Category Archives: News 2017

Dec 10, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Dec 10, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Coyote Alert

Have received reports of coyote activity in and around the village. Please keep pet food indoors and garbage secure.
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Yellow Pine Christmas Bags

Santa’s Yellow Pine Elves, we will be doing Christmas Bags again!! Contact [Nicki] if you are interested in helping out.
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Yellow Pine Tavern

Watch all of your favorite sports on our Big Screen TV at the Yellow Pine Tavern. Featuring Football

Open 9am to 8pm (or later on game nights)

Christmas potluck will be at the Tavern. Look for further updates on the time and what the Tavern will be providing.
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The Corner

The Corner is closed for the season. Stop by if you need wood permits. We will reopen after we have the baby.
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Diamond (Kennedy) Fuel & Feed

208-382-4430

Did you know you can order antifreeze from Diamond? “Full strength or 50/50 diluted. Prestone Prime is our best value brand. We also carry Chevron brands. We carry many other automotive lubes and additives, so don’t hesitate to ask.”
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YPFD News:

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.

Training will resume in the spring.
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VYPA News:

Next meeting June 2018
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Local Observations:

Monday (Dec 4) some clearing during the night and bright moon, overnight low of 20 degrees. Mostly cloudy this morning and flaking snow. Breaks in the clouds at lunch time, bits of sun or filtered sun, cold breeze and not much melting, high of 32 degrees. Trees are still holding big snow loads and so are the power lines. Thicker clouds later in the afternoon, light breezes with a bite. Quiet day, no wild birds or critters around. Breaks in the clouds and stunning moon rise.
P1000336-20171204Moon
Dec 4th “Super Moon Rise” – rrS

Tuesday (Dec 5) clearing during the night and cold, low of 5 degrees. Clouds coming in this morning after sunrise, cold light breeze. Clouds whipped on by and mostly clear before lunch time. Clear sky all afternoon, but the sun didn’t feel very strong and only a few icicles dripped, high of 30 degrees. Snow still stuck to power lines this evening. Temperatures dropping quickly with the sun. Clear cold night.

Wednesday (Dec 6) overnight low of 1.5 degrees, clear sky this morning, temps rising with the sun, 4 degrees at 1030am and 7 degrees by 1045am. Red-breasted nuthatch visited. Sunny all day, but below freezing and no melting, high of 28 degrees. Fox tracks on Pioneer Street. Clear sky before dark and temps dropping.

Thursday (Dec 7) overnight low of 4 degrees and clear sky this morning, we still have 3 inches of snow on the ground, not melting. Heard a steller jay calling. Sunny day, but not very warm, a few icicles dripping, high of 33 degrees. The trees and power lines are still coated with frozen snow from the last storm. Red-breasted nuthatches calling from the edge of the forest. Reports of coyote activity in and around the village. Mostly clear at dark, temps dropping, colorful sunset.

Friday (Dec 8) overnight low of 8 degrees, clear sky this morning. The hoarfrost has grown a half inch thick on top of 3″ of old snow. Very quiet today, sun had some strength to it and the power lines have lost half their snow loads, more trees dumping snow on their sun-ward sides out in the forest. Icicles growing a little more during the day, high of 36 degrees. We were a few degrees warmer at sundown than yesterday, clear sky. Cold clear night.

Saturday (Dec 9) overnight low of 7 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning (a few wisps of high clouds.) Heard a steller jay calling. Sunrise turned the hoarfrost on the snow into brilliant diamonds. Red-breasted nuthatch visited. High thin hazy clouds over most of the sky after lunch time, filtered sun, but still made it a little above freezing, icicles dripping and growing, high of 34 degrees. Hazy sky at sunset, not as cold as previous evenings. Elk wandering down the road after dark. Thinner clouds, lots of stars.

Sunday (Dec 10) overnight low of 8 degrees, almost clear this morning, a few thin wisps of clouds. We still have 3″ of snow on the ground with a thick layer of hoarfrost. Red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Filtered sun early afternoon, warm enough for icicles to drip, high of 35 degrees. Sounds of heavy equipment (and back up beepers) this afternoon. Hazy sky before sunset.
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RIP:

Nellie Ernestine (Francis) Downend

March 26, 1924 – Nov. 29, 2017

Nellie was born in Emmett on her grandfather, Charley Martin’s homestead to Merlin and Minnie (Gantz) Francis.

Her brother Bud was born in 1927. She attended schools in Emmett, Parma, Boise and graduated from Cascade High in 1942. Nellie was captain of the Cascade basketball team and the drum major for the band. After graduation, she worked in the Bradley Mining Co. office and later was the clerk of the Valley County Ration Board and a member of the Cascade Hospital Board.

Nellie married Robert (Bob) D. Downend in 1945, the same year he was inducted into the U.S. Army. When Bob was in basic training, she worked in the finance office at the Camp Roberts Army Base and then worked for an attorney in San Luis Obispo.

Bob served in Japan and was discharged in 1947. They then worked at Banks One for her Dad where their son Danny was born that same year. In 1948 they moved to Garden Valley where Bob worked for Bedal & Smith Logging.

In 1951 they moved back to Cascade and purchased the Utah Oil Service Station and Wholesale Distributorship. Their daughter, Bobbie Kay, was born that same year. They worked together running the business until 1976.

In 1977 Nellie went to work at the Valley County Courthouse where she microfilmed county records and went on to serve as bailiff of the ourt. In 1990 they retired. Nellie loved living in Cascade where she was involved in many community activities.

The Cascade Chamber of Commerce honored her as “Cascade Woman of the Year” in 1960. She served as Noble Grand of the Rebekah Lodge, Worthy Matron of the Valley Chapter of the Order of Eastern Star, president of the Cascade School PTA, Guardian of Job’s Daughters, and den mother for the Boy Scouts.

Nellie was the chairman of the Cascade High School reunions for several years. She served as secretary of the Cascade Hospital Building Committee, which raised funds to help build the hospital.

Bob and Nellie served as co-chairmen of the Cascade Chamber of Commerce crab feed for several years. She was proud of her volunteer work to help build the first three holes on the Cascade golf course.

Nellie enjoyed spending time with her family and friends boating, water skiing, snow skiing, golfing, snowmobiling (when she wasn’t hitting the trees!), walking two miles every day, and hosting happy hour in the backyard.

After retiring, Nellie and Bob traveled in their motor home to Parker, Lake Havasu, and Las Vegas. They made many trips to the Oregon and Washington coasts.

In 1995 they flew to Mazatlan, Mexico with their daughter to celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary. In 2004 they sold their office and shop and in 2006 they sold their home of 52 years and moved to Boise.

Mom was fun-loving, feisty and a little stubborn, a great cook, a first-rate singer/dancer, and an even better mother and friend. She will never be forgotten. We love you Mom! See you later alligator!

Per her wishes, there will be no services. Nellie and Bob’s ashes will be scattered at a later date in Cascade. Nellie was preceded in death by her husband Bob, brother Bud Francis and her parents.

She is survived by her son Dan (Kitta), daughter Bobbie Kay Downend, grandsons Greg and Jeff and several nieces and nephews.

Published in the Star-News December 7, 2017
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Idaho News:

Dec. 20 deadline noted for Valley, Adams property taxes

The Star-News December 7, 2017

The deadline for the first half of the year’s property taxes for Valley and Adams counties will be Wednesday, Dec. 20.

Payments will be accepted through 5 p.m. Dec. 20 at the county courthouses in Cascade and Council. The treasurer offices in both counties are staffed Monday through Friday, including the lunch hour.

Late charges begin on Thursday, Dec. 21, and interest begins on Jan. 1, so mailed payments must be postmarked by Dec. 20.

Valley County property owners can also pay their taxes through the Access Idaho program, which accepts credit cards. For more information, contact the treasurer’s office at 382-7110 or treasurer@co.valley.id.us.

Credit card payments are available in Adams County and will be accepted until midnight on Dec. 20. Contact the staff at (208) 253-4263 extension 6 or http://co.adams.id.us.

Payments also can be left in the payment drop box just outside the main courthouse entrance in Council.

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Valley County allows ‘tiny houses’ to be built

Law sets standards for homes 400 s.f. or less

By Max Silverson for The Star-News December 7, 2017

Valley County commissioners on Monday approved an ordinance that will allow the construction of tiny houses, which are homes of 400 square feet or less.

The new ordinance relaxes current standards for exits, access, ceiling height and handrails for tiny homes attached to foundations.

“There has been overwhelming support and little opposition to it,” Valley County Building Official Anne Guarino said.

Commissioners were initially hesitant to adopt the ordinance, citing concerns that the final version of the rules could change before they are officially adopted into Idaho building codes.

A state law allowing tiny houses is expected to be approved by the 2018 Idaho Legislature, Guarino said.

The wording of the Valley County ordinance guarantees that the local rules will match whatever version is passed at the state level, even if they are changed later, she said.

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Board of Guardians seeks volunteers to serve as advocates

The Star-News December 7, 2017

The Valley County Board of Guardians is looking for board members and volunteers to serve as court-appointed guardians, or advocates, for adults who are disabled or otherwise impaired.

The seven-member board sets policies for accepting referrals as well as for the recruiting, screening and training of volunteer guardians.

Volunteer guardians are appointed by the court, often in an emergency situation, to step in and help adults with disabilities who have been deemed legally incapacitated by the courts and who do not have immediate family members willing or able to help.

The volunteers may be required to make decisions based on the person’s limitations, see to the person’s well-being and to encourage maximum self-reliance and independence.

To learn more about the program, visit the Valley County website at http://co.valley.id.us, then follow the links to Services and then Community Guardian.

Those who are interested in becoming a board member or volunteer guardian may contact one of the board members via the same links.

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UI to host online series on food preservation, safety

The Star-News December 7, 2017

The University of Idaho will host an online series on food preservation and food safety beginning Thursday, Jan. 18, at 1 p.m.

The Preserve @ Home course will cover how to produce high-quality preserved foods as well as the science behind food preservation and food safety.

The class will include online text that can be downloaded and printed, an online discussion board for student interaction and a real-time chat with classmates.

Registration is $35 plus the cost of supplemental materials. The enrollment and payment deadline is Tuesday, Jan. 16. For more information or to register, write to lsant@uidaho.edu

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Provo man arrested, loot recovered from Valley County burglaries

By Max Silverson for The Star-News December 7, 2017

A Provo, Utah, man has been charged in connection with thousands of dollars of stolen goods traced to burglaries in Valley County, the Valley County Sheriff’s Office said.

Karl Gresham, 36, was arrested Sunday morning at the location of a pickup truck and trailer on Round Valley Road, Lt. Jason Speer said.

Gresham was being held in the Valley County Jail on a $30,000 bond on two felony charges of grand theft, one felony charge of burglary and one misdemeanor charge of theft.

He is scheduled to appear on Tuesday in Valley County Magistrate Court in Cascade to determine if there is enough evidence for him to stand trial.

Residents on Round Valley Road called Valley County Dispatch after noticing an out-of-place pickup truck and trailer that had run out of gas in the middle of the road, Speer said,

When sheriff’s deputies showed up, they found the pickup and trailer filled with stolen items.

“Thousands upon thousands of dollars in tools, a motorcycle, and an ATV were found,” Speer said. “The trailer was also stolen.”

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McCall OKs lease of former juvenile center for police

City will pay $32,400 per year to Valley County for unused space

By Phil Janquart for The Star-News December 7, 2017

The McCall Police Department is scheduled to move this summer into the former Valley County Juvenile Detention Center following approval last week of a lease with Valley County.

The McCall City Council last Thursday approved a five-year renewable lease for the former detention center. The city will pay $32,400 per year to lease the 3,000 square-foot space.

The lease will now go to Valley County Commissioners on Monday for final approval.

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Tamarack Resort now open for skiing and snowboarding

by KBOI News Staff Friday, December 8th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — The upper mountain and learning area of Tamarack Resort is now open to skiers and snowboarders.

The resort will be open for seven-days-a-week for the remainder of the winter.

In addition to the 11 runs and three lifts being open, Tamarack’s lodging, dining, rental, retail and lessons are also available to visitors.

Conditions at the resort can be accessed on their online snow report.
http://tamarackidaho.com/winter-home/snow-report

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Tamarack using 1.5 million gallons of water a day to make snow

by Sophia Doumani Saturday, December 9th 2017

Tamarack, Idaho (KBOI) — This winter is much warmer than the last but Tamarack was able to open its slopes again on the same weekend because of 14 snow guns.

These snow guns are water guzzling machines. To put it in perspective, they consume 1,100 gallons of water a minute, 1.5 million gallons a day and approximately 25 million gallons per ski season.

General manager of the Tamarack Resort, Brad Larsen, says the snow guns are considered a “non-consumptive use of water.”

“The water goes back into the water shed once it melts,” Larsen said. “Most of it ends up back in Lake Cascade some way or another.”

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[Idaho] County issues disaster declaration for town without water

12/6/17 AP

Grangeville, Idaho — County officials approved a disaster declaration for a western Idaho town so it can apply for emergency state funding after losing its water wells.

The Lewiston Tribune reports the water wells in the town of White Bird stopped working late last month, causing Idaho County commissioners to approve the declaration on Tuesday.

Town officials say a cause has not been determined for why the wells suddenly quit functioning. Officials say seismic activity may have contributed to the loss.

The town declared a state of emergency, and it began providing water resources to residents at what officials say is an unsustainable cost.

The town has applied for emergency funding from the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture rural development agency has committed to helping the town.

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Idaho sells 5 commercial properties, but 5 receive no bids

Associated Press, KTVB December 07, 2017

Boise, Idaho – Five properties Idaho officials offered at an auction sold for above appraised value, but five others didn’t receive any bids.

The auction Wednesday by the Idaho Department of Lands brought in nearly $8.5 million, about $1.6 million above the appraised value.

An office building in Idaho Falls brought in the most at $5.3 million, $125,000 above its appraised value.

An office building in Boise sold for $1.6 million, nearly double its appraised value. Three parking lots in Boise also went for above the appraised value.

The five properties with no bids at or above the appraised value include a commercial building in Idaho Falls and four commercial lots in Meridian.

The Idaho Land Board has been selling commercial real estate following complaints that state-owned businesses unfairly compete with private businesses.

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Christmas tree shortage driving up prices

Morgan Boydston, KTVB December 05, 2017

Meridian, ID – Have you bought your Christmas tree yet? If not, you should probably get on it because they’re going fast!

But just a heads up: you’ll likely have to pay more than you did last year and you might not find exactly what you’re looking for. Why? Because America is facing a Christmas tree shortage.

Customers likely won’t physically see the shortage in trees at any local lots right now, but they will see it reflected in the price tag. It can take up to 10 years to grow a tree, so we can blame the Great Recession for that.

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University of Idaho stinks up evergreens to deter Christmas tree thefts

Lexi Davenport, KREM December 05, 2017

Moscow, Idaho – The University of Idaho’s landscape crew sprayed about 200 trees on campus with a natural repellent of skunk scent, fox urine, and a sticking agent. It’s all to protect the trees from theft and destruction during the holiday season.

The tree-spraying program started back in 1990 and has drastically reduced the number of tree thefts on campus. According to officials, U of I would lose four or five evergreen trees each holiday season. The repellent stays on the trees for about four weeks and does not harm the evergreens or the environment.

U of I officials said the repellent is hard to notice while in colder temperatures outdoors, but it becomes very odorous once indoors. The smell from the repellent can stay in a room and on furniture for a long time, according to officials.

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Idaho launches online voter registration

By Kimberlee Kruesi – 12/5/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idahoans can now register to vote online for the first time.

Secretary of State Lawerence Denney announced Tuesday that the move will offer convenience to voters and cut down administrative work for county election officials.

“Today, Idahoans can not only find out things like where to vote, whether they are registered to vote, or whether the county has received their absentee ballot, but also register to vote online,” Denney said.

Online registration requires voters, who would have to have a state-issued ID, to fill out an electronic application that is then sent to state elections officials for validation. The Idaho Transportation Department will provide digital copies of voter signatures from state-issued driver’s licenses to become part of the voter registration database.

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Tribal flags could be displayed inside Idaho Capitol

12/5/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Tribal leaders in Idaho say they want tribal flags to be displayed inside the Statehouse as a reminder that five sovereign nations reside in the Gem State.

The Idaho Council on Indian Affairs met Tuesday to discuss the logistics of hanging the flags at the Capitol. Legislative staffers said Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter and legislative leaders are supportive of the move.

Ted Howard, chairman of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes, says displaying the flags will help educate the public on the unique standing the tribes have with the United States, as well as serve as a reminder that all of Idaho used to be the tribe’s homeland.

The council hopes to have the flags up and ready before the end of the 2018 legislative session, which begins in January.

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Supermoon Lights Up The Valley

Dec 6, 2017 – IME

The 2017 supermoon sets to the west over the ridge to the north of Warm Springs around sunrise Monday morning, near Ketchum.

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Scam Alerts:

New PayPal phishing scam regards camera purchases

John Matarese Dec 4, 2017 KIVI TV

What would you do if you got an email from PayPal saying it is billing you hundreds of dollars for a camera that you never ordered?

That’s what happened to one woman — and it should be a warning to everyone.

“The email was from PayPal. It just said, ‘Thank you for your purchase,'” she said.

However, Frazee didn’t recall making any purchases.

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Protecting yourself during the season of scams

by Abigail Taylor Thursday, December 7th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Scammers are finding creative ways to steal your cash this holiday season.

They know those credit cards are being swiped left and right, so they’re just waiting to cash in on your generosity.

Already this month in Idaho, there have been several dozen scams reported to the Better Business Bureau.

Here are a couple of the common ones to look out for:

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Mining News:

Ask Midas: Financial Assurance

December 5

Midas Gold Idaho wants to keep the community informed about the work we are doing at the Stibnite Gold Project site. The Ask Midas blog series gives the experts in our company a chance to answer some of the community’s most frequently asked questions and help clear up any misconceptions around the project.

MYTH: Recent news stories claim that mining companies in the U.S. no longer have to provide proof of financial responsibility, also known as financial assurance or bonding, for the cost of environmental cleanup and reclamation.

FACT: Mining companies are still required to provide financial assurance for the cleanup and reclamation of the sites where they work. Recently, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was considering adding a new rule that would have required mining companies to provide additional financial assurance over and above what is already required. However, the Agency Administrator for the EPA determined that this would be a duplication of existing federal and state regulations that ensure mining companies prove the necessary funds set aside to reclaim project sites. This ruling aims to reduce unnecessary duplication of laws but does not let industry off the hook for responsible cleanup practices and providing financial assurance to ensure cleanup work is done. Reclamation and bonding is a requirement for all modern mining companies.

Midas Gold will be required by the U.S. Forest Service, and state agencies overseeing our project, to provide financial assurance and set aside millions of dollars to guarantee environmental restoration work is fully funded before we receive a permit.

If you have a question you would like us to answer, please email it to community @ midasgoldcorp.com

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Delay on open pit mine: how the public can help

by Alexis Goree Tuesday, December 5th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Tonight, the Forest Service hosted the first of three open houses for the open pit mine project in the Boise National Forest.

The proposed CuMo project advancement is reliant on the engagement and support of the community after 10 years of analysis and delays. Changed conditions in the Treasure Valley has been one of them.

CuMoCo Mining company has given the Forest Service a proposal to open roads to contract drill pads and exploration drilling for possibly the worlds largest molybdenum project. The deposit is exploring southwest Idaho, 14 miles northwest of Idaho City.

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Public Lands:

Big Creek/Yellow Pine/South Fork Collaborative Meeting

Payette National Forest December 14, 2017; 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM Valley County Emergency Operations Center (EOC)

Melissa B. Hamilton
U of I Valley County Extension Educator
Community Development / Agriculture
208-382-7190

Agenda:
Matrix for EFSFSR Project Area sent to collaborative 10-25-2017.pdf
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McCall and New Meadows Ranger Districts Seek Grants for Recreation Projects

PNF 12/8/2017

McCall, ID – The McCall and New Meadows Ranger Districts on the Payette National Forest will apply for multiple state recreation grants to support trail and campground projects, as well as winter recreation opportunities. These grants are made available annually by the Idaho Department of Parks & Recreation to government entities for the provision of equipment, and the creation and renovation of outdoor recreational facilities.

Trails

The Forest is submitting two grant proposals for trails work. The first will be to cover the second phase of rerouting the Jackson Creek Trail, located off the Warren Wagon Road near McCall. The proposal calls for rerouting the trail out of wetland areas, and for continuing general enhancements of the trail.

The second grant proposal is to fund replacement of the Jenkins Crossing Bridge, located on the Jackson Creek Trail. The funding will cover the purchase of a prefabricated bridge, as well as costs associated with the bridge installation.

Recreation

A grant proposal for making improvements to the McCall District’s Lake Fork Campground is being submitted. The campground’s current restroom facilities are in need of full replacement. The grant proposal is to fund the cost of two American with Disabilities Act (ADA) accessible concrete restrooms, as well as other enhancements to the campground such as a new entrance information kiosk, campsite markers and parking barriers.

The McCall Ranger District is submitting a grant proposal to fund the purchase of equipment to be used by volunteer campground hosts who provide services to the many campsites frequented by Forest visitors. Funds are also being requested to purchase pressure washers to facilitate the cleaning of restrooms, and other facilities at recreation sites.

Winter Recreation

The final grant proposal is for the ongoing Over-Snow-Vehicle-Education Project. Funds requested by the district will support the work of seasonal employees who provide assistance to Forest visitors that are snowmobiling on the Forest, or taking advantage of other winter recreation opportunities. These employees provide safety information to the public, as well as assist in maintaining winter travel routes and associated signage.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
p: 208-634-0784
c: 208-634-6945
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Middle Fork Weiser River Landscape Restoration Project Final Record of Decision

Dear Interested Party,

The Middle Fork Weiser River Landscape Restoration Project Final Record of Decision has been signed by Payette National Forest, Forest Supervisor, Keith Lannom on December 5th, 2017. Implementation may begin immediately pursuant to 36 CFR 218.12.

The Final Environmental Impact Statement and Draft Record of Decision were made available on May 19th, 2017. Three objections were received during the 45-day predecisional objection period. Idaho Conservation League, American Forest Resource Council, and WildEarth Guardians all submitted their respective objections by the July 3, 2017 deadline. An objection resolution meeting was held with all objectors on August 7, 2017. As a result of the resolution meeting, the Forest provided clarification to the road analysis as requested by WildEarth Guardians. This clarification is included in the Final Record of Decision as Attachment 3 – Roads Analysis Clarification for WildEarth Guardians. No changes were made to the Selected Alternative through the objection resolution process. The Final Environmental Impact Statement, Record of Decision, objection letters, objection withdrawal letters, Biological Assessment, Letter of Concurrence from US Fish and Wildlife Service, and all other pertinent project documents are posted on the Project webpage.
https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=41687.

The Middle Fork Weiser River project area encompasses approximately 50,000 acres on the Council Ranger District of the Payette National Forest. Restoration activities include timber harvest, biomass harvest, road reconstruction, road realignment, temporary road construction, road decommissioning, culvert removal, thinning of sub-merchantable trees, prescribed fire, and other actions. The Project also proposes managing recreation use in the project area, with an emphasis on improving developed and dispersed recreation areas, improving and realigning existing trails, and developing new trail opportunities. Hard copies or CDs of the FEIS and Final ROD and additional information regarding this project can be obtained from: Mark Fox (project lead), 2092 Highway 95, Council, Idaho, 83612, (208)253-0164, mrfox @ fs.fed.us.
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Middle Fork Weiser River Landscape Restoration Project Record of Decision Signed

PNF 12/8/2017

McCall, ID – The Middle Fork Weiser River Landscape Restoration Project final Record of Decision has been signed, and implementation can begin.

The project area encompasses nearly 50,000 acres on the Council Ranger District. This is the third project of as many as eight the Payette National Forest is and will be conducting under our Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program (CFLRP), with the assistance of the Payette Forest Coalition.

Forest restoration activities for this project include timber and biomass harvest to reduce fuel loading; road reconstruction, realignment, and decommissioning; culvert removal to enhance riparian areas; and thinning of sub-merchantable trees and the use of prescribed fire to restore healthy conditions and help protect communities from wildfires.

The project also has an emphasis on improving developed and dispersed recreation areas, improving and realigning existing trails, and developing new trail opportunities.

The Payette National Forest is actively conducting large scale forest restoration projects that are restoring our Ponderosa pine forests to healthy structure and function. We are improving wildlife habitat, restoring fish connectivity, reducing road sediment, improving floodplain function, restoring upland and riparian vegetation, promoting large tree growth, reducing wildfire risks to local communities, encouraging the use of woody biomass and providing local economic benefits. A fourth project (Huckleberry Landscape Restoration Project, 67,000 acres) is under analysis now, and a fifth project is in initial planning stages.

“We look forward to adding to the accomplishments that we have already achieved in returning our forests to a healthy condition that can thrive into the future,” said Keith Lannom, Payette National Forest Supervisor. “These restoration and collaborative projects are truly producing significant results on the ground and with our local economies.”

Other CFLRP Projects on the Payette National Forest:

* Mill Creek-Council Mountain Landscape Restoration Project, 50,000 acres – in the final phases of implementation.

* Lost Creek-Boulder Creek Landscape Restoration Project, 80,000 acres – under implementation now.

* Huckleberry Landscape Restoration Project, 67,000 acres. Decision expected in the spring of 2019.

For a summary of our CFLRP projects, please watch is video: https://youtu.be/cowXrwSpQwY

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
p: 208-634-0784
c: 208-634-6945
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BLM seeks comments on grazing permit renewals near Grand View

Date: December 4, 2017
Contact: Michael Williamson mwilliamson@blm.gov 208-384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management is seeking public comments on the renewal of thirteen grazing permits in the Battle Creek, East Castle Creek, and Owens grazing allotments. The project seeks to maintain or improve land health and address resource impacts through the renewal of grazing permits and potential development of the Purjue Canyon area to promote education and recreation on lands south of Grand View.

This scoping period allows the public, organizations and other interested parties to identify potential issues which the BLM may opt to include in the environmental analysis. Comments are most helpful if they provide specific actions, resources, or issues to be considered and analyzed. The BLM will accept comments throughout the scoping period (Dec. 4 to Jan. 16, 2018).

“The purpose of this landscape level project is to implement the Secretary of the Interior’s priority of shared conservation stewardship that improves land health while supporting local economies through agriculture and recreational activities,” said BLM Bruneau Field Manager Tanya Thrift. “Our intent in reaching out to the public and our partners during this scoping period is to give everyone a chance to provide issues they feel should be included in the analysis.”

As part of the scoping period, the BLM will host a public meeting on Dec. 18 from 4-7 p.m. at the Boise District Office, 3948 Development Avenue, Boise, Idaho 83705. Resource specialists will be on hand to talk about the process and answer questions.

Maps and information about the renewal process are available at: https://go.usa.gov/xn8X2

Comments can be submitted by any one of the following:

* Email: blm_id_bd_beco@blm.gov
* Fax: 208-384-3205
* Mail: BLM Boise District Office, 3948 S. Development Ave., Boise, ID 83705; Attention: Kavi Koleini.

Please note that before including their personal identifying information (address, email, phone number), commenters should be aware that their entire comment – including their personal identifying information – may be made publicly available at any time. While those commenting can ask in their comments to withhold this information from public review, the BLM cannot guarantee that they will be able to do so.

For more information, contact Kavi Koleini at (208) 384-3337 or kkoleini@blm.gov
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Letter to Share:

Game bird last couple weeks report

12/5/2017

Things have been going pretty great over at the youth access hunting area. We did not put out any pheasants over Thanksgiving weekend. Talked to Sonny and they were real shorthanded and talked to Jim Hagedorn and the Game Bird Foundation and we were shorthanded so we took a look and I could see quit a few birds so decided to hold off a week. We dropped 25 birds last Friday evening about 3:00 the First of December. Lots of activity Friday evening as we were enjoying the release with the young folks from the U of I Wildlife Society. Shortly after we released there was two rigs showed up. One a mom and son, the other had 4 men and a women. All Decked out in orange vest. 6 kids came out of the canopy on the pickup, all decked out in orange caps and vests. The whole works had 2 youth shotguns. Mom handled the dog, the 4 guys were mentoring and helping the kids, no guns. With all the shooting the kids got they got one bird. No worry they were back Saturday . 2 boys their dads and the dog. The dads mentored the kids and handled the dog. They got one bird. What proud kids and what proud dads. I wish daylight was longer in the evening so the kids could get out for a hunt after school.

Lots of road hunting from folks with no kids in the rig. I see them on week day mornings when the kids are in school. Don’t know what I can do except to get a load of buckshot so I keep my mouth shut. Folks have been real good about walking in and staying away from the livestock. What a great fall. I have 2 elk tags and 2 deer tags and I haven’t even got the rifle out. I have had one of my best hunting seasons ever this fall watching young people and their folks.

Jim,

As of last night, we have had 26 birds reported as harvested. A few people have called in the band without submitting harvest reports, and we have had 2 birds harvested off the area and called in. 11 different hunters have harvested birds. Multiple hunters have been repeat visitors. Exciting stuff

Nicole Alonso
Farm Bill Coordinator – Region 2
Idaho Department of Fish and Game
(208) 750-4226

God Bless and have a Merry Christmas.

Jim Hagedorn “Whiskers”
The Game Bird Foundation
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Be careful of antifreeze with your pets

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Dec 8, 2017 – IME

Antifreeze products contain ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, methanol or a combination of those products. Most automotive antifreeze liquids contain ethylene glycol and pose the greatest risk to pets. Relatively safe antifreeze products contain propylene glycol. Those products are considered GRAS (generally recognized as safe). Propylene glycol is also commonly used in toothpaste and cosmetics. Methanol is present in many windshield washer fluids.

All those compounds can depress the brain and cause “drunken” behavior. Of the three compounds, ethylene glycol is the most serious. It has a sweet taste that is attractive to dogs and cats. When ethylene glycol is ingested, it forms oxalate crystals in the kidneys that cause acute kidney failure and subsequent death without immediate treatment.

Clinical signs can occur within one hour after ingestion. Animals appear drunk and uncoordinated. Anywhere from 12 to 36 hours after ingestion, kidney failure develops with decreased urine production. The kidney damage is often irreversible and fatal. Diagnosis is based on a history of exposure to antifreeze and the clinical signs. Because many ethylene glycol formulations contain a fluorescent dye, the muzzle, paws, urine and vomitus may fluoresce or glow under an ultraviolet light! There are special test kits that can measure ethylene glycol in the blood. A few days later, blood and urine tests can show the typical oxalate crystals in the urine and kidney failure in the blood.

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‘Santa Claws’ helps Idaho spay-and-neuter cause

KTVB December 09, 2017


(Photo: KTVB)

Boise, ID – The annual ‘Santa Claws’ event helps put pet owners in the Christmas spirit, and helps raise money for a group that aims to reduce the number of unwanted cats and dogs in Idaho.

Spay and Neuter Idaho Pets, or SNIP, is teaming up with Bark ‘n’ Purr in Vista Village for SNIP Santa Claws on Saturday and Sunday, December 9 and 10.

You can bring your pet to the store between the hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. and take a picture with Santa. The photo costs $20, and the proceeds go to SNIP.

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Idaho fighting order to destroy wilderness wolf, elk data

By Keith Ridler – 12/6/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idaho officials are challenging a federal court order to destroy information collected from tracking collars placed on elk and wolves obtained illegally by landing a helicopter in a central Idaho wilderness area.

Idaho Department of Fish and Game Director Virgil Moore on Tuesday requested a stay of the judgment in U.S. District Court in Idaho pending the agency’s appeal to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Judge B. Lynn Winmill ruled in January the U.S. Forest Service broke environmental laws nearly two years ago by authorizing Idaho Fish and Game to put collars on about 60 elk by landing helicopters in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, where engines are prohibited.

Idaho also collared four wolves in an action the Forest Service didn’t authorize. Fish and Game blamed miscommunication with a helicopter crew.

Winmill wrote that it was such an extreme case “the only remedy that will directly address the ongoing harm is an order requiring destruction of the data.”

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Wolves in E. Washington do not appear to hurt deer, elk

by Nicholas K. Geranios, Associated Press Friday, December 8th 2017

Spokane, Wash. (AP) — The growing population of wolves in eastern Washington state does not appear to be hurting the populations of deer, elk and other ungulates.

A report issued this week by the state Department of Fish and Wildlife looked at ungulate populations between fiscal 2015 and 2017.

The report concluded that none of the ungulate populations in the assessment appeared to show clear signs of being limited by predation from wolves.

Ungulates include elk, moose, deer and bighorn sheep.

Gray wolves were hunted to extinction in Washington early in the past century. But the animals started migrating into the state in the early 2000s from Idaho and Canada. The first wolf pack was documented by DFW in 2008.

source:
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2018 plan for Mexican wolves calls for fostering of pups

By Susan Montoya Bryan – 12/5/17 AP

Albuquerque, N.M. — Federal wildlife officials have a plan for fostering as many as a dozen captive Mexican gray wolf pups with packs in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico in 2018.

The goal of the proposal unveiled this week by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is to boost genetic diversity among the endangered species over the next year.

Aside from fostering, managers want to remove a female wolf from a pack in Arizona to prevent it from mating with a sibling.

During a temporary stint in captivity, the wolf either would be artificially inseminated or allowed to mate with another captive wolf before being released back into the wild.

Environmentalists are calling for the release of more captive wolves.

The public has until Dec. 26 to comment on the proposal.

source:
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Suburban NY police: Watch out for the ‘coywolf’

Coyote hybrid spotted wandering around suburb

Local News 8 – Dec 06, 2017


The coywolf is larger than most coyotes (pictured). They have different colorings, with more gray in their coats.

