Category Archives: News 2017

Oct 22, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 22, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Halloween Party Oct 28 6pm Yellow Pine Tavern

Annual Halloween Party: Hot Dogs and Chili provided. Bring other snacks if you wish.

Costume Contest: ghosts, witches, fairies all welcome or come as you are for good fun and eats.
— — — —

Heli Pad Progress

“Yellow Pine volunteers working on the Yellow Pine Helispot. Getting closer…” – AF

“Thanks to Jake S. with Boise National Forest who helped get this project get off the ground along with the April blow down, which expedited the process.” – JF

photos

— — — —

Fall Rx Burns planned

BNF:
Cascade Ranger District: Slash piles will be ignited in the following locations: Warm Lake, Yellow pine, Landmark and Crawford. It will be pile burning for two days.

PNF:
The Krassel Ranger District plans to ignite 1,600 acres in the Fourmile drainage, and 2,000 acres in the Bald Hill project area.
— — — —

Bear Aware

Bears are still around and looking for food, not much of a berry crop this year. Keep garbage secured and pet food indoors, take down bird feeders until hibernation. Clean BBQ grills (bears love grills and outdoor fridges.)
— — — —

YPFD News:

vcsar_logo-a

“Valley County Search and Rescue (VCSAR) has 4 new Yellow Pine Members. Congratulations to Jeff F., Ann F., Gary N. and Dayle B.” – AF

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.

Training is on Sundays starting at 11am at the YP Fire Station and open to the community of Yellow Pine. Check with Jeff or Ann to confirm trainings.

Both Fire Sirens will be tested at noon on the first of each month.
— — — —

VYPA News:

Next meeting June 2018
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
———————–

Yellow Pine Community Meeting with Midas Gold September 8, 2017

Meeting was opened at 1:30pm by Willie Sullivan who facilitated the meeting. Kyle Fend, Environmental Supervisor for Midas represented Midas Gold. Also in attendance was Valley County Commissioner Elting Hasbrouck. Over 40 area residents were also at the meeting. Kyle brought with him an open letter from Midas Gold President and CEO, Laurel Sayer, promising to have open discussions with members of the Yellow Pine Community and look for reasonable options to allow some form of safe access for the travelling public. They will work to coordinate meeting dates with Lorinne Munn who was appointed the point of contact.

Kyle acknowledged Midas is hearing the community, wants to retain a route into the area, and says the Midas Engineering Department is looking into the issue. He stressed it wasn’t easy as health and safety is a huge issue. The mine proposes to expand the Yellow Pine Pit which will take out the existing road. There are issues involved in going around the pit. On one side are issues with roadless boundaries on the other side the river must be dealt with. He indicated driving on the haul roads was not a good option with the safety issues involved, 200 ton trucks will be using the haul road for the mine.

Lorinne asked if the road the mine is proposing to build, the “Burnt Log Road” will be going through roadless areas and permits given for that, why can’t permits be given for a temporary road adjacent to the mine. Kyle responded that the mine has prior rights to access their property which would apply to the Burnt Log Road but not for access by the public on another road. Cecil Dallman pointed out the road could be reclaimed later. Lorinne also mentioned the Stibnite Road would be a good access for the public rather than contending with the Midas trucks on the proposed road. Kyle said the 200 ton trucks would not be on the Burnt Log Road and he felt there would be no conflict with public traffic.

Scott Crosby was concerned about the travel time current residents of Yellow Pine would encounter by having to go around to Landmark and back by Burnt Log Road to access Monumental and areas beyond. It is 32 miles up Johnson Creek and back on Burnt log a total of 50 miles or more versus what is now 14 miles to Stibnite and on to Monumental. A gate station or metering would be acceptable just so access would be maintained. There is a great deal of resentment related to road closures around here, we are wary that they probably won’t be reopened. Cecil mentioned maybe a Corridor Land tradeoff could be arrainged . Kyle expressed that metering would have an impact on productivity at the mine. It is not quick and easy when scheduling the trucks.

Lynne Imel mentioned the Idaho Conservation League sent a good letter to the Payette National Forest during the Scoping process. You can go on line and look at all of the letters that were sent.

Joel Fields asked if there will be access to Sugar Creek which is now closed. It was acknowledged the road closure would be beyond that point.

Willie Sullivan mentioned in the 2nd meeting the Village had with Ann La Belle she indicated a contractual agreement with the community might be a good way to go to guarantee the road would be reopened in the end. What does Midas expect of us, what was going to be in this agreement? Kyle said he can’t speak to that. Willy asks when will we get an answer as to what they expect of this community. It seems they hold a treat out as to giving us access and it’s bait and switch when we get to the meeting. This is the 3rd bait and switch meeting. Valley County Commissioner Elting Hasbrouck, who had driven to the meeting this morning, was asked his opinion of this suggestion to sign a contract. He said the community should not sign anything. Elting said the County Commissioners or the Sheriff are the only agencies that can close a County road and this is usually done only in emergency situations. “You can’t kick them out of the woods to get this done”. Elting says the County has additional concerns about the road to Cascade the wear and tear from mine traffic, and what to do about the snowmobile traffic which is an economic concern to the County. We all need to sit down and figure this out.

Chris Schwarzhofff from Big Creek says they are concerned about the road closure as well. He said 99% of the time Big Creek folks go through Yellow Pine and rely on Yellow Pine for a number of things it is a strategic issue. He feels the Stibnite Road is a strategic road whereas for example Sugar Creek Road is not strategic.

Dan Stiff has gone to all of the previous Yellow Pine – Midas meetings and wants to hear from Midas that they are going to make it happen, there will be continuous access. We are open to flexibility on how it happens and where the access is. Dan who is a Yellow Pine Fire Commissioner says we need access for Fire and Rescue.

Lorinne suggested Midas might be manipulated by the Forest Service and Fisheries to close the road as part of the deal for mining. Kyle says that is not the case, the road will simply cease to exist as the pit is mined and expanded. Cindy Fortin asked about the current gate that is posed to go up during breakup on Stibnite Road. Kyle responded that normally the Stibnite Road is closed naturally due to conditions during the Winter. With Midas current traffic the road is kept open year around and during the spring when it is wet and slushy, the fear is there will be harm to the fisheries. A temporary gate is put up during that time to protect this resource.

Scott Amos suggested the Mine take a close look at accessing the area through Sugar Creek and the Cinnebar mine. He has been conversing with the current mine owner who he says is very agreeable to using his property for a new route.

Erin, who’s husband works for Midas expressed dismay at what she worries is a degeneration of the relationship between the Community and Midas. She is very proud of the relationship, as many others have expressed, and is extremely grateful for the assistance and interest Midas has shown to the Community.

Scott pointed out that in the plan once the mining is done it would be nice to see the Valley as it used to be. His grandparents ran the gas station in the mining days. The past is gone, but Midas plans look really good for the area. It seems no one in the room was against the mine. All were pretty enthusiastic about the Midas plan except for the road closure.

Kyle said he will debrief with McKinsey Lyon and Belinda Provancher bringing our interests and concerns to them. He promised they will do better with bringing the Community into the loop. The Community will choose the group to work with Midas. Public Relations and Engineering are 2 different groups in Midas and they will work with us. Erin expressed that we need to know what is Midas’s point of view in relation to what we are telling them.

In our previous meeting Ann LaBelle had made a commitment that the Engineers would be at this meeting with the options they are looking at, Kyle apologized for that failure. They tried to reschedule but that did not go well. They are taking a hard look at what options there might be. It was expressed by the community that a 4 horse trailer might be a criteria for getting around the site. A backcountry road such as Profile is all that is hoped for, the road could be moved as needed by the mine, hours could be posted, a guide car or flaggers could be used, Winter closure is not a problem as it has never been maintained in the Winter . Deb Filler pointed out there are old haul roads to the East, could looking at these be an option? Kyle said in the plan they are trying to reutilize existing routes already. Kyle said alternative analysis on an alternate to satisfy all needs can be presented. He expressed his appreciation at the size of the group and that we all took time to come out.

Willie closed the meeting at 2:33 pm. After a 5 minute break, Commissioner Elting Hasbrouck addressed the meeting. He was impressed by the size of the group. He missed the other meetings but wanted to be informed about any other meetings we might have and what comes of them. The size of our group and that we stay together is important. He is concerned about the Midas impact on the other County Roads such as Warm Lake to Cascade. If Burnt Log is the main route we may lose the snow grooming for snowmobiles. The snowmobile traffic and that economic impact is a big concern. He said if an alternate road is planned they would need to know what that road would be like. He also brought up they would like to check into saving money by removing the Warm Lake – Yellow Pine 911 lines that don’t appear to be used. **

It was proposed that a small working group be chosen by the folks in the room to set up any other meetings with the Community that Midas might offer, hoping to get that meeting with the Engineers. Four members were chosen to be the liason between Midas and the Village. Willie Sullivan, Lynn Imel, Cecil Dallman and Lorinne Munn. Willy had sent out emails and letters announcing this meeting and was hoping to be able to replace some of the letters by email on further correspondence.

Submitted by Lorinne N. Munn, Secretary of Yellow Pine Village Association

**Note: The 911 phone line they are talking about is an actual physical phone with direct pick-up to Cascade Dispatch. We think this line is in the MTE building behind the Tavern. Doing away with this mysterious phone will Not affect our abilities to call 9-1-1. Jeff made sure this was correct when the Commissioner suggested this. – AF
————————————-

Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 16) overnight low of 23 degrees, clear sky this morning, patches of snow remain in the shade. Saw one jay and heard a finch, otherwise no signs of life except chimney smoke. Mid-day the sounds of chainsaws to the south where folks are working on the Life Flight Helicopter landing pad southwest of the cross roads. Bobcat sighted in the neighborhood around 11am. Sunny day and warmer temperatures, high 67 degrees. Nice evening, but a bit nippy, some thin clouds moving in.

Tuesday (Oct 17) overnight low of 25 degrees, hazy thin clouds this morning, patches of snow on the ground in the shade. Convoy of heavy trucks went up the back Stibnite Road this morning. Power blinked off and on at 1024am. More clouds by early afternoon, warmer temperatures, high 69 degrees. No birds around today. Colorful sunset. The snow in the shade melted – finally. Fully dark by 730pm.

Wednesday (Oct 18) overnight low of 27 degrees, mostly cloudy, roofs wet with melted frost and dew this morning. Heard a jay, had a couple of red-breasted nuthatches visit. Large truck traffic again this morning. Idaho Power p/u truck in the village. Pretty windy early in the afternoon, calmer towards evening, high 65 degrees. Junco sighted. Deep crimson sunset. Pileated woodpecker visited right at dark.

Thursday (Oct 19) overnight low of 30 degrees, sky covered by high thin haze, not much dew or frost. One stellar jay visited. A chipmunk scurrying around and a pine squirrel stashing cones. Quite windy early in the afternoon, tall trees swaying, flags flapping, calmed down by evening, high 67 degrees. Not much color in the sunset.

Friday (Oct 20) started raining before 5am, rain snow mix, then all snow by 10am, clouds down to the valley floor. Snow starting to stick by 1015am, then stopped by noon, just a trace on the ground and starting to melt. Chipmunk hunting seeds. Clouds lifted early afternoon, just the top of VanMeter hidden. Melting snow line rising during the afternoon. Afternoon rain showers and dark clouds, high 43 degrees. Snowing and stacking up before dark. Still snowing at midnight.

Saturday (Oct 21) overnight low of 30 degrees, patchy snow on the ground (just under 3/4″) and overcast. Heard a jay and a couple of nutcrackers this morning. Breezy before lunch time, blowing snow out of the trees. Light snow falling after lunch, breezy and cloudy. Pine squirrel running down the fence blasting through the trace of snow. Nutcrackers calling to the north. Misty rain late in the afternoon, low clouds, high 41 degrees. Rained all night.

Sunday (Oct 22) warmed up during the night, still raining this morning, low foggy clouds on the ridges, no snow on the ground. Little red-breasted nuthatch knocking on the barn. 4-wheeler traffic early. Rain all morning and into the early afternoon, clouds lifted until only the very top of VanMeter cloaked. Pine squirrel busy between rain storms. More rain falling in the late afternoon/evening, gentle but steady, high 46 degrees. Cloudy and dark by 7pm (and still raining.)
——————————

RIP:

Gordon D Colburn

August 20, 1937 – October 15. 2017

Gordon D. Colburn, 80, passed away on Sunday, October 15, while elk hunting near his home in Valley County. He was born August 20, 1937, to Ralph E. and Beulah Himes Colburn at Emmett, Idaho. In 1940, Dad was joined by a sister, Monette. In 1941, the family moved to Stibnite, Idaho, where his father worked for the Hubert Martin Construction Co. and the Bradley Mining Co. In 1945, the family grew with the addition of a brother, Phillip, and again in 1947 with the addition of twin sisters, Shirley and Sharon. Imprinted at an early age with pine trees, mountains, streams, lakes, and an outdoor lifestyle, Dad developed a lifelong love to fish, hunt, camp, and participate in winter sports. After spending nearly 10 years as a boy in Stibnite, he always believed it was a great place for a kid to grow up. Dad frequently told stories of the mining camp becoming snow-bound in the winter as the road to Stibnite would almost always snow shut. One particularly bad year, the Idaho Air National Guard air-dropped food for over 100 families. During one pass, the pallet of bread broke open on the way down and slices of bread came floating down like snow. The kids were tasked with running out on the runway to pick up the bread.

In late December, 1949, the family left Stibnite and had short-term residential stops in Emmett and Kooskia, Idaho, and Eugene, Oregon, before settling in Boise, Idaho, in 1951. Dad attended North Junior High and Boise High School. In his senior year at BHS, he met his soulmate & life-long partner, our mother, Inez Elguezabal. Both Dad and Mom graduated from BHS in 1955, and then attended BJC (now BSU). In high school and while at BJC, Dad held several part-time & summer employments at Riverside Grocery, Vanderford’s (36th & State), and Schubach Jewelers. He also served on an engine crew with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), wildland firefighting. During the school year, Dad was a “pick up firefighter” and would go out on call when he was available. He was the head cook on a fire in Adams County when a retardant plane crashed, just missing the firecamp.

Dad was hired by Idaho First National Bank on March 1, 1957, which began his long career with the bank. His initial assignments were in the bookkeeping department and the teller windows of the Head Office at 10th & Idaho Streets. Dad and Mom were married on June 15, 1957, and his introduction to the Basque culture began in earnest. Between Inez’s mother’s Basque cuisine and her father’s tales of his emigration from the Basque Country and his early life in the U.S. as a sheepherder in the Idaho mountains, Dad felt he was going to fit in very well. The young family began to grow in August of 1958, with the birth of their daughter, Tammie.

Dad also served in the Army Reserve from 1958 through 1962. His basic training was at Fort Ord in Monterey, California, and he served in the 755th Engineer Company in Boise. In December of 1960, Dad was placed in the bank’s trainee program, and transferred to the Parma office. At the time, the Parma branch was known as one of the bank’s training offices because of the experience and expertise of then VP & Branch Manager, Clarence J. Kniefel. Clarence proved to be a good mentor for Dad, who quickly received promotions and additional responsibility. In 1964, the Colburn family grew with the addition of their son, Richard (Ric). By 1965, Dad became Assistant Manager of the Parma office. With Clarence Kniefel’s tutelage and a good staff, the office saw excellent growth through the late 60’s. In October of 1969, Clarence Kniefel retired and Dad was promoted to Branch Manager. He was blessed with extraordinary Assistant Managers and Loan Officers, a steady flow of trainees, a stable staff and effective marketing, allowing the Parma branch to expand its customer base and continue its exceptional growth through the 70’s. During his 23 years in Parma, Dad had a profound sense of pride and gratitude in being able to serve the community and assisting the businesses and farms in the area. He took great pride in the employees at the bank, many of whom went on to manage their own branches, become executives, and run their own companies. Dad was active in community affairs and organizations including the Jaycees, Chamber of Commerce, Parma Industrial Corp., Parma Lions Club and served a seven-year term as a trustee of the Parma School District.

In 1972, Dad and Mom purchased property at Cascade Reservoir, building a cabin in 1974 that would become the center of our family’s activities, including fishing, hunting, wood gathering, snowmobiling, cook-outs, card games and singing around the camp fire. The cabin became Mom and Dad’s full-time home, where they live today. Our family also took numerous trips in the camper over the years to fish for steelhead on the Salmon River and help with spring roundup at the Alzola Ranch, south of Grasmere. Never one to pass up a chance to teach a life lesson, in 1973, on a family road trip to California, we stopped at a diner/casino for lunch in Winnemucca. Seeing us kids enamored with the lights and sounds, after lunch he said, “Come here, I’m going to teach you kids something.” He pulled some dimes from his pocket and started playing one of the slot machines. He plugged in the first dime and said, “See? The machine just eats your money.” With the second dime he said, “See? You just waste your money when you gamble.”On the third pull, he hit a $20 jackpot and the lights and bells started going off. Dad turned to us and said, “Get in the car, lesson over.” Mom quickly took us out to the car to wait for Dad. We snickered in the back seat all the way to California and we never let him forget that lesson.

In 1975, the family hosted Heather Gemmell, the American Field Service (AFS) exchange student at Parma that year. Heather and her family have been close extended family ever since with mutual trips to and from Idaho and South Africa over the years. During Tammie’s college years, her roommate, Lynn Miller, became an extended part of the family, coming home with Tammie on school breaks, and eventually living with Mom and Dad, while she did her student teaching in Middleton. More recently, another friend, Chickie Schroeder, was “adopted” into the family, sharing in our common Basque heritage. Chickie, Lynn, and Lynn’s husband, Tom Kelly, recently traveled with all of us for a big family trip to Alaska. Dad always considered Lynn, Tom, and Chickie as part of the family.

In the early 80’s, Dad faced a medical challenge, causing him to request a sabbatical from the branch environment. The bank granted him the transfer, appointing him as a Training Officer in the Training & Development section of Human Resources in the Administrative Office in Boise. In time, the medical challenge stabilized and was controlled. In 1985, he requested the bank’s consideration for another branch assignment. In mid-1985, Dad was appointed to the McCall office as Branch Manager. Dad and Mom quickly became immersed in the community. Dad loved serving in both a professional and personal capacity. He was active in Rotary and served on the airport and hospital boards. He was one of the founding board members of the Shepherds Home Foundation, which provides a home for neglected children in McCall. Dad considered coming to McCall a homecoming, given his roots in Stibnite. Dad retired from the Bank after exactly 40 years on February 28, 1997.

In the winter of 1997-98 they decided to go “off grid” and were the winter caretakers for the Shepp Ranch on the Salmon River. While it was an “experience of a lifetime”, Dad said he had never worked so hard and could “check that one off the list.” Always wanting to see and experience more, Dad made several trips into the back country with the aviation service that carried the mail to the ranches along the Salmon River.

For several years the folks lived the “snowbird” life and commuted to the Parker Dam area in Arizona, with their 5th wheel trailer, visiting family and making friends along the way. Mom and Dad traveled to Euskadi (the Basque Country) to see Mom’s ancestral home and the house of her father. Dad had quite a knack for the eating and drinking part of the Basque culture. The relatives affectionately called him “Gorka”, and had him tending bar at a couple family events, though he knew only a few words in Basque. On one trip to see Richard, Rosa and the grandkids at their home in Euskadi, the family also traveled to Rome, toured the city and Vatican and saw Pope Benedict in his weekly audience with the people. On Easter Sunday, 2017, we saw Dad baptized in the Catholic Church in Cascade. It was a major moment in his spiritual life, and we were so proud of him.

The entire family took a trip this summer, to celebrate Dad’s and Mom’s 80th birthdays and 60th wedding anniversary. We spent two jam-packed weeks beginning in Fairbanks. We visited Denali National Park, and rode the Alaskan Railroad all the way to Anchorage. We had a family dinner in Anchorage with our Alaskan cousins, toasting Mom and Dad. The trip concluded with a 7-day cruise from Alaska, through the Inside Passage to Vancouver, BC. Dad reveled in his first sighting of a grizzly bear, and constantly marveled at the scenery.

Gordon is survived by his loving wife and 60-year soulmate, Inez; his children, Tammie Colburn and Richard (Rosa Mari) Colburn; his grandchildren, Nekane and Josu Colburn; his aunts, Mary Bishop and Loreta Himes; his sisters, Monette (Clare) Baldwin and Shirley (John) Elicker, and his brother-in-law George Traughber; numerous cousins, nieces and nephews, and their families. Gordon was preceded in death by his parents, Ralph and Beulah; his brother, Phil; and his sister, Sharon. A Rosary Vigil will be held on Tuesday, October 24, at 12 Noon, at St. John’s Cathedral, downtown Boise, 775 N 8th St, Boise. A Funeral Mass will be held on Tuesday, October 24 at 1pm, at St. John’s Cathedral, downtown Boise, 775 N 8th St, Boise. Immediately following the funeral, a reception will be held at the Basque Center, 601 W Grove St, Boise, ID 83702. All are welcome to come share their stories of Dad and meet with the family. In lieu of flowers the family asks that memorials be made to any of the following: Euskaldunak, The Basque Museum and Cultural Center, or the Shepherd’s Home Foundation, PO Box 2011, McCall, ID 83638. Services are under the direction of Summers Funeral Home at 1205 W. Bannock St., Boise, ID 83702.

source:
[h/t SMc]
————————————–

Idaho News:

Idaho Geological Survey Celebrates National Geologic Map Day with Stibnite Area Map

October 13, 2017 UofI

The Idaho Geological Survey (IGS) is celebrating National Geologic Map Day today, Oct. 13, by highlighting its recent geologic map of central Idaho’s historic Stibnite Mining District.

IGS, a public service and research arm of the University of Idaho, produced the map in print and digital forms to create a detailed geologic depiction of the Stibnite mining area. It includes geologic cross-sections and a regional geologic map and is available digitally or in print form through IGS and at http://www.idahogeology.org.

Reed Lewis, an IGS geologist who co-authored the map, said it emphasizes the complex rock layers in this part of Idaho, as well as the ancient faults along which mineralizing fluids flowed. The historic Stibnite Mining District east of McCall produced gold, tungsten and antimony beginning in the early 1900s. Both tungsten and antimony were extracted during and immediately after World War II.

The map was funded in part by a grant from Midas Gold Inc. and was a multi-year project that involved traversing steep terrain and collecting rock samples for age determinations. Once thought to be largely Precambrian, some of the strata were found to be Ordovician in age, several hundred million years younger than expected.

continued:
[h/t Midas Gold]
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Member sought for Valley County Planning & Zoning Commission

The Star-News October 19, 2017

The Valley County Board of Commissioners is seeking to fill a vacancy on the five-member Planning and Zoning Commission beginning in January.

Applicants must be full-time residents of Valley County and have lived in the county for at least the past five years.

The selected applicant will replace current commissioner Rob Garrison, who has decided not to seek a new term.

Those who are interested may submit their resumes to Cynda Herrick at cherrick@co.valley.id.us or at the Planning and Zoning Office, 219 N. Main St. in Cascade, or mail it to P.O. Box 1350, Cascade, ID 83611.

For more information, call Herrick at 208-382-7115.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Preservation society to hold membership meeting Nov. 6

The Star-News October 19, 2017

The Long Valley Preservation Society will hold it annual membership meeting Monday, Nov. 6, at 6:30 p.m., at the Bulgin residence at 13033 Delayne Rd, Donnelly. All members are welcome to attend.

On the agenda will be nomination and election of officers, a discussion of the annual budget as well as new fundraising ideas, and a review of the foundation replacement project at the McDougal General Store.

Lucy Chronic will also report on the Idaho Heritage Conference 2017.

The society, founded in 1973, operates Historic Roseberry, a collection of relocated buildings in various stages of restoration one mile east of Donnelly.

The complex includes the McDougal General Store, the Roseberry Bandshell and The Barn at Roseberry, which is the site of the annual Summer Music Festival at Roseberry staged by the McCall Folklore Society.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Snow Causes Wreck

The Star-News October 19, 2017

20171014rollover-a
Photo courtesy Cascade Rural Fire Protection District

Cascade Fire & EMS rescuers work to extricate the occupants of a car that ran off Idaho 55 and rolled about two miles south of Smith Ferry about 9:19 a.m. Saturday. The driver, Brenna Albaugh, 19, of Grass Valley, Calif., and passengers Sarah Ethington, 19, of Carnation, Wash., and Kennadee Conner, 20, of Grangeville, escaped without serious injuries, the Valley County Sheriff’s Department said. The road was snow covered at the time of the crash, one of three reported on Idaho 55 on Saturday, the sheriff’s office said.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Authorities rescue man, girl on hunting trip after injury

10/18/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Authorities rescued a man and his 15-year-old daughter on a hunting trip after an all-terrain vehicle rolled, injuring the man in a remote area of western Idaho.

KBOI-TV reports that authorities with the Washington County Sheriff’s Office say they received a report of a hunter who had broken his ankle near Dodson Pass on Sunday night.

Authorities mounted a search but it was called off that night because of the rugged terrain and the darkness. The man and the girl were located the next morning in a rocky ravine.

Authorities say the teenager was not injured, and she was taking care of her father. The man was transported by helicopter to the hospital.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Fire safety burn permits no longer required this year

October 19, 2017
contact: Emily Callihan, Public Information Officer208-334-0236

(Boise) – After October 20, a fire safety burn permit from the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL) is no longer required until next year for burning activities outside city limits.

The permits are required from May 10 to October 20 every year during “closed fire season” and can be obtained online at burnpermits.idaho.gov or in person at IDL offices statewide.

People still should check with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality, tribal reservations if applicable, and local fire departments before burning for potential burning limitations and required permits.

Idaho law (38-115) requires any person who plans to burn anything outside city limits anywhere in Idaho – including crop residue burning and excluding recreational campfires – during closed fire season to obtain a fire safety burn permit.

Even though a fire safety burn permit is not required outside closed fire season, the permit may still be obtained year round.

The fire safety burn permit system informs fire managers where burning activities are occurring, reducing the number of false runs to fires and saving firefighting resources for instances in which they are truly needed. It also enables fire managers to respond more quickly to fires that escape, potentially reducing the liability of the burner if their fire escapes.

The fire safety burn permit is free of charge and good for 10 days after it is issued. Permits issued through the self-service web site are available seven days a week, issued immediately, and valid immediately.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Local orchards still feeling effects of harsh winter

Alex Livingston, KTVB October 16, 2017

Weiser – From peaches, to nectarines, to apples, orchards like Ron Kelley’s are still feeling the impact of last winter.

“We had at least 20 below zero in January,” said Kelley. “We had about three feet of snow, so we were just thinking about snow removal.”

Once spring rolled around, the focus shifted and Kelley could really see the damage that was done to his peaches in particular.

“We saw in April that we didn’t have much of a crop,” Kelley said. “This year we only had 1 or 2 percent of a crop, we hardly had a peach out here. That’s at least a third of our income.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Uniquely Small-Town Idaho

Ever heard of Cream Can Junction.

Oct. 21, 2017 By Mychel Matthews, The Times-News

Twin Falls, Idaho (AP) — Ever heard of Cream Can Junction?

It’s too small to be a “real town,” but it’s on the map, in the far southeast corner of Blaine County.

How about Rogerson, Elba or Raft River?

These, like Cream Can Junction, are a few of the many unincorporated communities — towns that aren’t towns — in Magic Valley. Classified as “populated places,” the communities have neither a city government nor city limits, but are bound in spirit.

So what does it take to be a “real town?”

At some point in their history, real towns have filed incorporation papers with the state of Idaho authorizing the residents to organize and govern themselves.

continued:
[h/t SG]
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Health officials warn of places with the most germs

Kaitlin Loukides Oct 17, 2017

Pocatello, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – On Tuesday, the Centers for Disease Control is saying the biggest population of people who are skipping their flu shot, are the ones who likely need it the most.

Those between the ages of 65 and 74 are deciding to forego getting vaccinated, but that could be problematic – especially for those who live more sedentary lifestyles.

Southeastern Idaho Public Health epidemiologist Jeff Doerr explains why this age group is the most at risk when it comes to contracting respiratory viruses.

continued:
————————————-

Public Lands:

BC YP SR Collaborative

Next meeting October 26th in the commissioners room.

Melissa B. Hamilton
U of I Valley County Extension Educator
Community Development / Agriculture

BC-YP Meeting-June 2017meeting.docx

10-26-17 BC YP FC AGENDA.docx
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Field review of Wildland Urban Interface project

Release Date: Oct 17, 2017
Contact(s): Jim Bishop 208-382-7400

Cascade, Idaho, October 17, 2017 — The Cascade District of the Boise National Forest is beginning environmental review of a proposal to reduce fire risk and improve forest resiliency on national forest lands adjacent to private lands in a project area along the eastern slope of West Mountain and western side of Lake Cascade.

A public field review of the project area is scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 26, 2017. Field trip participants should RSVP to Jim Bishop, at jjbishop@fs.fed.us or by phone at 208-382-7400.

Participants plan to meet at 9 a.m. at the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) located at 107 West Spring Street, Cascade and return to the EOC by 4 p.m. Please be prepared for cold weather, bring your own lunch, water and transportation. There may be car-pooling opportunities at the site. All roads are accessible and open to passenger cars.

The proposed French Hazard Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) Project includes, prescribed fire, thinning (both commercial and non-commercial), and mechanical chipping of small trees and brush. The proposed reduction of fuel loads, ladder fuels, and stand densities is intended to decrease the likelihood of crown fires and improve the resiliency of treated stands should a wildfire occur within the project area. For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the comprehensive proposed action report on the Project webpage: http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49636.

Consistent with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Forest Service will prepare an environmental assessment (EA). The first step in the NEPA process, called “scoping,” includes a comment period for the public, other stakeholders, and government entities to identify potential issues with the proposed action and suggest what should be analyzed in the EA. Scoping will begin later this month. To receive notice of the upcoming comment period, visit the project website and select “Subscribe to email Updates” under “Get Connected” in the right panel.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

French Hazard WUI Update

USDA Forest Service 10/19/2017

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the proposed French Hazard Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) Project on lands managed by the Cascade Ranger District of the Boise National Forest.

Project Description

The French Hazard WUI project proposes to implement a suite of vegetation treatments: commercial thinning (thinning with product removal), noncommercial thinning (thinning with no product removal), prescribed fire, and mastication (mechanical chipping). Treatment activities would be used alone, or in combination, to meet the needs for hazardous fuel reduction and vegetation restoration to restore species composition and stand structure, reduce undesirable species and stand densities, while favoring retention of larger diameter more fire-resistant trees throughout the project area. Reducing fuel loads, ladder fuels, and stand densities would, decrease the opportunity of crown fire development and improve the resiliency of affected stands should a wildfire ignition occur. In addition, activities occurring within the WUI would create or enhance defensible space for suppression resources should a wildfire threaten adjacent private properties. Restoring vegetative conditions more reflective of the fire-adapted ecosystem, reducing hazardous fuels, and minimizing risks to public health and safety would allow for safe and effective management of wildfire in the urban environment and meet the intent of several goals identified in the National Fire Plan and the Comprehensive Strategy.

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the comprehensive proposed action report on the Project webpage: http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49636.

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback for the environmental assessment. To be most useful, please make your comments as specific as possible. Your comments will help us identify and address issues. Comments may be submitted in the following ways:

Through the French Hazard WUI Project webpage .Select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel.

Via email to comments-intermtn-boise-cascade@fs.fed.us. Please put “French Hazard WUI Project” in the subject line of e-mail comments. Email comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), Adobe (.pdf), and Word (.doc).

Hand deliver to Boise National Forest, Cascade District, 540 North Main Street, Cascade, ID 83615 Attention: Jim Bishop. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.

By fax at 208-382-7480.

Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection in the Public Comment Reading Room on the project webpage and will be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act.

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by November 17, 2017 and make your comments as specific as possible.

Healthy Forest Restoration Act

This project is authorized under the Healthy Forest Restoration Act and thus is subject to requirements at 36 CFR 218.7 parts (a) and (c). There will be an objection process before the final decision is made (36 CFR 218). In order to be eligible to file an objection, specific written comments related to the project must be submitted during the designated comment period identified above or other designated public comment period specifically requested per requirements at 36 CFR 218.5 during the environmental analysis process. Individual members of organizations must have submitted their own comments to meet the requirements of eligibility as an individual. For more information on how the objection process works for projects and activities implementing land and resource management plans, please read the regulations under 36 CFR 218 Subparts A and B on the National Forest Service web site at https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title36-vol2/pdf/CFR-2013-title36-vol2-part218.pdf

For further information on the project, please contact Jim Bishop, Team Leader, at jjbishop@fs.fed.us or by phone at 208-382-7400.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Goose Lake Road from Highway 55 to Brundage Ski Resort

The Council Education Resource Crew (CERC) teamed up with the Payette NF Watershed Restoration Crew to plant approximately 6,000 native shrubs and trees along the newly constructed and disturbed road cut and road fills along the Goose Lake Road from Highway 55 to Brundage Ski Resort.

CERC members are high school students attending Council High School.

photos

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Rainbow Bridge in October

Thanks for the photo share David Steinhaus. (via BNF FB)
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Century Link SUP Decision is now Available

USDA Forest Service 10/17/2017

The Decision Memo for the CenturyLink Mores Creek Rim Road ROW Project on the Mountain Home Ranger District is now available on the Project webpage: https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=50749.

The purpose of this project is to authorize a 30-year special use permit for Century Link to install and maintain a new telecommunications line and associated infrastructure along National Forest System Road 237.

Forest Supervisor Seesholtz has determined that this action falls within categorical exclusion, 36 CFR 220.6 (e)(3). The project was reviewed in accordance with the categorical exclusion guidelines at FSH 1909.15(30), updated May 28, 2014. Following review of the resource conditions identified at 36 CFR 220.6(b), Forest Supervisor Seesholtz has determined no extraordinary circumstances exist. In addition, the interdisciplinary team’s analysis did not identify any other unusual circumstances or uncertainties about environmental effects associated with the action that would preclude use of a categorical exclusion.

Section 431 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014 (Pub. L. No. 113-76) directed that the 1992 and 2012 legislation establishing the 36 CFR215 (post-decisional appeals) and 36 CFR 218 (pre-decisional objections) processes “shall not apply to any project or activity implementing a land and resource management plan … that is categorically excluded … under the National Environmental Policy Act.” Section 8006 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (Farm Bill) (Pub. L. No. 113-79) repealed the Appeals Reform Act (ARA) (Pub. L. No. 102-381) implemented by 36 CFR 215. The Farm Bill also directs that the pre-decisional objection process established in the Consolidated Appropriation Act of 2014 shall not be applicable to categorically excluded projects or activities. As a result of these two statutes, the Forest Service no longer offers notice, comment and appeal opportunities pursuant to 36 CPR 215 for categorically excluded projects.

The decision may be implemented five business days from the decision date and after the special use permit has been issued. Implementation is anticipated to begin in the fall of 2017.

If you have questions concerning this project decision, please contact Stephaney Kerley, Mountain Home District Ranger, at 208-587-7961 or skerley@fs.fed.us.

Sincerely,
Melissa Yenko
Forest Environmental Coordinator
Boise National Forest
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Henry Clay Mineral Project Decision is Now Available

USDA Forest Service 10/17/2017

The Decision Memo for the Henry Clay Mineral Exploration Project on the Mountain Home Ranger District is available on the Project web page: https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=39633.

As identified in my attached decision, the purpose of this project is to approve a Plan of Operations to explore for locatable minerals, as required by Forest Service mining regulations published in the Code of Federal Regulations (36 CFR 228A). This action is needed because the Forest Service is required to conduct the appropriate level of environmental analysis to approve the operator’s Plan of Operations (36CF 228.4(f)).

Ranger Kerley has determined that this action falls within categorical exclusion 36 CFR 220.6 (e) (8). The Henry Clay Minerals Exploration Project was reviewed in accordance with the categorical exclusion guidelines at FSH 1909.15(30), as updated May 28, 2014. Following review of the resource conditions identified at 36 CFR 220.6(b), Ranger Kerley has determined that no extraordinary circumstances exist. In addition, the interdisciplinary team’s analysis did not identify any other unusual circumstances or uncertainties about environmental effects associated with the action that would preclude use of a categorical exclusion.

On January 17, 2014, the President signed into law the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014 (Pub. L. No. 113-76). Section 431 of that Act directs that the 1992 and 2012 legislation establishing the 36 CFR215 (post-decisional appeals) and 36 CFR 218 (pre-decisional objections) processes “shall not apply to any project or activity implementing a land and resource management plan … that is categorically excluded … under the National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA].” On February 7, 2014, the President signed into law the Agricultural Act of2014 (Farm Bill) (Pub. L. No. 113-79). Section 8006 of the 2014 Farm Bill repealed the Appeals Reform Act (ARA) (Pub. L. No. 102-381). The ARA’s implementing regulation was 36 CFR 215. The 2014 Farm Bill also directs that the pre-decisional objection process established in the Consolidated Appropriation Act of 2012 shall not be applicable to categorically excluded projects or activities. As a result of these two statutes, the Forest Service no longer offers notice, comment and appeal opportunities pursuant to 36 CPR 215 for categorically excluded projects.

The decision may be implemented five business days from the decision date, after finalization of the signed Plan of Operations, and the posting of a bond by the operator. Implementation is anticipated to begin in May 2018 and all ground disturbing activities will be completed within one year (365 days).

For additional information about this project, please contact Rick Wells, Forest Geologist, by phone at 208-373-4136 or email at rickywells@fs.fed.us.

Sincerely,
Melissa Yenko
Forest Environmental Coordinator
Boise National Forest
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

BLM to conduct prescribed burn near Crouch

Date: October 18, 2017
Contact: Jared Jablonski, jjablonski@blm.gov, (208) 384-3210

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management will be conducting the Garden Mountain Prescribed Burn, located approximately two miles northwest of Crouch, Idaho. The burn will occur between Oct. 23 and Jan. 1, depending on weather, fuel and ground conditions. Once initiated, burning operations are expected to last up to one week and have the potential for smoke to be visible from large distances.

The burn’s objective is to reduce hazardous fuels along roads and adjacent to subdivisions by burning up to 200 slash piles located on 286 acres of BLM land. While no closures are planned, the public is asked to be mindful of fire personnel and equipment in the area.

These slash piles were the result of a 2016 timber sale that occurred within the project site.

For more information, contact the BLM Boise District Fire Information Line at (208) 384-3378.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

BLM to host tour of Soda Fire rehabilitation areas

Date: October 19, 2017
Contact: Michael Williamson, mwilliamson@blm.gov, (208) 384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management will conduct two public tours of Soda Fire rehabilitation treatments. The tours will take place on Nov. 3 and Nov. 14, and will take approximately five hours. Departures will be at 9 a.m. from the BLM Owyhee Field Office, 20 1st Avenue West, Marsing, Idaho.

Participants are responsible for providing their own tour transportation and lunch. Due to rough terrain, high-clearance four-wheel drive vehicles are necessary.

The tours will feature post-fire herbicide and seeding treatments completed in both the Vale (Oregon) and Boise (Idaho) Districts. Areas visited will highlight the layering of rehabilitation treatments and adaptive management, as well as BLM’s considerations for the resumption of grazing. The tour will also include a site visit to planned future fuel breaks.

Those interested in participating in either tour must RSVP with Seth Flanigan, Assistant Project Manager, at 208-384-3450 or sflanigan@blm.gov, no later than October 30, 2017.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Forest-thinning project saved homes but highlights obstacles

By Andrew Selsky – 10/16/17 AP

Sisters, Ore. — Lightning started a forest fire one August afternoon near this Oregon tourist town, and it was spreading fast. Residents in outlying areas evacuated as flames marched toward their homes.

Just a few months earlier, the U.S. Forest Service and a group of locals representing environmental, logging and recreational interests arranged to thin part of the overgrown forest, creating a buffer zone around Sisters.

Workers removed trees and brush with machines, then came through on foot to ignite prescribed burns. That effort saved homes, and perhaps the community of 2,500 on the eastern slopes of the Cascade Range, by slowing the fire’s progress and allowing firefighters to corral it.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

US, states struggle to pay spiraling cost of fighting fires

By Don Thompson and Dan Elliott – 10/15/17 AP

Sacramento, Calif. — The long and brutal 2017 wildfire season is stressing the state and federal agencies that have to pay for the army of ground crews and machinery required to fight them.

The federal government spent more than $2.7 billion on firefighting in its most recently finished budget year, a record that far surpassed the previous high point of $2.1 billion set just two years ago.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

USFS Regional Intermountain News

Newsletters
———————————–

Letter to Share:

Youth Pheasant Hunt

Idaho Gamebird Foundation Oct 22, 2017

2017Pheasant-a

This is the kind of birds that Little Canyon and Sonny and Andy brought to us to put out. Young man with his dad, dad not hunting. No dog. Young man missed 4 but got one. Still hunting. They seen a number of hens, that Mark Gottchalk raised.

I am as excited as the kid was and his dad is puffed.

“Whiskers”
——————————-

Critter News:

Pet Talk – What Is Lepto?

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Oct 20, 2017 IME

Lepto is short for leptospirosis, a bacterial disease that is transferable from animal to animal, and animal to man. It occurs commonly in dogs and livestock, though rarely in cats. Many wild animals carry the bacteria in their urine, and those animals urinate in our streams and lakes. When our dogs drink that water, the potential for infection with lepto occurs. The wild animals that harbor lepto include mice, rats, raccoons, opossum, sheep and deer.

There are many strains of leptospirosis bacteria. These bacteria are shed in the urine of infected animals and put into the waters where we walk our dogs. When a dog consumes water that is infected with lepto bacteria, they enter the dog’s bloodstream and other tissues, especially the liver and kidneys. Disease outbreaks often occur during or immediately following periods of heavy rain or flooding, common in the Wood River Valley every spring.

Clinical signs that occur in dogs can be variable, but usually involve fever, shivering, decreased appetite, vomiting and dehydration. Decreased urine production due to acute renal failure is common. Jaundice due to liver damage is a common sign.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Third week October 2017
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wildlife managers track daughter of famous OR-7 wolf

By Mark Freeman – 10/15/17 AP

Medford, Ore. — State and federal wildlife managers will again be able to track gray wolf OR-7’s Rogue Pack now that one of his presumed offspring is sporting a new GPS collar.

In what was described as a “textbook” capture, biologists on the morning of Oct. 3 were able to trap, tranquilize and collar the newly named OR-54 in Klamath County’s Wood River Valley, the eastern portion of the pack’s normal range, according to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

The roughly 80-pound female is about 1½ years old and is likely from OR-7’s 2016 litter, said John Stephenson, a wildlife biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Bend who tracks wolves here.

“It’s very helpful to have a member of the Rogue Pack collared to give us an idea of where they are,” Stephenson said. “It’s working well so far.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Education International

Third week of October 2017

Money for wolf issues

Italian wildlife group offers £21,000 reward for information leading to arrest of wolf killers in Tuscany

Wolves kill British professor
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wyoming wildlife managers to hold grizzly management circuit

10/16/17 AP

Jackson, Wyo. — Wyoming wildlife managers are hosting a circuit of meetings around the state to talk about management of grizzly bears.

The Jackson Hole News & Guide reported Monday that the Wyoming Game and Fish Department recently gained authority over the state’s grizzlies.

The meetings aren’t designed to set policies, such as hunting regulations. They’ll simply be for members of the public to share their feelings on the state’s grizzly management.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wyoming wildlife officials search for grizzly shot by hunter

AP Oct 18, 2017

Cody, Wyo. (AP) – Wildlife officials are looking for a grizzly bear that was shot and wounded when a hunter said it charged him in northern Wyoming.

The Cody Enterprise reports that the bear charged Tev Kelley and his hunting partner Scott Smith Oct. 6 while they were field dressing an elk Smith had just shot.

Kelley first fired his .45 handgun at a log as a warning shot before shooting the bear.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Let The Games Begin

Oct 20, 2017 – IME


Courtesy photo by Rosemary Wright

Two bull elk lock horns during a fight in a field near Bellevue earlier this month. During the elk mating season in the early fall, bulls compete to establish dominance and gain the loyalty of females, or cows, in the herd. Bulls become more aggressive during the autumn rut, but do not always resort to fighting, which depletes their energy and can cause injury. They often compete for cows by showing off their antlers, posturing and emitting a strong musk.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Commissioners consider Elk ordinance

Winter feeding rules discussed at county workshop

Mark Dee Oct 20, 2017 IME

With elk already beginning to graze along the valley floor, the Blaine County commissioners took their first step toward setting new regulations on a divisive topic: winter feeding.

On Tuesday, county attorney Tim Graves presented a draft of an ordinance that would revise the county’s policy on feeding big game animals, which is currently prohibited by plat notes governing some 70 subdivisions. Elsewhere in the county, there is no policy governing feeding.

Right now, those rules are only enforceable through civil litigation—which is why representatives from the Golden Eagle Ranch subdivision attended the workshop earlier this week.

For six weeks last winter, during the depths of February and on into March, residents of Golden Eagle fed dozens of elk that they say were trapped by snow in the mid-valley neighborhood. To enforce existing rules, the county sued; that lawsuit is still ongoing.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Lawsuit: Eastern Idaho sheep grazing threatens bighorns

By Keith Ridler – 10/18/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Environmental groups have filed a lawsuit contending the U.S. Forest Service is illegally jeopardizing bighorn sheep by allowing University of Idaho domestic sheep on two eastern Idaho grazing allotments as part of agricultural research activities.

Western Watersheds Project and WildEarth Guardians in the 18-page lawsuit filed Tuesday contend the grazing through permits issued to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Sheep Experimental Station risks transmitting diseases to bighorn sheep.

The lawsuit filed by Advocates for the West challenges the Forest Service’s authorization of the grazing allotments in the Caribou-Targhee National Forest.

The lawsuit contends the federal agency is violating environmental laws by allowing the grazing this fall and winter before completing an environmental analysis.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Utah wildlife officials want to move mountain goat species

10/16/17 AP

Salt Lake City — Conservationists say mountain goats that were introduced by state wildlife officials in Utah’s La Sal Mountains are damaging Mount Peale’s fragile alpine ecosystems.

The Salt Lake Tribune reports wildlife officials are now developing proposals to establish goat herds in other Utah ranges where this big game species is not native.

Conservationists complain the state is sacrificing alpine landscapes just to provide more opportunities for big game hunting. Researchers say the La Sals are already showing signs where wallowing goats have exposed soils and left excrement and hair all around.

Big game specialist Rusty Robinson says officials with the state Division of Wildlife Resources are gathering data on alpine plant communities and will hold public meetings as they develop a Deep Creeks goat plan over the next year.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Buck killed after goring helpers at fun run near Davenport

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Oct 18, 2017

A mule deer buck was killed on Saturday after being aggressive to runners and goring two helpers during the Half Ass Half Marathon north of Davenport [Washington].

The buck came onto the Porcupine Bay-area road used for the 13.1-mile course and began acting aggressively and chasing some of the runners, says Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Police Officer Curt Wood.

“Two men who were manning a water station tried to chase the buck away but it turned and began attacking them,” Wood reported.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

3 little pigs found wandering in Caldwell

KTVB October 18, 2017


Are these your three little pigs? (Photo: Caldwell Police)

Boise — Maybe their house blew down?

Police are looking for the owners of three piglets found running loose in Caldwell Tuesday.

An animal control officer for the Caldwell Police Department caught the trio after they were spotted in the area of Laster Lane and War Eagle Road.

The piglets are being cared for at the West Valley Humane Society until their owner is found. The shelter can be reached at 208-455-5920.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Public meetings set in Idaho to amend sage grouse plan

10/18/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Federal officials have announced public meetings in Idaho to amend the 2015 sage grouse conservation plan.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management in a news release Wednesday says meetings are set for Nov. 2 in Twin Falls, Nov. 6 in Idaho Falls, and Nov. 7 in Marsing.

The Interior Department last week announced plans to amend the 2015 sage grouse plan that has been unpopular with Idaho officials.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Trumpeter swan hunting proposal alarms birders

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Oct 20, 2017

A federal plan to let hunters shoot trumpeter swans has drawn fire from some of the people who toiled to bring the majestic white birds back from the brink of extinction.

Here’s the story from the Associated Press out of Minnesota:

Trumpeter swans, North America’s largest waterfowl species, have made a comeback in recent decades thanks to efforts to reintroduce them to their former breeding range. Now the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working on a plan that would let hunters shoot them in several states that allow the hunting of tundra swans, a more numerous species.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Bill would void court order on salmon recovery

Congressmen want to reassert authority over dam operations

Greg Moore 10/18/2017 IME

Legislation being considered by the U.S. House of Representatives would nullify two federal court rulings regarding the operation of dams on the Columbia and Snake rivers to benefit endangered salmon and steelhead, some of which swim upstream for 900 miles from the ocean to spawn in the upper Salmon River and Redfish Lake.

In May 2016, the U.S. District Court for the District of Oregon invalidated the federal government’s operations plan for 14 dams in the Columbia Basin. Judge Michael Simon ruled that the 2014 Columbia Basin salmon biological opinion, drawn up by NOAA Fisheries, violated the Endangered Species Act and the National Environmental Policy Act. The judge ordered a new biological opinion and full NEPA analysis, adding that he doubted such a document could be written without considering removal of eight dams on the lower Snake River in Washington.

Federal courts have declared five successive Columbia Basin salmon plans, dating to 2003, to be illegal.

In March 2017, Simon also ruled that starting in 2018, federal dam operators must increase spring water releases over spillways at the eight dams to improve survival rates for juvenile salmon migrating to the ocean.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
October 20, 2017
Issue No. 848
Table of Contents

* NOAA Still Predicting La Nina Could Shape Coming Winter; Unrelated To Big Rain Hitting This Weekend
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439753.aspx

* Briefs Filed Opposing Irrigators’ Request For Juvenile Salmon Transportation/Spill Hearing In Federal Court
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439752.aspx

* Idaho Opens Rivers For Hatchery Steelhead Fishing With Restrictions; Says Rules Will Protect Wild Fish
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439751.aspx

* Tribes’ Moving Forward On Long-Term Plan To Reduce Lake Trout In Flathead Lake; Spawns Tribal Fish Business
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439750.aspx

* Council Hears About Success Of Montana’s South Fork Flathead Westslope Cutthroat Conservation Project
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439749.aspx

* South Fork Flathead Westslope Cutthroat Project Receives Award Of Excellence
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439748.aspx

* Study Links Salmon Spawning To Geological Change, Effects On Stream Beds Have Long-Term Consequences
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439747.aspx

* Montana Wildlife Mitigation (Libby, Hungry Horse Dams) Program Halfway Through 60 Years; Mitigating Operational Losses Next
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439746.aspx

* After Review, Council Approves 29 Basin Wildlife Projects Costing Over $12 Million In 2018
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439745.aspx

* New House Bill Would Move Anadromous Fish ESA Listings From Commerce Dept. To Interior
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439744.aspx

* Invasive New Zealand Mudsnails Found in California’s Carmel River, Threat To Trout, Steelhead
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439743.aspx

* Interior Secretary Zinke Names New Director Of Bureau Of Indian Affairs
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439741.aspx

* Washington Draft Plan Addresses Impact Of New Projects Off Pacific Coast; Protecting Fisheries A Goal
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439740.aspx

* Idaho Climate Summit To Explore Climate Change Effects On Idaho; Live-Stream Nov. 16-17
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439739.aspx

* EPA Awards $32 Million For Tribal Environment Programs In Northwest, Alaska
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439738.aspx

* EPA Names New Administrator For Region 10 Covering Alaska, Northwest States
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439737.aspx
——————————-

Fish & Game News:

F&G: Fewer yearlings challenge area deer hunters this season

By Andrew Weeks for The Star-News October 19, 2017

Hunters who haven’t harvested a deer yet this season should find solace that their ill luck might not have anything to do with their skill in the field. It just might be that there aren’t as many animals this year.

The general deer season hunt, which opened Oct. 10, started slow, said Regan Berkley, regional wildlife manager with the McCall office of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. That was expected for a mid-week opener, Berkley said.

Something that might frustrate hunters is that there are fewer yearlings this year.

“We did have a winter that was tough on mule deer in the winter ranges, especially the fawn component, which was hit pretty hard,” she said. “I don’t think we’ll see as many yearlings harvested this year.”

General deer hunts run until Tuesday and Oct. 31 depending on the zone. Several other hunts are on the calendar, including a number of elk seasons “that are all over the map,” Berkley said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Fish and Game – Elk History

(Courtesy photo, Idaho Department of Fish and Game)

Fish and Game “Import elk from Yellowstone 1915. In 1915 Idaho Fish and Game began importing elk into Idaho from Yellowstone National Park.”

