of Ketchum. For geologists, though, the near-daily tremors offer a rare chance to measure seismic activity in the area—and, hopefully, to help predict long-term risks.

“Idaho has very little knowledge of its seismic hazard and the current state of tectonic stress that mountain ranges are experiencing,” said Claudio Berti, director and state geologist of the Idaho Geological Survey. “Nature doesn’t make big mountains without associated big geologic hazards, and there are very big mountains in central and southeast Idaho.”

The iconic Sawtooth Range saw some noticeable changes by April when backcountry guides noticed that blocks had toppled from the top of the Finger of Fate, a spire popular with rock climbers. The nearby Arrowhead rock formation had fallen completely.

continued:
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USDA Forest Service Payette National Forest SOPA Update

You are subscribed to Payette National Forest SOPA for USDA Forest Service. This information has recently been updated, and is now available.

The quarterly schedule of proposed action for the Payette National Forest has been published. It is available online at: (link)

Thank you for your interest in your National Forest.
———————

Critter News:

Pet Talk – Melanoma

By Dr. Allani Delis Jul 3, 2020 IME

Melanoma is a cancer that comes from cells on the body that produce a dark brown pigment. That dark brown color is called melanin in scientific terminology. Dogs can get melanoma on the toenail, skin and, most commonly, the mouth (oral melanoma). While oral melanoma is not common in cats, it is one of the most common oral cancers in dogs.

No direct cause of oral melanoma has been found. Dogs with black or dark brown gums and black hair coats may be at a higher risk. This cancer can be found in any breed, but it is more common in the cocker spaniel, German shepherd, poodle, dachshund and golden retriever. Middle-age or older dogs (average age 10-12) are at a greater risk.

With oral melanoma, the main finding is a tumor inside the mouth. The tumor may be black or pink. Bad breath, bleeding from the mouth, face rubbing, lack of appetite and trouble chewing or swallowing are the most common signs.

continued:
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6 plead guilty, sentenced in 2018 poaching case in Franklin County

June 29, 2020 Local News 8

Franklin County, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Six men all reached plea agreements in a Franklin County court for the illegal killing and possession of three mule deer and 16 elk, including several trophy class animals in the fall of 2018 near Preston.

Through an investigation conducted around that time, Fish and Game conservation officers learned over course of several months, multiple poaching incidents took place on the “Reeder Ranch” and surrounding private property northwest of Preston, with complete disregard for season and weapon restrictions or tagging requirements.

The individuals involved left most of the elk carcasses to waste and recovered only the antlers and choice cuts of meat from others.

continued:
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US sets Aug. 31 deadline for wolverines protection decision

by Associated Press Thursday, July 2nd 2020


Getty Images

U.S. wildlife officials have agreed to decide by the end of August whether climate change and other threats are pushing the rare wolverine closer to extinction in the mountains of the West.

Government attorneys and conservation groups that had sued to force a decision filed court documents Thursday settling the lawsuit and agreeing to the deadline.

That came more than four years after a federal judge chastised government officials for rejecting the views of many of its own scientists when it decided against protecting wolverines in 2014.

continued:
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Bass make trip from Oxbow Reservoir to Little Payette Lake

Fish and Game transplants 600 fish to bolster numbers

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 2, 2020

Staff from the Idaho Department of Fish and Game staff captured about 600 small mouth bass from the Oxbow Reservoir on the Idaho border and transported them to Little Payette Lake last month.

The fish are routinely restocked in the lake because most of the small mouth bass that hatch typically do not grow large enough to survive through the winter months, said Jordan Messner, Fish and Game’s Southwest Regional Fisheries Manager for McCall.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

New Disabled American Veteran discounts for muzzleloader and archery permits take effect July 1

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Tuesday, June 30, 2020

The new fees for both permit types are $3.75 for resident and $5.75 for nonresident DAV license holders

A new law that takes effect July 1 reduces the archery and muzzleloader permit fees specifically for Disabled American Veterans. Only holders of Disabled American Veteran licenses are eligible for the discounted permits.

The new fees for both permit types are $3.75 for resident and $5.75 for nonresident Disabled American Veterans. DAV license holders previously had to pay the regular resident or nonresident price for these permits.

continued:
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White-tailed deer collar data picks up migrations prior to fawning

By Kiira Siitari, Regional Communications Manager
Monday, June 29, 2020

Does seek high-quality habitat to have their young


Kiira Siitari\IDFG

For the first time since the early 1990’s, Fish and Game has collars on white-tailed deer in game management unit 1 in northern Idaho. Biologists use GPS collars to better understand deer movement and survival, answering the call from hunters for more data on one of the Panhandle’s most popular and accessible big game species.

Early collar data revealed the movements of does getting ready to give birth. While most does in the study stayed close to where they were collared, some traveled many miles to have their fawns, often within a few days of one another during May.

continued:
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Upper Salmon River Chinook Salmon Fishing Report

By Brent Beller, Fisheries Technician
Tuesday, June 30, 2020

The 2020 Upper Salmon River Chinook fishery opened this past Friday, June 26.

Angler effort on opening day was high with anglers spread out throughout the fishery area. Over the weekend, the majority of anglers were observed fishing downstream of the Yankee Fork Salmon River, and poor weather on Sunday resulted in a drop in angler effort. Salmon were caught each day, and an estimated 21 hatchery Chinook (16 adults and 5 jacks) were harvested between Friday and Sunday. Anglers averaged an estimated 65 hours per Chinook caught and 95 hours per Chinook kept.

Conditions on the upper Salmon River were good throughout the weekend. Currently the Salmon River downstream of the Yankee Fork is flowing at 1,740 cfs which is 75 percent of average for today’s date. The river’s visibility was clear, and water temperatures were in the mid to upper 50s.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Orphaned, now plump cub returned to the wild

Wildlife managers debut rehabilitate-and-release technique to save life of Jackson Hole black bear.

By Mike Koshmrl Jun 24, 2020 Jackson Hole News and Guide


Bradly J. Boner / News&guide

When Taz McBride first laid eyes on “Hissy” he was up close with the tiny black bear in his Melody Ranch backyard.

Hissy wasn’t exactly menacing, as far as black bears go. The gaunt, housecat-size animal appeared to be out on its own when it circled around a hot tub last October, encountered McBride — and hissed. The name came naturally to the then 10-year-old, who went on to spot the orphaned black bear cub more than once last fall.

Last Thursday afternoon McBride and Hissy were face-to-face again, this time in a more suitable spot for a black bear. They encountered each other at Jackass Meadows, well into the backcountry west of the northern Teton Range. It was just before Hissy was let loose to go live his black bear life.

“Hello there,” McBride told the bear. “Hello.”

Hissy, now a healthy 110-pound yearling bruin, had an odyssey of eight months.

continued: (with video)
—————-

Seasonal Humor:

Covid1665Plague-a

FlySeason-a
————————

Idaho History July 5, 2020

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 12

Idaho Newspaper clippings November 9-14

1918BonnersFerry-a
Boundary County serviceman pictured in downtown Bonners Ferry in 1918 Photo courtesy Boundary County Museum

source: Boundary County, Idaho News
— — — — — — — — — —

Nov 9

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 09, 1918, Page 1

19181109DSM1
Tells How Conrad L. Ostroot Died
Was Taken Ill With Influenza on Shipboard – Had Best of Care

Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Ostroot, whose son, Conrad, a bright young man well known in Moscow, died some time ago, are just in receipt of the following letter giving detailed information about his last illness. The letter follows:

“London, Oct. 20, 1918.

“Mrs. E. E. Ostroot, Moscow, Idaho.

Dear Madam: It is with great regret that I have to confirm the news of the death of your son, Conrad L. Ostroot, at sea on Oct 10th, 1918.

“He sailed early in October for Europe for important duty under my direction.

“Shortly after leaving port he developed Spanish influenza which later turned into pneumonia. He received the best of care from the ship’s doctor and it looked for a long time as if his strong constitution would pull him through, but it was not to be. Other deaths occurred but I saw to it that he had better treatment than most.

“You may feel that you son died in line of duty just as much as if he had fallen in battle. He was an excellent man who did his full duty – evidenced by his selection from a considerable number for duty of special importance.

“Very truly yours, N. H. Heck, Lieutenant U. S. N. R. F.”

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 09 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 09, 1918, Page 3

19181112DSM2
City News

The Cornwall Red Cross sent a nice lot of fruit for the Moscow soldiers today. The fruit goes to the hospitals and convalescent wards.

Mrs. Frank Mix sent to the soldier hospitals today a lot of cream, fruit, cookies and puddings which were thankfully received by those well enough to eat them.

Homer and Howard David have now fully recovered from the attacks of influenza for which they have been housed for the past two weeks. Howard David is able to be down town. Mrs. Homer David has also recovered from a similar attack.

W. T. Wilkins left for his home today at Blackfoot, Idaho. Mr. Wilkins will return to Moscow in a few days, as his son is still ill of influenza.

Mrs. Chas. Thomas of Champion, Alberta, arrived in Moscow, called by the illness of her daughter, Miss Ona Thomas, of influenza. Miss Thomas had been working at Plummer’s cafeteria and now at the home of Mrs. O. W. Beardsley.

Miss Joy Newman, typist at the university, has a slight attack of influenza and was taken today to the home of Mrs. Roberts.