Police are warning residents about an usually large coyote-wolf hybrid that’s been spotted around a New York City suburb.

The animal was an eerie sight in the fog near Rockland County condos, WCBS reported.

“It looks larger than your average coyote,” Nyack resident Sean McCormack told WCBS. “Very scary, yeah, very scary.”

“It’s a coywolf — basically, it’s a mixture of a coyote and a wolf,” Clarkstown police Officer Peter Walker told WCBS.

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Wolf Education International

Newsletter Dec 9, 2017

Coywolf — Coyote-Wolf Hybrid — Spotted Roaming In Rockland County

Are we crying wolf? A European tale of farmers vs. nature

Tapeworm could jump to humans with potentially deadly consequences, veterinarian warns
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US to review end of protections for Yellowstone grizzlies

By Matthew Brown – 12/6/17 AP

Billings, Mont. — U.S. officials said Wednesday they’ll review the recent lifting of protections for Yellowstone-area grizzly bears in light of a court ruling that retained protections for gray wolves in the Great Lakes.

About 700 bears in and around Yellowstone National Park lost their threatened species status on July 31, opening the door to future trophy hunts in Wyoming, Montana and Idaho.

Just a day later, a federal appeals court in Washington D.C. said in the wolf case that wildlife officials needed to give more consideration to how a species’ loss of historical habitat affects its recovery.

Like wolves, grizzly bears have seen a strong recovery over the past several decades in isolated regions of the U.S., but remain absent from the vast majority of their historical range.

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N. Idaho hunter shot by partner who mistook him for an elk

12/6/17 AP

Moscow, Idaho — Authorities say a 60-year-old northern Idaho man is recovering after being shot in the buttocks with a .50-caliber muzzleloader rifle by his hunting partner who mistook him for an elk.

The Latah County Sheriff’s Office tells the Moscow-Pullman Daily News that the Moscow man was shot Monday near Dreary by a 72-year-old Potlatch man.

Officials say the injured man was transported to a hospital and was in stable condition Tuesday.

Names haven’t been released.

source:
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Idaho officials delay possible increase in grazing fees

By Associated Press – 12/5/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — The state’s top elected officials have put off a possible increase in grazing fees on state lands due to potential litigation.

The Idaho Land Board on Tuesday voted 5-0 to delay a decision about grazing fees but didn’t set a timeline.

Secretary of State Lawerence Denney said after the meeting the board likely won’t take up grazing fees again until spring.

In public comments, ranchers mostly were against raising the rates.

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Man Saves Rabbit From Fire in California


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SW Idaho city authorizes police to shoot downtown crows

12/9/17 AP

Nampa, Idaho — Officials in Nampa in southwestern Idaho have authorized the city’s police force to use pellet guns to shoot crows in the downtown area through Sunday night.

Mayor Bob Henry approved the discharging of firearms in the downtown area that is otherwise prohibited.

Officials say the crows feed in fields during the day and return to the city in the evening where it’s warmer, partly because of the street lights.

Officials say the crows create a mess downtown that can cause a health hazard.

Nampa officials are also exploring using a bird repellent hazer that nearby Caldwell used when crows created a problem in that city several years ago.

source:
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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
December 8, 2017
Issue No. 854
Table of Contents

* Briefs Filed In Appeals Court To Expedite Challenge To Increased Spill For Juvenile Salmon, Steelhead
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439929.aspx

* Federal Agencies Outline NEPA/EIS Progress Evaluating Columbia/Snake River Uses, Improvements For Fish
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439928.aspx

* Study: As River Warms Through McNary-John Day Pools, Juvenile Salmon Change Food-Source To Non-Native Shad
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439926.aspx

* ESA-Listed Chum Salmon Spawning Below Bonneville, Weather Cooperating For River Operations Aiding Fish
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439925.aspx

* U.S. – Canada Columbia River Treaty Negotiations Expected To Begin In Early 2018
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439924.aspx

* Corps Seeking Public Input On Detroit Dam Fish Passage, Temperature Control Scoping Process
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439923.aspx

* River Managers Reset Annual Guidelines For Zero Nighttime/Weekend Flows At Lower Snake Dams
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439922.aspx

* Idaho Power To Provide More Information To Idaho, Oregon As Part Of Hells Canyon Complex Relicensing
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439921.aspx

* Canadian Science Committee Recommends Listing Fraser River Sockeye As ‘Species At Risk’
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439920.aspx

* Harvest Managers Approve Tribal Hook And Line, Setline Sturgeon Fishing In John Day Pool
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439919.aspx

* Study Takes A Look At Best Landing Nets To Reduce Harm In Catch-Release Fisheries
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439918.aspx

* NASA Looking For Citizen Scientists To Collect Pacific Northwest Snowpack Depth Measurements
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439917.aspx

* IDFG Boise River Survey Finds A Surprise: A Non-Native Freshwater Shrimp >From Mississippi River
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439916.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

F&G open house Tuesday to review hunting rules changes

The Star-News December 7, 2017

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game will host an open house to discuss proposed changes to local hunts on Tuesday at 4:30 p.m. at the McCall Regional Office, 555 Deinhard Lane.

The meeting will feature information as well as allow for comments on the two proposed changes on the 2018-19 upland game, furbearer and turkey regulations.

Fish and Game is proposing a new fall turkey hunt in portions of Units 22, 31 and 32. The department is also seeking public comment on removing the fox trapping and hunting restrictions in Valley and Adams counties.

For more information on the proposals or to provide comments online, visit the Idaho Department of Fish and Game website at
https://idfg.idaho.gov/comment

source:
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Fish and Game to begin helicopter game surveys

The Star-News December 7, 2017

Hunters with late-season deer and elk tags might have some company this month as Idaho Department of Fish and Game survey helicopters will be taking to the air.

“Deer and elk surveys occur during winter, when animals are concentrated and are easier to see and count in open country,” said Regan Berkley, McCall regional wildlife manager for Fish and Game.

Information gathered during these surveys helps to determine male to female ratios as well as hunting season mortality and current calf and fawn survival, Berkley said.

“Biologists will be on the lookout for hunters, and will try to avoid disturbing active hunts,” she said.

source:
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Fish and Game issues advisory on McCall ‘town deer’

The Star-News December 7, 2017

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is warning residents to not feed the “town deer” in McCall and to watch out for them on the roads.

Fish and Game responds to dozens of reports of dead or injured deer each year in McCall and Cascade, with more than 30 reports in McCall alone last year, McCall Regional Wildlife Manager Regan Berkley said.

“These deer died of two primary causes: vehicle-related injuries or starvation because their digestive systems were unable to process the feed they were given,” Berkley said.

Deer do not naturally spend winters in McCall because they do not have access to natural forage,” she said.

“The only reason the town deer stay is because people feed them, year after year,” Berkley said “Feeding in town may actually harm more deer than it saves.”

Deer on the roads are another winter problem. “During winter, we get so much snow that the only places deer can really move around are on roads,” Berkley said. “If you observe a deer crossing the road, expect that more deer are coming right behind it.”

Fish and Game’s options for responding to injured deer are limited because adult deer are not candidates for successful rehabilitation, she said.

Badly injured deer will be euthanized, while those that appear to be able to survive their injuries will be released.

source:
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Fish and Game working a poaching case in the Magic Valley

by Brian Morrin Sunday, December 3rd 2017


(Fish and Game photo)

Rupert, Idaho (KBOI) — Idaho Fish and Game conservation officers served a search warrant early Friday morning at a home in Rupert.

The officers had probable cause to believe there was evidence tied to big game poaching.

These elk skulls were confiscated from the home.

IDFG says it’ll continue to work hard to protect wildlife from those who seek to steal it.

source:
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Squirrel blamed for vandalizing Christmas lights

by The Associated Press Monday, December 4th 2017


(Sea Girt Police Department)

Sea Girt, N.J. (AP) — It was a squirrel that nearly stole Christmas in a New Jersey town.

Sea Girt officials were puzzled when wires to the town’s Christmas tree and display were found torn last week. Workers repaired the damage so the tree could be lit on Friday.

Police kept watch over the display and on Saturday posted a photo on Facebook of the culprit — a squirrel.

Police said the squirrel was “charged with criminal mischief and released on bail.”

source:
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Possum breaks into Okaloosa liquor store, gets drunk

By Annie Blanks Dec 1, 2017 News Herald

Okaloosa Island — An opossum that snuck into a liquor store and apparently helped itself to a few drinks the day after Thanksgiving was brought in to the Emerald Coast Wildlife Refuge for treatment before it was released Thursday.

Michelle Pettis, a wildlife health technician at the refuge, said the juvenile female opossum was brought in by a Fort Walton Beach police officer Nov. 24. He said a Cash’s Liquor Store employee at the AJ’s on the Bayou location discovered the animal next to a broken and empty bottle of alcohol the morning after Thanksgiving.

“A worker there found the opossum up on a shelf next to a cracked open bottle of liquor with nothing in it,” Pettis said. “Assuming the opossum drank it all, he brought her to us, and we looked over her and she definitely wasn’t fully acting normal.”

Pettis said the opossum appeared disoriented, was excessively salivating and appeared to be pale. The staff quickly pumped the marsupial full of fluids and cared for her as she sobered up.

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Seasonal Humor:

MooseSleighTeam-a
This image from the cover of “Pioneer Life in Ely” by Lee Brownell
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Tips & Advice:

See how fast a Christmas tree goes up in flames

KTVB December 08, 2017


The Christmas tree fire spread quickly in this demonstration. (Photo: BFD)

The Boise Fire Department wants to remind you — with the beauty of a Christmas tree — comes a fire hazard.

Check out this video from the fire department. It shows you just how quickly a Christmas tree can burn!

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Fire Adapted Communities Video

A five minute video explaining how your community can become more resilient when faced with wildfire or other natural disasters.

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Advertisements

Dec 3, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Dec 3, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Yellow Pine Christmas Bags

Santa’s Yellow Pine Elves, we will be doing Christmas Bags again!! Contact [Nicki] if you are interested in helping out!!
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Yellow Pine Tavern

Watch all of your favorite sports on our Big Screen TV at the Yellow Pine Tavern.

Featuring Football

Open 9am to 8pm (or later on game nights)

Christmas potluck will be at the Tavern. Look for further updates on the time and what the Tavern will be providing.
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The Corner

The Corner is closed for the season. Stop by if you need wood permits. We will reopen after we have the baby.
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Hunter’s Missing Rope

Looking for a 5/8th inch climbing rope that is white with a green stripe that was stretched across the river from the Yellow Pine Campground by the concrete bridge to the other side. of the river. It was removed while we were hunting on the far side. If you or someone know of it’s whereabouts, please leave it at the Yellow Pine Tavern for us. Thank You.
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Diamond (Kennedy) Fuel & Feed

208-382-4430

Did you know you can order pet food from Diamond Fuel & Feed and have it delivered via Arnolds? Give them a call.
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YPFD News:

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.

Training will resume in the spring.
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Winter Operations 2017-18 for YPFD and Ambulance (Medic-4)

– As always call 9-1-1 to report any Emergencies. Non-Emergency Dispatcher 208-382-5160

– As of December 7, 2017 Jeff and Ann will be out until Spring.

– Cecil Dahlman will be available throughout the winter and should be contacted if needed for FD needs.

– Those that have been trained or oriented to YPFD operations can continue to orientate and train with all the FD equipment and apparatus at their discretion.

– All initial 9-1-1 dispatches will come from Valley County Sheriff’s Office Dispatch center over the Yellow Pine (YLWPIN) frequency. The Yellow Pine Frequency (YLWPIN) is a repeater to and from Thunderbolt Tower (VALLTB). Dispatch does not have a “Yellow Pine Frequency”, due YLWPIN being only a repeater from the Thunderbolt tower so you don’t have to say you’re on the Yellow Pine frequency.

– Dispatch will say Yellow Pine Fire on Thunderbolt or Yellow Pine Medic-4 on Thunderbolt. Fire means they need someone to respond in the Fire Engine or Medic-4 for Ambulance on the Medical side.

– If you want to call Dispatch by landline or cell, please utilize the 9-1-1 landline or 208- 382-5160

– Medic-4 is the second call for assistance; Medic-1 or Medic-2 (Paramedic Ambulances) from Cascade will be the initial dispatch. If Medic-4 is not available or no one answers, please realize help is on the way. You can always confirm with Dispatch by calling 9-1-1 or 208-382-5160

– Someone hopefully acknowledge from Yellow Pine. For those that have been given radios, please carry them and turned on and be monitoring the Yellow Pine Frequency (YLWPIN) Please carry the County radios if you have them. If you need help from Cascade Fire for any reason please ask Dispatch to have them respond. You can always cancel them if they are not needed. Update Dispatch with pertinent information when available.

– If anyone needs a refresher on the radios or more explanation please see me.

– Due to Yellow Pine Radio/Repeater/Tower transmitting issues, Dispatch will also be monitoring the Meadow Creek (FG MDW) Tower as well. The receive side of YLWPIN is excellent. If you are unable to transmit on Yellow Pine (YLWPIN) or Thunderbolt (VALLTB) towers try Meadow Creek (FG MDW). The County is aware of our communications issues and will hopefully have a plan to fix it in the near future.

– All equipment and apparatus is running and filled with water and fuel. If fuel is needed please see Lorinne at the YP Tavern for Un-leaded and Matt at the Corner for Diesel. Both should be able to hold the invoices until we get back.

– The YPFD generator is working and will automatically turn on after a 10 second interruption of power. All FD station electrical outlets and apparatus doors, phones, etc. work during a power failure.

– YP Helispot, 44°57’ 36.92 “N” 115° 29’ 44.26 “W”

*** The Helispot is not officially opened due to pile debris, uneven terrain, stumps etc. and not having the endorsement of the flight services. The plan will be to have the Helispot fully operational by late spring 2018.

– Ambulance availability. Due to Ann and Jeff being out of town the ambulance transport component will be out-of-service. YP has one Emergency Medical Responder in town during the winter. If warranted, the ambulance can be used for a response to the incident. The only approved folks who can transport a patient in the ambulance are a State of Idaho licensed EMT or Paramedic, and hold National Certification, and an Employee of Cascade Fire/EMS. This is an Idaho State Health and Welfare regulation and Law by the State of Idaho. We will be in jeopardy of losing the ambulance from Yellow Pine if a patient is transported anywhere without an Idaho licensed EMT or Paramedic in the back of the ambulance with a patient.

– Once 9-1-1 is activated from YP, Cascade ambulance, (Medic-1 or 2) will immediately be dispatched and a radio call will go out to Medic-4 (YP ambulance) to see if there is an available licensed responder available to respond in the ambulance. If not, Medic-1 or 2 from Cascade Fire/EMS will be en-route regardless.

– If there are any questions, please feel free to contact me; 208-633-1010 or Yellowpinefire@yahoo.com

Thanks, Jeff Forster
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VYPA News:

Next meeting June 2018
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Local Observations:

Monday (Nov 27) rain came down pretty good during the night, ovenright low of 33 degrees. Partly clear and breezy this morning. Heard a Steller’s Jay calling. Scattered sunshine and breezy mid-day, 10 degrees cooler than yesterday, high of 46 degrees. A few flakes of snow around 2pm and partly clear. Backhoe up on Yellow Pine Ave. cleaning the ditches between School St. and Pioneer St. Clearing before dark. Bright stars twinkling.

Tuesday (Nov 28) overnight low of 18 degrees, clear sky this morning, light frost. Some high wispy clouds came in before lunch time. Cloudy afternoon, high of 44 degrees. Fresh elk poop in the driveway. Gusty breezes after dark. Heavy snow fall after 1030pm.

Wednesday (Nov 29) overnight snow piled up 2.5″, the low was 19 degrees (must have cleared off early this morning.) Increasing clouds and warming enough for the trees to drop snow bombs before lunch time. Mail truck was about half hour late. Cloudy afternoon, high of 34 degrees. Fresh elk tracks in the snow on Pioneer street this afternoon. Clearing before dark and temps dropping. Quiet night, could hear someone split a round of wood blocks away.

Thursday (Nov 30) overnight low of 10 degrees, high thin clouds and weak sunshine this morning. Thicker overcast and no sun by early afternoon, didn’t get above freezing today, high around 29 degrees. Heard a pine squirrel sounding off this afternoon, they have been pretty quiet lately. Hazy fat moon around 830pm, then thicker clouds later on hiding the moon.

Friday (Dec 1) cloudy overnight and warmer this morning than all day yesterday. Above freezing by lunch time and melting snow dripping off roofs. Gusty breezes after lunch and more melting, high of 42 degrees. A few breaks in the clouds late afternoon, then overcast before dark. Quiet day, very little traffic. Thick clouds hiding the moon.

Saturday (Dec 2) skiff of snow fell before 6am, overnight low of 28 degrees, high thin clouds this morning. Saw a steller jay fly over the neighborhood and heard red-breasted nuthatches calling. Thicker darker clouds after lunch time and chilly breeze, high of 40 degrees. Light rain in the afternoon, changing to snow after dark.

Sunday (Dec 3) snowed all night, 3″ heavy wet snow on the ground this morning, low of 30 degrees, low clouds and overcast. Light snow falling all morning into the afternoon and evening, less than 1/2″ accumulation by dark, high just under 32 degrees. Thinner clouds before dark, still snowing lightly.
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Letter to Share:

Commissioner Cruickshank’s November Newsletter

Dec 1, 2017

From the Desk of Commissioner Cruickshank,

Wednesday November 1st
This morning I attended my National Association of Counties (NACo) Executive Board orientation to understand the roles of the position at the NACo offices in Washington D C. I then was able to attend a portion of media training for NACo Board members.

This afternoon I was able to attend a meeting at the White House South Auditorium concerning Rural Infrastructure. Secretary Perdue spoke to us on the importance of the infrastructure needs. I was able to request better forest management to happen and to assist in relaxing the hiring process for the Forest Service so they can approve hires at the local level. There was also a discussion on states limiting local government with budget caps which limits the ability to improve infrastructure in some cases.

Late afternoon I was able to attend the afternoon session of the NACo Finance Budget meeting.

Thursday November 2nd
This morning was a continued Finance meeting and a NACo Executive Board meeting where we worked on Strategic Priorities.

I flew home this afternoon.

Friday November 3rd
I stopped by the Idaho Association of Counties office this morning and visited with staff.

This afternoon I had a Deposition for a lawsuit from a prior board I was Chairman of several years ago.

Saturday November 4th
I created the October newsletter.

Sunday November 5th
I forwarded a request to have folks sign onto a letter to support the Secure Rural Schools (SRS) program to congressional leadership. SRS provides funding to our county road maintenance and our schools to educate students.

Monday November 6th
Commissioner day today. Please go to Valley County Idaho Official Site our county website and click on the commissioner section. Once there the minutes can be found once they are approved and placed on the website. Please check out the new website design and layout and provide any feedback.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday November 7th
I sent out a reminder of the NACo West Region call I will be hosting on Thursday.

I reviewed and replied to multiple emails today and returned phone calls.

Wednesday November 8th
I attended the Ribbon Cutting for the Northwest Passage apartments in Donnelly. These apartments are an addition for Workforce Housing in our region.

Thursday November 9th
I held the West Region Call this morning.
Later this morning I participated in a Payette National Forest Cooperating Agency call on the Stibnite project.

Monday November 13th
Commissioner day. Please see the minutes once approved on the Valley County website.

Tuesday November 14th
I participated in a NACo Transportation Committee Conference call to discuss current issues with transportation infrastructure at the national level. Topics included fuel tax increases, bonding for improvements, drones and upcoming census for 2020.

I reviewed applications for filling a Judge position in the 4th District.

I signed a support letter for the City of Donnelly grant to update their Transportation Plan.

I discussed our Wild Fire grant program with our consultant and looked at potential extensions for the programs.

Wednesday November 15th
I participated in a NACo Resilient County Conference call. Topics included Disasters now becoming the norm, creating disaster toolkits, flooding, wildfire, new technology to provide information and topics for our next NACo Legislative Conference meeting in March.

Friday November 17th
I reviewed dates of the NACo Legislative Conference and the schedules. I worked on more reviews of Judge applications for the 4th District.

Monday November 20th
Commissioner day. Please see the minutes once approved on the Valley County website.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Wednesday November 22nd
I attended the Woody Bio Mass Utilization Partnership (WBUP) in Emmett. Today we decided to place the WBUP in a recess mode as we have come to a point where we need to determine our path forward if there is one.

Friday November 24th
I reviewed a document from my deposition for accuracy.

Monday November 27th
Commissioner day. Please see the Valley County Website for the minutes once approved.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday November 28th
I participated in Interviewing for the Valley County Building Official position that will become vacant as our current Official is retiring the end of December.

Wednesday November 29th
This morning I participated in a NACo Western Interstate Region Leadership call to discuss the upcoming meetings at the NACo Legislative Conference and work on agenda items for the Annual Conference which will be in Sun Valley, Idaho this coming May 2018.

This afternoon I and a fellow commissioner from Adams County met with Bryan who is the Community and Military Affairs representative with Zions Bank. Bryan just wanted to visit with us on where Zions Bank can be of assistance in the areas he is involved with.

Thursday November 30th
Today I participated on the Magistrate Commission proceedings to interview for the Ada County Judge to fill a position that is becoming vacant in the 4th District. Our interviews are held in the Fourth District Administrators office in the Ada County Courthouse.

Well that does it for another month of my duties.

Christmas will have come and gone as will the New Year so Happy Holidays to all and safe travels over the holidays.

Thanks for reading the news.

Gordon
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Idaho News:

Valley County to hear code change Monday to allow ‘tiny houses’ to be built

By Phil Janquart for The Star-News November 30, 2017

Valley County Commissioners will hold a public hearing on Monday on an ordinance allowing so-called tiny houses as one solution to the need for affordable housing.

Tiny houses are defined as being 400 or less square feet in floor area, excluding lofts.

The public hearing is scheduled for 2:15 p.m. Monday at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade.

The proposed rules would loosen standards for exits, access, ceiling height and headroom that are now required for larger homes, she said.

A state law allowing tiny houses is expected to be approved by the 2018 Idaho Legislature, Valley County Building Official Anne Guarino said.

Local jurisdictions are being given the option to adopt the provision early to speed up implementation, Guarino said.

Affordable housing was a motivation in proposing the state law and county ordinance, she said

continued:
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Warning issued over jury duty telephone scam

Caller demands ‘fine’ for missing service date

By Max Silverson for The Star-News November 30, 2017

Dianna Annen of McCall recently got a call late in the evening where the caller told her that her husband had failed to show up for jury duty.

He would be arrested if she didn’t pay the sheriff’s office $1,500 in prepaid Albertsons debit cards, the caller said.

The call was a scam.

It’s not the first time somebody had unsuccessfully tried to scam Annen, 74, over the phone. She told the caller she was going to call the police before doing anything.

More than 200 people in Valley County have received similar calls over the past few weeks, Lt. Jason Speer of the Valley County Sheriff’s Office said.

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Vehicle hits power pole on Hwy 55

KTVB December 01, 2017


(Photo: Nick Gibler)

Boise County — Highway 55 was closed in both directions for an extended period of time after a vehicle hit a power pole Friday afternoon.

Boise County dispatch says the pole had fallen over both lanes of traffic at milepost 76, about 10 miles north of Horseshoe Bend.

Idaho Power is reporting 2,890 customers are without power in the Garden Valley & Lowman areas. Crews are on scene but no word on when power will be restored.

As of 6 p.m., both lanes had reopened.

No word on any injuries.

source:
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It’s all about your elevation: Idaho snow levels, explained (and a cheat sheet)

by Deni Hawkins Friday, December 1st 2017


Deni Hawkins

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — You’ve probably heard Roland Steadham, Nate Larsen or me mention snow levels when talking we’re talking about upcoming storm systems in reference to which areas will see snow, and which areas will see rain.

But what does that number (usually spoken about in terms of thousands of feet of elevation) really mean to you? I’ve found this is one of the tougher concepts to explain on air, because it can be confusing if you’re not familiar with elevations of specific mountainous areas, or even the town you live in.

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New land-use rules clear path for Bruce Willis’ airport

12/1/17 AP

Ketchum, Idaho — Central Idaho officials have changed land-use rules, clearing the way for actor Bruce Willis to finishing building a private airport.

Camas County commissioners unanimously approved an amendment to the county zoning ordinance making private airports of unrestricted size and operation on AG-80-zoned agricultural land legal, the Idaho Mountain Express reported .

Under the amendment, private airports registered with the Federal Aviation Administration are automatically allowed without any county permits.

It immediately took effect after it was passed Monday.

The move came after Willis’ attorney had threatened to take legal action.

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Mining News:

Forest Service plans public meetings on Idaho open-pit mine

11/29/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — The U.S. Forest Service is holding public meetings on a proposed open-pit molybdenum mine a Canadian company wants to build in the Boise National Forest in central Idaho.

The agency on Tuesday announced meetings on Dec. 5 in Boise, Dec. 6 in Idaho City and Dec. 7 in Garden Valley.

The agency is accepting comments as it prepares a supplemental environmental assessment for the mine planned by Vancouver, British Columbia-based American CuMo Mining Corp.

A federal court ruling last year ordered the Forest Service to re-evaluate the potential harm an open-pit mine could cause to Sacajawea’s bitterroot.

About 80 percent of the known population of the plant is in the Boise National Forest where the mining company says the largest unmined deposit of molybdenum in the world is also located.

source:
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Forest Service begins public scoping for 2018 CuMo Exploration Project Supplemental EA

Boise, Idaho, — November, 28, 2017 — The Boise National Forest is hosting three public scoping meetings for the preparation of 2018 CuMo Exploration Project Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA). The meetings are an opportunity to visit with Forest resource specialists, learn more about the SEA and provide comments.

The open house style meetings are scheduled from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the following locations.

* Dec. 5, 2017 – Best Western Vista Inn at the Airport, 2645 Airport Way, Boise, Idaho
* Dec. 6, 2017 – Ray Robinson Community Hall, 206 W. Commercial St., Idaho City, Idaho
* Dec. 7, 2017 – Crouch Community Hall, 1022 Old Crouch Road, Garden Valley, Idaho

The SEA will focus on the re-evaluation of the Sacajawea bitterroot’s baseline, as well as other resources addressed in the 2015 SEA that were affected by the 2016 Pioneer Fire to determine whether decisions and conclusions reached in the 2015 SEA and Decision Notice/Finding Of No Significant Impact are different or remain the same.

This SEA will only focus on these resource issues because the Court determined that other issues addressed in the 2012 and 2015 lawsuits were properly addressed and there is no significant new information or changes circumstances related to these resources. For more information about this Project visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=52875 .

The 2011 DN/FONSI and supporting EA, the 2015 Supplemental DN/FONSI and Supplemental EA, and the complete Aug. 29, 2012, and July 10, 2016, US District Court for the District of Idaho Memorandum Decisions and Orders, for the CuMo Exploration Project are available under the “Supporting tab” on the 2018 CuMo Exploration webpage: https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=52875
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USDA Forest Service 2018 CuMo Exploration Project Scoping Letter is now Available

On February 11, 2011 Forest Supervisor Seesholtz signed a Decision Notice and Finding of No Significant Impact (DN/FONSI) approving the plan of operations for the CuMo Exploratory Project. A lawsuit was filed on July 27, 2011 challenging this decision. On August 29, 2012 the US District Court for the District of Idaho issued its Memorandum Decision and Order. The Court ordered “that the Defendant Forest Service’s decisions regarding groundwater made in the Environmental Assessment [be] vacated and the matter … remanded to the Forest Service for further proceedings consistent with this opinion …” See Idaho Conservation League, et al., v. United States Forest Service, Case No. 1:11-cv-00341-EJL, 2012 WL 3758161 (D. Idaho, Aug. 29, 2012).

To address the analysis deficiencies identified by the Court, the Forest Service moved forward with the preparation of a supplemental EA to undertake further analysis concerning potential effects of the exploratory project to groundwater and groundwater hydrology.

In addition to updating the groundwater analysis, the Forest Service also updated other aspects of the analysis to address new information or changed circumstances that included analysis of potential effects to Sacajawea’s bitterroot. The status for this plant species changed from a Forest Watch species in 2011 to a R4 sensitive species at the time of release of the SEA for notice and comment in August 2013 and the status was subsequently updated following release of the SEA in 2013 to reflect the 2014 change in the NatureServe ranking of this plant from GNR/S2 (i.e. no global ranking) to G2/S1 (i.e. global ranking as imperiled). In addition, the Grimes Fire and fire control lines in the project area in 2014 had potentially affected the plant. In light of the new ranking of this species, additional information resulting from baseline studies completed in 2011 following issuance of the February 2011 decision, and the potential effects from the fire, as well as the importance of minimizing impacts to pollinator habitat, project mitigation, monitoring and effects disclosures were updated in the SEA.

The supplemental DN/FONSI (SDN/FONSI) addressing the 2011 Court order and other changes summarized above was signed on September 30, 2015. Plaintiffs from the 2011 lawsuit again filed a lawsuit, this time challenging the 2015 supplemental decision in January 2016. The lawsuit challenged the analysis of potential effects of exploration activities to groundwater and Sacajawea’s Bitterroot. The Court issued the memorandum decision and order in this lawsuit on July 11, 2016. The Court’s decision on these two points were as follows:

* Groundwater: The Court upheld the Forest Service’s SDN/FONSI as to the challenges relating to groundwater, and thus denied Plaintiff’s Motion for Summary Judgment and granted Defendants’ Motions for Summary Judgement as to the NEPA claims relating to groundwater.
* Sacajawea’s Bitterroot: The Court found that the Forest Service’s analysis and conclusions concerning Sacajawea’s bitterroot to be arbitrary and capricious because it failed to re-examine the baseline LESA population in the Project area following the 2014 Grimes Fire, stating “Instead of compiling and analyzing the updated data it acknowledges is needed to accurately evaluate the Project’s impact on LESA, the Forest Service proposes undertaking the data collection and evaluation as part of the Project itself. This approach improperly postpones the analysis required by NEPA until the Project has already been approved and started.”

… “The Court has afforded the Forest Service substantial deference in reaching this decision. See River Runners, 593 F.3d at 1070. The ruling stated herein does not second guess the Forest Service’s conclusions but, instead, finds error in the Forest Service’s analysis which failed to take a “hard look” at the Project’s impacts on the environment with regard to a known rare and at risk plant. For the reasons stated herein, the Court will vacate the Forest Service’s findings of no significant impact as to LESA. The Forest Service is directed to undertake the proposed re-evaluation of LESA’s baseline forthwith and analyze the results for purposes of determining whether its decisions and conclusions with regard to LESA as stated in the SEA and SDN/FONSI are different or remain the same. The Forest Service may then file an amendment or addendum to the SEA and SDN/FONSI discussing their analysis, reasoning, and decision on that issue.”

Baseline LESA surveys were completed in 2016. However, following completion of the 2016 baseline surveys, the 2016 Pioneer Fire burned additional areas within the PCA. On July 18, 2016, the Pioneer Fire began when hot temperatures, strong winds, and dry conditions, exacerbated by a lack of late-summer monsoonal moisture, fueled the fire’s growth to more than 64,000 acres by August 9, 2016, and 190,000 acres by September 15, 2016. The fire affected 27 drainages within the Idaho City, Lowman, and Emmett Ranger Districts on the Boise National Forest (Forest). The Pioneer Fire burned with varying intensity and left a mosaic of burn patterns on the landscape, ranging from unburned islands to areas where tree crowns were completely consumed.

The 2016 Pioneer Fire burned approximately 1,578 acres (55 percent) of the Project area, primarily in the eastern half of the Project area (Please refer to the CuMo Project: Plant Conservation Area and Fire History Map on the project webpage.). The fire burn severity was variable throughout the Project area, and included areas that were not burned at all or were burned with low, moderate, or high severity. The highest acreage of burn in the Project area was low to moderate severity (49 percent of the Project area); mapping shows that only 2 percent of the Project area was burned with high severity during the Pioneer Fire however field observation and verification indicates that there is less than 2 percent high severity burn in the project area.

As occurred in response to the 2014 Grimes wildfire (Please refer to the CuMo Project: Plant Conservation Area and Fire History Map on the project webpage.), each resource area addressed in the 2015 CuMo Exploratory Project SEA was affected differently. Similar to the updates made in response to the 2014 Grimes fire, updates will be made to address the change in baseline conditions caused by the 2016 Pioneer fire and, as appropriate, updates to the direct, indirect and/or cumulative effects will be made.

The Forest is moving forward with the preparation of a second supplemental EA to address the 2016 Court order requiring the re-evaluation of the LESA’s baseline to determine whether decisions and conclusions with regard to LESA documented in the 2015 SEA and DN/FONSI are different or remain the same in light of the effects resulting from the 2014 Grimes Fire, as well as the 2016 Pioneer Fire (Please refer to the CuMo Project: Plant Conservation Area and Fire History Map on the project webpage.). In addition, the supplement will address changed conditions resulting from the 2016 Pioneer Fire for all resources identified as affected in the 2017 Supplemental Information Report (SIR) completed for this project (https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=52875). Based on preliminary conclusions in the 2017 SIR, Alternative B is not expected to change. A full description of Alternative B, including mitigations (Attachment A), monitoring (Attachment A), checklist process (Attachment A), and additional project description details (Attachment B) are available in the 2015 supplemental DN/FONSI available on the Project website.

It is important to note that the supplemental EA will focus on the re-evaluation of the LESA’s baseline, as well as other resources addressed in the 2015 SEA that were affected by the 2016 Pioneer Fire (refer to 2017 SIR), to determine whether decisions and conclusions reached in the 2015 SEA and DN/FONSI are different or remain the same.