[h/t SMc]
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Hungry donkey takes bite out of pricey McLaren

Friday, 29 September 2017


Donkey’s owners ordered to pony up $9000 for sports car chomp.

The owners of a hungry donkey must cough up almost $9000 to the driver of a McLaren sports car, after the animal chomped on the rear of the vehicle.

Police said that Vitus the donkey may have mistaken the orange McLaren parked next to his enclosure as a giant carrot when he bit the back, damaging the paint and a carbon-fiber piece, in Germany.

The car owner was forced to take the matter to court when the donkey owner refused reimbursement for the incident last September.

At the time, local media reported the owner of the donkey refused to pay for the damage, telling the McLaren owner he should have picked a better parking place.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

These baby horses are so Restless


————————————-

Seasonal Humor:

Woodin-a

StumpTable-a
———————

Tips and Advice:

Going hunting? Don’t forget to pack survival gear

by KBOI Staff Monday, October 16th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Hunting is generally safe, but every year hunters find themselves deeper in the woods and stay out longer than planned.

What’s more, hunting in the fall in Idaho means the temperatures can swing from the 70’s to below freezing within hours. Add snow and rain to the mix in rugged, remote locations and you have the potential for a life-threatening situation.

That’s why survival gear is just smart. Here’s what Idaho Fish and Game suggests:

Lighters – They’re cheap, light and don’t take up much space, so get a bunch of them. Carry one in your pocket, another in your day pack, and have spares in your vehicle. Remember inexpensive lighters that get saturated won’t ignite, so stash them in a waterproof container.

Fire starter – Don’t expect to always find dry wood. Buy some fire starter or make your own. This is not just for emergencies.

continued:
———————————–

Oct 15, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 15, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Halloween Party Oct 28 6pm Yellow Pine Tavern

Annual Halloween Party: Hot Dogs and Chili provided. Bring other snacks if you wish.

Costume Contest: ghosts, witches, fairies all welcome or come as you are for good fun and eats.
— — — —

Midas Meeting October 8

Audio recording of meeting provided by Scott Amos
— — — —

Fall Rx Burns planned

BNF:
Cascade Ranger District: Slash piles will be ignited in the following locations: Warm Lake, Yellow pine, Landmark and Crawford. It will be pile burning for two days.

PNF:
The Krassel Ranger District plans to ignite 1,600 acres in the Fourmile drainage, and 2,000 acres in the Bald Hill project area.
— — — —

Bear Aware

Bears are around and hungry this fall, not much of a berry crop this year. Keep garbage secured and pet food indoors, take down bird feeders until hibernation. Clean BBQ grills (bears love grills and outdoor fridges.)
— — — —

H-Fest Meeting

Meeting held Oct 14 at The Corner.
— — — —

VYPA News

Next meeting June 2018
— — — —

YPFD News

Sunday YPFD training (today): “Patient Packaging”

Thanks to all who attended to see and train on our equipment and chat about about how many ways we can move a patient from the ground to the ambulance.
Photo gallery:

We will be working on the “YP Heli Spot” tomorrow afternoon starting around 2pm – clearing trees and debris for those that choose to join us.

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.

Training is on Sundays starting at 11am at the YP Fire Station and open to the community of Yellow Pine. Check with Jeff or Ann to confirm trainings.

Both Fire Sirens will be tested at noon on the first of each month.
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 9) overnight low of 23 degrees, clear and frosty this morning. Traffic and activity in the village, folks are getting ready for winter. Sunny cool day until clouds came in later in the afternoon, high of 57 degrees. Pileated woodpecker hunting ants this evening just before dark.

Tuesday (Oct 10) no frost, not much dew, mostly cloudy sky this morning. Thinner clouds and some sun and gusty breezes before lunch time. Aspens are mostly yellow and tamarack trees are starting to turn, some lilac leaves turning red, maple tree half red and leaves falling. Calmer and less clouds later in the day, high of 64 degrees. Quiet afternoon and evening.

Wednesday (Oct 11) overnight low of 33 degrees, overcast and light sprinkles this morning. Pine squirrel looking for treats where the feeder used to be. Drizzles off and on until lunch time, then breaks in the clouds. Raven flew over the village calling. Have not seen nutcrackers for several days. Partly clear in the afternoon but not very warm, high of 51 degrees. 4-wheeler with deer on back went by in the late afternoon. Quiet evening, more open sky and temps dropping.

Thursday (Oct 12) snowed about 1/4″ before 7am, overnight low of 27 degrees, mostly cloudy and a few flakes of snow falling this morning. Most of the snow melted by 11am. Occasional flakes of snow falling after lunch, no accumulation. Helicopter flew over the village at 208pm. Breaks in the clouds a bits of sunshine then back to cloudy and cold breezes, high of 45 degrees. Quiet, no birds or critters around, light traffic.

Friday (Oct 13) early morning snow stacked up to an inch by 10am, overnight low of 32 degrees. Cloudy and snowing on and off during the morning. Most of the snow melted by lunch time. Snowing pretty good early afternoon and sticking, clouds down to the valley floor at times. Mail truck over an hour late. Snow on and off in the afternoon and evening, but breaks in the clouds at times too, high of 38 degrees. More snow after midnight during the night.

Saturday (Oct 14) overnight low of 24 degrees, an inch of snow on the ground this morning and partly cloudy. Heard a Steller jay, saw robin tracks in the snow. Bright sunshine and by lunch time most of the snow had melted out in the open, but lingering in the shade. Mostly clear sky all afternoon and evening, high of 49 degrees. Leaves are falling.

Sunday (Oct 15) overnight low of 21 degrees, clear sky and cold breeze, half inch of snow on the ground in the shade. Loud gunshot in the village just after 10am. Beautiful blue sky most of the day, high of 60 degrees. A few little brown birds around, but most have gone elsewhere. Light weekend traffic. High hazy clouds just before sundown. Snow still on the ground in the shade, but not as thick. Colorful sunset painting the clouds pink against the blue sky.
————————————–

Idaho News:

Across The Crevice

New Salmon River Bridge will support recreation, forest projects

By Phil Janquart for The Star-News October 12, 2017

Manning-Crevice-Bridge
The current Manning Crevice bridge was built in 1934 and has deteriorated past the point of maintenance. Photo for The Star-News by Phil Janquart

It comes at a cost of over $9.6 million, but when the Manning Crevice Bridge replacement is complete, it will support a growing recreation economy and open up new access for logging trucks.

The steel and concrete suspension bridge, funded with federal highway dollars, is being erected over the Salmon River 14 miles east of Riggins.

It will replace the current wooden bridge built in 1934 by the Civilian Conservation Corps that was built as part of an ambitious plan to build a road all the way to Salmon.

The project was abandoned at the onset of World War II and the stretch of Salmon River where the road would have gone is now protected under the federal 1968 Wild and Scenic Rivers Act.

But the current bridge has an important role in supporting outfitters, guides and others using the river for rafting, kayaking, hunting and fishing. That role will be assumed by the new bridge, which is scheduled to be opened next spring.

“We are talking about a major economic interest for Riggins,” Payette National Forest Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said. “The river corridor is really the major basis of their economy.”

The current bridge does not meet standards for loaded logging trucks and for road maintenance equipment firefighting vehicles, Harris said.

The existing structure is only rated for about 36,000 pounds, which makes it impossible for some heavy equipment to cross, he said. By comparison, a fully loaded semi-trailer weighs 80,000 pounds.

continued:
— — —

Shearer’s Ferry Manning Creek Bridge [History]

In the early 1860s there was quite a lot of traffic between the mining towns of Florence and Warren, and one of the earliest ferries crossed at Elkhorn Creek (called Elk Creek in those years), at the site of the Howard Ranch. Frederick and Susan Shearer ran this ferry for a number of years, and in 1865 their son George, a Confederate Civil War veteran, joined them. The Shearer ferry was replaced by a cable bridge in the mid-1860s. A toll was charged for crossing the bridge which was 75 cents per loaded animal (35 cents on return).

continued:
— —

Manning Bridge [Teepee Springs Fire]

IDAHO Magazine Facebook

photo:

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Man airlifted to hospital after crash on Idaho 55

KTVB October 15, 2017

Banks, Idaho – An Eagle man had to be airlifted to a Boise hospital after a three-vehicle crash involving a motor home on Idaho 55.

The crash happened at about noon on Sunday just south of Banks.

Idaho State Police say 77-year-old Lloyd Corn of Nampa was driving a Coach motor home when he stopped in the lane of travel with a turn signal on, waiting to turn into a pullout. 62-year-old Michael Moser of Eagle was stopped behind the motor home when he was hit from behind by a Chevrolet Suburban, driven by 17-year-old Jay Waltman, of Middleton.

The crash caused Moser’s Ford F-150 pickup to be pushed into the motor home, police said.

Moser was taken by air ambulance to Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise. The extent of his injuries are not known at this time.

Lane were partially blocked for more than two hours while crews worked to clear the scene.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Women injured in 120-foot plunge off Highway 55

KTVB October 10, 2017

Gardena, ID — Two women were rushed to a Boise hospital after a wreck north of Gardena Monday evening.

According to Idaho State Police, 59-year-old Marjorie E. Krahn of McCall was driving south on Idaho 55 when the crash happened at 7:42 p.m.

Police say Krahn’s Honda Pilot drifted, veering off the highway and more than 120 feet down an embankment on the side of the road.

Both Krahn and her passenger, 87-year-old Marilyn Krahn of McCall, were wearing seatbelts when the crash happened. The injured women were taken by ambulance to St. Luke’s Medical Center in Boise for treatment.

The crash blocked the southbound lane of Idaho 55 for about four hours.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho deputies who shot, killed rancher face lawsuit

By Kimberlee Kruesi – 10/13/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — The family of an Idaho rancher who was fatally shot by two deputies has filed a wrongful death lawsuit.

Jack Yantis was killed two years ago after one of his bulls was hit by a car and deputies shot the animal. Yantis arrived with a rifle just as deputies decided to put down the animal. Authorities have said there was an altercation, and Yantis and two deputies all fired their weapons.

Yantis’ family filed the complaint Friday against Adams County, Sheriff Ryan Zollman and former sheriff’s deputies Brian Wood and Cody Roland. The 37-page complaint alleges the sheriff’s office violated federal civil rights during and after the shooting of Yantis.

Adams County Under Sheriff Jeff Brown declined to comment on the lawsuit.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Earthquake rattles southeastern Idaho

Todd Kunz Updated: Oct 11, 2017

Bear Lake County, Idaho (KIDK/KIFI) – A 4.1 magnitude earthquake struck in Bear Lake County at 7:24 p.m. MDT, Tuesday.

According to both the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Utah Seismology websites, the epicenter was not far off of U.S. Highway 30 between Georgetown and Soda Springs.

There were reports of it being felt, but no reports of any damage.

UPDATE 9:42 PM: A smaller aftershock of 2.8 magnitude followed at 7:53 p.m. in the same location.

source:
————————————————

Public Lands:

October 2017 – December 2017 Schedule of Proposed Actions (SOPA)

Payette National Forest 10/11/2017

Here is the link to the Payette NF SOPA web page: Payette NF Schedule of Proposed Actions

or

sopa-110412-2017-10.pdf
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

BLM crews clean graffiti off popular Black Cliffs

Joe Parris, KTVB October 11, 2017


Black Cliffs cleanup (Photo: Joe Parris/KTVB)

Ada County – Bureau of Land Management crews are working to restore a popular rock-climbing spot that was tagged with graffiti earlier this year.

Vandals targeted the Black Cliffs climbing area near Lucky Peak in March, leaving behind purple, red, and white spraypaint all over the cliff face.

Crews used pressure washers and environmentally-friendly chemicals to strip the paint off the rocks Wednesday.

BLM Public Affairs Specialist Michael Williamson said it was disappointing to see beautiful public lands like the Black Cliffs marred with graffiti

“These cliffs are a million-and-a-half years old, and it only takes a minute to deface them and put something like this up here,” he said. “It’s really disheartening.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Western senators fight to change how wildfires are funded

Dean Johnson, KTVB October 12, 2017

… While [California] firefighters continue to fight the flames, a group of western senators, including Idaho Republicans Jim Risch and Mike Crapo, are fighting for how fires are funded in Washington, D.C.

Currently, states can receive federal hazard mitigation funding, which helps lessen the effects of a future disaster, only if the president issues a major disaster declaration. However, unlike hurricanes, floods, and tornadoes, one issue facing the West is that wildfires rarely trigger that type of declaration.

“Even some of those bigger fires don’t really reach that magnitude of being declared a federal disaster, and so you don’t have as much funding available to some of the local communities,” Jonathan Oppenheimer with the Idaho Conservation League said.

This year’s firefighting costs around the country have exceeded $2 billion, making it the most expensive firefighting year in history.

Idaho Sens. Mike Crapo and Jim Risch are co-sponsoring a bill with many other western senators that would treat wildfires in the same manner as other natural disasters, like hurricanes, floods or tornadoes.

full story:
—————————–

Critter News:

Pet Talk – Cataracts in pets

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Oct 13, 2017 IME

A cataract is opacity within the lens of the eye. Cataracts can be classified by their severity, age at onset and underlying cause. When only a portion of the lens is opacified, it is called an immature cataract and vision is only partially affected. When the lens is completely opaque, a mature cataract is present and the affected eye is effectively blind. Cataracts are very common in dogs and much less so in cats.

Inherited cataracts are the most common type in dogs; they affect more than 40 breeds and can arise at any age. Other causes of cataracts include diabetes mellitus in dogs, nutritional deficiencies in the newborn, trauma to the eyes and severe inflammation to the eye.

As they grow old, all animals develop a hardening of the center of the lens, which turns the lens a milky gray-white color. This aging change is called nuclear sclerosis and is not the same as a cataract and is never treated.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Middleton man, 78, attacked by dogs while sitting on front porch

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, October 11th 2017

Middleton, Idaho (KBOI) — Seventy-eight-year-old George Davis was sitting on his porch taking in the late afternoon sun when two dogs, each about 65 pounds, suddenly appeared.

“They seen me sitting here and they just run straight across the street and attacked me,” Davis told KBOI 2News. “They were on me before I…I thought they were some dogs (that wanted to) come over to be petted. They weren’t interested in that. They were interested in attacking me.”

And attack him they did as his bite wounds clearly show.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Eastern Idaho owner of dogs that mauled woman faces charges

10/10/17 AP

Blackfoot, Idaho — Police in the eastern Idaho town of Blackfoot say a man has been charged with several misdemeanors after his dogs mauled a woman and killed her pet.

Police say 47-year-old Troy M. Smith is charged with three counts of harboring vicious animals and other dog-related misdemeanors. Smith does not have a listed phone number and could not be reached for comment on Tuesday.

The woman was injured on Sept. 25 after she saw her dog being attacked by three pit bull mixes in her yard. Police say she was trying to save her own dog when the three attacking dogs turned on her.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Second week of October 2017
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Collared wolf OR-33 shot dead northwest of Klamath Falls

10/12/17 AP

Medford, Ore. — A collared gray wolf known as OR-33 was illegally killed in southern Oregon, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is asking the public to help solve the crime.

The agency announced the death Wednesday, saying DNA from a heavily decomposed carcass found this spring was matched to DNA from when OR-33 was collared by wildlife biologists two years ago.

The carcass was found northwest of Klamath Falls on the Fremont-Winema National Forest.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Pinedale Online Wolf News

9/28/17: Wolf News Roundup
(By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online!) In Wyoming, federal funding for wolf control in the predator zone of Wyoming ends September 30, and after that date, responsibility falls on local predator control boards. In Washington, the Center for Biological Diversity and Cascadia Wildlands have teamed up to sue the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife over the state’s protocol for lethal removal of wolves involved in repeated livestock depredations. In Alaska, the wolf population on Alaska’s Prince of Wales Island has grown to more than 240 animals, so state officials have authorized a wolf hunt quota of 46 animals, according to media reports. The Minnesota wolf population is booming, with 500 packs and more than 2,800 wolves in the northern portion of the state – more than twice the numbers required in federal recovery plans….. (Click on the link above for the complete story.)

10/3/17: Wolf Hunt Area 11 Closes
(By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online!) Wolf hunt area 11 (the area from Boulder Creek north to the Upper Green) has now closed after the harvest quota was reached on opening day, Sunday, October 1. Although the quota was set at 3 wolves, four were taken, as the Wyoming Game & Fish Department reported in its trophy game harvest summary…… (Click on the link above for the complete story.)

10/4/17: WSU predation study flawed
(By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online!) The Washington Policy Center took a look at the Washington State University paper authored by Robert Wielgus that claimed that killing wolves increases the number of sheep and cattle that wolves depredate the following year. The Washington Policy Center researchers found ghe WSU study’s conclusions are based on erroneous statistical arguments, and are not supported by rigorous analysis of the study’s own data. Contrary to Wielgus’ conclusions, ther re-analysis of his study’s data finds that the strongest explanation of an increase in loss of cattle and sheep was simply an increase in the wolf population. Data in Wielgus’ study actually support the current Washington state strategy of removing wolves where there is conflict with a rancher, consistent with the common-sense conclusion that removing wolves reduces livestock deaths…… (Click on the link above for the complete story.)

10/4/17: Mexican wolf range: 90% in Mexico
(By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online!) A recent peer-reviewed scientific paper reaffirmed the historical range of the endangered Mexican wolf as being southeastern Arizona, southwestern New Mexico and the Sierra Madre Mountains in Mexico. The paper was the featured article published in the July issue of The Journal of Wildlife Management. In the peer-reviewed paper, the authors use ecological, physiographic and morphological data to clarify the Mexican wolf’s historical range. The authors say extending the historical range boundary too far northward would place Mexican wolves north of historical transitions and run the risk of “genetic swamping” by the larger Northern Rockies wolves. The survey found that there were 63 wolves in Arizona and 50 in New Mexico. This represents a more than doubling of the population since 2009…… (Click on the link above for the complete story.)
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Education International

Second week October 2017

Oregon Authorizes Lethal Removal of Four Harl Butte Wolves

In Israel’s Ein Gedi, tourists’ trash lures wolves out of the shadows – and into trouble

French sheep farmers protest against protection of wolves

Red Cliff Tribe To Trap, Collar Wolves This Fall
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Rabid coyote bites man at Oregon farm

10/11/17 AP

Portland, Ore. — Health officials say a coyote tested positive for rabies after biting a man at a farm in Gervais, Oregon.

Richard Sherman of the Marion County Health Department said Wednesday that the victim reported that the coyote bit him on the leg after walking up to him and sniffing him. The man shot the coyote before seeking medical treatment, which included a series of injections.

The animal’s body was taken to a laboratory for testing, and results confirmed rabies.

Sherman says coyotes are rarely found with rabies. In Oregon, only three have tested positive for the disease in the past decade.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Oregon woman wakes to find bear in living room

10/10/17 AP

Sumpter, Ore. — A woman in Oregon forgot to latch her front door and awoke to find a 160-pound bear in her living room.

The Baker City Herald reports that the bear knocked over a bookshelf but didn’t harm the 78-year-old woman.

The 3-year-old male bear was trapped and euthanized late last week by state wildlife officials.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Predator-proof pens ‘last-ditch effort’ to save Selkirk caribou

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Oct. 12, 2017


A small band of Southern Selkirks herd woodland caribou is photographed just north of the U.S.-Canada border during an aerial survey in March 2017. (Via Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife)

The Kalispel Tribe is going to take another shot at restoring endangered Selkirk mountain caribou with a $96,000 grant for a maternal penning project.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service grant along with other funding the tribe has obtained will be used to assist in the capture of caribou cows and newborn calves for placement in special pens built to protect them from predators, the Tribe says in a release.

Fewer than a dozen caribou remain in the South Selkirk population. The tribe calls the project “a last ditch/stop gap measure to prevent the extirpation of these animals.”

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

From tragedy came a high-tech idea — ‘smart nanny cam for horses’

by Matt Markovich, KOMO News Friday, October 13th 2017

Remond, Wash. (KOMO) – Alexa Anthony throws a blanket on her horse, Elektra, for the night. It’s going to be cold in the stable and she wants Elektra to be warm.

But in 2012 on Christmas night, after doing the same routine with another horse called Magic, a horse she rode in the NCAA Equestrian Finals, something horrible happened.

“He got colic, he got really sick from that, I didn’t know because it was the middle of the night,” said Anthony. “So we came at 8 o’clock the next morning, and it was too late.”

Had she known sooner of his symptoms, she could have saved him.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

US government halts Wyoming wild horse roundup amid dispute

By Mead Gruver – 10/11/17 AP

Cheyenne, Wyo. — The U.S. government has agreed to halt a Wyoming wild horse roundup amid a legal dispute over whether it should count foals toward the roundup quota.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management and roundup opponents agreed in a court filing Tuesday the roundup would stop at 1,560 horses of all ages, a number the BLM was set to reach Wednesday. Meanwhile, U.S. District Judge Nancy Freudenthal in Cheyenne was set to rule within days whether to allow the roundup to resume while a lawsuit filed by the opponents moves ahead.

The roundup began Sept. 23 and originally was expected to take four to six weeks. The Wild Horse Preservation Campaign and two photographers sued Friday, claiming the BLM was deviating from past practice by not counting captured foals toward the roundup’s 1,560-horse limit.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Young pheasant hunters get their shot

At behest of local group, fish and game releases birds at youth hunting access

By Eric Barker of the Tribune

Young pheasant hunters will have a better chance of bagging a bird thanks to an agreement between the Game Bird Foundation and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

Members of the foundation — which established the 900-acre The Palouse River Upland Game Access Yes! Area near Potlatch as a youth hunting area in recent years — doggedly lobbied the department to expands its extensive pheasant-release program centered at southern Idaho wildlife areas to the north central Idaho site.

Jim Hagedorn, one of the founders of the group that also raises and releases pheasant chicks, hammered the department at its monthly sportsmen’s breakfast meeting in Lewiston last week for not spending any of its pheasant release budget in the northern half of the state. The Viola man wanted to know why the department was upping the number of birds released at WMAs near Boise and other southern Idaho cities but wouldn’t provide birds for his group.

He had the backing of Idaho Fish and Game Commissioner Dan Blanco of Moscow, who also attended the meeting.

Within hours, the department started to formulate a plan that was finalized Tuesday. Starting Oct. 21, the department will release 25 birds a week for eight weeks at the site that is open to hunters age 17 and younger, as long as they are accompanied by a licensed adult. The adult mentors also may hunt at the site.

“This is really something. It just thrills me to death,” said Hagedorn. “This is sportsmen working with Fish and Game and Fish and Game working with sportsmen. This is the way it should be.”

… Directions and area rules that require hunters to sign in and fill out post-hunt harvest report cards are available at:
https://idfg.idaho.gov/ifwis/huntplanner/yes/property/?id=1363

continued:
[h/t “Whiskers”]
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho agency to vote on opening catch-and-keep season

10/12/17 AP

Lewiston, Idaho — The Idaho Fish and Game Commission is set to vote on a proposal to allow catch-and-keep steelhead fisheries on the Snake, Salmon and Little Salmon rivers and on the Clearwater River and its north, south and middle forks.

The commission will vote on the proposal Friday. If it passes, anglers on the Clearwater and its tributaries and the Snake River downstream of Couse Creek would have to release all steelhead longer than 28 inches (71 centimeters).

The size restrictions are designed to protect steelhead bound for the Clearwater Basin. The state expects only about 7,300 hatchery and about 1,400 wild B-run steelhead to make it back to Idaho waters, The Lewiston Tribune reported.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
October 13, 2017
Issue No. 847

Table of Contents

* Council Approves Questions For Independent Science Board To Address In Review Of Basin Fish And Wildlife Plan
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439719.aspx

* Colville Tribes Use ‘Whooshh’ System To Collect, Transport Salmon For Hatchery Needs, Surplus Distribution
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439718.aspx

* States Set Two Days For Sturgeon Retention Fishing Downstream Of Bonneville Dam; Fish Over 66-Inches Increasing
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439717.aspx

* Washington Opens Sections Of Snake River To Steelhead Retention For Fish Under 28 Inches
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439716.aspx

* Draft Salmon Survival Report: Smolt To Adult Returns For Snake River Fish Remain Below NW Power/Conservation Council Goals
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439715.aspx

* Washington State, Others, Request Supreme Court Review Ninth Circuit’s Decision On Culverts/Salmon Passage
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439714.aspx

* Washington Approves Importing Atlantic Salmon Eggs From Iceland To Cooke Aquaculture Hatchery
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439713.aspx

* Montana To Close Invasive Mussels Inspection Stations For Season; Found 16 Contaminated Boats
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439712.aspx

* Oregon Officials Express Concern Over EPA Making Changes To Willamette River Cleanup Plan; EPA promises inclusion
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439711.aspx

* Interior Hires Deputy Assistant Secretary For Fish, Wildlife, Parks; Announces 5 Other Top Positions
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439710.aspx

* USFWS Offers $5,000 Reward For Illegal Killing Of Gray Wolf In Oregon Known As OR-33
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439709.aspx

* House Natural Resources Committee Approves Five Bills Making Changes To Endangered Species Act
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439708.aspx

* EPA Proposes To Withdraw Clean Water Act Restrictions For Bristol Bay’s Pebble Mine
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439707.aspx
————————————-

Fish & Game News:

How to avoid common hunting violations – Video series

By Sue Nass, Writer/Producer Video Services
Thursday, October 5, 2017

It happens every fall. Hunters unwittingly violate game laws because they are unaware of a rule or they don’t understand the reason for the law.

Idaho’s seasons and rules are put into place for biological or safety reasons. There are always those who will deliberately flout game laws, putting others in danger or taking more than their fair share. However, Fish and Game realizes that most hunters are trying to do the right thing.

So, Idaho Fish and Game has taken the top five most common hunting violations and made short videos explaining the reason for each the rule and the actions necessary to stay in compliance. Happy hunting!

continued w/videos:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Got your buck (or bull) yet? Here are some early season harvest stats

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, October 5, 2017

Harvest reports are trickling in, but the majority of big game hunters are gearing up for fall hunts

Here’s your way-too-early roundup of how the big game season is going. If you’re a baseball fan, this is the box score after the first inning. If you’re a fan of politics, this is election results with 10 percent of the precincts reporting.

So why bother? Because we big game hunters are curious people, and many of us are gearing up for October and November hunts. But our early season hunting buddies had a chance to run around in the woods earlier and get a crack at bulls and bucks.

How did they do?

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Fish & Game Commission OKs limited catch-and-keep season for hatchery steelhead

Betsy Z. Russell The Spokesman-Review Oct 13, 2017

The Idaho Fish & Game Commission voted today to open a belated catch-and-keep season for steelhead on Sunday, but to reduce the traditional daily bag limit from three fish to two, amid other restrictions. Only hatchery fish less than 28 inches long may be kept; wild steelhead still must be released. The decision came after the department adopted an emergency rule in August closing steelhead harvests statewide due to low numbers; the season normally would have started Sept. 1. But since then, steelhead numbers, while still low, have improved.

The Lewiston Tribune reports that more than 1,000 people commented on the proposed catch-and-keep season, with many of them asking the department not to open a harvest season on the Clearwater River, due to concerns over very low numbers of protected wild fish.

Idaho has required all wild steelhead to be released since the 1980s; this year’s wild steelhead returns are expected to be the lowest since 2008.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

This Man Woke Up To A Strange Noise, Then He Saw This On His Porch

Oct 1, 2017 Bored Panda

Earlier this month, we wrote about the most awesome “I woke up to this” moments that have ever happened, and this story that happened to Tim Newton from Alaska definitely belongs there.

“Tim was awakened by noises on [his] deck last week – and looked outside. In astonishment, he grabbed his camera.. and can you believe it? Mama Lynx and her SEVEN kits!!” – he later wrote on his facebook page.

“She called to them and they all lined up right outside in front of where he was standing (he was inside the screen door!) Amazing ALASKA WILD LIFE!!! They proceeded to run and play on our deck, and then in our yard!”

“I’ve concluded that lynx must spend 1 percent of their waking lives chasing rabbits, and 99 percent chasing their kids. It was pretty much non-stop frolicking and rough-housing.”

source w/more photos:
———————————

Seasonal Humor:

DogCamping-a
[h/t SMc]
————————————-

Tips & Advice:

How to preserve pumpkins until Halloween

Marie Rossiter Oct 15, 2017 KIVI TV

Every year, it seems stores start selling pumpkins earlier and earlier, but buying early can mean a rotted mess by Oct. 31.

If you want to preserve your pumpkin masterpiece until Halloween, then take a look at the following tips. Each of these can help keep your jack-o-lantern looking perfectly spooky and fresh—not moldy and rotted.

1. Scoop Out All The Pumpkin “Guts”

You need to keep your pumpkin as bug-free as possible to avoid fast rotting. Yes, the “pumpkin guts” (as my family loves to call them) look stringy and feel cold and slimy, but kids usually love getting their hands dirty for the job. However, to keep the bugs out, needs to be scraped completely clean. Any residual pulp will attract little critters. So, find a sturdy spoon with a good edge and put some elbow grease into cleaning your jack-o-lantern.

2. Banish Pumpkin Rot With Bleach

When it comes to popular pumpkin-saving tips found online, bleach has to rank as No. 1. Multiple websites claim dunking your final product into a solution of bleach and water works wonders. Why? Bleach disinfects anything it touches. So, by applying it to the pumpkin, the bleach destroys the germs and helps keep them away.

continued:
———————————–

Oct 8, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 8, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Ditch Day October 4

Sadly, no one showed up. So ditches will be on the agenda for the Village Spring Clean Up.
— — — —

Midas Meeting October 8

There was a meeting on Sunday October 8, 2017 at 130pm at the Yellow Pine Community Hall with Midas Gold. (See letter from Midas below.)
— — — —

Fall Rx Burns planned

BNF:
Cascade Ranger District: Slash piles will be ignited in the following locations: Warm Lake, Yellow pine, Landmark and Crawford. It will be pile burning for two days.

PNF:
The Krassel Ranger District plans to ignite 1,600 acres in the Fourmile drainage, and 2,000 acres in the Bald Hill project area.
— — — —

Bear Aware

Bears are around and hungry this fall, not much of a berry crop this year. Keep garbage secured and pet food indoors, take down bird feeders until hibernation. Clean BBQ grills (bears love grills and outdoor fridges.)
— — — —

H-Fest Note:

A very vocal segment of our community has indicated that my decision making and integrity around the festival is untrustworthy. With that said I am removing myself from the Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival.

Thank you, Deb Filler
— — — —

VYPA News:

Next meeting June 2018
— — — —

YPFD News:

Training is on Sundays starting at 11am at the YP Fire Station and open to the community of Yellow Pine. Check with Jeff or Ann to confirm trainings.

Both Fire Sirens will be tested at noon on the first of each month.
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 2) overnight low of 32 degrees, partly cloudy, damp, and light breeze this morning. Huge flock of Clark’s Nutcrackers during the day and one Steller Jay. Cloudy and chilly breezes today, high of 53 degrees. Quiet afternoon, clouds breaking up before dark, and a single cloud to the east lit up with rose gold colors as the sun went down.

Tuesday (Oct 3) overnight low of 25 degrees – hard freeze, mostly clear sky this morning, some high thin wisps and frosty. Lots of nutcrackers again today, loud but so graceful. “Cotton ball” clouds during mid day, chilly breezes, high of 59 degrees. Quiet and partly cloudy evening.

Wednesday (Oct 4) overnight low of 25 degrees, frosty and 1/2″ ice on the chicken water, gray overcast sky. Snow then snow mixed with rain falling early afternoon. Lots of nutcrackers and seeing more steller jays. Chipmunk gathering seeds. Drizzles off and on during the afternoon and evening, high of 40 degrees.

Thursday (Oct 5) overnight low of 30 degrees and mostly cloudy this morning. Low flying airplane at 10am, some ridges socked in. Several stellar jays and a large flock of nutcrackers. Cloudy and cool day, high of 49 degrees. Couple of robins by evening and a stellar jay.

Friday (Oct 6) overnight low of 28 degrees, clear and frosty this morning. Jays calling, light traffic on the main road. High thin clouds coming in, mostly cloudy by early afternoon and warmer, high of 65 degrees. Jays and Clarks nutcrackers are busy. Almost clear later in the afternoon and quiet. Jays and a pine squirrel going after cones. Bright moon rise.

Saturday (Oct 7) no frost this morning, gray overcast and breezy, not a lot of dew. Loud close gunshot just after 10am. The river sounds louder, but the river gauge doesn’t show an increase. Gray cloudy breezy day, high of 57 degrees. Shots fired around 430pm for about an hour. Close loud gunshot at 544pm. Pileated woodpecker visited the ant pile, not as many nutcrackers around. Partly clear and gusty before sundown.

Sunday (Oct 8) snow fell during the night, a little over an inch on the ground this morning and still snowing. Low of 28 degrees, peaks socked in. Bigger flakes falling by 1030am. Heard a jay imitating a hawk this morning. Snow melted by lunch time. Raven flying over the village around 2pm. Breaks in the clouds later in the afternoon and chilly light breeze, high of 47 degrees.
————————————

Letter to Share:

Open Letter to Yellow Pine Residents

RE: Community Meetings with Midas Gold and Yellow Pine regarding Access

October 5, 2017 Midas Gold

We appreciate the Yellow Pine community’s willingness to be open and discuss important subjects with us. We are listening. We’ve heard clearly that access to Thunder Mountain via the Stibnite Road is important to Yellow Pine. Upon hearing your concerns, we recently instructed our technical team and engineering contractors to identify if there are feasible and safe options for travel from Yellow Pine to Thunder Mountain during the operating phase of the proposed mine. While we are not the final decision makers on what our project will look like, we can assure you we want to find a solution that can work for everyone and be approved by regulators.

Gathering this information will help Midas Gold understand all considerations for engineering, safety, environmental impact, impact to other stakeholders, permitting and cost. We will do our best to communicate openly with everyone that these discussions may impact — including other residents, nearby communities, user groups and regulators.

Our goal is to have an open discussion with members of the Yellow Pine community about access, understand the impacts various alternatives might have on the Yellow Pine community, and to see if there are reasonable options that would allow some form of safe access for the travelling public. If we can achieve those objectives, we would aim to put our understanding in writing, in the form of a “community agreement” so that any commitments made will be clear to you, the residents of Yellow Pine, and the operations team in the future.

As many of you know, Midas Gold has held two community meetings (Sept. 15 and Sept. 27) in Yellow Pine to discuss access through or around the Stibnite site during any future mining operations. In the first two meetings, we heard that the residents of Yellow Pine would choose a group to represent the Yellow Pine community in the discussions; we also heard that residents remain open to considering various options as long as access to Thunder Mountain is made available on a semi-regular basis from May through Fall, weather permitting.

A third meeting for Oct. 8, 2017, was scheduled to discuss possible route options with Midas Gold’s technical team. While our lead engineer will not be able to make this meeting, Kyle Fend and Belinda Provancher, who you know quite well, will be there.

Moving forward, we will continue to coordinate meeting dates with Lorinne Munn, as she was appointed the point of contact for the Yellow Pine residents in the meeting held on September 27.

Outside of this process, please know that we are always here to receive feedback. We’ve worked hard over the last many years to be a trusted partner with this community and we want to make sure that continues.

Yours sincerely
Laurel Sayer
President & CEO
Midas Gold Idaho, Inc.
——————————

Idaho News:

The Star-News schedules candidate forums in McCall, Cascade

The Star-News October 5, 2017

Candidate forums for the Nov. 7 city elections will be sponsored by The Star-News in McCall and Cascade later this month.

The forum for candidates for the McCall City Council will begin at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 23, in the lower level Community Room at Idaho First Bank, 475 E. Deinhard Ln. across from Rite Aid.

The forum for candidates for Cascade mayor and Cascade City Council will begin at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 30, at the American Legion Hall. The moderator for both forums will be Tom Grote, editor and co-publisher of The Star-News.

Candidates will be invited to make opening statements, after which Grote will ask questions, and written questions will be taken from the audience. Closing statements will end each forum.

Light refreshments and sample ballots will be available at each forum.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

McCall Senior Citizens Center to host yard sale on Oct. 14

The Star-News October 5, 2017

The McCall Senior Citizens Center will host its “warm and fuzzy” fall yard sale on Saturday, Oct. 14, at 10 a.m.

The center is seeking donations of all items for the yard sale but is especially in need of winter items, such as quilts, coats, jackets and blankets.

Items can be dropped off at the center, 701 First St., on Tuesdays or Thursdays, and all donations are tax deductible. Proceeds will benefit the programs offered at the center.

Hamburgers and hot dogs will be sold for $5 a plate at the event, which will be at the community center.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Historic Roseberry to host Boot Stompin’ Barn Dance on Oct. 21

The Star-News October 5, 2017

Historic Roseberry will host its third annual Boot Stompin’ Barn Dance on Saturday, Oct. 21, at 6 p.m.

Ava Honey and the Hornets will provide music for the old-fashioned square dance. Tickets cost $20 per person and are available online at mccallarts.org or at Albertsons in McCall.

Mountain Vino will sell beer, wine and soft drinks, but there will not be food vendors at the event. Proceeds will benefit the McCall Arts and Humanities Council, Historic Roseberry and McCall Folklore Society.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Cascade medical center auxiliary to host tea party Nov. 18

The Star-News October 5, 2017

The Cascade Medical Center Auxiliary will host its second annual Holiday Tea Party on Saturday, Nov. 18, at 1:30 p.m. at The Ashley Inn in Cascade. Reservations are required, and tickets are $20 plus tax per person.

Proceeds from this event will help to fund scholarships for Cascade High School graduates who are going into the medical, dental or veterinary fields. To make a reservation, call The Ashley Inn at 208-382-5621, ext. 1.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

McCall to add economic development director and fix up waterfront

Teya Vitu, Idaho Business Review, KTVB October 06, 2017

McCall – Big changes are planned in McCall.

One is planned construction on the roughly 400 feet of Payette Lake shoreline between Mile High Marina and Brown Park. The area is littered with derelict docks and dock debris.

“It’s a mess,” said Kurt Wolf, McCall’s parks and recreation director. “Hopefully, we can get the shoreline cleaned up this fall and hopefully usable by next spring.”

Wolf will seek public input on what to build on the stretch where a mill used to be. Brown Park was formerly known as Mill Park.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

N. Idaho man dies from flu-related illness

Alex Livingston, KTVB October 03, 2017

State health officials say a man from northern Idaho has died from a flu-related illness.

This is Idaho’s first flu-related death of the season. The first reported flu death last season didn’t occur until December.

The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare has issued a warning that the flu season appears to have arrived early this year. Health and Welfare says in addition to the north Idaho man’s death, there have been early reports of flu activity from other parts of the state.

“We certainly don’t know when it’ll peak this season, but its an early indicator that flu is coming,” Leslie Tengelsen, state influenza surveillance coordinator with Health and Welfare, said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Canoe carving brings tribal traditions to life

By Tom Holm – 10/8/17 AP

Lapwai, Idaho — Wood chips were flying as fourth- and fifth-grade Lapwai Elementary students helped carve a traditional canoe.

Nez Perce Tribe member Julian Matthews organized the evening carving session to instill a sense of culture in the youngsters. About 30 kids helped bite out chunks of the canoe’s interior with shaped axes or shaved off lumber for future paddles.

Matthews said he and several others started the process of carving out the canoe in a traditional fashion in July. The thick fir that will one day float nearby rivers was felled in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness and hauled down behind Nimiipuu Health, where Matthews and tribal members from Kalispell, Mont., as well as friend and carpenter James Jameson, set to work.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wilder farmer makes potato history

10/8/17 AP

Wilder, Idaho — Mary Hasenoehrl made history with Idaho’s famous export when she became the first woman to represent potato growers on the Idaho Potato Commission.

The Idaho Press-Tribune reports that Hasenoehrl has been involved in agriculture for most of her life.

She and her husband, Doug Gross, are partners in more than 560 acres of potatoes on their Wilder farm.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Trump declares disaster in Idaho due to flooding

by Associated Press Sunday, October 8th 2017

Washington (AP) — President Donald Trump has declared that a major disaster exists in Idaho due to flooding from March 29 to June 15.

Trump ordered federal assistance to support state, tribal and local recovery efforts in areas affected by the flooding, the White House said in a press release sent out Saturday.

Federal funding is available to the state and to tribal and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis.

The funds are for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by the flooding in the counties of Ada and Canyon.

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.

source:
———————————-

Letter to Share:

Ford Tri-Motor NC 7861

(Former Johnson Flying Service Ford) presently at the National Naval Aviation Museum

from Bill Fogg October 5, 2017

Open the [link] below for a cockpit panorama of NC 7861 4AT-46, an old Johnson Flying Service Ford Tri-Motor, now posing as a RR-5 Tri-Motor in the Naval Aviation Museum in Pensacola, FL. The outside looks pretty good, but it is sporting a different paint color scheme from the last time I saw it many years ago. The inside is well worn as one would expect for a former Johnson Fling Service Workhorse that was used to haul Smokejumpers, as well as Freight of all kinds and varieties!!

Once you open the attached link below , at the bottom of it is place to click on “Cockpit Panorama” that allows you to take a pretty nice 360 degree look inside this Tri-Motor. Take note of the “Johnson Bar” Braking lever in the center of the floor between the pilot and copilot seat’s. This was original and is actually a Ford Automobile gearshift lever that controlled the Aircraft’s Main Landing Gear Brakes! Pulling straight back on the gearshift lever applied both right and left main wheel brakes, back to the left, left brake only and conversely back to the right, right brake only! As one can imagine it took a great deal of coordination for a single pilot (without the aid of a copilot to assist in control and braking the aircraft with this braking configuration, vs. the standard rudder pedal toe, or heel activated brakes, of the more modern era aircraft during landing and takeoffs

This is the same Johnson Flying Service Ford Tri-Motor that My Dad (Bob Fogg) and I flew (around 1968 or 1969) from McCall to Boise to Chamberlain Basin around 1968 or 1969 shortly before Bob Johnson sold it. We flew it to Boise to pick up a Big Game Hunting Party that had arrived in Boise on a Commercial Flight and we ferried them and their gear into Chamberlain Basin in the Frank Church Wilderness Area to join up with their Hunting Guide, at which point and Dad and I flew the return leg back to McCall. That flight was a very memorable trip for me personally, as Dad allowed me to actually log flight time in a 1929 Ford Model 4-AT Tri-Motor from the Co-Pilot seat from McCall to Boise J!! Looking 360 degrees around the cockpit of this old Girl from the attached sight sure stirred a lot of fond Father and Son memories!

Hope you all enjoy looking around inside this 1929 Ford Tri-Motor as much as I did J!

Bill

link:
———————————

Public Lands:

Boise National Forest SOPA is Now Available for First Quarter for Fiscal Year 2018

USDA Forest Service 10/2/2017

The Boise National Forest’s “Schedule of Proposed Actions” (SOPA) for October 1 through December 31, 2017 is now available on the Boise National Forest Schedule of Proposed Actions webpage. The Forest Service produces the SOPA every three months to keep the public informed about projects that the Forest is currently working on or planning to analyze in the near future.

The SOPA has been standardized across all National Forests from a national database to track key project planning information. The reports for the Boise and all other National Forests are currently available at http://www.fs.fed.us/sopa or through the Boise National Forest website at http://www.fs.fed.us/sopa/forest-level.php?110402. The Forest Service automatically posts the SOPA four times a year in January, April, July, and October.

If you have questions about a specific project please contact the project leader listed in the SOPA. If you have general questions about the SOPA, please feel free contact me.

Sincerely,
Melissa Yenko
Forest Environmental Coordinator
Boise National Forest
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

French Hazard WUI Project

Boise NF 10/6/2017

The Forest Service will soon be seeking public input (scoping comments) for the proposed French Hazard Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) Project on the Cascade Ranger District in Valley County, ID.

The purpose of the project is to reduce the fire risk in the area adjacent to private land (Wildland Urban Interface). Activities will include timber removal, thinning, prescribed fire, and mastication.

The District will be hosting a Public Field Meeting to discuss the project on October 26.

If you would like to attend, please RSVP to Jim Bishop, Team Leader, at jjbishop@fs.fed.us or by phone at 208-382-7400.

As it becomes available additional information will be published on the French Hazard WUI project website
https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49636
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Another Stewardship Contract Awarded for Lost Creek – Boulder Creek Project

Date: October 3, 2017
Contact: Brian Harris (208) 634-0784 cell: (208) 634-6945

McCall, ID – The Payette National Forest has awarded the Restoration Stewardship Contract to Evergreen Forest of Tamarack, Idaho. The project is located on the New Meadows Ranger District North of Lost Valley Reservoir. This is the sixth of a dozen stewardship contracts planned with the Lost Creek-Boulder Creek Landscape Restoration Project. This contract will result in restoration stand treatments on 950 acres and improvements on 30 miles of roads. It is expected to produce about 9 million board feet of logs for wood products which will contribute to the economic vitality of local communities.

“It’s fantastic that our restoration activities are in full swing in the Lost Creek-Boulder Creek project,” said Keith Lannom, Payette National Forest Supervisor. “This is a landscape scale project made possible through the collaborative work by the Payette Forest Coalition and the Payette Forest’s interdisciplinary team in designing an ecologically-sound landscape restoration project.”

The Restoration Stewardship Contract, and other projects in the Lost Creek-Boulder Creek restoration project include treatments to restore the area to historic conditions. These include thinning and prescribed fire to increase the large tree and seral component of forest stands, increase fire resiliency, improved recreation facilities and opportunities, and improve wildlife habitat. Road and riparian treatments will improve aquatic habitat and water quality.

The Payette Forest Coalition (PFC) played an important role in the Lost Creek-Boulder Creek project. The PFC is a diverse group of stakeholders that includes member from the environmental community, forestry groups, timber industry, motorized and non-motorized recreation groups, and county and state government agencies. The PFC met for two years to understand conditions, develop goals, and to consider different approaches to meeting goals for this project. The group ultimately came to consensus on recommendation for restoration in this area.

“The PFC adds a collaborative and consensus approach to conducting land stewardship on public lands,” added Lannom. “They are a vital part of the Payette Forest’s restoration program and reflect how the Forest Service operates as a multiple use agency.”

Work on the Restoration Stewardship contract is expected to begin this fall or spring and continue until March, 2021.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

IDL invites input on changes to forest fire protection rules

Betsy Z. Russell The Spokesman-Review Oct 4, 2017

The Idaho Department of Lands is inviting forest landowners, logging contractors and others with an interest in forest operations to participate in negotiated rulemaking sessions over the next two months on updates to the department’s forest fire protection rules. The changes include updated definitions and requirements dealing with spark arresters, fire suppression equipment, fire watch requirements and logging practices during fire restrictions.

Public meetings will be held in Coeur d’Alene, Orofino and McCall, and a toll-free line will be provided for those who want to participate remotely in those meetings. Written comments also are being accepted through Dec. 15. There’s more information online here, and the initial draft of the proposed new rules is online here.

source w/links:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Committee mulls forest management

Witnesses debate effects on wildfire

Greg Moore October 6, 2017 – IME

A congressional subcommittee hearing last week was a microcosm of a nationwide debate over whether more logging and other forms of forest management would reduce wildfires in the West.

Held Sept. 28 before the Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee of the House Committee on Natural Resources, the hearing was titled “Exploring Solutions to Reduce Risks of Catastrophic Wildfire and Improve Resiliency of National Forests.”

“The topic we’re discussing could not be more relevant to what is happening on the ground in Idaho right now,” subcommittee member Rep. Raul Labrador, R-Idaho, said during the hearing. “This year has been one of the worst fire seasons in U.S. history.”

In 2013, Idaho Gov. Butch Otter commissioned a study by the University of Idaho on whether forest management reduces damage from wildfires. The study authors answered with a qualified “yes.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

BLM cancels 10 million acre Sagebrush Focal Area Withdrawal Proposal

BLM News Release October 5, 2017

Washington, D.C. – Based on a recent analysis and review of data available that showed that future mining is not a significant threat to sage grouse habitat, the Bureau of Land Management has canceled its Sagebrush Focal Area withdrawal application and the Department’s proposed withdrawal of 10 million acres of federal lands from location and entry under the mining law in Greater Sage-grouse habitat in six Western States. The BLM also terminated the associated environmental analysis process. The notice of cancellation can be found on the BLM website here: https://on.doi.gov/2hOpRxn

The BLM determined the proposal to withdraw 10 million acres was unreasonable in light of the data that showed that mining affected less than .1 percent of sage-grouse-occupied range.

“The proposal to withdraw 10 million acres to prevent 10,000 from potential mineral development was a complete overreach,” said Acting BLM Director Mike Nedd. “Secretary Zinke has said from the beginning that by working closely with the states, who are on the front lines and a valued partner in protecting the health of these lands, we can be successful in conserving greater sage grouse habitat without stifling economic development and job growth. And that’s what we intend to do—protect important habitat while also being a good neighbor to states and local communities.”

The recommendation to withdraw nearly 10 million acres from location and entry under the mining law was one of many land use restrictions proposed for a new management area designated as the Sagebrush Focal Area (SFA). However, that recommendation was unreasonable in light of the data available. In particular, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s 2005 “Not Warranted” decision, the 2010 “Warranted But Precluded” Decision and the 2015 “Not Warranted” decision all showed that mining—including locatable mining—was not a significant threat to sage-grouse.

The lands will continue to be managed in accordance with existing plans, programs, policies and regulations in Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Wyoming. They had been temporarily segregated, or closed to new mining claims for 2 years when the Department originally proposed the lands for withdrawal in 2015, while the agency studied whether locatable mineral exploration and mining projects would adversely affect habitat important to the greater sage grouse. That temporary segregation period expired September 24, 2017.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

USFS Regional Intermountain Newsletter

Archived Newsletters
———————————-

Letter to Share:

Youth Only Pheasant Hunts

10/8/2017

Youth Only Pheasant Season starts today October 7 through October 13. You want to stay tuned to this email, as the Clearwater IDFG, the Gamebird Foundation and Little Canyon Shooting Sports will have a very big announcement for youth hunters in the region this week.

Due to recent rules change, proper licensed youth 17 years of age and younger can participate in youth hunts, which is not reflected in the 2016-2017 upland game rule book. All youth hunters must be accompanied by an adult 18 years or older. “one adult may accompany more than one youth hunter”.

Watch for good news to come this week from the Clearwater IDFG and the Gamebird Foundation; the WMA’s down in south Idaho have there own set of rules. Go to https://idfg.Idaho.Gov/press/youth-pheasant-hunt-runs-oct-7-13. More to come Tuesday or Wednesday.

“Whiskers”
Jim Hagedorn
Idaho Gamebird Foundation
——————————

Critter News:

Pet talk – What is ‘distemper’ in cats?

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt October 6, 2017 – IME

Feline distemper is caused by a virus called feline parvo virus. It is a highly contagious disease of young, unvaccinated cats. A high death rate is associated with the disease. Another name for the disease is feline pan leukopenia, as it decreases the bone marrow’s production of white blood cells, which are necessary to fight off all infections.

Feline parvo virus is related to the virus that causes canine parvo disease. The virus is very invasive and affects the cells lining the stomach and intestines, as well as bone marrow stem cells. Feline distemper is most common in young cats 3-6 months of age.

Most kittens infected with the virus have fevers, are depressed, have a poor appetite, vomit and have diarrhea and severe dehydration. Diarrhea may be bloody. Infection in pregnant cats may cause abortions. Kittens infected while still unborn may be delivered with brain abnormalities. These kittens may have seizures and marked incoordination due to the brain damage done by the virus.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

MCPAWS to sponsor fun run, Oktoberfest on Saturday

The Star-News October 5, 2017

MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter will host a full day of fun with a dog-friendly 5km fun run followed by Oktoberfest on Saturday.

The Tails on Trails fun run will begin at 9 a.m. Saturday at Brundage Mountain Resort. Registration is $35 for adults and $25 for youth under age 21.

The race fee includes a Tails on Trails hat, goodie bag and registration for Oktoberfest. Registration is available online at http://mcpaws.org.

Oktoberfest festivities will begin at noon at Alpine Village, 616 N. Third St. The event will include live music by Bottom Line Band and the Treasure Valley Musik Meisters as well as a costume contest, raffle, craft goods, activities for kids and food and drinks.