Mrs. Cyrus Roberts returned to her home in Kendrick, her son Cecil having recovered from the influenza.

Mrs. F. I. Lindgren went to her home at Orofino today, leaving her son Paul, of the S. A. T. C., practically well of influenza.

Arlie Decker, Dean of Forestry at Pullman College, has recovered from his attack of influenza and arrived in Moscow today to visit his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Decker.

Mrs. Geo. Daugherty of Estes is in Moscow today. Mrs. Daugherty has been assisting in collecting fruit for the soldiers, having brought in last week an automobile load of canned and fresh fruit.
— —

19181109DSM2
Influenza Situation in Moscow is Better

The influenza situation still shows improvement in Moscow, both in the city and in the university and the S. A. T. C. There were eight new cases among Class A men of the S. A. T. C. admitted to the hospital today and nine were released as cured. There have been no more deaths, but one case is regarded as almost hopeless. Otherwise the situation is regarded as much better than it has been for some time. Nearly all new cases are very mild.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 09 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 09, 1918, Page 4

19181109DSM3
W. E. Wallace Tells Of The Influenza
Moscow Man Returned From San Francisco Says Epidemic Terrible There

W. E. Wallace returned last evening from San Francisco where Wallace and Cooper have the jobbing rights of California and Nevada for the I. L. C. automobile lens. Mr. Wallace says the Inland Empire has escaped wonderfully easy from the dread epidemic. In San Francisco there are 20,000 cases of influenza with about an average of one hundred deaths a day. The terrible disease is no respecter of persons, taking the rich and poor, the old and young; occasionally a victim drops dead on the street, and in instances entire families.

Several of the prominent physicians and nurses of San Francisco have been victims of influenza. The ambiances are going day and night. It is compulsory for every one to wear masks except in the privacy of one’s own home or hotel room. Business is at a stand still, having fallen off from 60 to 70 per cent in many cases, and yet they cannot secure the necessary help. Of course no crowds are allowed to congregate; even war bulletins being removed from the windows; the mass of some churches is given on the church steps; no courts are are permitted; no music is allowed in restaurants.

Coast cities are conserving on lights; no lights are allowed in show windows except at certain times; cluster lights are reduced to one late in the evening; no electric signs as usual, except on certain nights; in fact, it is a gloomy city where it was once bright and gay.

Mr. Wallace come home by way of Portland and Seattle, where stores are closed all day Saturday and open other days from 10 to 3 p.j. All along the way the sad sights of caskets and boxes were exhibited at most stations.

Sixteen bodies were on the train as they pulled out of Oakland, that city being badly stricken also. So Moscow can well be thankful that her population has so far suffered so few tragedies.

Mr. Wallace will remain with his family until about the first of January.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 09 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918ArmisticeParadePullman-a
(click image for larger size)
A naval unit in Pullman, Washington, on Nov. 11, 1918, celebrating the end of World War I. Courtesy of the Franks Collection, Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture

source: Northwest Public Broadcasting
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Nov 11

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 11, 1918, Page 1

World War Is Over

19181111DSM1
(click image for larger size)
— —

19181111DSM2
Moscow Holds Greatest Celebration In History

The greatest celebration in the history of Moscow was held today. The celebration began at 2 o’clock this morning when word came over the telephone that the armistice had been signed. It started with the ringing of church bells and the sounding of whistles, with shrieks by the few who were up at that unseemly hour.

Early this morning special bulletins began to reach the office of The Star-Mirror telling of the signing of the armistice and that the was is over. As the bulletins were posted great crowds gathered around the bulletin boards and read with deep interest.

When it became known that is was not a hoax – that Germany had actually surrendered and that the war was actually over a celebration that would do honor to the occasion was arranged. It was decided to close all stores at noon and devote the afternoon to celebrating.

At 2 o’clock the parade, the largest, best and most thrilling ever seen here, started. Let by the band, President Lindley and the army officers, the S. A. T. C. men from the university, 500 strong, nearly all in uniform, and singing “‘Twill not be over till it’s over over there,” led the great parade. Then came the university cannon. Then the vocational training corps, a sturdy bunch of real soldiers commanded by real army officers and looking like a young army, Company C, Idaho National Guards, the Boy Scouts, the Red Cross, old soldiers, members of various lodges, the fire department and civilians afoot, on horseback, in carriages and automobiles, formed a parade that would have been an honor to a city 10 times as large as Moscow. The streets were thronged with a glad, happy, cheering mob of men, women and children.

It was a “perfect end of a perfect day.” It was an event long to be remembered in Moscow. The influenza was forgotten and everyone seemed joyously, almost hilariously happy.

Miss Isabelle Richards was the Goddess of Liberty and Little Vern Sturm represented “Uncle Sam and the Allied Nations” on the fire truck.

George Creighton took Mayor Truitt, Judge Steele of the district court, and George G. Pickett, city attorney, in his car, which carried the American and the Allied flags, and made a fine showing in the parade.
— —

19181111DSM3
American Casualty List Nearly Seventy Thousand

Almost 70,000 American soldiers have been killed, wounded, taken prisoner or died from accident, disease or other causes, since the United States began war with Germany. The total up to this morning, was 68,451, and 969 were added in today’s list. This does not include causalities in the marine corps. …
— —

19181111DSM4
Influenza Causes Two More Deaths In Moscow

Two more deaths, due to influenza, have occurred here, bringing the total since the influenza epidemic struck Moscow up to 12.

Earl S. John, whose wife died just one week ago, followed her today. Mr. and Mrs. St. John were stricken two weeks ago and both were critically ill from the start. Her death occurred just one week before that of her husband. Mr. St. John was 22 years of age and had been employed as a window decorator in David’s department store. Mr. and Mrs. St. John had no children. …

Leland Eddy, of Sandpoint, a member of the S. A. T. C., class B, the vocational training corps, died this morning after an illness of two weeks. His condition has been critical for more than a week and hope of his recovery was abandoned several days ago. His mother arrived in Moscow before his death, reaching here Saturday evening. …

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 11 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 11, 1918, Page 2

19181112DSM2
City News

Mrs. C. A. Christenson of route 5, gave a sack of apples and four quarts of cherries to the soldiers’ mess fun.

Robert Cozier of the S. A. T. C., who is a victim of the influenza at his mother’s home, is improving.

Miss Grace Ball, commercial teacher of the university, has received news of the serious illness of her father and sister.

Mrs. Geo. W. Shepherd, who has been visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Hill, was called to Great Falls, Mont., by the illness of her husband, who had taken a relapse from an attack of influenza.

Miss Helen Savage, who has been in Pullman for the past year, has been quite ill of influenza and pneumonia, but is now recovered. Her mother, Mrs. Savage, of Moscow, is with her and both expect to return to Moscow the latter part of the week.
— —

Troy Has Monster Celebration Today

More than 2,000 persons joined in the wildest celebration the town of Troy has ever known today. All business was suspended and the afternoon given over to celebrating the close of the war. The finest parade ever seen in Troy was headed by “uncle Sam” with “General Pershing” dragging the kaiser through the streets and the effigy was burned later wile 2,000 enthusiastic people yelled themselves hoarse. Although business is closed the merchants and citizen are feeding everybody who will accept, popcorn, peanuts and other confections and every man who wants to smoke has a free cigar. Troy never does anything in a half-hearted way and the celebration today is a record breaker. The Star-Mirror furnished the people of Troy with the terms of the armistice which were read at a great meeting where patriotic speeches were delivered and patriotic music played and patriotic songs were sung.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 11 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918ArmisticeDayParadeTroyIdaho-a
(click image for larger size)
1918 Armistice Day Parade. Troy, Idaho. Donor Clyde Spencer

source: Photo Group 5 University of Idaho Library Special Collections & Archives
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Nov 12

The Idaho Republican. November 12, 1918, Page 2

19181112TIR1
Shelley

The influenza has not started on the decline in Shelley yet, but instead many new cases are being reported. There has been only one death in Shelley from the flu that of Mrs. Frank Hiatt. The cases seem to be much lighter because people are now taking better care of themselves when they have the disease. A stranger at the sugar factory succumbed to an attack of the flu. The people of Shelley should consider themselves lucky for not having conditions more serious The main thing is to take care of yourself when you get this dreaded disease, go to bed when you feel ill and call the family physician.

The Dean Drug store and Roger’s Cafe are the only business houses open here at the present time after 6 o’clock. The drug store is open after 6 for the sale of medicine only. Roger’s Cafe stays open until 9 p.m. Other business houses will not open again at nights until notified that they may do so by the board of health.

Edley Hampton is recovering from a slight attack of the flu.

Election day was much quieter here this year than the last congressional election; due partly to the flu and partly to the war conditions, but the big majority of citizens here turned out to vote.

Miss Clara Dolder is up and around again, after having recovered from a severe case of influenza.

Edgar Thornton has returned from an attack of the flu, as has Guy Mallory also.
— —

19181112TIR2


Firth

The flu has reached Firth. A. G. Robbins, Mrs. M. D. Andrus and several of the family and possibly others not reported are or have been afflicted, but all seem to be convalescing nicely.

