Category Archives: News 2018

Nov 11, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Nov 11, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
November 22 at 4pm Thanksgiving Potluck at the Yellow Pine Tavern
November 24 “Stop the Bleed” Training YPFD

(details below)
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Village News:

Yellow Pine US Mail

Three day a week mail delivery from Cascade starts November 1, 2018. The Post Office in Yellow Pine will be open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Be sure to buy your holiday stamps here.
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Firewood Permits

Permits available May 15, 2018 through November 30, 2018 at The Corner.

Fuelwood permits have been reduced to $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum and a 10-cord maximum per household.

link to more info:
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.


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Ice Hole Campground Closed

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
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Wolf Hunters – be sure of your target!

“There’s two German shepherds running around down by the Eiguren Ranch. Look like wolf pups from far. I mentioned to the owner he might want to keep them closer, just an FYI.” – JB
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Pests

No recent reports of bear activity, but they are still around fattening up for winter. Please do not leave pet food outside and secure your trash. Mice are looking for a warm place to winter.

Video Link Bear Visitor Aug 20, 2018
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Local Events:

Thanksgiving Potluck at the Yellow Pine Tavern

Thursday November 22 at 4pm

Turkey, dressing, mashed potatoes and gravy provided
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November 24 “Stop the Bleed” Training

Jeff and I are now instructors for the National Program from the American College of Surgeons on educating the public on “Stop the Bleed”. We are going to hold a class here in YP the Saturday after Thanksgiving November 24, 2018 at the YP Fire Station and will do more once we return from our winter break. We are in the process of building “stop the bleed” packets to be placed in the businesses around town as well.

Background: Motivated by the 2012 tragedy in Sandy Hook and multiple tragedies that have occurred in the ensuing years, what has become known as the Hartford Consensus was convened to bring together leaders from law enforcement, the federal government, and the medical community to improve survivability from manmade or natural mass casualty events. The resulting injuries from these events generally present with severe bleeding which, if left unattended, can result in death. The participants of the Hartford Consensus concluded that by providing first responders (law enforcement) and civilian bystanders the skills and basic tools to stop uncontrolled bleeding in an emergency situation, lives would be saved. The first responder program has received very good response and is widely being used across the country. The next step is to focus on needs of civilian bystanders.

Need: Civilians need basic training in Bleeding Control principles so they are able to provide immediate, frontline aid until first responders are able to take over care of an injured person. Due to many situations, there may be a delay between the time of injury and the time a first responder is on the scene. Without civilian intervention in these circumstances, preventable deaths will occur.

Mission/Objective: The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma is leading the effort to save lives by teaching the civilian population to provide vital initial response to stop uncontrolled bleeding in emergency situations. This will be accomplished by the development of a comprehensive and sustainable bleeding control education and information program targeted to civilians that will inform, educate and empower the 300+million citizens of the United States.

Copyright © 2017 by the American College of Surgeons
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx

There will be a YPWUA meeting in October. (?)
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VYPA News:

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 18th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th. Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.
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YPFD News:

The next meeting to be in May 18th, 2019 at the Community Hall
There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.
There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.
Sept 22nd YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Sept. 30th Yellow Pine Times.
October 6 YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Oct 21st Yellow Pine Times.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11am all are welcome

The YPFD has 2 Size Chimney Brushes with extension rods that were donated for use around YP. If you would like to borrow one, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you. The YPFD also has loanable mitigation tools, (Weed-Whacker, Hedge Trimmer, backpack blower and 16’ pole saw). If you would like to borrow one or all, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you.

It’s also time to check the Smoke Alarm batteries and Fire Extinguishers. Please test the alarm and replace Smoke Alarm Batteries every year, if you have the replaceable battery type. Fire Extinguishers should be checked as well and should be easily seen and reachable. A good location for the Fire Extinguishers would be the kitchen and near the wood stove and/or fireplace. The needle should be in the green.

If you need a Smoke Detector or Fire Extinguisher for your YP residence please contact Jeff F.