Entry for Oktoberfest is $10 and includes a beer and an event koozie. Raffle tickets will be sold for $5 each at the event. For more information, visit http://mcpaws.org

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Boise veterinarian performs life-saving surgery on boy’s service puppy

KTVB October 04, 2017


A WestVet surgeon donated his services to save “Phillip,” a 6-week-old puppy in training to become an autism service dog for a young boy named Jakson. (Photo: WestVet)

A Boise veterinarian successfully performed life-saving surgery on a six-week-old puppy suffering from a fatal heart defect.

The Labrador retriever named Phillip is in training to become an autism service dog for a 7-year-old Jakson Thiel.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

First week of October 2017
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wolf roaming Skagit county is real wolf, DNA test confirms

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review October 2, 2017

DNA tests have confirmed that a wolf captured, tested and fixed with a GPS collar on June 8 is indeed a wolf.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says a GPS collar placed on the wolf captured in June shows the 100-pound black male has remained in Skagit County. It’s one of the few wolves known to have set up operations on the west side of the Cascade mountains in northwestern Washington.

It’s not clear where the gray wolf came from because DNA samples don’t find a connection with known wolf packs in Eastern Washington, Idaho or British Columbia, says Fish and Wildlife spokeswoman Ann Froschauer.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Statisticians counter WSU prof’s findings that killing wolves does more harm than good

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Oct 3, 2017

A Washington State University professor erred in controversial research released in 2014 suggesting that killing wolves that attack cattle is counterproductive because it stimulates more attacks, according to a statistical analysis released today.

Working with a Ph.D. statistician, the Washington Policy Center analyzed the data provided by Dr. Robert Wielgus and found several problems with conclusions that are widely used by critics of Washington’s wolf management, especially in cases where wolves are killed.

“Rather than support his hypothesis, his own data point in the opposite direction, supporting the state’s policy of removing wolves when there is a conflict and undermining Wielgus’ own hypothesis,” says Todd Myers of Seattle-based WPC, a conservative think tank that promotes public policy based on free-market solutions.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wyoming hunters down a dozen wolves on opening day

10/3/17 AP

Jackson Hole, Wyo. — The three-month long wolf hunting season is underway in Wyoming.

The Jackson Hole News and Guide reports a dozen wolves were legally harvested in the first 40 hours Sunday, over a quarter of the total wolves that can be killed in the state’s managed hunt area.

Wyoming Game and Fish Department carnivore manager Ken Mills attributed the considerable success to the opener falling on a weekend, winter weather pushing lots of sportsmen into the field, and also a species that may temporarily have lost its fear of mankind.

Mills says it has been three years since the last hunting season. He says because of this, “there’s almost a whole new generation of wolves out there and they’re naive to human hunters.”

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Education International

Newsletter first week October 2017

Hunting to resume after Wyoming gains authority over wolves

Northern Minnesota hunter has harrowing encounter with pack of wolves
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wildlife officials euthanizes bear after livestock killings

10/3/17 10:39 AM

Great Falls, Mont. — Wildlife officials say they euthanized a grizzly bear after more than 10 large calves and a 1,400-pound (635-kilogram) cow were found dead with signs of grizzly depredation.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture Wildlife Services and the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks determined the adult male grizzly euthanized Monday was responsible for killing the animals.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Grizzly bears seeking food in Montana town

10/4/17 AP

Great Falls, Mont. — Montana wildlife managers have captured a grizzly bear south of Choteau that had been eating fruit near homes and are looking for a second bear that has been looking for food in the town.

State Fish, Wildlife and Parks officials say a 3-and-a-half-year-old, sub-adult male bear, weighing 399 pounds, and was captured Monday night just south of Choteau.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Federal agency denies protections for small, fanged predator

10/4/17 AP

Billings, Mont. — Federal wildlife officials say a cat-sized predator that lives in old-growth forests of the Northern Rockies is not in danger of extinction despite worries about habitat loss and accidental trapping.

The Trump administration on Wednesday included the Northern Rockies fisher among 25 species that officials said do not merit protection under the Endangered Species Act.

Northern Rockies fishers once ranged across at least five states. They’re now limited to a smaller area straddling the Montana-Idaho border.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service last year agreed to consider new protections after wildlife advocates documented at least 66 fishers accidentally killed by trappers in Idaho. The agency says a months-long review found no evidence fisher populations were in decline because of trapping, climate change, logging or other potential threats.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Judge: BLM broke law in plan to sterilize Idaho wild horses

By Kimberlee Kruesi – AP

Boise, Idaho — The U.S. Bureau of Land Management violated environmental law in its plan to sterilize a herd of wild horses in southwestern Idaho, according to a recent ruling from a federal judge.

U.S. District Judge Edward Lodge ruled Friday the BLM failed to analyze consequences of the action and ordered the agency to reconsider its decision.

“The BLM’s decision in this case is arbitrary and capricious because it did not consider the significant impacts its decision may have on the free-roaming nature of the herd nor explain why its decision is appropriate despite those impacts,” Lodge wrote in his 44-page ruling.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

The story of bald eagle shot by poacher made into a book

By Devin Heilman – 10/8/17 AP

Coeur d’Alene, Idaho — It’s heartbreaking, yet uplifting and eye-opening, and it’s a story Janie Veltkamp has to tell.

Beauty, a bald eagle, was shot by a poacher and left for dead with a shattered beak. She was rescued and brought to Birds of Prey Northwest, where she has since remained in Veltkamp’s caring hands.

“She’s such a beautiful bird, and only missing two inches of her biology,” Veltkamp said.

Beauty could never return to the wild. She would never be the same after losing such an important part of her livelihood. But Veltkamp had a dream for Beauty’s beak to be restored, to give back what was taken from her. With the help of a mechanical engineer, a veterinarian and a dentist, Veltkamp’s dream came true.

“She represents the cruelty and compassion of humans,” Veltkamp said of Beauty, who underwent surgery to have a 3D-printed prosthetic beak carefully attached to what remained of her natural beak.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
October 6, 2017
Issue No. 846

Table of Contents

* 2017 Juvenile Salmon/Steelhead Survival In Snake/Columbia: Fish Take A Hit In McNary To John Day Reach
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439683.aspx

* Draft Annual Salmon Survival Study Considers Impacts Of Lower Snake Dam Breaching, More Spill
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439682.aspx

* Irrigators Seek Evidentiary Hearing In Federal Court On Spill/Transportation Protocol In Low Water 2015
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439681.aspx

* Study Looks At How Large-Scale North Pacific Atmospheric, Ocean Circulation Trends Affect Wild Chinook Productivity
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439680.aspx

* Idaho Commission Seeks Public Comment On Reopening Steelhead Angling For Hatchery Fish Under 28 Inches
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439679.aspx

* Idaho Approves Coho Season Oct. 17; Once Extinct, Now Back With Nez Perce Tribe Reintroduction Program
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439678.aspx

* Washington Closes Three Rivers To Chinook Retention Due To Low Hatchery Returns
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439677.aspx

* IPUC To Decide If Idaho Power Can Pass On $220 Million In Hells Canyon Complex Relicensing Costs To Oregon, Idaho Consumers
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439676.aspx

* Washington Governor Asks Cooke Aquaculture To Withdraw Request To Transfer One Million Atlantic Salmon Smolts
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439675.aspx

* Alaska Salmon Harvest A ‘Banner Year,’ Includes 52.4 Million Sockeye Worth $326 Million
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439674.aspx

* BPA Makes FY 2017 $1.3 Billion U.S. Treasury Payment On Time, In Full
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439673.aspx

* Oregon Fish/Wildlife Commission Considers Uplisting Marbeled Murrelet From Threatened To Endangered
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439672.aspx

* Analysis Suggests Open-Ocean Aquaculture Viable Option For Industry Expansion Under Climate Change Scenarios
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439671.aspx

* Reclamation Awards $21.7 Million Contract To Refurbish Pump Generating Plant At Grand Coulee
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439670.aspx

* Study: Large Volcanic Eruptions In Tropics Can Lead To El Nino Events (Warming) In Pacific Ocean
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439669.aspx

* Reclamation Awards Grant Aimed At Improving Water Flows In Central Oregon’s Deschutes River
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439668.aspx
——————————————-

Tips & Advice:

Hearing protection essential as ammo for hunters

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Oct 5, 2017

Shooting ranges require users to have hearing protection. But many of the shooters who are honing their shotgunning skills at the skeet range this week or zeroing in their deer rifles will head into the fields or forest on opening day with nothing in their ears.

Hunters rationalize that hearing protection puts them at a disadvantage. They can’t hear the beating of wings that spells a rooster pheasant flushing. They can’t hear the snap of a twig that gives away a whitetail buck approaching a stand.

But the alternative is ringing in the ears and the eventual sensation of having your ears stuffed tightly with cotton all the time, even though they’re not.

Exposure to noise greater than 140 decibels can permanently damage hearing. Even the diminutive .22-caliber rifle can produce noise around 140 dB, while big-bore rifles and pistols can produce sound more than 175 dB, according to the American Speech-Language Hearing Association.

Muzzle brakes or other modifications can make the firearm louder.

continued:
————————————–

Fish & Game News:

Fish & Game notes changes to rules in McCall-area hunting zones

BY Andrew Weeks for The Star-News October 5, 2017

Several changes have been made to McCall area hunting zones this year, according to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

The upcoming November A-tag muzzleloader hunt was changed to a short-weapon hunt, allowing archery hunters to also participate in the season.

But the biggest changes are with elk hunts in Weiser, said Regan Berkley, regional wildlife manager with the McCall Fish & Game office.

Among the changes is a rifle hunt that was added in December, which overlaps two muzzleloader hunts, and adding hunts in January and February.

One of the changes that hunters have been most vocal about is cow elk hunting that was added to the A tag, Berkley said. The department also placed a quota on the A tag.

The changes were made in an effort to move the elk population toward objectives in the state’s elk management plan, which aims to strike a balance of maintaining enough elk for hunting and minimizing damage to private lands, Berkley said.

Currently, the cow elk population is over the state’s goal by some 3,200 animals despite at least a decade of increasing controlled cow hunt tags in the area, she said.

“We’ve had a series of mild winters, and are making more use of agricultural crops,” Berkley said, “Calf production has been high. We’ve been increasing controlled hunt permits, but some hunts were going undersubscribed.”

The good news for hunters is there should be a lot of elk available in the Weiser zone. Hunts for the cow portion of the A tag began Oct. 1 for youth, and the wider, any age hunt begins Tuesday.

“People scooped up the A tags,” Berkley said, including those hunters who were excited about the rifle cow hunting. However, that meant that many archers did not get the tag they have traditionally bought, and some here were disappointed.

Hunters who are excited about the changes are not all locals. Julianna Goitiandia, a customer service rep at Sportsman Warehouse in Nampa, said the Weiser zone seems to be on hunters’ minds this year even if they live outside the area.

The store sold out of the A tags several weeks ago, she said, and hunting equipment has been moving steadily out the door in anticipation of the hunt.

It might take a few years of additional harvest, but adding hunts should get the elk numbers back to a manageable goal, Berkley said.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Fish and Game seeks info about poached mule deer

10/5/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — State wildlife authorities are trying to find out who poached a mule deer near the town of Melba.

Idaho Fish and Game conservation officer Joey Ishida found the headless carcass of the large buck last weekend. Though the head was missing, no meat had been removed from the carcass.

Evidence suggests the deer was poached somewhere else, and the dumped along the road.

The department asks anyone who has information to call Fish and Game or the Idaho State Police.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Finding Injured or Orphaned Wildlife: What to Do

By Regan Berkley, Regional Wildlife Manager
Wednesday, August 9, 2017

The local Idaho Fish and Game office takes one or more calls every week about injured or distressed wildlife. Examples include an orphaned calf elk, a deer stuck in a soccer net, and a deer with an arrow sticking out of its neck. Each situation is different, and our response to each animal takes those differences into account. Here are a few Frequently Asked Questions we often get about wounded or orphaned wildlife:

Question: What will Fish and Game do if I call to report an injured animal?

Answer: That depends on the situation. We will do our best to get someone out to see if we can locate the animal. Sometimes, we are unable to come immediately due to other field work or requests for help. When we do find the animal, we will assess its injuries. Often, wild animals are able to recover without our help from injuries that seem very serious. If the injuries appear to eventually be fatal, we may decide to dispatch the animal. We sometimes capture animals in order to remove things like nets on antlers, traps on feet, or arrows that are not fatal. Occasionally, an injured animal can be transported to a rehabilitation facility, but this option works better for some animals than others. We will only transport to a rehabilitation facility if we expect the animal will be able to return to the wild.

Question: If I observe a severely injured animal, can I put it out of its misery?

Answer: No, the public is not authorized to dispatch injured wildlife. Please report injured animals to your nearest Sheriff’s office or Fish and Game.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Fall edition of Windows to Wildlife

Idaho’s new endemic species, protecting bats and yourself, and fall events

link:
Deniz Aygen
Watchable Wildlife Biologist, Idaho Department of Fish and Game


— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

DeerProtester-a

Caption: “Protesters blocking a road. This whole breastfeeding in public thing has just gotten out of control.”

– shared by Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue
—————————————–

Seasonal Humor:

CowHunt-a

Caption: “This rancher is ready for hunting season.”

– shared by IDAHO Magazine
——————————–

Fun Stuff:

Keller Ferry Aurora 

Craig Goodwin Sep 29, 2017

The Northern Lights pulsate over Keller Ferry in eastern Washington.


————————————–

Oct 1, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 1, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Saturday’s Fish Fry

“Our Annual Fish Fry was a great success. Fish was provided by Stu Edwards. Everyone pitched in to make it a happen. Special thanks to my morning Coffee Crowd the Tavern is a good place to plan events. A great crowd showed up, folks from Johnson Creek, the East Fork and Big Creek joined Village residents to visit and eat. A raffle to benefit our planned Helicopter Landing Zone brought in over $800.00. Thanks Everyone we are well on our way!”
Photo Gallery:

— — — —

Saturday’s Power Outage

The power flickered at 1057am then went out at 1122am. Power restored at 1205pm.
— — — —

Fall Rx Burns planned

BNF:
Cascade Ranger District: Slash piles will be ignited in the following locations: Warm Lake, Yellow pine, Landmark and Crawford. It will be pile burning for two days.

PNF:
The Krassel Ranger District plans to ignite 1,600 acres in the Fourmile drainage, and 2,000 acres in the Bald Hill project area.
— — — —

Bear Aware

Bears are around and hungry this fall, not much of a berry crop this year. Keep garbage secured and pet food indoors, take down bird feeders until hibernation.
— — — —

Ditch Day October 4

This is the day we clean and repair the village ditches in preparation for the spring run-off. Please join us.
— — — —

Midas Meeting October 8

There will be a meeting on Sunday October 8, 2017 at 130pm at the Yellow Pine Community Hall with Midas Gold.
— — — —

H-Fest Meeting October 14

Saturday October 14th is the next Harmonica meeting at noon, at the community hall.
— — — —

VYPA News:

Next meeting June 2018
— — — —

YPFD News:

Training is on Sundays starting at 11am at the YP Fire Station and open to the community of Yellow Pine. Check with Jeff or Ann to confirm trainings.

Sunday training at YPFD.
YPFD has been training on over the side and backcountry rescues training and learning to raise and lower a patient or rescuer using anchors, ropes, Multi Purpose Devises, pullies, rescue litter, litter wheel, and personnel rescue harnesses with some indoor practice using descending and ascending devises.
Photo Gallery:

– AF
Fire Siren will be tested at noon on the first of each month.
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Sep 25) clearing during the night but did not get below freezing, mostly clear this morning. Hearing a few finches, a couple of robins and lots of nutcrackers. Late morning airplane traffic. Clouds moving in by lunch time. A couple chipmunks and a pine squirrel running around. Cloudy and a little breezy early afternoon, high 59 degrees. Dozens of nutcrackers all over the neighborhood and the nearby forest, we have a bumper crop of pine cones this fall. Big brown hawk trying to catch a nutcracker and was getting mobbed by the flock. Loud shot to the east at 754pm (dark.) Cloudy evening, clearing during the night.

Tuesday (Sep 26) overnight low of 34 degrees, mostly clear sky and good amount of dew this morning. Clarks nutcrackers calling as the sun came up. Clouds came in and mostly cloudy and breezy afternoon, warmer, high 65 degrees. Lots of nutcrackers in the trees. Pine squirrels sounding off here and there. Quiet evening, calmer and in the 50’s.

Wednesday (Sept 27) overnight low of 30 degrees, clear sky and frosty this morning. When the sun came up and melted the frost it was “raining” off the roofs. Clear sky all day, warmer and light breezes, high 72 degrees. Clarks nutcrackers calling from all over the village and forest. OHV traffic on the main street. Nutcrackers and a few finches this afternoon. Clear warm evening, bright 1/2 moon.

Thursday (Sept 28) Power off at 703am. Frosty clear morning. Sunrise around 930am melted the frost off the roofs like rain. Sound of Nutcrackers and generators this morning. More traffic than usual for a Thursday, streets are drying out and a little dust. Low flying airplane at 1253pm. Clear, sunny and warm day, high 75 degrees. Thought we heard a wood chipper this afternoon. Power on at 504pm. Warm clear evening.

Friday (Sep 29) clear this morning, light frost. Nuthatches and nutcrackers calling. Robins and a jay flying around. Helicopter flew over at 1016am. Maple and lilac leaves are starting to get some fall colors. Low flying airplane circled over the village around lunch time, then more air traffic during the heat of the day. Lots of activity in the neighborhood, we are all getting ready for winter. Nuthatches “hanking” in the trees, pine squirrel calling on the other end of the block. Beautiful fall day, high 75 degrees. A few wispy “mare’s tails” clouds early this afternoon, then clearing before dark.

Saturday (Sep 30) started raining early this morning, low overcast, foggy clouds nearly to the valley floor. Power flickered at 1057am. Power off from 1122am to 1205pm, steady rain. Stopped raining before 1pm, ridges still socked in. Decreasing clouds and sunshine later in the afternoon, high 57 degrees. Pretty quiet evening, little bit of extra traffic. Mostly cloudy before dark.

Sunday (Oct 1) started snowing before daylight, 1/4″ by 10am and ground nearly white, low of 30 degrees, overcast and ridges socked in low. Clarks nutcrackers calling from the trees. Snow tapered off to light mist then quit before lunch time. Fire siren tested at noon. Quiet and cool day, high 46 degrees. More showers in the afternoon. Streamers of foggy clouds hiding the tops of ridges, once in a while you can get a peek at the snow line up high. Fall colors bursting out on the hillsides.
———————————

RIP:

Stewart Sandidge ‘Lloyd’ Johnson

June 2, 1916 – Sept. 19, 2017

StewartSandidgeLloydJohnson-a

Fruitland – 101 year old Stewart Sandidge “Lloyd” Johnson of Fruitland peacefully passed away at his home September 19, 2017, surrounded by loving family and friends. Lloyd was born on June 2, 1916, the sixth of eight children born to Benjamin and Stella Johnson. His parents were early McCall pioneers.

He graduated from McCall High School and attended the University of Utah and the University of Idaho. Lloyd was an avid outdoorsman, hunter, fisherman, skier and smokejumper. He loved telling stories of McCall, the mountains, the people and of his days leading search and rescue trips into Idaho’s primitive area.

When he was 7 years old Lloyd was proclaimed the “world’s smallest ski jumper” at the initial McCall Winter Carnival. He had a passion for skiing. He was an original member of the “Idaho Ski Team” who were instrumental in promoting Sun Valley and skiing in Idaho. After having helped develop the Little Ski Hill in McCall he taught skiing, formed the Mighty Mites and turned them into Olympic skiers. He was a key contributor to planning and establishing Brundage Mountain ski area and was an active skier until he was 90.

He worked for many years for the US Forest Service and became the original smokejumper on the Payette National Forest. Lloyd built the smokejumper base and was the Base Foreman when the McCall Smokejumpers formed in 1943 and he continued until 1953. He has been recognized nationally as the oldest living smokejumper and says, “We never lost a fire because we got on them early.”

In, 1954, he moved his family to Fruitland to begin his new career as owner of a Westcott Oil distributorship, a business he successfully operated until his retirement. After retiring, Lloyd managed the New Plymouth Cenex Farm Center for 10 years.

Lloyd was preceded in death by his wife of 62 years, Betty Gillespie Johnson, and by six of his siblings. He is survived by his daughter Judy (Wayne) Meyer and his son Jon, as well as 6 grandchildren– Brett (Kelly) Meyer, Denise (Chum) Sullivan, Tanya Meyer, Lisa (Bart) Veis, Ryan and Spencer Johnson and 8 great-grandchildren– Seda, Ashlin, Logan, Emily, Justin, Jared, Lucy and Maddie. He is also survived by his sister Ione (Bob) Gordon of Boise, sister-in-law Marion Johnson of McCall and many nieces and nephews.

Lloyd was a loved and cherished son, brother, husband, father, grandfather, uncle and friend. His favorite saying – “if you want to have a friend, you have to be a friend”.

He was a friend and supporter of Fruitland High School and the entire Fruitland community.

Lloyd Johnson embodied the ideals that have made this country great – hard work, love of family and generosity of spirit.

A graveside service will be held at 11:00 am, Saturday, September 30, 2017 at Rosedale Memorial Gardens, Payette, Idaho followed by a lunch and Celebration of Life at the Johnson home, 401 S. Colorado Avenue, Fruitland at 1:00 pm.

In lieu of flowers the family has suggested contributions to Fruitland High School Athletic Dept or Fruitland FFA, PO Box A, Fruitland ID 83619; or Smokejumpers Good Samaritan Fund, c/o Chuck Sheley, 10 Judy Lane, Chico CA 95926; or Heart ‘n Home Hospice (The OpAL Foundation) 1107 N W 11th St Fruitland ID 83619.

source Argus Observer:
— —

Retired Fruitland smokejumper celebrates century mark

April Ehrlich – Independent-Enterprise Jun 8, 2016


Stewart “Lloyd” Johnson, second from left, and fellow smokejumpers stand ready to fight forest fighters by parachute.

Stewart “Lloyd” Johnson might be 100 years old, but that does not mean he is no longer a smokejumper parachuting from a plane to fight flames cutting through forest pines below.

“Once a smokejumper, always a smokejumper,” is the motto Johnson lives by. He keeps a collection of memorabilia from his parachuting days in the basement of his Fruitland home, and he continues to meet with local retired smokejumpers in the area.

Black-and-white photos of airplanes and his fellow firefighters cover the walls of his smokejumping museum. There’s a photo of him at the center of a group photo in the 1940s, with a head of curly hair and a strong gaze. The photo was featured on the cover of the National Smokejumper Association quarterly magazine in April 2006.

continued:
——————————————–

Commissioner Cruickshank’s September Newsletter

From the desk of Commissioner Cruickshank, September 30, 2017

Friday September 1st
I participated in a National Association of Counties (NACo) Executive Board conference call. Reports from NACo Executive Director spoke on the happenings with congress to be worked on which include the debt ceiling, Tax Reform, Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILT), Secure Rural Schools (SRS), some states being invited to the White House to discuss issues, Municipal Bonding, State and Local Tax Deductions (SALT) being removed from Federal Income Tax forms as a deduction and Opioid awareness efforts.

Sunday September 3rd,
I received a call on information from the Highline Fire that it is close to reaching the Valley County boundary and could potentially reach the Big Creek area of Valley County.

Monday September 4th, Labor Day
I attended a Fire Briefing on the Highline Fire to learn more about the fire and the threat to the Big Creek area along with certain positions the fire team will take when the fire reaches trigger points as it moves into Valley County.

Tuesday September 5th
Commissioner day today on Tuesday due to Monday being Labor Day. The minutes of the commissioners meeting, once approved, can be found on the Valley County website under the commissioner section. http://www.co.valley.id.us/
Of importance today was the approval of an Emergency Declaration for the Bearskin Fire in Valley County which is in the Deadwood area and has potential to threaten the structures of the Deadwood Outfitters and other Forest Service Buildings.

I also participated in a NACo Transportation Committee conference call at noon.

Monday September 11th
Today started out with the American Legion hosting Patriot Day on the Courthouse steps to honor the brave folks from 9-11.
We then held our commissioner meeting. The minutes can be read once approved on our website. http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday September 12th
I listened in on a live stream webinar titled “Governing in the face of Partisan Divide”. This was hosted by NACo and NACo’s Executive Director facilitated the discussion with Representative Kurt Schrader from Oregon and Representative Charlie Dent from Pennsylvania.

Wednesday September 13th
I attended a meeting with Midas Gold representatives to discuss the potential of Community Agreements being proposed by Midas Gold to assist with concerns within our communities and visit about the potential effects when their operation moves forward to the communities.

Thursday September 14th
I hosted the NACo West Region conference call today. We reviewed the recent success of the NACo PILT Fly-In where 30 county folks met with 70 congressional offices and had briefings with key folks on the PILT need by counties. Some attendees were able to meet with Forest Service leadership and Department of Interior leadership to help them understand the effects if PILT and SRS are not funded to assist counties.

Friday September 15th
I participated in the NACo Executive Board conference call. Today we reviewed the PILT Fly-In, NACo chairing a National Coalition to assist with advocacy on issues that impact counties and other areas such as cities and schools, Debt Ceiling, Tax Reform, utilizing the NACo website and County Explorer section to find data and Opioid drug availability by manufacturers.

Sunday September 17th
Today I flew to Rapid City, South Dakota to attend the South Dakota County Convention.

Monday September 18th
I attended the South Dakota Convention opening session and heard a presentation on “Round Up Your Best Employees”. This presentation was on the ability to work together toward a common goal.

I assisted with manning the NACo Vendor Exhibit and spoke with many South Dakota elected officials about their counties and concerns.

I received a phone call from Idaho’s Representative on NACo’s Western Interstate Region (WIR) Board to let me know that she is resigning her position as an elected official which eliminates her being the Idaho Representative for WIR. I then contacted the Idaho Association of Counties Executive Director to see how the process would work to refill this position for Idaho. As a result I started contacting Idaho elected officials who might be interested in filling this vacancy.

I then attended a workshop on Highway Right-of-Ways to see how they handle issues with ROW’s. I also attended a workshop on Property Tax Limitation and Levies. Interesting enough South Dakota limits county budgets with a cap but not school districts.

Tonight I attended the South Dakota President’s reception.

Tuesday September 19th
I attended the Vendor Breakfast this morning where the vendors speak on what they provide to South Dakota counties.

The General Session today was a presentation on the impacts of Medicinal and Recreational Marijuana in Colorado. This presentation highlighted the issues Colorado is seeing with marijuana grows and the movement of marijuana out of the region illegally. Colorado residents can grow up to 99 plants per person with the correct permits. With this availability outside people are hiring Colorado residents to purchase property, including houses, to grow marijuana and send to them.

I was able to speak to the South Dakota Association of County Commissioners on PILT, SRS, Transportation, Sage Grouse plans that were ignored, Essential Air Service, the large landscape we as rural counties work with and building relationships. My main intent was to ask them Who is Your Voice? If you are not speaking out then Who Is? We all need to understand the issues we face and in visiting with them I find many of our issues are the same with them. I also spoke to them on attending future NACo conferences and utilizing the NACo Website for information specific to their county.

I then attended the South Dakota Commissioners meeting where they elected a new president and officers. With quite a bit of Tribal and Trust Lands in South Dakota this was a main topic along with keeping the State and Federal Legislators informed.

Wednesday September 20th
I participated in a National Forest Counties and Schools Coalition (NFCSC) conference call. The NFCSC just recently held a SRS Fly-In and the folks who attended reported on their efforts to educate folks on the importance of the SRS funding, which has not been funded since 2015 and the effects are being felt across the United States. Also discussed were several pieces of legislation where the SRS funding could be included to get us back on track along with forest management. Of most interest was the conversations being held as more bipartisan support is happening for this funding.

Today I flew home from South Dakota.

Thursday September 21st
I participated in a NACo Rural Action Caucus (RAC) conference call to discuss an upcoming RAC Symposium being held in Wise County, Texas.

Friday September 22nd
I worked to catch up on emails today.

This afternoon I received a phone call to discuss Valley County’s Fire Wise grants with folks from the Idaho Department of Lands. We discussed the status of certain grants and timelines to have them either extended or completed.

Monday September 25th
Commissioner meeting today was short so we could travel to Boise for the Idaho Association of Counties (IAC) Fall Conference. Please see the Valley County website for the minutes once approved. http://www.co.valley.id.us/

This afternoon was a session on “Setting the Ground Rules for Introducing Legislation”. What this entailed was the process IAC has adopted when a person wants to bring an issue forward to consider for a legislative action. Next was a session on the impact of “Legalization of Marijuana in Colorado”. This was very interesting as I could compare the presentation I heard in South Dakota to this one. Interesting to note. in 3 years Recreational marijuana sales are up 227% while Medical marijuana is only up 17.8%. Everyone pays in cash including property taxes. Colorado residents claim No Harm because it’s legal, No Risk as Mom and Dad do it, it is available everywhere so there is Social Acceptance. Concerns are you can’t compare alcohol with marijuana on effect as it reacts differently and it is better to Inform and Educate than to Incarcerate.

I then attended the IAC Transportation Committee meeting where we discussed the Surplus Eliminator funding, Emergency Funds held because of Hurricane Harvey and Irma and will come at a later date however many counties like Valley have spent the funds on repairs expecting reimbursement for most of the expense. We also discussed recent conversations between the counties Department of Motor Vehicles and Idaho Transportation Department on issues with the system which needs replaced. Representative Phyllis King presented her legislation on electric bicycles and what their definition should be.

Tonight was the IAC Awards and vendor dinner. Valley County Sheriff Patti Bolen received the Mills-Adler award for the Sheriff’s.

Tuesday September 26th
This morning was a session on “Active Shooters”. We learned how shooters plan and create confusion for their event.

I attended the IAC Public Lands Committee meeting where we discussed Fire Wise Litigation concerning the small town of Orogrande, Idaho in Idaho County, the judge understanding the Idaho Roadless Rule better as a result, a bill in congress not allowing outside interests to file suits, listened to a proposed resolution on lands being donated to Federal agencies for Public Land which reduces a tax base and shifts the burden to the other taxpayers and heard a report on the recent WIR meetings. We also heard from Jonathan Shuffield, NACo’s Associate Legislative Director for Public Affairs and WIR. Jonathan provided a recap of the PILT and SRS Fly-Ins and how these topics are top of the list for NACo to work on. The Administration’s request to review National Monument designations and the need to address Fire Borrowing.

Next was a discussion on the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Planning 2.0 and the work to re-write the plan. Then we heard from the Forest Service on Collaborative groups and how they are assisting the Forest Service when suits are filed and the Forest Service prevails only because a collaborative group was involved with the design of the project. The new Forest Service Chief is expected to attend a meeting in Coeur d Alene this spring.

Late afternoon the IAC Legislative Committee met to review proposed Resolutions for tomorrows membership vote. We also discussed how IAC could support NACo’s opposition to the State and Local Tax (SALT) deduction being removed from the Federal Tax form which impacts Idaho by 1.79 Billion dollars. The average cost to an Idaho taxpayer would be $8,800.00 they would not be able to deduct if this is approved by congress.

Tonight was a conference dinner held at Zoo Boise where we had an outside BBQ and could tour the Zoo.

Wednesday September 27th
I started my morning listening in on the NACo Northeast Region conference call at 6 AM where they we talking about SALT and the impacts to the nation. I also learned that the Tax Reform proposal was to be released this morning. If SALT is allowed then this is double taxation on the citizens.

At 7 AM I attended the second session of the IAC Legislative Committee to finish the discussion on proposed resolutions and to visit more on how to support NACo on the SALT issue including the Tax Exempt status of Municipal Bonds which is also being eliminated. Municipal Bonding is huge to municipalities in stretching dollars when projects are looked at.

The another General Session was held for the membership where Jonathan Shuffield with NACo spoke on the ongoing efforts by NACo on behalf of counties. Next was a presentation on “Combating Child Sex Abuse in the 21st Century”. We then held IAC elections to fill the new leadership positions for the upcoming year, passed an IAC Budget and By-Laws update. We then went on with the membership voting on Resolutions and the support to NACo on opposing SALT and the elimination of Tax Exempt Municipal Bonds.

I then participated in a NACo Transportation Committee conference call on formulating ideas for this years transportation committee to work on.

Next was a meeting of the IAC Commissioners where Jonathan with NACo spoke on NACo Advocacy of issues like PILT, SRS, Hurricane relief, Health Care funding, Puerto Rico’s issues with drinking water, Tax Reform, etc. Then we heard from the “Office of Emergency Management” on First Net and how they are working to identify the need and fill in dead spots so emergency efforts can communicate outside of public channels which helps with better communication and response.

Tonight was the IAC Board of Directors meeting and dinner. We reviewed our Mission Statement, heard a report on Trac-Phone litigation/settlement, found out that the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act was being changed which impacts counties however the counties were not contacted. When asked about why the folks involved didn’t think this effects counties however every Public Hearing where folks are sworn in is impacted. We discussed being involved with an event on “Climate Change – Safeguarding Idaho’s Economy” and who should attend and if IAC should be a sponsor.

Thursday September 28th
I drove home from Boise. I received a call from a North Idaho Commissioner requesting me to provide a copy of a bill to NACo and see what their thoughts are.

Friday September 29th
I participated in a NACo Executive Board conference call. We discussed the Affordable Care Act repeal not having enough votes, Tax Reform will now be the topic before they come back to health care. State and Local Tax (SALT) deductions is the number one pay for Congress is working towards as it produces over a Trillion dollars in 10 years in revenue however it is on the backs of the American Taxpayer. Municipal Bonding seems to be safe, if SALT goes away the threat is no Tax Reform even though there is other ways to cut spending, NACo folks are doing many media spots including radio which is more than ever done before and congress felt counties would be the weakest link on SALT so it would be easy to do. So far NACo and county leaders are fighting back and showing this is a huge impact to our citizens. This week NACo had a commissioner from Montana testify on the need for forest management and next week NACo 1st Vice President Greg Cox will meet with Interior Secretary Zinke. We also learned that when the Trump Administration proposed using Public Private Partnerships to assist with infrastructure they have come to the realization this may not be the best answer for infrastructure needs and funding. Mr. Cox also spoke on seeing more Hepatitis A cases in southern California and some in Utah.

Well this ends the month of September. Cooler weather, rain and snow have slowed the fires in Idaho and many firefighters have left the area to work on fires elsewhere. This is a much welcome relief for us who live with smoke now every year.

Thanks for reading the news and let me know if something perks your interest.

Gordon
———————————————–

Idaho News:

Gas piping blamed for Tamarack blast, fire that killed 4

Fireplace had been converted to wood, but gas line still in place

By Ben Fletcher for The Star-News September 28, 2017

Propane gas that pooled in a space behind a converted wood fireplace fueled an explosion that killed four people and destroyed a home at Tamarack Resort on June 30, Idaho State Fire Marshall Knute Sandahl said.

The wood fireplace had been converted from a propane source, but the fuel was unknowingly turned on by the group, which had rented the home for the Fourth of July holiday.

The victims were not able to smell the gas flowing freely because it pooled in a concealed void space located behind the chimney. Investigators classified the fire as an accident.

The bodies of Erin Smith, 34; her daughter, Autumn Smith, 7; James “Jim” Harper III, 49; and James “JJ” Harper IV, 14, were recovered following an explosion and fire that ensued inside the 3,600 square foot home at 541 Whitewater Dr.

William “Mitch” Smith, 46, was the lone occupant to survive the fire.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

NTSB: Deadly plane crash happened after pilot accidentally flew into canyon

KTVB September 28, 2017

Cascade, Idaho — A small plane crash that killed one man and badly injured another near Cascade earlier this month occurred after the pilot inadvertently flew into a box canyon, the National Transportation Safety Board determined.

NTSB investigators say the pilot realized the plane was unable to climb out of the terrain, and attempted a “course reversal turn” to get out of the canyon. During the maneuver, the plane stalled, and the aircraft plummeted to the ground.

The crash happened Sept. 2 near in a remote mountain area near the Sulfur Creek Air Strip.

The pilot, 54-year-old Andrew D. Akin of Griffin, Georgia, had come to Idaho to pick the plane up from a seller in the Nampa area, and fly it back to Georgia to deliver it to the buyer, a friend of his. Flying with Akin was his cousin, 50-year-old David R. Henderson of Boise, who was also certified as a pilot.

Henderson was killed in the crash, while Akin had to be airlifted to a hospital by helicopter.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

July 29 Payette Lake drowning ruled to be accidental

The Star-News September 28, 2017

The death of a man in Payette Lake on July 29 has been determined to be accidental, the Valley County Sheriff ’s Office said.

“Alcohol and prescription medications played a factor into his death,” Lt. Jason Speer said. “We were not able to locate any signs of foul play.”

Emergency responders were called to a “suspicious circumstance” at 910 Yew Wood St. at 1:21 a.m. on July 29, the sheriff’s office said.

Carmello Tinnerello Jr, 61, Boise, was found floating unresponsive in the lake. The man was pulled from the water by a woman staying at the same house as Tinnerello, the sheriff’s report said.

Rescuers tried to revive Tinnerello but he was pronounced dead at the scene.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

McCall Fire & EMS notes Fire Prevention Week Oct. 8-14

The Star-News September 28, 2017

The McCall Fire & EMS team is encouraging area residents to develop and practice a home escape plan in honor of Fire Prevention Week Oct. 8-14. This year’s theme is “Every Second Counts: Plan 2 Ways Out!”

“Developing and practicing a home escape plan is like building muscle memory,” McCall Fire and EMS firefighter/paramedic Jon Metz said. “That preplanning is what everyone will draw upon to snap into action and escape as quickly as possible in the event of a fire.”

For more information about Fire Prevention Week activities in McCall and home escape planning, visit http://mccallfire.com or http://firepreventionweek.org

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Former Idaho coroner faces charges, questions

9/24/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — The former Valley County coroner is facing two misdemeanor charges because prosecutors say he used the county’s truck for personal transportation. Some officials are also raising questions about where he stored human remains when he stopped using the designated county morgue for a few months earlier this year.

The Idaho Statesman reports that Idaho law doesn’t specify how coroners may store bodies, and former coroner Nathan Hess has declined to answer questions about the matter.

Ness resigned May 18, and county commissioners named Scott Carver to the position the same day.

Hess’ arraignment is currently set for Oct. 3. He told the Idaho Statesman that he was hindered in the job by a lack of training or help from county officials.

As in other rural areas across the state, the Valley County morgue and coroner’s office is in space rented from the region’s only funeral home. Ness was an employee at Heikkila Funeral Home when he took the coroner’s post, and he hoped to buy the funeral home himself someday.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Cascade survey finds need for good-paying jobs, housing

Residents say new development should not depend on tourism

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 28, 2017

Cascade residents want economic development, affordable housing and more community involvement, the Cascade City Council was told Monday night.

The topics were part of a presentation by the Idaho Rural Partnership at Monday’s council meeting held at The Ashley Inn.

A community review was conducted in April 2016 through public meetings and surveys sent to Cascade residents.

“Most residents of Cascade place a high value on the family-friendly and working town character of the community and want to see it retained,” the review said.

Priorities in the review included living-wage jobs, creative approaches to financing infrastructure improvement and exploring the possibility of creating a marina on Lake Cascade.

Living-wage jobs may have been a primary concern in the review, but a definition for what constitutes a living wage needs to be determined, said Jon Barrett, executive director of the Idaho Rural Partnership.

Residents noted in the survey that they did not want to focus solely on tourism and recreation to drive economic development.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Magazine names Ikola ‘Logging Business of the Year’

The Star-News September 28, 2017

Ikola Logging of McCall has been named the 2017 Timber Harvesting Logging Business of the Year by Timber Harvesting magazine.

Led by Gerry Ikola, 69, the business was founded by his father in 1947 and today involves Ikola’s wife, Capella, and their three children, Erika, Gerry Jr. and Gabe.

The Ikolas will accept the award Saturday in Natchez, Miss., at the concluding banquet of the annual meeting of the American Loggers Council.

Timber Harvesting recognized the business for its professionalism and innovation on the job and for the family’s influential Ieadership and pro-industry outreach beyond the woods, a news release said,

“Both Gerry and Capella have worked tirelessly through Associated Logging Contractors-Idaho and the Idaho Forest Products Commission to help improve the logging industry in the state and region,” the release said.

The Ikolas’ children play important roles in the company and plan to continue the Ikola Logging tradition of outstanding performance after their parents retire, the release said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Larger US Veterans Affairs clinic opens in eastern Idaho

9/28/17 AP

Pocatello, Idaho — A larger U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs clinic has opened in eastern Idaho that will enable it to serve up to a 1,000 more veterans than before.

The opening of the clinic in Pocatello was celebrated on Wednesday, but it began serving veterans last month, the Idaho State Journal reported.

The new facility, which is part of the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, is three times larger than the previous building where the clinic was housed for the last 15 years.

“This has been a work in progress for many years, and I’m so glad it’s finally here,” said Shella Stovall, the director of the health care system. “The opening of this outstanding facility just reaffirms our commitment to our veterans.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho breathing easier now on fire bills

By Betsy Z. Russell The Spokesman-Review Sep 25, 2017

Although the fire season seemed downright awful, with heavy smoke choking much of the state, Idaho is coming out of it without any pressing bills.

That’s because the state Legislature pre-funded its wildland firefighting costs two years ago with a $60 million appropriation. This year’s firefighting expenditures, on lands for which the state is responsible for fire protection, came to just over $21 million, with $5 million reimbursable from other agencies or owners; that’s a net obligation, as of now, of $16.3 million.

Going into the fire season, Idaho had a $48.4 million cash balance from the legislative appropriation two years ago. Now, combining the $16.3 million in this year’s costs with additional outstanding bills from previous years, the state’s net obligation is about $34 million. So after all those bills are paid, Idaho will still have $14 million in its firefighting account.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Utility seeks $220 million from Idaho, Oregon ratepayers

By Keith Ridler & Associated Press Sunday, October 1st 2017

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Officials are considering a utility company’s request to pass on to ratepayers $220 million in relicensing expenses for a three-dam hydroelectric project on the Idaho-Oregon border.

The Idaho Public Utilities Commission has set an October 11 settlement conference for Boise-based Idaho Power’s request concerning its stalled relicensing application for the Hells Canyon Complex on the Snake River.

Oregon officials are refusing to agree to the relicensing until salmon and steelhead can access four Oregon tributaries that feed into the Hells Canyon Complex, as required by Oregon law for the relicensing.

But Idaho lawmakers have prohibited moving federally protected salmon and steelhead upstream of the dams, which could force restoration work on Idaho’s environmentally degraded middle section of the Snake River.

source:
—————————————–

Mining News:

Land trust accepts $1.2 million donation

Local News 8 Sep 29, 2017

Soda Springs, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Agrium has donated almost $1.2 million to help fund conservation and wildlife habitat protection in the Soda Springs area.

The Sagebrush Land Steppe Land Trust will manage projects associated with the Rasmussen Valley Mine. “Every penny of this fund will go directly on the ground for conservation easements and habitat improvement projects in southeast Idaho,” said SSLT Executive Director Matt Lucia.

The the Land Trust will accept project requests, evaluate progress, and disburse funding for projects that benefit the local environment.

Agrium is working to identify reclamation and off-site mitigation practices to benefit wildlife and their habitat, incorporate mine designs to increase the number of final reclamation acres, and minimize the impact of phosphorous mining on wetland and stream resources.

Acting Idaho Falls District Bureau of Land Management Manager Lance Brady commended the company. “Agrium’s donation to the Sagebrush Steppe Land Trust shows its commitment to being a good neighbor—to being a part of a community, really. On one level, this is about helping with important habitat work, but it’s also about jobs, about working landscapes and about how Idaho residents traditionally use this part of the state.”

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Company ordered to pay Idaho tribes for toxic waste storage

By Keith Ridler Associated Press Friday, September 29th 2017

Boise, Idaho (AP) – A federal court has ruled that an agribusiness company that mined phosphate for fertilizer must pay $1.5 million in permit fees annually to eastern Idaho tribes to store millions of tons of toxic waste on tribal lands.

Chief U.S. District Court Judge B. Lynn Winmill in a 33-page order on Thursday granted a request by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to enforce a tribal court decision imposing the permit fees on FMC Corporation.

Winmill ruled that FMC previously consented to tribal jurisdiction and agreed to the $1.5 million in fees before challenging them in tribal court and declining to pay them starting in 2002 after closing the fertilizer plant.

FMC in a statement Friday to The Associated Press says it will appeal the decision to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Blackfoot to host cobalt refining facility

60 to 90 new jobs possible

Local News 8 Sep 29, 2017

Blackfoot, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Vancouver, British Columbia based eCobalt has announced plans to proceed with development of a cobalt mining operation based in Salmon.

Part of the operation will include a hydrometallurgical refining facility to be built on a railhead in Blackfoot.

Mayor Paul Loomis said that operation could provide between 60 to 90 full-time, well-paying jobs. A site on Pioneer Road, just outside city limits in Bingham County, was identified for that work. Loomis said Blackfoot is “thrilled’ with the announcement.

Key to the Blackfoot project will be a new railroad spur.

continued:
———————————

Public Lands:

Payette National Forest to Begin Conducting Recreation Visitor Surveys

Date: September 26, 2017
Contact: Jascha Zeitlin, Forest Service (208) 549-4224

McCall, ID – Beginning on October 1, 2017, and lasting through September of 2018, the Payette National Forest will once again conduct National Visitor Use Monitoring (NVUM) surveys. The surveys are conducted on random days throughout the year.

The information collected from the surveys is useful for forest planning and is relevant to community tourism promotion and planning. It provides the national forest managers with an estimate of how many people actually recreate on federal lands and what activities they engage in while there. Other important information for forest and tourism planners includes measures of visitor satisfaction and data about the economic impact of recreation visits to the local economy.

This ongoing survey has been conducted on every national forest in the country every five years and information previously gathered as well as this survey tracks recreation use and visitor trends across the nation over time. The surveys have been conducted on the Payette National Forest three times in the past – 2003, 2008 and 2013.

Beginning next month, you will see Payette National Forest Service employees working in developed and dispersed recreation sites and along Forest Service roads. They will be wearing orange vests and be near a signs that read: “Traffic Survey Ahead.” Just like the postman these folks may be out in all kinds of adverse weather condition. They are waiting to talk to you, so please pull over for an interview – you will be helping your community! The interviewers want to know about your visit to the forest. The survey takes about 8 minutes, does not ask for your name, and is voluntary. Questions focus on where you recreated, how far you have traveled, what activities you have participated in, and your satisfaction with your national forest visit.

If you have any questions regarding these surveys, or just want more information about them you may contact Jascha Zeitlin, Payette National Forest NVUM Program Manager at (208) 549-4224.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Southwest Idaho fall prescribed fire burning planned

September 26, 2017
Contact: Venetia Gempler (208) 373-4105

Boise, Idaho, September 26, 2017 — Southwest Idaho interagency fire managers anticipate favorable fall weather conditions for planned low-intensity prescribed fires. Prescribed fires are designed to reduce hazardous vegetation (fuels), large wildfire potential to communities, and improve wildlife habitat.

Weather and conditions permitting, prescribed burns are scheduled to start in September and continue through November. Approximately 2,400 acres are planned for ignition in nine project areas within the Boise National Forest.

Public and firefighter safety is always the first priority in all public land fire operations. Fire managers develop burn plans that account for safety, specific fuel and weather prescriptions and smoke management. All controlled burns are closely evaluated and are only approved when favorable conditions are present.

Prescribed burns may affect people sensitive to smoke and may impact access to burn areas and travel routes. Fire officials strongly advise forest visitors and homeowners to prepare and plan activities around the proposed dates and locations of burns and to use extreme caution near prescribed fire areas. Please be aware of firefighters and equipment in the area and on roadways, comply with posted notices and drive slowly in areas with decreased visibility.

Information and signs will be posted on roads that access burn areas in advance of ignitions and remain in place through burn completion.

The http://www.rxfire.com website is updated with information regarding southwest Idaho burn planned within Idaho Department of Lands, Bureau of Land Management, Payette National Forest and Boise National Forest.

The Boise National Forest prescribed fire hotline: (208)-373-4208.

Planned Boise National Forest fall prescribed burns include:

Idaho City Ranger District

* Warm Springs Ridge (200 acres): located approximately 4 miles west of Idaho City, Idaho. Prescribed burn using hand ignition to reduce surface vegetation (fuels).
* Mores South (50 acres): located about 3 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho. This is a landscape burn (ground fire) using hand ignition to reduce fuel in the Wildland Urban Interface.
* Alder Ridge (100 acres): located 1 mile north of Placerville, Idaho. This is a landscape burn (ground fire) using hand ignition to reduce fuel in the Wildland Urban Interface.
* Little Ophir (100 acres): located 4 miles west of Pioneerville, Idaho. A landscape burn using hand ignition that will reduce fuel in the Wildland Urban Interface area.
* Warm Springs Aerial (600 acres): located 4 miles west of Idaho City, Idaho will use a helicopter and hand ignition to reduce fuel in this wildland urban interface.
* Amber (300 acres): located 2 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho. This is a modified tree well burn.

Cascade Ranger District

* Horsethief (360 acres): located about 1 mile east/northeast of Horsethief Reservoir. This burn involves helicopter and hand ignition to reduce fuels over the area.
* Westside Restoration Unit 39 and 40 (consist of 25 acres each): This project is located on National Forest System (NFS) road 435 along West Mountain. It is approximately 10 miles west of Cascade, Idaho. This will be hand ignition to reduce fuels within the wildland urban interface.
* Amanita Campground Landing Piles: This project is located approximately 25 miles west/northwest of Cascade along the West Mountain road. It will be pile burning for one day.
* Administrative sites: Slash piles will be ignited in the following locations: Warm Lake, Yellow Pine, Landmark and Crawford. It will be pile burning for two days.

Mountain Home Ranger District

* Cottonwood II Rx (1000 acres): This project is located about 17 miles NE of Boise, Idaho along NFS roads 203 and 377.

Lowman Ranger District

* Administrative Sites (20 acres): (Lowman and Elk Creek Guard Stations)
* Wapiti Summer Homes (10 acres): (Grandjean area)
* Bear Valley/Elk Creek (5 acres): (scattered piles)
* Long Creek Summer Homes (1 acre): (Junction of NFS roads 582/545)

Emmett Ranger District

* West Scriver Landing Piles: This project is located about 7 miles north of Crouch, Idaho, in the Scriver Creek drainage. It will be pile burning for one day.
* Pinney Slope Landing Piles: This project is located about 6.5 miles north of Crouch, Idaho, in the Pinney Creek drainage. It will be pile burning for approximately five days.
* Sagehen Admin Pile: This project is located directly west of Sagehen Reservoir and will take one day to burn.
* Williams Creek Landing Piles: The project area is located west of Idaho State Highway 55, between Banks and Smiths Ferry, Idaho. The project area is located entirely on NFS lands in Valley County, Idaho, Township 10 N., Range 3 E. Sections 4, 5, 8, 9, 16, 17, 19-21 and 29-31, the Boise Meridian. It will be pile burning for approximately five days.
* Garden Valley Admin Pile: This project is located at the Garden Valley Forest Service site 3 miles east of Crouch, Idaho. The project will be approximately two days of burning.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Local forestry and fire grants available

September 28, 2017
Contacts:
Jennifer Russell, IDL Cooperative Grants Project Coordinator – jrussell@idl.idaho.gov or 208-666-8669
Tyre Holfeltz, IDL Program Manager – tholfeltz@idl.idaho.gov or 208-666-8653

(Coeur d’Alene) – Non-profit groups, local and state agencies, tribes and educational institutions can apply for grants of up to $240,000 each to help protect, enhance and conserve forests in Idaho.

The Landscape Scale Restoration, Western Fire Managers, and Hazard Fuels Reduction Grants fund activities that support local or state initiatives and address issues identified in county wildfire protection plans or the Idaho Forest Action Plan. The Idaho Forest Action Plan is a long-term, coordinated strategy for reducing threats to Idaho’s forests while increasing the social, economic and environmental benefits they provide.

The Idaho Department of Lands (IDL) is requesting project pre-proposals for the grants. Within each grant program, a limited number of project pre-proposals will be selected for full development and competition with other applicants across the West.

IDL will hold a webinar on October 30, 2017 to explain the types of projects that qualify and how to build successful project pre-proposals. To sign up for the webinar, e-mail Jennifer Russell at jrussell@idl.idaho.gov.

Project pre-proposals are due January 22, 2018. More information about the grants and examples of past projects can be found at http://www.idl.idaho.gov/grants/index.html

The IDL administers the grants, which are funded through the U.S. Forest Service State and Private Forestry branch.
—————————————

Critter News:

MCPAWS to sponsor fun run, Oktoberfest on Oct. 7

The Star-News September 28, 2017

MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter will host a full day of fun with a dog-friendly 5km fun run followed by Oktoberfest on Saturday, Oct. 7.

