Author Archives: The Yellow Pine Times

About The Yellow Pine Times

The Yellow Pine Times is a not for profit newsletter dedicated to sharing news and events.

June 20, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

June 20, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Please be conservative when watering lawns. We ask those that are here all week to not water lawns on the weekends so that more water is available for the weekend cabin owners. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!

Happy Father’s Day and Summer Solstice.

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order issued
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit season
May 15 – Firewood Season, permits at The Corner
May 25 – Johnson Creek road fully open
June 7 – Lick Creek road open
June 13 – Profile road open
June 15 thru July 4 – Community Hall Yard Sale
June 26 – South Fork Salmon Season starts
June 26 – Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers Highland Games
July 2-4 Yard Sale Silver Dollar Cafe
July 2-3 Live Music at The Corner
July 3 – Annual Golf Tournament
July 3 – Independence Day Parade 4pm
July 4 – YPWUA 2021 Shareholder Meeting 10am
July 10 – YPFD meeting 10am at Fire Hall
July 10 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
July 11 – Festival Planning Meeting on Zoom 2pm
July 17 – ATV/UTV Escapade 10am
July 21-22 Mastercraft stove maintenance
Aug 14 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
Sept 11 – YPFD Budget Meeting 10am at Fire Hall
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Community Hall Yard Sale – Going on now.

June 15 thru July 4, 2021. At the Community Hall, This self-serve yard sale supports maintenance on the Community Hall. Shop at your leisure; decide what the items are worth to you; and pay one of the volunteers. Easy-peasy

Received a report complimenting on how well things were laid out at the hall.
— — — —

Dust Abatement

The infrastructure committee has determined to use Calcium Chloride this year (same stuff used on the E. Fork.) It is slightly less expensive than the Earthbind. If you are interested in dust abatement this year please let Deb Filler know. She can give you the cost information. If you would prefer the Earthbind (the stuff that was used last year) let Deb know that. If you choose Earthbind, North American Dust Control will bill you directly.

Dust abatement will occur once Landmark is open. (No date set yet as of June 18th, will be coordinated with the EFSF county dust abatement.)
— — — —

The Highland Games are back in Yellow Pine

All day, June 26th. Watch the Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers compete.
— — — —

Yard Sale July 2-4

I am having a huge yard sale between the store and the Silver Dollar July 2nd, 3rd and 4th. Items include restaurant equipment, antiques, tools, building supplies, furniture, electrical wire, stainless steel cable, diesel heaters and much, much more. -S Holloway
— — — —

The Corner July 2-3

Live music at The Corner both Friday and Saturday evenings, starting at 5 p.m.
— — — —

Annual Golf Tournament, July 3rd

Check in at the golf course at 10am. Bring a team or we’ll set one up for you. $20 registration requested. Fun Prizes.

Proceeds support the Village of Yellow Pine
— — — —

Independence Day Parade July 3 4pm

Join us to watch or participate in the annual Yellow Pine Independence Day Parade. All family-friendly entrants are welcome. If you want to participate, meet at the fire house at 315pm.
— — — —

YPWUA 2021 Shareholder Meeting July 4 at 10am

Sunday July 4th 10am Community Hall

1. Financial Report – Willie
A. Willie stepping down as treasurer

2. Operations – Warren
A. Boil order status
B. Leaks

3. Grants – IMPORTANT VOTE BY SHAREHOLDERS TO OBTAIN GRANTS
A. Details of grants
B. Requirements to receive grants
C. More future grants

4. Summer lawn watering
A. Because of our situation lawn watering is discouraged
B. Odd/Even days watering
C. No watering after 2 pm

5. Election of one board member
A. Dave Prouty is not running for another term
— — — —

ATV/UTV Escapade July 17

July 17, 2021: This out-and-back ride is rated as intermediate. Participants ride from Yellow Pine Community Hall to Logan Creek , then return to Big Creek Campground for lunch (provided) and history/stories. After lunch, participants will continue the ride to Pilot Peak. The timeframe of this event is estimated to be from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. Check-in starts at 9:00am; leave at 10:00am. You can register early at (link)
— — — —

Heating Maintenance Day July 21-22

Deb Filler is coordinating with Mastercraft of McCall to schedule a maintenance day in Yellow Pine for propane and pellet stoves. If you are interested, please contact Deb at 208 633-6945. Mastercraft will be here July 21 and 22 to do stove maintenance.
———-

Village News:

Attention

Would the person who borrowed the measuring wheel please return it to the community hall? It will be needed for the festival.
— — — —

Yellow Pine County Club Question

[We] are looking for the names of the golf course holes and distances. We don’t have the name for hole #12, and hope someone might remember or have a record of it somewhere? We can measure the few holes that we guessed at the distances.

1. Humble Pie – 102
2. Double Trouble – 45 paced ?
3. Bitch & Moan – 47 paced ?
4. Deception Alley – 70
5. No Chance! – 80
6. Easy Opportunity – 74
7. So Easy – Sure! – 54 paced ?
8. Timber Alley! – 97
9. Lucky Lady! – 60
10. Branch Buffet – 70
11. Birdie Bargain – 51
12. No name – 60
13. Split decision? – 52
14. Gambler’s Choice! – 80
15. Cream Puff – 73
16. Rock Garden! – 50
17. Unfair Fairway – 82
18. Duffer’s Delight – 47

Contact: Ann F at email: aforsterrn @ aol.com (remove spaces)
— — — —

Abstein Bridge June 14-15

The drillers were in June 14 and 15 to drill test holes on both ends of the bridge. The drill rig blocked the bridge for about 2 hours the first day and 3 hours the second day, although 4-wheelers could get through if necessary.

A report that the crew was very nice and ‘left no trace.’
— — — —

Another Wind Storm

On Tuesday afternoon, June 15th, it was quite windy in Yellow Pine, estimate wind gusts of at least 30mph or higher. The South Fork weather station at Tea Pot Dome registered a maximum gust of 42mph and the station at Stibnite registered a maximum gust of 33mph.

No reports of trees down locally, but on Wednesday the mail truck driver reported trees had come down on Johnson Creek road – but had been cut out by the time he came through. No report on the South Fork route. Be aware there might be trees down on other back country roads.
— — — —

Internet Outage

On Friday morning, June 18th around 1030am Yellow Pine internet went down for about an hour. MTE said it was part of a larger outage. It apparently affected the MTE webcam at the Johnson Creek airstrip as it seems to be “stuck.”
— — — —

Johnson Creek Fly-in

The weekend of June 18-20 was busy at the Johnson Creek Airstrip.

20210618JCairport-a
(courtesy MTE webcam)
— — — —

Conserve (and Boil) Water

Please be conservative when watering lawns. We ask those that are here all week to not water lawns on the weekends so that more water is available for the weekend cabin owners. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!
— — — —

Scrap Metal

Sharing a message that Mike Amos will haul out a load of scrap metal. If you have scrap metal, contact Mike. He has an area by his place to stack it.
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

South Fork Salmon River salmon fishing opens on June 26.

Johnson Creek, Profile Gap and Lick Creek roads are Open. These roads have not been bladed and are rough.

Elk summit was still closed last weekend (June 14) but could be open soon.

Monumental summit is rumored to be open.

Deadwood summit is open from the Landmark side.

The Hwy 55 project Smith’s Ferry area: Starting June 1, crews will transition into their summer construction schedule. Drivers can anticipate single-lane, alternating traffic controlled by flaggers Monday – early Friday morning. From Friday morning – Sunday, and any major holidays, the road will be open to two lanes. This schedule will be in place until September. Project Website link:

The Hwy 55 project from Donnelly to McCall starts soon. One lane during the week and two lanes on weekends. Project is slated to last until September.
— — — —

Critters

Aggressive Deer and Elk

Be aware that mothers will attack dogs and chase people if they feel their babies are threatened. Keep dogs leashed in the forest during “baby season” for their own protection.

Ticks

* Know where to expect ticks. Many ticks live in grassy, brushy, or wooded areas. When possible, avoid wooded and brushy areas with tall grass and leaf litter. Walk in the center of trails, particularly in spring and summer when ticks feed.
* Wear appropriate clothing. When in tick habitats, wear light-colored, tightly woven long pants and long-sleeve shirt. Tuck your pant legs into socks or boots, and your shirt into your pants. This helps keep ticks on the outside of your clothing where you can spot them more easily.
* Use tick repellent when necessary, and carefully follow instructions on the label. Apply an EPA-registered repellent effective against ticks, such as those containing DEET to clothes and exposed skin, and permethrin to clothes and gear. Take care when applying repellent on children. EPA’s search tool can help you find the repellent that best suits your needs.
* Check clothing, gear, and pets after being areas with ticks. Ticks can hitch a ride into your home on clothing and pets, then attach to you or a family member later. Carefully examine coats, camping gear, and daypacks. Don’t forget your dog, see CDC’s where to check your pet for ticks.
* Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming can reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease and may be effective in reducing the risk of other tick-borne disease. Showering can wash off unattached ticks and it is a good opportunity to do a tick check.
* Check your body, your child and pets thoroughly for ticks. Carefully inspect areas in and around the hair, head, neck, ears, under arms, inside the belly button, around the waist, between the legs, and behind the knees. Ticks can be very small before they feed—look for what may appear like a new freckle or speck of dirt. Continue checking for two to three days after returning from areas with ticks.

Pine Martins & Raccoons

Watch your small pets. Reports of pine martins living in the dump and raccoons on the north side of the village.

Be Bear, Fox & Coyote Aware

* Do not feed them human food
* Secure your trash
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Be Mountain Lion Aware

Note: A report of a mountain lion near the upper end of the village in early spring.

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report June 13th: “The bins were half full.”

The bins were emptied May 22nd. Locals worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water. Turn off your trickles.

Update May 14, 2021: Kerry and Dion from Idaho Rural Water were onsite yesterday along with Nicki and me for leak detection in the “downtown” Yellow Pine grid.

Utilizing their leak detection equipment, and Nicki’s knowledge of the distribution system, Kerry and Dion successfully located a number of leaks including a large leak at a fire hydrant. The fire hydrant was turned off and Tim, the fire chief, was notified that the hydrant is not operational.

Many small leaks were identified and marked, but of particular concern is the waterline that runs under the alley behind the hotel and all the way down to the community center. Numerous active leaks were located in that section. So many leaks exist along the alley that the best course of action is probably replacing the entire run of pipe.

Nicki followed up after the guys left and using her tablet and GPS program, accurately recorded the location of all the leaks identified. Now that a record of the leak locations exists, prioritization of the leaks and a plan to repair them can be developed.

Kerry and Dion were very thorough and helpful, and the work they completed will be beneficial to reducing demand on the system as a whole. Based on today’s daily system data, reported this morning by Nicki, it appears that daily demand was reduced by approximately 10,000 gallons as a result of yesterday’s work.

Regards, Warren Drake, Drake Diversified LLC

Update May 13, 2021: Cecil, Tom and Ron fixed a leaking valve which resulted in saving 5000 gallons of water!

Update May 6, 2021: The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an application with the USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility planning grant. If any additional information is needed please contact: Willie Sullivan, Treasurer Ypwater @ gmail.com

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Your Water Before Using
Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020.
Link: to Notice
— — — —

VYPA News:

June 12 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall (no minutes yet)
Agenda link to: 2021 June VYPA Agenda.docx

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Secretary
Ron Noel, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)

Festival
Want to join YPAC Corp in making a difference? We are raising money to benefit the Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival . Any donation will help.
Each year, during the first full weekend of August, the sleepy mountain village of Yellow Pine is transformed into the largest festival of it’s kind in the western hemisphere!
The festival is produced by volunteers and raises funds to support the village of Yellow Pine as well as the funds needed to hold next year’s festival.
As you all know, the 2020 festival had to be cancelled due to Covid-19. This placed a significant burden on Yellow Pine to come up with enough funding to hold the 2021 festival this August 5, 6, 7.
Souvenirs and events at the festival help raise funds. We also know there are many of you who support the festival, but are not able to attend. This fund raiser is to give you an opportunity to help us help Yellow Pine.
Thanks in advance for your tax-deductible contribution to this cause that means so much to us!
GoFundMe link:

Anyone interested in being a part of the Festival Planning/Working committee, please contact Deb Filler. Meetings will begin at the end of January. Even if you aren’t physically in YP, you can participate in the committee.
Next Festival Planning July 11, 2021 – Contact Deb for Zoom link and passcode.
2021 Planning Notes updated June 6, 2021 (link)
Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival Policy and Procedure Link:
— — — —

YPFD News:

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful.
link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021.pdf

June 12, 2020 – 10am Fire siren test and YPFD meeting (no minutes yet.)

May 15, 2020 – there was a YPFD meeting 10am at the Fire Hall.
Link: to 20210515 YPFD MeetingNotes_Final.docx

The Fire Station recently had a propane heater installed. The heater will be a great addition to the fire station. It will be more efficient at keeping the station above freezing during the winter, especially since we keep water in the engines so they are ready to roll if an emergency occurs. It will also make it more pleasant to hold meetings at the fire station. Big thanks to Fire Chief Tim Rogers for coordinating this.

Meeting schedule for the YPFD. All meetings are at the YPFD Station
Sat. May 15 at 10am
Sat. June 12 at 10am
Sat. July 10 at 10am
Sat. September 11 at 10am Budget Meeting

YP Fire District 2 (east of Yellow Pine Ave) up for election Nov 2nd for 4 year term (per Valley County.) Link:

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30, 2020 at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by a escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Tim Rogers – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
Hours: 1pm-8pm, closed on Tuesdays
We offer smoked tri tip, brisket, and chicken sandwiches and also burgers and chicken wings.
Firewood Permits available May 15th.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Yellow Pine Tavern open daily:
Monday thru Thursday 8am to 9pm
Friday and Saturday 8am to 10pm
Sunday 8am to 8pm
Indoor Dining with limited seating and Outdoor Dining Available.
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer, Wine and Pop
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Opened June 12th for Summer
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
The store is now receiving inventory of Food items. The ATM is operational, and Debit/Credit cards are accepted. Currently there is fuel, ice, alcoholic beverages (non liquor) tobacco, non alc beverages, snacks, and Dairy items (ice cream, milk, butter, and yogurt). Fresh produce is soon to come. Times may be in flux as we adjust to trends, but more or less the summer hours are going to be from 10-5pm, Monday – Saturday, and Sunday 10-3pm. If there are needs for fuel or anything during off hours, Josh will be around on call to accommodate. For any particular store item requests, please call 208-633-3300 or Email
For room reservations, please call 208-633-3300 or Email for reservations
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation – (208) 382-4844

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (June 14) overnight low of 48 degrees, this morning clear sky, warm and light breeze. Johnson Creek is running 800CFS below median. Some early air traffic. Woodpecker drumming on the power pole, a few swallows, finches and jays calling, ground squirrels running around. Sunny and hot at lunch time. Sunny, light breeze and hot early afternoon. Quite hot late afternoon, mostly clear and light breeze, high of 93 degrees. Starting to cool down some before dusk and mostly clear sky.

Tuesday (June 15) overnight low of 49 degrees, this morning partly cloudy and hazy sky. A few tree swallows, finches and robins calling, a couple of jays flying around, ground squirrels scampering about. Nice breezes before lunch time and warming up. Gusty breezes at noon. Windy by 2pm, estimate gusts of 30+mph. A hummingbird and a couple of evening grosbeaks stopped by. Cooling off late afternoon, breezes gusting up once in a while and partly cloudy, high of 82 degrees. Pleasant temperatures after sunset, calmer and mostly clear. Getting breezy again at dusk.

Wednesday (June 16) overnight low of 45 degrees, this morning clear sky and light breeze. Loud air traffic. Tree swallows taking feathers to nests, robins, a few finches and jays calling. Mail truck was a bit late, but no problems reported (fallen trees had been cut out on Johnson Creek route.) Clear, warm and light breezes after lunch time. Warm sunny afternoon with light breezes, high of 84 degrees. Colombian and golden mantled squirrels running about, a few finches visiting. Clear, warm and light breeze early evening. Very pleasant after sunset, clear sky and fairly calm. Stars out before midnight.

Thursday (June 17) overnight low of 40 degrees, this morning clear sky and light breeze. Light air and street traffic. Tree swallows taking feathers to nests, robins, a few finches and jays calling. Sunny, warm and light breeze at lunch time. Sunny and hot with stronger breezes mid-afternoon, high of 87 degrees. Clear and almost calm early evening, still pretty warm. Breezes kicking up at sunset. Cooling off, calmer and clear at dusk. Stars out before midnight Mars is rising just above Golden Gate peak.

Friday (June 18) overnight low of 40 degrees, this morning clear sky and light breeze. Light (and loud) early air traffic. Not as many tree swallows nesting here this year, a few robins and finches calling. Internet down around 1030am to a little after 1130am. Clear, warm and light breezes at lunch time. Getting hot, light breezes and almost clear early afternoon. Hot and clear late afternoon, high of 91 degrees. Waxing moon in the sky. Light early evening air traffic. Cooling off nicely before dusk. Stars out before midnight.

Saturday (June 19) overnight low of 44 degrees, this morning clear sky and light breeze. Quite a few (loud) airplanes flying over the village. Johnson Creek is running less than 1/3 of normal flow. More swallows around and gathering nesting materials, a robin and a few finches calling. Warming up pretty good by lunch time. Hot and sunny afternoon, estimated high of 87 degrees (gizmo on the fritz.) Still pretty warm early evening, clear and breezy. Warm, clear and calm before dusk. Stars out before midnight.