On October 22 at four o’clock in the afternoon, occurred the death of Emil J. Ekedahl of Firth. He had been stationed at Camp Fremont and became ill with pneumonia. Within ten days he passed away and was brought home for burial. He was only twenty-one years and eight months at the time of his demise. …

The Mentor club which was to have met with Mrs. L. F. Ramsey has post poned its meetings spending the abatement of the flu.
— —

19181112TIR3
Upper Presto

Mrs. Ila Grover passed away Sunday morning, after suffering from an attack of influenza. …
— —

19181112TIR4
Jameston

Miss Elda Fielding, who has been very ill with the influenza is improving.

Word has been received that Glen Andrew, who has been ill with the influenza at Camp Sherman, Ohio, is improving.

Use plenty of camphor as a preventative for the flu. A little bag of camphor tied around the neck is very good.

Election day was very quiet in Jameston.
— —

Death of George Bailey

George Bailey, age eight years, son of George Bailey of Groveland, died Thursday night, after suffering an attack of influenza and pneumonia for the past four weeks.

His mother and brother Glenn proceeded him, both dying from the same disease. …
— —

Idaho Budget

Citizens of Jerome are aroused over the treatment accorded Boyd Kelly Frazer, 19 years old, at the S. A. T. C school at Moscow and an investigation into circumstances attending his discharge when suffering from Spanish influenza and his death three days after his arrival home, has been started.

Last week an order was issued at Idaho Falls that every person must wear a mask while anywhere associated with other persons, and that all business houses except drug stores and restaurants and hotels should close at 6 o’clock p.m.

Dick Donovan, deputy director of the state farm markets bureau, who has been sick for almost a month in a Pittsburgh, Pa., hospital with Spanish influenza, has entirely recovered.

Because of the influenza epidemic the state board of agriculture announced last week that the Lewiston livestock show, scheduled for November 7 to 13, will be postponed until the latter part of November or some time during December.
— —

Back on the Job

P. H. Whitiger, head mechanic at the Service garage, resumed his work Saturday morning, after being confined to his home for several days, on account of sickness.
— —

Able to be at Work

Charles Kinney who has been confined to his bed for several weeks past is much improved and now able to be around. Mr. Kinney has accepted a position with the Smith Bakery company.
— —

Influenza Reaches Alaska.

Nome, Alaska – Nome has been stricken with influenza. About 300 white residents are reported suffering, and Eskimos in near-by villages are said to be dying by scores. The weather has been below zero for several days.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 12 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 12, 1918, Page 4

19181112TIR5
Grandview

Two Grandview citizens, victims of influenza, Mrs. Will watts, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A,. J. Satterfield passed away at the hospital in Pocatello early Tuesday morning. She had been called to Pocatello two weeks before to help care for the sick in her brother’s family. A few days later she contracted the disease, follow by pneumonia, which resulted in her death. She was very sick from the first. Her mother had been with her constantly for ten days. Her husband, to who she was married just a year ago, was called to the colors several moths ago, and she had been expecting to visit him. They were unable to reach him with a message, as word reached them from Washington D. C. that he had sailed for France three days before. …

Ralph Quigley, a young man about twenty year of age died November 5, after an attack of influenza-pneumonia. He had been working in Blackfoot, but came home, after contracting the influenza. … Several other members of the family are still sick.

Mrs. Patton is reported very ill with influenza.
— —

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 12 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 12, 1918, Page 5

19181112TIR6
Local News

J. W. Ezell, who has been very ill, is now improving.

Miss Lyn Thompson is much improved from her recent illness.

Miss Eula Palmer was on the sick list the last of the week.

Mrs. E. J. Benson was on the sick list the last of the week.

Mrs. Roy Clifford is very ill at her home.

C. C. Hayes of Idaho Falls was in Blackfoot Thursday and purchased twelve caskets from D. H. Biethan.

Fred Weber, who has been ill with the influenza, is now somewhat improved.

Miss Nell Crenshaw has fully recovered from a few days’ illness.

Miss Clara Schofield resumed her work at the Blackfoot Mercantile Friday, after a week’s illness.

Miss Delphia Montgomery has recovered from a severe attack of the influenza.

Miss Milbury Pew resumed her work at the Racket store Friday having fully recovered from her illness.

R. W. Adair was on the sick list the last of the week, but is doing nicely at present.

Word has been received that Mrs. Guy Priest, who is in Bainebridge, Ind., is ill with the influenza.

Mrs. L. C. Rockwood was on the sick list a few days the last of the week.

Mrs. Carilone Warren went to Pocatello Saturday to stay with her daughter who is ill.

Gordon Thompson has fully recovered from a severe attack of the flu.

Miss Meria Weise resumed her duties at the Pearson grocery, after being confined to her home with sickness.

Mrs. W. C. Sollenberger went to Pocatello Friday to visit with her daughter Mrs. Drollinger, who is ill at the present time.

Mr. Clifford arrived in Blackfoot the last of the week from Moscow, where he has been taking military training. He was called home on account of the illness of his wife.
— —

Dr. Simmons Leaves

Dr. and Mrs. Simmons left Friday for Pocatello, from there Dr. Simmons left for Fort Riley, Kan., where he will be in the service.

Mrs. Simmons returned to Blackfoot Saturday morning to remain some time before joining her husband.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 12 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. November 12, 1918, Page 1

19181112AFP1
(click image for larger size)
— —

Death of Mrs. Nathan Perry.

Mrs. Nathan Perry died at Rockland last night, of influenza. A husband and two small children survive her. At her bedside when death came were Mr. and Mrs. McCulloch of Rigby, father and mother of the deceased.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 12 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. November 12, 1918, Page 4

People and Events.

The family of P. A. Friesen, who live just over the line in Bingham county from Cedar creek, are reported to be down with influenza.

Charles Johnson and family are ill with influenza. The children of Mrs. Muehien [?] came down first, and had barely began to get well before other members began coming down.

Dr. Noth is gaining very fast and will soon be able to go on a vacation which he has earned several times over during the past ten years. He began learning to walk again Saturday, and made fair progress.

Mrs. Webb, mother of Mrs. Frank Barnard, who is seriously ill is reported slightly improved.

M. J. Unger and Bob Elisberry made a trip to Aberdeen Saturday. They found the “no admittance without a mask” sign up and working. The flu is getting a good start in Aberdeen.

James Frodsham was a visitor from Rockland yesterday, bring news of the death of Mrs. Nathan Perry, from influenza. Mr. Frodsham reports the situation much better than it has been for a month past.

Mrs. A. B. Altree is recovering from an attack of pneumonia, contracted while she was taking care of sufferers from influenza in Rockland and American Falls. Mrs. Altree has without doubt done her part since the epidemic began, and her friends will be glad to hear that she is recovering her health.

Elmer Drummond died at the hospital Monday morning at 2 o’clock, after suffering with influenza for a week. Deceased is survived by his wife and three children, aged four months, four years and six years. …

Miss Gweenty, the nurse who came from Burley to assist in caring for the influenza victims at Rockland when the epidemic was at its height there and who fell a victim to the disease herself within a few days, returned to her home yesterday. Miss Gweenty left realizing that she had fallen among friends during her illness and is profuse in her tans for the way she was cared for. Miss Gweenty is the only one of nine nurses who were headed for Power county who ever reached their destination. What became of the others is one of the mysteries. They may have been taken off the train before they reached here to assist in other localities, or may themselves have fallen ill.
— —

19181112AFP2
Arbon News

Raldo Woods, 14-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Heber Woods, died Tuesday of pneumonia induced by influenza. The young man had been ill only 11 days. The remains were laid to rest at Valley View cemetery.

Newell Leishman and Frank Turner are both recovering from a serious siege of pneumonia. Both had to be operated on to better their condition.

Richard Bandy is now able to sit up a little after several weeks illness with pneumonia.

Flu conditions locally are on the mend. All cases are very light now and only a case now and then breaking out.

Mrs. John Lusk came over from Malad Monday to help care for her son, Dave Lusk, who was quite ill with influenza, but is improving. Dr. Epson of Malad was the attending physician.

Election day was quiet here, due to the flu situation and cold weather, many losing their votes on account of illness.

source: American Falls Press. [volume] (American Falls, Idaho), 12 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. November 12, 1918, Page 1

19181112BFH1Several New “Flu” Cases
Everybody Getting It – Serious Cases Are Rapidly Improving

County Assessor W. C. Reid is confined to his home with Spanish influenza as is also County Clerk Elder, Prosecuting Attorney Frank Bottum, and Deputy County Clerks, Miss Peterson and Miss Bruce. Consequently the court house is not the scene of many activities. E. M. Flood is acting county clerk in the absence of Mr. Elder and Miss Reid is taking her father’s place in the assessor’s office.

Yesterday morning, the First National bank was unable to take care of its customary business as Cashier Shultis, Assistant Cashier MacNamara, and Teller Thomsen are all “flu” victims. Many of the stores of the city are seriously handicapped by the illness of employees with the Spanish influenza and the disease seems to be claiming new victims every day although there are few serious cases and all the old cases are improving rapidly. Drs. Fry and Keller are on the go day and night but have found it almost impossible to attend to each and every call as promptly as usual.

In the Porthill and Copeland districts there are many “flu” cases but all are reported to be getting along nicely.