The Tails on Trails fun run will begin at 9 a.m. Oct. 7 at Brundage Mountain Resort. Registration is $35 for adults and $25 for youth under age 21.

The race fee includes a Tails on Trails hat, goodie bag and registration for Oktoberfest. Registration is available online at http://mcpaws.org.

Oktoberfest festivities will begin at noon at Alpine Village, 616 N. Third St. The event will include live music by Bottom Line Band and the Treasure Valley Musik Meisters as well as a costume contest, raffle, craft goods, activities for kids and food and drinks.

Entry for Oktoberfest is $10 and includes a beer and an event koozie. Raffle tickets will be sold for $5 each at the event. For more information, visit http://mcpaws.org

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Pet talk – What is distemper?

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Sept 29, 2017 IME

Canine distemper is caused by a very contagious virus that infects the respiratory tract, brain and intestines. The disease is easily prevented by vaccination.

The canine distemper virus is closely related to the human measles virus. It is commonly spread via coughing and exposure to infectious urine and diarrhea. The virus is destroyed by sunlight, high heat, drying and many common disinfectants.

Clinical signs in affected dogs with distemper include fever, cloudy nasal and eye discharges, coughing, decreased appetite, vomiting and diarrhea. Neurological signs include seizures, behavioral changes, weakness and difficulty walking. Involuntary repetitive twitching of a leg or facial muscles is common. These neurological signs often occur several weeks after the vomiting, diarrhea and nasal discharges start. Other findings include thickened foot pads (known as “hard pad disease”), abnormal tooth enamel and dry painful eyes from decreased tear production. Some dogs have minimal clinical signs initially and then months to years later develop the classic neurological twitching of legs and facial muscles. This is called “old dog distemper.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Dog reunited with Boise owner after weeks wandering in Foothills

Joe Parris, KTVB September 26, 2017

Boise – The hand-colored sign on Jane Hosteny’s garage door says it all: “Welcome Home Emma.”

A lost dog’s weeks-long trek through the foothills around Boise came to a happy conclusion Sunday, when she reunited with the owner who had never given up searching for her.

Jane Hosteny said Emma, her Labrador and Border Collie mix, ran away while Hosteny was in Denmark visiting family. Hosteny had left her pet at her daughter’s home in the North End, but Emma bolted out an open door Sept. 1.

“They searched every day – we must have hundreds of flyers in the North End,” she said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Dogs fatally attack pet, injure eastern Idaho woman

9/27/17 AP

Blackfoot, Idaho — A woman was injured and her dog was killed after three canines attacked her outside her eastern Idaho residence.

The Idaho State Journal reports that three pit bull mixes entered the woman’s fenced yard in Blackfoot and fatally attacked her pet on Monday. When the woman heard the attack, she intervened and the three canines turned on her.

A neighbor called police, and a responding officer shot one of the dogs in order to reach the woman. The other two fled after the gunshot.

The woman was transported to the hospital with multiple bites to her face and body, and she was listed in good condition on Tuesday.

The owner of the dogs gave custody to police. Police did not say what will happen to the remaining two dogs.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Lawsuit would prevent Washington from killing more wolves to protect cattle

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review September 25, 2017

Two conservation groups say they filed a lawsuit today seeking to stop the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife from killing any more state-endangered wolves.

Three wolves from two packs were killed by state-authorized shooters this summer in an effort to stop a series of wolf attacks on cattle that occurred on public and private land in northeastern Washington. No further attacks on cattle have been confirmed.

However, in today’s suit the Center for Biological Diversity and Cascadia Wildlands claim the agency’s killing of wolves from the Smackout and Sherman packs failed to undergo required environmental analysis. The protocol was created by a Wolf Advisory Group that includes about 18 people with a range of interests, from wolf advocates to ranchers. The protocol was revised this year.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wyoming wolf hunt to begin Sunday

AP Sep 29, 2017

Cheyenne, Wyo. (AP) – For the first time since 2013, licensed wolf hunting will take place in Wyoming.

Wyoming’s wolf hunting season opens Sunday and runs through Dec. 31. It is confined to 12 trophy game hunt areas in the northwest part of the state.

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department has set a quota of 44 wolves to be taken.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Grouse hunter and bird dog have harrowing encounter with wolves

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review September 28, 2017

After reading the alarming account of a grouse hunter’s way-too-close encounter with a pack of wolves, I may always leave the window of my pickup open when I’m out in wolf country with my bird dog.

Minnesota hunter Justin Bailey was hunting ruffed grouse Tuesday when a wolf chased his hunting dog out of the woods.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

British woman ‘may have been attacked by wolves’ in Greece

26 September 2017 BBC

A British woman who died in northern Greece after apparently being mauled by a pack of stray dogs may have been attacked by wolves, a coroner has said.

Celia Hollingworth, from Bradford-on-Avon, Wiltshire was reported missing on Thursday after visiting an archaeological site near Maroneia.

Coroner Nikolaos Kifinidis suggested she may have been attacked by other wild animals such as wolves or jackals.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Education International

Newsletter Third week September 2017

DNR estimates surge in wolf population in Minnesota

Wolf Population Soars on Alaska Island, Kill Quota Increased

Wolves discovered living just outside Rome for first time in more than a century

Experts called in to examine remains of Briton ‘mauled by wolves’ in Greece

Wolves ate hiker after her frantic phone call, coroner says
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Cougars kill far more elk than wolves on Idaho Panhandle, study suggests

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review September 25, 2017

Mountain lions are far more likely to kill a cow or calf elk than wolves in the Idaho Panhandle. And nutrition plays a large role in how many calves survive a winter.

Those are some of the findings emerging in the first two years of an elk mortality study that involves capturing and putting radio collars on cow and calf elk and monitoring how they live and die.

I referred to this study in 2016 and again last week as Idaho Fish and Game Department biologists begin using the data for wildlife management.

A Montana study on elk in the Bitterroot Mountains has had similar results.

Here’s an update on the Idaho Panhandle study by Fish and Game biologist Laura Wolf.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wyoming hunter survives grizzly bear attack

AP Updated: Sep 26, 2017

Jackson, Wyo. (AP) – UPDATE 9/26/17: A 41-year-old Wyoming man has survived an encounter with a grizzly bear in which he was twice mauled but still managed to ride on horseback to rescuers.

James Moore, of Rock Springs, was hunting about 10 a.m. Monday with two others in the Teton Wilderness in northwest Wyoming when a sow with two cubs attacked him.

Teton County Sheriff’s Office Lt. Matt Carr tells the Jackson Hole News & Guide that Moore heard the brush rustling right next to him and the next thing he knew the bear was attacking him.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Montana hunter shoots grizzly bear as it mauls his son

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review September 29, 2017

A man shot and killed a grizzly bear after it ran out of some brush and bit his adult son’s arm, Montana wildlife authorities say.

The father and son were hunting black bears near the Hungry Horse Reservoir on Sunday when the bear attacked, according to an Associated Press report.

Authorities say the men didn’t see the bear until it was about 12 feet (3.7 meters) away. The father shot the bear while it had his son by the arm, and then shot it two more times as it released itself and turned toward the father.

Authorities found the female bear dead the next day in the area of the attack. She was about 12 years old and 250 pounds (113 kilograms) and in good condition.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Video: Pack goats do their job for successful elk bowhunter

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review September 26, 2017


Bowhunter Howie Halcomb shows his appreciation to one of his pack goats as they haul out the meat from his successful bull elk hunt in an Idaho wilderness. (Howie Halcomb)

Just as he was heading into the Idaho wilderness two weeks ago, I ran this story about backcountry elk bowhunter Howie Halcomb and his praise for his team of six pack goats.

When Halcomb returned from his hunt, he posted this GoPro video — filmed by one of the goats! — documenting the hunter’s success in taking a nice bull. The video shows the team of goats each packing out the last of the meat as Halcomb carries his share and the antlers. Each goat can pack out about 40 pounds.

Notice the leisurely pace of the goats. They scatter and pause frequently to nibble as they go, but never let Halcomb out of their sight as he hikes out.

source w/video:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

No antlerless hunts during general deer season in Idaho’s southeast region

Local News 8 Posted: Sep 29, 2017

Pocatello, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – General deer opener is just around the corner with opening day on October 10.

Most hunters are sighting in their rifles, getting campers ready and even starting their camp groceries list, and a quick check of the regulations would be another good step in preparation for this season as some changes have been made.

In southeast Idaho, there will be no antlerless deer hunting allowed this fall during the general any-weapon season in the following units: 66A, 68, 70, 71, 72, 73, 73A, 74, 75, 76, 77 and 78.

This is different from years past when youth could harvest does in many units during the general hunt.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Patience Will Be Rewarded

IME Sept 29, 2017

photo by Roland Lane

A great blue heron stalked its prey at Penny Lake, west of Ketchum, last week. According to Idaho State University, the species is the most common and widely distributed colonial waterbird in Idaho. Usually solitary when not breeding, some herons are year-round residents in Idaho, while others, especially in the northern part of the state, are breeders or transients. Adult great blue herons are about 4 feet tall.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho sockeye return second lowest in 10 years, but better than expected

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review September 25, 2017

The sockeye salmon returns to their spawning areas in Idaho was the second lowest in 10 years — a statistic that actually exceeded expectations in a grim year for some Columbia River system fisheries such as steelhead.

The 157 sockeye trapped in the Sawtooth Basin this summer could have been worse.

Here’s more info from Idaho Fish and Game Department writer Roger Phillips:

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
September 29, 2017
Issue No. 845

Table of Contents

* Contract Awarded To Build Fish Passage Tunnel At Cle Elum Dam For Juvenile Sockeye
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439645.aspx

* Idaho Sockeye Run Second Worst In 10 Years But Good Conversion Rates From Lower Granite To Sawtooths
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439644.aspx

* Study: Japanese Tsunami Enabled Hundreds Of Aquatic Species To Raft Across Pacific To U.S. West Coast
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439642.aspx

* Study: Temperature, Presence Of Hatchery Fish, Impact Prespawn Mortality For Wild Willamette Spring Chinook
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439641.aspx

* Warmer Northwest Waters Have Fish Moving North, Spawning Earlier, Longer Off Pacific Northwest
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439640.aspx

* Study Indicates Including Avian Predation Data In Salmonid Survival Studies Could Mean More Precise Estimates
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439639.aspx

* Treaty Fishing Gets Another Week; B-Run Steelhead Downgraded To 6,500 Fish, 1,000 Wild
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439638.aspx

* WDOE Denies Water Quality Permit For Longview Coal Export Terminal; Company To Appeal
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439637.aspx

* Easy-To-Use, New Environmental DNA Technology Can Bring Laboratory To Field
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439636.aspx

* Land, Water Rights Purchase Aimed At Protecting Fish In Idaho’s Sawtooth Valley
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439635.aspx

* Biologists Report Creek Habitat Project In Northeast Oregon Shows Young Salmon Use Increasing
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439634.aspx

* Council Requests Science Review Of 2014 Columbia Basin Fish/Wildlife Program; Amendment Process Starts In April
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439633.aspx

* Science Panel Reviews NOAA’s Evolving Life-Cycle Model For Evaluating Basin Salmon Recovery
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439632.aspx

* WDFW Ends Lethal Actions Against NE Washington Wolf Pack; Lawsuit Filed To Stop Wolf Killing
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439631.aspx

* Feedback: Ocean Conditions And Salmon Survival
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439630.aspx
———————————-

Fish & Game News:

First Convictions Generated in Conspiracy Wildlife Poaching Case

By Evin Oneale, Regional Conservation Educator
Tuesday, September 26, 2017

The first four of eleven defendants named in an Adams County wildlife poaching conspiracy case have recently been found guilty or pleaded guilty to charges against them.

… The investigation began in the fall of 2015 when Fish and Game officers discovered the remains of a bull elk killed before the legal hunting season opened in unit 22 west of McCall. By the time the investigation concluded, officers had discovered at least four more illegally-taken bull elk and at least one mule deer.

In August 2017, five case defendants – Shannan Norris (45), Casey Dutton (23), Bob Norris (69), Trey Painter (23) and Chad Painter 44, all from Caldwell – were arraigned on a total of 20 felony counts involving conspiracy to unlawfully possess big game animals. Each felony charge carries potential prison time of up to five years and/or fines up to $50,000. A lifetime hunting, fishing and trapping revocation may also be included in felony sentencing at the judge’s discretion.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff

Gigantor the tortoise captured by Ore. police after slow-speed chase

by KVAL Wednesday, August 9th 2017

Eugene, Ore. – Police took a tortoise into custody Monday after a slow-speed chase.

Officers found the tortoise “running” loose at Hilton Drive and Elizabeth Street in the Bethel neighborhood.

A veterinarian kept the tortoise overnight for safekeeping while police worked to locate the owner.

The tortoise – named Gigantor – has now been reunited with its owner.

Gigantor is an over 100 pound African Spurred Tortoise, police said.

“According to his owner, Gigantor broke out some boards to his fence and took off,” Eugene Police said in a statement. “It was interesting to note that while at the veterinarian’s office, he was giving the kennel quite a challenge, too.”

source:
———————————-

Seasonal Humor:

HikeBears-a
[h/t SMc]
———————————-

Sept 24, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 24, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Monday’s Power Outages

Monday September 18, our power went off at 1134am. Idaho Power recording said the outages was from Smiths Ferry up thru Cascade, Donnelly, McCall and Warm Lake to Yellow Pine. Power came back on just after 515pm (off for less than 5 hours.) Then, at 1007pm the power went off again. The Idaho Power recording just after midnight said there were 3000 people in the dark, from Warm Lake to Yellow Pine and Cascade to Donnelly, also Round Valley and Smiths Ferry. Power came back on after 2am (off nearly 4 hours.) Was unable to find out the cause.
— — — —

Snow in the High Country Sept 21, 2017

20170921SnowMidas-a
photo courtesy Midas Gold (see story in Idaho News)

Snow on VanMeter Sep 20th
P1000323-20170920Snow
— — — —

Bear Aware

Bear reported on the west side of the village this last week. Bears are looking for food. Keep garbage secured and pet food indoors.
— — — —

Just for the Halibut September 30 at 4pm

Sponsored by Stew Edwards, Hosted by the Tavern. September 30th at 4pm

Join us for Food & Fun $5 suggested donation gets you 5 raffle tickets for donated prizes Benefits go to the Landing Zone for Yellow Pine.

The Usual YP Pot Luck Bring a side dish to share!
— — — —

Ditch Day October 4 at 10am

This is the day we clean and repair the village ditches in preparation for the spring run-off. Please join us.
— — — —

H-Fest Meeting October 14

Saturday October 14th is the next Harmonica meeting at noon, at the community hall.
— — — —

VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting September 9th, 2017

[Draft Minutes]

Officers in Attendance: Deb Filler Chairman, Lorinne Munn Secretary, Kathy Hall Member at Large. Also in attendance 15 other members of the community.

1. Meeting was called to order at 2:02Pm by Deb Filler Chairman.

2. Willie moved the minutes be approved as posted there was no objection.

3. Treasurer’s report by Joel Fields was read by Deb Filler as follows:

a. As of August 31st, Total Community Funds $33,347.24

b. General Village Fund $7079.77

c. Cemetery Fund $5,532.38

d. Harmonica Fund $14,463.18

e. Community Hall Fund $(16.60)

f. Restroom Fund $6,288.51

g. Note must be made that the Cemetery fund received $100.00 for a plot this month which wasn’t on the last statement. The Community Hall fund has a negative due to Mark Hardesty plumbing supplies came to $425.17 The Harmonica Fund picked up $225.17 of this cost and the Community Hall Fund the remaining $200.00. Mark gave his labor for free, Thank You Mark.

4. Community Hall report by Kathy Hall. We made $162.00 for the Labor Day Community Breakfast which was split with the Harmonica Festival since their product was used for the breakfast. She is working on a Process Manual for the Hall. She is also working on ideas for fundraising for the Hall. On the wish list is a cover for the outside grill, fixing the foundation, and painting the outside of the Hall. Thanks to our Fire Department we have fire extinguishers and fire alarms for the Hall. Lynn Imel has donated a prep table which is installed. The Fillers have donated 3 propane tanks for our heater in the main part of the Hall. Lynn is getting wheels for the piano. Dawn Brown has donated $250.00 for use of the Hall for her Fly-In this month. Kathy still needs Vintage T Shirts for certain years and electrical help to fix a switch. The Hall will be winterized October 15th.

5. Willie Sullivan gave the Cemetery report. No new plots were sold this last month. The kiosk posts were rotted and new posts will be cemented in by next Friday.

6. Willie also gave a Community Hall Bathroom report. Stu Edwards has finished the plans. Next step is a building permit from Valley County. At this rate it will be next spring because concrete is involved in the proposed block and concrete foundation. It will have wooden floors and walls and be ADA compliant.

7. Lynn Imel was not present for a Membership Committee report.

8. Deb Filler submitted the Annual Written Harmonica Committee report. There are outstanding expenses and revenues which should all be in by the end of the month at which time the Budget total will be closed. As of now the remaining funds that will be transferred to the general fund is $729.50. The festival funds have already purchased the griddles, propane tank installation, propane, and plumbing expense. The total donated for the village benefit was/will be at least $3,298.43 (this could be more if additional funds are received before the 30th.) In the past, disposal fees to Lakeshore Disposal which was donated in the past but not now. This was an unexpected expense this year. We also have fees for the medical team. We have a new source of income from Project Filter for $500.00 to post no smoking signs. There are still several outstanding sources of revenue and expense for the Harmonica Fest. We received a $10,000.00 grant for advertising for the 2018 festival. This is an 87.5% reimbursement grant through the Bureau of Tourism. The McCall Chamber of Commerce is our fiscal agent (as we are not a 5013c charity). Saturday October 14th is the next Harmonica meeting at noon, at the community hall. Everyone is welcome to become part of the committee. We will be looking at what worked or did not work; income & expenses; new ideas.

9. Kyle reported for Midas Gold. He said the Geotechnical drilling is done for now. There will be more core drilling at the end of next month. There will be a winter drill program of 2-3 months. The Geotechnical drilling is foundation drilling for engineering and design. There will be more field work by contractors before the snow flies to support design and get to the feasibility level. If anyone wants more information about Midas Gold plans please contact Belinda Provancher at provancher @ midasgoldinc.com

10. The chairpersons meeting was reported on by Deb Filler. All committees are meeting their requirements as to number of members. Kathy is head of the Community Hall committee, Lynn is head of the Membership committee, Deb is head of the Harmonica committee. The cemetery is by commission not a committee of which Willy is the head commissioner.

11. The 2nd reading of the motion to change the By Laws so the Offices of Harmonica and Chairperson of the Village of Yellow Pine Association cannot be held concurrently by the same Officer was read by Deb Filler. There was objection to this motion by Cecil Dallman and Bill McIntosh. The third reading will be in the June meeting.

Old Business

Candy Sullivan reported on the Labor Day golf tournament and auction: $1,818.50 was raised and will distributed as follows. $556.00 will go to the bathroom fund of which $100.00 will still be coming in from Midas. $510.00 for fireworks. $752.50 to the Helicopter Pad. Candy thinks the bathroom has enough funds already to build the bathroom so if the Labor Day funds are not needed for that she indicated the $556.00 will go to the Helicopter Pad.

New Business

Deb Filler reported Ditch Day will be Wednesday October 4th starting at 10AM. It is held the 1st Wednesday in October yearly. Pick a ditch and clean it. This will help preserve the work we paid for a few years ago and prevent spring run-off flooding. Deb says we still have parts of our ditch clearing program that was engineered and needs doing but we ran out of funds to complete the project. For example, the back Alley behind Stiffs and the Community Hall if cleared would prevent the flooding that occurs there. The area along Kuenzli’s pasture needs attention and the hill ditches need to be realigned, among other items still on the list.

Meeting was adjourned at 3:01PM by Deb Filler

Next Meeting is in June

Submitted by Lorinne N. Munn, Secretary Yellow Pine Village Association
— — — —

YPFD News:

Training is on Sundays starting at 11am at the YP Fire Station and open to the community of Yellow Pine. Check with Jeff or Ann to confirm trainings.

Fire Siren will be tested at noon on the first of each month.
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Sep 18) windy night, early morning sprinkles, overcast and blustery this morning with a few drops of rain. Birds and squirrels must be under cover, the only sound was the wind in the trees and vehicles up on the main road. Sprinkles, showers and blustery all morning. Power out 1134am, Idaho Power recording said power out in Smiths Ferry, Cascade, Donnelly, McCall, Warm Lake and Yellow Pine. Loud thunderstorm and hard rain this afternoon, high of 49 degrees. Power came on about 515pm. Sprinkles, showers and low clouds this evening. Low strings of fog/clouds streaming past Golden Gate – closer to the ground than the peak. Break in the rain at 7pm. Power out 1007pm for almost 4 hours. Rain during the night and early morning.

Tuesday (Sep 19) still raining this morning, low of 34 degrees and very low clouds. We received .067″ of rain in the last 24 hours. Snow on top of Golden Gate, snow line approx 6000′ on VanMeter. Rain snow mix after 9am for about 20 minutes, then back to rain. Pretty much rained all day, just varying in intensity, high of 43 degrees. Quiet day. Pileated woodpecker on the power pole this evening and a small flock of juncos searching the ground for food just before dark (usually don’t see juncos here until snow in on the ground) and robins are still around. Probably rained all night.

Wednesday (Sep 20) still raining this morning, low of 34 degrees and overcast. We received 0.55″ of rain in the last 24 hours. Snow line on VanMeter is lower than yesterday morning and Johnson Creek ridge is white. Half a dozen juncos in the yard, pileated woodpecker and a flicker calling, 2 finches and robins all around. Rained all day, clouds dropping low on the mountains, and quiet. Cool wet day, high of 42 degrees. Stopped raining early evening and lots of birds flying around. Breaks in the clouds and cooling off before dark. Light fog around midnight.

Thursday (Sep 21) power blipped off and on at 834am. Started snowing around 7am, ground white by 9am. In the previous 24 hours we received 0.64″ of rain plus 0.02″ of melted snow. The clouds are clear to the valley floor and 32 degrees at 9am. Stopped snowing before noon and melted, breaks in the clouds. Robins, finches and nutcrackers flying. Snow line receding up the flanks of the hills early afternoon. Light sprinkles later in the afternoon and clouds half way down the mountains for a bit, high of 50 degrees. Robins flying and a flicker on the power line at dusk. Rain during the night.

Friday (Sep 22) still sprinkling this morning and above freezing, low clouds – ridges socked in, 0.20″ of rain/snow in 24 hours. A steller jay, a few pine siskins and several finches in the yard. Have not seen chipmunks out much for a couple of days, but pine squirrels are busy. Sprinkles and showers most of the morning and early afternoon, high of 47 degrees. Flock of clarks nutcrackers attacking pine cones in the trees. Light sprinkles or misting on and off all afternoon and early evening.

Saturday (Sep 23) overnight low of 33 degrees, “chunky’ overcast this morning. Heard a few clarks nutcrackers calling and spied one chipmunk looking nervously around. Loud dirt bike brapping about the neighborhood around 10am and 1130am. A few breaks in the clouds and getting breezy before lunch time. Airplane traffic in the afternoon. Cloudy evening, high of 52 degrees. A few rowdies after dark.

Sunday (Sep 24) clearing overnight, low of 26 degrees, almost clear this morning and first hard freeze of the season. Frost on windshields, metal roofs and grass (chicken water froze.) Heard a jay this morning (and loud dirt bike.) Low flying helicopter at 1055am. Airplane traffic shortly after 12 noon and clouds building up. Cloudy and breezy afternoon, high of 56 degrees. Rather large flock of clarks nutcrackers after the cones in pine trees this afternoon. Multiple low flying (loud) airplanes at 441pm. Mostly quiet evening, some truck/trailer traffic up on main street. Mostly cloudy at dark.
————————————

Idaho News:

After the Snow Rolls in Midas Gold Team Helps Hunters

Midas Gold September 21

Early in the fall, it is always hard to predict what type of weather we will see up at the Stibnite Gold Project site. This week was no exception. Rain early in the week quickly changed to snow flurries and by the end of the day on Wednesday there were seven-foot snow drifts above Stibnite at Monumental Summit. This unexpected storm blanketed the roads and trapped two groups of hunters in the backcountry near our site. Fortunately, we were able to help them make it down from the mountains safely.

Late on Wednesday, a hunter stopped at the core shed on site after running into town to get snow chains and not being able to get back up to his hunting party. He was part of a larger group hunting on Mule Ridge when the storm hit. As soon as we learned they were stuck, we fired up our Cat dozer and backhoe and offered to open up the roads so they could get back home. It took us 20 staff hours in the deep snow but eventually everyone got down safely. You can see just how deep the snow is from the photos below.

Thursday morning, we learned of another group of four hunters who were trapped on the back side of Monumental Summit. One of the men had texting GPS device and was able to contact his wife. She was directed to contact our office by the Valley County Sheriff’s Office and see if we could help them. After 13 staff hours, our team cleared a path for the group and we just learned that everyone is on their home to their families.

In Idaho, especially in the backcountry, we all have to help take care of one another. We care deeply about our neighbors and are always happy to lend a hand. The amount of snow took everyone by surprise and we are grateful we played a small part in getting everyone home safely.

Link with photo gallery:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

CPR, First Aid classes to be taught in Donnelly

The Star-News September 21, 2017

CPR/AED and First Aid certification classes will be held at the Donnelly Fire Station on Monday, Oct. 2, and Tuesday, Oct. 3, at 6 p.m. The CPR/AED class will be Monday and First Aid will be taught on Tuesday. The cost of the class is $5, and space is limited. To register, call 208-325-8619.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Deadly Tamarack cabin fire ruled an accident

by KBOI News Staff Thursday, September 21st 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — It’s been more than two months since a fire ripped through a cabin near Tamarack Resort that killed four people, including two adults and two children.

On Thursday, the Idaho state fire marshal, Knute Sandahl, announced in a press conference that the fire started when one of the adults attempted to start a fire in a propane-fueled fireplace at the cabin.

A valve releasing the propane was opened, but when the person used a piece of paper to light the fire, the fireplace exploded. Investigators believe the valve was open for several minutes before the explosion.

Sandahl says that the fireplace had been converted to a wood-burning system at some point in the past, but the people who own the cabin now believed it was still set up for propane.

The conversion to a wood-burning system created a small empty area behind the new fireplace, and investigators believe that when the valve for propane was turned on, the gas filled the empty area, which contributed to explosion.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Lightning starts fire that burns McCall home Monday

By Tom Grote for The Star-News September 21, 2017

A McCall home was heavily damaged on Monday when it was hit by lightning that started a fire, McCall Fire & EMS said.

The house at 155 Morgan Dr. in the River’s Crossing community was not occupied at the time of the fire and no one was injured, Chief Mark Billmire said. Damage was estimated at between $250,000 and $300,000.

Firefighters were called to the scene at about 3:11 p.m. after neighbors reported hearing and seeing lightning strike the home followed by smoke and flames, Billmire said.

Response was delayed because lightning knocked out the Valley County Dispatch radio repeater on No Business Mountain and communications had to be switched to an alternate repeater, he said.

Smoke and flames were spewing from all four sides of the two-story house when firefighters arrived, Billmire said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Historic 1915 courthouse in Adams County to be demolished

9/17/17 AP

Council, Idaho — A 1915 historic courthouse in Adams County is slated to be demolished after the abandoned building was condemned in the spring.

KTVB-TV reports that the Adams County commissioners on Friday sought bids for contractors to gut the more than 100-year-old courthouse that sits atop a hill in the town of Council.

Some residents don’t want to see it go. Danna Barnhart says it’s one of the oldest courthouses in the state.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Heard those explosions in Blaine County? Don’t panic, sheriff says

KTVB September 20, 2017


(Photo: Courtesy of Idaho Power)

Blaine County — The Blaine County Sheriff’s Office says the sound of explosions have caused some consternation across the county lately.

But officials are reassuring residents they are not under siege.

Blame the loud booms on Idaho Power, which has been working to replace transmission lines between Hagerman and the Wood River Valley. Crews use explosives to splice the power lines together.

Jeff Lincoln, the principal engineer in Idaho Power’s transmission department, said the explosive devices are essentially a metal sleeve surrounded by detonation cord.

“The force of that explosion basically crimps that tube on the wire,” fusing it into one piece, Lincoln said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

N. Idaho man rescued 2 days after car plunges down ravine

9/20/17 AP

Kamiah, Idaho — Authorities in northern Idaho say a man spent two days trapped in his vehicle after it plunged into a ravine.

The Idaho County Sheriff’s Office says 24-year-old Jacob Phillips of Kamiah appeared to have a broken leg when rescuers pulled from the car Sunday morning and flew him to a hospital in Lewiston.

Authorities say Phillips left work in Grangeville on Friday afternoon, and family members reported him missing later that day when he didn’t arrive home.

Searches along several possible routes failed to locate Phillips.

Wireless communications provider Inland Cellular narrowed the search area by pinging Phillips’ cellphone.

Searchers then located Phillips about 75 feet down a ravine off State Highway 162.

St. Joseph Regional Medical Center says Phillips was treated and transferred to another hospital that a spokeswoman on Wednesday declined to name.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

After record breaking flu season, Dept. of Health and Welfare prepares for 2017-2018

by Devan Kaney Wednesday, September 20th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Last year was the deadliest flu season on record in Idaho with 72 influenza-related deaths.

“We certainly saw a record number of deaths last year, so certainly want people to be prepared,” said Dr. Leslie Tengelsen, Idaho’s State Influenza Surveillance Coordinator at the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare.

Idaho’s Department of Health and Welfare saw multiple strains of the virus in the 2016-2017 season.

“A combination of a million different viruses that circulate there can be up to four different flu viruses,” Tengelsen said. “In fact, we saw all four different flu viruses in Idaho and across the country last year.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho opts into national public safety broadband network

Associated Press, KTVB September 20, 2017

Boise – Idaho has joined 20 other states in an interstate communications network that allows public safety agencies to communicate across jurisdictions during emergencies.

Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter announced this week that he signed a letter for Idaho to participate in the First Responder Network Authority, known as FirstNet.

FirstNet, in partnership with AT&T, will build, operate and maintain a secure wireless broadband communications network for Idaho’s public safety community at no cost to the state. It’s expected to boost broadband access in rural areas.

Otter says it’s in Idaho’s best interest to participate in the network.

FirstNet was created in 2012. It followed a recommendation from the 9/11 Commission that a dedicated nationwide broadband network be created to help public safety agencies communicate during large-scale emergencies.

source:
—————————————–

Aviation News:

Flying the Mail in Remote Idaho

Neither tight canyons, nor wildlife on runways…The postman’s creed is slightly different for pilots delivering mail in the mountains.

By Debbie Gary Air & Space Magazine October 2017

Ahead of the Cessna parked at Central Idaho’s Badley Ranch airstrip, the peaceful canyon doesn’t reflect the difficulty of takeoff and landing here. The strip climbs from a 10- to a 17-degree slope. (Debbie Gary)

When we approached the first mail stop, Ray Arnold rolled his Cessna 206 up on its left wing and spiraled down inside the narrow canyon that funnels Big Creek past Taylor Ranch. Bare ground the color of a cougar’s hide filled the front window. The airspeed was slow, the bank was steep, and my senses were on high alert: One bad turn and we could hit the mountain, or fall into the creek. But Arnold’s hand was steady and he rolled out just above the rushing water. Another turn revealed a smaller creek and the twisted grass strip of the University of Idaho’s Taylor Wilderness Research Station.

… To reach Taylor Ranch from Cascade, we flew 70 miles above central Idaho’s nine- and ten-thousand-foot peaks, snow-covered national forests, and fire-ravaged slopes. Arnold pointed out backcountry landing spots as we passed; some snowy white stripes in a sea of evergreens, others no more than dirt scratches on the face of bare hills.

Each time he indicated a landing site, he recounted a close call some pilot had experienced there: a ski plane upended in deep snow, a nosewheel grabbed by a gopher hole. But the mail must go through.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

McCall council lower rates for airport hangar leases

Current rates called high compared with other cities

By Phil Janquart for The Star-News September 21, 2017

The McCall City Council last week lowered the rates charged to owners of hangars to lease ground at the McCall Airport.

In a 4-1 vote, council members voted to lower the rate from 35 cents per square foot per year to 30 cents per square foot for the 79 non-commercial hangars at the airport.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

McCall Airport kiosk to help pathway users understand aviation

By Phil Janquart for The Star-News September 21, 2017

The City of McCall is hoping those who use the pathway near McCall Airport will soon have a better appreciation for the airport.

The airport manager, Jay Scherer, is heading an effort to build a pocket park on airport’s west side adjacent to the public pathway.

Once built, observers will be able to do more than watch aircraft take off and land. Plans include installing a scanner that picks up flight frequencies and signs that identify flight protocols and traffic patterns, as well as weather and navigational equipment on the ground.

“We want to get people interested and excited about aviation,” Scherer said. “We want people to come check us out. Maybe we can inspire some kids to get interested in aviation.”

The project has the support of the McCall chapter of the Idaho Aviation Association, chapter president-elect Rob Tucker said.

continued:
——————————-

Mining News:

Judge: Mining company in contempt for Idaho water pollution

Rebecca Boone Associated Press, KTVB September 18, 2017

Boise – A federal judge is holding the Atlanta Gold mining company in contempt of court for allowing arsenic and iron to enter a tributary of the Middle Fork of the Boise River.

Chief U.S. Magistrate Judge Ronald Bush released the decision on Friday, ordering the company to pay up to half a million dollars in fines and penalties if they don’t fix the problems by next year.

The Idaho Conservation League and Northwest Environmental Defense Center sued Atlanta Gold Corporation in 2011, alleging the company was violating the federal Clean Water Act when it discharged water containing pollutants from a mining tunnel into Montezuma Creek. That case resulted in a 2012 order directing the mining company to fix the problems.

In the latest ruling, the judge said Atlanta Gold had made significant progress but still allowing too much pollution into the tributary.

source:
————————————

Fire Season:

Highline Fire Closure Rescinded

McCall, ID – The Payette National Forest has rescinded the Highline fire closure in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness effective immediately, allowing access to the trails, airstrips and area in and around Chamberlain Basin. “While the fire has moderated with the recent wet and cold fall weather, the fire still has a potential to flare up and there are risks associated with traveling in Wilderness that the public needs to understand and have awareness about,” said Anthony Botello, Krassel District Ranger. “Wilderness visitors are warned to take precautions around and under fire-weakened trees while traveling within the fire area,” Botello advises.

The Highline Fire was started by lightning on July 28 in one of the most remote areas of the Wilderness. With the exception of a handful of days, it burned mostly with low intensity and a slow rate of spread for the past 55 days and burned dead and downed vegetation, brush and some stands of trees in a natural, mosaic fashion in the Wilderness. Due to concerns for the safety of employees and visitors, the Payette issued multiple closures as the fire grew and moved.

Lightning ignited fires in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness are a natural part of the ecosystem and are managed to prevent impacts to and loss of buildings, private land, trail bridges, historic structures and other values at risk, but these natural fires are intentionally allowed to travel across the landscape in as natural a manner as possible.

Trail, airstrip and/or area closures are sometimes necessary to protect visitors from unpredictable fire intensity and spread, while allowing firefighters to take necessary actions. However, closures are also an impact to visitors to the National Forest and even more intrusive to visitors to Wilderness. Wilderness is managed with as few of controls over visitors as possible to maintain the untrammeled nature and primitive and unconfined recreation visitors seek. “We take closures in Wilderness very seriously. We go into them slowly and thoughtfully and come out of them as quickly as we can,” Botello said.

The Highline fire is not entirely out. Its spread has moderated and most areas of the fire are showing little to no heat. The short-term weather predictions are calling for cool and wet weather for the next few weeks with possible seasonal warming and drying by the first half of October. Visitors are encouraged to check with the Payette National Forest for current fire, trail and airstrip conditions and if possible stay out of the Highline fire area. Wilderness users are responsible for understanding their surroundings and taking precautions to avoid hazardous areas where fire has effected trees, soil, water or other features of a natural landscape.

For more information on Wilderness in the Payette National Forests, contact the Krassel Ranger District at 208-634-0600.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
— — —

Firefighters pull out after wet weather cools Highline Fire

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 21, 2017

The Highline Fire in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness has diminished significantly, prompting the Forest Service to lift area closures.

The Chamberlain airstrip and surrounding wilderness were opened to visitors Tuesday due to wet and cool weather.

The Highline Fire was started by lightning on July 28 and had burned almost 85,000 acres of wilderness by Tuesday.

The Forest Service was winding down its teams assigned to the fire this week. The National Incident Management Organization team that has been managing Highline Fire operations since Aug. 17 will give back control of the fire to the Payette National Forest today, Public Information Officer Mike Ferris said.

Firefighters on the ground at Big Creek, Beaver Creek and the privately owned Root Ranch have already been moved out, Ferris said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Bearskin Fire closure is modified to open County roads

Boise National Forest
Contact: Venetia Gempler (208) 373-4105

Boise, Idaho, September 22, 2017 – Changing weather conditions prompted Forest officials to modify the Bearskin closure to open up Valley County roads 555, 579, 563 and a section of Valley County road 582. All National Forest System trails and roads remain closed within the Bearskin Fire perimeter including NFS road 510.

NFS road 582 between the junctions of NFS roads 545 and 515 remain closed for culvert replacement. This work is expected to last into October.

Forest visitors are reminded to be cautious and aware of their surroundings. Trees burned in the fire may continue to smolder and fall. With warmer temperatures predicted in coming weeks, fire activity may increase. Crews will continue to patrol and monitor the fire.

To view this Forest Closure Orders and map visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices
Scroll down to the Lowman Ranger District closures for Bearskin Area Closure Reduced – Version #5.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Land Management Agencies lift Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in all zones of the Payette Fire Restriction Area

Date: September 19, 2017

McCall, Idaho – With much cooler temperatures and the abundance of precipitation in the past several days, land management agencies have lifted Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in the Little Salmon Zone of the Payette Fire Restriction Area effective Tuesday, September 19, 2017. Other Payette Restriction Area Zones lifted fire restrictions last Friday, September 15, 2017 and Wednesday, September 13, 2017. As such, fire restrictions are no longer in place within any zones of the Payette Fire Restriction Area. The Fire Restrictions are rescinded by agencies managing state, private and public lands in the area, including the United States Forest Service (USFS), Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association (SITPA), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL).

The restrictions were put into effect on August 11, 2017 when fire danger and burning conditions were unusually high. Recent storms have brought significant moisture with much cooler temperatures to the area, moderating fire conditions significantly. Forest visitors are reminded to always be careful with all use of fire in the outdoors. The accidental start of a wildfire can still be devastating. Be alert and be aware. Follow these tips to help prevent wildfire:

* NEVER leave a camp fire unattended
* Keep water, dirt and a shovel near your fire at all times
* Make sure your fire is dead out and cold to the touch before you leave it
* Use of fireworks, exploding targets or tracer rounds is prohibited on public lands

Fire restrictions may be lifted but burn bans may still be in place in some areas. Fire restrictions and burn bans address different types of activities. Burn bans pertain to controlled burning activities such as debris burning, slash burning, or agricultural burning, for which a fire safety burn permit from IDL is required. Visit http://burnpermits.idaho.gov/ for more information.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Prescribed Fires on the Payette National Forest

Date: September 18, 2017
Contact: Brian Harris (208) 634-0784 cell: (208) 634-6945

McCall, Idaho – The Payette National Forest will be conducting multiple prescribed fires (broadcast and pile burning) this fall. Depending on weather conditions, prescribed fire could take place anytime from now through early November.

“Fire is one of the most important natural agents of change in our forested ecosystems,” said Keith Lannom, Payette National Forest Supervisor. “Prescribed fire plays a major role in our forest restoration efforts by reducing accumulated fuels, while promoting long-term ecosystem integrity and sustainability by reducing the risk to communities and wildlife habitat from high-severity wildland fire.”

The Council and Weiser Ranger Districts plans to apply fire 4,000 acres in Cookhouse Gulch, 2,000 acres in the Mill Creek drainage, 1,500 acres in Spring Creek, and 1,000 acres in the Weiser River Fuels project area.

The McCall and New Meadows Ranger Districts plans to burn 1,500 acres in the Lost Creek-Boulder Creek project area, 3,042 acres in Rapid River (east of Pollock Mountain), 525 acres in the Upper Weiser River drainage, 400 acres near Rock Flat, and 500 acres in Bear Basin.

The Krassel Ranger District plans to ignite 1,600 acres in the Fourmile drainage, and 2,000 acres in the Bald Hill project area.

Trail heads and roads that lead into these areas will be posted with caution signs and a map of the prescribed fire locations. Fire personnel will work closely with the Idaho/Montana Airshed Group, the National Weather Service, and the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality to insure that smoke impacts are minimized. The decision to ignite on any given day will depend on favorable weather conditions and the need to reduce smoke effects as much as possible.

Smoke from these prescribed fires will be much less than what would be expected from a wildfire. If smoke concentrations approach air quality standards fire ignition may be delayed until air quality improves. Residual smoke may be visible for up to 2 weeks following ignition, but most of the smoke from the fires will dissipate 1-2 days after ignition.

These prescribed fires will reduce fuels near communities and improve current big game habitat by opening timber stands (maintaining the large tree component) and rejuvenating the herbaceous and browse component. In addition, birds and small mammals generally benefit from an increase in snags and/or coarse woody debris. Reducing accumulated fuels will not only increase available forage, but also promote long-term ecosystem integrity and sustainability by reducing the risk to habitat from high-severity wildland fire.

Smoke sensitive individuals may call Patrick Schon (McCall and New Meadows RDs; 347-0300), Justin Pappani (Krassel RD; 634-0600), or Phil Graeve (Council and Weiser RDs; 549-4200) with any concerns they may have about the planned prescribed fires. The public may also call the Ranger District for more information.

Prescribed fire is an important component of forest restoration and part of the comprehensive fire management program on the Payette National Forest. For more information, please call: Council RD: 253-0100; Krassel RD: 634-0974; McCall RD: 634-0400; New Meadows RD: 347-0300; Weiser RD: 549-4200

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho fire season wrapup: ‘Everybody is breathing a little easier now;’ costs covered

Betsy Z. Russell The Spokesman-Review Sept 19, 2017

Although the fire season seemed downright awful, with heavy smoke choking much of the state, Idaho is coming out of it without any pressing bills. That’s because the state Legislature pre-funded its wildland firefighting costs two years ago with a $60 million appropriation. This year’s firefighting expenditures, on lands for which the state is responsible for fire protection, came to just over $21 million, with $5 million reimbursable from other agencies or owners; that’s a net obligation, as of now, of $16.3 million.

Going into the fire season, Idaho had a $48.4 million cash balance from the legislative appropriation two years ago. Now, combining the $16.3 million in this year’s costs with additional outstanding bills from previous years, the state’s net obligation is about $34 million. So after all those bills are paid, Idaho still will have $14 million in its firefighting account.

State Forester David Groeschl shared that news with the state Land Board this morning, and offered a wrapup of this year’s fire season. The number of fires on state-protected land was 62 percent of the 20-year average, but the number of acres burned was 440 percent of the 20-year average. That was largely because of the big Craig Mountain Complex south of Lewiston, which burned almost 50,000 – accounting for most of the 52,700 acres that burned.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Humans caused nearly half of fires in Idaho Panhandle

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Sept 19, 2017

A sigh of relief came from fire fighters through the cool damp air on Monday. The rain enabled agencies responsible for managing lands and providing wildland fire protection in the Coeur d’Alene Dispatch area to lift fire restrictions for the Idaho Panhandle.

… Of the wildfires recorded by the Idaho Panhandle National Forests’ Coeur d’Alene Dispatch area this season:

* 39 were caused by lightning, burning 3,997 acres so far, officials reported Friday.

* 32 were caused by human activity, burning 1,832 acres.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Crapo, Wyden, Bipartisan Senators to Congress: Permanent Wildfire Funding Fix Must Be a Top Priority

September 20, 2017

Washington, D.C. – In the wake of historic wildfires in Oregon, Idaho, California, Washington and across the West, U.S. Sens. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., Jim Risch, R-Idaho, Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., Cory Gardner, R-Colo., and Michael Bennet, D-Colo., introduced an updated version of their bipartisan wildfire funding solution that would protect desperately needed funding for fire prevention and treat wildfires as the natural disasters they are.

The Wildfire Disaster Funding Act of 2017 would end the destructive cycle of borrowing from fire prevention accounts to put out fires and stop the erosion of the Forest Service’s budget by reforming the way the federal government funds wildfires.

“Oregonians and westerners are battling another record-breaking fire year. The threat of catastrophic wildfires is growing, yet the federal government continues to conduct ‘business as usual’ when it comes to fighting fires in Oregon and the West,” Wyden said. “More communities are put in danger and fire prevention work gets left undone because of a backwards fire budgeting system. It’s past time for Congress to make it a top priority to end fire borrowing, stop the erosion of the Forest Service becoming the ‘Fire Service’ and start treating wildfires like the natural disasters they are.”

“If you live in a community in the western United States, you do not need to be told that wildfires are major natural disasters,” Crapo said. “With over eight million acres burned, ten states choked with smoke, and lives and structures lost, this year’s fire season is a brutal reminder that we must start treating mega fires as the disasters that they are. Now is the time to both recognize that fires are major disasters and end the destructive cycle of fire borrowing that only makes the fire situation in this country worse.”

continued:
———————————-

Public Lands:

Two Forest Roads will Close Temporarily for Road Repair in the West Branch Area near New Meadows

9/19/2017
Contact: New Meadows District Office at 208-347-0300

New Meadows, Idaho- The Payette National Forest will be enacting two temporary road closures to provide for public safety during road repair work that is scheduled to begin soon. Both roads are located in the West Branch area and accessed from Price Valley Road.

NFS Road 991 will be closed starting on Monday, September 25th and NFS Road 102 will be closed past milepost 1 a short time later, estimated to be October 2nd. Each road will be closed for up to 10 days to allow for the Contractor to complete the road repair work, which is focused on culvert work. NFS Road 101 will still be accessible during the closures.

Forest users should find alternative routes during these closures. Forest Closure Orders have been issued for both roads and the maps are attached below.

West Branch Weiser NFS Road #102 Thru Traffic Closure

NFS Road #991 Thru Traffic Closure
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

‘Good Neighbor Authority’ brings IDL a new mission: More active management of fed forests

Betsy Z. Russell The Spokesman-Review Sept 19, 2017

Idaho has been seeing success with using the “Good Neighbor Authority” it was granted under the 2014 federal Farm Bill to partner with the U.S. Forest Service and increase active management and timber harvests on national forests in the state – and it’s poised to ramp the program up. “Right now we have two foresters doing GNA projects across the state, so we’re looking to significantly expand this program,” state Department of Lands Director Tom Schultz told the state Land Board today.

In the department’s budget request for next year, it’s asking for eight new positions, all from dedicated funds. That would allow the department to create a new GNA Bureau within its Forestry & Fire Division, and up the staffing for GNA programs from the current 4.3 positions to 12.3.

Two Forest Service officials touted the success of the program to the Land Board on Tuesday. “How we accomplish the work is evolving,” Nora Rasure, USFS regional forester for the Intermountain Region, told the board, “and I think that’s what’s exciting – that we can find new and different ways to get that work done.”

She said through the use of GNA and forest collaboratives, state and federal agencies are bringing their efforts together. “Working with each other to kind of pull and push each other forward, I think we’ve come up with some creative ways for doing the work,” she said.

continued:
— — — —

Forest Service, Idaho work to boost logging on federal land

By Keith Ridler – 9/22/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — The U.S. Forest Service and Idaho have forged 10 agreements for logging and restoration projects on federal land in what officials say could become a template for other Western states to create jobs and reduce the severity of wildfires.

Under the deals, Idaho foresters will administer timber sales on about 10,000 acres (40 square kilometers) the federal agency has on its to-do list but can’t complete because the money for the work is instead going to fight wildfires.

So far this year, the cost of that fight has surpassed $2 billion — more than half the federal agency’s annual budget — during one of the worst fire seasons on record in the West.

The state work involves managing timber sales to a lumber company after determining how much is available and sometimes even marking what can and can’t be cut.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

USFS Regional Intermountain News

9/20/2017

Archived Newsletters
———————————-

Critter News:

Pet Talk – What Is Parvo?

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt – IME September 22, 2017

Parvo is a gastrointestinal disease causing severe vomiting and diarrhea in dogs. It is caused by a very contagious virus called canine parvovirus. CPV is very concentrated in the diarrhea of infected animals. It is resistant to many disinfectants and can persist in the environment under a variety of conditions. It can be destroyed by cleaning contaminated surfaces with a 1:20 bleach solution—one part household bleach with 20 parts water. The best prevention of parvo disease is vaccinating your pets as puppies and then every three years. Treatment is expensive and not always successful. Vaccination is very inexpensive and an excellent prevention of the disease.

The primary signs of parvo disease are poor appetite, lethargy, vomiting and diarrhea. Vomiting is often severe and diarrhea may be profuse and bloody. There is often a fever and dogs quickly become dehydrated. Secondary septicemia is common, along with shock and collapse.

Because of the severity of clinical signs in parvo disease, a number of tests are required to treat your pet effectively. Some of the tests include a complete blood count, a serum biochemistry profile, X-rays of the abdomen and stool exams to confirm the parvovirus. These tests can also show other intestinal parasites that may be complicating the disease.

Dogs with parvo disease need to be isolated from other dogs because of how contagious the virus is. Hospitalized dogs are often quarantined in an isolation ward to decrease spread of disease.

Treatment of parvo is largely supportive, as there are no antiviral drugs to kill the parvo virus. These supportive measures include intravenous drugs and electrolytes, antibiotics to suppress secondary bacterial infections, drugs to suppress the severe vomiting and sometimes blood or plasma transfusions if blood or protein loss is severe. Treatment for parvo can often take five to seven days of intense hospitalization. Dogs that survive the first two to four days of treatment are most likely to recover fully. Around 10 percent of dogs will die from this severe gastrointestinal viral disease, more if not treated aggressively by your veterinarian.

Parvo disease is horrible—just ask any veterinarian or veterinarian nurse. Whenever we see parvo, it is so sad because it is so preventable by simple vaccinations.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

MCPAWS to sponsor Brundage fun run, Oktoberfest Oct. 7

The Star-News September 21, 2017

MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter will host a full day of fun with a dog-friendly 5km fun run followed by Oktoberfest on Saturday, Oct. 7.

The Tails on Trails fun run will begin at 9 a.m. Oct. 7 at Brundage Mountain Resort. Registration is $35 for adults and $25 for youth under age 21.

The race fee includes a Tails on Trails hat, goodie bag and registration for Oktoberfest. Registration is available online at http://mcpaws.org.

Oktoberfest festivities will begin at noon at Alpine Village, 616 N. Third St. The event will include live music by Bottom Line Band and the Treasure Valley Musik Meisters as well as a costume contest, raffle, craft goods, activities for kids and food and drinks.

Entry for Oktoberfest is $10 and includes a beer and an event koozie. Raffle tickets will be sold for $5 each at the event. For more information, visit http://mcpaws.org

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary plans open house Sept. 30

The Star-News September 21, 2017

Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary near McCall will host it’s annual open house from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 30.

The open house is the only time during the year the public can tour the grounds and see wildlife displays and demonstrations.

Those attending are urged to bring a picnic lunch and perhaps see kokanee salmon on their migration in Lake Fork Creek.

Snowdon is located seven miles out Lick Creek Road east of McCall at end of the pavement

Snowdon’s mission is to rehabilitate and return injured and orphaned wildlife to the wild, and provide hands-on education to promote a healthy coexistence with wildlife and the ecosystem.

Snowdon specializes in the rehabilitation of local wildlife, including orphaned baby birds and mammals and injured small mammals, songbirds, waterfowl, and raptors.

The 35-acre sanctuary has a number of animal pens and enclosures, and a clinic equipped to care for ill and injured birds and animals.

Go to http://snowdonwildlife.org for more information

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho considers wildlife overpasses near Montana border

9/19/17 AP

Idaho Falls, Idaho — The Idaho Transportation Department is considering the construction of overpasses that would provide safe crossings for wildlife over a stretch of U.S. Highway 20 near the state’s border with Montana.

The wildlife overpasses are in two of the four options the department has outlined for how it would use the $22 million slated to improve the 4-mile stretch of highway near Island Park, the Post Register reported on Monday.

