Author Archives: The Yellow Pine Times

About The Yellow Pine Times

The Yellow Pine Times is a not for profit newsletter dedicated to sharing news and events.

Weather Reports Oct 10-16, 2021

Oct 10 Weather:

At 10am it was 40 degrees, overcast and good air quality. At 1230pm dark overcast. At 245pm it was 55 degrees, mostly cloudy and chilly gusty breezes. At 645pm it was 49 degrees, dark overcast, light breeze and just starting to sprinkle. Not raining at 750pm. Fine light mist after 830pm. Looked cloudy at 1045pm and not raining. Rain during the night turning to snow. (Low estimated due to equipment error.)

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 11, 2021 at 10:00AM
Low overcast, flaking snow
Max temperature 58 degrees F
Min temperature 30 degrees F <– estimate
At observation 33 degrees F
Precipitation 0.25 inch
Snowfall 1/4 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 11 Weather:

At 10am it was 33 degrees, low overcast and flaking snow. At 1210pm snowing lightly and socked in low. Snowing pretty good but not sticking at 1230pm. Stopped snowing before 130pm. At 230pm it was 36 degrees, low overcast, light chilly breeze and occasional flakes of snow. Still snowing lightly at 330pm. Not snowing at 530pm, no accumulation. At 640pm it was 33 degrees, overcast, light cold breeze and a few flakes of snow falling (didn’t last long and no accumulation.) Looked cloudy at 1130pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 12, 2021 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloudy, breezy, cold
Max temperature 37 degrees F
Min temperature 27 degrees F
At observation 31 degrees F
Precipitation 0.01 inch
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 12 Weather:

At 10am it was 31 degrees, mostly cloudy, breezy and cold. Snow line approx. 6000′. At 1230pm it was mostly cloudy, cool and breezy. At 250pm it was 41 degrees, mostly cloudy and chilly breezes. At 415pm it was 39 degrees. At 645pm it was 35 degrees, overcast and calmer. At 1115pm it looked cloudy. Stars visible to the east before 2am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 13, 2021 at 10:00AM
Overcast, light breeze
Max temperature 41 degrees F
Min temperature 25 degrees F
At observation 28 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Oct 13 Weather:

At 10am it was 28 degrees, overcast and light breeze. At 1230pm it was 34 degrees, overcast and chilly light breeze. At 3pm it was 39 degrees, overcast and chilly breeze. Rain shower late afternoon. At 645pm it was 38 degrees, broken overcast and calm. At 1145pm it appeared partly clear to the east. Started snowing before 6am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 14, 2021 at 10:00AM
Overcast, flaking snow
Max temperature 40 degrees F
Min temperature 26 degrees F
At observation 29 degrees F
Precipitation 0.02 inch
Snowfall 3/8 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 14 Weather:

At 10am it was 29 degrees, overcast (top of VanMeter foggy) and flakes of snow falling, patchy ground cover. Stopped snowing before 1130am, breaks in the clouds and melted snow dripping off the roof. At 3pm it was 41 degrees, dark overcast and light cold breeze. At 650pm it was 38 degrees, dark overcast, light sprinkles of rain and light chilly breeze. Rain probably didn’t last long. Not raining at 830pm and not wet either. Looked cloudy at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 15, 2021 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 42 degrees F
Min temperature 29 degrees F
At observation 35 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 15 Weather:

At 10am it was 35 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 1245pm it was 53 degrees, partly cloudy and light breeze. At 250pm it was 58 degrees, partly cloudy and light breezes. At 7pm it was 45 degrees, clear and calmer. At 11pm stars and bright moon.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 16, 2021 at 10:00AM
Partly high thin haze, light breeze, frosty
Max temperature 60 degrees F
Min temperature 25 degrees F
At observation 27 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 16 Weather:

At 10am it was 27 degrees, partly cloudy (high thin haze) light breeze and frosty. At 1245pm it was 58 degrees, light breeze and mostly sunny. At 3pm it was 69 degrees, almost clear (a bit of thin haze) and light breeze. At 7pm it was 50 degrees, clear and calm. At 110am it was 33 degrees, clear and frost on the ground.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 17, 2021 at 10:00AM
Mostly hazy, light breeze, frosty
Max temperature 71 degrees F
Min temperature 27 degrees F
At observation 30 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Marinated Deer Flank Steak with Ramen

By Ian Malepeai Idaho Fish & Game

Ingredients

Marinade

1 each Deer Flank Steak (about 1 lb. of venison total, really any cut could work with this)
1 tablespoon Gochujang (look in the Asian food section)
1 tablespoon Honey
1 tablespoon Sesame Oil
2 tablespoons Water
1 teaspoon Shichimi Togarashi, optional
Add everything but the flank steak to a medium sized mixing bowl. Combine with a fork until mix is smooth and all ingredients are incorporated. Add the flank steak and coat evenly with the marinade. Cover bowl with clear film and leave in the fridge anywhere from 4-24 hours.

Heat grill to medium-high. Take the venison directly from the refrigerator to the grill, do not pre-warm the meat at all. Cook flank steak no more than 3 minutes on each side. Remove to clean plate and let rest before slicing. Slice thin and serve on top of the Ramen bowl.

The “Ramen”

6 cups water
1 tablespoon vinegar, white
2 packages “Oriental” Ramen
1 cup broccoli florets
1 cup matchstick carrots
1 cup chopped kale
4 eggs
1 mango, cored and sliced thin

Directions

In one medium sized sauce pan add 4 cups water, bring to a boil. In a separate sauté pan add two cups of water and add the vinegar – bring to a simmer.

Add to the ramen (including the flavor pouches, opened), broccoli, carrots and kale to the four cups of water. Bring back to a boil and remove from heat.

Crack, gently, the four eggs into the vinegar-water and let simmer until the egg whites completely set but the yolk is still runny, about 2 minutes.

Portion into four bowls the ramen, broth and vegetable mix. Top each bowl with a poached egg, sliced mangos and sliced flank steak.
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Road Reports Oct 13, 2021

Note: Probably snow above 6000 feet.

Please share road reports. Most back country roads have not been graded this season and are rough. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: A little snow on Sunday and Monday settled the dust. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting Wednesday, Sept. 8, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
Project link:
Donnelly to Deinhard Project: Construction on Highway 55 between Donnelly and McCall. This is a much-needed project to repair potholes and cracks in the roadway and will include placing a new layer of pavement on the highway for smoother driving conditions.
What to expect:
* Idaho 55 will be reduced to one lane with pilot cars midweek (Monday – Thursday)
* All lanes will be open on weekends (Friday – Sunday)
* Roadway surface will be uneven for several weeks
* Speed limit will be reduced and 12-foot restrictions will be in place
* Construction is expected to be complete in September.
Update Sept 30th: The Idaho Transportation Department (ITD) continues to pave Idaho 55 between Donnelly and McCall. Crews will begin working at night. Expect traffic control and delays until 10 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Adjustment of driveways and roads entering Idaho 55 between Donnelly and Lake Fork will continue into next week. If your driveway or road is repaved please wait 30 minutes to an hour before driving over it.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 6) road is in good shape, no trees or rocks in the road. A few hunting camps but not a lot of traffic.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 6) the road is in good shape, still rather smooth and dust abated. No trees or rocks in the road.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 13) A skiff of snow lingers on Warm Lake summit and upper Johnson Creek this morning. The road is still in pretty good shape.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Probably snow above 6000 feet.
No current report. Watch for ATV and UTV traffic.
Last report Wednesday (Aug 18) “Zena bridge is finished and looks great! Road is very rough. I would not recommend taking a car or camp trailer over.” – JB
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road:
No current report. Probably snow above 6000 feet.
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Profile has seriously rocky sections that are washing out worse than usual. Some are sharp. Carry a saw whether its windy or not — roots of beetle kill trees are now quite rotten and fall easily.” – CP
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Quartz Creek
No current report.
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Cleared Quartz Creek of trees last weekend.” – SA

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open, travel at your own risk.
Monday (Oct 11) Probably snow above 6000 feet.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open. Travel at your own risk.
No current report. Probably snow above 6000 feet.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Opened June 9
No current report. Probably snow above 6000 feet.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Opened by May 27
No current report. Probably snow above 6000 feet.

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
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Oct 10, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 10, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Stage 1 Fire Restrictions rescinded Sept 17th

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit season
May 15 – Firewood Season, permits at The Corner
Sept 17 – Stage 1 Fire Restrictions Rescinded
Oct 25 – Halloween and Salmon Feed YP Tavern 7pm
Oct 28 – The Corner closing for the season
Nov 7 – Time Change – Fall back 1 hour
(details below)
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Local Events:

Halloween/Salmon Bake Party at the Tavern

Note Date Change: Monday, October 25th at 7pm. Salmon provided by Tom Wood. Bring a Potluck Dish if you wish. Halloween Costumes encouraged or come as a Hunter.
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Village News:

Notice to all VYPA Members:

I have accepted a position on the board of directors of the Yellow Pine Area Coalition (YPAC).
I will be relinquishing all my VYPA responsibilities by January 1, 2022.
I will complete my responsibilities as Project Manager for the Community Hall Repair Project prior to stepping off the Council.
If you are interested in filling the position of VYPA Chairman; leading the Harmonica Festival committee; coordinating the YP Escapades; managing the village’s online presence; or working on the Community Hall committee, please contact one of the Council members.
Over the next 2 1/2 months, the VYPA Council will be working toward a smooth transition for my successor. Thank you for allowing me to serve our community for the last 13 years.
Deb Filler, VYPA Chairman
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University of Yellow Pine

20211009SchoolOctober 9, 2021 – rrS
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October 5th Fall Fuel Delivery

The Diamond Fuel and Feed tanker truck delivered fuel on Tuesday, October 5th.
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Notice – New Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
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Life Flight

It is a very good idea to have Life Flight insurance if you live or recreate in the back country. If you already have Life Flight, consider it as a gift to a loved one.
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Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are Open. These roads have not been bladed and are rough. Travel at your own risk.

Hwy 55 projects
Smith’s Ferry area: Starting Tuesday, Sept. 7, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route. Project Website link:
Donnelly to McCall: One lane during the week and two lanes on weekends. Project is slated to last until September.
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Critters

Be Bear Aware

* Do not feed them human food
* Secure your trash
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Bats

While bats are an important part of our ecosystem and most do not carry rabies, CDH offers the following tips to protect yourself and pets:
* Never touch a bat with your bare hands.
* If you have had an encounter with a bat, seek medical attention.
* If you come in contact with a bat, save the bat in a container without touching it and contact your health department to arrange testing for rabies. Whenever possible, the bat should be tested to rule out an exposure to rabies. During regular business hours in Ada, Boise and Elmore Counties, call 208-327-7499 and in Valley County, call 208-634-7194. After business hours in all counties, call 1-800-632-8000.
* Always vaccinate your pets for rabies, including horses. Pets may encounter bats outdoors or in the home.
* Bat-proof your home or cabin by plugging all holes in the siding and maintaining tight-fitting screens on windows. Bats can enter through holes the size of a quarter.

Mosquitoes – West Nile

* Remove standing water
* Wear long sleeves and pants during morning/evening hours
* Use a good repellent with DEET (our bugs laugh at “backyard” formulas.
* Vaccinate your horses and mules! West Nile can be fatal to equines.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

Aug. 29th the price of first-class postage stamps went to 58 cents from 55 cents.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Saturday (Sept 4) The dumpsters are being emptied on Wednesdays.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

July 25, 2021 Update:

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association Board asks that individuals refrain from using domestic water to dampen the road. The Water Corporation is doing its best to provide water for domestic use during the low water period but as the supply becomes more limited, it is incumbent upon each of us to be judicious with its use. Thank you for your cooperation in ensuring that all community members have an adequate supply of water.

The corporation has received the first $150k grant of the anticipated $450k. We are hoping to have some of the supply lines replaced by winter. Thanks to those who wrote letters of support. They were very beneficial in securing the grants. – Willie Sullivan

Sept 10, 2021 Update

DRINKING WATER WARNING
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059
BOIL WATER ADVISORY
Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST. Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted.
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 180 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059 . Date distributed: 9-10-21.

YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 at the Community Hall at 10am. Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting held July 5, 2020 at the Community Hall 2pm. link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
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VYPA News:

Village Of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes September 11, 2021
Attending Council Members: Deb Filler, Chairman; Ronda Rogers, Treasurer; Hailey Harris, Secretary; Rhonda Egbert, Member At Large.
Attendees: Sue Holloway, Sue Matlock, Christie Harris, Belinda Provancher, Josh Jones, Candy Sullivan, Willie Sullivan, Lorinne Munn, Cindy Fortin, Leslie Jensen, Ginny Bartholomew, Lynn Imel, Merrill Saleen, Niki Saleen, Steve Holloway, Tim Rogers.
Deb Filler called to order the regular meeting of the VYPA at 1400 at the Yellow Pine Community Hall.
Approval of minutes from last meeting-Deb Filler asked attendees if there were any outstanding questions/concerns with prior meeting minutes. All attendees agreed that there were no questions/concerns. Minutes approved.
Treasurer Report: Breakdown of ledger given by Ronda Rogers (see attached). Lorinne Munn requested a breakdown of how funds were appropriated. All VYPA minutes and attachments are available via Cloud Access. Joshua Jones to assist Council with technology solution to having documents available.
Community Hall: outside kitchen door replaced; upcoming, prioritized improvements will be done with available grant funds.
Cemetery: Chappy’s was stone set.
Infrastructure: Lorinne Munn, Susan Matlock, and Dawn Brown volunteered to be on the infrastructure team.
Harmonica Festival: Lorinne expressed great concern about proceeds made at Community Breakfast versus prior years. First Aid booth is provided as a courtesy not a requirement-all incidents were handled appropriately.
Stibnite Foundation Update: Ronda Rogers handed grant check to VYPA council. Community Hall project was awarded $6200.00.
Water Dept: Steve Holloway gave update on fire hydrants, sand filter replacement, and the pressure regulators that will be put into place with grant funding that has been granted.
YPFPD: Meeting held today at 1000. Phil is going to be presented new procedures.
Perpetua Resources: Belinda Provancher-Annual pig roast/community potluck cancelled; field work is starting late September/early October prior to winter season.
Old Business
Fireworks research update: Rhonda Egbert-Completed research on fireworks requirements. All 2021 fireworks followed the law.
New Business
Community Reps Named: Stibnite Advisory Council-Lynn Imel requested continuation. Unanimous election. Stibnite Advisory Council-Ronda Rogers requested continuation. Unanimous election.
2022 Festival Chairman: Deb Filler-motioned by Ronda Egbert, second by Hailey Harris, motioned carried.
Escapades Ride: September 18, 2021, next ride to Thunder Mountain. Proceeds support the Community Hall.
Lorinne Munn expressed concern about retired fire truck. Information was given about current ownership of the truck and the restoration process that the new owners are working on. A letter addressed to The Council was provided by and orally delivered during the meeting by Lorinne Munn. All questions/concerns were addressed, and a meeting to address pain points will be scheduled with the Council and Business owners with Adam Pellegrini to facilitate. (See attachment for Munn’s letter).
Respectfully submitted by,
Hailey Harris, VYPA Secretary
A complete, audio recording of this meeting can be accessed at: (link)

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link: (see document at link for attachments)
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Hailey Harris, Secretary
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

Remember to clean your chimney before lighting your first fall fire, and check the fittings. Chimney brushes are available to borrow from the YPFD.