It is not likely that the schools will be allowed to start again for another week or two. The opening of the schools will be ordered by the state health board upon the recommendations of County Health Officer Fry.

Dr. Fry states that he has reported 79 new cases of the influenza this week to the state health department; last week he reported 84 cases and the week before that 88 cases. He has reported a total of 355 cases but of course there are many mild cases that the physicians have not heard of and Dr. Fry estimates that in this county there have been, counting the present cases, about 700 Spanish influenza victims. There have been a total of nine deaths from the disease.
— —

Mrs. Van Etten Passes Away
Victim of Pneumonia – Funeral Services Held Sunday Afternoon

Mary Josephine Van Etten died at the Bonners Ferry hospital Saturday morning of pneumonia following and attack of Spanish influenza. Interment was had Sunday afternoon in the local cemetery, funeral services being conducted by the Rev. E. R. Henderson. …She is survived by her husband, a day and a half old son, her father and mother and sisters and brothers.
— —

Little Bernice McGarvey Dies

Bernice, the little four and a half year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. R. McGarvey, of Naples, died at her home Thursday night of Spanish influenza. Funeral services were conducted at the local cemetery Saturday afternoon at two o’clock. Rev. Fr. Kelly officiating. …
— —

Postpone Supreme Court

Attorneys of this city were notified last week that the term of the supreme court which should have convened in Coeur d Alene yesterday, would be indefinitely postponed on account of the Spanish influenza epidemic.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 12 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. November 12, 1918, Page 2

19181112BFH2
Idaho News Paragraphs
Recent Happenings in This State Given in Brief Items for Busy Readers.

The epidemic of influenza is on the increase at Elk River.

Miss Catherine Lansing, age 42, died recently at Lewiston from the “Flu.” Miss Lansing was among the most devoted of the Red Cross workers, and for the last year had given practically all of her time to this work.

The influenza epidemic has run its course in Lewis county, no new cases having been reported for nearly two weeks. In all 23 deaths occurred in Lewis county from the epidemic, 15 being at Nez Perce and eight at Ilo-Vollmer.

One doctor in Kellogg reported 400 cases of Spanish influenza. In some families six and seven members are in bed from the disease – all regulations are closely followed, but it seems to be on the increase. Eight have died Friday and Saturday.

If no furthers cases of influenza develop the Sandpoint schools may resume Nov. 18. The ban on picture houses and public gatherings will probably be removed at the same time.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 12 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. November 12, 1918, Page 6

19181112BFH3
Local Pick-ups

Tom Martin, of the Kootenai Valley Times, is seriously ill with Spanish influenza.

R. McPherson is confined to his home with an attack of Spanish influenza.

Mrs. and Mrs. O. F. Howe are confined to their beds this week with Spanish influenza. Mrs. Gray, mother of Mrs. Howe, is taking care of the sick folks.

Mrs. J. Bert Cowen and two children are sick with the Spanish influenza.

J. L. Leach, proprietor of the Golden Rule Transfer, is sick this week with the Spanish influenza.

The H. B. Carratt family have all been victims of the Spanish influenza. At last reports the family were on the road to good health again.

Bryon N. Hawks, proprietor of the Brody Drug Store, who has been seriously ill with Spanish influenza, is on the road to recovery and will be able to attend to his business duties in a day or so.

Miss Verna Bruce, nurse at the St. Luke’s hospital in Spokane, arrived here Saturday to spend a few days visiting with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Bruce. Miss Bruce has just recovered from a severe attack of the Spanish influenza and Sunday, her sister, Miss Dollie, was taken ill with the same disease. Mrs. Lillian Smith, a cousin of Miss Bruce, accompanied her here from Spokane, but returned home Sunday on account of the sickness of Miss Dollie Bruce.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 12 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. November 12, 1918, Page 8

H. B. Wilson of Bacon & Wilson, Plummer druggists, died last week of influenza.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 12 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 12, 1918, Page 1

19181112DSM1
Only One New Case Of Influenza Here

The influenza situation in Moscow is better today than at any time since the epidemic stuck Moscow. There have been no deaths since Sunday night and in the report issued today but one new case had been admitted to the hospital while eight had been discharged as cured. The new case is very mild. The patient belongs to class A of the S. A. T. C. Of the men released four are class A and four are class B men. The general situation in Moscow is regarded as very favorable. It is hoped that schools may be reopened in the near future if the situation continues to show improvement.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 12 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 12, 1918, Page 5

19181112DSM2
City News

Mrs. T. A. Meeker is improving nicely since having the influenza.

Winnifred Edmundson has been very sick with the influenza for over two weeks at Grangeville, where she is teaching in the city schools. She is now able to be up.

Roy Handlin of the S. A. T. C. is just recovering from an attack of influenza and is now at the Elks’ temple.

Frank Neely is ill of influenza and pneumonia, but is improved today.

Frank Griffith, who lives near Moscow, has received word that his son Elza Griffith at the camp at Eustic, Va., died of influenza.

Emer Keiber of Wallace came home Sunday to assist in the care of his father, Geo. Keiber, and two sisters, who are ill of influenza.

Prof. H. B. Reed of the psychology department at the university received word yesterday that his brother A. A. Reed, died of influenza last week in Saskatchewan.

Judge and Mrs. W. M. Morgan arrived at noon today from Coeur d’Alene where the judge had expected to hold a term of court, but on account of the epidemic of influenza, the session was postponed. Judge and Mrs. Morgan expect to return to Boise tomorrow.
— —

Yesterday Was A Legal Holiday In Idaho

Few people knew that yesterday was a legal holiday in Idaho. Governor Alexander issued a proclamation declaring it such, as soon as he learned that the armistice had been signed and the war was over, but the telegram announcing the proclamation did not reach Moscow until late yesterday evening after The Star_mirror had gone to press and it was not made known until today. But Moscow people made it a holiday, whether legal or illegal, and they certainly enjoyed it, even though they had only half a holiday when they might have had a full day. But they had part of a holiday last week when the United Press fake report of the signing of the armistice was received, and are not complaining.
— —

Juliaetta Celebrated Signing of Armistice

Juliaetta. – The people of Juliaetta gave vent to their joy in the new of peace yesterday, by a most enthusiastic demonstration. All the bells of the town rang continuously for six hours. Business houses were closed. A parade was formed, and speeches were made by prominent citizens. All day the people were finding new ways to express their patriotism and joy. In the evening a huge bonfire was built, around which gathered several hundred citizens and people from the surrounding country. Under the flags of the allied nations, an impromptu program was rendered. The Reverend Mt. Nelson, Mr. Columbus Clark, Mr. Earl Crum, and Mr. E. W. Porter were the principal speakers. The crowd joined in singing patriotic songs. The demonstration lasted far into the night.
— —

Oscar Roos Died at Lewiston Today.

A. Langdon was called to Lewiston today by the announcement that his son-in-law, Oscar Roos, had died of pneumonia, following influenza. Mr. Roos married Myrtle Langdon, oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Langdon, and was well known in Lewiston where he was engaged in railroad work. He had recovered from influenza enough to be up and around when he took a relapse and died today. Mrs. Langdon was with her daughter when death came to her husband. …

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 12 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918RedCrossStLouis-a
(click image for larger size)
Members of the St. Louis Red Cross Motor Corps on duty on five ambulances during the 1918 flu pandemic. Via Library of Congress

source: PBS
— — — — — — — — — —

Nov 13

The Challis Messenger., November 13, 1918, Page 1

19181113TCM1-headline
Citizens Maintain Quarantine

Wednesday evening, word reached town that District Judge F. J. Cowen, together with T. R. Jones, Clay Vance and an attorney from Idaho Falls had passed the quarantine guards on Willow creek summit and were on their way to Challis.

At about seven o’clock a large number of our citizens met and proceeded down the road to a point about 100 yards below the school house and erected a barricade to stop the entrance of the car carrying the party named above into town.

An offer was made the visitors to the effect that if they would go to the Challis Hot Springs for the night the Council of Defense would meet with them the following morning. Judge Cowen said he would consent to this arrangement provided he was guaranteed an entrance to town the next morning. This could not be assured him and after some further parleying, the Judge and his party returned to Mackay.

There was no violence offered nor disrespect shown to the party. The assemblage was simply a body of determined men and women to enforce a quarantine which our health officers deem is necessary to protect the lives of our citizens against a disease that proves fatal in many cases.

Should Spanish Influenza enter our town it would be a serious blow to the community and there is no question but that some of our citizens would lose their lives as a result. We have but one physician and no nurses here and our situation would be extremely dangerous.

The State Board of Health and the Governor have given us all assurances of their support in maintaining the quarantine. The people therefore, believe they are standing on their rights as American citizens and have resolved to back our health officers in maintaining the quarantine.
— —

19181113TCM2-headline
To Maintain Quarantine
“The ‘Flu’ Will be Mild in Comparison to What We Will Get if We Do Not Change Our Ways”

On the 11th or November, 1919, Judge F. J. Cowen called E. J. Michael, Clerk of the District Court on the ‘phone and asked hint to call a meeting of the citizens and see if they would not make some changes in regard to the quarantine situation here. The meeting was called and the following message was ordered ‘phoned to Judge Cowen:

“The County Board of Health, consisting of a majority of the Board of County Commissioners have established quarantine but not prohibited travel along the public highways, and only require people coming from infected districts to submit to reasonable regulations so as not to spread the disease. If any person will submit to these reasonable regulations they can freely enter the quarantined district and travel unrestricted to any place therein.