The most comprehensive option calls for the construction of three wildlife overpasses with fencing along the roadway that would funnel animals into using the crossings.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Washington kills three wolves this season to quell cattle attacks

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Sept 21, 2017

Wolves have kept Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife field staff busy this summer, especially in Stevens, Ferry and Asotin counties.

Gray wolves are protected in Washington by state endangered species rules, but lethal measures can be taken in cases of self-defense or repeated attacks on livestock.

At least six wolf attacks on livestock have been confirmed this season despite prevention efforts including range riders. Cattle depredations have been confirmed in Stevens and Ferry counties this summer as well as in Asotin County, where a cow and calf were attacked this month southeast of Cloverland by the Tucannon Pack.

Two wolves from the Smackout Pack and one wolf from the Sherman Pack have been killed by state-authorized shooters in response to separate incidents. In both cases, no further cattle attacks in those pack areas have been confirmed.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Education International

Third week September 2017

Wolves in Israel are raiding campsites to try to snatch children, experts warn
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Grizzly bears roaming more new areas of Wyoming

AP Sep 22, 2017

Cheyenne, Wyo. (AP) – Wyoming is seeing more grizzly bears moving outside their established habitat in and around Yellowstone National Park, causing more conflicts with humans.

Dan Thompson of the Wyoming Game and Fish Department says as the bears extend their range it becomes more difficult to avoid conflicts between bears and humans.

In 2016, Wyoming recorded 223 cases of conflicts between grizzly bears and humans – by far the highest number among the three states in the Yellowstone ecosystem. Montana had 118, and Idaho just two last year.

Wildlife advocates say grizzlies should be able to roam suitable forest and public land areas surrounding their current habitat.

Federal protection of the bears was lifted earlier this year and management of the species was turned over to Idaho, Montana and Wyoming.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

10 calves killed by grizzlies in central Montana

9/23/17 AP

Kalispell, Mont. — Wildlife officials say grizzly bears have killed ten calves on a central Montana ranch.

The Daily Inter Lake reported that the dead animals were found recently in a creek bottom on a ranch near Dupuyer in Teton County.

Wildlife officials say at least 12 grizzlies have been present in the area. It’s uncertain which were responsible for attacking the calves.

The owner of the calves will be eligible for compensation from the livestock loss fund.

Grizzly bears have been spreading into agricultural areas and encountering conflicts with humans along central Montana’s Rocky Mountain Front as they population continues to recover from widespread extermination last century.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Officials to decide fate of peninsula mountain goats

By Evan Bush – 9/23/17 AP

Seattle — In 2010, a mountain goat in Olympic National Park gored a 63-year-old hiker and severed an artery. Then the goat stood over the bleeding man and prevented rescuers from tending to the injury. It proved fatal.

The tragic, rare goat attack helped rekindle a dormant battle over the peninsula’s mountain goats.

In the 1980s and ’90s, park officials waged campaigns to remove or eradicate the nonnative creatures, said to be destroying plant life within the park.

Those efforts stalled, and now the National Park Service is taking another swing. This summer, it published four plans for goat management. Park officials favor capturing as many mountain goats as possible over several years, transporting them to the North Cascades and killing goats that evade seizure.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Man pleads guilty to Boise Foothills chukar poaching, woman has arrest warrant

by KBOI News Staff Tuesday, September 19th 2017


Idaho Fish and Game posted the photo of the hunting duo on social media to help track down the pair. (Courtesy Idaho Fish and Game)

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — One of two people who were spotted on a trail camera earlier this year illegally hunting chukar in the Boise Foothills has pleaded guilty.

According to Idaho court records, Dustin Dill, pleaded guilty on Monday in Ada County District court to two misdemeanors (violating Fish and Game rules and hunting without a license). He was sentenced to a year of probation and will be unable to hunt, fish or trap for two years.

Idaho Fish and Game told KBOI 2News that the other person seen on the trail cam, Shanelle Choumas, was charged earlier this year. According to Idaho court records, she currently has an arrest warrant from a separate case from 2016 for permitting animals to go without care.

Idaho Fish and Game posted the photo of the hunting duo on social media to help track down the pair after it says they were hunting chukar on the Boise River Wildlife Management area March 18, which was 46 days after the hunting season had closed.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Owls in the Outhouse: Opening the Bathroom Door on a Foul Bird Issue

By Kris Millgate September 18, 2017


Long-eared Owl rescued from vault toilet. Photo courtesy Bureau of Land Management

Visiting a public lands outhouse is not always a pleasant experience for humans. It’s even less so for birds. Yes, birds. Here’s why there’s an owl in the toilet – and what we can do about it.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Surplus hatchery salmon released into northern Idaho creek

9/23/17 AP

Lewiston, Idaho — More than 100 spring chinook salmon not needed at a northern Idaho fish hatchery have been released into a creek to spawn naturally.

Workers with Dworshak National Fish Hatchery released the fish Wednesday into Lolo Creek, The Lewiston Tribune reported.

Extra spring chinook returned to the hatchery this year, so the fish are surplus, fisheries biologist Tom Tighe said. Workers released the fish in an area with proven spawning gravel just upstream from where Lolo Creek joins the Clearwater River, he said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Warm waters off West Coast has lingering effects for salmon

By Phuong Le – 9/17/17 AP

Seattle — The mass of warm water known as “the blob” that heated up the North Pacific Ocean has dissipated, but scientists are still seeing the lingering effects of those unusually warm sea surface temperatures on Pacific Northwest salmon and steelhead.

Federal research surveys this summer caught among the lowest numbers of juvenile coho and Chinook salmon in 20 years, suggesting that many fish did not survive their first months at sea. Scientists warn that salmon fisheries may face hard times in the next few years.

Fisheries managers also worry about below average runs of steelhead returning to the Columbia River now. Returns of adult steelhead that went to sea as juveniles a year ago so far rank among the lowest in 50 years.

Scientists believe poor ocean conditions are likely to blame: Cold-water salmon and steelhead are confronting an ocean ecosystem that has been shaken up in recent years.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
September 22, 2017
Issue No. 844

Table of Contents

* Gorge Fire Aftermath – Rains, Debris Flows—Prompts Trucking Of Two Million Juvenile Fish From Oregon Hatchery
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439608.aspx

* Council Gets Update On Assessing Hatchery Stock, Habitat For Potential Salmonid Reintroduction Above Grand Coulee
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439607.aspx

* NOAA Climate Center Pegs La Nina At 55-60 Percent For Coming Months; Could Mean Colder, Wetter Than Average
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439606.aspx

* Updated Salmon Returns Show Below Average; Harvest Managers Set Commercial, Tribal Fishing Times
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439605.aspx

* Agencies Announce Caught Night Poachers Gillnetting Salmon At Mouth Of Deschutes River
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439604.aspx

* New Corps Contract Moves Willamette Trout Production From McKenzie River Hatchery To Trout Farm In Summer Lake
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439603.aspx

* Escaped Atlantic Salmon Continue To Be Caught; WDFW Report Says Fish Not Expected To Establish Themselves
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439602.aspx

* Biologists Tell Council That Sea Lion Predation Puts Willamette Winter Steelhead At 89 Percent Chance Of Extinction
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439601.aspx

* Estuary Cormorants Nesting In Low Numbers; Corps Unsure If Culling Will Resume Before Season Ends
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439600.aspx

* Upper Columbia White Sturgeon Recovery Efforts Now Producing Enough Fish For Tribal, Non-Tribal Fisheries
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439599.aspx

* NOAA Fisheries Finalizes Recovery Plan For ESA-Listed Eulachon (Smelt); Includes Columbia Estuary
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439598.aspx

* Groups Amend Complaint In Wild Upper Willamette Winter Steelhead Litigation
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439597.aspx

* Judge Extends Stay In Deschutes River Lawsuit As Parties Pursue Settlement, Possible Mediator
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439596.aspx

* Corps Ends Summer Ops At Dworshak While Managers Note Continued Low Steelhead Passage In Lower Snake
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439595.aspx

* Fall Creek Dam (Mid-Willamette) Gets New Fish Collection Facility To Meet BiOp Requirements
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439594.aspx

* Council Science Advisory Panel Issues Evaluation Of Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Projects
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439593.aspx

* USGS Scientists To Release Red Dye In Idaho’s Kootenai River To Study Where, How Fast Larval Sturgeon, Burbot Move
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439592.aspx

* Idaho Fish And Game Director Moore Elected President Of National Fish And Wildlife Organization
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439591.aspx
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Monarch butterflies might vanish from northwest summers

By Annette Cary – 9/23/17 AP

Kennewick, Wash. — Children in the northwest might not see the fluttering orange and black wings of a Monarch butterfly on a summer day a few decades from now.

A study published recently in the journal Biological Conservation documents the steep decline of the population of migrating monarchs in the West.

“This study doesn’t just show that there are fewer monarchs now than 35 years ago,” said Cheryl Schultz, an associate professor at Washington State University Vancouver and lead author of the study.

“It also tells us that, if things stay the same, western monarchs probably won’t be around as we know them in another 35 years,” she said.

continued:
————————-

Fish & Game News:

Highline Fire Closure Area Reduced in Middle Fork Elk Zone

By Evin Oneale, Regional Conservation Educator
Friday, September 15, 2017

A large portion of the Middle Fork Elk Zone has reopened thanks to cooler temperatures and slower fire growth of the Highline and Goat Fires burning within the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness Area. The new closure area and other fire updates can be viewed at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5500/ or https://idfg.idaho.gov/fire.

The updated closure impacts only 17 percent of the Middle Fork Elk Zone, where the season opens today (September 15).

The Big Creek Trail #196 and everything south of the trail is now available to hunters. Several backcountry airstrips are also operational including Cold Meadows, Cabin Creek and Soldier Bar.

While the previous closure affected 52 percent of Unit 26, now only 19 percent of the unit is closed. Nearly half of unit 20A remains closed as fire activity is primarily within that unit.

source:
— — — —

Cooler temps draw big game, create challenges for hunters

By Andrew Weeks for The Star-News Sept 21, 2017

Deer and elk seasons are off to a slow start in the McCall area, but that likely will change as the temperatures dip, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game said.

Hunters currently are afield on a couple of hunts: archery season, which opened Aug. 30 and runs through Sept. 30; and any-season deer and elk hunts, which recently opened in some backcountry units

“The start of the season has been slow, mostly because of the hot, dry weather,” said Regan Berkley, regional F&G wildlife biologist in the agency’s McCall office. “I’m guessing the cooler, wetter weather pattern we’re about to see will change that and things will pick up.”

That’s good news for hunters anticipating the general season opener in early October. A drop in temperatures could, however, bring new challenges to hunters.

“Cooler weather will be much better,” said McCall F&G Conservation Officer Marshall Haynes said. “But this week’s extreme drop in temps, and rain and snow, might not make it real easy on the hunters.”

But elk like the weather, Haynes said. “The elk rut usually peaks in mid to late September and should be good with the change in weather,” he said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Make the call to catch poachers

By Mike Demick, Conservation Information Supervisor
Monday, September 18, 2017

With many hunting seasons in progress or about to begin, the Idaho Fish and Game is asking the public to call the Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) hotline if they witness a violation of fish and game laws.

“Calls from concerned citizens are instrumental in catching poachers stealing from Idaho’s citizens,” said Chris Wright, Fish and Game assistant enforcement bureau chief.

Callers to CAP hotline, 1-800-632-5999, can report wildlife law violations anonymously, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Cash rewards are available to callers who provide information leading to the citation of suspected wildlife law violators.

During the 35 year history, CAP has been an important link to catching poachers. Each year, CAP receives an average of 600 calls from the public, which results in 150 citations issued and $20,000 paid in rewards.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — —

F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

New Hampshire llama helps protect ducks from wild bear

by WGME Wednesday, August 16th 2017


The llama’s name is Noir for its black fleece, and Wednesday was not his first escape. (Jackson Police Department)

Jackson, NH (WGME) – Golfers in Jackson, New Hampshire were surprised when a llama showed up on the sixth hole at Eagle Mountain Golf Course.

The llama’s name is Noir for its black fleece, and Wednesday was not his first escape.

Apparently, llamas are very protective, and Noir has become attached to a family of ducks.

Recently, a bear has been sniffing around the ducks and their eggs looking for a snack.

So Noir has been jumping into action, escaping his paddock to chase the bear off.

Noir the llama is back home on the farm, but not before starring in a few selfies.

Noir’s owners are working to raise the llama’s electric fence, and are going to reach out to state biologists to help with their bear problem.

source:
—————————–

Seasonal Humor:

ElkSaddle11-a
———————————-

Sept 17, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 17, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Bear Aware

Bear reported on the west side of the village this week. Bears are looking for food. Keep garbage secured and pet food indoors.
— — — —

Just for the Halibut September 30 at 4pm

Sponsored by Stew Edwards, hosted by the Tavern, September 30th at 4pm

Join us for Food & Fun $5 suggested donation gets you 5 raffle tickets for donated prizes Benefits go to the Landing Zone for Yellow Pine.

The Usual YP Pot Luck Bring a side dish to share.
— — — —

Ditch Day October 4 at 10am

This is the day we clean and repair the village ditches in preparation for the spring run-off. Please join us.
— — — —

VYPA News:

Last meeting was Saturday, Sept 9, 10am at Community Hall.
— — — —

YPFD News:

Training is on Sundays starting at 11am at the YP Fire Station and open to the community of Yellow Pine. Check with Jeff or Ann to confirm trainings.

Fire Siren will be tested at noon on the first of each month.
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Sep 11) overnight low of 41 degrees, clear sky, slight haze of smoke, light breeze and a good amount of dew. Feels a little like fall this morning. More birds around, could hear robins, nutcrackers, a nuthatch and finches. Power blipped off and on at 1157am. Clear hot day, light haze of smoke, high of 90 degrees. More traffic than usual for a Monday, streets are dusty again. Quiet evening. Bright half moon. Doe running around after dark.

Tuesday (Sep 12) overnight low of 43 degrees, mostly clear sky (high thin wisps) light haze of smoke (low end of yellow AQ). Heard one nutcracker and a nuthatch calling. Pine squirrels dropping cones out of the trees and sounding off. Heard a pileated woodpecker whooping after lunch time. Quiet day and very little traffic. Clouds coming in from the south and by late afternoon it was pretty much overcast. Short little misty rain shower at 615pm, not enough to get wet, high of 89 degrees. Clouds breaking up by evening, good air quality.

Wednesday (Sep 13) early morning rain shower, overnight low of 50 degrees, clouds dissipating quickly, light breeze and excellent air quality. Power off 8am to 420pm. Robins grouping up, calling and flying, nuthatches “hanking” in the trees. Pine squirrels busy gathering cones. Pileated woodpecker visited the ant pile. Diamond (Kennedy’s) Fuel truck delivered fuel to Yellow Pine today. Idaho Power crew spotted in Scott Valley this afternoon. A little more traffic than usual for a Wednesday. Quiet except for a generator and a chainsaw today. Warm afternoon, partly cloudy, light breezes and good air, high of 83 degrees. Quiet evening, slight haze of smoke. Middle of the night, a large “creature” was huffing and growling on Westside Ave.

Thursday (Sep 14) overnight low of 51 degrees, mostly cloudy, not much dew, light haze of smoke and light breezes. A few more birds around, robins flocking and flying, nutcrackers and nuthatches calling from the forest, pileated woodpecker whooping and a few finches. Pine squirrels very busy gathering cones. Power out from 8am to around 330pm. Cloudy and cooler today, a little breezy, high of 74 degrees. Quiet evening and dark clouds.

Friday (Sep 15) overnight low of 44 degrees, overcast, sprinkles of rain started falling before sunrise, damp and misty this morning (0.02″). Not many birds out except robins, a jay and a nutcracker. Misty sprinkles on and off before lunch time (0.01″). Pileated woodpecker visited the ant pile. Cloudy, cool and breezy all day, but no more rain, high of 49 degrees. Quiet afternoon and evening. Not a day to have a window open.

Saturday (Sep 16) overnight low of 38 degrees, partly cloudy, chilly breezes and good air this morning, slight haze of smoke. Heard nuthatches, nutcrackers and robins. Report of an owl hooting in the neighborhood before daylight. Streets are dusty again already, increased traffic this afternoon. Breezy cloudy day, high of 64 degrees. Folks buzzing still around after dark.

Sunday (Sep 17) overnight low of 34 degrees, mostly cloudy sky with a slight haze of smoke this morning. Not much bird activity (a flicker poking the ground), a lone pine squirrel sounding off. Fall temperatures today, cloudy and light breezes, high of 70 degrees. Increased traffic, a little thicker smoke and dusty roads.
—————————————-

Idaho News:

Shooting at Lake Cascade campground leaves San Diego man dead

Nampa man charged, said he was defending himself

By Tom Grote for The Star-News September 14, 2017

A shooting at a campground on Lake Cascade early Friday left a San Diego man dead and a Nampa man charged with a felony.

William L. “Tinker” Brasuell, 45, of San Diego, Calif., died at the scene of the shooting, which happened about 1:30 a.m. Friday at the French Creek Campground on the west side of Lake Cascade near Cascade.

Christopher D. Humes, 47, of Nampa, was detained at the scene and charged with aggravated battery, which carries a penalty of up to 15 years in prison.

Valley County Prosecuting Attorney Carol Brockmann said she will seek to add an additional 15 years of prison time under a state law on use of a deadly weapon during a felony.

Humes is scheduled to appear in Valley County Magistrate Court in Cascade on Sept. 26 on a hearing to determine whether there is enough evidence for him to stand trial. Humes was being held in Valley County Jail on $100,000 bond.

An autopsy found Brasuell he had been shot once in the chest, Valley County Coroner Scott Carver said.

Humes told investigators that he fired three shots at Brasuell with a .380 handgun after Brasuell attacked him, according to a Valley County Sheriff’s Office report filed with the charges.

Brasuell choked him, threatened to kill him and threw him to the ground, Humes told sheriff’s deputies who responded to the scene.

Humes, who was dressed only in underwear, a T-shirt and socks, said he did not see Brasuell show a weapon, and no weapons were found near the body, investigators said.

Three .380 shell casings and the handgun were recovered from the scene. Humes declined to be treated by EMTs, the report said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

State fire marshal finalizing report on Tamarack cabin fire that killed four

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, September 13th 2017


Photos courtesy Alan PartridgeII and Sarah Whipple

Tamarack, Idaho (KBOI) — It’s been more than two months since a fire ripped through a cabin near Tamarack Resort that killed four people, including two adults and two children.

Since then there’s been few details on what caused the deadly fire, though answers may be coming soon.

The state’s fire marshal told KBOI 2News on Wednesday that his office returned from Tamarack today (Wednesday) for an additional two-day follow up and is finalizing a report.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Charges filed against Former Valley County coroner

Nathan Hess accused of using county vehicle for personal gain

By Tom Grote for The Star-News September 14, 2017

Former Valley County Coroner Nathan Hess has been charged with two misdemeanors that said he used county vehicles for his personal gain.

Hess, who resigned in May without explanation, used his county-issued vehicle to take a body to a funeral home in Boise on Jan 16, 2017, for which he was paid $400, according to the charges.

Hess also used the county vehicle for his personal use between November 2016 and April 2017, court records said.

The charges are punishable with up to one year and jail and a $1,000 fine for each charge. Hess, 41, of Donnelly, is scheduled to appear in Valley County Magistrate Court in Cascade on Oct. 3.

“It has been my honor to serve Valley County,” Hess said in his resignation letter. “However, because of circumstances I do not wish to disclose, I am unable to continue my services as coroner.”

“I don’t have a comment at the moment, but I will,” Hess told The Star-News on Tuesday.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Summer’s nearly over, but West Nile virus threat isn’t

Joe Parris, KTVB September 14, 2017

Boise – Summer is coming to an end. If that thought makes you sad, at least you can look forward to the end of mosquito season too.

For now though, as long as Idaho has warm days, the mosquitoes will be sticking around, and so will the risk of west Nile virus.

All the flooding that happened across the Valley this year caused public health officials to predict a bad mosquito season. Thankfully though, it looks like that isn’t happening.

In 2016 Idaho saw nine reported cases of human West Nile virus infections across the state. This year, there have been 10.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Stargazers eye the nation’s first dark sky reserve in Idaho

By Keith Ridler, Associated Press Fri., Sept. 15, 201


This June 4, 2016 photo provided by Nils Ribi Photography shows the Milky Way in the night sky at the foot of the Boulder Mountains in the Sawtooth National Recreation Area, Idaho. (AP / Nils Ribi Photography)

Boise, Idaho (AP) — Tourists heading to central Idaho will be in the dark if local officials get their way.

The first International Dark Sky Reserve in the United States would fill a chunk of the state’s sparsely populated region that contains night skies so pristine that interstellar dust clouds are visible in the Milky Way.

“We know the night sky has inspired people for many thousands of years,” said John Barentine, program manager at the Tucson, Arizona-based International Dark-Sky Association. “When they are in a space where they can see it, it’s often a very profound experience.”

Supporters say excess artificial light causes sleeping problems for people and disrupts nocturnal wildlife and that a dark sky can solve those problems, boost home values and draw tourists. Opposition to dark sky measures elsewhere in the U.S. have come from the outdoor advertising industry and those against additional government regulations.

Researchers say 80 percent of North Americans live in areas where light pollution blots out the night sky. Central Idaho contains one of the few places in the contiguous United States large enough and dark enough to attain reserve status, Barentine said. Only 11 such reserves exist in the world.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Cause of Elderly Woman’s Death in St. Joe Wildfire Area Determined

September 08, 2017 By Chanse Watson Shoshone News Press

Wallace — The Shoshone County Sheriff’s Office (SCSO) reports that the 74- year old Emmett, Idaho woman who was found deceased in the St. Joe National Forest earlier last month died as a result of heat exhaustion and dehydration.

Virgina Bayes and her husband, Walter, 79, became stranded and separated in a remote area of southern Shoshone County while out recreating in late July.

To make a bad situation worse, the couple were also in the vicinity of the Buck wildfire area.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

House Passes Vital Fiscal Year 2018 Funding for Idaho

Simpson secures PILT, wildfire funding, in House Appropriations bills

Washington, September 14, 2017

On Thursday, Idaho Congressman Mike Simpson supported passage of full year fiscal year 2018 funding. While a continuing resolution funds the government until December 2017, full year appropriations must still be passed for the remainder of the fiscal year. The bill was passed by a vote of 211-198 and includes legislation previously passed by the House including Chairman Simpson’s Energy and Water bill which has critical funding for Idaho National Laboratory.

“Today’s legislation is an important step towards finishing fiscal year 2018 appropriations,” said Congressman Simpson. “This bill is an important marker for many Idaho priorities such as PILT, wildfire funding, and provisions that rein in burdensome regulations from the previous Administration. I look forward to working with my colleagues to see that these policies ultimately are signed into law so we can ensure federal agencies can fulfill their missions as quickly and efficiently as possible.”

continued:
[h/t Gordon C]
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Pacific Northwest could be in for another La Niña winter

Rich Marriott, KING September 15, 2017

Good news, skiers. New weather models show an increased chance of La Niña conditions this winter in the Pacific Northwest.

La Nina conditions in the Pacific increase the chances of below normal temperatures and above normal precipitation.

NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center (CPC) issued its monthly update on El Niño/La Niña (ENSO) conditions in the Pacific. Computer models had been leaning towards a neutral winter, but are now trending towards a La Nina winter.

CPC says there is “an increasing chance (55-60%) of La Niña during the Northern Hemisphere fall and winter 2017-18.”

As a result, CPC issued a La Niña Watch for the Pacific.

We often have pretty good ski seasons during La Niña winters. But remember, it just increases the chances of a cool, damp winter – it doesn’t guarantee them.

We had a La Niña winter last year, with the wettest October-June on record.

source:
——————————–

Fire Season:

Area Closure Order for Missouri Fire has been Terminated

9/15/2017

The Area Closure Order for the Missouri Fire (Order #0412-504) has been terminated. This lightning ignition on the Krassel District north of Yellow Pine has displayed little to no activity and no growth for several weeks. Those venturing into the burned area are advised to watch for hazard trees and unstable terrain. The Missouri Ridge Trail (NFS #031) is passable.

map:

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Land Management Agencies lift Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in most zones of the Payette Fire Restriction Area

September 15, 2017

McCall, Idaho – With cooler temperatures and chances of precipitation increasing into next week, local land management agencies will lift Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in the Payette West, Payette East, and Long Valley/Meadows Valley Zones of the Payette Fire Restriction Area beginning Friday, September 15, 2017. The Fire Restrictions are rescinded by agencies managing state, private and public lands in the area, including the United States Forest Service (USFS), Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association (SITPA), and the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL). Restrictions were terminated in the Weiser River Zone of the Payette Fire Restriction Area on Wednesday, September 13, 2017.

The Little Salmon Zone of the Payette Fire Restriction Area remains in Stage 1 fire restrictions until further notice. See map below for location.

The restrictions were put into effect on August 11 when fire danger and burning conditions were unusually high. Recent storms have brought some moisture with much cooler temperatures to the area, and with the days getting shorter fire conditions have moderated. Forest visitors are reminded that vegetation is still dry and to be careful with all use of fire in the outdoors. The accidental start of a wildfire can still be devastating. Be alert and be aware. Follow these tips to help prevent wildfire:

o NEVER leave a camp fire unattended
o Keep water, dirt and a shovel near your fire at all times
o Make sure your fire is dead out and cold to the touch before you leave it
o Use of fireworks, exploding targets or tracer rounds is prohibited on public lands

Area closures due to active wildfires are still in effect on some public lands, including the area affected by the Highline Fire on the Payette National Forest. Contact the land management agency for your area of interest for specific information regarding fire closures.

Fire restrictions may be lifted but burn bans may still be in place in some areas. Fire restrictions and burn bans address different types of activities. Burn bans pertain to controlled burning activities such as debris burning, slash burning, or agricultural burning, for which a fire safety burn permit from IDL is required. Visit http://burnpermits.idaho.gov/ for more information

notice w/map:
— — —

Boise National Forest

Stage 1 fire restrictions will be lifted effective 12:01 a.m. September 17. To view the order click here.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Amid raging wildfires, fire management practices criticized

By Andrew Selsky – 9/7/17 AP

Salem, Ore. — Intense wildfires plaguing much of the West have rekindled controversy over logging restrictions and fire management practices that critics say have created explosive fire seasons.

U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, an Oregon Democrat, took to the floor of the Senate on Thursday to describe the toll the fires have taken.

Efforts to thin dead and dying trees have been inadequate, he said as he stood next to a large photo of flames leaping from trees in the majestic Columbia River Gorge.

“This is a yearslong pattern in the West,” he said, calling for smarter policies and criticizing the “broken system of fighting wildfires.” He complained that federal funds earmarked for fire prevention are instead used for firefighting.

“The idea of ripping off prevention, which you need most, defies common sense,” Wyden said. “Shoddy budgeting today leads to bigger fires tomorrow.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Forest Service spends record $2B battling forest fires

By Matthew Daly and Dan Elliott – 9/14/17 AP

Washington — The Forest Service has spent more than $2 billion battling forest fires around the country — a record as wildfires blacken the American West in one of the nation’s worst fire seasons.

Wildfires have ravaged the West this summer with 64 large fires burning across 10 states as of Thursday, including 21 fires in Montana and 18 in Oregon. In all, 48,607 wildfires have burned nearly 13,000 square miles (33,586 square kilometers).

The fires have stretched firefighting resources, destroyed more than 500 homes and triggered health alerts as choking smoke drifted into major Western cities.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Billions of dead trees force US fire crews to shift tactics

By Dan Elliott – 9/7/17 AP

Albany, Wyo. — Vast stands of dead timber in the Western U.S. have forced firefighters to shift tactics, trying to stay out of the shadow of lifeless, unstable trees that could come crashing down with deadly force.

About 6.3 billion dead trees are still standing in 11 Western states, up from 5.8 billion five years ago, according to U.S. Forest Service statistics compiled for The Associated Press.

Since 2010, a massive infestation of beetles has been the leading cause of tree mortality in the West and now accounts for about 20 percent of the standing dead trees, the Forest Service said. The rest were killed by drought, disease, fire or other causes.

Researchers have long disagreed on whether beetle infestations have made wildfires worse, and this year’s ferocious fire season has renewed the debate, with multiple fires burning in forests with beetle-killed trees.

continued:
——————————————-

Public Lands:

Payette forest awarded stewardship contract near Lost Valley

The Star-News September 14, 2017

The Payette National Forest has awarded the Rough Finn Stewardship Contract to Idaho Forest Group of Grangeville.

The project is located on the New Meadows District near Lost Valley Reservoir and is the fifth of a dozen stewardship contracts planned with the Lost Creek Boulder Creek Landscape Restoration Project, a news release said.

The contract will be for work on 1,300 acres and improvements on 30 miles of roads. The project is expected to produce about 10 million board feet of logs, the release said.

Work is expected to begin this fall or spring and continue until March 2021.

Planned projects include thinning and controlled fire to increase the area’s resistance to fire, improved recreation facilities, and improved wildlife habitat.

The project was the subject of a 2015 lawsuit was filed by Alliance for the Wild Rockies, Idaho Sporting Congress, and Native Ecosystems Council. A judge dismissed the lawsuit in August 2016.

“We are pleased to move ahead with the restoration activities,” Payette Forest Supervisor Keith Lannom said

The project will result in a landscape that is closer to a more natural state and more resistant to uncharacteristic wildfires, Lannom said.

The Payette Forest Coalition met for two years to understand conditions, develop goals, and to consider different approaches to the project, he said.

“The PFC adds a collaborative and consensus approach to conducting land stewardship on public lands,” Lannom said. “They are a vital part of the Payette Forest’s restoration program and reflect how the Forest Service operates as a multiple use agency.”

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Hunter Gets $500 Reward for Busting Motorized Gate Crashers

Posted by HLNews Sep 7, 2017

Boise – A public land hunter in Idaho recently collected a $500 reward from Backcountry Hunters & Anglers after reporting illegal use of an off-road vehicle in the Third Fork drainage on the Emmett Ranger District of the Boise National Forest.

As a result of this action, an Ada County resident pleaded guilty to two counts of violating the Motor Vehicle Use map on public lands, which carries a fine of $225 for each count. These areas are closed to protect wildlife from motorized disturbance during spring calving and fall hunting. BHA offers rewards of up to $500 for public land users who provide a report of illegal OHV use leading to a conviction.

Daniel Garringer, the hunter who reported the lawbreakers, acknowledged the challenges of enforcement in the area.

“The use of ATVs and off-road vehicles in the area has always been prohibited, but in the recent years, due to the rise in popularity, things have really gotten out of hand,” said Garringer. “I have no issue with riding your ATVs on the main road that is open to traffic to get to your favorite spot to hunt; however, I do have an issue with people abusing and pushing the limits to get to areas that are off limits to motorized vehicles.”

continued:
[h/t BNF]
————————————-

Critter News:

Pet Talk – Dental Disease in Dogs and Cats

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt 9/15/2017 IME

The gingiva is the part of the gums that surrounds the teeth where they arise from the jaw. Gingivitis is inflammation of this area. Gingivitis is a component of periodontal disease, which is the most common dental disease of dogs and cats. Because the gingiva lies in close proximity to the teeth and helps maintain the health of the tooth sockets, longstanding and severe gingivitis can increase the risk that teeth will be lost. When the gingiva is inflamed, it often recedes from the tooth, revealing the tooth roots.

The major cause of gingivitis in dogs and cats is accumulation of plaque and tartar on the base of the teeth. In cats, many viral infections can cause inflammation of the gingiva.

Dogs and cats don’t brush their teeth, so it’s up to their owners to make sure their teeth are cleaned. Some owners are able to brush their pets’ teeth. There are many oral medications, bones and products that help your pet keep its teeth clean of plaque and decrease subsequent gingivitis and tooth loss. Many owners brush their pets’ teeth religiously, but most owners never do, nor even think about it.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary plans open house Sept. 30

The Star-News September 14, 2017

Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary near McCall will host is annual open house from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 30.

The open house is the only time during the year the public can tour the grounds and see wildlife displays and demonstrations.

Those attending are urged to bring a picnic lunch and perhaps see kokanee salmon on their migration in Lake Fork Creek.

Snowdon is located seven miles out Lick Creek Road east of McCall at end of the pavement

Snowdon’s mission is to rehabilitate and return injured and orphaned wildlife to the wild and provide hands-on education to promote a healthy coexistence with wildlife and the ecosystem.

Snowdon specializes in the rehabilitation of local wildlife, including orphaned baby birds and mammals and injured small mammals, songbirds, waterfowl, and raptors.

The 35-acre sanctuary has a number of animal pens and enclosures, and a clinic equipped to care for ill and injured birds and animals.

Go to http://snowdonwildlife.org for more information.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wolves understand cause and effect better than dogs

Date: September 15, 2017
Source: University of Veterinary Medicine — Vienna

Summary: A rattle will only make noise if you shake it. Animals like the wolf also understand such connections and are better at this than their domesticated descendants. Researchers say that wolves have a better causal understanding than dogs and that they follow human-given communicative cues equally well. The study provides insight that the process of domestication can also affect an animal’s causal understanding.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

8/30/17: Wolf News Roundup

(By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online!) The Wyoming Game & Fish Department reports that as of August 30, there have been 65 confirmed wolf deaths in Wyoming so far in 2017, with 36 of the animals killed in response to livestock depredations; 17 wolves legally taken in Wyoming’s predator zone; and 12 others that died of natural or unknown causes. Additional reports on Oregon, Washington an Idaho…. (Click on the link above for the complete story.)
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Some New Mexico lawmakers concerned with wolf recovery plan

9/12/17 AP

Albuquerque, N.M. — Some state lawmakers in New Mexico say a plan for recovering endangered Mexican gray wolves in the American Southwest is flawed and politically driven.

The 21 Democrats outlined their concerns in a letter sent recently to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The agency is seeking public comments as it works to meet a court-ordered deadline to have a recovery plan completed by the end of November.

The plan is a long time coming as the original guidance for restoring the species was adopted in 1982. The lack of a plan has spurred legal challenges and skirmishes over states’ rights under the federal Endangered Species Act.

The lawmakers say federal officials should specify a target for wolf releases as well as a benchmark for genetic diversity among the population in New Mexico and Arizona.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Endangered Mexican wolf killed following livestock attacks

By Susan Montoya Bryan – 9/15/17 AP

Albuquerque, N.M. — An endangered Mexican gray wolf has been killed by federal employees after a Native American tribe requested the animal be removed from the wild in the wake of a string of cattle deaths near the Arizona-New Mexico border.

The death of the female wolf marks the first time in a decade that efforts by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to curb livestock attacks by wolves has had lethal consequences for one of the predators.

The decision to remove the member of the Diamond Pack was first made in June after three calves were killed over several days, sparking concern among wildlife managers about what they described as an unacceptable pattern of predation.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wolf over its head in swimming attack on whitetail buck

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Sept. 13, 2017


A gray wolf swims after a whitetail buck at Lakeland Provincial Park and Recreation Area in northern Alberta. (David Smith / LEP Photography)

A wolf could out-swim a white-tailed deer but couldn’t make the buck a meal.

Canadian amateur photographer David Smith was canoe-camping recently in Lakeland Provincial Park and Recreation Area in northern Alberta near Lac La Biche when the deer plunged into the water with a wolf in close pursuit.

His series of photos, which are available for viewing on his Facebook page, shows the wolf catching the whitetail and biting its rump several times but then giving up. Perhaps the wolf had been kicked or maybe it simply figured it was futile to kill a deer in the middle of a big lake, Smith said.

The buck swam away.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Education International

Second week September 2017

Lethal wolf take lands ODFW in hot water with both sides

Wolves on the prowl

Coywolves are Taking Over Eastern North America
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Charging Grizzly Bear Near Island Park

8/31/2017 U.S. Forest Service – Caribou-Targhee National Forest (via FB)

A hiker on the Lake Marie Trail south of Sawtell Peak near Island Park Idaho was charged twice by a grizzly bear. The hiker deployed bear spray and was able to safely get away from the bear. Hikers are warned to use caution if you go on this trail or avoid the trail for the next week or so to prevent another encounter with this bear. The bear could be defending cubs, or its food.

Bow hunters are advised to remove your carcass immediately, or if you have to leave your carcass move the gut pile away from the carcass so as not to attract bears. If you have to leave your carcass make sure you know where it is and you approach it with the assumption there is a bear on the carcass. You do not want to surprise a bear on your kill. As a courtesy to others in the area of your kill, put your gut pile at least ¼ mile away from a trail so a bear is not close to trails or other areas used by recreationalists.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

2nd grizzly attack in week in Montana stopped by bear spray

by Associated Press Monday, September 11th 2017

Gardiner, Mont. (AP) — A grizzly bear attacked a woman in southwest Montana but was driven off by bear spray.

It was the second grizzly attack in the region in a week.

Andrea Jones of the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Department says the latest attack occurred on Saturday on a private ranch north of Gardiner.

Jones says the victim and two companions were near a cow carcass when the bear attacked and bit the legs and back of the victim. The bear fled when her companions deployed bear spray.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Yellowstone grizzly bear killed after raiding backcountry camps

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Thu., Sept. 14, 2017

A grizzly bear that had been raiding backcountry campsites and chasing campers in Yellowstone National Park since last year has been captured and killed, the Associated Press reports.

The National Park Service says biologists killed the immature, male grizzly on Sept. 8 after their nonlethal attempts to alter its behavior failed.

In 2016, the bear entered campsites in the Heart Lake area of Yellowstone and destroyed tents, sleeping bags and sleeping pads. National Park Service staff tried unsuccessfully to haze the bear with bean bag rounds, rubber bullets and cracker shells.

Last month, the bear forced a group of three backpackers out of their campsite near Heart Lake and consumed all of their food. In response, Yellowstone officials closed the area to backcountry camping and made the decision to catch and kill it.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Power crew frees young osprey tangled in twine in nest

9/13/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — A young osprey tangled in twine atop a nesting pole in southwest Idaho has been cut loose and freed by workers with a utility company.

Idaho Power in a news release Tuesday says employees Chad Owens and Jeremy Torkelson on Sept. 3 ascended to the nest near Swan Falls Dam in a bucket on a long arm extending from a truck.

… The company sent a line crew. The men wrapped the young bird in a shirt and removed the twine from its talons, and the osprey immediately flew away.

full story:

—————————————

Fish & Game News:

Highline Fire Closure Area Reduced in Middle Fork Elk Zone

By Evin Oneale, Regional Conservation Educator
Friday, September 15, 2017

A large portion of the Middle Fork Elk Zone has reopened thanks to cooler temperatures and slower fire growth of the Highline and Goat Fires burning within the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness Area. The new closure area and other fire updates can be viewed at
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5500/ or https://idfg.idaho.gov/fire.

The updated closure impacts only 17 percent of the Middle Fork Elk Zone, where the season opens today (September 15).

The Big Creek Trail #196 and everything south of the trail is now available to hunters. Several backcountry airstrips are also operational including Cold Meadows, Cabin Creek and Soldier Bar.

While the previous closure affected 52 percent of Unit 26, now only 19 percent of the unit is closed. Nearly half of unit 20A remains closed as fire activity is primarily within that unit.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Seats available for wolf trapping certification classes in Idaho Falls, McCall and Coeur d’Alene

By Gregg Losinski, Regional Conservation Educator
Thursday, September 7, 2017

IDAHO FALLS – Those interested in trapping wolves in Idaho are reminded that Idaho law requires you pass a mandatory wolf trapping certification class before purchasing wolf trapping tags.

Idaho Fish and Game has four certification classes currently available and open for enrollment.

* Idaho Falls: Saturday September 23rd, 9 AM to 4:30 PM., Fish and Game Upper Snake Regional Office, 4279 Commerce Circle.
* Coeur d’Alene: 2 separate courses: Friday, September 22nd; Saturday September 23rd, 9 am to 4:30 pm, Fish and Game Panhandle Regional Office, 2885 W. Kathleen Ave.
* McCall: Saturday November 18, 9 am to 4 pm, Fish and Game office, 555 Deinhard Ln.

Pre-registration is required. Those interested can register at
https://idfg.idaho.gov/education/wolf-trapper-education-course
or by contacting the respective Fish and Game office.

The registration fee is $8 per student. Those registering online by credit card will be charged an added convenience fee of $1.75.

The course will cover a variety of topics including wolf biology and management, wolf behavior, trapping and snaring techniques, harvest reporting requirements and proper care of the animal after harvest. On-site demonstrations include both classroom and in the field presentations and include equipment and rigging, using diverters to avoid non-target catches, trap site selection, and information on how to minimize human scent in the area.

Students successfully completing the certification course receive an Idaho Wolf Trapper Certification Card that enables them to purchase wolf trapping tags. Certified wolf trappers may purchase up to five wolf trapping tags per trapping season.

The general furbearer trapping class does not qualify people for the purchase of wolf trapping tags. When registering, please be certain to sign up for the wolf trapper instructor-led class you want to take.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Deceased New York woman leaves $300,000 to two cats

Mary Bowerman, USA TODAY Network, TEGNA August 24, 2017

A wealthy Bronx, New York woman recently died and left part of her fortune to her beloved cats, according to local reports.

Ellen Frey-Wouter left $300,000 of her $3 million estate to ensure that Tiger and Troy would be properly cared for, WABC-TV reported.

Frey-Wouter, who was widowed, left detailed instructions that the cats “never be caged” and be well cared for, the New York Post reported.

Tiger and Troy are being cared for by Frey-Wouters’ former home health aides, the Post reported.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

KittenT-paper-a
[h/t CP]
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Record-setting cats share home

by The Associated Press Sunday, September 17th 2017


Will Powers holds his cat Arcturus Aldebaran Powers, Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017 in Farmington Hills, Mich. Arcturus, a F2B Savannah cat, has been named the tallest pet cat in the world in the Guinness World Records 2018 version. Arcturus, at two years old, is about 19 inches and still growing. (Edward Pevos/Ann Arbor News via AP)

story:
——————————-

Seasonal Humor:

BearMaulingPrelude-a
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Duh? Don’t take selfies with bears, Aspen police say

Photogs endanger themselves, their kid, animals

Sep 15, 2017 Local News 8

Don’t take selfies with bears.

That’s the reminder Colorado’s Aspen Police Department issued recently after a crowd surrounded a mama bear and her cubs coming down from a tree near a mall Wednesday, KUSA reported.

It was a “fairly large crowd of photo takers and those that insisted on trying ot get close enough to take selfies,” Sgt. Rob Fabrocini told KUSA.

“We were trying to do the best we can to keep people away, but it’s a large area and people get by us,” Fabrocini told KUSA. “There was a woman holding a child within 5 feet of the bear trying to take a selfie with her back to the bear, which was very aggravating to see that.”

continued:
————————————-

Sept 10, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 10, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

September 13-14 Scheduled Power Outage

Maintenance Work Requires Scheduled Power Outage

To maintain reliability, Idaho Power crews will be doing work on the power line that serves the Yellow Pine area.

The power must be off Sept. 13 and 14, between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. each day. The outage is necessary for crews to safely work on a power line in rugged terrain near Yellow Pine.

We apologize for the inconvenience and appreciate your understanding.
— — — —

Bear Aware

Bears are looking for food. Keep garbage secured and pet food indoors. Bears “sign” has been reported around the transfer station.
— — —

Yellow Pine Blowdown Update

Did not see the crew up here this week. Maybe they are done?
— — — —

VYPA News:

Next meeting on Saturday, Sept 9, 10am at Community Hall.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Agenda

September 9th at 2pm at the Community Hall

I. Call to order
II. Reading of the Minutes Lorinne Munn Secretary
III. Treasurer’s Report Joel Fields Treasurer
IV. Community Hall Report Kathy Hall Member at Large
V. Cemetery Report Willie Sullivan Commissioner
VI. Membership Report Lynn Imel Vice Chairman
VII. Harmonica Festival written report Deb Filler Chairman and Committee Chair
VIII. Report by Midas Gold Belinda Provancher
IX. Composting Toilet Construction Willie Sullivan
X. Suggested Rules for the Community Hall report by Kathy Hall
XI. Report on Annual Appointment of Committee Chairpersons by Deb Filler
XII. Second reading of the motion to change the By Laws so the Offices of Harmonica and Chairperson of the Village of Y.P. Association cannot be held concurrently by the same Officer.

Old Business
New Business
Adjourn

Submitted by Lorinne N. Munn Secretary Village of Yellow Pine Association
— — — —

YPFD News:

Training is on Sundays starting at 11am at the YP Fire Station and open to the community of Yellow Pine. Check with Jeff or Ann to confirm trainings.

Fire Siren will be tested at noon on the first of each month.
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Sep 4) overnight low of 47 degrees, “clear” (no clouds) and very red sunrise thru thick smoke, orange air quality. Heard a jay and a couple clarks nutcrackers. Pine squirrel chittering, a golden mantle and a few chipmunks running around. Early airplane traffic. Very smoky at lunch time, no color to the sky, VanMeter and Golden Gate are barely visible, orange air quality. Thicker smoke and breezy late afternoon, high 95 degrees. Very dusty, everything is coated in gray. Quiet by late evening. Air quality in the red zone after midnight.

Tuesday (Sep 5) overnight low of 44 degrees, so smoky this morning we can’t see the sky, no shadows, red air quality. Big hawk flying low thru the neighborhood, one pine squirrel sounding the alarm. After the hawk was long gone, clarks nutcrackers were calling and finches flying. Really thick smoke after lunch time and cooler than yesterday. Pretty warm later in the afternoon and horrid air quality, can’t see if the sky has clouds or clear, high 87 degrees. Light traffic this evening (and very dusty.) Thick smoke after dark, Red air quality.

Wednesday (Sep 6) overnight low of 44 degrees, very smoky this morning, can’t see the sky, red air quality (just shy of purple!) Clarks nutcrackers and a pileated woodpecker calling. Pine squirrels chittering, cutting and dropping cones from the ponderosas. Have not seen any hummingbirds for a few days, took down the feeders (attracting yellow jackets.) Still smoky at noon, can barely see the outline of VanMeter and Golden Gate. More traffic than normal for a Wednesday, streets are very dusty. Smoky all day and hot, fairly calm afternoon, high 90 degrees. Very smoky late afternoon, air quality just below purple. Too smoky to have open windows at night.

Thursday (Sep 7) overnight low of 47 degrees, thick smoke this morning again, can’t see the sky (probably clear) and red air quality. Clarks nutcrackers and a pileated woodpecker calling, finches flying and calling. Pine squirrels sounding off and gathering cones. Thick smoke all day, can barely see the outline of the mountains, looks like fog out in the forest, Red air quality. Dry, hot and still, high 89 degrees. Smoky sunset.

Friday (Sep 8) overnight low of 52 degrees, moderate smoke this morning, can see some of the sky (looks clear) and red air quality. Birds: clarks nutcrackers, a few finches, a pileated woodpecker and a red-breasted nuthatch calling. So quiet we can hear the river. Group of motorcycle riders road into the village this morning. Cloudy by lunch time, clap of thunder then a sprinkle of rain for almost 10 minutes after 130pm, not enough to settle the dust but it smells better. Early afternoon cooler temps than we have been having. Quite a thunderstorm between 3pm and 430pm this afternoon, several strikes within a mile or two of the village and hard rain for about half an hour, then light sprinkles for about an hour (0.39″ measured), high 83 degrees. Pileated woodpecker tearing up the ant pile. Helicopter flying around the area after 6pm (not sure if it’s F&G or FS.) Partly cloudy before dark, less smoke and much better air.

Saturday (Sep 9) overnight low of 47 degrees, mostly cloudy and light haze, better air this morning. Pileated woodpecker whooping to the east, a few clarks nutcrackers and a couple of finches calling. A few pine squirrels calling back and forth across the neighborhood, gathering pine cones. Helicopter flying to the south around 930am. Partly cloudy after lunch and warm, high 86 degrees. Light traffic on main street. Clarks nutcracker pecking pine cones in the neighbor’s tree. Local streets are dusty! Much better air all day, just a slight haze of smoke.

Sunday (Sep 10) overnight low of 46 degrees, clear blue sky, light haze of smoke and slight breeze. Clarks nutcrackers calling, enjoying the heavy pine cone crop this year. Pine squirrels are busy too. Shots fired after noon. A few clouds and light haze of smoke after lunch time, getting warm in the sunshine, high 85 degrees. Light traffic (and dusty.) Shooting started again just before 5pm, lasted around half an hour. Warm pleasant evening. Pileated woodpecker visiting the ant pile.
———————————

RIP:

Diana Lyn Chandler

DianaLynChandler
1964-2017

Diana Lynn (Willhoyt) Chandler passed away at her home on September 5, 2017. .

Diana was born in McCall, Idaho on July 13, 1964, to Royce and Alyce Willhoyt.

Diana was raised in McCall. She married Vincent Tappe on November 10, 1979.
Together, they had 4 wonderful children, Tabitha, Joshua, Jason and Joseph.

Diana married Trent Chandler on February 14, 1997.
They spent much of their time exploring the outdoors. Diana was an avid mushroom hunter, loved to fish, hunt and simply spend every opportunity enjoying the woods. Diana was most comfortable camping out and enjoying nature without the interruptions of modern technologies. Most would say, “Diana was born a century too late.”

Diana was preceded in death by her son Joshua Tappe.

Diana is survived by her husband, Trent, daughter Tabitha (Sean) Post, son Jason Tappe, son Joe (Tricia) Tappe, stepson Nathan Chandler, stepdaughters Dalynn Garcia and Darcy (Randy) Owens, 10 grandchildren, father Royce Willhoyt, mother Alyce (Gordon) Cruickshank, brother Eddy (Laura) Willhoyt, several nieces and her extended family and friends.

Diana requested a private, family graveside service.

A celebration of her life will take place on September 16, 2017, 2:00 p.m., at Eddy Willhoyt’s residence.

She requests all friends and family attend to remember her and celebrate with stories, tall tales, laughter and a pot luck meal.
—————————————-

Letter to Share:

Commissioner Cruickshank’s August Newsletter

9/4/2017

From the desk of Commissioner Cruickshank

Tuesday August 1st
Today the commissioners met with various county offices and departments for a review of the proposed 2018 Budget. We discussed additional positions requested, wages, other revenue sources, etc. We also discussed Elected officials taking on some supervision and oversight of the various departments that are under the commissioners. With the commissioners only being part time the thought is to provide a person who can assist with day to day operations.

Wednesday August 2nd
I returned a call to the Idaho Attorney General’s office as they wanted to speak to me about a prior board I chaired which is no longer in existence.
I called and visited with the Valley County Clerk to clarify some wage rates to insure I had the correct information for the budget.
I sent an email out to all the Elected officials and Department Heads requesting their presence for the next Commissioners meeting.

Thursday August 3rd
Received a call about the fencing project was completed at the new Clear Creek Trail Head. The fencing was a condition once Valley County purchased the property to secure Public Access at this site for Winter and Summer recreation parking.
Worked on emails.

Friday August 4th
I participated in a NACo Executive Board conference call. Today we recapped the National Association of Counties (NACo) Annual Conference and discussed good and bad comments received about the conference.

Monday August 7th
Commissioner day today. Once the minutes are approved they can be found on the Valley County website under the Commissioners section. http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday August 8th
I scheduled my flights for an upcoming trip to Washington DC to attend the NACo Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) Fly-In. Each year NACo brings folks back to visit with congressional offices and do Briefings to the delegates on the importance of the PILT program and what it means to rural counties like Valley County. With Valley County receiving several hundred thousand dollars from this program it assists with the operations of the county. For me it is an honor to be asked to come represent rural counties and showcase the impacts if not funded. The PILT payments are not a for sure program as congress holds the purse strings.

Wednesday August 9th
I sent out the agenda for the NACo Western Region Conference Call for tomorrow.
This afternoon I participated in a National Forest Counties and Schools Coalition conference call to help finalize details on the Secure Rural Schools (SRS) Fly-In which happens the week following the PILT Fly-In. With congress not reauthorizing the SRS payments this impacts county road budgets and school funding. Again congress holds the purse strings to help offset the compact created over 100 years ago on sharing receipts from the Natural Resources harvested off National Forests.

Thursday August 10th
Today I hosted the Western Region Conference Call. We discussed the recent NACo Annual Conference, the PILT Fly-In, the SRS Fly-In and looking for a better way of educating the congressional folks on how PILT and SRS is needed across the western region.