This supplement will focus on these only these resource issues because the Court determined that other issues addressed in the 2012 and 2015 lawsuits were properly addressed, the evidence and analysis in the SEA and supporting project record supported the determination that no significant impacts would occur to other resources from proposed management activities, and there is no significant new information or changes circumstances related to these resources. Specifically, the 2012 and 2016 Court Orders concluded that:

* The EA has given appropriate consideration to the great gray owl and taken the requisite “hard look” at the impacts the CuMo Project may have on the species in making its determination that no significant impact would be had to the species and, therefore, no EIS is needed. Accordingly, the Court finds the Forest Service has satisfied it obligations under NEPA in this respect. (2012 Memorandum Decision and Order, pg 23.)
* The Forest Service’s conclusion finding no significant impact on the species [Northern Goshawk] is not arbitrary and capricious as it is based on the hard look given to appropriate study and data concerning the northern goshawk. (2012 Memorandum Decision and Order, pg 25.)
* The EA … concludes the Project alternative “may impact individual wolverines but are not likely to contribute to a trend towards federal listing or cause a loss of viability to the population or species …” … The Court finds this conclusion is well reasoned and explained and not arbitrary and capricious. (2012 Memorandum Decision and Order, pg 27.)
* The Court concludes that the CuMo Project is consistent with the Forest Plan and, in particular, with [Forest Plan standards] MIST08 and MIST09. The Forest Service properly evaluated the Forest Plan as required by NFMA and set forth a plan for approving any encroachments into a RCA [riparian conservation area] that is unavoidable and the monitoring and mitigation efforts to be used in such a case. (2012 Memorandum Decision and Order, pg 44.)
* The Court finds the Forest Service’s conclusions regarding groundwater are not arbitrary or capricious as they are supported by material throughout the SEA and in the administrative record. The record evidences that the Forest Service took a hard look at the Project’s impacts on groundwater in reaching its finding of no significant impact. (2016 Memorandum Decision and Order, pg 33.)
* Plaintiffs fault the Forest Service for not identifying, inventorying, and mapping the surface water features that have been found to be connected to the groundwater in the Project area. (Dkt. 30 at 22.) … Having considered the entire record, the Court finds the Forest Service appropriately considered this issue in reaching its conclusion that mapping would not be useful in the case given the particular makeup of the Project Area. (2016 Memorandum Decision and Order, pgs 33-34.)
* The Court also finds the Forest Service properly addressed DEQ’s concerns about unlined waste pits. (2016 Memorandum Decision and Order, pg 35.)
* Based on the foregoing, the Court finds the Forest Service’s analysis and conclusions concerning groundwater satisfy NEPA. The Forest Service complied with the Court’s prior Order and addressed the concerns stated therein with regard to groundwater. Therefore, the Court upholds the Forest Service’s SDN/FONSI as the NEPA challenges relating to groundwater. (2016 Memorandum Decision and Order, pgs 36-37.)

We are requesting your comments on the proposed updates to the analysis proposed to address the specific concerns identified in the July 10, 2017 Court Order described above, and subsequent changed conditions resulting from the 2016 Pioneer Fire described in the 2017 SIR. To be most useful in the analysis, please submit your comments by January 8, 2018. Written, facsimile, hand-delivered, verbal, and electronic comments concerning this project will be accepted.

Please send written comments to Melissa Yenko, Forest Environmental Coordinator, Boise National Forest; 1249 South Vinnell Way, Suite 200; Boise, Idaho 83709; or by fax at 208-373-4111; or you may hand-deliver your comments to the Boise Forest Supervisor’s Office, located at 1249 South Vinnell Way, Suite 200, Boise, during normal business hours from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding Federal holidays.

Comments may also be submitted through the 2018 CuMo Exploration Project webpage at https://cara.ecosystem-management.org/Public//CommentInput?Project=52875.

Email comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), Adobe (.pdf) and Word (.doc) to comments-intermtn-boise@fs.fed.us. Please put “2018 CuMo Exploration Project” in the subject line of e-mail comments. Comments must have an identifiable name attached or verification of identity will be required. A scanned signature may serve as verification on electronic comments.

Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection in the “Public Comment Reading Room” (https://cara.ecosystem-management.org/Public//ReadingRoom?Project=52875). Comments received in response to this solicitation, including names and addresses of those who comment, will be part of the public record for this project and will be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act. Only those who submit comments or notify the Forest that they would like to remain on the mailing list for this project through one of the comment options provided above or subscribe to receive email updates for this project will receive future correspondences on this project. Comments submitted anonymously will be accepted and considered; however, without an associated name and address receiving further correspondences concerning this project will not be possible.

To stay connected to this Project electronically, the Forest Service has transitioned to a web-based electronic public notification system that allows all interested parties to receive project material (scoping documents, updates, draft and final NEPA documents, and decisions) by e-mail. This system gives you direct control over which mailing lists you are subscribed to and immediate electronic access to project documents as they are posted online. It’s easy, it’s good for the environment, and it gives “on-demand” access to projects.

To subscribe to this new system, go online to the 2018 CuMo Exploration Project webpage: https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=52875. On the project webpage, you will see a box titled “Get Connected” on the right hand side of the page, click on “Subscribe to Email Updates”. When you click on that item, you will be prompted to provide your e-mail address and select a password. When you have logged in, you will be able to manage your account by subscribing to projects by Forest, District, project type, or project purpose. You will also be able to change your e-mail address and password. If you no longer wish to follow the project(s), simply delete your subscription. Once you are subscribed, you will receive all project information via e-mail, unless you specifically request hard copies.

Three open-house style public meetings will held to discuss the 2018 CuMo Exploration Project Supplemental EA scoping effort. The meetings will allow the Forest Service to summarize the approach to the Supplemental EA, as well as provide an opportunity for the public to ask questions, offer opinions, and provide written comment, if desired. The public meetings will occur from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at the following locations:

* December 5, 2017 – Best Western Vista Inn at the Airport, 2645 Airport Way, Boise, Idaho
* December 6, 2017 – Ray Robinson Community Hall, 206 W. Commercial St., Idaho City, Idaho
* December 7, 2017 – Crouch Community Hall, 1022 Old Crouch Road, Garden Valley, Idaho

The 2011 DN/FONSI and supporting EA, the 2015 supplemental DN/FONSI and Supplemental EA, and the complete August 29, 2012 and July 10, 2016 US District Court for the District Of Idaho Memorandum Decisions and Orders, for the CuMo Exploration Project are available under the “Supporting Tab” on the 2018 CuMo Exploration Project webpage: https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=52875.

Thank you for your continued interest in this project. For additional information or hard copies of any of the documents on the website referenced above, please feel free to contact me.

Sincerely,
Melissa Yenko
Forest Environmental Coordinator
Boise National Forest
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Canadian company announces plan to open mine, refinery in east Idaho

East Idaho News October 16th, 2017

Blackfoot, [ID] — Vancouver, British Columbia based eCobalt has announced plans to develop a cobalt mining operation in Salmon and hydrometallurgical refinery on a railhead in neighboring Blackfoot. The Salmon mine is the only environmentally permitted primary cobalt project in the United States.

With pre-construction activities already underway, the vertically integrated Idaho Cobalt Project is designed to produce cobalt for the rechargeable batteries market. The total capital and reclamation cost is estimated at $288.1 million.

“We are thrilled to announce eCobalt’s massive investment in our community that could create 60-90 full-time, well-paying jobs,” said Blackfoot Mayor Paul Loomis. “The Idaho Cobalt Project is projected to support mining and refining capabilities through 2029. We’re excited to welcome eCobalt to Blackfoot and support their Idaho Community Block Grant application requesting funds to build a new railroad spur here, vital to improving their mine to refinery transport capabilities,” he said.

Refinery jobs will pay in the $60,000-$70,000 range. Approximately 125 jobs will be created at the Salmon mine.

continued:
[h/t Midas]
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Idaho asks federal agency to regulate oil injection wells

By Keith Ridler – 11/28/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idaho wants the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to take over regulating underground injection wells needed by the state’s oil and natural gas industry to economically dispose of wastewater.

The federal agency in a notice Monday said it will take public comments through Jan. 11 on the plan to transfer a portion of the state’s Underground Injection Control program.

The Idaho Department of Water Resources in August requested the change after failed attempts by the state to get approval from the EPA to regulate what are called class II injection wells.

“The lack of class II injection well permits is the single biggest hindrance to developing this industry in Idaho,” said John Foster, spokesman for Texas-based oil company Alta Mesa.

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Public Lands:

Pioneer Fire closure area significantly reduced, in time for winter activities

Boise National Forest News Release 11/30/2017

Boise, Idaho, November 30, 2017 — Progress on the Pioneer Fire recovery effort has prompted Forest officials to reopen an area within the 2016 burn, in time for winter recreation. The old closure spanned about 49,000 acres. The Pioneer Winter Timber Salvage Operations closure includes roads and trails within the remaining 3,000 acres as salvage logging continues.

Rock Creek Road and other routes in the 594 road system west and southwest of Lowman, Idaho, remain closed to motorized vehicles. Routes that remain closed include: National Forest System (NFS) roads 594, 594E, 594D, 594D1, 594D2 and 594DA.

Both closures are in place for public safety from hazards associated with salvage logging. Visitors may encounter heavy equipment and logging trucks on NFS roads.

“We’re pleased to be able to reopen more of the Pioneer Fire area,” said Brant Petersen, Idaho City District Ranger. “We have made enough headway on hazardous recovery work to warrant reducing the closure order and reopening public access to popular recreation opportunities this winter.” To learn more about Pioneer Fire implementation efforts and winter recreation opportunities watch this video:

The Idaho State Highway 21 corridor is heavily used by all types of recreationists. Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation (IDPR), who operate a back country yurt program, will be able to open three of the six Idaho City Backcountry Yurts (Rocky Ridge, Stargaze and Skyline Yurts). For more information:
https://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/activities/yurts

Visitors will be able to park in four IDPR Park N’ Ski areas and have access about 16 miles of non-motorized trails. As more work is completed, additional winter routes will be groomed for snowmobile access. Overall, winter recreationists will experience more open areas and spectacular views. For additional park and ski information visit:
https://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/activities/nordic

Be aware that as in any post fire area the landscape is different. There is a higher degree of hazards that may last over many years. Dead trees will continue to fall and washouts and debris flows may occur after heavy rains.

Visitors should also be prepared for the backcountry and the winter weather conditions. Tell someone where you are going, carry extra food, water and warm clothing. Carry appropriate safety equipment for the outing such as, avalanche equipment, beacons, transceivers and a shovel. To view all forest closures visit:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices
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BLM protects road surface with annual winter closure of Eighth Street

Date: November 27, 2017
Contact: Michael Williamson, (208) 384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management would like to remind the public of the annual seasonal road closure of upper Eighth Street in the Boise Foothills to prevent road damage during wet conditions.

This seasonal closure pertains only to full-sized vehicles and is in effect from Dec. 1 to May 15, beginning 2.8 miles up the road from the Jim Hall Foothills Learning Center. The route remains open year-round for motorcycles, mountain bikes and all other non-motorized use.

“The purpose of this seasonal road closure has always been to prevent road damage from full-size vehicle use when the road bed is wet and easily rutted,” said David Draheim, BLM outdoor recreation planner. “This goes a long way towards minimizing erosion and road maintenance costs, and preventing other resource damage from occurring.”

Over the last several years there has been an increased cost associated with repairing vandalism to the gate and resource damage from those trying to drive around it.

The BLM appreciates the public’s cooperation in respecting the road closure and helping to protect resources. For more information, please contact the BLM Boise District Office at 208-384-3300.
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BLM set to hire 80 new firefighters

Kaitlin Loukides Nov 28, 2017 Local News 8

Idaho Falls – The Bureau of Land Management Idaho Falls District is now hiring wildland firefighters for the 2018 fire season.

“We are looking for hardworking, physically fit individuals to fight fires across eastern Idaho,” Kris Bruington, Idaho Falls District BLM Fire Operations Supervisor, “We will be filling approximately 80 seasonal positions in eastern Idaho.”

Pay starts at $12.33 with the opportunity for overtime and hazard pay. To qualify you must be 18 years of age, a U.S. citizen and have six months of general experience.

Positions range from engines and hotshots to dispatch. Learn more about wildland fire positions and the Idaho Falls District here.

You can apply through January 30, 2018 by clicking on this link and search for range technician positions. Idaho Falls District has stations in Idaho Falls, Pocatello, Atomic City, Blackfoot, Fort Hall, Malad, American Falls, Dubois, Salmon and Soda Springs.

source:
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USFS Regional Intermountain News

Issue 23 November 29, 2017

link:
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Critter News:

Danger Along the Trail

McCall man warns hikers after dog caught leg in trap

By Max Silverson for The Star-News November 30, 2017

Randy Hickman was taking his dogs for their daily walk earlier this month when he heard a desperate cacophony of barks and yelps. Cora, a small Shih Tzu/Heeler mix, had been caught in a leg-hold trap.

The trap was placed just a few feet from where Hickman had parked his car near the entrance to the Crestline trailhead off of Eastside Drive in McCall.

“I was shocked that someone would put their traps in such a high traffic area,” Hickman said. “People walk their dogs here all the time and it’s a popular spot to get Christmas trees.”

The traps were legally set since the Crestline Trailhead is located on state land, according to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

Hickman was lucky that Cora was mostly unharmed from the experience.

“Thankfully I know how to release these traps,” said Hickman, who works for a beer and wine distributing company and is a member of the rock ‘n’ roll band The Bottom Line.

“If I didn’t, and this happened as it was getting dark, she could have really hurt herself,” he said.

Hickman called the McCall Fish and Game office and was told the trap, along with several others he found nearby, were legally placed.

Trapping is generally allowed on all public lands, but there are exceptions for Valley County for fox, which may only be trapped on national forest and state lands, McCall F&G Conservation Officer Kevin Primrose said.

Traps must be set five feet from the center of a maintained trail and off of roadways, Primrose said.

continued:
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Mush!

2018 McCall Winter Carnival to feature Iditarod sled-dog qualifier

By Tom Grote for The Star-News November 30, 2017

A qualifier for the Iditarod sled-dog race in Alaska will be held as part of the 2018 McCall Winter Carnival.

The McCall Ultra Sled Dog Challenge will see up to 12 sled-dog teams and their mushers cover 200 miles of highlands along the west side of Long Valley between McCall and Smiths Ferry.

The race will begin on Monday, Jan. 29, and end on Wednesday, Jan. 31. The teams will earn points toward qualifying for the Iditarod race, a 1,000 mile race between Anchorage and Nome, Alaska, scheduled to start March 3.

The race is the brainchild of Jerry Wortley, a New Meadows resident and pilot who provides supporting flights for the Iditarod race each year.

“Early in Idaho’s history, travel by sled dog was the only way to get around during winter in the backcountry,” Wortley said.

continued:
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No. 2 is No. 1 Problem at McCall Golf Course

Workers collected 1,000 pounds of dog poop last year

By Phil Janquart for The Star-News November 30, 2017

There is a poop problem at the McCall Golf Course and it’s becoming increasingly hard to ignore.

On any given day, the seven miles of cart paths used as walking paths during the winter are dotted with biological land mines left by man’s best friend.

And, some of the winter park’s patrons are getting tired of seeing it, much less having to slalom around it.

“We picked up over a 1,000 pounds of it last year,” McCall Golf Course Superintendent Eric McCormick said.

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Mohkave the tame bobcat dies at age 16

Animal would stop traffic at home of owner

By Phil Janquart for The Star-News November 30, 2017

Mohkave, the tame bobcat who turned heads and stopped traffic on Warren Wagon Road in McCall for 16 years, died last week of kidney failure, his owner said.

Mohkavebobcat

The 55-pound bobcat gained near celebrity status, stopping drivers in their tracks as they passed his home and serving as an educational tool for teachers at local schools.

Children and adults in the thousands became acquainted with Mohkave over the years, said his owner, Rob Mayfield. A special part for regular visitors to McCall was a visit to Mohkave, Mayfield said.

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Pet Talk – Bad breath in cats and dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Dec 1, 2017 – IME

Bad breath is caused by gingivitis or inflammation of the gums that surround the teeth. Gingivitis is a component of periodontal disease, the most common oral disease in dogs and cats. Dogs and cats don’t brush their teeth, or floss, so tartar builds up on the teeth. This tartar is made up of millions of bacteria, which irritate the gums, causing that foul breath you notice when your dog or cat decides to lick you early in the morning or late at night. Because the gingiva lies in close proximity to the teeth and helps maintain the health of the tooth sockets, longstanding and severe gingivitis can increase the risk that teeth will be lost. When the gingiva is inflamed, it often recedes from the tooth, revealing the tooth roots.

The major cause of gingivitis in animals is the accumulation of plaque and tartar on the base of the teeth. Try not brushing your own teeth for a week or two and then you can feel this plaque and tartar forming on your teeth.

In many animals, there are no obvious signs of gingivitis, and the condition may be noticed only when your veterinarian is doing an oral exam on your pet. There may be pain on opening the mouth, loss of appetite or bleeding from the gums. The gums are usually bright red and swollen. A foul odor is always noticed from the mouth.

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Fitness trackers no longer exclusive to humans; new collars measure your pet’s activity

by Mallory Sofastaii Dec 1, 2017 KIVI TV

If you’re thinking of buying a fitness tracker for a friend or family member, you may also want to consider getting one for your dog. More companies are now beginning to unleash fitness trackers for pets.

“Pet trends follow human trends, said LinkAKC Chief Marketing Officer Herbie Calves.

We started taking notice of what we feed our pets, now it’s the amount of activity they’re getting.

LinkAKC, one of the newest pet fitness trackers on the market, tells consumers the right amount of activity for your pet then monitors movement throughout the day.

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FDA warns of commercial dog bone treats after 90 illnesses, 15 dog deaths

by Adrian Mojica, WZTV Monday, November 27th 2017

The Food and Drug Administration is warning dog owners to think twice about stuffing your pet’s stocking with dog bones over the holidays.

The FDA says it received about 68 reports of pet illnesses related to “bone treats” frequently purchased at stores. These include treats described as ham bones, pork femur bones, rib bones, and smokey knuckle bones. The FDA did not list any specific brands of dog treats in its warning.

In total, the FDA says there have been about 90 dogs involved in the reports, and 15 dogs reportedly died after eating a bone treat. Other complications include choking, digestive tract obstruction, cuts to the mouth, vomiting diarrhea, and bleeding from the rectum.

The FDA says owners should also avoid giving dogs chicken bones from the kitchen and be careful they can’t get to turkey or steak bones placed in the trash.

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Idaho State Police issue drug overdose kit for police dogs

11/28/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idaho State Police has issued an overdose reversal drug that troopers can administer to police dogs that are in danger of inhaling harmful substances during searches.

Sgt. Ken Yount tells KTVB-TV in a story on Monday that the agency has issued an injectable form of naloxone.

Yount says dogs are trained to sniff out and locate controlled substances.

He says that can include powerful forms of heroin and fentanyl that are up to 100 times stronger than morphine.

He says the rapid, intense sniffing dogs use to locate the drugs could cause them to get a fatal dose.

Each kit for police dogs cost $150. Yount says that so far they haven’t had to use one.

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Boise police K9 dies after cancer battle

KTVB November 27, 2017


(Photo: Boise police)

Boise – A Boise police K9 officer died unexpectedly last week after a battle with cancer, the department announced Monday.

Dasty died Friday, November 24, after being diagnosed earlier this year.

Dasty was handled by a Boise police officer at the Boise Airport and was an explosives detection K9 owned by the TSA. The dog was undergoing treatment and was due for early retirement with his handler in Boise.

“Dasty was a happy dog who loved his job. He would even sit by the car on his days off waiting to go to work,” said Dasty’s handler, Officer Whipps. “Dasty was well loved by his airport colleagues, his family and pretty much anyone who met him.”

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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Third week of November 2017
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US adopts recovery plan for Mexican wolves, lawsuit planned

By Susan Montoya Bryan – 11/29/17 AP

Albuquerque, N.M. — After decades of legal challenges and political battles that have pitted states against the federal government, U.S. wildlife managers on Wednesday finally adopted a plan to guide the recovery of a wolf that once roamed parts of the American Southwest and northern Mexico.

The plan sets a goal of having an average of 320 Mexican gray wolves in the wild over an eight-year period before the predator can shed its status as an endangered species. In each of the last three years, the population would have to exceed the average to ensure the species doesn’t backslide.

Officials estimate recovery could take another two decades and nearly $180 million, a cost borne largely by breeding facilities that support threatened and endangered species work.

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Environmentalists plan lawsuit over wolf plan

11/29/17 AP

Environmental groups say they intend to sue the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service over its plan for recovering the endangered Mexican gray wolf in the American Southwest and northern Mexico.

The agency released the plan Wednesday, just a day before a court-ordered deadline. That triggered instant criticism from the same groups that had initially sued in an effort to get the agency to update outdated guidance for restoring the species.

The groups followed up Wednesday afternoon with a notice of intent to sue, accusing federal officials of violating the Endangered Species Act.

The groups contend the plan contains shortcomings that will hinder recovery of the predator and could threaten to lead to the extinction of the wolves.

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Wolf Education International

Newsletter last week November 2017

Wolves’ return to Oregon brings conflict and opportunity

A different look at ranchers’ attitude toward wolves

Anderson: Wolves known to stalk hunter’s kill scene for an easy meal

Final Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan, First Revision
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Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary completes second bear enclosure

The Star-News November 30, 2017

Snowdon Animal Sanctuary near McCall has completed its second bear enclosure just in time to welcome its first resident, a small orphaned bear cub.

A $2,500 grant from the Idaho Fish and Wildlife Foundation as well as donations from GoFundMe funded the one-acre bear enclosure, which will supplement a two-acre bear enclosure already in place.

With both enclosures, the sanctuary will be able to separate bears of different sizes as well as help wildlife agencies from neighboring states when not in use by Idaho bears.

Volunteers Tom O’Reilly, John Schott and Scott Pressman as well as Snowdon Board member Jeff Rohlman worked to install the metal paneling.

The paneling helps to make the enclosure escape-resistant for orphaned bear cubs.

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Grizzly numbers hold steady around Yellowstone

By Matthew Brown – 11/30/17 AP

Billings, Mont. — Grizzly bear numbers in and around Yellowstone National Park are holding relatively steady, according to figures released Thursday, as state wildlife officials begin discussions on whether to hold the first public hunts for the animals in decades.

There are an estimated 718 bears in the Yellowstone region that includes portions of Wyoming, Montana and Idaho, according to the leader of the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team.

That’s up slightly from last year’s tally of 695 bruins, but is not considered a significant increase because of uncertainties around the estimates, said study team leader Frank van Manen with the U.S. Geological Survey.

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Jerome man gets jail, probation for poaching four elk

Laine Harbaugh killed and left four elk in the Pioneers

by Joshua Murdock Dec 1, 2017 IME

A Jerome man charged with one felony and one misdemeanor for killing and wasting four elk without having a tag in November will serve 14 days in county jail and two years of probation after pleading guilty to charges that were amended down to misdemeanors.

Laine Harbaugh originally faced one count of flagrant, unlawful killing or wasting a combination of animals or species within 12 months, a felony, and one count of wasting of wildlife, a misdemeanor, for killing and leaving to rot four elk in hunting Unit 49 of the Pioneer [Mountains] Zone on Nov. 26. Blaine County Prosecutor Jim Thomas said the killing and wasting occurred around Hyndman Peak and the headwaters of the Little Wood River. He said Harbaugh did not possess a big game elk tag at the time he killed the animals.

Thomas said the “flagrant” felony charge was a result of Harbaugh killing the four elk—two elk is the threshold for the charge—and the misdemeanor wasting charge was a result of Harbaugh’s leaving the animals to rot after killing them.

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Ruling preventing Idaho horse herd sterilization is appealed

By Keith Ridler – 11/29/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — The U.S. Bureau of Land Management is appealing a federal court ruling preventing the sterilizing of a herd of wild horses in southwestern Idaho that opponents of the plan fear could set a precedent.

The notice filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Idaho challenges a ruling in September ordering the BLM to revise its 2015 plan.

The plan calls for sterilizing the herd and replenishing it with wild horses captured elsewhere to maintain a herd of 50 to 200 horses.

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Officials plan to cull at least 600 Yellowstone bison

by Associated Press Wednesday, November 29th 2017

Pray, Mont. (AP) — Bison managers expect between 600 and 900 of the animals at Yellowstone National Park to be culled this winter by hunting or slaughter.

Federal, state and tribal officials met in Montana on Tuesday to work out the details for a winter management plan for the bison herds, agreeing the population should be decreased or stabilized, the Bozeman Daily Chronicle reported .

There are nearly 5,000 bison in the two park herds, park officials estimated. The removal of 600 bison would keep the population relatively stable, according to park biologists.

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Goat on the loose for over a month finally caught

Local News 8 – Nov 30, 2017

Blackfoot, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Blackfoot Police Department has finally caught a goat that has been on the loose since Oct. 27.

According to officials, the department received several calls about the loose goat in the area of Old West Bridge and Frontage Road.

Over one month later, the goat has been apprehended, and officials report the goat has been placed in a permanent home.

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Ada Co. commissioner charged with game tag violation

Morgan Boydston, KTVB November 28, 2017

Boise County — Ada County Commissioner Rick Visser is charged with misdemeanor failing to validate a game tag.

According to court records, Visser was charged in late April in Ada County and the case was then moved to Boise County. The commissioner tells KTVB he was hunting in Horseshoe Bend, which is in Boise County, at the time of the citation. He says the citation was for allegedly not validating his turkey tag immediately upon kill.

Under Idaho Statute 36-409 (Fish and Game – Licenses to hunt, fish and trap), as soon as a person kills any wildlife for which a tag is required, a tag belonging to that person must be validated and attached to said wildlife in a manner provided by commission rule.

Court records show Visser’s trial is set for Jan. 9 in Boise County. He’s due back in court next month for a motion hearing.

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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
December 1, 2017
Issue No. 853
Table of Contents

* Judge Floats Idea Of Suspending Work On 2018 BiOp For Salmon/Steelhead Due To Lack Of Completed EIS
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439901.aspx

* Judge Denies Irrigators’ Motion For Hearing On 2015 Spill/Transportation, Spread The Risk
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439900.aspx

* NOAA Invites Comments On Lethal Removal Of Sea Lions At Willamette Falls; Threat To Listed Winter Steelhead
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439899.aspx

* New Approach In Idaho Underway To Better Direct Salmon Habitat Restoration, Measure Results
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439898.aspx

* Columbia River Harvest: US V. Oregon EIS Completed, Preferred Alternative Extends Current Agreement
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439897.aspx

* Recovery Of West Coast Marine Mammals Dramatically Increasing Consumption Of Chinook Salmon
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439896.aspx

* Study Brings Attention To How Timing Of Fishing Seasons Impacts Spawning, Life History Patterns
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439895.aspx

* South Santiam’s Foster Dam Gets Improvements To Aid Juvenile Salmon Passage
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439894.aspx

* Idaho’s Dworshak Reservoir Held At Lower Elevation As Hedge Against High Winter Inflows
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439893.aspx

* Washington Energy Site Council Denies Permit For Huge Oil Terminal On Columbia River
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439892.aspx

* Wild Fish Conservancy Sues Cooke Aquaculture Over Atlantic Salmon Fish Farm Escape
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439891.aspx

* Senate Passes Bill To Improve Conditions At Columbia River Tribal Fishing Sites
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439890.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

Fish and Game issues advisory on McCall ‘town deer’

The Star-News November 30, 2017

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is warning residents to not feed the “town deer” in McCall and to watch out for them on the roads.

Fish and Game responds to dozens of reports of dead or injured deer each year in McCall and Cascade, with more than 30 in McCall alone last year, McCall Regional Wildlife Manager Regan Berkley said.

“These deer died of two primary causes: vehicle-related injuries or starvation because their digestive systems were unable to process the feed they were given,” Berkley said.

Deer do not naturally spend winters in McCall because they do not have access to natural forage,”she said.

“The only reason the town deer stay is because people feed them, year after year,” Berkley said “Feeding in town may actually harm more deer than it saves.”

Deer on the roads are another winter problem. “During winter, we get so much snow that the only places deer can really move around are on roads,” Berkley said. “If you observe a deer crossing the road, expect that more deer are coming right behind it.”

Fish and Game’s options for responding to injured deer are limited because adult deer are not candidates for successful rehabilitation, she said.

Badly injured deer will be euthanized, while those that appear to be able to survive their injuries will be released.

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Fish and Game to begin helicopter game surveys

The Star-News November 30, 2017

Hunters with late-season deer and elk tags might have some company during December as Idaho Department of Fish and Game survey helicopters will be taking to the air.

“Deer and elk surveys occur during winter, when animals are concentrated and are easier to see and count in open country,” said Regan Berkley, McCall regional wildlife manager for Fish and Game.

Information gathered during these surveys helps to determine male to female ratios as well as hunting season mortality and current calf and fawn survival, Berkley said.

“Biologists will be on the lookout for hunters, and will try to avoid disturbing active hunts,” she said.

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Fish and Game: Poachers are ‘stealing the natural resources of Idaho’

by Sophia Doumani Friday, December 1st 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — It’s a small percentage of poachers that can make a big difference for law-abiding hunters this season.

Chief of enforcement for Idaho Fish and Game, Matt O’Connell, says there is a 10 percent violation rate. Of those, about 5 percent are considered to be serious violations.

“The small minority of violators out there who are doing the more serious violations can directly input big game populations, fish populations, and cause the limits to be affected for other sportsmen who are trying to be honest and do the right thing,” O’Connell said.

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Attract wintering birds, support outdoor education

By Mike Demick, Conservation Information Supervisor
Monday, November 27, 2017

Stock up on winter bird seed and find that special holiday gift for the outdoor person on your list at the Fish and Game Morrison Knudsen (MK) Nature Center’s Holiday Bird Seed Sale December 1 and 2.

Backyard bird lovers can purchase locally-preferred bird seed, as well as feeding supplies, books, apparel, jewelry, children’s gifts and nature-themed holiday gifts. Nature center staff will be available to help with seed selection and for education.

The sale will be held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. Family-friendly activities are planned for Saturday, December 2 including kid’s take home crafts from 11 to 2 p.m. and live bird presentations at 11:30 a.m., 12:30 and 1:30 p.m.

The nature center is located behind Fish and Game headquarters at 600 S. Walnut in Boise.

Proceeds will help fund the nature center’s educational programs. The sale is presented by MK Nature Center and Wild Birds Unlimited.

For questions, contact Sue Dudley at 208-287-2900

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Boise River survey finds a surprising species: a non-native freshwater shrimp

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Shrimp was likely dumped from an aquarium or escaped a pond

Finding strange, non-native creatures living in the Boise River has nearly become a tradition, or at least, a recurring incident, and Idaho Fish and Game would like to see it end.

In a recent case, Fish and Game crews surveying the Boise River near Warm Springs Golf Course discovered a freshwater shrimp commonly known as “grass” or “ghost” shrimp that are native to the lower Mississippi River. They are typically sold in pet shops for aquariums, and they likely came from someone dumping an aquarium, or somehow escaped a private pond.

“That’s my best guess,” said Regional Fish Biologist John Cassinelli. “Those are the most likely explanations for how they got there.”

The first shrimp was found in a slow, placid stretch of the river while crews were introducing a mild electrical current, which stuns fish and other aquatic creatures so biologists can gauge populations.

The strange find piqued the biologists’ curiosity whether there might be more shrimp. They returned later and found several others – including an egg-carrying female – lurking beneath a cutback in the same, slow section of the river.

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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Big cheetah-like feline captured in Pennsylvania

by The Associated Press Saturday, November 11th 2017


This Nov. 7, 2017 photo shows an African Serval cat rescued from the streets of Reading, Pa., by the Animal Rescue League of Berks County. Police captured the big African cat, resembling a cheetah, running loose through the streets. The cat was transported to a big cat rescue facility that can give it the special diet and extensive exercise it needs. ( Tim Leedy/Reading Eagle via AP)

Reading, Pa. (AP) — Police captured a big African cat, resembling a cheetah, running loose through the streets of a Pennsylvania city.

Reports about the spotted feline started coming in on Nov. 3 in Reading, about 60 miles (97 kilometers) northwest of Philadelphia. When officers tracked it down, they initially thought they’d found a cheetah.

The Animal Rescue League of Berks County says they got a call from the city’s police department about the big cat on Saturday.

When staff responded, they found a cat called an African serval. The cats are illegal to own in Pennsylvania without a license, and the state’s game commission says no one in Berks County has such a license.

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Lost Kitty

Lost cat, no collar and not very friendly – please share and let’s find this poor baby’s owner.

(via Cascade Vet Clinic FB page)

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LionThinHerd-a
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Tips & Advice:

Fire dept: Do not plug space heaters into power strips

by KATU Staff Wednesday, November 29th 2017


Photo: Umatilla County Fire District #1

As the weather gets colder and space heaters come out of the basement, a local fire department is asking you to remember a key tip.

The Umatilla County Fire District #1 wants to remind space heater users that you should never plug a heater into a power strip.

“These units are not designed to handle the high current flow needed for a space heater and can overheat or even catch fire due to the added energy flow,” the department says in a Facebook post.

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25,000 bugs could be living in your fresh Christmas tree

Jermaine Ong Nov 27, 2017 KGTV

It’s bad enough there could be a Christmas tree shortage this holiday season, but if you do get that fresh tree, you may be bringing home thousands of unexpected guests.

Pest control company Safer Brand says as many as 25,000 bugs could live in one Christmas tree.

According to the company, most of the bugs aren’t dangerous and will eventually die. The common bugs that survive are aphids, spiders and bark beetles.

Safer Brand suggests customers inspect trees for potential bug nests before buying.

The company also says if you do buy a tree, leave it in a garage for a few days and shake it out before bringing it inside your home.

