Category Archives: News 2017

Aug 13, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Aug 13, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Smoke in Yellow Pine

The smoke we endured this last week mostly came from fires in BC, Canada, fires in surrounding states and fires in the Idaho Wilderness. The Missouri Fire has been quiet. This weekend the weather changed and by Sunday we had good air quality.

McCall AQI site:
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Yellow Pine Blowdown Update

It appears the logging crew took a break during the festival, we did not see them after Aug 1st. Logs decked by School Street are still there this weekend. (Porta potties are still here too.)
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H-Fest Thank Yous

Thank you Steven Toomey, Brandon Kilborn and their friend Zack for doing the “heavy lifting” during fest, keeping trash cans empty and road barricades upright.
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Firewood – ** Correction **

The firewood at the shooting range is NOT free. You must have a valid permit and tag the wood. Firewood permits are available at The Corner, please bring cash and a driver’s license.
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Yellow Pine Gravel Pit:

Valley County Quarry Development

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the proposed Valley County Quarry Development (Valley County Quarry) Project on lands managed by the Cascade Ranger District of the Boise National Forest.

Project Description

Valley County has submitted applications to the Boise National Forest (NF) to obtain the necessary approval for the portion of the project on federally administered lands. The Boise NF is proposing to issue a special use permit to authorize Valley County to use National Forest System lands for the purpose of developing and operating a quarry.

The development of an additional aggregate source is needed to economically support the road maintenance activities on the Stibnite/East Fork South Fork Salmon River (EFSFSR) Road, Johnson Creek Road and other local backcountry roads as determined necessary by the proponent (Valley County). These road surface improvements would reduce sediment delivery to adjacent waterways, provide improved road surface protection, and enhance public safety.

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the proposed action report (PAR) on the Project webpage: http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=51422

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. Please make your comments as specific as possible to help us identify and address issues.

Electronic, written, hand-delivered, and facsimile comments concerning this project will be accepted. Comments may be submitted through the Valley County Pit Development Project. To submit comments using the web form, select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s webpage.

Email comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), Adobe (.pdf), and Word (.doc) to: comments-intermtn-boise-cascade@fs.fed.us. Please put “Valley County Pit Development Project” in the subject line of e-mail comments. Comments must have an identifiable name attached or verification of identity will be required. A scanned signature may serve as verification on electronic comments.

Written comments may be submitted to: Boise National Forest, Cascade Ranger District, PO Box 696, Cascade, ID 83638 Attention: Terre Pearson-Ramirez, or by fax at 208-382-7480. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection in the Public Comment Reading Room on the project webpage and will be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act.

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by September 8, 2017.

For further information on the project, please contact Terre Pearson-Ramirez, NEPA Planner, by email at tramirez@fs.fed.us or by phone at 208-382-7457

Scoping Letter (PDF):
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VYPA News:

Yellow Pine Village Council Meeting Agenda

2:00 Community Hall 08/12/2017
Type of Meeting: Monthly Meeting
Meeting Facilitator: Deb Filler, Village Chairperson
Invitees: All Y.P. property owners, renters, & YPFD residents, public

I. Call to order
II. Approval of minutes from last meeting: Lorrine Munn, Secretary
III. Standing Committee Reports:
IV. Treasurer: Joel Fields
V. Community Hall: Kathy Hall
VI. Cemetery: Willie Sullivan
VII. Membership:
VIII. Harmonica Festival: Deb Filler
IX. Joel Fields, Midas Gold, Museum- Bill McIntosh, Fire/Sheriff- Jeff Forster
X. Ad Hoc Committee Reports
XI. Snow removal
XII. Composting toilet construction: Willie Sullivan
I. Old Business
II. New Business
III. Appointment of committee chairpersons (per By-Laws)
IV. By Law changes proposals/action
V. Adjourn
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YPFD News:

Next meeting will be on the 26th of August, 2:00 at the Comm Hall. Discussing the 2018-19 Budget.

Training is on Sundays starting at 11am at the YP Fire Station and open to the community of Yellow Pine. Check with Jeff F. or Ann F. to confirm trainings.

Fire Siren will be tested at noon on the first of each month.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District July Commissioner Meeting

July 29, 2017

In Attendance:
Jeff Forster (Interim Fire Chief)
Cecil Dallman (Zone 1 Commissioner)
Dan Stiff (Zone 2 Commissioner)
Tom Rickter (Zone 3 Commissioner)

Meeting came to Order at 1409

Read minutes from last meeting

(The reading of the minutes were for the Residence in Yellow Pine that attended, the commissioners had approved the minutes, via e-mail prior to the meeting)

Old Business

Portable Pump Stations From May Meeting
We reviewed the status and operation of all portable pumps and hoses.
* A complete list of hoses, couplings, and foot valves was compiled and item put on order.

Discussion about purchasing Progressive line Back Packs, (Dan / Jeff Order)

Tank … Suggestion for a training day…Tank by Jack Walkers
* The old tank on Stibnite Road near Jack’s place needs to be flushed.

Willie: Cement Pads for the Tanks in town 3…One at Dave’s, one at Buck Cox’s.
* Willie Sullivan suggested we look into cement pads for foundations for our tanks.

Fire Extinguishers
* Discuss Distribution process
* Fire Extinguishers and Smoke Detectors will be distributed by Dan
* Saturday 15 August we will distribute them at the Village Association meeting at the Rec Hall. After that, just call Dan and he will arrange to meet you at the fire station.

Fire Rescue Vehicle (Chevy)
* Status
* Commissioners and the Interim Fire Chief have decided to sell the Chevy and purchase a newer asset.

New Business

Budget Review
* $75,312.00
* Budget Meeting August 26th, 2 PM at Community Hall
Tentative meeting set for Budget spending with Commissioners Thursday, 11 August, 2017

Storage discussion
We discussed adding a new bay to the Fire Station.

What do we use the empty bay / make decision on purchasing another tanker as primary

Made decision to sell the Army Truck

Discuss meeting with Midas (Extraction Equipment)
* We have proposed to Midas to purchase $25K worth of Heavy Extraction equipment to be housed in the YPFD station. 3 members of the department are attending Heavy Extraction with Valley County later this Fall.

Review incident from 7/27
* Communication was an issue due to Line of Sight up in Quartz Creek
* 18 of the 30+ residence of Yellow Pine responded to the Fire Department Siren
* Items that could have assisted us:
** Trail extraction Stokes with Wheel
** More training on Stokes / SKED / Vacuum Mattress transport
* Dress.
** Too many of us showed up in shorts and non-hiking boots. Standard response dress discussed and agreed upon.

Discussion about November Elections

Next Meeting

Discussion about Town Water to fill Fire Truck
Possibility that soon, the town will be replacing pipe around town.
Best option would be to have a parallel system fire / Potable Water System ($$).

Communication about the Fire Department Siren and 911 Message to Community.

Business Cards for Fire Department Commissioners

Do we have the ability to Bond? Ask Doug Miller (Valley County Clerk)

Looking into Purchasing a Portable Repeater. Jeff

Talk to Donna Valdez about donation of some material for LZ (Dan)
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Welch Memorial Golf Tourney 2017

Saturday September 2 at 1pm – Yellow Pine Country Club
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September 13-14 Scheduled Power Outage

A message that Idaho Power needs to replace power poles.
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Local Observations:

Monday (Aug 7) overnight low of 46 degrees, appears to be a few clouds above the smoke this morning, McCall shows RED air quality. Some campers still on the golf course, light traffic and dusty. One hummingbird, a finch and a pine-siskin. Pine squirrels chasing each other and several chipmunks running around, spotted one colombian ground squirrel. Sounded like there were a couple of grosbeaks calling from the trees to the east before lunch. Light breezes and smoky at noon. A few campers leaving. Calm, cloudy, a bit muggy, dusty and smoky afternoon, high of 88 degrees. Most of the campers were gone by evening. At 930pm it was 66 degrees and calm, appears to be partly/mostly cloudy.

Tuesday (Aug 8) overnight low of 50 degrees, appears to be clear above the smoke this morning. McCall shows Orange air quality. Flock of pine-siskins chirping from the power-line this morning. By lunch time the McCall air monitor had improved to Yellow, and the smoke seems to be thinner here too. Hot hazy afternoon (dust and smoke) a few clouds, light breezes, yellow air quality, high of 91 degrees. Almost clear at dark and thicker haze of smoke. Very orange moon rose over Golden Gate.

Wednesday (Aug 9) overnight low of 48 degrees, appears to be clear above moderate smoke this morning. McCall AQI shows orange air quality. Quiet, very few birds. Juvenile jay and several chipmunks. A few afternoon clouds, light breezes and Orange air quality, high of 90 degrees. Clear, calm and smoky evening. Increasing smoke after midnight (very orange moon.)

Thursday (Aug 10) overnight low of 47 degrees, appears to be clear above thick smoke this morning, McCall AQI shows Red. Did not see or hear many birds, a few pine-siskins, a mourning dove and a jay. Pine squirrels chittering, chipmunks jerking about. Appears to be clear sky after lunch, hard to tell as the sky looks flat and gray from the smoke. McCall AQI still in the red. Not as hot today, calm this afternoon and smoky, high of 89 degrees. Early evening light breezes, McCall AQI in the Orange. A couple of young hummingbirds visited the feeder. Calm after dark, thicker smoke. McCall AQI Red at midnight.

Friday (Aug 11) overnight low of 47 degrees, appeared to be a few clouds above thick smoke, the sun is a fuzzy orange disk this morning, McCall AQI shows Red. Could hear a few pine-siskins, a robin and a jay calling, a couple of young hummers buzzing the feeders. It was so quiet for a bit that we could hear the river. Dust rising from the back Stibnite road, even tho we had a little dew early. Mostly cloudy after lunch time (hard to see the clouds thru the smoke.) 1pm McCall AQI Orange (barely below red), high of 85 degrees Thunderstorm came thru with a little rain before 4pm. Strike map shows hits near Parks Creek and Rainbow Ridge. The rain cooled it off, but didn’t do much about the smoke. Still hazy with smoke this evening.

Saturday (Aug 12) overnight low of 43 degrees, clear sky above a haze of smoke, McCall AQI Yellow. Still a bit damp from yesterday’s shower. Pine-siskins calling from the trees, pine squirrel scolding and chipmunks running around. A report that the EFSF Road has been graded (and perhaps dust abatement will be applied soon.) Smoky haze sticking with us all day. Some afternoon clouds building to the south (hard to see thru the haze) and Yellow Air quality. A couple of young hummingbirds and a few pine-siskins at the feeder early afternoon. Late afternoon and early evening: mostly cloudy, pretty warm, a bit muggy and just a thin haze of smoke (McCall AQI in the green!), high of 89 degrees. Nighthawk calling at dusk, single swallow flying over the neighborhood, clarks nutcracker flying near the school, “Baby” Jay on the edge of the golf course (has learned to feed itself and no longer begging.) Very light sprinkles of rain after 10pm (with lightning) until around midnight.

Sunday (Aug 12) Overnight low (from yesterday morning) 48 degrees, trace of rain in the gauge, mostly cloudy and much better air quality (can see the sky.) A few pine-siskins at the feeder, clarks nutcrackers calling from the trees and one young hummingbird, no sign of the colombian ground squirrels. Hear a helicopter flying around the area just after 11am. Sprinkled a little rain for about an hour around lunch time. Cooler and good air, broken clouds by 130pm. Cooler, cloudy and quiet afternoon, high of 77 degrees.
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Eclipse News:

Here’s the exact time the eclipse will be over your city

KTVB August 08, 2017

Parts of Idaho and eastern Oregon will be treated to a total eclipse of the sun on Aug. 21. Even if you aren’t in the path of totality, you will still get a show to remember.

If you would like to know exactly when the once-in-a-lifetime eclipse will happen in your neighborhood, NASA has created a fantastic interactive map that lets you zoom into your community and find out – down to a tenth of a second – when the eclipse will begin, when you’ll see totality (the moment the moon moves completely in front of the sun), and when the eclipse will end.

https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/interactive_map/index.html

source:
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UTC Time to MTD time converter

https://www.utctime.net/utc-to-mdt-converter
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Don’t blindly trust companies selling solar eclipse glasses on Amazon

They could be legit, but it’s hard to know for sure

by Loren Grush Jul 26, 2017

On August 21st, a total solar eclipse will pass through the continental United States — traveling from the coasts of Oregon to South Carolina. It’s going to be an incredible sight, but the only way to watch it safely is to view the partially eclipsed Sun with special solar filter glasses that block out the majority of the Sun’s light. Only certain solar filter glasses sold online have been properly certified.

A quick search of solar filter glasses on Amazon will pull up hundreds of companies selling products for safely viewing the eclipse. Many of the glasses are sponsored or recommended by Amazon, and claim to have been certified for safely viewing the Sun. However, some of the vendors being featured on Amazon’s website are allegedly selling counterfeit products, and it’s hard to tell which ones are legitimate.

“Some of the places they’re selling from are reputable manufacturers who we recognize and have had their glasses certified — and others are suspect,” says Rick Fienberg, a spokesperson for the American Astronomical Society (AAS), a DC-based nonprofit that’s been working with NASA on verifying certified solar filter glasses. “We do have some confirmed reports of glasses being sold on Amazon by various vendors that are not genuine and that are not made from well-known manufacturers with documented proof of their identification.”

continued:
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Amazon recalls some solar eclipse glasses week before event

Sara Roth, KGW August 12, 2017

On Saturday, the photography staff at KTVB’s sister station in Portland – KGW – received an email from Amazon, explaining the solar filters the station purchased for the Aug. 21 total solar eclipse were not confirmed safe for viewing.

At least one KTVB viewer has received a similar notification about a recall from Amazon, which also affects eclipse glasses.

… An Amazon spokesperson said Amazon is responding “out of an abundance of caution.”

“Safety is among our highest priorities. Out of an abundance of caution, we have proactively reached out to customers and provided refunds for eclipse glasses that may not comply with industry standards. We want customers to buy with confidence anytime they make a purchase on Amazon.com and eclipse glasses sold on Amazon.com are required to comply with the relevant ISO standard,” the company said in a statement.

Amazon said customers who did not receive an email purchased glasses that were safe to use. The company did not reveal how many glasses were recalled or how much money was refunded.

The company said some counterfeiters are even ripping off legitimate brands so even if a customer purchased a verified product, it could be counterfeit.

Anyone who is concerned about their eclipse glasses but did not receive an email about the recall can reach out to Amazon customer service for a refund.

full story:
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Vets say prepare pets for eclipse

by Reed Andrews, KATU News Friday, August 11th 2017

Your solar eclipse glasses won’t fit your dog — veterinarians say to put away any tape or string, the glasses aren’t needed for pets.

“Those commercial eye care products for dogs aren’t necessarily going to be protective for these eclipse viewing,” said Sarah Tauber, a veterinarian for Dove Lewis. “Animals won’t directly look into the sun like we’re all told not to do.”

Tauber says for pet owners in the path of totality, where large crowds are expected, the ensuing traffic and loud noises could cause problems for pets.

“Mostly, keep them inside. A lot of people have indoor, outdoor pets, and I think the safest thing to do with a lot of the changes that are going to be happening during the weekend is just to keep them inside,” Tauber said.

source:
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ITD: make sure vehicle is in good working order before traveling for eclipse

Stephanie Hale-Lopez Aug 8, 2017 KIVI TV

The total solar eclipse will increase the total number of vehicles on the road. With thousands expected to travel on Idaho roadways, experts have a message for drivers.

“It’s important to do a pre-trip check, where you check the tires — make sure there’s plenty of air pressure — make sure there’s no leaks and that fluids are topped off,” said Jared Scofield, owner of Garry’s Automotive in Boise. “Things that are the most basic are often the most overlooked.”

Making sure your vehicle’s battery, tires, headlights and brakes are in good working order could save you in the event of delays or an emergency.

The hot temperatures expected on the day of the eclipse could cause havoc on your vehicle, affecting your engine or even your air conditioning.

continued:
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Lunartic Friends Music Festival to rock eclipse weekend

The Star-News August 10, 2017

Enough music to make the sun get tired and go to sleep will be featured during Lunartic Friends Music Festival on Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 19-20, in Cascade.

The festival will be held at the Cascade Sports Park on the south side of Cascade and will feature camping for those staying over for the solar eclipse on Monday, Aug. 21.

Bands scheduled to perform on Saturday, Aug. 19, include Brief ‘N’ Breezy, the Smooth Avenue Band, Straight Shooter and the Bret Welty Band.

Sunday’s scheduled bands include Destination Dead, the Uke-A-Ladies, The Guess When and The Retreads.

Tickets cost $20 for a one-day pass or $40 for a three-day pass with additional fees for camping and parking.

Go to http://lunarticfriends.com for details.

source: http://www.mccallstarnews.com/
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Eclipse Projects: Pinhole Projector and Eclipse Glasses Decorating

Posted on August 10, 2017 Boise County Connection

Paper Pinhole Projector – Idaho

Supplied by NASA

Copy of the Idaho map

Carefully cut out the circle and star shapes to create your pinholes.

With your back to the sun, hold your 2D printed pinhole projector 2-3 feet above the ground.

continued, scroll down for printable template and more info:
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U.S. Forest Service prepares for the solar eclipse

Boise, Idaho, August, 9, 2017

The Boise and Sawtooth National Forests are preparing for the solar eclipse. With the projected increase of visitors, there are special considerations requiring additional attention from all Forest users during this time, please visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/main/boise/home

Some areas within the path of totality are closed. Below are some of the specific closure areas. Recreationists are highly encouraged to “know before you go” by visiting the Boise National Forest alerts and notices page where all current closures are posted: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices

* Bear Valley Creek areas will be closed for the protection of threatened and endangered species and for public health and safety. This area north of Lowman, Idaho, hosts adult salmon completing their spawning migration (almost 900 miles). This area is very sensitive and we ask our visitors to help us protect this valuable resource.

* National Forest Systems (NFS) Road 555 (Scott Mountain Road) will be designated one-way traffic at different times of the day for public safety Aug. 18-21, 2017. Northbound traffic is open from 6 a.m. -1 p.m. Southbound traffic is open from 1—7 p.m. Two-way traffic is open to 7 p.m.—6 a.m.

* Snowbank Mountain area has limited occupancy capacity and will be monitored. Once capacity has been reached, NFS Road 446 gate will be closed to further incoming traffic for public health and safety. If you plan on viewing the eclipse from this delicate area, please help protect it by adhering to the posted motor vehicle boundaries (300 feet from designated roads).

* Salvage logging and Forest road repair work has begun in areas burned by the 2016 Pioneer Fire. Forest visitors traveling on State Highways 55, State Highway 21, Boise County Road 17 (Banks Lowman Highway) and adjacent NFS roads within the Lowman and Idaho City Ranger Districts should drive with caution as there is an increase of logging truck activity. Safety is always important, especially while traveling in burned areas as there is a higher degree of hazards. Many immediate threat hazard trees have been removed along priority roads and travel routes however, fire weakened trees have potential to fall; obstructing roadways and camp sites. Forest recreationists are encouraged to critically evaluate parking areas and camping locations.

* Be bear aware. During dry summer months, bear’s natural food may be scarce, attracting them to improperly stored food sources. For additional safety information, please visit: https://www.fs.fed.us/visit/know-before-you-go/bears
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Idaho News:

Pioneer Picnic in Roseberry Aug. 20 seeks old photos, family stories

The Star-News August 10, 2017

Old photos and family stories from the early days of Long Valley are being sought for this year’s Long Valley Pioneer Picnic to be held at Historic Roseberry on Sunday, Aug. 20

The festivities begin at 11 a.m. at The Barn at Roseberry with registration and conversation. Those attending should bring a dish to share and their own table service.

The afternoon will feature a presentation from the Yensen family. Live music will be provided by Mountain Fever, also known as Jon and Bonnie Glick.

Those attending are invited to help update the museum’s photo archives by bringing their old family photos to be scanned or donated.

Picnic attendees are also invited to bring copies of written family stories from the early days of Long Valley to add to the museum’s family history archives.

For questions, write to Lucy Chronic at lmchronic@gmail.com.

source: http://www.mccallstarnews.com/
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Woman, child killed after airborne car crashes into tree

KTVB August 10, 2017

Donnelly, Idaho — A woman and a child are dead after a crash Wednesday night.

Idaho State Police say Devin Hawkins, 36, of McCall was driving northbound on Mountain Road near Little Lane, west of Donnelly, in a 2002 Porsche with two passengers.

Hawkins was driving at a high rate of speed when he failed to negotiate a curve. He tried to overcorrect his car but ended up driving off the road and hit a culvert.

The impact from hitting the culvert caused Hawkins’ car to go airborne then hit a tree. His two passengers died at the scene, Kerri Hawkins, 37, of McCall, and a child in the car.

Devin Hawkins was brought to St. Luke’s McCall Medical Center. Everyone in the car was wearing seatbelts.

The crash is under investigation by the Idaho State Police with assistance from the Valley County Sheriff’s Office.

source:
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Driver in June 26 wreck near McCall charged with manslaughter

By Tom Grote for The Star-News August 10, 2017

A Donnelly woman has been with charged with vehicular manslaughter in a June 26 accident near McCall that killed an Arizona woman.

Charges were filed against Jan Gallad, 49, of Donnelly, last week by the Valley County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office. The charge is a misdemeanor punishable to up to six months in jail and a $1,000 fine.

Gallad is scheduled to appear for a hearing on Sept. 19 in Valley County Magistrate Court in Cascade.

The criminal complaint against Gallad said she moved out of her lane “in an unsafe manner” on Idaho 55 south of Lake Fork, colliding head-on with a car driven by Adele Valois, 73, of Tucson, Ariz.

The car driven by Valois left the road and came to rest upside down in a ditch, the Valley County Sheriff’s Office said.

Valois was taken to St. Luke’s McCall and transferred by air ambulance to St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, where she died, the Ada County Coroner’s Office said.

source: http://www.mccallstarnews.com/
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Sheriff investigates death of man in Payette Lake

By Tom Grote for The Star-News August 10, 2017

The death of a man in Payette Lake on July 29 is being investigated by the Valley County Sheriff’s Office.

Emergency responders were called to a “suspicious circumstance” at 910 Yew Wood St. at 1:21 a.m. on July 29, Lt. Jason Speer said.

A man identified as Carmello Tinnerello Jr, 61, Boise, was found floating unresponsive in the lake, Speer said.

The man was pulled from the water by a woman staying at the same house as Tinnerello, he said. Rescuers tried to revive Tinnerello but he was pronounced dead at the scene.

The case was turned over to the sheriff’s office and Valley County Coroner Scott Carver, who ordered an autopsy. The initial results of the autopsy were “inconclusive,” Carver said.

A final determination will depend on the results of blood tests on levels of drugs and alcohol present at the time of Tinnerello’s death, Carver and Speer said.

No other details of the incident will be disclosed while the investigation continues, Speer said.

source: http://www.mccallstarnews.com/
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Boise man dies in rafting accident

KTVB August 12, 2017

A Boise man has died in a boating accident on the Payette River.

Sgt. David Anthony of the Boise Co. Sheriff’s Office said Saturday that William Navarro and his girlfriend, Heidi Landa, were floating down the river in a catamaran-style raft shortly before 9 p.m. Friday night near Chief Parrish, between Horseshoe Bend and Banks.

When they hit the rapids, Anthony said, Navarro fell out of the raft.

Navarro and Landa were both wearing life jackets. However, Navarro took his life jacket off after having difficulties in trying to get back onto the raft, Anthony said.

Landa tried to help Navarro, but he went under after they came up on another set of rapids.

The Horseshoe Bend Fire Department’s water rescue team found Navarro near Beehive Bend. He was unconscious and not breathing.

source:
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Mosquitoes in Elmore County test positive for West Nile Virus

by KBOI News Staff Friday, August 11th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Elmore County becomes the twelfth Idaho county to report mosquitoes testing positive for West Nile Virus as of Friday.

The Central District Health Department says multiple mosquito pools were located this week.

The pools are in the areas of Canyon Creek Street, Hamilton Road, and East 6th Street/South 18th East Street in Mountain Home, Three Island Crossing Park in Glenns Ferry and King Hill outside Glenns Ferry.

continued:
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Old scam with new twist surfaces in Magic Valley

KTVB August 12, 2017

The Twin Falls Police Department has recently received reports of a scam in which a caller threatens arrest in an attempt to take people’s money.

People have reported receiving a call, or a voicemail message, from a man claiming to be a local law enforcement officer, specifically a detective, deputy, or someone with the warrant or records division. Often, the name that is given is an actual officer’s name, which can be found by doing an internet search.

The caller says the potential victim has an arrest warrant for missing a court date. Past schemes have threatened arrest for failure to pay a traffic ticket or other violations, such as missing jury duty.

continued:
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Kawasaki Recalls All-Terrain Vehicles Due to Fire Hazard

Suzanne Nuyen, TEGNA August 12, 2017

Kawasaki is recalling about 15,000 of their all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) due to a fire hazard.

The company received 18 reports of fuel leakage from the fuel tap. Although no injuries have been reported, the leakage poses a fire hazard.

The recall involves 2013-2017 KFX50 models and 2012-2017 KFX90 models.

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled vehicles and contact Kawasaki for a free repair. Kawasaki can be reached toll-free at 866-802-9381 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. PT Monday through Friday. More information on recalls can be found on their website.

source:
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Farming in the heat: How temperatures are influencing Idaho’s crops

by Nate Larsen Tuesday, August 8th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Hot temperatures are influencing Idaho’s crops.

The long list of hot summer days has made it hard for sensitive crops to fully mature in some cases.

Most farmers have had a hard time keeping crops wet with the above average temperatures.

So far this summer, we’ve had 11 days of 100 degree temperatures and a run of 39 days with high temperatures in the 90’s.

Farmers are lucky this year having ample water to keep up with the demand.

continued:
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Fire Season:

Hanover Fire near Riggins continues to grow

KTVB August 09, 2017

Riggins, Idaho – The Hanover Fire northeast of Riggins has burned almost 6,500 acres – more than 10 square miles.

The fire started after a lightning strike on August 1st.

A public meeting is scheduled for Wednesday night at 8 o’clock Mountain Time in the gym at Salmon River High School in Riggins.

The Salmon River Road is open and the Salmon River is open to all activities. But the fire has been moving slowly down slope toward the river, and firefighter equipment and activity has increased on the Salmon River Road east of Riggins.

Also, helicopters may start dipping from the river, so rafters and other recreationists are advised to watch out for that.

source:


Photo By Jonathan Moor Posted on: 08/09/17

InciWeb link: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5459/
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Land Management Agencies to Implement Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in Central Idaho

August 8, 2017 Payette NF

McCall, Idaho – With the threat of wildfire danger increasing rapidly throughout central Idaho, local land management agencies will implement Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in the Payette Dispatch Area beginning at 00:01 a.m. on Friday, August 11, 2017 and will remain in effect until October 1, 2017 unless rescinded earlier by the jurisdictional agencies. These restrictions are being implemented by agencies managing state, private and public lands in the area, including the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), United States Forest Service (USFS), Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association (SITPA), and the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL). Fire restrictions are intended to decrease the risk of any human caused wildfires in the designated areas.

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions will be in effect within the Payette Fire Restriction Area. This area includes the Payette National Forest (excluding the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness), Idaho State Lands, Boise and Cottonwood BLM Field Offices and private lands in central Idaho. For a detailed map of the Payette Fire Restriction Area see below and visit: http://www.idahofireinfo.com/p/payette-mountains-fire-restrictions.html.

Fire, fuels and weather conditions as they relate to fire restrictions will continue to be monitored – based on these conditions, restrictions can be rescinded or additional restrictions issued if conditions warrant. The land management agencies would like to thank the public for their attention to fires in Idaho so far this season and ask for their help in preventing any future unwanted fire with drying fuels and hotter temperatures expected to continue into this fall.

Under the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions, the following acts are prohibited on the restricted state, private and federal lands:

* Building, maintaining, attending or using a fire, campfire or stove fire except within a designated recreation site, or on their own land, and only within a permanent land owner-provided structure. (See liquid petroleum fueled stove exemption below).

* Smoking, outside an enclosed vehicle or building, or designated recreation site, or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials.

The following are exemptions to the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions:

* Persons with a written special use authorization specifically exempting them from the effect of this order.

* Persons using a stove or grill that is fueled solely by liquid petroleum fuels. Such devices, including propane campfires, may be used only in an area cleared of flammable material.

* Persons using a stove fire (a fire built inside a fully enclosed metal stove, grill, or sheep herder type stove that is outfitted with a chimney that is at least five (5) feet in length that is equipped with a spark arrester consisting of a mesh screen with screen opening of 1/4 inch or less).

* Persons using metal fire pans (sides must be 3 inches high with a metal grate on top) within ¼ mile of the Main Salmon River. Pack-out of ashes is required.

* Any federal, state or local officer or member of an organized rescue or firefighting force in the performance of an official duty.

* All land within a city boundary is exempt.

With the volume of wildfires burning throughout central Idaho, fire managers are asking the public to be extra cautious when spending time in the outdoors. Idahoans are also reminded that the use of fireworks are prohibited on forest and range lands in Idaho during closed fire season (May 10 through October 20).

Please visit http://www.idahofireinfo.com/p/fire-restrictions.html for current information regarding fire restrictions or contact the local land management office.

Payette National Forest Designated areas: campfires are allowed in permanent Forest Service provided fire structures in the following areas on the Payette National Forest – please see attached map.

Krassel RD: McCall RD: Council RD:
Big Creek Campground Kennally Creek Campground Cabin Creek Campground
Ponderosa Campground Paddy Flat Campground Big Flat Campground
Buckhorn Bar Campground, all loops Upper Payette Lake Campground Evergreen Campground
Lafferty Campground
Secesh Campground Burgdorf Campground Hornet Picnic Area
Camp Creek Campground Chinook Campground Huckleberry Campground
Four Mile Campground Lake Fork Campground Sheep Rock Recreation Site
Poverty Campground Ruby Meadow Campsite (3 sites)
Old East Fork Road Campsites
Deadman Campsites Pete Creek/Three Mile Trailhead (9 sites) Weiser RD:
Split Creek/Cow Creek Campsites Buck Park Cabin
Indian Point Campsites Jeanette Campground Brownlee Campground
Lick Creek Trailhead Lake Fork Cabin Justrite Campground
Reed Ranch Campsites Paddy Flat Cabin Kiwanis Campground
California Lake Paradise Campground
Spring Creek Campground
 New Meadows RD:
Goose Lake Campsites (3 sites)
Granite Lake Campsite
Yantis Ditch (2 sites)
Smokey Boulder Road Campsites (13 sites)
Hazard Lakes Campground
Grouse Campground
Last Chance Campground
Cold Springs Campground
Hard Creek Horse Camp

Lost Valley Reservoir (7 sites)

Lower Lost Valley (7 sites)

Campfires are prohibited in all other locations on the Payette National Forest except as otherwise noted above.

Map

(click map for larger size, then click again to zoom in.)

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
p: 208-634-0784
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Stage 1 Fire Restrictions to be implemented in Treasure Valley and West Central Mountains

August 7, 2017 Boise NF

Boise, Idaho – With the threat of wildfire danger increasing throughout southwest Idaho, local wildland fire management agencies will implement Stage 1 Fire Restrictions, effective August 11, 2017 beginning at 12:01 a.m. They will remain in effect until further notice. These restrictions are intended to decrease the chance of any preventable fires in the designated areas.

Stage 1 restrictions prohibit fires, campfires, or camp stoves in areas other than designated recreation sites with approved fire structures. Stage 1 also prohibits smoking in open areas except when stopped in sites that are free of flammable materials with a radius of at least 3 feet of barren soil or in developed recreation sites.

The identified areas going into Stage 1 Fire Restrictions include private and public lands protected by the Boise National Forest, Boise District BLM and State and Endowment Lands within:

* Ada, Canyon, Gem, Payette, Elmore, Boise, Valley and Washington counties

* Within Washington County, all Bureau of Reclamation lands surrounding Mann Creek Reservoir

* Within Valley County, all Bureau of Reclamation lands surrounding Lake Cascade

* Within Elmore and Boise counties, all Bureau of Reclamation lands surrounding Arrowrock and Anderson Ranch reservoirs

For a map of the Treasure Valley and West Central Mountain Zones, visit: Idaho Fire Information

Treasure Valley Fire Restrictions Zone – All of Ada, Canyon, Gem, Payette and Washington counties. Portions of Boise County including the administrative boundary of Lucky Peak Lake to Arrowrock Dam, south shore of Arrowrock Reservoir and that portion of Elmore County that lies south of the South Fork Boise River to Anderson Ranch Dam, south along Anderson Dam Road (FS Rd 134) to Highway 20, east on Highway 20 to the Elmore/Gooding County line south to Interstate 84. The Treasure Valley Restriction area is bounded by the Idaho/Oregon boundary to Oreana then follows the Bachman Grade to Triangle and continues east-northeast of the Owyhee Front to the Bruneau River. The northern boundary begins near Weiser, Idaho and follows Highway 95 to Indian Valley, then generally follows the Little Weiser River to the Payette and Boise National Forest boundary lines.

West Central Mountains Fire Restrictions Zone – Boise National Forest, Boise District BLM and State and Endowment Lands within Elmore County, Boise County, and Valley County to include all Bureau of Reclamation lands surrounding Lake Cascade. From the point where the Boise National Forest boundary intersects State Highway 20 near Dixie following the Boise National Forest boundary west and north along the ridge of the Danskin to Boise Front foothills and extending north encompassing the Idaho Department of Lands to its intersection back with the Boise National Forest boundary near Sagehen Reservoir. The far northern boundary includes all Boise National Forest lands, excluding the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. All lands north of Sagehen Reservoir including Tripod Mountain and West Mountain within the North Fork Payette River drainage north to near Tamarack Resort.

With the fire season well underway, these restrictions are intended to keep visitors to public lands safe as well as preventing unwanted human-caused wildland fire. If you are planning a visit to public lands in these areas, please visit the following link for current fire restrictions:
http://www.idahofireinfo.com/p/fire-restrictions.html

Map

Linda Steinhaus
Public Affairs
Boise National Forest
p: 208-373-4106
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2017 Idaho Wildfire Season Has Been Less Intense Than Last Year (So Far)

By Frankie Barnhill Boise State Public Radio Aug 10, 2017

At this time last year, a gigantic wildfire in the Boise National Forest held the record as the largest wildfire in the country.

The Pioneer Fire burned until the snow fell last October. It left almost 300 square miles of destruction in its path. The tiny town of Lowman was put on evacuation notice and a terrifying cloud full of ash and smoke hung over the wildfire – visible 60 miles away in Boise.

But according to Jennifer Smith with the National Interagency Fire Center, southwest Idaho forests are getting a bit of a break this year.

continued:
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Wildland Fire Summary Through August 2017

Please review the fuels and fire behavior advisory for Nevada, Utah, part of Idaho and Wyoming.

It is an overall busy fire season in the Great Basin, although there are relatively few large fires on National Forest Systems lands. Record grass crops in the lower elevations have supported many large, fast moving fires managed by BLM and States. Forest Service personnel are heavily supporting interagency fires in the basin and elsewhere in the west. As another long, demanding season drags on, people are starting to feel the results of cumulative fatigue. It is a great time for everyone to be aware of hazardous conditions and the potential for extreme fire behavior. Let’s look out for one another.

We are at preparedness level 4 both regionally and nationally. Preparedness levels for wildland fire range from 1-5 with 5 being the highest level. Preparedness Levels are dictated by fuel and weather conditions, fire activity, and resource availability. Our fire personnel and aviators are helping the northwest, including northern California and the Rockies, who are also experiencing high fire activity.

We continue to have moderate to heavy Initial Attack (IA) on new starts each day, most of which are contained successfully. There are four uncontained large fires showing on the daily Incident Management Situation Report, two of those with Forest Service jurisdiction (www.nifc.gov/nicc/sitreprt.pdf ). There are also fires burning on National Forest Systems Land within the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness including the Highline Fire on the Payette National Forest and the Tappan and Ibex Fires on the Salmon Challis National Forest. Visit our website for more information on fire activity in the region, http://www.fs.usda.gov/main/r4/home.

Smoke from dozens of fires throughout the western U.S. and Canada have been impacting the west. For the latest information on smoke in Idaho visit: http://idsmoke.blogspot.com/

A very wet winter across the western and northern Nevada, Utah, and southern Idaho, has produced tremendous fine fuel loading and continuity in the lower elevations. Fine fuel loadings are 200-300% above average across much of the advisory area. Recent large fires in northern Nevada, southern Idaho and Utah, have displayed extreme fire behavior and high resistance to control. Very hot and dry conditions through the month of July have caused live and dead fuel moisture to rapidly decrease to critical levels mostly affecting northern Nevada and southern Idaho.

With the 7 day predictive services report calling for a mix of dry and wet thunderstorms in the Great Basin, there is potential for extreme fire conditions across much of the region. The temperatures will return to above normal as an influx of visitors is expected for the total solar eclipse on August 21st. Preparations are being made to ensure the safety and smooth operations of the public, firefighters, employees, and emergency management personnel. All Intermountain Region Forests in the path of totality will be under fire restrictions.

For more information on fire restrictions visit:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/main/r4/fire-aviation/prevention

For more information on predictive service outlook please visit: http://www.predictiveservices.nifc.gov/outlooks/outlooks.htm

For more information on the solar eclipse please visit:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/r4/home/?cid=fseprd539436
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Public Lands:

Bull Trout Campground reopens

Boise, Idaho, August 11, 2017

The Boise National Forest, Lowman Ranger District has reopened Bull Trout Campground and the surrounding dispersed recreation areas along the NFS road 520 after being closed for almost two weeks. That’s good news for visitor’s who planned to camp and watch the solar eclipse.

District employees have contacted campers that had reservations to get them re-booked. For new reservations until Aug. 15 call the Lowman Ranger District at 208-259-3361. Reservations after Aug. 15 will be made through http://www.recreation.gov

The closure was prompted when two bears began to regularly visit the area foraging for food. Idaho State Fish and Game caught one bear which was euthanized because it had lost fear of humans, destroyed private property and posed a potential threat to public safety. The second bear seems to have left the area.

“This year, bears appear more prone toward human contact. In spite of heavy precipitation experienced this past spring and winter, we’re finding that berry crops in traditional bear habitat have not fared well,” said Mike Feiger, Acting Lowman District Ranger. “Bears are seeking other food sources and in this campers and campgrounds are an easy and attractive source.”

Bears possess an extremely keen sense of smell, and can find food from great distances. Once a bear finds food near humans, it is likely to come back again and again. Bears associating food with humans often results in a dangerous situation for both the bear and for people.

Forest visitors must be vigilant about storing food, toiletry products and keeping a clean camp to avoid attracting black bears. For tips and techniques about camping in bear country visit:
https://www.fs.fed.us/visit/know-before-you-go/bears or http://www.bebearaware.org
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Volunteers improve Marble Creek Trail in Frank Church wilderness

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Aug 10, 2017

Kelly O’Neill was born and raised in the desert city of El Paso, Texas, but she spent this summer in the forested Idaho wilderness improving hiking and packing trails.

ONeill is the Lead Wilderness Steward for the Selway-Bitterroot Frank Church Foundation in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness located east of McCall.

Last month, O’Neill a crew of volunteers and two SBFC Wilderness Ranger Interns worked on a section of the Marble Creek trail inside the Frank Church Wilderness that is part of the 900-mile Idaho Centennial Trail.

Marble Creek is one of ten volunteer-staffed trail projects the foundation has planned this summer, Communication & Membership Coordinator Sue Webster said.

Four projects are located in the 2.3 million acre Frank Church wilderness and six are located in the 1.3 million acre Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness Area, Webster said.

continued: http://www.mccallstarnews.com/
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Wilson Flat Trail Reconstruction Project Scoping Letter Now Available

USDA Forest Service 8/9/2017

Dear Interested Party,

The Forest Service is seeking scoping comments for the Wilson Flat Trail Reconstruction Project located on the Mountain Home Ranger District. This project is located in the House Mountain Inventoried Roadless Area (IRA) in an area assigned to the Primitive theme under the Idaho Roadless Rule (36 CFR 294). This project was presented to the Idaho Roadless Commission on May 9, 2017.

The Forest Service is proposing to reconstruct and/or realign approximately 1 mile of motorized ATV Trail 606 and re-establish the trailhead (information board and parking) located off Forest Road 120.Project map is available on the project web page at https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=51463.

The trail segment listed is part of the popular Wilson Flat ATV trail system located on the Mountain Home Ranger District. The trail segment is located within the perimeter of the 2013 Elk/Pony Fire. During August 2014, surges of monsoonal moisture swept through Idaho from the southwest creating severe thunderstorms and flash flooding across the Boise National Forest. Locally heavy rain and flash flooding occurred through much of the Wilson Creek watershed, resulting in damage to roadways, stream crossings, trails, and natural resources. The portion of the Wilson Flat trail system being proposed for reconstruction was damaged during this event.

This system was formally designated in 1999 using an old decommissioned road system. On September 12, 2000, a Decision Memo was signed for a new trail construction, repair/replacement to two stream crossings and routing trail maintenance and light reconstruction.

Preliminary analysis indicates that the proposed action falls within a categorical exclusion (CE). Specifically CE category 1: Construction and reconstruction of trails [36 CFR 220.6 (e)(1)]. Impacts from this action are anticipated to be minor. This is in part due to the overall small footprint associated with the reconstruction (less than one acre) and its vicinity to existing disturbances (roads and existing trails). Design features may be developed by the Forest Service to address any resource concerns identified during internal and external scoping and impacts analysis.

If approved, implementation is anticipated to start in the fall of 2017.

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. Even if you have no specific concerns, we are asking that you respond if you desire to stay on the project’s mailing list.

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by September 7th, 2017, and make your comments as specific as possible. Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection and will be released in their entirety if requested pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act. Comments received in response to this request will also be available for public inspection on the “Public Comment Reading Room” on the Wilson Flat Trail Reconstruction webpage:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=51463

How to Comment

Written, facsimile, hand-delivered, verbal, and electronic comments concerning this project will be accepted.

Written comments must be submitted to: Mountain Home Ranger District, Attention: Stephaney Kerley, 3080 Industrial Way, Mountain Home, Idaho, 83647. The office hours for those submitting hand-delivered comments are: 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding Federal holidays. Verbal comments may also be provided at the Mountain Home Ranger District office during normal business hours or via telephone 1-208-587-7961.

Comments may also be submitted through the Wilson Flat Trail Reconstruction webpage: https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=51463. To submit comments using the web form select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s webpage.

Email comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), Adobe (.pdf) and Word (.doc) to comments-intermtn-boise-mtn-home@fs.fed.us. Please put “Wilson Flat Trail Reconstruction Project” in the subject line of e-mail comments. Comments must have an identifiable name attached or verification of identity will be required. A scanned signature may serve as verification on electronic comments.

Stay Connected to this Project via the Web

To assist the Forest Service in meeting its goals of reducing our carbon footprint and to achieve a sustainable operation, we are transitioning to a web-based electronic comment system that allows all interested parties to receive project material (scoping documents, updates, draft and final NEPA documents, and decisions) by e-mail. This new system gives you direct control over which mailing lists you are subscribed to and immediate electronic access to project documents as they are posted online. It’s easy, it’s good for the environment, and it gives “on-demand” access to projects.

To subscribe to this new system, go online to the Wilson Flat Trail Reconstruction webpage: https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=51463. On the project webpage, you will see a box titled “Get Connected” on the right hand side of the page, click on “Subscribe to Email Updates”. When you click on that item, you will be prompted to provide your e-mail address and select a password. When you have logged in, you will be able to manage your account by subscribing to projects by Forest, District, project type, or project purpose. You will also be able to change your e-mail address and password. If you no longer wish to follow the project(s), simply delete your subscription. Once you are subscribed, you will receive all project information via e-mail, unless you specifically request hard copies.

For further information on the Wilson Flat Trail Reconstruction Project, please feel free to contact Stephaney Kerley at 1-208-587-7961.

Sincerely,
Melissa Yenko
Forest Environmental Coordinator
Boise National Forest
Phone: 208-373-4245
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US cattle grazing plan for Idaho national monument approved

By Keith Ridler, Associated Press Friday, August 11th 2017

Boise, Idaho (AP) — Cattle grazing will continue at a south-central Idaho national monument known for its ancient lava flows following a challenge by an environmental group, federal officials announced this week.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management in a statement Wednesday said grazing on BLM-administered portions of Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve not covered by lava flows will stay at about 99 percent of current levels.

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USFS Regional Intermountain News

Archived Newsletters
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Yellowstone visitation up 40 percent in 9 years

Management options under study

Local News 8 – Aug 10, 2017

Mammoth Hot Springs, Wyo. (KIFI/KIDK) – Two separate studies commissioned by Yellowstone National Park in 2016 show visitors enjoy the park, but they think it’s too crowded during the summer season.

The studies looked at traffic, parking, visitor demographics, values, experiences, and expectations.

Since 2008, annual visitation at Yellowstone has increased by 40 percent. The growth has challenged the park’s ability to manage visitor use to protect resources and still offer high-quality visitor experiences.

“Historic and recent trends demonstrate that visitation will increase over the long-term, therefore, it is imperative for us to plan now,” said Superintendent Dan Wenk. “Good visitor use management will allow the park to protect resources, encourage access, and improve experiences.”