Sept 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting (no minutes yet.)
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss upcoming election (no minutes yet.)
July 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
June 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:

Sept 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

2021 Meeting schedule for the YPFD. All meetings are at the YPFD Station
Sat. May 15 at 10am
Sat. June 12 at 10am
Sat. July 10 at 10am
Sat. September 11 at 10am Budget Meeting

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by a escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Lorinne Munn
Deputy Fire Chief: Merrill Saleen
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Phil Jensen – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Nikki Saleen
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
As the season comes to an end, we are starting to dwindle our inventory. To ensure our stock is fresh and kept to our standards, we will only be taking reservations until the end of our season (October 28). To make arrangements, please call The Corner at 208-633-3325 or call/text Hailey Harris at 970-275-7336. Thank you for a great summer!
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Open daily: 8am to 9pm Sunday: 8am to 2pm
Indoor Dining and Outdoor Dining Available.
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Open through the end of hunting season.
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Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
Store hours: 10am to 5pm, Monday – Sunday. Gas and Diesel now available. The Liquor Store is now reinstated. Now Selling Black Rifle Coffee.
The store is stocked with basic convenience store items such as food, fuel, liquor, beer, wine, tobacco, ice, non alcoholic beverages, snacks, ice cream. New Yellow Pine branded shirts, hats and koozies have arrived. We are going through the process of installing a propane dispenser and bottle exchange service.
For any particular store item requests, please call 208-633-3300 or Email
For room reservations, please call 208-633-3300 or Email for reservations
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Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Our Elk & Deer hunts are booked for our 2021 season, we do have a couple openings for our 2022 Elk & Deer hunts. We Also have a couple openings for Mountain Lion hunts December 2021 through February 2022 and Spring Bear hunts May of 2022. Please see our Website site for further details.
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:

Garden Mountain Contractors
We would like to extend our services into the Yellow pine area if there may be a need. We dig a lot of dirt! If you need this give us a shout on our FB page below. – Larry Williamson Garden Valley, Idaho FB Page:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 4) overnight low of 32 degrees. This morning mostly clear sky and good air quality. Trio of chipmunks and a few jays visiting, later the local pine squirrel showed up. Mostly sunny at lunch time, slight haze. Quite warm mid-afternoon, almost clear sky, gusty breezes, high of 82 degrees and haze building to the south (Boundary Fire.) Most of the sky had small clouds at sunset, cooling off and calmer. Clouds or haze before midnight.

Tuesday (Oct 5) 24 hour low of 34 degrees (from Monday’s reset.) This morning it appears clear above haze of smoke and poor air quality. Early loud air traffic. Jays, a male hairy woodpecker and chipmunks visiting. Increasing traffic and dust. Haze of smoke at lunch time, light breeze and probably mostly clear. Diamond Fuel and Feed delivered fuel today. Warm, mostly cloudy, haze of smoke and dust and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 76 degrees. Mostly cloudy and haze of smoke (and some dust) at sunset and calmer. Clouds or haze before midnight.

Wednesday (Oct 6) overnight low of 39 degrees. This morning partly cloudy and light haze of smoke. McCall air quality is Yellow, but ours is better. Early loud air traffic. Jays, chipmunks and male hairy woodpecker visiting. Gusty breezes blowing colored leaves off the trees and bushes at lunch time. Mail truck made it in on time. Helicopter at 215pm. Mild, partly cloudy, good air and gusty breezes mid-afternoon, high of 71 degrees. Grasshoppers clacking around. Internet spotty around 535pm. Partly cloudy at sunset, lighter breezes. Clouds to the east before midnight.

Thursday (Oct 7) overnight low of 42 degrees. This morning dark overcast, good air quality and sprinkled lightly just after 10am (not enough to get wet.) Internet connection spotty around 1045am. Jays, a pine squirrel and chipmunks visiting. Cool and overcast with slight breeze at lunch time. Cloud of smoke behind the Fire Hall (controlled burn.) Cool, cloudy, drops and sprinkles of rain mid-afternoon, high of 58 degrees. Short rain shower after 4pm. Partly cloudy just before sunset and calm. Looked cloudy to the east before midnight.

Friday (Oct 8) overnight low of 40 degrees. Yesterday’s sprinkles amounted to a trace in the rain gauge. This morning it started raining around 955am, dark overcast and good air quality. Light street traffic. Break in the rain between 1130am-1230pm, then more rain until a little after 1pm. Cool and low overcast (socked in mid-way down VanMeter Hill) mid-afternoon, high of 50 degrees. Overcast and a “freckle” of rain drops on the roof at sunset, light chilly breeze.

Saturday (Oct 9) overnight low of 41 degrees. Yesterday’s showers added up to 0.07″. This morning mostly cloudy, patches of blue sky and light breeze. Hairy woodpecker, pine squirrel, chipmunks and jays visiting. Mostly cloudy at lunch time. Light traffic for a Saturday, streets are starting to dry out. Cool light breeze and mostly cloudy (thin high wispy) mid-afternoon, high of 58 degrees. Almost clear at sunset, light breeze and cooling off. Some stars shining to the east before midnight.

Sunday (Oct 10) overnight low of 31 degrees. This morning overcast and good air quality. Jays, a pine squirrel and chipmunks visiting. Dark overcast at lunch time. Mostly cloudy and chilly gusty breezes mid-afternoon, high of 58 degrees. Overcast, light breeze and light sprinkles of rain started around sunset.
—————-

Mining News:

2nd gold mine proposed near Yellow Pine

Stallion Gold project would border Perpetua mine

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News October 7, 2021

A Canadian mining company has begun exploring for gold and antimony on 5,600 acres of land bordering Perpetua Resources’ proposed Stibnite Gold Mine near Yellow Pine.

Crews from Stallion Gold Corp of Vancouver, British Columbia, began collecting soil and rock samples from the largely under-explored Horse Heaven Project this past summer, Stallion Gold CEO Drew Zimmerman said.

A Stallion Gold investor presentation said that deposits at Horse Heaven “share similarities” to Perpetua’s Stibnite project, which is predicted to produce 6 million ounces of gold.

Spokespeople for both Stallion Gold and Perpetua said the two projects are unrelated and that neither company has a business relationship with the other.

The Horse Heaven project is located on the Boise National Forest, which would be in charge of issuing permits for exploratory drilling and other approvals for the proposed mine.

Zimmerman had no estimate on when the company could begin mining.

Perpetua Resources began exploratory work on its Stibnite Gold Project in 2009. An extensive review of the project led by the Payette National Forest has been underway since 2016.

A decision on the Stibnite Gold Project is not expected until 2023, or 14 years after the start of the project.

The Horse Heaven project area takes in 8.8 square miles of land near the confluence of Johnson Creek and the East Fork South Fork Salmon River. Parts of the project zone are within one mile of Yellow Pine.

By comparison, Perpetua’s project area totals 46.6-square-miles, but the company proposes to mine only about three square miles.

Stallion Gold raised $2 million in July through a private stock offering to fund exploration of the Horse Heaven Project, the company’s only current project.

A $953,000 deal to acquire the mineral rights for the land was completed in May.

Zimmerman told The Star-News that Stallion Gold is “not affiliated with Perpetua Resources in any way,” a statement echoed by Perpetua.

“To be explicitly clear, there have been no conversations about expanding our project or merging with Stallion Gold,” said Mckinsey Lyon, a Perpetua spokesperson.

Exploration Zones

The main area Stallion Gold wants to explore for gold and antimony is Golden Gate Hill, which is less than a mile from Yellow Pine, a village of about 25 year-round residents.

Golden Gate Hill is flanked by Johnson Creek to the west and the East Fork South Fork Salmon River to the north.

The Golden Gate mineral zone stretches 1.8 miles and could include high-grade gold deposits, according to Stallion Gold.

Another area Stallion Gold wants to explore is Antimony Ridge, a smaller mineral zone located about one mile southeast of the Golden Gate Zone.

Antimony Ridge has historically been mined as far back as World War I for antimony, a mineral used in munitions and renewable energy, among other things.

However, no work has been done on the Antimony Ridge zone since 1987, when Amselco Minerals and Meridian Gold Company did some exploratory drilling.

Benefits of the project’s location include year-round road access, nearby power lines, water rights availability and the nearby Johnson Creek airstrip, the investor presentation said.

Stallion Gold was known as Hybrid Minerals Inc. until the company announced a name change on June 2 after it acquired the Horse Heaven Project.

Hybrid’s main focus was exploring a cobalt mine near Salmon in Lemhi County. That project was abandoned in April 2019 due to falling cobalt prices, according to the company.

Profiles of Stallion Gold Officers

Drew Zimmerman – CEO

Nine years of experience in public markets

Rose from investment advisor to portfolio manager.

Certified by Chartered Financial Analyst Institute. No past experience running mining companies

University of Victoria: Bachelor of Commerce – International Business.

Based in Vancouver, British Columbia.

William “Bill” Breen – President and VP of Exploration

41 years of experience with mining companies. Minex exploration (31 years)

Consultant for Horse Heaven Syndicate (10 years). Member of the Society of Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration

Professional geologist certifications in Wyoming and Washington

University of Idaho: Bachelor of Science – Geology

Based in Idaho: Mayor of Hope in northern Idaho.

Dong Shim – CFO

14 years of experience in accounting and finance.

Member of Chartered Professional Accountants of British Columbia. President of SHIM Accounting Corporation (2013 to present)

Simon Fraser University: Bachelor of Business Administration – Accounting and Finance

Based in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Kelly Pladson – Corporate Secretary

12 years of experience in corporate governance and regulatory compliance

Based in Vancouver, British Columbia

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (Used with permission.)
— — —

Stallion Gold – Horse Heaven

Map
20211008StallionGoldMap
(click image for larger size)

link: to website
————

Idaho News:

Valley County hospitals report fewer new COVID-19 cases

Two new deaths reported among county residents

By Tom Grote for The Star-News October 7, 2021

The number of new COVID-19 cases reported by Valley County’s two hospitals slowed last week, with 63 new cases reported.

That compares to 90 new cases reported the previous week, 92 new cases reported three weeks ago and 119 new cases reported a month ago.

St. Luke’s McCall reported 55 new cases in the last week, while Cascade Medical Center reported eight new cases.

Two new deaths in Valley County due to COVID-19 were reported this week by Central District Health. Both deaths were men over age 70, the health department reported. No other details were released.

A total of six confirmed deaths and two suspected deaths related to COVID-19 among Valley County residents have now been reported by Central District Health.

Youths age 17 and younger made up the greatest number of McCall residents to test positive at all St. Luke’s Health System testing locations in the past month, the hospital reported.

That group accounted for 28% of new cases among McCall residents, followed by ages 30 to 39 and ages 50 to 69 with 18% each.

A total of 91% of people hospitalized for COVID-19 at all St. Luke’s Health System hospitals are unvaccinated, the hospital said.

The two hospitals have reported a total of 1,419 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic arrived in Valley County in March 2020.

continued:
— — — —

COVID-19 Updates: 1,682 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 53 new deaths

October 8, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 1,682 new COVID-19 cases and 53 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 267,664.

The state said 889,233 people have received the vaccine, and 1,622,114 total doses have been administered. 798,684 people are fully vaccinated.

The age group with the most cases is 18-29 with 63,817 cases.

The state said 51 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 11,620, and 14 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 1,927.

53 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 3,117.

full story: [Valley County 1367 cases, 10 deaths.]
— — — — — — — — — —

1 dead, highway blocked for hours in Idaho 55 pileup

KTVB Staff October 4, 2021

One woman was killed and two other people were hurt in a four-vehicle collision north of Cascade Monday.

The pileup happened at about 3:30 p.m., and blocked Idaho 55 for more than four hours.

According to Idaho State Police, a 53-year-old man from Ogden was headed north in a Dodge Ram pulling a trailer when one of the trailer tires came off and flew into the opposite lane.

A southbound 32-year-old from Caldwell, who was driving a Ford F350 pulling an enclosed trailer, hit the tire and lost control. The man swerved into the northbound lane, hitting an oncoming Honda Accord head-on.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho man, 71, killed in crash after vehicle crashes into Payette River

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, October 6th 2021

A 71-year-old Garden Valley man died Wednesday following a crash on Highway 55.

Idaho State Police says the man was driving south when his vehicle went off the southbound side of the road and overturned north of Horseshoe Bend.

The vehicle ended up in the Payette River. The driver was ejected and died at the scene.

He was not wearing a seat belt, troopers say.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

State, feds probe logging accident near New Meadows.

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News October 7, 2021

A fatal logging accident near New Meadows last month is under investigation by the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

The Sept. 10 accident killed Luis Garcia, 50, of Mexico and critically injured Christian Vargas, 20, also of Mexico, according to a news release from the Adams County Sheriff’s Office.

Vargas was transported by air ambulance to St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, where he was listed as being in “good condition” as of Tuesday, a hospital spokesperson said.

Garcia died before first responders arrived shortly after 11 a.m. on Sept. 10, the sheriff’s office said.

continued:
—————

Idaho History:

1918 to now: How Idaho weathers pandemics

Almost 103 years ago, Idaho’s Spanish flu response began similarly to March 2020.