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How to prevent being a victim of package theft this Christmas

by Abigail Taylor Tuesday, November 28th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — It is like hitting the jackpot for an opportunistic thief: the thousands of packages left on doorsteps during the holiday season.

While online shopping has made buying Christmas presents a breeze for many, it’s also made it really easy for criminals to cash in on what’s inside.

… Here are some practical things you can do so you’re not a victim:

1. Track your package. That way you know when to expect its arrival.

2. Be careful leaving notes. Include delivery instructions online rather than a note on the door because that just shows you’re not home.

3. Pick up your package instead. You can grab it from the post office or shipping center.

4. Ship it somewhere else. Have it sent to your work or a friend’s house who will be home.

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Nov 26, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Nov 26, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: Thank you for your 2018 Yellow Pine Calendar orders. Folks will be notified when they are mailed.

Village News:

Thanksgiving in Yellow Pine

The annual Thanksgiving Day pot-luck was held at The Corner this year.
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Yellow Pine Tavern

Watch all of your favorite sports on our Big Screen TV at the Yellow Pine Tavern.

Featuring Football

Open 9am to 8pm (or later on game nights)

Christmas potluck will be at the Tavern. Look for further updates on the time and what the Tavern will be providing.

– L
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The Corner

The Corner is closed for the season. Stop by if you need wood permits. We will reopen after we have the baby.

– H
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Hunter’s Missing Rope

Looking for a 5/8th inch climbing rope that is white with a green stripe that was stretched across the river from the Yellow Pine Campground by the concrete bridge to the other side. of the river. It was removed while we were hunting on the far side. If you or someone know of it’s whereabouts, please leave it at the Yellow Pine Tavern for us. Thank You.
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Diamond (Kennedy) Fuel & Feed

208-382-4430

Did you know you can order pet food from Diamond Fuel & Feed and have it delivered to Yellow Pine via Arnolds? Give them a call.
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Bear Aware

It is probably safe to put bird feeders back out. Bears in our area usually hibernate by Halloween per our local F&G office.
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YPFD News:

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.

Training will resume in the spring.
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VYPA News:

Next meeting June 2018
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Fall Rx Burns planned

BNF:
Cascade Ranger District: Slash piles will be ignited in the following locations: Warm Lake, Yellow pine, Landmark and Crawford. It will be pile burning for two days.

PNF:
The Krassel Ranger District plans to ignite 1,600 acres in the Fourmile drainage, and 2,000 acres in the Bald Hill project area.
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Local Observations:

Monday (Nov 20) rain by daylight, overcast and above freezing. Still have about 1.5″ of old snow on the ground this morning and bare patches under trees are growing. Fresh fox tracks in the neighborhood. Rain/snow mix then all snow then back to rain mid-day, clouds so low it looks foggy. No birds or wild critters around, very quiet day, high of 37 degrees. Drizzled all afternoon and evening, still sprinkling at dark. Foggy like the clouds were right down on us after 1030pm.

Tuesday (Nov 21) overnight low of 30 degrees, overcast and light fog along the river this morning. Rather low airplane went over at 1030am. Fog thickening and light rain after lunch. Misty droplets and thicker fog later in the afternoon, high of 40 degrees. Misting and foggy at dark. Probably rained all night.

Wednesday (Nov 22) it warmed up during the night to 40 degrees, fog and light misty rain this morning. The snow is going away again except in the shady spots where it’s icy. Spied a stellar jay flying over the neighborhood. Fog and misty drizzle until lunch time. Mail truck was a little late, moving rocks on the South Fork road. Break in the rain early afternoon, cracks in the clouds, high of 48 degrees. Cloudy and foggy this evening. Heard a pileated call just before dark. Around midnight the fog was “sweating” droplets of moisture (not exactly rain) and there was a clear spot overhead with Orion’s Belt twinkling.

Thursday (Nov 23) early morning passing shower, stayed above freezing overnight, low of 34 degrees. Mostly cloudy this morning, rising sun peeking thru breaks in the clouds, light fog along the river and belts of fog drifting across the flanks of the mountains. Mostly cloudy, breezy and warm for this time of year, “snow eater” winds gusty at times, high of 55 degrees. Started sprinkling late in the afternoon, hard rain after dark. Rained all night.

Friday (Nov 24) stayed above freezing, overnight low of 36 degrees. Most of our old snow is gone except in the shade. Wet month, so far over 5″ of water. Nice weather today, partly sunny and mild with very light breezes, high of 48 degrees. Clearing and temps dropping with the sun.

Saturday (Nov 25) overnight low of 22 degrees, frosty and mostly cloudy this morning. Heard a hairy woodpecker cheeping. Some traffic today including an airplane around 1030am. Overcast, damp and a chilly breeze this afternoon, high of 40 degrees. Quiet, cool, cloudy evening. Warm breezy night.

Sunday (Nov 26) warmed up during the night, cloudy and stayed above freezing. A few sprinkles on and off before and after lunch time and blustery. Steady rain this afternoon and a bit breezy, high of 56 degrees. Still raining after dark and above freezing.
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Weather Notes:

Boise set a record high temperature for Thanksgiving this year. Here is the Yellow Pine water data to see how we compared to past Thanksgivings.

YP Thanksgiving Day High/Low Temps

11-25 2010 25F / 6F
11-24 2011 41F / 29F
11-22 2012 38F / 19F
11-28 2013 41F / 17F
11-27 2014 41F / 34F
11-26 2015 33F / -2F
11-24 2016 38F / 26F
11-23 2017 55F / 36F
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Idaho News:

Cascade’s beloved ‘pie lady’ passes away

Dean Johnson, KTVB November 21, 2017


Dorothy Jean Grimaud was nicknamed the pie lady of Cascade. She was well-known for her pies. (Photo: KTVB)

Valley County has lost a legend. She was known around the state as the “pie lady,” but around Cascade, Mrs. G was known for decades as a neighbor who cared about her community and those who live there. Mrs. G passed away Monday morning from natural causes.

Whether it was reading at the local school or just being the stand-in grandma, Mrs. G did everything to support Valley County.

“She’s touched a lot of people’s hearts,” Yvette Davis, one of Mrs. G’s closest friends said.

The “pie lady” even had her own parking spot at the local American Legion Post; every week she would make a pie that would be auctioned off on Friday at the post with the proceeds going to the Coats for Kids campaign.

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Valley County sends lake rules back to drawing board

Changes on speed, age limits draws protests

By Max Silverson for The Star-News November 22, 2017

A once-approved ordinance revamping boating laws on Valley County lakes was sent back to the drawing board on Monday by Valley County commissioners.

Commissioners took no action on the proposed ordinance following a public hearing on proposed changes that would remove rules governing speed limits, operator age restrictions and protections for swimmers and kayakers on Payette Lake.

More than 15 people spoke on Monday in opposition to the proposed changes. A total of 76 emails and letters in opposition also were received, Valley County Clerk Doug Miller said.

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Two wrecks on Idaho 55 send four to hospital

The Star-News November 22, 2017

Two auto accidents in the same area of U.S. 95 west of New Meadows last week sent four people to the hospital.

Last Thursday about 3:07 p.m., a one-vehicle accident was reported about two miles south of the Evergreen Forest sawmill on U.S. 95. No other details of the accident were available.

Taken by ambulance to St. Luke’s McCall were Preston Hall, 44; Bobby Angel, 23; and Bobby and Roger Cole, 29, all of New Meadows.

Hall was transferred to St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, where he was released on Monday, a hospital spokesperson said.

Angel and Cole were treated at the McCall hospital and released, a hospital spokesperson said.

Last Friday at about 11:21 a.m., a car rolled over at about the same location, the sheriff’s office said.

Jessica Cason, 19, of Meridian, was taken by ambulance to St. Luke’s McCall, where she was treated and released.

No other details of the accident were available.

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Update On Fatality Crash On U.S. Highway 95 South of Council

11/23/2017 Idaho State Police News Release

On Wednesday, November 22, 2017, at approximately 8:10 p.m., the Idaho State Police investigated a three-vehicle fatality crash on U.S. Highway 95 at milepost 126.2, south of Council.

A 2014 Dodge Ram 2500 was driving northbound on U.S. Highway 95 when it went to pass a vehicle in front of it. The driver sideswiped a vehicle traveling southbound, a 2006 GMC Yukon with a utility trailer, sending it off the off the west shoulder of the road about 30 feet. All five occupants of the Yukon were uninjured.

The driver of the Dodge Ram 2500 continued traveling northbound, collide head-on with a pickup that was headed southbound. The pickup caught on fire upon impact. The driver of the Dodge Ram 2500 and the two occupants of the pickup succumbed to their injuries on scene.

No names are being released at this time due to next of kin notifications are still in progress. U.S. Highway 95 was blocked in both directions for approximately 7 hours.

source:
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Whooping Cough outbreak in Ada County, health care providers on alert

Stephanie Hale-Lopez Nov 21, 2017

Boise, ID – Within the last 90 days, 14 cases of Pertussis — or Whooping Cough — have been reported in Ada County, prompting the Central District Health Department (CDHD) to issue an alert.

“Whooping cough is out there,” said Sarah Correll, epidemiologist with CDHD. “It’s having a little uptick, and we want to make sure that cases don’t get missed.”

To date, the number of whooping cough cases in Ada County is more than double compared to the same time last year.

St. Luke’s Pediatrician, Dr. Mark Uranga, says if you have a dry, lingering cough, get checked.

continued:
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Study: Idaho’s taxes the lowest in the region

by Associated Press Saturday, November 25th 2017

Boise, Idaho (AP) – A new state study shows Idaho’s overall taxes are the lowest in the region and rank 48th in the nation.

The Spokesman-Review reports the annual Tax Burden Study, which the Idaho State Tax Commission has prepared each year since the 1970s, shows that Idaho’s total state and local tax burden per person ranks 48th among the 50 states plus the District of Columbia, and falls 29.6 percent below the U.S. average. It’s the lowest among 11 Western states.

The state’s tax burden relative to income – an important difference because Idaho incomes are much lower than most states -l ranks 37th nationally and 10th among the 11 Western states. It comes in 11 percent below the national average.

Idaho politicians, including Gov. Butch Otter and all three of the leading GOP candidates to succeed him in next year’s election, are calling for cutting Idaho’s personal and corporate income tax rates.

source:
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Hack Alert:

Hackers may be watching your home cameras

How to keep prying eyes away from your family

Nov 22, 2017 KIVI TV

Home video monitors are in almost every home these days.

We have baby cams, nanny cams and video doorbells to catch those holiday package thieves.

… but experts say an unsecured camera can make you more vulnerable.

… “With an unsecured video camera, someone half a world away can watch whatever you are doing in your home, such as grabbing a beer out of your fridge, or even worse,” Garcia said.

Garcia said thieves can target it locally by hacking into your Wi-Fi signal if you live in an apartment building, or via the cloud if your camera system sends a live image to your smartphone.

full story:
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Letter to Share:

Sen Risch Letter to USDA Sec Perdue Re: Wilderness Airstrips

Nov 16, 2017

link to PDF file:
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Public Lands:

Lowman Ranger District temporarily closes Clear Creek Road for public Safety

Contact: Venetia Gempler (208) 373-4105
Date: 11/24/2017

Boise, Idaho, November 24, 2017–The Clear Creek road [National Forest System (NFS) road 582] will be closed for public safety while roadside hazard trees are removed. The road closure begins at Idaho State Highway 21 and continues to the junction of NFS road 510 from Dec. 1, 2017, through March 31, 2018, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor.

Local landowners and their guests, who want to access their private property along Clear Creek are exempt from this order. For specific information about this order, follow the link below and scroll down to the Lowman Ranger District.

All motorists are reminded to drive defensively since they may encounter increased traffic from logging trucks in the area and along the Banks to Lowman road (Forest Highway 17).

Forest visitors should be prepared since weather conditions this time of the year can be very unpredictable. Carry extra provisions and let someone know about your travel plans.

Before venturing into a burned area, look for posted warning signs or current closure orders and be aware of your surroundings.

A detailed description of the closure is attached. For this, and all Boise National Forest area closures visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices

Road Closure Map:
Closure Order:
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State attorneys general bash plan to hike national park fees

AP Nov 22, 2017

A group of state attorneys general is urging the National Park Service to scrap its proposed entrance fee hike at 17 popular national parks.

The top government lawyers from 10 states and the District of Columbia sent a letter Wednesday saying they don’t want national parks to be “places only for the wealthy.” All the signers are Democrats except for Arizona’s Mark Brnovich.

The Park Service is accepting public comments on the plan, which would more than double the fee to $70 per vehicle at some of the most-visited parks. They include Grand Canyon, Yosemite, Yellowstone, Acadia and Shenandoah.

You can submit comments HERE.

The AGs say the increase is inconsistent with the laws governing the park system. They also question the rationale, saying President Donald Trump has proposed reducing the service’s overall budget.

source:
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Jackson objects to national park fee hike

Nov 22, 2017 – Local News 8

Jackson, Wyo. (KIFI/KIDK) – The Jackson Town Council says it was caught by surprise when it got a look at the National Park Service plan to more than double entrance fees at Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks.

And, in a letter to Grand Teton National Park Superintendent David Vela, the council said the proposal came after no public process.

The council stated it opposed the proposed rate increase and the associated impacts it would have on the community and access to public lands.

continued:
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Mining News:

Yellowstone mining opponents press Gianforte to join cause

AP Nov 21, 2017

Billings, Mont. (AP) – Opponents of two gold mines proposed near Yellowstone National Park are pressing Montana U.S. Rep. Greg Gianforte to sponsor legislation that would withdraw public lands in the area from future mining.

A coalition of businesses and conservation groups on Tuesday said the Republican’s support was crucial to making permanent a temporary mining ban enacted last year on 47 square miles of land outside Yellowstone.

A Yellowstone-area mining ban bill sponsored by Democrat U.S. Sen. Jon Tester is stalled in the Senate in the face of Republican opposition.

Gianforte and Republican U.S. Sen. Steve Daines have said they support the concept of a permanent ban. But they say there needs to be something for the other side and have criticized lawsuits blocking mines in northwest Montana despite local support.

source:
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Photo and Link to Share:

Idaho Game Bird Foundation

11/21/2017

2017IGFphesant-a

“Take a look at this happy little girl. This is what it is all about and makes the time spent well worth it.”

“Whiskers”
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The Game Bird Foundation is now on Facebook
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Critter News:

Your Pet 2Day: Pets and cold weather

by Bryan Levin Friday, November 24th 2017

video:
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Abandoned pets found in Lake Lowell area

Gretchen Parsons, KTVB November 20, 2017

Boise – Animals, mostly cats, are being found in the Lake Lowell area.

Sadly, a resident who lives nearby says the area has become a increasingly popular disposal site for unwanted pets.

Melissa Blackmer moved to the Lake Lowell area two years ago. She began to notice an unusual amount of stray cats, many of them were surprisingly friendly.

“They are definitely people’s pets, they are friendly, they will often just walk up to you, they are hungry. Feral cats don’t tend to warm up to people,” Blackmer says.

continued:
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Canyon County family reunited with service dog

The family searched for Charlie for several days

Steve Bertel, Anna Silver Nov 22, 2017 KIVI TV

Canyon County – A special dog was found on Tuesday morning after the owners and community members searched for her in Canyon County since Friday.

Charlie is a service dog to Monique Ortuno’s special needs daughter who has autism and sometimes stops breathing at night.

The family recently moved to Idaho from California and were desperate to find her.

Nampa police, animal control, and dozens of volunteers helped look for the dog, even setting a non-lethal trap near the Centennial Golf Course in Nampa where she had been spotted.

continued:
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Trappers ask court to throw out lawsuit over US fur exports

By Matthew Brown – 11/23/17 AP

Billings, Mont. — Fur trappers are asking a federal judge to throw out a lawsuit from wildlife advocates who want to block the export of bobcat pelts from the United States.

Attorneys for trapping organizations said in recent court filings that the lawsuit against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service infringes on the authority of state and tribal governments to manage their wildlife.

The plaintiffs in the case allege the government’s export program doesn’t protect against the accidental trapping of imperiled species such as Canada lynx.

More than 30,000 bobcat pelts were exported in 2015, the most recent year for which data was available, according to wildlife officials. The pelts typically are used to make fur garments and accessories. Russia, China, Canada and Greece are top destinations, according to a trapping industry representative and government reports.

continued:
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Wildlife Services urges ranchers to report all cattle deaths

11/20/17 AP

Sun Valley, Idaho — USDA Wildlife Services in Idaho is asking ranchers to report all cattle deaths and leave the carcass undisturbed in an effort to preserve evidence and help investigators confirm a wolf depredation.

The Capital Press reports Idaho State Director of USDA Wildlife Services Todd Grimm said during the Idaho Cattle Association’s annual convention that ranchers who come across a dead cow with no outward signs of cause of death shouldn’t assume the cause. The animal’s death could have been caused by a wolf.

Wildlife services has confirmed 750 wolf depredations in cattle in the past 22 years, affecting 400 producers in 32 counties in Idaho. But Grimm says the science indicates for every wolf killing confirmed, there are probably six or seven more.

source:
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Third Week of November 2017
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Wolves’ return to Oregon brings conflict and opportunity

By Gillian Flaccus – 11/23/17 AP

Portland, Ore. — Wolves were once so plentiful in the abundant forests that would become Oregon that the earliest settlers gathered from far and wide to discuss how to kill them.

Those “wolf meetings” in the 1840s, spawned by a common interest, eventually led to the formation of the Oregon territory, the precursor for statehood in 1859.

Today, Oregon’s statehood is secure, but the future of its wolf population once more hangs in the balance. Wolves have returned after decades, and this time, humans are having a much more contentious discussion about what to do with them.

It’s a political debate playing out against the backdrop of a rapidly growing wolf population, a jump in wolf poaching and demands from ranchers and hunters who say the predators are decimating herds and spooking big game.

continued:
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter 11/25/2017

Surge of wolf killings isn’t organized effort

Wolf cub hybrids face the chopping block in Germany

Germany’s wolf population on the rise, new data shows

The Language of Wolves
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NRA, hunting group say grizzly bear hunts needed for safety

By Matthew Brown – 11/25/17 AP

Billings, Mont. — The National Rifle Association and a sport hunting group want to ensure their members can hunt grizzly bears in the three-state region around Yellowstone National Park after the animals lost U.S. protections.

Idaho, Montana and Wyoming are considering limited trophy hunts for grizzlies outside the park in future years after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service revoked the species’ threatened status in July.

Conservation groups have sued to restore protections, and now the NRA and Safari Club International have asked U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen to let them intervene in the case.

Several of the groups’ members said in affidavits submitted by their attorneys that hunting would help the region’s economy, allow states to better manage the animals and improve public safety.

continued:
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Black bears back in eastern Nevada after 80-year absence

By Scott Sonner – 11/26/17 AP

Reno, Nev. — More than 500 black bears have returned to parts of their historic range in the Great Basin of Nevada where the species disappeared about 80 years ago, scientists say.

A new study says genetic testing confirms the bears are making their way east from the Sierra ranges north and south of Lake Tahoe along the California line.

In some cases, recent generations have moved hundreds of miles to sites near the Utah line, marking a rare example of large mammals recolonizing areas where they’d been wiped out.

“The recovery of large carnivores is relatively rare globally,” said Jon Beckmann, a conservation scientist for the Wildlife Conservation Society in Bozeman, Montana, who co-authored the new study.

continued:
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Group tracks wildlife movement with cameras in Targhee Pass

11/24/17 AP

Idaho Falls, Idaho — An environmental group is documenting the movement of wildlife through the Targhee Pass on the Idaho-Montana border in an effort to push for the construction of safe wildlife passages.

The Post Register reports the group Yellowstone to Yukon has deployed 14 motion-activated wildlife cameras that have captured more than 5,000 photos of wildlife mostly near U.S. Highway 20.

Program director Kim Trotter says the group hopes to provide the information collected from the cameras to the Idaho Transportation Department in order to identify sites for wildlife overpasses.

Trotter says many different kinds of animals traverse the Targhee Pass area and many of the animals use the same pathways.

Trotter says the group was inspired by similar overpass projects in Wyoming that have reduced the number of car wrecks involving animals.

source:
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Researchers study the genetics of bighorn sheep

By Eric Barker – 11/25/17 AP

Lewiston, Idaho — Bighorn sheep living in decades past along Idaho’s Salmon River from Riggins to its East and Middle forks far upstream were more genetically diverse, and the different groups of sheep there were more connected with each other, compared to sheep populations of today.

A University of Idaho researcher made the determination by analyzing genetic samples taken from wild sheep skulls and horns that are part of the Carrey-Boggan Collection on display at the Jack O’Connor Hunting Heritage and Education Center at Lewiston.

Lisette Waits, a professor and researcher at the university’s College of Natural Resources at Moscow, led a team that compared the genetics of the sheep in the collection with samples taken from contemporary populations. They wanted to know how the genetic makeup of the sheep has changed over the years, particularly in response to severe population declines brought on by things like habitat degradation and disease introduced by domestic sheep.

continued:
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BLM reopens Boise Wild Horse Corral

Date: November 22, 2017
Contact: Michael Williamson 208-384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management has reopened the Boise Wild Horse Corral for wild horse and burro adoptions and public visits. The corral had been temporarily closed since May due to an outbreak of strangles, an equine form of distemper.

About 75 percent of the facility’s horses became infected with the highly contagious condition, and all have fully recovered. The BLM has consulted with a local horse veterinarian and has determined that the appropriate wait time has elapsed since the last symptoms were detected, and it is now safe for the corral to reopen and adoptions to resume.

“Our priority was for the safety of our facility’s horses and to take all precautions to prevent the disease from being transmitted to privately-owned horses,” said Raul Trevino, BLM Boise corral manager. “We’ve worked closely with the veterinarian and we believe the disease has run its course. People interested in adopting a horse or burro are now encouraged to call for an appointment.”

For more information on adoptions and events, please contact Raul Trevino at (208) 896-5915 or rtrevino@blm.gov.

The BLM encourages interested individuals to visit BLM.gov to learn more about the program and providing a good home for an unadopted or unsold animal. To contact the Wild Horse and Burro information center, please call 866-4MUSTANGS (866-468-7826) or email wildhorse@blm.gov
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Federal court blocks sheep grazing in eastern Idaho

11/21/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — A federal court has blocked thousands of domestic sheep from being released to graze in eastern Idaho where environmental groups say they jeopardize a small herd of bighorn sheep with deadly viruses.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Candy Dale on Monday granted the temporary restraining order sought by Western Watersheds Project and WildEarth Guardians in a lawsuit filed last month against the U.S. Forest Service.

The groups contend the grazing of sheep owned by the University of Idaho via permits issued to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Sheep Experiment Station risks transmitting diseases to bighorn sheep.

Dale in the 31-page ruling says the environmental groups established the likelihood of irreparable harm to the bighorns.

source:
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Forest Service weighs changes to protections for sage grouse

By Keith Ridler – 11/22/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — The U.S. Forest Service is rethinking protection plans for sage grouse in six Western states after a U.S. court agreed with mining companies that the agency illegally created some safeguards in Nevada.

The agency announced Tuesday that it’s working with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, which also is reviewing its plans for the struggling bird following an order by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke.

Forest Service spokesman John Shivik says the coordinated review makes sense two years after federal officials decided the chicken-sized bird shouldn’t receive endangered-species protections. But the government did impose restrictions on land use.

The agency is taking public comments in Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Utah, Colorado and Wyoming through Jan. 5. It says it will review the input before deciding if changes are needed to its plans.

source:
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Fish & Game News:

There’s still time left to buy a 2017 hunting license, and hunt with it

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Buying will get you in Price Lock and give you plenty of hunting opportunities in December.

It’s late in the year, and if you haven’t bought your 2017 hunting license, you’re either among the world’s great procrastinators, or haven’t found time to hunt yet. While it might sound silly to buy a 12-month license with weeks left, it’s not as silly as you might think this year.

First, there’s Fish and Game’s Price Lock, which means if you buy any annual license in 2017, you’re locked into the same prices for all 2018 hunting, fishing and trapping licenses and permits. Otherwise, most resident license and tag prices will increase about 20 percent.

continued:
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Commission keeps rule for prepayment to apply for moose, sheep and goat tags

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Monday, November 20, 2017

Commissioners also delay sale of nonresident Sawtooth Elk Zone tags

Idaho Fish and Game commissioners on Nov. 17 rescinded a proposed rule that would allow hunters to forego prepaying moose, bighorn sheep and mountain goat tags when applying for those controlled hunts in the spring.

Those hunts will remain under the existing rules, which means residents and nonresidents must pay the application fee and tag fee to apply, as well as have a valid hunting license.

Application fees for moose, bighorn sheep and mountain goats will increase in 2018 to $16.75 for residents and $41.75 for nonresidents, which was part of the legislation passed in 2017 that included hikes for nearly all resident hunting, fishing and trapping licenses, tags and permits.

continued:
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Bear steals unlucky Michigan hunter’s 6-point buck

Max White Nov 22, 2017

Alcona County, Mich. (WXYZ) – A Michigan hunter had just snagged a nice 6-point buck last week when his trophy was taken away by a bear.

John Wardynski, from Bay City, Michigan, posted the video of the bear taking the buck away on his Facebook page.

continued w/video:
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BearRetriever-a
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Seasonal Humor:

OldElkCar-a
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Nov 19, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Nov 19, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: Last chance to order the 2018 Calendar, deadline Monday November 20th 1159pm. Send email with “2018 Calendar” in the subject line, please include name, address and number wanted. We can mail gifts for you! Thanks for your support.
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Village News:

Reports from last Sunday

“Reports of a small cougar around [upper] side of town; locals out for a walk came across about thirty elk close to town.”

– LI
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Hunter’s Missing Rope

Looking for a 5/8th inch climbing rope that is white with a green stripe that was stretched across the river from the Yellow Pine Campground by the concrete bridge to the other side. of the river. It was removed while we were hunting on the far side. If you or someone know of it’s whereabouts, please leave it at the Yellow Pine Tavern for us. Thank You.
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Mail Days M-W-F

Starting November 1st, the mail is being delivered 3 days a week.
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The Corner

The Corner is closed for the season. Stop by if you need wood permits. We will reopen after we have the baby.

Thanksgiving potluck will be held at The Corner 4pm November 23rd. Please call Heather at the Corner 208 633-3325 for items to bring.

– H
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Yellow Pine Tavern

Winter hours currently will be: 9am to 8pm daily

Christmas potluck will be at the Tavern. Look for further updates on the time and what the Tavern will be providing.

– L
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Diamond (Kennedy) Fuel & Feed

208-382-4430

We will now be carrying wood pellets, so if you or someone you know up there burns pellets we will have some in stock by Thursday night. We will also order 1 ton pallets if there is an interest. No delivery to YP at this time, but folks can come pick up themselves.

Also, current price on the wood pellets are $5.99/ 50 lb. bag or $250 for a bulk order of 50 bags (1 ton). The brand is Purcell which is rated just as good if not better than the North Idaho Brand. It is made and sold by the same manufacture. Chris Gurney, the new owner here, said next summer he would be willing to deliver 1 ton bulk orders to YP if there are enough interested. Current prices may change by then of course.
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Bear Aware

It is probably safe to put bird feeders back out. Bears in our area usually hibernate by Halloween per our local F&G office.
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YPFD News:

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.

Training will resume in the spring.
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VYPA News:

Next meeting June 2018
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Fall Rx Burns planned

BNF:
Cascade Ranger District: Slash piles will be ignited in the following locations: Warm Lake, Yellow pine, Landmark and Crawford. It will be pile burning for two days.

PNF:
The Krassel Ranger District plans to ignite 1,600 acres in the Fourmile drainage, and 2,000 acres in the Bald Hill project area.
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Local Observations:

Monday (Nov 13) overnight low of 25 degrees, frost melting with sunrise. About 2.5″ old snow on the ground, very hard and dense, patches of open ground under the trees. Heard a red-breasted nuthatch. Cloudy before lunch time. Cloudy and breezy early afternoon, “snow-eater” wind, high of 50 degrees. Started to sprinkle just before 5pm, showers on and off continued after dark. Raining pretty good around midnight.

Tuesday (Nov 14) skiff of snow fell early morning, overnight low of 32 degrees. Partly clear and light breeze this morning. Flock of pine-siskins showed up. Mostly cloudy during the day with outbreaks of sunshine once in a while, light chilly breeze, high of 42 degrees. A little bit of “human activity” today. Sky clearing just before dark and temperature dropping quickly.

Wednesday (Nov 15) overnight low of 20 degrees, high thin clouds. Mail truck made it in on time. Dark clouds came in from the south early afternoon and breezy, high of 46 degrees. Rain started just before 9pm and getting windy. Rain pounded down during the night and gusty wind.

Thursday (Nov 16) probably did not get below freezing overnight, rain melted a lot of the snow on the ground, patchy snow cover this morning and rain/snow mix falling for a while, then rain, sometimes snow, then rain, high of 35 degrees. Airplane flew over at 414pm in the storm. Misty drizzle at dark. Heavy snow during the night.

Friday (Nov 17) overnight low of 24 degrees, 4″ of new snow on the ground this morning, partly clear and light breeze. Trees dropping snow bombs out in the forest. Heard little birds calling (not sure if juncos or pine-siskins.) Internet and long distance phone out around 1115am, for less than 15 minutes. Couple of little snow flurries during the day, no accumulation, warm enough to melt some snow, high of 38 degrees. Clearing off at dark and temperature dropping, cold light breeze.

Saturday (Nov 18) overnight low of 14 degrees, 2″ of old snow on the ground this morning, high hazy clouds, filtered sun and slight cold breeze. Watched 2 stellar jays looking through old pine cones for seeds. Partly cloudy and warmed up enough to melt a little snow this afternoon, high of 40 degrees. Clear and temperature dropping fast just before dark.

Sunday (Nov 19) overnight low of 13 degrees, 1-2″ of old snow remaining with a few bare patches, nearly clear sky. Heard a stellar’s jay calling. Sunshine and bright snow, frost starting to melt from the strength of the sun even tho it is still below freezing. Internet connection a little “iffy” around 1230pm. High hazy clouds early afternoon and a very noticeable chilly light breeze, high of 40 degrees. Overcast at dark, dropping below freezing.
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RIP:

Jim Ed Biggers

Biggers, Jim Ed, 58, passed away Saturday, November 11, 2017 at a local hospital. Arrangements have been entrusted to All Valley Cremation, 1538 11th Avenue North in Nampa.

Published in Idaho Statesman on Nov. 14, 2017
[h/t L and B]
Note” “Little” Jimmy Biggers lived in Yellow Pine.
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Scam Alerts:

New Scam, Claiming to Be One of Our Deputies

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office dispatch has received two calls today from McCall citizens, claiming that they are Lt. Jason Speer and there is a warrant out for their arrest for failing to report for jury duty. THIS IS A SCAM!! They then want you to go to the store and get a visa gift card to pay them money. We understand that most people will know it’s a scam, unfortunately there are some that may fall prey to this type of call. It happens a lot.

PLEASE DO NOT SEND MONEY. Please contact the Valley County Sheriff’s Office dispatch at 208-382-5160 if you have any questions.

source: The Valley County Sheriff’s Office Facebook page
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Boise woman targeted by phone scam: ‘I want to get this story out’

by Alexis Goree Tuesday, November 14th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Loretta Reed believed she was careful when answering calls from strange numbers. But last week she got a call from someone claiming to be her grandson, Evan, and she fell for it.

“As I go back and think about it I said, oh Evan what is wrong, and then out came this story”

He told her he was sick and asked a friend to drive him to get medicine when they got stopped by police and drugs were found in the car. A so-called Sergeant Clark from the Nampa Police Department said she needed $4,000 to bail him out.

“I followed this so-called Sergeant Clark’s instructions to go to my bank, withdraw $4,000 and go to Target and buy eight $500 gift cards.”

continued:
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Idaho News:

School bus slides off road south of Cascade

KTVB November 16, 2017


(Photo: Cascade Fire Protection District)

Cascade, Idaho — Several children suffered minor injuries when their school bus slid off the road Thursday morning.

The incident happened on Thunder City Road in a rural area south of Cascade.

According to the Cascade Fire Protection District, the bus driver drifted too far onto the soft shoulder of the dirt road, causing the bus to slide off into a ditch. It was left tilted at an precarious angle, but did not completely roll.

Twelve children were on board the bus at the time, ranging from elementary-aged students to junior high. No one was seriously hurt, although several students suffered scrapes, scratches or bruises, according to first responders.

The bus was driving slowly when the slide-off occurred, according to the Cascade Fire Protection District. The district sent out a second bus to bring the children to school.

source:
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Three-car crash on Idaho 55 injures California man

The Star-News November 16, 2017

A California man was injured last Thursday in a three-vehicle accident on Idaho 55 near Fairbrother Lane south of McCall, the Idaho State Police reported.

Richard Scott, 69, of Sacramento, Calif., was taken by ambulance to St. Luke’s McCall after the accident, which happened about 8:09 p.m. last Thursday, the ISP reported. Scott’s condition was not available.

Scott was driving north when he lost control of his pickup, crossed the center line, and went into a broad slide.

Kathryn Thier, 35, of McCall, was driving her car south and drove off the left shoulder and into a ditch to avoid colliding with Scott’s vehicle.

Dean Neptune, 24, of Nampa, was driving a commercial box truck behind Thier and struck Scott’s pickup. All occupants were wearing seat belts, the ISP reported.

The section of Idaho 55 where the accident occurred was closed for about two hours until the scene could be cleared. The crash remained under investigation this week.

source:
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Cascade Legion post to host free Thanksgiving Day dinner

The Star-News November 16, 2017

The Cascade American Legion Post 60 and Auxiliary will host a traditional Turkey Day feast on Thanksgiving, Thursday, Nov. 23, at 1 p.m.