Sunday (June 20) overnight low of 44 degrees, this morning partly clear sky (mostly small clouds) and light breezes. Constant air traffic since daylight, some low and loud. Robins and swallows calling, finches visiting. Pine squirrel stopped by, ground squirrels running about. Warm, partly cloudy and breezy at lunch time. Hummingbirds visiting. Hot afternoon, breezy and a few clouds, high of 86 degrees. Still warm and almost clear by early evening and breezy.
——————

RIP:

Darrell Merlin Hathaway

Hathaway, Darrell, 66, of Meridian, passed away Monday, June 14, 2021 at his home with his family by his side.

Arrangements are under the care of Accent Funeral Home and Cremation, Meridian.
— — —

The world is short one more honorable man today.

Darrell Hathaway, or “Dary”, for short, passed away in Meridian this morning of natural causes.

He was a fixture of Yellow Pine for many years. Attending school before his family moved to Atlanta. His mom, Georgia Alred, passed away last December. His sister just a few years ago. Dary worked at Quartz Creek mines for Fay Kissinger before joining the Navy. And returned to work at Thunder Mountain and at Stibnite Mines after his tour of duty in Vietnam.

For the last 10 years, Dary had worked as a caregiver in Garden Valley, living with a wheelchair bound fellow disabled Vietnam veteran, to assist him with daily chores.

Not everyone who knew Dary would call him “friend”. But everyone who knew him knew that he was someone they could count on in their time of need.

Scott A.
—————–

Independence Weekend:

4th of July Preview

The Star-News June 17, 2021

Below are brief descriptions of some of the local events scheduled for the 4th of July holiday. …

Yellow Pine to offer music, golf tourney, parade, fireworks

The tiny community of Yellow Pine east of McCall will host a full slate of Independence Day events, including live music, a golf tournament, parade, and fireworks.

Live music will be featured at The Corner both Friday and Saturday evenings, starting at 5 p.m.

The Annual Golf Tournament begins Saturday, July 3, at 10 a.m. at the Yellow Pine “golf course.” A donation of $20 per person is requested and includes a ticket for a beverage. Additional beverages will be available for purchase.

Prizes will be awarded for first, second and third place for teams. Proceeds will help support the Village of Yellow Pine.

The annual Independence Day Parade will begin at 4 p.m. on Saturday, July 3. To participate, meet at the fire house at 3 p.m. All family-friendly entries are free and welcome.

full story:
—————–

Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 87 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

June 17, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 87 new COVID-19 cases and zero new deaths Thursday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 194,006.

There are a total of 155,288 confirmed cases and 38,718 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state. …

The state said 702,880 people have received the vaccine, and 1,292,452 total doses have been administered. 637,197 people are fully vaccinated. …

The age group with the most cases is 18-29 with 48,359 cases.

The state said 11 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 8,729, and 3 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 1,471. …

409 vaccine breakthrough cases have been reported.

Zero new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 2,122.

full story: [Valley Co 854 Cases, 6 deaths.]
— — — — — — — — — —

Vax Rate at 56.6%

The Star-News June 17, 2021

The total of eligible Valley County residents who had received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine topped 56% this week, the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare reported.

A total of 56.6% of Valley County residents age 12 and older had received the vaccine as of Monday, up from 54.7% two weeks ago, or a total of 5,668 out of 10,017 eligible residents, the H&W said.

A total of 765 positive cases have been reported in Valley County since the pandemic entered the county in the spring of 2020.

St. Luke’s McCall reported four new cases since June 1.

Cascade Medical Center reported two new cases on Tuesday, the first positive cases report by the hospital since March 17, CEO Tom Reinhardt said.

“Just when we think we’re in the clear, the virus reminds us that it is always ready to attack and that our work isn’t done to protect the community,” Reinhardt said.

continued:
— — — —

St. Luke’s mobile COVID-19 vaccine unit to visit area next week

By Tom Grote for The Star-News June 17, 2021

The St. Luke’s mobile COVID-19 vaccine unit will offer free walk-up COVID vaccinations in McCall, New Meadows and Riggins next week.

The retrofitted RV will make the following stops:

• McCall: Tuesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., The Terrace/Ponderosa Center, next to Hotel McCall across from Legacy Park

• Riggins: Wednesday, 8 a.m. to noon, St. Luke’s Clinic – Salmon River Family Medicine, 214 Main Street

• New Meadows: Wednesday, 2:30 to 6 p.m., St. Luke’s Clinic – Meadows Valley Family Medicine, 320 Virginia St.

• McCall: Thursday, June 24, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m., Marketplace at McCall (Ridley’s/Rite Aid), corner of Deinhard Lane and North 3rd Street.

Anyone age 12 or older can receive a vaccine regardless of whether or not they live or work in Idaho.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

At-home COVID-19 tests now available for free in Idaho

By Meredith Spelbring Jun 15, 2021 KIVI

At-home COVID-19 tests are now available to all Idahoans.

The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare announced Tuesday Idaho residents can get a free, at-home test by calling 211. No personal information will be request aside from a name and mailing address, according to the department.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Work starts Monday on Idaho 55 from McCall to Donnelly

Winter weather, traffic broke up surface laid in 2010

By Tom Grote for The Star-News June 17, 2021

Eleven miles of Idaho 55 between Donnelly and McCall will get new pavement under a project to start on Monday by the Idaho Department of Transportation.

The $3.25 million project is scheduled to be finished in August, ITD Public Information Officer Jake Melder said.

The entire width of the highway will be repaved, but areas of the road that have broken up due to weather and traffic will get special attention, Melder said.

“For sections of damaged pavement, we will repair the base, and place a fresh layer of asphalt on top to provide a smooth riding surface,” Melder said.

Also targeted for repair is a culvert crossing just south of McCall that has had trouble with heaving during the winter, he said.

continued:

Link: to ITD project
— — — — — — — — — —

Dane Jackson wins the North Fork Championship, Sage Donnelly is the queen of NFC IX

By Steve Dent Jun 20, 2021 KIVI

Crouch, Idaho — Dane Jackson once again had the fastest lap in the North Fork Championship, Dane successfully defended his title as the king of the North Fork and the win marked his third in the last four years.

Jackson also won the boater cross and had the fastest qualifying lap becoming the first racer to ever win the triple crown at this extreme whitewater kayaking event.

Sage Donnelly competing in her first NFC coming from a slalom background earned the title of queen of the North Fork, Natalie Anderson finished second and Darby McAdams rounded out the podium for the ladies.

continued: w/videos
————–

Public Lands:

The South Fork of the Salmon watershed showcases the remote wilderness we have in Idaho

By Steve Dent Jun 20, 2021 KIVI

Yellow Pine, Idaho — The South Fork of the Salmon River didn’t make the list of America’s most endangered rivers in 2021, but it did make that list all three years prior. …

One of the things we haven’t been able to do is showcase the South Fork of the Salmon watershed so my brother Scott and I embarked on a three-day, two-night self-support kayaking expedition that took us 58 miles through this remote wilderness finishing up after the confluence of the Main Salmon.

The South Fork of the Salmon has long been a favorite trip for experienced kayakers who paddle this whitewater rollercoaster at over six feet when it becomes a full-on class five trip, we did it at 4.5 feet.

full story: w/videos
— — — — — — — — — —

Out-of-state fees to rise at Ponderosa, other state parks

Camping fees for out-of-state visitors will increase to double that of residents at five of the busiest state parks, including Ponderosa State Park, to comply with a new Idaho law.

Out-of-state campers will pay $48 a night for a basic campsite and $64 a night for a site with full hookups at Ponderosa, Farragut, Henrys Lake, Priest Lake and Round Lake state parks. Residents will pay $24 and $32, respectively, for the fees.

The changes were implemented to comply with House Bill 93, which also specifies in-creases to entry fees for non-residents at five of the state’s busiest parks.

Non-resident daily entry fees increased to $14 at Bear Lake, Farragut, Hells Gate, Priest Lake and Round Lake. Cost for Idaho residents is $7.

continued: The Star-News June 17, 2021
— — — — — — — — — —

Bureau of Reclamation to increase flows, could mean shorter rafting season on Payette

by CBS2 News Staff Monday, June 14th 2021

The Bureau of Reclamation says it has started to increase flows at Cascade and Deadwood dams to help with irrigation and salmon migration.

Runoff volume in the Payette River basin is running at about 58 percent of normal.

“Flows are anticipated to support recreational floating on the North Fork and South Fork Payette rivers,” the Bureau of Reclamation said. “However, dry conditions will likely result in lower river stages and shorter rafting season this summer.”

source:
——————–

Fire Season:

How you can prepare for the above-normal expected fire season

By Anna Azallion Jun 15, 2021 KIVI

The National Interagency Fire Center is predicting an above-normal fire season in Idaho, and there are things you should do to prepare for it now.

The warmer and drier conditions in Idaho are one of the reasons for this above-normal fire potential. High temperatures, like those expected this week, are unusual for this time of year, and the state of Idaho is experiencing different levels of drought. …

“The Bureau of Land Management Boise District’s ten-year average points to vehicle-related fires as our number one cause over the last ten years each fire season, and that can be from UTVs, motorcycles, vehicles on the highway, trailers,” said Jared Jablonski, a BLM fire information officer.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise National Forest says employees put out over 400 abandoned campfires in 2020

by CBS2 News Staff Sunday, June 20th 2021

The Boise National Forest is asking for help in reducing human-caused wildfires in Idaho.

Forest officials said a campfire is “out” only when it is cool to the touch.

Boise National Forest Fire Prevention employees located and extinguished over 400 abandoned campfires in 2020.


The photos provided show a campfire that still holds heat.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

IDL firefighters have responded to 99 wildfires in Idaho so far

By Katie Kloppenburg Jun 17, 2021 KIVI

Firefighters with the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL) have already responded to 99 wildfires on state and private lands protected by the IDL. So far this year, the fires have burned 433 acres on these lands.

IDL firefighters and Clearwater-Potlatch Timber Protective Association and Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association crews have held 90 fires to less than 10 acres. Many of the fires were contained at less than an acre, according to IDL.

“It’s early in the fire season, and we’ve already seen three times as many acres burned this year over the 20-year average,” said Josh Harvey, IDL’s Fire Bureau Chief. “Unfortunately, 95% of these fires were human-caused and could have been prevented. We are ready to suppress fires, but we need the public to help us by not starting wildfires.”

continued:
—————

Critter News:

Idaho camper shoots family dog, mistaking it for wolf

June 16, 2021 AP

A family has said their pet dog is recovering after she was shot twice last weekend by a camper in Idaho who mistook her for a wolf.

The pet is actually an Alaskan malamute.

The Idaho Statesman reported Rob Kolb and his daughter started their backpacking trip on Friday in central Idaho with their dog named Suki.

The next morning, they woke up to multiple gunshots.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho dog recovering after being shot multiple times

Katie Terhune June 18, 2021 KTVB

A dog is expected to make a full recovery after he was found with multiple gunshot wounds in Gooding County earlier this month.

Dave Wright, the rescue coordinator at Friends Furever Animal Rescue in Twin Falls, said the black retriever he calls Garth had been shot with a shotgun, a pellet gun, and a .22, leaving him riddled with ammunition and near death.

Garth was found after a resident of Gooding County called dispatch to report what they believed was a dog hit by a car at about 7:15 p.m. on June 5. Wright, whose organization works closely with law enforcement, drove out to the scene along with Gooding County Sheriff’s deputies to search.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

2 conflicts with deer and dogs reported in Pocatello’s Johnny Creek

June 17, 2021 Local News 8

For the second time in a week, a deer-dog altercation in the Johnny Creek area has been reported to the Idaho Fish and Game office in Pocatello.

In both incidents, homeowners reported encounters between mule deer does and pet dogs that have resulted in the pets requiring veterinary attention.

Deer will act defensively when approached by dogs and people, especially if there are fawns in the picture. In one of the incidents, a fawn was actually seen in the vicinity of the doe before the confrontation with the dog took place.

continued: w/tips to protect dogs
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Humane Society getting ‘alarming number’ of calls for pets locked in hot cars

by Ryan L Morrison Tuesday, June 15th 2021 CBS2

The Idaho Humane Society said Tuesday it’s responding to an “alarming number” of calls for pets locked in hot cars.

IHS says officers responded to 29 calls in May, primarily centering around Memorial Day weekend.

In just the first two weeks of June, IHS has received 31 calls, 24 of which were in the city of Boise.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Gallery: Sheep take over mountain road near Tamarack Resort

June 14, 2021 CBS2

link: to slide-show
— — — — — — — — — —

‘Fish salvage’ issued for Magic Valley reservoir due to drought conditions

The order was issued due to irrigation water being shut off following drought conditions at the Big Wood River.

KTVB Staff June 14, 2021

Idaho Fish and Game (F&G) announced Monday that a ‘fish salvage’ for the Richfield Canal and the Big Wood River below Magic Dam is in effect. The order was issued due to irrigation water being shut off following drought conditions.

The Big Wood Canal Company notified F&G that the gates to the Magic Dam would close on June 10, causing flow reductions into the Big Wood River below the dam and Richfield Canal.

The gates were closed early due to ongoing regional drought conditions in the Big Wood River Basin. In a normal year, there is enough water to keep the gates open until the first weeks of October.

continued:
—————

Fish & Game News:

Chinook Salmon Seasons and Rules

South Fork Salmon River

Current Season Status: Scheduled to Open
River Code: 21
Stream Name: South Fork Salmon River
Lower Boundary Description: Bridge on Forest Service Road 48 (Lick Cr-East Fork South Fork Road) where it crosses mainstem South Fork Salmon River
Upper Boundary Description: Posted boundary approximately 100 yards downstream from the Idaho Fish and Game South Fork Salmon River weir and trap.
Season Date Range: Saturday, June 26, 2021 – 5:30 AM MDT
Daily Limit: 4 salmon per day, only 1 may be an adult
Possession Limit: 12 salmon, no more than 3 may be adults
Legal Harvest: Adults Jacks

Notes: Open Saturday June, 26 and Sunday June 27, then four (4) days per week; Friday through Monday until the season is closed

Special Note: Fishing with bait for Chinook Salmon is allowed on the South Fork Salmon River

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

F&G Commission amends wolf hunting and trapping seasons to align with new state law

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Thursday, June 17, 2021

New seasons take effect July 1

During a conference call on Thursday, June 17, Idaho Fish and Game Commissioners amended current wolf trapping and hunting seasons in response to recent legislative direction.

The amended seasons take effect on July 1, consistent with the effective date of Senate Bill 1211. Changes will not be reflected in the current printed 2021 Big Game Seasons and Rules brochure, but an updated brochure with the changes will be available on Fish and Game’s website by July 1.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wildlife Express Newsletter

Summer 2021

link: (PDF file)
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Backyard Squirrel Maze 1.0 – Ninja Warrior Course


————–

Seasonal Humor:

SquirrelCheeks-a

CovidCoffeeMasks-a
————–

Idaho History June 20, 2021

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 62

Idaho Newspaper clippings November 4-11, 1919

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

November 4

Evening Capital News., November 04, 1919, Page 7

19191104ECN1

In The Panhandle Of The State

Lewiston – The annual report of the officers of the Lewiston chapter of the American Red Cross shows that the membership of the chapter, comprising Nez Perce, Idaho and Lewis counties, is now 8,769. Lewis county has [1,796], Idaho county 2,794 and Nez Perce county 4,179. During the influenza epidemic of a year ago the chapter expended over $8,000 in relief work in the three counties. Several hospitals were maintained and trained nurses secured from coast points to aid the stricken communities. The grand total of articles manufactured by the women of the chapter, including garments, hospital supplies and surgical dressings is 128,429. The canteen department reports that 1,265 returning soldiers and sailors were served with lunches at the depot. The junior Red Cross has 86 auxiliaries and 2,664 members in the three counties.

Lewiston – Women and girls of high school age from all over Nez Perce county are to have the privilege of taking a home nursing course under the instruction of a specially trained Red Cross nurse employed by the Lewiston Red Cross chapter.

Wallace – A mass meeting was held here Wednesday night to discuss the daylight saving system. About 40 residents were present and voted in favor of adopting mountain time. this would mean that instead of turning the clock back next Sunday one hour Wallace time would not be changed and Wallace would have the same time as is used in Missoula. It would also change the departure and arrival of all O. W. R. A. & N. trains one hour later and the city would have the same time as the Northern Pacific. In other words, the time situation would be exactly reversed from what it is now. The opinion of the meeting was not unanimous and the resolution calling on the city council to go on record as favoring mountain time was made with the proviso that that time is adopted throughout the district.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 04 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. November 04, 1919, Page 5

19191104BFH1

Local Pick-ups

Miss Katherine Egan is convalescing from an attack of the Spanish influenza.

William (“Buddie”) Kinnear has been quite sick the past week with influenza but is now reported as improving.

Mrs. A. B. Ashby is critically ill at her home with Spanish influenza. Drs. Fry and Faucett today reported her conditions somewhat improved.