Carolyn Komatsoulis (Idaho Press) October 6, 2021


Credit: Idaho Press Courtesy Photo
When Boise celebrated the end of the Great War on Nov. 11, 1918, it was a dangerous gathering in the Spanish flu epidemic that killed millions.

Christmas and New Years were quiet affairs in Nampa in 1918, since the influenza ban prevented any public gatherings.

Almost 103 years ago, Idaho’s Spanish flu response began similarly to March 2020. Restrictions were put in place.

“That there is some fear of the Spanish influenza becoming epidemic in Idaho is shown by the fact that the State Board of Health held a (meeting) in Boise Tuesday,” read the Nampa Leader-Herald on Oct. 11, 1918. “And after (considering) the matter decided to close all places of public meeting against schools.”

The Spanish influenza was one of the deadliest pandemics in history, lasting for the most part from Spring 1918 to Summer 1919.

The disease infected around 500 million people worldwide, which at the time was around a third of the planet’s population. Somewhere between 20 million and 50 million people died.

In just one year, 1918, American life expectancy dropped 12 years.

full story:

[To read more about the Influenza in Idaho, check out the table of contents on the Yellow Pine Times’ Idaho History Page:]
—————-

Scam Alert:

Common election season scams to watch out for

By Nicole Camarda Oct 07, 2021 KIVI

Scammers and hackers are always looking for ways to steal personal and finical information from whoever they can and one of the largest targets is voters.

According to the Idaho Secretary of State’s Office, election scams are common during this time of year and people will try to get access to addresses, ID information and even banking information.

October is Cyber Security Awareness month and elections are right around the corner which means more Idahoans need to be aware of the risks.

continued:
—————–

Public Lands:

Fall Burning on the Krassel RD

Sept 29, 2021 Payette NF

The Krassel Ranger District, Payette National Forest is planning to implement prescribed fire this fall east of Yellow Pine. The unit is located east of Yellow Pine, on the North side of the East Fork Rd, between Quartz creek and Profile creek. See attached maps for more specific areas affected. Ignitions should take 1 to 2 days for each. Hazards from the prescribed fires including fire spread, smoke, rolling debris, ash pits and fire weakened trees may be present in the area until significant weather (precipitation and cooler temperatures) occurs.

Ignition is anticipated to take place in October or early November.

Please contact Patrick Schon at 208-634-0623 patrick.schon@usda.gov or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622 laurel.ingram@usda.gov with any questions or comments, or if you will be operating in or close to that area this fall.

Map

Thank you,
Patrick Schon
Fire Management Specialist
Payette National Forest, East Zone
————–

Fire Season:

Firefighters knock down Goose Fire in the Boise Foothills

KTVB Staff October 6, 2021

Firefighters worked overnight to get the upper hand on a grass fire that scorched 200 acres of land near homes in the Boise Foothills.

The Goose Fire began at about 5 p.m. Wednesday in the area of Idaho Highway 55 and Beacon Light Road, near the Eagle Sports Complex and a number of houses.

According to the Bureau of Land Management, all of the active flames had been knocked down as of 8:35 p.m. Wednesday. Crews remained at the scene overnight, but were aided by late-night rainfall.

continued: w/photos
— — — —

441-acre Goose Fire contained Thursday morning

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, October 6th 2021


Courtesy Karen Lesh

A large fire, fueled by gusty winds, that erupted in the foothills near Eagle on Wednesday was contained at 10 a.m. Thursday morning, the Bureau of Land Management reports.

The 441-acre fire started near the Eagle Sports Complex and then spread to Hill Road between Horseshoe Bend and Seamans Gulch roads. At one point Wednesday evening, deputies had called for voluntary evacuation recommendations for several homes north of Hill Road and near Seaman’s Gulch, but they’ve since been given the OK to return to their homes.

Multiple emergency crews from across the Treasure Valley fought the fire including Boise and Eagle. The Bureau of Land Management has dubbed it the Goose Fire.

continued: w/photos
— — — —

ACSO: Goose Fire in the Boise Foothills was started by fireworks

According to the Ada County’s Sheriff’s Office, the Goose Fire was started by fireworks that were lit in the middle of W. Goose Creek Road.

KTVB Staff October 7, 2021

story:
— — — — — — — — — —

2021 Payette Wilderness Fires
Three fires are burning in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Payette National Forest. The Club, Rush Creek, and Vinegar fires were started by lightning on July 15, 2021. A Type 3 Incident Management Team took over the fires on July 19th. A closure order for trails has been put in place in and around these fires for public and firefighter safety to prevent any interference with suppression and response operations.
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — —

Boundary Fire in Frank Church Wilderness scorches 137 square miles, 88% contained

In this story is a list and interactive map of large wildfires burning in Idaho and Oregon.

KTVB Staff October 9, 2021

link:

Boundary Fire
Salmon-Challis National Forest
The lightning-caused Boundary Fire ~2 miles W of Boundary Creek Boat Launch was detected on August 10.
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — —

Mud Lick, Haynes, and Iron Fires
Salmon-Challis National Forest
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — — — — — — — —

Some useful links:

InciWeb Fire info link:
Air Quality McCall link:
National Fire Heat Map link: (zoom in to our area)
Weather Station at Stibnite link:
Real Time Lightning Map link: (zoom to our area)
GOES-West Satellite Maps Pacific Northwest link:
—————–

Critter News:

Apples picked up in Eastern Idaho to avoid attracting bears

October 5, 2021 Local News 8

Conservation officers and biologists from Idaho Fish and Game teamed up with a group of volunteers recently to pick and gather apples around the city of Ashton in an effort to prevent the juicy fruits from attracting bears into backyards.

Fish and Game regularly responds to bears wandering into neighborhoods this time of year as they search for fruit trees and other easy meals to provide them with quick calories in preparation for winter.

“An apple tree can be quite the find for a hungry bear, but it comes at a price,” wildlife biologist Jeremy Nicholson said. “Bears that become accustomed to spending time near humans and eating human food are commonly removed from the population because of the danger they pose to the public.”

continued: with bear tips
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho trooper, volunteer rescue owl tangled in trash along Interstate-84

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, October 5th 2021


Courtesy Idaho State Police

An owl is thanking its lucky feathers for an Idaho State Trooper and an animal rescue volunteer.

Idaho State Police says drivers along Interstate-84 spotted a Great Horned Owl tangled in some plastic in Nampa on Tuesday. The trooper parked her patrol vehicle between the owl and traffic and waited until a volunteer from Animals in Distress could arrive.

“The owl is OK and released away from the freeway,” ISP said.

source:
————–

Fish & Game News:

Hunters: If your tag isn’t properly notched, it’s invalid

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Thursday, October 7, 2021


Sara Cassinelli/Idaho Fish and Game

This applies to all permits that require you to notch the month and date

Reminder for hunters, after you harvest your animal, you must validate your tag by completely removing the correct day and month – just like in the picture – and attaching it to the largest portion of the carcass.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Don’t be tempted to shoot that road-side deer or elk, it might not be what you think

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, October 6, 2021

F&G uses decoy to nab poachers in problem areas.

That buck or bull standing next to the road might be a tempting target, but it could also be a very costly mistake that causes you to lose your money and hunting license.

Idaho Fish and Game conservation officers deploy “artificial simulated animals” during hunting season to catch law-breaking hunters. Commonly called ASAs, they are life-like copies of deer, elk and other game species that look and act like the real thing.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Elk hunters are reminded to know their bulls before pulling the trigger

By Brian Pearson, Regional Communications Manager
Tuesday, October 5, 2021

Multiple moose were illegally killed by elk hunters in Southwest Idaho last year

Moose are an iconic Idaho species, and moose hunts are a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for Idahoans. Populations are carefully managed through an exclusively controlled hunt framework, and these hunts are among the most sought-after in the state. In Southwest Idaho, densities of moose are low, and the moose population isn’t large enough to support a hunt, so even one moose killed – mistakenly or intentionally – is too many.

After multiple moose were mistaken for elk and illegally killed in Idaho Fish and Game’s Southwest Region in 2020, Fish and Game is reminding hunters that it is their responsibility to positively identify their target before pulling the trigger, and that they need to “know their bulls” before heading out for rifle seasons.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Dressing for hunting: hope for the best weather, but prepare for the worst

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Tuesday, October 5, 2021

Wear the right hunting clothing so you can stay in the woods and make your hunting time count

Fall hunting happens in all kinds of weather and conditions, so don’t underestimate the importance of your clothing. It may determine how long you’re able to stay outdoors and hunt, and more time in the woods often equates to a higher chance of success. Dressing for Idaho’s variable fall weather takes preparation and investment, but it can pay dividends.

Hunting is often better when the weather is cold, wet and snowy, and finding clothes that keep you comfortable can be a challenge, so here are things to consider:

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Hunt safe: Survival tips for big game hunters

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, October 6, 2021

Be prepared for those unexpected situations you might encounter while hunting in the fall

Every hunting season, hunters get lost or disoriented, caught outdoors in cold, wet weather, or experience some other unexpected hazard. While most escape no worse than tired, chilled and hungry, the hazards in Idaho’s woods shouldn’t be underestimated. Hunters can take precautions and prepare for unexpected situations.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Small horses bring big smiles to Treasure Valley seniors

By Karen Lehr Oct 01, 2021 KIVI

Boise, Idaho — 18 months into the pandemic, we could all use some cheering up.

That’s the goal of the local non-profit Mini Joys, taking miniature horses around the Treasure Valley to meet with children and seniors.

Mini Joys founder Laurie Bell started the non-profit nine years ago, visiting special needs classrooms, foster homes, children’s hospitals, and senior homes. Groups can also visit the Mini Joys farm near Hidden Springs.

continued: w/video
—————-

Seasonal Humor:

MooseVoicemail-a

CovidZoo-a
[h/t CP]
—————-

Idaho History Oct 10, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 75

Idaho Newspaper Clippings February 11-12, 1920

Idaho photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

February 11

The Challis Messenger., February 11, 1920, Page 1

19200211CM1

19200211CM2Quarantine Established Wednesday Evening, Feb. 4th
Mail Service Discontinued For Two Days
Postoffice Department Denies Knowledge of any Such Order to Mackay Postmaster. Local Postmaster Received no Order to Hold Outgoing Mail But Contractor Hansen Failed to Take Mail Out One Morning.

Last Wednesday evening a quarantine was established at Willow creek summit against infected districts and as a result the people of the entire Salmon river section of Custer county were with outmail for two days.

On Thursday morning the editor called up Mackay postmaster W. A. Criswell and was informed by him that he had received instructions from the Postoffice Department at Washington on February 2nd (two days before the quarantine was established) to withhold all Challis mail until quarantine was lifted. A meeting of business men was held and the following telegram was sent to the Department at Washington:

“Mackay postmaster claims order from Department to withhold all Challis mail. Challis section under quarantine AGAINST influenza, effective February 4th at 6 p.m. Uninterrupted service last year under same conditions. County Health Officer Recommends mail service be continued at once and has made no request for its discontinuance. This district is NOT infected. C. L. Kirtley Health Officer, Custer County.”

On Friday afternoon telegraphic advices from Washington informed us that the Mackay postmaster had been ordered to release the Challis mail at once and Saturday evening we received mail which had been held up at Mackay for approximately 66 hours.

Local postmaster E. W. Keyes, informed the contractor’s agent here that she had no orders to withhold outgoing mail, but despite this fact the contractor. W. V. Hansen, neglected to take the mail out one morning and Friday evening a committee of citizens called on our postmaster and asked that she take the necessary steps to have the mail leave here Saturday morning. Mrs. Keyes called up the contractor at Makay and insisted that the mail leave according to schedule the next (Saturday) morning. Mr. Hansen, whom we are informed, had withdrawn all his stage equipment used on the Mackay route except one truck, instructed his local stage agent, Nickerson, to get the mail out next morning. Thus we were deprived of our incoming mail service two days and the outbound service one day, causing great inconvenience to the citizens of not only this valley, but of Pahsamaroi and the upper country as well.

Last Monday afternoon the following telegram to Dr. Kirtley was received:

“Immediately upon receipt of your telegram took matter up with postoffice service authorities and was advised that postmaster at Mackay had no orders from here to withhold Challis mail. I was assured that he would be communicated with and erroneous impression corrected. Have not heard further from you so assume that service has been restored.”

We are, for sufficient reasons, withholding the signature on this telegram, but the same can be seen upon request.

Interfering with Uncle Sam’s mail service is a serious offense and an endeavor to fix the guilt upon any person or persons responsible for the discontinuance of our mail service is being made so we are informed and a complaint and warrants will be sworn out against those found to be responsible and the matter pushed to a finish.

Such an effort is child’s play – Ouija board stuff – and is extremely ridiculous as anyone, who would give the matter any thought would readily see that the Postoffice Department would not discontinue mail service into a district which was not infected unless the residents there demanded it.
— —

19200211CM3Many Cases Of Flu In Our County

An epidemic of flu is raging in various sections of Custer county.

At Mackay 30 cases are reported and we are informed that others cases are known to exist there which have not been reported by the doctor in charge.

At White Knob the epidemic is said to be raging. Some cases are reported at Barton and near Chilly and several cases are reported near Clayton and in Pahsamaroi.

A quarantine has been established at the Wats bridge and that road will be open to travel only between the hours of 8 a.m. and 10 p.m.

There are no cases of flu in Round valley at the present time, although Bill Vogel is under quarantine on suspicion.

Dr. Kirtley has done remarkably well in keeping the epidemic out of this valley when we are hemmed in with the disease on all sides.

Bert Williams, who has been critically ill with the flu at the Ramshorn mine is reported as on the improve now while Roy Tracht is reported as seriously ill.

By everyone carefully adhering to the quarantine regulations the epidemic will soon be under control and the disease stamped out.