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Critter News:

Smoky air can affect every member of your family, including pets

Alexa Block, KREM August 07, 2017

Smoky air could truly affect every member of a family including the furry ones.

Dr. Erica Ronhovde, an associate veterinarian at VCA North Division Animal Medical Center, answered some questions about what pet owners should do when air quality is poor.

“Any warning that is out there for humans it’s exactly the same for pets. Their lung physiology is exactly the same as humans, especially for cats and dogs,” said Ronhovde. “Birds’ respiratory systems are a lot more sensitive, so they (bird owners) need to be a lot more strict about keeping the air quality inside the house good, as well as not letting birds outside if that’s what they do.”

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Pet talk – Cheat Grass, Foxtails And Grass Seeds

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Aug 11, 2017 IME

Every summer, veterinarians see multiple patients with grass seeds and awns in their eyes, ears, skin, nose and even vulva. These nasty seeds can get lodged in the nasal cavity, causing incessant sneezing. They can get stuck between the digits of the paws and penetrate the interdigital webs of the paws, causing persistent oozing sores at the site. They can then migrate from the entrance of the paws along tissue planes up the legs and cause persistent purulent draining tracts. They most commonly get embedded into the ear canals of dogs when they were running head down. They can especially be troublesome when they get caught in the recesses of the eye. This will cause your pet to squint and rub at its eye incessantly. These grass fragments can penetrate any body orifice and any skin surface, causing infections until they are properly removed.

Foxtails that penetrate the toes and skin must be removed like a sliver in our hand. It must be removed in total, or the infection persists. Veterinarians often have to sedate their patients to probe the affected area and remove the grass seed. Foxtails in the nasal cavity are even more difficult to remove. General anesthesia is necessary to prevent movement of the dog while placing scopes and forceps in the nasal cavity. Foxtails and grass seeds in the recesses of the eyes can usually be removed with topical anesthesia. They often cause corneal ulcers, which heal with proper medications.

Foxtails and grass seeds have been found to migrate into lungs, deep muscle tissues and even the spinal cord. They carry many bacterial and fungal elements with them when they migrate. Whenever there is a draining tract on your pet, a foxtail is immediately suspected and appropriate surgical exploratory and antibiotics are necessary.

source:
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Groups move to ban cyanide traps that kill predator animals

By Keith Ridler, Associated Press Thursday, August 10th 2017

Boise, Idaho (AP) — Predator-killing cyanide traps such as one that sickened a boy in Idaho and killed his dog should be banned, environmental groups told the federal government Thursday.

The Center for Biological Diversity and other conservation groups petitioned the Environmental Protection Agency to outlaw the spring-activated devices called M-44s.

The traps look like water sprinkler heads embedded in the ground and spray cyanide when triggered by animals attracted by bait.

The groups said the federal agency should ban the traps that pose a threat to people and pets on public lands and kill non-targeted wildlife.

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Crossing paths with a predator: Idaho wildlife safety

by Devan Kaney Thursday, August 10th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — It’s an all too common scenario in Idaho: you’re camping or on a long hike in the mountains, when a bear crosses your path.

What do you do? Run? Hide? Climb?

Roger Phillips of Idaho’s Department of Fish and Game says none of the above.

“Don’t run from it,” Phillips said. “Back up, keep your eyes on it, move slowly, kind of watch what the bear is doing.”

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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Second week of August 2017
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Wolf Education International

Second Week August 2017

French farmers demand action against wolves killing livestock
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Idaho police looking for shooter targeting llamas, livestock

Associated Press, KTVB August 10, 2017

Curry, Idaho – Idaho police are looking for a shooter who has been targeting livestock and llamas in southern Idaho.

Llama owner Steve Westphal tells the Times-News that his two favorite llamas were killed in two separate incidents in Twin Falls County. Westphal says he found the first llama dead several weeks ago, and he found a second llama dead on Sunday with an obvious gunshot wound.

A nearby cattleman reported that one of his prize bull and a heifer were also killed earlier this month by an unknown shooter. He suspects the shooter got access to the animals through a railroad track that passes along both men’s properties.

Twin Falls County Sheriff’s Deputy Levi Meyer believes they may be able to apprehend the shooter if they catch them in the act.

source:
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Hummingbird Feeder Mix

Hummingbird food is a very basic recipe similar to simple syrup. You may be tempted to use turbinado sugar or brown sugar, but this is never a good sugar to use. These sugars contain too much iron for the hummingbird’s system and can cause illness or death.

Powdered or confectioners sugar should not be used either. Powdered sugar has cornstarch added to it to prevent clumping and the cornstarch will cause the nectar to ferment.

source:
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Here is the recipe for making hummingbird nectar

1. Mix 4 parts water to 1 part table sugar in a pan. For example, use 1 cup sugar to 4 cups water. Make sure to use cane sugar only. If it doesn’t say cane on the label it is probably beet sugar. I know of nothing harmful about using beet sugar, but a lot of anecdotal evidence suggests that the birds strongly prefer cane sugar. Do not use honey, Jell-O, raw sugar, corn syrup, turbinado, molasses or brown sugar. Especially do not use artificial sweeteners. Putting hummingbirds on a diet will kill them. They burn prodigious amounts of energy for their size and need real sugar. Do not use red food coloring. It is unnecessary and can harm the little hummers even in low concentrations because they eat so much nectar. If your feeder isn’t red, tie a red ribbon on it as described in the Feeders section, above. Do not add anything else that you might think of. Just sugar and water, that’s all.

2. Bring to a boil then remove from the heat. Stir it while it is heating until all of the sugar is dissolved. Don’t boil it for long because that will change the ratio as water is boiled off. The reason for boiling is not to make syrup, but to drive out the chlorine in the water and to kill mold and yeast spores that might be in the sugar. This will help make the nectar last longer both in the feeder and in your refrigerator.

3. Cover and allow to cool before using or pouring into the storage bottle. We recommend making a large batch of nectar and storing it in the refrigerator in a 2 liter soda bottle (washed thoroughly first.) This makes refilling the feeder so easy that you won’t mind doing it every few days.

Sugar water is a very rich growth medium. Yeasts like to eat it causing fermentation which can harm hummingbirds. Mold and bacteria grow in it and can also harm the birds. That is why it is important to keep the feeder clean and the nectar fresh. You must change the nectar frequently to avoid these contaminants.

In cooler temperatures we recommend changing it every seven days. If the temperatures are getting above 60 degrees, follow this chart:

Daily high temp / Change nectar after
61-70 / 4-5 days
71-80 / 3 days
81-85 / 2 days
86+ / daily

Be sure and take them apart every time. … If contamination occurs, use a mild bleach solution to sterilize it, but if you use bleach, rinse thoroughly afterwards. Even a tiny amount of bleach could be harmful to birds weighing only a quarter of an ounce! Glass or metal pieces can be boiled, but you should probably not boil plastic pieces. The black mold may leave a very faint stain, but this will not affect the safe operation of the feeder.

source:
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Feds to give states more flexibility in protecting wild bird

By Matthew Daly – 8/8/17 AP

The Interior Department has unveiled a plan to protect the threatened sage grouse that gives Western states greater flexibility to allow mining, logging and other economic development where it now is prohibited.

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke announced the strategy Monday for the ground-dwelling bird that has suffered a dramatic population decline across its 11-state range. Zinke insists that the federal government and the states can work together to protect the sage grouse and its habitat while not slowing economic growth and job creation.

States affected by the plan are California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington and Wyoming.

source:
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Sockeye start returning to Sawtooth Valley

Aug 7, 2017 IME

The first sockeye salmon of the year have arrived in the Sawtooth Valley – a naturally produced fish on July 27 and a hatchery fish on Aug. 2. The fish completed a 900-mile journey that included passing through eight dams and swimming 6,500 vertical feet in elevation from the Pacific.

Through Aug. 2, 225 sockeye had crossed Lower Granite Dam, about 30 miles downstream from Lewiston. That’s the last dam salmon cross before reaching Idaho, and after crossing it, the fish still have to swim another 400 miles to return to their spawning grounds in the Sawtooth Valley.

Fish and Game biologists are expecting that about 150 fish will complete the final leg to the valley, and they don’t expect many more fish over Lower Granite this year.

“Typically, about 95 percent of the run has passed through Lower Granite by early August,” Eagle Hatchery Manager Dan Baker said.

At the same time last year, 790 sockeye crossed Lower Granite, and 595 returned to Stanley.

source:
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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
August 11, 2017
Issue No. 840

Table of Contents

* ODFW Analysis: With Continued Sea Lion Predation, Wild Willamette Winter Steelhead At Risk Of Extinction
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439416.aspx

* Managing Snake River Steelhead With A-Run, B-Run Dichotomy: Is There A Better Way?
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439415.aspx

* Snake River Sockeye Trickling Into Stanley Basin; Upper Columbia Sockeye Numbers Far Below 10-Year Average
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439414.aspx

* Alaska Announces Non-Retention Of Chinook Salmon Throughout SE Alaska, Cites ‘Poor Production Conditions’
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439413.aspx

* Due To Low Numbers Of Estuary Cormorants Showing Nesting Activity, Culling Remains Suspended
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439412.aspx

* Wenatchee Basin Research: Choice Of Spawning Habitat May Result In Lower Reproductive Success For Hatchery Spring Chinook
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439411.aspx

* Montana Effort To Restore Native Fish In Popular Sport Fishery Alpine Flathead Lakes Nears Finish Line
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439410.aspx

* Temperatures To Cool In Lower Snake River, Riverboat Needs Higher Pool At Port Of Clarkston
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439409.aspx

* Imnaha River Research Revealing Some Of The Mysteries Of Drainage’s Threatened Steelhead
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439408.aspx

* Dillon Dam Removal On Umatilla River Good For Fish Passage And Irrigators
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439407.aspx

* Restoring Kootenai River Burbot: Study Looks At Impacts, Importance Of Water Temperatures
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439406.aspx

* Fall Chinook Fishing On Snake, Clearwater, Salmon Rivers Opens August 18
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439405.aspx

* ODFW Kills Two Wolves From Northeast Oregon Pack To Limit Livestock Depredation
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439404.aspx

* UW To Host Interior Department’s Northwest Climate Science Center
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439403.aspx

* Corps Confirms Suspected Oil Leak In Generator Unit At Lower Monumental Dam
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439402.aspx

* NOAA Research Shows How Changing Ocean Conditions Influence Bird Predation On Salmon
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439401.aspx
——————————–

Fish & Game News:

Learn about bear behavior and help prevent unwanted encounters

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Friday, August 4, 2017 – 2:21 PM MDT

People can prevent attracting bears into situations that can be lethal to the animals

There’s been several incidents this summer involving black bears, and it’s a good opportunity to remind people about these native Idaho animals. Black bears are common, and their native range includes most of the state. Black bears are typically shy, and any encounter with humans is usually brief, from a safe distance and ends with the bear fleeing.

Black bear attacks on humans are rare, and there has never been a recorded human death from a black bear in Idaho.

When people see a black bear from a safe distance, they should consider it an exciting and interesting wildlife sighting. But they should not approach or crowd the bear, and it’s often a good idea to talk or yell to get the bear’s attention so it’s aware of your presence, especially if it’s moving in your direction and unaware of you.

Black bears are omnivores with a wide-ranging diet, and most of their diet is plants, but they are capable of killing large animals, so they should always be treated with respect and caution.

While most black bear encounters are random when people and a bear happen to be in the same place at the same time, that’s not always the case. Sometimes bears are attracted to the same areas as people, and people should know how to avoid those situations, or deal with them when they occur.

continued:
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Escaped elephant strolls through Wisconsin neighborhood

by The Associated Press Friday, June 30th 2017


(Jaime Peterson via AP)

An elephant walks in the street, Friday, June 30, 2017, in Baraboo, Wis. Law enforcement officers quickly got in touch with the nearby Circus World Museum, home to the wandering pachyderm. A trainer arrived and led the elephant back to the circus complex.

Circus World spokesman Dave Saloutos says the elephant, named Kelly, was freed by her pachyderm partner, Isla, who used her trunk to disengage a restraint.

Saloutos says Kelly lumbered across the shallow Baraboo River and wandered into a neighboring backyard where she unlatched a gate and munched on some marigolds during her couple hours of freedom.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Baby elephant chasing birds


————————————–

Seasonal Humor:

FishHotflash-a
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Aug 6, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Aug 6, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Smoke in Yellow Pine

Folks have been asking about the smoke in Yellow Pine. As far as I can find out, the smoke is not local, there have been no new fire reports on the Missouri and/or Pueblo fires. The smoke is apparently coming from fires in other parts of Idaho, the surrounding states and Canada. (More info below under “Fire Season”.) However There was a report this afternoon of helicopter activity over Antimony Ridge.
— — — —

Profile Road Update and Firewood for Locals

8/1/2017

Profile road is open, but vehicles may be held by road guards if truck traffic is on the road.

Dead and downed trees were removed around the Big Creek Station and Big Creek Lodge in preparation for point protection efforts if needed for the Missouri Fire. The small material (branches, tops, etc.) was chipped and spread and the tree boles were bucked into manageable lengths. This wood is being hauled to the old “shooting range” downstream of Yellow Pine for firewood collection. Anyone with a valid Payette NF fuelwood permit is welcomed to make use of the wood.

As dump trucks are hauling the wood over Profile, vehicles will be held to allow dump trucks to pass. Once these trucks are off the road, private vehicles will be allowed to travel over Profile. Delays should be minimal, but could be up to 60 minutes and the public is asked to exercise patience as we make the road safe for travel.

Wood hauling will end on Thursday August 3 to allow free flowing weekend traffic for Harmonica Fest.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Blowdown Update

Tuesday (Aug 1) the crew had been working in the area along School Street and had a load ready to haul out.
P1000274-20170801Logging1

The crew worked around early campers.
P1000276-20170801Logging2

Thursday (Aug 3) looking mostly south from the corner of School Street and Westside Ave.
P1000283-20170803Logging3

Another load of logs ready to go out.
P1000284-20170803Logging4
— — — —

YPFD News:

Thank You YPFD from the west side residents (and festival campers) for watering Westside Ave. during the weekend. It helped keep down the dust.

P1000289-20170804YPFDziva
YPDF tanker truck Friday evening. Ziva, one of our volunteers, supervising.

Fire Training is on Sundays starting at 11am at the YP Fire Station and open to the community of Yellow Pine. Check with Jeff F. or Ann F. to confirm trainings.

Fire Siren will be tested at noon on the first of each month.
— — — —

Fish & Game

Hunter Education trailer setting up Thursday (Aug 3) on the north west corner of Yellow Pine Ave and School St.
P1000287-20170803IDFG
— — — —

VYPA News:

Next meeting is August 12th, 2017 2pm at the Community Hall.
— — — —

Community Hall Garage Sale July 15

I’ve been meaning to send out a thank you to the entire Village of Yellow Pine. I wanted to thank everyone for their help and their support at the first yard sale of Yellow Pine. It was a roaring success. We made $285 on the yard sale. And the best part of the whole thing is that the community house is looking wonderful. Not only is it going to be great for the harmonica breakfast but it is also perfectly arranged for Bingo during harmonica.

Also it is available for anyone in the community to utilize at any time. They just need to either check the calendar that is in community house or give me a call.

Thank you again to everyone for your time energy and support.

Kathy Hall
— — — —

Welch Memorial Golf Tourney 2017

Saturday September 2 at 1pm – Yellow Pine Country Club
— — — —

September 13-14 Scheduled Power Outage

A message that Idaho Power needs to replace power poles.
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/The-Yellow-Pine-Times-278419589262862/
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Local Observations:

Monday (July 31) overnight low of 47 degrees with clear sky this morning, light smoky haze in the air. Not many birds around, but lots of chipmunks. Fest campers are starting to arrive. Breezy and hot early in the afternoon, persistent haze of smoke. Breezy and hot later in the afternoon as well, haze of smoke all day, high 95 degrees. Have not seen the swallows around today, just a few pine-siskins and lots of chipmunks. Cooling off after sundown and calmer with a light haze of smoke.

Tuesday (Aug 1) overnight low of 47 degrees, clear sky and haze of smoke this morning. A few noisy airplanes before 9am (Johnson Crk Airstrip webcam down.) A few pine-siskins and finches at the feeders. Jay, flicker, nighthawk and olive-sided flycatcher calling. Fire siren tested at noon. Logging crew loaded a truck full of logs today to haul out, working along the east end of School Street. Hot sunny day, high 98 degrees. A few more campers have pulled into the golf course. Pine squirrels, golden mantels and chipmunks raiding the bird feeders, while the juvenile jay squawks at them. Nighthawk “vooming” at dusk. Campfire to the west of the school at dark.

Wednesday (Aug 2) overnight low of 46 degrees, clear sky and haze of smoke this morning. A few finches and pine-siskins at the feeder. Looks like a few swallows were headed for the river. Squirrels of all kinds out running around. Hot and breezy afternoon, high 96 degrees, smoke getting thicker. Calm and very warm smoky evening. More campers arriving and very dusty. Air Quality poor! Orange waxing moon after dark.

Thursday (Aug 3) overnight low of 47 degrees, clear sky above moderate haze of smoke. McCall station reports Orange Air Quality. Not many birds this morning, one hummer buzzing by. Pine squirrels and chipmunks. Dust cloud rising above the back Stibnite road this morning (dust abatement wearing thin.) Campers crowding into the open spots on the golf course between the downed trees and slash piles. West side of the village VERY dusty. Not seeing many colombian ground squirrels today, however there are many many chipmunks running around. Hot dry smoky dusty afternoon, high 96 degrees. YPFD Volunteers got the old army tanker truck out and went by spraying water on the road to help settle the dust. Many thanks from the neighbors (and campers.) Smoke getting thicker after the sun went down, very warm evening. Campers still pulling after dark. Quiet from 1130pm to 1am, then traffic coming from the bars to the golf course.

Friday (Aug 4) overnight low of 47 degrees, clear sky above a light haze of smoke. Early morning airplanes drowned out the bird song. Dark doe with twin fawn followed by the light doe tiptoed across the road early while campers were sleeping. Lots of chipmunks running around, pine squirrels chasing each other and chittering, only one ground squirrel sighted. YPFD tanker truck sprayed water on Westside Ave before lunch time, sure helps with the dust. Another hot and smoky day, high 94 degrees. Campers trickling in during the afternoon. YPFD tanker truck sprayed water on the road again this evening. The folks camped along the road were saying they appreciate it too. Smoky orange moon above Antimony ridge at dark.

Saturday (Aug 5) overnight low of 46 degrees, clear sky above a moderate haze of smoke (McCall AQI in the red at 8am.) Dusty until the YPFD tanker truck sprayed the road with water. Fairly quite morning, not many birds, one hummer buzzed by. Lots of chipmunks running around, a couple golden mantels. Two pine squirrels were chasing each other up and down and up the fence. The YPFD ambulance went by tooting the horn a little after lunch time. Early afternoon the smoke got a lot thicker, can barely see the outline of VanMeter Hill. Cooler than it has been, high of 88 degrees, light breezes and smoky all day. YPFD tanker sprayed water again this afternoon to settle the dust. Smoke thicker later in the evening, sun was an orange disk to the west before setting. Orange nearly full moon at 215am (a few loud people still ‘partying’)

Sunday (Aug 6) overnight low of 45 degrees, clear sky above pretty thick smoke (McCall AQI shows Red at 8am.) Some rather loud airplanes early. A few pine-siskins at the feeders, one juvenile calliope hummer, very few birds around. Chipmunks galore. Campers started leaving after lunch time. Dusty and smoky, very poor air quality. Not as hot today, high of 88 degrees. Some campers staying another night. Several loud gun shots this evening, pretty close to the neighborhood.
— — — — — — — — — — — —

July average high temperature:

2017 = 92 degrees
2016 = 84 degrees
2015 = 83 degrees
2014 = 91 degrees
2013 = 91 degrees
2012 = 89 degrees
2011 = 84 degrees
2010 = 84 degrees
———————————–

Letter to Share:

Commissioner Cruickshank’s July Newsletter

August 3, 2017

Monday July 3rd
I worked to catch up on my emails today.

Tuesday July 4th
Happy Independence Day everyone.

Wednesday July 5th
I sent out a reminder of a National Association of Counties (NACo)Western Region Conference call for Thursday July 6th.

I received a call concerning when information is sent to be used by Google and others on rural addressing once a new address is created. Unfortunately once we send in the information we have no control on when the data will be added to the Internet.

I received a call concerning the condition of a paved road in Valley County and inquiring when the crews could come work on the road. I forwarded this information on to our Road Superintendent.

Thursday July 6th
I listened in on the NACo Central Region Conference call to see what issues they were discussing.

Mid Morning I hosted the NACo Western Region Conference call. On this call we discussed the changes to the NACo By-Laws concerning how counties votes are counted related to population size. The changes don’t impact each county much and does give a little more weight to a rural county. We also discussed the upcoming NACo Conference and events that a person attending could see.

Monday July 10th
Commissioner meeting today. The minutes once approved can be located on the Valley County website at Valley County, Idaho | Official Site click on the commissioners section and then click on minutes. http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Wednesday July 12th
As I will be running for a two year term on the NACo Executive Committee to represent the 15 Western States I sent out an email to the 15 States Executive Directors and Elected Officials from those states on my intent to run for the position.

This afternoon I participated in a National Forest Counties and Schools Coalition conference call to discuss advocacy for the Secure Rural Schools (SRS) program which is being discussed by both the Senate and House on reauthorization. This important funding helps county road departments and schools with funds to offset the missing timber harvest receipts. Conversations are happening for a possible 2 year authorization.

Monday July 17th
Commissioner day again. Please see the minutes on the website once approved. http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday July 18th
Today I received a call from the Emergency Manager on the Missouri Fire as it had grown to 426 acres. This fire is between Yellow Pine and Big Creek in the Profile Summit area. The Emergency Manager will be attending briefings on the fire and keep us informed of any changes. We are also now receiving daily reports from the Forest Service on this fire.

Mid morning I attended a meeting to discuss the recent “Bring It Don’t Burn It” program and review the quantity of debris collected. This program has grown a lot since it was started by the Fire Departments and the Fire Wise Group to help reduce the hazards of brush fires. Discussion was along the lines of what will it take to continue the program and help educate the value the citizens receive from the program. This year Valley County submitted this program to NACo as a Bright Idea and won an Achievement Award for the program. What a great community we live in to work hard on reduce the hazards.

Wednesday July 19th
I responded to a request to verify that funding was provided for the Squaw Creek Soil and Water Conservation District so the State of Idaho will match funds for the District. Just another way of stretching the dollars we provide to landowners for projects.

I signed comment letters for the South Fork Salmon River Access Management Plan and the Midas Gold proposed Stibnite Mining Operation and sent them to the Forest Service.

I attended a meeting with the Valley County Sheriff Office, GAR INC. (consultant), City of Cascade Council member and Mayor to discuss the potential of Valley County Sheriff taking on the law enforcement for the City of Cascade.

Tonight I drove to Boise as I have an early flight tomorrow.

Thursday July 20th
I flew to Franklin County, (Columbus) Ohio to attend the NACo Annual Conference.

Tonight I attended a reception and dinner for NACo Past Presidents.

Friday July 21st through Monday July 24th is all captured in the attached document I created of my attendance.

[Link to document:]

Tuesday July 25th
I flew Home today from Columbus, Ohio.

Once arriving in Boise I received a call from Congressman Labrador to discuss issues. Of importance to note is the discussion of not being able to deduct our state income tax from the Federal Form which has counties concerned. We also discussed the SRS need and working on Forest Management which includes Fire Borrowing concerns. Valley County receiving requests for Cooperating Agency Status with the Payette, Boise and Salmon/Challis was interesting for the Congressman to hear as it shows some changes in how the Federal Agencies are operating.

I received a call on the incident of the DF Development employee and the private person dispute over access. I then called a contact person with DF Development to inform them of this and to see what could be done to better inform DF Development employees.

Wednesday July 26th
More calls this morning concerning the dispute of access of a county road where it is private land on both sides.

This afternoon I participated in another National Forest Counties and Schools Coalition call. On this call was a discussion on folks doing a Fly-In to help showcase the need and impacts to rural counties and schools if the funding for Secure Rural Schools is not reauthorized.

Tonight a concerned citizen stopped by my house to discuss some court proceedings that they felt I needed to hear about and possibly provide some help for the concerns.

Thursday July 27th
I created the NACo Annual Conference report and sent out to the Idaho Association of Counties (IAC) to be placed on their website so all the Idaho Counties have the opportunity to read my report.

Monday July 31st
We ended the month with a commissioner meeting. These minutes will not be approved until sometime in August. Once approved they will be posted on the Valley County website. http://www.co.valley.id.us/

As always if there is something that perks your interest in my newsletter let me know and I will do my best to expand on the issue.

July has been a hot month and August looks to stay the course for the first part at least.

I hope everyone is having a great summer.

Until next month be safe.

Thanks for reading. Gordon
————————————–

Idaho News:

Ten-digit dialing begins this week in Idaho (yes, for all local calls)

by KBOI News Staff Monday, July 31st 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Don’t say we didn’t warn you.

Beginning on Saturday, all Idahoans will need to begin dialing the 208 area code in order to make a local call.

The Idaho Public Utilities Commission approved new area code 986 for the state in December 2015 to address the need for additional phone numbers. To implement the new area code, the commission also approved mandatory 10-digit dialing for all of Idaho.

As numbers are needed, assignments may be made out of the new 986 area code beginning on Sept. 5.

Here are some other handy tips from the Idaho Public Utilities Commission.

continued:
http://idahonews.com/news/local/ten-digit-dialing-begins-this-week-in-idaho-yes-for-all-208-phone-calls
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Preparing For The Eclipse

Valley County Sheriff’s FB page Aug 4, 2017

On August 21, 2017 a total solar eclipse will move across the country beginning in Oregon, crossing 14 states with Valley County, Idaho being in its path of totality. Partial phase start will be at 10:11:13 AM, totality starts at 11:26:35 AM. Smith’s Ferry is listed to be a prime location. We will experience 2 minutes and 12 seconds of totality!!!

We expect the demands for our agency to be extremely high during the days leading up to and after the Eclipse, so here are some tips that will not only help you, but also assist us in keeping the community safe.

Yield To Emergency Vehicles

Expect heavy traffic & extremely long delays on Highway 55. Plan to have water, snacks and fuel up your vehicle prior to the weekend. One accident on Hwy 55 could impact your travel in ways that you do not want to imagine. Be patient and cautious with your travel, don’t do it if you don’t have to. Please yield to emergency vehicles and allow them to pass or come through. This is very critical…

DO NOT STOP OR PARK ALONGSIDE THE HIGHWAY TO WATCH THE ECLIPSE…. DON’T BE A PART OF THE PROBLEM OR THE CAUSE OF AN ACCIDENT.

Extreme Fire Danger

Because of the traffic expected on 55 and the long delays, we are asking that you be very cautious of smoking outside of your vehicle and turn your vehicles off, IF you are stopped in traffic for an extended amount of time. The risk of fire danger is very high at this time and the potential for an accidental fire is very probable when you have a lot of vehicles stopped on the highway due to an accident or heavy traffic delays. Check your tires, make sure they are road worthy. Keep checking your mirrors if you’re pulling a trailer of any kind.

If you are camping, please make sure you check with us for fire restrictions that may arise prior to the Eclipse. There are no fire restrictions at this time, but that can change at a moments notice.

Calling 911

Cell phone service is NOT going to be what we normally experience. Due the circumstances of the event, prepare for your cell phone NOT to work the way you want it to. Valley County has limited coverage as it is and the infrastructure of the cell towers may not be able to handle the influx of people that are expected. With all of the calling, texting, tweeting, posting selfies and YouTube videos it is definitely going to put a burden on the cell phone towers. We ask that you please use 911 in case of an emergency, not for general questions or non emergency phone calls. We get a lot of 911 calls because people can’t find our phone number. If you google Valley County Sheriff, Idaho you will find it. Just in case you can’t find it, our number is 208-382-5160.

No Trespassing – respect it! If you don’t have someone’s permission to be on their property to view the eclipse, you need to find somewhere that you do have permission. Property owners; you must have your property posted every 660 feet with signs or orange paint. No parking signs must be posted in parking lots, contact your local law enforcement agency for regulations that are required on “no parking” private parking lots.

Get Eclipse Glasses

One of the most important safety tips for everyone, even outside of the “path of totality,” is to have proper eclipse eyewear to prevent any permanent eye injury. Check local stores and online before they sell out!

Stock Up

Grocery stores, gas stations, hotels, restaurants, transportation services, coffee shops, retail stores, urgent care clinics, and other business establishments will experience an increase in business. We recommend stocking up on water, groceries, home or camping necessities, and fueling up your vehicles beforehand.

We will be out in full force in the days leading up to and following the Eclipse to help ensure your safety!
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Payette County issues disaster declaration for eclipse

KTVB July 31, 2017

Payette County – Payette County is being proactive in anticipation of possible damage and emergencies caused by the upcoming total solar eclipse.

County commissioners on Monday declared a local emergency/disaster declaration because of the August 21 event. It’s in effect until September 5.

Officials said the declaration is in anticipation of public safety risk, financial damage and excess costs of labor, cleanup and property damage. It will help the county to respond to emergencies that happen leading up to the eclipse and beyond.

continued:
http://www.ktvb.com/news/eclipse/payette-county-declares-disaster-declaration-for-eclipse/460845851
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

S. Idaho museums try to preserve past with little cash

By Mychel Matthews – 8/4/17 AP

Twin Falls, Idaho — Owner Herman Stricker in the 1870s sold opium to Chinese miners who worked and lived in the Snake River Canyon. The foundation of his China House opium den still stands near the rock outline of “Stagecoach King” Ben Holladay’s stage stop.

West of the site lie the remains of Bill Dowdle, who shot up the “town” during a drunken rampage and was shot and killed by Lucy Stricker’s brother Charles Walgamott. Some buried alongside Dowdle in the small cemetery died while following the Old Oregon Trail; others died while on the intersecting stage route and Kelton Freight Road.

Yes, there’s plenty to intrigue at the historic Rock Creek Station and Stricker Homesite south of Hansen. And the site is a prime example of what’s possible when public funding and private efforts combine.

continued:
http://www.therepublic.com/2017/08/04/id-money-museums/
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

ITD: 284 bridges throughout Idaho considered structurally deficient

by KBOI News Staff Tuesday, August 1st 2017

The Highway 55 Snake River Bridge at Marsing is one bridge in southwest Idaho that has reached its life span and is considered structurally deficient.

The Idaho Transportation Department will replace it next year.

But ITD says just because a bridge is classified as structurally deficient, doesn’t mean it’s unsafe.

“Any bridge that would be considered unsafe to drive on, it would be closed,” said Jennifer Gonzalez, ITD spokeswoman.

continued:
http://idahonews.com/news/local/itd-284-bridges-throughout-idaho-considered-structurally-deficient
——————————–

Fire Season:

InciWeb Idaho:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/state/13/

Idaho Fires:
http://www.idahofireinfo.com/

NIFC:
https://www.nifc.gov/fireInfo/nfn.htm

McCall Air Quality Station:
https://www.airnow.gov/index.cfm?action=airnow.local_city&cityid=669

Here is the most recent fire map from the Interagency Fire Center:

NASA GEOS 5 Smoke Forecast Aug 3-10

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

5-acre fire in Star ignited by hot exhaust pipe

by Abigail Taylor Saturday, August 5th 2017

Star, Idaho (KBOI) — An Ada County farmer lost 5-acres of his wheat field to an accidental, but preventable, fire on Saturday.

Fire crews with the Star Fire District were called out just before 2 p.m. to the area of Star Road and US-26.

They say when they arrived on scene the fire was just over an acre in size, but it spread quickly.

continued:
http://idahonews.com/news/local/5-acre-fire-in-star-ignited-by-hot-exhaust-pipe
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Mammoth Fire triples in size, but no longer threatening power supply

KTVB August 06, 2017


The Mammoth Fire, approximately seven miles north of Shoshone, Lincoln County, Idaho, August 4, 2017. (Photo: Bureau of Land Management)

Shoshone – The Mammoth Fire north of Shoshone tripled in size overnight, growing from 20,000 acres Saturday evening to an estimated 60,000 acres on Sunday, BLM officials said.

The fire destroyed one home and several other structures on Friday, but crews have been able to successfully keep the fire from damaging any more buildings over the weekend.

Saturday evening, the fire threatened to knock out electricity service to the Wood River Valley, but by Sunday morning, the Blaine County sheriff said he had been notified by Idaho Power that the threat had passed.

continued:
http://www.ktvb.com/news/local/mammoth-fire-evacuations-lifted-wind-a-concern/462208887
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Fire near American Falls threatens homes

KTVB August 05, 2017


(Photo: KIFI)

A fire that started Friday night has grown to 30,000 acres and threatens five homes southeast of American Falls.

The Powerline Fire has already destroyed six outbuildings.

It ignited on the Fort Hall Indian Reservation, and is burning in sage, grass, and juniper in the Arbon Valley area about seven miles southeast of American Falls, the Idaho Falls District Bureau of Land Management reported Saturday evening.

continued:
http://www.ktvb.com/news/local/idaho/fire-near-american-falls-threatens-homes/462254574
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

400 acre wild land fire on I-15 near Fort Hall

Local News 8 – Updated: Aug 05, 2017

Fort Hall, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Fort Hall Fire Department responded to a wild land fire on Interstate 15 by mile marker 83 near Fort Hall Friday around 3:40 p.m.

Officials report this 400 acre fire quickly spread to the East side of I-15 and impacted neighboring grain fields.

Additional support has been provided by Chubbuck Fire Department, Blackfoot Fire Department, Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Fort Hall Police, Fort Hall Corrections, Tribal Transportation, Bingham County Sheriff, Shelly and Firth Quick Response teams are all at the scene.

The Tribal Emergency Operations Center was activated to support the Incident Commander. EOC contact number is (208)-237-0137.

Officials said traffic to the immediate area has been blocked off, and no structures are threatened.

source:
http://www.localnews8.com/news/blackfoot/400-acre-wild-land-fire-on-i-15-near-fort-hall/599765409
———————————-

Public Lands:

Boise NF booth at H-Fest in Yellow Pine

Boise NF employees sharing information about the Forest at the annual Yellow Pine, Idaho Harmonica Festival! Reminding everyone to listen to Smokey Bear and please be careful with all campfires and any activities that may cause a wildfire!

(Special thanks to Rick Wagner for sharing photos).

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Boise National Forest receives application for guided rock climbing

Boise, Idaho, July 31, 2017

The Boise National Forest, Cascade Ranger District has received a proposal to conduct Outfitting and Guiding for Rock Climbing. The proposal received was for the Pins and Needles area east of Donnelly, Idaho. This kind of activity provides basic and advanced rock climbing along with instruction. No overnight camping or infrastructure was proposed. Only day use activities are identified in the proposal.

The Forest is seeking to determine if competitive interest in providing this type of outfitting and guiding service exists before moving forward with the approval process. Forest Service Regulations require a determination of competitive interest in the area. Therefore interested individuals or companies should send a written proposal to Christopher Woras at the Cascade Ranger District, P.O. Box 696, Cascade ID, 83611.

If competitive interest exists, a prospectus may be issued providing detailed information. The deadline for response is Aug. 15, 2017. For further information you may call Christopher Woras @ 208-382-7422.

Linda Steinhaus
Public Affairs
Boise National Forest
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Seniors snap up US national park passes before price hike

By Keith Ridler – 8/2/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Seniors are snapping up so many lifetime passes good for U.S. national parks and other recreation areas ahead of a steep price increase later this month that some government agencies have run out and started issuing vouchers.

The America the Beautiful Lifetime Senior Pass has been available to buyers 62 and older for $10 for the past two decades. On Aug. 28, the price is going up 700 percent, to $80, after a measure passed by Congress late last year.

Recently retired Paul Dunham of Yuba City, California, picked one up last week at Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve in central Idaho.

continued:
http://www.therepublic.com/2017/08/02/us-national-parks-senior-passes/
————————————–

Critter News:

Pet Talk – Rabies exposure in humans and pets

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Aug 4, 2017 IME

Rabies virus infections in humans are nearly always fatal, but are almost completely preventable with appropriate post-exposure prophylaxis. Proper management of rabies exposure is therefore critical. The same is true for domestic pets.

Rabies virus is a zoonotic virus that accounts for an estimated 50,000 deaths in humans annually. This death rate is concentrated in developing countries with endemic canine rabies and inadequate public health systems. Four to five times more dogs and cats die of rabies annually in these developing countries than humans do. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, rabies vaccination programs have eliminated domestic dogs as reservoirs of rabies in the United States, though 80 to 100 dogs and more than 300 cats contract with rabies each year, usually infected by wildlife when these domesticated pets are not vaccinated against rabies. Because rabies virus is endemic in wildlife reservoirs throughout North America and much of the world, some potential for rabies exposure in humans and domestic animas is always present. Wildlife reservoirs in North America are bats, raccoons, foxes and skunks. If your pet is bitten by a bat, raccoon, fox or skunk, then rabies prophylaxis should be instituted immediately.

continued:
http://www.mtexpress.com/wood_river_journal/features/pet-talk/article_8e9ef48c-7881-11e7-b3b3-0b51cae41630.html
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Search for two-legged dog has happy ending

KTVB August 05, 2017

The search for Duncan, the world-famous two-legged dog, ended happily on Saturday.

Duncan went missing after his family’s truck hit a bison in Fremont County, between Island Park, Idaho, and West Yellowstone, Montana.

According to a release issued by Panda Paws Rescue, owned by Amanda Giese, the truck rolled over three times. Duncan and two other dogs were ejected. Human members of the family were injured, but are expected to recover.

continued:
http://www.ktvb.com/news/local/idaho/search-for-two-legged-dog-has-happy-ending/462228106
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Dog leads family to two injured young girls struck by lightning

by KUTV Monday, July 31st 2017

Beaver County, Utah (KUTV) – The family of two girls struck by lightning Friday issued a statement thanking the community.

The two girls, one 8 and the other 16, were hiking in the area of Puffer Lake when lightning struck the 8-year-old on the top of her head and traveled into the older girl, according to Wende Wilding with Fishlake National Forest.

A dog with the girls at the time of the hike returned to their camp at a family reunion and led family members back to where the girls were found unconscious.

continued:
http://idahonews.com/news/nation-world/dog-leads-family-to-two-injured-young-girls-struck-by-lightning
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MCPAWS gets $35,535 from PetSmart Charities to upgrade cat housing

The Star-News Aug 3, 2017

MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter in McCall has received a grant for $35,535 from PetSmart Charities to upgrade the cat housing at the shelter.

The wire dog crates that have been used to house kittens and nursing mothers will be replaced with state-of-art, humane cat housing units from Mason Company, a leading cat kennel manufacturer.

Replacing the deteriorating plastic and wire cat kennels will create cleaner, safer, and more humane housing for the cats at MCPAWS.

Over the past few years, MCPAWS has seen an increase in cat intakes, making the upgrade of cat housing a top priority. This increase is, in part, due to the recent expansion of their service area to include Adams and Idaho Counties.

With this grant, cat housing at MCPAWS will be dramatically improved, leading to happier, healthier cats, and more cat adoptions.

Shelter Operations is one of PetSmart Charities’ 10 grant categories designed to support animal welfare organizations and nonprofits as part of their newly expanded mission to find lifelong loving homes for all pets by supporting programs that bring people and pets together.

Funding from PetSmart Charities supports best practices that help pets thrive in a shelter environment until they find their forever family and offers funding for shelter-based programs that improve adoptions, reduce pets’ length of stay and strengthen shelter infrastructure.

source The Star-News:
http://www.mccallstarnews.com/
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Mountain lion killed in south-central Idaho

7/31/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Officials with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game say they have shot and killed a mountain lion in south-central Idaho.

The agency announced Monday the female big cat was one of two mountain lions that had killed several domestic cats and a dog in the past week near Oakley.

Fish and Game officers have set up live traps to capture the second mountain lion.

In Idaho, mountain lions posing an immediate threat to a person or property can be killed without a proper license tag.

source:
http://www.therepublic.com/2017/07/31/id-mountain-lion-killed/
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Popular recreation area closed after bear encounters

KTVB August 01, 2017

Boise – A popular recreation area in the Boise National Forest encompassing Bull Trout Lake has been closed to the public after reports of people encountering bears in the area.

Forest officials say bears have been spotted in campgrounds near the lake over the past couple weeks.

Thanks to their keen sense of smell, bears can find food from great distances. Once food is found near humans, the bear is likely to return, which often creates a dangerous situation, officials warned.

The closure includes Bull Trout Campground and surrounding areas along NFS road 520. Bull Trout Lake is a popular fishing and camping destination located just off of Idaho 21 north of Grandjean.

The Boise National Forest is reminding visitors to be extra vigilant this summer when storing and disposing of their food and toiletry products to avoid attracting bears.

For more information and tips for avoiding a dangerous encounter with a bear, check out this website.
http://www.bebearaware.org/

source:
http://www.ktvb.com/news/local/popular-recreation-area-in-boise-national-forest-closed-after-bear-encounters/461136824
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Black bear swats Priest Lake jogger on Kalispell-Reeder trail; injuries minor

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Aug 1, 2017

A black bear charged a man jogging along Priest Lake on Monday, inflicting minor injuries to his leg before running off, Idaho Fish and Game Department officials say.

The incident follows a more serious attack on a woman hiking near the lake with her two unleashed dogs on July 4.

Monday’s incident occurred on the Kalispell-Reeder Trail on the west side of Priest Lake not far from Elkins Resort, said Phil Cooper, IFG spokesman in Coeur d’Alene.

“The man was jogging and said he passed a bear about 30 feet off to the side of the trail, but the man continued with no incident,” Cooper said. “The jogger made a loop and on his way back he passed the bear again. He said the bear ran up on the tail and chased him for a short distance. He said he put his hands up in the air to look bigger but the bear kept coming so he dropped to the ground.

“He said the bear swatted his leg and caused minor cuts before the bear left. The man said he did not seek medical attention.”

continued:
http://www.spokesman.com/blogs/outdoors/2017/aug/01/black-bear-swats-priest-lake-jogger-kalispell-reeder-trail-injuries-minor/
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Staying safe in bear country

Tips for recreating in Idaho

Anna Silver Aug 4, 2017 KIVI TV

A man was attacked by a bear while jogging recently in North Idaho and sightings have prompted a closure at a popular campground near Lowman.

While recreating in Idaho, there’s a chance a bear could be nearby. In the Treasure Valley, many people like to head to the Bogus Basin Recreation Area to hike which Idaho Fish and Game says is bear country.

It’s the time of year where bears are moving around and looking for food.

While out hiking, it’s always a good idea to make noise, carry bear spray and know how to use it.

If you’re camping in an area where there are bears, you’ll always want to secure your food. Idaho Fish and Game says once a bear gets food from an area, they will come back to that spot.

continued:
http://www.kivitv.com/news/staying-safe-in-bear-country
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Bear breaks into SUV, then takes it for a short drive

Subaru trashed in Durango neighborhood

By Mary Shinn Herald Staff Writer Friday, Aug. 4, 2017


photo Ron Cornelius

A bear that broke into an SUV early Friday in Durango took it for a short ride, rolling it out of a driveway and crashing it into a mailbox.

… La Plata County Sheriff’s Office deputies determined a bear was to blame, because it defecated in the car, likely because it was nervous, Cornelius said.

It also ripped up the interior of the vehicle. It pulled the steering wheel straight off the shaft, ripped the radio out of the dash and busted out the back window.

… CPW recommends residents keep cars locked and take steps to keep bears away from trash and homes.

Residents should take down bird feeders and make sure fruit from trees is picked when it’s ripe.

Freezing food scraps in plastic bags until trash day can help keep bears away, and hanging rags soaked in Pine-Sol or ammonia around compost, chicken coops and other bear attractants can function as a deterrent, he said.

full story:
https://durangoherald.com/articles/176934-bear-breaks-into-suv-then-takes-it-for-a-short-drive?wallit_nosession=1
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Yellowstone grizzlies removed from threatened species list

By Matt Volz – 7/31/17 AP

Helena, Mont. — For the second time in a decade, the U.S. government has removed grizzly bears in the Yellowstone region from the threatened species list.

It will be up to the courts again to decide whether they stay off the list.

The decision by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to remove federal protections from the approximately 700 bears living across 19,000 square miles in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming took effect Monday.

continued:
http://www.therepublic.com/2017/07/31/us-yellowstone-grizzly-bears/
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8/5/17: Wolf News Roundup

(By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online!) Last week the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed a lower court ruling that vacated a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service rule to remove Endangered Species Act protections for gray wolves in the western Great Lakes region, which includes Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. The ruling maintains federal protections for wolves and blocks the states from asserting control and opening up sport hunting and commercial trapping seasons targeting the animals. In Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife managers intend to remove some of the adult wolves in northeast Oregon’s Harl Butte pack to limit further livestock losses as non-lethal measures and hazing have not been successful in limiting wolf depredations. …. (Click on the link [below] for the complete story.)
http://www.pinedaleonline.com/news/2017/08/WolfNewsRoundup.htm
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Oregon will kill 2 wolves at the request of ranchers

8/3/17 AP

Portland, Ore. — Oregon wildlife officials will kill two adult wolves in northeast Oregon at the request of ranchers who say animals in their pack have preyed on cattle for more than a year.

The Oregonian/OregonLive reports (https://goo.gl/FXw3iA ) Department of Fish & Wildlife managers made the announcement Thursday, saying the state will not target specific animals.