American Legion members will provide the turkey and the trimmings for the free community event, and local churches and other volunteers will bring assorted pies and desserts.

The dinner will be held at the Cascade American Legion hall, 105 E. Mill St.

continued:
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2018 Winter Carnival theme: There’s ‘Snow’ Place Like Home

The Star-News November 16, 2017

“There’s ‘Snow’ Place Like Home” is the theme of the 2018 McCall Winter Carnival, the McCall Area Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Bureau announced.

“In deciding this year’s theme we really wanted to capture what makes living in McCall so special,” carnival Chair McKenzie Kraemer said.

“Home means so many things to so many different people and we are excited to see what this theme inspires,” Kraemer said.

Plans for the 2018 carnival, to be held Jan. 26 through Feb. 4, include traditional events like fireworks, the Mardi Gras Parade and snow sculptures along with a few new events.

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$1,150 grant awarded for blinds at historic NM depot

The Star-News November 16, 2017

The Adams County Historical Society has been awarded a $1,150 matching grant from the Idaho State Historical Society.

The grant funds will be used to purchase UV protection blinds to be installed in the President’s Room of the Pacific and Idaho Northern Railway Depot in New Meadows.

The blinds will help protect photos, documents and woodwork in the room from damaging sunlight while items are being documented cataloged and inventoried.

The same type of blind was previously installed in the Lobby, Ticket Agent’s Office and Ladies Waiting Room for the same reasons. The historical society will match the grant with volunteer time by professionals.

source:
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Idaho History:

Idaho Pen Turkey Flock 1924

Source: Original 1924 Nature Magazine from JTR Collection
courtesy John T. Richards – Idaho History 1860s to 1960s
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Public Lands:

National forests to start selling Christmas tree permits Saturday

The Star-News November 16, 2017

Boise and Payette National Forest vendors will begin selling Christmas tree permits on Saturday.

This year, fourth-graders can receive a free permit through the “Every Kid in a Park” program.

Fourth-graders will receive a voucher for one free Christmas tree permit when they register for the “Every Kid in a Park” initiative at http://EveryKidinaPark.gov.

The fourth-graders and a parent must redeem the voucher at a Forest Service office, as commercial vendors will not accept the vouchers. Free Christmas tree permits cannot be sent electronically or through the mail.

Permits for sale to the general public will be available at the Boise and Payette National Forest offices starting Monday. Cost is $10 and valid until Dec. 25.

Each permit allows one tree to be cut, and there is a limit of three per family. The maximum height of a permitted tree is 12 feet. Permits are valid for use on both forests and are for personal use only.

Christmas tree permits are available at these locations:

• New Meadows Ranger District Office, 3674 Highway 95, New Meadows. 208-347-0300.

• McCall Ranger District Office, 102 W. Lake St., McCall. 208-634-0400.

• Albertsons, 132 E. Lake St., McCall. 208-634-8166.

• C&M Lumber, 3625 Walker Lane, New Meadows. 208-347-3648.

• Cascade Ranger District, 540 N. Main St., Cascade. 208-382-7400.

source:
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Making A Break

Forest Service project near Lake Cascade would help separate wildfires, homes

By Max Silverson For The Star-News November 16, 2017

Wendy Green doesn’t mind that the Forest Service is thinking about cutting trees and shrubs near her home. It would be a small price to pay to save her home in a wildfire.

Green was among those who recently toured an area on the west side of Lake Cascade where work is planned to slow down future wildfires.

The French-Hazard Wildland Urban Interface Project would take place on more than 6,000 acres of the Boise National Forest on the eastern slope of West Mountain between Hurd Creek and Moores Creek along West Mountain Road.

The project would also thin stands throughout the area that have become overgrown with brush and fast-growing fir species, Project Leader Jim Bishop of the Cascade Ranger District said.

The project contains 3,661 acres slated for commercial logging, 1,369 acres scheduled for thinning, 3,800 acres planned for controlled burns and 950 acres where equipment will chew up dense vegetation that could help a wildfire spread.

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BC YP SR Collaborative meeting December 14th

11/15/2017

The next meeting for the collaborative will be held on December 14th at the EOC 10:00 am to 3:00 pm.

Melissa B. Hamilton
U of I Valley County Extension Educator
Community Development / Agriculture
208-382-7190
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Pioneer Fire Recovery & Restoration Update

11/16/2017

After a busy summer field season on the Boise National Forest, work continues on the Pioneer Fire area to recover and restore the landscape.

Improving Aquatic Habitat for Bull trout

Two Aquatic Organism Passages (AOPs) have been placed on the Lowman Ranger District’s Clear Creek Road (National Forest System road 582). These AOPs are replacing small culverts on Pole and Big Spruce Creek, opening up more than 3 miles of upstream habitat for bull trout and other aquatic species within the Clear Creek watershed.

Opening access to bull trout spawning habitat provides refuge for small fish to escape predators and protect them from being swept downstream from high flows and/or increased sediment from the burned landscape.

The AOPs, which look like large culverts, are multipurpose bottomless arches with two concrete footer walls sunk below the scour depth of the stream, engineered to replicate natural stream conditions. The structures are designed to safeguard the popular road from damaging debris flows blocking stream flows and minimize the risk from water overflowing on to the road bed.

These AOPs are vitally important for the Boise National Forest’s long term recovery efforts which are part of the Pioneer Fire’s Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) assessment and supports the U.S. Fish and Wildlife’s bull trout recovery plan. Learn more about AOPs by watching the video:

Salvage Timber and Roadside Hazard Sales Status

Twelve salvage timber sales sold to reduce hazard trees in heavily used recreation areas are in various stages of operation from beginning to completion.

* Whoopum up and Upper Rock Salvage and Sunset Ski Roadside Hazard sales: completed.

* Upper Rock Creek Salvage and Pikes Fork Roadside Hazard sales: are expect completion mid-November.

* Crooked and Kempner Salvage and Banner Roadside Hazard sales: expected completion this winter barring extreme weather conditions.

* Upper Beaver and Lamar Salvage sales: just started with completion expected in the summer and fall 2018, respectively.

* Clear Creek Roadside Hazard sale: expected to begin mid-November with completion expected in 2018.

Two additional sales were advertised for bid Nov. 3, 2017:

* 393 Roadside Hazard and the Gold Fork West Salvage sales bid openings were scheduled for Nov. 15.

* 393 Roadside Hazard had an oral auction and Gold Fork West had a sealed bid.
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Barber Flat Bridge Open to Full-Size Vehicles

Boise, Idaho, November 17, 2017 Boise National Forest News Release

The Barber Flat Bridge located on the Idaho City Ranger District, National Forest System (NFS) Road 327 is now open to full size vehicles but will have load restrictions.

Recent improvements to the bridge have mitigated concerns, allowing the Forest to open the bridge to full-size vehicles. Load restrictions are posted and may impact heavy loads including logging and gravel transporting vehicles. Brett Barry, Boise National Forest civil engineer said “The structural improvements completed and future instream structure work will ensure the bridge functions for years to come.”

The Barber Flat bridge improvements have been classified into two phases. Phase one, which concluded this fall included new hardware, abutment improvements and additional monitoring. Phase two will begin during the fall of 2018, projected treatments include adding instream structures that divert channel flows which prevent future damage to abutments.

Recreationists are urged to use caution when traveling on NFS Road 376 from Alexander Flats to NFS Road 327. The road is a single lane road with turnouts that is maintained for high clearance vehicles. Winter weather may further impact road conditions in this area.
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2017 CuMo Exploration Project Supplemental Information Report is Now Available

11/17/2017

Dear Interested Party,

This email is to inform you that the recently completed CuMo Exploration Project Supplemental Information Report (SIR) is now available on the New 2018 CuMo Exploration Project webpage (https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=52875) under the Assessment Tab.

The new 2018 CuMo Exploration Project webpage will replace the original CuMo webpage. Key documents from the original webpage are being relocated to the new webpage under the Supporting Tab. The original webpage is still available at https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=21302 but due to this site being unstable most documents have been unpublished and are being relocated.

For additional information regarding the SIR, please contact Rick Wells, Forest Geologist, at 208-373-4136. For questions regarding the project webpages, please contact me directly. Thank you for your continued interest in this project.

Sincerely,
Melissa Yenko
Forest Environmental Coordinator
Boise National Forest
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Idaho Trails Association on a roll; seeks new members to keep momentum

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 126, 2017

A statewide non-profit outdoor service group is looking for more members to achieve its simple goal of keeping Idaho’s nonmotorized trails open and usable.

The Idaho Trails Association is looking for more members to join trail building and maintenance projects next season, said North Idaho resident and long-distance hiker Tom Dabrowski.

Founded in 2010, ITA volunteers have completed 21 projects in 12 parts of the state, he said. A total of 215 volunteers contributed more than 5,175 hours of field work time on 103 miles of trail, sawing more than 1,000 logs off the trails, fixing water bars, cutting back brush and repairing trail treads, he said.

The volunteers coordinate with government trails crews to spread out the work and cover more trails, he said.

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Last Chance to Comment on National Parks Massive Fee Increase

Western Slope No Fee Coalition 11/17/2017

In late October we alerted you to the National Park Service’s proposal to move to “surge pricing” during the most popular season at 17 popular parks. At those parks, the entrance fee during the most desirable time of year will at least double and nearly triple at some, to $70 per vehicle for a single visit.

Public comments are being taken only until November 23. Before you sit down with your family to give thanks this year, show your support for National Parks that are accessible to everyone by adding your voice to those of your fellow citizens!

Details here.
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USFS Regional Intermountain News

November 16, 2017

link:
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Lipomas in Dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Nov. 17, 2017 – IME

Lipomas are benign tumors that originate from fat cells. “Lip” in Latin stands for fat and “oma” stands for tumor. They are the most common tumor seen in dogs and are most common in overweight, middle-age to older dogs. The exact cause of the formation of these tumors is unknown. They are common in all breeds, but especially in Labrador retrievers.

Lipomas are well-defined, oval or round growths that exist and can be easily felt under the skin, or the subcutaneous area of the body. They usually feel soft and smooth, and can be easily moved around under the skin. Most occur on the trunk of the dog, especially under the chest. They can also occur on the legs and neck. They start off small, but can grow as large as an orange. Most lipomas do not cause any clinical signs. They are removed surgically for cosmetic reasons or if they occur in the joints of the dog and are causing gait abnormalities. In rare instances, lipomas can develop in the abdomen, chest or behind the eye. These lipomas can cause serious problems and must be removed surgically.

Lipomas can mimic other, more malignant tumors. Your vet will almost always want to stick a needle into the lipoma, aspirate a sample of cells and confirm that only fat cells are noted under the microscope. Biopsy of the tumor (taking a small sample of the tumor surgically) will also show that the tumor is benign.

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Want to live longer? Get a dog

Findings also suggest increased social well-being

Victoria Larned – CNN Nov 17, 2017

The benefits that come with owning a dog are clear– physical activity, support, companionship — but owning a dog could literally be saving your life

Dog ownership is associated with a reduced risk for cardiovascular disease and death, finds a new Swedish study published Friday in the journal Scientific Reports.

For people living alone, owning a dog can decrease their risk of death by 33% and their risk of cardiovascular related death by 36%, when compared to single individuals without a pet, according to the study. Chances of a heart attack were also found to be 11% lower.

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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Second week of November 2017
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Environmental group sues for records of wolf killings

By Nicholas K. Geranios – 11/15/17 AP

Spokane, Wash. — An environmental group is suing the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife over its failure to release some public records on wolf deaths in the state.

The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking records about the killing of a wolf from the Smackout Pack this summer and the killing of nearly the entire Profanity Peak pack in 2016.

The lawsuit was filed Tuesday in Thurston County Superior Court.

Bruce Botka, a spokesman for the WDFW in Olympia, says the agency does not comment on the filing of legal complaints and had not reviewed the lawsuit yet with attorneys.

Wolves are listed as endangered by the state in the eastern third of Washington, where they are relatively abundant. They have federal endangered species protection in the western two-thirds of the state.

source:
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Pro-wolf group from out-of-state hounds Washington with lawsuits

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 16, 2017

An Arizona-based environmental group is suing the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife for access to some public records on wolf deaths in the state.

The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking records about the killing of a wolf from the Smackout Pack this summer and the killing of several animals in the Profanity Peak pack in 2016.

Lethal removal of some wolves was authorized by the agency director in those cases after preventative measures didn’t stop multiple wolf attacks on livestock. The attacks generally stopped after a few wolves were killed.

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Online quiz: Can you distinguish wolf from coyote?

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 15, 2017

Oregon has posted an online quiz to help people – especially hunters – bone up on telling the difference between wolves and coyotes.

The quiz found at the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife website shows photos of the animals at various ages. As users are quizzed on their knowledge, the website offers tips on how to differentiate wolves from coyotes.

More than 16,000 people had taken the quiz in the first week after it was released this fall.

Wolves are still protected in both Oregon and Washington by state or federal rules. Coyotes are not protected and can be hunted.

source:
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Wyoming game managers take public comment on grizzly bears

11/17/17 AP

Jackson, Wyo. — A Wyoming Game and Fish Department public meeting on how to manage grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem drew comments and ideas from hunting guides who perceive there are too many grizzly bears and environmentalists insistent that Jackson Hole should remain a hunting-free sanctuary.

About 100 people attended the meeting Wednesday night when they were asked their thoughts on population monitoring, research, conflict management, information and education and grizzly bear hunting.

The comments and ideas voiced included prohibiting grizzly bear hunting until the Yellowstone region’s bears are connected with the grizzly bear population in northwest Montana; requiring wildlife managers to tell the public where tracked grizzlies are in real time when the bears venture into well-used areas; and requiring that meat from a hunted grizzly bear can’t be wasted, the Jackson Hole News & Guide reported.

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Landowner uses tractor to ‘totally’ disable elk poacher’s pickup

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 14, 2017


A landowner used a tractor to “disable” a pickup belonging to elk poachers trespassing on his property in Pierce County on Nov. 11, 2017. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife)

Public sentiment is clearly behind the landowner who used his tractor to, shall we say, immobilize the pickup of elk poachers who were trespassing.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife police are hesitant to say that’s the proper way to respond. There could be consequences.

But for now, the WDFW report on Facebook is chalking up a lot of fans for the Pierce County man who went out into the night to make sure the poachers didn’t get away.

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Spokane man, brother cited for trophy elk poaching in Montana

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 16, 2017

A Spokane man and his twin brother have been charged with 16 crimes involved with the illegal killing of eight bull elk in what Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks officials describe as years of poaching activity on a Fergus County ranch.

James Stephen Page, of Garneill, Mont., and William Thomas Page, of Spokane, Wash., both 32, are accused of illegally harvesting eight bull elk over several years on the 3 Bar Ranch, which is on the west side of the Snowy Mountains, southwest of Lewistown, agency spokesman Bruce Auchly reports today.

The case involves eight felony charges. If convicted, the brothers could lose for life their hunting and fishing privileges in Montana, and possibly other states, and face thousands of dollars in fines.

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Bald eagles’ annual gathering begins at Lake Coeur d’Alene

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 16, 2017


A bald eagle snatches a spawning kokanee from the Wolf Lodge Bay area of Lake Coeur d’Alene. (Jerry Rolwes)

Kokanee are spawning and dying in North Idaho’s two largest lakes and bald eagles have begun congregating for the annual feast.

Dozens of eagles are congregating at Granite Creek and in the Bayview shoreline area to take advantage of revived kokanee fisheries in Lake Pend Oreille.

Lake Coeur d’Alene is more accessible and better known for the eagles that congregate from November into January to feast on the kokanee — land-locked sockeye salmon — spawning in Wolf Lodge Bay.

The number of eagles varies from year to year, with 31 adult (white-headed) eagles and 6 immatures counted today in the first weekly survey of the eagle season by Carrie Hugo, U.S. Bureau of Land Management wildlife biologist.

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Sage grouse policy moving back to square one as decade of collaboration questioned

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 13, 2017

Federal scientists and land managers who’ve been crafting strategies to protect a ground-dwelling bird’s habitat across the American West for nearly two decades are going back to the drawing board under a new Trump administration edict to reassess existing plans condemned by ranchers, miners and energy developers.

Here’s more in a report from Associated Press reporter Scott Sonner, who’s covered some of the public meetings related to the review.

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Idaho Man Lands Near-Record Fish And An Even Better Story From The Boise River

By James Dawson Nov 17, 2017 Boise State Public Radio

It’s a near-miss lunker. Jason Waidelich had the catch of a lifetime on the Boise River this month when he hooked a rainbow trout that weighed a whopping 19.25 pounds.

“My adrenaline was pumping, I couldn’t breathe. It was pure shock,” Waidelich told KTVB. “The only time I’ve ever seen a trout that big is in the aquariums at Cabela’s.”

The 32-inch long monster was just shy of the state record held by Michelle Larsen-Williams, set in 2009. She hooked her 20-pound, 34.25-inch long rainbow on the Snake River in 2009.

Idaho Fish and Game biologist John Cassinelli agrees. “That’s pretty insane from the Boise River.”

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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
November 17, 2017
Issue No. 852
Table of Contents

* IDFG Making Progress On Fixing Water Chemistry Issues Impacting Snake River Sockeye Hatchery Smolt Survival
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439869.aspx

* Colder, Wetter, Snowier Now Forecasted For Upcoming Winter; La Nina Conditions May Hang Around Until April
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439868.aspx

* Council Hears Presentation On How California’s Booming Renewables Affecting BPA Revenues
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439866.aspx

* Council Directs Cost Efficiency Savings To More Funds For Hatchery, Fish Diversion Improvements
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439866.aspx

* Corps Seeks Comment On Willamette Valley Reservoir Storage Reallocation Draft Study
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439865.aspx

* Corps Awards $6.2 Million Contract To ODFW To Operate Bonneville Fish Hatchery
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439864.aspx

* Western Governors Seek Clarification On Interior’s Plans To Prevent Spread Of Invasive Mussels
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439863.aspx

* Montana Supreme Court Upholds Salish-Kootenai Tribes Water Rights Compact
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439861.aspx

* Federal Climate Science Report For U.S. Released, Projects Trends In Temperature, Precipitation, Sea-Level Rise
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439862.aspx

* Petty Nominated For Interior Assistant Secretary Overseeing Bureau Of Reclamation, USGS
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439858.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

Don’t improperly dump your big game carcasses

By Phil Cooper, Wildlife Conservation Educator
Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Proper disposal keeps you out of trouble and eliminates problems for others

When you’re done butchering a big-game animal, there’s usually bones, hide and other inedible parts that should be double-bagged, securely tied, and put out with your household waste for garbage collection.

Hunters are required to remove and care for all of the edible meat from hindquarters as far down as the hock, the shoulders as far down as the knee, and meat along the backbone. There is also a lot of meat in the neck and covering the ribs that make good ground or stew meat.

When you take your harvested animal to a professional meat processor, you can deliver the clean carcass and your work is done. Perhaps the best part of paying a professional meat processor is the shop disposes of the bones for you.

When hunters do the processing themselves, there is a pile of bones, hide, and a head that need to be disposed of. If you’re quartering the animal in the field and in a remote area, these will be cleaned up by scavengers in short order.

If you bring an animal out whole and need to dispose of the inedible remains, a transfer station will accept animal carcasses for no charge from residents who live within that county who pay the solid waste disposal fee.

When disposing of game animals, hunters should consider the consequences of their actions. It only takes one improperly dumped and highly visible carcass to generate strong negative reactions from the public.

Unwanted big game carcasses that end up on the side of the road or other visible areas become eyesores and public health issues. They can even be hazardous because they attract dogs and scavengers, which become dangers to drivers who swerve to avoid hitting them.

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Biologists think they’ve found answers to low survival of sockeye salmon

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, November 16, 2017

Sockeye runs have improved since the 1990s, but biologists want better survival of young fish and more returning adults

Idaho Fish and Game’s sockeye recovery program has overcome many challenges in preserving the species, and scientists are continuing to learn and improve as they transition from staving off extinction to growing Idaho’s sockeye population.

Fish and Game’s Assistant Fisheries Chief Paul Kline said F&G biologists think they’ve answered a nagging question about its relatively new sockeye hatchery in Springfield. The hatchery succeeded in raising lots of young sockeye, but the fish have survived poorly after being released to migrate to the Pacific.

Biologists found differences in water hardness between Springfield Hatchery in Southeast Idaho where the fish are raised from eggs and Redfish Lake Creek near Stanley where they’re released. Differences in water chemistry between the two waters may be adding stress to fish that are already stressed from “smoltification” – a period when they migrate downstream and their bodies transition from freshwater to saltwater.

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International Effort Slows Invasive Bullfrogs

By Michael Lucid, Wildlife Regional Biologist
Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Northern leopard frog numbers have declined dramatically in the northern portion of their range to the point there is only a single known natural population left in all of British Columbia or northern Idaho.

An international team of biologists has been working hard to prevent the northward movement of invasive bullfrogs toward British Columbia’s Creston Wildlife Management Area where that last leopard frog colony resides. Biologists on both sides of the border are using a promising new technique called ‘electrofrogging’ to remove, then euthanize, bullfrogs from small ponds.

Bullfrogs spread disease, outcompete native amphibians, and eat most anything in their path. Working together to slow the spread of bullfrogs is not only protecting the Creston leopard frog colony but helping prepare Idaho’s Boundary-Smith Creek Wildlife Management Area for a major climate adaptation restoration project which will benefit six climate sensitive Species of Greatest Conservation Need.

continued w/video:
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Idaho agency denies sex discrimination lawsuit allegations

By Keith Ridler – 11/14/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is asking that a federal sex discrimination lawsuit be dismissed and that any recordings made by the former employee not be allowed as evidence.

The 8-page document filed Monday also asks that Fish and Game receive attorney fees.

The lawsuit filed last month in U.S. District Court seeking $100,000 in damages includes an allegation that a male supervisor threatened to strangle the female employee with an extension cord.

Fish and Game denies that ever took place.

The lawsuit also says the woman made recordings to back up some of her claims.

Fish and Game contends those recordings are illegal and should not be allowed as evidence, and the woman’s claim barred as a matter of public policy.

A ruling is pending.

source:
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Badger discovered asleep in cat bed in Linlithgow

BBC News Oct 19, 2017

A sleepy badger was caught napping in a cat bed in a house in Linlithgow.

The badger entered the kitchen through a cat flap and filled up on cat food before going to sleep in the soft bed.

The Scottish SPCA was called to the house at Beecraigs Country Park on Wednesday and an officer was able to persuade the badger to leave of its own accord.

The charity said it was unusual behaviour for badgers, which are usually shy animals, to enter a home.

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Badger-a
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Seasonal Humor:

ThanksgivingCard-a
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Tips & Advice:

Space heater safety

Tristan Lewis Nov 03, 2017 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho – As temperatures begin to drop, many of us are starting to bring out our space heaters.

Home heating fires account for 16% of structure fires in America.

Space heaters are rated for indoor use and should only be operated according to the owner’s manual, and be UL listed with tip-over shut off protection. Use of space heaters should only be temporary and are unsafe for prolonged periods.

All heat sources require at least 3 feet of clear space around them. Keep children, animals and any combustible materials away from heat sources.

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Nov 12, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Nov 12, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: We will be taking orders for the 2018 Calendar until November 20th. Send email with “2018 Calendar” in the subject line, please include name, address and number wanted. We can mail gifts for you! Thanks for your support.
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Village News:

Matt’s back-country rescue

Three young men, out-of-state hunters from Bozeman, MT, drove almost to the trailhead at Roosevelt Lake to start their hunt. After cutting several downed trees they finally decided to just park on the road and hike the rest of the way. They hiked down past the pioneer cemetery several miles, spent several nights camping and finally got a nice buck. That night it really snowed. They got their deer and gear back to the truck to discover they were in serious trouble. They shoveled snow (it sounded like two days) then realized that wouldn’t work as the snow was getting steadily deeper. They packed four days of rations (& the deer) and started taking turns breaking trail and working their way through waist deep snow. About eleven o’clock they heard a snowmobile…..Matt was breaking trail for the guide Al B. The three & packs were rescued by riding on snowmobile sled. They arranged for Matt to get the rest of their stuff, and waited a few days here in YP to ride out with Heather. We’ll see them next summer when they come back to get their truck. Amazing that Matt arrived at the right place at the right time.

– LI Nov. 12, 2017
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Mail Days M-W-F

Starting November 1st, the mail is being delivered 3 days a week.
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Community Hall Update Oct. 2017

Hello fellow Yellow Piners, I am just wanting to take a minute to give a community hall update.

Items completed:

Junk removal with exception of small camper trailer. Anyone interested?
Mobile Grill covered
Flowers planted
Inventory of completed and on the Cloud
Water off and winterized
Past Harmonica T-Shirts going good.
Still need 1990, 2003, 2004, 2005 ,2008, 2011
New fire extinguishers and smoke detectors are installed
Clock installed in main hall
4 propane tanks in place and full
New trailer cleaned and parked
Also all outside Harmonica items (benches, etc.) on new trailer and tarped

Still in Process:

Process Manual
repair and refinishing of outside picnic tables
electric repair of light switch
new wheels for the piano
event sign for the airport
Fund raising ideas

Thank you to everyone who made this possible
Chairman of Community Hall
Kathleen Hall
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The Corner

The Corner is closed for the season. Stop by if you need wood permits. We will reopen after we have the baby.

Thanksgiving potluck will be held at The Corner 4pm November 23rd. Please call Heather at the Corner 208 633-3325 for items to bring.

– H
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Yellow Pine Tavern

Winter hours currently will be: 9am to 8pm daily

Christmas potluck will be at the Tavern. Look for further updates on the time and what the Tavern will be providing.

– L
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Diamond (Kennedy) Fuel & Feed

208-382-4430

We will now be carrying wood pellets, so if you or someone you know up there burns pellets we will have some in stock by Thursday night. We will also order 1 ton pallets if there is an interest. No delivery to YP at this time, but folks can come pick up themselves.

Also, current price on the wood pellets are $5.99/ 50 lb. bag or $250 for a bulk order of 50 bags (1 ton). The brand is Purcell which is rated just as good if not better than the North Idaho Brand. It is made and sold by the same manufacture. Chris Gurney, the new owner here, said next summer he would be willing to deliver 1 ton bulk orders to YP if there are enough interested. Current prices may change by then of course.
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Bear Aware

A fed bear is a dead bear. Keep garbage secured and pet food indoors, take down bird feeders until hibernation. Clean BBQ grills (bears love grills and outdoor fridges.) Good info on living with bears HERE (scroll down.)
http://www.ruralnetwork.net/~yptimes/page8.html
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YPFD News:

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.

Training will resume in the spring.
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VYPA News:

Next meeting June 2018
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Fall Rx Burns planned

BNF:
Cascade Ranger District: Slash piles will be ignited in the following locations: Warm Lake, Yellow pine, Landmark and Crawford. It will be pile burning for two days.

PNF:
The Krassel Ranger District plans to ignite 1,600 acres in the Fourmile drainage, and 2,000 acres in the Bald Hill project area.
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Local Observations:

Monday (Nov 6) snowed over an inch after dark last night, overnight low of 18 degrees, 1.5″ new snow, 5.5″ total snow on the ground this morning. Snowmobile sighted. Partly cloudy during the day, bits of sun felt warm, high 40 degrees. Clearing and getting cold as the sun went down.

Tuesday (Nov 7) overnight low of 4 degrees, clear sky and slight breeze this morning, 5″ of snow still on the ground. No bird calls, but sound of chainsaw off in the distance. High hazy clouds moved in by lunch time. Filtered sun and cool this afternoon, high 37 degrees. Temperature dropping fast after sunset. Quiet day, no birds or wild critters sighted.

Wednesday (Nov 8) clear night, hard freeze. This morning there is still 5″ of snow on the ground, high thin clouds coming in. Heard juncos tweeting. Mail truck made it in close to on time, using So Fork route now that snow has closed Johnson Creek at Landmark. Quiet cloudy afternoon, sort of inverted (can smell vehicle exhaust), high 43 degrees. Drips and drops of rain just at dark. Probably misted on and off all night.

Thursday (Nov 9) probably stayed above freezing all night, misty rain and cloudy this morning. Rain sprinkles and drizzles on and off all day, cloudy and cool. Quiet afternoon, more rain, high 40 degrees. Probably sprinkled on and off all night.

Friday (Nov 10) rain turned to light snow by the time the sun came up, overnight low of 28 degrees. Big fat flakes of snow for a while this morning, about 1/4″ accumulated before it turned to rain and melted. Rain drizzles sometimes mixed with snow during the day. Saw one stellar jay flying thru the neighborhood. Chilly damp day and low clouds, high 35 degrees. Still sprinkling before dark. By midnight it looked like the clouds had sat right down to the ground.

Saturday (Nov 11) overnight low of 31 degrees, mostly cloudy sky this morning. There is still a little over 3″ of snow on the ground. Cloudy damp day, a little snow melting and dripping off the roofs, high 41 degrees. Quiet afternoon and evening, no wild critters or birds around.

Sunday (Nov 12) overnight low of 27 degrees, high thin haze this morning. About 3″ of snow covers the ground in the open, but bare spots growing under trees. Small herd of does on the golf course after lunch time. Cloudy all day, above freezing and melting a little bit of snow, high 44 degrees. Beautiful red sunset (after the sun was down.)
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Scam Alert!

Nov 8, 2017 – rrSue

Received a phone call a few days ago (fellow with heavy accent) with a garbled intro about Medicare. When I asked for details he was vague. When I asked if this was a scam, he got belligerent. When I questioned further, he said, “Never mind.” and hung up. Beware!
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Idaho News:

Movie Stars & Baseball Teams

New documentary recounts the early history of McCall

By Phil Janquart for The Star-News November 9, 2017

1920McCall-a
Photo courtesy McCall Historic Preservation Commission. Photo from 1920 shows downtown McCall crowded with traffic.

McCall once had a horse track, a baseball team and dog sleds that delivered mail. The Hollywood film “Northwest Passage” starring Spencer Tracy was filmed in McCall.

These are tidbits from McCall’s history that have been revived by a documentary produced by the McCall Historic Preservation Commission.

The 30-minute program, “McCall, Idaho: An Early History,” showcases a history that dates back to a time when the Nez Perce and Shoshone tribes spent their summers in the area and fur trappers harvested animal pelts.

That all took place long before there was a ski resort or motorboats cruising Payette Lake, which was named after French-Canadian fur trapper Francois Payette.

The documentary will be available electronically on the city’s website and DVDs will be availabe at McCall City Hall, but no date has been set for its release. The DVD also will be distributed to McCall schools and the McCall Public Library.

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Cascade Legion post to hold Veterans Day observances

The Star-News November 9, 2017

The American Legion in Cascade will observe Veterans Day with a high school assembly, an observance in front of Legion Hall and a flag retirement ceremony.

Members of American Legion Post 60 and Auxiliary Post 60 will conduct a Veterans Day student assembly at Cascade High School on Friday at 10:30 a.m.

They will also host the annual Veterans Day Ceremony on Saturday at 11:11 a.m. in front of Legion Hall, 105 E. Mill St. in Cascade.

The American Legion Post 60 members will also conduct their annual flag retirement ceremony on Saturday at 1 p.m. in the Legion Hall’s east parking lot.

During this event, Legion members will properly dispose of the unserviceable and worn American flags that were turned in during the year by burning them.

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State agency sponsors aviation-themed art contest for youths

The Star-News November 9, 2017

The Idaho Division of Aeronautics is sponsoring a statewide, aviation-themed art contest with the theme “Careers in Aerospace.” The Digital Artwork Category is for ages 14 to 20 year and is a design challenge to create the official logo for the 2018 Aerospace Career Exploration Academy.

The Standard Artwork Category is split into five age groups for youths ranging from age 5 to 18. Contest notices will be sent to schools, Valley County 4-H clubs, Cascade homeschoolers and scout troops.

The deadline to enter either art contest is March 1, 2018. To download an application to enter the art contest, see http://aceacademy.aero/art-contest.

The McCall Chapter of the Idaho Aviation Association will create a satellite campus at which Valley County students interested in STEM education programs and aviation will be able to participate directly in the ACE Academy, chapter president Rob Tucker said.

The McCall campus will be digitally linked to the Boise State University campus for statewide interactive presentations. McCall ACE Academy participants will also experience hands-on activities at the McCall airport,Tucker said.

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Idaho hunter found after vehicle goes off road

11/7/17 AP

Warren, Idaho — Authorities in north-central Idaho say a missing hunter has been found dead outside his vehicle that went off the road.

The Idaho County Sheriff’s Office in a news release Monday says family members found the body of 65-year-old Ernest Wright of Warren on Saturday on a U.S. Forest Service road about 3 miles (5 kilometers) from Warren Summit.

Officials say Wright succumbed to his injuries at the scene of the crash.

Officials say Wright went hunting Friday but didn’t return, causing family and friends to start a search that lasted through the night. They alerted authorities Saturday morning that Wright was missing.

The sheriff’s office called in a helicopter, but family members found Wright before it arrived.

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La Niña is officially here. What does that mean for our winter?

Doyle Rice, USA TODAY, KTVB November 09, 2017

La Niña, the cooler sibling of El Niño, is here.

The La Niña climate pattern — a natural cycle marked by cooler-than-average ocean water in the central Pacific Ocean — is one of the main drivers of weather in the U.S. and around the world, especially during the late fall, winter and early spring.

Federal government forecasters announced La Niña’s formation Thursday. The Climate Prediction Center says this year’s La Niña (translated from Spanish as “little girl”) is on the weak side, but it should still continue through the winter.

This is the second consecutive La Niña winter. Last year’s episode was unusually brief, forming in November and gone by February.