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 11 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Challis Messenger., February 11, 1920, Page 2

Idahoan Has Long Sleep

Buhl, Idaho. — Bernard Sandgren, 23 years of age, son of Mr. and Mrs. M. Sandgren, residing a mile north of this city, has been in a somnambulant state of mind since January 20, following an attack of influenza.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Challis Messenger., February 11, 1920, Page 5

Items About People You Know

To Pahsamaroi — Dr. Kirtley went over to Pahsamaroi the later part of the week for a conference with Dr. Hanmer, county physician for Lemhi county relative to the flu situation. Dr. Hanmer assured Dr. Kirtley that the board of health of Lemhi county, and he, as its executive official, were heartily in accord with our quarantine and that the county commissioners of Lemhi county had instructed him to use every effort to keep the disease out of Salmon this year. We are not, it seems, entirely alone in our desire for a rigid quarantine against infected districts.

Taking Census — J. A. Hirrington and J. L. Riley began last Monday to count noses for Uncle Sam in the Salmon river section of Custer county.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Challis Messenger., February 11, 1920, Page 8

19200211CM4Quarantine Regulations
County Health Officer

To the Public Generally;

Whereas a contagious and infectious disease, known as Influenza has again made its appearance in many states and particularly in certain parts of Custer county, public health demands that prompt and efficient measures be taken to prevent the spread of said disease to those portions of Custer county not yet infected.

1st. Now, therefore, it is ordered by the County Health Officer of Custer county that all of that portion of Custer county which drains into Salmon River shall and is hereby declared to be a quarantine district for the purpose of preventing the introduction of Influenza into the said district. Said quarantine district and this order creating the same shall remain in full force until the further order of the Board of Health of said Custer county, Idaho.

2nd. All persons are prohibited from entering said district without a permit from the County Health Officer.

3rd. The County Health Officer is hereby authorized and empowered to appoint as many quarantine guards and to create as many quarantine districts as may be necessary to enforce these rules and regulations.

4th. The County Health Officer of Custer County, Idaho, shall cause to be printed suitable permits and quarantine cards in harmony with law and these regulations and place a sufficient number of said permits and quarantine cards at each quarantine station with the quarantine guards stationed there to meet all such necessary demands. It is hereby and herein further ordered and directed that the County Health Officer shall provide all quarantine guards at each quarantine station with “yellow flags” of suitable size, to be used by said quarantine guards in placing or causing same to be placed on the vehicle in which said person or persons are traveling.

5th. All persons coming into said district and desiring to remain therein shall be quarantined for a period of four days, at the home of such person or persons, in case they have a home in said district, and if not, then in some suitable place prepared and designated by the County Health Officer.

6th. All persons have business to transact in said district may enter said district and attend to [?] business, and depart again from said district; but all homes or other places to which such person are allowed to stop and enter must be quarantined for a period of four days; such person or persons so entering under the provisions of this [Order?] shall stop at the first quarantine station on the road [?], that such person or persons enter said quarantine district, and procure a written permit therefor; said permit shall direct such person or persons to travel the most direct public highway to and from his or her, or their homes or place where they seek to go, without stopping; and that each home of place where such person or persons shall go or stop, shall be quarantined by the placing of a proper quarantine card up in a conspicuous place on said residence or place where such person or persons shall go or stop as aforesaid; said quarantine card shall be applied such person or persons by said quarantine, such quarantine to be and remain in full force and effect for a period of four days from and after such person or persons shall so enter as aforesaid; and in the event any such person or persons or others in said home shall become afflicted with said disease, then in such case, said quarantine of said home or place shall be and remain in full force and virtue until ordered discontinued by said County Health Officer. It is further hereby and herein provided that all persons entering said quarantine district as aforesaid, shall place in a conspicuous place on the vehicle in which they travel a “yellow flag” and keep said flag thereon for a period of four days provided they remain in said quarantine district for such period of time; said flag to be supplied by the quarantine guard.

7th. All persons desiring continuous passage through said district shall be granted such privilege, but such person or persons shall first procure from such quarantine guard a permit and flag therefor, and all homes and other places in which they may be permitted to stop and enter shall be quarantined for a period of four days, as provided in Rule Sixth hereof.

8th. The County Health Officer is hereby empowered and directed to cause to be printed large quarantine cards to be posted up in a conspicuous place at each quarantine station so created as aforesaid, which said quarantine card shall correctly describe the boundaries of the Quarantine District hereby created.

9th. Every person or persons, company or corporation violating any of the provisions of this Order will be prosecuted as in such case made and provided.

An emergency existing therefore, this Order shall be and is in full force and effect from the date hereof.

Penalty for violation of this Order is $50.00 fine or imprisonment in the county jail for ninety days or by both such fine and imprisonment.

Dated at Challis, Idaho, this 4th day of February, 1920.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 11, 1920, Page 1

19200211DSM1

Anniversary Week Of The Boy Scouts

This week is the tenth anniversary of the organization of the Boy Scouts of America and National Good Turn week. Many of the big magazines are giving space to the Scout Good Turn and with them we are urging that everybody do at least one good turn to some one else this week.

The Moscow Boy Scouts have been delayed in their anniversary week plans on account of the influenza but as far as conditions will allow they intend to carry out the program. …
— —

Glee Club Concert Has Been Postponed

Due to the influenza quarantine now in effect at the University of Idaho and the illness of Russell T. Scott, manager and baritone soloist, who is suffering with influenza, the much looked for University of Idaho Male Glee club concert to have been held in the auditorium Friday night has been indefinitely postponed until health conditions are better.

After a triumphant tour of southern Idaho where the club concerts were greeted with crowded and enthusiastic houses, the Friday night concert was looked forward to with considerable pleasure.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 11 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 11, 1920, Page 2

Princeton Pickings

Miss Lavalle Cone came home from Moscow Monday. She will remain at home here until she entirely recovers from an attack of the flu.

Considerable sickness is reported around Princeton. Two families are recovering from the flu and there is considerable colds and sore throat prevalent among the children.

Art Henderson and Orvis Morgan are both here from the Bovill hospital convalescing from the flu.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 11, 1920, Page 4

Worley Funeral Held

The funeral of J. W. Worley was held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock, conducted by Rev. H. O. Perry at Grice’s chapel. Only a few friends of the deceased were permitted to attend. Interment was made in the Moscow cemetery. Mrs. Worley and and her children, who have been ill are slowly improving.
— —

Coffee Importation Increase

During the last year the imports of coffee increased 237,000,000 pounds in quantity and $147,000,000,000 in value.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 11, 1920, Page 5

City News

Mrs. M. P. Martinson, who has been very ill of pneumonia at her home on Polk street, is slowly improving. Mrs. McGillan is the attendant nurse.

G. F. Savage is convalescent after a severe attack of influenza.

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Stone are both ill of influenza at their home on north Jefferson. Mrs. Stone’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Butler from east of Moscow are in to assist in nursing and Mrs. Butler has been ill. All are improving except Mr. Stone, who is quite ill.

E. J. Rosenberg arrived this morning from Spokane to visit his family. Mrs. Rosenberg, who teaches in the public schools is confined to her home by illness.

Mrs. C. J. McCollister is seriously ill of pneumonia at the home of Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Brooks. Mr. and Mrs. McCollister whose home is in the Nez Perce, were in Moscow to visit friends and relatives, when Mrs. McCollister was taken ill of influenza about three weeks ago. Mrs. McCollister is a sister of Pat Perrine, a senior at the university.

Mrs. E. A. Keane has received work from Spokane that Mrs. Harry M. Driscoll is improving, after a very serious attack of pneumonia.

Mrs. W. H. Correll left today for Culdesac, called by the illness of her sons, of influenza.

Alton Cornielson, high school student, has recovered from the “flu” and is back in school again.

Mr. B. P. Luvaas was called to Genesee by the illness of his son, Lyman Luvaas, who had been taken ill with pneumonia, but later reports show a slight improvement.

The son and daughter of N. G. Gilbertson, east of Moscow, who have been very ill of pneumonia, following influenza, are reported a little better today but their condition is still causing grave concern.
— —

19200211DSM2Mrs. M. K. Bue Is Influenza Victim

Mrs. M. K. Bue died at her home in Enterprise, Oregon, last Saturday morning of pneumonia.

The body has been brought here for interment and the funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Norwegian Lutheran church.

Mrs. Bue, whose maiden name was Marie Croghan, made her home in Moscow for several years previous to her marriage and was actively identified with the Norwegian Lutheran church of this city. She leaves besides her husband, who is a brother of Mrs. C. B. Westover, three children, one of whom was an infant two days old at the time of her death, one sister in Enterprise, three brothers in the east and hosts of relatives at different points, many of whom are living here in the west and among whom may be mentioned the Nordby families of Genesee, the Luvass, Ostroot and Dahl families of Moscow.

Rev. F. I. Schmidt will conduct the funeral, and all friends will be permitted to attend as the body will not be taken to the church.
— —

Texas Whiskey to Be Pure

Austin, Texas. — Whiskey, under the new prohibition law, is classed as a drug, and R. H. Hoffman, pure food and drug commissioner, has announced that he is “going after” retail druggists who are watering their whiskey. The law requires that medicinal whiskey be 44 to 50 per cent ethyl alcohol, he said, and druggists are now paying $1.70 a gallon, plus a $3 tax, for whiskey and selling it for $2 a pint, or $16 a gallon. Mr. Hoffman is of the opinion that they make enough profit without adding water to their stock.
— —

A Two Cent Honor

A bill has been introduced in the senate to restore the coinage of a two-cent coin to be known as the Roosevelt piece.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 11, 1920, Page 6

Cora Correspondence; School Closed Monday

Cora — Mrs. I. S. Miller is very ill with influenza. Mr. Miller’s brother, Ham, visited him a few days last week.

Fritz Leistner and Mrs. Leistner’s brother Marvin McMannama, have been very ill with influenza, therefore school closed last Monday but is expected to open again this Wednesday.

Florence Kidwell came home for a few days but hearing that the Moscow high school was ready to open again, she returned to Moscow Sunday.

Howard Wilcox and Gertrude Farnam came home Thursday, the Garfield schools being closed.

Lewis Burson received word that his wife, who is visiting in North Dakota, is very seriously ill.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 11, 1920, Page 7

19200211DSM3
Influenza Ban Still In Effect On Campus
No Social Events May Be Held Without Specific Authority

The influenza ban is still on and all students should remember that no public or social events may be held without specific permission or authority from Professor H. T. Lewis. Professor Lewis said he cannot guarantee any more basket ball games, but the ban was lifted for the Willamette game Monday night.

An interesting feature of the epidemic this year is the large number of cases among faculty members. Last year the faculty escaped with but one or two cases. Professor Conwell has suffered a relapse and is still ill. Professor Axtell was quite sick but is out now.

Thirty Student Cases

There have been from 30 to 35 students who have had the influenza, and new cases are being reported right along. Lyle Colburn and Carl Patch are ill at the S. A. E. house.

The Hutton home was opened for a girls’ hospital with Irene McKay and Miss Brown, nurse, in charge. Five patients are the most to be confined there at one time.

The “Y” hut was taken over for an emergency hospital for the boys. Two men are ill there now.

Volunteers Respond

In his call for volunteer nurses and assistants Professor Lewis had very good responses from the Chi Delta Phi, Gamma Phi Beta, Delta Gamma, Kappa Sigma, Sigma Nu and Phi Delta houses.

During the epidemic all individual health claims have been suspended and the money spent for hospital supplies and overhead expenses. The health claims will be established again as soon as the ban is lifted.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., February 11, 1920, Page 8

President Lindley is Ill

Dr. E. H. Lindley, president of the University of Idaho, is confined to his home on First street with what is feared is a mild case of influenza. His condition is not regarded as serious and his many friends are hoping for his early recovery. Dr. Lindley was forced to cancel his engagement to speak at the annual banquet of the Young Men’s Republican Club, of Seattle, on Lincoln’s birthday, tomorrow night.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Cutting Wood at Taney, Idaho (1)

TaneyFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

February 12

The Grangeville Globe. February 12, 1920, Page 4

19200212GG1

Can Prescribe Whiskey
Doctors and Druggists Required to Secure Permits

The Bureau of Internal Revenue has issued a statement relative to the regulations governing the use and procurement of intoxicating liquors for medical purposes.

Both the physician who prescribes and the pharmacist or druggist who sells liquor for medical purposes must have a permit. Application for the permits should be made to the Federal prohibition director. In States where prohibition directors have not been appointed application should be made to the Collector of Internal Revenue. In the case of residents of the District of Columbia application should be made to Collector of Internal Revenue, Joshua W. Miles, Baltimore, Md.

Blank forms – 1403 – for prescribing liquors are being printed and distributed among Federal prohibition directors assistant directors and collectors of internal revenue. Where such blanks are not yet available, physicians holding permits may issue prescriptions on blanks regularly used by them.

Following is the Bureau’s statement:

“Any physician duly licensed to practice medicine and actively engaged in the practice of such profession may obtain a permit to prescribe intoxicating liquor and may then issue prescriptions for distilled spirits, wines or certain alcoholic medicinal preparations for medical purposes for persons upon whom his in attendance in cases where he believes that the use of liquor as a medicine is necessary. In no case may spirituous liquor be prescribed by one or more physicians in excess of one pint for the same person within any period of ten days.

“No specific limitation is placed upon the quantity of wines which may be prescribed for medical purposes. The regulations merely require that no prescription be issued for a greater quantity than is necessary for use as a medicine. Physicians who do not hold permits to prescribe intoxicating liquor are under no circumstances permitted to issue prescriptions.

“All prescriptions for intoxicating liquor are required to be written on prescription blanks prescribed by the regulations (Form 1403), and to be provided by the Bureau, except that in emergency cases physicians may use their regular prescription blanks provided the same contain the date of issue, amount prescribed, to whom issued, and directions for use, stating the amount and frequency of dose.Pending an adequate supply of the official blanks being printed and distributed to directors and acting directors, physicians holding permits have been authorized to issue prescriptions on blanks regularly used by them.

“Prescriptions for intoxicating liquor may be filled only by registered pharmacists who hold permits authorizing them to do so, or who are employed by retail druggists holding such permits. Pharmacists and druggists holding such permits will procure their supplies of intoxicating liquor from manufacturer or other persons holding permits authorizing them to sell liquor.

“Persons to whom prescriptions for intoxicating liquor are issued by physicians may procure the liquor prescribed through pharmacists or druggists holding permits without obtaining a permit.

“Physicians may also obtain permits entitling them to procure not more than six quarts of distilled spirits, wines or certain alcoholic preparations during any calendar year for administration to their patients in emergency cases where delay in procuring liquor on a prescription through a pharmacist might have serious consequence to the patient.