The schools of Independent School District No. 4 began today the serving of soup and hot lunches. This service is in charge of the domestic science department of which Miss Dorothy Spurling is in charge.
— —

News Notes From Leonia

The two little Fuller children have been taken from the Curley Creek school in Montana, to Leonia, Idaho, to complete the required number of children needed to keep the Leonia school going. Five of the six pupils in the Leonia school belong in Montana districts.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 04 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Market Day at Peck, Idaho ca. 1911

Peck1911Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

November 5

Evening Capital News., November 05, 1919, Page 8

19191105ECN1

Charities Body Joins City Welfare Plans
Miss Bray Named Superintendent at Annual Meeting – Red Cross to Be Asked for Appropriation for Social Service

Further co-operation in the city welfare work is assured by the action of the Associated Charities of Boise in its annual meeting Tuesday night, when Miss Elizabeth Bray, city welfare director, was chosen as superintendent of the organization. A resolution was also passed authorizing a committee to urge upon the executive board of the Red Cross an appropriation for public health and welfare work.

The meeting was held at the mayor’s office in the city hall, Charity work on the last year and plans for the year to come were discussed. Miss Bray told the members what she has learned in her investigations since assuming her office and made recommendations bearing on the employment of a regular social service worker.

Treasurer Charles M. Kahn reported total expenditures during the year of $4,931, and total receipts of $5,465. An additional fund raised by the Commercial and Rotary clubs brought in $2,600, of which $1,000 has been used. Disbursements were heavier than usual because of the influenza epidemic last winter. …

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Challis Messenger., November 05, 1919, Page 2

19191105CM1

19191105CM2

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Street Scene, Pierce, Idaho

PierceFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

November 6

Evening Capital News., November 06, 1919, Page 16

19191106ECN1

Monthly Review of County Agent Work in This State Given by University Extension Department

The extension department of the University of Idaho, headquarters in Boise, has issued a monthly review of the activity of county agent work in various counties in the state. …

Bannock

Livestock – The livestock co-operative shipment from two communities did not turn out so well as expected on account of the poor condition of stock and flood of Kansas City market. A loss of about $2 per head below local prices was sustained in this venture. State and federal veterinaries have been assisting in the control of the influenza among the horses, a number having died from the results of this disease, but it seems to be checked by the use of the serum and many are demanding the vaccination of their animals. …

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 06 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Filer Record., November 06, 1919, Page 11

19191106FR1

19191106FR2Surgeon General Blue On The “Flu”

19191106FR3“Flu” cost 500,000 lives in the United States. Will it come back this year? This question, being asked by thousands of scientists and millions of laymen throughout the world, is discussed by Surgeon General Blue of the Public Health Service in an official bulletin, in which it is said that the plague probably will reappear, but not in as severe a form as last winter.

“Probably, but by no means certainly, there will be a recurrence of the influenza epidemic this year,” said General Blue. “Indications are that should it occur it will not be as severe as the pandemic of the previous year. City officials, state and city boards of health, should be prepared in the event of a recurrence. The fact that a previous attack brings immunity in a certain percentage of cases should allay fear on the part of those afflicted in the previous epidemic.

“Influenza is spread by direct and and indirect contact. It is not yet certain that the germ has been isolated or discovered, and as a consequence there is yet no positive preventive, except the enforcement of rigid rules of sanitation and the avoidance of personal contact.[“]

General Blue says that evidence points strongly to infected eating and drinking utensils, especially in places where food and drink are sold to the public, as being one of the modes of transmission of this disease.

source: The Filer Record. (Filer, Idaho), 06 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 06, 1919, Page 3

19191106DSM1

19191106DSM2‘Flu’ Spread By Handshake
Dirtier the Atmosphere, the More Immune One is to Disease, Says Colonel Vaughn.

St. Louis, Mo. – There is no indication of an epidemic of influenza this winter, according to speakers at the convention of the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States here.

One method of spreading the disease is by handshaking, it was said.

Col. Victor C. Vaughn [sic], in an address, declared the dirtier the atmosphere and the more bacteria one breathed, the more immune he would be to disease. This was proved, he said, by statistics complied during the war, which showed that the greatest death rate from disease was among men from rural districts.

“The city-reared man,” he asserted, “is accustomed to breathing filthy air, while the country-bred man is not, and consequently a foul atmosphere will affect the latter sooner than the former.”

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 06 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Nezperce Herald., November 06, 1919, Page 1

19191106NH1

Death of Leander Smith

Leander R. Smith, who came to the Mohler section from Omaha, Neb., some two weeks ago to visit his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Smith and his sister, Mrs. Harley Brannon, died on October 31 from the effects of an attack of influenza suffered by him a year ago

The funeral was conducted from the home of his parents at 11 a.m last Sunday by Rev. Geo. H. Ellis, and the remains were laid to rest in the Nezperce cemetery.

The deceased was born near Leslie, Iowa; 36 years ago, and besides his parents, leaves a brother and two sisters, all of whom were at his bedside except the brother, whose home is in Kansas City, Mo.

The bereaved family has the sympathy of the community in this sad experience which so untimely came to them.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 06 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Main Street, Plummer, Idaho ca. 1912

Plummer1912Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

November 7

Evening Capital News., November 07, 1919, Page 3

19191107ECN1

Tuberculosis And The Christmas Seal Sale

By M. S. Parker

In some of the states of the Union nearly one-fifth of the deaths caused by preventable diseases during the first six months of this year resulted from the dread disease tuberculosis, notwithstanding the epidemic of influenza that swept over this country during the early months. Idaho had its full portion of mortality from that cause. During the past few years hundreds of citizens of the Gem state have fallen victims of tuberculosis and the situation is worse now than ever before, being augmented by influenza.

And severe as was the epidemic, influenza caused but a little less than twice as many deaths the first half of this year in most sections of the United States as did the “great white plague.”

Officials everywhere are emphasizing this appalling fact in urging wholehearted support by the citizens of the annual Christmas Seal sale, the purpose of which, in the main, is to raise funds with which to fight tuberculosis, indeed a very humanitarian purpose, and there should be generous response to the appeal among the people in every walk of life.

Funds raised through the sale of millions of seals to be offered the public as health investment this fall will be used during the coming year, not only to fight tuberculosis, but other preventable diseases as well. Idaho’s allotment of the $6,500,000 fund to be raised throughout the nation in the campaign headed by the National Tuberculosis association is not large and I am sure the state will make a very gratifying showing.

It may be assumed that the general public does not fully realize the menace of tuberculosis because the disease is not surrounded by so many dramatic features as was the influenza epidemic which was given such very general publicity.

The people must be brought to realize that tuberculosis is not only one of the greatest enemies of the human race but that it can be prevented and can be cured, if treatment is not too long delayed.

The campaign against tuberculosis as well as other preventable diseases must be carried into every county in Idaho next year but only by generous purchase of Christmas Seals can it be done, at least in a manner that the situation demands. Citizens of Idaho, don’t fail to meet your share of the responsibility in this important matter.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. November 07, 1919, Page 1

19191107CC1

Red Cross Wants 10,000
Membership of Idaho, Nez Perce and Lewis counties 8800

When the citizens of Idaho, Lewis and Nez Perce Counties give their dollars for membership in the Red Cross, it must not be forgotten that several thousands of these membership dollars will be spent in these three counties during 1920.

In the first place, the splendid Public Health program now being started by the Red Cross will soon be under way in the Lewiston Chapter. Two nurses have already been engaged and in addition to this public health work, the Chapter has employed a graduate nurse for each of the three counties to give instruction in Home Hygiene and Care of Sick. Every community in the chapter jurisdiction will have this wonderful opportunity to better public and individual health conditions, at no expense to those taking the courses. Your membership dollars help pay for this greatly needed work.

Another branch of Red Cross activity now being conducted by the Lewiston Chapter in behalf of returned service men of the three counties, is the Home Service Section.

Up to the present time the Home Service Section of the Lewiston chapter has attended to over 400 cases of soldiers and sailors in Lewis, Idaho and Nez Perce Counties, 88 of these men were disabled in some manner, and are receiving special attention Ten of them are tubercular; fourteen have received treatment in hospitals; many have received financial aid for their families. In all these cases the Lewiston Red Cross chapter has supplemented and aided the government in every possible way. A trained secretary is employed to give assistance in all cases of need. The secretary keeps in touch with all service men who have needed advice or aid, and with all families in similar need. This work is supported entirely by your Red Cross dollars, and will continue until the last man returns home from service, or from the hospitals.

The Red Cross Canteen

Although the numbers are dwindling gradually, eight, ten, twelve or more service men are returning each week, and are being met at the train by a uniformed Canteen worker. Until the last boy returns Lewiston Chapter will see that the returning men are cared for and all their needs satisfied, when they reach Lewiston to stay, or pass through to their homes in the three counties.

The Junior Red Cross is another of the branches of work that is being continued with greater emphasis than ever. There are almost 3,000 junior workers in the three counties.

These are some of the reasons why the people of our district have a special interest in seeing the 10,000 membership mark reached. We want to know that all the advantages of the American Red Cross may be available to our people now, as well as in time of great emergency, such as was experienced in the influenza epidemic of last year.

Idaho, Nez Perce and Lewis Counties have 8800 members of the American Red Cross.

Make it 10,000. All you need is a heart and a dollar.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Residence Section of Potlatch, Idaho ca. 1911

Potlatch1911Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

November 8

Evening Capital News., November 08, 1919, Page 8

19191108ECN1

Don’t Disregard A Cold

The influenza and pneumonia that swept the country a year ago were proceeded [sic] by an epidemic of colds. Foley’s Honey and Tar will check a cold if taken in time, and will also stop a cough of long standing. It promptly gives relief, soothes and heals. Mrs. Geneva, Robinson, 88 N. Swan St., Albany, N. Y., writes: “Foley’s Honey and Tar is the best cough medicine I ever used. Two bottles broke a most stubborn lingering cough.” It loosens phlegm and mucous, clears air passages, eases hoarseness, stops tickling throat.

– Adv.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Main Street, Preston, Idaho, January 1913

Preston1913Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

November 10

Evening Capital News., November 10, 1919, Page 3

19191110ECN1

Gooding College Campaign
One Hundred Fifty Thousand Dollars For Men’s Dormitory
Starts Today — Let’s Go

19191110ECN2The Intermountain Empire

Gooding College is located on the main line of the Oregon Short Line, just half way between Granger and La Grande. It is the only Methodist college between Denver and the coast and has only one other school, offering full academic and collegiate work, within a distance of 250 miles. It assists worthy young men and women with work and furnishes scholarships to returned soldiers. It had an increase of four hundred per cent in enrollment last year and never lost a day on account of the influenza. It is better than ever this year with night classes for adults, a Rural Life School, a Summer Session and an Epworth League Institute.

Study the map and ask yourself, “How can I invest my money in any other place where it will do as much for humanity and the Kingdom of God as it will in this popular school of the Inter-Mountain people?”

For further particular address Charles Wesley Tenney, President, Gooding, Idaho

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 10 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Main Street Looking North, Pocatello, Idaho ca. 1914

Pocatello1914Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

November 11

Bonners Ferry Herald. November 11, 1919, Page 1

19191111BFH1

19191111BFH2
Mrs. A. B. Ashby Passes Away
Died Thursday After An Illness Of Eleven Days With Influenza And Meningitis
Funeral Sunday Afternoon
Was Prominent and Respected Matron of This District

Mrs. Maggie Ashby died last Thursday evening at her home in the south part of town, death being due to an attack of meningitis resultant from Spanish influenza which was contracted October 26th.

The funeral services were held at the Ashby home Sunday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock and were conducted by Rev. G. H. Wilbur, pastor of the Union church, who spoke words of cheer and comfort to the mourning family and relatives of the deceased and gave a brief obituary. Several hymns were sung by a choir composted of Mrs. G. H. Wilbur, Mrs. F. A. Shultis, Mrs. Belle Bishop, Miss Mildred Jarvis, J. W. Stewart and W. F. Kinnear.

The funeral was attended by a host of the friends of the deceased and her family and the most beautiful floral tributes were banked on and about her coffin, expressive of the great respect and love felt for her by all her acquaintances. Interment was had in the Bonners Ferry cemetery.

The deceased is survived by her husband, A. B. Ashby, station agent of the Great Northern Railway Co., four children, Lester, aged 16, Gladys, aged 14, Geraldine, aged 10 and Shirley, aged 6 years; her father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Harvey, of Marshalltown, Iowa; two brothers, George Harvey, of Marshalltown, Iowa, and Calvin Harvey, of Bonier, Iowa, and Calvin Harvey, of Bonier, Iowa; four sisters, Mrs. Ida Shumway, of Newport, Wash., Mrs. Emma Welcho, of Iowa Falls, Iowa, Mrs. Maude Ashby, of Seattle, Wash., and Mrs. Mabel Ritchie of Hillyard, Wash. Mrs. and Mrs. Walter Shumway, of Newport, Wn., Mrs. Robert Ritchie and Mrs. S. W,. Ashby were here to attend the funeral and Mrs. S. W. Ashby will remain for a time to help take care of the Ashby home.

The pallbearers were Tom Nicholson, J. T. Bush, L. N. Brown, S. W. Biggar, J. B. Brody and Ray Homesley.

The deceased was 42 years of age and was born at Marshalltown, Iowa, on April 16, 1877. She became the bride of A. B. Ashby at Iowa Falls, Iowa on October 7, 1901. The couple came west in 1906 and have made Bonners Ferry their home since 1908.

The deceased was a loving and faithful wife and mother. Her first thoughts were always for her home and her family and she was a true helpmate to her husband in his efforts to make a comfortable home for his children. The deceased had a charming personality and made friends readily and was always anxious to extend a helping hand to anyone in trouble. She was a faithful member of the Union church Ladies’ Aid society and whenever her home duties permitted, took an active part in all social events and matters pertaining to the public welfare.

In the death of Mrs. Ashby this district has lost one of its most beloved and respected matrons. The entire community is united in mourning her death and in extending condolences to the bereaved relatives.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 11 Nov. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
———————-

Further Reading

Victor C. Vaughan

Wikipedia

Victor Clarence Vaughan (October 27, 1851 – November 21, 1929) was an American physician, medical researcher, educator, and academic administrator. From 1891 to 1921 he was the dean of the University of Michigan Medical School, which rose to national prominence under his leadership.

He also served as president of both the American Medical Association and the Association of American Physicians, founded multiple medical journals, and was a leader in standardizing state medical licensing exams throughout the country. Serving with the U.S. Army during the Spanish–American War and World War I, he was instrumental in helping the military cope with the threats of typhoid fever and influenza. …

World War I

Even with his distaste for war, Vaughan termed the delay in the United States joining World War I a “national disgrace”. He and all five of his sons were commissioned in 1917. The Council of National Defense created the General Medical Board on April 2, 1917, and Vaughan was appointed to its executive committee along with Gorgas (by then the Surgeon General of the Army), three other officers, and five doctors: Surgeon General William C. Braisted, Surgeon General Rupert Blue, Admiral Cary T. Grayson, Franklin Martin, F. F. Simpson, William J. Mayo, Charles H. Mayo, and William H. Welch.

Gorgas had successfully lobbied Congress to remove a prohibition on reserve medical officers being promoted above major, and Vaughan was soon promoted to colonel and put in charge of the communicable diseases division. Disease was a major problem with the early mobilization effort; measles was the leading cause of mortality in the army during 1917, and from September 1917 to March 1918 the death rate for pneumonia at the most populous army camps was twelve times that of the general population. Vaughan, Gorgas, and William H. Welch toured camps, finding overcrowding and poor facilities, and the publicity surrounding Gorgas’s reports led Congress to hold hearings that led to increased medical staffing and some improvements in conditions. But the largest challenge the military faced was influenza.

The outbreak of influenza, first at Camp Kearny in December 1917, and then at Camp Funston in March and April, became a major issue when thousands of troops became ill at Camp Devens in September, with nearly 750 dying. Vaughan and Welch were dispatched there to investigate. Vaughan observed that this strain of influenza, rather than attacking the very young and very old, was killing men in prime physical condition, leading him to warn, “If the epidemic continues its mathematical rate of acceleration, civilization could easily disappear from the face of the earth.” By the time the epidemic ran its course, over a million troops were afflicted with influenza, and 30,000 of them died; 675,000 people died in the United States as a whole.

excerpted from: Wikipedia
— — — — — — — — — —

Hill’s Cascara Quinine Cold Tablets

HillsCascaraQuinineColdTablets-aphoto source: The Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Whitehall Pharmacal Company

Patent Medicines; Drugs; Non-Liquid

The indications or uses for this product as provided by the manufacturer are: Recommended for the relief of the following discomforts usually associated with colds: nasal stuffiness and discharge, headache, muscular aches and pains, neuralgia and neuritic pains, constipation, and that hot, flushed feeling.

Physical Description
acetophenetidin, 2 grs. per tablet (drug active ingredients)
cascara sagrada (drug active ingredients)
quinine sulfate (drug active ingredients)
aloin (drug active ingredients)
aspirin (drug active ingredients)
ephedrine sulfate (drug active ingredients)

source: The Smithsonian National Museum of American History
— —

Cascara Sagrada

Rhamnus purshiana. Family: Rhamnaceae

Cascara sagrada was first used by the American Indians. It means “sacred bark.” It’s made from the bark of a tree found in the northwestern U.S.