Officials will remove two adult uncollared animals in the Harl Butte pack sometimes in the next two weeks.

continued:
http://www.therepublic.com/2017/08/03/or-wolf-kill/
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Court keeps Great Lakes wolves on endangered species list

By John Flesher – 8/1/17 AP

Traverse City, Mich. — A federal appeals court Tuesday retained federal protection for gray wolves in the western Great Lakes region, ruling that the government made crucial errors when it dropped them from the endangered species list five years ago.

The court upheld a district judge who overruled the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which had determined that wolves in Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin had recovered after being shot, trapped and poisoned nearly out of existence in the previous century. They’ve bounced back and now total about 3,800.

continued:
http://www.therepublic.com/2017/08/01/us-wolves-great-lakes-2/
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Wolf Education International

First week of August 2017

Idaho may offer hunters bounties for bad wolves, allow bait
http://wolfeducationinternational.com/idaho-may-offer-hunters-bounties-for-bad-wolves-allow-bait/

Wolves may be partly to blame for wildfires raging across southern France – here’s why
http://wolfeducationinternational.com/wolves-may-be-partly-to-blame-for-wildfires-raging-across-southern-france-heres-why/

Wolves kill livestock in Washington
http://wolfeducationinternational.com/wolves-kill-livestock-in-washington/

Johnson Endorses Advancement of Bipartisan Wildlife Bill Containing Gray Wolf Delist Provision
http://wolfeducationinternational.com/johnson-endorses-advancement-of-bipartisan-wildlife-bill-containing-gray-wolf-delist-provision/

Oregon To Kill Wolves That Preyed On Livestock
http://wolfeducationinternational.com/oregon-to-kill-wolves-that-preyed-on-livestock/

Gray wolves just won another battle to stay on the endangered species list
http://wolfeducationinternational.com/gray-wolves-just-won-another-battle-to-stay-on-the-endangered-species-list/
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No discounts for nonresident tags sold as second tags this year

Roger Phillips Aug 01, 2017 Local News 8

Boise, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Due to high demand for nonresident deer and elk tags, Fish and Game commissioners decided on July 27 to keep them at full price.

In 2016, commissioners discounted nonresident elk tags sold to resident hunters as second tags during the month of August to spur sales. However, this year’s sales of nonresident deer and elk tags are selling even faster than last year when the nonresident deer allocation sold out for the first time since 2008, and nonresident elk came close to selling out with less than 800 tags remaining.

On Aug. 1, resident Idaho hunters can buy nonresident deer and elk tags as second tags but must pay the full nonresident price of $301.75 for deer and $416.75 for elk. Nonresidents can also buy these as second tags starting Aug. 1.

continued:
http://www.localnews8.com/lifestyle/outdoor-games/no-discounts-for-nonresident-tags-sold-as-second-tags-this-year/597182552
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Bat tests positive for rabies in SE Idaho

Associated Press, KTVB August 01, 2017

Pocatello, Idaho – State officials say a bat has tested positive for rabies in southeastern Idaho and area residents should take precautions.

Southeastern Idaho Public Health in a statement Monday says the bat was found in rural Bingham County.

Officials say this is the first bat to test positive for rabies in Idaho this year.

Last year, about 20 bats tested positive for rabies in the state.

Rabies is a viral illness that can be fatal in humans and other animals.

Officials say never touch bats, and be suspicious of bat activity during daylight hours.

source:
http://www.ktvb.com/news/local/bat-tests-positive-for-rabies-in-se-idaho/461071628
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Fish & Game News:

F&G News:

Learn about bear behavior and help prevent unwanted encounters

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Friday, August 4, 2017 – 2:21 PM MDT

People can prevent attracting bears into situations that can be lethal to the animals

There’s been several incidents this summer involving black bears, and it’s a good opportunity to remind people about these native Idaho animals. Black bears are common, and their native range includes most of the state. Black bears are typically shy, and any encounter with humans is usually brief, from a safe distance and ends with the bear fleeing.

Black bear attacks on humans are rare, and there has never been a recorded human death from a black bear in Idaho.

When people see a black bear from a safe distance, they should consider it an exciting and interesting wildlife sighting. But they should not approach or crowd the bear, and it’s often a good idea to talk or yell to get the bear’s attention so it’s aware of your presence, especially if it’s moving in your direction and unaware of you.

continued:
https://idfg.idaho.gov/press/learn-about-bear-behavior-and-help-prevent-unwanted-encounters
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

World’s largest duck spotted in Tacoma

by Alex Cnossen, KOMO News Friday, June 16th 2017


A giant rubber duck is hanging out in Tacoma this week. (Photo by Alex Cnossen, KOMO News).

Tacoma, Wash. (KOMO) – A giant rubber duck is hanging out in Tacoma this week.

The duck, hailed as the world’s largest, floated into Thea Foss Waterway as part of the Festival of Sail Tacoma Thursday afternoon. The duck and more than 20 sailing ships will be featured on the Tacoma waterfront through June 18.

The four-day maritime festival is the largest tall ships event in the Seattle region and will feature music, food and wine.

continued w/photo gallery:
http://idahonews.com/news/offbeat/giant-rubber-duck-spotted-in-tacoma
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Seasonal Humor:

Dogmyspot-a
[h/t CP]
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July 30, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

July 30, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

There is a new fire up on Pueblo Summit. See updated Fire Report:

Village News:

Heeding the Siren’s Call

At approximately 1pm on Thursday July 27, the siren at the fire hall went off, and it wasn’t a test! However it was not a fire either. They needed some “muscle” to help with an ATV accident up Quartz Creek.

20170727Accident1-a

photo courtesy AF

“On July 27th the Community of Yellow Pine came together in a time of need. Thanks to the Life Flight crew and Cascade EMS for always being there! A huge thanks to Jeff for your quick response, expert care and leadership. To the community of Yellow Pine – everyone involved should be proud of the efforts and support they provided in a challenging situation. Our prayers go out to the patient and family.” – AF

photo gallery on FB:

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July 24, 2017 Missouri Fire Meeting Yellow Pine Community Hall

Meeting started at 1pm and lasted approximately 30 minutes. Attended by at least 23 locals and 10 officials. The IC Team PIO Jessie gave an overview of the fire. Missouri Fire has only grown an acre in the last 2 days, 1277 acres now. They have achieved 25% containment. Fire line constructed from Missouri Ridge on the south flank down to the road. Another fireline along the road and a third line on the north west side from the road up Ryan Creek. They have pumps and sprinklers in place and will leave them for the next crews. The wilderness portion of the fire will be allowed to burn until nature puts it out. We also heard from a fire boss, the Incident Commander in Training, Krassel Ranger Botello and Cascade Ranger Strohmeyer and others (sorry I didn’t get all the names.) Very informative meeting.

They do not expect this fire to impact the Harmonica Festival. Roads leading in to Yellow Pine remain open (watch for increased traffic.) Profile road is closed to the public, but they are allowing local folks from Big Creek out and in with supplies during low traffic times. Still a lot of fire traffic and equipment on that narrow road, and are asking folks not to drive up to look at the fire. The fire team and Midas Gold had dust abatement applied to Johnson Creek road from Wapiti Meadow Ranch to Yellow Pine, then up the back road to Stibnite. That has really helped keep the dust down with all the traffic.

As reported before, the helicopters dumped approximately 50,000 gallons of water on the fire on Saturday and they are approaching 350,000 gallons of water dumped since the fire started. Helicopters are dipping from Fish Lake. They are flying supplies and food in for the crews and using Knox Ranch for refueling. The big fire camp at the Cox ranch has had up to 400 crew and support personnel (and feeding a lot of sandwiches to Vernon’s dog.) Folks are putting in long days, leaving the camp at 6am and not returning until 9 or 10pm. There is a spike camp over in Big Creek, doing structure protection and reducing fuels. They plan to start releasing some of the elite crews for other fires soon. They plan to keep crews around as long as the fire is burning and coordinate with the Payette NF.

Good news, the old cabin up Missouri Creek trail survived the fire, it burned all around the cabin and outhouse tho. The folks from Yellow Pine send a big THANK YOU to the fire crews.

Cascade Ranger Jake Strohmeyer gave an update on the Blowdown project after the fire meeting. The contractor has been hauling logs out of the lower campground. They will start on the golf course when they finish around the campground. And as part of the timber sale, they will clear a helicopter landing pad (for Life Flight) out at the crossroads on the south west side.

Also discussed was the big washout on Gold Gate about 1.4 miles up up the road. Ranger Jake looked into having equipment from the fire camp fix the road, but it wasn’t feasible. Golden Gate road is on the list of roads to be fixed by the Boise NF, but due to the rough winter/spring, the Boise Forest has a lot of other roads ahead of it on the list to fix.

20170724YPFireMeeting-a

photo courtesy Payette NF FB

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Profile Road Closed to Big Creek

The closure of the Warren-Profile Gap Road between Yellow Pine and Edwardsburg/Big Creek is indefinite, but will open as soon as it is possible. If planning for an alternate route to Big Creek area, be aware that Valley County is warning that due to road damage from winter and spring storms, the Warren-Profile Gap road from Warren to the South Fork is not capable of handling large trucks or vehicles towing trailer. This route comes over Elk Summit into Big Creek. If you choose to take this route be cautious of increased two-way traffic on this narrow, winding dirt road.

Access to Yellow Pine is fully open, and we do not expect traffic to be impacted. Please be drive cautiously as fire vehicles are operating in the area.
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Yellow Pine Blowdown Update

Thursday (July 27) a report that a loader was loading logs from the far side of the golf course along the EFSF road.

As of Sunday (July 30) there are still a lot of downed trees on the golf course along School Street and in the hole #1 area.
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YPFD News:

There was a YPFD Commissioner Meeting on July 29 at the Community Hall.

Training is on Sundays starting at 11am at the YP Fire Station and open to the community of Yellow Pine. Check with Jeff F. or Ann F. to confirm trainings.

Fire Siren will be tested at noon on the first of each month.
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VYPA News:

Next meeting is August 12th, 2017 2pm at the Community Hall.
— — — —

The Corner Announcement

We have the store up and running. We have a ton of items. Here is a small list; Ice Cream, Yogurt, Various other Snacks, small propane bottles, motor oil , sunscreen, bug spray, feminine needs, shampoo, conditioners, toothpastes, toothbrushes, lighters, cell phone chargers. The list goes on and on. Basically a little bit of everything. We also get food orders in three times a week. People have been ordering perishables from us. We can get a wide variety, what we have been selling the most of is, bacon, milk, lettuce, ground beef, berries, bananas, yogurt and similar items. The produce we get is a decent price and great quality. We are also working on getting together other gift shop type items.
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Harmonica T-shirt Request

I would like to send out a request to everyone who might have a T-shirt from the past harmonica festivals. We are missing the following years: 1994, 2002-2014. It would be a donation to the Community Hall. I am hoping to make the Center more inviting and useful. Any suggestions from anyone are also welcome.
My email is: 75hallker @ att.net My phone: 208-633-6270

Thanks so much, Kathleen Hall – VYPA – Member at Large
— — — —

H-Fest Aug 4-6 Info:

Honey Dippers brought in the porta potties Sunday (July 30) around lunch time.

YellowPineMapHarpDonations requested: The Silent and Live Auctions are looking for large and small donations for the festival. Contact Lorinne at 633-5555 for details.

The Silent Auction is 1:00-4:00 PM Saturday (Aug 5.) Winning bidders can pick up their items immediately after the Silent Auction. If you like the excitement of a Live Auction, it is Saturday, 7:00-8:00 pm on the South Stage. Your winning bids in these events not only gets you great stuff; it helps ensure the festival continues every year. If you bring items to donate to the auctions, please deliver them to the folks at the Silent Auction booth.

Even though we don’t have an ATM in town, most of the festival fund raisers (auctions, Bingo!, breakfast, T-shirt booth), the local businesses (The Corner & Yellow Pine Tavern), and most of the vendors will accept debit & credit cards at the festival!

There will be a community breakfast on Saturday (Aug 5) and Sunday (Aug 6) at the Community Hall. Breakfast will be served from 8:00 to 11:00 both days. The cost is $5. Menu: Scrambled eggs with diced ham; pancakes; coffee/juice. For just $1 more, you can have blueberry pancakes or add oatmeal.

Saturday (Aug. 5), 5:30 – 7:00 at the schoolhouse museum is the Pulled Pork Dinner. The cost is $7. Menu: Pulled pork sandwich, Cole slaw, chips, ice cream & iced tea or lemonade or water. Proceeds support the museum. Dinner music is provided by David Court.

Advanced Harmonica workshop with Ewald Grabher, is held in the Community Hall at 12:30 on Saturday, Aug 5th. Cost is $10; pay at the door.

Bring the kids to the Huckleberry Stage on Saturday (Aug 5) at 2pm. Let them join Jim Keezer & Carol Carnahan for Children’s Time -some fun-loving, musical entertainment, where the kids are the stars.

Just a reminder – there is no liquor store in Yellow Pine now. However, beer and wine can still be purchased at The Corner and the Yellow Pine Tavern.

Please remember, county and forest law enforcement will be present. They are watching for drinking while driving, unattended camp fires, and other illegal activities.

The Lost & Found has moved. It is located inside the Yellow Pine Tavern. Please check there for your lost items and deliver any found items. Items in the lost and found will be announced throughout the festival.
— — — —

Big Creek Lodge

Breakfast at Big Creek Saturday Aug 5. Breakfasts run from 8-10am, and are $10/plate. Visitors can take a tour of the lodge and enjoy pancakes, ham, eggs and coffee/juice.
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Welch Memorial Golf Tourney 2017

Saturday September 2 at 1pm – Yellow Pine Country Club
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Click here to follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Local Observations:

Monday (July 24) overnight low of 50 degrees, partly cloudy with light smoke this morning, air quality kind of poor. Finches and pine-siskins at the feeders, a couple of hummingbirds. Heard a olive-sided flycatcher and a flicker calling. Swallows still around. Sunny and hot, afternoon thunderheads building and light breezes, high of 94 degrees. Helicopters still flying for the fire. At least one swallow nest still has chicks being fed. This evening the light colored doe was trotting down Dave’s Lane.

Tuesday (July 25) overnight low of 53 degrees, partly cloudy with light smoke this morning. Air quality a mix of smoke and dust. Pine-siskins and a few finches at the feeders, heard the olive-sided flycatcher calling “free beer” and a nighthawk. Swallows swooping and looks like they are feeding chicks in a couple of nest and some on top of the nests. Fire traffic up on the main and back roads. Overcast by 1030am, but partly clear at 145pm and getting hot, high of 91 degrees. Passing storm clouds later in the afternoon and gusty winds, rumble of thunder to the north east (lightning strikes in the fire area.) Got about 2 drops of rain. Light colored doe hanging out in the neighborhood at dusk. Mostly clear at dark and calm.

Wednesday (July 26) overnight low of 47 degrees, roof wet with dew (no rain), mostly clear and good air this morning. Pine-siskins and finches, olive-sided flycatcher and a jay calling. A few swallows still swooping around, didn’t see any activity around the nests this morning. A few hummingbirds visiting the feeders. Clouded up and we had a nice little rain shower after lunch (less than a tenth of an inch) our first measurable rain this month! Clouds broke up and partly clear later in the afternoon and much cooler than it has been, high of 82 degrees. Lots of chipmunks this year, several babies running around now. The light colored doe was hanging out in the neighborhood again this afternoon, going from yard to yard munching on grass. A few swallows swooping this evening and young finches calling from the trees.

Thursday (July 27) overnight low of 51 degrees, mostly cloudy this morning, but starting to clear. Chipmunks and ground squirrels running around. Heard finches and an olive-sided flycatcher calling. Also can hear a chainsaw to the southwest, report that crew was loading logs on the far side of the golf course. Fire siren went off around 1pm and it didn’t sound like the monthly test. Several 4-wheelers and vehicles rushed to the fire hall, then back up the hill followed by the ambulance. Fairly quiet afternoon, light traffic and good air, high of 86 degrees. A report that several people are camped at Golden Gate and Yellow Pine campgrounds. Lots of ATV and Fire traffic on Johnson Creek. A report that the transfer station was empty (and the “burn pile” is growing.)

Friday (July 28) overnight low of 47 degrees, clear sky this morning and good air. A few swallows, jays, finches and hummers around, olive-sided flycatcher calling and a raven. Bumper crop of chipmunks this year. Clouds came in before lunch time. Rained for 6 minutes in the early afternoon, not enough to wet things, and breezy. Partly cloudy later in the afternoon. Not as hot as it has been, high of 84 degrees. Pretty quiet evening after the fire traffic was done. Cooling off after dark.

Saturday (July 29) overnight low of 47 degrees, mostly clear sky and a good amount of dew wetting the roofs. A few finches and pine-siskins at the feeders. Heard the olive-sided flycatcher, a jay and a flicker. Clouds coming in before lunch time. Pretty hot early in the afternoon, high of 96 degrees. Quiet afternoon in the neighborhood, lots of traffic up on the main road and back Stibnite road. A report of a western tanager seen in a yard near the Abstein Subdivision. Almost dark by 945pm, days are getting shorter. Very quiet except for the call of a nighthawk.

Sunday (July 30) overnight low of 50 degrees, clear sky this morning, slight haze of smoke to the north east, dry and not much dew. Not many birds around, could hear the olive-sided flycatcher and a jay calling. Lots of chipmunks running around and fewer ground squirrels. The Honey Dippers were putting out porta potting around lunch time. Hot afternoon with a few clouds and light breezes, high of 96 degrees. Haze of smoke has persisted all day, it may be from fires elsewhere.
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Idaho News:

Comforts of Home: Missouri Fire base camp provides food, showers to firefighters

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 27, 2017

Fighting a forest fires is hot, sweaty, dirty business, but that doesn’t mean the misery has to last 24 hours a day.

Fortunately, the amenities of a Forest Service base camp offer creature comforts like clean showers, catering services and bathrooms.

Just such a camp has been set up at the Cox Ranch near Yellow Pine to serve as the headquarters for firefighters battling the Missouri Fire.

“Fourteen days is a really long time to go without a shower,” said Sierra Hellstrom, a Forest Service public information officer, about the typical assignment duration for a fire crew.

“We try to bring these in for the comfort of the firefighters as well as those of us in camp,”

The base camp, located on Johnson Creek Road, was set up on July 18, only three days after lightning started the fire, which quickly grew.

The camp is equipped with a full range of services needed to support the management of a large wildfire, inducing logistical support, mapping staff, public information staff and fire scientists as well as a financial department and incident command offices equipped with Wi-Fi and phone connections.

The Forest Service itself does not run all of the facilities, but contracts with private businesses that must be prepared to mobilize quickly.

Just as firefighters must respond to incidents at the drop of a hat, a base camp and the vendors that support it need to be nimble and ready to deploy as soon as they get the call.

Quick Response

Upon hearing about the Missouri Fire base camp assignment, Suzie Stewart of Stewart’s Firefighter Food Catering, based in Lakeview, Ore., was out the door, hauling her portable kitchen and crew of 21 caterers down the highway within hours.

“From the time I got the call until I arrived here and set up and fed dinner was almost 30 hours,” Stewart said.

Once these private vendors are set up, the situation on the ground can change rapidly.

“If the fire is approaching the camp, we’ll pack up quickly,” she said. “Sometimes they’ll take us from one site to another site, chasing the fire.”

Steward’s crew is capable of feeding the government-mandated minimum of 10,000 calories per day for fire crews of up to 500 people at the camp, she said.

Mobilization isn’t the only challenge for contractors. Access roads to remote camps can present significant difficulties.

Jim Anderson owns and operates Rocky Mountain Showers, a portable shower contracting service based in Ronan, Mont., that provides an urbane and comparatively luxurious trailer with 12 showers that looks better suited for a music festival than a backwoods fire camp.

“In this country, you don’t get in a hurry – you can’t,” Anderson said. “Getting into here you really take your time.”

Anderson estimated it took more than two hours to drive the 18 miles from Warm Lake Road at Landmark Creek to the base at the Cox Ranch. Driving the rugged route any faster might have destroyed his equipment.

source The Star-News:
http://www.mccallstarnews.com/
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Confrontation between man and security guard over Idaho public road

Dean Johnson, KTVB July 26, 2017

Boise – It’s no secret that tensions have been building between some outdoor enthusiasts and a Texas company that purchased thousands of acres of land in Adams, Boise, and Valley counties. Land that’s comprised of prime and popular hunting grounds.

A new viral social media post is adding fuel to the fire between the company, DF Development, and Idahoans traveling through its huge swath of private property.

The post shows a man wearing a DF Development shirt telling a driver, who is on a public road, he’s trespassing.

… The man says he was heading up to East Fork Clear Creek, which is in the Boise National Forest, to go camping with some friends. He stopped on Clear Creek Road and that’s when he says the confrontation with the DF Development security guard ensued.

continued:
http://www.ktvb.com/news/local/confrontation-between-man-and-secuity-guard-over-idaho-public-road/459508227
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August 21, 2017 Eclipse

The Star-News July 27, 2017

Cascade is in the path of totality, which will last 1 minute, 55 seconds starting at 11:26:53 a.m., according to http://eclipse2017.org. Smiths Ferry, 20 miles to the south, will see the longest duration of totality in the area at 2 minutes, 12 seconds starting at 11:26.35 a.m.

The path of totality will extend as far north as Donnelly, where the total eclipse will last for 48 seconds starting at 11:27:27 a.m.

source The Star-News:
http://www.mccallstarnews.com/
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Eclipse glasses for sale at the St. Luke’s auxiliary thrift shop

The Star-News July 27, 2017

The St. Luke’s McCall Auxiliary Thrift Shop has certified solar eclipse glasses manufactured by American Paper Optics for sale at $5 a pair.

All proceeds will benefit the Auxiliary’s Margaret Fogg Memorial Scholarship Fund, which awards $15,000 in scholarships annually to local students who are pursuing careers in the healthcare field.

Purchase eclipse glasses from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday at the thrift shop at 216 Lenora St. in downtown McCall.

The total solar eclipse will be visible in the area on Monday, Aug. 21.

Viewers are advised not to look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars, or other optical device.

Viewing is also discouraged through a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device even while wearing eclipse glasses.

source The Star-News:
http://www.mccallstarnews.com/
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Cascade fire district has vacancy on commission board

The Star-News July 27, 2017

The Cascade Rural Fire Protection District is seeking applications to fill a vacancy for fire commissioner.

Applicants must live in Zone 3, which is located in the southern area of the fire district in the Clear Creek area. The term for the position expires at the end of the year and the seat will be up for election in November for a four year term.

A letter of intent should be sent to Cascade Rural Fire Protection District, P. O. Box 825, 109 East Pine Street, Cascade, ID, 83611.

For questions contact the district at 382-3200 or crfpdpam @ frontier.com

source The Star-News:
http://www.mccallstarnews.com/
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Driver killed in McCall after crashing into building

by KBOI News Staff Tuesday, July 25th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — A McCall man died after crashing into a building in the city Tuesday afternoon, according to Idaho State Police.

ISP says Craig T. Boswell, 56, of McCall, was driving westbound on Park Street just after 2 p.m. in a 2014 Jeep Cherokee when he failed to stop at a stop sign at the intersection with North Mission Street.

Troopers say the Jeep went through the intersection and collided with a building.

ISP says Boswell was taken by ground ambulance to St. Luke’s Medical Center in McCall where he later died.

Troopers say Boswell was not wearing a seatbelt and that they are continuing to investigate the crash.

source:
http://idahonews.com/news/local/driver-killed-in-mccall-after-crashing-into-building
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Emmett Police patrol cars found torched overnight, person of interest identified

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, July 26th 2017


(Photo courtesy Tim Rynearson)

Emmett, Idaho (KBOI) — Four Emmett Police patrol vehicles were found to be set on fire behind city hall, police say.

Officials say the call went into Gem County dispatch for a report of a vehicle fire. The fires were extinguished quickly, police say, and no structures were threatened.

Idaho State Police is investigating the case as arson and a person of interest has been identified.

Emmett PD says there is no threat to the public and the investigation is ongoing.

source:
http://idahonews.com/news/local/photos-emmett-police-patrol-cars-found-torched-overnight
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Mosquito numbers stoke West Nile concerns

Joe Parris, KTVB July 24, 2017

Every summer, Ada County officials urge the community to be aware of mosquito season and West Nile virus, but this week they are asking everyone to pay extra attention to the conditions.

Several mosquito traps have already tested positive for West Nile virus in Ada County this summer.

This week the forecast is calling for rain showers which is expected to create new areas of standing water.

continued:
http://www.ktvb.com/news/health/mosquito-numbers-stoke-west-nile-fears/459150374
— —

West Nile Virus found in mosquitoes in Owyhee and Washington counties

by KBOI News Staff Monday, July 24th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Mosquitoes trapped in both Owyhee and Washington counties have tested positive for West Nile Virus, according to the Southwest District Health Department.

Officials say the mosquitoes in Owyhee County were found in the town of Bruneau and the CJ Strike Wildlife Management Area four miles south of Bruneau.

In Washington County, the district says the infected mosquitoes were found in the Weiser Bass Pond location about a mile and a half from the city.

The district says none of the locations are located in a mosquito abatement district and that residents should take extra precautions to avoid being bitten.

Officials also recommend draining any standing water from your property.

source:
http://idahonews.com/news/local/west-nile-virus-found-in-mosquitoes-in-owyhee-and-washington-counties
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Health Advisory: Blue-green algae reported in Brownlee Reservoir

by KBOI News Staff Friday, July 28th 2017

Cambridge, Idaho (KBOI) — The Southwest District Health Department has issued a health advisory for Brownlee Reservoir near the Idaho-Oregon border.

The health district said Friday that recent samples taken from the reservoir show concentrations of bacteria-producing blue-green algae. The advisory is specifically near mile markers 317 and 321 near Morgan Creek.

Blue-green algae occurs naturally, but under some conditions the algae can release toxins into the water that harmful to people and animals.

Tips from Southwest District Health and Idaho Power share these tips where blue-green algae blooms are known to be present.

continued:
http://idahonews.com/news/local/health-advisory-blue-green-algae-reported-in-brownlee-reservoir
———————————-

Fire Season:

Campfire Safety

Annually, about half of all wildfires in Idaho are started by humans, and campfires are one of the leading causes. As we move through the fire season please continue to be careful with fire while enjoying all that the Idaho outdoors has to offer. Don’t leave your fire until it is dead out. Remember, if it’s too hot to touch it’s too hot to leave.


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Living with Fire

For more information on how to make your homes, neighborhoods and community’s fire adapted please visit:
http://www.livingwithfire.info/what-can-home?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery
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Weather, firefighters slow progress of Missouri Fire

Main backcountry access road remains closed

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 27, 2017

The Missouri Fire near Yellow Pine grew to 1,277 acres as of Wednesday, showing no significant growth since Friday, fire officials said.

Cooler temperatures combined with firefighting efforts and vegetation still holding moisture from heavy winter snowfall at high elevations have combined to lessen the severity of the blaze, officials said.

The fire was started by lightning on July 15 and grew to 625 acres in four days.

The risk to the communities of Yellow Pine, Edwardsburg and Big Creek has diminished for the short term, reports said.

Yellow Pine has a summer population of about 100 people, according to local residents. Edwardsburg contains 35 homes, which are summer cabins only, fire officials said.

The most active parts of the fire were in the interior portions of its boundary, according to the report. While growth has stalled, warmer forecasted temperatures will contribute to conditions that could lead to additional growth of the fire.

The majority of pumps, hoses and containment lines will be left in place until it is determined that the fire has significantly diminished, officials said.

Firefighting efforts have put a priority on protecting Yellow Pine and Edwardsburg as well as preventing the fire’s progression towards the west.

continued The Star-News:
http://www.mccallstarnews.com/
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Robie Creek fire sparked by power lines

by Abigail TaylorSunday, July 30th 2017


An old school bus was destroyed in this fire. (KBOI Staff Photo)

Boise County, Idaho (KBOI) — Authorities say power lines sparked a fire in the area of Robie Creek Saturday evening.

It started around 6:15 p.m.

According to police, several nearby homeowners say just prior to seeing plumes of smoke outside that their power was flickering on and off.

The Incident Commander for the Forest Service told KBOI 2News that only a few acres burned but it would have been much worse if they hadn’t gotten there when they did.

They say anytime a fire starts in this area it’s a concern because there are more than 200 surrounding houses.

continued:
http://idahonews.com/news/local/robie-creek-fire-sparked-by-power-lines
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Martin Canyon fire near Bellevue contained, human caused

KTVB July 28, 2017

Bellevue — The Martin Canyon fire, burning three miles east of Bellevue, is expected to be fully controlled by Sunday night.

The fire, which BLM officials say was caused by target shooting, has burned more than 4,000 acres and has temporarily closed Muldoon Canyon.

Officials are urging target shooters to practice only within approved ranges and to always clear the area around your target before shooting.

source:
http://www.ktvb.com/news/local/martin-canyon-fire-near-bellevue-contained-human-caused/460375783
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Brush fire near Amity Road threatened a dozen homes; cause unknown

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, July 26th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — A small but aggressive brush fire threatened about a dozen homes early Wednesday afternoon.

Boise Fire says the 25-acre brush fire near Amity and Holcomb roads is now in mop up mode. Firefighters from Meridian, Eagle and the BLM assisted Boise Fire to extinguish the fire.

The fire has been ruled accidental, Boise Fire says, but it’s still unclear at this point what caused the fire.

None of the homes received any damage.

source:
http://idahonews.com/news/local/fire-crews-tackling-brush-fire-in-south-boise
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Update: firefighters getting the upper hand on two fires burning in Owyhee County

by KBOI News Staff Friday, July 28th 2017


Photo courtesy Dan Hawkins.

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — The Bureau of Land Management says fire crews are getting the upper hand on two fires burning in Owyhee County.

The Murphy Flat Fire burning about two miles east of Murphy has been stopped. It is no longer advancing. Containment is expected at 8 o’clock tonight (7/29/2017). It was caused by lightning and it’s size is estimated at 997 acres.

The Chaulky Fire, burning near Hemingway Butte is about 135 acres in size. Fire crews expect to have the fire controlled by 6 o’clock tonight (7/29/2017). This fire was also started by lightning.

source:
http://idahonews.com/news/local/blm-responding-to-two-new-fires-burning-in-owyhee-county
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Lumberyard, outbuilding burn in Lagoon Fire

KTVB July 27, 2017

Shoshone — A lumberyard and an outbuilding were destroyed as fire crews battled a wildfire near Shoshone.

The Lagoon Fire, measured at 1,412 acres Thursday afternoon, was sparked by a lightning strike around midnight Tuesday. According to the Bureau of Land Management, crews will assess other structures in the area of the fire Thursday to see whether there is additional damage.

The wildfire spurred evacuations in Shoshone Wednesday as the fire burned nearer to homes. People living on both sides of Highway 93, north to the Grape Creek Subdivision, were urged to get out. Evacuations were lifted that same night after firefighters got the upper hand on the flames.

Highway 75 was shut down for some time Wednesday as well, but has since reopened.

continued:
http://www.ktvb.com/news/local/lumberyard-outbuilding-burn-in-lagoon-fire/459917391
— —

Lagoon Fire contained Friday night

KTVB July 29, 2017

link:
http://www.ktvb.com/news/local/lagoon-fire-expected-to-be-contained-friday-night/460373814
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Fire causes outages, road closures in Magic Valley

KTVB July 29, 2017

Twin Falls – A section of Idaho Highway 46 was closed and about 4,300 homes and businesses lost power for several hours Saturday afternoon and evening due to a brush fire north of Buhl, in the Snake River Canyon.

Highway 46 was closed in both directions between mileposts 92 in Gooding County and 89 in Twin Falls County Saturday afternoon, according to the Idaho Transportation Department. River Road was also closed. The northbound side of Highway 46 reopened just after 6:30 p.m. ITD indicates that it is also now open to southbound travel.

Southern Idaho Regional Communication says the fire has burned a couple power poles. Idaho Power reported multiple outages due to equipment damage, affecting a total of 4,277 people as of 6:30 p.m. Saturday. Service has been restored.

source:
http://www.ktvb.com/news/local/fire-causes-outages-road-closures-in-magic-valley/460482901
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Idaho mountain fire watch tower closed due to vandalism

7/26/17 AP

Priest Lake, Idaho — An Idaho mountain lookout tower used by authorities to spot fires in the area has been closed due to vandalism.

The Daily Bee reported (http://bit.ly/2w0VHZC ) Tuesday that many items the lookout uses to find and report fires were taken within the past two weeks.

Priest Lake authorities state the lookout is closing due to public safety concerns and because of its remote setting, preparation of the upcoming fire season at Priest Lake and local fire resources being committed to fires in other states.

The Priest Lake Fire Protection District will continue to assess the damage to determine if and when the tower becomes usable again.

The District is home to the only two remaining lookouts operated by the Idaho Department of Lands.

source:
http://www.therepublic.com/2017/07/26/id-fire-lookout-closed-vandalism/
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Lightning starts several fires in eastern Oregon

KTVB July 29, 2017

Vale, Oregon – Lightning started six fires Friday night and five fires Saturday in eastern Oregon, the Vale District Bureau of Land Management said Saturday.

All five of the fires confirmed to have started after Saturday’s lightning event are located in the Owyhee Reservoir area.

continued:
http://www.ktvb.com/news/local/lightning-starts-six-fires-in-eastern-oregon/460469676
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Jumbo airtanker gets approval to fight US wildfires

By Keith Ridler – 7/26/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Federal officials have given a giant airtanker approval to fight wildfires in the U.S., but a lack of contracts currently limits the aircraft to California and one county in Colorado.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Interagency Airtanker Board issued the 17-month interim approval on Tuesday for the aircraft capable of carrying 19,200 gallons (72,700 liters) of liquid.

Global SuperTanker Services CEO Jim Wheeler said Wednesday the company is close to signing a contract with two states.

“The next step is for us to try to get a contract with the Forest Service,” he said.

continued:
http://www.therepublic.com/2017/07/26/us-jumbo-fire-bomber-2/
———————————-

Public Lands:

Payette National Forest July 2017 – September 2017 Schedule of Proposed Actions (SOPA)

7/26/2017

Payette National Forest SOPA for USDA Forest Service. This information has recently been updated, and is now available.

Here is the link to the Payette NF SOPA web page: Payette NF Schedule of Proposed Actions
https://www.fs.fed.us/sopa/forest-level.php?110412
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Celebration of Smokey’s 73rd Birthday

BOISE, Idaho, July 27, 2017

The Boise National Forest (NF) employees along with partner members of the Treasure Valley Fire Prevention and Safety Co-op, invite the public to join in the celebration of Smokey Bear’s 73 birthday.

The celebration begins at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 9, at Julius M. Kleiner Memorial Park, located (at the corner of Eagle Road and Fairview Avenue) – 1900 N. Records Avenue, Meridian, Idaho 83712 and ends at 1:30 p.m.

“The party is an honorary celebration of Smokey’s years of dedicated service in educating us about the importance of preventing human caused wildfires,” said Boise NF Fire Prevention Officer Terry Carrico.

Activities will be at Pavilion A. (See a map of park and directions on the park’s website at http://www.meridiancity.org/kleinerpark.aspx.

Birthday cookies, along with ice cream provided by the John William Jackson Fund and Meadow Gold Dairy will be served at noon.

Partners of the Treasure Valley Fire Prevention and Safety Co-op include employees from Bureau of Land Management, Idaho Department of Lands, Boise NF, Boise State University and City Fire Departments from Boise, Meridian and Nampa.

The public will have free admission to the beautiful park. During the event there will be firewise safety information and kids’ activities. Smokey Bear will also be making an appearance!

Further information is available by calling Terry Carrico, at 208-587-7862 or the Boise National Forest Supervisor’s Office at 208-373-4100.
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USFS Regional Intermountain News

July 12 newsletter online here:
https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USDAFSR4/bulletins/1a989ba
—————————————

Critter News:

Nampa woman’s home damaged by Great Dane

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, July 26th 2017


(Jen Gempler)

Nampa, Idaho (KBOI) — A woman in Nampa came home from work earlier this week to find that her foster dog had made a total mess.

Jen Gempler started taking care of the Great Dane, Boomer, just days earlier.

Gempler has fostered 13 dogs for the non-profit organization Idaho Saint Bernard Rescue.

“Dogs try to get out or they play too hard and something happens. You’re kind of expecting something to happen every once in awhile just so you’re prepared,” Gempler said.

Still she says she was not prepared for this.

continued:
http://idahonews.com/news/local/nampa-womans-home-damaged-by-great-dane
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6 Ways To Protect Your Dog From Summer Heat And Heat Stroke

By Vicki Clinebell

As warmer summertime temperatures approach, it’s important to remember that dogs are vulnerable to injuries and illnesses related to hot weather including heat stroke, sunburn, and foot pad burns. The most dangerous condition is heat stroke, which can cause organ failure, seizures, brain damage, hemorrhages, blindness, convulsions and even death.

Heat stroke and heat exhaustion are dangerous situations for any dog. Heat exhaustion is generally the early stages when a dog begins overheating. You can often remedy the effects by taking immediate action to reduce the animals’ body temperature and prevent the more deadly heat stroke. Heat exhaustion symptoms can include diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, rapid panting, and the skin inside the ears reddening. Get your dog inside quickly to a cooler area like a basement or near a fan, and offer fresh water. Dampen the skin with lukewarm water and allow it to air-dry.

Heatstroke occurs when the dogs’ normal body mechanisms cannot keep body temperature in a safe range. Dogs don’t have the ability to sweat, and panting can’t fully cool a dog down when they are overheated. A dogs’ normal body temperature is 100-102.5 degrees, a body temperature over 106 degrees is deadly and calls for immediate veterinary assistance. Signs of heat stroke include rapid panting, a bright red tongue, red or pale gums, and thick, sticky saliva. The dog may show depression, weakness and dizziness, vomiting – sometimes with blood, diarrhea, shock, and coma.

continued:
http://dogtime.com/dog-health/general/21665-protect-your-dog-from-summer-heat-and-heat-stroke
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Pet talk – Thyroid disease in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Jul 28, 2017 – IME

Hypothyroidism develops from a decrease in circulating thyroid levels in the blood. It is very common in humans and dogs. Thyroid hormone is needed to maintain normal metabolism, hair growth, activity levels, heart function and many bodily functions.

Hypothyroidism develops from inflammation of the thyroid gland, which exists in our neck and is usually caused when our immune system attacks and destroys the thyroid gland. We don’t know why this occurs, but the results cause typical lethargy and hair loss in dogs. Other signs may include reduced stamina, increased sleeping, premature graying of the muzzle, dark pigmentation of the skin and poor appetite.

Blood tests are necessary to diagnose the condition and monitor treatment. Hypothyroidism is treated by supplementation with oral L-thyroxine drugs. Dosages require adjustment in each individual animal, with some dogs requiring once-daily and some twice-daily administration.

continued:
http://www.mtexpress.com/wood_river_journal/features/pet-talk/article_fb63b546-7311-11e7-baa2-cf05672f4414.html
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Black bear euthanized after encounters with Idaho campers

7/24/17 AP

Ketchum, Idaho — Wildlife managers have killed a black bear after a string of encounters with people at a popular Idaho recreation area, including one in which a camper awoke with her foot in the bear’s mouth.

Over the past three weeks, the bear rubbed up against a woman reading a book near a stream and bothered campers as they slept, state Department of Fish and Game spokesman Kelton Hatch said. The woman who had her foot in the bear’s mouth was awakened by the pressure, but she wasn’t injured.

In each instance, the bear was frightened away when campers yelled, Hatch said. But it was clearly habituated to human food and contact.

continued:
http://www.therepublic.com/2017/07/24/us-black-bear-euthanized/
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Black bear or grizzly? Should hunters be tested on knowing the difference?

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review July 26, 2017


(Idaho Department of Fish and Game)

Should Washington bear hunters be tested to prove they can tell the difference between a black bear and a protected grizzly?

That requirement is already in effect in Montana, but just now being considered as a proposal in Washington, where grizzlies are more rare.

Idaho has posted a good Bear Identification course and exam online, and I encourage everyone to check it out, even if you’re NOT a hunter.

continued:
http://www.spokesman.com/blogs/outdoors/2017/jul/26/black-bear-or-grizzly-should-hunters-be-tested-knowing-difference/
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Idaho couple snaps photos of grizzly bear chasing a cyclist

Tasha Cain, KREM July 27, 2017


Cassie Beyer

An Idaho couple brought home pictures from their Canadian vacation people are going crazy over.

Cassie Beyer and her husband Donald Poster were taking scenic photos of the British Columbia wilderness when they saw a grizzly bear chasing a bicyclist down the highway.

continued:
http://www.ktvb.com/news/idaho-couple-snaps-photos-of-grizzly-bear-chasing-a-cyclist/459987294
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho may offer hunting bounties for bad wolves, allow bait

Associated Press, KTVB July 26, 2017

Boise – The Idaho Department of Fish and Game has proposed putting bounties on problem wolves and allowing hunters to lure wolves with bait.

The Capital Press reported Monday that the department’s Wolf Depredation Control Board has discussed how best to take action against the wolves’ high numbers where livestock and big game depredation is most rampant.

Fish and Game Director Virgil Morris says the use of sportsmen who pay for the opportunity to hunt or trap is traditionally the best method to manage wildlife populations.

Morris says wolf-related livestock depredations are at an all-time low, but federal funding to programs aimed at killing problem wolves has been cut, leading to the state, ranchers and sportsmen being left with the bill.

source:
http://www.ktvb.com/news/local/idaho/idaho-may-offer-hunting-bounties-for-bad-wolves-allow-bait/459649220
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Video: Hiking safely with dogs in wolf country

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review July 27, 2017


— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

With cattle in Washington’s wolf country, ranchers worry

By Lynda V. Mapes – 7/23/17 AP

… No one in Washington has borne the brunt of adjustment to the return of the wolf like the families here. Washington is home to a minimum 115 wolves in an estimated 20 packs. But 11 of those packs are bunched up here, overlapping grazing allotments in the Colville National Forest.

As wolves once again raise their pups this summer, their growing families and appetites raise a specter of dread in ranching country. Last summer, 15 cattle were killed or injured by the Profanity Peak pack — most of which was in turn killed by the state.

Apart from the complications and expense added to their management routines, ranchers are animal people. And they don’t like what they see, either in cattle eaten alive by wolves, or wolves shot dead by the state.

full story:
http://www.therepublic.com/2017/07/23/wa-cattle-washington-wolf-country/
— — — —

Wolves from two packs kill calves in northeastern Washington

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review July 25, 2017


Washington officials confirmed a minimum of 20 gray wolf packs in the state at the end of 2016. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife)

Wolves from two different packs — one already targeted for lethal removal — have been associated with new attacks on livestock, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife reports today.

The Smackout Pack is charged with killing a calf in a private fenced pen in Stevens County — the fifth confirmed depredation by the pack since September. Last week, Jim Unsworth, WDFW director, authorized the killing of some of the Smackout Pack wolves to try to change the cattle killing ways of the pack. The department has not yet reported on those efforts.

Also last week, department staff confirmed that a calf was killed on a grazing allotment in Ferry County.

“The producer uses five WDFW contracted range riders across his grazing areas to discourage conflict with wolves,.” the agency reports.

continued:
http://www.spokesman.com/blogs/outdoors/2017/jul/25/wolves-two-packs-kill-calves-northeastern-washington/
— — — —

Washington kills wolf that attacked cattle in Stevens County

7/28/17 AP

Olympia, Wash. — State officials have killed a wolf in northeast Washington to prevent more livestock attacks.

The Department of Fish and Wildlife said Thursday that one wolf was killed last week. It did not provide details about the killing. Officials say removal operations are continuing.

Agency director Jim Unsworth on July 20 authorized killing some members of the Smackout pack after confirming that the animals had repeatedly attacked livestock in Stevens County.

continued:
http://www.therepublic.com/2017/07/28/wa-wolf-killed/
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Third Week of July, 2017
http://kwvrradio.net/main/
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Wolf Education International

Forth week of July 2017

Idaho proposes wolf baiting; mulls bounty on problem wolves
http://wolfeducationinternational.com/idaho-proposes-wolf-baiting-mulls-bounty-on-problem-wolves/

Mexican wolf advocates make final push against recovery plan
http://wolfeducationinternational.com/mexican-wolf-advocates-make-final-push-against-recovery-plan/

More hunting dogs are being killed by wolves in Wisconsin
http://wolfeducationinternational.com/more-hunting-dogs-are-being-killed-by-wolves-in-wisconsin/

Wisconsin officials sued over hunter harassment law
http://wolfeducationinternational.com/wisconsin-officials-sued-over-hunter-harassment-law/
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Elk hunters debate ethics of long-distance shots at big game

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review July 25, 2017

A story on the ethics of long-distance shooting for big game is among the reasons I’m a fan of the Elk Network website that came online in March, created by the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

“Just because you can shoot long, doesn’t necessarily mean you should” presents an issue that’s discussed in a lot of elk camps across the country every season. Tackling the topic online allows elk hunters from other camps to chime in. It’s food for thought and insight, elk hunters among elk hunters.

continued:
http://www.spokesman.com/blogs/outdoors/2017/jul/25/elk-hunters-debate-ethics-long-distance-shots-big-game/
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Swallows: The Songbirds of the Sky

Swallows spend much of their time in the wild blue yonder. Learn the birding basics of where to spot these colorful songbirds when they come down to earth.