“Provision is also made in the regulations for issuing permits to hospitals and sanatoriums to enable them to procure intoxicating liquor to be administered for medicinal purposes to patients at such institutions and also for issuing permits to manufacturing industrial, and other establishments maintaining first aid stations, authorizing them to procure liquor for administration to their employees for medical purposes in emergency cases.

“All applications for permits above referred to should be made on Form 1404 in triplicate and forwarded to the local Collector of Internal Revenue.

“Section 27 of the National Prohibition Act provides that any intoxicating liquor seized under section 25 or section 26 thereof, and subject to be destroyed, may upon application of the United States Attorney, be ordered by the court to be delivered to any person holding a permit to purchase liquor. All liquor seized under such sections of law may be diverted through regular channels for medicinal purposes under the procedure above described.

“Any intoxicating liquor seized under Federal Law prior to October 28, 1919, if not claimed within sixty days from such date, may likewise upon order of the court be delivered to any person holding a permit to purchase and be diverted to medicinal or other non-beverage purposes.”

Complaints of exorbitant charges for liquor for medicinal purposes which place dispensers thereof in the class of profiteers will be investigated.”

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 12 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Grangeville Globe. February 12, 1920, Page 5

19200212GG2School Opens Monday

Unless something unforeseen occurs the schools will open for business Monday morning. All the teachers afflicted with the influenza have fully recovered and it is expected an attendance near normal will prevail.
— —

Will Visit California

Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Knox will leave some time next week for a few weeks or a month’s sojourn at points in California. Mr. Knox recently got out after a severe attack of the influenza and it is expected the California climate will assist him in recuperating and aid his health generally.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

Jerome County Times., February 12, 1920, Page 2

19200212JCT1

Senator Johnson Flu Victim

Washington. — Senator Hiram Johnson of California is ill at his home here from influenza, it has been learned. The senator has been confined to his bed, but it is not believed his condition is serious.

source: Jerome County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 12 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Payette Enterprise., February 12, 1920, Page 1

19200212PE1

Personal And Local Mention

The Flu must have made its appearance at the Will Griggs home some time during Tuesday night. At least there was a ten pound boy arrived early Wednesday morning.

Mr. A. J. Vanderford being sick and unable to be at his place of business this week, C. F. Callen is janitor, head salesman and the whole push at the Chevrolet sales room.

Little Charles Woodward, son of Dr. J. C. Woodward, was suddenly taken last Saturday with what at first seemed to be infantile paralysis. His condition for a time appeared to be very critical, but later development proved his case not to be as first indicated and his condition not so serious. He is improving nicely and it is believed he will soon be fully recovered.

Mr. Langdon, proprietor of the Commercial Hotel wishes to repudiate the statement made in the Commissioners proceedings regarding smallpox at the Commercial, as there has been no cases to his knowledge.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 12 Feb. 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Payette Enterprise., February 12, 1920, Page 4

19200212PE2How to Avoid Influenza

There is one point regarding influenza on which the medical profession is in agreement. This is stated by the Journal of the American Medical Association as follows:

“The pulmonary complications of influenza, which make it so serious a disease, may be avoided to a large extent by rest in bed at the onset of the illness. Influenza itself is not usually fatal, and general insistence on the importance of rest and warmth at the onset of the illness will accomplish more than all else in preventing complications and reducing fatalities from the disease.”

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

Payette Enterprise., February 12, 1920, Page 5

Fruitland Department
Mrs. F. M. Burtch

The E. E. Holt Family, who have been ill, are much better.

The George McKeown family has been on the sick list, but all are improving at present.

Those who have been on the sick list but who are improving at present, are, the L. J. Meeker family, the Hooker family, the George Eldredge family, the Percy Frank family, Harry Powell and little daughter, Mr. Solterbeck and M. W. Hezeltine.

The sick folks at the Rands home are improving slowly.

The Whitley Bottom School is closed this week on account of so much sickness.

John Murdock is among those who were taken ill this week.

Mrs. Zane Schubert and Mrs. L. H. Eby have been quite ill the past week.

There will be no meeting of the Fruitland Mother’s Circle until March.

Miss Elsie Bayer came home from Caldwell Saturday on account of the illness of one of her teachers.

Both school and churches have been closed the past two weeks in the effort to stamp out the present outbreak of Flu in the community.

A. M. Carpenter and wife are on the sick list this week.

Mr. James Deal is recovering from his illness at the present writing.

The Methodist people very kindly have loaned the Bungalow, and the ladies of the community have fitted it up as a temporary hospital for the care of the sick.

Mr. H. B. Strawn is on the sick list this week.
— —

Clarence B. Griner

Clarence B. Griner who has been working here through the packing season, died on the morning of February 9th from pneumonia, following influenza. His entire family were ill and feeling that he must keep up in order to care for his loved ones, he heroically ministered to them until compelled to cease. He was born in Danville, Illinois, on March 25, 1887. On May 20, 1907 he was married to Miss Zora Jones and to this union five children were born, three boys and two girls. All but one survive him although at the time of his death two little daughters were lying near his bedside critically ill. In 1914 he took up a homestead near Ironside, Oregon, where he lived until coming to Fruitland last September. His father, Daniel Griner, is expected on Thursday from Illinois and arrangements for interment will be deferred until his arrival. The sympathy of the entire community is extended to the bereaved family.
— —

Oran C. Rands

Oran C. Rands was born at Tripp, S. D. on January 22, 1885, and departed this life on February 3, 1920 at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Rands, at Fruitland, Idaho. The cause of his illness was pneumonia following an attack of influenza. He is survived by a father, mother, two brothers and other relatives and many friends. Only last week his brother Franklin succumbed to the same disease. The sympathy of the community is extended to the sorrowing relatives.

(ibid, page 5)
—————-

Further Reading

There was almost a 1921 Theodore Roosevelt 2 cent piece

Well worn Copper 03 May 2019

1921Roosevelt2cent-a

Following the 1919 death of Theodore Roosevelt a bill was almost passed which would have created a Roosevelt two-and-a-half cent piece. The proposal gathered support in Congress, and by 1921 had been modified to a 2 cent coin, which was believed to help bookkeeping and accounting. The coin was to be struck in a mixture of 95% zinc and 5% copper. If this sounds familiar to anyone, it is the exact composition of our current cent! There is a great article in the June 1921 issue of The Numismatist debating the merits of such a piece. While many wanted to honor Roosevelt, there were some who felt his likeness would have been belittled on such a minor coin. And particularly since Roosevelt did so much to improve American coinage in his lifetime, the thought of placing his likeness on a zinc coin would have dishonored him. Apparently it was well known that a zinc/copper mixture would appear silvery at first, but quickly blacken once circulated. Eventually the bill died and nothing became of it. And Theodore Roosevelt would have to wait until his image was placed on the reverse of a 2016 quarter.

source: American Numismatic Association
— — — — — — — — — —

Mandatory masks, shuttered theatres and confusing rules: The 1918 Spanish flu pandemic and its similarities with today

Tu Thanh Ha And James Keller December 28, 2020 Updated February 3, 2021

[part 2]

Dr. Hastings

Like contemporary public-health officers who have become household names, the Spanish flu gave prominence to the early pioneers of preventive medicine such as Dr. Hastings.

He is recognized today as a key figure who improved the city’s sanitation in the early 20th century, reducing infant mortality and eradicating typhoid and tuberculosis.

Near retirement as a hospital physician, he turned to public health, spurred by the memory of a daughter who died of typhoid fever after she drank tainted raw milk. He started campaigning for pasteurization and better inspections of milk.

He became Toronto’s medical health officer in 1910, saying on his appointment that “I am anxious to make Toronto the banner city of the Dominion in the matter of health.”

He held the post for two decades. He advocated medical inspections at school to contain diphtheria and scarlet fever. Seeing that city officials revamped plumbing systems but still let sewage disposal taint the water supply, he complained in a speech that “they strain at a gnat and swallow a camel”

Like some other prominent Canadians at the time, he believed in eugenics. He warned that “the subnormal are producing two or three times as rapidly as the mentally normal,” and wanted to prevent “the spread and multiplication of worthless members of society.”

He retired in 1931, hailed as a man who had made Toronto more salubrious. But despite his skills, his handling of the Spanish flu was limited by the knowledge of the time.

Cures And Vaccines

Although Dr. Hastings warned people against squandering money on remedies of dubious value against the flu, stores ran out of menthol, camphor and lozenges. Makers of syrups, laxative, quinine tablets or meat extracts also claimed their products helped ward the flu.

During the war, the sale of spirits was restricted in much of Canada. One exception was liquor prescribed for medical reasons. By 1919, Ontario doctors had penned more than half a million prescriptions for whiskey. Police had to keep order as people lined up outside dispensaries selling liquor.

Meanwhile, Canadian researchers were part of the worldwide effort to isolate the flu strain and immunize the population.

A Queen’s University bacteriologist, Guilford Reed, tested a vaccine on 200 volunteers. The Connaught Laboratories, then part of the University of Toronto, produced another vaccine and shipped out thousands of doses to hospitals and the military.

The Globe described those scientists as “working for humanity.”

“In the solitude of their laboratories, they labour with germs and poisons,” The Globe reported. “They do this for no personal reward. Their discoveries never yield them great riches. … But they carry on that life may be safer and better for those about them, and for those who come after them.”

Those vaccines had a key shortcoming: Scientists at the time didn’t know that a virus, rather than larger bacteria, caused influenza. Nevertheless, modern researchers say those vaccines helped by reducing lethal bacterial complications in flu patients.

Sisters Of Service

As flu cases spiked up, it became clear the health care system would not be able to cope. Many nurses and doctors were overseas for the war. Others became sick, leaving hospitals short staffed. Many victims died at home without ever receiving medical care.

The Ontario government responded by mobilizing volunteer nurses as part of a new organization: Sisters of Service, or S.O.S. An Oct. 15 story announced a “new army to fight the flu,” with 60 women signing up during the first meeting at the legislature. As many as 2,000 volunteer nurses eventually joined the fight.

Margaret Patterson, a Toronto doctor who recently returned from fighting the bubonic plague in India, led the training effort. She held daily lectures and pamphlets with her lessons were distributed across the province.

Three of her lectures were printed in The Globe, addressed “to young lady volunteers.” They detailed instructions on monitoring and treating the symptoms, using household materials. “We are called upon to meet an emergency, a very old disease that is comparatively new to the present generation,” one of the lectures said.

Sisters of Service was part of a network of women’s organizations that rallied to respond to the Spanish flu, providing nursing services, making supplies such as pneumonia jackets to keep patients’ lungs warm and cooking for the sick. Those groups also included the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire, who still operate today as IODE Canada.

1908Okak-aResidents of Okak, an Inuit community on Labrador’s northern coast, are shown circa 1908. A decade later, more than three-quarters of Okak’s population would be wiped out by the influenza pandemic, which had been brought to them by the same Moravian missionaries who encouraged them to settle in places like Okak.
Courtesy Of Them Days / Alice Perrault Collection

First Nations

Chief Joseph Davis was among thousands of First Nations soldiers who enlisted to serve in the war.

A trapper from the tiny Brunswick House First Nation near Chapleau, Ont., he sailed out for Europe, leaving behind his wife, Angeline, and three young daughters.

He came home in January, 1919, to find out that the flu had killed two of his children.

His wife had to travel more than 50 kilometres by canoe through ice-covered waters to reach Chapleau. One child was already dead. The other was gravely ill and died in hospital.

An earlier Globe article in November described another Indigenous woman who also came to Chapleau with two flu-stricken children. The woman, who was sick herself, had to portage her canoe for 10 kilometres with children in tow. She said she had left behind another woman and her two ailing children. They were later found dead.

The news from Brunswick House and other First Nations showed the reach of the flu in Indigenous communities, with fatality rates in some areas that were 10 times higher than nearby cities and towns.

One article reported that 86 out of 100 Inuit died at the Hebron mission in northern Labrador. Weakened survivors gathered together and left the dead in the other huts. They later discovered that the sled dogs had eaten the bodies. They had to kill the dogs and buried the remains of the dead in a hole cut in the frozen sea.

The flu also hit Indigenous communities in the west very hard, particularly in Manitoba. On the Cross Lake First Nation, nearly everyone was infected and 130 died out of a population of 500. The flu killed 120 of the Norway House Cree Nation – one in six residents. “It was something terrible, whole families wiped right out,” a Globe story read.

1918TelephoneOperators-aTelephone operators in High River, Alta., wear masks to protect themselves from the flu in 1918.
Glenbow Archives

What We Missed

While The Globe already billed itself “Canada’s national Newspaper,” its coverage of the Spanish flu often focused on Toronto and Ontario. There were updates about Quebec, but, beyond that, only occasional dispatches from the East Coast and Western Canada.

Even in Toronto, the coverage was often sporadic and tucked deep into the paper, drowned out by news from the war in Europe, which neared its end just when infections in Canada reached their peak.

The Last Wave

A lasting legacy of the pandemic was the creation of the federal Health Department. The idea of a national health ministry had been around for years, though largely discussed as a way to prevent venereal diseases. The ravages of the Spanish flu propelled the idea forward.

“The epidemic which is now ravaging Canada has brought the question up again in urgent form before the government,” The Globe reported.

Another wave of the flu in the spring of 1919 forced the finals of the Stanley Cup to be called off after five games between the Seattle Metropolitans and the Montreal Canadiens. Five players for the Habs became sick and one, Joe Hall, later died. Team manager George Kennedy also caught the flu and never fully recovered, dying two years later.

In many countries, the Spanish flu faded away by 1919. However, in Canada, there was a final wave in early 1920.

It struck Lieutenant-Colonel Dick Worrall, a picaresque figure who rose from private to commanding a battalion during the war. Born in England, he lied about his age to enlist at 16 in a British infantry regiment in 1906. He later enrolled in the U.S. Army, where he was garrisoned on an island when war started in 1914. He deserted, swam ashore then jumped onto a freight train to Quebec to join the Royal Montreal Regiment.

After the Armistice, he settled in Montreal and married Lorraine Welch, a war widow whose first husband, Captain Charles Crowdy, died from German shelling.

In February, 1920, Welch became ill with the flu. Her husband also contracted the disease while looking after her.