Saturday August 12th
I sent out notes from the Western Region Call.
I attended the 4-H Livestock Auction and worked the ring to help collect bids on animals. The auction was very successful. At the end we auctioned off a Pie which brought $4,300.00, after it was sold multiple times. The proceeds from this Pie is used by the 4-H program to help offset costs for students to attend leadership training and such. As I mentioned it was a success.

Monday August 14th
Another commissioner day. Please see the website for the minutes of this meeting once approved. http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Wednesday August 16th
I participated, with the Sheriff and Prosecuting Attorney, in the Interview Process for Valley County looking to fill a Part Time Human Resource position.
This afternoon NACo held a SRS Conference Call to discuss NACo’s efforts to assist with the reauthorization of this program. Several pieces of legislation are being created however only a few have been released and no one will discuss where the funding is coming from. This protects the funding from being looked at for other programs or what is being cut to fund SRS.
This afternoon I scheduled flights for a NACo Executive Board Meeting to be held in La Jolla, CA in October.
I stopped by the Idaho Department of Lands to discuss a cattle grazing issue that I was told about to understand their grazing permit process.
Tonight I attended the Farm Bureau Dinner held at Jug Mountain Golf.

Thursday August 17th
I participated in a Cooperating Agency Conference Call to discuss what reports are coming in by various agencies concerning the Stibnite Mine Project. Most of today’s discussion was about our project schedule being flexible as some of the reports are not completed and very few have been completed. We also discussed some last minute changes to the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) which will be sent out for acceptance and signature by the various agencies involved. We did another review of the task list that was created to keep us on track.

Friday August 18th
I participated in a Site Debrief conference call for the Stibnite Mine Project. This was to listen to the various agencies who have toured the site and looked at the water related issues for the proposed operation and restoration of the mine site.

Monday August 21st
The Solar Eclipse happened today. Many folks came to Valley County, from as far away as Australia, as the area near Smith’s Ferry was in the Totality Path.

Tuesday August 22nd
We had changed our commissioner meeting date to today due to the Solar Eclipse. Once the minutes are approved they can be found on the Valley County website under the commissioners section. http://www.co.valley.id.us/
This afternoon the Human Resource (HR) Interview team made a call with a Tentative Offer to fill the Part Time HR Position pending final approval by the Commissioners at their next meeting.

Wednesday August 23rd
I received a call from our Building and Grounds Manager of a water leak outside the courthouse which impacts the older section of the courthouse. The water had to be shut off and next week will be repaired.
I received a call from a citizen who wanted to thank the commissioners for our Road Superintendent for the work he did to assist when a tree fell on the right-of-way and blocked his driveway access.
I returned a call to the President of Midas Gold Idaho to discuss some of their ongoing work.

Thursday August 24th
I reviewed a Grant Application for Hazardous Fuel Removal with our consultant. Valley County will be applying for a new funding source and I wanted to insure I had all the facts correct before signing the application. I then signed the application and had it submitted for Valley County. If Valley County is successful it will add to the Fire Wise program funding.

Monday August 28th
Commissioner day today. Please see the Valley County website for the minutes once approved. http://www.co.valley.id.us/
Myself and the Prosecuting Attorney called and made the offer for the HR Position official as the commissioners approved the hiring of a Part Time person to handle the HR duties.

Tuesday August 29th
I had the Honor of Welcoming the Idaho Association of County Assessors to Valley County as the Assessors were holding their annual conference in McCall this year. The Mayor of McCall also was there to welcome them to McCall. We both spoke on getting out and seeing the sights of the area.

Wednesday August 30th
I participated in an Idaho Association of Counties (IAC) Board of Directors Executive Session to discuss the replacement of the retiring IAC Executive Director.

Thursday August 31st
I went to Cascade and signed the Deeds for parcels sold in Monday’s Tax Deed Auction, visited with the Prosecuting Attorney on some concerns with various departments and signed an Emergency Declaration for the Bearskin Fire to allow resources to be utilized if need be. The official declaration will be approved by the Commissioners next Tuesday as I can only sign for a 7 day declaration for the imminent threat.

Well that wraps up another summer month. Fall should be approaching however with these hot dry days one wonders.

Thanks everyone for reading and if something perks your interest on a topic I mentioned please let me know and I will do my best to provide some additional information.

Gordon
—————————————

Idaho News:

One dead, pilot rescued after Valley County plane crash

by KBOI News Staff Monday, September 4th 2017


Photo courtesy Valley County Sheriff’s Office

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — One person was killed and another rescued after a small plane crash in Valley County Saturday.

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office says they received a call Saturday morning from the pilot of a small plane who said his aircraft had stalled and he was forced to crash land near Sulfur Creek Air Strip.

Deputies say the caller also told them he was injured and needed medical help, and that his passenger had died in the crash.

The sheriff’s office says they were able to roughly determine the plane’s location using the cell phone signal and an air ambulance was dispatched.

Unfortunately, deputies say the air ambulance wasn’t able to reach the crash site, so the sheriff called Two Bear Air Rescue in Montana for assistance.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Man killed in shooting at Valley Co. campground

KTVB September 09, 2017

A shooting that killed a California man at a Valley County campground is under investigation.

Valley County sheriff’s deputies and Cascade Rural Fire and EMA responded to the shooting just after 1:30 a.m. Friday at the French Creek Campground, Lt. Jason Speer wrote in a Valley Co. Sheriff’s Office news release.

William L. Brasuell, 45, was found dead. He was from San Diego, California.

Christopher D. Humes was booked into the Valley County Jail on a charge of aggravated battery with a firearm.

An autopsy on Brasuell’s body is scheduled for Monday, and the investigation into the shooting continues.

If you have any information about the shooting, the Valley Co. Sheriff’s Office asks you to contact Detective Bracht or Detective Mokhtarani at (208) 382-5160.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Valley County Search and Rescue seeks new members

The Star-News September 7, 2017

New volunteers are being sought for Valley County Search and Rescue, which conducts rescues of those who are lost or injured in the outdoors.

Training is provided in radio communications and GPS units, as well as search and rescue techniques.

“Team members have a strong desire to help others, learn emergency search and rescue skills, and enhance the safety and enjoyment of the outdoors for all,” Capt. Larry Mangum said.

The group is looking for active adults who are comfortable in the mountains. During winter, the group’s priority is on incidents relating to snowmobiles and other winter sports.

The team operates under the direction of the Valley County Sheriff’s Office and is involved in about 14 searches per year, Mangum said.

Summer searches are done on foot, on ATVs and UTVs, and on mountain bikes, motorcycles and horses. The searches are supplemented by air using airplanes and helicopters, he said.

Winter searches are done on snowmobiles, tracked machines or snowshoes.

Some members staff the Incident Command trailer which is outfitted with numerous radios, antennas, computers, printers and maps.

The group has equipment for rescue and transportation operations after lost or injured persons are located.

In addition to search calls, Valley County Search and Rescue participates in public events such as providing aid stations or communications for races and rides, parades, and other local activities.

For more information and an application, go to http://www.valleycountysar.org or contact Shelley Platt 634-7786 or shelleyplatt@icloud.com

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Missing Hunters Found: Two men back home after spending night in backcountry

by Associated Press Monday, September 4th 2017

Inkom, Idaho (AP) – Two missing hunters were found by emergency responders late Sunday morning after spending the night in the backcountry northeast of Inkom, Idaho.

The Idaho State Journal reports that Lonnie Labbee, 50, of Pocatello, and Andrew Blomquist, 28, of Inkom, were found by search and rescue personnel around 11 a.m. along Webb Creek in the Inman Canyon area.

Family members reported Sunday afternoon that both men were fine and back at home.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Earthquake swarm continues to rattle southeastern Idaho

By Rebecca Boone – 9/5/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — More than 100 aftershocks have rattled southeastern Idaho since a 5.3 magnitude quake hit near the town of Soda Springs late last week, and experts say they could continue for another week or so.

The 5.3 quake hit was the second in the series, and it hit about 6 p.m. Saturday. There were no reports of injuries or damage, though officials say 17,000 people reported feeling the 5.3 quake from as far away as Salt Lake City, Utah.

continued:
— —

Small earthquake hits southeast Idaho, near Pocatello

9/9/17 AP

Conda, Idaho — A small earthquake has hit southeast Idaho.

The U.S. Geological Survey reports that a magnitude 3.1 earthquake struck at 8 p.m. Saturday and had an epicenter about 3.5 miles (5.7 kilometers) southeast of Conda, an unincorporated community in Caribou County, and 49 miles (79 kilometers) east of Pocatello, a city of about 54,000 people.

The agency says the earthquake had a depth of 3 miles (5 kilometers.)

Earlier this week, more than 100 aftershocks rattled southeastern Idaho after a 5.3 magnitude quake hit near the town of Soda Springs.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho’s Craters of the Moon designated top stargazing site

9/6/17 AP

Carey, Idaho — Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve in south-central Idaho has been designated an International Dark Sky Park due to its exceptional stargazing.

National Park Service officials formally announced the designation in a news release Tuesday that the Tucson, Arizona,-based International Dark-Sky Association made in June.

Craters of the Moon spokesman Ted Stout says the monument and preserve is the 21st area in the National Park Service system to receive the designation.

Overall, it’s among only 39 sites in the United States to be named an International Dark Sky Park.

Stout says the night-sky viewing is excellent at Craters of the Moon because of its distance from large cities and the low southern horizon looking out over the Snake River Plain.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Fall into lifelong learning and UI Extension programs this season!

University of Idaho – Valley County Extension 9/7/2017

While residents are getting their last few days of summer recreation and busy collecting wood for winter, we all know that fall is around the corner! Join us this season for some community programs. UI Extension has teamed up with Idaho Power to offer an Energy Efficiency class in September. We will be closing down the Meadows Valley Community Garden in October, and partnering with Idaho Department of Agriculture to offer an educational class on pesticides (pesticide re certification credits available). November we will be hosting the multi-state web conference, Women in Agriculture and a community get together with the West Central Mountains Food Coalition.

Our office specializes in community development, agriculture, horticulture, and 4-H youth development programs. Please view the boxes below to learn more about upcoming programs!

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho repays feds $3.5 million to settle FCC school broadband claims

by Rebecca Boone, Associated Press Wednesday, September 6th 2017

Boise, Idaho (AP) — Idaho has repaid the Federal Communications Commission $3.5 million to cover federal funds that went to the botched statewide school broadband contract.

State leaders made the payment Tuesday as part of a settlement with the federal agency over claims that the state misused more than $14 million in federal money by putting it toward the illegally awarded contract.

The payment is expected to bring the long-running school broadband scandal to an end.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho officials designing giant, glow-in-the-dark potato

9/6/17 AP

Ketchum, Idaho — Idaho officials plan to replace a 6-ton potato replica used for advertising with one that glows in the dark.

Idaho Potato Commission officials say it will be lighter and leaner than the Great Big Idaho Potato Truck’s current Russet Burbank potato replica, the Capital Press reported (http://bit.ly/2xOS7ng).

The potato truck is used to promote the Idaho brand and has traveled over 148,000 miles (238172 kilometers) and toured through 7,200 cities in six years.

continued:
———————————-

Fire Season:

Fire Update 9/10/2017 posted here:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wildfires spark air quality warnings throughout Idaho

9/5/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Air quality throughout Idaho has become unhealthy thanks to wildfire smoke settling in from the Pacific Northwest.

The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality on Tuesday issued very unhealthy alerts, or purple air quality warnings, in Clearwater, Idaho, Latah, Lewis and Nez Perce counties.

DEQ says at those levels everyone should limit their time outdoors if possible, especially people with respiratory issues.

Meanwhile, air quality in Boise is at unhealthy levels for sensitive groups. Officials say active children and adults, and people with asthma or lung disease should reduce prolonged or heavy exertion outdoors.

Several large wildfires burning in Idaho, Montana and British Columbia since last week triggered the advisories. According to the National Weather Service, the wind is pushing smoke from three different directions and exasperating the problem.

Forecasters expect the smoke to stay for several days.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho bills parent of juvenile $84,500 following wildfire

9/8/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idaho officials have sent an $84,500 bill to the parent of a juvenile after fire investigators determined the juvenile started a wildfire with mortar-style fireworks.

The Idaho Department of Lands in a news release Thursday says the July 7 brush fire burned 420 acres (170 hectares) of grazing land near the northern Idaho town of White Bird.

Officials determined the fire was caused by negligent behavior and Idaho law requires the person responsible be billed for firefighting costs.

Federal, state and local agencies responded to the wildfire.

Officials didn’t release the name of the person who received the bill.

Idaho State Forester David Groeschl says humans have caused more than two-thirds of wildfires on lands protected by the Idaho Department of Lands so far this year.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

NIFC mobilizes active duty military personnel to help fight wildfires

Steve Bertel Sep 5, 2017 KIVI TV

Boise, ID – The National Interagency Fire Center in Boise is mobilizing active duty military personnel to serve as firefighters to assist with wildfire suppression efforts.

Currently, more than 80 large wildfires are burning on about 1.4 million acres in California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming — with nearly 28,000 firefighters and support personnel working on them, said NIFC spokeswoman Jennifer Jones.

The National Preparedness Level is currently at 5 — the highest level — indicating a high level of wildfire activity and a high level of commitment of wildfire suppression assets (i.e. firefighters, aircraft, and engines) to wildfires. “Weather and fuel conditions are predicted to continue to be conducive to wildfire ignitions and spread in most of the western U.S. through September — and in parts of the Northern Rockies and California through October,” Jones said.

The National Multi-Agency Coordinating Group at NIFC requested the Department of Defense to provide 200 active duty military personnel to assist with firefighting efforts.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wildfire-weary Western US coughs through late-season surge

By Steven Dubois, Associated Press Wednesday, September 6th 2017


A wildfire continues to burn on the Oregon side of the Columbia River Gorge near Cascade Locks, Ore., and the Bridge of the Gods, late Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (Genna Martin/seattlepi.com via AP)

The smoke, the flames, the aching lungs, the evacuations. They’re summertime facts of life in the U.S. West, where every wildfire season competes with memories of previous destruction.

This year was supposed to be mild after an extremely wet winter and spring but has ended up one of the worst in U.S. history in land burned. The foliage that sprouted from previous rain and snow has gone bone-dry in intense heat, feeding flames in places that have not seen downpours in months and strangling cities with smoke.

The biggest fires came a little later than usual in some states, after Labor Day, when the fire season traditionally starts to peter out.

A look at the fires:

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Fuel and Fire Season Update

USFS Regional Intermountain Wildfire Updates 9/8/2017

Please review the fuels and fire behavior advisory for Nevada, Utah, part of Idaho and Wyoming.
https://gacc.nifc.gov/gbcc/fuels.php

We have had relatively light large fire activity on NFS lands in the Great Basin area this season, however, our people are engaged in IA activities and large fire support with our partners and other neighbor regions. It’s a great time for everyone to be aware of hazardous conditions; we still have a potential for extreme fire behavior. Fire season is not over, yet.

Currently, the Great Basin is at a Preparedness level 4 while nationally, the Preparedness Level is 5. Preparedness levels range from 1-5 with 5 being the highest level. There are specific management directions with each level affecting the mobilization of resources. Preparedness Levels are dictated by fuel and weather conditions, fire activity, and resource availability. The Great Basin is helping out our neighbors who are at planning level 5 in the Northwest, Northern California and the Northern Rockies. We are also helping the Southern Area with support for Hurricane Harvey and awaiting Irma as she nears landfall.

In addition to Initial Attack and new starts, we have 10 ongoing large fires in the Great Basin. The largest are Pole Creek in Wyoming, Tank Hollow in Utah, and the Highline, Goat, Bearskin and Ibex in Idaho are within Forest Service boundaries and are being managed by the Forest Service. Please visit our website for more information on fire activity in our region. https://www.fs.usda.gov/main/r4/home.

Smoke has been heavily impacting Idaho and for latest information on smoke in Idaho visit: http://idsmoke.blogspot.com/

A very wet winter across Western and Northern Nevada into Northern Utah and Southern Idaho has produced tremendous fine fuel loading and continuity in the lower elevations, with multiple cheat grass crops reported. Fine fuel loadings are 200-300% above average across much of the advisory area. Recent large fires in Northern Nevada, Southern Idaho and Utah have displayed extreme fire behavior and high resistance to control. Very hot and dry conditions through the month of August have caused live and dead fuel moisture to rapidly decrease to critical levels mostly affecting Northern Nevada and Southern Idaho.

The western fire season is reaching its peak for 2017 as it enters September. Above normal fire activity continues to be observed across the northern Great Basin. Fuel moisture levels and fire danger indices are at near-record levels for severity. Lightning frequency has begun to decline and Initial Attack resources are effectively handling most but a few are still developing into larger incidents that require additional resources. Drier and warmer than normal conditions across the Great Basin are allowing for the fine fuels to become more receptive to fire activity. Precipitation received in the Great Basin is below 25% of normal. Fire season will peak by mid-September as the fuels remain much drier than average and as existing precipitation trends continue. By mid-September the shorter days will have an impact for fuel moistures to recover.

For more information on fire restrictions visit:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/main/r4/fire-aviation/prevention

For more information on predictive service outlook please visit: http://www.predictiveservices.nifc.gov/outlooks/outlooks.htm
—————————————-

Public Lands:

Fish passage work for bull trout closes a segment of Clear Creek road

Boise, Idaho, September 5, 2017 — The Boise National Forest, Lowman Ranger District has closed National Forest System (NFS) road 582 (Clear Creek road) for six weeks from Sept. 5 through Oct. 13, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. The closure begins just above the junction with the NFS road 545 (Long Creek) and extends below the junction of NFS road 515.

The road is being closed to all motorized access to provide for public safety during the construction and facilitation of large concrete culvert replacement structures on Pole Creek and Big Spruce Creek.

Both Pole and Big Spruce Creeks flow into Clear Creek, which is designated as critical habitat for bull trout. The structures are called aquatic organism passages or AOPs. These AOPs installations are part the 2016 Pioneer Fire’s Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) efforts.

The AOPs are being installed to provide better access to bull trout spawning and rearing habitat and for fish to take refuge in associated tributaries either from swift water or high sediment loads in Clear Creek. Bull trout are threatened species under the Endangered Species Act and require specific actions.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Construction at Mann Creek Reservoir Recreation Sites

Date: September 6, 2017
Contact: Jascha Zeitlin, Payette National Forest, Weiser Ranger District, (208) 549-4224

Weiser, ID – Two Mann Creek Reservoir day use areas will be closed starting this week for construction through the end of September. These closures will affect the south beach and associated day use and picnic area, as well as the eastern boat launch, dock, and picnic area. These projects will improve accessibility and provide better amenities for visitors. While the boat launch on the east side of the reservoir will be closed to the public during construction, visitors will still be able to use the boat launch on the western shore. Site managers wish to apologize for any issues this may cause for reservoir visitors but believe the long term benefits will outweigh the temporary inconvenience. Mann Creek Campground will remain open and not be impacted by construction. Also, dispersed camping around the reservoir will not be affected.

Mann Creek Reservoir recreation sites are jointly managed by the US Bureau of Reclamation and the Payette National Forest. Please contact the Weiser Ranger District with any questions (208) 549-4200.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Rough Finn Stewardship Contract Awarded – Lost Creek Boulder Creek Project

USDA Forest Service Region 4 Payette News Releases Update
Date: September 8, 2017
Contact: Kim Pierson, New Meadows District Ranger, (208) 347-0301

McCall, ID – The Payette National Forest has awarded the Rough Finn Stewardship Contract to Idaho Forest Group of Grangeville, Idaho. The project is located on the New Meadows District near Lost Valley Reservoir. This is the fifth of a dozen stewardship contracts planned with the Lost Creek Boulder Creek Landscape Restoration Project. This contract will result in restoration stand treatments on 1,300 acres and improvements on 30 miles of roads. It is expected to produce about 10 million board feet of logs for wood products which will contribute to the economic vitality of local communities.

The Rough Finn Stewardship Contract, and other projects in the Lost Creek Boulder Creek restoration project include treatments to restore the area to historic conditions. These include thinning and prescribed fire to increase the large tree and seral component of forest stands, increase fire resiliency, improved recreation facilities and opportunities, and improve wildlife habitat. Road and riparian treatments will improve aquatic habitat and water quality.

In June of 2015, a lawsuit was filed by Alliance for the Wild Rockies, Idaho Sporting Congress, and Native Ecosystems Council seeking to enjoin the Forest Service from implementing the Lost Creek Boulder Creek restoration project. On August 31, 2016, the Court dismissed the plaintiffs’ lawsuit. “We are pleased to move ahead with the restoration activities in the Lost Creek Boulder Creek project,” said Keith Lannom, Payette National Forest Supervisor. “The court’s decision upheld the collaborative work by the Payette Forest Coalition and the Payette Forest’s interdisciplinary team in designing an ecologically-sound landscape restoration project.” The Lost Creek Boulder Creek restoration Project will result in a landscape that is closer to a more natural state and more resistant to uncharacteristic wildfires.

The Payette Forest Coalition (PFC) is a diverse group of stakeholders that includes member from the environmental community, forestry groups, timber industry, motorized and non-motorized recreation groups, and county and state government agencies. The PFC met for two years to understand conditions, develop goals, and to consider different approaches to meeting goals. The group ultimately came to consensus on recommendation for restoration in this area. “The PFC adds a collaborative and consensus approach to conducting land stewardship on public lands,” added Lannom. “They are a vital part of the Payette Forest’s restoration program and reflect how the Forest Service operates as a multiple use agency.”

Work on the Rough Finn Stewardship contract is expected to begin this fall or spring and continue until March, 2021.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

State-by-state look at standing dead trees in Western US

By The Associated Press – 9/7/17 AP

The U.S. Forest Service estimates 6.3 billion dead trees were still standing in 11 Western states in 2015, up from 5.8 billion in 2010.

The numbers come from the agency’s annual Forest Inventory Analysis Program and include trees at least 5 inches (127 millimeters) in diameter.

The agency estimates roughly 20 percent of the standing dead trees in 2015 were killed by bark beetles. Other causes of death include drought, disease and fire. The proliferation of standing dead threes has forced firefighters to change tactics, sometimes cutting containment lines farther from the flames to avoid the danger of injury or death from falling trees.

A state-by-state look at the numbers of standing dead trees in 2015 compared with previous available totals:

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

USFS Regional Intermountain News

Newsletters
———————————

Critter News:

Boise Fire rescues dog from septic basin

KTVB September 04, 2017


(Photo: Boise Fire)

Boise — A dog survived a plunge into an open septic basin Sunday, thanks to Boise firefighters.

Boise Fire responded after someone spotted the pet trapped in the ten foot deep pit, and called authorities.

Firefighters say the basin was covered with temporary boards, and the dog had fallen through. Most of the waste had already been pumped out.

The dog wasn’t hurt, and “seemed thankful for the rescue,” Boise Fire noted.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Pet Talk – What is mange?

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Sep 8, 2017 IME

Mange is a skin disease caused by a parasitic microscopic mite. There are four different mites that can cause skin disease in dogs and cats. They are Cheyletiella, Demodex, Notoedres and Sarcoptes. In the Wood River Valley, we are mainly concerned with Demodex and Sarcoptes mange mites.

Sarcoptic mange is highly contagious and produces intense itching, reddening of the skin, thinning of the hair and development of crusts and scabs. Bacterial infections commonly occur in the inflamed and irritated skin.

Sarcoptic mites burrow directly into the skin, where they deposit eggs that hatch in three to 10 days. The eggs become larvae that burrow up to the skin surface to feed and molt into a nymph stage. The nymphs travel about the skin surface to feed. These nymphs then molt into adults, which then mate and deposit more eggs in the skin. The entire life cycle is complete within three weeks. Sarcoptic mites prefer skin with little hair, so they are most numerous on the ears, elbows, abdomen and ankles. As the disease spreads, hair is lost and eventually the mites occupy large areas of skin. Sarcoptic mites may also infest people in close contact with infected dogs.

Treatment for sarcoptic mange involves using the avermection class of drugs. Talk to your vet before using these drugs, as they can have adverse effects in the herding breeds of dogs.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Education International

Newsletter First week of Sept

Romania to kill bears, wolves after rise in attacks
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Nuisance Black Bears Reported [McCall]

(via FB 9/5/2017)

7 steps you can take to avoid creating food-habituated bears

During the past month or so, IDFG has received numerous reports of nuisance black bears in certain areas of McCall.

Please take the following steps immediately to avoid creating any food-habituated bears:

* Secure all garbage all the time, and particularly at night.

* Store garbage cans in a garage or shed that has secure, well-sealed doors.

* If you have trash pick-up service, do not put cans out until the morning of pick up.

* Never tamper with latches on bear resistant containers, or prop them open while they are outside. If your container’s latch seems faulty, contact Lakeshore to request a new container.

* Keep BBQ grills clean of food and grease

* Do not put out bird seed or bird feeders between mid March and mid November

* Keep pet food indoors, especially at night

Many of the residences visited by the bear had unsecured food sources: garbage, pet food, bird seed, or greasy BBQ grills.

If the bear continues to gain access to garbage and other food sources, it will quickly become accustomed to human food. Bears can lose their natural wariness of humans, and can become aggressive if they view a person as a threat or obstacle to their food. If it becomes evident that this bear is losing its wariness, IDFG will need to trap and euthanize the bear.

It is extremely important that all residents take measures to avoid habituating bears in this area to human food.

Questions? Call Idaho Department of Fish and Game at 634-8137.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Grizzly bites, claws hunter; man’s head got worst of it

By Amy Beth Hanson – 9/5/17 AP

Helena, Mont. — A grizzly bear feasting on an elk carcass charged a bow hunter in Montana and attacked him, slashing a 16-inch (41-centimeter) cut in the man’s head that required 90 stitches to close.

“The bear just flat-out charged us,” said Tom Sommer, as he recovered in a Montana hospital on Tuesday afternoon. He said it closed the 30-foot (9-meter) distance in 3 or 4 seconds.

“It bit my thigh, ran his claws through my wrist and proceeded to attack my head,” Sommer said. “I could hear bones crunching, just like you read about.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

More groups sue over Yellowstone grizzly bear protections

AP Sep 06, 2017 Local News 8

Helena, Mont. (AP) – Three more conservation groups are suing to restore federal protections to grizzly bears living in and around Yellowstone National Park.

The complaint filed Wednesday by Alliance for the Wild Rockies, Western Watersheds Project and Native Ecosystems Council brings the total number of lawsuits to at least five opposed to the U.S. government’s decision to remove grizzlies from the threatened species list.

Most include similar claims that the 700 Yellowstone bears are still threatened because climate change has made traditional food sources scarce and because of increasing conflicts with humans.

One challenge filed by Native Americans from seven states and Canada says hunting bears goes against their religious and spiritual beliefs.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says the Yellowstone grizzly population has recovered and turned management of the species over to Idaho, Montana and Wyoming.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Charges detail extensive poaching ring in Washington, Oregon

By Gene Johnson – 9/8/17 AP

Seattle — An extensive poaching ring is responsible for slaughtering more than 100 black bears, cougars, bobcats, deer and elk in southwestern Washington state and northwestern Oregon, with many of the animals hunted with dogs and then left to rot, authorities said Friday.

“There was an absolute wanton disregard for our conservations laws,” Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Capt. Jeff Wickersham said.

Seven people — six adults, some of whom have previously been targeted in poaching investigations, and one juvenile — have been charged so far, but investigators plan to recommend charges against more people, he said. Some face upward of 60 counts related to illegal hunting and wasting animals.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

F&G gives advice for handling bats that could be rabid

The Star-News September 7, 2017

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game has issued advice to local residents on how to handle bats.

“News of recent cases of rabid bats in Valley County has left residents nervous about encountering bats inside or outside their homes,” McCall Regional Wildlife Manager Regan Berkley said.

The Central District Heath Department announced last month that two bats infected with rabies were found in homes in McCall and Donnelly.

“It is important that people understand how to best handle a bat that is found in their home, including what precautions to take to prevent exposure to rabies,” Berkley said

If a bat is found, the first thing to determine is whether the bat had direct contact with people or pets.

Bats that have not had contact with humans or pets can be captured and released outsides, she said. Bats that have had high risk contact with humans or pets should be captured and tested for rabies.

Capture a live bat without touching it by using a cardboard box, or other container, with small air holes. Then slide a folder or piece of cardboard over the opening of the box to secure the bat inside. To release it, carry it outside, then step back and remove the folder.

The bat may not immediately fly away until it becomes familiar with its surroundings, Berkley said. The open box can be left outside and retrieved later.

If a bat is suspected or known to have had direct contact with a person or pet, contact F&G or the health department to assess the risk associated with the bat. If the risk is deemed high, the bat should be safely captured and tested for rabies by calling the McCall F&G office at (208) 634-8137.

The bat will be humanely euthanized and transferred to the nearest public health district office for rabies testing, Berkley said.

If the bat is found dead, homeowners can contact the health department at (208) 634-7194 so it can be submitted for testing.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho racing to combat deadly bat fungus

9/5/17 AP

Twin Falls, Idaho — Officials are scrambling to slow a deadly fungal disease that has killed millions of bats before it eventually spreads to Idaho.

The Times-News reports the Idaho Department of Fish and Game is partnering with National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest Service, Idaho Power Co. and Idaho National Laboratory to monitor for the fungus.

The fungus, called white-nose syndrome, kills bats during hibernation, when their energy reserves are critically low.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Power crews rescue osprey on top of power pole

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, September 6th 2017


Idaho Power crews helped rescue a stuck osprey over the Labor Day weekend. (Screen grab via YouTube Bob Scott)

Swan Falls, Idaho (KBOI) — Idaho Power crews don’t get too many calls like this.

Over the Labor Day weekend, two crew members were dispatched to the Swan Falls area for a report of a stuck osprey.

“We weren’t really sure what we were getting ourselves in,” Chad Owens, a line crew foreman for the company told KBOI 2News.

When Owens and lineman Jeremy Torkelson arrived on scene, they quickly realized the bird was in serious trouble.

“The bird was going nowhere,” Owens said.

It’s unclear how long the bird had been stuck in the twine and rope material.

continued w/video:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Birds, wildlife impacted by smoke, but how much isn’t certain

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Sept 7, 2017

Birds and critters can’t heed health agency warnings to take refuge indoors from the pall of wildfire smoke smothering the West.

They’re stuck outside, coping with bad air quality much as they deal with weather extremes throughout the year.

“Wildlife appears to be hunkering down a little more,” said Madonna Luers, Washington Fish and Wildlife Department spokeswoman in Spokane. “Our biologists can’t say for sure whether that’s because of hot weather or a combination of the smoke and heat, but birds have appeared to be less active.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
September 8, 2017
Issue No. 843

Table of Contents

* Eagle Creek Fire Forces Early Release Of Juvenile Fish At Bonneville Hatchery
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439542.aspx

* More Than Half Of Net Pen Atlantic Salmon In San Juans Escaped; Reported Catches At Mouth Of Columbia River
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439541.aspx

* NOAA Fisheries: Ocean Surveys Show Poor Conditions For Columbia Basin Salmon, Could Depress Runs For Years
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439540.aspx

* Study Looks At Juvenile Salmon Mortality By Seabirds, Ties Size Of Columbia River Plume To Predator-Prey Interaction
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439539.aspx

* Study Tracks Pathways Deadly Salmonid Virus IHNV Spreads; Returning Adults Most Frequent Source
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439538.aspx

* Volatile Power Market Could Bring Budget Uncertainties To BPA-Funded Basin Fish And Wildlife Program
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439537.aspx

* Corps Signs Contracts Allowing ODFW To Continue Operating Five Corps Hatcheries
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439536.aspx

* Compact Extends Tribal Commercial Fishing One week; Ocean Coho Fishing Ends Off Oregon
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439535.aspx

* Marine Researchers Launch One Of The Largest Field Studies Of Near-Shore Ocean; 100 Scientists, 13 Institutions
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439534.aspx
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Miami animals take shelter from Irma in county jail

Miami, FL (AP) Sunday, September 10th 2017

Mo the Sloth and Kramer the Emu are as innocent as they come, but they’re doing time in a county jail.

So are plenty of horses, pigs, goats, sheep, tropical birds, alligators, snakes, turtles and a few other species that the sheriff’s office cares for at a farm for abandoned, abused, confiscated or donated animals.

Once the 426 humans who normally occupy cells at the Monroe County Jail were evacuated by bus to lockups in Palm Beach County, there was an opportunity to move 250 animals indoors, rather than leave them exposed to Hurricane Irma’s storm surge, flooding rains and pounding wind.

After all, hurricane preparedness wasn’t just about protecting humans and buildings. All over Florida, from zoos to refuges to shelters, getting animals ready for the storm was a top priority as well.

continued:
———————————

Fish & Game News:

Higline Fire forces F&G to close hunting units in areas 20A, 26

The Star-News September 7, 2017

The Highline Fire burning in the wilderness east of McCall has forced the Idaho Department of Fish and Game to close more than half of the hunting units in areas 20A and 26.

“With hunting season around the corner, Middle Fork B tag elk hunters who planned to hunt in units 20A or 26 are encouraged to consider trading in their tags for a different zone,” McCall Regional Wildlife Manager Regan Berkley said.

Tags may be exchanged at any Fish and Game regional office before the first day of the hunt, which is Sept. 15 for the Middle Fork B tag.

Due to the fire, 55 percent of Unit 20A and 52 percent of Unit 26 are closed, Berkley said.

Forest Service officials do not have an estimate of when the area, or parts of the area, might reopen. Fire officials have expanded a closure area to include both major Big Creek airstrips (Cabin Creek and Soldier Bar) as well as the entire Big Creek trail.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Cow in Texas bears striking resemblance to KISS frontman Gene Simmons

Associated Press Aug 1, 2017


Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Kerrville, Texas (AP) — A newborn calf in Texas has strikingly similar black-and-white facial markings to KISS frontman Gene Simmons, and the rock star likes their shared look.

Simmons’ onstage persona includes face paint, black leather clothing and wild hair. He tweeted his admiration for the calf named Genie, saying, “This is real, folks!!!”

The female calf was born Friday at a ranch near Kerrville, 60 miles (96 kilometers) northwest of San Antonio.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

CowsPhone-a
————————————

Tips & Advice:

Why you should always put a quarter on a frozen cup of water when evacuating your home

By Oscar Contreras Sep 7, 2017 KIVI TV

An emergency which can force you to leave your home can strike when you least expect it and in the haste of evacuating, you don’t often think about the insignificant things you’re leaving behind. Especially when it comes to food left in the refrigerator.

But a trick that’s making the rounds on social media after thousands were forced from their homes after Hurricane Harvey — and the droves more that are being ordered to evacuate in Florida due to Hurricane Irma, might save you from visiting your local pharmacy for ingesting spoiled food.

This trick isn’t only for people being evacuated because of a hurricane, but can also apply to those leaving for vacation for a long period of time, or for those that have been forced from their homes due to some other circumstance.

So how does this trick work?

continued:
———————————–

Seasonal Humor:

BearPopHiker-a
——————————

Sept 3, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 3, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Bear Aware

Bears are looking for food. Keep garbage secured and pet food indoors. Bears “sign” has been reported around the transfer station.
— — —

Yellow Pine Blowdown Update

The logging crew was loading logs from the lower bench (west side of golf course) early in the week. Crew took the weekend off. Report that the golf course was “playable’ except #7.
— — — —

Recycle your old refrigerator

Idaho Power has arranged for free pick-up of old refrigerators. Call 1-800-253-5618 (11:30 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.) and ASK FOR DONNA. She will confirm your request and coordinate for one pick-up day in Yellow Pine. They require: The motor must run, but need not cool down. You must have reasonable access to move it outside. You must sign for permission to take it. If you cannot be home on pick-up day you must put it outside and put a note inside giving ARCA permission to take the unit. Each owner must call. There must be written permission to take the unit. – LI
— — — —

Oil/Gas Furnace Tune-up

Bill from Rocky Mountain Mechanical in Emmett will be coming to Yellow Pine in September (date not set yet) to service furnaces. If you want a furnace tune-up call Office (208) 365-7473. Recommended by Tracey Kennedy of Kennedy Fuel and Feed. If you need to leave a message, she asks that you leave your name, telephone number, address and zip code.
— — — —

VYPA News:

Next meeting on Saturday, Sept 9, 10am at Community Hall.

Sept 2 Fundraiser Breakfast

Thank you to everyone who made the fundraising breakfast a huge success.

Cinda did a beautiful job with the omelets and the hollandaise sauce.

I also want to thank all of the people that came and supported the breakfast. We made $162 that will go to the maintenance and improvement of the Community Hall

Kathleen Hall
Community Hall Chairperson
— — — —

YPFD News:

Thank you to the Yellow Pine Fire Department for providing fire extinguishers and smoke/CO2 detectors for the safety of homeowners in Yellow Pine.

Training is on Sundays starting at 11am at the YP Fire Station and open to the community of Yellow Pine. Check with Jeff or Ann to confirm trainings.

Fire Siren will be tested at noon on the first of each month.
— — — —

Gravel Pit

Valley County Quarry Development

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the proposed Valley County Quarry Development (Valley County Quarry) Project on lands managed by the Cascade Ranger District of the Boise National Forest.

Project Description

Valley County has submitted applications to the Boise National Forest (NF) to obtain the necessary approval for the portion of the project on federally administered lands. The Boise NF is proposing to issue a special use permit to authorize Valley County to use National Forest System lands for the purpose of developing and operating a quarry.

The development of an additional aggregate source is needed to economically support the road maintenance activities on the Stibnite/East Fork South Fork Salmon River (EFSFSR) Road, Johnson Creek Road and other local backcountry roads as determined necessary by the proponent (Valley County). These road surface improvements would reduce sediment delivery to adjacent waterways, provide improved road surface protection, and enhance public safety.

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the proposed action report (PAR) on the Project webpage:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=51422

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. Please make your comments as specific as possible to help us identify and address issues.

Electronic, written, hand-delivered, and facsimile comments concerning this project will be accepted. Comments may be submitted through the Valley County Pit Development Project. To submit comments using the web form, select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s webpage.

Email comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), Adobe (.pdf), and Word (.doc) to: comments-intermtn-boise-cascade@fs.fed.us. Please put “Valley County Pit Development Project” in the subject line of e-mail comments. Comments must have an identifiable name attached or verification of identity will be required. A scanned signature may serve as verification on electronic comments.

Written comments may be submitted to: Boise National Forest, Cascade Ranger District, PO Box 696, Cascade, ID 83638 Attention: Terre Pearson-Ramirez, or by fax at 208-382-7480. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection in the Public Comment Reading Room on the project webpage and will be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act.

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by September 8, 2017.

For further information on the project, please contact Terre Pearson-Ramirez, NEPA Planner, by email at tramirez@fs.fed.us or by phone at 208-382-7457

Scoping Letter:

Click to access 106454_FSPLT3_4048588.pdf


— — — —

September 13-14 Scheduled Power Outage

A message that Idaho Power needs to replace power poles.
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Aug 28) overnight low of 45 degrees, clear sky and smoky this morning, yellow air quality. Clarks nutcrackers flying and calling, also heard a few pine-siskins and a pine squirrel sounding off. Clouds building up before lunch time. The big green logging truck brought a full load of logs up from the lower bench mid-day. Overcast (smoky) and breezy by 130pm. Thicker smoke by late afternoon, warm, calm and mostly cloudy, high 89 degrees. Red sunset, a little less smoke and fewer clouds, can see the color blue in the sky. Pine squirrels chasing and mating in the trees. Some time before daylight we had 2 thunderstorms roll thru about 30 minutes apart, loud thunder, some wind but not much rain.

Tuesday (Aug 29) warm this morning, 57 degrees at 830am, mostly cloudy sky, but can see blue in the cracks, light smoke. No birds around. A bit damp from the predawn thunderstorms, barely enough to settle the dust (0.05″). Light rain showers around 930am (0.01″). The big logging truck brought a load up from the lower bench before lunch time. Extremely low flying airplane at 1224pm. Helicopter flew over at 140pm. Partly cloudy afternoon, hot and muggy, high 97 degrees, but better air quality (could smell pine instead of smoke!) A report of 2 pileated woodpeckers hanging out on Riverside Ave. Quiet evening. Sky clear at dark, thin haze of smoke.

Wednesday (Aug 30) overnight low of 47 degrees, mostly cloudy this morning, slight haze of smoke. Heard one stellar jay and a clarks nutcracker, also several finches calling from the trees. By 945am the sky was mostly clear but the smoke was thicker – yellow air quality. Big logging truck hauled a giant tree up from the lower bench, followed by the small logging truck with a load. Cloudy and really smoky at noon. A female (or juvenile) calliope hummer at the feeder. Better air quality after 2pm, pretty warm out, mostly cloudy and light breezes, high 92 degrees. The smoke seemed to come and go in “waves” today, sometimes it was smoky and sometimes it was less smoky. Quiet evening.

Thursday (Aug 31) overnight low of 47 degrees, appears to be clear this morning above a moderate haze of smoke (close to orange air quality?) Heard a pileated woodpecker whooping and a couple of nutcrackers calling, a few finches tweeting from the trees. Several pine squirrels sounding off, a few chipmunks running around. Did not see or hear the logging crew up on this end today. Dry and hot with afternoon breezes and smoky, high 88 degrees. One or two hummingbirds are still visiting the feeders.

Friday (Sept 1) overnight low of 42 degrees, clear sky and moderate smoke this morning. Clarks nutcrackers and a few pine-siskins calling. Pine squirrel sounding off. Streets are dusty! Dave had to fix a cracked water line at the corner of Pioneer St. and Dave’s Lane today. Hot afternoon, light breezes, high 92 degrees. Quiet evening, seems to be a little less smoke, and red sunset.

Saturday (Sept 2) overnight low of 45 degrees, mostly clear sky with haze of smoke and warming up quickly. Dry and crunchy in the forest. Clarks nutcrackers calling. Light breeze, air quality is better than yesterday morning. Thicker haze by lunch time. Loud dirt bike roaring around the village after noon. Increasing traffic and dust. Cannon shot at 109pm to start the golf tourney (thanks Wally for calling to warn folks.) Clear all day and hot afternoon, high 96 degrees. Quiet late afternoon. About 725pm a white flatbed truck peeled out on Westside Ave. dusting half the neighborhood. Rude dirt bike at 1120pm.

Sunday (Sept 3) overnight low of 45 degrees, clear sky with light haze of smoke (thicker to the south) and dry. A few nutcrackers and a pine squirrel calling. A few airplanes and light traffic. Shots fired in the neighborhood from 2 different directions around 1130am. Golden mantel squirrel and a couple of chipmunks running around. Thicker smoke after lunch time, hot and breezy, high 99 degrees. Dry, hot, dusty, smoky afternoon.
———————————-

Idaho News:

Cecil Andrus honored at Statehouse ceremony

by Scott Logan Wednesday, August 30th 2017 KBOI


Cecil Andrus, the longest serving governor in Idaho history, lies in state in the Capitol Rotunsa Wednesday. Andrus died last week at age 85. (KBOI photo)

story:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Cascade to disband police force, hire sheriff’s office

Council splits 3-1 on plan intended to save money

By Max Silverson for The Star-News August 31, 2017

The Cascade City Council voted 3-1 on Monday to disband the Cascade Police Department and contract police services with the Valley County Sheriff’s Office.

Council members Judy Nissula, Kathy Hull and Debbie Haskins voted in favor of contracting services, with Rachel Huckaby voting against. Mayor Rob Terry is not eligible to vote except when there is a tie.

The vote was held after a public hearing held at The Ashley Inn attended by about 80 people.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

East Lake Fork Road Bridge to close Wednesday

New bridge scheduled to be finished by January

By Max Silverson for The Star-News August 31, 2017

The East Lake Fork Road bridge just east of Lake Fork will close on Wednesday for five months while the bridge is replaced.

The road will be closed through January 2018 while work is done.

During the closure, motorists will be forced to use Elo Road, Paddy Flat Road or Spink Lane to travel between Idaho 55 and Farm to Market Road.

Speed limits on the alternate routes will remain the same as they are now except for a short stretch of Paddy Flat Road, where the speed limit was lowered to 25 miles per hour, Valley County Road Department Superintendent Jeff McFadden said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Retired Oregon deputy drowns in rafting accident on the Payette River

KTVB August 29, 2017

Boise County — An Oregon sheriff’s office is mourning one of their own after a deputy drowned in the Payette River Saturday, just months after retiring from the department.

Greg Senior died in a rafting accident near the Boise County-Valley County line, Boise County officials confirmed Monday.

In a Facebook post about his death, the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office wrote that Senior had celebrated his retirement just five months prior, after 27 years at the sheriff’s office.

… Boise County Chief Deputy Steve Dorau said Senior’s body was found the same day as the rafting accident, but river conditions made it too hazardous to reach his remains. Senior’s body was recovered Monday after the Cascade Dam dropped water levels, he said.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Two people in SW Idaho test positive for West Nile Virus

by KBOI News Staff Friday, September 1st 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — The Southwest District Health Department says two people have confirmed cases of West Nile Virus.

One is a woman in her 50s who lives in Payette County. The other is a man in his 20s who lives in Owyhee County.

The virus is usually spread by being bitten by an infected mosquito.

Health officials say most people who get the virus don’t ever show symptoms, but others may get a fever, headaches, body aches, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, and sometimes swollen lymph glands or a skin rash.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho earns $29.1 million from cabin sites auction

8/28/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — The state has auctioned off 59 residential cabin sites in northern Idaho, bringing in $29.1 million.

A majority of the 59 Priest Lake properties auctioned Aug. 18-19 went to buyers that already owned cabins on the land, the Spokesman-Review reported. The cabin sites were sold at their appraised values which ranged from $313,000 to $707,000.

There was no competitive bidding, which was good for the many cabin owners who thought the appraised values were too high, said George Nethercutt who served as a past chairman of the former Priest Lake State Lessees Association. He was able to successfully bid for and purchase the land underneath his family cabin.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Earthquakes rumbles through southeast Idaho

9/2/17 AP

Soda Springs, Idaho — The U.S. Geological Survey says a moderate magnitude 5.3 earthquake has rumbled through southeast Idaho.

There were no immediate reports of damage or injuries.

The epicenter of the quake was located 11 miles east of Soda Springs, Idaho, and was also felt in Wyoming, and across northern Utah in Logan, Ogden, Salt Lake City, Draper and Provo.

The USGS reported four separate quakes Saturday evening in an area about 63 miles from Pocatello and 130 miles from Salt Lake City.

The largest quake at magnitude 5.3 struck just before 6 p.m. local time. The USGS said a handful of smaller quakes followed for about an hour.

The agency says only slight damage occurs with earthquakes at that level of intensity.

source:
— —

Southeast Idaho rattled by more than four dozen earthquakes; study says more could be coming

No reported injuries or damage

Chris Oswalt Sep 03, 2017 Local News 8

Soda Springs, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The rumbles were constant, spread out by only minutes. Forty-nine earthquakes have rattled southeastern Idaho and Northern Utah in just a matter of hours, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The largest earthquake registered as a magnitude 5.3 about 10 miles east of Soda Springs.

continued w/safety tips:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Search under way for missing Idaho hunters

by Associated Press Sunday, September 3rd 2017

Inkom, Idaho (AP) – A large-scale search was under way to locate two missing hunters who were last seen Saturday near Inkom, Idaho.

The Idaho State Journal reports that family members believe the hunters are in the Inman Canyon area, northeast of Inkom, which is southeast of Pocatello.

The hunters were identified as 50-year-old Lonnie Labbee of Pocatello and 28-year-old Andrew Blomquist of Inkom.

Making the search urgent was that Labbee may be experiencing heart problems and might need medical attention.

An emergency helicopter from Portneuf Medical Center was deployed Saturday night to search for the hunters and it was expected to be back in the air on Sunday morning.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho to receive $2 million to protect water quality

Associated Press, KTVB August 31, 2017

Boise – Federal officials are awarding Idaho about $2 million in grants for 10 projects intended to protect water quality.

The U.S. Environmental Protection announced the awards Thursday to the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality.

The money is aimed at what are called nonpoint source pollutants that aren’t always subject to federal or state regulation.

The federal agency says that includes agricultural runoff, drainage from abandoned mines, unpermitted urban runoff and failing disposal systems.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Otter appoints new justice to Idaho Supreme Court

8/29/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idaho Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter has appointed Twin Falls judge Richard Bevan to the state’s highest court.

Otter announced Tuesday that Bevan — currently the 5th Judicial District’s administrative judge — will replace retiring Idaho Supreme Court Justice Daniel Eismann. Bevan was among four other finalists vying for the open seat.

Eismann will retire at the end of the month.

continued:
———————————–

Fire Season:

Wildfire growing near Deadwood Reservoir

KTVB September 02, 2017


Bearskin Fire, Thursday, August 31. (Photo: Boise National Forest)

A wildfire burning about four miles northeast of Deadwood Reservoir continues to grow in hot, dry weather conditions, Boise National Forest managers reported Saturday afternoon.

The Bearskin Fire has burned 15,278 acres in steep, rough terrain. Slopes are covered with highly flammable lodgepole pine and dead and down trees. The fire is surrounded by old burn scars, which firefighters hope to use to their advantage in suppressing this fire.

An area closure was expanded Friday to include the Deadwood Reservoir area and all campgrounds in the vicinity.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Crews stretched thin, officials warn of increased fire danger in Idaho mountains

KTVB September 03, 2017

Boise – Hot, dry and unstable weather conditions in Idaho and across the West threaten to put more work in front of a wildfire-fighting force that’s already stretched to the limit.

The national preparedness level remains at 5 – its highest level – meaning that national firefighting resources are fully committed.

The Boise National Forest and part of the Payette National Forest are under red flag warnings through Monday night. A red flag warning indicates that conditions are ideal for wildfires to start and spread rapidly.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Fires can affect early season hunts, so plan ahead

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Friday, September 1, 2017 – 10:58 AM MDT

Fire closures and restrictions can limit access for hunters

Idaho’s early hunting seasons often coincide with fire season, and hunters should consider that when planning trips. If they’re traveling to their favorite hunting spots, it’s important to stay informed about current fire conditions, fire restrictions and rehab work on recent or past fires that can affect their hunts.

Fish and Game’s fire page can be a good place to start.

You can get more details about active fires in Idaho, on the InciWeb incident information site.

Here are some other tips for hunters during fire season:

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Ember from fire pit started southwestern Idaho house fire

8/31/17 AP

Star, Idaho — Authorities say embers from a portable fire pit blown by a windstorm ignited a deck and destroyed a home in southwestern Idaho.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Fire burns 200 acres in Boise foothills

KTVB September 03, 2017


Crews were fighting a brush fire Friday night in the Boise foothills. (Photo: Lisa Chavez/KTVB)

BOISE – The fire that burned about 200 acres in the foothills above Hill Road was accidentally started by two children playing in a backyard fort, Boise Fire Department spokeswoman Char Jackson said Saturday.

The fire broke out Friday night in the area around Hill Road and Plano Lane.

Jackson said the children had started a small fire in their fort, and the fire got out of control. Ada County Sheriff’s Office detectives are now handling the investigation.

Firefighters first went to the scene at about 8:30 p.m., and worked in steep terrain.

Jackson said the fire was contained at 3 a.m. Saturday, and that at least one unit would be monitoring the scene overnight.

Boise, Eagle, Middleton, Kuna, Meridian and Star fire departments, as well as Bureau of Land Management and Idaho National Guard, responded to the fire.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

‘Firestorm’ burning more than half a million acres in Montana

Jacob Rodriguez, KUSA September 03, 2017


In southeastern Montana, a wind-driven wildfire ripped through parched forest and grasslands, forcing the evacuation of an undetermined number of ranches and homes, officials said Thursday. (Photo: U.S. Forest Service Photo/InciWeb)

As the country keeps its eyes trained on Houston, another natural disaster is ravaging states far to the north.

With red flag warnings covering 200,000 square miles of Montana, Idaho, Wyoming and the Dakotas saying the danger for new wildfires is imminent, firefighters continue to battle blazes that have burned huge swaths of land.

This summer has been particularly dry and windy for our northern neighbors and a lack of moisture and unfortunate weather has led to hundreds of wildfires burning across Montana, Idaho and northern California.

Rainfall at this point hasn’t been much help; lightning strikes on Wednesday sparked at least 40 more in a state already on fire, according to the Great Falls Tribune. High winds are pushing the fires and helping them spread.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Oregon wildfires have cost taxpayers more than $100 million

8/28/17 AP

… Nearly a dozen large wildfires are burning in Oregon this summer, a fire season marked by extremely hot and dry weather.

The large fires in Oregon have cost the state and federal agencies a combined $100 million to fight so far, Northwest Interagency Coordination Center spokesman Brian Ballou said.