By Kenn and Kimberly Kaufman Birds & Blooms

Swallows are different from any other songbird. Their habitat isn’t tied to the woods, meadows or our backyards. Instead, their true home is the sky.

These graceful fliers are constantly on the go, ranging widely to feed on swarms of flying insects. They can live practically anywhere as long as they can find places to build their nests. In fact, those nests determine much about their lives. So let’s take a look at the birding basics of these aerial artists from the viewpoint of where they choose to build their nests and raise their young.

Holes in Trees


(Marie Read) Tree swallows (pictured here) have a beautiful blue sheen to their feathers. Adult females are almost as colorful as males. Juveniles are more brown overall.

Natural holes in dead tree trunks—whether drilled by woodpeckers or left by decay—provide nesting sites for many kinds of birds. Among them are two swallows with snowy white bellies and iridescent backs: the tree swallow, found from coast to coast, and the violet-green swallow, widespread in the West in summer.

Like other cavity-nesting birds, these swallows will also accept nest boxes if you put them up. The tree swallow has benefited from the popularity of bluebirds, because it can use the same size and style of nest box as bluebirds do. Every year, vast numbers of baby tree swallows hatch out of boxes along “bluebird trails”!

continued:
http://www.birdsandblooms.com/birding/birding-basics/swallows-the-songbirds-of-the-sky/
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Why are Hummingbird feeders red?

From Cornell University, All About Birds

It’s not because hummingbirds are inherently attracted to the color red, because these peripatetic featherweights feed on flowers of many colors: white, purple, yellow, red, even ultraviolet colors that we cannot see. But the key here lies in the eyesight of nectar-feeding insects, not hummingbirds. Bees, wasps, and butterflies are better at locating pale-colored flowers than red flowers. In nature, red flowers tend to have more nectar in them, because they are not being visited as often by insects. So hummingbirds are indeed attracted to red, not because they can see it better but because they have learned from experience that red flowers tend to have more nectar than flowers of other colors.

source (FB)
[h/t SMc]
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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
July 28, 2017
Issue No. 839

Table of Contents

* BPA Sets Rates For 2018-19; Includes Surcharge To Recover Costs Associated With Increased Spill For Fish
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439348.aspx

* Hooking Mortality Study Under Way On Cowlitz River, Information Could Help Manage Basin Sports Fisheries
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439347.aspx

* 2017 Snake River Sockeye Return To Lower Snake Dams Nearly Complete, Passage Numbers Low Compared To 10-Year Average
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439346.aspx

* Fall Fishing Opens To Lower Than Usual Fall Chinook, Coho Returns; Season Includes Rolling Steelhead Closures
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439345.aspx

* Bill To Expedite Sea Lion Removal Clears House Natural Resources Committee, Heads To Floor
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439344.aspx

* Study: Environmental DNA Could Help With Accuracy Of Matching Salmonid Species With Redds
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439343.aspx

* Nez Perce Leader Casey Mitchell Sworn In As CRITFC’s New Chairman
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439342.aspx

* To Date Montana Has Intercepted Nine Boats With Invasive Mussels; In 330 Samples, No Detections
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439341.aspx

* Montana FWP Recommending Commission Approve Conservation Easement Purchase For Whitefish Watershed Plan
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439340.aspx

* What To Do About Priest Lake Fishery: Lake Trout? Kokanee? Both? IDFG Wants Anglers’ Views
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439339.aspx

* Science Commentary Identifies Incentives To ‘Open Black Box Of Peer Review’ Of Published Research
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439338.aspx

* National Academies Report: Electric Grid Vulnerable To Natural Disasters, Attacks; Actions Needed To Improve Resiliency
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439337.aspx
————————————–

Fish & Game News:

Dead animal removal must be handled as priority

One common call we receive at Idaho Department of Fish and Game is about dead wildlife. Several times per week, we receive reports of dead deer, foxes, elk, or even bears. Often, the caller requests that IDFG staff come out to move or remove the carcass. Sometimes, people become frustrated when the carcass is not removed immediately.

Since we receive a lot of “calls for service” at IDFG, we need to prioritize these. Dead wildlife that are causing a hazard on a highway or other main road generally are a high priority. We often work with state or local road departments to move these off to the side of road, and try to coordinate this response pretty quickly.

IDFG may be able to assist with dead wildlife found in yards, driveways, golf courses, or parks, but sometimes cannot get to these quickly because of other, higher priority calls.

Poaching reports, efforts to assist injured wildlife, or needs to accomplish time-sensitive data collection may delay us by a couple of days. Furthermore, the staff at the McCall office is small, and spends time out of contact doing field work, so some days it’s hard to reach the appropriate person for assistance.

In the meantime, keep in mind that is quite acceptable for residents to move or remove the animal. We often recommend that people move small animals themselves: these can be easily bagged and put in the trash.

Larger animals are harder to deal with, but can be dragged into nearby woods or loaded into a truck bed for transport. Moving the animal yourself is often the best option if you find the sight or smell of a carcass very troubling, but staff cannot respond right away.

If you suspect the animal was killed illegally, or observe a bullet or arrow wound, please leave the animal as you found it and contact the local IDFG or Sheriff’s office.

Call the McCall office of Idaho Department of Fish and Game at 634-8137 if you have any questions.

Regan Berkley, Regional Wildlife Manager, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, McCall

posted in The Star-News July 27:
http://www.mccallstarnews.com/
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Deer walks into a grocery store, goes straight to the liquor section

by Alex Ronallo, WLUK Wednesday, July 12th 2017


This still frame taken from surveillance video provided by Festival Foods shows a fawn walking into the Darboy store’s liquor department July 10, 2017. (Courtesy Darboy)

Darboy, Wisc. (WLUK) — Oh, deer, oh deer – this is not a joke.

A white-tailed fawn made quite a spectacle at a grocery store in Wisconsin.

People are really fawning over surveillance camera video of the animal — in Festival Foods’ liquor section.

“It just walked through the door like any other guest.”

continued:
http://idahonews.com/news/offbeat/deer-walks-into-a-grocery-store-goes-straight-to-the-liquor-section
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DeerXingSuicidal-a
—————————————-

Tips & Advice:

Tips for summer pest control

Misty Inglet Jul 19, 2017 Local News 8

Pocatello, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Summertime means pest season for homes. It can be a constant battle to keep pesky critters out of the house.

Wasps, spiders, box elder bugs and earwigs are just a few of the common faces found in the summertime. They not only keep homeowners busy, but local pest control companies as well.

“Between about March and end of October is our busy season,” said Joe Hansen, owner of Moxie Pest Control in Pocatello. “So we’re getting somewhere between 20 and 30 calls a day.”

So far this season, Hansen said they have been seeing a lot more earwigs than in past summers.

continued:
http://www.localnews8.com/news/tips-for-summer-pest-control/590362448
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Seasonal Humor:

FestTweet-b———————————

July 23, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

July 23, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Yellow Pine Fire Meeting

The Forest and Incident Management Team will be holding a community information meeting at 1pm tomorrow (Monday July 24th) at the Community Hall.

Today’s fire update posted here:
https://yellowpinetimes.wordpress.com/2017/07/23/fire-update-7232017/
— — — —

Golden Gate Road

Road to Golden Gate is only passable on foot due to large deep wash-out about 2/3rds of the way up. – AF


— — — —

Profile Road Closed to Big Creek

Recreational access to the Edwardsburg/Big Creek area is not closed at this time, however; due to fire activity we strongly suggest that you choose an alternate location for recreational activities. An alternate entry into the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness is through Thunder Mountain. The Payette National Forest has many great locations for camping, hiking, fishing, etc.

The closure of the Warren-Profile Gap Road between Yellow Pine and Edwardsburg/Big Creek is indefinite, but will open as soon as it is possible. If planning for an alternate route to Big Creek area, be aware that Valley County is warning that due to road damage from winter and spring storms, the Warren-Profile Gap road from Warren to the South Fork is not capable of handling large trucks or vehicles towing trailer. This route comes over Elk Summit into Big Creek. If you choose to take this route be cautious of increased two-way traffic on this narrow, winding dirt road.

Access to Yellow Pine is fully open, and we do not expect traffic to be impacted. Please be drive cautiously as fire vehicles are operating in the area.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Blowdown Update

July 22, 2017

A report that a load of logs went out on Thursday. Making progress. The plan is to have the golf course cleared before festival.
— — — —

Power Outage 7/22

Idaho Power called on Thursday to let us know of a planned outage for maintenance on Friday from 1pm to 3pm. However the power was only off for 40 minutes.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Public Meeting July 17 – Stibnite Gold EIS

A good turnout, counted 37 locals plus officials from Midas Gold and both Payette and Boise NF.

Video of meeting posted to FB [h/t SA]
https://www.facebook.com/groups/yellowpine/permalink/10155548380748844/

For those who don’t use Facebook, part 1 of 8 is here:
Part 1 https://youtu.be/OikV3ElEKgs

Info re: Stibnite Gold Plan:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=50516
— — — —

Judy Wiley Memorial Stone Thank You

To the people of Yellow Pine,

I want to thank each and everyone of you for the memory gathering at the cemetery to dedicate Judy Wiley’s memory rock. I know so many people, in so many ways, had a part in making this happen. I want you to know how much it meant to me.

One of the last things Judy told me was how content she was and how she knew she was where she was supposed to be. I think all of you in Yellow Pine were the reason for this peace. She had come a long way working through her journey to become a confident woman, thanks to the with the support and encouragement of you all.

I am proud to have met and to get to know each of you.

Thank you, again.
Linda Blank
— — — —

YPFD News:

Next YPFD Commissioner Meeting: July 29 at the Community Hall at 2pm.

Training is on Sundays starting at 11am at the YP Fire Station and open to the community of Yellow Pine. Check with Jeff F. or Ann F. to confirm trainings.

Fire Siren will be tested at noon on the first of each month.
— — — —

VYPA News:

Next meeting is August 12th, 2017 2pm at the Community Hall.
— — — —

The Corner Announcement

We have the store up and running. We have a ton of items. Here is a small list; Ice Cream, Yogurt, Various other Snacks, small propane bottles, motor oil , sunscreen, bug spray, feminine needs, shampoo, conditioners, toothpastes, toothbrushes, lighters, cell phone chargers. The list goes on and on. Basically a little bit of everything. We also get food orders in three times a week. People have been ordering perishables from us. We can get a wide variety, what we have been selling the most of is, bacon, milk, lettuce, ground beef, berries, bananas, yogurt and similar items. The produce we get is a decent price and great quality. We are also working on getting together other gift shop type items.
— — — —

Yellow Pine featured in “Big Life” magazine.

photo gallery:

— — — —

Harmonica T-shirt Request

I would like to send out a request to everyone who might have a T-shirt from the past harmonica festivals. We are missing the following years: 1994, 2002-2014. It would be a donation to the Community Hall. I am hoping to make the Center more inviting and useful. Any suggestions from anyone are also welcome.
My email is: 75hallker @ att.net My phone: 208-633-6270

Thanks so much, Kathleen Hall – VYPA – Member at Large
— — — —

H-Fest Aug 4-6

Donations requested

The Silent and Live Auctions are looking for large and small donations for the festival. Contact Lorinne at 633-5555 for details.
— — — —

Big Creek Lodge

Breakfast at Big Creek Saturday Aug 5. Breakfasts run from 8-10am, and are $10/plate. Visitors can take a tour of the lodge and enjoy pancakes, ham, eggs and coffee/juice.
— — — —

Welch Memorial Golf Tourney 2017

Saturday September 2 at 1pm – Yellow Pine Country Club
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Local Observations:

Monday (July 17) overnight low of 42 degrees, mostly cloudy and smoky this morning, air quality rather poor. Not many birds around, couple of finches, a few swallows, can hear an olive-sided flycatcher. More squirrels than birds out and about. Watched cliff swallows feeding 2 babies in a nest up on the front of the Community Hall. Rather warm day today, high of 89 degrees, intense afternoon sunshine. Had half a dozen young hummingbirds at the feeders this afternoon. Heard a sawyer cutting in the old campground down by Johnson Creek. Air quality got worse after dark, very smoky.

Tuesday (July 18) overnight low of 44 degrees, a few clouds and lots of smoke this morning, almost hazardous air quality. The darker doe brought her spotted twin fawns out of the forest across the road into the subdivision. Couple of jays and a few finches at the feeders, flicker posing on the power line, two hummers fighting over their feeder. Quite a few swallows around, juveniles perched on top of bird houses. Couple of airplanes this morning (more parked at the airstrip.) Can see a helicopter with bucket flying over VanMeter hill bringing water from somewhere to the west. Air quality improved after lunch time, warming up, partly cloudy and light breeze. Heard a woodpecker drumming after lunch. Rather hot afternoon, high of 92 degrees. Could hear the helicopter with the bucket going all day and into the evening. The forest is crunchy dry underfoot. Also can hear the sawyer on the blowdown project working away. Report that he is nearly done down in the old campground and the truck could start hauling as soon as Thursday.

Wednesday (July 19) overnight low of 46 degrees, clear sky with haze of smoke this morning, air quality a little poor. Juvenile jay is funny to watch (still learning to feed itself), some swallows and juveniles still around, a few finches and a couple of hummingbirds. Air pretty clear by 130pm and hot, high of 93 degrees, mostly clear sky and light breezes. Hearing the helicopter in the early afternoon, and the sawyer working on the blowdown project. Idaho Power truck in the village mid-day. Hot and gusty breezes later in the afternoon, big plume of smoke from Missouri fire visible from main street. By sundown it was cooling off, calming down (plume much smaller) and a little haze of smoke starting to settle in. By 9pm thick smoke settled in. Lights flickering a little after 10pm, Power out at 1048pm. Thick smoke hiding stars. The 1215am Idaho Power message said crews went home for safety reasons.

Thursday (July 20) very smoky, overnight low of 44 degrees, clear sky above heavy smoke. Power restored at 845am. A few finches a couple of robins, juvenile hummers and some swallows. The smoke “inversion” lifted by lunch time improving the air quality from “crappy” to “kinda poor”. Much better air quality later in the afternoon, breezy and warm, high of 89 degrees. Lots of truck traffic thru the village today. A report the fire crew has a water tanker and watering the back road. No smoke plume this afternoon, fire was reported to be “less active” today. Helicopters still flying at dusk. Young Cassins finches perched on the power lines this evening begging, a couple of hummingbirds buzzing the feeder. Smoke settled in during the night.

Friday (July 21) overnight low of 43 degrees, clear sky above a haze of smoke (mostly to the north east.) A few noisy airplanes this morning, vehicle traffic on the main road. Some finches at the feeder – juveniles as well. Some swallows still around, not much activity around the nests. The golden mantel squirrels are looking pretty fat eating sunflower seeds. After lunch stronger breezes and better air quality. Planned power outage 1259pm to 140pm. Warm sunny day, high of 87 degrees. Helicopters flying all afternoon, and still flying at dusk. Juvenile pine-siskins visiting the feeders and half a dozen young hummingbirds tanking up on sugar water. Cloud of dust and light haze of smoke this evening. Smoke settled in during the night.

Saturday (July 22) overnight low of 42 degrees, clear sky above and quite a bit of smoke to the north east, air quality rather poor. A couple noisy airplanes. A few finches and pine-siskins at the feeders, not many swallows around, a couple of hummingbirds. Smoke lifted and better air quality by 10am. Hot sunny day, high of 92 degrees, some light breezes at times. Forest is crunchy dry, not many wildflowers blooming except yarrow. Fire helicopter running back and forth all afternoon. Increasing local traffic raising a lot of dust in the neighborhood this afternoon and evening. Not much smoke this evening. Air quality still pretty good at 11pm.

Sunday (July 23) overnight low of 47 degrees, clear sky above smoke inversion (mostly to the north east) air quality somewhat poor. Young pine-siskins at the feeders this morning, not many other birds. Heard an olive-sided flycatcher out in the forest. A few noisy small airplanes over the village. Lights flickered at 1125am. Smoke cleared out before lunch time. Sunny hot day, high of 95 degrees. Lights flickering again around 430pm. Less traffic (and dust) in the subdivision this afternoon, and fairly quiet with better air quality this afternoon. Still hearing helicopters this evening. Western tanager sighting, and a deer bounded up the hill towards main street before 8pm.
——————————–

Idaho News:

Valley County orders residents to be ready to evacuate due to Missouri Fire

by KBOI News Staff Thursday, July 20th 2017


Missouri Fire on July 16. Photo courtesy Payette National Forest.

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Valley County Sheriff Patti Bolen has issued a “Level 1 – Ready” evacuation order for the Edwardsburg and Big Creek area in response to the growing Missouri Fire.

The order is an alert to residents to be ready to evacuate the area and to start making preparations.

… The sheriff says there is no immediate danger to residents.

There is a community meeting planned for noon on Friday at the Big Creek Work Station to discuss the latest on the fire with the public. Officials will be there to answer any questions.

The Missouri Fire is currently burning between Yellow Pine and Edwardsburg. It is estimated to be about 1200 acres in size and is expected to grow due to the difficult terrain making firefighting efforts harder.

full story:
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Access to Thunder Mountain

Midas Gold (via FB 7/20)

We’ve had some questions recently about what access to Thunder Mountain may look like during construction and operations at the Stibnite Gold Project. We want to make sure you have all the information that is set out in the plan we submitted to the U.S. Forest Service.

In our proposal, the public can access Thunder Mountain via three routes: (1) Powerline Road (Riorden Creek Road) to Thunder Mountain Road/Burntlog Road, which is the most immediate from Yellow Pine, (2) Trapper Flats Road, and (3) Landmark to Burntlog Road.

The plan we proposed closes the USFS road through our project site to keep the public safe while we are operating. During construction and operations, there would be significant concerns that require highly controlled access to these areas to ensure everyone’s safety.

Other alternatives may be proposed and now is the time for all ideas to be presented so that they can be evaluated. We appreciate everyone who’s shared their thoughts so far.

We are available and willing to discuss options you may want the Forest Service to consider, or to tell you more about how we came to our final proposal. The great thing about the process is that everyone has the opportunity to express their thoughts and bring solutions forward that make for a better plan.
— — —

40,000 Trees and Growing!

Midas Gold (via FB 7/20)

Thank you to the five Boy Scouts from troop 247 who planted almost 500 trees at Stibnite. We appreciate your service and help Restoring the Site.

photo:

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Cascade mayor declares state of emergency for solar eclipse

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 20, 2017

The City of Cascade has declared a state of emergency in preparation for the throngs of tourists expected to descend upon the area for the total solar eclipse on Aug. 21.

“This declaration allows us to access the Idaho Office of Emergency Management resources to better enhance our limited resources here in Cascade,” Cascade Mayor Rob Terry said after signing the declaration on Friday.

The precautionary measure can be taken in advance of an anticipated risk to public safety that is expected to cause financial damage, excess cost of labor cleanup or property damage, Terry said.

“We are estimating in excess of 20,000 visitors to the Cascade area,” he said.

Cascade is not in the path of totality of the eclipse, but the path will cross the area about 20 miles south of town.

Potential traffic accidents and cleanup costs are worries for the city, Terry said.

Additionally, there is the possibility that cell towers will be overloaded and phones will not work, he said.

Officials from the Cascade Police Department, Valley County Sheriff’s Office, Cascade Rural Fire District as well as Boise National Forest and Cascade Medical Center are planning to be fully staffed on the day of the eclipse, which falls on a Monday.

Kelly’s Whitewater Park in Cascade will have parking and bathroom facilities available as well as food vendors.

The Valley County Astronomical Society will host a “solar walk” at the whitewater park on Saturday, Aug. 19, and staff an informational booth on the day of the eclipse.

source The Star-News:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

BLM worries about man-made fires as thousands plan to flock to Idaho for solar eclipse

by Amika Osumi Thursday, July 20th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — The highly anticipated solar eclipse is now just about a month away.

On August 21, Idaho will be filled with locals and tourists wanting to watch the moon pass between the sun and the Earth.

With all the extra cars and campers in the area that day, the Bureau of Land Management is worried about man-made fires.

The area they are most concerned with is the city of Weiser because so many people plan on traveling to the small town for a good view of the eclipse.

A big worry for the BLM is that people will drive or park their cars in dry, grassy areas.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

ISP: Heroes saved woman’s life in Eastside Drive wreck

By Tom Grote for The Star-News July 20, 2017

Two men were credited with saving the life of a Nampa woman last week when she became pinned under a car that had crashed on Eastside Drive near McCall.

Todd Callaham, 52, of McCall, and Christopher Wagner, 38, of Boise, used a winch to roll back a car that was pinning Donna Contreras, 32, of Nampa, Idaho State Police Trooper Mark Wright said.

Contreras was taken by ambulance to St. Luke’s McCall and transferred to St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, where she was listed in “good” condition on Wednesday.

The accident happened about 9:31 a.m. on Eastside Drive about six miles north of McCall near Tamarack Bay Condos, Wright said.

Contreras was a passenger in a 1991 Ford Bronco heading south and driven by Kyle Petersen, 27, of Nampa. Petersen failed to negotiate a curve and drove over an embankment. The car and a trailer rolled several times.

continued at The Star-News:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Dirt biker impaled with 8-foot tree branch

Natalie Shaver, KTVB July 18, 2017

Boise – A local man is thankful to be alive after being impaled by an 8-foot tree branch while dirt biking.

The branch ended up just inches away from a major artery.

Now, Jon Francey has a message for others.

Jon says the reason he’s alive today is because of his friends. So wants others to learn from his experience: to always wear your gear and don’t ride alone.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Air St. Luke’s goes above and beyond for injured hiker

Dean Johnson, KTVB July 20, 2017

Boise – First responders know all too well how people can wind up in trouble. It’s their jobs to help ease the situation and get victims to safety, but you could say a group of medical professionals from Air St. Luke’s went above and beyond when they helped an injured hiker in the Sawtooth Mountains.

… “I hooked my hammock to a couple of the trees down there. They seemed really sturdy,” Contos said.

But just before bed, one of the trees gave way.

“Tree fell on me. I didn’t even know that’s what had happened at the time,” Contos said.

The next thing she remembers is being face down on all fours, trying to breathe, and spitting up blood.

… Air St. Luke’s was dispatched to help Contos. Rick West and his team, using night vision goggles, searched for 20 minutes to find a suitable place to land, settling on a spot about a half-mile away.

… “It was too dark and they knew they could trip or drop me or anything, they could have fatalities themselves if they had left in the dark. So they waited the night through the rest of the morning in the darkness with me,” Contos said.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Father of Caldwell girls hurt in ATV crash to reported hit-and-run driver: ‘Come forward’

by Abigail Taylor Tuesday, July 18th 2017

Caldwell, Idaho (KBOI) — Two Caldwell sisters are recovering after reportedly being hit by a car while riding their ATV.

They say the man who hit them fled the scene.

It happened Saturday afternoon on Freezeout Road between Purple Sage and Galloway Road in Caldwell.

The two girls, 12-year-old Kendall and 15-year-old Abby, say they were on their way home from their grandma’s house when they heard a car behind them blowing its horn and revving its engine.

Moments later, they say the car rammed into them.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Mosquitoes in Gem County test positive for West Nile

KTVB July 18, 2017

Emmett – Mosquitoes collected in traps within the Gem County Mosquito Abatement District have tested positive for West Nile virus, officials announced on Tuesday.

The mosquitoes were collected during routine monitoring last Tuesday, and test results were returned on Monday.

“Several samples tested positive for the disease during the week of July 10, 2017,” said district director Jason Kinley. “This indicates that there is West Nile virus in some mosquitoes in the area, and follows what neighboring counties have already determined during the 2017 mosquito season.”

continued:
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Documents show Bruce Willis’ airport will be large, busy

7/21/17 AP

Ketchum, Idaho — Federal Aviation Administration documents show that a central Idaho airport being built by actor Bruce Willis will be larger and busier than officials originally expected.

Willis’ Soldier Field Airport is located about 10 miles (16 kilometers) east of Fairfield.

… The airport will base about 20 aircrafts, and could have about 500 landings by single-engine, multi-engine and jet planes each month, according to the documents. The airport’s 8,500-foot-long (2591-meter), 100-foot-wide (30-meter) runway will be made of concrete, and not dirt like county leaders and reports previously said. It will be fitted with high-intensity lights.

full story:
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Silver City in need of new watchman

Lacey Darrow Jul 19, 2017 KIVI TV

As the snow fell in the Treasure Valley this last winter, even more- much more fell in Silver City.

But among the silence of the snow was one man, alone, watching over the historic mining town.

… In the late 60’s after a lot of vandalism occurred they decided to hire a watchman to take care of the town all winter. The job has been filled ever since.

full story:
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Idaho to continue buying timberland and farmland

AP Jul 18, 2017

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Idaho officials have decided to continue buying timberland and farmland to generate revenue for public schools following a financial consultant’s review of the state’s reinvestment plan.

The Idaho Land Board voted 4-0 Tuesday to approve the plan with a few modifications as it seeks to generate money from the state’s 2.4 million acres of endowment land.

The reinvestment plan involves $76 million from the recent sales of commercial and residential real estate, with more money expected from future sales.

About $45 million of that belongs to the public schools endowment and the rest split between two smaller endowments.

Financial experts say more analysis is needed to know if locking in the smaller endowments with timberland and farmland is prudent.

source:
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Northern Lights dance over Northwest skies

by Scott Sistek Monday, July 17th 2017


JB Hawkins Photography

Seattle — They say patience is a virtue — it’s was also very rewarding to several photographers around the Pacific Northwest eagerly awaiting the Northern Lights Sunday night…and into Monday morning.

A big solar flare hit the planet Saturday night and peaked during the day Sunday. The storm began to fade as the Pacific Coast headed into the late evening, just as a band of clouds moved into Western Washington, making it seem this Northern Lights display may not pan out.

continued w/more photos:
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Fire Season:

Q & A

A reader asked “What do the terms “Type 3” and “Type 2″ teams mean?”

Link to best answer we could find:
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Idaho Fires

Missouri Fire

https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5373/
— —

Payette Wilderness Fires

https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5387/
— —

Wapiti Creek Fire (north of Lowman)

https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4836/
— —

Craig Mountain Complex

https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5376/
— —

Idaho Fire Info

http://www.idahofireinfo.com/
— —

National Interagency Fire Center

https://www.nifc.gov/fireInfo/nfn.htm
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Highway 21 back open after brush fire

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, July 19th 2017


Boise BLM says the Mile Marker 15 fire is near Hilltop and is about 10 acres in size. (BLM Photo)

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Highway 21 is back open after being closed in both directions Wednesday afternoon due to a brush fire near Spring Shores.

Boise BLM says the human-caused Mile Marker 15 fire is near Hilltop and is about 10 acres in size.

The highway was blocked about two to eight miles north of Boise (Sandy Point Lane to Robie Creek Road).

The BLM says crews are working hotspots on the perimeter of the fire.

No further spread is expected. The fire should be contained by 8 p.m. tonight (Wednesday) and controlled Thursday afternoon.

source:
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Sheriff: Someone used gas to start, spread brush fire in Eagle

by KBOI News Staff Thursday, July 20th 2017


(Ada Sheriff + Eagle Fire)

Eagle, Idaho (KBOI) — The Ada County Sheriff’s Office says a 30-acre brush fire that burned along Willow Creek Road last weekend was intentionally set.

Deputies say there’s evidence that the fire was started on the road and then gas was used to move flames from the road to a nearby hillside. Eagle Fire crews saw smoke from the area at about 5 a.m. as they were already at another range fire.

continued:
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Wildfires Aplenty

By Brian Walker July 19, 2017 CdA Press

Coeur d’alene — With 21 fires in North Idaho in the past four days, wildfire season is heating up.

“We’re on a trend that’s putting things drier than average for this time of year,” said Destry Scheel, manager for the U.S. Forest Service’s Coeur d’Alene Interagency Dispatch Center. “It’s a drier scenario than last summer.”

Most of the fire activity has resulted from Friday’s lightning storm, Scheel said. In some cases, it can take several days after a storm before smoke is seen and reported.

“We are chasing several small starts from the lightning that came through last weekend,” said Shoshana Cooper, Forest Service spokeswoman.

continued:
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Fire concerns heightened during solar eclipse

Dean Johnson, KTVB July 21, 2017

Boise – The first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in 99 years, which crosses 14 U.S. states including Idaho, is a month away from today. Some say it could be the largest tourist attraction in Idaho history. However, the timing, right in the heat of fire season, has fire managers very concerned.

“The more people on the ground and the more folks out there on public lands, the higher likelihood there is of a fire starting,” Jared Jablonski with the Bureau of Land Management said.

Jablonski says the fact that the southwestern part of the state has only seen traces of precipitation this month only adds to that risk.

“The vegetation out there is extremely dry. We haven’t had a lot of moisture and the eclipse is falling right in the prime, our prime fire season,” Jablonski said.

That’s why coming August 21st, you can expect to see a lot of fire crews out looking for danger zones.

continued:
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Potlatch bans campfires, burning on company lands in Idaho

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review July 20, 2017

Fire Season — Fire restrictions continue to tightened up throughout the region as land managers seek to prevent wildfires in hot and drying conditions.

Potlatch Corporation has announced that effective Monday, July 24 that no campfires or open burning will be allowed on its property in Idaho because of increasing fire danger in the region.

“The burning ban on Potlatch’s Idaho properties will remain in effect until conditions improve,” the company said in a release.

source:
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Jumping Behind the Scenes With A BLM Smokejumper

Kaitlin Loukides Jul 19, 2017 Local News 8

Pocatello – It’s something you’d only expect to see out of a “Mission Impossible” film – people jumping from 3,000 feet in the air out of plane right into a wildfire to fight that fire.

But these smokejumpers are nothing close to fictional.

This is Jacob Blehm’s first season as a BLM smokejumper, and so far, he has had to jump four times this early-on in the season. Normally, he said some jumpers will make between 20 and 30 jumps during the wildfire season.

“We’ve been here for about four days, and we actually just jumped a group of eight people yesterday morning down in northern Utah,” Blehm said.

He said, as fire activity grows throughout the nation, the BLM will reposition jumpers throughout the country where they’re most needed.

continued:
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Agencies investigate if military training set Oregon fires

7/20/17 AP

Plush, Ore. — Federal and state agencies are investigating if there was a link between a series of wildfires in southeastern Oregon and military training exercises.

Officials believe the seven small fires that ignited on July 11 could have been connected because they were all attributed to human activity, Oregon Public Broadcasting reported (http://bit.ly/2tKJHKe ).

In addition, remains of an incendiary flare used in the military training exercises were found at one of the burn sites, the state Department of Forestry said. The Oregon National Guard agreed to suspend the use of the flares after investigators contacted officials. But National Guard spokesman Maj. Stephen Bomar said he was skeptical his agency was the source of the fires.

continued:
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Intermountain Region Wildfire Update

July 20, 2017 Regional Intermountain Newsletter Special Issue

Grass and brush are extremely dry, allowing grass fires to ignite easily. With just a little wind, fire can grow very quickly.

We ask the public to be mindful of these conditions and do not park on dry grass. Anything that could cause a spark has the potential to cause accidental fires.

For more information for Everything Fire visit:

https://www.fs.usda.gov/r4

Below are some fires managed by the Forest Service and other interagency cooperators in the Great Basin.

continued:
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Public Lands:

BC YP SR Collaborative – Summer meetings canceled, next meeting September, 28th at EOC

(via email 7/21/2017)

We will not be meeting over the summer.

Below are the action items from the minutes.

Action Items:

1. Wes requested clarification from Jeff regarding storm proof roads. Jeff Barrett advised that he would provide the data related to effects of storm proof roads.

2. Todd recreation proposals needs to be submitted to Wes. It was advised that a revision of the proposal would be distributed.

3. Private property owners need to be contacted and by whom. The recreation committee will be responsible for contacting private property owners. Sandra Mitchell and Conway Ivey within 30 days in writing.

4. Request for a 3.2 layer be added Payette Forest Management prescription area.

5. Sandra will provide additional information to Wes.

6. Nathan, Kyle, Jeff and Wes

7. Field trip to Big Creek would be self-guided tour Rocky will ask Anthony to provide list of projects that are being worked on by Forest Service.

Conway informed the collaborative of his companies progress related to his mine. Conway wanted reflected in the record that Jocelyn Hatch was extremely valuable to the collaborative and will be sorely missed and wanted to express appreciation to the Nez Perce Tribe for allowing employees to attend the collaborative meetings.

The next meeting would be on September 28, 2017 at the EOC building at 10:00 a.m.

Melissa B. Hamilton
U of I Valley County Extension Educator
Community Development / Agriculture
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National parks increase price of senior citizen lifetime pass

Staff Writer Jul 21, 2017 Local News 8

A head’s up to any senior citizen who may be looking to visit our national parks in the future.

Senior Lifetime Passes for the National Park Service will be going from $10 to $80 by the end of August.

Last year, Congress passed legislation raising the price of National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Senior Pass.

But if you’re on a fixed budget, you can now get an annual senior pass. It will let you visit any park for one year, and it’s $20. Four of those can then be used for a lifetime pass.

Seniors who already have lifetime passes, don’t worry. They will be grandfathered in.

The additional funds will be used for park maintenance and facility improvement.

source:
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Letters to Share:

Next Tuesday is the day

(via email 7/21/2017)

Alert!! Next Tuesday July 24th is the last day to get free baby pheasant chicks. Little Canyon Shooting Sports will have their last hatch of baby chicks. The Gamebird foundation will be helping out with folks to make sure that the chicks have good warm places, good food and water. We have a very nice brooder to lone if someone wants it. It will raise 150 chicks. For young kids projects, 4-H, FFA, Scouting we will help with the feed. If you have some brooding hen chickens, put about 15 chicks under her at night and see the results. It is the best brooder you can find. Call for information.

Last chance. Pass along to a friend, they might enjoy a chick or 2.

“Whiskers” 208-883-3423
The Gamebird Foundation
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Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.

[If you can donate to help feed the fawns and this elk calf, please do. She has double the normal number of babies to care for this season.  -rrS]

photo gallery:

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Critter News:

Hero dogs protect girl from rattlesnake in Owyhee County

KTVB July 19, 2017

Owyhee County – Two dogs took charge – and one was bitten in the process – while protecting a child from a rattlesnake in Owyhee County.

Rodney Bacon and his family live out in sagebrush and grassland, near the Idaho and Nevada state line in Owyhee County. On Monday evening, Rodney, his 3-year-old daughter, Harper, and their German shepherd named Trek went to get mail out of his SUV.

Suddenly the dog began nudging Harper away from the vehicle.

“She wanted to get around towards the end of the SUV and he wouldn’t let her and she kept saying “Stop pushing me! Trek stop pushing me!” Rodney said.

Rodney and Harper went back inside before they realized that Trek was trying to keep Harper away from a coiled rattlesnake.

continued:
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How to handle bear encounters

Idaho Fish and Game (IDFG) provides tips for identifying black and grizzly bears and what to do when you encounter each:


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Black bear that startled campers continues to raid campgrounds, coolers near Ketchum

by KBOI News Staff Thursday, July 20th 2017

Ketchum, Idaho (KBOI) — A black bear that forced the closure of some campgrounds earlier this month is continuing to push its luck.

Idaho Fish and Game says the black bear, which raided a camp July 12 and then the following night had a camper feel its mouth on their leg, is continuing to visit a variety of campgrounds and raid coolers north of Ketchum and around the Sawtooth National Forest headquarters.

Wildlife officials have unsuccessfully tried to capture the bear.

“This bear has shown no outward signs of aggression to date,” said Josh Royse, Fish and Game Regional Conservation Officer. “But it is also not showing an appropriate fear of humans and it is extremely food conditioned.”

The bear again made human contact on July 19, in the Wood River Campground off of Highway 75 north of the Sawtooth NRA headquarters. At about 4 p.m., the bear was driven away by a camper after it tried to open a cooler. At 6 p.m., the bear rubbed against a chair and the arm of a woman reading a book.

continued:
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Idaho wildlife officials warn of aggressive bear near Coeur d’Alene

by KBOI News Staff Friday, July 21st 2017

Coeur d’alene, Idaho (KBOI) — The U.S. Forest Service is warning folks in northern Idaho of an aggressive mamma bear near Coeur d’Alene.

Wildlife officials say the aggressive bear is on Canfield Mountain’s Cave Trail.

“While confrontations with bears are very rare, an encounter with a sow and cubs are extremely dangerous,” the Idaho Panhandle National Forest said on social media. “Mother bears are very protective of their cubs.”

source:
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Far-ranging grizzly spotted in Montana’s Big Belt Mountains

7/19/17 AP

Helena, Mont. — Another grizzly bear has shown up in a part of Montana that hasn’t seen grizzlies in as long as a century.

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks officials said Wednesday that a trail camera captured a picture of a 3 ½ year old grizzly in the Big Belt Mountains west of White Sulphur Springs sometime this summer.

Last month, two grizzlies were killed after preying on livestock near Stanford, east of Great Falls.

continued:
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Third week of July 2017
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

State reports at least 4 wolves have died this year

7/17/17 AP

Spokane, Wash. — At least four wolves have died in Washington state this year, according to the state Department of Fish and Wildlife.

A new report says two wolves died after being struck by vehicles. Another wolf was killed to protect woodland caribou.

The agency says a fourth wolf, wearing a tracking collar, was legally killed after wandering into Idaho, where wolves can be hunted.

continued:
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Washington to kill members of wolf pack in Stevens County

By Nicholas K. Geranios – 7/20/17 AP

Spokane, Wash. — The state plans to kill some animals in a wolf pack, which has repeatedly preyed on livestock in Stevens County, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife said Thursday.

The wolves, known as the Smackout pack, has preyed on livestock four times since September.

“The purpose of this action is to change the pack’s behavior,” said Donny Martorello, a wolf manager for the agency. “That means incrementally removing wolves and assessing the results before taking any further action.”

continued:
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Report: wolf and livestock deaths hit record high in Wyoming

By Bob Moen – 7/18/17 AP

Cheyenne, Wyo. — Gray wolves killed a record number of livestock in Wyoming last year, and wildlife managers responded by killing a record number of wolves that were responsible, according to a new federal report.

The report released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service found that wolves killed 243 livestock, including 154 cattle, 88 sheep and one horse, in 2016. In 2015, 134 livestock deaths attributed to wolves were recorded.

Last year’s livestock losses in Wyoming exceeded the previous record of 222 in 2009.

continued:
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Group calls for release of Mexican gray wolves in New Mexico

7/17/17 AP

Albuquerque, N.M. — Environmentalists are asking that federal wildlife managers release more captive Mexican gray wolves into the wild in New Mexico to help with recovery of the endangered species.

The Center for Biological Diversity outlined its request in a letter to regional officials with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

continued:
— — —

Federal spending proposal calls for review of wolf genetics

7/19/17 AP

Albuquerque, N.M. — Environmentalists are concerned that a proposed spending plan for the U.S. Interior Department calls for a study to determine whether Mexican gray wolves are a genetically distinct subspecies.

A report accompanying the legislation suggests federal wildlife officials would be required to determine the validity of the Mexican wolves’ designation as a subspecies of the gray wolf. Red wolves also would be reviewed.

continued:
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Wolf Education International

Third week July 2017

With cattle in Washington’s wolf country, ranchers work and worry

David Little: Wolves at the door — so deal with it

CA verifies second wolf pack

Federal Spending Proposal Calls for Review of Wolf Genetics

Report: wolf and livestock deaths hit record high in Wyoming

Wolves to the slaughter: France approves cull to save sheep
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Boise cat reunited with family after four years

Lacey Darrow Jul 18, 2017 KIVI TV

A Boise cat that went missing from its home is now back with its family, but what makes the story truly miraculous is the fact that the cat went missing more than four years ago.

Austin was just four years old when a cat showed up on their families doorstep.

continued (quite a story too):
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Alaska honorary cat mayor dies at 20

by The Associated Press Sunday, July 23rd 2017

Talkeetna, Alaska (AP) — Stubbs, the honorary feline mayor of the Alaska town of Talkeetna, has died at the age of 20.

… Talkeetna, a town with a population of about 900, elected the yellow cat mayor in a write-in campaign in 1998.

There is no human mayor in the town.

full story w/photos:
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Idaho, Utah team up to fight invasive mussels

7/23/17 AP

Pocatello, Idaho — Idaho is teaming up with Utah to protect Bear Lake on the Utah-Idaho border from invasive mussels.

Idaho State Journal reports that the states have partnered with the Bear Lake Regional Commission to boost inspection capabilities at two inspection stations run by Utah around Bear Lake.

Idaho will contribute $135,000 to Utah’s efforts to combat the spread of the quagga mussel. The inspection station run by Idaho on the lake will close as resources are shifted to two boat check stations on the Utah side of the lake.

Until now, boaters would be checked in Utah and again in Idaho when transporting their boats on the roadway. Now, a single check will cover boaters.

Quagga and zebra mussels are a concern because they can clog pipes and cover beaches and can travel by hitching rides on trailered boats and other watercraft.

source:
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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
July 21, 2017
Issue No. 838

Table of Contents

* Lake Roosevelt Northern Pike Numbers Rise; ‘Chronic Recruitment, Exponential Growth’
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439314.aspx

* Summer Chinook, Sockeye Runs Downgraded; Treaty Commercial Fishery Extended
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439313.aspx

* Dworshak’s Largest Turbine Out Another Year; Poses Challenges For Salmon Management
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439312.aspx

* Irrigators Petition Corps, NOAA Fisheries To Investigate River Management Decisions During 2015 Low/Hot Water
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439311.aspx

* NOAA Climate Outlook: PNW Warmer Than Average August-Oct., Winter Conditions Likely Neutral
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439310.aspx

* Study: Alaska Pink Salmon Adapt To Climate Change With Early Migration Timing
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439309.aspx

* WDFW To Take Lethal Action On Smackout Wolf Pack In Stevens County; Repeated Livestock Attacks
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439308.aspx

* Appeals Court Rejects Challenge To NW Power/Conservation Council’s Basin Fish/Wildlife Program
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439307.aspx

* Science Review Of NW Power/Conservation Council/BPA Wildlife Projects Out For Comment
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439306.aspx

* Wetland Restoration Project Improves Tidal Marsh For Salmon, Steelhead In Columbia River Estuary
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439305.aspx

* OSU Gets Largest Research Grant In Its History — $122 Million—To Build New Marine Research Vessel
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439304.aspx

* House Natural Resources Committee Holds Hearing On Five Bills To Change Endangered Species Act
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439303.aspx

* Study Identifies Global Hotspots For Transboundary Water Conflicts; Columbia River Treaty Cited As Advanced Agreement
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439302.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Cop rescues baby skunk, then runs for his life

Published on Aug 4, 2015

A Michigan Police officer frees a stuck baby skunk then high-tails it out of there and an adorable and hilarious rescue caught on video. Jen Markham


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Pennsylvania family rebuilding after skunk spray ruins home

by Associated Press Saturday, June 17th 2017

Latrobe, Pa. (AP) — A Pennsylvania family is slowly rebuilding their life and their home seven months after a skunk sneaked into their home and ruined it.

Latrobe resident Scott Gray tells WPXI-TV the family’s plight is worse than if their home was ruined by fire because their insurance won’t cover the damage.

Gray says the skunk apparently sneaked into the house through a doggie door then spent three hours inside with the family’s dogs, spraying its noxious scent everywhere.

The family threw away toys, furniture, and appliances and had to strip the house down to its wood framing to get rid of the odor.

The family has been living in a small apartment down the street while they rebuild. So far, they’ve spent more than $30,000.

source:
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DogSkunk-a
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Tips & Advice:

Fire Safety:

How to protect your home from wildfires:

1. Create defensible space by clearing brush away from your home

2. Use fire-resistant landscaping and harden your home with fire-safe construction.

3. Assemble emergency supplies and belongings in a safe place

4. Plan escape routes and make sure all members of the household know the plan.

For more information, visit: http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/fire/ready.shtml
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Fire Prevention Tips

Whether you are recreating or traveling on the highways or back roads, keep fire prevention in mind and follow these fire prevention tips:

On the road:

* Keep tires properly inflated.
* Grease your wheel bearings.
* Tie up trailer safety chains.
* Do not drive or park in tall, dry grass.

At the campground:

* Have a shovel, bucket, and water nearby.
* Make sure your campfire is completely out. If it’s too hot to touch, it’s too hot to leave.

Target Shooting:

* Check weather conditions. Hot + Dry + Wind = Quick Spreading Wildfires
* Choose a shooting area that is clear of dry grass/vegetation and rocks.
* Always bring water, a fire extinguisher and a shovel.
* Discharging a firearm using incendiary, steel core or tracer ammunition is prohibited on BLM lands from May to October 20.
* Burning, igniting or causing to burn explosive material, including exploding targets is prohibited on BLM lands from May to October 20.

For information on current wildland fires, fire restrictions, and fire prevention in Idaho, visit http://www.IdahoFireInfo.com.

source:
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Seasonal Humor:

TreeDownsizing-a

HotDogMelt-a
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July 16, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

July 16, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Fire on Profile

July 15, 2017 5:20pm

We detected a new smoke around 10am this morning on the east side of the Profile Road about 2 miles up from the East Fork. We have staffed the fire with Krassel Crew 6, Krassel Helitack, Snowslide module and we have others in route. The fire is 4 to 5 acres with an active perimeter.