Worrall, who had survived the German gas attacks at Ypres and led night patrols in no man’s land, died shortly after midnight following nine days at Royal Victoria Hospital.

As one Globe article noted during the pandemic, “Never since the black death has such a plague swept the world.”

source: The Globe and Mail
——————–

Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)

Road Reports Oct 10, 2021

Note: Snow in the forecast for the Mountains on Monday, Oct 11th.

Please share road reports. Most back country roads have not been graded this season and are rough. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: A little rain on Friday settled the dust only temporarily, starting to get somewhat dusty again by Saturday afternoon. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting Wednesday, Sept. 8, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
Project link:
Donnelly to Deinhard Project: Construction on Highway 55 between Donnelly and McCall. This is a much-needed project to repair potholes and cracks in the roadway and will include placing a new layer of pavement on the highway for smoother driving conditions.
What to expect:
* Idaho 55 will be reduced to one lane with pilot cars midweek (Monday – Thursday)
* All lanes will be open on weekends (Friday – Sunday)
* Roadway surface will be uneven for several weeks
* Speed limit will be reduced and 12-foot restrictions will be in place
* Construction is expected to be complete in September.
Update Sept 30th: The Idaho Transportation Department (ITD) continues to pave Idaho 55 between Donnelly and McCall. Crews will begin working at night. Expect traffic control and delays until 10 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Adjustment of driveways and roads entering Idaho 55 between Donnelly and Lake Fork will continue into next week. If your driveway or road is repaved please wait 30 minutes to an hour before driving over it.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 6) road is in good shape, no trees or rocks in the road. A few hunting camps but not a lot of traffic.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 6) the road is in good shape, still rather smooth and dust abated. No trees or rocks in the road.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 6) The road is still in pretty good shape.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened June 7
No current report. Watch for ATV and UTV traffic.
Last report Wednesday (Aug 18) “Zena bridge is finished and looks great! Road is very rough. I would not recommend taking a car or camp trailer over.” – JB
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Opened June 13
No current report.
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Profile has seriously rocky sections that are washing out worse than usual. Some are sharp. Carry a saw whether its windy or not — roots of beetle kill trees are now quite rotten and fall easily.” – CP
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Quartz Creek
No current report.
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Cleared Quartz Creek of trees last weekend.” – SA

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open, travel at your own risk.
Report Sunday (Oct 3) “Lightning Peak was snow-free and clear of trees.” – SA
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open. Travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Opened June 9
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Opened by May 27
No current report.

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Weather Reports Oct 1-9, 2021

Oct 1 Weather:

At 10am it was 35 degrees, mostly cloudy (like bubble wrap) and light breeze. At 1230pm it was 56 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 230pm it was 65 degrees, partly clear and light breezes. At 650pm it was 61 degrees, mostly cloudy – partly clear and calm. At 11pm it appeared to be partly to mostly clear to the east.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 02, 2021 at 10:00AM
Clear, light frost (Green AQ)
Max temperature 74 degrees F
Min temperature 30 degrees F
At observation 32 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 2 Weather:

At 10am it was 32 degrees, clear sky and light frost. At 1245pm it was 63 degrees, clear and light breeze. At 245pm it was 70 degrees, clear sky and slight breeze. At 655pm it was 61 degrees, clear and calm. Looked clear at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 03, 2021 at 10:00AM
Clear (Green AQ)
Max temperature 75 degrees F
Min temperature 30 degrees F
At observation 33 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 3 Weather:

At 10am it was 33 degrees, clear sky and good air quality. At 230pm it was 77 degrees, partly cloudy (high wispies) and light breeze. At 645pm it was 65 degrees and partly cloudy (high wispies.) At 1045pm it looked mostly clear to the east.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 04, 2021 at 10:00AM
Mostly clear (Green AQ)
Max temperature 79 degrees F
Min temperature 32 degrees F
At observation 34 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 4 Weather:

At 10am it was 34 degrees, mostly clear and good air quality. At 1230pm it was mostly clear with slight haze. Gusty breezes at 230pm. At 250pm it was 80 degrees, almost clear (haze building to the south – Boundary Fire) and gusty breezes. At 655pm it was 65 degrees, most of the sky had small clouds and calmer.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 05, 2021 at 10:00AM
Clear? Haze of smoke (Poor AQ)
Max temperature 82 degrees F
Min temperature 34 degrees F
At observation 40 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 5 Weather:

At 10am it was 40 degrees, appears clear over haze of smoke and poor air quality. At 245pm it was 74 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy, haze of smoke and dust. At 645pm it was 66 degrees, mostly cloudy, haze of smoke (plus some dust) and calmer. Appeared to be cloudy (hazy?) to the east at 11pm. A few stars out to the east at 2am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 06, 2021 at 10:00AM
Partly cloudy, light haze (Fairly Good AQ)
Max temperature 76 degrees F
Min temperature 39 degrees F
At observation 45 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 6 Weather:

At 10am it was 45 degrees, partly cloudy and light haze. Gusty breezes at 1230pm and partly cloudy. At 230pm it was 69 degrees, partly cloudy, good air and gusty breezes. At 7pm it was 46 degrees, partly cloudy to mostly clear and a bit breezy. Some clouds to the east at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 07, 2021 at 10:00AM
Dark overcast (Good AQ)
Max temperature 71 degrees F
Min temperature 42 degrees F
At observation 49 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 7 Weather:

At 10am it was 49 degrees, dark overcast and good air quality. Started sprinkling lightly shortly after 10am and lasted less than 30 minutes. At 1pm it was 53 degrees, overcast and slight breeze. At 245pm it was 55 degrees, overcast and a few drops of rain. Short sprinkle for about 5 minutes ending at 3pm. Short rain shower just after 4pm. Breaks in the clouds at 5pm. At 635pm it was 55 degrees, partly cloudy and calm. Likely cloudy at 1030pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 08, 2021 at 10:00AM
Dark overcast, light rain (Good AQ)
Max temperature 58 degrees F
Min temperature 40 degrees F
At observation 43 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 8 Weather:

Light rain started 955am. At 10am it was 43 degrees, dark overcast, light rain and good air quality. Stopped raining before 1140am. Raining at 1235pm, stopped before 115pm. At 250pm it was 50 degrees, overcast (socked in mid-way down VanMeter Hill.) At 650pm it was 47 degrees, dark overcast, about 3 drops of rain and slight breeze. Not raining at 9pm, light breeze. It appeared cloudy to the east at 1045pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 09, 2021 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloudy, light breeze (Good AQ)
Max temperature 50 degrees F
Min temperature 41 degrees F
At observation 45 degrees F
Precipitation 0.07 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 9 Weather:

At 10am it was 45 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breeze. At 1230pm it was mostly cloudy and light breeze. At 245pm it was 55 degrees, mostly cloudy (high thin wispy) and light breeze. At 7pm it was 47 degrees, mostly clear and light breeze. At 1140pm some stars to the east.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 10, 2021 at 10:00AM
Overcast (Good AQ)
Max temperature 58 degrees F
Min temperature 31 degrees F
At observation 40 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
—————————–

Sausage Pizza With Spinach Salad

Food Network Magazine
Yield: 4 servings

Ingredients

1 pound pizza dough, at room temperature
All-purpose flour, for dusting
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 pound sweet Italian sausage, casings removed
3/4 cup whole-milk ricotta cheese
1/2 cup shredded mozzarella cheese
1/2 cup shredded provolone cheese
1/3 cup grated parmesan cheese
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 small red onion, thinly sliced
4 cups baby spinach (about 2 1/2 ounces)
1 small bulb fennel, trimmed, cored and thinly sliced
1/2 cup chopped roasted red peppers
3/4 cup quartered marinated artichoke hearts, drained and halved
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
Red pepper flakes, for topping

Directions

Make the pizza: Place an inverted baking sheet or pizza stone on the lowest oven rack; preheat to 475 degrees F. Stretch the pizza dough into an 11-by-15-inch rectangle on a floured piece of parchment paper; trim any excess paper around the dough. Transfer the dough (on the parchment) to a pizza peel or another inverted baking sheet and slide the dough and parchment onto the hot baking sheet. Bake until browned in spots, 10 to 12 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook, breaking it up into pieces with a wooden spoon, until no longer pink, about 4 minutes.

Remove the crust from the oven. Spread the ricotta on top, leaving a 1-inch border. Sprinkle with the mozzarella, provolone and parmesan; top with the sausage and garlic. Return the pizza to the oven and bake until the cheese is bubbling, 8 to 10 minutes. Sprinkle with the oregano.

Meanwhile, make the salad: Soak the red onion in ice water for 10 minutes, then drain. Toss the spinach, fennel, roasted red peppers, artichoke hearts and red onion in a large bowl with the vinegar and olive oil; season with salt and pepper.

Top the pizza with the salad and cut into pieces. Sprinkle with red pepper flakes.
———————-

Road Reports Oct 6, 2021

Please share road reports. Most back country roads have not been graded this season and are rough. Conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road. Remember there is no cell phone service. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are dusty again. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Drivers, please don’t speed through neighborhoods. Locals brake for kids, dogs, horses, deer, elk and squirrels.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam (check date on image)

Highway 55
Smith’s Ferry Project: Starting Wednesday, Sept. 8, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
Project link:
Donnelly to Deinhard Project: Construction on Highway 55 between Donnelly and McCall. This is a much-needed project to repair potholes and cracks in the roadway and will include placing a new layer of pavement on the highway for smoother driving conditions.
What to expect:
* Idaho 55 will be reduced to one lane with pilot cars midweek (Monday – Thursday)
* All lanes will be open on weekends (Friday – Sunday)
* Roadway surface will be uneven for several weeks
* Speed limit will be reduced and 12-foot restrictions will be in place
* Construction is expected to be complete in September.
Update Sept 30th: The Idaho Transportation Department (ITD) continues to pave Idaho 55 between Donnelly and McCall. Crews will begin working at night. Expect traffic control and delays until 10 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Adjustment of driveways and roads entering Idaho 55 between Donnelly and Lake Fork will continue into next week. If your driveway or road is repaved please wait 30 minutes to an hour before driving over it.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 6) road is in good shape, no trees or rocks in the road. A few hunting camps but not a lot of traffic.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 6) the road is in good shape, still pretty smooth and dust abated. No trees or rocks in the road.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 6) The road is still in pretty good shape, last week’s snow had melted.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened June 7
No current report. Watch for ATV and UTV traffic.
Last report Wednesday (Aug 18) “Zena bridge is finished and looks great! Road is very rough. I would not recommend taking a car or camp trailer over.” – JB
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Opened June 13
No current report.
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Profile has seriously rocky sections that are washing out worse than usual. Some are sharp. Carry a saw whether its windy or not — roots of beetle kill trees are now quite rotten and fall easily.” – CP
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam (check date on image)

Quartz Creek
No current report.
Last report Thursday (Aug 19) “Cleared Quartz Creek of trees last weekend.” – SA

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
No current report.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open, travel at your own risk.
Report Sunday (Oct 3) “Lightning Peak was snow-free and clear of trees.” – SA
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open. Travel at your own risk.
No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Opened June 9
No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Warren Wagon Road: Opened by May 27
No current report.

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Oct 3, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 3, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Stage 1 Fire Restrictions rescinded Sept 17th

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit season
May 15 – Firewood Season, permits at The Corner
Sept 17 – Stage 1 Fire Restrictions Rescinded
Oct 5 – Diamond Fall Fuel Delivery
Oct 28 – The Corner closing for the season
Oct 31 – Halloween
Nov 7 – Time Change – Fall back 1 hour
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

October 5th Diamond Fuel and Feed Fall Delivery

We are planning our fall fuel haul into Yellow Pine for Tuesday, October 5th. Please call or email us so we can add you to the list.
Diamond Fuel and Feed Team
diamondfuel.feed @ gmail.com
(208) 382-4430
———

Village News:

Planned Phone/Internet Outage Sept 30th

MTE needed to replace some equipment and shut down our internet starting before 9am and back on pretty good before noon. However, the afternoon and evening connection was spotty at times.
— — — —

Fish Fry Sept 25th

Our Annual Fish Fry Thanks to Stu for Providing the Fish and Teri also providing fish this year. Willie, Jeff and Ann cooking. Steve and Sue providing the Location. Alpine Village is a perfect place to have the Event. Also thanks for all of the great Potluck dishes. There was around 40 or 50 in attendance Residents and Friends.
20210925FishFry-aphoto courtesy Yellow Pine Tavern
— — — —

Fall Colors Sept 26th

20210926FallColorrrS
— — — —

Mouse Nest

20210930MouseNest-a

If someone says your car has an air conditioner filter, believe them.
— — — —

Notice – New Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sundays.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
— — — —

Life Flight

It is a very good idea to have Life Flight insurance if you live or recreate in the back country. If you already have Life Flight, consider it as a gift to a loved one.
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are Open. These roads have not been bladed and are rough. Travel at your own risk.

Hwy 55 projects
Smith’s Ferry area: Starting Tuesday, Sept. 7, drivers can expect full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. After 2 p.m., the road will be open to one-way alternating traffic. Please note: the delays may be significant immediately after the road reopens due to large traffic volumes. Once this traffic clears, drivers can expect 15-minute delays. We encourage drivers to plan ahead and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route. Project Website link:
Donnelly to McCall: One lane during the week and two lanes on weekends. Project is slated to last until September.
— — — —

Critters

Be Bear Aware

* Do not feed them human food
* Secure your trash
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Bats

While bats are an important part of our ecosystem and most do not carry rabies, CDH offers the following tips to protect yourself and pets:
* Never touch a bat with your bare hands.
* If you have had an encounter with a bat, seek medical attention.
* If you come in contact with a bat, save the bat in a container without touching it and contact your health department to arrange testing for rabies. Whenever possible, the bat should be tested to rule out an exposure to rabies. During regular business hours in Ada, Boise and Elmore Counties, call 208-327-7499 and in Valley County, call 208-634-7194. After business hours in all counties, call 1-800-632-8000.
* Always vaccinate your pets for rabies, including horses. Pets may encounter bats outdoors or in the home.
* Bat-proof your home or cabin by plugging all holes in the siding and maintaining tight-fitting screens on windows. Bats can enter through holes the size of a quarter.