Taxpayer money covers the costs of fighting wildfires, with the funds coming from local, state and federal coffers. Which agency pays the bill depends on which agency oversees the burned lands. The Forest Service manages national forests, home to the bulk of the fires burning this year in Oregon, and the state Department of Forestry protects state-owned forests, private timberland and federal Bureau of Land Management land west of the Cascades.

full story:
— — —

Fire in southwest Oregon grows to 143,000 acres

Statesman Journal, KGW September 03, 2017

As fire teams make progress in protecting this coastal town from Oregon’s largest wildfire, focus has shifted to the inland side of the fire and the communities of the Illinois Valley.

The Chetco Bar Fire, burning in southwest Oregon, continued a slow and gradual growth to 142,857 acres Saturday.

So far, the fire has been primarily the concern of Brookings, a town of 6,500 on the southern Oregon Coast.

continued:
— — —

All hikers safe after being trapped by Eagle Creek Fire

Associated Press, KGW September 03, 2017

Hood River, Ore. — All of the 153 hikers forced to spend the night in the mountains east of Portland, Oregon, after wildfires trapped them have made it down the trail to safety.

The Hood River County Sheriff’s Office said Sunday that the final group has left the Wahtum Lake area at the bottom of the trail and were headed by bus to meet with their friends and family.

Deputy Joel Ives says all of the hikers were accounted for. Ives says one hiker was taken out by ambulance for exhaustion and dehydration.

The U.S. Forest Service says the wildfire was human-caused, potentially from the misuse of fireworks.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Headaches and raspy voices as wildfire smoke chokes US West

By Keith Ridler – 9/2/17 AP

The smoke from massive wildfires hangs like fog over large parts of the U.S. West, an irritating haze causing health concerns, forcing sports teams to change schedules and disrupting life from Seattle to tiny Seeley Lake, Montana.

Air quality has been rated unhealthy across the region because of blazes that show no signs of abating. Officials said Friday that one of the worst U.S. wildfire seasons in terms of land burned is likely to keep scorching Western states and blanketing them with smoke until later this fall.

continued:
———————————-

Public Lands:

Bull Trout Campground Closed For the Season

Contact: Venetia Gempler (208) 373-4105

Boise, Idaho, September 1, 2017 — The Boise National Forest, Lowman Ranger District has made the decision to close Bull Trout Campground and surrounding dispersed recreation areas and their access roads along the NFS Road 520 (Bull Trout Lake Road) due to bear and human encounters. A black bear, displaying signs of being habituated to humans and their food, was found in dispersed sites immediately adjacent to the campground. The Bull Trout Lake Campground will remain closed for the remainder of the 2017 season, but the dispersed sites in the area will reopen by September 14th if the bear has been removed.

Bears possess an extremely keen sense of smell, and can find food from great distances. Once a bear finds food near humans, it is likely to come back. Bears associating food with humans often results in a dangerous situation for both the bear and for people.

The Boise National Forest is reminding visitors to be extra vigilant this summer and fall when storing and disposing of their food and toiletry products to avoid attracting black bears. Forest visitors can visit the website http://www.bebearaware.org for more information and tips and techniques to keep both recreationists and the bear’s safe and out of danger. If you have questions regarding the closure please contact Michael Feiger, Acting Lowman District Ranger or Mathue Fasching at 208-259-3361.

Campers at Bull Trout Lake Campgrounds that made their reservations online should contact https://www.recreation.gov/ or call Toll Free 1-877-444-6777. Campers who paid cash on-site need to contact the Lowman Ranger Station Recreation staff for camping vouchers (208-259-3361).

For current closure information: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Logging to Occur Along the Bear Basin – Old Brundage Mountain Road and the Brundage Mountain Cutoff Road

Date: August 28, 2017
Contact: June Galloway, Forest Service (208) 634-0700

McCall, ID – Logging operations as a part of the Brundage Wildland Urban Interface/Bear Basin Restoration Project will begin this week, and end towards the end of October.

Activity will first occur east of Forest Road 451 (Bear Basin – Old Brundage Mountain Road). Logging operations will then move to a unit south of Forest Road 452 (Brundage Cutoff Road) – this activity will impact the recreational trails in the Rising Sun area. When that occurs, the Rising Sun Area will be closed and posted at the trailheads instructing people to stay out of that area. Logging operations and log hauling will not be conducted on weekends, nor on holidays.

“Evergreen Forest Products in Tamarack has been awarded this stewardship contract,” said Lisa Klinger, McCall District Ranger. “It is great that forest restorations projects such as this help to provide economic stability to our local towns, as we proactively restore Bear Basin and Brundage Mountain to a more sustainable condition for forest users. It is a win-win for everyone.”

The Brundage Wildland Urban Interface/Bear Basin Restoration Project decision was signed in 2012. The project was designed to treat tree stands around private property at Brundage Mountain Resort and throughout the interface to reduce the potential for uncharacteristic wildfire, and modify fuel conditions so that in the event of wildfire, effective suppression actions are more likely to be successful. The project will improve defensible space and move vegetation and watershed conditions towards a more desirable state. This includes promoting large tree structure, restoring riparian ecosystems and improving water quality. Some of this restoration work has already been accomplished through road decommissioning completed in 2013. Prescribed burning and mechanical fuels treatments will follow in the future to again further the enhancement of defensible space. The overall project area on both the New Meadows and the McCall Ranger Districts is 5,100 acres.

On Tuesday afternoon, August 29th, there will be Magnesium Chloride applied to first 3/4 of a mile on the Bear Basin road beginning at the Forest boundary near highway 55. This is a requirement of the contract to prevent excessive dust due to hauling operations. There will be a road grader and a water truck operating on the road and the surface will initially be a little messy until it dries. Wet Magnesium Chloride can be a concern to vehicles as it can promote rust.

For more information of this project, please visit this webpage: http://www.fs.usda.gov/goto/Brundage_BearBasin

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Trail Work – Frank Church Wilderness

Payette NF Krassel RD
(via FB Aug 28)

Some great trail work has been done in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, Krassel Ranger District of the Payette National Forest.

See below for trails and miles completed so far this season.

photo gallery:

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Heart of Gold Minerals Project Decision Memo is Now Available

USDA Forest Service 8/29/2017

The Decision Memo for the Heart of Gold Mineral Exploration Project on the Idaho City Ranger District is now available on the project web page: https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49260. The Decision Memo documents Ranger Petersen’s decision to implement the Heart of Gold Mineral Exploration Project.

Ranger Petersen determined that this action falls within categorical exclusion 36 CFR 220.6(e)(3). The Heart of Gold Mineral Exploration Project was reviewed in accordance with the categorical exclusion guidelines at FSH 1909.15(30), as updated on May 28, 2014. Following review of the resource conditions identified at 36 CFR 220.6(b), Ranger Petersen determined that no extraordinary circumstances exist. In addition, the Interdisciplinary Team’s analysis did not identify any other unusual circumstances or uncertainties about environmental effects associated with the action that would preclude use of a categorical exclusion.

On January 17, 2014, President Obama signed into law the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014 (Pub. L. No. 113-76). Section 431 of that Act directs that the 1992 and 2012 legislation establishing the 36 CFR 215 (post-decisional appeals) and 36 CFR 218 (pre-decisional objections) processes “shall not apply to any project or activity implementing a land and resource management plan … that is categorically excluded ….under the National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA].” On February 7, 2014, the President signed into law the Agricultural Act of 2014 (Farm Bill) (Pub. L. No. 113-79). Section 8006 of the 2014 Farm Bill repealed the Appeals Reform Act (ARA) (Pub. L. No. 102-381). The ARA’s implementing regulation was 36 CFR 215. The 2014 Farm Bill also directs that the pre-decisional objection process established in the Consolidated Appropriation Act of 2012 shall not be applicable to categorically excluded projects or activities. As a result of these two statutes, the Forest Service no longer offers notice, comment and appeal opportunities pursuant to 36 CFR 215 for categorically excluded projects.

The decision may be implemented five business days from the decision date, after finalization of the signed Plan of Operations, and the posting of a bond by the operator. Implementation is expected to begin in late summer 2017 and all ground disturbing activities will be completed within one year.

For additional information about this project, please contact Melissa Swain, Project Leader, by phone at 208-392-6681 or by email at mbswain@fs.fed.us.

Sincerely,
Melissa Yenko
Forest Environmental Coordinator
Boise National Forest
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Forest sells 11 salvage timber sales prompting area closure for public safety

Boise National Forest News Release Aug 30, 2017

Boise, Idaho, August, 30, 2017—Eleven recent salvage timber sales in the South Pioneer Fire Recovery project prompted forest officials to close the area for public safety through December 2018. The salvage timber units were sold to four local timber companies supplying area mills in Idaho and eastern Oregon. Contractors are actively working the sales and plan to work through the winter as weather permits. Some of the sales will not be finished until 2018.

The total salvage timber area is about 10,000 acres within the 49,000 acre closure. The larger closure area was designed to include all areas of active logging and most of the associated road corridors needed to transport the timber from the sale areas. As logging is complete, the closure area and ending date are expected to be reduced over time.

The closure affects about 49,000 acres of the 1.9 million acres in hunting units 33 and 39 causing hunters to make alternate plans for their fall hunts. “It’s a tough spot for us and hunters,” said Brant Petersen, Idaho City District Ranger. “This work is being done to reduce the risk of hazard trees falling in an area heavily used by recreationist and hunters. To do that safely and minimize the risk to employees, contractors and visitors, we have to close the area.”

After any burn there is a higher degree of hazards that may last over many years. Snags or dead trees continue to fall and washouts or debris flows may occur after heavy rains. Visitors should stay alert within any fire area and drive cautiously. While recovery and restoration work continues, visitors may encounter heavy equipment and logging trucks on National Forest System roads.

Besides boosting local economies, revenue generated from salvage sales will fund future activities such as continued hazard tree reduction along road corridors, road maintenance and reforestation. Industry will recover 45 Million Board Feed (MMBF) of merchantable timber. Fore more information on salvage operations visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/boise/home/?cid=fseprd530485

To view all forest closures visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

US interior secretary urges mining ban near Yellowstone

By Matthew Brown- 8/28/17 AP

Billings, Mont. — U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke wants to speed up a proposal to block new gold mining claims on forested public lands in Montana near Yellowstone National Park and will also consider blocking other types of mining, agency officials said Monday.

Federal officials are undergoing a two-year review of mining on more than 30,000 acres among the towering peaks of the Absaroka mountains just north of the park.

The review was launched last year by Zinke’s predecessor, former Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, in response to local concerns that two proposed gold mines could profoundly alter the character of a region heavily dependent on hikers, hunters and tourists.

Interior spokeswoman Heather Swift said Monday that Zinke wants to move forward as quickly as possible with a proposed 20-year withdrawal of future mining claims in the area north of the park, known as Paradise Valley. The review of that withdrawal was scheduled to be completed by the U.S. Forest Service and Interior’s Bureau of Land Management by November, 2018.

continued:
————————————-

Critter News:

Bat found in Eagle tests positive for rabies

by KBOI News Staff Tuesday, August 29th 2017

Eagle, Idaho (KBOI) — A bat found in the Eagle area has tested positive for rabies.

The Central District Health Department says the rabid bat, the first reported in Ada County this year, was brought inside a home by a family cat. The homeowner did not come in contact with the bat, officials say.

“We have seen a recent uptick in calls and concerns from the public related to exposure to bats,” said Sarah Correll, epidemiologist with Central District Health. “It’s important that parents talk to their kids about not touching wild animals. Also, people should have their pets vaccinated to protect them in case they interact with a rabid bat or other wild animal.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Happy ending after week-long hunt for dog missing after Idaho 55 crash

Katy Moeller Idaho Statesman Sept 2, 2017

About a week ago, Nicole Cantrill got a heart-stopping phone message from her mother.

“She said, ‘I totaled my car, Ziva is missing and I’m in the Saint Al’s ER,’” Cantrill recalled Friday.

Her 65-year-old mom, Patricia Robertson, was in a rollover crash on Idaho Highway 55 north of Horseshoe Bend on Aug. 25. Robertson doesn’t remember what led up to the crash, which left her with a broken rib, bruises and cuts.

Her dog, Ziva, who was likely disoriented and scared by the crash, disappeared into the Boise County wilderness.

Six days after Cantrill posted a plea for help in finding Ziva on her Facebook page — which was shared more than 1,300 times — a Garden Valley woman named Jillian Sanford and her scent dog, Tango, tracked down the missing dog.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Pet talk – What is a spay?

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Sept 1, 2017 IME

A “spay” is the elective sterilization of a female dog. It is done primarily to prevent the dog from going into heat, or estrus, which is the period of time when the female dog is susceptible to becoming pregnant. When a dog is spayed, its ovaries and uterus are removed surgically under general anesthesia. Sterilization also prevents or dramatically reduces the incidence of breast cancer in dogs. The removal of the ovaries and uterus is technically called an ovaria-hysterectomy, or OVH.

Before performing the surgery, it’s important to conduct an appropriate preoperative evaluation that includes a physical exam and blood tests to make sure kidney and liver function are normal. These comprehensive blood tests are especially important in older dogs to detect any problems that may present a risk for anesthesia and surgery.

The conventional manner of performing a sterilization procedure requires an incision into the abdomen that is large enough to extract the ovaries and uterus and suture the respective arteries and veins to prevent any bleeding.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Sherman Pack wolf killed after fifth cattle attack in Ferry County

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Sept 1, 2017


Washington officials confirmed a minimum of 20 gray wolf packs in the state at the end of 2016. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife)

The first wolf from the Sherman Pack was shot today in an effort to stop wolf attacks on cattle in Ferry County, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife reports.

The Sherman Pack was associated with a confirmed cattle kill on Monday. It was the fifth cattle depredation associated to the pack this year. The depredation occurred within the Colville National Forest, in the same vicinity as the previous four depredations. The area is being patrolled by range riders.

The department director, on Aug. 25, authorized incremental lethal control of the pack in accordance with established protocols after nonlethal prevention techniques failed.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Last week of August 2017
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Business leaders want Mexican wolves in Grand Canyon area

8/29/17 AP

Flagstaff, Ariz. — More than 60 business leaders have urged the federal government to release endangered Mexican gray wolves into the Grand Canyon area in northern Arizona and eastern Utah.

The business leaders are submitting their request in a joint letter to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

The federal agency is seeking public comments on its draft plan that limits the wolf-recovery efforts to just one zone south of Interstate 40 in Arizona and New Mexico.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Education International

Last week of August 2017

Some wolves may have become ‘habituated’ to eating cattle

Livestock Producers Remain Helpless Against Gray Wolves

Wolves and sheep don’t mix

Economic Aspects Of Large Carnivore-Livestock Conflicts In Romania

Lethal wolf take lands ODFW in hot water with both sides
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wildlife groups say Yellowstone bears still need protections

AP Aug 30, 2017

Billings, Mont. (AP) – Wildlife advocates and a Montana Indian tribe are asking a U.S. court to restore protections for grizzly bears in and around Yellowstone National Park so that trophy hunting of the fearsome animals would not be allowed.

The Northern Cheyenne Tribe, Humane Society and several conservation groups filed three lawsuits Tuesday and Wednesday in Montana challenging the government’s recent move to lift protections.

Idaho, Montana and Wyoming are planning limited public hunting of the region’s roughly 700 bears, although no hunts are expected this year.

Critics say there’s already too much pressure on the bear population as climate change impacts what the animals eat and conflicts with humans result in dozens being killed every year.

A separate challenge of the government’s decision was filed in July by Native Americans from seven states and Canada.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho officials decline to ban toxic landscaping shrub

By Chadd Cripe – 8/29/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — The toxic landscaping plant blamed for more than 100 wildlife deaths in the past two winters in Idaho will remain a legal option for homeowners.

The Idaho State Department of Agriculture on Monday completed its negotiated-rulemaking process for a proposed rule banning certain species of yew plants as noxious weeds. The department declined to create a rule for the Legislature to review.

County weed superintendents expressed concern about the costs of enforcing a new rule.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho posts 2017 big-game hunting season outlook

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Sept 1, 2017


Bull elk are counted by an Idaho Fish and Game Department aerial survey. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game)

Idaho’s 2017 big game hunting seasons outlook calls for similar numbers of elk and whitetails — and that’s good news.

However, hunters can expect fewer mule deer in areas hit hard by winter.

Here’s the full report posted by Idaho Fish and Game information specialist Roger Phillips.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Someone’s randomly shooting and killing cows in eastern Idaho

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, August 30th 2017

Swan Valley, Idaho (KBOI) — Multiple cows have been shot dead in the Swan Valley area in eastern Idaho.

The Bonneville County Sheriff’s Office says eight cows appear to have been “shot randomly” in the Fall Creek and June Creek area Aug. 26-27. More cows may be dead, the sheriff’s office said.

Anyone with information about the killings is asked to call 208-529-1200.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Hummingbirds tough to identify when juveniles aloft

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Aug 31, 2017


As bird migrations are getting underway, Cortney Litwin found this hummingbird in a garden at Arbor Crest while attending the art show on Sunday. Although a few birders say it could be a female Anna’s hummingbird, others say it’s more likely a juvenile or adult female black-chinned hummer, a common species in Spokane County. (Cortney Litwin)

When a Reader Outdoor Photo Gallery image posted this week raised a question of species identification, I solicited the expertise of “private eyes” in the regional birding community.

The sweet photo above was snapped Sunday at Arbor Crest Winery by Courtney Litwin, but neither of us could make a confident identification. Turns out that a lot of experienced birders had some doubts, too.

The problem in late summer stems from all the juvenile birds of the year that don’t have a full compliment of feathers and colors to aid in identification and sexing.

A few birders thought the hummer above might be an Anna’s. A higher number of birders thought it could be a Calliope. But the majority of birders responding say the bird is a black-chinned hummingbird, most likely an adult female but possibly a juvenile.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Eurasian collared-dove fair game year-round for hunters

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Aug 30, 2017


Eurasian collared-dove. (Terry Gray)

The 2017 mourning dove hunting seasons open in Idaho and Eastern Washington on Friday, but hunters can warm up on a similar bird with the blessings of wildlife biologists.

The Eurasian collared-dove is a fast-spreading exotic species that’s unprotected in Washington and Idaho and can be shot by licensed hunters year-round where hunting/shooting is allowed. They’re delicious, too.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

The Columbia Basin Bulletin:

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
September 1, 2017
Issue No. 842

Table of Contents

* Intent To Sue Filed Over Fish Farm Escape; Washington Sets Up Incident Command Structure To Contain, Recover
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439510.aspx

* Record Low Steelhead Run Spurs Closures, Reduced Bag Limits; So Far, Return Only 30 Percent Of Average
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439509.aspx

* Fish Managers: Low Steelhead Returns This Year Likely Result Of 2015 Juvenile Fish Hitting Warm Ocean Water, Less Food
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439508.aspx

* Idaho Study Looks At Possible Impact Of Warmer Waters On Energy Needs For Juvenile Wild Steelhead
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439507.aspx

* As Hot Weather Continues, Lower Granite Tailwater Temperatures Still Holding Under 68 Degrees
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439506.aspx

* Council Presentation: Toxic Pollutants Threaten Fish Health, Distribution, Abundance In Columbia River Basin
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439504.aspx

* Research Finds Anti-Depressants In Brains Of 10 Fish Species In Niagara River; Wastewater Plants Fail To Keep Pace
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439503.aspx

* WDFW Plans Lethal Action To Address Predation By Wolf Pack In Ferry County
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439502.aspx

* Study Updates Impact Of Fukushima Radioactive Release On North Pacific Marine Species
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439501.aspx
——————————-

Fish & Game News:

Unit 20A Access Difficult this Fall

By Evin Oneale, Regional Conservation Educator
Tuesday, August 29, 2017 – 2:05 PM MDT

Planning to hunt unit 20A this fall? Several normal access points are currently closed.

The Stoddard Pack Bridge was lost in a March rock slide. This bridge crossed the Salmon River at the northeast corner of unit 20A on the Salmon River Road. Identified for national emergency funding, the bridge will be replaced by the Salmon-Challis National Forest, but not for at least two years.

Several slides this spring damaged the Elk Creek Road (AKA Elk Summit Road) between Warren Summit and the South Fork Salmon River northeast of McCall. The road will be closed between Sawmill Point and the South Fork Salmon River most of September and October as the Valley County Road department conducts repairs. More details on this closure are available at: http://www.co.valley.id.us/departments/road-bridge/road-reports/

Chamberlain Basin airstrip is currently closed due to the Highline Fire. Hunters can stay up to date on this closure by checking the InciWeb fire information site at: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5387/

You may be asking yourself just what access remains for unit 20A? Elk Creek Road remains accessible from Big Creek to the South Fork Salmon River. Hunters can also access Unit 20A by traveling forest roads from Dixie to either Mackay Bar or Whitewater Ranch, and then use foot bridges to cross the Salmon River. Be aware of land ownership, as there are private ranches in both areas.

If these access limitations prove to be overwhelming obstacles for some hunters, hunt tags may be exchanged for $3.75 at any Fish and Game office prior to the first day of the hunt.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Recent cases of rabid bats mean people should take precautions

By Rita Dixon, Wildlife Natural Resource Program Coordinator
Thursday, August 31, 2017 – 6:25 PM MDT

Understanding the basics of bats and rabies helps people know how to deal with bat encounters

News of recent cases of rabid bats in various parts of Idaho have left residents nervous about encountering bats inside or outside their homes. It is important that people understand how to best handle a bat that is found in their home, including what precautions to take to prevent exposure to rabies.

Improving rabies awareness and preventing human exposure to rabid bats is a public health priority. At the same time, conservation of bats and the benefits they provide is increasingly important due to declining populations of many bat species.

If a bat is found, the first thing to determine is whether the bat had direct contact with people or pets. Bats that have not had contact with humans or pets can be captured and released outside.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Mountain goat counts slated for early September

The Star-News August 31, 2017

Idaho Fish and Game biologists will conduct a helicopter survey in early September to count mountain goats near Yellow Pine, a news release said.

The mountain goat surveys will focus on an area north of the East Fork of the South Fork Salmon River Road between Monumental Creek and the South Fork of the Salmon River.

The surveys will encompass portions of hunt units 25, 26 and 20A. Because mountain goat surveys are conducted primarily in alpine habitats, minimal disturbance to archery elk and deer hunters is expected. Biologists will try to avoid flying near any hunters they observe.

For questions, call the Fish and Game McCall office at (208) 634-8137.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Grouse hunters asked to place wings to F&G barrels

The Star-News August 31, 2017

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is asking grouse hunters to donate forest grouse wings in wing barrels located in the West Mountain area this fall.

The department uses grouse wings to determine a birds’ age and sex, allowing biologists to track population trends over time, a news release said

Barrels in Valley County will be located on No Business Road, Poison Creek Road, Anderson Creek Road, and Snowbank Mountain Road.

Hunters are asked to detach and deposit the right wing from each of ruffed, spruce, or blue grouse into the slot on top of the barrel. Instructions are on the barrel.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Officers stop deer on California bridge for ‘toll evasion’

by The Associated Press Tuesday, August 29th 2017

This photo provided by the California Highway Patrol shows a doe, caught in the headlights of a CHP cruiser on the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge early Tuesday morning, Aug. 29, 2017. Officers joked on a Twitter post they tried to stop the deer on the bridge “for toll evasion,” and that she usually pays the toll but “today she was a buck short.” After staring at them for a couple of minutes, long enough for the officers to snap a photograph, the deer went back into the woods on Treasure Island. (Officer Sean Deise/California Highway Patrol via AP)

Source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

DeerSafety-a
—————————————-

Seasonal Humor:

BearSandwiches-a
—————————————-

Aug 27, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Aug 27, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Firewood at Shooting Range

The firewood at the shooting range near Yellow Pine is NOT free (the pile is much smaller this weekend.) You need a valid permit and tag the wood. Firewood permits are available at The Corner, please bring cash and a driver’s license.

There are some “free use areas” over in Big Creek. Free permits and special tags can be obtained at the McCall District office.
— — — —

Bear Aware

Reports of bear scat along Johnson Creek road near the village. Also a report of bear “sign” at the transfer station recently.
— — — —

Recycle your old refrigerator

Idaho Power has arranged for free pick-up of old refrigerators. Call 1-800-253-5618 (11:30 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.) and ASK FOR DONNA. She will confirm your request and coordinate for one pick-up day in Yellow Pine. They require: The motor must run, but need not cool down. You must have reasonable access to move it outside. You must sign for permission to take it. If you cannot be home on pick-up day you must put it outside and put a note inside giving ARCA permission to take the unit. Each owner must call. There must be written permission to take the unit. – LI
— — — —

Oil Furnace Tune-up

Bill from Rocky Mountain Mechanical will be coming to Yellow Pine in September to service oil an furnace. If you want a furnace tune-up call Office (208) 365-7473. Rocky Mountain Mechanical, 3328 W Idaho Blvd, Emmett, ID 83617. Recommended by Tracey Kennedy of Kennedy Fuel and Feed.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Blowdown Update

The logging crew has been working this week in various places on the golf course. Early in the week they loaded a big truckload over in the hole #13 area. On Wednesday they were along Westside Ave. Thursday they brought out a large load of logs from the lower bench.

P1000320-20170823Loggers
— — — —

Tire lost on the EFSF road

On the way back from the harmonica festival, we lost a tire/wheel from our trailer. It’s an aluminum wheel, with a tire mounted. We would sure love to get it back if anyone traveling the road happens to come across it. Not sure when it came off because of the ungodly amount of dust, but it was between YP, and the South Fork Road.

Dave May via YP Facebook
— — — —

VYPA News:

Next meeting on Saturday, Sept 9, 10am at Community Hall.
— — — —

YPFD News:

Thank you to the Yellow Pine Fire Department for providing fire extinguishers and smoke/CO2 detectors for the safety of homeowners in Yellow Pine.

Next meeting will be on the 26th of August, 2:00 at the Comm Hall. Discussing the 2018-19 Budget.

Training is on Sundays starting at 11am at the YP Fire Station and open to the community of Yellow Pine. Check with Jeff F. or Ann F. to confirm trainings.

Fire Siren will be tested at noon on the first of each month.
— — — —

Gravel Pit

Valley County Quarry Development

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the proposed Valley County Quarry Development (Valley County Quarry) Project on lands managed by the Cascade Ranger District of the Boise National Forest.

Project Description

Valley County has submitted applications to the Boise National Forest (NF) to obtain the necessary approval for the portion of the project on federally administered lands. The Boise NF is proposing to issue a special use permit to authorize Valley County to use National Forest System lands for the purpose of developing and operating a quarry.

The development of an additional aggregate source is needed to economically support the road maintenance activities on the Stibnite/East Fork South Fork Salmon River (EFSFSR) Road, Johnson Creek Road and other local backcountry roads as determined necessary by the proponent (Valley County). These road surface improvements would reduce sediment delivery to adjacent waterways, provide improved road surface protection, and enhance public safety.

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the proposed action report (PAR) on the Project webpage:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=51422

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. Please make your comments as specific as possible to help us identify and address issues.

Electronic, written, hand-delivered, and facsimile comments concerning this project will be accepted. Comments may be submitted through the Valley County Pit Development Project. To submit comments using the web form, select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s webpage.

Email comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), Adobe (.pdf), and Word (.doc) to: comments-intermtn-boise-cascade@fs.fed.us. Please put “Valley County Pit Development Project” in the subject line of e-mail comments. Comments must have an identifiable name attached or verification of identity will be required. A scanned signature may serve as verification on electronic comments.

Written comments may be submitted to: Boise National Forest, Cascade Ranger District, PO Box 696, Cascade, ID 83638 Attention: Terre Pearson-Ramirez, or by fax at 208-382-7480. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection in the Public Comment Reading Room on the project webpage and will be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act.

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by September 8, 2017.

For further information on the project, please contact Terre Pearson-Ramirez, NEPA Planner, by email at tramirez@fs.fed.us or by phone at 208-382-7457

Scoping Letter:
— — — —

Labor Day Weekend

Sept 2 Festival Fundraiser Breakfast 8am to 1030am

Start your day right! Join us at the Festival Fundraiser Breakfast; Saturday, September 2nd at the Community Hall in Yellow Pine. Breakfast is only $5. All proceeds support the Yellow Pine Festival and the Community Hall. Everyone is welcome! Sponsored by Project Filter.
— —

Sept 2 Welch Memorial Golf Tourney 2017

Saturday September 2 at 1pm – Yellow Pine Country Club
— — — —

September 13-14 Scheduled Power Outage

A message that Idaho Power needs to replace power poles.
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Aug 21) overnight low of 43 degrees, almost clear this morning with a light haze of smoke. Sounds busy in the village with increased traffic, heavy equipment, weed-whacker, chainsaws in the forest and airplanes flying over. A few young finches at the feeder and a pileated woodpecker calling. The doe with twin fawns and the other doe were trotting thru the golf course together towards the river at 1030am, and clarks nutcrackers calling. At 11am the light is dimmer and the village quiet. At 1115am the temperature dropped nearly 1 degree (from 62F to 61.2F) and the sunlight is much dimmer. At 1125am the temperature had dropped almost 3 degrees, much dimmer outside and a bit of a red hue (had to turn on a light in the house.) At 1135 am the temperature had dropped 4 full degrees to 58F. The chickens are still out pecking around and a few birds are flying over. At 1145am the temperature had dropped 5 degrees (56.9F) even though it is getting brighter out. At 1153am the temperature was up nearly half a degree. At 12pm it was brighter and temperature up to 58.7 degrees. At 1215pm it was 63.5 degrees and almost normal light. It never got totally dark here, more like evening twilight. Clear sunny day, high of 88 degrees. Quiet afternoon and evening. Less smoke by sundown.

Tuesday (Aug 22) overnight low of 42 degrees, clear sky this morning, light breeze and moderate haze of smoke tinting the sunlight red. Some airplane traffic this morning. Did not hear any birds, saw only one chipmunk. Logging crew loaded their big truck out by hole #13, then moved equipment towards school street. Hot smoky afternoon, dusty at times, high of 91 degrees. A few young finches and a couple of clarks nutcrackers visited. Setting sun cast red light thru the smoke, quiet evening.

Wednesday (Aug 23) overnight low of 45 degrees, red light cast by the rising sun, sky appears to be mostly clear, moderate smoke and yellow air quality. Heard a few finches, a flicker calling and a pine squirrel sounding off. Warm day, light breezes, increasing clouds early afternoon and the smoke is rather thick, high of 89 degrees. Logging crew working along Westside Ave north of the School. Quiet later in the afternoon, cloudy, smoky and almost calm. Warm and somewhat muggy evening, overcast and almost calm. Smoke is slightly thinner. Gusty breezes after 915pm and a short little shower before midight (not enough to settle the dust.)

Thursday (Aug 24) overnight low of 48 degrees, dark overcast and light haze of smoke this morning. Heard a clarks nutcracker and a pine squirrel scolding. Light shower of rain 930am for about 30 minutes (0.04”). Logging crew is working on the lower bench on the north west side of the golf course this morning, later they brought out a large load of logs on the bigger truck. Helicopter flew over at 1131am. The rain didn’t get rid of the smoke, yellow air quality at lunch time. Light afernoon breezes, probably partly cloudy (hard to see the sky thru the smoke), high of 84 degrees. Late afternoon the logging crew was working west of the #14 un-Fairway. Thinner smoke by evening and partly cloudy.

Friday (Aug 25) overnight low of 44 degrees, clear sky with light haze of smoke (yellow air quality) the metal roofs were wet with dew. Clarks nutcrackers calling from the trees. Loggers moving equipment and sawing early this morning. Smoky dry day, increasing clouds, and light breezes, high of 87 degrees. Quiet afternoon, thinner clouds. Ospry juveniles still hanging around the nest, flying quite well, they dropped a fish on the road though. Some guys were shooting in the Old East Fork campgrounds this evening. Less smoke and lots of stars out after 10pm.

Saturday (Aug 26) overnight low of 44 degrees, clear sky with moderate haze of smoke (yellow air quality) and light dew. Clarks nutcrackers calling, pine squirrel chittering. Shooting around 930am in the EF campground. Hazy warm day, yellow air quality, light afternoon breezes, high of 90 degrees. Not as many chipmunks around, but still more than usual. The logging crew has stacked several log decks ready to haul. A large landing area for Life Flight has been cleared west of the crossroads. There is new asphalt on either side of the EFSF cement bridge, but the approaches are rather rough. The dust abatement is holding up well. Some of the goosberry bushes are turning red/brown, and seeing some yellows starting in the forest. Its really dry and crunchy. Spied a red-breasted nuthatch creeping down the truck of a tree. The juvenlie osprey are still hanging around the nest. Fat sliver of an orange moon setting just after dark. Clear but enough of a haze that only the brightest stars were visible.

Sunday (Aug 27) overnight low of 43 egrees, clear sky with moderate haze of smoke (yellow air quality.) Several clarks nutcrackers flying around the neighborhood and calling, robin perched on the power line, flicker flew over squeeking as it flapped. Dry and dusty, warming up fast after a cool morning. Hot dry, dusty smoky day, high of 95 degrees. Quiet evening, but still pretty warm. Seems the smoke was thinner just before sundown.
—————————–

Eclipse Humor:

(from Facebook)
SolarEllips

(from Twitter)
“During the eclipse, DO NOT look right at the sun. Make yourself look big, make noise, and back away slowly. Don’t provoke a solar attack.”
—————————-

Eclipse News:

Crowds who gathered in Cascade wowed by total solar eclipse

Aug 21, 2017 KIVI TV

The small town of Cascade was one of the towns in the path of totality, and it saw a serious influx of crowds for Monday’s total solar eclipse.

Visitors from all around the country, and the even the world, descended on the small Idaho town for a chance to see the rare celestial event.

Some of those who traveled a long distance had been planning their trips for years.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Experience the eclipse totality in the Idaho mountains

Brian Holmes and Xanti Alcelay, KTVB August 23, 2017

Cascade, Idaho — The next total solar eclipse that will cross the United States from coast to coast won’t happen until 2045.

So if you didn’t get a chance to experience it in totality Monday, you have a bit of a wait ahead of you.

Even if you did, you can see it again in virtual reality.

KTVB’s Brian Holmes and Xanti Alcelay traveled up to Valley County Monday with our 360 camera to see how the thousands of people who came to Cascade saw the celestial show.

source w/video:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Nampa man falls victim to “eclipse over-hype” losing $20,000 on weekend event for small crowd

Karen Lehr Aug 22, 2017 KIVI TV

Cascade – The Great American Eclipse has come and gone, but one Nampa man is still paying the price.

Falling victim to “eclipse over-hype”, Jeff Webb spent more than $20,000 to put on a weekend music festival in Cascade, compete with campsites, live music and food for thousands.

“It got hyped up and it hurt, so I lost over 20,000 dollars this weekend,” Webb said.

The money was spent on what Webb hoped would be an epic eclipse event starting Saturday, two days before totality.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Eclipse overhyped in Garden Valley?

Dean Johnson, KTVB August 23, 2017

Many communities across Idaho spent months planning and preparing for this summer’s total solar eclipse. Many even formed committees to help plan for the large influx of people.

While the eclipse certainly lived up to the hype, the Associated Press says Monday’s eclipse was the most observed and most photographed eclipse in history. The number of people coming into some of our communities did not.

There was a lot of hype in Garden Valley surrounding the eclipse. Many expecting tens of thousands to come up to the small area as it set in the path of totality. One day later, some organizers are saying with the turn-out they did receive, they would have done things a lot different.

“We thought that we would get at least the Fourth of July crowd, and I don’t’ know that we, we didn’t get it here,” Garden Valley School District Superintendent Greg Alexander said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Solar show in Stanley eclipsed by low tourism

Businesses suffer amid fewer visitors than expected

Joshua Murdock Aug 23, 2017 IME

Businesses and locals in Stanley were prepared for an anticipated influx of eclipse tourists beyond anything the town had seen, but on Monday, locals were grappling with what many described as an unequivocally underwhelming weekend.

A few business owners in Stanley have a new name for Monday’s eclipse, and it can’t be printed in the newspaper. Their frustration stems from patronage falling far short of previous estimates, which foretold complete inundation by as many as 30,000 people. In fact, some business owners said the past weekend fell short of even a typical mid-August weekend in Stanley, and that their bottom lines suffered dearly.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Restaurant manager reacts to eclipse business: ‘as far as I’m concerned it was a bust’

Erin Oshaughnessy Aug 21, 2017 Local News 8

Pocatello, Idaho KIFI/KIDK – Following the eclipse on Monday morning, many were surprised by the lack of activity in Pocatello.

For places like the Portneuf Hospital, the lack of activity was a good thing.

“Everything that is happening on this Monday is kind of the same stuff we see most Mondays,” commented Todd Blackinton, a public relations spokesperson for the Portneuf Hospital.

However, for local eateries, many banked on more people staying in the area.

“We are very disappointed with the pre-eclipse. As far as i’m concerned it was a bust,” commented Pocatello Perkins manager, Stan Hales.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Transportation Department’s on-line cameras crash

Steve Bertel Aug 21, 2017 KIVI TV

Boise, ID – Dozens of Idaho Transportation Department on-line cameras have crashed, preventing website viewers from receiving real-time looks at traffic on Idaho’s major roadways -– including eclipse-viewer traffic on Highways 55 and 95.

“It’s very unfortunate for the cameras to go down -– today of all days,” said ITD spokesman Bill Kotowski.

ITD officials are working to find the cause of the problem and restore the cameras as soon as possible, but Kotowski says no one yet knows when those repairs will be completed.

Although the Monday morning traffic flows along Highways 55 and 95 were not as congested as many had anticipated, “We are still concerned when people start heading home” Kotowski said. “We anticipate choke points along 55 and 95.”

Traffic flow information is still available at the 5-1-1 website, he said.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Post-eclipse traffic backs up 26 miles on Idaho 55

The Star-News August 24, 2017

A line of stopped cars 26 miles long formed on Idaho 55 south of Cascade after Monday’s total solar eclipse, the Valley County Sheriff’s Office said.

At one point, traffic came to a standstill between Banks on the south and Round Valley on the north, Lt. Jason Speer said.

“The biggest problem was that people did not stay with their cars,” Speer said. “Traffic would start moving and they were in the river.”

One motorists reported to Speer that it required eight hours to drive between Valley County and Boise following the eclipse, which reached totality just before 11:30 a.m. in Smiths Ferry, Cascade and Donnelly.

No traffic problems were reported in the days and hours leading up to Monday’s eclipse, Speer said.

Eclipse viewers allowed themselves plenty of time to find a spot to watch the celestial happening, he said.

Also, viewers were spread out over a large area, which also helped to prevent congestion, he said.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho roads busy as people head home after eclipse

KTVB August 21, 2017


Photo: Paul Boehlke/KTVB (Banks to Lowman Road)

Now that the solar eclipse is over, it’s time to worry about getting home. We received reports of congested highways across Idaho.

… The Idaho Transportation Department estimates there were 30,000 more cars than typical on the roads leading up to the event.

ITD spokesman Vince Trimboli says the busiest traffic areas include Interstate 15 between Utah and Idaho Falls, US 93 near the Craters of the Moon National Monument, Highway 95 from Payette to Riggins and Idaho 55 north of Eagle.

… Along Highway 55 in Horseshoe Bend. Southbound traffic is moving slowly – about 10 mph.

Near Crouch in the Garden Valley area. Expect severe delays.

Highway 55 southbound from Cascade. Delays increasing on Main Street. Average speed around 5 mph.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

First responders report typical weekend

Crowds for eclipse were only moderate on national forests

Joshua Murdock, Mark Dee, Greg Moore Aug 23, 2017 IME

Despite cries of an impending “apoc-eclipse,” law enforcement, health and emergency services across the region held up to only slightly increased demand by visitors viewing the total solar eclipse on Monday.

As the crowd ebbed Tuesday afternoon, local authorities praised planning—and lighter than expected attendance—for keeping things on track.

“As far as what we saw, everything went smoothly,” said Blaine County Disaster Services Coordinator Chris Corwin, who reported no “major issues” from Friday through Monday. “We had our plans in place, and fortunately we didn’t have to execute all of them. Some might say we were over-prepared, but to me that’s not a bad thing.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Estimated 300,000 people in Eastern Idaho for eclipse

Katie Keleher Aug 22, 2017 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The eclipse came and so did the people. Just how many? An estimated 300,000, possibly more.

Even though traffic was backed up all along the highway and interstate, the transportation department is happy with how things turned out.

“We had no crashes, no fatalities in Eastern Idaho,” Bruce King, Idaho Transportation Department, said. “With all the additional traffic, we’re very grateful that we came out that way.”

continued:
— — —

ITD: 160,000 people came to Idaho for the eclipse

by KBOI News Staff Tuesday, August 22nd 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — The Idaho Transportation Department estimates that 160,000 people traveled to the Gem State to watch the eclipse that occurred Monday morning.

ITD says most of the people came from Oregon and Utah.

The busiest roads due to the traffic were I-15 between Utah and Idaho Falls, US-93 near Craters of the Moon National Monument, US-20 near Arco, Highway 95 between Payette and Riggins, and Highway 55 north of Eagle.

To see a breakdown of ITD’s methodology, go to this site: http://itd.idaho.gov/news/solar-eclipse-traffic-counts/

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Don’t throw away those used eclipse glasses! BSU will donate them for you

by Kelsey Anderson Wednesday, August 23rd 2017

Boise State University wants your used eclipse glasses!

The university will donate used pairs to ‘Astronomers Without Borders,’ which is a nonprofit organization that plans to hand out the shades to people in South America and Asia for the 2019 eclipse.

You can drop off your eclipse glasses at the Alumni and Friends Center on University Avenue, which is just south of Albertsons Stadium.

source:
—————————————

Idaho News:

Cecil Andrus, logger who rose to Idaho governor, dies at 85

By Kimberlee Kruesi and Keith Ridler – 8/25/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Cecil D. Andrus managed huge swaths of public land as a cabinet member in President Jimmy Carter’s administration and was the longest-serving governor in Idaho history, but the former lumberjack was known as an approachable everyman who listed his number in the local phone directory.

The 85-year-old Andrus died late Thursday, the Andrus Center for Public Policy said. His daughter, Tracy Andrus, said he died of complications from lung cancer.

Andrus resigned midway through his second term as Idaho governor in 1977 to become President Jimmy Carter’s secretary of the Interior Department and served until Carter’s term ended in 1981. He then was elected governor two more times, becoming the first four-term governor in Idaho history. He was also the last Democrat to hold the office in red-state Idaho.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Report: 2016 crime rises in Cascade, McCall, falls in Valley County

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Aug 24, 2017

Reported crimes surged in Cascade during 2016 over 2015, according to statistics released from the Idaho State Police.

The number of crimes reported rose by nearly 7 percent in McCall, but fell by 5.5 percent in areas patrolled by the Valley County Sheriff’s Office, the ISP report said.

… Valley County Sheriff’s Office

Reported crimes fell by 5.5 percent in 2016 in areas patrolled by the Valley County Sheriff’s Office, the ISP report said.

The sheriff’s office patrols areas outside city limits within the county as well as the City of Donnelly.

Total offenses fell from 346 in 2015 to 327 last year. The county made 8 percent more arrests (313 to 337) and solved 60 percent of crimes reported.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Valley County Search and Rescue seeks new members

The Star-News Aug 24, 2017

New volunteers are being sought for Valley County Search and Rescue, which conducts rescues of those who are lost or injured in the outdoors.

Training is provided in radio communications and GPS units, as well as search and rescue techniques.

“Team members have a strong desire to help others, learn emergency search and rescue skills, and enhance the safety and enjoyment of the outdoors for all,” Capt. Larry Mangum said.

The group is looking for active adults who are comfortable in the mountains. During winter, the group’s priority is on incidents relating to snowmobiles and other winter sports.

The team operates under the direction of the Valley County Sheriff’s Office and is involved in about 14 searches per year, Mangum said.

Summer searches are done on foot, on ATVs and UTVs, and on mountain bikes, motorcycles and horses. The searches are supplemented by air using airplanes and helicopters, he said.

Winter searches are done on snowmobiles, tracked machines or snowshoes.

Some members staff the Incident Command trailer which is outfitted with numerous radios, antennas, computers, printers and maps.

The group has equipment for rescue and transportation operations after lost or injured persons are located.

In addition to search calls, Valley County Search and Rescue participates in public events such as providing aid stations or communications for races and rides, parades, and other local activities.

For more information and an application, go to http://valleycountysar.org or contact Shelley Platt 634-7786 or shelleyplatt@icloud.com

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Elk Creek Road closures noted starting this month

The Star-News Aug 24, 2017

Elk Creek Road in remote Valley County will be closed during much of September and October, the Valley County Road Department said.

The closures will allow work to repair three slides that occurred in March between Sawmill Point and the South Fork Salmon River.

The contractor will be working 10 days on and four days off. The road will be open when no work is being done.

Closure dates are Aug. 29-30, Sept. 5-14, Sept. 19-28, Oct. 3-12 and Oct. 17-26. For questions, call (208) 382-7195.

source:
[Note: This is the road that goes from Warrens to the South Fork over to Big Creek via Elk Summit. See map below.]

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Boise woman dies in car wreck near Cascade

The Star-News Aug 24, 2017

A Boise woman died in a one-car rollover on Monday in the Crown Point area north of Cascade, the Valley County Sheriff’s Office said.

Rebecca L. Stephens, 42, died at the scene of the accident, which happened about 4 p.m. Monday on Sunset Loop, Lt. Jason Speer said.

Stephens was driving the car northbound when it left the east side of the road, Speer said. The vehicle rolled twice and landed on its top on Crown Point Parkway.

Passengers in the car were Jennifer Kent, 44, of Boise and two minor children whose names were withheld.

None of the passengers were seriously injured, Speer said. The children were wearing seat belts but Stephens and Kent were not wearing seat belts, he said.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Southeast Boise woman diagnosed with West Nile Virus

by KBOI News Staff Tuesday, August 22nd 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — The Central District Health Department says a Boise woman over the age of 65 is recovering at home from West Nile Virus.

The department says this is the second human case of the virus this year in Idaho. A Kootenai County resident was diagnosed with having the disease earlier this month.

The health district says that twelve Idaho counties so far have reported mosquito pools that tested positive for West Nile Virus this year.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Sen. Crapo wants Congress to honor MK Wake Island defenders

by Scott Logan Wednesday, August 23rd 2017


The Wake Island Memorial at Veterans Memorial Park in Boise. (KBOI photo)

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — It’s been almost 76 years but now the men with Boise-based Morrison-Knudsen Construction Company who fought on Wake Island in 1941 are a step closer to receiving one of the nation’s highest civilian honors.

Sen. Mike Crapo (R-Idaho) is co-sponsoring legislation on Capitol Hill that would bestow on the MK workers who fought with the marines and navy on Wake Island the Congressional Gold Medal, among the country’s highest civilian honors.

continued:
———————————–

Fire Season:

“Not only campfire start unwanted fires. Poorly maintained tires and brakes can spark a wildfire too. One less spark one less Wildfire.”
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

What others can learn from Meridian home destroyed by fire

KTVB August 25, 2017

Boise – After a grass fire grew big enough to burn a Meridian family’s home to the ground, Meridian Fire Department Deputy Chief and Fire Marshal Joe Bongiorno shared tips to help keep this tragedy from happening to others.

Bongiorno said the fire on August 18 started by Interstate 84 near the home, was pushed up a hill by the wind and into the landscape surrounding the home.

The family’s home had large arborvitae plants along the deck and the side of the house. Bongjorno says that although these plants are green, they are not plants you should grow close to your home.

Bongiorno says, “In the fire service they’re known as gasoline plants because they, they burn like the dickens. So, they’re very, very flammable.”

Bongiorno added that homeowners should have no landscape touching their houses. He says that all flammable landscape touching homes should be cut down.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

3 Idaho firefighters injured after truck hits gas can, burns

by Associated Press Tuesday, August 22nd 2017

Arimo, Idaho (AP) — Three Idaho firefighters battling a grass and brush fire threatening homes suffered burns after their firetruck ran over a gas can, engulfing the truck in flames.

Downey Fire Department Chief Chris Sorensen tells the Idaho State Journal that the gas can came loose at about 11 a.m. Monday and fell from the truck near the town of Arimo.

Sorensen says the three firefighters with the department escaped the vehicle, but one has burns on 40 percent of his body. One broke his leg.

All three were taken to Portneuf Medical Center in Pocatello.

Their names haven’t been released.

The 5-ton (4.5-metric ton), six-wheel-drive firetruck was destroyed.

source:
— —

Firefighter who saved fellow fireman suffered severe burns

8/25/17 AP

Pocatello, Idaho — An eastern Idaho firefighter being treated for burns is credited with saving another firefighter’s life.

Idaho State Journal reports Downey firefighter Matt Henderson was severely burned when he rescued Kent Winward from their burning firetruck on Monday. Kent Winward’s wife, Melissa, says her husband would be dead if Henderson had not acted quickly and pulled him off the truck.

Family members say Henderson escaped the fire with severe burns on 30 to 40 percent of his body and minor fractures while Kent suffered less severe burns and a broken ankle. They are being treated at the University of Utah Intermountain Burn Center in Salt Lake City. Henderson’s brother-in-law Jeff Gosar says it may take a year for Henderson to recover.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho has had the same number of wildfires this year, they’ve just been smaller

by Nathan Larsen Wednesday, August 23rd 2017


KBOI Photo

Boise, Idaho – (KBOI) — Wildfires have been raging across Oregon, Washington, and Montana this fire season.

Here in the Gem State, we’ve had our wildfires, but they haven’t seemed as extreme.

Here in the Boise BLM Fire District, we’ve already seen 89 fires this season, a number that the BLM says is average.

“The difference is this year, is we’re just not seeing nearly the acreages burn that we have as far as our 25-year average, so you’re just not getting the big fires, we’re catching them small, but we are seeing the same number that we usually see for a fire season,” said Jared Jablonski, Boise District Fire Information Officer.

continued:
——————————————

Public Lands:

A note of appreciation extended to eclipse visitors from Boise NF employees

Aug 23, 2017 Boise NF (via FB)

On behalf of the Cascade Ranger District of the Boise National Forest, I would like to express my appreciation to the people that visited the area to view the eclipse. While the crowds were not nearly as large as some predicted, we still had thousands of visitors come to experience this unique event on the National Forest lands surrounding Cascade.

Forest employees talked with people from all over Idaho, every region of the U.S., and from at least seven countries. Almost without exception, visitors were respectful to our employees and of the natural resources around them. Many were awe-struck by the natural landscape that served as a backdrop for the event and took time before the eclipse to learn about and explore the surrounding forest.

Over 1000 people viewed the eclipse from the Snowbank Mountain area but despite this large number of people, very little impact to the land could be seen after the crowds dispersed. At the top of Snowbank where over 300 people congregated, not a single piece of litter was found.

This is truly remarkable and is indicative of the attitude of respect toward both the eclipse event and the land that we sensed from this group of visitors. To all those who visited, thanks for coming to experience this incredible and rare moment with us and we hope that you get a chance to visit your public lands again soon. #ForestService

Jake Strohmeyer
Cascade District Ranger
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Toxic algae prompts health advisory for SW Idaho lake

8/26/17 AP

Nampa, Idaho — Visitors at a southwest Idaho lake shouldn’t enter the water due to toxic algae.

Southwest District Health tells the Idaho Press-Tribune (http://bit.ly/2wyaA9F) in a story on Saturday that high concentrations of blue-green algae at Lake Lowell led to the health advisory.

Officials say coming in contact with the algae can cause nausea, vomiting, liver damage and other problems.

Anglers are encouraged to clean and rinse their catch with uncontaminated water.

Lake Lowell is part of the Dear Flat National Wildlife Refuge that’s managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

BLM replaces bridge on Mud Flat Road

BLM News Release August 25, 2017
Contact: Michael Williamson mwilliamson@blm.gov (208) 384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management is overseeing the construction and replacement of the Current Creek Bridge. The bridge is located near milepost 51 on Mud Flat Road, also known as the Owyhee Uplands Backcountry Byway, and is approximately 43 miles southwest of Grand View.

On-site work recently started and is expected to be complete by November 2017. A bypass has been placed and there will be no traffic disruptions to the public during construction.

“The Current Creek Bridge is over 50 years old and supports a lot of traffic from local ranchers, recreationists and sightseers to the Byway,” said BLM Owyhee Field Manager Michelle Ryerson. “During routine inspections, we determined the bridge needed to be replaced and so we moved forward on it soon afterwards for safety’s sake.”