We are supporting the law and our quarantine regulations and protecting as best we can our people against the affliction of Spanish Influenza. We have no desire to violate your orders and believe the facts have been misrepresented to you. We have always had the greatest respect for you and your orders as to judge and believe when you get all the facts you will appreciate our stand and until then we ask you to withhold judgment and stand with us in protecting the lives of our people and to not issue further Court Orders until our side is represented.”

Upon receiving the above message the Judge replied that the people were not receding from their position in maintaining the quarantine and that if we did not change our methods we would get into a worse condition than Spanish Influenza could possibly put us.

Citizens of Custer County and Idaho, what do you think of this?

Is torture and punishment in store for the law abiding citizens of this district, just because they are trying to protect their wives, their children, themselves and all that is dear to them from this terrible disease?

Judge Cowen has threatened to call on the Governor to establish martial law in this section, but the Chairman of the State Board of Health has ‘phoned that if martial law is established it will be to enforce our quarantine, not to break it.
— —

19181113TCM3-headline
People of Pahsamaroi Enforce the Quarantine

In the early days of Idaho when the people reached a point where they could no longer tolerate unprovoked law breaking they took matters into their own hands and made a community a safe place in which to live.

Perhaps the pioneers who hanged law breakers to trees in those days were hotter headed than their decendants [sic] of today at any rate the SPIRIT OF SELF DEFENSE is not dead in the Pahsamaroi valley.

If the Citizens wished to have their lives protected and the quarantine enforced they must, they decided, act themselves: The Custer County Health Officers were doing their utmost to make the quarantine effective, but attempts were made by certain attorneys to make the quaranntine [sic] a legal farce by blocking every effort of our officers; as a result a number of people met together and formed a ‘Safety First Unit’ they decided the issue, found the solution required drastic action that they themselves must take that action, The Village of Mackay had set that example by refusing political organizers a hearing and drove their speakers from their community.

When parties who came to Pahsamaroi Valley were put under quarantine and then refused to live up to the requirements of the law, were going through the valley at will with the possible chance of spreading the contagious desease [sic] with a total disregard for Officials the law and the lives of their fellow citizens, the residents took prompt action, and the quarantine breakers were required to go into quarantine or leave the valley, they decided on the latter couse [sic] and the citizens accompanied them to see that this was done, this should be a warning to other transgressors generally.
— —

Pete Fourcade and wife are visiting friends here and enjoying the security of our quarantine.
— —

Bologna Bill Stretched Again
19181113TCM4

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 13 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Challis Messenger., November 13, 1918, Page 2

Idaho Budget

Dr. J. D. Irwin of Caldwell was seriously injured when his automobile was struck by an interurban car.

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 13 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Challis Messenger., November 13, 1918, Page 5

Items About People You Know

Peter McKinney, of Salmon, after going into quarantine for four days, transacted business here the fore part of the week.

Floyd Carpenter returned to Challis the latter part of last week. He was quarantined for four days at the quarantine station.

Allan Williams returned from Idaho Falls last week. He went through quarantine before coming into town.

Mrs. M. A. Dillingham and children who have been ‘Flu’ sufferers at Salmon are almost completely over the disease and will return home in the course of a couple of weeks.

D. B. Drake has received word from his folks who are in California to the effect that they had had the ‘Flu’ with the exception of little Dorothy, who escaped the disease.

M. A. Brown has been on the sick list the past week.
— —

Sheriff Macbeth of Butte county, was here a short time Tuesday afternoon, serving an injunction on our quarantine officers, restraining them from interfering with or stopping C. V. Hansen from entering the quarantine.

Harry Holden of Idaho Falls, was in conference with a committee of Challis citizens Thursday afternoon. He has been employed as counsel by the local board of health.

Commissioner Hansen came up as far as the Harry Waters ranch this morning. Mr. Hansen stated that he was not intending to come into town and that a quarantine will be established at Mackay.

Clay Vance a representative of the department of justice was allowed to enter town this morning upon permission of the local board of health. Mr. Vance’s official duty was to be present at the canvass of the vote which is taking place today and had nothing whatever to do with the quarantine.

We are fortunate in having an established quarantine for we believe that it alone is responsible for no “Flu” cases in this district.

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 13 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Challis Messenger., November 13, 1918, Page 7

The prevalence of influenza was responsible for a much lighter vote than would have been cast had health conditions throughout the state been normal. Many did not vote because they were confined to their homes with the disease, while others doubtless did not go to the polls because they desired to avoid coming in contact with some who were probably afflicted with the disease.
— —

Bankers’ Meeting Postponed.

New York. – Indefinite postponement on account of influenza in St. Louis of the convention of the Investment Bankers’ Association of America, which was to have been held there this month is announced.

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 13 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 13, 1918, Page 3

19181112DSM2
City News

Tom Armstrong and wife and three children, who live east of Moscow about six miles, are all ill of influenza.

Mrs. Ethridge, of Viola, formerly Miss Fanny Murphy, is ill of influenza. Her husband and his mother, are also ill of he same disease.

Mrs. Jerry Gelwick and mother, Mrs. E. R. Dewey returned today from Seattle. Mrs. Gelwick has recovered from an attack of influenza. Mr. Gelwick will remain on the coast for the present.

Guy Penwell, whose eyes were badly burned by a premature explosion of gunpowder during Monday’s celebration, is rested easily today. Dr. Carol Smith of Spokane, has stated that unless infection sets in, the sight will be restored.

Elza Griffith, at Camp Eustis, Virginia, is ill of influenza but has not died as was printed by error in yesterday’s paper.

Dr. Carol Smith, who left for Spokane this morning, states that the masks for prevention of influenza are not required now in Spokane.

In order to reduce the stock to a minimum before the quarantine is raised, the Post Exchange at the assay building of the university, will immediately reduce prices on all goods now on hand. …
— —

19181113DSM1-headlineHead of University On Educational Work
President Lindley Makes Statement Concerning S. A. T. C. Status

The question of perhaps greatest importance just now with the S. A. T. C. and the vocational men is the possible effect of the forthcoming peace upon students here in military work.

In an interview with an Argonaut representative, President Lindley says:

“From the first I have believed the plan of vocational training for soldiers was designed by the government to meet the needs of the period of reconstruction as well as the demands of the war. This country has had an insufficient number of men trained in these crafts. The increasing role of machinery in modern life places an increasing premium on such knowledge and skill. What better knowledge could there be for a farmer than a course in general mechanics?

“As to the Collegiate Section, there is much evidence that the United States plans to provide for the education of young soldiers whose school work has been interrupted by the war. It is rumored that the S. A. T. C. is to be established in the American Army in France during the period of further service there and will continue until demobilization.

“It will be remembered that Senator Reed proposed an amendment to the Manpower Bill providing for two years training for all returning soldiers who desire it. Judging from the telegram above quoted, the government realizes a similar obligation to the members of the S. A. T. C. who are now in college. These students entered upon a course of collegiate training for government service. It is hoped and believed that they will be permitted to remain in school long enough to derive a real benefit from the experience.

“Courses of study may be modified to fit the new conditions, but the educational program, I trust, will be carried forward. The man who expects to compete successfully in the new era now dawning will find need for all the training possible. In other words, the man who expects to succeed without scientific training will find himself on the scrap heap.

“This program will not appeal to the men who have no ambition, but those who desire to win promotion and success in the world will appreciate this as a golden opportunity to get ready without expense to themselves for the strenuous days just ahead.”
— —

19181113DSM2Flu Situation Still Demands Caution
Guild Hall No Longer Needed as Hospital – Classes Resume Work

The influenza situations while not quite so encouraging this week as last, is not at present causing undue alarm here. One more death, that of Leland Eddy, of Sandpoint, occurred at 3 o’clock Monday morning.

The admissions for the last few days has shown an increase especially the admissions Friday and Saturday. But the discharges continue, and the hospitals are being emptied of influenza patients.

The guild Hall, which was used for a convalescent hospital, is no longer been closed. [sic]

Classes continue as per schedules. Girls from town are meeting the quarantine restrictions and are moving on to the campus so that they may take up their regular class work.
— —

Princeton Pickings
Many Have Influenza

Mr. Shook’s family are sick with the influenza. Dr. Thompson was called Monday to see Mrs. Shook.

John Lienhart family are all improving, John being the worst.

Mrs. Jock Graves was called to Bovill to see her son, Friday, who has influenza at Dr. Gipson’s hospital. He is improving.

Mrs. C. R. Hawkins has been on the sick list for several weeks, is improving.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 13 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918Atlantic15-a
In Sydney, Australia, nurses leave Blackfriars Depot in Chippenedale during the flu epidemic in April of 1919. NSW State Archives / Tara Majoor

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
— — — — — — — — — —

Nov 14

The Grangeville Globe. November 14, 1918, Page 1

19181114GG1Death Called Mrs. Soltman.
Young Matron Taken by Grim Reaper After Short Illness.

Mrs. William Soltman, aged 25 years and 21 days, passed away at the family residence last Saturday evening after a short illness from pneumonia which followed influenza. Funeral services were conducted in the open air at the residence Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock interment being made at Prairie view cemetery.