Mosquitoes – West Nile

* Remove standing water
* Wear long sleeves and pants during morning/evening hours
* Use a good repellent with DEET (our bugs laugh at “backyard” formulas.
* Vaccinate your horses and mules! West Nile can be fatal to equines.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

Aug. 29th the price of first-class postage stamps went to 58 cents from 55 cents.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Saturday (Sept 4) The dumpsters are being emptied on Wednesdays.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

September Water Usage

date flow used hours gph gpm more less
09/01/21 14497186 26378 24 1099 18 W 3522
09/02/21 14528659 31473 24 1311 22 T 5095
09/03/21 14562089 33430 24 1393 23 F 1957
09/04/21 14597407 35318 24 1472 25 S 1888
09/05/21 14631533 34126 24.5 1393 23 S 1192
09/06/21 14665588 34055 23.5 1449 24 M 71
09/07/21 14702783 37195 24 1550 26 T 3140
09/08/21 14749530 46747 24 1948 32 W 9552
09/09/21 14788402 38872 24 1620 27 T 7875
09/10/21 14823817 35415 24 1476 25 F 3457
09/11/21 14854357 30540 24 1273 21 S 4875
09/12/21 14889770 35413 24.5 1445 24 S 4873
09/13/21 14921434 31664 23.5 1347 22 M 3749
09/14/21 14954314 32880 24 1370 23 T 1216
09/15/21 14989719 35405 24 1475 25 W 2525
09/16/21 15028507 38788 24 1616 27 T 3383
09/17/21 15064968 36461 24 1519 25 F 2327
09/18/21 15106193 41225 24 1718 29 S 4764
09/19/21 15142267 36074 24 1503 25 S 5151
09/20/21 15174293 32026 24 1334 22 M 4048
09/21/21 15204133 29840 24 1243 21 T 2186
09/22/21 15234224 30091 24 1254 21 W 251
09/23/21 15266560 32336 24 1347 22 T 2245
09/24/21 15306678 40118 24 1672 29 F 7782
09/25/21 15352845 46167 S 6049
09/26/21 15384582 31737 S 14430
09/27/21 15415208 30626 22 1392 23 M 1111
09/28/21 15445672 30464 24 1269 21 T 162
09/29/21 15474439 28767 24 1199 20 W 1697
09/30/21 15504210 29771 24 1240 21 T 1004

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

July 25, 2021 Update:

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association Board asks that individuals refrain from using domestic water to dampen the road. The Water Corporation is doing its best to provide water for domestic use during the low water period but as the supply becomes more limited, it is incumbent upon each of us to be judicious with its use. Thank you for your cooperation in ensuring that all community members have an adequate supply of water.

The corporation has received the first $150k grant of the anticipated $450k. We are hoping to have some of the supply lines replaced by winter. Thanks to those who wrote letters of support. They were very beneficial in securing the grants. – Willie Sullivan

Sept 10, 2021 Update

DRINKING WATER WARNING
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059
BOIL WATER ADVISORY
Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST. Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted.
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 180 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059 . Date distributed: 9-10-21.

YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 at the Community Hall at 10am. Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting held July 5, 2020 at the Community Hall 2pm. link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
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VYPA News:

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall (no minutes yet.)
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Hailey Harris, Secretary
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

Remember to clean your chimney before lighting your first fall fire, and check the fittings. Chimney brushes are available to borrow from the YPFD.

Sept 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting (no minutes yet.)
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss upcoming election (no minutes yet.)
July 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
June 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:

Sept 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

2021 Meeting schedule for the YPFD. All meetings are at the YPFD Station
Sat. May 15 at 10am
Sat. June 12 at 10am
Sat. July 10 at 10am
Sat. September 11 at 10am Budget Meeting

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by a escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Lorinne Munn
Deputy Fire Chief: Merrill Saleen
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Phil Jensen – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Nikki Saleen
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
As the season comes to an end, we are starting to dwindle our inventory. To ensure our stock is fresh and kept to our standards, we will only be taking reservations until the end of our season (October 28). To make arrangements, please call The Corner at 208-633-3325 or call/text Hailey Harris at 970-275-7336. Thank you for a great summer!
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Open daily: 8am to 9pm Sunday: 8am to 2pm
Indoor Dining and Outdoor Dining Available.
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Open thru hunting season.
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Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
Store hours: 10am to 5pm, Monday – Sunday. Gas and Diesel now available. The Liquor Store is now reinstated. Now Selling Black Rifle Coffee.
The store is stocked with basic convenience store items such as food, fuel, liquor, beer, wine, tobacco, ice, non alcoholic beverages, snacks, ice cream. New Yellow Pine branded shirts, hats and koozies have arrived. We are going through the process of installing a propane dispenser and bottle exchange service.
For any particular store item requests, please call 208-633-3300 or Email
For room reservations, please call 208-633-3300 or Email for reservations
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Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Our Elk & Deer hunts are booked for our 2021 season, we do have a couple openings for our 2022 Elk & Deer hunts. We Also have a couple openings for Mountain Lion hunts December 2021 through February 2022 and Spring Bear hunts May of 2022. Please see our Website site for further details.
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:

Garden Mountain Contractors
We would like to extend our services into the Yellow pine area if there may be a need. We dig a lot of dirt! If you need this give us a shout on our FB page below. – Larry Williamson Garden Valley, Idaho FB Page:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Sept 27) overnight low of 36 degrees. This morning clear sky, light breeze, haze of Idaho smoke and Yellow air quality (the satellite map shows the Middle Fork and Main Salmon rivers outlined in smoke.) Jays and chipmunks visiting. Some high thin hazy clouds and getting breezy at lunch time. Mostly clear, breezy and a little better air mid-afternoon, high of 79 degrees. A few airplanes navigating turbulence over the village. Almost clear and much calmer at sunset. Mostly cloudy after midnight. Wind gusts ushered in the rain around 630am.

Tuesday (Sept 28) 24 hour low of 38 degrees (from Monday’s reset.) This morning low overcast (VanMeter socked in mid-way) steady light rain and almost calm. Steady rain and low clouds at lunch time. Jays, chipmunks and pine squirrel visiting. Stopped raining early afternoon and by mid-afternoon breaks in the clouds, but the top of VanMeter is still fogged in and chilly breezes, high of 46 degrees. Broken cloud cover and chilly light breeze before sunset. Clouds on VanMeter finally lifted to reveal fresh snow.

Wednesday (Sept 29) overnight low of 27 degrees. This morning frosty, mostly clear, light breeze and good air quality. Jays, a pine squirrel and chipmunks visiting. Partly cloudy and chilly breeze at lunch time. Mail truck driver made it in on time (a little snow on the summits.) Mostly clear and chilly light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 61 degrees. Mostly clear at sunset, light cool breeze and good air. Probably clear before midnight.

Thursday (Sept 30) overnight low of 26 degrees. This morning frosty, clear sky and good air quality. A belted kingfisher, 3 hairy woodpeckers and jays visiting. Internet out before 9am, back on before 12pm. At lunch time clear and light chilly breeze. Light air and street traffic. Clear sky, light breezes and great air quality mid-afternoon, high of 72 degrees. Internet connection a bit spotty at times this afternoon. Clear and cooling off at sunset, great air quality. Internet working better around 8pm then spotty again around 930pm. Appeared to be clear before midnight.

Friday (Oct 1) 24 hour low of 28 degrees (from Thursday morning’s reset.) This morning mostly cloudy (like bubble wrap) and light breeze. Early loud air traffic. Jays and chipmunks visiting. Mostly cloudy and cool at lunch time. Mild temperatures, partly clear and light breeze mid-afternoon, high of 74 degrees. Increasing street traffic (and a bit of dust.) Mostly cloudy – partly clear at sunset, calm and cooling off. Looked partly or mostly clear before midnight.

Saturday (Oct 2) overnight low of 30 degrees. This morning clear sky, good air quality and light frost. Air and street traffic (getting a bit dusty.) Clear and light breeze at lunch time. Jays, downy woodpecker, pine squirrel and chipmunks visiting. Mild temperatures, clear sky, slight breeze and good air quality mid-afternoon, high of 75 degrees. Clear and cooling off at sunset. Looked clear before midnight.

Sunday (Oct 3) overnight low of 30 degrees. This morning clear sky, light frost and good air quality. Jays and chipmunks visiting. Sunny and warming up at lunch time. Quite warm mid-afternoon, partly cloudy, light breezes and good air, high of 79 degrees. Partly cloudy (high wispies) at sunset and calm.
—————

Idaho News:

Valley County hospitals report 90 new COVID-19 cases

By Tom Grote for The Star-News September 30, 2021

A total of 90 new cases of COVID-19 were reported in the past week by the two hospitals. That compares to 92 new cases reported the previous week and 119 new cases the prior week.

St. Luke’s McCall reported 82 new cases in the last week, while Cascade Medical Center reported eight new cases.

St. Luke’s McCall reported 288 new cases from Sept. 1 through Monday, far exceeding the previous monthly record of 188 positive tests set in December 2020.

Cascade Medical Center reported 55 new cases during September through Monday, which is eight less than the hospital’s high monthly mark of 63 cases reported in August.

Youths age 17 and younger made up the greatest number of McCall residents to test positive at all St. Luke’s Health System testing locations so far in September, the hospital reported.

That group accounted for 33% of new cases among McCall residents during the month, followed by age 30 to 49 (17%) and ages 50 to 69 (16%).

A total of 89% of people hospitalized for COVID-19 at all St. Luke’s Health System hospitals are unvaccinated, the hospital said.

Four confirmed deaths and two suspected deaths related to COVID-19 among Valley County residents have been reported by Central District Health.

The two hospitals have reported a total of 1,419 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic arrived in Valley County in March 2020.

St. Luke’s McCall offers walk-in COVID-19 vaccines from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at St. Luke’s Clinics – Payette Lakes Family Medicine, 211 Forest Street, McCall.

Appointments also can be scheduled online through St. Luke’s myChart or calling 208-381-9500 or by calling 208-634-2225.

Booster shots are available by appointment through Payette Lakes Clinic to those who have a compromised immune system. Patients should schedule the booster shots through MyChart.

Cascade Medical Center offers a walk-in vaccination clinic from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.

full story: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — — —

St. Luke’s McCall deals with staffing shortage

Job offers turned down due to lack of housing

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 30, 2021

Almost half of the job offers that St. Luke’s McCall has made to prospective employees in the past year have been turned down, primarily because candidates cannot find housing in McCall.

Even more candidates for essential positions drop out of the hiring process before that point, St. Luke’s Chief Operating Officer Amber Green said.

“First and foremost, they don’t even come here…they can’t find housing,” Green said.

The hospital currently has 32 open positions, with the greatest need in support service departments like cleaning, food service, medical assistants and patient access staff, St. Luke’s McCall Public and Community Relations Manager Laura Crawford said.

… Affordable housing is not a new problem affecting McCall, but the pressures have been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic and the latest housing boom, Crawford said.

The lack of affordable housing has been affecting lower paying jobs at the hospital, but nurses, managers, doctors and other specialists have not been immune from the problem, she said.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

COVID-19 Updates: 1,778 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 24 new deaths

October 1, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 1,778 new COVID-19 cases and 24 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 259,100.

The state said 878,212 people have received the vaccine, and 1,600,127 total doses have been administered. 786,828 people are fully vaccinated.

The hotspots so far this week are Canyon County, Ada County, Bannock County, Twin Falls County and Kootenai County.

The age group with the most cases is 18-29 with 62,228 cases.

The state said 55 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 11,258, and 9 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 1,872.

24 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 2,931.

full story: [Valley County 1307 cases, 8]
— — — —

Covid-19 Hospitalizations Sept 27th

source: KTVB
— — — —

COVID-19 contact tracing: local health districts are thousands of cases behind

Between staffing and technology limitations, local health districts are unable to keep up amid surge of reported COVID cases.

Andrew Baertlein September 29, 2021 KTVB

The Idaho Division of Public Health’s COVID-19 dashboard is behind approximately 11,500 outstanding positive cases needing local health district review, according to the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare.

That backlog not only limits the accuracy of reported COVID-19 cases in real time, but it also limits local public health districts in their ability to properly contact trace. Contact tracing is a process that notifies close contacts they have been exposed to the coronavirus and gathers information about where the virus is spreading in the community.

This backlog of cases has developed due to a lack of necessary manpower to process cases in real time, according to local health districts. However, hiring more staff hasn’t been easy.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

McCall Public Library to offer assistance with voter registration

McCall Public Library is celebrating National Voter Registration Week by helping community members register to vote, check their registration details or request an absentee ballot via mail.

The celebration will continue through Friday, Oct. 8, which is the last day for Idahoans to register early.

There will be a Voter Registration Popcorn Party on Thursday, Oct. 7, for those who come in to register.

The last day for voters to request absentee ballots is Friday, Oct. 22, and early voting will begin on Monday, Oct. 18.

Librarians can answer questions, including about registering at the polls in November, either in person or by calling 208-634-5522.

McCall Public Library is located at 218 E. Park St.

source: The Star-News September 30, 2021
— — — — — — — — — —

Donnelly woman dies after car crash near McCall

by CBS2 News Staff Saturday, October 2nd 2021

One person is dead after a car crash near McCall Saturday.

Idaho State Police say the crash occurred at the intersection of Norwood Rd. and Johnson Rd. just south of McCall.

Police say a 71-year-old McCall man was driving east on Johnson Rd. crossing Norwood Rd.

A 51-year-old Donnelly woman was driving north on Norwood Rd. when the McCall man struck her car, causing her to spin off the east shoulder of the road.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Two hurt in plane crash near Warren

Wreck is second this year in same area

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News September 30, 2021

Two people were injured on Monday when a single-engine airplane crashed near Warren, according to a news release from the Idaho County Sheriff’s Office.

A Cessna 182 occupied by Gary Haass, 62, and Amy Haass, 58, crashed at about 12:30 p.m. northeast of the Warren Airport, the release said.

The hometowns for Gary and Amy Haass were not available. They were reportedly flying to an unknown destination in Idaho from Wasilla, Alaska, the Idaho County news release said.

The two were taken by air ambulance to St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, where they both were reported in “good” condition on Wednesday, a hospital spokesperson said.

The crash started a fire in trees and brush, a Payette National Forest spokesperson said.