Cook and Sons Construction, LLC, based in White Bird, Idaho, is performing the construction work. The small business performs bridge and road construction, excavation, culvert installation and crane operations.

For more information, contact the Owyhee Field Office at (208) 896-5912.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Tony Tooke appointed U.S. Forest Service chief

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Aug 21, 2017

An Alabama native who’s worked on or for national forests since he was 18 has been named the 18th Chief of the U.S. Forest Service.

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue today announced the new chief is Tony Tooke, who’s currently the Regional Forester for the Southern Region basted in Atlanta. He replaces Tom Tidwell, who was named chief in 2009.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Zinke won’t eliminate any national monuments

By Matthew Brown and Brady McCombs – 8/24/17 AP

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke said he’s recommending that none of 27 national monuments carved from wilderness and ocean and under review by the Trump administration be eliminated.

But there would be changes to a “handful,” he said.

Zinke told The Associated Press that unspecified boundary adjustments for some monuments designated over the past four decades will be included in the recommendations he planned to give President Donald Trump on Thursday. None of the sites would revert to new ownership, he said, while public access for uses such as hunting, fishing or grazing would be maintained or restored.

… Zinke declined to say whether portions of the monuments would be opened up to oil and gas drilling, mining, logging and other industries for which Trump has advocated.

… Zinke had previously announced that no changes would be made at six national monuments — in Montana, Colorado, Idaho, California, Arizona and Washington.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

USFS Regional Intermountain News

Archived Newsletters
——————————-

Critter News:

Warning issued after two rabid bats found in Valley County

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Aug 24, 2017

A warning was issued by the Central District Health Department last week after two bats infected with rabies were found in homes in McCall and Donnelly earlier this month.

At the McCall home, the homeowner and a cat had contact with the bat, which was trapped and submitted for testing, health department Public Information Officer Christine Myron said.

At the Donnelly home, two people and two dogs were potentially exposed to a rabid bat, Myron said.

The specific locations of the homes were not released due to federal health privacy laws, she said.

The humans and animals were receiving therapy to prevent infection from the disease, she said. For humans, the therapy includes a series of four vaccinations over two weeks.

… Here are some protection tips:

• Do not touch a bat with bare hands.

• Seek medical attention after an encounter with a bat.

• If there is contact with a bat, save the bat in a container without touching it and contact the health department at (208) 634-7194 to arrange testing for rabies.

• Always vaccinate pets for rabies, including horses, as pets may encounter bats outdoors or in the home.

• Bat-proof homes by plugging all holes in siding and keeping tight-fitting screens on windows.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Pet Talk – Ear infections in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Aug 25, 2017 IME

One of the most common problems that veterinarians see is infections of the external ear canal. The dog’s ear canal has developed over hundreds and thousands of years into a horrible trap where dirt, moisture and foreign objects like grass seeds want to settle, then irritate the external ear canal. This is called otitis externa.

Many factors can cause otitis externa. Some are floppy ears, ear canals with narrow diameters, the overproduction of wax, excessive hair in the ear canal and frequent swimming causing constant moisture to the ear canal, which invites yeast and bacterial infections. Sometimes low thyroid disease can cause irregular wax production and inflammation. One of the major causes of ear infections is a disease called atopy, which is allergies’ to pollens and other allergens’ causing severe inflammation and itching to the face, ears and paws of dogs.

The most important physical and diagnostic tests are an exact exam of the ear canal, called otoscopy, and an evaluation of the debris within the ear canal. This usually involves looking microscopically at this debris for bacteria, yeast, parasites and foreign plant material. Often, swabs of the ear canal are sent to a lab for cultures and cytology. Sometimes even blood tests, allergy testing, biopsies and skin scrapings for parasites are necessary to determine the cause of the ear infection and subsequent necessary appropriate treatment.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Coeur d’Alene 2-year-old attacked by her grandmother’s rescued dog

Evan Noorani, KREM August 25, 2017

Coeur d’Alene, Idaho — A 2-year-old girl from Coeur d’Alene has spent days in the hospital after her grandmother’s dog attacked her.

Alainna Pleasant has now spent four days in the hospital, as of Thursday, August 24. The girl’s mothers, Chantel Pleasant and Santana Bruski, were very surprised by the outburst from the dog.

“She was in the living room petting the dog, her grandma was sitting on the couch and the dog just snapped at her first, then grabbed her and started lifting her up in the air and shaking her,” said Chantel.

This was the first-time Alainna had met the dog. Alainna’s grandmother had rescued the dog just days before. Now Alaina’s parents said they wished they had spent more time around the dog before bringing him home.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho officials reject bait hunting plan targeting wolves

By Keith Ridler – 8/25/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idaho officials declined to move forward Friday allowing the use of bait by hunters to specifically target wolves amid widespread opposition.

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission voted 7-0 to direct the Department of Fish and Game to suspend an administrative process called negotiated rulemaking.

Commissioner Jerry Meyers said he would like more information about wolf baiting before moving ahead with any plan.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Oregon OKs killing 2 wolves after attacks on livestock

by The Associated Press Friday, August 25th 2017


The agency said Thursday in a statement that wolves from the Meacham pack have killed four calves from a local ranch. The map shows areas of known wolf activity in northeastern Oregon. (ODFW)

Umatilla, Ore. (AP) — The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has authorized the killing of two wolves from a pack in northeastern Oregon.

The agency said Thursday in a statement that wolves from the Meacham pack have killed four calves from a local ranch.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Education International

Fourth week August 2017

Wolves facing reduced protection status

“Wolf Hydatid Disease in Coyotes, Foxes and other Canines”

Coywolves are Taking Over Eastern North America

Woman attacked by coyote while walking on upstate NY trail
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Judge: Bears near US-Canada border merit endangered status

Matt Volz / Associated Press, KTVB August 23, 2017

Helena, Mont. – A judge has ruled a small population of grizzly bears in Montana and Idaho near the Canadian border can be considered endangered even if they are not on the brink of extinction.

U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen’s order Monday reversed the 2014 re-classification by U.S. wildlife officials for the 40-50 bears of the Cabinet-Yaak bear population under the federal Endangered Species Act.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said then that the bear population had stabilized and that its status should be “threatened” but not on a waiting list for classification as endangered.

The conservation group Alliance for the Wild Rockies sued and Christensen sided with the group.

The bears live about 300 miles from grizzlies near Yellowstone National Park that lost federal protection status in July.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

4-H trained wild horse yearlings available for adoption

Yearlings to be showcased during Western Idaho Fair

August 22, 2017 BLM News Release
Heather Tiel-Nelson, 208-736-2352

Boise, Idaho – Over the past ten weeks, University of Idaho 4-H club members from around the Treasure Valley have worked hard to train and prepare their wild horse weanlings. This weekend, they finally get to showcase the results of their work.

On Friday, August 25, at 6 p.m. in the D&B Arena at the Western Idaho Fairgrounds in Boise, 4-H’ers aged 12-18 will demonstrate how skilled the young horses have become as they navigate a trail course that will include stepping over logs, backing through a narrow log path, and loading into a horse trailer.

These trained yearlings will then be available for adoption by competitive bid at the Fair on August 27 from 2 to 3 p.m. in the draft horse barn.

There were four different clubs who participated in training the yearlings: Lively Livestock 4-H from Idaho County, led by Stacy Van Steenwyk; Desperados 4-H from Ada County, led by Jan Maxie; Snake River Livestock 4-H from Owyhee County, led by Taft Bearden; and Idaho Youth Ranch 4-H Club from Canyon County, led by 4-H leader Brandon Breaux.

The partnership between the University of Idaho Extension 4-H Youth Development program and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has grown in popularity since its inception in 2009. “The purpose of this growing partnership is twofold,” said Boise District Wild Horse Specialist Raul Trevino. “It helps to increase awareness of the BLM’s wild horse adoption program while instilling horsemanship and life skills in the 4-H youth of the Gem State.”

Since 2009, over 268 horses have been adopted and $22,000 raised for 4-H clubs in southwestern and eastern Idaho.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Eclipse blamed for accidental release of thousands of Atlantic salmon into Puget Sound

by Kara Kostanich, KOMO Wednesday, August 23rd 2017

Anacortes, Wash. (KOMO) — The Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is calling all fishermen to help catch thousands of farmed Atlantic salmon that were accidentally released just off Cypress Island in the San Juan Islands.

On Saturday, Cooke Aquaculture had a net pen failure that caused the release of Atlantic salmon in Puget Sound.

The company says 305,000 fish were in the net pen but believes only up to 5,000 escaped.

The company released a statement to KOMO News that said in part, “Exceptionally high tides and currents coinciding with this week’s solar eclipse caused damage to a salmon farm that has been in operation near Cypress Island for approximately 30 years.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
August 25, 2017
Issue No. 841

Table of Contents

* Washington Encouraging Anglers To Fish For Thousands Of Atlantic Salmon Escaped From Fish Farm
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439477.aspx

* Coming Heat Wave Has River Managers Increasing Cold Clearwater Water Into Lower Granite Reservoir
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439476.aspx

* Fall Commercial Fishing Begins On Columbia Mainstem, Low Steelhead Numbers Prompts Idaho To Suspend Retention
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439475.aspx

* Council Approves Pilot Toxic Contaminant Mapping Project For Columbia River Basin
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439474.aspx

* After Tests Show Contaminants In Six Hanford Reach Fish Species, State Issues Fish Consumption Advisory
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439473.aspx

* Council Fish/Wildlife Committee Identifies Spending For Hatchery Upgrades, Fish Screen Projects
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439472.aspx

* Council Report To Governors Shows BPA’s 2016 Fish/Wildlife Costs Account For One-Third Of Wholesale Power Rate
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439471.aspx

* Group Issues White Paper On 2015 Hot Water Year For Sockeye As Region Grapples With BiOp, Spill
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439470.aspx

* Ninth Circuit Declines PGE Request On Deschutes River Case, Lawsuit Continues In Lower Court
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439469.aspx

* Research: Kootenai River Hatchery Juvenile Burbot Seek Deep Water, Coarse Substrate
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439468.aspx

* ODFW To Take Lethal Action To Limit Meacham Wolf Pack Livestock Depredations In Northeast Oregon
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439467.aspx

* Irreplaceable Biodiversity? DNA Study Indicates Migrating Spring Chinook, Steelhead Rely On Crucial Gene
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439466.aspx

* Yakima Project ‘Flip-Flop’ Operations Underway To Aid Spawning Spring Chinook
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439465.aspx

* Study: Take A Caught Fish Out Of Water, Stress Hormones Go Up, Harder To Catch Again
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439464.aspx

* Stocking Mountain Lakes: ODFW Experiment Looks At Bigger Juvenile Fish To Possibly Avoid Predation
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439463.aspx
————————————

Fish & Game News:

Mountain Goat Counts Slated for Early September

By Evin Oneale, Regional Conservation Educator
Friday, August 25, 2017 – 7:57 AM MDT

Idaho Fish and Game biologists will take to the air in early September to count mountain goats near Yellow Pine, Idaho. The mountain goat surveys will focus on an area north of the East Fork of the South Fork Salmon River Road between Monumental Creek and the South Fork of the Salmon River.

The surveys will encompass portions of hunt units 25, 26 and 20A. Because mountain goat surveys are conducted primarily in alpine habitats, minimal disturbance to archery elk and deer hunters is expected. Biologists will try to avoid flying near any hunters they observe.

For questions regarding the early September mountain goat surveys, please contact the Fish and Game McCall office at 208-634-8137.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Desperately Seeking Hunter Education Instructors

Aug 25 via Facebook

Interested in giving back to the local hunting community? We need hunters – novice to veteran – to teach Hunter Education courses to the next generation of hunters.

Your investment is only a few hours a year. The impact could last for generations.

Call Jaime at the Hunter Education Center – 208-327-7159, or Derek at the Fish and Game Nampa regional office – 208-465-8465 to learn more.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Harvey the Hurricane Hawk seeks refuge in Houston man’s taxi

by Sinclair Broadcast Group Saturday, August 26th 2017


A Cooper’s hawk sought refuge in a Houston-area man’s taxi as Hurrican Harvey barreled down on the Texas coast on Friday August 25, 2017. Harvey the Hawk was handed over to a Texas wildlife center on August 26. (Image credit: William Bruso / Youtube)

A Houston-area taxi driver picked up a strange passenger on Friday night as Hurricane Harvey was barreling down on the Texas coast, a Cooper’s hawk seeking shelter from the hurricane.
Many people in Texas relied on the kindness of others to evacuate and stay safe during the Category 4 hurricane. The same can be said for Harvey the Hurricane Hawk.

“He just kind of hopped on in and doesn’t want to leave,” taxi driver William Bruso said in the first of a series of YouTube videos featuring Harvey the Hawk. “He looks kind of scared.”

continued w/videos:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Resourceful Dog Walks Away With Bag Of Dog Food After Hurricane Harvey

“Must be a Texas dog cause he can survive without help,” one person said.

By Carla Herreria 8/26/2017 HuffPo


Tiele Dockens

The morning after Hurricane Harvey tore into Texas, Gulf Coast residents were already trying to prepare for life after the destructive storm – including Otis, the dog.

Tiele Dockens was checking out the damage for friends and family in Sinton, north of Corpus Christi, when she saw Otis on the street carrying a large bag of dog food.

continued:
————————————

Seasonal Humor:

bearhummerfeeder-a
———————————

Aug 20, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Aug 20, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Eclipse Monday

Yellow Pine is outside the zone of totality, but we should get at least 95%. The time should be similar to Cascade.

21 Aug 2017 Total Solar Eclipse at Cascade, ID
Partial phase start: 10:11:27AM (MDT)
Totality Start: 11:26:53AM (MDT)
Duration of Totality: 1m 55s
— — — —

Firewood – Correction

The firewood at the shooting range near Yellow Pine is NOT free. You must have a valid permit and tag the wood. Firewood permits are available at The Corner, please bring cash and a driver’s license.

There are some “free use areas” over in Big Creek. Free permits and special tags can be obtained at the McCall District office.
— — — —

Bear Aware

Reports of Bear scat on the road by Golden Gate and bear sign around the transfer station area.
— — — —

Recycle your old refrigerator

Idaho Power has arranged for free pick-up of old refrigerators. Call 1-800-253-5618 (11:30 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.) and ASK FOR DONNA. She will confirm your request and coordinate for one pick-up day in Yellow Pine. They require: The motor must run, but need not cool down. You must have reasonable access to move it outside. You must sign for permission to take it. If you cannot be home on pick-up day you must put it outside and put a note inside giving ARCA permission to take the unit. Each owner must call. There must be written permission to take the unit. – LI
— — — —

Oil Furnace Tune-up

Bill from Rocky Mountain Mechanical will be coming to Yellow Pine in September to service oil furnaces. If you want a furnace tune-up call (208) 365-7473. Rocky Mountain Mechanical, 3328 W Idaho Blvd, Emmett, ID 83617. Recommended by Tracey Kennedy of Kennedy Fuel and Feed.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Blowdown Update

The Logging Crew was back to work on Monday, Aug 14, over in the hole #7 area. They have been working from first to last light. By Wednesday evening they were over by hole #17 (by the school corner.) Saturday they were over by hole #13.

P1000299-20170818Logging
August 18, 2017 crew loading logs by the School Corner.
— — — —

WICAP

WICAP was in Yellow Pine on Thursday August 17th at the Yellow Pine Tavern to help folks sign up for Energy Assistance.
— — — —

VYPA News:

Meeting on Saturday, August 19, 10am at Community Hall – VYPA Council Meeting to discuss committee members.
— —

Village of Yellow Pine Association August 12, 2017 Meeting Minutes

Officers present: Deb Filler, Chrm.; Lynn Imel, Vice Chrm.; Kathy Hall, Mem. At Large; Joel Fields, Treasurer – via telephone
Absent: Lorrine Munn, Secretary
Members present: Nine + one via telephone
Guests: Allen Mulder, Kyle Fend (Midas Gold)
Meeting opened at 2:00 by Chairperson, Deb Filler

Minutes of the July 8, 2017 meeting minutes were not available for reading/approval. Without objection, the decision was made to present the July minutes for approval at the September 9, 2017 meeting.

Treasurer’s Report: See attached copy provided by Joel Fields, Treasurer, via e-mail.
Joel Fields reported via telephone, adding that deposits have been made after the July 30 report and all expenses and receipts have not been completed; he and the Chairperson will consult and provide a detailed report of the festival profit/expense at the September 9th meeting.
Dan Stiff requested that the final report be supplied to members before the end of August, when many residents leave. Deb Filler responded that not all of the income and expenses are received before the end of August.

Committee Reports:
Community Hall: Kathy Hall
Lynn Imel will remove the old kitchen grills which are no longer needed. She will also contact Idaho Power and try to arrange for the disposal of the hall’s refrigerator. Any residents who have old refrigerators should contact her to see if Idaho Power will arrange for a pick-up day.
Showing movies in the Community Hall was a recent proposal that was denied. Movies are copyrighted and cannot be shown to the public unless a license is purchased. Terry Hall reported that he had verified that information. (Contact Lynn Imel for a copy of the legal information).
Kathy Hall would like to know if rules have been formed for the use of the community hall, e.g. serving of liquor. Rules have been formed in past years and posted in the hall. Lynn Imel moved that members be requested to submit their suggestions to Kathy Hall or other officers. Insurance may dictate some activities. Motion to have members supply suggested rules was seconded and approved. Please supply suggested rules to Kathy Hall or other officers so the Community Hall committee can have in-put.

Membership: no report
This committee has the responsibility to verify members who are qualified to vote and report at the August meeting. Lynn Imel moved that a committee chairperson be appointed at the September 9th meeting. Seconded by Dan Stiff. Motion approved.

Harmonica Festival: Deb Filler, Chairperson
A de-briefing meeting was held a few days after the event to discuss what worked well and what did not. She will create a detailed report for the September 9th meeting; the financial aspects of the event will be shown on the Treasurer’s report when all expenses are paid. See attached Treasurer’s report for the present balances.

Cemetery: Willie Sullivan
No report

Snow Removal: Ad Hoc committee Jeff Forster, Kathy Hall, Cecil Dallman, Bill McIntosh
“$1,500 be allocated annually for snow removal from Abstein & Orchard; Huckleberry to Henry; Stibnite to Profile; Profile to Yellow Pine Ave; Yellow Pine Ave to Christmas Tree (near Sullivan’ house); Yellow Pine Ave. to East Fork Road; Yellow Pine Ave. to Ellison, Yellow Pine Ave. to Pioneer; Pioneer to Riverside; School House Road. Any un-used funds will be rolled into a fund to be built for snow removal on excessive years with a cap of $5,000. Contractor will be responsible for providing equipment and maintenance.”
Lengthy discussion followed, four other motions and amendments were addressed. See Secretary for detail of debate. Final decision:
Joel Fields motion: Village pays for snow plowing on the same roads as they pay for dust abatement (Yellow Pine Ave. to Post Office plus into the community hall). Seconded. Dan Stiff requested amendment: “with a $300 cap”. JF declined to accept the amendment. Kathy Hall requested amendment: “remove plowing to the community hall.” Amendment declined. Discussion: Plow exactly as dust abatement (16’ in road center). Leaves berms in road that must be removed. Plowing width must be as discretion of the operator. Motion clarified: Fire Dept. to Post Office with width at discretion of operator. Seconded. Discussion: Dust abatement cost the Village approximately $1,200 for service for summer use; therefore, $1,200 for winter use is reasonable. Kathy Hall requested amendment to show $1,200 allocation. JF approved amendment. Motion approved. Aye 7 Nay 4 Abstain 2
Village funds up to $1,200 will be paid to a contractor to remove snow from Yellow Pine Ave., up to Profile, and from The Corner to the Post Office. The width of the plowing at the discretion of the operator.

Restroom construction: Willie Sullivan
No report

New Business
Annual appointment of committee chairpersons
By Laws require that at the August meeting Chairpersons of all standing committees be re-appointed or replaced. Present officers will meet before September 9th and address this. All members should express their opinions, and offer to be leaders. Contact any officer.

By Laws changes/additions
Dan Stiff motion: “The offices of the Harmonica and Chairperson of the Village of Y.P. Assoc. cannot be held concurrently by the same officer.” By Laws require that changes be read aloud at three consecutive Village meetings. This is the first reading of this motion.

Final announcements:
Jeff Forster: Alan Perry, Inspector for the Idaho State Fire Marshall’s Office, inspected the YPFD Friday, August 11th. District commissioners, Cecil Dallman, Dan Stiff and Jeff Forster were present during the inspection. His conclusion, “Wow! I’m impressed. Your fire district is better than many rural Idaho districts.”
Discussion: Congratulations to the YPFD crew. Please make an effort to attend Sunday morning 11 o’clock training sessions; everyone can help in some way. Please, no more rumors spread…ask your district commissioner so you have facts.
At a recent accident response 18 people responded to the fire siren and assisted in the recovery. This was an excellent showing of local support.
YPFD is providing every business and residence with a free smoke/CO2 detector and a free fire extinguisher. See any of the commissioners to arrange for pickup installation. Best location for the smoke detector is just outside of sleeping quarters.

Midas Gold: Kyle Fend
The guided tours provided by Midas during the Harmonica Festival were well attended and would probably be available next year, perhaps with an additional tour on Sunday morning. The shuttle service from the campgrounds to Yellow Pine were not used, so will not be used in future. Midas is interested is hosting a Yellow Pine “Locals” tour of Stibnite and will work on arrangements.

Meeting adjourned at 3:30 p.m.

Dan Stiff motion: Village not pay for snow removal. Seconded. Discussion. Motion failed.
Jeff Forster motion: Village pay for snow removal from East Fork Road to the Post Office with a cap on the amount paid. Seconded. Discussion included the following: Need to plow to all houses to provide access for emergencies. County plowing allowed business/private access to main roads (last winter). County leaves berms that must be removed before they freeze. Motion failed.
Bill McIntosh motion: The topic be re-addressed at the September meeting for a decision. Seconded. Motion failed.
Matt Huner motion: Accept the committee’s report as a motion. Seconded. Discussion: Residents have chosen to live in Yellow Pine and must accept responsibility for themselves and help others. Village pays for dust abatement therefore plowing the Yellow Pine Ave. to Post Office is reasonable. Motion failed.

Link:
— — — —

YPFD News:

Next meeting will be on the 26th of August, 2:00 at the Comm Hall. Discussing the 2018-19 Budget.

Training is on Sundays starting at 11am at the YP Fire Station and open to the community of Yellow Pine. Check with Jeff F. or Ann F. to confirm trainings.

Fire Siren will be tested at noon on the first of each month.
— — — —

Gravel Pit

Valley County Quarry Development

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the proposed Valley County Quarry Development (Valley County Quarry) Project on lands managed by the Cascade Ranger District of the Boise National Forest.

Project Description

Valley County has submitted applications to the Boise National Forest (NF) to obtain the necessary approval for the portion of the project on federally administered lands. The Boise NF is proposing to issue a special use permit to authorize Valley County to use National Forest System lands for the purpose of developing and operating a quarry.

The development of an additional aggregate source is needed to economically support the road maintenance activities on the Stibnite/East Fork South Fork Salmon River (EFSFSR) Road, Johnson Creek Road and other local backcountry roads as determined necessary by the proponent (Valley County). These road surface improvements would reduce sediment delivery to adjacent waterways, provide improved road surface protection, and enhance public safety.

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the proposed action report (PAR) on the Project webpage:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=51422

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. Please make your comments as specific as possible to help us identify and address issues.

Electronic, written, hand-delivered, and facsimile comments concerning this project will be accepted. Comments may be submitted through the Valley County Pit Development Project. To submit comments using the web form, select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s webpage.

Email comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), Adobe (.pdf), and Word (.doc) to: comments-intermtn-boise-cascade@fs.fed.us. Please put “Valley County Pit Development Project” in the subject line of e-mail comments. Comments must have an identifiable name attached or verification of identity will be required. A scanned signature may serve as verification on electronic comments.

Written comments may be submitted to: Boise National Forest, Cascade Ranger District, PO Box 696, Cascade, ID 83638 Attention: Terre Pearson-Ramirez, or by fax at 208-382-7480. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection in the Public Comment Reading Room on the project webpage and will be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act.

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by September 8, 2017.

For further information on the project, please contact Terre Pearson-Ramirez, NEPA Planner, by email at tramirez@fs.fed.us or by phone at 208-382-7457

Scoping Letter:
— — — —

Labor Day Weekend

Sept 2 Festival Fundraiser Breakfast 8am to 1030am

Start your day right! Join us at the Festival Fundraiser Breakfast; Saturday, September 2nd at the Community Hall in Yellow Pine. Breakfast is only $5. All proceeds support the Yellow Pine Festival and the Community Hall. Everyone is welcome! Sponsored by Project Filter.
— —

Sept 2 Welch Memorial Golf Tourney 2017

Saturday September 2 at 1pm – Yellow Pine Country Club
— — — —

September 13-14 Scheduled Power Outage

A message that Idaho Power needs to replace power poles.
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Aug 14) overnight low of 52 degrees, partly cloudy and good air this morning. Heard clarks nutcrackers and robins calling, a few pine-siskins at the feeders, lots of chipmunks, and a pine squirrel scolding. Heard a chainsaw out in the forest, the loggers are back, working near hole #7. Osprey chicks are big enough to fly, but still returning to the nest to be fed. Partly cloudy, light breezes and good air all afternoon and evening, high of 80 degrees. Loggers still sawing at dusk.

Tuesday (Aug 15) overnight low of 40 degrees, clear sky and excellent air quality this morning. Not many birds around. Sawyers at work early, limbing downed trees. Heard a clarks nutcracker calling and a few pine-siskins. Honey Dippers are in YP picking up the porta potties today. A few high clouds and light breezes in the early afternoon, moderate temps, high of 84 degrees. Clear at dusk. Yellow jackets chasing the hummers away from the feeder this evening.

Wednesday (Aug 16) overnight low of 40 degrees, clear sky and good air quality this morning. Heard a few pine-siskins, a nutcracker and a jay calling from the trees. Chipmunk scolding from the fence. Sawyers working to the south west, sounds like they are on the lower bench. Cloud of dust hanging over the back Stibnite road. Mostly clear day, warm but not hot and light breezes, high of 86 degrees. Young osprey have fledged and have been flying over the village and calling for their parents. Getting a bit hazy towards late afternoon and evening, might be dust and smoke, wilderness fires are getting larger. Loggers are working near hole #17 by the School corner. Clear night.

Thursday (Aug 17) overnight low of 41 degrees, mostly clear sky and good air quality this morning. A few pine-siskins at the seed feeder, a few more calling from the trees, only one hummingbird. Golden mantel, chipmunks and a pine squirrel running about. Increased traffic up on main street (dust abatement is wearing thin.) Warm and mostly sunny day, some gusty breezes after lunch time, high of 88 degrees. Logging crew was working to the south west this morning, then over by hole #15 towards evening. Loud shooting (west of the subdivision) started just after 8pm. Hazy sunset.

Friday (Aug 18) overnight low of 43 degrees, clear sky and light haze (dust and a little smoke) this morning. Clarks nutcrackers flying and calling, a pine squirrel scolding. Have not seen any ground squirrels around, some of their holes look filled in from below. Quiet enough you could hear the river once in a while. Dust hanging in the air over the back Stibnite road, bit of traffic. Logging crew was loading logs near the school corner this morning. Helicopter flew over just before 11am. Warm sunny day, light afternoon breezes, high of 91 degrees. Quiet evening, slight haze high in the air. Nighthawks flying over before dark.

Saturday (Aug 19) overnight low of 45 degrees, a few clouds and slight haze this morning. A few evening grosbeaks calling from the trees. Some early airplane traffic. Loggers working over by hole #13 this morning. Pine squirrel chasing chipmunks. Increased weekend traffic and dusty air. Grasshoppers are getting big. Very loud gunfire to the west of the neighborhood started just after 1pm and went on for about an hour. Kids on horses riding around the golf course later in the afternoon. Warm day, high of 87 degrees. Clouds building to the north and light smoky haze coming in by evening.

Sunday (Aug 20) overnight low of 41 degrees, mostly clear sky and light haze this morning. Quite a few early morning airplanes. Could hear clarks nutcrackers once in a while. Clouds moved in before lunch time and became breezy. Shorts fired on and off for most of the morning and early afternoon. Young cassins finches at the feeder, nutcrackers and jays calling in the early afternoon. Cloudy and rather breezy most of the day, high of 84 degrees. Less traffic this evening and not as dusty. Bit of smoky haze coming in after sundown.
——————————

Idaho News:

Yellow Pine: Now you know about it, forget it

On August 16, 2017 by Judy Nichols


One of my favorites playing Amazing Grace the first time we attended the festival.

I’m going to tell you about a place I love, and then I’m going to tell you to forget about it. Well, maybe not altogether, but mostly. Because, like Boo Radley, exposing it to too many people might kill it.

Yellow Pine, Idaho, population about 40, sits on the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River, at the end of a 32-mile, one-lane, paved road, then about 15 miles of unpaved road.

Its main drag is a block-long, dirt road, with one coffee shop, one café, two taverns, and one tiny, shuttered grocery store that’s for sale. Scattered around on the hillsides are cabins, some rustic, some pretty swanky, often used only on weekends during the summer. In the brutal winters, most people here head down the mountains to warmer climates.

But in the summer, Yellow Pine reminds me of my grandmother’s town, Hanover, Kansas, where I used to visit as a kid. Everybody knows everybody.

continued:
[h/t AF]
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

First Dark Sky Reserve In The U.S. Could Be In Idaho

By Matt Guilhem Boise State Public Radio Aug 14, 2017


Light pollution makes the Milky Way impossible to see in all but the darkest regions. The skies over Stanley and the surrounding Sawtoooth National Recreation Area are some of the darkest in the continental U.S. by Shutter Runner / Flickr

With up to a million people predicted to come to Idaho to watch the solar eclipse on August 21, the sky is big business. While day turning to night is rare to see, the night sky is a spectacle unto itself.

In town, you might see just a few stars, but in the wilderness – away from the glow of the city – the sky puts on a show each night. In Idaho’s Sawtooth National Recreation Area, one of the darkest places left in the lower 48 states, a campaign is underway to save the pristine sky.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

St. Lukes McCall – Amateur Radio Station On-line

2017-08-19

The permanent installation of the Amateur Radio station at St. Lukes hospital in McCall has been completed. This station is intended to support EMCOM logistical communications, through staffing by both Idaho ARES and Central Idaho Amateur Radio Club amateur radio operators, during disaster, civil emergency and exercise events.

It is hoped that Idaho ARES and other local Amateur Radio clubs are able to support the completion of similar installations at other St. Lukes facilities, leading to the construction of network capability among St. Lukes hospitals, and in the process, advancing both Amateur Radio capabilities and involvement in supporting St. Lukes and other served agencies in a time of need.

For more information, please see the article posted on the Central Idaho Amateur Radio Club web-site by clicking here
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Secesh Meadows to host appreciation BBQ, auction Saturday

The Star-News Aug 17, 2017

A barbecue and auction to thank those who helped build the fire station in Secesh Meadows north of McCall will be held Saturday at the fire station.

The barbecue will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday and the auction will begin held at noon. The event is sponsored by the Secesh Meadows Rural Fire Department.

Funds from the last 10 years of the barbecue and auction raised enough funds to complete the fire station, provide equipment and still leave a reserve fund, organizer Hal Sager said.

“We have accomplished what we set out to do and this may be our last big auction,” Sager said.

The department provides fire protection to 129 homes and summer cabins located in the meadows.

To get to Secesh Meadows, take Warren Wagon Road about 30 miles to the end of the pavement. Keep going straight on the gravel road for about five miles to the fire station on the left side.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Elk Creek Road closures noted for September, October

The Star-News Aug 17, 2017

Elk Creek Road in remote Valley County will be closed during much of September and October, the Valley County Road Department said.

The closures will allow work to repair three slides that occurred in March between Sawmill Point and the South Fork Salmon River.

The contractor will be working 10 days on and four days off. The road will be open when no work is being done.

Closure dates are Aug. 29-30, Sept. 5-14, Sept. 19-28, Oct. 3-12 and Oct. 17-26. For questions, call (208) 382-7195.

source:
— — —

Big Creek to Warrens: Warren to the South Fork access update

Payette NF via FB

Regarding road repairs on two areas that slumped this spring on Valley County’s section of the road.

This is the road beyond Warren down to the South Fork of the Salmon River near Trails End Subdivision.

Valley County has contracted the repairs to begin at the end of August. The road will be remain open, except for these listed dates – on these dates the road will be closed.

Aug. 29-30 Road closed to relocate the fiber optic lines at the upper sloughs
Sept. 5-14 Contractor will complete the upper 2 slough repairs
Sept. 19-28 Begin work on lower repair
Oct. 3-12 Work on lower repair
Oct 17-26 Complete work on lower repair

map:

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Advisory issued for logging in Bear Basin area

The Star-News Aug 17, 2017

Logging is expected to begin this month on the Brundage Bear Basin Stewardship Sale, a news release from the Payette National Forest said.

Hauling will occur on the Goose Lake Road, the Bear Basin Road ), and the connector road between the Goose Lake Road and the Bear Basin Road, the release said.

Logging is expected to continue throughout the fall and finish up this year.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Survey noted for Valley County hazard mitigation plan

The Star-News Aug 17, 2017

Valley County is working on an update to its Multi-Jurisdiction Hazard Mitigation Plan.

The county and other local agencies and organizations have formed a team to complete the required five-year update as part of a federally-funded grant through the Idaho Office of Emergency Management and the University of Idaho.

The update process will focus on what actions have been completed the county, what actions remain to be completed, and the incorporation of new actions.

To take the survey, go to https://hazard-analytics.org/valley-county and follow the Survey link. Paper copies can also be found at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade.

For questions, contact Valley County Emergency Manager Juan Bonilla at dfc @ frontiernet.net

Survey link:
source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

3 reported injured in Boise Co. plane crash

KTVB August 19, 2017

Boise County – Fire and ambulance units in Boise County responded to a plane crash Saturday afternoon at the Warm Springs Creek Airport northeast of Lowman.

The dispatcher said three people were injured, but did not say how severe those injuries were.

Also, there is no word on whether the plane was taking off or coming in for a landing before the crash.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho officials eye selling 10 commercial properties

AP Aug 15, 2017

State officials are considering selling 10 properties as part of a plan to get rid of politically contentious commercial real estate and use the money to buy timberland and agricultural land that the state uses to generate revenue to fund schools.

The Idaho Land Board on Tuesday voted 4-0 to move forward with a possible auction in December as it seeks to generate money from the state’s 2.4 million acres of endowment lands.

Four or the properties are in Boise, four in Meridian and two in Idaho Falls.

The Idaho Department of Lands recommended a Nov. 3 auction date.

But Attorney General Lawrence Wasden wanted that delayed until a financial consultant completes a study analyzing what’s best for smaller endowments.

The board expects to get that report by November.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Comments sought on Idaho plan to regulate water pollution

Keith Ridler / Associated Press, KTVB August 16, 2017

Boise – Federal authorities are taking comments and have set public meeting dates on Idaho’s plan to take over regulating pollution discharge into the state’s lakes and rivers.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Friday said it’s accepting the comments as Idaho officials seek to shift control of permitting and enforcement aspects under the federal Clean Water Act to the state.

Meetings are set in September in Idaho Falls, Twin Falls, Boise, Lewiston and Coeur d’Alene.

If the authorization process moves forward, the Idaho Pollutant Discharge Elimination System in the summer of 2018 will phase in responsibility for issuing pollution discharge permits to cities, industrial businesses, mining operators, animal feedlots and others.

Idaho officials say a state-run program will have more responsive local experts better acquainted with Idaho making decisions.

source:
————————–

Fire Season:

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in effect

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions Prohibit the the following:

* Building, maintaining, attending or using a fire, campfire, charcoal, coal or stove fire, except in designated recreation sites, and only within a metal and/or concrete fire structure provided by the forest service

* Personal charcoal grill

* Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle or building, a designated recreation site or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho’s two largest wildfires mostly in wilderness

Associated Press, KTVB August 19, 2017


Highline Fire burning in McCalla Creek drainage. (Photo: Inciweb)

The two largest wildfires in Idaho are burning mostly in wilderness areas.

The Highline Fire has burned about 11,000 acres [18,393 acres by 8/20] – roughly 17 square miles – in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. It started with a lightning strike on July 28.

The Chamberlain Airstrip is closed because of that fire.

Forty firefighting personnel are assigned to the Highline Fire.

continued:
Note: see today’s fire report for updated info:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Fire Protection Association organizes in eastern Idaho

8/14/17 AP

Idaho Falls, Idaho — A new Rural Fire Protection Association has formed in the wake of one of the most devastating wildfires to hit eastern Idaho.

Aug. 21 marks the one-year anniversary of the ignition of the 83-square-mile (215-square-kilometer) fire. It also marks the date of the solar eclipse, which will bring a swarm of visitors to the area.

Officials say they have significant worries about a potential repeat wildfire, the Post Register reported.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Military aircraft called to help battle blazes in US West

8/16/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Two military aircraft will help detect and map wildfires in the U.S. West.

The National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, Idaho, on Wednesday says the Air National Guard aircraft will be based in eastern Washington state and western Oregon.

Officials say the twin-engine, propeller-driven aircraft are equipped with infrared sensors that can map wildfires and give fire managers information that can help with strategy.

Federal officials last week raised the National Fire Preparedness Level to its highest point, opening the way for assistance from the military.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Sundance, Trapper Peak fires to be commemorated after 50 years

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Aug 16, 2017


Augst 30, 1967. Fire fighters carry chain saws and supplies on the fire line of the 55,910-acre Sundance Mountain fire which burned west from Coolin to Bonners Ferry in Northern Idaho. Crewmen hauling supplies up a fire trail between Lee Creek and Lost Creek in the fire’s early stages are (from left) Jim Blake, from Newport, and Dean Douglas, Alvin Coy and Darrel Wear, all from Priest River. (Photo Archive/The Spokesman-Review)

story:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Great Fire of 1910

From Wikipedia


Little North Fork of the St. Joe River, Idaho

The Great Fire of 1910 (also commonly referred to as the Big Blowup, the Big Burn, or the Devil’s Broom fire) was a wildfire in the western United States that burned about three million acres (4,700 sq mi; 12,100 km2) in northeast Washington, northern Idaho, and western Montana.

The area burned included parts of the Bitterroot, Cabinet, Clearwater, Coeur d’Alene, Flathead, Kaniksu, Kootenai, Lewis and Clark, Lolo, and St. Joe National Forests. The firestorm burned over two days, August 20–21, and killed 87 people, mostly firefighters. It is believed to be the largest, although not the deadliest, forest fire in U.S. history. The outcome was to highlight firefighters as public heroes while raising public awareness surrounding national nature conservation. The extensive burned area was approximately the size of the state of Connecticut.

continued:
———————————–

Public Lands:

Tussock Moths

Payette NF 8/17/2017 (via FB)

The McCall District has recently had reports of defoliation of trees and shrubs in the Bear Basin area… so we went to take a look. The Forest Health Protection Team and local Silviculturist found two Tussock Moths and the Spruce Bud Wrorm. Present were the Douglas Fir Tussock Moth and the Rusty Tussock Moth. The Douglas Fir Tussock Moth was found in the trees and the Rusty Tussock Moth on the brush, including the huckleberry bushes. There have been reports of a rash after picking huckleberries which is caused by the Rusty Tussock Moth caterpillars. The hairs or tufts have little spines that can cause skin irritation. It is suggested to wear long sleves when picking huckleberries.

Insects including these two moths and bud worm are a natural part of the ecosystem. At this time the Forest with the help of the Forest Health Protection Team will monitor the infestation to determine if further action is needed. Monitoring includes putting traps out in the forest to capture the adult male moths when they start to fly in August and September. At this time it appears to be very localized infestation.

The pictures are of the Rusty Tussock Moth Caterpillars that are feeding on the shrubs, defoliation and egg mass.

photo gallery:

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Timber Salvage Area Closed For Public Safety

Boise, Idaho, August, 15, 2017

The Boise National Forest is temporarily closing the South Pioneer Fire Recovery Project area including the Rock Creek drainage on the Lowman Ranger District for public safety. The Rock Creek drainage includes National Forest System road 594.

Salvage operations including log truck traffic, skidding timber, felling operations and service vehicle traffic make it dangerous for access in the area. All closure areas within the Lowman and Idaho City Ranger Districts remain in effect until Dec. 31, 2018, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor.

There is a higher degree of hazards after a burn, visitors should stay alert within the Pioneer Fire area. Snags or dead trees are continuing to fall and washouts or debris flows may result after heavy rains. “Public and employee safety is always our first priority, said Brant Petersen, Idaho City District Ranger. “The area is closed but we’re keeping key routes open so visitors can to get through the burned area and on to their destination.”

Forest visitors should drive with caution since they may encounter heavy equipment and logging trucks. Routes effected include, State Highways 55, State Highway 21, Boise County Road 17 (Banks Lowman Highway) and adjacent National Forest Systems (NFS) roads within the Lowman and Idaho City Ranger Districts.

To view all forest closures visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices

Pioneer Fire salvage sales support public health and safety by reducing hazard trees on more than 13,000 acres of high recreation use areas within the North and South projects. Revenue generated from the salvage sales fund resource protection and reforestation efforts including the restoration of whitebark pine on more than 600 acres and the planting of Douglas Fir and Ponderosa Pine trees on more than 18,000 acres. Industry will recover the economic value of 45 Million Board Feet (MMBF) of merchantable timber. For more information on salvage operations please visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/boise/home/?cid=fseprd530485

Map:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Brundage Bear Basin Stewardship Sale

Payette NF 8/15/2017

A reminder if you recreate in the Brundage Mountain area.

Logging is expected to begin on the Brundage Bear Basin Stewardship Sale in this month (August). Log haul will occur on the Goose Lake Road (# 50257), the Bear Basin Road (#50451), and the connector road between the Goose Lake Road and the Bear Basin Road, road #50452.

Logging is expected to continue throughout the fall and finish up this year.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Hazel #1 Minerals Plan of Operations Project Decision is Now Available

USDA Forest Service 8/15/2017

The Decision Memo for the Hazel #1 Mineral Exploration Project on the Idaho City Ranger District is now available on the project web page: https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49769. The Decision Memo documents Ranger Petersen’s decision to implement the Hazel #1 Mineral Exploration Project.

Ranger Petersen determined that this action falls within categorical exclusion 36 CFR 220.6(e)(3). The Hazel #1 Mineral Exploration Project was reviewed in accordance with the categorical exclusion guidelines at FSH 1909.15(30), as updated on May 28, 2014. Following review of the resource conditions identified at 36 CFR 220.6(b), Ranger Petersen determined that no extraordinary circumstances exist. In addition, the Interdisciplinary Team’s analysis did not identify any other unusual circumstances or uncertainties about environmental effects associated with the action that would preclude use of a categorical exclusion.

On January 17, 2014, the President signed into law the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014 (Pub. L. No. 113-76). Section 431 of that Act directs that the 1992 and 2012 legislation establishing the 36 CFR 215 (post-decisional appeals) and 36 CFR 218 (pre-decisional objections) processes “shall not apply to any project or activity implementing a land and resource management plan … that is categorically excluded ….under the National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA].” On February 7, 2014, the President signed into law the Agricultural Act of 2014 (Farm Bill) (Pub. L. No. 113-79). Section 8006 of the 2014 Farm Bill repealed the Appeals Reform Act (ARA) (Pub. L. No. 102-381). The ARA’s implementing regulation was 36 CFR 215. The 2014 Farm Bill also directs that the pre-decisional objection process established in the Consolidated Appropriation Act of 2012 shall not be applicable to categorically excluded projects or activities. As a result of these two statutes, the Forest Service no longer offers notice, comment and appeal opportunities pursuant to 36 CFR 215 for categorically excluded projects.

The decision may be implemented five business days from the decision date, after finalization of the signed Plan of Operations, and the posting of a bond by the operator. Implementation is expected to begin in late summer 2017 and all ground disturbing activities will be completed within one year.

For additional information about this project, please contact Melissa Swain, Project Leader, by phone at 208-392-6681 or by email at mbswain@fs.fed.us.

Sincerely,
Melissa Yenko
Forest Environmental Coordinator
Boise National Forest
————————————–

Critter News:

Bat in Valley County tests positive for rabies

by KBOI News Staff Thursday, August 17th 2017

The Central District Health Department says a bat found inside of a house in Valley County has tested positive for rabies.

The homeowner and a cat had contact with the bat and they were able to keep the bat trapped until it could be tested, according to officials.

The district says the homeowner is now undergoing rabies-preventive therapy and the cat was given a rabies vaccination booster shot.

Officials say this is a good reminder to make sure cats, dogs, and horses are up-to-date on rabies vaccinations.

continued:
— — —

Health official confirm 2 rabid bats in eastern Idaho

8/17/17 AP

Idaho Falls, Idaho — Eastern Idaho officials say two rabid bats were recently found in Idaho Falls and Swan Valley.

According to an Eastern Idaho Public Health news release, bats are the only animal in the state known to be natural carriers of the potentially fatal virus. Epidemiologist Ken Anderson says rabies can be transmitted to humans and other animals that have been bitten, scratched or come in close contact with an infected bat.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Pet talk – Intestinal parasites in dogs and cats

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Aug 18, 2017 IME

Numerous parasitic organisms can live in the gastro-intestinal tract of dogs and cats. Some of these parasites, like round worms, hookworms, whipworms and giardia, can cause clinical signs of vomiting, diarrhea, weight loss and abdominal pain. Some intestinal parasites of dogs and cats can potentially infect a human, which is of particular concern when young children are handling or playing with animals that are infested or in areas, like sandboxes, where infected animals have defecated.

Many dogs and cats are born with parasites, as roundworms can be passed in the womb from mother to fetuses. Most parasites are obtained from environmental exposure, such as whipworms, giardia, hookworms and tapeworms. Copraphagia (eating another animal’s stool) is another common means of exposure to intestinal parasites.

Some parasites cause marked effect on the health of the dog and cat, while other parasites will cause simple anal irritation and scooching. Hookworms and whipworms consume blood that they suck from the walls of the intestines. This can cause intestinal bleeding with dark tarry stools and pale gums due to blood loss (anemia). Roundworms and giardia can cause vomiting, diarrhea and weight loss.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Colville Tribe expands wolf hunting off reservation while pro-wolf groups wail

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Aug 7, 2017

While animal advocate groups write letters and court the media and public for more “transparency” in managing Washington’s recovering wolf population, Native Americans are expanding their options for wolf hunting.

Animal groups seem to go frantic every time a wolf is threatened or removed for killing livestock, as though wolves are sacred. State and federal endangered species rules protect wolves but make provisions for managing animals that threaten people or livestock.

The Tribes aren’t bound by state and federal rules and can hunt wolves under rules set by their tribal wildlife officials.

Wolf experts and recovery advocates say limited hunting of wolves is necessary in the long run to make sure wolves maintain their wariness of humans.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Second week of August 2017
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Grizzly bear relocated to Fall Creek

Local News 8 – Aug 15, 2017

Jackson, Wyo. (KIFI/KIDK) – An adult male grizzly bear that was getting into livestock feed west of Meeteetse, Wyoming has been trapped and relocated.

Wyoming Game and Fish personnel captured the bear August 11. In cooperation with the Caribou-Targhee National Forest, the bear was relocated to the Fall Creek drainage approximately 25 miles northwest of Moran Junction. That area is located in occupied grizzly bear habitat.

The agency said the relocation is intended to minimize conflicts between humans and grizzly bears and is critical to the recovery of the population.

Bears can create conflicts after they have obtained food rewards.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Rare white moose captured on camera taking a dip

by Sinclair Broadcast Group Monday, August 14th 2017

A rare white moose was filmed going for a swim in a Swedish lake on August 11.

Even the creature’s antlers are white.

source w/video:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Emergency deer, antelope hunts due to Nevada to wildfires

8/16/17 AP

Reno, Nev. — Nevada’s Wildlife Commission has approved a series of emergency hunting seasons this fall to help reduce antelope and mule deer populations in parts of northeast Nevada ravaged by wildfires

State wildlife biologists say fires already have destroyed more than 500 square miles (1,295 sq. kilometers) of crucial winter range in Elko County that will be unable to sustain enough food and habitat for existing herds this winter.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho wildlife officials prohibit harvest of steelhead

8/15/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Anglers in Idaho will not be allowed to keep any steelhead starting Friday, but catch-and-release will be permitted.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game says the decision announced Tuesday is intended to allow enough steelhead to make it to hatcheries to have future generations.

Officials say that through Monday, about 400 steelhead have crossed the Lower Granite Dam in eastern Washington state, about 30 miles downstream from Lewiston in northern Idaho.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Idaho angler’s record-setting trout in Utah deemed invalid

Alex Merritt Aug 18, 2017 KIVI TV

An Idaho man who caught a record-setting trout in Utah has been told his fish does not qualify for the record anymore because he caught it without a valid fishing license.

Sidney Cellan caught the 57-pound (26-kilogram), 48-inch (122-centimeter) lake trout in June at the Flaming Gorge Reservoir.

The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources told Cellan the fish was the state’s largest catch-and-release trout in history. Wildlife officials, however, now say they made an honest mistake in crowning Cellan’s trout since his fishing license expired a few days before the catch.

Cellan released the fish, so it is still in the reservoir for another angler to catch.

The record trout of 46.5 inches (118 centimeters) by Ray Johnson in 1998 stands, again.

source:
——————————–

Fish & Game News:

Fire restrictions issued on Idaho Fish & Game managed lands

Local News 8 – Aug 18, 2017

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is imposing Stage I fire restrictions on IDFG managed lands across the Upper Snake Region effective immediately.

Until further notice, the following restrictions apply on all Wildlife Management Areas, Lakes and Reservoirs, and fishing access areas owned or managed by IDFG across Clark, Fremont, Teton, Bonneville, Bingham, Butte and Custer counties.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Fish and Game closes steelhead harvest to protect small run of fish

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Tuesday, August 15, 2017 – 12:20 PM MDT

Closure takes effect at midnight on Aug. 17. Catch and release angling is still allowed

An extremely small number of steelhead returning to Idaho so far has prompted Fish and Game to reduce the bag limit on adipose-clipped hatchery steelhead to zero – closing all rivers to harvest for the fall steelhead season.

Through Aug. 14, about 400 steelhead have crossed Lower Granite Dam about 30 miles downstream from Lewiston. The 10-year average for that date is about 6,000 steelhead. Regardless of the size of the hatchery return, anglers have been required to release any wild fish caught since 1987. Catch and release of wild fish is an important conservation tool to protect them, and it continues this year.

Closing harvest of hatchery steelhead while leaving it open for catch-and-release fishing will also help ensure enough broodstock return to steelhead hatcheries to produce the next generation of fish.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Timber sale nets Idaho Department of Fish and Game $900,000

8/14/17 AP

Coeur d’Alene, Idaho — The Idaho Department of Fish and Game will receive about $907,000 in a northern Idaho timber sale.

Fish and Game Regional Manager Chip Corsi told The Spokesman-Review (http://bit.ly/2vCKb82) that the timber stand is landlocked with no public access, and the department wanted to take advantage of high prices for western red cedar.

Some area residents opposed the timber sale, urging the agency to save the cedar trees. Some of the trees are 80 to 120 years old, and residents wanted the Fish and Game Department to seek an easement across private land so that people could walk to the cedar grove.

But the rebounding U.S. housing market has increased demand for cedar siding and decking, pushing prices to near-record levels.

The Fish and Game department plans to use the proceeds for wildlife habitat improvements in northern Idaho.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Unexpected wildlife caught at one Boise park

by KBOI News Staff Tuesday, August 15th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — A rooster was spotted wandering around Kathryn Albertson Park over the weekend.

With no owner in sight, one man stepped in to save the animal.

Me and my fiance, we had heard that someone dumped a rooster around here,” said Cody Ayola. “One day we couldn’t find him. Next day we found him walking around in the grass over in that area.”

Cody named the rooster Jeffrey and says he’s now in good hands in Caldwell.

But it’s still a mystery as to how he ended up in the park.

Animal dumping has been an issue in Boise parks in the past.

Boise Parks and Recreation is urging people not to do it because not only could it hurt the animal, it could also impact the ecosystem.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Giant Chicken – Brahma Rooster


— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

GiantMetalRooster-a
—————————–

Seasonal Humor:

19150703SpeedLImit-a

July 3, 1915 Elmore County
—————————————