A typical La Niña winter in the U.S. brings cold and snow to the Northwest and unusually dry conditions to most of the southern tier of the U.S., according to the prediction center. The Southeast and Mid-Atlantic also tend to see warmer-than-average temperatures during a La Niña winter.

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Canal policies threaten federal flood insurance in Idaho

Local News 8 – Nov 10, 2017

Boise, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has threatened to suspend the National Flood Insurance Program in Idaho.

The program has more than 8,000 enrollees in Idaho and insures structures worth more than $2.1 billion.

Idaho Department of Water Resources Deputy Director Mat Weaver told the Idaho Water Resource Board the threat revolves around a conflict between state law and federal law regarding the “operation, maintenance and repair of canals and flood ways.”

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Hundreds volunteer to help restore Table Rock landscape

by KBOI News Staff Saturday, November 11th 2017

Hundreds of volunteers showed up at Table Rock Saturday to help restore the landscape.

In 2016 the Table Rock Fire ripped through the foothills blackening everything in its path.

The volunteers spent their morning planting native species to rehabilitate the land.

The Bureau of Land Management, Idaho Fish and Game, City of Boise and Land Trust of the Treasure Valley organized the habitat restoration.

They provided all of the necessary tools, plants and equipment.

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Mining News:

Drilling Down on Safety

November 6 Midas Gold

Midas Gold has been exploring the Stibnite Gold Project site since 2009. Our exploration work has included an extensive drilling program. This has allowed us to better understand what type of minerals exist at the site and in what quantities. More recently, we’ve used drilling to understand the geotechnical structure of the soil and underlying bedrock, so our engineering team can make sure future facilities are designed with the exact conditions of site in mind.

The information we gather through drilling will arm us with the data we need to build the safest project possible. And while we’ve been collecting this information, we’ve made sure to do it in the safest manner possible.

Earlier this month, we wrapped up our drilling program for the season and we are happy to report that not only did we collect crucial information we did it without any safety incidents or unintended impacts to the environment. This is only possible because of our wonderful partner, T&J Drilling. Wehave worked with them since 2012 and from the moment we started working with them they embraced our values of safety and protecting the environment. In fact, for the last 22 months we have had zero safety incidents up at the site and we have gone five and a half years without a reportable spill. This wouldn’t be possible without strong partnerships with our contractors and suppliers.

To show our appreciation, we made a special plaque for T&J Drilling using materials from the site – including a piece of stibnite from one of their drill sites. We are honored to work with such a thoughtful and caring team and appreciate all they are doing to help make the Stibnite Gold Project a reality.

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Public Lands:

Change in the Landscape

Payette program restores vast swaths of forests

By Max Silverson for The Star-News November 9, 2017

Andre Snyder peered into a cavernous culvert recently installed on the west branch of the Weiser River west of New Meadows. The 14-foot wide culvert was installed to replace the previous four-foot culvert that sat in its place for years, blocking fish passage.

The culvert is just one example of how an initiative by the Payette National Forest is restoring the land and water in large swaths of national forest.

Since 2012, the Payette has selected tracts of land for what are known as Collaborative Landscape Forest Restoration Projects.

Two projects are underway, one is nearly to start, and two more are in the planning stages spanning nearly 1 million acres, half of which are on the Payette.

Commercial timber cutting is not used on all landscape projects, but when it is, the projects do not operate like typical timber sales, Payette Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said.

The projects operate under what are called stewardship contracts, which allow the Payette to exchange goods for services, he said.

Timber value is traded for forest restoration projects such as thinning, chipping, culvert replacement to allow for fish passage, taking roads out of service and rerouting of roads that cause erosion and sediment runoff, Harris said.

The projects operate under the umbrella name of the Weiser-Little Salmon Headwaters Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Project.

continued:
See a video about the projects at

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Payette archaeologist to discuss historical sites Nov. 16

The Star-News November 9, 2017

An archaeologist will discuss sites of historical significance in the Payette National Forest on Thursday, Nov. 16, at 6:30 p.m. at The Barn Owl Books and Gifts.

The discussion will focus on how to develop educational interests of visitors while maintaining the wilderness character of the land.

The event, the first in a new series titled “Outdoor Conversations,” is co-sponsored by the Selway-Bitterroot Frank Church Foundation and the McCall Public Library.

The Barn Owl Books and Gifts is located at 626 N. Third St., Suite 110. Refreshments will be served.

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Boise and Payette National Forests Begin Christmas Tree Permit Sales Nov. 18

Boise, Idaho, Oct. 27, 2017

The Payette and Boise National Forest vendors will begin selling Christmas tree permits Saturday, Nov. 18. On Monday, Nov. 20, permits will be available at Payette and Boise National Forest Offices. Christmas tree permits are $10, and valid through Dec. 25.

Each permit allows one tree to be cut, with a limit of three permits per family. The maximum height of a permitted tree is 12 feet. Permits are valid for use on both National Forests – a permit purchased at a Boise National Forest office, can be used on the Payette and vice versa. A Christmas tree permit is for personal use only – commercial use is prohibited. Permits are not refundable.

Harvesting a Christmas tree is a fun adventure and often a traditional family event. Please be certain you are fully prepared for winter conditions and winter travel before heading out. All purchasers are provided with information about where a Christmas tree may be harvested, as well as restrictions and helpful tips.

Fourth-graders receive a Free Permit! In coordination with the “Every Kid in a Park” program, fourth-graders can receive a free Christmas tree permit. The Forest Service is among several federal agencies supporting the Every Kid in a Park initiative which is a nationwide call to action to build the next generation of outdoor enthusiasts. The initiative provides a free entry pass to many fee locations throughout the nation. Fourth-grade students, with the assistance of an adult, can register for the initiative at http://www.EveryKidinaPark.gov.

To receive a free Christmas tree permit, the fourth-grader and a parent must go to a Forest Service office in person with the “voucher” they received from the online registration.

Commercial vendors do not except the vouchers – free Christmas tree permits to registered fourth-graders are only available at Forest Service offices. Free Christmas tree permits cannot be sent through the mail or electronically.

Safety Guidelines:

If an unusually heavy snowfall occurs in southwest Idaho, and forest roads become a safety concern for the public, some areas may be closed early to Christmas tree gathering as Forest roads are not plowed. Call ahead and check websites for road conditions before heading out. Please do not block private or county roadways at any time.

A Few Reminders when traveling to the Forests:

* Use the Christmas tree brochures with instructions provided by offices and vendors.
* Practice winter survival and driving techniques.
* Bring the right tools, such as a saw and a shovel, so the tree can be cut to within 6” of the ground’s surface.
* Take along emergency equipment, plenty of food and water, and try to use a 4-wheel drive vehicle if you are planning to travel in snow country.
* Always advise neighbors and family friends of the route you intend to take, and include a map of your destination, and the time that you plan to be gone.
* Be prepared for the possibility of a long day as time may be needed to search for the “perfect tree.”
* According to Idaho state law, any vehicle carrying a load that extends more than 4 feet past the tailgate or end of the car, must display a red or florescent orange flag tied on the end of the load to caution other drivers.
* Much of the Boise National Forest has burned in recent years. Please help our Forests with recovery and restoration efforts by not cutting green trees in burned areas. Check the alerts and notices pages of the Forest websites for closure areas.###

See list of offices and vendors on the following pages.

Christmas Tree Permit Locations Payette National Forest Offices / https://www.fs.usda.gov/payette
All Payette National Forest offices are open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. For more information contact any of the District Offices. (Vendors and offices closed on Thanksgiving)

Council Ranger District Office
2092 Highway 95, Council, ID
(208) 253-0100

New Meadows Ranger District Office
3674 Highway 95, New Meadows, ID
(208) 347-0300

Weiser Ranger District Office
851 E Ninth St., Weiser, ID
(208) 549-4200

McCall Ranger District Office
102 West Lake St., McCall, ID
(208) 634-0400

Payette National Forest Vendors

Weiser: Ridley’s Food and Drug 208) 549-1332
652 E First St., Weiser, ID
Open: Everyday 7 a.m. – 11 p.m.

Cambridge: Jay’s Sinclair (208) 257-5000
Corner of Hwy 95 and Hwy 71, Cambridge, ID
Open: Everyday 7 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Council: Farmer’s Supply Co-op (208) 253-4266
2030 N. Highway 95, Council, ID
Open: Everyday 6 a.m. – 10 p.m.

McCall: Albertsons (208) 634-8166
132 E. Lake Street, McCall, ID
Open: Everyday 6:30 a.m. -11 p.m.

New Meadows: C & M Lumber (208) 347-3648
3625 Walker Ln, New Meadows, ID
Open: Mon – Sat 8 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Christmas Tree Permit Locations Boise National Forest Offices / https://www.fs.usda.gov/boise
Interagency Visitor Information Center (208) 373-4007

Sells permits for the Payette and Boise National Forests
1387 South Vinnell Way
(BLM State Office – West of Walmart on Overland Road, Boise)
Hours: M-F – 7:45 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. (Vendors and offices are closed Thanksgiving Day)

The Idaho City Ranger District (208) 392-6681
3833 Highway 21
Idaho City, ID
Hours: M-F 8 a.m. – 4:30p.m
The Idaho City Ranger District may not be open on weekends.

Check with local vendors for weekend hours.

Lowman Ranger District (208) 259-3361
7359 Highway 21
Lowman, ID 83637
Hours: M-F 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Emmett Ranger District (208) 365-7000
1805 Highway 16, Room 5
Emmett, ID 83617
Hours: M-F 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Cascade Ranger District (208) 382-7400
540 North Main Street
Cascade, ID 83611
Hours: M-F 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Mountain Home Ranger District (208) 587-7961
3080 Industrial Way
Mountain Home, ID 83647
Hours: M-F 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Christmas Tree Permit Locations Boise National Forest Vendors

Idaho City Grocery (208) 392-4426
3868 Highway 21
Idaho City, ID 83631
Open: Everyday, 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Tom’s Service/Sinclair (208) 392-4900
243 State Highway 21
Idaho City, ID 83631
Open: Everyday, 5 a.m. – 11 p.m.

Donna’s Place (208) 392-9777
200 Main Street
Idaho City, ID 83631
Open: Everyday, 6 a.m.-10 p.m.

Donna’s Place (208) 392-9666
110 E Granite Street
Placerville, ID 83666
Open: Everyday, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.

East Cleveland Beverage (208) 459-6442
2518 E Cleveland
Caldwell, ID 83605
Open: Everyday, 6 a.m. – 10 p.m.

B & W Fuels (208) 365-2291
1900 N. Washington
Emmett, ID 83617
Open: Sun – Thursday, 6 a.m. – 9 p.m.; Fri-Sat, 6 a.m. -10 p.m.

D & B Supply (208) 963-7035
111 State Highway 16
Emmett, ID 83617
Open: Mon – Sat, 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.; Sunday 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Christmas Tree Permit Locations Boise National Forest Vendors

Valley View Chevron (208) 793-4321
459 State Highway 55
Horseshoe Bend, ID 83629
Open: Mon-Thursday, – 5:30 a.m. – 10-p.m.; Friday – Sunday 5:30 a.m. – 11 p.m.

Ray’s Corner Market (208) 793-2391
445 State Highway 55
Horseshoe Bend, ID 83629
Open Everyday: 6 a.m. – 10 p.m.

Garden Valley Chevron (208) 462-3869
P.O. Box 447
Garden Valley, ID 83622
Beginning Nov.20 – open: Everyday – 7 a.m. – 9 p.m.
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Critter News:

MCPAWS launches endowment fund, legacy society

The Star-News November 9, 2017

MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter has launched two new programs to help raise money for the shelter and honor those who donate.

The MCPAWS Endowment Fund, also known as McFund, is an investment fund designed to provide a permanent, consistent source of income to help the shelter obtain long-term financial sustainability. The growth income will help support the operations at MCPAWS.

The minimum gift is $5,000. Endowment gifts can be established as an outright gift or through estate planning products.

The MCPAWS Legacy Society honors those who contribute to the endowment fund with a plaque on the Legacy Society Wall at the animal shelter.

For more information, call 208-634-3647 or email Amber Kostoff at director@mcpaws.org or Kattie Kingsley at devdirector@mcpaws.org

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Pet Talk – Chemotherapy and your pet

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Nov 10, 2017 – IME

Chemotherapy is the use of various drugs to destroy tumor cells, but leave normal cells OK. The use of chemotherapy depends on several factors. These include the type of tumor, its location, the condition of the patient, if the tumor has spread to other areas of the body (metastasis), personal beliefs of the pet’s owner and financial restraints. Chemotherapy can be used with or without surgery, depending on the tumor type. Most often, chemotherapy is used after a malignant tumor has been removed from your pet. This is to ensure that any metastatic cells are killed.

Chemotherapy works by damaging rapidly growing cells. Rapidly dividing cancer cells are typically more sensitive to chemotherapy than normally dividing healthy cells. The effective use of chemotherapy is a balance between killing cancer cells and minimizing side effects on the patient’s healthy cells.

Chemotherapeutic agents, or drugs, are commonly administered together in specific protocols that maximize destruction of tumor cells. The protocols may be altered to fit the needs of the individual patient or changed based on the tumor type, the patient’s health status, the veterinarian’s experience and the owner’s constraints. Discuss your pet’s protocol with your veterinarian to be sure you understand all possible side effects, the treatment schedule and costs, as well as monitoring any problems with the drugs.

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Wildlife moving into foothills

Dean Johnson, KTVB November 09, 2017


A pack of wolves is confirmed to have eaten a cow in the Boise foothills.

Boise – It’s rare here in Idaho, but can happen: coming face-to-face with a mountain lion or even a wolf. However, it’s something Idaho Fish and Game says people need to be aware with winter on the horizon.

“We’re seeing deer moving down. We’re seeing elk moving down, winter is kinda starting up and just like an 18-year-old kid, they’re going to follow the food,” Jim Hayden, a biologist with Idaho Fish and Game says.

One of those predators following their food into the foothills are wolves. Earlier this week, the Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services says an investigator with their agency found the tracks of a pack of wolves next to the carcass of a cow. The investigator however could not confirm if the pack killed the cow.

The livestock was found near Ourada Ranch Road, which is just a few miles north of the Hidden Springs subdivision.

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Rancher kills wolf attacking livestock in Ferry County

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 9, 2017

A rancher has killed an adult female gray wolf as it was caught in the act of attacking livestock on private grazing grounds in northern Ferry County.

The livestock producer reported the incident on Oct. 27, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife officials confirmed in a report released today.

Even though the wolf in that portion of the state was protected by state endangered species rules, it is lawful to kill a wolf in self-defense or to protect other people, livestock or pets.

WDFW enforcement investigated the producer’s action and found it to be consistent with state regulations.

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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

First week of November 2017
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Another wolf shot in Oregon; investigation continues in unsolved cases

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 7, 2017

Another gray wolf has been found dead in Oregon, marking the third such unsolved death of a federally protected wolf in the past year, state and federal wildlife officials told the Associated Press. Another wolf was shot by a hunter who claimed self-defense.

Here’s more from the latest report:

The wolf was found dead Oct. 29 in Klamath County on state forest land. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has offered a $5,000 reward for information on the killing, authorities said Monday.

The wolf was known to biologists as OR-25 and was wearing a tracking collar. It was believed to have killed a calf at a private ranch near Prospect earlier this year, according to state wildlife officials.

OR-33, another collared male, was found shot dead April 23 about 20 miles northwest of Klamath Falls in Fremont-Winema National Forest. OR-28, a collared female, was found dead Oct. 6, 2016, in Fremont-Winema National Forest near Summer Lake.

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Gun encourages self-defense claim in shooting of wolf

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 6, 2017

An elk hunter got the benefit of the doubt for killing a wolf in self-defense in northeastern Oregon last month, the first time that’s happened since the predator began migrating to the state in the late 1990s, state police said Thursday.

The story from the Associated Press says the man shot the animal initially thinking it was a coyote. He said three wolves were trotting toward him. Feeling threatened, he shot one of the wolves, an 83-pound female, at 27 yards. The other two wolves ran away at the shot, he said.

The hunter detailed the incident in an interview with Bill Monroe of Oregon Live and said he was “terrified” as the wolves advanced. There’s no reason to doubt his story.

No charges were pressed after the the hunter reported the incident and it was investigated.

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Welcome to Wolf Watch

Pinedale Online

11/2/17: Oregon hunter kills wolf in self-defense
(By Oregon State Police) A hunter from Clackamas had an encounter with three wolves while out elk hunting in the Starkey Wildlife Management Unit in Union County. The hunter initially assumed the animals that were moving around him were coyotes. One of the animals began to run directly at him while another moved around him. The hunter stated he focused on the one running directly at him. He began to scream at it, and fearing for his life shot it one time. He said what he still believed to be a coyote died from the single shot. He stated that after the shot the other two disappeared out of sight. They later came to the conclusion the animals were wolves and reported the incident to the Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The case will not be prosecuted as this is believed to be an incidence of self-defense…… (Click on the link above for the complete story.)

10/31/17: California Cattle Depredation
(By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online!) Three months after California confirmed the presence of its first wolf pack, state officials have now confirmed the pack’s first livestock depredation on cattle. While officials were investigating the depredation on cattle, a wolf remained nearby. Although wolves are an endangered species in California (pursuant to both federal and state laws) state agencies have no program in place to compensate for livestock losses to wolves. The cattle owner has now moved his cattle out of the area……. (Click on the link above for the complete story.)

10/26/17: Wolf news roundup 10/27/2017
(By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online!) By Thursday afternoon, Oct. 26, there have been 32 wolves taken in Wyoming’s wolf hunting season (in the trophy zone), and six hunt areas are now closed, while six hunt areas remain open until the quota is reached or the season ends Dec. 31. In addition to the wolves taken by hunters in the trophy zone, 23 wolves have been killed in the state’s predator zone – a number that includes wolves killed in agency control actions as well as hunter harvest. More wolf news from Minnesota, Washington, Oregon and Germany…… (Click on the link above for the complete story.)
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GOP bill would end wolf management in Wisconsin

By Todd Richmond – 11/9/17 AP

Madison, Wis. — Some northern Wisconsin legislators are proposing a bill that would end the state’s efforts to manage wolves and force police to ignore wolf killings, unless the federal government removes the animals from the endangered species list.

The Republican lawmakers — Reps. Adam Jarchow, Mary Felzkowski and Romaine Quinn along with Sen. Tom Tiffany — released the proposal Wednesday. They said in a memo to their colleagues seeking co-sponsors that wolves “have taken over northern Wisconsin.”

“They are depredating our deer population, killing livestock and attacking family pets,” they said in the memo.

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see also:

Wolf advocacy groups rip bill to end management

11/9/17 AP

Madison, Wis. — The Latest on a Republican bill to end Wisconsin’s wolf management efforts.

story:
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter 11/10/2017

Bill would end state protections for Wisconsin’s growing wolf population

“Alpha Male” Wolf Shot. Now What Happens?

Raising Livestock in Areas With Wolves Won’t Be Easy
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Loaded for pheasant, Montana hunter kills charging grizzly bear with 12 gauge

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 7, 2017

While bird hunting along Montana’s Rocky Mountain Front, a sportsman must consider being loaded for bear as well as pheasant.

On Saturday near Pendroy, a pheasant hunter shot and killed a grizzly bear that charged him after it was surprised by the hunter’s bird dog, according to Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks.

The incident occurred after the resident hunter from Bozeman had shot a pheasant near an irrigation canal on a farm almost 20 miles north of Choteau.

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Bear spray nozzle fails, but still helps elk hunter deter charging grizzly

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 7, 2017

Perhaps the potential for repelling a grizzly attack with a can of bear spray hadn’t been fully explored, until this….

An elk hunter near Livingston, Montana, was able to deploy bear spray at a bear that had charged and had him on the ground, but the nozzle of the spray didn’t work properly in his frenzy so he ended up throwing the canister at the bear, according to initial reports. The hunter was bit on his hand and wrist, but he’s OK, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Park Warden Sergeant Matt Wemple told the Associated Press.

Wemple said the man was tracking an elk on Saturday in the Rock Creek-Tom Miner area after shooting it the day prior. He reported getting separated from his hunting party before the bear charged him from about 30 yards away and knocked it him to the ground.

continued:
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A ‘Sub’-urban cowboy and his coffee

Brian Holmes, KTVB November 08, 2017


Dan Weston makes his coffee runs on four hooves instead of four cylinders. (Photo: Mike di Donato)

If you live in the middle of Meridian, Idaho’s fastest growing city, and you own a horse there are only so many ways to get them out for exercise.

One way Dan Weston does it is a bareback amble through town.

Every chance he gets, Dan, along with his daughter Alexis, and his friend Sherry, head out not across the south 40, but across the street and into the neighborhood to the north.

continued:
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Moose poaching prompts investigation by Idaho authorities

11/9/17 AP

Coeur d’Alene, Idaho — The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is investigating the illegal hunting of two moose in the northwestern part of the state.

The Coeur d’Alene Press reports a cow and a calf were shot last week in an area east of Lewiston.

Conservation Officer Rick Cooper says the moose were likely shot from the road, and only a small portion of the meat was taken.

continued:
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US sage grouse policy heading back to square one

By Scott Sonner – 11/11/17 AP

Sparks, Nev. — Federal scientists and land managers who’ve been crafting strategies to protect a ground-dwelling bird’s habitat across the American West for nearly two decades are going back to the drawing board under a new Trump administration edict to reassess existing plans condemned by ranchers, miners and energy developers.

Federal officials are wrapping up a series of public meetings with three sessions starting Tuesday in Utah ahead of a Nov. 27 cutoff for comment on Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s order last month to consider revisions to land management amendments for the greater sage grouse that were adopted under the Obama administration.

Zinke says he wants to make sure the amendments don’t harm local economies in 11 western states and allow the states to have maximum control over the efforts within their borders.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Hunters reminded to report on deer, elk, pronghorn tags

By Mike Demick, Conservation Information Supervisor
Monday, November 6, 2017

With most big game hunting seasons winding down, Idaho Fish and Game reminds hunters who purchased a 2017 deer, elk, or pronghorn tag to report the results of their big game hunts as soon as possible.

Hunters can file their reports online at https://idfg.idaho.gov/hunt/report or call 1-877-268-9365 and speak to a live operator 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Hunters are required to file a report for each tag they purchased whether they went hunting or not. Reporting is required either 10 days after a deer, elk or pronghorn is harvested, or ten days following the end of the season for which a tag is valid.

To file reports, hunters need to know their tag number or hunting license number, the number of days they hunted, the game management units they hunted in, the date they harvested, and the number of antler points on the animal they harvested, or the length of the horns for pronghorn in inches.

With some hunts continuing through the end of December, reminders will be sent in the coming weeks to prompt late season hunters to file their reports when their hunts are over.

Promptly received hunting and harvest data provides Fish and Game a more complete picture of game populations to base decisions for next year’s season. Without this timely information, managers are forced to be more conservative when making future hunting opportunities available. In addition, hunters like having harvest estimates well before the application period for fall controlled hunts. If Fish and Game receives hunter reports early, wildlife managers are able to complete the harvest estimates sooner so hunters can plan their hunting trips next fall.

source:
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Bigfoot sighting reported in California

by Alexandra Lehnert, KMPH Friday, October 13th 2017

Fresno County, Calif. (KMPH) – We’ve all heard the stories of Bigfoot: people saying they’ve seen the legendary beast all over the country, and now, another sighting in the Golden State.

According to paranormal expert Jeffrey Gonzalez, the most recent sighting was near Avocado Lake.

Gonzalez says a local farmer saw a family of five or six Bigfoot running on his ranch in the middle of the night.

“One of them, which was extremely tall, had a pig over its shoulder. And the five scattered and the one with the pig was running so fast it didn’t see an irrigation pipe and it tripped, with the pig flying over,” says Gonzalez.

continued w/photos:
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CampingBigfoot-a
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Tips & Advice:

Fresh Cut Trees

The United States Department of Agriculture urges you to keep your tree in water while indoors to maintain freshness, reduce fire hazards and to enjoy its beauty throughout the holiday season. If the base dries out, resin will form over the cut end and the tree will not be able to absorb water causing it to dry out quickly. Most fresh-cut trees should last at least five weeks before drying out if properly cared for.

source:
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Nov 5, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Nov 5, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: There is still plenty of time to order your 2018 Yellow Pine Calendar (Deadline Nov 20th.) Please reply to the Calendar email or send me an email with number wanted, name and address, with “2018 Calendar” in the subject line. Price is the same as last year $25 with postage. These calendars are custom printed on thick card-stock (in the USA!) photos taken around Yellow Pine by Local Color Photography. Thanks for your support.

Village News:

Mail Days M-W-F

Starting November 1st, the mail is being delivered 3 days a week.
— — — —

Snow Storm & Power Outage Nov 2nd

We had about 3-4″ of heavy wet snow fall late Thursday night into Friday morning, then turned to rain. Power went out at 630am Friday. Idaho Power’s 1030am report said they were searching for cause of outage. The 1230pm recording said they had located a downed tree in a remote area and had called in extra resources. The 430pm Idaho Power recording said the extra resources were on site, estimated restoration “late evening.” The 830pm recording estimated restoration between 1030pm and 1230am. The 1030pm recording said the crews were finishing up repairs and estimated restoration by 1230am. Power back on at 1256am. (Rained and snowed all day Friday.) Total outage nearly 19.5 hours.
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YP Tavern B-day Party

“A power outage in Yellow Pine didn’t keep us from celebrating Birthdays for Nicki and Allan. Also we were celebrating the end of Hunting Season with our Alaska friends who have now left for the winter.”
photo gallery at the Yellow Pine Tavern

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The Corner

The Corner is closed for the season. Stop by if you need wood permits. We will reopen after we have the baby.
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Bear Aware

Bears are still around around and looking for food, recent reports of “something out there in the night”. Keep garbage secured and pet food indoors, take down bird feeders until hibernation. Clean BBQ grills (bears love grills and outdoor fridges.) Good info on living with bears HERE (scroll down,)
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YPFD News:

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
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VYPA News:

Next meeting June 2018
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Fall Rx Burns planned

BNF:
Cascade Ranger District: Slash piles will be ignited in the following locations: Warm Lake, Yellow pine, Landmark and Crawford. It will be pile burning for two days.

PNF:
The Krassel Ranger District plans to ignite 1,600 acres in the Fourmile drainage, and 2,000 acres in the Bald Hill project area.
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 30) did not go below freezing overnight, overcast this morning. A few breaks in the clouds and chilly breeze before lunch. Bits of sunshine in the afternoon, partly cloudy and chilly breeze, high 52 degrees. Steller jay looking for handouts, a few nutcrackers calling from the trees. Chipmunk spotted scurrying around, pine squirrel calling from a tree. Light traffic and mostly quiet evening.

Tuesday (Oct 31) overnight low of 20 degrees, not much frost this morning (dry), and high thin hazy clouds. Thicker darker clouds by lunch time. Chipmunk dashing about, heard a nutcracker call in the distance. A few breaks in the clouds later in the afternoon, cooler temperatures, high 45 degrees. One pint-sized Trick-or-Treater – she was scary looking, dressed like “Chucky” with scars and a bloody knife (that Dad was carrying.) Dark overcast at sunset. Some cracks in the clouds after moonrise, enough to make the sky look rather ‘spooky’ for Halloween.

Wednesday (Nov 1) did not go below freezing overnight, gray overcast this morning, not much dew. Heard a clarks nutcracker calling to the north east. Quiet morning. Fire siren tested at noon. Cloudy cool afternoon, high of 46 degrees. Quiet evening, cloudy.

Thursday (Nov 2) overnight low of 27 degrees, overcast and a few flakes of snow falling late morning. Small flock of clarks nutcrackers visiting. Snow flakes changed over to list mist, then light sprinkles, then light rain over the course of the day, high of 37 degrees. Snow mixed with the rain just before dark. Quiet day, wildlife hunkered down. Snowed pretty good for a while, about an inch before midnight. Snowed a bunch during the night and the power was out by 630am.

Friday (Nov 3) (power out) overnight low of 32 degrees, 2.5″ new snow on ground (there was 3-4 inches before the rain started melting it). Rain turned to rain/snow mix all morning, then big fat flakes of heavy wet snow after lunch. Mail truck made it in by 1245pm. Could hear trees falling to the north east and north west around 130pm. Light rain/snow mix all afternoon. Saw a few starlings. By afternoon the clouds were so low it appeared foggy. Snowing big flakes and 1/2″ new snow on the ground by 530pm (3.5″ total on the ground), high 33 degrees. Snowed until after dark. Power on by 1am. More snow fell, another 1/2″ new during the night.

Saturday (Nov 4) overnight low of 25 degrees, 4″ total snow on the ground this morning and partly cloudy. Cool day, clouds came in, not much melting, high 34 degrees. Heard a clark’s nutcracker after lunch, saw squirrel tracks in the snow. Chilly cloudy evening. Time Change!

Sunday (Nov 5) snowing by 9am (new time) overnight low of 25 degrees, 1/4″ new snow by 1030am, 4″ total snow on the ground. Light snow falling all day, not much above freezing, high 35 degrees. Very quiet day, no birds, critters or people around. Snowing pretty good after dark.
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RIP:

Mona Peterson

1941-2017

Mona Peterson

October 27th our beloved mom and wife went to be with our Lord and Savior. She was born at home to Frank and Elsie Braddock in Reeder, ND, joining her brothers Cecil and Dale. At 18 she moved to Idaho and met the love of her life, Robert Peterson.

Married April 17, 1960, just before leaving for their honeymoon, her mom told her “wherever your husband’s job takes him, you will go also”. Taking this advice we moved to numerous areas in the summers to be with Dad while logging.

Tammy Lynn was born in 1961 and six years later Kari Ann arrived.

Mona was passionate about canning and making jelly, as well as creating afghans for family and friends. She was very involved with the Lutheran Church, Hospital Auxiliary and Idaho Women in Timber. She worked at Wheeler’s Valley Pharmacy for 25 years. She adored her granddaughters Lauren and Marlee and her son-in-law Ed. Her two cats never left her side. Her kind, devoted husband would often bring one to visit while in the care center. We will all miss her joyful, giving heart.

A memorial service will be held at 2:00 pm on Saturday, November 4th, at the Shepherd of the Mountains Church in Cascade.

Published in Idaho Statesman on Nov. 1, 2017

source:
[h/t B]
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Rachel Melrose (Loomis) Stone

RachelMelroseLoomisStone

Rachel Melrose (Loomis) Stone, 93, loving Mother, Grandmother, and Great Grandmother, joined her Lord, husband, siblings and friends when she passed peacefully in her sleep on Oct. 3, 2017 in Spokane Valley, Wash.

Born Nov. 26, 1923 in Roseberry, Rachel was the daughter of the late George “Mervyn” and Nora Loomis of Donnelly.

While attending Boise Business College in 1942, she met her husband of 61 years, Col. James Sherman Stone. Their marriage on July 31, 1943 was the first wedding in the chapel at Mountain Home AFB.

Rachel was a giving person and active volunteer throughout her life. She belonged to the Officer’s Wives Club at each AFB and the Beta Sigma Phi Sorority.

Professionally she worked as a secretary, in real estate sales, and as a Mary Kay consultant. As a proud convert to the Catholic Church she believed in the power of prayer, frequent attendance at Mass and recitation of the Rosary. Rachel gave back to her faith by teaching catechism and active involvement with the Catholic Church Altar Society.

Rachel was proud of her lifetime commitment to volunteerism. She was the first to support her children, grandchildren and/or community organizations with her personal time or financial donations.

She was instrumental in the establishment of “Meals on Wheels” in Buena Park, Calif., and was nominated as the Orange County Diocese “Woman of the Year” in honor of her faith and commitment.

Rachel’s volunteer efforts also included Catholic Charities, Girl and Boy Scouts of America, Special Olympics, Wounded Soldiers, youth sports programs including Little Miss Softball, Buena Park High School Athletics and Fine Arts, Buena Park and Fullerton City Commissions and served on the Board of Directors of Fullerton Fountains.

Rachel took pride in her role as a wife and mother and frequently said “One of my most important goals as a parent was to get a college education for my children” and she was proud of her four children graduating with bachelor’s and advanced degrees. She attended most high school and college graduations for her children and grandchildren with great pride.

Rachel enjoyed traveling even if just a road trip in the family car. She traveled to Rome, Italy with friends and enjoyed cruises to Jamaica and Mexico. She either lived in or visited all 50 States in the United States and most recently enjoyed checking social media to experience the travels and activities of her kids and grandkids.

Rachel is survived by her four children: son Don Stone of Lopez Island, Wash.; daughters Sharon Israel of California, Terry Mahoney of Spokane Valley, Wash., and Jeanie Marie Urban of Concord, Calif.; Son-in-law Brian Mahoney of Washington: 10 grandchildren: Nathan Stone of Wash., Shannon Miller of California, Zanna Grandinetti of Washington, Shaun Israel of California, Kevin Mahoney of Washington, Amanda Uy of California, Jessica Israel of California, Tessa Mahoney of Idaho, Danny Urban of California, and Kelly Urban of California; 14 great-grandchildren: Ellie and Sammy; Delaney, Graham, Aeden and Blakely; Kiersten, Brodie and Brooklyn; Tyler and Ethan; Annabelle, Isabelle and Samantha; plus numerous nieces and nephews.

Preceding Rachel in death were her husband, parents Nora and Mervyn Loomis, siblings Elton and Myron Loomis of Donnelly, Idaho, Hazel Loomis (Withers) Hackler of Cascade, son-in-law Cliff Israel of Calif., daughter-in-law Carole Stone of Wash. and great-grandson Anthony of California.