Clara Anna Knorr was born October 19, 1893, in Idaho county, Idaho. … On March 16, 1916, she was united in marriage with William J. Soltman. In addition to her husband and two children, Donald Jack, aged twenty months and Christine Clara, aged five months, she is survived by her aged grandfather, D. A. Borcherding, her father, C. B. Knorr, three brothers, Ben, Ed and Walter and five sisters…
— —

News of Close of World War Greeted With Enthusiasm.

On receipt of authentic information that the war had been brought to a close the citizens of Grangeville took a half-holiday and celebrated the event in appropriate style. All business ceased in the afternoon of Monday, the Cowboy band turned out and in addition to rendering patriotic music lead a hastily formed parade around the principal streets. American flags were profusely in evidence and as were also the allied flags.
— —

Influenza About Over.

Very few cases of the “Flu” have come to light since our last publication, and it is confidently believed here that the quarantine can soon safely be lifted. A few cases are confined to the emergency hospital, and all the real serious victims are on the road to recovery.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 14 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Grangeville Globe. November 14, 1918, Page 3

Nine enlisted men of the navy who volunteered to be inoculated with the serum of Spanish influenza to help medical officers gather specific facts regarding the disease and discover the means of combating it, have been commended by Secretary Daniels. The experiment was conducted during the prevalence of the epidemic in the first naval district, Boston, and the volunteers understood the danger to which they exposed themselves for the benefit of others.

The test indicated that the disease is not due to a filtrated virus, as the results were negative. None of the men inoculated contracted the disease. They were isolated for tend days after their inoculation.
— —

As a measure against the further spread of influenza, war workers in Washington, D. C., are taken to their duty every morning by automobile instead of in crowded street cars. The division of transportation of the governmental emergency commission worked out the plan which, it is estimated, provides for the accommodation of 25,000 of these workers every day in privately owned automobiles that volunteer to “give a life” to the man and women – especially the latter. The danger of traveling in crowded street cars is thus removed for them.
— —

Distribution of 20,000,000 food cards among American housewives will be made by the United States food administration on December 1, instead of October 27, as was originally planned. The spread of influenza and the consequent ban on all manner of public gatherings and activities, including patriotic work, prompted the postponement of the campaign.

The new card will contain no regulations regarding either “wheatless” or “meatless” days, but will urge as a whole the careful saving of all edibles, particularly wheat, meat, fats and sugar. It will be necessary for the United States to send 5,750,000 tons more of foodstuffs to the allies this year than last with an almost staggering total of 17,500,000 tones in the coming year in order that 120,000 000 people of these allied nations sitting at a “common table” with America may have stamina to bring th war to a conclusion if peace is not meantime obtained by Germany’s surrender.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 14 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Grangeville Globe. November 14, 1918, Page 8

Dr. W. G. Law, D. C., of Vollmer, who has been in the city for the pat two weeks assisting with the influenza cases, will return to his home on tomorrow morning’s train. The doctor assisted in some of the most stubborn cases in this community.

Al White of the Bradbury Cigar store, is able to be about his room in the Imperial hotel since he received a setback after combating the “Flu.” He has been a very sick man for quite a spell and his friends will be pleased to see him about again.

Dr. Scallon is still confined to his home from the effects of his recent attack of influenza. An abscess formed in the doctor’s ear and he has been having considerable trouble with that member. He expects to be able to attend to his practice shortly, however.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 14 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Wallace Miner. November 14, 1918, Page 1

Big Zinc Producer To Increase Output

Men are being put on at the Interstate-Callahan mine as rapidly as they can be obtained, and mine production has been resumed after a suspension of several months, during which period development work was continued steadily, resulting in large additions to the known ore reserves. It will of course require considerable time to secure an adequate force underground, the difficulty due to the general labor shortages being intensified by the epidemic of influenza. …

source: The Wallace Miner. (Wallace, Idaho), 14 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lincoln County Times., November 14, 1918, Page 1

Now that the fighting is over, the election is over, and the influenza is fast spending its force, we shall have time to give our earnest thought to bettering our farming here on the North Side. We have got to do it to maintain the value of our properties. …
— —

J. F. Sorrels Passes Away.

On last Friday night, in the temporary hospital established in the Eagles Hall, occurred the death of J. F. Sorrels from pneumonia following an attack of influenza. The unfortunate gentleman was sick but a few days and although all possible was done for his recovery, it was not so to be and he answered the call of the grim reaper.

Mr. Sorrels was among the early settlers in Jerome, coming here with his family at an early date to establish his home, and was quite well known over the tract.

The deceased leaves a wife and three sons, the youngest being only 18 months old, who will morning the loss of an affectionate father and husband.

The funeral was held Saturday with interment at Jerome cemetery.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 14 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lincoln County Times., November 14, 1918, Page 4

19181114LCT1
Appleton

The Humphrey homes have been under quarantine the past week. C. H. Humphrey has nearly recovered from influenza, but L. C. Humphrey is still quite sick.

Election passed off with little excitement. A good many voters stayed at home. Booths were placed outside the school house and votes passed in to the judges through the windows. L. C. Humphrey was elected justice of peace and C. H. Smith constable for the third term.

Wm. Sparks’ children were sick last week and placed under quarantine which was lifted Friday.
— —

19181114LCT2
Eldorado Heights

The Stevens and Fuliner families have all been sick with grippe, but are improving at present.

Reginald Bingham has been ill with Spanish influenza for the past three weeks in the hospital at Vancouver, B. C. The latest report is to the effect that he is able to be around again.

The two Lovingood families have ha a siege of influenza. All are improving.

D. Oliver Brown and family are also on the influenza list. They are much improved at present.
— —

Gooding College Notes.

According to the report of President Charles Wesley Tenney, Gooding College will start a number of practical courses for the benefit of those who have not been able to begin school before on account of sickness or of work at home. These courses will commence about Dec. 1 or as soon as the quarantine is raised and will include bookkeeping, shorthand, typewriting, spelling, penmanship, practical English and commercial arithmetic – just the subjects and just the methods for the young men and young women who are somewhat out of touch with regular school conditions and who wish to do as much as possible during the winter months.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 14 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Lincoln County Times., November 14, 1918, Page 5

Notice.
Teachers’ Examination Postponed

By order of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, the teachers’ examination set for Nov. 21, 22 and 23 has been indefinitely postponed. Notice of new dates for holding the examinations will be published later.

Stella Cook, County Superintendent.
— —

Rolland McGuire.

On last Sunday evening at the home of his sister, Mrs. A. Newell in Arcadia Valley, occurred the death of Rolland McGuire, who was a victim of pneumonia. The young man was only 17 years of age and had made his home with his sister since coming to Jerome. The funeral was held Monday with services and interment at Jerome cemetery.
— —

Death of Wm. F. Crowder

On last Monday morning, at the local hospital established in the Eagles Hall occurred the death of William F. Crowder of Boise Ida., from the effect of Spanish influenza, which rapidly developed into pneumonia.

The young man was only 32 years of age and came to Jerome a short time ago where he was engaged with one of the ditch crews on the canal work. …
— —

Mrs. A. Newell.

The little community of Arcadia Valley was saddened on last Monday evening, when the death of Mrs. A. Newell was announced from her home on that day.

This little family have all been the victims of the flu, seven of them being down at one time, resulting in the death of Mrs. Newell and her brother, Rolland McGuire.

The deceased leaves five children, the youngest being only five days old, and the sympathy of the community is extended to these children who are called upon to our the death of a dear parent and one to guide their little footsteps through the pathways of their young life. …
— —

A Promising Career Ended.

On last Sunday morning deep gloom was again cast over our little community when the word was passed out that H. D. Maclear had passed to the great beyond.

Little Mac, as he was more familiarly known among his friends, was stricken about two weeks ago with influenza, which rapidly developed into pneumonia, and although the brave young man put up a most remarkable fight he was unable to withstand the ravages of the disease and answered the final call at noon on Sunday last. …

Harold D,. Maclear was born at Evanston, Ill., on Nov 13th. 1888, making him 30 years of age at the time of his death lacking 3 days. He as untied in marriage about four years ago to Miss Violet Boone of Twin Falls, who , with a little son, Billie of three tender year, is left to mourn the passing of an affectionate father and husband. …
— —

The Local Flu Situation.

Several new cases of flu have developed in Jerome and vicinity during the past week, none of a serious nature, however, and with another doctor in the field temporarily, and some of the nurses relieved from other cases, it is to be hoped that the disease can be brought under control in our midst.

Due precaution is urged on everyone to assist the local officers in their endeavor to stop the epidemic by keeping a strict quarantine and to avoid congregating in any great numbers.
— —

Memorial.

In Memory of Mrs. Stella M. Lawshe

That dread disease,
Sweeping o’er our land,
Has stopped in Jerome
And laid a hand
On one of our young folk, so dear.

A girl in our midst
For over ten years;
We learned to love her,
To comfort her fears
And to share her joys and sorrows.

Though ’tis hard to give
A chum of so long,
Friendly at all times;
We part with a song
In our heart and a tear in our eye.

The tear is there for sorrow,
Yet, through the heart’s pain,
Comes a thought of “Tomorrow”
Fore we’ll meet again
Beyond those Shining Gates.