The bark contains anthraquinone glycosides. This acts as a cathartic or laxative. Cascara may help relieve constipation. But in 2002, the FDA marked laxatives that contain cascara sagrada as category II agents. This means they are not generally recognized as safe and effective for over-the-counter use. Manufacturers had not done the studies to show the safety of cascara sagrada.

excerpted from: University of Rochester Medical Center Health Encyclopedia
— — — — — — — — — —

Foley’s Honey and Tar Compound

FoleysHoneyandTarCompound-aFoley’s Honey and Tar Compound bottle, ca. 1895, St. Albans
Contributed by St. Albans Historical Society

Foley’s popular “cough syrup” retailed during the late 1800’s until the mid-1960’s. It was made in Chicago, Illinois and boasted that it was “sold everywhere. “ O. W. Bigelow sold it in his store in St. Albans in the late 1800’s. During the 1918 influenza epidemic newspaper ads touted the mixture as the answer to those suffering from the flu. In the early days the syrup of 7% alcohol, along with other ingredients, was given to infants with a dose being five to ten drops.

source: Maine Memory Network
— —

Foley & Co., Chicago, IL

Posted on December 3, 2014 by Jessica

Foley & Co. of Chicago made a range of medicinal products starting in the 1870s, the most well known of which was Foley’s Honey and Tar Compound.

According to the Pocono Record,

“The use of Foley’s cough syrup was long-lived — it was retailed during the late 1800s until the mid-1960s. In the early days, Foley’s concoction was 7 percent alcohol mixed with a special solution of pine tar and honey, terpin hydrate, sodium benzyl succinate and gum arabic. The recommended dosage for adults was one teaspoon; for children, a half teaspoon; for infants, five to 10 drops, according to the directions on the label of another undated bottle. Foley’s mixture cleared the throat of phlegm and mucus, stopped the tickling, opened the air passages for easier breathing and coated inflamed surfaces with a soothing medicine, according to an advertisement published in The Evening Independent of St. Petersburg, Fla., in 1919.

Another ad in the Evening Independent boasted that Foley’s Honey and Tar was “sold everywhere,” which may be true since ads for the product can be easily found in old newspapers throughout the country. Even the Stroudsburg Daily Times carried an ad in 1889, promoting the “wonderful value” of the compound. Although newspaper ads for Foley’s Honey and Tar were common, the number grew during the flu epidemic of 1918, touting the mixture as the answer to those who were suffering.”

There isn’t much written history about the founder of Foley & Co or the inventor of Foley’s Honey and Tar but records do show that two men, John B. Foley and Harry B. Foley, were associated with the business. …

Around the turn of the century, there was a great deal of negative press surrounding patent medicines, which brought about passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906. In an attempt to dispel some of that negative association, Harry B. Foley wrote an article for Western Druggist, a trade magazine widely read by pharmacists and drug store merchants. Foley tries persuade retail druggists that patent medicines are a great deal for them commercially, as well as protecting them from any unhappy customers.

“A store that makes a specialty of selling no-secrets [non patent medicines] soon loses the confidence of the people and they will trade with the druggist who pushes advertised proprietary medicines, and if they are not satisfied, they do not hold the druggist responsible.”

excepted from: Artifacts from the Old Main building of Illinois State University
————–

The Great Influenza Outbreak of 1918

It was an unusual pandemic in the United States involving the H1N1 virus which infected 500 million globally resulting in the loss of 50 to 100 million.

[This has interesting oral history from elders that were alive during the pandemic.]


——————

Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)

Road Reports June 20, 2021

Note: On Tuesday, June 15th, the area experienced a wind storm. Watch for downed trees.

Please share road reports. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. There is still snow in higher elevations, but it melting fast (rivers are running below normal.) Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are dry and dusty. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting June 1, crews will transition into their summer construction schedule. Drivers can anticipate single-lane, alternating traffic controlled by flaggers Monday – early Friday morning. From Friday morning – Sunday, and any major holidays, the road will be open to two lanes. This schedule will be in place until September.
Project link:
Donnelly to Deinhard Project: Next week construction will begin on Highway 55 between Donnelly and McCall. This is a much-needed project to repair potholes and cracks in the roadway and will include placing a new layer of pavement on the highway for smoother driving conditions.
What to expect:
* Idaho 55 will be reduced to one lane with pilot cars midweek (Monday – Thursday)
* All lanes will be open on weekends (Friday – Sunday)
* Roadway surface will be uneven for several weeks
* Speed limit will be reduced and 12-foot restrictions will be in place
* Construction is expected to be complete in September.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Watch for downed trees. No current report.
South Fork Salmon River salmon fishing opens on June 25. Check F&G regs.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
No current report.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (June 16) Mail truck driver reports trees had come down but had been cut out before he came in. Road has not been graded yet, it is rough.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam *check date on image*
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open
Reported to be rough. Watch for downed trees, ATVs and UTVs.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open, travel at your own risk. Watch for new trees down.
A report (June 14) that folks have been traveling over the summit this last weekend, the road is in bad shape.
Another report (June 14) the downed trees from winter have been cut out wide enough to accommodate trucks and trailers.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Link: Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open, travel at your own risk. Watch for downed trees.
A 2nd hand report (June 14) that someone made it over to Thunder Mtn. last weekend in a full sized truck. No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
A report (June 14) that the route still had snow, but it may be melting open soon. An earlier report that there were a lot of trees down during the winter snow.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Open per Valley County June 9th.
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Open
No current report.
Update from Payette NF May 27: “Secesh Summit to Burgdorf/Warren – Open. Warren Summit – Open to the South Fork Salmon River.”

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Weather Reports June 13-19, 2021

June 13 Weather:

At 9am it was 59 degrees, clear sky and light breeze. At 1230pm it was 87 degrees, a few small clouds and light breeze. It was 90 degrees before 130pm and partly cloudy. Gusty afternoon breezes. At 6pm it was 92 degrees, mostly cloudy and blustery breezes. At 740pm it had dropped to 82 degrees and partly cloudy. At 855pm it was 73 degrees. At 1045pm some stars.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 14, 2021 at 09:00AM
Clear, light breeze
Max temperature 94 degrees F
Min temperature 48 degrees F
At observation 65 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

June 14 Weather:

At 9am it was 65 degrees, clear sky and light breeze. Hot, light breezes and clear at 145pm. At 6pm it was 90 degrees, mostly clear and light breeze. At 9pm it was 73 degrees and mostly clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 15, 2021 at 09:00AM
Partly cloudy/hazy
Max temperature 93 degrees F
Min temperature 49 degrees F
At observation 65 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

June 15 Weather:

At 9am it was 65 degrees and partly cloudy and thin haze. Getting a bit breezy by 1030am. Gusty breezes at 12pm. Strong wind gusts by 2pm, estimate some over 30mph. At 6pm it was 76 degrees, breezes gusting occasionally and partly cloudy. At 830pm it was 71 degrees, calmer and mostly clear. Getting breezy again at 910pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 16, 2021 at 09:00AM
Clear, light breeze
Max temperature 82 degrees F
Min temperature 46 degrees F
At observation 55 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

June 16 Weather:

At 9am it was 55 degrees, clear sky and light breeze. At 1pm it was 74 degrees, clear and light breeze. At 6pm it was 81 degrees. clear sky and light breeze. At 820pm it was 71 degrees, fairly calm and clear. Stars out at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 17, 2021 at 09:00AM
Clear, light breeze
Max temperature 84 degrees F
Min temperature 40 degrees F
At observation 55 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

June 17 Weather:

At 9am it was 55 degrees, clear sky and light breeze. At 130pm it was sunny, warm and light breeze. At 2pm it was 82 degrees and stronger breezes. At 630pm it was 83 degrees, clear and almost calm. Getting a little breezy at 8pm. At 9pm it was 68 degrees, clear and calm. Stars out at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 18, 2021 at 09:00AM
Clear, light breeze
Max temperature 87 degrees F
Min temperature 40 degrees F
At observation 55 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

June 18 Weather:

At 9am it was 55 degrees, clear sky and light breeze. At 2pm it was 86 degrees, almost clear and light breezes. At 630pm it was 87 degrees, clear and almost calm. At 915pm it was 68 degrees, calm and clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 19, 2021 at 09:00AM
Clear, light breeze
Max temperature 91 degrees F
Min temperature 44 degrees F
At observation 59 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

June 19 Weather:

At 9am it was 59 degrees, clear sky and light breeze. Getting hot by early afternoon, clear and strong sunshine and a little breezy. At 630pm it was 83 degrees, clear and breezy. Estimate high temp of 87 degrees, gizmo on the fritz. At 915pm it was 70 degrees, clear and calmer. Stars out at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 20, 2021 at 09:00AM
Partly clear, light breeze
Max temperature 87 degrees F *Estimated*
Min temperature 44 degrees F
At observation 60 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
———————–

Iced Orange Cookies

Lori DiPietro, New Port Richey, Florida
Makes about 5-1/2 dozen

Ingredients

1/2 cup shortening
1 cup sugar
2 large eggs
1/2 cup orange juice
1 tablespoon grated orange zest
2-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt

Icing:

2 cups confectioners’ sugar
1/4 cup orange juice
2 tablespoons butter, melted
Orange paste food coloring, optional

Directions

In a large bowl, cream shortening and sugar until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in orange juice and zest. Combine the flour, baking powder and salt; gradually add to the creamed mixture.

Drop by heaping teaspoonfuls 2 in. apart onto ungreased baking sheets. Bake at 350F for 10-12 minutes or until edges begin to brown. Remove to wire racks to cool. In a small bowl, combine icing ingredients until smooth; drizzle over cooled cookies.

Tip: Proceed with substituting your preferred citrus (lemon, lime, etc.) in place of orange and proceed as the recipe instructs. However, keep in mind that using baking substitutions may change the flavor and texture of your cookies.
————————-

Pork Chop Piccata with Spaghetti

Food Network Magazine
Yield: 4 servings

Ingredients

Kosher salt
8 ounces spaghetti
4 cups broccoli florets, halved or quartered if large (8 ounces)
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
1/4 teaspoon grated lemon zest, plus 3 tablespoons lemon juice
Freshly ground pepper
4 bone-in pork chops (1/2 inch thick; about 6 ounces each)
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1/3 cup dry white wine
2 tablespoons drained jarred capers

Directions

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the spaghetti and cook as the label directs for al dente, adding the broccoli in the last 2 minutes of cooking. Reserve 1/2 cup cooking water, then drain the pasta and broccoli and return to the pot. Add 1 tablespoon butter, 2 tablespoons parsley, the lemon zest and a big pinch each of salt and pepper. Stir well, adding the reserved cooking water as needed to loosen.

Meanwhile, season the pork chops on both sides with salt and pepper. Dust with the flour, shaking off any excess. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the pork chops and cook until well browned and just cooked through, about 4 minutes per side. Remove to a plate and tent with foil to keep warm.

Carefully add the wine to the skillet, scraping up the browned bits from the pan. Cook until reduced by about half, then stir in the lemon juice and capers; return to a simmer. Remove from the heat and swirl in the remaining 2 tablespoons each butter and parsley until the butter is melted. Pour in any accumulated juices from the plate of pork. Season the sauce with salt and pepper.

Divide the spaghetti and broccoli among plates and top each serving with a pork chop. Spoon the sauce on top.
———————

Road Reports June 16, 2021

Note: On Tuesday, June 15th, our area experienced a wind storm. Watch for downed trees.

Please share road reports. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. There is still snow in higher elevations, but it melting fast (rivers are running below normal.) Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are dry and dusty. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting June 1, crews will transition into their summer construction schedule. Drivers can anticipate single-lane, alternating traffic controlled by flaggers Monday – early Friday morning. From Friday morning – Sunday, and any major holidays, the road will be open to two lanes. This schedule will be in place until September.
Project link:
Donnelly to Deinhard Project: Next week construction will begin on Highway 55 between Donnelly and McCall. This is a much-needed project to repair potholes and cracks in the roadway and will include placing a new layer of pavement on the highway for smoother driving conditions.
What to expect:
* Idaho 55 will be reduced to one lane with pilot cars midweek (Monday – Thursday)
* All lanes will be open on weekends (Friday – Sunday)
* Roadway surface will be uneven for several weeks
* Speed limit will be reduced and 12-foot restrictions will be in place
* Construction is expected to be complete in September.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Watch for downed trees. Max wind gust June 15th 42mph. No current report.
South Fork Salmon River salmon fishing opens on June 25. Check F&G regs.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Watch for downed trees and rocks. No current report.

Johnson Creek Road: Open per Valley County
Report Wednesday (June 16) Mail truck driver reports trees had come down but had been cut out before he came in. Road has not been graded yet, it is rough.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open and rough. Watch for downed trees.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open, travel at your own risk. Watch for new trees down.
A report (June 14) that folks have been traveling over the summit this last weekend, the road is in bad shape.
Another report (June 14) the downed trees from winter have been cut out wide enough to accommodate trucks and trailers.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Link: Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open, travel at your own risk. Watch for downed trees.
A 2nd hand report (June 14) that someone made it over to Thunder Mtn. this last weekend in a full sized truck.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
A report (June 14) that the route still had snow, but it may be melting open soon. An earlier report that there were a lot of trees down during the winter snow.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Open per Valley County June 9th.
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Open
Update from Payette NF May 27: “Secesh Summit to Burgdorf/Warren – Open. Warren Summit – Open to the South Fork Salmon River.”

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

June 13, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

June 13, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Please be conservative when watering lawns. We ask those that are here all week to not water lawns on the weekends so that more water is available for the weekend cabin owners. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order issued
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit season
May 15 – Firewood Season, permits at The Corner
May 25 – Upper Johnson Creek road and Landmark Open
June 7 – Lick Creek road open (rough!)
June 14-15 – Abstein Bridge core drilling
June 15 thru July 4 – Community Hall Yard Sale
June 26 – Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers Highland Games
July 2-4 Yard Sale Silver Dollar Cafe
July 2-3 Live Music at The Corner
July 3 – Annual Golf Tournament
July 3 – Independence Day Parade 4pm
July 10 – YPFD meeting 10am at Fire Hall
July 10 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
July 17 – ATV/UTV Escapade 10am
July 21-22 Mastercraft stove maintenance
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Abstein Bridge June 14-15

A message from Valley County to let us know that there will be core drillers in to take core samples at the Abstein bridge [on] both sides of the bridge.
— — — —

Community Hall Yard Sale

June 15 thru July 4, 2021. At the Community Hall, This self-serve yard sale supports maintenance on the Community Hall. Shop at your leisure; decide what the items are worth to you; and pay one of the volunteers. Easy-peasy
— — — —

The Highland Games are back in Yellow Pine

All day, June 26th. Watch the Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers compete.
— — — —

Yard Sale July 2-4

I am having a huge yard sale between the store and the Silver Dollar July 2nd, 3rd and 4th. Items include restaurant equipment, antiques, tools, building supplies, furniture, electrical wire, stainless steel cable, diesel heaters and much, much more. -S Holloway
— — — —

The Corner July 2-3

Live music at The Corner both Friday and Saturday evenings, starting at 5 p.m.
— — — —

Annual Golf Tournament, July 3rd

Check in at the golf course at 10am. Bring a team or we’ll set one up for you. $20 registration requested. Fun Prizes.

Proceeds support the Village of Yellow Pine
— — — —

Independence Day Parade July 3 4pm

Join us to watch or participate in the annual Yellow Pine Independence Day Parade. All family-friendly entrants are welcome. If you want to participate, meet at the fire house at 315pm.
— — — —

ATV/UTV Escapade July 17

July 17, 2021: This out-and-back ride is rated as intermediate. Participants ride from Yellow Pine Community Hall to Logan Creek , then return to Big Creek Campground for lunch (provided) and history/stories. After lunch, participants will continue the ride to Pilot Peak. The timeframe of this event is estimated to be from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. Check-in starts at 9:00am; leave at 10:00am. You can register early at (link)
— — — —

Heating Maintenance Day July 21-22

Deb Filler is coordinating with Mastercraft of McCall to schedule a maintenance day in Yellow Pine for propane and pellet stoves. If you are interested, please contact Deb at 208 633-6945. Mastercraft will be here July 21 and 22 to do stove maintenance.
———-

Village News:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Opened June 12th for Summer, call (208) 633-3377 for reservations.
YellowPineLodge
— — — —

YPFD Meeting June 12

At 10am the YPFD tested the siren and had a meeting at the fire hall.
— — — —

VYPA Meeting June 12

At 2pm there was a Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting.
— — — —

Conserve (and Boil) Water

Please be conservative when watering lawns. We ask those that are here all week to not water lawns on the weekends so that more water is available for the weekend cabin owners. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!
— — — —

Scrap Metal

Sharing a message that Mike Amos will haul out a load of scrap metal. If you have scrap metal, contact Mike. He has an area by his place to stack it.
— — — —

Dust Abatement

The infrastructure committee has determined to use Calcium Chloride this year (same stuff used on the E. Fork.) It is slightly less expensive than the Earthbind. If you are interested in dust abatement this year please let Deb Filler know. She can give you the cost information. If you would prefer the Earthbind (the stuff that was used last year) let Deb know that. If you choose Earthbind, North American Dust Control will bill you directly.

Dust abatement will occur once Landmark is open. (No date yet.)
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Johnson Creek road is Open. The county cleared a large avalanche across Warm Lake road above the turnoff to North Shore Lodge.

The Stibnite road between Yellow Pine and Stibnite mine is open.

Lick Creek Report Mon (June 7) “came in from McCall over Lick Creek this morning. 2 wheel drive in a 1 ton dually, no problems. McCall side is ruffer than a cob (as usual).”
https://yellowpinetimes.files.wordpress.com/2021/06/20210607lickcreek-a.jpg
[photo and report courtesy DC]

Profile Gap will open soon.

Deadwood summit is open from the Landmark side.

Elk summit and Monumental summit are still closed.