Recitation of the Holy Rosary will be held Nov. 3, 2017 at 7 p.m. at Heikkila-Carver Funeral Chapel in McCall, with viewing beginning at 5 p.m. until the conclusion of the Rosary at 8 p.m.. Mass of Christian Burial will be held on Saturday, Nov. 4, 2017, beginning at noon at Our Lady of the Lake Catholic Church in McCall with the Reverend Steve Rukavina and Deacon Floyd Loomis officiating.

Graveside services will follow at Holmes Cemetery southeast of Donnelly at approximately 1:30 p.m. Please join family and friends for a dessert reception immediately following the graveside service at Donnelly Bible Church, Donnelly.

Flowers are welcome. Please direct flower deliveries to Heikkila-Carver Funeral Chapel, McCall, Idaho by Friday, Nov. 3. If you desire to make a donation in Rachel’s honor, please donate to the Roseberry Idaho Historical Society or any organization committed to helping others.

To leave a condolence or message for Rachel’s family, please visit http://heikkilafuneralchapel.com.

Arrangements in care of Heikkila-Carver Funeral Home, McCall.

source The Star-News:
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Letter to Share:

Commissioner Cruickshank’s October Newsletter

From the desk of Commissioner Cruickshank, 11/4/2017

Monday October 2nd
I attended the morning session of the Economic Summit in McCall.
This afternoon I attended a Name Clearing Hearing in front of a Hearing Officer on a former employee of Valley County.
This evening I sent an email to the Idaho Administrative Rules Committee on a proposed rule change that appears to impact counties when Public Hearings are utilized.

Tuesday October 3rd
I responded to some questions on activities I had mentioned in my September Newsletter. These topics were on Active Shooter presentations and the State and Local Tax Deduction being looked at in Federal Tax Reform.

Monday October 9th, Columbus Day
I received a call from staff in Congressman Labrador’s Washington DC office to discuss the Forestry Bill being worked on by the House. He explained the concerns I had on how some of the lands would be managed as it appeared to take some discussion away from local governments on land management.
I sent emails to a group of elected officials who had attended the NACo Annual Conference in July to follow up with any questions they had after attending a NACo event for the first time.

Tuesday October 10th
Today I flew to La Jolla, California to attend a NACo Executive Board event.
This afternoon I participated in a NACo Transportation conference call to discuss legislative issues concerning transportation funding and discuss the need for the funding to be extended as the last authorization of Federal Funding was expiring.

Wednesday October 11th
Today was a networking event with sponsors of NACo. This evening I attended a dinner reception to thank the sponsors for their support of NACo.

Thursday October 12th
Today I attended the presentation by various panels on issues the NACo membership is experiencing to highlight where sponsors could possibly assist in various fields. Panels included Partnerships for Data-Driven Justice, Establishing Alliances to Fight the Opioid Epidemic, Joining Together for Better Individual Health Outcomes, Poverty and Early Childhood Development and Leveraging Transportation Solutions for Economic Resilience.
Late in the afternoon we broke into various groups to brainstorm potential areas for partnering with sponsors to assist with efforts on the topics presented by the panels.
We then listened to a NACo Business update on Priorities and Goals for 2018 by NACo.
We ended the evening with a dinner event.

Friday October 13th
I flew home from La Jolla.

Saturday October 14th
I sent Thank You emails to the sponsors I had connected with the last two days for attending this event and their assistance with NACo programs which help all counties.

Monday October 16th
Commissioner day today. Please find a record of the meeting minutes, once approved, on the Valley County website at Valley County, Idaho | Official Site Click on the Commissioner section and then click on Agendas and Minutes to find the day of the meeting you are interested in.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday October 17th
I started my day reviewing questions for Judge applicants. As Chairman of the Valley County Commissioners I sit on a Magistrate Commission to interview applicants for filling a vacancy in a Judge seat within the 4th District. The 4th District encompasses Ada, Boise, Elmore and Valley Counties. If any Judge seat becomes open in these areas we are tasked with selecting a replacement.
Valley County Recreation Director and myself then met with the Executive Director of the Winter Wildlands Alliance to discuss their recent filing of a lawsuit against the Payette National Forest Winter Travel Plan. The Executive Director explained their reasoning for filing the lawsuit. Of particular interest to Valley County is the potential impact of the winter recreation which recent studies have shown to be 30 plus million in economic benefit to Valley County.

Wednesday October 18th
I researched to see if Valley County had received funding from the Woody Bio-Mass Utilization Partnership (WBUP) organization who was to reimburse Valley County for a Bio-Mass Feedstock Supply study we conducted. We had received $2,500.00 of a $5,000.00 request.

Thursday October 19th
I attended the WBUP meeting in Cascade. Discussions were held on the Bio-Mass Campus potential, what markets might be available for Bio-Mass, an upcoming event in November to be held in Grangeville, Idaho on Bio-Mass and I learned that the $2,500.00 left owing Valley County would be coming in the near future.

Monday October 23rd
Commissioner day today. Please see the minutes once approved on the Valley County website.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday October 24th
I attended a meeting at the Payette National Forest Supervisors office with the American Forest Resource Commission (AFRC) to hear projected Timber Harvest sales on the Boise, Payette and Salmon Challis National Forests. Attendees included Adams County, Timber Industry, Idaho Loggers Association, Forest Service staff, AFRC and myself. Of interest in this meeting was the Forest Service hiring process to fill vacancies which takes several months as the approval has to be finalized by the Washington DC office. Quite often the applicant has found another job by the time the approval comes through. Difficult process for the Forest Service to fill needed positions.
This afternoon I participated in an Idaho Association of Counties Legislative Meeting via phone. Today Legislative Committee set our priority list on specific legislation proposed during the recent Annual Conference.

Wednesday October 25th
Today I met with a potential candidate who may run for the District 1 Congressional Seat which is being vacated by Congressman Labrador. The discussion was primarily to understand local government perspective on issues that impact counties.
I returned a phone call to a Kootenai County Commissioner who wanted to discuss an upcoming event on Climate Change to see if I was going to attend. Due to another conflict I explained I was not. The Commissioner said that he would attend the event then.
This afternoon I met with some folks who wanted to understand the workings of a commissioner in Valley County.

Thursday October 26th
I responded to a request concerning a grant extension with the Idaho Department of Lands for a Fire Wise grant.
I participated in a Cooperating Agency conference call to discuss documents to be reviewed on the Midas Gold proposed project.
I attended the mid morning session of the Big Creek/Yellow Pine collaborative group to review topics in the East Fork of the Salmon River concerning trails and access.
I returned a call from the Idaho Attorney Generals Office on finding a date for a Deposition from myself on a prior board I was involved with.
I returned a call to the State Tax Commission on a State Form that had not been submitted by a prior organization I had been involved with. I made several phone calls and found the correct person to provide the information needed by the State Tax Commission.

Monday October 30th
Commissioner day today. Please see the Valley County website for the minutes once approved.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/
I reviewed meeting materials for an upcoming Idaho Association of Counties (IAC) Board meeting and replied to IAC staff on some corrections that were needed.

Tuesday October 31st, Happy Halloween
Today I flew to Washington DC to attend the NACo Finance and Executive Board meetings the next few days. In between flights I worked on replying to emails.
Tonight I met with a representative of mining properties in Valley County to discuss their concerns on access to their mine sites and related work as it involves the Payette and Boise National Forests for access and potential work on their mine sites.

Well this wraps up another month for my activities. As always if something perks your interest please let me know and I will attempt to help understand from what I know.

Have a wonderful Thanksgiving and thank you for reading my newsletter.

Gordon
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Idaho News:

The Last Interview: Ray Arnold retires from backcountry mail route

Unusual profession spurred dozens of news stories

By Max Silverson for The Star-News November 2, 2017

After 42 years of delivering everything from daily junk mail to a duo of belligerent llamas to residents in the backcountry, Ray Arnold has retired from flying what is the last U.S. Postal Service air route into a wilderness area in the continental US.

Arnold, now 80, delivered mail from Cascade to far-flung stoops in and around the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness. Walt Smith, who has worked for Arnold Aviation for 15 years, is now flying the route that covers several hundred miles of territory.

Arnold’s unusual delivery route has been reported dozens of times in publications ranging from the New York Times, to National Geographic and the CBS Evening News.

“It’s unique in that it’s the only route left like this in the lower 48 states,” Arnold said. “But there’s only so much you can write about.”

Whether interviewers came from Boise or from the East Coast, Arnold made time for them – The Star-News included – to go over the same questions and found space in the plane for an extraordinary ride-along.

What is likely the last interview with Arnold appears in the November issue of Smithsonian Air & Space magazine.

Ray and ex-wife, Carol, who remains his business partner, are completely unimpressed with the media attention. They keep no scrapbook of famous articles or list of celebrity TV hosts who have covered their business.

continued:
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McCall fire to give away free metal ash buckets

The Star-News November 2, 2017

McCall Fire & EMS will hand out free metal ash buckets as a reminder of the need to properly remove and store ashes from wood-burning stoves and fireplaces this winter.

Other tips for safely removing fireplace ashes include treating all ashes as hot, waiting at least 24 hours after a fire before removing ashes, never adding live embers to the ash bucket and storing metal buckets with ashes in a well-ventilated location.

Residents can pick up a bucket at the McCall Fire & EMS station at 201 Deinhard Lane.

source:
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Changing of the Guard

Valley sheriff’s office takes over patrols of Cascade

By Max Silverson for The Star-News November 2, 2017

Valley County Sheriff’s Sgt. Kevin Copperi makes an effort to regularly stop by Cascade schools, a role that was previously carried out by the Cascade Police Department.

School visits are just one of the responsibilities assumed by the sheriff’s office since taking over policing of Cascade on Oct. 1.

The Cascade City Council voted to disband the police department and contract policing services to the sheriff’s office.

… Patrolling the city differs from patrolling rural areas in that officers have more time to stop and talk, Copperi said.

Under the contract, the sheriff’s office is required to carry out 5,400 total hours of annual police coverage within the City of Cascade, which is roughly equivalent to the time of three deputies.

continued:
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100-foot cell tower disguised as tree proposed for Donnelly

P&Z to hold public hearing Monday night

By Phil Janquart for The Star-News November 2, 2017

A proposed 100-foot cell tower that would be disguised as a pine tree is the topic of a public hearing Monday before the Donnelly Planning and Zoning Commission.

The hearing is set to begin at 6 p.m. Monday, at the Donnelly Community Center.

Horizon Towers of Danville, Calif., has applied for a permit to build the wireless tower on city property located 550 feet west of Idaho 55 on N. J. Corbet St.

“The proposed tower will provide the city … better coverage, as well as create better coverage along Highway 55 north to McCall and south to Cascade,” Horizon states in its application.

continued:
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Snowfall of 17 inches and counting at Tamarack Resort

by Sarah Jacobsen Friday, November 3rd 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Tamarack Resort is a winter wonderland and the snow just keeps falling down.

Today around 9 a.m. they counted 17 inches mid-mountain, about six inches down at the base, and snow continues to fall.

Big, fluffy snowflakes creating a white wonderland up here in the mountains.

continued:
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Idaho man ordered to pay $1.7 million following wildfire

11/4/17 AP

Idaho Falls, Idaho — An eastern Idaho man who started a wildfire with illegal fireworks near the eastern Idaho city of Idaho Falls has been ordered to pay $1.7 million in restitution.

The Post Register reports that 21-year-old Kristian Lopez of Ammon didn’t appear Friday at the restitution hearing in the Bonneville County Courthouse where Magistrate Judge Steven Gardner granted the default judgment.

Lopez was shooting bottle rockets on Aug. 21, 2016, when one ignited a wildfire that scorched 81 square miles (210 square kilometers) that included a wildlife refuge and farmland.

He told investigators he and his friends tried to extinguish the blaze but failed.

Lopez in September 2016 pleaded guilty to misdemeanor malicious injury to property and in December 2016 was sentenced to a suspended sentence of 180 days in jail.

source:
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Boise man dies in Owyhee County plane crash

KTVB November 03, 2017


(Photo: Owyhee County Sheriff’s Office)

Owyhee County – A Boise pilot died Friday in a plane crash in Owyhee County, sheriff’s officials said.

The Owyhee County Sheriff’s Office said 56-year-old Dean Hilde was flying a personal aircraft in the Combination area of the county – southeast of the Jordan and Pleasant Valley area – when he apparently encountered tough, windy conditions.

The plane was forced into a hillside.

Hilde was pronounced dead at the scene. His passenger, 42-year-old Gerald Bublitz of Boise, suffered serious injuries and was transported to an area hospital by air ambulance.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

source:
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New plant species to be named after late Idaho governor

10/31/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Researchers say that a newly discovered plant species will be named after the late Gov. Cecil Andrus after a group of his friends successfully helped raise $10,000 for their work.

KBSX-FM reports scientists from Boise State University and the College of Idaho discovered the new plant species in the Boise Foothills.

They offered to let someone name the yellow, flowering plant for a $10,000 donation.

Andrus’ friends say they wanted to see the plant bear his name since he would often walk his dogs in the area where the plant was discovered.

They were able to reach their goal after a last-minute donation last Friday.

The researchers say the donation will be used to research the plant and others like it in southwest Idaho and southeast Oregon.

source:
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Phone scam in Idaho Falls area

Local News 8 – Oct 30, 2017

Bonneville County, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Bonneville County Sheriff’s Office reports it has taken multiple calls lately about a reoccurring phone scam calling residents in the Idaho Falls area.

According to Sgt. Bryan Lovell, the scammer indicates they are with the Bonneville Sheriff’s Department and tells the victim they have a warrant for their arrest for various reasons including missing a court hearing, unpaid fines and missing jury duty.

Lovell says this almost always an issue the victim didn’t or couldn’t have known about and are being told by the scammers in various ways they will be sent to jail unless they pay money.

continued:
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Original ‘Big Idaho Potato’ retires this year, set to become Airbnb destination

by Nathan Larsen Wednesday, November 1st 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — The Idaho Potato Commission’s iconic 6-ton giant potato is getting a new home.

The potato has been on six national tours, which is incredible, considering it was only designed to go on one.

With 150,000 miles traveled on the bed of a semi-truck, it’s time for an upgrade.

continued:
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Mining News:

At least two people dead after mining accident east of Winnemucca

by News 4-Fox 11 Digital Staff Wednesday, November 1st 2017

Valmy, Nev. (News 4 & Fox 11) — At least two people were killed and others were injured following an accident reported at a gold mine east of Winnemucca, according to the Humboldt County sheriff and company that owns the mine.

Marigold Mine in Valmy issued a mayday call at about 2:15 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 31, Sheriff Mike Allen confirmed to News 4-Fox 11.

The sheriff’s office responded, along with Nevada Highway Patrol, firefighters and the Nevada’s Division of Investigation, among other agencies in the region.

When they arrived, they determined there had been a mining accident, Allen said.

SSR Mining Inc., which owns Marigold Mine, released a statement Tuesday saying the accident “involved contact between a haul truck and a light vehicle within the open pit operations at the mine.”

continued:
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US OKs 1st phase of contested mine in northwest Montana

11/4/17 AP

Kalispell, Mont. — The federal government has approved the first phase of a proposed copper and silver mine in northwestern Montana, But it won’t consider approving full development of the operation until later.

The U.S. Forest Service plans to allow Hecla Mining Co., based in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, to build an entrance for the Rock Creek Mine and conduct an environmental evaluation, the Flathead Beacon reported Friday.

The mine would be near Noxon, Montana, about 10 miles from the Idaho border. It would extend under the Cabinet Mountains Wilderness Area.

A coalition of conservation groups fighting the new mine said it could drain water from surface streams in the wilderness area, harming fish and wildlife.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Region 4 smokejumpers 75 year reunion

Andrew Harris Oct 24, 2017

The 75 year reunion for the Region 4 Smokejumpers will take place in McCall, Idaho. June 22-24, 2018.


[h/t B Fogg]
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BLM Advisory Council to meet in November

Date: Nov. 3, 2017
Contact: Michael Williamson (208) 384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management today announced it will hold a meeting of the Boise District Resource Advisory Council, demonstrating that partnerships and inclusion are vital to managing sustainable, working public lands. The public is welcome to attend the meeting which will occur on November 17, 2017 at 3948 Development Ave., Boise, ID, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Planned agenda items at the meeting include the Four Rivers Field Office Resource Management Plan, a review of the RAC’s September Field Trip, updates on the Gateway West project and wild horses at the Boise Corrals, and project updates from the Field Offices.

“The RAC represents diverse public interests and provides invaluable input for managing our public lands,” said District Manager Lara Douglas. “Their feedback helps us make more informed decisions, resulting in better projects on the ground.”

A half-hour comment period, during which the public may address the RAC, will begin at 11 a.m. Depending on the number of people wishing to comment and time available, the amount of time for individual oral comments may be limited.

Resource Advisory Councils are critical in assisting the BLM in continuing to be a good neighbor in the communities we serve. The 15-member RAC provides advice and recommendations to the BLM on resource and land management issues within the BLM Boise District.

For more information about the upcoming RAC meeting, please contact Mike Williamson at (208) 384-3393 or mwilliamson@blm.gov
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BLM Seeks Nominations to Resource Advisory Councils and other BLM Land Management Advisory Committees

Date: Nov. 3, 2017
Contact: Michael Williamson (208) 384-3393

The Bureau of Land Management today announced that it is seeking public nominations for open positions on 17 of its 36 Resource Advisory Councils (RACs). As published in a notice in the Federal Register, the BLM will consider nominations for 30 days.

The BLM’s RACs, composed of citizens chosen for their expertise in natural resource issues, help the Bureau carry out its multiple-use mission and stewardship of 245 million acres of public lands. The Bureau, which manages more land than any other Federal agency, has 36 RACs across the West, where most BLM-managed land is located. Each RAC consists of 10 to 15 members with an interest or expertise in energy and mineral development, ranching, outdoor recreation, conservation, state and local government, tribal and cultural resources, and academia. The diverse membership of each RAC helps ensure that BLM land managers receive the varying perspectives they need to achieve their mission of managing the public lands for multiple uses.

“Restoring trust in the federal government and being a good land manager are two of my top priorities at Interior, and state and local input, particularly in communities surrounding public lands, is imperative to building trust,” said U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke. “Nobody knows the land better than the people who live and work it. Council members provide a valuable service to the Department and offer a variety of perspectives that assist in solving land and resource use issues.”

Individuals may nominate themselves or others to serve on an Advisory Council. Nominees, who must be residents of the state or states where the RAC has jurisdiction, will be reviewed on the basis of their training, education, and knowledge of the council’s geographic area. Nominees should also demonstrate a commitment to consensus building and collaborative decision-making. All nominations must be accompanied by letters of reference from any represented interests or organizations, a completed RAC application, and any other information that speaks to the nominee’s qualifications.

Further information about the BLM RAC application process and an electronic fillable nomination form, can be found on the BLM website at https://www.blm.gov/get-involved/resource-advisory-council/apply.

Each of the 17 RACs has different positions open in the following categories:

Category One – Public land ranchers and representatives of organizations associated with energy and mineral development, the timber industry, transportation or rights-of-way, off-highway vehicle use, and commercial recreation.

Category Two – Representatives of nationally or regionally recognized environmental organizations, archaeological and historical organizations, dispersed recreation activities, and wild horse and burro organizations.

Category Three – Representatives of State, county, or local elected office; representatives and employees of a state agency responsible for the management of natural resources; representatives of Indian tribes within or adjacent to the area for which the RAC is organized; representatives and employees of academic institutions who are involved in natural sciences; and the public-at-large.

For more information, please contact Mike Williamson at (208) 384-3393 or mwilliamson@blm.gov
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Federal officials ban snowmobiles in parts of Idaho forest

11/1/17 AP

Lewiston, Idaho — Federal officials have released a plan for a proposed wilderness area in a northern Idaho forest that includes banning snowmobiles.

Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest Supervisor Cheryl Probert decided to maintain a ban on snowmobiles in the Great Burn recommended wilderness area, the Lewiston Tribune reported.

The Great Burn is located along the Idaho-Montana border and spans over 391 square miles (1013 sq. kilometers). It has no roads.

Motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles will continue to be permitted to travel to Fish Lake on a limited basis as part of the decision reached Tuesday.

continued:
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House Passes Bill to Improve Forest Health

Press Release November 1, 2017

Congressman Simpson votes to move forward conversation on fire borrowing and forest management

Washington, D.C. – Idaho Congressman Mike Simpson voted in favor of legislation that would advance effective forest management and address the issue of fire-borrowing. H.R. 2936, the Resilient Federal Forests Act would promote collaborative forest management, reduce frivolous litigation, and modernize the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self Determination Act. Included in the package is Congressman Simpson’s bipartisan H.R. 1483, the Litigation Relief for Forest Management Projects Act which would reverse a disastrous court ruling that has created duplicative steps in projects intended for conservation and forest health. H.R. 2936 passed the House by a vote of 232-188.

“Idahoans know all too well about the devastating impacts of catastrophic wildfires,” said Congressman Simpson. “The air quality in the summer, the evacuations from our communities, and the resources it takes to fight fires are all serious problems in Idaho. That is why Congress needs to act. I am pleased this legislation addresses the litigation issues that have halted far too many projects and promotes collaborative forest management provisions that seek to improve the health of our forests.”

“We also need to fix fire-borrowing,” said Simpson. “The rolling-ten year average, which is used to calculate the cost of wildfires, has decimated the Forest Service budget. Wildfire funding is anticipated to consume two-thirds of the total Forest Service budget by 2021 if we don’t change the current budgeting process. The status quo leaves little room to fund programs that actually prevent wildfires and reduce overall costs. That is why I proposed a solution to fix this problem.”

Congressman Simpson introduced H.R 2862, the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act (WDFA) which is bipartisan legislation that had 150 cosponsors in the 114th Congress. The bill would treat wildfires like other natural disasters and eliminate the need for fire-borrowing.

“I look forward to working with my colleagues to advance the needed reforms in both my Wildfire Disaster Funding Act and H.R. 2936 so we can curb the cost of wildfire suppression funding and protect our landscapes and communities from the catastrophic fires we have sadly grown accustomed to in the west.”

[h/t Gordon C]
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USFS Regional Intermountain News

November 1

Archived Newsletters
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Letter to Share:

Pheasants

Idaho Gamebird Foundation 11/5

2017NovPheasants-a

From the first spots on the edge the road was lined with pheasants, both hens and roosters. I would make a guess at 30 and better. As the sun was coming up I could hear pheasants cackling all over. I did get close to a couple. I will follow up in the morning and take my camera that I can zoom in with.

These pheasants are turned out ever Friday night for the next 6 weeks for youth hunting with an adult mentor. Be sure to call in the tag number to be entered into the drawing.

“Whiskers”
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Testicular tumors in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Nov 3, 2017 – IME

In the intact (unneutered) male dog, tumors involving the testicles are the second most common form of cancer. Most of these tumors are benign and are not usually aggressive.

There are several types of cells in the testicles that can form tumors. These tumors are called sertoli cell tumors, seminomas and interstitial cell tumors. Sometimes the testicles stay in the abdomen and don’t descend into the scrotum. This is called cryptorchidism. Crypt means hidden. Orchid is the Latin name for the testicle. Because of the increased body temperature in the abdomen versus the lower body temperature in the scrotum, these hidden testicles are especially prone to tumors.

Palpation (feeling the testicles within the scrotum) may reveal nodular enlargement or pain. Sertoli cell tumors will secrete estrogens, causing feminization. These dogs will produce enlarged breasts and can exude odors that make them attractive to other male dogs. Estrogen can also cause depression of the bone marrow and a resulting anemia (low red blood cell count). In rare cases, a tumor can be malignant and spread to other areas of the body, especially the prostate and spine.

Your vet can do a fine needle aspirate of the testicular tissue to determine how serious the tumor is.

continued:
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Learning to bugle in elk during the rut

Outdoor Idaho 9/24

Here’s our story about a woman who wanted to talk to the animals. From our hour-long “My Excellent Adventure” show.

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Two hunters found dead in Elmore County camp due to carbon monoxide poisoning

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, November 1st 2017

Atlanta, Idaho (KBOI) — An adult and a child were found dead over the weekend due to apparent carbon monoxide poisoning.

The Elmore County Sheriff’s Office says deputies were contacted for some overdue hunters in the Atlanta and Middle Fork road area. When police arrived, they found an adult and a child dead.

No foul play is suspected. Police say they’re not releasing the victim’s names at this time.

source:
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Last year’s tough winter affects hunting

Michaela Leung Local News 8 – Oct 30, 2017

Idaho Falls, Idaho – Hunting is very popular here in Idaho. Although it’s for fun and for food. It plays an important role in managing the wildlife.

Overall hunting has been going well but the deer population was scarce in some areas.

“There were some spots where we expected it would be down a little bit because of the tough winter we had last year but overall folks that have gotten out and beat the bushes have been doing pretty well,” says Gregg Losinski, Regional Conservation Educator, Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

He says they aren’t having that same issue with elk.

“We have too many in some places. We really do need hunters to go out there and do the best jobs they can because if they don’t do that for us now, come winter we have problems with elk coming down trying to get into hay and feed blocks,” says Losinski.

continued:
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Falling tree kills North Carolina hunter in central Idaho

11/3/17 AP

Idaho Falls, Idaho — Authorities say a North Carolina man hunting in central Idaho was killed when a tree fell on top of him as he was sleeping.

The Post Register reports that authorities with the Custer County Sheriff’s Office say 67-year-old Kenneth Lawrence Horton was hunting with family members in the Salmon-Challis National Forest when the dead tree fell, causing a chest injury on Wednesday.

The sheriff’s office dispatched ambulances and a search and rescue unit to his location nearly 12 miles (19 kilometers) west of Challis. Air ambulance personnel reported Horton dead Wednesday afternoon, and he was taken to a funeral home in Challis.

source:
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Oregon hunter fatally shoots wolf; claims self-defense

By Steven Dubois – 11/2/17 AP

Portland, Ore. — An elk hunter killed a wolf in self-defense in northeastern Oregon, the first time that’s happened since the predator began migrating to the state in the late 1990s, state police said Thursday.

The Union County district attorney accepted the hunter’s explanation of the Oct. 27 shooting, and the 38-year-old man from Clackamas won’t be prosecuted, Capt. Bill Fugate said. In Oregon, it’s illegal to kill a wolf for sport.

The hunter told investigators he was alone when he saw three animals he believed to be coyotes, Fugate said. One of them ran toward him, forcing him to shoot. The animal died from a single shot, and the others ran away.

The hunter said he returned to camp and told fellow hunters what happened. He said he was unsure if he shot a coyote, so he returned to the scene and discovered it was a wolf.

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Wolf Education International

Nov 5 Newsletter

Close encounter of the wolf kind

Animal rights activists camp out to stop culling of wolf in Germany

Wolf pack makes 1st confirmed livestock kill
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Animal rights groups sue Minnesota fur farm over gray wolves

11/1/17 AP

Lakeville, Minn. — Two animal rights groups have filed a lawsuit alleging that a fur farm and petting zoo near Minneapolis is breeding, neglecting and killing gray wolves.

The Animal Legal Defense Fund and the Lockwood Animal Rescue Center filed the lawsuit on Sept. 29 against Teresa Petter, who owns Fur-Ever Wild in Lakeville, the Star Tribune reported.

They allege that Petter is breaking federal law by breeding gray wolf puppies as a petting zoo attraction and that she kills wolves that get too old and sells their fur.

Petter denied the accusations Tuesday, saying the allegations in the lawsuit “are absolutely whacked.”

continued:
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Hunter, guide attacked by grizzly in Washakie Wilderness

AP Oct 31, 2017

Cody, Wyo. (AP) – A hunting guide and hunter are recovering in Wyoming hospitals after being attacked by a bear in the Washakie Wilderness.

The Cody Enterprise reports John Sheets said he was field dressing an elk Thursday night on a late-season cow hunt with a female hunter when she was attacked by a grizzly bear.

Sheets said he rushed in, grabbed the bear by the neck and stabbed it with his hunting knife, which caused the bear to retaliate.

Sheets said the rest of the encounter is fuzzy, but he remembers the bear dragging the hunter down a hill. He said the bear came back up and chewed on his ear and broke his leg.

He says they were able to escape on their horses.

Sheets said the last he heard the hunter was in stable condition.

source:
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Wildlife officers euthanize third bear in Steamboat Springs

10/31/17 AP

Steamboat Springs, Colo. — Wildlife officers say they have euthanized a third bear that was causing problems in the Steamboat Springs area.

The Steamboat Pilot & Today reports the bear had been breaking into garages, ripping into freezers and getting into food.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife Area Wildlife Manager Kris Middledorf says there have been multiple property damage reports over the past week.

continued:
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Bobcat in bathroom of Oklahoma newspaper startles publisher

10/30/17 AP

Sapulpa, Okla. — A small-town Oklahoma newspaper publisher found a startling front-page story practically in his newsroom: There was a hissing bobcat in the bathroom.

Sapulpa Herald publisher Darren Sumner says the wild animal jumped at him one recent morning as he was heading into the restroom at his office in Sapulpa, a Tulsa suburb.

Sumner shut the door and trapped the adult male cat inside until police and a game warden arrived. Wildlife control workers captured the bobcat in a cage and released it in nearby Pawnee County.

Neither Sumner nor the wild cat was injured in the confrontation.

source:
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2 states warn Trump against big changes in sage grouse plan

By Dan Elliott – 10/31/17 AP

Fort Collins, Colo. — Two Western governors on Tuesday warned the Trump administration against making big changes in a plan to protect a ground-dwelling bird across the West, saying it would send a message to states not to bother working together to save other imperiled species.

Colorado Democrat John Hickenlooper and Wyoming Republican Matt Mead said a 2015 conservation plan designed to save the greater sage grouse was the product of long negotiation among state and federal governments, conservation groups, industry and agriculture.

“If we go down a different road now with the sage grouse, what it says is, when you try to address other endangered species problems in this country, don’t have a collaborative process, don’t work together, because it’s going to be changed,” Mead said. “To me, that would be a very unfortunate circumstance.”

Hickenlooper said, “We are both very concerned that the new administration is going to take away all the guide rails that allowed this collaboration to exist.”

… Not all Western governors support the 2015 plan. Idaho Republican C. L. “Butch” Otter filed a lawsuit shortly after the plan was released, contending the Obama administration illegally imposed federal land-use restrictions. A federal judge dismissed the lawsuit in January, but Otter has appealed.

full story:
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Western governors want federal help in invasive mussel fight

By Keith Ridler – 11/3/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Governors of 19 Western states are pressing the federal government to do more to prevent the spread of damage-causing invasive mussels from infected federally managed waterways.

The Western Governors’ Association on Thursday sent a letter urging Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to put in place by spring 2018 controls to prevent the spread of zebra and quagga mussels.

The governors are also asking that federal agencies conduct mandatory inspections and decontamination of boats leaving infected water bodies. The mussels can attach to boats and trailers and travel long distances, clogging water pipes, damaging boat motors and affecting other aquatic life.

continued:
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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
November 3, 2017
Issue No. 850
Table of Contents

* Federal Agencies Update Court On NEPA, EIS Process For Columbia/Snake Salmon, Steelhead
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439818.aspx

* Meteorologists At Winter Weather Conference Make Predictions For 2017-18 Winter
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439817.aspx

* Corps Says Culling Cormorants In Columbia River Estuary To Protect Salmonids Over For This Season
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439816.aspx

* Efforts Aimed At Better Understanding Of Juvenile Salmonids In Columbia River Estuary; Where They Go, What They Eat
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439815.aspx

* Study Details How Contaminated Highway Runoff Deadly To Coho, Loss Rates 60 To 90 Percent
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439814.aspx

* Conservation Groups Announce Intent To Sue Corps Over Willamette Chinook, Steelhead
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439813.aspx

* Study: Range Of Western Freshwater Mussels Declines By One-Fifth, Could Impact Stream Health
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439812.aspx

* No Chum Yet, But Annual Operations For Spawning Fish Slated To Begin Next Week
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439811.aspx

* Washington, Oregon Fishery Managers Seek Nominations For Columbia River Fishery Advisory Groups
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439810.aspx

* Bad Year For Steelhead But IDFG Hopes Enough To Trap At Hells Canyon For Fishing In Boise River
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439809.aspx

* Oregon Reports Wolf Killed By Elk Hunter In Self-Defense; A First Since Wolf Return To State In 1990s
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439808.aspx

* WDFW Commission Approves Purchase Of Wildlife Habitat Land East Of Cascades
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439807.aspx

* NOAA Report Details Economic Contribution Of Commercial, Recreational Fisheries In 2016, Dutch Harbor Again No. 1
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439806.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

Stocked pheasants provide opportunity for youth at Palouse River Access Yes property

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Conservation Educator
Wednesday, November 1, 2017

To provide a special opportunity for youth hunters, Idaho Fish and Game has partnered with an area landowner and the Game Bird Foundation and will stock pheasants each week to an area of private land near Potlatch Idaho.

Little Canyon Shooting Preserve is providing 25 roosters per week to the Palouse River Upland Game Bird Area, an 810 acre Access Yes! parcel, north of Potlatch Idaho.

Eligible youth must be 17 years or younger, possess a valid hunting license or passport, and be accompanied by an adult mentor (18 years or older who possesses a valid hunting license). The mentor may also hunt. The number of youth hunters is limited to five per day. Sign in at: http://www.signupgenius.com/go/5080444acae2aa4f94-palouse

Birds will be banded with individual numbers to evaluate hunter utilization. Fish and Game’s phone number (208-799-5010) will be located on each band to allow hunters to report band numbers. Additionally, with each band number hunters report, they will be entered into a drawing for a prize. The drawing will be held at the end of the season. The effectiveness of this system will help determine future action.