Anthony Botello
Krassel Ranger
Payette National Forest

Update 850pm July 15

It’s 8-10 acres now, there are upwards of 30 firefighters on it and another hotshot crew headed there tomorrow. The Profile road is open, but we ask folks pass through and not stop in the vicinity on the road as it is hindering our efforts.

Note: As of 630pm July 16 a large plume of smoke visible from Yellow Pine.

Update 7pm July 16

We just got an update it is 70 acres, We have 40 people responding. It’s moving around. We have ordered a type 2 incident management team who will hopefully be here by Wednesday or Thursday.

photos by Forsters:

— — —

Community Hall

A Garage Sale was held Saturday July 15 at the Community Hall from 9am to noon.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Public Meeting Monday July 17, 2017 – Stibnite Gold EIS

Ranger Strohmeyer and I along with the Stibnite Gold EIS Project Manager Piper Goessel, would like to come up to Yellow Pine next Monday July 17 to give folks a presentation and answer questions on the Stibnite Gold project.

The plan would be we would give a short overview of the project, then break out around some poster boards to answer questions more specifically about the project. Something important to remember is that we are in the scoping period of the project so we will talk about the proposal that Midas has submitted, but we have not started analysis, alternatives, etc., so this would be an opportunity for an overview so folks can provide scoping comments. We need your written comments by July 20.

Here is the project webpage for all the details. https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=50516

We will plan to be in town and begin the meeting at 10am, we would like to have it in the Community Center.

Thank you, spread the word and invite those who are interested in this project and we will see you next week.

Anthony B. Botello
District Ranger
Krassel Ranger District
Payette National Forest
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Judy Wiley Memorial Stone July 17

We would like all people in the community, who can make it, to come join us at the cemetery on July 17th at 3pm. At that time, we would like to talk about Judy Wiley. She didn’t want a service or a memorial. So this would be a chat and a talk. We plan to place a stone at the foot of Bud Boyd in her memory. Judy’s sister, Linda Blank, will be joining us. Thanks to the community for their generous donations. We would also like to invite the community for chips and salsa at the Tavern after the ‘talk’. It would be a good time to talk to her sister and tell her your stories of Judy.

– MF
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Ed Staub & Sons Propane July 18

We will be in Yellow Pine Tuesday July 18th in the early afternoon. Please let everyone know that this will more than likely be our last fill before fall, so we will be filling everybody!
Thank you
Nettie
Ed Staub & Sons
McCall ID 208-634-3833
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YPFD News:

July 16 – YPFD Training Day – Small live fire training today with pumping operations and nozzle and water control. Awesome day of training, thanks to everyone who participated!

photo gallery:

Next YPFD Commissioner Meeting: July 29, 2017. Community Hall at 2pm.

Training is on Sundays starting at 11am at the YP Fire Station and open to the community of Yellow Pine. Check with Jeff F. or Ann F. to confirm trainings.

Fire Siren will be tested at noon on the first of each month.
— — —

Transfer Station

20040831dump

Please remember that the dump is for household trash only. Do not leave items outside of the bins. Construction debris and furniture should be taken to the Donnelly station.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Blowdown Update

Last update – July 5, 2017

The logger could start as early as the end of [last] week. Logs will be hauled up Johnson Creek and there will likely be only one load per day going out. He will also likely camp down in the flat upstream of YP Campground. I’ll let you know as soon as I get confirmation on all of those items.

Jake Strohmeyer
District Ranger
Boise National Forest, Cascade Ranger District
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The Corner Announcement

We have the store up and running. We have a ton of items. Here is a small list; Ice Cream, Yogurt, Various other Snacks, small propane bottles, motor oil , sunscreen, bug spray, feminine needs, shampoo, conditioners, toothpastes, toothbrushes, lighters, cell phone chargers. The list goes on and on. Basically a little bit of everything. We also get food orders in three times a week. People have been ordering perishables from us. We can get a wide variety, what we have been selling the most of is, bacon, milk, lettuce, ground beef, berries, bananas, yogurt and similar items. The produce we get is a decent price and great quality. We are also working on getting together other gift shop type items.
— — — —

VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting July 8, 2017

Officers in Attendance: Dan Stiff, Chairman; Deb Filler Vice Chairman; Lorinne Munn, Secretary; Ann Forster, Treasurer; Kathy Hall, Member At Large.

1. Meeting was called to order at 2:04 p.m. by Dan Stiff, Chairman

2. Lorinne Munn, Secretary, read the minutes of the June 10, 2017 meeting. Corrections and additions as follows:

a. Deb Filler mentioned the Harmonica race has 21 people interested and 6 have signed.
b. Willie Sullivan clarified that the fireworks were purchased by donations, not village funds.
c. Lorinne Munn clarified that the Fire Dept. is a Fire Protection District and the Valley County knows and approves of this. The Dept. does not have the training or equipment to fight interior structure fires. That would require trained firefighters. As a Fire Protection District, the focus is on prevention and fire proofing around structures, protecting surrounding structures and preventing a fire from spreading.
d. Ann Forster has qualified to join Gary Niebrand and Jeff Forster in extrication of passengers in a vehicle accident.

2. Treasurer’s report was given by Ann Forster, Treasurer. Balance on hand in the account is $25,297.44. Within that total the General Fund has $8,354.55; Harmonica Festival has $5,423.70; Community Hall has a minus balance… -$101.60; Bathroom Fund, $6,288.51; Cemetery Fund $5,332.28.

3. Willie Sullivan, Cemetery Commissioner, presented a written report: The committee is researching the planting of grass that requires less water and is drought resistant. Flags that were placed at graves on Memorial weekend will be removed after July 4th. A Bernice Parks memorial bench is now in place. Three headstones have been added. Two more plots have been purchased. The kiosk will be replaced when the repairs are completed. Trash will be removed. Sundy Martin has resigned as Commissioner; a new Commissioner will be elected this year and future elections for the other positions will be held in 2018 and 2019 to maintain the three-year staggered terms of office. Please email or mail to Candy any information about people buried in our cemetery so it can be included in a booklet about our Pioneer Cemetery.

4. Kathy Hall presented an oral report on the Community Hall. The committee focus in on making the Community Hall more welcoming. The window bars have been removed and stored to allow for painting the window frames. Mark Hardisty is working on repairing the water pipes in the kitchen. Some electrical work is needed. The new BBQ with and propane supply is complete. Any donated non-working exercise equipment is to be removed. The wood stove is for sale. Items in the kitchen that are broken and no longer used will be removed. Those present agreed. Dawn Brown has made arrangements to purchase the yellow folding chairs (presently stored in the Hall) from the Fire Department. Other folding chairs will be removed. A cleanup crew will be working on the kitchen soon. Better storage is needed for Harmonica items and exercise equipment. Harmonica T-shirts, years 2000 to 2014, are needed to complete our display. The committee wants to start raising money to paint the Community Hall.

5. Deb Filler, Harmonica Festival Chairman, presented a report: The Festival is less than one month away and plans are running smoothly. Presale of T-shirts is going well; $745. has been raised in the pre-sale. The committee is seeking donated items for the auction and is working on making ice available to campers.

6. Belinda Provancher, representing Midas Gold, reported the lighting fixtures at the Veterans’ Memorial have been made operational, with one additional light control to be added later.

7. Willie Sullivan reported that the composting toilet project plans must the engineered since it is a public building. The toilets have been purchased. Once the engineering report is complete, the building permit from the county will be acquired. There will be two separate rooms built as an addition on the South side of the hall. No water or heat is required. There will be a wooden interior of plywood with hard surface paint. Hand rails and hand sanitizers will be installed.

8. Idaho Power Co. is continuing to donate $60. Per year to lighting of the Veterans’ Memorial.

9. Deb Filler reported dust abatement will be applied on Monday, July 10th and payments have been made by everyone requesting the treatment. The Village pays for abatement on the main street to Profile St. and up Profile to Stibnite road. Midas Gold has donated one half of the cost; the Village’s cost is over $500. Willie Sullivan made a motion that dust abatement be funded for this amount, motioned was seconded, and the motion passed by a majority.

10. The purchase of a computer for the Village Association use was discussed. Willie Sullivan mentioned that the computer committee reported at the last September meeting. He recalled that a purchase cost of $1,300 to $1,600 was approved. Ann Forster stressed the importance of moving away from our antiquated method of bookkeeping to a computer method will save the Treasurer time and all of the Village records and minutes could be kept in one place. The computer could also be used by the Water Users’ Assoc. Dick Filler made a motion calling for a re-vote on the purchase of a computer. The motion to purchase a computer was passed by a majority.

11. Ann Forster reported that the July 4th golf tournament was very successful despite the downed trees in the golf course. The EMT group will sponsor next year’s tournament, the 20th year. The tournament is available every “odd” year for fundraising by other groups.

12. Willie Sullivan reported the fireworks cost $2,500 and the insurance cost $300. Dennis and Chris Heck donated $1,000 worth of fireworks. For next year’s fireworks $400. was collected by Sullivan family members who solicited donations from the crowd. The Corner has donated $300. and the golf tournament donated $120. There will also be a Labor Day golf tournament which will provide another donation; more donations are needed. Willie Sullivan requested that the Village verify that three years ago a vote was taken by the members stating that the Village would provide $500. from Village funds if it is ever needed to assist in fireworks expenses. That money has never been asked for; the past vote was confirmed and the money is still available if needed.

New Business

Plowing of snow during the winter: Dan Stiff reported that money was paid to Cecil Dallman for plowing without passing that expense through the proper process. Willie Sullivan moved, and it was seconded, to let that payment stand. The motion passed by a majority. Dan Stiff made a motion that a committee be formed to report back concerning future plowing the roads in winter. Willie Sullivan, Cecil Dallman, Bill McIntosh, Kathy Hall and Matt Huber will be members of that committee.

Ann Forster requested that the new Treasurer by installed at the beginning of the fiscal year, June 30th. Willie Sullivan and the Village Council will look into changing the By-laws to accommodate this request. It was suggested that the Treasurer’s position could be made to a 13- month position so there could an overlap with the old and new Treasurer working together for one month.

Dan Stiff suggested that anyone going to the Valley County Commissioners regarding the Fire Department include the Fire Department staff in the discussion.

Election of officers: Deb Filler represented the nomination committee for the positions of Treasurer and Chairman. The committee nominated Joel Fields as Treasurer, seconded by Jeff Forster. Willie Sullivan moved that nomination close; seconded by Ginny Barthomew; motion passed. Joel Fields will be Treasurer. Deb Filler nominated herself as Chairman. Lorinne nominated Ann Forester. Ann declined. Willie Sullivan moved nominations close; motion seconded; motion passed. Deb Filler will serve as Village Chairman. Deb Filler nominated Lynn Imel to fill the Vice Chairman position until elections next year (now vacant since Deb Filler moved to Chairman). Willie Sullivan suggested this be approved; motion seconded by Ginny Barthomew; motion passed. Lynn Imel will serve as Vice Chairman until elections in July 2018.

Meeting was adjourned 4:00 p.m. by Dan Stiff
Next meeting is August 12th, 2017
Submitted by Lorinne N.j Munn, Secretary, Yellow Pine Village Assoc.

link:
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Yellow Pine featured in “Big Life” magazine.

photo gallery:

[h/t AF]
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H-Fest Aug 4-6

Donations requested

The Silent and Live Auctions are looking for large and small donations for the festival. Contact Lorinne at 633-5555 for details.
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Big Creek Lodge

Breakfast at Big Creek Saturday Aug 5. Breakfasts run from 8-10am, and are $10/plate. Visitors can take a tour of the lodge and enjoy pancakes, ham, eggs and coffee/juice.
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Welch Memorial Golf Tourney 2017

Saturday September 2 at 1 PM – Yellow Pine Country Club
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Harmonica T-shirt Request

I would like to send out a request to everyone who might have a T-shirt from the past harmonica festivals. We are missing the following years: 1994, 2002-2014. It would be a donation to the Community Hall. I am hoping to make the Center more inviting and useful. Any suggestions from anyone are also welcome.
My email is: 75hallker @ att.net My phone: 208-633-6270

Thanks so much, Kathleen Hall – VYPA – Member at Large
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Local Observations:

Monday (July 10) overnight low of 53 degrees, partly cloudy “dirty” sky this morning. A few finches and pine-siskins at the feeder, hear a jay calling. Swallows are busy feeding babies that poke their heads out of the nest boxes. Male calliope and a couple of female or juvenile hummers at the feeders. Big tanker truck and trailer went up main street this morning, than later dust abatement applied to Yellow Pine Ave. Clouds building after lunch time, not as hot and nice little breeze, high of 89 degrees. Got rather muggy and calm towards evening, then mostly clear at dusk, nighthawks calling. Quiet day.

Tuesday (July 11) overnight low of 50 degrees, clear sky this morning, better air quality. A few finches at the feeders. Swallows doing “group feedings”, going from box to box feeding each others chicks (swallow chicks are not quite as big as parents yet.) A few hummers visiting the feeders (we have been changing the sugar water every other day now its hot.) Light traffic and mild temps early afternoon, high of 86 degrees. County road grader and water truck starting on this end of Johnson Creek road. A report there are 3 chicks in the osprey nest, mother defending nest from other ospreys. Solitary male cowbird this evening (no finches around.) Juvenile jay begging to be fed. Seeing a few more chipmunks in the neighborhood (and too many colombian ground squirrels!) Evening grosbeaks around this evening (have not seen them for a while.)

Wednesday (July 12) overnight low of 44 degrees, clear sky this morning, good air quality. Couple of finches at the feeder, can hear a grosbeak, robin and jay calling. A report of fresh bear poop close to the intersection coming into the village. A report that the transfer station is not only full, but overflowing and a pile of debris outside the building. Quite warm today and into the evening, high of 90 degrees. Heard an olive-sided flycatcher then at dusk a nighthawk, and one female hummingbird at the feeder. Very clear at midnight, sparkly stars.

Thursday (July 13) overnight low of 46 degrees, clear sky this morning, good air quality. A few finches at the feeder, heard a grosbeak, a robin and an olive-sided flycatcher calling. Swallow chicks still growing and begging for food. A bit of traffic early. Rivers are dropping and running just a little above average now. Pretty hot after lunch, some passing clouds. Hot dry afternoon, high of 96 degrees. A couple of hummingbirds visited the feeder. Warm clear evening.

Friday (July 14) overnight low of 48 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning. A couple of finches and an evening grosbeak at the feeders. Swallow chicks crowding at the door hole begging to be fed. Some young swallows have fledged and perching on boxes and power lines. Have not seen any chickadees or nuthatches this summer. Crunchy dry in the forest. High thin clouds moving in before lunch time. Thicker clouds in the early afternoon helped block some sun. Then partly cloudy and hot later in the afternoon, high of 97 degrees. Darker clouds, cooler and breezy early evening. A few hummers visiting the feeders. Mostly clear at dusk. Light traffic today and good air.

Saturday (July 15) overnight low of 52 degrees, clear sky this morning (a little haze to the east.) A few finches at the feeders. Swallow chicks should fledge soon, seeing some young ones out perched on the tops of the bird houses and power lines – begging. (One chick flew off by 2pm.) Young steller jay on the squirrel feeder. Helicopter flew over at 947am (may have been for Profile fire?) Clouds coming in by lunch time and a little breezy. Clouds departed, hot sunny afternoon, high of 96 degrees. More clouds later in the afternoon moderated the temps somewhat for a short time, then clear and hot. Increased traffic and dust. Cloudy again late afternoon then cleared off again by early evening. Report of a fire along Profile road, 2 miles from the junction with the Stibnite road. Slight smell of smoke around midnight.

Sunday (July 16) overnight low of 50 degrees, clear sky this morning with smoky haze to the north east, air quality a tad poor. Three swallow chicks still in the box, adults flying around feeding young that are out sitting on box tops (2 chicks left the nest by 11am, last chick left before 5pm.) A few finches and a jay at the feeders. All the squirrel species out this morning, chipmunks, golden mantels, pine squirrels and ground squirrels. Light traffic but raising a lot of dust. Gusty breezes mid-afternoon and clear. Not as hot as its been, but still pretty darn warm, high of 90 degrees. By 630pm a large plume of smoke was visible from the Profile Fire to the north east, updated report that it is 70 acres. A few hummers visiting the feeders, not much bird activity this evening.
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Idaho News:

Probe continues for cause of Tamarack fire that killed 4

Coroner needs more tests to determine cause of death

By Tom Grote for The Star-News July 13, 2017

Fire investigators were back at the scene last Friday of an explosion and fire at Tamarack Resort near Donnelly that killed four Boiseans on June 30.

Investigators sifted through the debris and conducted a number of interviews, Idaho State Fire Marshal Knute Sandahl said Monday.

No determination of the cause of the fire has been reached, Sandahl

continued:
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Fatal fires rare in Valley County

Tamarack victims were first deaths since 2005

By Tom Grote for The Star-News July 13, 2017

The June 30 fire that killed four people at Tamarack Resort was the first fatal fire in Valley County in 12 years, according to records.

Fatal fires are rare in the county, with the previous fatality recorded in McCall in October 2005.

The last fatal fire in the Cascade area was in 2005 and the previous fatal fire in the Donnelly area was in 2003, according to the records of fire districts serving those towns and surrounding areas.

The four people killed in the Tamarack Resort fire equaled the number of victims of a Christmas Week fire near Lake Cascade in 1998.

Here is a review of those previous fires that results in deaths.

continued:
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State fire marshal on deadly Tamarack cabin fire: ‘I want to get answers for the family’

by KBOI News Staff Friday, July 14th 2017


(KBOI Staff Photo)

Donnelly, Idaho (KBOI) — Fire investigators are continuing to try and figure out what caused a deadly fire that ultimately killed four people at a cabin at Tamarack Resort.

Idaho state fire marshal Knute Sandahl told KBOI 2News on Friday that investigators still have a long ways to go.

“There’s still a few more pieces to the puzzle,” Sandahl said. “The unfortunate thing is that it’s going to take a lot longer than I would like.”

Sandahl says investigators are focusing their attention on the fireplace.

continued:
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Cascade council to study disbanding police force

Members want to see how alternative would work

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 13, 2017

The Cascade City Council on Monday took the first step toward what could be disbanding the Cascade Police Department and contracting with the Valley County Sheriff’s Office.

The council voted to split with Valley County the $2,500 cost of hiring a consultant to negotiate a preliminary contract for policing services within city limits.

The decision does not commit the city to a contract, but will allow council members to see specific terms of an agreement.

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Six people in the hospital following McCall crash

by KBOI News Staff Thursday, July 13th 2017

McCall, Idaho (KBOI) — Six people are in the hospital after a crash on Eastside Drive in McCall.

Idaho State Police says Kyle Petersen, 27, was driving in a 1991 Ford Bronco when he failed to negotiate a curve and rolled several times.

Petersen and his passenger, 32-year-old Donna Contreras, were both transported to the ambulance along with four juveniles.

Police say the four juveniles and Contreras were wearing seat belts, but it is unknown at this time if Petersen was as well.

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Valley County gets funds for emergency food, shelter

The Star-News July 13, 2017

Valley County has been awarded $2,961 to supplement emergency food and shelter programs in the county.

The funds were provided through the Department of Homeland Security Federal Emergency Management Agency under the Emergency Food and Shelter National Board Program

Public or private voluntary agencies in Valley County interested in applying for funds should contact Marilyn Arp, Local Board Chair, at 634-5833 or P.O. Box 228, McCall, ID 83638. The deadline for applications is Friday, July 21.

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Brutal winter’s impact still being felt in some Idaho towns

More water, fewer fish, less cash for river towns

KIVI TV Jul 13, 2017

“Snowpocalypse 2017” may feel like a distant memory, but anglers and businesses that cater to them are still feeling the effects.

The swollen rivers resulting from the melting snow made the migration from the Pacific Ocean to Idaho difficult for Chinook salmon. This year’s salmon return is less than half of the 10-year average.

… A limited season was allowed on the Little Salmon River and a very early season gave anglers on the Clearwater a meager opportunity that yielded very few fish. For the first time in many years there will be no season on the South Fork Salmon River outside of Cascade or the Upper Salmon River in Lemhi and Custer Counties.

full story:
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Plane that took off from McCall crashes in eastern Oregon

by KBOI News Staff Tuesday, July 11th 2017

Baker City, Ore., (KBOI) — A pilot and his passenger escaped serious injuries after their small plane crashed near the Baker City Airport over the weekend.

The Baker County Sheriff’s Office says a plane that had taken off from McCall and was headed to Baker City landed in a field east of the runway after its engine failed.

The pilot, Peter Taylor of Red Bluff, Calif., suffered a small cut above his right hand — the only reported injury.

The crash remains under investigation.

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Officials may know where missing man is, but can’t get to him

KTVB July 10, 2017

Idaho County – Sheriff’s officials believe they have found the area along Highway 95 where they believe a 54-year-old Boise man and his vehicle went into the Salmon River.

Relatives and the Idaho County Sheriff’s Office have been looking for John “Randy” French, who has not been seen or heard from since he went on a fishing trip June 29 in the Riggins area in Idaho County.

On Sunday, the sheriff’s office received a report from a citizen that the license plate for French’s vehicle had been found, and there was evidence that the vehicle went into the river near milepost 201.5 on Highway 95.

continued:
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2 injured in Muldoon UTV rollover

July 10, 2017 IME

A man and woman from Bellevue were flown to Portneuf Medical Center in Pocatello after crashing a utility task vehicle off of the side of Muldoon Canyon Road near Bellevue on Sunday.

According to Blaine County Sheriff’s Patrol Capt. Curtis Miller, Nikki Swainston, 44, was driving east in a Polaris Razor 800 utility task vehicle, commonly known as a UTV or “side by side,” with Jose Guerrero, 42, in the passenger seat. Miller said that Swainston failed to negotiate a left curve about 11.6 miles east of Bellevue, causing the vehicle to travel off of the right side of the road, go down an embankment and roll onto its passenger side. He said Swainston was likely traveling too fast for the road.

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Pocatello man drowns in Snake River rafting accident

Local News 8 – Jul 10, 2017

Alpine, Wyo. (KIFI/KIDK) – A 48-year-old Pocatello man died Saturday after he was thrown from a raft on the Snake River. The accident happened about 11:38 a.m. Saturday.

Lincoln County, Wyoming Sheriff’s Captain Brian Andrews said Christopher Chapman, 48, was thrown out of a raft that flipped over in the Snake River Canyon near Alpine. The rest of the rafting party made it to shore safely.

Chapman was pulled into another raft that was floating the river behind. The rafters took him to Sheep Gulch. They began to administer CPR, but could not revive him. He was declared dead at the scene.

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Idaho Power worker says water bottle almost started fire inside truck

by KBOI News Staff Friday, July 14th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Go ahead and file this under “didn’t think of that.”

Idaho Power has shared a video story of one of its workers that recently noticed a potential fire hazard from inside an Idaho Power truck during a lunch break.

“I happened to notice some smoke out of the corner of my eye, and looked over and noticed that light was being refracted through a water bottle and was starting to catch the seat on fire,” said Dioni Amuchastegui, a stations battery technician for the power company.

Employees posted a video to the company’s YouTube channel to recreate the potentially dangerous situation and even recorded a blazing temperature of 213 degrees.

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Blaze caused by fireworks destroys Pocatello home

Associated Press, KTVB July 14, 2017

Pocatello, Idaho (AP) – Authorities say a man setting off aerial fireworks in eastern Idaho while a neighbor screamed at him to stop ignited a brushfire that destroyed one home and damaged another.

Pocatello Fire Department Captain Nick Christensen tells the Idaho State Journal that firefighters responded to the blaze at about 10 p.m. Thursday and had it extinguished at about 1:30 a.m. Friday.

Authorities say the fire started when a fireworks mortar ignited dry grass that quickly spread across a ravine and then to a street with homes.

Authorities say that about 15 homes were evacuated but reported no injuries. Damage estimates were unavailable.

Police say they know the identity of the man lighting fireworks but are not releasing his name. Pocatello Mayor Brian Blad says the city intends to bring charges.

source:

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Idaho man apologizes for blaze started by illegal fireworks

7/15/17 AP

Pocatello, Idaho — An eastern Idaho man is apologizing for setting off illegal aerial fireworks that caused a brush fire that burned down a neighbor’s home and damaged another.

John Woods of Pocatello told the Idaho State Journal in a story on Saturday that he caused the Thursday fire.

“I lit off five fireworks and I think the fourth one was a bad deal,” he said. “I burnt people’s houses down, and I don’t know what else to say except I’m sorry.”

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Bonneville County Weed Control uses insects to stop invasive weed

Michaela Leung Jul 12, 2017 KIVI TV

According to Bonneville County Weed Control, the Yellow Starthistle has already taken over millions of acres in California.

This weed chokes out the grass that wildlife depend on and the needles in the weeds can cause Chewing Disease in animals.

The county has come up with a unique solution. They have brought in the Hairy Weevil. The county says the bugs will not be a problem for other plants and animals in the area.

“They shipped us in some insects that only eat Yellow Starthistle. If for some reason all these Yellow Starthistle disappear the bug would go away. They will not eat anything else. And hopefully they will start suppressing the spread,” says Jeffrey Pettingill, Superintendent for Bonneville County Weed Control.

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Mosquito traps in Ada County test positive for West Nile

by KBOI News Staff Friday, July 14th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Two mosquito traps in Ada County have tested positive for West Nile according to the Ada County Mosquito Abatement District.

This is the first time this year West Nile has been found in Ada County this year.

“With the historic flooding we saw this spring, this unfortunately was something we were anticipating this year,” said Commissioner Dave Case. “When we have positive results like this, our Mosquito Abatement District addresses it immediately. We will continue to monitor these locations, in addition to our regular treatment efforts throughout all of Ada County.”

The areas that tested positive were in Kuna near Indian Creek and Valley Heights drive between Cloverdale and Five Mile.

continued (w/tips to elimiate mosquitoes):
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Idaho, western state farmers battling ‘significantly high’ Mormon cricket populations

by Rebecca Boone Associated Press Thursday, July 13th 2017

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Farmers in the U.S. West face a creepy scourge every eight years or so: Swarms of ravenous insects that can decimate crops and cause slippery, bug-slick car crashes as they march across highways and roads.

Experts say this year could be a banner one for Mormon crickets – 3-inch-long bugs named after the Mormon pioneers who moved West and learned firsthand the insect’s devastating effect on forage and grain fields.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal Plant Health Inspection Service reports “significantly higher Mormon cricket populations” on federal land in southwestern Idaho, agency spokeswoman Abbey Powell wrote in an email to The Associated Press.

“There isn’t a clear explanation why populations are so much higher this year,” Powell wrote. “We know that populations are cyclical. … In Idaho, in a few locations, we have seen populations as high as 70 per square yard.”

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Fire Season:

Homeowners in Boise prepare to fight wildfires

Michael Sevren Jul 12, 2017 KIVI TV

Boise, Idaho – Homeowners are learning how to protect their property from wildfires. On Wednesday local firefighters and Zamzows hosted a class for families who live in the wildland-urban interface. An area where the city meets the open range. They learned how to come up with an evacuation plan, make survivable space and firewise landscaping. Firefighters say planting different types of vegetation in three different zones around your home can prevent a wildfire from reaching it.

“You also have the ‘no area’ around the home which is those first immediate five feet you don’t want to plant anything in that area and so if you see something live a fuel break like how we use bulldozers on fires that’s essentially what your landscape is a fuel break for that wildfire,” said Keri Steneck of the Boise District BLM.

Firefighters say planting native vegetation and clearing away dead plants can also lower the risk of a fire reaching your home.

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Local ranchers, farmers provide initial attack efforts during fire season

Stephanie Hale-Lopez Jul 13, 2017 KIVI TV

Boise – This fire season, it’s not just firefighters who are fighting flames, it’s ranchers and farmers, too. Known as the Rangeland Fire Protection Association — or RFPAs — they’re the not-so-secret weapon when it comes to protecting private land.

Ranchers and farmers rely on the land for their livelihood, which means helping to protect it just makes sense. In fact, more than 300 of them have joined one of the nine RFPA groups across the state.

“Because they are on the ground, living and working where these fires are happening, they can get to the fires more quickly,” said Emily Callihan, Public Information Officer for the Idaho Department of Lands.

continued:
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290 acre brush fire burning west of Kuna 80 percent contained

by KBOI News Staff Thursday, July 13th 2017


(Photo courtesy Ada County Sheriff)

Kuna, Idaho (KBOI) — A brush fire is burning on Black Cat and King Roads, just west of Kuna.

The BLM says the Murphy Lane fire is 290 acres and is burning grass and brush near Kuna Butte.

Kuna Fire and BLM are responding, and dispatch tells KBOI 2News that resources are still working to get on scene. The call for the fire came in at 2:56 p.m. Thursday.

The fire has also spread to Kuna Cave Road, and people are urged to avoid the area.

… The fire is now 80% contained, and full containment is expected by 11:00 Thursday night.

full story:
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Firefighters tackle early morning brush fire in Eagle

by KBOI News Staff Saturday, July 15th 2017


The Eagle Fire Department says the brush fire was reported near north of Beacon Light and Willow Creek. (Eagle Fire)

Eagle, Idaho (KBOI) — Firefighters were called out to an early morning brush fire in Eagle Saturday.

The Eagle Fire Department says the brush fire was reported near north of Beacon Light and Willow Creek. It was reportedly at about 20 acres.

There’s no word yet on a cause, or containment at this time.

source:
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Early morning fire burns 30 acres in Eagle

KTVB July 15, 2017

Eagle – A brush fire that broke out early Saturday morning in the area of Willow Creek Road and Knob Hill Court is under investigation.

The fire burned approximately 30 acres, and is now contained.

The fire threatened structures for a short time, but an Ada County dispatcher says it did not damage any homes.

Someone who spotted the fire called it in at 4:49 a.m. Saturday. Crews from the Eagle, Meridian, Star and Boise fire departments responded.

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Lightning ignites fires to north, south

July 10, 2017 IME

Fire season in the area has begun.

Eighteen firefighters responded to a lightning-caused fire reported in the Yankee Fork drainage Sunday. According to a news release from the Salmon-Challis National Forest, the Milk Fire, about eight miles north of the Yankee Fork Work Center, east of the Custer Lookout, was reported to have burned 10 acres by Monday.

A lightning-caused three-acre fire was reported on the forest’s Middle Fork Ranger District near Indian Creek on July 4. According to the Forest Service, it has been extinguished.

The lightning-caused Antelope Fire by this morning had burned about 2,000 acres of grass and brush on BLM land about five miles south of Shoshone. However, high winds fueled the fire today and the blaze was last estimated to have burned more than 4,000 acres of land. Highway 93 south of Shoshone was closed this afternoon because of the fire and efforts to slow its spread.

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Evacuations in place as 40,000-acre fire near Bruneau Dunes spreading at ‘alarming speed’

by Kelsey Anderson & KBOI News Staff Monday, July 10th 2017

Bruneau, Idaho (KBOI) — About 40,000 acres have burned near the Bruneau Dunes State Park, and evacuations are in place, according to the Twin Falls Bureau of Land Management.

The Loveridge Fire started Sunday, near the Sailor Cap Bombing Range. A spokeswoman for the Twin Falls BLM tells KBOI 2News, the blaze started around 4:30 p.m. Sunday and is spreading at an “alarming speed.”

We’re told more resources from throughout the state will be pouring in today to help fight these flames. Structures are threatened.

The state park is now closed.

There’s no estimated contain or control time for the fire. There’s no determined cause yet.

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Highway 93 back open after fast-moving brush fire

KTVB July 10, 2017

U.S. Highway 93 about 5 miles south of Shoshone was back open Monday evening – but that drivers should expect delays – after being closed in both directions because of a fast-moving brush fire.

The Bureau of Land Management says the Antelope Fire is being fueled by 25 mph wind gusts.

Seven air tankers are dropping retardant on the fire. Other resources battling the blaze include 8 engines, one dozer and four overhead.

The fire was started by lightning Sunday.

continued:
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Meadow Creek Fire burns 200 acres near I-84

by KBOI News Staff Monday, July 10th 2017

The Bureau of Land Management says a brush fire two miles east of I-84 mile marker 256 is showing active fire behavior.

The fire has already grown to 200 acres, and smoke jumpers are en route.

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Twin Falls District BLM Fire Update

July 11, 2017

Meadow Creek Fire

* Located two miles east of I84, mile maker 256
* Size: 493 acres
* Contain: 7/12/2017 at 6 p.m.
* Control: 7/14/2017 at 6 p.m.
* Resources: Raft River Rural Fire Department, smoke jumpers, five engines, two type two hand crews, two overhead
* Fuel type: grass, brush, juniper
* Fire behavior: smoldering and creeping
* Structures threatened: no
* Cause: undetermined
Size change due to more accurate mapping. Resources are improving containment lines and mopping up hotspots.

Loveridge Fire (Final Update)

* Located eight miles southeast of Bruneau, BLM land
* Size: 38,645 acres
* Contain: 7/10/2017 at 6 p.m.
* Control: 7/11/2017 at 8 p.m.
* Resources: nine engines, two overhead, two dozers, one water tender
* Fuel type: grass and brush
* Fire behavior: none
* Structures threatened: no
* Cause: lightning

Antelope Fire

* Located approximately 5 miles south of Shoshone
* Size: 29,500 acres
* Contain: estimated 7/12/2017 at 8 p.m.
* Control: estimated 7/13/2017 at 8 p.m.
* Resources: Notch Butte Rangeland Protection Association, ten engines (Twin Falls District BLM and Sawtooth National Forest), three dozers, three overhead, one water tender
* Fuel type: grass and brush
* Fire behavior: smoldering
* Structures threatened: no
* Cause: lightning

Resources continue to improve containment lines and mopping up hotspots.

For More Information, Kelsey Brizendine, Fire Information and Prevention Officer, kbrizendine@blm.gov 208-308-5991

Idaho Wildfires visit http://www.IdahoFireInfo.com
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Crews fight lightning caused fire in Arbon Valley

Local News 8 – Jul 14, 2017

Ft. Hall, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Ft. Hall firefighters are working to contain the Rattlesnake fire.

The fire began at around 4 p.m. Thursday in the Arbon Valley area. It was believed to be started by lightning.

It was estimated at about 155 acres Friday morning. There was no prediction as to when it would be contained or controlled.

The Ft. Hall Fire Department is managing the fire, but has released no information.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service have committed one dozer, three engines and one 10-man hand crew to help fight the fire. Other fire agencies have also been working on that fire.

Earlier Thursday, the 10 acre Trail Creek fire was contained on Ft. Hall land. It is forecast to be controlled by 8 p.m. Friday.

source:
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Smokejumpers brought in to help fight brush fire near Inkom

Containment of both fires expected Sunday night

Chris Oswalt Jul 16, 2017 Local News 8

Inkom, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Bureau of Land Management said Sunday afternoon that it expects to have two brush fires burning outside of Inkom contained by evening.

The two lightning-caused fires are burning on BLM land in the Blackrock Canyon area north of Inkom. They are being called Caddy Canyon 1 and Caddy Canyon 2.

Caddy Canyon 1:
113 acres
Six engines and air attack currently being used
Estimated containment 7 p.m. Sunday

Caddy Canyon 2:
25 acres
Smokejumpers and hand crews were diverted to Caddy Canyon 1 fire
Estimated containment at 3 p.m. Sunday with full control by 8 p.m. Sunday

The BLM says neither fire is threatening any homes or property.

source:
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Lightning to blame for 18 new wildfires in Idaho

by Brian Morrin Saturday, July 15th 2017


Moose Creek wildfire caused by lightning

Nez Perce – Clear Water National Forests, Idaho — Tonight, fire fighters are battling eighteen lightning caused fires in the Nez Perce, Clearwater National Forests.

The fires broke out late Friday (7/14/2017) afternoon. Thunderstorms rolling through the area are believed to be the culprit.

The fires are burning in the Lochsa, Powell, Moose Creek and Red River Ranger Districts.

The U.S. Forest Service says its receiving reports of other fires that haven’t been confirmed yet.

source:
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Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests Fire Update

July 16, 2017

Several lightning-caused starts have been detected across the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests due to a late afternoon isolated thunderstorm on July 14, 2017.

Currently, 18 fires have been detected on the Lochsa/Powell, Moose Creek, and Red River Ranger Districts with additional possible starts continuing to be reported. Weather advisories are currently in effect and storm cells are expected to cross the area this afternoon, with lightning, wind, sporadic rain and possible hail.

Forest and Fire Management Staff considered the long-term effects of smoke in their decision to manage fires in the wilderness and roadless areas. “We are very sensitive to health impacts due to wildfire smoke and take measures to reduce the long duration fires when we can,” said Cheryl Probert, Forest Supervisor. Fire managers are working with air quality specialists to monitor smoke and potential impacts to communities. In addition to smoke impacts, values at risk, availability of resources, and location were considered in determining suppression actions of fires not threatening communities.

Firefighter and public safety is the number one priority in wildland fire management and emergency response. Fire activity across the nation has significantly increased and the National Preparedness Level (PL) is currently 4. PL 4 means that three or more Geographic Areas are experiencing wildland fire incidents requiring Type 1 and 2 Incident Management Teams. Competition exists for resources between Geographic Areas. Nationally, 60% of Type 1 and 2 Incident Management Teams and crews are committed to wildland fire incidents.

Current fire status for fires by district:

Lochsa/Powell:

Fires currently staffed on the Lochsa/Powell District include the Parachute-0.25 acres approximately 4 miles northeast of Powell, Storm–0.25 acres, Cherokee – 3 acres, Twin #322–0.25 acres, and Round Top 1–0.5 acres all located approximately 5 miles south of Lolo Pass, Checkerboard–5.25 acres located near the Idaho/Montana border approximately 5 miles east of Lolo Pass, Pappoose–5-7 acres located approximately 4 miles northwest of Powell, and Brushy– 15 acres, located north of Brushy Fork about 4 miles south of Lolo Pass.

The fires on the Lochsa/Powell Ranger District with the exception of the Hidden and Maud fires are located in the area referenced as the checkerboard with adjacent privately owned tracts of land.

The Hidden fire (approximately 1 acre) is located in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness, currently unstaffed and is being managed for resource benefits. The Maud fire (approximately .25 acres) located in a roadless area south of Beaver Ridge is also being managed for resource benefits and is currently unstaffed.

For more information on current fire status or closures for public safety due to wildfire, please call (208) 942-3113.

Moose Creek Ranger District:

Moose Creek 1 fire is 7 acres and is .25 miles east and southeast of Moose Creek Ranger Station. Moose Creek 2 and 3 fires have merged and are estimated to be 2 acres located southwest of the Moose Creek Runway. The Mink Peak fire is on Mink Peak and is approximately .5 acres in size. The Lone Pine fire is .25 miles west of Lone Pine Point in Marten Creek and is .5 acres in size. The Lone Pine fires is 1.5 miles south of the Three Links bridges. The Elbow Bend fire is one mile south of Roll Point and 1.8 miles northeast of Elbow Bend. The fire is located within the 2015 Roll fire perimeter.

All wilderness fires were started by lightning and will be managed for resource benefits.

For more information on current fire status or closures for public safety due to wildfire, please call (208) 926-4258.

Red River Ranger District:

Fires currently being managed for resource benefits on the Red River Ranger District, are located approximately 14 miles east of Red River Ranger Station. The Ladder fire is approximately 2 acres, Rattlesnake Point fire is approximately 2 acres, and the Bleak fire, approximately 10 acres located 3.5 miles southwest of Dry Saddle near the Magruder Road.

For more information on current fire status or closures for public safety due to wildfire, please call (208) 842-2245.

Fire and closure information will be posted on the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests website at http://www.fs.usda.gov/nezperceclearwater

maps:

see also: http://www.idahofireinfo.com/
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Debate over use of jumbo bomber as wildfires rage in West

By Keith Ridler – 7/15/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — A giant aircraft that can fly high above oceans on intercontinental flights instead jets in low and slow over a flaming forest, trailing a long plume that settles on the ground and creates a wildfire-stopping barrier.

The operators of the Boeing 747 converted from a passenger jet into a firefighting air tanker say it has proven itself battling forest fires in countries outside the U.S. The modifications allow it to drop more than 19,000 gallons (72,000 liters) of a flame-squelching combination of ammonium phosphate and sulfate mixed with water that comes billowing out in a red-colored line.

“We just happen to be the biggest, fastest firetruck in the air,” said Jim Wheeler, CEO of Global SuperTanker Services.

continued:
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NFIC

July 14, 2017

Many western states continue to experience high fire activity. Seven new large fires were reported as well as seven contained. Firefighters continue to work toward their suppression goals.

When you work and play in our precious forests and rangelands, it’s critical for you to be fire safe. Remember to have spark arresters on equipment and vehicles like chainsaws, motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles. Modern exhaust systems can easily ignite vegetation, so drive and park in designated areas, and avoid dry brush and grass. Taking these simple steps can keep you, and our natural resources, from going up in smoke.

States currently reporting large fires:

Alaska (14)
Arizona (5)
California (7)
Colorado (5)
Idaho (2)
Louisiana (1)
Montana (5)
Nevada (5)
New Mexico (1)
North Dakota (1)
Oregon (5)
Utah (1)
Washington (1)
Wyoming (1)

more info:
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Public Lands:

Midas Gold Geophysical Investigation Update

USDA Forest Service 7/12/2017

Dear Interested Party,

The Forest Service is seeking scoping comments for the proposed Plan of Operations for Geophysical Investigation on the Krassel Ranger District of the Payette National Forest. Activities include the construction of 62 drill pads, access to drill pads, drilling, and drill site reclamation in the Stibnite area east of Yellow Pine, Idaho. The project area is located on National Forest System lands located within sections 2, 3, 11, 14, 15, 16, 21, 24, Township 18 North, Range 9 East, Boise Meridian, Valley County, Idaho The scoping document provides more detailed information about the project and can be found along with the Plan of Operations as submitted by Midas Gold Idaho, Inc. on the project’s webpage at http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=52065.

The Forest Service is contacting interested individuals, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent comments. To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by August 14, 2017, and make your comments as specific as possible.

The project webpage provides you tools to engage this process as you wish. From “Get Connected” on the right hand side of the page, use the “Comment/Object on project” link to access a simple webform to submit your comments on this project. The “Public Comment/Objection Reading Room” are the published comments received on this project. Click on “Subscribe to Email Updates” and enter your email address if you wish to receive electronic communication about this project.

Webform submission of comments is preferred but written comments concerning this project will also be accepted. Comments for the project may be submitted to Clint Hughes, 500 North Mission, Building 2, McCall Idaho 83638.

Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection and will be released in their entirety if requested pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act. Comments received in response to this request will also be available for public inspection on the “Public Comment Reading Room” on the project webpage http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=52065. Only those who subscribe to Email Updates or submit scoping comments will receive further communication about this project.

For further information on this project, please contact Clint Hughes, Geologist, 208-634-0756 or cehughes02@fs.fed.us.

Sincerely,
Anthony B. Botello
Krassel District Ranger
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Feds partner to reduce hazardous fuels around Lake Cascade

Boise, Idaho, July 10, 2017

The Cascade Ranger District of the Boise National Forest, in partnership with the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) are planning fuel treatments to mechanically reduce the amount of hazardous fuels on Reclamation lands next to private property around Lake Cascade.

“This project has multiple benefits,” said Jim Bishop, Fuels Assistant Fire Management Officer, Cascade Ranger District. “Besides reducing the fuel load, mulching along these areas will improve the forest’s ability to withstand wildfire and in the long term, improve wildlife habitat by generating new growth.”

A track-mounted mechanical mulching (mastication) machine will use a rotating drum to shred vegetation, including standing trees to clear the sites and decrease risks from wildfire.

The Boise National Forest road crew and District employees will begin July 10, 2017, in the following areas:

* Unit #1 Tucker Road – 28 acres. Located south of Roseberry Road off Tucker Road in T-16N R-3E Section 16, approximately 2 miles west of Donnelly, Idaho.

* Unit #2 Dawn Drive – 77 acres. Located south of Roseberry Road and east of Dawn Drive in T-16N R-3E Section 15, approximately 2 miles southwest of Donnelly, Idaho.

For public and employee safety, signs will be posted on roads and access points leading into the project area to notify them that operations are in progress.

Residents adjacent to the project area will be notified before implementation. Your cooperation and patience during this period are appreciated.

Linda Steinhaus
Public Affairs
Boise National Forest
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Some mountain roads could be closed for years after devastating spring runoff

KTVB July 11, 2017


(Photo: Kelton Hatch/Idaho Fish & Game)

Fairfield – Heavy winter snow and the resulting spring runoff caused such severe damage to some mountain roads, it could be years before they are reopened.

Idaho Fish & Game officials said one road – in the Sawtooth National Forest – could be closed for three years or longer.

The heavily damaged road is an unpaved eight-mile stretch northwest of Fairfield along the South Fork of the Boise River between Bounds Creek Campground and Baumgartner Campground.

Photos taken by Fish & Game conservation educator Kelton Hatch shows a large section of the road near Bounds Creek Campground completely washed out by the river.