The Hwy 55 project Smith’s Ferry area: Starting June 1, crews will transition into their summer construction schedule. Drivers can anticipate single-lane, alternating traffic controlled by flaggers Monday – early Friday morning. From Friday morning – Sunday, and any major holidays, the road will be open to two lanes. This schedule will be in place until September. Project Website link:
— — — —

Critters

Aggressive Deer and Elk

Be aware that mothers will attack dogs and chase people if they feel their babies are threatened. Keep dogs leashed in the forest during “baby season” for their own protection.

Ticks

* Know where to expect ticks. Many ticks live in grassy, brushy, or wooded areas. When possible, avoid wooded and brushy areas with tall grass and leaf litter. Walk in the center of trails, particularly in spring and summer when ticks feed.
* Wear appropriate clothing. When in tick habitats, wear light-colored, tightly woven long pants and long-sleeve shirt. Tuck your pant legs into socks or boots, and your shirt into your pants. This helps keep ticks on the outside of your clothing where you can spot them more easily.
* Use tick repellent when necessary, and carefully follow instructions on the label. Apply an EPA-registered repellent effective against ticks, such as those containing DEET to clothes and exposed skin, and permethrin to clothes and gear. Take care when applying repellent on children. EPA’s search tool can help you find the repellent that best suits your needs.
* Check clothing, gear, and pets after being areas with ticks. Ticks can hitch a ride into your home on clothing and pets, then attach to you or a family member later. Carefully examine coats, camping gear, and daypacks. Don’t forget your dog, see CDC’s where to check your pet for ticks.
* Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming can reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease and may be effective in reducing the risk of other tick-borne disease. Showering can wash off unattached ticks and it is a good opportunity to do a tick check.
* Check your body, your child and pets thoroughly for ticks. Carefully inspect areas in and around the hair, head, neck, ears, under arms, inside the belly button, around the waist, between the legs, and behind the knees. Ticks can be very small before they feed—look for what may appear like a new freckle or speck of dirt. Continue checking for two to three days after returning from areas with ticks.

Pine Martins & Raccoons

Watch your small pets. Reports of pine martins living in the dump and raccoons on the north side of the village.

Be Bear, Fox & Coyote Aware

* Do not feed them human food
* Secure your trash
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Be Mountain Lion Aware

Note: A report early this spring of a mountain lion near the upper end of the village.

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report June 13th: “The bins are half full.”

The bins were emptied May 22nd. Locals worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water. Turn off your trickles.

Update May 14, 2021: Kerry and Dion from Idaho Rural Water were onsite yesterday along with Nicki and me for leak detection in the “downtown” Yellow Pine grid.

Utilizing their leak detection equipment, and Nicki’s knowledge of the distribution system, Kerry and Dion successfully located a number of leaks including a large leak at a fire hydrant. The fire hydrant was turned off and Tim, the fire chief, was notified that the hydrant is not operational.

Many small leaks were identified and marked, but of particular concern is the waterline that runs under the alley behind the hotel and all the way down to the community center. Numerous active leaks were located in that section. So many leaks exist along the alley that the best course of action is probably replacing the entire run of pipe.

Nicki followed up after the guys left and using her tablet and GPS program, accurately recorded the location of all the leaks identified. Now that a record of the leak locations exists, prioritization of the leaks and a plan to repair them can be developed.

Kerry and Dion were very thorough and helpful, and the work they completed will be beneficial to reducing demand on the system as a whole. Based on today’s daily system data, reported this morning by Nicki, it appears that daily demand was reduced by approximately 10,000 gallons as a result of yesterday’s work.

Regards, Warren Drake, Drake Diversified LLC

Update May 13, 2021: Cecil, Tom and Ron fixed a leaking valve which resulted in saving 5000 gallons of water!

Update May 6, 2021: The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an application with the USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility planning grant. If any additional information is needed please contact: Willie Sullivan, Treasurer Ypwater @ gmail.com

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Your Water Before Using
Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020.
Link: to Notice
— — — —

VYPA News:

June 12 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
link to: 2021 June VYPA Agenda.docx

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Secretary
Ron Noel, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)

Festival
Want to join YPAC Corp in making a difference? We are raising money to benefit the Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival . Any donation will help.
Each year, during the first full weekend of August, the sleepy mountain village of Yellow Pine is transformed into the largest festival of it’s kind in the western hemisphere!
The festival is produced by volunteers and raises funds to support the village of Yellow Pine as well as the funds needed to hold next year’s festival.
As you all know, the 2020 festival had to be cancelled due to Covid-19. This placed a significant burden on Yellow Pine to come up with enough funding to hold the 2021 festival this August 5, 6, 7.
Souvenirs and events at the festival help raise funds. We also know there are many of you who support the festival, but are not able to attend. This fund raiser is to give you an opportunity to help us help Yellow Pine.
Thanks in advance for your tax-deductible contribution to this cause that means so much to us!
GoFundMe link:

Anyone interested in being a part of the Festival Planning/Working committee, please contact Deb Filler. Meetings will begin at the end of January. Even if you aren’t physically in YP, you can participate in the committee.
Next Festival Planning Meeting ?, 2021 – Contact Deb for Zoom link and passcode.
2021 Planning Notes updated May 9, 2021 (link)
Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival Policy and Procedure Link:
— — — —

YPFD News:

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful.
link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021.pdf

June 12, 2020 – 10am Fire siren test and YPFD meeting (no minutes yet.)

May 15, 2020 – there was a YPFD meeting 10am at the Fire Hall.
Link: to 20210515 YPFD MeetingNotes_Final.docx

The Fire Station recently had a propane heater installed. The heater will be a great addition to the fire station. It will be more efficient at keeping the station above freezing during the winter, especially since we keep water in the engines so they are ready to roll if an emergency occurs. It will also make it more pleasant to hold meetings at the fire station. Big thanks to Fire Chief Tim Rogers for coordinating this.

Meeting schedule for the YPFD. All meetings are at the YPFD Station
Sat. May 15 at 10am
Sat. June 12 at 10am
Sat. July 10 at 10am
Sat. September 11 at 10am Budget Meeting

YP Fire District 2 (east of Yellow Pine Ave) up for election Nov 2nd for 4 year term (per Valley County.) Link:

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30, 2020 at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by a escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Tim Rogers – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
Hours: 1pm-8pm, closed on Tuesdays
We offer smoked tri tip, brisket, and chicken sandwiches and also burgers and chicken wings.
Firewood Permits available May 15th.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Yellow Pine Tavern open daily:
Monday thru Thursday 8am to 9pm
Friday and Saturday 8am to 10pm
Sunday 8am to 8pm
Indoor Dining with limited seating and Outdoor Dining Available.
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer, Wine and Pop
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Opened June 12th for Summer
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
The store is now receiving inventory of Food items. The ATM is operational, and Debit/Credit cards are accepted. Currently there is fuel, ice, alcoholic beverages (non liquor) tobacco, non alc beverages, snacks, and Dairy items (ice cream, milk, butter, and yogurt). Fresh produce is soon to come. Times may be in flux as we adjust to trends, but more or less the summer hours are going to be from 10-5pm, Monday – Saturday, and Sunday 10-3pm. If there are needs for fuel or anything during off hours, Josh will be around on call to accommodate. For any particular store item requests, please call 208-633-3300 or Email
For room reservations, please call 208-633-3300 or Email for reservations
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News
https://yellowpinetimes.files.wordpress.com/2019/08/thestarnews-a.jpg
click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (June 7) overnight low of 32 degrees, mostly hazy sky and light breeze this morning. A few jays, swallows and robins around. Windy and clear at lunch time. Low flying helicopter at 124pm. A break in the wind early afternoon for almost an hour, then back to blustery and partly cloudy. Jays, male downy woodpecker and a finch visiting, ground squirrels and a chipmunk running about. Warm and calmer late afternoon, high of 76 degrees. Increasing clouds by early evening. At dusk it was partly cloudy, pleasant temperature and calm. Stars out before midnight.

Tuesday (June 8) overnight low of 44 degrees, mostly cloudy sky and light breezes this morning. Loud low airplane at 905am. Some swallows, jays and robins visiting. Mostly cloudy and stronger breezes at lunch time. Warm, partly cloudy and gusty winds mid-afternoon. Mostly cloudy, warm and breezy late afternoon, high of 79 degrees. Windy early evening. Much calmer and clear before dusk. Looked partly to mostly cloudy before midnight.

Wednesday (June 9) overnight low of 50 degrees, dark broken overcast and breezy this morning. Rivers are running below normal. A few swallows, jays, robins and finches calling. Idaho Power crew up here doing maintenance. Thinner clouds and more open sky and lighter breezes before lunch time. Clouds moving in early afternoon. A short but intense 5 minute shower mid-afternoon, high of 75 degrees. Gray overcast early evening and light breezes. Cloudy and getting a little breezy at dusk. Robins calling at full dark. Mostly cloudy before midnight. Hard rain early morning.

Thursday (June 10) overnight low of 41 degrees, 24 hour rain total = 0.07″ (first rain in June.) This morning dark low overcast (VanMeter fogged in,) light breeze and light misty rain. No swallows in sight, robins, a female hairy woodpecker, a clark’s nutcracker, a few jays and finches visiting. Ground squirrels and a golden mantled squirrel running around. Light drizzle after lunch time, low foggy clouds. Rain stopped mid-afternoon. Cool, cloudy and light breeze late afternoon, high of 50 degrees. Cooling off after sunset and partly cloudy. Stars out before midnight.

Friday (June 11) overnight low of 32 degrees, 24 hour rain total = 0.33″ (giving us 0.40″ for June so far.) Early morning loud air traffic. Tree swallows are back, robins, collared dove and finches calling, several clark’s nutcrackers and jays visiting. Breezy and mostly hazy at lunch time. Mostly high thin clouds and gusty breezes early afternoon. Ground squirrels, golden mantled and 2 pine squirrels visited. Mid-afternoon air traffic. Gray overcast and light breezes late afternoon, high of 68 degrees. Shots fired around 540pm. Partly clear before sunset. Mostly cloudy and calmer before dusk. Mars rising above the peak of Golden Gate hill before 11pm.

Saturday (June 12) overnight low of 42 degrees, dark overcast sky this morning. Light air traffic. Tree swallows swooping, jays and clark’s nutcrackers visiting, ground squirrels running about. Fire siren test at 10am. Partly clear and breezy before lunch time. Mostly cloudy and light breezes early afternoon, high of 78 degrees. Increased street traffic on the main road. Mostly clear and light breezes early evening. Mostly clear and calmer before dusk. Stars out before midnight and quiet.

Sunday (June 13) overnight low of 42 degrees, clear sky and light breeze this morning. Air and street traffic (brief vehicle siren sounded down by the fire hall.) Tree swallows, robins and finches calling. A few clouds, warming up and light breezes at lunch time. Hot by early afternoon with gusty breezes. Mostly cloudy, hot and blustery late afternoon, high of 94 degrees.
——————

Flag Day June 14

1. The flag should never be displayed upside down except as a signal of dire distress.

2. The flag should never touch anything beneath it such as the ground, floor, water or merchandise.

3. The flag should never be carried flat or horizontally.

4. The flag should never be used as wearing apparel.

5. The flag should never be fastened, stored or displayed in such a manner as to permit it to be easily torn, soiled or damaged.

6. The flag should never have placed upon it nor attached any mark, insignia, design, picture or drawing of any nature. (In the U.S. Flag Code this is considered flag mutilation and is a misdemeanor).

7. No part of the flag should be used as a costume or athletic uniform. Flag patches can be affixed to the uniform of military personnel, firemen, policemen or members of patriotic organizations.

The flag is considered a living thing therefore a flag pin should be worn on the left lapel near the heart.

8. When the flag is no longer a fitting emblem to be displayed, it should be destroyed, preferably by burning it or leaving it with an American Legion post.

9. The flag should not be flown in inclement weather.

10. The flag should be retired at sunset unless it is properly illuminated at night.

11. The flag should not be draped over the hood top or sides of a vehicle. When the flag is displayed on a motorcar, the staff should be fixed firmly on the chassis or clamped to the right fender.

[h/t Shawn Miller]
—————-

Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 118 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

Idaho officials reported 118 new COVID-19 cases and zero new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March to 193,515.

There are a total of 154,878 confirmed cases and 38,637 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state.

Idaho has reported fewer than 200 new cases most days this month. In January, the state’s daily average of new cases was closer to 700 daily. But Idaho’s vaccination rates continue lagging behind national rates.

The state said 695,645 people have received the vaccine, and 1,272,507 total doses have been administered. 623,099 people are fully vaccinated.

continued:
— — — —

Idaho Hospitalizations June 9, 2021

https://media.ktvb.com/assets/KTVB/images/2ddf3386-3cb0-43f9-ab35-f236fc913e20/2ddf3386-3cb0-43f9-ab35-f236fc913e20_1140x641.png
source: KTVB
— — — — — — — — — —

St. Luke’s to bring vaccination RV to McCall, NM

The St. Luke’s mobile COVID-19 vaccine unit will be offering free walk-up COVID vaccinations in McCall, New Meadows and Riggins this month.

The retrofitted RV will make the following stops:

McCall: Tuesday, June 22, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., The Terrace/Ponderosa Center, next to Hotel McCall across from Legacy Park

Riggins: Wednesday, June 23, 8 a.m. to noon, St. Luke’s Clinic – Salmon River Family Medicine, 214 Main Street

New Meadows: Wednesday, June 23, 2:30 to 6 p.m., St. Luke’s Clinic – Meadows Valley Family Medicine, 320 Virginia St.

McCall: Thursday, June 24, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m., Marketplace at McCall (Ridley’s/Rite Aid), corner of Deinhard Lane and North 3rd Street.

Anyone age 12 or older can receive a vaccine regardless of whether or not they live or work in Idaho.

Minors must have parent permission to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. A parent or legal guardian should come with the child to provide consent at the appointment.

Written or verbal consent by phone may be accepted if a parent or legal guardian is not present.

The Pfizer vaccine and Johnson & Johnson vaccine will be offered at the mobile vaccine stops.

Pfizer is a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine available to ages 12 years old and older. The J&J is a single-dose vaccine available to adults 18 and older.

If receiving the Pfizer, a follow-up booster is required 21 days after receiving the initial dose. The mobile unit will return to the same location for boosters.

To find out more about the COVID-19 vaccine go to stlukesonline.org.

Viewers can watch a recording on St. Luke’s YouTube Channel of a live Q&A with St. Luke’s Children’s physicians about vaccines for adolescents ages 12 to 15.

source: The Star-News June 10, 2021
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County property assessments rise 23%

Median home price soars to $482,000

By Max Silverson for The Star-News June 10, 2021

Valley County property values have increased 23% over 2020, Valley County Assessor June Fullmer told Valley County Commissioners on Monday.

Valley County had the second highest median home price for any county in Idaho at about $482,000, just behind Blaine County at about $483,000, Fullmer said.

Valley County property values hit an all-time high of about $6.27 billion with new construction also setting records, Fullmer said.

The total value figure is up from about $5.06 billion last year. The previous highest property value was about $5.51 billion in 2008.

Fullmer said that she thought COVID would slow the housing market, but it did just the opposite. “People want to move up here,” she said..

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

June 21 deadline noted to pay Adams, Valley property taxes

June 21 at 5 p.m. is the deadline for property owners in Adams and Valley counties to pay the second half of their yearly property taxes.

Late charges and interest will begin on June 22, with interest retroactive from Jan. 1, so mailed payments should be correctly stamped by date.

The treasurers’ offices in both counties are open during the lunch hour Mondays through Fridays.

Valley County accepts credit card payments at (link) or by calling 208-382-7110.

continued: The Star-News June 10, 2021
— — — — — — — — — —

Poison Hemlock now present in Idaho

Jun 11, 2021 KIVI

https://ewscripps.brightspotcdn.com/dims4/default/a786f75/2147483647/strip/true/crop/853×480+0+400/resize/1280×720!/quality/90/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fewscripps-brightspot.s3.amazonaws.com%2Fe8%2F21%2F1e8a627e4ee5bf2d53198b1c697a%2Fthumbnail-poison-hemlock-purple-stem.jpg
Photo by: Idaho Weed Awareness Campaign

Idaho noxious weed officials are warning people to be on the lookout for Poison Hemlock, a dangerous noxious weed proven to be fatal to humans and livestock. Poison Hemlock is now in full growth around the state.

Poison Hemlock typically grows in riparian areas, stream banks, canals and ditch banks, ponds and pastures. The plant grows for two years, in the second year it flowers and then dies. The Idaho Weed Awareness Campaign has information about Poison Hemlock and what to do to control and eradicate it on their website.

“This dangerous noxious weed presents an issue of public and animal safety. Poison Hemlock has been proven to be deadly to both animals and humans. It is so toxic that horses and cows literally can die within hours after eating this poisonous plant,” said Roger Batt, statewide coordinator for the Idaho Weed Awareness Campaign.

continued:
—————–

Idaho History:

In 1929, 4 men kidnapped the Idaho lieutenant governor during bank robbery attempt

On June 12, 1929, the men decided that Lt. Gov. William Kinne’s car would work as a getaway vehicle but it soon blew a tire and crashed into a ditch.

Brian Holmes June 11, 2021 KTVB

For Idaho Lt. Gov. William Kinne, June 12, 1929, was like any other day when he was driving on Highway 12, heading to Orofino from Lewiston. That was until four men needed a ride for a bank robbery that they were planning.

About 15 miles into his drive, near the town of Arrow, four men walked into the road, with their guns drawn.