There is little more to say,
And not much else to do,
But give our lives to God
‘Till He summons us too,
To dwell in the land
Where we live anew.

– By a Friend and Schoolmate, H. A. R.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 14 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Payette Enterprise., November 14, 1918, Page 1

19181114PE1
Personal and Local Mention

Dr. J. C. Woodward was called to Nyssa Sunday evening to attend several cases of Spanish influenza, and on Monday was called to Council to administer to a family who were al very bad with the same disease.

The local Draft Board has received word from the war department to discontinue inducting men for service, but to continue classifying and examining until further notice. men who were enroute to training camps were returned to their homes.

Grace Bowman, who recently came from Crane, Oregon, where she has been rendering valuable service in caring for the sick after the closing of the schools, has received her transportation and will leave today for New York city and from there will go to France where she will act as reconstruction nurse.

Mrs. and Mrs. T. O Mead arrived in Payette a few days ago from La Grande where they are employed as operators of a picture show which closed on account of influenza. After remaining in quarantine four days at the Blair home they received a telegram to return to La Grande as the quarantine had been lifted and the show allowed to run. This would indicate the epidemic had been stamped out at that place.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 14 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Payette Enterprise., November 14, 1918, Page 5

19181114PE2
North Payette

The United War Work Campaign is on this week and every one is eager to give to the limit to help our boys in the Camps here and over there.

Word came last Saturday that Denver Nichols was critically ill with influenza. Before the night the news of his death arrived. Denver had been in Camp Rosecrans about two weeks. He leaves a wife to mourn his loss.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 14 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. November 14, 1918, Page 1

19181114EE1
Victory Celebrated With Glee
Emmett Citizens Turn Out En Masse to Rejoice in Allied Triumph.

The anxiously awaited news, officially confirmed, of the armistice, was announced to this community about 2 o’clock Monday morning, by the continuous blowing of the Mill whistle, and many a sleeping citizen wakened more readily than ever before in his life. Many sprang from their beds and with hasty and abbreviated preparations hurried to join in an impromptu celebration. Guns were fired and several energetic autoists honked out their elation. One car, bearing a bugler, made the rounds, sounding out the reveille, beautiful in the crisp morning air. Those in authority, however thought best to defer the real celebration until 2 p. m. that no one might miss the opportunity of arranging affairs to spend the rest of the day care-free.

Accordingly, in the meantime, floats were being prepared, flags and bunting flamed out from every available place and at 2 o’clock crowds of joyous people lined the streets eager to help celebrate the gladdest hour the modern world has experienced. The weather was ideal and the procession of gala cars, encircling a space of about nine blocks in the center of town emanated a deeper and keener appreciation of the good news than before, and the joyous mingling of band, honking and screaming of autos, shouting, ringing of bells and beating of any noisy instrument available, sent gladdest echoes sounding through out the valley and re-echoing from the hills. …
— —

19181114EE2
The “Flu” Claims Four.
Ralph Vanderdasson and Baby Succumb – Also Son of Dan Nielson

On Tuesday, James Vanderdasson received a message stating that the family of his son Ralph, whose home is on Smiths Prairie, had been stricken with influenza while en route to Emmett. Mr. and Mrs. Vanderdasson and Tom Davidson, a brother of Mrs. Ralph Vanderdasson, left at once to attend them. This message was soon followed by another urging them to make haste; that the baby had died and the father was steadily growing worse, with almost no hope of recovery. Ralph lived, however, until after the arrival of his parents, but soon passed away. The father and babe were buried there yesterday, and the mother is reported better. We are informed that they are being cared for at a ranger’s station where they had been forced by illness to discontinue their journey. The sympathy of the community will go out to the family and the young woman so sadly bereaved.
— —

Theodore Neilson.

Theodore Neilson, who suffered a relapse and pneumonia following influenza, passed away Wednesday morning. He leaves a wife and child about two years of age, and other relatives. His father, Dan Neilson, brother-in-law, Ray Castle from Boise and family came down from Sweet, and uncle Andrew Neilson from Nampa were here to attend the funeral which was held this afternoon.
— —

Thomas Hayes.

Thomas Hayes, the young man who was reported seriously ill last week, died Saturday evening of influenza. He was 17 years old. Undertaker Bucknum took the body overland to Jordan Valley, Ore., to the home of an uncle with whom the young man had made his home for several years. Interment was made Tuesday.
— —

Two Kessler Boys.

Word has been received by friends of the death of William Kessler, Oct. 21, and Nickolas Kessler, Oct. 23 from influenza at their home in Spaulding, Neb. They were sons of the late Peter Kessler and residents of Emmett until about three years ago.
— —

Calls Are Cancelled.

Judge Sutton has received instructions from the War Department to stop the classification of all men over 36 years, and proceed with the classification of all others. All calls have been cancelled.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 14 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. November 14, 1918, Page 2

Tales of Town

The influenza mask is a good tobacco cure, if it is worth nothing else.

According to our calculation, the proper amount of sugar to use is just not so much as you want.
— —

The War Is Won!

The kaiser wore a worried frown,
His under lip he bit.
And moaned: “Mine Gott in Himmel!
Do your women always knit?
No matter what, in rain or storm,
Your boys are always fit,
Because they’re warm in garments
Your women folk have knit;
Mine Gott, Yanks, I quit;
I can’t compete with armies
Whose women always knit.”

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 14 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Emmett Index. November 14, 1918, Page 4

News Of Soldiers

Mrs. Frank Knox this week received word from Portland that her son, Arnold Thommen, engaged in shipbuilding there, is quite ill with appendicitis and the Flu.

Word received this week from Joe Middleton and Ralph Skinner, who are in the special service branch of the army at Moscow, says that the former has been dismissed from the hospital and the latter is in the convalescent ward. Ralph was a very sick boy for three weeks, but though weak, is on the road to recovery. Both of them had influenza. Marion Knox, who accompanied them from here, has been so fortunate as to escape the epidemic.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 14 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. November 14, 1918, Page 8

19181114EE3
Letha

Mrs Pell Johnson was sick in bed with what appeared to be grip last week. She has fully recovered now.

Ralph Vanderdassen lost his baby the other day from Spanish influenza and his wife is very ill. They started out of Smith’s Prairie and were obliged to stop at a ranger station where the baby died.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 14 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. November 14, 1918, Page 1

19181114ICFP1
Grangeville In Celebration Over Signing of Armistice

Grangeville on Monday celebrated Germany’s signing of the armistice by a half-holiday in the afternoon. Stores were closed and business generally was adjourned, while townspeople congregated on Main street. After the Cowboy band had rendered several patriotic selections from the pavilion at the foot of the flag pole, a parade was formed, and headed by the band and followed by men, women and children in serpentine style passed up one side of the street and down the other. Later anvils were placed in the street and powder blasts set off.

The crowd, however was not nearly so enthusiastic in its demonstrations as it was two weeks previous, when word was received that Germany had accepted President Wilson’s peace principles, recognized as the beginning of the end. It seems that most of the crowd’s enthusiasm was spent at that time.

Grangeville did not celebrate the premature armistice report, circulated over the country Thursday of last week.
— —

Girl Dies At Cottonwood
Miss Myrtle Rhett, Aged 18, Succumbs to Influenza.

Miss Myrtle Rhett, 18 years old, died Sunday morning in her home in Cottonwood from Spanish influenza. She was teaching school in Clearwater when taken ill, and later was removed to her home. Surviving her are her mother, Mrs. Olive Rhett and two brothers, Chester, in the U. S. navy, and Wallace, at home. Funeral services were held Monday in Cottonwood, with burial in the cemetery there. A. J. Maugg of Grangeville was called to Cottonwood to assist.
— —

19181114ICFP2
Edw. Steinbach Is Laid Away With Honors
Grangeville Soldier Who Died From Spanish Influenza Buried.
Services at the Grave
Rev. Fr. Phelan Delivers Funeral Sermon in Prairie View Cemetery.

A military funeral was held in Grangeville Wednesday afternoon for Edward Steinbach, Grangeville soldier, who died on November 5, from Spanish influenza, at Camp Rosencrans, Cal. The body arrived in Grangeville Tuesday evening.

The funeral procession, headed by the Grangeville Cowboy band, which played a funeral march, left the Maugg parlor and passed through Main street to Prairie view cemetery. The soldier’s coffin was draped by a large American flag. While the procession passed, and until burial was completed, the municipal flag was flown at half mast. …

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 14 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. November 14, 1918, Page 8

19181114ICFP3
Local News In Brief

Gay Eimers to Return

Gaylord Eimers, son of Mr. and Mrs. John P. Eimers, will shortly be given an honorable discharge from the army, because of physical disability, it is said. Gaylord enlisted last spring, and recently has been in camp in Kentucky. He suffered an attack of Spanish influenza, followed by complications from which he has not recovered.

Dr. P. J. Scallon, who has been confined to his home for the last three weeks by [influenza and] and abscess in the inner left ear, has sufficiently recovered that he is dressed and able to be about the house, but he has not yet ventured outdoors. Dr. Scallon, while in bed, prescribed to a number of patients over the telephone.
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Personal

Miss Florence Murray is again at work in the county auditor’s office, after having been ill with influenza.