Officials advised sportsman that some roads throughout Idaho’s mountains will remain closed through hunting season because of damage. Anyone looking to head into the mountains is urged to check with the local Forest Service or Bureau of Land Management offices to get updated information on campground closures, road conditions and fire danger.

source:
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Forest Supervisor issues Decision on South Pioneer Fire Salvage and Reforestation Environmental Assessment

Boise, Idaho, July 11, 2017
Boise National Forest Supervisor Cecilia Seesholtz signed the Decision Notice and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the South Pioneer Fire Salvage and Reforestation Project July 10, 2017, selecting Alternative B (Proposed Action) with modifications. Modifications made in the Decision Notice were in response to a changed condition caused by high spring flows and runoff in June that resulted in damage to NFS road 312 and loss of corresponding vehicle access north of the damaged road. Changes are discussed in detail in the Decision Notice and FONSI posted on the project website: https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=50694

Implementing Alternative B, as modified in the July 10, 2017, Decision Notice/FONSI, will:

* Reduce hazard trees along roads and trails on about 7847 acres through a combination of treatments including salvage and fell and leave

* Salvage additional dead trees on 3,971 acres

* Decommission 4.4 miles of unauthorized routes causing resource damage

* Re-establish forested conditions by planting trees on 12,571 acres, naturally regenerating 4,703 acres

* Restore whitebark pine on 294 acres

* Restore riparian vegetation on 37 acres

“We know that when we engage our stakeholders throughout the planning phase of a project, we make better decisions,” said Brant Petersen, Idaho City District Ranger. “We regularly met with our local collaborative group, the Boise Forest Coalition, tribal and timber industry representatives; County commissioners; state agencies and other interested stakeholders. A 30-day comment period on the Environmental Assessment was included in the extensive public involvement efforts implemented from October 2016 through June 2017. These efforts helped inform the development of the Proposed Action and understand the effects of implementing actions included in the decision.”

District Rangers from both the Idaho City and Lowman Ranger Districts hosted field trips with a wide range of people to discuss the proposed action and the Forest’s intent to request an Emergency Situation Determination (ESD). During the analysis process for Environmental Assessment preparation, Forest representatives met formally and informally with groups to discuss the project when requested and participated in public forums to share presentations about the Project. “We truly appreciate the hard work and thoughtful collaboration our partners put into helping us developing this project,” said Petersen.

An Emergency Situation Determination is defined at 36 CFR 218.21(b) as: A situation on National Forest System (NFS) lands for which immediate implementation of a decision is necessary to achieve one or more of the following:

1) Relief from hazards threatening human health and safety

2) Mitigation of threats to natural resources on NFS or adjacent lands

3) Avoiding a loss of commodity value sufficient to jeopardize the agency’s ability to accomplish project objectives directly related to resource protection or restoration.

Authority to authorize an ESD rests solely with the Chief and Associate Chief of the Forest Service. Current regulations at 36 CFR 218.21(d) identify that when an emergency situation exists with respect to all or part of a proposed project, the proposed action shall not be subject to the predecisional review (objection) process and may be implemented immediately following notification of the decision.

“Throughout the planning process, we discussed with stakeholders the timing of hazard tree removal and salvage harvest and how critical it is to achieving the purpose and need for the South Pioneer Project, “ said Cecilia Seesholtz, Forest Supervisor of the Boise National Forest. “The combination of my Decision and approval of the ESD by the Chief of the Forest Service May 31, 2017, allows immediate implementation.”

“Doing the work immediately this field season recovers the greatest wood product value from hazard and dead trees salvaged before deterioration occurs. It is essential to recover this value so we can accomplish project objectives for hazard tree treatments; watershed improvements; and forest restoration, including reforestation.”

“The South Pioneer Project is known for its high concentration recreation use year-round,” said Seesholtz. “Operations will reduce risks and improve public access to the yurts, operated by Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation, multiple motorized and non-motorized winter and summer trails and trailheads and popular campgrounds along Idaho State Highway 21.”

With the ESD approval, the Forest is moving forward with project implementation, including the award of hazard and dead tree salvage sale contracts, following issuance of the South Pioneer Project Decision Notice/FONSI signed July 10, 2017, and notifying stakeholders of the decision through this news release and other venues.

For more information visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/boise/home/?cid=fseprd530485
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Cattle grazing suspended on 2 central Idaho allotments

By Keith Ridler – 7/14/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — An environmental group has reached a settlement in a lawsuit against the U.S Forest Service that suspends cattle grazing in a central Idaho area with salmon spawning habitat and that includes the White Clouds Wilderness.

The agreement between Hailey, Idaho,-based Western Watersheds Project and the Forest Service late last week removes cattle from portions of the East Fork of the Salmon River in the Sawtooth National Recreation Area.

The lawsuit filed in October contended the Forest Service broke environmental laws on two grazing allotments by issuing permits to livestock growers with a history of violating restrictions.

The agreement eliminates livestock on the two allotments in 2017 and 2018 and prevents their return until the area meets environmental standards set for the recovery of salmon, steelhead and bull trout.

source:
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Senior Pass Price Skyrocketing

Western Slope No Fee Coalition July 13, 2017

Dear Public Lands Supporter

The National Park Service says the effective date for an 800% increase in the price of a lifetime Senior Pass has been set for August 28, not October 1 as previously announced. ACT NOW!

Below is the article we issued when the increase was first approved, updated with new developments.

continued:
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USFS Regional Intermountain News

Regional Spotlight
Sage-Grouse
Forest News
About Us

June 28 Newsletter now online here:
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Zinke recommends no changes to Idaho, Washington monuments

By Nicholas K. Geranios – 7/13/17 AP

Craters of the Moon National Monument in Idaho and the Hanford Reach National Monument in Washington state are no longer under review for possible modification, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke said Thursday.

The monuments were among 27 covered by President Donald Trump’s April executive order calling for a review of monuments created since 1996.

Thursday’s announcement that no changes will be made to the two monuments came after public comments and conversations with stakeholders, Zinke said.

continued:
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Letter to Share:

So You Want To Be A Rehabber?

A day in the life – and ramblings – of a wildlife rehabilitator. From Dory:

Wake up in the morning after a sleepless night trying to figure out medication changes, nipple changes, diet changes, and stressing about the grant you worked on for TWO DAYS only to have it disappear…POOF…into thin air and you can’t retrieve it anywhere on your computer. You head out to the barn at 7:45 with a cup of Keurig coffee in your hand to feed eighteen (18) babies – four of which need special attention, i.e., meds and tube feeding. Your intern – who you wonder how in the world did I ever do this last year on my own? – ends up getting kicked on her already bruised and battered legs while holding fawns while I stick the tube down their throat and put antibiotic ointment in eyes we HOPE will come back from blindness – and gets crapped on all while trying to keep legs from kicking us and injuring themselves. We then scoop and scrape up poop and pee and put down fresh shavings and straw, cut up mounds of apples and other produce, clean the containers for the produce and water, clean and refill bottles with the appropriate formulas for each baby, empty – scrub – and refill pools, and pick fresh browse to hang in the pens/enclosures. We head to our respective “domiciles” – me to the house to check emails and FB – feed my four dogs and two cats and myself – and the intern to clean herself up and make some breakfast. It is now nearly 11:00 AM. Checking email and…POOF…again. The computer tells me I have a virus and all credit cards and other information is compromised. Send a text to genius neighbor asking for assistance. Nearly have the dogs and cats fed and a call comes in re. a fawn next to a road “with a broken back leg”…jump in the truck (with two dogs in the back seat), honk for the intern, and head out to find the fawn as per the directions given over the phone (the people that found it had to leave the area). Spend nearly two hours and 1/4 tank of gas scouring back roads and finally realize we were given wrong directions. Call the folks back – get it straightened out. Finally locate the fawn and it has a broken front leg – with exposed bone – and a broken back. Put fawn in the crate in the box of the truck. Stare into his beautiful eyes and realize there is nothing that can be done. Call vet and let them know we are coming in to have a fawn euthanized. Arrive at vet and we are put in a room to wait for a vet to come in to administer the “blue juice.” Keep sending intern out to the truck to check on my pups that are waiting in the heat. Intern and I start cracking jokes about the fawn’s beautiful eyelashes and how we should transplant them to one of our fawns that is missing her eyelashes…and her eye. Humor is a good coping mechanism. The vet finally comes in and puts the little guy out of his suffering. I’m covered in blood and stink. So what better time to stop in at the feed store and purchase 18 gauge needles we need to administer antibiotics to the special needs fawns at home? Blood and all, we head to the feed store and get the needles and the pine shavings we realize we are out of. A stop at the coffee drive thru – who needs food? – and on our way home to feed the eighteen babes that are late for their mid-day feeding. We get home and genius neighbor is waiting to check out my ailing computer (thanks Don :-) ). Intern runs up to the barn to heat bottles and I head up as soon as the computer issue is figured out. Need a new computer. Head up to the barn to tube feed the two special needs babes, only to discover the bandages on the one have slid down and are doing no good on the wound. Go to plan B and put her in a diaper which will reach high enough to cover the wound…do they make newborn “extra long” diapers? After tube feeding the two babes – and trying and succeeding to give the one a smaller nipple and she actually suckles after many days of tubing – we feed the other fifteen fawns and the elk calf. Bottles refilled and ready to go in the fridge and we realize we forgot to give the two fawns their shot of antibiotics. Catch the fawns…again…and give them their shot. Put out more produce for the night and we head once again to our respective dwellings. It’s now 8:30 PM – I’m still covered in blood and goo – and a shower and a rum & Coke is all I can think of. I remember I haven’t eaten today and pull the dried up Subway sandwich the intern picked up yesterday in town when she did a speed run for supplies for the fawns and I had not had a chance to eat. Slam down the sandwich – make a rum & Coke – and jump in the shower. And, here I am at 9:00 PM. Are you ready to be a rehabber yet? Would I change my life? Absolutely not. I thank God every day for blessing me with my life. Thanks for “listening”…sometimes it’s just good to ramble…


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Critter News:

After spending 9 months alone in mountains, lost dog is home

7/10/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — A lost Boise dog is back home after nine months and a brutal winter alone in the Idaho mountains.

Mo, an elderly Chesapeake Bay Retriever, wandered away from her owners during a hunting trip last September.

Darwin and Cindy Cameron stayed near the tiny hamlet of Horseshoe Bend about 30 miles (48 kilometers) north of Boise for three months looking for Mo. But deep snow and harsh conditions eventually made the search impossible.

Dog rescuer Cheri Glankler took in a starving retriever that had collapsed at a nearby ranch last month, the Idaho Statesman reported. Based on the dog’s initial disheveled appearance, it was clear that she had been living on her own in the wild, Glankler said. She posted photos of the dog on Facebook, and word quickly reached the Camerons that Mo may have been found.

continued (quite a story!):
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Pet talk – Heat stroke in pets

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Jul 7, 2017 – IME

The combination of high temperatures, high humidity and poor ventilation can be fatal to dogs and cats. Dogs and cats do not sweat, as people do. Thus, the cooling benefits of water evaporation from the skin are not available to them. Panting and radiation of heat from the skin surface are their main means of controlling body temperature. If the air temperature and humidity are high and air circulation is reduced, those protective mechanisms are inadequate. Body temperature can then increase dramatically, resulting in collapse and severe shock. Animals not treated promptly may die.

Dogs with short “pushed-in” noses, such as pugs, bulldogs, Pekingese and boxers are especially susceptible to heat stroke, since their restricted breathing doesn’t allow enough air exchange for rapid heat loss.

Heat stroke is an emergency. The goals of therapy are to lower body temperature and treat shock and organ damage that occurs with the hyperthermia. As soon as you realize your pet has heat prostration, remove it from the source of heat and wet it with cool tap water. Wrap the animal in a cool, wet towel and transport it to the veterinary hospital immediately.

continued:
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Pet talk – Allergies in dogs and cats

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt July 14, 2017 – IME

Allergic reactions occur when the immune system reacts to substances called antigens. Antigens are usually proteins. There are four ways that antigens can get into the body: by injection, i.e. a bee sting; by ingestion—think peanut allergies; by inhalation—think ragweed; and by contact—think poison oak or poison ivy. Systemic allergies include urticarial (hives), anaphylaxis and drug allergies.

Anaphylaxis is a severe, life-threatening hypersensitivity reaction. Urticaria, or hives, is acute focal swellings of the skin, which are very itchy. Drug allergies occur when the immune systems reacts adversely against some component of a drug.

Anaphylaxis and urticaria can be caused by many different allergens, including insect venoms, injectable drugs and vaccines and blood transfusions.

In dogs, the target organ for anaphylaxis is the liver and gastrointestinal tract. Vomiting, diarrhea, respiratory distress, collapse, shock and death can occur. In cats, facial itchiness, salivation, difficulty breathing, diarrhea and vomiting may occur.

continued:
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Tips to keep your pet cool during the hot summer months

Michael Sevren Jul 12, 2017 KIVI TV

Garden City, Idaho – Unlike humans, cats and dog don’t sweat and these hot temperatures can be deadly to your four-legged friend. Veterinarians at WestVet say they’re seeing at least one overheated pet a week and some of the cases have been fatal. Heavy panting is one symptom to look out for and doctors say keep an eye out for stumbling and increased body temperature. Heat stroke in pets can happen when they’re are left in hot cars, at home with no air conditioning, and even hiking in the foothills.

“Unfortunately what happens to this patents is all the organs start to fail one at a time, we literally see pretty much every organ fail unless we get to them in time cause they just get heated up too much so it’s serious,” said Dr. Andrea Oncken an Animal Critical Care Specialist with WestVet.

Some tips to keep your pet cool, limit play outside in the middle of the day, make sure your pet has water, and a cool spot in your home for them to relax.

source:
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Cheatgrass can be a health risk for dogs

Jim Duthie, KTVB July 14, 2017

Boise – Whether it’s hiking, camping, or fishing, most of us are spending a lot of time outdoors this time of year, and in most cases, we take our dogs along with us. But there’s something out in those open spaces that you might not have thought about, that could cause injury to your pet.

… We’re talking about the seedheads from a plant that is common throughout southwest Idaho: cheatgrass.

“These get up in between their toes and form these nasty abscesses,” said Dr. Rosenthal. “They get in the ears and cause ear infections. They get in the eyes and cause ulcers in the eyes. And the valley, of course, is full of them.”

full story:
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Canine Water Safety Critical in Rafting Adventures

July 10, 2017 by Janet Juroch – BCC

It is part of Americana to take your dog everywhere, even rafting. Somehow we forget to make sure our dogs are safe and should have a flotation jacket just as people do. Little dogs especially can fall off rafts and they need help in some of our colder and swift waters. Big dogs can be better swimmers but many are not ready for rivers like the fast moving Payette Rivers.

Hunters usually make sure their hunting dogs have a safety vest of florescent orange so their dogs are visible and not mistaken for other wildlife. They can be easily seen. So when riding the water crafts, a safety vest is just as important. Many dogs are taken by the Payette River and never to be found.

A local Garden Valley resident, Lisa Rappleye, lives at Milepost 19 on the Banks-Lowman Road. This is at Danskin Station where rafters can put in or take-out along the Southfork of the Payette. She is well aware of the continuing problem that she encounters with floaters losing their dogs on the river. People come to her house and frantically looking for their dog that got carried away by the waters. She explains that some dogs do end up at her place and they are okay. But there are the ones that are never found. She says, “It is getting really old and I am tired of my day being ruined by the dog owners that realize their dog did not make it.” She wants to get the word out that it is crucial to keep your pets safe in the Payette.

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Wood River Wolf Project enters 10th year

Signs of wolves are few around valley

Greg Moore Jul 7, 2017 – IME

As the Lava Lake Institute for Science & Conservation enters its third season running the Wood River Wolf Project, wolves have either learned to keep a low profile or are mostly gone from the valley altogether.

Project Coordinator Avery Shawler said she and project Field Manager Kris Thoreson have been monitoring wolf presence since April, including placing camera traps ahead of sheep bands as they’ve been trailed into the mountains beginning in late June.

“So far, it’s been a very quiet year,” she said. “We’re getting the sense that the wolves in the Wood River Valley are getting very wary of humans and have decided that sheep just aren’t worth it.”

If so, Shawler said, that would be a mark of success for the wolf project.

continued:
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Fish and Game proposes allowing hunters to bait wolves

Another rule would restrict remote cameras

Greg Moore Jul 14, 2017 IME

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission is considering several changes to hunting rules, including allowing the use of bait to hunt wolves and prohibiting the use of motion-activated remote cameras and electronic communication devices for hunting all big-game animals.

The Department of Fish and Game is seeking public comment on the proposed changes until July 26.

Under current rules, wolves can be killed by hunters when they are attracted to bait set out for black bears, where hunting seasons are open for both black bear and wolf, but big game rules do not allow use of bait specific to hunting wolves. The use of bait for black bear is determined on a game management-unit basis, and baiting is permitted in the hunting units surrounding the Wood River Valley.

Department spokesman Mike Keckler said the department is proposing the rule change in response to requests from hunters who want to use bait for hunting wolves outside of the black bear seasons…

continued:
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Wolf activity, including livestock attack, updated by Washington officials

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review July 14, 2017


Washington officials confirmed a minimum of 20 gray wolf packs in the state at the end of 2016. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife)

A wolf attack on livestock in Ferry County has been confirmed this week by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. Following is the report issued today by the agency detailing that wolf depredation along with updates on other wolf capture, collaring and monitoring efforts.

At least two Washington wolves have been killed in vehicle collisions this season and another was killed to protect woodland caribou.

At least one Washington collared wolf is known to have been legally killed after ranging into Idaho, where gray wolves have been delisted from endangered species protections and can be hunted and trapped in specified seasons.

continued:
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter Second week July 20107

Europe’s Wolves They’re Back
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Idaho camper feels bear’s mouth on foot; Fish and Game closes campgrounds

by KBOI News Staff Saturday, July 15th 2017

Ketchum, Idaho (KBOI) — The Sawtooth National Forest has closed camping along a popular camping destination near Ketchum after a rash of bear activity.

Idaho Fish and Game says the forest has closed all camping along the North Fork Road. The bear activity started Wednesday morning when a bear awoke campers and was later chased off. The next night, Fish and Game says, a camper woke up to feeling pressure on her right foot from the bear’s mouth.

She yelled and the bear ran off.

“She wasn’t injured,” said Fish and Game Conservation Officer Alex Head. “The sleeping bag was not damaged, but it did leave some saliva on the sleeping bag.”

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Black bears active in Teton Valley

Local News 8 – Jul 12, 2017

Tetonia, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – After a flurry of black bear activity in Teton Valley, the Idaho Fish and Game Department is encouraging people to be cautious.

Spokesman Gregg Losinski says Fish and Game personnel trapped a black bear that had begun getting into things at the BYU-Idaho Outdoor Learning Center last week.

At the same time, another black bear was getting into human living space in Tetonia. In one case a bear broke into a home’s basement window. Losinski said the bear apparently went inside the house but was frightened away before causing much more damage.

Department Bear Educator Kyle Garrett has been going door-to-door to remind people how to discourage bears. At one house, the occupants were not home, but he noticed a bear had already paid a visit to the house. (see picture)

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Black bears cute, loveable but also seriously dangerous

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review July 10, 2017

Videos of black bears that circulate online can be hilarious. Bears have personality. They do funny things. But sometimes bears and other wild animals attack people for no clear reason. Don’t ever forget that.

Bear awareness education can go a long way in helping prevent bear attacks, especially keeping clean campsites, hanging food and carrying bear spray.

The following roundup of four recent attacks, including two fatal attacks and one serious attack on a woman at Priest Lake, helps us understand the risks and responsibilities of being in bear country.

continued:
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Utah wildlife officers euthanize bear who bit man’s head

7/11/17 AP

Salt Lake City — Wildlife officials have recently confirmed that a bear was euthanized after biting a man’s head in central Utah.

KSL-TV reports the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources confirmed Monday that a California man was attacked while camping in Desolation Canyon on Fourth of July. The man says he awoke to find a black bear biting the back of his head.

According to Conservation Outreach Section Chief Robin Cahoon, the man suffered relatively minor injuries and drove himself to get medical care.

Wildlife officers say they successfully captured and euthanized the bear involved in the attack.

source:
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Mountain lion crashes through window, lands on sleeping woman

by Sinclair Broadcast Group Thursday, July 13th 2017

A mountain lion crashed through a window in Colusa, California July 4, landing on the bed of a sleeping woman before darting out a back door.

Security footage of the incident shows the mountain lion first colliding with the door of a bowling alley next door.

Confused, the animal turns and sprints towards the apartment building.

continued:
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Antlers growing like weeds on heads of deer, elk, moose

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review July 14, 2017


A bull moose photographed by a trail cam in Stevens County sports a good rack of antlers in early July with six weeks to grow before they harden and the velvet is rubbed off in time for the mating season. (Steve Gilbertson)

Weeds aren’t the only things growing like weeds this summer. Members of the deer family are sprouting antlers that can grow to 30 or 40 pounds, in the case of an elk or moose, in just a few months.

Deer antlers are among the fastest types of tissue growth in mammals.

Each year, the antlers of a buck or bull typically begin growing in April in response to increasing day length after the old rack falls off. They develop fully in four months. The northeastern Washington bull in the photo above is going to be a bruiser during the fall mating season considering it still has six weeks of growing season left.

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WSU convenes first elk-hoof disease meeting

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review July 13, 2017


This limping elk was photographed east of Castle Rock in June. The elk’s left rear hoof is misshapen from hoof rot disease.

Looking for a diagnosis and cure that state wildlife scientists weren’t able to deliver, the 2017 Washington Legislature shifted authority for research on elk hoof disease from the Department of Fish and Wildlife to Washington State University.

The first meeting in the new alignment was held this week, as reported below by Charlie Powell, WSU Veterinary School public Information officer.

continued:
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Endangered pygmy rabbits saved by BLM

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, July 12th 2017


(Photos courtesy BLM)

Some endangered pygmy rabbits are taking a breath of fresh air after Oregon Bureau of Land Management saved them.

The rabbits were on a state managed breeding ground that was swept by fire in late June. The fire burned nearly 38,000 acres. The BLM says dozens of rabbits were saved.

“Everybody was really excited to be a part of that,” said Parrish of the seven-member BLM team.

The rabbits rely on the sagebrush, but that was burned away. In some places the ground was still warm to the touch. For hours, the team reached into the burrows to save the rabbits.

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The West’s newest bird species has a beak like a crowbar

A recently discovered species of crossbill already faces extinction.

Nick Neely July 12, 2017 High Country News

At 6:30 one morning in early July, Craig Benkman, a University of Wyoming ecologist, began to stalk red crossbills in the South Hills of Idaho. We were between Twin Falls and the Nevada border, outside a cabin tucked into a forest near a minor ski hill, Magic Mountain. He and several of his graduate students had quietly strung ornithology’s signature ploy, a diaphanous mist-net, between two metal poles. It hung nearly invisible, low to the ground, below two lodgepole pines. Several of these sanguine birds — a large finch with a beak that looks curiously off-kilter, one mandible overlapping the other — were resting in the grass by a salt lick. Crossbills feed exclusively on the seeds of conifer cones, and must supplement their diet with sodium. “It’s like how, in the Sierra, marmots chew on your sweaty boots,” Benkman explained. Typically the birds might swallow a little clay from the roots of a fallen tree for salt, but here cabin owners had arranged mineral blocks in the grass to lure moose and deer nearer to their windows. Benkman peered through his binoculars at a male sitting with several others beside the net, all of them looking up warily with glossy black eyes. The male’s domed head, breast and rump were the crimson of an heirloom tomato, flecked with orange, with yellow ochre. “Oh,” Benkman said, in a rising whisper. “An unbanded one.”

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Fish salvage order issued for lower Big Lost River

7/15/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idaho wildlife officials have issued a fish salvage order for the lower Big Lost River in central Idaho that’s expected to run dry.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game said Friday it has suspended limits on the number of fish that can be caught as well as size limits on the section of the river below the Moore Diversion.

The order runs through Aug. 31 and also allows anglers to use seines and dip nets to catch fish.

Anglers are required to have a valid fishing license.

Officials say high water in the spring caused an unknown number of fish to move below the Moore Diversion.

Officials say that section of the river will go dry this summer and fish will be stranded and die.

source:
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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
July 14, 2017
Issue No. 837

Table of Contents

* Some Columbia River Chum Salmon Populations (ESUs) Above Delisting Goals, Others High Risk Of Extinction
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439271.aspx

* Actions Continue To Aid Returning Snake River Sockeye: Removing Spillway Weirs, Increasing Cool Dworshak Flows
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439270.aspx

* Declining Steelhead: Study Says Conditions Early In Marine Life Phase Strong Contributors To Survival
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439269.aspx

* Ocean Conditions, Sea Lions Faulted For Low Willamette Steelhead Return; Only 822 Wild Winter Steelhead
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439268.aspx

* Harvest Managers Approve More Tribal Fishing, Concerns Expressed Over Low Sockeye, Summer Steelhead Returns
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439267.aspx

* With Some Of Lowest Steelhead Returns On Record, ODFW Asks Anglers To Give Fish A Helping Hand
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439266.aspx

* Upper Columbia Tribes’ Report Examines Costs, Benefits Of Altering Dam Operations To Get Closer To Natural Flows
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439265.aspx

* $1.6 Million Fish Passage Project Will Open 17 Miles Of NE Oregon Habitat For Migratory Fish
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439264.aspx

* House Appropriations Bill Includes Language Prohibiting Removal Of Federal Dams Without Congressional Approval
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439263.aspx

* Study: Flexibility In Behavior of Some Animals Helps Them Accommodate A Changing Climate
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439262.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

I Found a Bat in my Home! What Do I Do?

By Sue Nass, Monday, June 26, 2017

They come out after sunset in the summertime, swooping through the backyard hunting for moths, flies, beetles, spiders, crickets, and other insects. That is all okay. But what if you find a bat trapped inside your home? First, stay calm.

Many people assume that bats “carry” rabies, that is, spreading the disease without ever becoming sick themselves. However, although bats can transmit rabies if infected (typically through a bite), only about one-tenth of one percent of bats ever contract the disease and when they do, they eventually become sick and die. But that doesn’t mean you should handle a bat carelessly.

The most important thing is to keep both you and the bat safe because bats are a valuable part of our environment and are legally protected in Idaho. Bats provide free pest control by consuming the insects that damage crops, saving US farmers over 3 billion dollars annually. A single individual of the bat species known as Little Brown Myotis can consume up to 600 mosquito-sized insects per hour!

So what to do about that bat in your home? Idaho Fish and Game has produced a short video that explains in quick precise steps how to safely remove the bat in a manner that will protect both you and the bat. Watch:

source:
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Chuck the Marmot gets full pardon after being caught stowing away

July 5, 2017 Spokesman Review


(PFPD photo)

Tongue firmly cheeked, a Post Falls PD officer penned the following report re: a persistent stowaway who was found in an engine compartment at the Post Falls Walmart:

Officers responded to Walmart when a customer was unable to get her car to start. She opened her hood and found a rather large Marmot trapped in the engine compartment. With the assistance of a kind citizen and a handy tow truck operator from Recovery Masters the Officers worked tirelessly to remove the animal’s fur from the fan belt. Once Unstuck Chuck was free Officers began the tedious task of negotiation with the furry stowaway. Chuck was very reluctant to leave his new found feast of electrical wires. When attempts to talk him down failed the Officers and helpers turned to their tools and used multiple methods of extraction. Finally, Chuck gave up and fled the Dodge Neon. While congratulatory back patting was taking place Chuck returned to his life of crime and found another vehicle to unlawfully enter. Once again, Officers tried to reason with the rodent who now seemed tired and perhaps a little stressed out. Begrudgingly, he quickly gave up and was captured. Officers quickly took him into custody and left the area before Chuck could reoffend. We are happy to announce that Chuck was granted a full pardon and was released back into his natural habitat. He has been trespassed from Walmart.

source:
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Alan Alan Alan Steve Steve Steve


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ShootinVarmints-a
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Tips & Advice:

Bear awareness tips offered for national forest visitors

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review July 7, 2017

Following several bear encounters in the past week, including the terrifying attack on a woman and her dogs hiking near Priest Lake, the Idaho Panhandle National Forest is putting out more education on living and recreating in bear country, especially in this season of what appears to be a bumper crop of huckleberries.

In summary, and with my added perspective gleaned from covering bear encounters for years:

* Do not approach or feed wild animals, especially bears. All wildlife can be dangerous. Breaking down their natural wariness to humans can lead to problems initially or to people who encounter the animal later.

* Bears are generally shy creatures and don’t want to come face-to-face with people. Make noise when hiking in bear country: Talk, sing or clap your hands to let a bear know of your presence.

* Store food in hard-sided vehicles,bear-proof containers or by properly hanging food bags out of a bear’s reach. For more information, read the Idaho Panhandle National Forests’ Food Storage Requirements. Proper food storage is required on national forest system lands north of Clark Fork, Lake Pend Oreille and the Pend Oreille River.

* Dogs can aggravate bears and wolves. Keeping a dog on a leash is the safest method for preventing a dog from encountering a wild animal, including a moose, and leading an agitated, protective or territorial critter back to the humans.

* Carry bear spray when in the woods. Have it handy on a belt or pack strap and know how to use it.

source:
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July 9, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

July 9, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Did you feel it?

At 1232am (local time) July 6 we felt a mild jolt, like a wave passing thru. It scared some of the chickens off the roost.  The quake was a 5.8 over in Montana. (More info under Idaho News.)
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Yellow Pine Blowdown Update

July 5, 2017

The logger could start as early as the end of this week. Logs will be hauled up Johnson Creek and there will likely be only one load per day going out. He will also likely camp down in the flat upstream of YP Campground. I’ll let you know as soon as I get confirmation on all of those items.

Jake Strohmeyer
District Ranger
Boise National Forest, Cascade Ranger District
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The Corner Announcement

We have the store up and running. We have a ton of items. Here is a small list; Ice Cream, Yogurt, Various other Snacks, small propane bottles, motor oil , sunscreen, bug spray, feminine needs, shampoo, conditioners, toothpastes, toothbrushes, lighters, cell phone chargers. The list goes on and on. Basically a little bit of everything. We also get food orders in three times a week. People have been ordering perishables from us. We can get a wide variety, what we have been selling the most of is, bacon, milk, lettuce, ground beef, berries, bananas, yogurt and similar items. The produce we get is a decent price and great quality. We are also working on getting together other gift shop type items.
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VYPA News:

Meeting (and Election) was July 8
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H-Fest News:

Donations requested

The Silent and Live Auctions are looking for large and small donations for the festival. Contact Lorinne at 633-5555 for details.
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Judy Wiley Memorial Stone July 17

We would like all people in the community, who can make it, to come join us at the cemetery on July 17th at 3pm. At that time, we would like to talk about Judy Wiley. She didn’t want a service or a memorial. So this would be a chat and a talk. We plan to place a stone at the foot of Bud Boyd in her memory. Judy’s sister, Linda Blank, will be joining us. Thanks to the community for their generous donations. We would also like to invite the community for chips and salsa at the Tavern after the ‘talk’. It would be a good time to talk to her sister and tell her your stories of Judy.

– MF
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YPFD Meeting July 29

Next YPFD Commissioner Meeting: July 29, 2017. Community Hall at 2pm.

Reminder that there is training every Sunday at 11:00 at the Fire Station unless we notify you.

Fire Siren will be tested at noon on the first of each month.
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Big Creek Lodge

Breakfast at Big Creek Saturday Aug 5. Breakfasts run from 8-10am, and are $10/plate. Visitors can take a tour of the lodge and enjoy pancakes, ham, eggs and coffee/juice.
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Harmonica T-shirt Request

I would like to send out a request to everyone who might have a T-shirt from the past harmonica festivals. We are missing the following years: 1994, 2002-2014. It would be a donation to the Community Hall. I am hoping to make the Center more inviting and useful. Any suggestions from anyone are also welcome.
My email is: 75hallker @ att.net My phone: 208-633-6270

Thanks so much, Kathleen Hall – VYPA – Member at Large
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Local Observations:

Monday (July 3) early morning airplanes, a few really loud ones just after 8am. Overnight low of 46 degree, clear sky this morning. A few finches and a golden mantel squirrel at the feeders, swallows hunting bugs. Swallow chicks are now covered in down, eyes still closed. Partly cloudy and warm this afternoon, high of 90 degrees. Light traffic and dusty streets. More shooting to the west this evening. Saw some kids sic their dog on a mule deer buck about 9pm. Bats hunting bugs at dark.

Tuesday (July 4) early morning airplanes, very loud one just after 730am. Overnight low of 44 degrees, high thin hazy clouds this morning. A few finches at the feeders by mid-morning (more were here at daylight), swallows hunting bugs (babies are really getting big, but eyes not open yet.) Hot day, high of 92 degrees, some high thin clouds. Swallow chicks are starting to preen their new (itchy) feathers. Streets are dusty. Little light colored doe grazing the side of the road around 730pm, 3 people on ATVs zipped by and didn’t see the deer. Lots of mosquitoes out in the evening.

Wednesday (July 5) early morning airplanes, extra loud pair went over at a little after 8am. Overnight low of 49 degrees, clear sky this morning. A few finches (and a pine squirrel) at the feeders, swallows hunting bugs (chicks are starting to open their eyes a bit.) Pretty darn hot this afternoon, high of 97 degrees. Shots fired on the south east end of the village just after 230pm. Heard a flicker whooping it up in the forest across from the school/museum. Sego lilies blooming profusely, seeing more yellow stars on the stonecrops. Warm evening, 88 degrees at 730pm. A few clouds after dark, bright moon. Earthquake jolt at 1232am!

Thursday (July 6) quiet morning. Overnight low of 49 degrees, partly cloudy this morning. Swallow babies are really growing, they fill the bottom of the nest box when they spread out. Lots of horseflies and deerflies out during the heat of the day. Hot and sunny all day, high of 96 degrees. Quiet afternoon, air a bit dusty towards evening, the pine pollen hasn’t been as bad. Nearly full moon rose before dark.

Friday (July 7) only a few early airplanes, couple of loud ones later. Overnight low of 49 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning. A few finches at the feeders. Seeing more robins and fledglings. Pine squirrel sitting on the fence post yelling to be fed. Swallow babies are growing fast, looking more like thier parents, eyes open wider this morning. Roads are getting pretty dusty, more traffic out on the main road. Another hot day, big cloud overhead with some welcome “shade” at 145pm. Mostly cloudy for a while later in the afternoon and hot, high of 96 degrees. Doe bedded down in the yard during the day, and returned at dusk. Lots of dust in the air. A report of a possible aftershock felt around 1230am by folks in a camper.

Saturday (July 8) a couple early airplanes. Overnight low of 50 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning. Cassins finches and a jay at the feeders. More air traffic as it started to warm up this morning and into the heat of the day. Another hot (dusty) afternoon, with a few little passing clouds, high of 100 degrees! Mostly clear (hot) evening, dusty haze hanging in the air. Gunshot at 823pm in the neighborhood. Loud UTV racing up and down the back road and doing donuts in the intersection after 11pm, raising a lot of dust. Beautiful full moon rise at 1113pm. Bats out hunting bugs.

Sunday (July 9) a few drops of rain around 530am. A fairly quiet morning, a few early airplanes. Overnight low of 56 degrees, clear sky this morning and heating up quickly. Finches and a jay at the feeders, swallow chicks active. Not as many butterflies. Hot before lunch time, clear sky, haze of dust in the air. Clouds building up in the early afternoon and HOT, high of 96 degrees The smallest swallow chick has died. Traffic raising a lot of dust. Shooting west of the village at 557pm. More shooting at 732pm. Loud rapid shots (or fireworks?) just before 8pm to the west across the river. Starting to cool off by 10pm and quiet.
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Letter to Share:

Commissioner Cruickshank’s June Newsletter

From the desk of Commissioner Cruickshank, 7/6/2017

June 1st through June 6th I was on Vacation.

Wednesday June 7th
I received a message asking if I would be available to meet with representatives of DF Development LLC of which I replied with dates I am available.

I received a call about the high flows of the Payette River and some erosion occurring if this continues.

Thursday June 8th
As the NACo Western Region Representative I held a conference call to discuss the recent NACo Western Interstate Region Annual Conference and to hear any recent legislative updates of concern to counties. Discussed Payment in Lieu of Taxes, Secure Rural Schools, Infrastructure package proposed for transportation issues and Forest health bills being introduced.

I received a call on the South Fork of the Salmon River Road and Forest Roads and Trails Act and how easements work for the county.

I discussed Cooperating Agency Status with a citizen to understand what this means for Valley County and the Stibnite Project proposed by Midas Gold.

I inquired about the next Idaho Transportation Board meeting as several backcountry airstrips were being discussed. As I had previously worked on these airstrips and keeping them active for use. I wanted to understand the position of the Board.

Today we learned that Warren Wagon Road was open over Secesh Summit.

Friday June 9th
I received a call concerning the Right-of-Way going into Paddy Flat area. Further research will be needed to verify the true width of the ROW which was the concern.

I replied to The Star News on the potential of the City of McCall leasing the Juvenile Detention Center for their Police Department.

Monday June 12th
Today was a commissioner day. The minutes once approved will be posted on the Valley County Website at Valley County, Idaho | Official Site http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday June 13th
I sent an email to the Payette and Boise National Forest Supervisor’s offices to re-request a Forest Road and Trails Act easement for the South Fork of the Salmon River Road which will place this road under Valley County jurisdiction.

I sent a message into the Valley County Contract Engineer to review the hydraulics of the Payette River Stream Flows to understand the Flood Plain concerns with recent mapping.

Wednesday June 14th
I visited with the Valley County Engineer on the Payette River Flows and erosion concerns.

I reviewed changes to the Valley County Personnel Manual and provided comments. I also reviewed the proposed Cafeteria Plan for Valley County Employees and provided comments.

I participated in a NACo Transportation Committee Conference Call where we discussed FAA reauthorization, Essential Air Service for small airports, Drones, Autonomous Vehicles and Air Traffic Control.

Thursday June 15th
I participated in a conference call for the Stibnite Mine Project. This was the first call I was able to be on as Cooperating Agency Status for Valley County. Today’s call was to discuss who will be involved and to work to finalize the Memorandum of Understanding for all to sign.

Monday June 19th
Commissioner day today. Please see the Valley County Website. http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Wednesday June 21st
Today I attended an Appreciation Luncheon hosted by DF Development LLC for first responders. While attending I was able to meet with Justin Wilks and others who are involved with the former Boise Cascade Properties. Most of our discussion was on Private Property rights, Public Access through their private property, potential re-alignment of roadways to provide better access for both Valley County and DF Development LLC and responsibility for repairing livestock fencing. I was also able to thank Mr. Wilks for working with Valley County to obtain the property for a trailhead at Clear Creek.

I visited with the owner of a mine in the Big Creek area as he was concerned about his access to the mine with some recent action by the Forest Service.

I was able to catch the last portion of an Idaho Association of Counties Board conference call.

Thursday June 22nd
I attended the Idaho Transportation Department Board meeting in Garden City. Today the ITD Board will be discussing the status of the Big Creek 4 airstrips in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. Under the Wilderness Act passed these 4 airstrips (Dewey Moore, Mile Hi, Simonds and Vines) were to remain open under their current use as airstrips. Recent attempts have been made to close the airstrips or call them emergency only which is a closure. The Idaho Transportation Department Board of Directors have the responsibility to determine if the airstrips remain open as provided in the Wilderness Act. The ITD Board passed a Resolution that requires the airstrips to remain open for use. I thanked the ITD Board for listening to the counties concerns of losing these airstrips as they are a part of the economy for the commercial aircraft business in our region.

Also at this meeting Valley County was Represented by Myself and Sheriff Bolen to receive an award for not having any fatalities on Highway 55 in 2016. This is called “Toward Zero Deaths”. This is the second year that Valley County has received this award. Unfortunately we have already had a fatality in 2017 so we will not make it 3 years in a row.

Friday June 23rd
Today I participated in a NACo Executive Board conference call. Discussed the upcoming NACo Annual Conference and duties of the NACo Executive Board.

Monday June 26th
Commissioner day today. Check the Valley County Website for the minutes once approved. http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Also today we learned that the Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) funding was being sent to counties. PILT funding was one of the topics I spoke about during recent testimony I provided during Congressional Hearings in Washington DC.

Tuesday June 27th
The Salmon/Challis National Forest asked if Valley County would be interested in Cooperating Agency Status for their update to the Forest Plan. The commissioners voted yesterday to be involved so I sent an email to the Salmon/Challis National Forest Supervisor requesting that Commissioner Willey be contacted to fill this request.

Tonight I attended the Scoping meeting held in Cascade for the Stibnite Mine Project proposal hosted by the Payette National Forest.

Wednesday June 28th
I attended a Cooperating Agency Status meeting in McCall at the Payette National Forest Supervisors Office. Today we had a presentation by Midas Gold Staff on the proposed Plan of Restoration and Operation, worked on finalizing who is involved, what our timeline is for our efforts, what type of data we need and future meeting dates and tours.

This evening I attended the Public Scoping meeting held in the same location hosted again by the Payette National Forest.

Thursday June 29th
Today the commissioners convened as the Valley County Board of Equalization to review citizens concerns about why the value of their properties had changed. We meet personally with some folks and others had worked with the Valley County Assessor staff to resolve some errors or corrections that changed the Market Value of the property. Of course there are some that we didn’t change and retained the current value. If the property owner still wants to protest the process allows them to make a claim to the Idaho State Tax Commission through the Board of Tax Appeal process.

Well that wraps up June for this commissioner. Thanks for reading the newsletter.

I trust all had a safe 4th of July.

Gordon
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Idaho News:

Large 5.8 magnitude earthquake in Montana felt in McCall, other parts of Idaho

by Associated Press & KBOI News Staff Thursday, July 6th 2017

Lincoln, Mont. (AP) — LINCOLN, Mont. (AP) — An earthquake strong enough to rouse sleeping residents more than 30 miles (48 kilometers) from its epicenter struck western Montana early Thursday.

A magnitude 5.8 earthquake hit just after midnight about 6 miles (9.7 kilometers) southeast of Lincoln, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. There were no immediate reports of injuries.

Residents in Lincoln briefly lost power and there was a gas leak in Helena, the National Weather Service in Great Falls said on Twitter.

… There are also reports that the quake was felt over in Idaho, including the McCall area, as well as in Bonner County.

full story:
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Cascade to note 100th birthday with July 17 events

The Star-News July 6, 2017

The city of Cascade will celebrate its centennial on Monday, July 17 at Armstrong Park.

An afternoon of fun for the entire family is promised, including 100-year-old family games, live music and a barbecue in the park from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Pieces of a 100-foot-long cake will be handed out …, and there will be a costume contest, a reading of historical snippets by “Old Father Cascade” and the unveiling of the Centennial Memorial.

source The Star-News
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Lack of affordable housing in McCall creates worker shortage

Dean Johnson, KTVB July 05, 2017

McCall – An affordable housing crunch in the city of McCall is starting to have a major impact on businesses in the area. The problem: there’s simply not enough workers.

“Help Wanted” signs hang in the windows of businesses all over McCall looking for somebody to come and help.

“The bank is hiring, the lumber yard is hiring, the eye doctor is hiring,” Bistro 45 owner Kit Worthington said.

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Investigation into deadly cabin fire focusing on propane fireplace

Natalie Shaver, KTVB July 03, 2017

Donnelly – The Idaho State fire marshal and the Valley County coroner on Monday released new information about a tragic house fire in Donnelly that killed four people.

Fire Marshal Knute Sandahl said his office has narrowed the focus of its investigation to a propane-fueled fireplace on the main floor of the house. Because the investigation is still ongoing, a definite cause has not been determined yet.

… “Witnesses have told to us that there was a loud boom which would indicate an explosion, and some of the physical evidence that we saw and observed would certainly add credence to that report,” Sandahl said.

full story w/video report:
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Clues sought to cause of Tamarack blast, fire that killed 4

One man survived inferno that leveled resort home

By Tom Grote for The Star-News July 6, 2017

It will likely be weeks before the exact cause is known of an explosion and fire that destroyed a house in Tamarack Resort near Donnelly, Idaho State Fire Marshal Knute Sandahl said Monday.


Photo (L) taken from Realtor.com/ Photo (R) for The Star-News by Gary Ertter
[Left: photo shows the house at 541 Whitewater Dr. before last Friday’s fire. [Right]: Smoke rises from a home at Tamarack Resort after an explosion and fire destroyed the home last Friday.

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Jeep with 2 bodies inside recovered from Payette River

KTVB July 06, 2017

Valley County – The Valley County Sheriff’s Office said a vehicle with two bodies inside was recovered from the Payette River on Thursday.

At least one person had been presumed drowned after a vehicle went off of Highway 55 and plunged into the river on June 24, just north of Smiths Ferry.

At around noon Thursday, the sheriff’s office and the Cascade Rural Fire Department led a recovery operation at milepost 99 on Highway 55.

Water flow through Cascade Dam was reduced, and the highway was down to one lane to aid the recovery efforts.

Divers from the Gem County Sheriff’s Office and the Boise Scuba Center found a 2017 Jeep Cherokee upside down in the river. The bodies were extricated after the Jeep was removed.

The Valley County Coroner’s Office took the bodies from the scene, and their identities have not been released yet.

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Bodies of married Garden City couple pulled from Payette River

by KBOI News Staff Thursday, July 6th 2017

… According to the Valley County Sheriff’s Office, William L. Ziegert, 71, and Julaine Ziegert, 72, of Garden City, were pulled from their Jeep on Thursday.

The married couple’s vehicle plunged into the Payette River near Smiths Ferry along Highway 55 in late June. A family dog was also found inside the vehicle.