The men, 24-year-old Albert Reynolds of Missouri, 20-year-old Engolf Snortland of North Dakota, 18-year-old Robert Livingston of Alabama and 24-year-old Frank Lane of Wisconsin, had planned on robbing a bank in Pierce and thought Kinne’s vehicle would make a good getaway car.

continued:
—————

Mining News:

Payette seeks comments on rock and clay mine NW of McCall

The Payette National Forest is seeking comments about a proposed rock and clay mine about six miles northwest of McCall.

The proposed St. Helens Mine Project would extract about 35,000 cubic yards of rock and clay over 10 years on about five acres of unpatented mining claims on the McCall Ranger District.

The mine, which located less than half a mile from Idaho 55 on Brundage Mountain Road, was used twice before for mining.

The proposal was submitted by Wildcat Diversified Investment LLC of McCall.

Operations would include 2.6 acres of excavated pits and 2.4 acres for mine-associated activities including an access road, stockpiles, a storage area, and a 15-foot buffer zone between the permit boundary and the outer perimeter of both pits.

All rock and clay extracted from the site would be transported to an off-site location for processing.

Topsoil and other material would be piled nearby and returned to the pit after the mining finishes. Disturbed areas would be replanted with vegetation.

Comments can be submitted until July 6 by visiting (link) and searching “St. Helens Mine Project or by mail to District Ranger Jennifer Blake, 102 W Lake Street, McCall, ID 83638. Include “St. Helens Mine Project” in the subject line.

For more information, visit the project webpage or contact Forest Geologist Clint Hughes at 208-634-0756 or clinton.hughes@usda.gov

source: The Star-News June 10, 2021
— — — — — — — — — —

US judge rules against Idaho suction-dredge gold miner

Associated Press June 8, 2021

A suction-dredge gold miner who operated in an Idaho river containing federally protected salmon without required permits is facing what could be substantial fines.

A U.S. District Court judge last week ruled Shannon Poe of California violated the Clean Water Act on the South Fork of the Clearwater River when he mined 42 days in 2014 and 2015.

continued: (KTVB)
————–

Public Lands:

Where camping is permitted in Idaho’s forests

You can go off-road to camp, but that doesn’t mean you should. The Forest Service advises campers to do their homework before going out in the forest.

John Masters June 11, 2021 KTVB

The camping season has arrived in Idaho and Forest Service officials want to remind the public to be good steward of the land this summer.

There have already been reports of trash and human waste left behind, and mistreatment of public lands. One recent example was posted on Facebook earlier this month. It shows a half dozen vehicles parked in a meadow in the Sawtooth National Forest.

https://media.ktvb.com/assets/KTVB/images/c1178dde-00b5-4812-995a-abfad5699c43/c1178dde-00b5-4812-995a-abfad5699c43_750x422.jpg
Credit: Aaron English

KTVB spoke with Zach Poff, the recreation and program manager for the Ketchum Ranger District, about where campers should and should not go. He says understanding where camping is allowed in Idaho’s forest is not as simple as some might think.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Park fees for non-Idaho residents doubling at five state parks

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, June 9th 2021

Camping and entry fees for non-Idaho residents will double at select Idaho State Parks on Thursday to comply with House Bill 93.

Fees at Bear Lake, Farragut, Hells Gate, Priest Lake, and Round Lake will increase from $7 to $14 starting on June 10.

At all other state parks, the fee for non-state residents will stay the same price as it is for in-state residents: $7.

continued:
—————-

Critter News:

Coyote kills dog in Hulls Gulch

Coyotes can be very protective of their young, particularly during the spring and early summer months.

KTVB Staff June 8, 2021

A pet dog was killed by a coyote along a popular trail in the Boise Foothills on Sunday.

The incident happened in Lower Hulls Gulch, about a half-mile above the Red Cliffs Trail junction.

“Please be ultra-vigilant with your pets, and leash them for their own safety while traveling in this area,” Ridge to Rivers posted.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise updates animal cruelty code including new “Good Samaritan” immunity for rescuers

by CBS2 News Staff Monday, June 7th 2021

The City of Boise’s newly updated animal cruelty code went into effect on Monday.

The updated code includes changes to animal cruelty regulations as well as general enforcement changes.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Dog ejected from vehicle in Idaho crash found herding sheep

Associated Press June 10, 2021

A dog who vanished for two days after being ejected from a vehicle during a car accident has been found apparently doing the job it was bred to do — herding sheep.

The Spokesman-Review reported Linda Oswald’s family and their dog, Tilly, were driving on an Idaho highway Sunday and crashed into another car, launching the border collie and red heeler mix and prompting an immediate search. …

A family recognized the dog in the photo as the dog they saw on their farm on Tuesday.

The families say Tilly was drawn to the farm’s sheep and trying to herd.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

First rabid bats of the season found in Bonneville and Payette counties

by CBS2 News Staff Monday, June 7th 2021

The first rabid bats of the season have been reported in Bonneville and Payette counties.

According to the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, one person was exposed to a rabid bat in Payette county. In Bonneville County, a vaccinated dog found a rabid bat.

“Rabies is a fatal viral illness if not treated with proper medical management. People should call their healthcare providers promptly if they believe they may have been bitten or scratched by a bat. Postexposure treatment administered to people after an animal bite or other exposure is extremely effective in preventing rabies,” said Dr. Leslie Tengelsen, state public health veterinarian.

continued:
—————-

Fish & Game News:

Fishing Idaho’s mountain lakes: tackle, tactics and tips for anglers

By Martin Koenig, Natural Resource Program Coordinator
Wednesday, June 9, 2021

https://idfg.idaho.gov/sites/default/files/styles/threshold-992/public/alpinelakefishing_1.jpg
Idaho Fish and Game

Knowing the basics helps you get the most of your trip to the mountains

Mountain lakes require some challenging logistics when you consider the travel and hiking required to access them, and when you arrive, there’s the challenge of catching fish, right?

Fortunately, hardest part of fishing a mountain lake is usually getting to it. The fishing tends to be pretty simple, so don’t overthink it. Remember these fish have a very short growing season, so they tend to be pretty aggressive and active feeders. The fishing pressure at mountain lakes also tends to be light, so the fish aren’t real cagey, and basic trout fishing tackle and tactics are usually all you need to catch them.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Fish salvage order issued for the Big Wood River below Magic Dam and Richfield Canal diversion

By Terry Thompson, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, June 10, 2021

A fish salvage order has been issued for the Richfield Canal and the Big Wood River below the dam due to irrigation water being turned off because of ongoing drought conditions.

The Big Wood Canal Company recently notified Fish and Game that they will be closing the gates in Magic Dam on June 10, 2021 leading to substantial flow reductions or cessation of flow which functionally de-waters the Big Wood River below the dam and the Richfield Canal. The gates are closing significantly earlier than normal due to ongoing regional drought conditions in the Big Wood River basin.

Effective June 10, 2021 Fish and Game has ordered that bag and possession limits be removed on portions of the Big Wood River below the dam. The boundaries of the fish salvage are from a point beginning at the railroad trestle, approximately 1.25 miles downstream of the dam, extending to the State Highway 75 Bridge. The order also includes the Richfield Canal from the upstream point of diversion from the Big Wood River to its confluence with the Little Wood River near Richfield, Idaho.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Flock of giant California condors trashes woman’s home

by The Associated Press Thursday, May 6th 2021

https://idahonews.com/resources/media/00448ad8-a040-46c6-8703-94293a93a313-medium16x9_AP21126750832868.jpg
(Cinda Mickols via AP)

Tehachapi, Calif. (AP) — Giant California condors are rare — but not at Cinda Mickols’ home.

About 15 to 20 of the giant endangered birds have recently taken a liking to the house in the city of Tehachapi and made quite a mess. …

The birds have trashed the deck — ruining a spa cover, decorative flags and lawn ornaments. Plants have been knocked over, railings scratched and there’s poop everywhere.

… The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which runs a program to save the species from extinction, responded on Twitter. The agency noted that the house is in historic condor habitat, and suggested that Mickols try harmless hazing like shouting and clapping or spraying water.

full story:
—————–

Seasonal Humor:

CovidCoughyFilter-a
Coughy Filter
———–

Idaho History June 13, 2021

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 61

Idaho Newspaper clippings October 20-31, 1919

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

October 20

Evening Capital News., October 20, 1919, Page 2

19191020ECN1

Viscount Astor Is Dead At Son’s Home

London, Oct. 20. – The body of Viscount Astor, who died of heart disease Saturday was laying today in the home of his son, Waldorf Astor, in St. James Square.

Although the Viscount had been in ill health since an attack of influenza last year, his death was unexpected, it was said. He walked about the grounds as usual Friday. He died in bed Saturday morning.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 20 Oct. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Main St. Looking West, Oakley, Idaho ca. 1914 (1)

Oakley1914Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

October 21

The Daily Star-Mirror., October 21, 1919, Page 1

19191021DSM1

19191021DSM2
Prepare Against Return Of The Flu
Athletic Director of University of Idaho Issues Some Good Rules

“In time of peace prepare for war” is the belief of W. C. Bleamaster, athletic director, and others in charge of the health of the great student body of the University of Idaho. There is no influenza here, nor near here, but they are preparing to combat or rather to prevent it again getting a foot hold in the big school. Athletic Director Bleamaster has issued the following set of rules which people outside the university, as well as those inside, will do well to follow:

“Keeping Fit”

No doubt this winter will bring a recurrence of the Flu, and it will be well for the students and faculty to take every precaution in order to safeguard against this disease.

The study rooms, library and class rooms should be well ventilated. It should be the duty of the faculty member in charge of class rooms to see that this rule is followed. The temperature should not exceed 65 degrees F.

Keep your feed dry and warm.

Dress according to the outside weather and temperature.

Do not sit in class rooms in damp clothing or wet shoes.

Do not wear too heavy clothing indoors. Wearing sweaters indoors is one of the most common causes of “colds” among students.

Sleep with windows open.

High tight collars and neck bands induce congestion and sore throat.

Be regular in your habits; eat slowly; masticate thoroughly; avoid an excess of protein diet; do not eat between meals; avoid an excess of candy.

Do not eat cold lunches during the winter months; get warm food at noon hour, if only a plate of soup.

Practically every cold is preceded by constipated bowels or torpid liver.

Drink plenty of water between meals and breath deeply of fresh air.

Lack of proper physical exercise and over eating create favorable conditions for colds.

Avoid draughts [sic] when fatigued.

Prevent sudden chilling of body after exercise.

Anxiety, worry, dissipation, or excess of any kind lowers the vitality and decreases the resistive power.

All “colds” are more or less contagious.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 21 Oct. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., October 21, 1919, Page 3

City News

Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Beckman and Mrs. Roy Holman and son, Royal, returned last evening from a motoring trip to Spokane. Mrs. Holman visited with Mrs. J. Crerar, who with her daughters are living in Spokane since the death of Mr. Crerar last winter in Montana of influenza. Mr. and Mrs. Crerar were former residents of Moscow.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — — — — — — — —

Orofino, Idaho

OrofinoFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

October 23

Evening Capital News., October 23, 1919, Page 1

19191023ECN1

Legislature Will Lose 13 Members; New Basis Needed
Light Vote at Last Election Works Against Several Counties in Computation House Membership

Reapportionment of the basis of representation in the legislature is being discussed as a probably consideration of a special session of the legislature should Governor Davis call a session for ratification of the national woman suffrage amendment.

Thirteen counties will lose a representative in the house of representatives of the next state legislature as the result of the light vote cast at the last election and failure of the last legislature to make a reapportionment. The representation is based upon the total vote cast for candidates for governor. For each 2,500 or fraction exceeding 1,000 votes a county is allowed one member of the house.

Vote Very Light

Because of the influenza epidemic the vote was extremely light last election and every county that had more than one representative on the basis of the former election will have one …

(Continued on Page Two)

less in the next legislature than at the last session, with the exception of Twin Falls county, which mustered enough votes to maintain its representation of three members.

This will result in a membership of 54 in the next house. The membership of the house at the last session was 64. Three new counties were created, each of which will have a representative. One senator is allowed each county, making a membership in the next senate of 44.

Not Affect Extra Session

Should the special session be called the same members and officials would serve as served last winter.

Counties which will lose a representative unless a new apportionment basis is made and the membership each will have in the house are as follows: Ada, 4; Bannock, 2; Bingham, 1; Bonner, 1; Bonneville, 1; Canyon, 2; Fremont, 1; Idaho, 1; Kootenai, 2; Latah, 2; Nez Perce, 1; Shoshone, 2; Washington, 1. The other counties excepting Twin Falls with 3, and including the new ones – Caribou, Clark and Jerome – will each have one representative.

Failed Reapportion

A bill was introduced in the house and passed at the last session making the basis each 1,500 votes and fraction over 800 to the representative which would have left the membership the same for each of the counties affected by the light vote at the last election, but the measure failed to pass the senate.

It is recognized by all the state officials that should the special session be called the matters to come before it must be narrowed to the smallest possible limit – not more than one item if possible. The members will be asked to come at their own expense. The principal purpose would be to ratify the national woman suffrage amendment. It would take a two-thirds vote to do this.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 23 Oct. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Wallace Miner. October 23, 1919, Page 1

19191023WM1

19191023WM2Precautions Against Flu

Dr. J. R. Bean, county health officer, speaking for himself and the health officers of Wallace and Kellogg, spoke upon the probable recurrence of influenza and the necessity of taking precautions now to prevent it. He read the suggestions prepared by the health officers covering prevention and treatment of the malady and strongly urged all members of the board of trade to cooperate with the health authorities in their efforts to avoid another flu epidemic. Dr. Bean also stated that the physicians of the county were agreed that vaccination to prevent flu was desirable; that while it did not always prevent contracting the disease it rendered it less virulent, and statistics show that few cases result fatally after vaccination. Physicians of the county are now supplied with the serum. Those who feel unable to pay the expense will be served free by the city and county health officers.

source: The Wallace Miner. (Wallace, Idaho), 23 Oct. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Wallace Miner. October 23, 1919, Page 2

[Editorial Page]

Might As Well Die

(Cincinnati Enquirer)

Reading what to do and what not to do in order to escape the influenza and other troubles tends to produce a mental condition of hopeless perplexity. It isn’t much use trying to live any more. What with the biologists the bacteriologists, the chemists, the prohibitionists and the rest of the alleged scientific outfit making their never-ending investigations, we’re hard put to it to know which way and how to dodge our multiplying enemies.

We’ve listened to and heeded the slogans of “swat the fly” and “bust the mosquito”‘ we’ve cut out all the best foods, and have been coerced into cutting out all the best drinks; we’ve learned to drink our water boiled and filtered, and we avoid close physical contact with even our best friends for fear of acquiring influenza or other pestilential microbes.

Now comes a doctor person who insists that even our freshly laundered handkerchiefs are alive, swarming with microbes which are eager and willing to infest us to our lasting injury.

Well, if we have reached the point where we can neither eat nor drink, nor wear our clothing without danger, and must in addition blow our proboscides or sneeze into a piece of absorbent cotton, as the doctor insists we must do, we might as well die.

Use absorbent cotton for such purpose? Perish the thought! Welcome, ye microbes! We’ll never adopt any such unaesthetic common, low-down habit as that. Who’d want to wave a bunch of absorbent cotton at his sweetheart or his wife? Why, the very mashers would refuse to flirt with such an unpoetic substitute for the ancient and sentimental handkerchief.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Filer Record., October 23, 1919, Page 11

19191023FR1

Boschees’ Syrup

In these days of unsettled weather look out for colds. Take every precaution against the dreaded influenza and at the first sneeze remember that Boschees’ Syrup has been used for fifty-three years in all parts of the United States for coughs, bronchitis and colds, throat irritation and especially for lung troubles, giving the patient a good night’s rest, free from coughing, with easy expectoration in the morning. Made in America and kept as a household panacea in the homes of thousands of families all over the civilized world. Try one bottle and accept no substitutes.

– Adv.

source: The Filer Record. (Filer, Idaho), 23 Oct. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., October 23, 1919, Page 1

19191023DSM1

Epidemic of Hiccoughs

San Francisco. – San Francisco newspapers have given space recently to a discussion among medical men here as to the cause of a local epidemic of hiccoughs.

Some physicians attributed it to the too emphatic “kick” in substitutes for liquor and others said the paroxysms were caused by an “attenuated influenza germ.”

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 23 Oct. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Oreana, Idaho

OreanaFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

October 24

Cottonwood Chronicle. October 24, 1919, Page 5

19191024CC1

Your Red Cross Calls Roll Armistice Week
Membership Rather Than Money Is Asked to Complete War Relief

19191024CC2Red Cross Chapters, branches and auxiliaries in the Northwestern Division, comprising Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington, will participate in the Third Red Cross Roll Call November 2 to November 11, Armistice Day. The American Red Cross, the greatest relief organization in recorded history, the mobilized heart-action of the American people,” will engage in no more “drives” for huge sums for war relief, but will continue its annual roll-call, which is simply the occasion on which the American people express their belief in the ideals and work of the Red Cross by enrolling as members. “All you need is a heart and a dollar.”

For five reasons, say the leaders of the Red Cross, this Third Red Cross Roll Call should enroll every loyal and public spirited American citizen among the millions of members of the organization that served our boys at home and overseas, saved the morale of France and Italy in our early days in the war, relieved the millions of refugees, fed the starving babies of Europe, saved whole nations from extermination, stood as next friend to those families in America whose dear ones were in the service, threw its tremendous resources into the fight against influenza, dealt with great national disasters of flood and fire, and now carries on to do its part to serve America and to make the war worth having been won.