The Rev. Fr. Phelan is able to be out, following a severe attack of Spanish influenza.

W. A. Lidquist, claim agent for the Camas Prairie Railroad company is suffering from Spanish influenza. He is in the Grangeville hospital.

Miss Dorothy Barker has recovered from an attack of Spanish influenza, and again is at her post as manager of the local Western Union office.
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19181114ICFP5
Clearwater

Word was received here Tuesday of death of Earnest Gunter in Montana from influenza. The body will be sent here for burial. Mr. and Mrs. Ike Gunter, parents of the young man, will come from Lewiston to attend the funeral.
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Epidemic Now Is Subsiding
Only One Death During Week, and Few New Cases.

The epidemic of Spanish influenza, which has held Grangeville and vicinity in its grip for almost a month, is rapidly subsiding. But one death occurred here during the week, that of Mrs. William Soltman. Some new cases have developed, but none is pronounced to be serious. No definite action has as yet been taken towards opening schools, churches and theaters and other places of public gathering.
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Miss Hazel Calhoun Ill.

Miss Hazel Calhoun, trained nurse, is reported to be seriously ill with Spanish influenza. She is in Cottonwood. Miss Calhoun formerly resided in Grangeville.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 14 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 14, 1918, Page 3

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City News

O. A. Giles of Elk River is ill of influenza at Eureka, Mont.

Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Rambo went to Lewiston last evening to take care of their son, Lawrence, 16 years of age, who is a recent victim of influenza.

Miss Inez Graham, who has been ill of influenza, is improving rapidly.

Mr. and Mrs. Sam L. Silvey have received the sad news of the death of their daughter, Mrs. Mae Platz, of influenza, at Bigger, Canada. Mrs. Platz was well known here having been born 28 years ago near Viola, and living in Latah county most of her life. She leaves a husband and two small children.

Miss Judith Olsen and Miss Anna Sund, students of the university, returned today from their homes at Sandpoint, where they have been during the quarantine.

Mrs. Geo. H. Savage returned last evening from Pullman, leaving her daughter Helen improving slowly. Mrs. Savage was called home by the sickness of little Margery Griffith, who makes her home with Mrs. Savage.

Miss La Vern Savage went to Pullman to take care of her sister, Miss Helen Savage, who is ill of influenza.

Miss Alice Johnson, who is a nurse of the Sacred Heart hospital of Spokane, is home, while convalescing from an attack of influenza, to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Johnson, who live near the university. A son, S. E. Johnson, who is also recovering from a similar attack, returned today from Portland, where he haws been working in the shipyards.

Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Clark have returned to Moscow after two weeks spent at the home of their son, Clyde who, with his wife, has been very sick with influenza, following by pneumonia. Clyde’s condition was so bad that for three days it was feared he would not recover. Both of the young people are doing much better and are regarded as out of danger. They are living on F. A. Clark’s farm in Clinton precinct, west of Moscow, on the Washington side of the state line.
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19181114DSM1
Moscow Ministers Hold A Meeting
Decide to Make No Protest Against Quarantine Rules of Health Board

The ministerial association discussed the quarantine question on Tuesday. Some restlessness was evident but the association resolved to abide by the regulations resolved to abide by the regulations without protest, feeling that the state authorities might be trusted to raise the quarantine at the earliest moment. The question at issue was, wither the state would be dealt with en masse and those places which had stamped the epidemic out by careful and self-sacrificive efforts be obliged to wait until more careless or less fortunate places had reached the safety line. A resolution was forwarded to the state authorities asking that whenever the quarantine be lifted, they would consider the week as commencing with Sunday rather than Monday and so enable the churches, whose week commences on Sunday, to hold services at the earliest possible moment. Sympathy was expressed for these businesses upon which the burden of the quarantine was falling very heavily. Special mention was made of the Creekmur College which has been put out of business and it was questioned whether the holding of its classes could be considered more dangerous than the holding of store sales.

And admirable paper was read by Rev. H. O. Perry on the “Theology of the Social Consciousness,” and the discussion following showed that the ministers were vitally interested in the social aspects of religion.

Mr. Chancy, the new “Y” secretary met with the ministers and arrangements were made for the co-operation of the Y. M. C. A. and the churches. As soon as quarantine is lifted classes for bible and religious study will be opened under the direction of the leading men in town and university and in connection with each church.

Details of the union Thanksgiving service will be published next week.
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Heart Failure Not Influenza Caused Death

It was heart failure, not influenza that caused the death of William Howe, S. A. T. C. man from Laramie, Wyoming, yesterday. The young man had been in usual health the day prior to his death and was working with the other men. He complained of partial blindness and trouble with his heart Tuesday evening and was taken to the hospital and died Wednesday morning. This reduced the number of deaths from influenza in the S. A. T. C. ranks, by one, from the published report.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 14 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Nezperce Herald., November 14, 1918, Page 5

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Local and Personal News Notes

Lost – from Nezperce hospital, heavy plush lap robe; borrowed to bring a sick person to the hospital. please return to Henry Sullivan.

Paul Frank, janitor at the Union State Bank building, went to Lewiston yesterday to take a treatment for the after effects of a severe influenza attack.

Borrowed from Nezperce Hotel during flue epidemic, tray and dishes. Any one finding surplus in their equipment will confer a favor by returning it.

John Conger, received a message Monday that the Washington University at Seattle had lifted its flu quarantine and would reopen Wednesday. He departed Tuesday to renew his studies there.

Among the other donations of food to the hospital during the influenza epidemic here, were several consignments of bread from our erstwhile big hearted bakeryman, Bert Lomax, who is new successfully engaged in the bakery business at Orofino. Nezperce thanks you very much, Bert.

In a letter, with remittance for another year’s subscription, “Jimmy” Kennedy says he will not move to his ranch near Nezperce till spring on account of so much sickness (presumably referring to flu epidemic here), but he will put in a crop here in the spring. In the meantime he is hold down a job at Morton, Idaho.

Adjutant General C. C. Moody departed last night for Boise. He was accompanied by Mrs. E. A. Chaney, clerk in the adjutant’s office at Boise, who has been at Nezperce adjusting records of the war registration there, which during the illness of County Auditor White, and influenza epidemic, had not been kept up to date.

– Lewiston Tribune.
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source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 14 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Further Reading:

It Came Without Warning

By Shelley Kuther Nov 21, 2018

It Came Without Warning is the title of a new book researched and compiled by the Ilo-Vollmer Historical Society in Craigmont. It details the 1918 Spanish flu epidemic and how it touched the lives of those in Lewis County, Idaho, resulting in 65 flu deaths in six months.

This book was undertaken as a 100-year remembrance of the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic, which is said to have killed more people in the United States than died fighting during World War I.

It left a giant footprint in Lewis County, with Nezperce having the highest death toll followed by the Ilo and Vollmer areas.

Using newspaper accounts, death certificates, and documented recollections, the book follows the virus through the months of October 1918 till the end of March 1919, as it sickened a rural population caught unaware with no good means to fight it.

Records indicate that people didn’t necessarily die from influenza but rather from the pneumonia which followed. It was mostly the young, healthy adults who contracted the flu, possibly because they had jobs, chores, or family obligations that kept them from heeding the advice of the medical profession to “go to bed and stay there.”

Thinking about an illness with the power to cause so many people to become ill and many of those stricken to die led to thoughts of how this disease affected the people of this region.

Who were the victims beyond a statistic in the count? What effects, other than the loss of life, did this widespread event have in our small communities and rural areas?

The members of the historical society have compiled information that provides some answers to those questions. Copies of the book may be ordered from The Ilo-Vollmer Historical Society, Box 61, Craigmont, Idaho 83523. For information contact emleachman @ q.com 208-924-5498.

source: Clearwater Tribune

[h/t Constance Reed Pentzer]
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1918AlaskaNativeChildren-a
Alaska Native children from the remote village of Nushagak survived the 1918–1919 influenza pandemic. Most of their parents and grandparents died of the virus, likely because they had not been exposed to an earlier H1-like influenza virus as a result of their geographic isolation. Photo courtesy of Alaska State Library

source: PBS
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Have Americans forgotten the history of this deadly flu?

Nov 16, 2018 PBS

In autumn of 1918, the largest military offensive in American history was raging on Europe’s Western Front. The battle concluded on Nov. 11, 1918, when the Armistice with Germany was signed, ending what was known as the Great War.

But more U.S. soldiers died of disease (63,114), primarily from the Spanish flu, than in combat (53,402).

Overall, 675,000 Americans were killed by the Spanish flu. This number surpasses the total of U.S. soldiers killed in World War I, World War II, the Korean War and Vietnam War combined. Current day estimates put the death toll from the 1918-1919 outbreak of the Spanish flu between 80 to 100 million worldwide.

This “twin catastrophe” was not coincidental, author Kenneth C. Davis writes in his book, “More Deadly Than War: The Hidden History of the Spanish Flu and the First World War.

“Refugees crowding cities, malnutrition, and shortages of doctors, nurses, and effective medications all contributed to the pandemic’s rapid spread and high rates of death,” Davis writes. “But it was the movement of troops — with men crowded together in barracks, tents, and trenches and jammed onto railroad trains and ocean-going troop transports — that was most responsible for the spread of the Spanish flu.”

continued: PBS
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Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)