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Idaho authorities identify remains found in Salmon River

by Associated Press Monday, July 3rd 2017

White Bird, Idaho (AP) – The Idaho County Sheriff’s office says a body found in the Salmon River on Saturday belongs to a man who went missing after a car crash in May.

A boater found the body downriver from Hammer Creek, and then took Sheriff Doug Giddings, Sgt. Justin Scuka and Idaho County Coroner Cody Funke to the location so they could recover the remains.

The sheriff’s office said Monday that the coroner has identified the man as 60-year-old Kenny Sawn, who went missing on May 28 after the vehicle he was in crashed into the Little Salmon River.

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Boise man goes missing after fishing trip near Riggins

by KBOI News Staff Monday, July 3rd 2017

Riggins, Idaho (KBOI) — Friends and family members say a 54-year-old Boise man has gone missing after a fishing trip in the Riggins area.

Friends say they’re looking for Randy French of Boise.

French was driving a 2004 Chevy Avalanche. Anyone with information about French can call the Idaho County Sheriff’s Office at 208-983-1100.

full story w/photos:
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Eclipse hosts asked to register with Valley County

The Star-News July 6, 2017

Anyone who plans to open their land for camping or viewing during the total solar eclipse on Monday, Aug. 21, is asked to register with Valley County.

No permits are required to host campers and there is no charge to register, Valley County Planning and Zoning Administrator Cynda Herrick said.

“We expect to get many inquires as the eclipse approaches for places to view and camp,” said Herrick, who is assisting the Valley County Astronomical Society, which is leading the coordination of eclipse activities.

“Having a registry will help connect those looking for a place to view the eclipse with those who have space available,” she said.

Herrick asks landowners to manage their own properties for fire protection, facilities, and other safety precautions.

To be added to the registry, contact Herrick at 382-7115 or cherrick@co.valley.id.us

source The Star-News
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New Idaho area code changes roll out next month

KTVB July 06, 2017

Changes to the way Idaho residents make calls will start in less than one month.

Beginning Aug. 5, callers will have to dial in the entire 10-digit number of the person they are trying to reach, including the area code. The change comes as Idaho adds a second area code – 986 – for the first time, as 208 numbers begin to run out.

Those who already have a 208 area code will not get a new phone number. The 986 area codes will begin being issued to new users Sept. 5.

After Aug. 5, Idahoans. who try to make a call without dialling an area code will reach a recording instructing them to hang up and try again. Residents are encouraged to update contacts saved in their cell phones ahead of the new requirement.

For more information on the area code change, visit the Idaho Public Utilities Commission website.

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More mosquitoes test positive for West Nile in Canyon County

by KBOI News Staff Thursday, July 6th 2017

Caldwell, Idaho (KBOI) — The West Nile Virus is staking its claim in Canyon County.

The county said on Thursday that mosquitoes in three traps collected over the July 4 weekend have tested positive for the virus. The traps were in various locations in the county including Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge, Fort Boise Wildlife Management Area, Parma (near the Oregon border) and near Nampa-Caldwell Boulevard and Karcher Road.

Last month, the virus was detected in mosquitoes found along the Boise River near Caldwell and Rotary ponds north of Caldwell.

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Mining News:

Payette: Midas Gold decision no sooner than two years

Meetings outline regulatory process for proposed Stibnite gold mine

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 6, 2017

It will be at least two years before a decision is made to allow Midas Gold Corp. to start building a gold mine at Stibnite in Valley County, members of an open house in McCall were told last week.

“A final record of decision is expected to be issued in spring 2019,” Payette National Forest Supervisor Keith Lannom said at the open house held at the Payette’s headquarters in McCall.

“That is a pretty aggressive timeline for a project this complex,” Lannom said.

The McCall open house was one of three sessions for the public to learn about the application by Midas Gold, of Vancouver, B.C. to mine gold and antimony from historical mining areas near Yellow Pine.

Those attending saw a 45-minute presentation on the project as well as a detailed explanation of the permitting process, including information on how and when public comment will be sought.

After the presentation, representatives from the Forest Service, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Midas Gold manned informational posters and answered questions about the proposal.

Other open houses were held in Cascade and Boise to kick off the public involvement phase of the Forest Service’s review of the project. The current public comment period ends on July 20.

Midas Gold’s reclamation plans for the Stibnite Mine will be evaluated to determine if they will sufficiently restore the land affected by mining operations, Lannom said.

… For more information on the application, go to http://fs.usda.gov/goto/StibniteGold

Written comments also can be submitted at the website or to comments-intermtn-payette@fs.fed.us with the subject “Stibnite Gold EIS Scoping Comment.”

full story at The Star-News:
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Idaho officials consider changes to dredge mining rules

7/4/17 AP

Lewiston, Idaho — Idaho officials are considering altering rules for suction dredge mining on the South Fork of the Clearwater River just before the monthlong season is set to begin.

At the Tenmile Mining District’s request, regulators are looking at several conditions included in its permits to see if they can be clarified or simplified, the Lewiston Tribune reported last week.

“The changes we are considering now I think are minor, commonsense changes that aren’t going to affect changes to the water and wildlife in the river,” Department of Water Resources Deputy Director Mathew Weaver said.

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Fire Season:

Old Freezeout Fire near Emmett destroys home and outbuilding

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, July 5th 2017


(photo courtesy of BLM)

Emmett, Idaho (KBOI) — A fire near Emmett has destroyed a home and an outbuilding and scorched 20 acres on Old Freezeout Road.

The BLM tells KBOI 2News the house was being used for storage and the outbuilding was a large shed. The fire started around 2 p.m. Wednesday.

The fire has blocked Old Freezeout Rd. but is around 20 percent contained. The fire is expected to be fully contained by 8:00 p.m. The cause of the fire is human caused, but the specific cause is still under investigation.

The BLM has four engines, 2 dozers, a water denter, a helicopter and two SEAT planes fighting the fire.

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Fire near White Bird contained

KTVB July 08, 2017


(Photo: Hayden York/KTVB First Person)

White Bird – Fire crews worked overnight to successfully contain a wildfire near White Bird in Idaho County, the Idaho Department of Lands said Saturday.

The fire was reported at 6:50 p.m. Friday, and has burned approximately 300 acres in grass and brush. It was 90-percent contained as of 11 a.m. Saturday, and was on track to be 100-percent contained in the early afternoon.

A 20-member Type 2 hand crew, one Type 5 engine, and three Type 4 engines are at the scene.

The fire is in the Idaho Dept. of Lands fire protection area. Cooperating agencies include the U.S. Forest Service, Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association, Salmon River Rural Fire Dept., Idaho County Sheriff, and Idaho State Police.

No structures are threatened. The cause is unknown.

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White Bird fire caused by fireworks

Alex Merritt Jul 8, 2017 KIVI

(White Bird) – Fire crews successfully contained the grass fire that was first reported at 6:50 pm yesterday. IDL fire investigators on scene have determined fireworks were the cause. The fire has been held to approximately 421 acres.

No injuries have been reported as temperatures soar to 108F, and no structures were damaged.

Resources are being released as the fire nears control. 2 engines and 9 IDL personnel remain on the incident.

The fire is in the Idaho Department of Land (IDL) fire protection area. Cooperators include the US Forest Service, Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association, Salmon River Rural Fire Dept., White Bird Fire Dept., Idaho County Sheriff, and the Idaho State Police.

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Grass fire in Boise foothills scorches multiple acres of land

by KBOI News Staff Monday, July 3rd 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Crews are responding to a grass fire in the Boise foothills near Cartwright and Ourada roads.

The BLM says the fire has burned 10 to 20 acres but is now contained. No structures were burned.

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Several families displaced after fireworks start Boise apartment fire

by Kelsey Anderson Wednesday, July 5th 2017

An apartment fire on the corner of N. Lakeharbor Lane and State Street in Boise has displaced many families, and was started by fireworks, according to the Boise Fire Department. Firefighters also tell KBOI 2News, one person was treated on scene for smoke inhalation, but is expected to be OK.

The fire broke out around 2:30 a.m. Wednesday. Eight units were affected by the flames, and evacuated. We’re told four of those units have severe damage. KBOI 2’s Lauren Clark says she saw lots of families leaving the apartment complex with their pets and belongings.

Boise Fire says the blaze started on the second floor of the apartment complex.

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Meridian grassfire likely started by firecrackers

Steve Bertel Jul 4, 2017 KIVI TV

Meridian, ID – Meridian Fire Department crews were able to quickly extinguish a grassfire Tuesday morning –- a fire officials say was likely caused by someone carelessly igniting firecrackers.

Investigators found at least two firecrackers in the area where the fire presumably started, near the intersection of Broadway and NE 3rd Streets.

Although the fire burned less than one acre, firefighters were concerned because flames were heading toward a nearby lumber yard.

The fire was reported about 11:17 a.m., according to an Ada County dispatch supervisor.

Crews had it under control by about thirty minutes later.

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Thirteen Fires Started By Fireworks Around July Fourth In Boise

By Samantha Wright July 6, 2017 Boise State Public Radio

After controversy over legal vs illegal fireworks in Idaho in the run up to the July Fourth holiday, the Boise Fire Department reports they did respond to fires over the long weekend caused by fireworks.

BFD reports 13 fires on July 4 and July 5. Four were started by fireworks, and five are still under investigation. That is a drop from last year when ten fires were started by fireworks.

One of this year’s fires burned an apartment building on Lakeharbor Lane, damaging five apartments and displacing residents. The fire department believes that fire was caused by fireworks and reports young teenagers were setting off fireworks in the area before the fire.

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Hot Springs Fire Caused By Fireworks

For Immediate Release: July 3, 2017,
Contact: Kelsey Griffee, kgriffee@blm.gov, 208-521-8709

Salmon, ID – The Hot Springs fire started Sunday afternoon four miles south of Salmon, Idaho, east of the airport on BLM land. Four engines from the BLM and Forest Service responded with a federal helicopter and the Lemhi Fire Protection District. The fire burned grass and brush and was fully contained at 25 acres at 9 a.m. Monday morning. The fire investigator confirms fireworks caused the fire.

Crews will remain on the fire Monday mopping up. Fire managers estimate the fire will be controlled at 6 p.m. today.

The fire started on BLM land where it is prohibited to possess or discharge fireworks. Remember you can be liable for the fire suppression costs and cited if you are found igniting fireworks.

This is the second human caused fire in the Salmon-Challis area in the past week. The Buffalo Jump Fire started on June 25, and was controlled at 6 acres. The Buffalo Jump Fire is under investigation.

Fire season has already started on BLM public lands. We have experienced hot and dry weather and below average precipitation over the past month. Fine fuels like grass are primed to ignite. Please observe the BLM Fire Prevention Order that is in effect until October 20th and be careful as you celebrate the 4th of July.

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Menan Butte Fire Update

For Immediate Release: July 3, 2017, 9:30 a.m.
Contact: Kelsey Griffee, kgriffee@blm.gov, 208-521-8709

Idaho Falls, ID – Crews held the fire perimeter overnight at 212 acres. Fire managers estimate full containment at 6 p.m. today. The Menan Butte fire started at approximately 11 p.m. July 1 and evidence suggested the fire was caused by fireworks. The investigation is ongoing.

Multiple agencies assisted in fire fighting efforts Sunday evening and into the early hours Monday morning. Three single air tankers and a heavy air tanker made multiple retardant drops on the advancing head of the fire. Two dozers worked lining the fire perimeter.

Storms passing over the area late Sunday afternoon brought erratic winds rekindling hot spots in the interior of the fire, causing the fire to grow from 30 acres to 212 acres. The fire did not threaten structures and roads were not closed. The fire remained on BLM land and did not burn the butte.

Fire managers reported this morning the fire is smoldering and has reached 75% containment. Seven engines from the BLM and Forest Service along with two dozers will continue to secure the fire perimeter and mop up the fire today.

Help prevent wildfires this holiday weekend. Fireworks are prohibited on BLM land under the BLM Fire Prevention Order that is in effect until October 20th. This is the fourth human caused fire in the Menan Butte area in the last two weeks. There have been two fires caused by shooting and one caused by an abandoned campfire.

For breaking fire information, follow @BLMIdahoFire on Twitter and search for #BLMIFDFire for posts specifically related to eastern Idaho. One less spark means one less Idaho wildfire.

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“Evidence suggests the [Menan Butte] fire was caused by fireworks.”

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Crews battling wildfire northwest of Burley

KTVB July 03, 2017

Kimama, Idaho – Crews are working to get a handle on a wildfire burning in a remote area of southcentral Idaho Monday evening.

The Crestview Fire was first reported just after 8:30 a.m. Monday. Less than 12 hours later, it had grown to an estimated 1,700 acres.

The fire is burning through grass, brush and juniper trees in a remote area northwest of Burley. BLM spokesperson Kelsey Brizendine said that crews had trouble accessing the fire, due to rough terrain.

While the fire was active throughout the day, crews were able to slow its growth, and were working to improve containment lines.

At this point, no structures are threatened, but officials said power lines are nearby.

The cause of the fire is under investigation.

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1,700 [Crestview] acre fire in Lincoln County has been contained

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Firefighters contain Bone Road brush fire

Local News 8 – Updated: Jul 05, 2017

The Idaho Falls Fire Department reports a brush fire off Bone Road has been contained.

The fire was estimated at 22 acres. Fire crews tended the fire through the night and will be working with the Bureau of Land Management Wednesday morning to clean up hot spots in juniper trees.

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Eastern Idaho moves to High Fire Danger

For Immediate Release: Friday, July 7, 2017
Contact: Kelsey Griffee (208) 521-8709

Idaho Falls, ID – The Eastern Idaho Interagency Fire Center continues to receive reports of fireworks being discharged on public lands. Both the BLM and Forest Service are reminding everyone that fireworks are prohibited on lands managed by both agencies across the state. Additionally, many counties have instituted open burn bans due to the dry weather conditions. State Statutes prohibit the discharging of fireworks after midnight July 5.

“There is an abundance of grass across eastern Idaho thanks to the cool, wet spring,” said Joel Gosswiller, Fire Management Officer for the Idaho Falls District. “After a month of hot, dry weather, with minimal precipitation, fuels are primed to ignite in the lowlands.” Due to weather and fuel conditions the Idaho Falls District Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has moved into High Fire Danger. While the Caribou-Targhee National Forest is still in Moderate Fire Danger, it is important to practice the same care with fire while on the Forest lands.

The Menan Butte Fire, was ignited by the illegal use of fireworks on July 1, 2017, and left behind a 238 scar that will take years to rehabilitate.

Whether you are recreating or traveling on the highways or back roads, keep fire prevention in mind and follow these fire prevention tips:

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Thousands flee wildfires burning in the US and Canada

by The Associated Press Sunday, July 9th 2017


(AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Wildfires barreled across the baking landscape of the western U.S. and Canada Sunday, destroying a smattering of homes, forcing thousands to flee and temporarily trapping children and counselors at a California campground.

Here’s a look at the wildfires blackening the West.

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Public Lands:

Idaho maps public access to endowment lands

By Kimberlee Kruesi – 7/7/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — The Idaho Department of Lands has released a map detailing recreation accessibility on the state’s public endowment lands despite earlier political resistance from Idaho lawmakers.

According to the agency, Director Tom Schultz requested the mapping of the state-owned land after the Idaho Legislature spiked a resolution urging the department to highlight which areas are accessible for recreation.

The maps, which were released on Thursday, show that 96 percent of the endowment lands are accessible by foot or by boat. Additionally, the department is working with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game to ensure that the new mapping layer is added to the state’s online interactive hunt planner map.

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Boise National Forest SOPA Update

USDA Forest Service 7/3/2017

The Boise National Forest’s “Schedule of Proposed Actions” (SOPA) for July 1 through September 30, 2017 is now available on the Boise National Forest Schedule of Proposed Actions webpage. The Forest Service produces the SOPA every three months to keep the public informed about projects that the Forest is currently working on or planning to analyze in the near future.

The SOPA has been standardized across all National Forests from a national database to track key project planning information. The reports for the Boise and all other National Forests are currently available at http://www.fs.fed.us/sopa or through the Boise National Forest website at
http://www.fs.fed.us/sopa/forest-level.php?110402
The Forest Service automatically posts the SOPA four times a year in January, April, July, and October.

If you have questions about a specific project please contact the project leader listed in the SOPA. If you have general questions about the SOPA, please feel free contact

Sincerely,
Melissa Yenko
Forest Environmental Coordinator
Boise National Forest
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Domestic Sheep Trailing to Take Place in Bear Basin Area

Date: July 5, 2017
Contact: Brian Harris (208) 634-0784 cell: (208) 634-6945

McCall, ID – For area sheep ranchers it’s time to move their bands to grazing lands on the Payette National Forest. As many as 4000 sheep plus lambs, and 16 pack and saddle horses will be making their way through the Bear Basin recreational area on their way to higher elevations. The bands of sheep will be escorted by several guard and herding dogs, as well as herders leading pack strings. Bands of sheep will make their way across the Bear Basin area Monday, July 10. Signs will be installed at trailheads and trail junctions alerting the public to the presence of guard dogs and sheep in the Bear Basin area during the trailing period.

* Forest users are advised to use caution if walking their dogs in the area during this time period due to the potential presence of sheep guard dogs in the area. Having your dog on a leash will help avoid your pet’s interaction with guard dogs.

* Bicyclists are cautioned to dismount their bikes and to move slowly around guard dogs.

* Motorcyclists on area roads passing by sheep bands are also encouraged to travel at very slow speeds while passing the bands.

The lands of the Payette National Forest provide opportunities for a wide variety of activities, like recreation, firewood gathering, livestock grazing, mushroom gathering, mining, and scientific research. These are all important uses and there is plenty of room for everybody, especially if we take a few precautions and treat each other with respect.

If you encounter domestic sheep or cattle while on National Forest lands, make the animals aware of your presence and pass by without startling them. Some popular trailheads are signed to alert visitors to the presence of livestock in the area and include cautions regarding stock and guard dogs. As a Forest visitor, it is up to you to maintain control of your own dogs in these areas; to prevent your dogs from harassing livestock. Under no circumstances should forest users attempt to pet a stock or guard dog. These are working dogs, not pets and their first duty is to protect their livestock from predators which includes human beings and other dogs.

Hikers or other visitors may encounter livestock while on forest trails this summer. Popular recreation areas where livestock may be present include: The Lick Creek Road corridor, Boulder Lake, and the Warren Wagon Road corridor.

If you have any questions or want to know if grazing occurs at your forest destination, please call your local Ranger District Office. For more information about the upcoming sheep trailing in the Bear Basin area, please call the McCall Ranger District office at 634-0400.

Brian D. Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
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Potential life-threatening hazard on South Fork of Boise River

by KBOI News Staff Friday, July 7th 2017


(Photo Courtesy of Elmore County Sheriff’s Office)

Elmore County, Idaho (KBOI) — The Elmore County Sheriff’s Office is warning of a potentially life-threatening hazard on the South Fork of the Boise River.

A collection of logs are laying across the river about two miles from the Neil Bridge take out. The logs were discovered over the Fourth of July weekend when a raft with six people inside overturned.

All six passengers were able to get out safely but were forced to stay overnight without any equipment.

The obstruction of the river is roughly a quarter mile below the blockage last year near Buffalo Creek.

The hazard is very dangerous and the sheriff’s office recommends you stay away from this portion of the river.

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Critter News:

Black bear euthanized after it went inside home in eastern Idaho

by KBOI News Staff Friday, July 7th 2017

Tetonia, Idaho (KBOI) — Wildlife officials with Idaho Fish and Game says they had to euthanize a 5-year-old black bear that entered a home outside Tetonia in eastern Idaho.

Fish and Game says the bear had become overly accustomed to humans. No injuries were reported.

Game officials are also in the same area looking for another black bear that showed similar behavior.

“It is important that homeowners report any bear that pays a visit,” the wildlife agency said. “People that allow bears to become food-conditioned and habituated to the presence of humans could very well be signing that bear’s death sentence. Once bears learn a behavior they will continue to exploit it, especially if food rewards are involved. ”

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SNRA warns visitors about bears

IME July 6, 2017

The Sawtooth National Forest is reminding visitors to be extra vigilant this summer when storing their food to avoid attracting black bears.

Bears possess an extremely keen sense of smell, and can find food from great distances. Once a bear finds food near humans, it is likely to come back. The result is a dangerous situation for both the bear and for people.

Campers can protect themselves and others from unwelcome nighttime visitors by storing their food properly. In developed campgrounds, campers should store all food not in use in their vehicle, trailer or camper with the windows tightly closed. Stoves, cooking utensils, personal items such as toothpaste and pet or livestock feed should be protected in the same manner. Garbage should be disposed of in the bear-proof trash containers in all campgrounds and never left out unattended.

In the backcountry, food and garbage should be kept out of bears’ reach by hanging it in a tree, at least 100 yards from the sleeping area. Food bags should ideally be 10 feet above ground and 4 feet out from tree trunks. Food can also be stored in an approved bear-proof container. Backcountry campers should attempt to reduce or eliminate food odors on themselves, their clothes and near their sleeping area.

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60 year old woman in hospital after bear attack in Bonner County

by KBOI News Staff Tuesday, July 4th 2017

Priest Lake, Idaho (KBOI) — All hiking trails at the Priest Lake Visitor Center are closed down after reports of a bear attack near the lake.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game says a 60 year old hiker was walking on the Chipmunk rapids trail with her dogs when the bear charged and knocked her down. She suffered claw marks on her head, side, and abdomen. She was taken to the hospital by air ambulance, but none of the injuries are life-threatening. Her dogs were also injured but will recover.

The victim used her cell phone to call relatives, when they arrived they were able to scare off the bear.

The incident is under investigation.

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Bear that attacked woman in northern Idaho was spooked by dogs

by Associated Press Wednesday, July 5th 2017

… Officials decided the bear needed to be killed because it lingered after the attack, but they called off the search because it crossed a river and they could not be sure they would find the same animal in the area packed with bears.

It appears the adult bear and cub were in a huckleberry patch when they were startled by the dogs, officials said. The bear attacked in defense, Cooper said. A veterinarian treated the dogs, and they will recover.

…Trackers with hounds followed the bear to where it crossed the Priest River about a mile (1.6 kilometers) from the attack, Cooper said. After wading across the river, they discovered paw prints of a cub traveling with the adult. Trackers ended the search at that point.

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Survey seeks to resolve conflicts with bears

Local News 8 – Jul 04, 2017

Jackson, Wyo. (KIFI/KIDK) – The Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance has launched a survey to learn more about human-bear conflicts, regulations, and personal habits. The objective is to learn ways of making the community safer for both humans and donors.

Master’s student Pieto Castelli is running the study this summer as an intern with the Alliance’s “Wild Neighborhoods” program.

The program is coordinated by the Alliance. It brings together local agencies and non-profits to provide homeowners with information and resources to reduce conflicts with wildlife and prepare for wildfire.

continued w/link to survey:
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Teen bit in head by bear wakes up to “crunching sound”

7/9/17 AP

Ward, Colo. — A teen staffer at a Colorado camp fought off a bear after waking up Sunday to find the animal biting his head and trying to drag him away.

The 19-year-old woke up at around 4 a.m. to a “crunching sound” with his head inside the mouth of the bear, which was trying to pull him out of his sleeping bag as he slept outside at Glacier View Ranch 48 miles (77 kilometers) northwest of Denver, Colorado Parks and Wildlife spokeswoman Jennifer Churchill said. The teen punched and hit it and other staffers who were sleeping nearby yelled and swatted at the bear, which eventually left, she said.

continued:
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Bear locks itself inside car, totals it from the inside out

by Jennifer Saylor Saturday, July 8th 2017

Asheville, N.C. (WLOS) — Bears are part of life in the mountains.

One North Asheville resident, Ashleigh Watkins, shared a series of photos that serve as a reminder that it’s not just thieves who are discouraged by locked doors.

“I live in North Asheville and a bear got into my car and totaled it,” she wrote in an email to News 13. “It actually opened the door and got stuck in there.”

continued w/photos:
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Tribes oppose removal of grizzly from protected status

7/5/17 AP

Rapid City, S.D. — Tribal leaders from the Great Plains and across Canada have come together in opposition to removal of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear from the Endangered Species Act protection.

The animal was removed from protected status last month, the Rapid City Journal (http://bit.ly/2sLLzBV ) reported. U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke said the population has rebounded from as few as nearly 140 bears in 1975 to an estimated 700 today.

“This achievement stands as one of America’s great conservation successes, the culmination of decades of hard work and dedication on the part of the state, tribal, federal and private partners,” Zinke said in a statement. “As a Montanan, I’m proud of what we achieved together.”

continued:
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Cougar spotted near Table Rock

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, July 5th 2017


(Picture and Video courtesy Rob Howe/Idaho Fish and Game)

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — A Boise Police officer responded to a report of a mountain lion in the Table Rock area.

Idaho Fish and Game said the sighting serves as a reminder that we live near wildlife. Fish and Game says although most encounters are non threatening, there are some steps you can take if you do come across a mountain lion.

If you come across a mountain lion, don’t run. If you’re with children, pick them up without bending over. Don’t turn your back on the lion! Remain facing the lion and slowly back away.

Never approach a mountain lion or offer it food.

Source w/video:
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Idaho Fish & Game taking comments on wolf-baiting proposal

Betsy Z. Russell The Spokesman-Review July 6, 2017

A proposed Idaho Fish and Game rule that would allow the use of bait during wolf hunts is raising eyebrows; no other state allows that, and Idaho currently allows bait to be used only in the hunting of black bears. That practice is a controversial one; a 1996 voter initiative that sought to ban it prompted a high-profile, emotional debate before failing at the polls, 40 percent to 60 percent.

“Right now, they’re just seeking public input on this proposal,” said Mike Keckler, Idaho Fish and Game spokesman. “This is a proposal that has been brought forward – our commissioners have heard from sportsmen who would like the opportunity.”

He noted that right now, under Idaho rules, someone who’s hunting black bears with bait and also has a wolf tag could legally harvest a wolf that responds to the bait, “if you are hunting for bears and have the necessary permits.” The proposed rule would allow bait to be used for wolves in other situations, including during winter wolf hunting seasons when bears are hibernating.

continued:
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Fourth week of June 2017
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2nd pack of gray wolves spotted in Northern California

By Olga R. Rodriguez – 7/6/17 AP

A female gray wolf, her mate and at least three pups are the second pack of wolves spotted in Northern California since the species went extinct there in 1924, state wildlife officials said Wednesday.

The gray pups were born this spring in Lassen National Forest to a female wolf of unknown origins. Her mate is the son of OR7, a wolf with a tracking device that was the first of its kind in almost a century to migrate into California from Oregon, the Department of Fish and Wildlife said.

Biologists began surveying the Lassen National Forest area in May after they found evidence of wolf presence.

continued:
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Wolf News from Pindale Online!

7/2/17: Wolf News Roundup 7/3/2017
(By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online!) Wolves from a Washington wolf pack have succeeded in killing cattle on a BLM grazing allotment despite the use of five range riders provided in a deal with state wildlife officials in attempt to decrease potential conflict. A pair of wolves has been hanging out in the town of Alpine, Arizona, apparently in pursuit of elk that are calving within the town, prompting federal wildlife officials to engage in a program to haze the wolves away from humans. In other Mexican wolf news, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service has issued its draft revised recovery plan. Environmentalists are unhappy that Utah and Colorado were excluded from the species’ range, but state wildlife officials in Arizona and New Mexico will be pleased that the plan gives states the authority to decide where and when Mexican wolves can be released. ……. (Click on the link above for the complete story.)
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State wildlife officials review feds’ plan for wolf recovery

7/8/17 AP

Albuquerque, N.M. — State wildlife officials are reviewing the federal government’s plan for recovering endangered wolves that once roamed parts of New Mexico, Arizona and northern Mexico.

A draft was recently released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as the agency works to meet a court-ordered deadline to have the plan completed by the end of November.

continued:
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Wolf Education International

First week of July 2017 Newsletter

Danish farmers want new plan as wolves breed

DNR researcher talks wolves and their impact on Minnesota moose
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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
July 7, 2017
Issue No. 836

Table of Contents

* Corps Begins Cool Water Discharges For Returning Snake River Sockeye; So Far, Dam Passage Far Below Average
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439224.aspx

* Corps Continues Suspension Of Culling Salmon-Eating Cormorants In Estuary As Eagles Continue To Harass, Disrupt Nesting
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439223.aspx

* Interior Secretary Supports Funding, Package Of Actions Developed To Combat Spread Of Invasive Mussels
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439222.aspx

* Ranch And Fish: Investments In NE Oregon Stream Resulting In Juvenile Salmon Finding New Habitat
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439221.aspx

* Summer Chinook Fishing Resumes Below Bonneville, Wild Summer Steelhead Passage To Date Very Low
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439220.aspx

* Corps Extends Negotiations With ODFW With Contracts For Six Operating Hatcheries
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439219.aspx

* Study: Harbor Seals Target Salmon Juveniles Of Conservation Concern In Salish Sea
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439218.aspx

* California Confirms Presence Of Wolf Pack In Lassen County, Collars Adult Female
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439217.aspx

* Study Links ESA-Listed Killer Whales High Pregnancy Failures To Low Abundance Of Chinook Salmon
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439216.aspx

* Study Details 10 Percent Of World’s Total Fish Catch Discarded Due To Poor Fishing Practices, Poor Management
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439215.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

Idaho Code 36-1101: Regulation of Dogs.

(B) Any person who is the owner of, or in possession of, or who harbors any dog found running at large and which is actively tracking, pursuing, harassing or attacking, or which injures or kills deer or any other big game animal within this state shall be guilty as provided in section 36-1401(a)1.(F), Idaho Code. It shall be no defense that such dog or dogs were pursuing said big game animals without the aid or direction of the owner, possessor, or harborer.

(C) Any dog found running at large and which is actively tracking, pursuing, harassing, attacking or killing deer or any other big game animal may be destroyed without criminal or civil liability by the director, or any peace officer, or other persons authorized to enforce the Idaho fish and game laws.
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Idaho Fish & Game trains dogs to track wildlife, people

By Keith Kinnaird – 7/9/17 AP

Sandpoint, Idaho — The state is beginning to embrace the concept of pairing Idaho Department of Fish & Game conservation officers with service dogs.

Matt Haag, a Bonner County-based conservation officer, just completed a year in the field with Hudson, a happy-go-lucky 2 1/2-year-old golden Labrador retriever with a penchant for pursuit.

“It’s amazing what they can do,” said Haag.

Hudson’s service role is evenly split between tracking humans to aid law enforcement operations and detecting, according to Haag. Hudson is trained to alert upon six species including deer, elk, moose, turkey and fish.

continued:
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Fish and Game seeks comments on several proposed rule changes

By Mike Demick, Conservation Information Supervisor

Wednesday, July 5, 2017 – 11:07 AM MDT

Idaho Fish and Game is launching a negotiated rule making process and wants to hear from the public concerning six proposed rule changes.

Summaries of the rule proposals include:

Nonresident Tag Limit and Outfitter Allocation in Unlimited Control Hunts: Create authority for non-outfitted nonresident tag limits in unlimited controlled hunts and to provide for outfitter allocation in unlimited controlled hunts.

Bighorn sheep Auction and Lottery Tags: Modify wording that restricts auction tag and lottery tag holders from hunting in Unit 11 during alternate years to “Controlled Hunt Area 11” to avoid having multiple tag holders from hunting in those portions of Hunt Area 11 that fall outside Unit 11 (i.e., Units 13 and 18).

Allow use of bait for purpose of hunting wolves: Develop rules to allow use of bait to hunt wolves in game management units and seasons to be set by Commission proclamation.

Prohibit use of trail cameras and electronic two-way communication as an aid to hunting big game: Develop rules to prohibit use of trail cameras, especially, but not limited to, livestream or other transmission of other real-time imagery, and the use of electronic communication (cellular phone call, texting, two-way radio communication) as an aid to hunting big game. This rule is not intended to prevent the use of telemetry or GPS collars on sporting dogs.

Revise provisions for Special Needs Big Game Hunt and Disabled Veteran Special Big Game Hunt tags: Develop rules to establish an application period and process for awarding tags if applications exceed number of tags available. Currently, these tags are issued first-come, first-served. Consider restricting these tag holders from hunting in controlled hunts with 5 or fewer tags.

Additional information, including complete text of the proposed changes and how to submit comments, is available on the Fish and Game website at: https://idfg.idaho.gov/comment.

The public comment period will run July 5 through July 26, 2017.

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission has authority to adopt seasons and administrative rules. Seasons are related to limits, size, sex and harvestable species and do not require legislative approval. Administrative rules include legal equipment definitions, controlled hunt requirements, allowable method of take, possession requirements, and tag quotas. Any administrative rule must be published in the Administrative Bulletin for public comment and must be upheld by the Idaho Legislature to become a final rule.

[h/t ‘Whiskers’]
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Sessions to teach F&G hunter, bowhunter education classes

The Star-News July 6, 2017

Classes to obtain Idaho Department of Fish and Game certification for either gun hunters or bow hunters will be offered in Cascade on July 25-27.

The sessions will be held in the Emergency Operations Center building, located at 108 W. Spring across from the Valley County Courthouse.

The course will provide instruction in weapon handling and safety, laws and ethics, responsibilities towards landowners, skills and methods, game care and survival skills.

Certification cards will be awarded to students upon successful completion of the course, which includes attending all class sessions, passing field exercises and a written test.

Anyone born on or after Jan. 1, 1975, must complete a hunter education course in order to purchase a hunting license.

To buy an archery permit, all bowhunters must possess a valid hunting license and show proof they have completed an approved bowhunter education course.

The bowhunting course is recommended for students ages 9-14 or anyone new to bowhunting. A parent must check in students under age 18.

Cost is $9.75. Register online at register-ed.com/programs/idaho. For questions, contact Marcie Orem at (208) 608-8460 marcie_orem@yahoo.com

source The Star-News
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Longhorn goes for a car ride on a Nebraska roadway

by FOX26 News Thursday, June 15th 2017


A man in Nebraska was filmed driving by with a massive longhorn sitting right in the passenger’s seat. (Angie Kriz and the Polka Toons)

Verdigre, Neb. (KMPH) – It’s definitely not something you see every day.

A man in Nebraska was filmed driving by with a massive longhorn sitting right in the passenger’s seat.

Craig Falls is the man who shot the video and says he was on his way to a polka “gig” when he whipped out his phone to capture the unusual sight.

Falls says the man behind the wheel is Lee Meyer from Neligh, Nebraska.

According to comments on Falls’ Facebook post, this actually isn’t that uncommon; people use these types of cars as floats to show off their cattle or other livestock at festivals.

source:
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Significant portion of Americans think chocolate milk comes from brown cows, survey says

Alex Hider KIVI TV Jun 15, 2017

There are plenty of ways to make chocolate milk. Chocolate syrup, Nestle powder or ovaltine mix are all fine options, as well as soaking milk in a bowl of Cocoa Puffs. But to a significant portion of Americans, making chocolate milk begins with the color of the cow.

According to the Washington Post, which cites figures from the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy, 7 percent of people who completed an online survey said they believe that chocolate milk comes from brown cows.

… “Right now, we’re conditioned to think that if you need food, you go to the store. Nothing in our educational framework teaches kids where food comes from before that point,” FoodCorps co-founder Cecily Upton told the Post.

full story:
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CowBreeds-a
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Tips & Advice:

How to survive a car crash into water

Dean Johnson and NBC News, KTVB July 07, 2017

It’s a tragedy that’s heard all too often in Idaho: Drivers drowning after their vehicles plunge into some of Idaho’s waterways.

It sparked KTVB to find out what you can do if you find yourself in this situation.

“The initial impact is kinda like hitting a rock,” Sgt. Gordon Dye with Idaho State Police said.

That’s why safety starts with buckling up.

“It’s like a head-on collision a lot of times, and if you’re severely injured then self-rescue is kind of hard to do,” Sgt. Dye said.

Once you’re in the water, it can be easier said than done: Don’t panic.

“As hard as it is you need to stay calm and think,” Sgt. Dye said.

continued:
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July 2, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

July 2, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Motorcycle Stolen June 30

Travis Patten from Donnelly reported: 2000 Kawasaki Klx400. Stolen from beside the Yellow Pine tavern between 11:00 and 11:45 last night. Keep eyes open everyone…

photo:

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Announcement from The Corner

We have the store up and running. We have a ton of items. Here is a small list; Ice Cream, Yogurt, Various other Snacks, small propane bottles, motor oil , sunscreen, bug spray, feminine needs, shampoo, conditioners, toothpastes, toothbrushes, lighters, cell phone chargers. The list goes on and on. Basically a little bit of everything. We also get food orders in three times a week. People have been ordering perishables from us. We can get a wide variety, what we have been selling the most of is, bacon, milk, lettuce, ground beef, berries, bananas, yogurt and similar items. The produce we get is a decent price and great quality. We are also working on getting together other gift shop type items.
— — — —

Ed Staub Propane

The Ed Staub & Sons Propane company came to Yellow Pine Wednesday June 28 to do maintenance and leak checks.
— — — —

YPWUA Meeting July 2

The annual shareholders meetings for the Yellow Pine Water Users Association was held on Sunday, July 2 at the Yellow Pine Community Hall
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Yellow Pine Independence Day weekend

“Another great 4th of July in Yellow Pine was celebrated on Friday the 30th with the Dave Nudo Band in the Tavern.” -LM

photo gallery:

Saturday July 1 – Golf Tournament

It was another successful July 4th Golf Tournament at the Yellow Pine Country Club to benefit the Medical Supply & Training Fund for the Village.

Thanks to so many who donated, participated, and helped during this year’s event:

Dan & Umi, Steve & Sue, Teri N., Kathy H., Matt & Heather, Willie & Candi, Dave P., Sam, Alex, Christee H., you all do so much to make this community a great place to live.

And thank you Doug for doing the Cannon Start in Wally’s absence.

Thanks to the sponsors: Ashley Inn, Franklin Building & Supply, McCall Golf, Star News, Fairway Independent Mortgage, Alpine Village, The corner Grill & Bar, The Tavern, Kiff Brown Foundation, Marjie & Joel, Les & Joyce, Steve & Jenny, Dan & Umi, Chris & Gary, Nate & Lane from Midas, your donations to a worthy cause for the community are appreciated.

This year’s results are:

Mixed:
1st place – Ted & Laura with a score of61
2nd place – Dan & Umi with a score of 63
3rd place – Anna & Mark with a score of 65

Women’s
1st place – Dawn & Shelly with a score of 75

Men’s:
1st place – Joel & Jeb with a score of 68
2nd place – Willie & Steve with a score of 70
3rd place – Stew & Mark with a score of 72

Closest to the Pin on hole #1 Ken H.

The Ambulance and Fire Engine were represented in the parade as were many locals with decorated horses, 4-wheelers, vehicles, and motorcycles.

At the end of the evening we were treated to a power outage as the Fire Engine watered down the trees and surrounding area where the fireworks were set off by Willie in a spectacular display, bring to end a wonderful day of celebration – Yellow Pine style.

photo gallery (from AF):

Saturday July 1 – Parade

The parade started at 4pm with the “town bell” being rung by Joel Fields, followed by a color guard and ended at 410pm with the YPFD ambulance and fire truck. This year’s Grand Marshal was Lynn Imel. Christie Petersen was crowned Miss Yellow Pine. Willey Ranch Outfitter was represented with 3 horses. Out of the Blue provided the marching ‘band’. Various motorcycles, 4-wheelers and floats were decked out in red white and blue.

photo gallery (from DF):

Saturday July 1 – Willie and The Single Wides played at The Corner.

Saturday July 1 – Fireworks started at 10pm, very nice display for over 20 minutes.

Sunday July 2 – Sneaky Bones playing at The Corner.
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Yellow Pine Blowdown Update

(from 6/21/2017)

The Yellow Pine Salvage Sale was awarded to Mark Tucker last Friday. He hopes to start logging in early July and plans to finish prior to the Harmonica Festival. I’ll send another update as soon as I see his actual schedule.

Jake Strohmeyer
District Ranger
Boise National Forest, Cascade Ranger District
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VYPA News:

Next Meeting (and Election) July 8

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Agenda
July 8, 2017 2pm at the Community Hall

I. Call to order
II. Reading of the minutes
III. Treasurer’s report
IV. Annual Cemetery committee written report
V. Community hall oral report
VI. Harmonica Festival Committee oral report
VII. Old Business
Midas Gold Report and any news of repair of Memorial lighting
Willie to give a report on the composting toilets
Marty report of the Idaho Power yearly donation of $60.00 towards the memorial light
Vote on Dust Abatement
Vote on the purchase of an Association Computer
Report on the 4th of July Activities Golf Tournament, Parade and Fireworks, Vote on providing funds for next year’s 4th of July fireworks
VIII. New Business
Discussion and voting on plowing streets of the Village for the winter in the future, and vote on paying Cecil for the plowing of village roads last winter
Nomination list of offices of Treasurer and Chairman presented
Election of Council members for Treasurer and Chairman
Cash dispersal
Vote on having the books end July 1st that is the end of the fiscal year
Discuss communication with County Officials
Submitted by Lorinne N. Munn, Secretary
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Judy Wiley Memorial Stone July 17

We would like all people in the community, who can make it, to come join us at the cemetery on July 17th at 3pm. At that time, we would like to talk about Judy Wiley. She didn’t want a service or a memorial. So this would be a chat and a talk. We plan to place a stone at the foot of Bud Boyd in her memory. Judy’s sister, Linda Blank, will be joining us. Thanks to the community for their generous donations. We would also like to invite the community for chips and salsa at the Tavern after the ‘talk’. It would be a good time to talk to her sister and tell her your stories of Judy.

– MF
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YPFD Meeting July 29

Next YPFD Commissioner Meeting: July 29, 2017. Community Hall at 2pm.

Reminder that there is training every Sunday at 11:00 at the Fire Station unless we notify you.

Fire Siren will be tested at noon on the first of each month.

Training in Cascade.
posting by Star News
Awesome photo by Dave
image link:

Yellow Pine Fire Commissioner Meeting Minutes

6/21/17 2pm

Call to order at 1406

Dan Stiff, Cecil Dallman and Jeff Forster were present. Tom Richter was excused

Cecil Dallman Swore in as Yellow Pine Fire District Commissioner, District 1 by Dan Stiff

May 31, 2017 Minutes approved

Financials for YPFD will be overseen by Dan Stiff and Cecil Dallman

Minutes will be taken by Jeff Forster

Old Business:

Fire Commissioners approved the purchase of:

* 50 Fire Extinguishers and 50 Smoke/Carbon Monoxide detectors for YPFD residences. We will advise when they are available and where to place the detectors and how to use a fire extinguisher properly.

* 2 200 gallon water trailers to be used for residential pile burning and for small fire containment in our District. The trailers will be placed throughout the village.

* Assorted diameter chimney brushes and extensions to be used by YP residents throughout the village

* Additional Rope Rescue equipment and personal protective safety gear

New Business:

Discussion of YPFD apparatus, equipment and fuel still in possession from previous Fire Chief. Dan Stiff will take lead on these issues.

Donation of old FORD Fire Truck to Donnelly Fire for an Advanced Extrication Class (18 Wheelers/Heavy Equipment) that will be held in September. We’ll have 3 YPFD folks going to this 4 day class. Hopefully we’ll get some scrap money for it. Granite stated they’ll donate the truck and trailer to haul it out if need be.

Midas Gold asked for a letter from the YP Fire Chief outlining the positive relationship Midas Gold has shown with the help and materials for our Repeater Tower, keeping the roads open during last winter, etc. The Chief was advised to prepare a DRAFT document.

Reminder that Fire/Rescue/EMS training will be held on Sunday’s at 11:00-2:00 PM. Please check with Jeff, Ann or Dan to confirm training in advance of Sundays. Cancellations and changes do occur.

Next YPFD Commissioner Meeting: July 29, 2017. Community Hall at 2:00 PM.

Adjourn: 3:08

Approved:
Dan Stiff
Cecil Dallman
Tom Richter
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Big Creek Lodge

Breakfast at Big Creek Saturday Aug 5. Breakfasts run from 8-10am, and are $10/plate. Visitors can take a tour of the lodge and enjoy pancakes, ham, eggs and coffee/juice.
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Harmonica T-shirt Request

I would like to send out a request to everyone who might have a T-shirt from the past harmonica festivals. We are missing the following years: 1994, 2002-2014. It would be a donation to the Community Hall. I am hoping to make the Center more inviting and useful. Any suggestions from anyone are also welcome.
My email is: 75hallker @ att.net My phone: 208-633-6270

Thanks so much, Kathleen Hall – VYPA – Member at Large
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Local Observations:

Monday (June 26) lots of early morning airplanes, some quite loud. Overnight low of 48 degrees, partly clear sky. All 5 tree swallow babies are wiggling, barely able to hold their heads up, both parents caring for them. A few finches and pine-siskins at the feeder, heard the olive-sided flycatcher and a flicker this morning. Increasing vehicular traffic, local streets are dusty. Hot day, high of 94 degrees, cloudy and muggy in the afternoon. Sprinkles of rain before 8pm, not enough to get wet. Thunder and lightning and a little rain after 1am.

Tuesday (June 27) 0.03″ of rain during the thunderstorm last night, overnight low of 51 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning. The 5 swallow babies are growing fast, both parents caring for them, bringing food and carrying waste out of the nest. A few finches at the feeder, heard the olive-sided flycatcher. Female hummer at the feeder this morning. Got pretty warm today, high of 82 degrees, clouds with dark bellies building in the afternoon. Breezy and cooling off towards evening. Thunderstorm with lots of close lightning strikes and rain between 7pm and 930pm. A bat flitting and hunting bugs over the neighborhood at dark.