These five reasons are:

1. The War Task of the Red Cross is Not Yet Fully Performed.

To men still in service, and to their families at home, to discharged soldiers not yet fully adjusted to the routine of civilian life, to 30,000 boys suffering or convalescing in Military or Naval hospitals, the American people still give cheer, comfort and service through their Red Cross.

In certain portions of the Old World the American Red Cross still feeds and clothes the undernourished and ragged babies, cares for the aged and the infirm, and assists the people of these disease-ridden, famine-stricken, war-ravaged countries to organize their own resources. Since the signing of the Armistice, this work has steadily declined but is not by any means fully completed.

2. The Rec Cross is the Disaster Relief Agent of the American People.

The speed and efficiency with which the Red Cross met emergency needs at Corpus Christi illustrated the value of nationwide Red Cross organization. In case of disaster, whether it be forest fire in the Northwest or a great Mississippi Valley flood, the first effective relief will hereafter come from nearby communities, working through their Red Cross Chapters.

3. In Case of Epidemic Local Red Cross Organization is Indispensable.

During the influenza epidemic, Red Cross action and co-operation saved three thousand lives, because the Red Cross was fully organized in every community in the United States. Against a possible recurrence of influenza this winter and against a danger of epidemic in the future, continued universal membership in the Red Cross is essential.

4. Red Cross peace program Calls For Universal Support and Co-operation.

The American Red Cross is still an emergency organization. It must be realized that there is such a thing as a continuing disaster. 300,000 babies under one year of age die every year because of ignorance; thousands of mothers die unnecessarily in child-birth; it is still possible for an epidemic like the influenza to take a toll within a compass of a few weeks five times greater than the losses of our nation in a year and a half of war; hundreds of thousands of people in the prime of life die in the United States every year from wholly preventable diseases. This is nothing short of a disaster which is a continuing one and will be permanent unless the people co-operate with one another to use the knowledge and wealth already in existence to bring the nation into a better day. The Red Cross through its millions of members comprising every element in every community, many of them themselves victims of the foes that cut short human life and rob it of its sweetness, can serve nation and community as can no other agency in supplementing, rein forcing, and supporting well-directed efforts for the conservation of the most precious things in the world, human life and happiness.

5. American Has Set the pace in a World Red Cross Movement

The League of Red Cross Societies of all nations has been formed through the inspiration of the Red Cross achievement of the United States. This League has no executive power whatever over the Red Cross of any nation, but will extend into every nation the benefits of a national, voluntary Red Cross society on the American model, to deal with problems of health and child welfare and to cope with the relief problems that are so pressing over so great a part of the earth’s surface. through these organizations many nations will meet their own problems which would otherwise be appealing to America for relief and assistance. The United States, whose people have shown the world how thus to rise out of despair into hope, must keep the Red Cross banner floating high. The success of failure of this great world movement of practical idealism will depend largely upon the manner in which the American people answer the Third Red Cross Roll Call.

19191024CC3The Red Cross Button is the most widely worn button in the world. Thirty million men and women and children in the United States now wear this emblem of countless good deeds accomplished. For the third year in America comes universal opportunity to wear it.

There are many instances of how this button, bearing upon a white background a tiny cross, has been worn and treasured. One morning in a distant northwest county, a man whose ruddy, optimistic countenance was clothed with ruddy beard, asked the Red Cross chairman if he had another button like the one he wore. The chairman gave him his own. “I have twelve children,” explained the man. “I gave my button to the twelfth, a new arrival, this morning. When I have anything good the whole family must come in on it.”
— —

19191024CC4— —

Red Cross Girls Feed Thousands of Doughboys

Since the armistice, twenty-five canteens, operated by Red Cross Chapters in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington have dispensed 23,379 gallons of coffee, and 224,236 dozen sandwiches, to soldiers, sailors, and marines en route. The hospitality of these canteens was accepted nine hundred thousand times, often by men who would have gone hungry but for the Red Cross service thus rendered. Figures show that these men, though the courtesy of the Red Cross, drank 8,497 gallons of iced drinks; used 6,663 bars of soap, and 37,713 paper towels; ate 57,491 chocolate bars, 16,629 pounds of candy, 14,754 dozen cookies, 74,913 dozen doughnuts, 9,488 dozen hot rolls; wrote 436,400 post cards furnished and stamped by the Red Cross; and to their own discomfort during a certain period, wore 12,250 influenza masks. All this, to say nothing of 22,956 full meals.

During this time 1847 sick men were aided by the canteen, seventy-nine of them being removed from trains as too sick to travel, and receiving immediate hospital attention.

Canteen work is nearly over, but the Red Cross still has vitally important work to do. Every membership in the Third Red Cross Roll Call will be a vote of confidence in the American Red Cross.
— —

“It’s a Long Way to Tipperary,” but the Red Cross is there.
— —

19191024CC5

At the present time in the Northwestern Division alone – comprising Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington – there are 750,868 Red Cross members. Alaska has 13,562; Idaho, 103,055; Oregon, 263,614; Washington, 390,637.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 24 Oct. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. October 24, 1919, Page 5

19191024CT1

19191024CT2

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 24 Oct. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Meridian Times., October 24, 1919, Page 3

19191024MT1

Inland Northwest

Influenza is showing a slight increase in Montana, according to reports received by Dr. John J. [?]ppy, state epidemiologist, nineteen new cases coming to the attention of his office during the past week, compared with ten the week previous.

The state board of pharmacy and the state board of health are to unite in a campaign against the drug evil in Montana.
— —

19191024MT219191024MT3Relief Ship Held Up By Arctic Ice
Attempt to Reach Mission in Northernmost Alaska Again Fails.
Reach Within 69 Miles
Dr. Marquis Brings Back Pitiful Tales of the Havoc Wrought by Influenza – Whole Villages Are Wiped Out

Newport. – Turned back by an impenetrable ice-field within 69 miles of his goal, Dr. John A. Marquis, general secretary of the board of home missions of the Presbyterian church of the United States, was forced to return to New York without reaching his destination at Point Barrow, Alaska, the northernmost mission in the world operated by the Presbyterian church.

Dr. Marquis left New York June 23 and sailed from Seattle July 7 to Nome, where he boarded the United States coast guard service steamer Bear, to reach Point Barrow, but for the second time within two years this doughty little craft with its hardy crew was unable to buck the terrific ice jam of the arctic. For eight days the sturdy boat battled, but finally on August 15 it was forced to turn back. The supplies for Point Barrow were unloaded at Point Hope, 350 miles south of that town. From here it is expected that sledges will be able to carry some of them to the needy people at Point Barrow.

“Last year,” says Dr. Marquis, “the Bear was able to get within 25 miles of Point Barrow, but the steady winds this year had forced the ice masses down farther south than they had been for years.

Ice at Latitude 70 1/2

“Massive fields of ice were reached when we were at latitude 70 1/2 degrees, Captain P. H. Uberroth, U. S. N., in charge of the Bear, declared the ice was the worst known since 1826.”

Dr. Marquis went to Alaska to see about the appeal from the people there for the erection of a hospital at Point Barrow and also to study the opportunities for Presbyterian mission and school work generally in Alaska, particularly since the influenza epidemic last year wrought such havoc. He returns with interesting stories of the work and with pitiful tales of the terrible havoc wrought by the “flu,” which in sections wiped out whole villages.

On leaving Seattle July 7, Dr. Marquis took passage to the Aleutian islands and thence to Nome. At Nome passage was taken on the Bear and for six weeks Dr. Marquis was on this government vessel. From Nome Dr. Marquis went to St. Lawrence Islands and thence to Siberia. Leaving Siberia, the next stop was at the Diamede islands, and then to Cape Prince of Wales, the westernmost point of the American continent, about four hours west of Seattle.

Upon this trip the vessel’s coal supply ran low and the Bear had to put back from Cape Prince of Wales to Nome for recoaling. Leaving Nome the vessel began its journey to Point Barrow. Kotzebue sound was entered and stop was made at the village, where the Society of Friends had excellent missions, and then the Bear went north to Kivalina, where no mission fields are established, but which a few missionaries visit at intervals. From this point Dr. Marquis went to Point Hope, which until recently was one of the most famous whaling stations in the arctic regions. From there the great but futile attempt northward was made toward Point Barrow.

Dr. Marquis on his return trip gave special study to the conditions as left by the influenza epidemic. As a result he bring back with him pitiful stories of the terrible ravages wrought by the epidemic among the Eskimos.

Whole Villages Wiped Out

In Nome alone, says Dr. Marquis, over 50 per cent of the Eskimo population was wiped out almost overnight, and in other sections of the country whole villages of igloos were swept away. In one town of 300 only thirteen adults were left alive, and small villages of twenty igloos or so with all inhabitants frozen stiff. In one case one little girl and a baby were found alive in a village. This child had kept herself from freezing to death by remaining wrapped up in bed with the baby beside her. The condensed milk which sustained her life she also took to bed with her. There had been no fire in the villages for days and the temperature was 50 [?[ degrees below zero.

According to Dr. Marquis, the Eskimos showed practically no resistance to influenza and went down almost without a fight. Among the foreigners the mortality was about the same as in similar communities in the United States.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 24 Oct. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Street Scene, Parma, Idaho ca. 1914 (1)

Parma1914Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

October 28

Evening Capital News., October 28, 1919, Page 8

19191028ECN1

Chest Colds, Coughs and Sore Throat Go Over Night
Begy’s Mustarine Is Better Than Liniments, Plasters, Poultices or Hot Water Bottles – Does the Work in Half the Time

19191028ECN2Remember the terrible Influenza Epidemic last year.

The demand for Begy’s Mustarine was so enormous, that stocks in retail stores and wholesale warehouses disappeared with amazing speed.

Get a box now – or two boxes, you can’t tell what will happen.

But just as soon as your throat gets sore or you feel that tightening in the chest, Rub on Begy’s Mustarine, for nothing on this earth will subdue inflammation, and prevent congestion, quicker than this great and first improvement on the old fashioned Mustard plaster.

It’s the quickest pain killer known, so be sure when you even suspect pleurisy, bronchitis or tonsillitis, to use it freely.

It won’t blister not even the tenderest skin – it can not blister.

But it’s hot stuff, and contains more concentrated non-blistering heat, than any other counter-irritant in existence.

That’s why it goes right after pains and aches, soreness and swellings, no matter where located and ends all the misery and distress so quickly, that sufferers are joyfully astonished.

Use Begy’s Mustarine always in the yellow box, to ease the pain of rheumatism and gout.

Just rub it on for a lame muscle, sore feet, stiff neck, cramps in the leg, sprains and strains.

Get out the box promptly when you have neuralgia, neuritis, lumbago, backache, headache, earache, toothache, or any ache anywhere.

Be sure it’s Begy’s Mustarine – made of real yellow mustard and other pain-destroying ingredients. Druggists announce return of money if it doesn’t do as advertised. One box equals 50 blistering Mustard plasters.

S. C. Wells & Co., LeRoy, N. Y.

[Adv]

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 28 Oct. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. October 28, 1919, Page 1

19191028BFH1

May Organize Chapter Here
Red Cross Meeting To Be Held Thursday Evening At The K. P. Hall
Red Cross Workers Interested
Big Membership Drive Scheduled for Week of November 2 to 11

Is the Bonners Ferry auxiliary of the American Red Cross to be disbanded and are the people of Boundary county to no longer participate in Red Cross work except what may be done by the home service branch or shall an independent chapter be organized in this county in which every citizen shall have a membership and a voice in its management?

These questions will be answered once for all at a meeting to be held at the K. P. hall on Thursday night of this week at eight o’clock when Mrs. Burns, of Seattle, Wash., will be present to give a short address and to assist in any organization plans. Mrs. Burns is an excellent speaker and she will tell the people of this county who attend the meeting of the future plans of the American Red Cross organization.

The officers of the Bonners Ferry auxiliary and prominent Red Cross workers are all anxious to see an independent chapter organized in this county but no attempt will be made in this line unless there is assurance that a large majority of citizens will take an active part in the work of the chapter. It is therefore hoped that a large crowd of people interested in Red Cross work will be out Thursday night. A program will be rendered in addition to the speaking and the business session.

Officers of the Red Cross auxiliary have been advised that if a chapter is organized here that all monies that have been paid by the Bonners Ferry auxiliary to the Sandpoint chapter in the way of membership fees will be returned here.

The third annual Red Cross Roll Call drive will be made in this country the week of November 2 to 11 under the direction of Mrs. L. N. Brown, who has been named chairman of the drive. Mrs. Brown will name an executive committee today and will meet with it at once to make appointments of the district chairman and arrange for a thorough canvass of the county for Red Cross memberships. This year only adult memberships will be solicited and the object of the drive in this county will be to secure 1000 members for the Red Cross. Last year the number of members secured was a little below this mark.

Booths will be established at the postoffice and in several of the stores of the city during the drive week and the ladies in charge of these booths will receive renewals and new memberships in the Red Cross.

Headquarters for the drive for the week of November 2 to 11 will be at the Commercial Hotel lobby.

The Red Cross has nothing to give but service in its after-the-war program.

First, the Red Cross is going to complete its war program one hundred per cent. This includes help to soldiers and sailors and their families. In a single month the Red Cross home service has helped 466,031 families of American soldiers and up to July 1st, 1919, the total of 800,000 district families had received service of various kinds.

The Red Cross has assumed responsibilities in Europe which must be carried through. Especially in Eastern Europe the aim of the Red Cross is to aid these peoples to get on their feet and shoulder their own burdens. The Red Cross cannot and will not leave babies and mothers to die when the tragedy can be prevented. This does not mean the pouring of money and supplies into stricken Europe, but the establishment of organizations with the proper training and equipment to meet the needs that exist over there.

Second, the Red Cross is to be the permanent disaster relief agent of the United States. It now has fifty units spread throughout the country ready to give relief at a moment’s notice.

Third, the Red Cross is now making plans for the building up of the vitality of the country. The objective is to prevent and cure disease and stop needless death.

Fourth, the Red Cross is the most effective agency for fighting epidemics like the influenza. A course in home nursing is now prepared and ready to be taught in each community. To a certain extend this will enable the people to take care of themselves, but should the need arise the local and national organizations are ready to step in and do whatever is necessary.

Fifth, to show the world that the Red Cross has not only started the greatest humanitarian movement that the history of civilization has ever seen but that it is going through with it in a one hundred per cent finish.

There is a provision in the League of Nations, assented to by all powers, that the Red Cross organizations of the different nations are the most effective means of building up the health of the world. This means that the consensus of opinion of the great powers is simply this; The Red Cross must not only go on but it should and must become a permanent organization. if the Red Cross is worth while, then it is worth while to become a member and if it is worth while to become a member then join in the Roll Call, November 2 to 11th.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 28 Oct. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Main Street, Paul, Idaho

PaulFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

October 30

The Wallace Miner. October 30, 1919, Page 6

19191030WM1

19191030WM2
Major Quigley Tells Board Of Influenza In The Army

At the weekly luncheon of the board of trade last Monday …

Major Quigley Talks

Dr. F. I. Quigley, major in the medical corps of the United States army during the great war, gave a brief address narrating his experience and observations in connection with handling the influenza in the army. From the time he completed his training at Fort Oglethorpe, Major Quigley was in command of base hospitals both in this country and in France, and his description of how the medical corps of the American army handled not only the flu, but every other emergency in the service aroused much interest. The hospital equipment and facilities provided for the army in France were a revelation to the allies and were the subject of continuous investigation by representatives of foreign medical army officers. Major Quigley’s address was instructive and interesting both from the standpoint of handling the flu and in giving his hearers an insight to the marvelous provision made by Uncle Sam for the care of sick and wounded. …

source: The Wallace Miner. (Wallace, Idaho), 30 Oct. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Emmett Index. October 30, 1919, Page 8

19191030EI119191030EI2Bares Secrets Of Sleep Sickness
Chicago Man Recovers and Tells His Experiences
Symptoms Of The Malady
Persistent Series of Illusions During Periods of Wakefulness One of the Peculiarities of Disease – Beach, Flowers, Castles and Sea Mark Six Months’ Visions of Chicago Legislator – Under Sleep Spell

After hovering under death’s wing for more than six months as a victim of sleeping sickness, former Alderman Theodore K. Long, now a member of the Illinois legislature, returned to Chicago from Battle Creek, Mich., and told for the first time the symptoms of the strange malady.

“Less than 10 per cent of those who contract sleeping sickness live to tell their experience,” he said.

The principal symptom of sleeping sickness he described as a persistent series of illusions during periods of wakefulness.

Beaches – Chimes – Flowers

“I imagined I was at the seaside, and could see hundreds of men and women in bathing,” he continued. “Of course, I had other illusions, but beach scenes predominated.

“Sometimes I could hear the ringing of what seemed a million cathedral chimes.

“Again, I saw wonderful examples of architecture, castles, battlements.

“Sometimes I wondered through fields of flowers, but, curiously, they had no perfume.

“And no matter what I saw, I could always hear the sound of the surf as it broke against the shore, and sooner or later I found myself on the beach again.

“In Springfield about seven months ago, while I was engaged in legislative work, I first noticed my health was not normal.

“I suffered from an intolerable languor.

Under a Spell of Sleep

“Try as I would I could not resist the desire to go to sleep.

“I would be compelled to go to bed at any time of day the spells struck me, and I would sleep from 12 to 14 hours.