To access the site, go 2.75 miles west of Potlatch Idaho on Highway 6 to Wellesley Road. Take a left and go 1.75 miles to South River Road. Turn left and cross the railroad tracks and the Palouse River Bridge. The parking lot and sign-in kiosk are on the left. Hunters are required to report their harvest on the mandatory report form located at the kiosk.

For more information, please call the Idaho Fish and Game office in Lewiston at 208-799-5010 or the Gamebird Foundation at 208-883-3423.

source:
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

“We catch bad guys, not snakes.”

Watch this squeamish cop try to catch a snake

By Marianna Kheyfets 9/29/2017 Circa

An online video shows a jittery police officer who’s afraid of snakes using a trash can to try to catch one at the University of Central Florida.

Carl Metzger, the deputy chief of the university’s police department, calls the video humorous. He added that the incident, which occurred earlier this month on the Orlando campus, is a result of ophidiophobia — the fear of snakes.

Metzger tells local news outlets everyone got a good laugh but it’s “obvious that that particular officer is uncomfortable with snakes.”

The video shows the officer jumping around, trash can in hand, trying to capture the elusive black snake.

Metzger says the officer, whose name wasn’t released, did his best “and ultimately accomplished his mission” of getting the snake out of the building.

video:

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SnakeHelmet-a
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Tips & Advice:

What to do before you light a fire in that wood burning stove

by Nathan Larsen Monday, October 30th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — As the colder weather settles in and you decide you want cozy up next to a warm fire…there’s something you should do before you set the logs ablaze, it’s cleaning out the chimney flue, or your enjoyment could be short-lived.

“Most people, believe me, need cleanings,” said Matthew Dehring, Chimney Sweeper.

Matt has been cleaning out chimney flues for 34 years.

In that time, there isn’t much he hasn’t seen.

Geese, owls, bats…you name it, we’ve found it! Plus, debris from trees, if they don’t have a chimney cap on it, it can fill up with leaves,” said Dehring.

continued:
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Trivia:

Daylight Saving Time has been ending later in recent years; here’s why

Scripps National Desk Oct 30, 2017

Prior to 2007, those acknowledging Daylight Saving Time were typically setting their clocks back an hour in October.

This year, DST ends at 2 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 5. Why is it so much later on the calendar?

When George W. Bush was president, the government changed the timing of the end of DST to coincide with the Energy Policy Act of 2005. That added four extra weeks to DST and moved the end to the first week of November.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

1865Time-a

1887Time-a

[h/t Bob Hartman]
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Oct 29, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 29, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: There is still plenty of time to order your 2018 Yellow Pine Calendar. Please reply to the Calendar email or send me an email with number wanted, name and address, with “2018 Calendar” in the subject line. Price is the same as last year $25 with postage. These calendars are custom printed on thick card-stock (in the USA!) photos taken around Yellow Pine by Local Color Photography.

Village News:

Halloween Party

There was a Halloween partly on October 28th at the Yellow Pine Tavern.

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The Corner

The Corner is closed for the season. Stop by if you need wood permits. We will reopen after we have the baby.
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YP Transfer Station

A report from Wednesday (Oct 25) that the bins had been emptied and the community slash pile burned. Road is rough between YP and the Transfer Station.
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Fall Rx Burns planned

BNF:
Cascade Ranger District: Slash piles will be ignited in the following locations: Warm Lake, Yellow pine, Landmark and Crawford. It will be pile burning for two days.

PNF:
The Krassel Ranger District plans to ignite 1,600 acres in the Fourmile drainage, and 2,000 acres in the Bald Hill project area.
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Bear Aware

Bears are around and hungry this fall, not much of a berry crop this year. Keep garbage secured and pet food indoors, take down bird feeders until hibernation. Bears love grills and outdoor fridges.) Good info on living with bears HERE (scroll down,)
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YPFD News:

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.

Training is on Sundays starting at 11am at the YP Fire Station and open to the community of Yellow Pine. Check with Jeff or Ann to confirm trainings.

Both Fire Sirens will be tested at noon on the first of each month.
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VYPA News:

Next meeting June 2018
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 23) overnight low of 31 degrees, quite foggy early, then lifting with the sun and partly clear. Pine squirrels very active once the sun was shining. Filtered sun after lunch time. About 215pm several airplanes coming from the north east, turning over the village (a couple low and loud) and landing at Johnson Creek. Partly cloudy late afternoon, high of 56 degrees. Quiet evening.

Tuesday (Oct 24) overnight low of 25 degrees, clear and frosty this morning. After lunch a chipmunk was running around, a flock of nutcrackers were after pine cones out in the forest. Backup beeper on heavy equipment to the east, otherwise very quiet. Tamarack trees were shining brilliant gold colors against a really blue sky, high of 61 degrees. Midas Gold survey call this afternoon. Starlings sighted. Clear quiet evening.

Wednesday(Oct 25) overnight low of 26 degrees, clear and frosty this morning. Sun hit about 1030am and roofs were steaming and dripping. Small flock of starlings. Some high thin ‘mare’s tails’ clouds coming from the north west after lunch, high of 66 degrees. Heard clarks nutcrackers calling to the north in the early afternoon. Mostly clear at sunset. Heard a pileated woodpecker calling from across the street, too dim to see. Mostly cloudy just as it was getting dark.

Thursday (Oct 26) a little rain shower during the night or early morning, stayed above freezing. Partly cloudy this morning and damp. Pine squirrel calling, a flicker hunting bugs, and a small flock of starlings. Mostly clear early in the afternoon, pretty day, high of 61 degrees. Pine squirrel running about and a steller jay poking at pine cones. Sun was down behind the hill before 6pm, clear sky. Just before dark a pileated woodpecker visited the ant pile. Bright moon riding high at dark.

Friday (Oct 27) overnight low of 27 degrees, high hazy clouds, light frost this morning. Mostly clear after lunch time. Lone Clark’s nutcracker in the neighbor’s tree. Nice fall day, high of 62 degrees Helicopter flew over the village at 604pm. Mostly clear at sunset, bright first quarter moon shining before dark. Lots of stars twinkling tonight.

Saturday (Oct 28) overnight low of 27 degrees, clear sky this morning. Not many birds around, saw one jay and heard one nutcracker. Pine squirrel was very busy. Clear and sunny nice day, high of 65 degrees. Light traffic during and day and quiet evening. Late afternoon slanting sunlight turned the tamaracks to gold. Bright waxing moon up before dark.

Sunday (Oct 29) overnight low of 28 degrees, clear sky this morning, light frost. Not many birds around except “Baby Jay” looking for a handout. Sound of chainsaw early this morning, someone getting in their winter’s wood. A few clarks nutcrackers are still around, calling from the trees. Beautiful warm sunny day, high of 67 degrees. Light traffic and quiet evening. Fat moon rising before dark.
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Letter to Share:

Midas Letter to Yellow Pine

October 25, 2017

Thank you for the letter dated October 16, 2017 from Willie Sullivan representing the Village of Yellow Pine Association (VYPA). Following is a proposal for formalizing our communication, an update for your committee on our progress evaluating access and our proposed next steps.

We very much appreciate members of the VYPA volunteering their time to participate in these discussions. Thank you for establishing a committee of representatives of the township, which we understand comprises Lorinne Munn, Cecil Dallman, Lynn Imel and Willie Sullivan. Midas Gold will also designate authorized representatives as per the discussion below. This will help ensure we are hearing one, unified, voice from Yellow Pine and that you are hearing a consistent and accurate message from the company.

A meaningful resolution to access routes will take time, which is why we would like to solidify our commitment to communicating regularly with the designated members of the VYPA. In order to facilitate and focus discussions, we propose that YPVA and Midas Gold enter into a Communications Agreement and we will send you a draft agreement on or before November 3. This agreement would formalize the list of individuals representing the Village of Yellow Pine and Midas Gold, provide commitments on regular communication, including a meeting schedule, and set objectives for the coming months.

We have committed to the residents of Yellow Pine that we would carefully and comprehensively evaluate public access to Thunder Mountain through our site and present options, alternatives and issues to you. In order to advance these discussions, we instructed our engineering and permitting staff to identify and then evaluate potentially feasible options that would provide continued seasonal access for regular vehicles through our project area that would connect members of the public in and around Yellow Pine to Thunder Mountain. Our team is currently evaluating potential access routes for consideration as alternatives in the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The routes we are assessing utilize the existing Yellow Pine to Stibnite road as far as the Sugar Creek junction and then progress through the site in various directions before connecting to the road up the EFSRSR to the existing Thunder Mountain Road on the far side of the proposed project boundaries.

We hope to review these options with you in just a few weeks. In mid-November we would like to meet with the group representing YPVA to discuss those findings. Belinda Provancher from Midas Gold will work with Lorinne Munn to establish a meeting date and logistics.

Our plan for the Stibnite Gold Project, and any changes to that plan, are now in the hands of the U.S. Forest Service (USFS). Please keep in mind that any access route alternatives need to be presented to USFS for consideration as an alternative to our proposed plan and would then be subject to a review of potential impacts. After review and public comment, the USFS will make the final determination of the route included in the EIS. Additionally, Midas Gold must further evaluate the engineering feasibility (at a conceptual level), the environmental impacts and the significant logistical and safety considerations, isolating public vehicle traffic across an active mine site.

We are committed to working with you to reach a mutual understanding, and look forward to hearing from you on the proposed communications agreement and a meeting date for reviewing our road access study.

Sincerely,

Belinda Provancher
Community Relations Manager
Midas Gold
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Idaho News:

Idaho 55 [Temp] Closed for Dead Trees

The Star-News October 26, 2017

2017treeH55-a
Photo by Dave Holland

Idaho 55 west of McCall was closed for about 20 minutes on Monday while crews from the Idaho Transportation Department and Idaho Power Co. cut down two dead trees. The tree were cut because they were considered a risk to the traveling public, ITD spokesperson Jennifer Gonzalez said.

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Ohio man sexually Skyped Valley County kids

Steve Bertel Oct 25, 2017 KIVI TV

Boise, ID – Timothy Raymond Schmidt, 34, of Cincinnati, Ohio pleaded guilty Tuesday in United States District Court to sexual exploitation of children, according to U.S. Attorney Bart Davis -– after communicating via Skype with two Valley County children.

According to the plea agreement, from January 28 to April 9, 2015, Schmidt, while living in Ohio, used Skype to communicate with two minor victims — ages 17 and 13 -– living in Valley County.

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Member sought for Valley County Planning & Zoning Commission

The Star-News October 26, 2017

The Valley County Board of Commissioners is seeking to fill a vacancy on the five-member Planning and Zoning Commission beginning in January.

Applicants must be full-time residents of Valley County and have lived in the county for at least the past five years.

The selected applicant will replace current commissioner Rob Garrison, who has decided not to seek a new term.

Those who are interested may submit their resumes to Cynda Herrick at cherrick@co.valley.id.us or at the Planning and Zoning Office, 219 N. Main St. in Cascade, or mail it to P.O. Box 1350, Cascade, ID 83611.

For more information, call Herrick at 208-382-7115.

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McCall settles airport taxiway lawsuit for $1.65 million

Feds will pay 90% to acquire land, build project

By Phil Janquart for The Star-News October 26, 2017

2017taxiway-a
Star-News Graphic by Tomi Grote. Area outlined in red shows the land the city of McCall has agreed to aquire for $1.65 million to allow construction of a new taxiway at McCall Airport.

The City of McCall has agreed to pay $1.65 million to landowners for 15.3 acres of property needed to build a new federally mandated airport taxiway.

New standards under the Federal Aviation Administration call for a wider separation between the taxiway and the main runway, which would help prevent collisions between large aircraft.

The agency says the old taxiway, which is 200 feet from the main runway, must be abandoned and that a new taxiway must be built 400 feet away.

The extra land also is needed to avoid placing the new taxiway over drainage ditches, according to the city.

An agreement between the city and landowners on a sale price for the acreage reached an impasse, prompting the city to file a lawsuit in June 2016 to have a judge or jury set a price.

A trial had been set to begin Dec. 4, but the settlement means the trial will be canceled pending completion of the settlement agreement.

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McCall cleans up Payette L. shoreline, has plans for development

By Phil Janquart for The Star-News October 26, 2017

It has been a repository for old docks, logs and pieces of metal, but a plan to transform a stretch of shoreline on Payette Lake near downtown McCall into a non-motorized access point for recreationists is inching forward.

The McCall Parks and Recreation Department set the process into motion earlier this month with a volunteer clean-up day that cleared debris from the narrow shoreline.

The area extends about 100 yards between Mile High Marina and Brown Park and is one of the few areas around Payette Lake where the public has access.

Visions for the area include swimming, paddle boarding and kayaking, but the first step is to remove debris, Parks and Recreation Director Kurt Wolf said.

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Local drummer making noise on Hwy 55

by Roland Steadham Friday, October 27th 2017

Horseshoe Bend, Idaho (KBOI) — A local drummer is turning a lot of heads along Highway 55 on Horseshoe Bend Hill.

Watch the video to meet this one of a kind drummer!

link:
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Idaho Experience

Idaho Public Television

Idaho Experience will showcase the rugged and innovative nature of Idahoans, our unforgettable events and unbelievable successes. Our stories will inspire a deeper understanding of how we came to be where we are today and where we may go tomorrow. The Idaho State Historical Society is our partner on this project.

http://video.idahoptv.org/video/3005599815/

[h/t LC]
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Human skeletal remains found along Salmon River

by KBOI News Staff Tuesday, October 24th 2017

Grangeville, Idaho (KBOI) — Human remains were found along the bank of the Salmon River near Cottonwood, sheriff deputies say.

The Idaho County Sheriff’s Office says hunters found the remains near Rice Creek and Grave Creek roads. Two deputies and the county coroner found the skeletal remains below the high water mark.

The remains were not intact and it appears to be an adult of unknown sex.

The sheriff’s office says it has two people missing in the Salmon River — 20-year-old Cayla Danenberg, who went missing since a crash along Highway 95 in May 2016 and John “Randy” French, 54, of Boise, who went missing after a Highway 95 crash on approximately July 2.

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Remains found in Salmon River are those of Nampa woman

KTVB October 27, 2017

Cottonwood, Idaho – The Idaho County coroner says human remains found by hunters along the banks of the Salmon River Monday are those of a Nampa woman missing for nearly a year and a half.

Cayla Danenberg, 21, was reported missing on May, 2016, after the car she was riding in crashed into the Salmon River about six miles north of the town of Lucille.

Authorities say Danenberg and Tiffany Maupin, 21, were returning to the University of Idaho when their car went off U.S. 95 into the river. Maupin’s body was recovered on May 28, 2016, about six miles downstream from where the car went into the river.

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Lowman Elementary may only be one room, but it has a lot of heart

by Sarah Jacobsen Wednesday, October 25th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — If you’ve ever driven through the town of Lowman, Idaho, nestled deep in the mountains on the South Fork of the Payette River, you may have seen this building.

Lowman Elementary School.

The one and only school in the town of Lowman.

“Here it’s just a great community, the school is part of the center of the community and I have great community support,” said teacher Kim Grigg.

This one room school houses grades kindergarten through 5th grade.

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Man pleads not guilty to lighting fireworks that burned home

by Associated Press Sunday, October 29th 2017

Pocatello, Idaho (AP) – A Pocatello man accused of lighting mortar rocket fireworks that authorities say burned one home and damaged another has pleaded not guilty.

The Idaho State Journal reported that John Woods, of Pocatello, faces up to 25 years in prison if convicted of first-degree arson. He pleaded not guilty last week in district court.

Defense attorney Shane Reichert says Woods is sorry for what happened but that his client is innocent until proven guilty. Reichert says the state must prove that he was responsible for that crime.

Woods told the Journal in an interview in July that he began lighting mortar rockets from his driveway. Another resident reports that she came out of the house when she heard an explosion. Three additional mortars exploded in the air near her home.

The July 13 fire caused thousands of dollars in property damages.

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Are we in store for another record setting snow year?

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, October 25th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Countless hours of shoveling snow, and mounds of it lining the driveway, last winters record snowfall remains fresh on our minds.

Heading into the next winter season we’re beginning to see hints of what could be another extreme snow year.

“A La Nina Watch has been issued by the Climate Prediction Center for the fall and winter season… at the equator in the eastern Pacific, the ocean surface is trending cooler than average,” said KBOI 2News meteorologist Nate Larsen. “A similar pattern to what we saw last season.”

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Idaho approves $3 million to study raising Boise River dams

10/28/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idaho officials have approved spending $3 million to help pay for a federal study to increase the height of three dams on the Boise River.

The Capital Press reports that the Idaho Water Resources Board on Tuesday approved paying for half of the $6 million study that requires a 50 percent non-federal match.

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation study will look at raising Anderson Ranch Dam by 6 feet, Arrowrock Dam by 10 feet and Lucky Peak Dam by 4 feet.

That would result in an additional 60,000 acre-feet of storage capacity in the system that can now store about 1 million acre-feet.

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Public Lands:

Barber Flats Bridge road temporarily closes for first phase of repairs

Boise, Idaho, October 27, 2017 —

The Boise National Forest is temporarily closing National Forest System road 376 (Barber Flat Road) Oct. 30, 2017, for public health and safety while the Barber Flat Bridge undergoes the first phase of a two phased repair process.

This order will remain in effect until noon Nov. 16, 2017. Once the first phase is completed the bridge will reopen to vehicles less than 50 inches. Phase two is planned for the late summer, early fall 2018.

The Barber Flat Bridge has been closed to vehicles wider than 50 inches since April 2012 when an inspection showed that a bridge pier had moved deeming it unsafe for full sized vehicles.

A detailed description of the closure is attached. For this, and all Boise National Forest area closures visit:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices
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Forests Without Borders: State, Payette forest cooperate to produce healthy timber stands

By Max Silverson for The Star-News October 26, 2017

Clark Lucas works for the Idaho Department of Lands, but his latest project is located on land managed by the Payette National Forest.

Lucas, an IDL forest resource specialist, has been surveying Payette forest land in the Sloans Point area east of Donnelly under a new program called the Good Neighbor Authority.

The national program was included in the 2014 Farm Bill passed by Congress. The agreement allows for the two agencies to work as partners to increase the pace and scale of forest restoration, with each entity contributing to a single project, officials said.

Work in the Sloan’s Point area will focus about 1,500 acres of Payette forest land containing Ponderosa pine and western larch. Work would include stream restoration, controlled burns, and thinning trees both to produce lumber and to reduce the risk of wildfire.

“The intent is to help move conditions closer to what nature would have done if wildfire had not been excluded over the past 100 years,” Payette Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said.

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Forest Service buys key wildlife habitat area in E. Idaho

10/24/17 AP

Last Chance, Idaho — The U.S. Forest Service has purchased about 60 acres (24 hectares) of private land inside the Caribou-Targhee National Forest in eastern Idaho that contains key spawning habitat for Yellowstone cutthroat trout.

The agency in a news release Tuesday says the Duck Creek area of Henry’s Lake is also important habitat for elk, deer, pronghorn, grizzly bears and other wildlife.

The Forest Service says the public will have non-motorized access with camping available within 100 yards (91 meters) of Red Rock Road.

The agency says it purchased the land from Rob and Ruth Plesner. Rob Plesner’s ancestors homesteaded in the area.

The Nature Conservancy of Idaho assisted with the deal. Officials didn’t release the selling price.

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Federal land manager to Idaho National Guard: Stop building

By Rebecca Boone – 10/24/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — The Bureau of Land Management has ordered the Idaho National Guard to stop building a tank crossing on a road in a national conservation area in the state until an environmental analysis is finished and the BLM decides whether to grant a permit.

A formal cease and desist letter was sent to the Idaho Military Division last month, stating that the construction project — which involves extensive digging and trenching on Simco Road — was a trespass on the BLM-managed Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey Conservation Area.

Both sides characterized the issue as the result of a rare misunderstanding in a long-standing positive relationship in the area that contains key habitat for eagles, falcons and hawks.

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House will vote next week on wildfire bill

Matthew Daly Associated Press, KTVB October 26, 2017

Republican leaders say the House will vote next week on a GOP bill to make it easier to cut down trees on national forests to reduce the risk of wildfire.

A bill by Arkansas congressman Bruce Westerman would loosen environmental regulations for forest-thinning projects on federal lands. The measure would waive environmental reviews for projects up to 30,000 acres for areas prone to insect infestations, disease or extreme wildfire risk.

The bill comes as the Forest Service has spent a record $2.4 billion battling forest fires across the West in one of the nation’s worst fire seasons.

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy of California says the bill makes needed changes “to keep our forests healthy and less susceptible to the types of fires that ravaged our state this month.”

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Yellowstone & Grand Teton entrance fees could more than double

Oct 25, 2017 Local News 8

Washington DC (KIFI/KIDK) – The National Park Service is considering a proposal to increase fees at highly visited national parks during peak visitor seasons. The list includes Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks and 15 other national parks across the country.

The increases would apply to entrance fees and revised fees for road-based commercial tours. According to the Park Service, the revenue would fund improvements to aging infrastructure, including roads, bridges, campgrounds, waterlines, bathrooms, and other visitor services.

Yellowstone Park officials have identified a number of improvement projects.

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National Parks Want a Massive Fee Increase

Visiting one of the 17 most popular National Parks will cost $70 during peak season if this proposal goes through.

The Western Slope No-Fee Coalition 10/25/2017

On October 24, 2017 the National Park Service issued an announcement that they want to implement a huge “targeted” increase in entrance fees at the most popular National Parks.

Their “target”? Families whose vacation schedules are tied to the school calendar, lower-income visitors, and your wallet!

These 17 parks would charge a premium entry fee during their peak season, more than doubling the current cost of a single-visit entry to $70!

The parks involved, along with their peak season when the increase would be in effect are:

– May 1-September 30 for Arches National Park, Bryce Canyon National Park, Canyonlands National Park, Denali National Park, Glacier National Park, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Teton National Park, Olympic National Park, Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Park, Yellowstone National Park, Yosemite National Park, Zion National Park
– June 1-October 31 for Acadia National Park, Mount Rainier National Park, Rocky Mountain National Park, Shenandoah National Park
– January 1-May 31 for Joshua Tree National Park

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Hispanic ranchers dealt blow in lengthy battle over grazing

By Susan Montoya Bryan – 10/24/17 AP

Albuquerque, N.M. — A group of Hispanic ranchers has been dealt a blow in their years-long feud with the federal government over grazing rights on land in New Mexico that has been used by their families for centuries.

Attorneys for the ranchers argued that the U.S. Forest Service violated the law when deciding to limit grazing on historic land grants even though the government has recognized that the descendants of Spanish colonists have a unique relationship with the land.

The ranchers claimed the agency failed to consider social and economic effects that would result from limiting grazing in a region where poverty and dependence on the land for subsistence is high.

In a recent ruling, U.S. District James Browning dismissed remaining counts against the government, finding that the National Environmental Policy Act does not require the Forest Service to consider social and economic effects that are a direct result of an agency’s action.

The law narrowly centers on effects to the physical environment, the judge ruled.

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Critter News:

Halloween isn’t always a treat for your pets: How to avoid a scary vet bill

Pet owners beware of these Halloween hazards

Candi Carney Oct 27, 2017

It’s creepy, spooky and downright fun for families — but the Halloween season might be more of a trick, versus a treat, for your four-legged friends.

Pet insurance companies say vet ER visits are always up around this time of year.

We talked to local veterinarian Dr. Brad Twigg about what pet owners need to be aware of so they can avoid a frightful bill from the ER.

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Pet Talk – What is ‘pinkeye’?

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Oct 27, 2017 IME

Pinkeye is actually conjunctivitis. Conjunctivitis is an inflammation and swelling of the tissues lining or covering the eyelids and eyeball.

There are numerous causes of pinkeye, including infection by bacteria and viruses, irritants such as dust and snow crystals, and trauma. Other irritants include smoke, shampoo, foreign bodies, abnormal hair, and many others. Certain forms of pinkeye are secondary to allergies and auto-immune disease, and also due to poor tear production. Rarely, parasites, tumors and fungal infections can cause conjunctivitis.

The main clinical sign of pinkeye is redness and swelling to the conjunctiva and a discharge at the lower corner of the eye. The discharge may be gray, green, yellow, white or just watery. With widespread or severe conjunctivitis, inflammation of the eyelids or cornea can occur. This is called blepharitis and keratitis.

Conjunctivitis may or may not be painful. If painful, then the animal squints its’ eyes and tries to rub or paw at them.

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Reward offered for info on wolf-killing poacher in Oregon

by Gillian Flaccus, Associated Press Wednesday, October 25th 2017

Portland, Ore. (AP) — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and five conservation groups have teamed up to offer $15,500 for information about the illegal poaching of a federally protected gray wolf that was shot dead in a national forest in southern Oregon.

The wolf, known as OR-33, was being tracked by authorities and is one of at least eight that have been poached or died under mysterious circumstances in the state since 2015, the conservation groups said.

The groups in a statement Tuesday said OR-33 was found dead of gunshot wounds in Fremont Winema National Forest on April 23. DNA tests only recently confirmed that he was OR-33, a 4-year-old male who left a pack in northeast Oregon in 2015. His radio tracking collar stopped working last year.

Over two days in June, he killed two goats and one lamb at a small livestock operation near the small city of Ashland just north of Oregon’s border with California.

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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

“Midway through October 2017”
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Wolf Education International

Fourth Week October 2017

Wolves return to haunt EU politics

Funding restored to trap wolves who attack livestock

$15,500 Reward Offered After Endangered Wolf Shot Dead

Legislative Pulse: Wyoming Wins Wolf, Monument Battles
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Tentative deal reached on deadly ‘cyanide bombs’

By Matthew Brown – 10/26/17 AP

Billings, Mont. — U.S. officials have reached a tentative deal with wildlife advocates trying to stop the use of predator-killing traps, including devices called “cyanide bombs” that earlier this year injured an Idaho teenager and killed his dog, according to court documents filed Thursday.

Government attorneys asked U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen to put on hold for 60 days a lawsuit over the poisoned traps pending final approval of the agreement by senior officials at the Interior Department.

Terms were not disclosed.

One of the devices named in the lawsuit, called an M-44, is partially buried and baited to attract predators. It sprays cyanide into the mouths of animals that trigger it.

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Scotchman Peak goat ambassadors reduce conflict with hikers

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Oct 27, 2017

The future for mountain goats on North Idaho’s Scotchman Peak is brighter, thanks to “goat ambassadors” who have been hiking the popular trail to educate hikers on avoiding contact with the goats.

The Friends of Scotchman Peaks Wilderness (FSPW) have wrapped up a second season of the Mountain Goat Ambassador Program with reports that hikers on Trail 65 near Clark Fork, Idaho, had fewer encounters with aggressive goats.

The 29 volunteer ambassadors were on the peak overlooking Lake Pend Oreille on 37 days for a total of 388 hours, reports Phil Hough, FSPW executive director. That’s every weekend from early June through early October for outreach, education, surveying and monitoring.

“The hikers encountered by our Ambassadors were very interested in learning about the goats and expressed a desire to keep both hikers and goats safe,” he said. Hikers also appreciated any information the knowledgeable ambassadors offered on the proposed wilderness area and the mountains in general, he added.

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video:

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Video: Gutless field dressing saves time, hassle for elk hunters

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Oct 25, 2017

I’ve killed an elk near a road where it could be loaded in a pickup exactly zero times in my hunting career.

Every one had to be quartered or the meat removed from the bone in the field to be hauled by a pack animal or, in most cases, by me and a buddy on our backs or on a cart.

In the following two videos, pro hunters demostrate the “gutless method” of deboning meat and getting it ready quickly to pack out.

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Utah woman hospitalized after apparent moose attack

AP Oct 26, 2017

Salt Lake City (AP) – Authorities say a woman is recovering after an apparent moose attack in Summit County.

Two hikers found the woman lying on a trail with her dog on Sunday. They told authorities a cow moose and her calf were about 20 feet (6 meters) away, with the mother acting aggressively.

The hikers got the woman and dog away from the area and called for help.

The woman was taken to a hospital, but the extent of her injuries is unknown. Authorities are waiting for the woman to recover sufficiently before questioning her further.

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Hunter bags 36-point freak-of-nature deer with his crossbow

Brian Broom, The Clarion-Ledger, TEGNA October 26, 2017

Jackson, Miss. – The hunt for a 6-point management buck that spanned four years ended with a Philadelphia, Miss., man taking a rare 36-point giant.

“I hunt there around my house,” Stan Ethredge said. “We’ve got a couple of hundred acres.

“I’ve been getting pictures of him for at least four years now. He was a big 6-point four years ago. He dropped his antlers and grew six points again. After the second year he was a 6-point, I figured that was all he was going to be. I figured he was a good cull buck, but I never got a shot at him. I just got pictures.”

Ethredge continued to monitor the deer and as expected, he grew into another 6-point the following spring, but during the summer, his antlers began to express abnormalities. The buck started growing drop tines and stickers.

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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
October 27, 2017
Issue No. 849
Table of Contents

* Wild Salmon/Steelhead Numbers Rising In Oregon’s Sandy River After 2007 Dam Removal
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439787.aspx

* Tribal Kelt Reconditioning Program Aims To Boost This Year’s Wild Steelhead Spawning In Lower Snake River
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439786.aspx

* Operations To Protect Spawning ESA-Listed Chum Below Bonneville Delayed; Early Basin Water Supply Forecast Normal
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439785.aspx

* U.S. State Department Picks New Columbia River Treaty Negotiator
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439784.aspx

* Another Sturgeon Fishing Day Added, Mainstem Night Fishing Ban Lifted, Wild Steelhead Passage Still Very Low
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439783.aspx

* More Questions Than Answers On Influx Of Tropical Organisms Found In Alaska Waters For First Time
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439782.aspx

* Oregon Governor Announces Nominations For New Oregon Members Of Northwest Power/Conservation Council
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439781.aspx

* Irrigators Say Not ‘Re-Litigating,’ Want Court To Hear New Information On Barging Fish During Low Flow, Warm Conditions
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439780.aspx

* Independent Science Panel Reviews Draft Report On Columbia Basin Salmon Survival
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439779.aspx

* Council Hears A USFWS Review Of Libby Dam Operations For Sturgeon, Bull Trout
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439778.aspx

* NOAA Study: Climate Shifts Shorten Marine Food Chain Off California
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439777.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

Bats get their due as important wildlife species Oct. 24-31

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Monday, October 23, 2017

Governor’s proclamation recognizes the value of Idaho’s bat population

Don’t expect a spotlight in the sky over Gotham City, but do expect furry, flying critters to get their due respect Oct. 24-31 as it’s proclaimed National Bat Week in Idaho by proclamation of Gov. Butch Otter.

“Bats provide important biological services that contribute substantially to the economy of the United States by protecting American forests and agriculture from destructive insects and by providing the fundamental benefit of pollination,” the proclamation reads.

Recently, bat populations have suffered losses from white-nose syndrome and other factors that require attention to ensure the sustainability of food production and protect environmental and human health.

“It is critically important to continue federal and state efforts, including development of new public-private partnerships and increasing citizen engagement to promote the health of bat populations, increase the quality and quantity of bat roosting and foraging habitat, and help restore bat populations to healthy levels,” the proclamation reads.

Want to learn more about bats? Did you know a bat can live over 40 years? Check out 13 Awesome Facts About Bats from the U.S. Department of the Interior.
https://www.doi.gov/blog/13-facts-about-bats

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Processing wild game: Beyond burger, five options for deer and elk meat

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Friday, October 27, 2017

Even if you have your game processed by a butcher, these are still options

We love deer and elk steaks, but you can only get so many off an animal. That means lots of wild game meat is ground into burger, but there are other options that make tasty meals and snacks.

Many hunters have their big game animals processed by professional butchers. If that’s the case, chances are good you will end up with lots of ground meat. Don’t worry, you can still use that meat for nearly everything below.


Roger Phillips/Idaho Fish and Game

If you do your own butchering, you have more options. And a quick note about processing the meat before it’s ground. Deer or elk burger has a reputation for having “gamey” flavor, which is usually not a compliment, but it can be just as tasty as steaks of you process it with a few things in mind.

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Information sought on killed cow & bull moose found south of Elk River

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Conservation Educator
Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Anyone with information encouraged to call CAP hotline 1-800-632-5999

On October 20, 2017, Idaho Fish and Game conservation officers located a cow moose and a bull moose that had been shot near the 21-mile marker on the Aquarius road, hunt unit 10A in Clearwater County. The Aquarius road connects Elk River to the Grandad Bridge area.

The scene suggests that the moose were killed at different times but within a hundred yards of each other. Although the actual dates of the deaths are unknown, officers believe the moose were shot on or after October 10. Portions of the animals were taken and the antlers of the bull moose were left at the scene.

Anyone with information is encouraged to call the Clearwater Regional Office at 208-799-5010, or the Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) hotline at 800-632-5999. Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward.

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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Anteater vs baby kangaroo


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Makem & Clancy: A Place In The Choir

“All God’s Creatures Got A Place In the Choir” was composed by Bill Staines, an American folk musician and singer-songwriter from New England, This song has been recorded by many others apart from Makem and Clancy…


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Tips & Advice:

It’s the season of unwanted guests in your home, pests

by Nathan Larsen Tuesday, October 24th 2017

Meridian, Idaho (KBOI) — As the temperatures continue to cool-off we tend to migrate indoors.

It’s not just us humans that look for warmth on cooler days, you’re probably seeing a few unwanted guests darting across the floor or crawling up on the ceiling.

We spoke with Treasure Valley Pest Control to see what to look for on the exterior of your home, where the little critters often get in.

continued w/video:
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Seasonal Humor:

HalloweenTurkey-a

HalloweenSuperman-a
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It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown

In the 1966 animated special It’s The Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown, The PEANUTS gang celebrates Halloween, with Linus hoping that, finally, he will be visited by The Great Pumpkin, while Charlie Brown is invited to a Halloween party.

watch for free online:
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