Wednesday (June 28) yesterday’s rain measured 0.29″, clear sky this morning. A few finches and pine-siskins at the feeders, robins hopping about. A few clouds by lunch time. Very pleasant day, light breezes. Increased traffic (both vehicles and airplanes.) Swallow babies growing fast, starting to get tiny down feathers. Swallows still taking feathers to the nest (and cleaning out the soiled ones.) Female hummer visited our feeders. Clouds building late afternoon, mild day, high of 78 degrees. A few drops of rain on and off late evening, not enough to get wet, distant thunder. Quiet night.

Thursday (June 29) a trace of rain from last evening, low of 42 degrees and mostly cloudy sky this morning. A couple of finches and a jay at the feeder. A few loud airplanes. Swallow babies getting darker markings, parents busy feeding and cleaning. Has been about half cloudy most of the day and very pleasant, high of 76 degrees. Two female (or juvenile) hummers at the feeder. A few afternoon airplanes, but otherwise quiet. Nice cool evening, but LOTS of mosquitoes out. Swallows hunting bugs. Nighthawk calling at dusk and a few robins. Clear sky before dark.

Friday (June 30) quite a few early morning airplanes. Overnight low of 41 degrees and almost clear sky this morning, good amount of dew. A few finches at the feeders, ground squirrels running about. Swallow babies are nearly covered in fine down and can hold their heads up. All mouths open when a parent brings a bug. Sego lilies, stonecrop and fireweed starting to bloom. White peonies in full bloom, penstemons blooming like crazy, yarrow, stonecrop and paintbrush in bloom too. Female (or juvenile) hummers at the feeders. Still have a lot of swallowtail butterflies visiting. Local streets are dusty, increasing traffic. Pileated woodpecker pecking on an elk antler on the fence this afternoon. Fairly warm day, high of 83 degrees, a few high thin clouds later. Quite a few planes parked on both sides of the airstrip by evening. A report there are at least 2 chicks in the osprey nest today. Jupiter next to the bright moon just before full dark and a bat flitting around hunting bugs.

Saturday (July 1) lots of early morning airplanes (extra loud one at 757am). Overnight low of 43 degrees and nearly clear sky this morning (a few wispy clouds), light haze of smoke and dust over the village. A few finches, a couple of pine-siskins and a jay at the feeders. Swallow babies have much bigger mouths and necks are stronger. Increased traffic and dust. Report of a motorcycle stolen from beside the Tavern last night. Two youngsters (in white helmets) tearing around the neighborhood at unsafe speeds on a 4-wheeler this morning. Multiple shots fired to the west at 955am for around 15 minutes. Cannon shot at 1019am to start the golf tourney. Fire siren tested at 12pm. Pretty warm today, high of 89 degrees. Parade started 4pm and went up the main road (while a brappy loud dirt bike revved it up down on Westside Ave.) Loud gunshot in the neighborhood just after 530pm. At 738pm a loud boom on the west side of the village, sounded like an explosion, happened two more times later on. Power went out at 855pm. A few illegal fireworks before 10pm. Bat flying over the neighborhood in a straight line, not hunting. Village fireworks started at 10pm and lasted over 20 minutes (some “personal” fireworks also going off.) At 1055pm the power came back on. Enough dust and smoke in the air to turn the moon pink. Quiet after 11pm.

Sunday (July 2) a few airplanes, but not too bad this morning. Overnight low of 48 degrees, clear sky this morning. Robins and a grosbeak calling, a few finches at the feeders, swallows swooping. Swallow chicks nearly covered in down feather and starting to grow wing and tail feathers, eyes still closed. Seeing more hummingbirds at the feeders. Loud dirt bike annoying the neighborhood before lunch. Hot by early afternoon, fat clouds building up. “Shootout” in the forest west of the village around 130pm. More shooting to the west started before 645pm and went on for over an hour. Increased traffic and dust in the neighborhood this evening. Clear sky and starting to cool off at dusk.
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Idaho News:

Idaho To Receive $30M In PILT Funding For 2017

By Taylor Munson June 28 Boise Public Radio

U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke announced yesterday Idaho will receive $30 million via Payments in Lieu of Taxes, a.k.a. PILT funding, for 2017.

A total of 44 local governments in Idaho will receive the funding. Idaho was a top contender for the money, with more than 60 percent of the state’s land being public.

Secretary Zinke made the announcement Tuesday, saying, “PILT investments often serve as critical support for local communities as they juggle planning and paying for basic services, such as public safety, firefighting, social services and transportation.”

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Valley County, Cascade will talk about taking over police duties

Study said city needs to make changes in department

By Max Silverson for The Star-News June 29, 2017

Valley County commissioners and the Cascade City Council will begin discussions on disbanding the Cascade Police Department and contracting services to the Valley County Sheriff’s Office.

Cascade Mayor Rob Terry spoke to commissioners at Monday’s regular county commissioners meeting, where all parties agreed to initiate preliminary discussions and explore options.

Terry cited findings from a cost analysis study conducted by Gary Raney, a former Ada County sheriff who is now a consultant.

The study found that the city could save a considerable amount of money by contracting services to the sheriff’s office, among other possible alternatives.

full story The Star-News:
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Solar Eclipse hosts asked to register with Valley County

The Star-News June 29, 2017

Anyone who plans to open their land for camping or viewing during the total solar eclipse on Monday, Aug. 21, is asked to register with Valley County.

No permits are required to host campers and there is no charge to register, Valley County Planning and Zoning Administrator Cynda Herrick said.

“We expect to get many inquires as the eclipse approaches for places to view and camp,” said Herrick, who is assisting the Valley County Astronomical Society, which is leading the coordination of eclipse activities.

“Having a registry will help connect those looking for a place to view the eclipse with those who have space available,” she said.

Herrick asks landowners to manage their own properties for fire protection, facilities, and other safety precautions.

To be added to the registry, contact Herrick at 382-7115 or cherrick @ co.valley.id.us.

source The Star-News:
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Avoid burning your retinas watching the solar eclipse; get protective glasses

Taja Davis Jun 30, 2017

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – No matter where you will be during the total solar eclipse in August, you need to be prepared for a lot of things — but especially when it comes to your eye protection.

“These are inexpensive solar eclipse glasses. These are incredibly dark compared to what your typical sunglass is. And you can see there’s just no comparison to the darkness,” Dr. Jerry Nave, with Advantage Eye Center, said.

Solar eclipse glasses block a higher amount of the photogenic radiation we get from the sun.

“What you’re doing is magnifying the protection with something like this compared to a sunglass. Sunglasses by themselves are not sufficient. The intention is to block the intensity,” Nave said.

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Four people killed in cabin fire near Tamarack Resort

KTVB July 01, 2017

Donnelly, Idaho — Four people have died in an overnight cabin fire near Tamarack Resort.

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office says multiple calls came in about the flames on Whitewater Drive just after 10 p.m. Friday. Several agencies responded, including Donnelly Fire, Cascade Fire, Idaho State Police, U.S. Forest Service Law Enforcement, Southern Idaho Timber Protection Association, and the Valley County Sheriff’s Office.

The cabin was fully engulfed in flames when crews arrived. The responding units were able to extinguish the fire.

William Smith, 46, of Boise, was taken to St. Luke’s McCall Hospital. The Valley County Sheriff’s Office said Saturday afternoon that he was treated and released.

The State Fire Marshal has confirmed locating four other victims, who were deceased. Their names have not been released.

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Idaho National Guard member Erin Smith one of four killed in Donnelly fire

by KBOI News Staff Saturday, July 1st 2017

Donnelly, Idaho (KBOI) — Four people were killed in a house fire near Tamarack Resort.

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office says the fire broke out at a home on White Water Drive in Donnelly about 10:06 p.m . Friday.

A man, 46-year-old William Smith of Boise, was taken to a hospital and later released.

The sheriff’s office said Sunday that although the positive identification of the four victims has not been confirmed Smith told deputies that the victims were his wife, Erin Smith, 34, of Boise, their friend James Harper III, 49, of Boise, and two juveniles.

Erin Smith made history last year when she graduated from the Army’s M1 Armor Crewman School. Smith was the first woman in history to graduate and be put on the path to be a member of a 4 person tank crew.

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Man missing after car plunges into NF Payette river

By Tom Grote for The Star-News June 29, 2017

The driver of a car that plunged into the North Fork of the Payette River north of Smiths Ferry on Saturday was still missing as of Wednesday, the Valley County Sheriff’s Office said.

Valley County dispatchers received reports about 5:30 p.m. Saturday that a car drove off Idaho 55 and into the river between Smiths Ferry and the Rainbow Bridge, Lt. Jason Speer said.

The sheriff’s office asked the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation to reduce the flow of the river through Cascade Dam to assist in the search for the vehicle.

The search was called off due to darkness on Saturday and was resumed on Monday.

The vehicle had not been located as of Wednesday.

full story The Star-News:
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Valley County Sheriff to resume searching for driver, vehicle in Payette River next week

by KBOI News Staf Friday, June 30th 2017

Smiths Ferry, Idaho (KBOI) — The Valley County Sheriff’s office isn’t giving up trying to locate the driver and vehicle that plunged into the Payette River last weekend.

The sheriff’s office told KBOI 2News that multiple agencies will try once again to recover the vehicle on Thursday.

link:
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Woman Hurt In Wreck

The Star-News June 29, 2017

20170626wreck
Photo for The Star-News by Gary Ertter

Senior Capt. Paul Vawter of Donnelly Fire & EMS walks past a overturned car that was involved in a two-car accident about 4:45 p.m. on Monday on Idaho 55 south of Lake Fork. The car was headed north and driven by Adele Valois, 73, of Tucson, Ariz. when a car heading south and driven by Jan Gallad, 49, of Donnelly, crossed the center line and struck the other car head-on, the Valley County Sheriff’s Office said. Valois was taken to St. Luke’s McCall and transferred by air ambulance to St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise. Her condition was not available.

source The Star-News:
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Arizona woman killed in crash on Highway 55

KTVB June 29, 2017

Boise – A 73-year-old Arizona woman was killed in a rollover crash on Idaho 55 earlier this week, officials said.

Ada County Coroner Dotti Owens identified the woman on Thursday as Adele Valois, of Tucson, Arizona.

Valois was the driver of a vehicle involved in a collision Monday afternoon on Highway 55. Officials say the vehicle left the road and flipped over landing on its top in a ditch next to the highway.

Valois was taken to Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical in Boise where she later died.

Owens said the cause of death is still under investigation.

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the crash.

source:
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Council couple found dead in wrecked car

The Star-News June 29, 2017

A Council couple was found dead on Saturday in their car that had wrecked on U.S. 95 about 10 miles north of Council, the Adams County Sheriff’s Office said.

Sheriff’s dispatchers received a request about 8:30 a.m. Saturday to check on the welfare of David Rittersbacher, 83, and passenger Joy Rittersbacher, 81, who were overdue from returning to McCall, a news release said.

The couple was last seen in McCall at 1:30 p.m. last Friday and were reported to be making their way back to Council. Deputies and concerned friends started a search along U.S. 95 until a 911 call was received about 10:40 a.m. about a vehicle at the bottom of a steep bank, the release said.

Officers found the car with the couple dead inside. No further information on the acccient was available.

source The Star-News:
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Fire motivates Table Rock neighbors to become firewise

Dean Johnson, KTVB June 29, 2017

One year after the Table Rock Fire burned more than 2,600 acres, threatened dozens of homes and burned one of the ground, neighbors say they’ve taken new steps to protect their properties.

The Table Rock Fire started just before midnight on June 29, 2016. Since then everyone from schoolchildren to prison inmates have helped restore the burn scar. It took days for firefighters to get control of the flames, and some of the burn scar is still visible today.

Residents tell KTVB they’ve used the fire as a learning experience. Over the course of the last year, many have become firewise. They’ve cleared shrubs and sagebrush away from their homes and plan to take a more proactive approach.

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One year later: Burnt remnants of scorched house all that remain of family home

by Amika Osumi Thursday, June 29th 2017


(KBOI Photos)

BOISE, Idaho (KBOI) — It’s been one year since the Table Rock Fire scorched two thousand acres of land. The fire swept through the area burning everything in its path, including one home.

One year later, the house is a mere shell of the home it used to be, and the owner says he’s still trying to pick up the pieces.

The fire started when Taylor Kemp lit a roman candle firework. That firework sparked a 2,600 acre fire.

Kemp was sentenced to jail last month and is ordered to pay $400,000 dollars in restitution, but Danielson says he doesn’t expect to see a dime of that money.

full story:
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Brown tips on branches show effects of spruce budworm

By John Lillehaug for The Star-News June 29, 2017

This is the time of year where we start seeing the negative effects of Spruce Budworm on conifer trees throughout the area.

Over the next few weeks it is likely we will start seeing brown tips on the ends of the branches where the new growth was and some spider-like webbing.

This is caused by the Western Spruce Budworm, a native North America insect that is defoliating the Douglas fir, Grand Fir, and Spruce in many parts of southern Idaho.

The insect populations began to increase around 2004 and now are at an outbreak stage in many areas. The Budworm has been present in the Long Valley area since about 2007 and is now spreading into the New Meadows area.

The cold, wet spring kept the insect at bay until the warm weather hit and brown tips at the tops of the Fir trees should appear as well as caterpillars hanging from silk threads as they dropped down to the lower branches or onto younger trees.

The caterpillar is the stage that feeds on the new growth which can be detrimental to smaller trees that don’t have much foliage. That is why the smaller trees often appear to be dead or dying.

The feeding stage of the caterpillar last about one to two months and then it spins a web or protective shelter where it goes through the pupation stage and emerges as an adult in August.

The adult lays her eggs in a mass on the underside of the needle. The eggs hatch late summer and the larvae migrate to an overwintering site which typically is a silken shelter under bark scales.

Budworm populations are cyclic across the west when the last outbreak extended for a period of 15 years. Normally the budworm does not kill larger trees but causes them to have reduced growth from loss of new growth or some cases dead tops.

Heavily defoliation over the course of five to 15 years of infestation often results in extensive tree mortality in the younger trees.

Even if the tree manages to survive the defoliation it may be stressed enough that bark beetles then attack and kill the tree.

Treatment for this insect can be difficult as the only way for control is to kill the caterpillar. Several insecticides are available for treating individual trees or small sized tree stands and only effective when the caterpillars are small and actively feeding on the trees, typically early summer.

Once the caterpillars have disappeared and the insect has gone into its next development stage chemical application is worthless. While chemical applications may be effective on individual trees, remember that control options are limited over large areas and trees may be attacked the following year as the outbreak persists.

Keeping stands of Douglas fir and true firs growing vigorously is the best way to minimize the effects of the Western Spruce budworm.

Call me at the Idaho Department of Lands office in McCall at 634-7125 with any questions.

(John Lillehaug is a Private Forestry Specialist with the Idaho Department of Lands and a member of the McCall Tree Advisory Committee.)

source The Star-News:
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Sage Winds

Spring 2017 Newsletter

Table of Contents:

Season in Review P.1
Bridging Gaps Between NWS Boise & Partners P.2
Meet & Greet P.3
Winter and Spring Flood Summary P.4
Eclipse Maps P.5
Summer 2017 & Fire Weather Outlook P.6

link SageWinds_Sp_2017.pdf
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Fire Season:

Yellow Pine Fire – Valley County Dispatch 911
The 24-hr number for Boise Dispatch is 208-384-3400
The 24-hr number for Payette Dispatch is 208-634-2757

Firewise http://firewise.org/
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Fire Starts on the Payette NF

June 28 (From lightning storm June 27)

The Payette National Forest is picking up numerous small wildfires resulting from the last two nights of lightning activity.

We have 6 reported wildfires that are staffed. Two of which are contained, and we are responding to 10 additional smoke reports.

On the Weiser Ranger District: The Adams Creek fire is contained at .25 acres. The Four Bit fire is at .10 of an acre located east of Cambridge, and just north of Four Bit Summit.

On the New Meadows Ranger District: The Bally Mountain Fire is at .25 acres and located approximately 2.5 miles east of highway 95. The Squirrel Creek Fire is .5 of an acre and located west of highway 95, and 2 miles northeast of Pollock Mountain.

On the McCall Ranger District: The Warren Wagon Fire is contained at .25 acres. The Louie Fire is a .10 of an acre and is located just east of Louie Lake. The fire is not expected to grow in size due to snow in the area.

photo link:

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Lightning storm ignites multiple wildfires in Idaho

6/27/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — The U.S. Bureau of Land Management says a lightning storm ignited multiple fires in Southwest Idaho.

The largest fire to spark during the storm Monday night was estimated at nearly 5 square miles and located northwest of Grandview.

The second largest blaze burned about 2.3 square miles Monday night about two miles east of the Mountain Home Air Force Base.

At least a half dozen smaller fires also started around the area.

No structures were threatened as of Monday night.

source:
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List of fires (June 27)

KTVB June 27, 2017

Yeti Fire
• Approximately 11 miles northwest of Grand View
• Approximately 3,800 acres

Dry Fire
• Approximately 16 miles north of Mountain Home
• Approximately 8 acres

Ditto Fire
• Approximately 14 miles northwest of Mountain Home
• Approximately 2,561 acres

Lock Fire
• Approximately six miles northwest of Mountain Home
• Approximately 350-plus acres

Breeze Fire
• Approximately 14 miles northwest of Mountain Home
• Approximately 800-plus acres

Rattle Fire
• Approximately 11 miles south of Mountain Home
• Approximately 200-plus acres

Rattle 2 Fire
• Approximately 12 miles south of Mountain Home
• Approximately 450 acres

Sim Fire
• Approximately seven miles northwest of the Mountain Home Air Force Base
• Approximately 200-plus acres

Chalk Flat Fire
• Approximately five miles northwest of Hammett
• Approximately 250-plus acres

Beet Dump Fire
• Approximately two miles east of the Mountain Home Air Force Base
• Approximately 1,500 acres

Grand Fire
• Near Firebird Raceway
• Approximately 20 acres
• The cause of this fire is being investigated. The BLM says explosions were heard in the area before the fire started.

source:
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Grass fire threatens Boise neighborhood, firefighters aren’t the only ones to respond

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, June 28th 2017


(KBOI Photos)

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — A grass fire came dangerously close to some homes in a Southeast Boise neighborhood, and while Boise firefighters responded quickly to the fire, the battalion chief admits they didn’t do the heavy lifting alone.

It’s a scary thing to hear anyone tell you there’s a fire, but its scarier when the fire is moving toward you — and moving fast.

Neighbors say the fire spread in a matter of seconds, burning through an acre of land and creeping toward homes on Anemone St. and Mimosa Way, just blocks from the site of the Oregon Trail Fire, also known as the Amity Road Inferno.

The human caused fire was put out quickly, with everyone safe and sound. Firefighters are saying it wasn’t just them that saved the day.

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The York Fire that threatened two homes now 70 percent contained

by KBOI News Staff Thursday, June 29th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Fire crews are mopping up a brush fire that sparked Thursday.

The BLM says the York fire is now 280 acres, but it’s 70% contained. The fire is expected to be contained by 11:00 p.m.

BLM responded with a helicopter and two air tankers along with local resources to fight the fire. The fire is North of Kuna Mora and S. Cole roads, but forward progression of the fire has stopped. Two structures were threatened, but are now safe.

The cause of the fire is under investigation.

source:
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Large grass fire near Utah border expected to be contained by Wednesday Evening

by KBOI News Staff Tuesday, June 27th 2017

Malad City, Idaho (KBOI) — Crews are fighting a large grass fire in southeast Idaho that has a portion of I-84 near the Utah border shut down.

The Idaho Bureau of Land Management (BLM) was called around 4 a.m. to the area of mile marker 271.

When they got there, they say the fire appeared to stretch about 300 acres, but high temperatures and wind have accelerated the blaze and it’s now grown to 3,000 acres.

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Crews battling blaze north of Sweet

By Sharla Arledge Idaho Department of Lands 6/30/2017

Fire crews are on the scene of a 250 acre wildfire near Sweet, Idaho. It is burning in grass and sage and is in the Timber Butte Fire scar from several years ago. The fire was reported about 4:30pm today, the cause is unknown. No structures currently threatened. The fire is 0% contained.

Approximately 50 firefighters are working the fire, which includes the crews of 12 engines, three single engine air tankers (SEATS), two heavy air tankers, and 2 bulldozers.

The fire is in the Idaho Department of Land (IDL) fire protection area. IDL is being assisted by Bureau of Land Management, US Forest Service, Gem County 2, and the Horseshoe Bend Fire Department.

source:
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Air, ground crews fight wildfire near Sweet

KTVB July 01, 2017


(Photo: Jenny Furst/KTVB First Person)

Sweet, Idaho – The Brownlee Fire near Sweet is fully contained, the Idaho Department of Lands said Saturday evening.

The fire was first reported at about 4:30 p.m. Friday. It was burning in the scar area from the 2014 Timber Butte Fire.

Air and ground crews stopped the spread of the fire Friday night. It burned 184 acres of grass and dry sage.

No structures are threatened, and the cause hasn’t been determined.

Four engines and 15 personnel are still at the scene.

IDL crews were being assisted by the Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Forest Service, Gem County 2, and the Horseshoe Bend Fire Department.

source:
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Help prevent the spread of wildfires this holiday weekend

June 30, 2017

Boise, Idaho – Hot and dry weather is predicted for the upcoming holiday weekend, and firefighters are asking for your help to prevent human-caused wildfires from spreading in Idaho. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) works to promote safety and reminds everyone that this summer there is an abundance of tall and thick grass, creating extreme burning conditions for the wildfire community.

“We are asking the public to be extremely vigilant when out recreating this holiday weekend, and to take all safety precautions to keep from igniting a wildfire,” said BLM Idaho State Fire Management Officer Michael Morcom.

On May 20, Idaho State Director Timothy Murphy issued a Fire Prevention Order making it a misdemeanor to carry, discharge or otherwise use fireworks on BLM-managed lands. Violations of the order can result in fines and more severe penalties, and offenders who start wildfires can also be held liable for damage and suppression costs. The safest way to enjoy fireworks this holiday weekend is to attend a public display sponsored by your local community.

In addition to fireworks, the use of incendiary/tracer/steel-core ammunition and exploding targets are prohibited. In general, please be proactive and take precautionary measures while shooting. Clear all flammable materials and rocks away from the target area, and be sure to have fire safety equipment (shovel, fire extinguisher and/or water) on hand. Sparks from steel core/steel jacketed fragments have been found to cause vegetation fires as much as lead core/copper-jacketed and solid copper jackets fragments.

During the summer, Kongming lanterns, wish lanterns, sky candles, fire balloons and sky lanterns are used at a variety of celebrations. Although they are not specifically prohibited, they are a fire hazard when they come into contact with dry vegetation.

Before you depart, make sure your vehicle and trailers are properly maintained by ensuring the safety chain is not dragging, wheel bearings are well greased and tires are inflated to the proper level to help prevent a blown tire. Sparks can be thrown from a vehicle or trailer that is not properly maintained, potentially causing roadside fires without knowledge of the driver.

The devastating effects from an escaped campfire can last for many years, so please completely extinguish your campfire before you leave. Currently, there are no fire restrictions in effect but in the future please KNOW BEFORE YOU GO!

For more information on current area wildfires and fire prevention information visit http://www.idahofireinfo.com and follow @BLMIdahoFire on Twitter.

source:
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Intermountain Region Wildfire Update

June 29th, 2017

Intermountain Region Wildfire Update

Fuels (grasses, shrubs, trees) are dried out – much of the region is in critical or near critical status, meaning fires can start easily. The fire season in the region has just begun and we have already experienced a high amount of human caused fires. While preparing for July 4th, please remember that fireworks are prohibited on all National Forest System lands.

Brian Head Fire, City of Brian Head, UT, 58,319 acres, growing 4,100 acres yesterday. It is currently 15 percent contained.

for more info and to subscribe go here:
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Study: Fuels treatment in Western forests has limited effect

Authors urge ‘adaptive’ strategy

Greg Moore 6/30/2017 IME

A review of more than 100 studies on various aspects of wildfire has concluded that thinning and logging of Western forests has had little impact on the frequency or severity of wildfires.

The paper, titled “Adapt to more wildfire in western North American forests as climate changes,” was written by 12 authors from universities around the West, including one from the University of Idaho. It was published in the May 2 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The authors advocate an “adaptive resilience” approach to addressing wildfires, which would allow the forest environment, human communities and firefighting strategies to evolve in response to more fires and climate change.

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Public Lands:

Visitors are reminded: fireworks are not allowed on the Boise National Forest

6/28/2017

BOISE, Idaho, June 28, 2017 — Boise National Forest land managers are reminding visitors and campers that all fireworks and other pyrotechnic devices are prohibited on National Forests lands regardless of weather conditions or holidays. The forest hosts large numbers of visitors over the Fourth of July weekend and this increased activity could lead to human caused fires.

Recent lightning storms moved across the forest and fire officials are monitoring for new starts. With the warmer weather and changing conditions, finer fuels like grasses are beginning to dry out and the potential for wildfires is escalating.

Forest visitors should take precautions to ensure they do not accidently start a wildfire.

* Be especially careful when towing trailers or boats as dragging safety chains can cause sparks and ignite roadside vegetation.

* When building campfires, use designated campfire rings or look for a place at least 15 feet from trees, shrubs, tents or other flammable objects; be aware of low hanging branches.

* Don’t leave campfires unattended and make sure they are dead out when you leave.

* All-terrain vehicles (ATVs) and motorcycles, should have properly installed and maintained spark-arresters.

* Exploding targets and tracer or incendiary bullets are prohibited on National Forest lands.

Some National Forest System roads and trails may still be impassible or closed due to damage from recent spring runoff. For all forest closures visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices

Linda Steinhaus
Public Affairs
Boise National Forest
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Commercial mushroom season comes to a close June 30, 2017

6/30/2017

Boise, Idaho, June 30, 2017- Boise National Forest officials want to remind mushroom harvesters that the commercial mushroom harvest on the Boise National Forest closes June 30, 2017. The limited commercial mushroom season began June 1 in areas of the Pioneer Fire area alongside public health and safety operations and recovery efforts for the 2016 wildfire.

The Barber Flats and Banner Ridge dispersed site camping areas, set aside for commercial mushroom harvesters will be reopened to general forest visitors beginning July 1, in time for the busy holiday weekend.

Personal mushroom harvest is open throughout the forest except for areas closed for public safety or protection of natural resources. Individuals can pick 5 gallons of any kind of mushroom per day and they cannot be sold, or bartered per Forest Service Handbook 2409.18.

Visitors are reminded to use the forest responsibly, stay on roads and trails, keep a clean camp and be cautious with campfires. With warmer temperatures grasses and brush are starting to dry out increasing wildfire potential.

Know before you go, call Ranger District offices and visit the Boise National Forest webpage page for current information and to follow us on Facebook: https://www.fs.usda.gov/boise/

Certain areas remain closed for public safety or resource protection. For current closures within the Boise National Forest visit: http://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices
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Forest Supervisor issues Decision on North Pioneer Fire Salvage and Reforestation Environmental Assessment

6/26/2017

Boise, Idaho, June 26, 2017–Boise National Forest Supervisor Cecilia Seesholtz signed the Decision Notice and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the North Pioneer Fire Salvage and Reforestation Project June 23, 2017, selecting Alternative B, the proposed action.

Implementing Alternative B will:

* Reduce hazard trees along roads and trails on about 5,200 acres through a combination of treatments including salvage and drop and leave

* Salvage additional dead trees on 2,010 acres

* Decommission 3.3 miles of unauthorized routes causing resource damage

* Re-establish forested conditions by planting trees on 6062 acres, naturally regenerating 1314 acres

* Restore whitebark pine on 336 acres

* Restore riparian vegetation on 209 acres

“We talked to a lot of people throughout the planning phase of this project,” said John Kidd, Lowman District Ranger. “We met with our local collaborative group, the Boise Forest Coalition, tribal and timber industry representatives; County commissioners; state agencies and other interested stakeholders. A 30-day comment period on the Environmental Assessment was included in the extensive public involvement efforts implemented from October 2016 through June 2017. These efforts helped inform the development of the Proposed Action and understand the effects of implementing actions included in the decision.”

District Rangers from both the Lowman and Idaho City Ranger Districts hosted field trips with a wide range of people to discuss the proposed action and the Forest’s intent to request an Emergency Situation Determination (ESD). During the analysis process for Environmental Assessment preparation, Forest representatives met formally and informally with groups to discuss the project when requested and participated in public forums to share presentations about the Project.

An Emergency Situation Determination, 218.21(b) is defined as: A situation on National Forest System (NFS) lands for which immediate implementation of a decision is necessary to achieve one or more of the following:

1) Relief from hazards threatening human health and safety

2) Mitigation of threats to natural resources on NFS or adjacent lands

3) Avoiding a loss of commodity value sufficient to jeopardize the agency’s ability to accomplish project objectives directly related to resource protection or restoration.

Authority to authorize an ESD rests solely with the Chief and Associate Chief of the Forest Service. Current regulations concerning authorization of an ESD exempt a project from the administrative review (objection) process.

“As discussed with stakeholders throughout the planning process, timing of hazard tree removal and salvage harvest is critical to achieving the purpose and need for the North Pioneer Project, “ said Cecilia Seesholtz, Forest Supervisor of the Boise National Forest. “The combination of my Decision and approval of the ESD by the Chief of the Forest Service May 31, 2017, allows immediate implementation.”

“Executing this Project this field season recovers the greatest wood product value from hazard and dead trees salvaged before deterioration occurs,” said Seesholtz. “It’s essential to recover this value so we can accomplish project objectives for hazard tree treatments; watershed improvements; and forest restoration, including reforestation.”

With the ESD approval, the Forest is moving forward with project implementation, including the award of hazard and dead tree salvage sale contracts, following issuance of the North Pioneer Project Decision Notice/FONSI signed June 23, 2017, and notifying stakeholders of the decision through this new release and other venues.

For more information visit:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/boise/home/?cid=fseprd530485

Linda Steinhaus
Public Affairs
Boise National Forest
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Salvage sale approved to reap timber from 2014 wildfire

6/30/17 AP

Lewiston, Idaho — The supervisor of the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest approved a redesigned logging plan for a timber sale that will see fewer trees cut and more assurances that scenic views and water quality are protected.

The Johnson Bar Salvage Sale was first approved last year, but it was halted by a federal judge who granted a temporary injunction requested by the Friends of the Clearwater and Idaho Rivers United.

The two environmental groups sued the U.S. Forest Service, saying the sale would harm water quality and steelhead habitat.

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Zinke calls for fewer barriers to development on public land

By Mead Gruver – 6/27/17 AP

Removing bureaucratic obstacles to development on federal land can create jobs and offer hope to nearby communities, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke said Tuesday in hinting at long-term changes in store for federal agencies including the Interior Department.

Promising reorganization “on a scale of 100 years” but without offering specifics, Zinke said the Interior Department and other land management agencies need to better cooperate. Right now, agencies that evaluate the same project often end up providing conflicting opinions, he said at the Western Governors’ Association annual meeting in his hometown of Whitefish, Montana.

“Jobs matter. There’s a social cost of not having jobs. And we love environmental regulations fair and equitable, but it takes wealth to make sure that we can maintain those regulations and improve,” Zinke said.

The Interior Department has begun reviewing its practice of requiring developers to offset the harm of their projects by paying for conservation elsewhere, he said.

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USFS Regional Intermountain News

6/28/2017

Table of contents

Regional Spotlight
Sage-Grouse
Forest News
About Us

link:
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Letters to Share:

Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue Update

6/30/2017

Update on the little one attacked by a coyote: She is thriving! What a little fighter. She screams and fights when I insert her feeding tube to the back of her throat (her jaw is broken and she can’t suckle a bottle…yet!), but then starts swallowing with vigor. Her eye still looks nasty, but she is tolerating my daily flushing. Her breathing sounded like Darth Vader – suspected the coyote crushed her trachia, causing swelling. She is responding great to the steroids to reduce swelling and her breathing sounds much better. Her gashes and puncture wounds are healing well. I think her best medicine is being near the other fawns. Hopefully soon there won’t be a wire panel separating them. She is fighting like a girl! Hence her name, “Xena: Warrior Princess.”

photo gallery:

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Wolf Alert

At the May 2017 Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) Commission meeting In Salmon, Idaho, IDFG released a draft outline for a new Wolf Management Plan. After listening to a recording of the meeting it emerged that, under questioning from members of the Commission, IDFG proposes to leave the maximum number of wolves open-ended and without limit.

If a Wolf Management plan is to be credible, it must identify a target population number for the state, just like other species. As a state, Idaho has agreed to maintain 150 wolves and 15 wolf packs in order to avoid and prevent relisting. It is time for the Department and the Commission to offer a specific management plan that plainly identifies firm population numbers, not vague objectives. IDFG admits to a statewide wolf population of 800-850 wolves in around 100 packs. The public will not accept these numbers as being permanent without a fight. There is no reason for Idahoans to bear the burden of being “The Wolf State” while our game herds struggle in many areas and our livestock industry suffers losses.

You have until July 26 to call your IDFG Commissioner and let him know about your feelings on a population cap or be at the Commission meeting July 26 and 27 in Bonners Ferry, Idaho. Meetings start at 7pm. Commissioners are: Brad Corkill 208-682-4602, Dan Blanco 208-816-0746, Blake Fisher 208867-2703, Greg Cameron 208-312-4465, Lane Clezie 208-3174867, Derick Atterbury 208-521-4500, and Jerry Meyers 208303-0559.

Paid for by Jim Hagedorn, Idaho Wildlife Foundation Member.
208-883-3423. jhag1 @ frontier.com
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Critter News:

Idaho Humane Society braces for influx of pets over 4th of July weekend

by Abigail Taylor Thursday, June 29th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Every year during this time, the Idaho Humane Society sees an influx of lost dogs and cats coming into its shelter.

Firework celebrations are stressful for even the bravest and calmest of pets.

During last year’s Fourth of July weekend, more than 100 strays were brought into the IHS animal shelter.

Their Veterinary Medical Center also saw an inflow of animals who were injured in an effort to escape loud fireworks.

The IHS shares these tips to help keep pets safe:

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Dog’s heat stroke while hiking Boise Foothills prompts warning

by KBOI News Staff Monday, June 26th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — The city of Boise is warning pet owners to use caution while hiking area trails after a dog reportedly had a heat stroke while hiking the foothills with its owner over the weekend.

City officials posted a reminder on Facebook for pet owners to “be very careful with their pets as summer temperatures begin to rise.”

They say it is important to bring water not only for yourself, but also your dogs.

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Pet talk – Fear and anxiety in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt 6/30/2017 IME

Separation anxiety and noise phobias are prevalent fear-related disorders in dogs. Dogs with separation anxiety experience distress when left alone or when separated from a favorite person. Dogs with noise phobia experience fear in response to certain noises, especially loud percussive sounds such as thunder, lightning, firecrackers, fireworks and gunshots. Every summer during our thunderstorm season, every Fourth of July and every New Year’s Eve, veterinarians are constantly being asked for sedatives for their noise-phobic dogs.

Dogs with noise phobias become restless. They may pace, vocalize, jump against windows or doors, chew, dig, tremble, salivate, pant, eliminate inappropriately and constantly seek to hide under beds or in closets or seek to be close to their owner. Some dogs will become so frantic that they will be destructive to the home. Some dogs, if outdoors, will run away to hide for hours and even days. With thunderstorm phobia, it is common for a dog to act fearful before people are even aware a storm is approaching.

Treatment for noise phobias are many. Some people just ignore their pet’s phobia. One should always reassure the pet that all is OK and always avoid punishment for its behavior. Establish a safe, dark place where sounds are muffled. Anti-anxiety drugs such as Acepromazine and Dexdomitor are available by prescription from your veterinarian. Non-pharmaceutical anti-anxiety products may also be tried.

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US pets getting fatter, 1 in 3 are overweight, report says

Cats, dogs have gained weight in past 10 years

Clint Davis Jun 27, 2017 KIVI TV

American pets are packing extra pounds these days, to the detriment of their health.

According to Banfield Pet Hospital’s annual State of Pet Health report, about one in three of all dogs and cats they treated in 2016 were overweight.

Banfield treated about 2.5 million dogs and 500,000 cats last year, according to its website, meaning approximately 1 million of those animals were overweight.

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Feds release long-awaited recovery plan for Mexican wolves

By Susan Montoya Bryan – 6/29/17 AP

Albuquerque, N.M. — After repeated failures over decades, U.S. wildlife officials have finally drafted a recovery plan for endangered wolves that once roamed parts of the American Southwest and northern Mexico.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is under a court order to complete the plan for the Mexican gray wolf by the end of November.

The draft document released Thursday calls for focusing recovery of the wolves in core areas of the predators’ historic range. That means south of Interstate 40 in the two states and in Mexico. The document also addresses threats, such as genetic diversity.

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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Fourth Week of June 2017
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Wolf News from Pinedale Online

6/15/17: Montana wolf population strong
(By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online!) Wolf numbers in Montana remained healthy in 2016 and more than three times the federally-mandated minimums. During the 2016/2017 wolf hunting and trapping season, 246 wolves were harvested – 163 by hunters and 83 by trappers. This is the highest harvest to date, but only 16 wolves higher than the 2013/2014 season. 2016 also saw 57 confirmed wolf livestock depredations – 52 cattle, five sheep. This is down from 64 in 2016. The recovery of the wolf in the northern Rockies remains one of the fastest endangered species comebacks on record and a real success story. Montana’s wolf population remains healthy, well distributed and genetically connected. The delisting of wolves in 2011 allows Montana to manage wolves as it does any other game species, which is guided by state management plans, administrative rules and laws. (Click on the link above for the complete story.)

6/15/17: Wielgus to sue WSU
(By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online!) Washington State University researcher Rob Wielgus reportedly plans to sue WSU over violations of his free speech regarding the Profanity Peak wolf pack’s repeated livestock depredations. Wielgus told K5 news that he plans to sue for six years of salary and then leave his WSU teaching position. (Click on the link above for the complete story.)
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter last week of June 2017

Let rich tourists hunt wolves by helicopter to solve Siberia’s wolf epidemic

Parasites, infections, wolves taking toll on Minnesota moose

Mexican Wolf Draft Revised Recovery Plan Released for Public Comment
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2 grizzlies euthanized after livestock attack

6/27/17 AP

Stanford, Mont. — Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks euthanized two grizzly bears for preying on livestock in Montana.

The Great Falls Tribune reports (http://gftrib.com/2sdGGq6 ) the two subadult males, who were siblings, were killed Monday.

Fish, Wildlife and Parks say the bears were the farthest east of the Rocky Mountain Front than any grizzly bear has been seen in more than a century.

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Groups challenge US plan to lift grizzly bear protections

By Keith Ridler – 6/30/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — At least three different legal challenges launched Friday against the U.S. government’s decision to lift protections for grizzly bears in the Yellowstone National Park area that have been in place for more than 40 years.

Some of the groups involved are the Northern Cheyenne Tribe, Center for Biological Diversity, The Humane Society and WildEarth Guardians. They sent 60-day notices of their intent to sue to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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Bear breaks through window into Alaska boy’s bedroom

Associated Press Jul 1, 2017

Anchorage, Alaska (AP) — A huge crash jolted 11-year-old Zach Landis awake in his Anchorage home, but it soon became clear it wasn’t a human intruder or his sisters playing a trick on him.

A black bear had broken through the garden-level window of Zach’s tiny bedroom and was whimpering like a scared dog in the room.

Zach screamed, and the man-sized animal bolted out the window and disappeared, the boy recalled Friday about the Monday night encounter at his home on a large, thickly wooded lot.

The boy scrambled over the shattered glass and ran upstairs to tell his parents.

“Mom, Dad, there’s a bear in my room,” he blurted. His mother, Alisa Landis, told him he just had a bad dream and that he could sleep with her and his father. No, no, no, it was a bear, Zach insisted, adding the animal had climbed out the window.

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Study: Wyoming deer avoid oil and gas wells

6/26/17 AP

Casper, Wyo. — Mule deer in southwest Wyoming have not adapted to oil and gas wells on their winter range, according to a 17-year study that also documented a 36 percent decline in deer populations exposed to energy development.

“The study shows the trade-offs of energy development in critical wildlife habitat,” said researcher Hall Sawyer, who has studied deer in southwest Wyoming since the 1990s.

The study looked at the Pinedale Anticline in Sublette County, where mule deer spend the winter and where one of the largest gas fields in the country encroaches on their winter range.

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7 western states report heavy winter losses of deer, elk

By The Associated Press – 7/2/17

Cheyenne, Wyo. — Across the U.S. West, wildlife managers are reporting above-normal losses of deer, elk and other wildlife following one of the coldest and snowiest winters in decades. Here’s a look at what they found:

Idaho

Idaho saw its third worst winter for mule deer fawn survival in the past 18 years, according to Roger Phillips, Idaho Fish and Game Department spokesman.

Of the 10 areas where mule deer are monitored, the lowest fawn survival rate was 3 percent, and the highest was 60 percent.

Mule deer numbers across the state are still healthy enough to withstand the loss as long as next winter is milder.

Concern for wildlife prompted Idaho to initiate supplemental feeding over the winter on a scale that hadn’t been done in about 20 years. It’s believed that white tail deer, bighorn sheep and elk came through the winter with normal losses.

full story:
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US rep wants Idaho sheep station open despite Trump’s budget

6/28/17 AP

Dubois, Idaho — U.S. Rep. Mike Simpson will try to keep open an Idaho sheep experiment station despite President Donald Trump’s proposed budget calling for its elimination.

The Post-Register reported (http://bit.ly/2t1BClE ) Tuesday that Clark County economic development officials worry closure of the station could have a major negative impact on the economy.

The U.S. Sheep Experiment Station employs 14 full-time researchers. It’s one of the most significant employers in the county that about 860 people live in.

The station’s annual budget stands at about $2.1 million for 2017, but Trump’s budget would send that figure to zero and lay off all 14 researchers. It would cancel a $1.7 million project aimed at increasing the efficiency of sheep production on rangeland, as well as a $711,000 project examining technologies for rangeland management.

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Eagle Fire Department saves mother and baby osprey

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, June 28th 2017

Eagle, Idaho (KBOI) — A mother osprey and her baby are taking a breath of fresh air after being saved by the Eagle Fire Department.

The birds had been caught up in a piece of plastic tarp that the mother was using to build her nest. Luckily, firefighters Andy Varin, Josh Bradshaw and Brent Thompson came along and got the ospreys untangled safely.

The Eagle Fire Department says the mother bird flew away, but the baby was taken to the World Center for Birds of Prey to be checked out and nursed to health.

source:
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Fish & Game News:

Sessions to teach F&G hunter, bowhunter education classes

The Star-News June 29, 2017

Classes to obtain Idaho Department of Fish and Game certification for either gun hunters or bow hunters will be offered in Cascade on July 25-27.

The sessions will be held in the Emergency Operations Center building, located at 108 W. Spring across from the Valley County Courthouse.

The course will provide instruction in weapon handling and safety, laws and ethics, responsibilities towards landowners, skills and methods, game care and survival skills.

Certification cards will be awarded to students upon successful completion of the course, which includes attending all class sessions, passing field exercises and a written test.

Anyone born on or after Jan. 1, 1975, must complete a hunter education course in order to purchase a hunting license.

To buy an archery permit, all bowhunters must possess a valid hunting license and show proof they have completed an approved bowhunter education course.

The bowhunting course is recommended for students ages 9-14 or anyone new to bowhunting. A parent must check in students under age 18.

Cost is $9.75. Register online at register-ed.com/programs/idaho. For questions, contact Marcie Orem at (208) 608-8460 marcie_orem @ yahoo.com

source The Star-News:
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

InvincibleMoose-a
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Moose caught in traffic in Aspen

by Gary Detman Thursday, June 15th 2017


A moose ran through the streets of Aspen, Colorado. Video Courtesy: Aspen Police – Pitkin County Sheriff’s Office.

Aspen, Colo. (CBS12) — A moose merged with traffic in Aspen, a popular resort town in the mountains of Colorado.

And it’s run through the city streets is caught on camera.

Aspen Police want to remind folks that moose are not friendly. Move away from them and give them room, especially if you have a dog.

“Be sure and give them lots of room if you see one, and if you happen to have your dog along, really make tracks away because the only thing that makes a moose grumpier than a tourist with a camera is a tourist, with a camera, with a dog,” wrote the department on its Facebook page.

source w/short video:
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Tips & Advice:

Lightning Safety

If you hear thunder, lightning is close enough to strike you, and on average, lightning kills 49 people in the U.S. every year. What should you do if a thunderstorm is near?

* Move inside a shelter: a substantial building with plumbing and electricity, or a metal-topped vehicle with the windows up.

* Stay in shelter for 30 minutes past the last thunder heard.

* If inside a building, stay away from windows and doors, and stay off porches.

If you’re caught outside with no safe shelter nearby take the following actions to reduce your risk:

* Get off any elevated area such as a hill or mountaintop

* NEVER shelter under an isolated tree, or lie flat on the ground.

* Get out of and away from bodies of water.

* Avoid being near objects that conduct electricity, such as barbed wire fences, power lines, or windmills.

For more information, visit:
http://www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov/
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Back-Country Humor:

4WheelerBackseat-a
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