“When I awoke I would not be rested, but felt as though I had done a hard day’s work.

“Finally I was compelled to give up my official duties and come to Chicago. I went to St. Luke’s hospital, where my case proved a riddle to attending physicians.

“Finally it was diagnosed as encephalitis, or African sleeping sickness and I was confined to bed for 14 weeks. It is a direct effect of influenza, and I have no doubt the germs spread by the tsetse fly of Africa in some manner have found their way to this country.

“After suffering from influenza, the body is especially subject to attack by the sleeping sickness germ.”

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 30 Oct. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Nezperce Herald., October 30, 1919, Page 7

19191030NP1

One Year Ago Today

Over Here

The influenza epidemic had just passed its crest. Fifteen citizens of this community had passed into eternity. The hospital had held as many as 57 patients at one time; hundreds of others were sick at their homes. Less than a half dozen families in the community were unaffected by the plague.

In such a time who came to our aid? Who sent doctors and nurses? Who instituted our hospital and furnished equipment? Who saved many lives?

19191030NP2

Over There

The great war was drawing to a close. Our boys were driving back the Hun in France and Belgium. The hours of terror and anguish were almost over. Four of Nezperce’s bravest sons had died on the battlefield; many others were lying in hospitals.

Who cared for our boys in hospitals and prison camps? Who supplied the necessities of life to the people of devastated Europe? Who helped millions of war’s victims? Who earned the name of the “Greatest Mother in the World?”

It Is an Honor to Become a Red Cross Member
Is Is the Privilege of Every American
All You Need is $1; You Have a Heart

This Space Contributed by Nezperce Trading Company

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 30 Oct. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Main Street, Payette, Idaho ca. 1916

Payette1916Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

October 31

The Idaho Recorder. October 31, 1919, Page 1

19191030IR1

Idaho Planning Extra Session

The prospects of the fifteenth Idaho legislature being called in extra session to ratify the woman’s suffrage amendment has stirred great interest in Idaho’s political circles. Under Governor Davis’s plan it would be an inexpensive session to the state, because members would not only pay their own way to Boise to attend, but they would agree not to accept the per diem wage of $5. The only expense that would be attached to the session would be rental of a public building in which the legislators could meet and the hire of such clerical forces as would be necessary.

The pioneer legislative halls of this state, in which many battles were fought, important legislation was passed and exciting scenes enacted, are no more. That building in which they were located has been torn down to make way for the wings of the new capitol. The state is therefore without legislative halls and would have to secure a public auditorium in which to convene the session extraordinary.

Deemed Important

Governor Davis believes that ratification of the Susan B Anthony amendment is of sufficient importance to call the legislators together, if they will agree to come without pay. If they should not agree to this, there will be no special session. There is a general movement under way to get most of the western states to hold sessions extraordinary for one day merely to give formal approval of the amendment.

Governor Stephens of California is really responsible for the plan, although Governor Davis said he has had it under consideration for some time. The proposal to convene the Idaho legislature, while not at all definite, will pave the way for an expression from the people. If there is no serious objection, and there does not appear to be any, the legislature will likely meet here some time in November

So far as Idaho is concerned, woman suffrage ceased to be an issue in this state long ago. Shortly after the state was admitted into the union the right of franchise was given to women for the past twenty or more years they have voted.

During the fight before congress to pass the Susan B. Anthony amendment an attempt was made by national suffrage leaders to divide the women of the state in their support of Senator William E. Borah, whom they bitterly attacked because of his stand that woman suffrage was a state issue and not a national one and that therefore he opposed the amendment.

They succeeded in dividing the women to some extent, but they failed to affect the vote of the senior senator, for he led the Republican ticket at the last election.

Unusual Situation

It is proposed that in the event the legislature is convened in extra session there be incorporated in the call a provision authorizing the members to pass an apportionment bill that will straighten out representation by counties for the legislature that meets in 1920. The last legislature failed to pass an apportionment bill, with the result that the legislature apportionment is left on the same basis that it was two years ago.

This means that representation in the house of representatives will be reduced at least ten votes, giving the lower assembly fifty-four members to forty-four in the senate, whereas in the last session it had sixty-four members.

The reason for this situation is the influenza situation a year ago, which kept thousands of voters away from the polls. The last reapportionment law provides that there hall be one representative in the house for every 2500 votes cast at the preceding general election and one representative for every fraction of 1000 or over. The shrinkage in the vote reduced the fractions, with the result that many counties which had more than 1000 votes but not 2500, find that on the last returns they had less than 1000.

Forgotten in Senate

The house realized that this situation was serious and rafted and passed a reapportionment bill. When it reached the senate, however, it was put away by some committee and forgotten. The legislature adjourned without making the apportionment. This does not affect the present legislature which will be called in extra session, but it does affect the legislature to be elected in 1920.

Counties which lost a representative unless a new apportionment is made and the apportionment they have in the next regular session of the legislature are; Ada, four; Bannock, four; Bingham, one; Bonner, one; Bonneville, one; Canyon, two; Fremont, one; Idaho, one; Kootenia, two; Latah, two; Nez Perce, one; Shoshone, two; Washington, one. The other counties, excepting Twin Falls with three, not including the new ones – Caribou, Clark and Jerome – will each have one representative.

These counties which are credited with four had five, those with two had three and those with one had two, and it is one of the objects of the proposed reapportionment to place them on that basis of representation.

Passes in House

The bill that was introduced in the house and passed during the last session, but failed in the senate, which proposed to give each county one representative for every 2500 votes, and in the event of a fraction of 800 or over, another representative. While the failure to pass the bill will cause the loss of thirteen representatives to as many counties, representation in the house is only reduced ten, because the three new counties created are each entitled to a representative and one senator.

Because of the rapid increase in counties in this state during the past ten years, the senate is almost as large as the house of representatives, in so far as numbers are concerned. Each county under the law is entitled to one senator and there are now forty-four counties.
— —

Call To Duty In Supporting The Red Cross Organization

Frank H. Havemaun, Chairman of Third Red Cross Roll Call, Salmon, Idaho.

Dear Sir: As war time division manager and as chairman of the advisory committee of the northwestern division of the American Red Cross, I wish to express to you personally my appreciation of the work you are doing to make the Third Red Cross Roll Call a success in the Lemhi county chapter.

The United States will lose many of the benefits of winning the war if the American Red Cross does not continue in every community with practically universal membership.

The war revealed conditions seriously affecting the public health and vitality. The Red Cross is the only organization big enough to take the lead in improving these conditions. In case the Influenza epidemic occurs, the cooperation of a fully organized American Red Cross will save hundreds of thousands of lives, some of them in your community, that will otherwise be sacrificed. Remember, the epidemic last year took five times as many lives as we lost in a year and a half of war.

Universal Red Cross membership will continue to save lives and relieve suffering after every great disaster, like the one at Corpus Christi, and will make special collections of funds as such times make necessary.

Other nations, inspired by our example, are organizing Red Cross societies to meet their own problems of relief, disease and disaster, so that they can stand on their own feet without constant appears to Americans. They will be watching the success of the Roll Call to see whether such an organization can endure in times of peace.

Everybody wants to join the Red Cross, the greatest of all welfare organizations and the only one that finances a great peace-time program wholly from the proceeds of membership at one dollar each. The success of the Roll Call in your chapter depends entirely upon the completeness of your organization and your publicity. I wish you the fullest measure of success.

Sincerely yours, C. O. Stimson.
— —

Red Cross Friends Line Up November 4

The Red Cross Roll Call will come along next Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock on Main street. Early in the afternoon the bugle call will be sounded to remind all citizens to assemble at the appointed place ready to respond to the call of names. After the enrollment all 1920 members will be admitted free to the Grand theater where a Red Cross film will be shown.
— —

There’s no disaster too big for Red Cross relief.
— —

Carrying Millinery Style Down The River To Lewiston

A young matron of Salmon, who is a leader in fashion particularly with reference to the smart hats she wears, was bereft of her bonnet the other day when her automobile went dashing over the Salmon river bridge. The beautiful hat was lost even before its wearer had worn it two days, but it nodded its plumes over the waves just as proudly as if worn on the pretty head of its owner, the envy of all beholders on the shore all the way down to Lewiston as a missionary of fashion in all the benighted regions below.
— —

Stage on Winter Schedule

The Salmon-Leesburg-Forney stages began the winter schedule on Tuesday last and yesterday’s trip marked the beginning and use of bob-sleds on the Leesburg summit. Manager Ferrill Terry reported Wednesday on the way home he encountered two feet of snow, which indicates the necessity of winter-time means of getting through.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 31 Oct. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. October 31, 1919, Page 1

19191031CC1

Has Membership Of 8769

The annual report of the officers of Lewiston chapter of the American Red Cross shows that the membership of the chapter, comprising Nez Perce, Idaho and Lewis county is no 8769. Idaho county has 2795, Lewis 1795, and Nez Perce county 4179. During the influenza epidemic of a year ago the chapter expended over $8000 in relief work in the three counties. Several hospitals were maintained and trained nurses secured from Coast points to aid the stricken communities. The grand total of articles manufactured by the women of the chapter, including garments, hospital supplies and surgical dressings is 128,429. The canteen department reports that 1265 returned soldiers and sailors were served with lunches at the depot.

The junior Red Cross has 86 auxiliaries and 2664 members in the three counties.

Cottonwood is an auxiliary of the Lewiston Chapter to which all articles made by the Red Cross workers here were sent.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 31 Oct. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Meridian Times., October 31, 1919, Page 1

19191031MT1

Charley Onwiler Has Serious Accident

Charley Onwiler met with a serious accident Sunday morning at his ranch just east of Meridian. He was nailing a board when a rusty nail hit his left eye with force enough to cut a deep gash in the eye ball, one-fourth of an inch in length. A delicate job of surgery was performed at a Boise hospital in sewing up the injured member, and the doctor has hopes of saving the sight of the eye, although it is doubtful. It may be necessary to remove the eye to save a sympathetic effect on the other, but Charley’s many friends hope that this will not be done. How the wound heals will determine the future action in the matter.

Charley is an optimistic sort of a fellow but his bad luck this year is a little more than his share. He had the appendicitis and the flu, but we know Charley pretty well and think his grit and energy will carry him through all right.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 31 Oct. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
——————–

Further Reading

Dr. A. Boschee’s Syrup of Tar and Wild Cherry

BoscheesSyrup-a

The indications or uses for this product as provided on its packaging:

For coughs due to colds, soothes throat, promotes expectoration

Physical Description

alcohol 1.75% per fluid oz. (drug active ingredients)
morphine sulp. 24/100 grain per fluid oz. (drug active ingredients)

source: National Museum of American History
— — — — — — — — — —

Smearing the Mustard on the Skin

By Roger M. Grace Thursday, March 3, 2005 Metropolitan News-Enterprise

Etched on a clay tablet in cuneiform (picture writing) is this medical advice from ancient Sumer (now Southern Iraq):

“Sift and knead together, all in one turtle-shell, the sprouting naga plant and mustard; wash the sick spot with quality beer and hot water; scrub the sick spot with all of the kneaded mixture.”

Dated at around 2100 B.C., the tablet is said to contain the world’s oldest known prescription.

Through the succeeding centuries, mustard came to be utilized for medicinal purposes in a variety of forms. Among them were mustard plasters, mustard poultices, and mustard baths, already discussed here. Add to the list mustard-based liniment (liquid or semi-liquid applied to the skin to relieve pain or as a counterirritant), mustard salve (greasy gook applied to sores and wounds) and mustard ointment (salve spread on the skin).

Such mustard-based agents were used by the Greeks and Romans to counteract a variety of maladies. They were employed by American Indians to treat rheumatism. Mustard-based preparations were marketed in Europe and were imported by colonists in the New World.

Makers of mustard-based preparations ascribed versatility to their products. An ad in the Edinburgh (Scotland) Weekly Journal on June 3, 1801, for example, represented that Whitehead’s Essence of Mustard “has frequently succeeded in curing the most desperate Cases of Rheumatism, Rheumatic Gout, Lumbago, Sciatica, Head-ach, Numbness, Palsy, and Complaints of the Stomach, after the best advice and every other Medicine has failed.” …

Bufferin, introduced Nov. 7, 1949, was touted as an advancement over regular aspirin because its buffering agents precluded stomach upset. Likewise, rub-on compounds containing mustard and buffering ingredients were heralded four decades or so earlier as modern replacements for mustard plasters because they eliminated blistering.

Taking major credit for buffered mustard was a New Yorker. Typical of his ads was one in the March 26, 1910 edition of the Newark (N.J.) Advocate which said:

“The man who put mustard plasters out of business had to invent something better, for mustard plasters have been used for aches, pains and other afflictions for scores of years and have given relief to millions.

mustarine-a“But when J. A. Begy, the well known chemist, of Rochester, N.Y. compounded, after years of experiment, a preparation which he named Begy’s Mustarine, he gave to the world something so much quicker in action than mustard plasters, that medical authorities recognized its supremacy at once.” …

Mustard-based products intended for external use are on the market in the U.S. yet today, billed as “natural” remedies.

excerpted from: Copyright 2005, Metropolitan News Company
— — — — — — — — — —

American Red Cross

History and Organization

Clara Barton established American Red Cross in Dansville, NY, on May 21, 1881. She became its first president. Barton organized a meeting on May 12 of that year at the house of Senator Omar D. Conger (R, MI). Fifteen people were at the meeting, including Barton, Conger and Representative William Lawrence (R, OH) (who became the first vice president). The first local chapter was established in 1881 at the English Evangelical Lutheran Church of Dansville.

Jane Delano (1862–1919) founded the American Red Cross Nursing Service on January 20, 1910.

continued: Wikipedia
— — — — — — — — — —

1919 Corpus Christi Hurricane

The hurricane exacted its greatest toll on Corpus Christi and the city’s immediate vicinity. Nearly all of the 284 verified fatalities were residents of Corpus Christi; 57 bodies were recovered in the city proper while 121 were found at nearby White Point, the highest death toll of any locality from the hurricane. The Houston Post reported a “conservative estimate” of $20 million for the total monetary loss from Corpus Christi, approximated by “prominent business men and other trained observers”. Squalls from began to impact the city on September 12, and the Gulf waters continued to rise until the storm passed on September 14. Corpus Christi was positioned within the right-front quadrant of the hurricane as it made landfall, which typically contains the storm’s strongest winds and highest storm surge. Winds ranging between 70–110 mph (110–180 km/h) buffeted the city for roughly 17 hours between September 14–15, accompanied by a 16-foot (4.9 m) storm surge — the highest on record in Corpus Christi’s history. The surge submerged some areas under 15 ft (4.6 m) of water.

The hurricane destroyed over 900 buildings in and around Corpus Christi. The downtown area and North Beach were devastated. All city businesses below the promontory were impacted, with some destroyed. Along the city’s beaches, 900 homes across 23 blocks between Star Street and Dan Reid Street disintegrated, leaving little trace of their former presence aside from sporadic debris. Few structures remained intact on North Beach, with only three structures partially surviving; among these was the Spohn Sanitarium, where four people were killed. Homes were razed along the beach, with their residents carried by the storm surge into Nueces Bay; many drowned in the bay while others survived as the waves carried them to White Point. Beach erosion carved a new coastline 50–200 ft (15–61 m) inland between North Beach and Caroll Street. Bluffs along Corpus Christi Bay near Corpus Christi and Portland recessed as far as 100 ft (30 m). Catastrophic damage occurred in downtown Corpus Christi where flooding reached a maximum depth of 11.5 ft (3.5 m). Industrial and public plants along a six-block stretch of the downtown waterfront were destroyed. Beyond the immediate waterfront, the Houston Post reported that “every commercial establishment’s first floor was wrecked, and in some cases the entire building rendered useless, over a corresponding area two blocks wide.” Floodwaters maintained a depth of 8–9 ft (2.4–2.7 m) in some of the buildings that remained standing. The surge deposited debris en masse in the downtown district, including 1,400 bales of cotton as well as large lumber reserves; piles of debris reached as high as 16 ft (4.9 m).

source: Wikipedia
——————

Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)

Road Reports June 13, 2021

Please share road reports. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. There is still snow in higher elevations, but it melting fast (rivers are running below normal.) Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are dry and dusty. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
Starting June 1, crews will transition into their summer construction schedule. Drivers can anticipate single-lane, alternating traffic controlled by flaggers Monday – early Friday morning. From Friday morning – Sunday, and any major holidays, the road will be open to two lanes. This schedule will be in place until September.
Project link:

Warm Lake Highway: Open, the old avalanche was cleared.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open – Watch for young wildlife.
Spring weight limits in effect.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open – Watch for rocks.
No current report.

Johnson Creek Road: Open per Valley County
Report June 9: Mail truck came in via Johnson Creek road – said the road is rough (it has not been bladed yet this year.)
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open per Valley County
Report Wed (June 9) “Lick Creek is rougher then crap, as usual. Watch out for the deep ruts on the McCall side and the culvert that is coming up through the road about Box Lake. Lots of trees still into the road but a truck can pass through just go slow. Watch for ATV/UTV’S racing through there; … as they forget Lick Creek is a multiuser road.” -KA
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed (should be open soon.)
Report Fri (June 11) people have “beaten” their way over the summit with difficulty.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Link: Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Open per Valley County June 9th.
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Open
Update from Payette NF May 27: “Secesh Summit to Burgdorf/Warren – Open. Warren Summit – Open to the South Fork Salmon River.”

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————