Aircraft and firefighters from the Payette responded to the scene and contained the fire at two acres, the spokesperson said.

continued:
— — — — —

CORRECTION

A story in The Star-News last week incorrectly reported the cause of a single-engine plane that crashed 60 miles east of McCall on Aug. 28, killing two people and injuring a third.

The story said the crash was was caused by the plane flying too low in a drainage, but a preliminary National Transportation Safety Board report said the last data from a tracking system showed the plane was flying at an altitude of 6,400 feet, or 2,000 feet lower than the crash scene.

The preliminary report did not cite a probable cause.

source: The Star-News September 30, 2021
— — — — — — — — — —

Two more earthquakes reported near Stanley on Saturday

Celina Van Hyning (KTVB) October 3, 2021

Less than two weeks after a 4.0 magnitude earthquake was reported near Stanley, two more earthquakes were reported in the same area on Saturday evening.

According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), a 4.0 magnitude earthquake hit nine kilometers northwest of Stanley at 5:47 p.m. on Saturday. Less than two hours later, a 2.8 magnitude earthquake was reported 10 kilometers northwest of Stanley at 7:34 p.m.

No damage has been reported as a result of Saturday’s earthquakes and no reports of feeling the earthquake in the Treasure Valley have been made.

continued:
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Idaho History:

Get to know the history of Old Freeze Out Road

There’s a turnoff at the top of Freezeout Hill, outside Emmett, which takes you down the original Freeze Out Road. The long and winding road has a unique history.

Dani Allsop September 30, 2021 KTVB


KTVB

Any map today will show you it’s an easy 30-minute drive from Boise to Emmett. A straight shot down State Street, or Highway 44, with a sharp turn to the right onto Highway 16. Continue driving straight until you drop down Freezeout Hill into Emmett.

But a little more than a century ago, there were many more turns involved when going to Emmett, and you can still go that way today.

At the top of Freezeout Hill there’s a turnoff called “Old Freeze Out Road” – a long and winding road with a colorful history.

The old road has 26 curves.

continued:
————–

Public Lands:

After Trident, 2 new plans for state lands

Payette forest, state to study swap of land around Payette Lake

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News September 30, 2021

State lands surrounding Payette Lake would become part of the Payette National Forest, under a preliminary proposal being studied by the Idaho Department of Lands.

The proposal would swap 16,125 acres of state land around Payette Lake for 30,895 acres of Payette forest land in Adams County, according to a draft agreement between the agencies.

The draft agreement, which has not been signed, was included in documents obtained by The Star-News in a public records request.

“These discussions have been preliminary and a commitment to execute the exchange has not been made at this point,” said Brian Harris, a spokesperson for the Payette Forest.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Hunters and visitors urged to use caution in Fawn Tussock Timber Sale area

Sept 30, 2021 Boise NF Press Release

The Cascade Ranger District employees are cautioning the public to be aware of road improvement work beginning next week within the Fawn Tussock Timber Sale area. The Timber Sale is located approximately 9 miles south of Cascade, Idaho.

Hunters and visitors using in the area, should be aware, engineers plan to upgrade roads beginning October 4, to meet standards for timber hauling. Anyone entering any section of the roads indicated on the attached map, should do so with caution and in anticipation of encountering vehicles, heavy equipment and eventually logging trucks.

Most of the sale area roads are behind closed gates however, timber managers encourage anyone visiting the area to be aware that there will be timber and silviculture employees accessing roads behind closed gates while working on timber sale preparation.

Fawn Tussock Timber Sale logging and hauling operations are planned to start in fall and continue through December. Main haul routes will be on National Forest System (NFS) road 404 and NFS road 446 near Cabarton. Please be aware, harvest operations and hauling will also be occurring on many secondary spurs in the 404 and 446 road systems.

No road closures are planned at this time for timber harvest or road maintenance activities. Safety signs will be in place to inform the public of ongoing activities.

Please be careful with campfires, as fire restrictions have been lifted for the Boise National Forest.

For more information, contact the Cascade Ranger District at 208-382-7400.

Map

Project link:

Linda Steinhaus
Public Affairs Specialist
Boise National Forest
————-

Fire Season:

Fall Burning on the Krassel RD

Sept 29, 2021 Payette NF

The Krassel Ranger District, Payette National Forest is planning to implement prescribed fire this fall east of Yellow Pine. The unit is located east of Yellow Pine, on the North side of the East Fork Rd, between Quartz creek and Profile creek. See attached maps for more specific areas affected. Ignitions should take 1 to 2 days for each. Hazards from the prescribed fires including fire spread, smoke, rolling debris, ash pits and fire weakened trees may be present in the area until significant weather (precipitation and cooler temperatures) occurs.

Ignition is anticipated to take place in October or early November.

Please contact Patrick Schon at 208-634-0623 patrick.schon@usda.gov or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622 laurel.ingram@usda.gov with any questions or comments, or if you will be operating in or close to that area this fall.

Map
Bald-Hill-I-and-J-Fall-21

Thank you,
Patrick Schon
Fire Management Specialist
Payette National Forest, East Zone
— — — — — — — — — —

2021 Payette Wilderness Fires
Three fires are burning in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Payette National Forest. The Club, Rush Creek, and Vinegar fires were started by lightning on July 15, 2021. A Type 3 Incident Management Team took over the fires on July 19th. A closure order for trails has been put in place in and around these fires for public and firefighter safety to prevent any interference with suppression and response operations.
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — —

Boundary Fire grows to 84,756 acres

October 1, 2021 Local News 8


InciWeb

The lightning caused Boundary Fire that started on August 10 has burned 84,756 acres and is 68% contained.

A point protection strategy is being applied to the Boundary Creek Fire, which is burning in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. The desired end state for this incident is that the fire will have taken its natural course while values-at-risk and firefighters have been protected.

With slightly higher temperatures and lower relative humidity, firefighters saw another increase in fire activity across the fire.

In the Sulphur Group, firefighters completed the burning operation north of the creek at Sulphur Creek Ranch. Today, crews will continue to improve upon their fire lines and wrap up the operation. Fire extended from Blue Bunch Mountain to the north end of Ayers meadow Thursday.

continued:
— —

Boundary Fire
Salmon-Challis National Forest
The lightning-caused Boundary Fire ~2 miles W of Boundary Creek Boat Launch was detected on August 10.
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — —

Mud Lick, Haynes, and Iron Fires
Salmon-Challis National Forest
InciWeb: Maps and closure orders
— — — — — — — — — —

Some useful links:

InciWeb Fire info link:
Air Quality McCall link:
National Fire Heat Map link: (zoom in to our area)
Weather Station at Stibnite link:
Real Time Lightning Map link: (zoom to our area)
GOES-West Satellite Maps Pacific Northwest link:
—————–

Critter News:

Dog park to be dedicated Sunday at McCall care center

Dog owners can bring their furry friends to celebrate the grand opening of the McCall Unleashed dog park on Sunday at 1 p.m.

The new dog park is located at the McCall Rehabilitation and Care Center, 418 Floyde St.

The event will include dog contests and prizes. Refreshments and dog biscuits will be served.

Alex Johnson, a senior at McCall-Donnelly High School, is organizing the event for his senior project.

Visit the McCall Rehabilitation and Care Center’s Facebook page for more information.

source: The Star-News September 30, 2021
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise State’s newest tee dog, Blitz, carrying on his dads legacy

By Lynsey Amundson Oct 01, 2021 KIVI

Boise — He’s a certified Good Boy with big paws to fill. Meet Blitz, a four-year-old black lab.

But he’s not just any black lab, Blitz is Boise State’s newest tee dog, the Boise Hawks bat dog, and the son of Cowboy Kohl.

“I was really proud of him when he went and grabbed the tee for the first time and just to have the legacy continue,” Devin Martin, Blitz’ owner said. “It was pretty incredible. Kohl was one of the best dogs I have ever known. He loved everything, loved everybody, loved to retrieve, and he takes after his dad in a lot of ways. ”

continued: w/video
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise Airport installs ‘pet restroom’ for service animals

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, September 28th 2021


Credit: Boise Airport

Boise Airport installed new amenities including a “pet restroom” for service animals and a private lactation center.

“The service animal relief center is a pet restroom…offering four-legged travelers a space to relieve themselves on artificial grass,” the Boise Airport news release says. The area offers free waste bags and a hose for washing the artificial grass.

This feature, along with the private lactation center, is required in midsized airports by the Federal Aviation Administration.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

What’s a food-conditioned bear and how to help prevent more bear conflicts

By Lynsey Amundson Sep 30, 2021 KIVI

With winter quickly approaching, bears all across Idaho are on the hunt for food to pack on the pounds before hibernation starts. This time of year, they sometimes search in places they normally wouldn’t, like in neighborhoods and people’s trashcans.

“A food-conditioned bear is basically one that has found a food source and it is going to return to it,” Roger Phillips, IDFG Public Information Supervisor said. “These things cover a lot of territories, they know where to find food, and unfortunately oftentimes this time of year as they get closer to hibernation that might be near humans.”

Idaho has a lot of black bears, and although most of the time they stay out in the wild when they find a food source, it’s more than likely they will keep returning to it for more.

Most recently, IDFG says they have seen an increase in bear conflicts in the Wood River Valley and McCall.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Call to Idaho poaching hotline leads to heavy sentences for Missourians

September 30, 2021 Local News 8

A simple call to Idaho’s Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) hotline of reported illegal wildlife crimes in Custer and Blaine counties, resulted in multiple-year hunting, fishing and trapping license revocations, jail time, and thousands of dollars in fines and restitution to the state.

Missouri residents Grifen Whiteside, age 21, and Dylan Davidson, age 25, pled guilty to six misdemeanors in Custer County and each received a 15-year license revocation, served 14 days in jail, received 10 years of probation and were fined $2,325. A third accomplice, Sydney Wallace, age 20, also of Missouri, received a one year hunting, fishing and trapping license revocation and was fined $715. Final sentencing for the trio concluded the summer of 2021.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Two rabid bats found in Canyon County

KTVB Staff September 27, 2021

Health officials issued a public warning Monday after rabid bats were found at two separate locations in Canyon County.

Southwest District Health (SWDH) said one of the bats was found alive outside an apartment complex. The other one was found dead on the ground in someone’s yard.

While most bats don’t carry rabies, health officials say bats are the only natural hosts for it in Idaho and they should always be avoided. There usually is an uptick in exposure calls from late August through September when bats are often migrating.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Sockeye salmon released into central Idaho lakes to spawn

by Associated Press Tuesday, September 28th 2021

The number of endangered sockeye salmon making it to central Idaho from the ocean this year is one of the worst returns in the last decade, with only 43 fish so far.

But state wildlife managers said Tuesday a hatchery program intended to prevent the species from going extinct allowed the release earlier this month of over a thousand sockeye into Redfish and Pettit lakes to spawn naturally.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game in August also started an emergency trap-and-truck operation at Lower Granite Dam in Washington due to overly warm rivers and captured 201 fish. The agency brought the fish to its hatchery in southwestern Idaho.

source: (CBS2)
—————–

Letter to Share:

Raffle tickets are in short supply.

The good news is that we are down to less than 200 Raffle tickets. The winner receives a new 7 cu. Foot freezer with a cut and wrapped heritage pig in it. Second prize is 2 BBQ baby pork rib racks. # 3 and 4 prize is 10 TGBF cups and coasters. If you want to win or have the best chance you need to get tickets now. Tickets are $5.00 each or 5 tickets for $20.00. All money from this project goes to the Game Bird Foundation to raise baby pheasant and Red-leg Partridge chicks to be released at the ripe old age of 10-12 weeks.

You can order the tickets by going to our web page (link) and order and pay for them. You can email me and order and send check to The Gamebird Foundation at PO Box 100, Viola, Idaho 83872. Or you can give me a call at 208-883-3423. And make a deal. We will fill out the stubs and send your half to you vi slow mail. The filled out stubs go in the stub box. You can also email me and I will do the hard work for you. jhagedorn611 @ gmail.com. The Pheasants and other birds will love you.

The drawing will be October 10th at the banquet in Moscow. More on this later.

Jim Hagedorn
Executive Director
The Gamebird Foundation
thegamebirdfoundation.org
jhagedorn611 @ gmail.com
208-883-3423
————-

Fish & Game News:

Friendly reminder to hunters: 10 common violations that can easily be avoided

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Wednesday, September 29, 2021

Brushing up on basic rules can help hunters avoid common blunders and a possible citation

With many of Idaho’s hunting seasons underway or about to begin, the Idaho Fish and Game staff reminds hunters that they can avoid running afoul with the law this fall by simply reviewing the regulations and avoiding common mistakes.

“Accidents happen and simple mistakes are made every year that get hunters into trouble,” said David Silcock, Fish and Game regional conservation officer based in Salmon. “We see many violations that can be avoided if hunters just take the time to review and understand the regulations.”

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Hunters: Please fill out your big game hunter reports

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Monday, September 27, 2021

Hunter reports are critical to effective big game management, and hunters are needed to do their part

Idaho Fish and Game needs all big game hunters to help by taking a few minutes to fill out their mandatory hunter reports regardless of whether they harvested, or even if they bought a tag, but didn’t hunt.

You can help effective wildlife management and do it quickly and easily on the new licensing system, or by calling (877) 268-9365. The phone option is available 24 hours per day and seven days per week. Please have your hunting tag number when calling. If you don’t have it handy, you can find it in your account at gooutdoorsidaho.com, which has tag information on file (and you can file your report there, too).

continued: w/link to submit report
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More F&G News Releases

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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Kuna animal sanctuary seeks volunteers to snuggle piggies

by CBS2 News Staff Monday, September 27th 2021


(Courtesy Dominifarm)

Dominifarm Animal Sanctuary is looking for helpers to make their rescued farm animals feel loved.

The sanctuary is a charity that cares for elderly, disabled and abandoned farm animals such as pigs, cows, chickens and horses. Dominifarm says volunteering helps the animals socialize, but it also helps the volunteers.

“At first, I started the sanctuary to help animals,” said Dominique Delobbe, president and operator of Dominifarm. “But over time, what has become beautiful to me is the beneficial impact of the animals on people who come to visit. The visitors get as much from the animals as the animals get from the visitors.”

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Seasonal Humor:

BearTrashShred-a

CovidCentaur-a
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