Smoke Alarm Info:

Cooking safety in the home:
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open for summer
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

We sell FS wood cutting permits.

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC

Buck Horn Outfitters in Idaho’s west Central Mountains in Units 25, 20 A, & 19 A. Providing Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Mountain lion, & Wolf Hunts. We offer Guided Rifle or Archery Hunts & Drop Camps. We are not about Quantity we are about providing Quality Hunts. My husband and I have been in the back country all our lives, we offer Deluxe camps with great food & our Guides know hunting, the back country and Stock.

Link to FB:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430 – 50# bag of Polar Ice Melt available for $7.99. Breaks the Ice Barrier. Quick Melting action, even in heavy snow.
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Nov 5) overnight low of 32 degrees, overcast this morning (top of VanMeter socked in) and a few drops and flakes falling for a short while. Heard some small birds twittering to the north east. Snow flurries around lunch time, then breaks in the clouds and scattered sunshine early afternoon, high of 44 degrees. Stellar jay visiting the neighborhood. Snow late afternoon, starting to stick a little, trees on Golden Gate frosted white, low clouds on top. More snow after dark, 1/2″ by 8pm. Snowed most of the night and early morning.

Tuesday (Nov 6) overnight low of 31 degrees, 3″ of snow on the ground, low clouds (ridges socked in) and still snowing. Heard starlings calling in the neighborhood. Snow stopped after lunch time, trees dumping snowloads. Breaks in the clouds and a bit of sunshine early afternoon, high of 42 degrees. More snow fell later in the afternoon and quit right after sunset, breaks in the clouds and temperature dropping. A skiff of snow fell after dark.

Wednesday (Nov 7) overnight low of 27 degrees, 2″ of snow remaining in the shade with a trace of new snow. Overcast and snowing a little before lunch time. Mail truck 2 hours late, broke down on main street. Breaks in the clouds and scattered sunshine early afternoon, mostly cloudy and stiff cold breeze, snow melting, high of 40 degrees. Flock of starlings in the neighborhood. Snow flurries late afternoon, trace accumulation. Clearing during the night and cold.

Thursday (Nov 8) overnight low of 15 degrees, average 1-2″ of snow with bare patches of ground, clear sky with a bit of haze. Sunny and melting snow off roofs mid-day, high of 39 degrees. Quiet day. Clear evening, temperatures dropping after sunset. Clear starry night.

Friday (Nov 9) overnight low of 10 degrees, high thin overcast and light breeze this morning, patchy snow cover (about 1″ in the shade.) Gray sky all day, chilly breezes and filtered sun melted a little of the snow, high of 38 degrees. Quiet day, very little traffic. Just below freezing at dark.

Saturday (Nov 10) overnight low in the 20’s, mostly cloudy this morning, occasional flake of snow and chilly breezes, patchy snow cover (still about 1″ in the shade.) The ground is starting to freeze. A few flakes of snow before lunch, then very light snow after lunch, a slight trace of snow by 3pm and mostly cloudy, high of 35 degrees. Overcast and breezy at dusk.

Sunday (Nov 11) overnight low of 9 degrees, clear sky and chilly breezes this morning, about an inch of patchy old snow in the shade. Quiet day, very little traffic. A solitary steller jay visiting early afternoon. Mostly clear afternoon and melting a little snow, high of 38 degrees. Partly cloudy at sunset and below freezing.
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Tips & Advice:

Be Ember Aware! Tip Series

“Used with permission from University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and the Living With Fire program.”

Be Ember Aware Tip #4 – Vulnerable Vent Dilemma

Vents play a critical role in the long-term preservation of your home by allowing excess moisture to escape from the attic and crawl space. If moisture was allowed to accumulate in these areas, the wood components of your home could be threatened by mold and decay fungi.

During a wildfire, vent openings have also been shown to be one vulnerable spots for ember entry into your home. The Wildfire Lessons Learned Center “Southern California Firestorm 2003” report concluded after reviewing the loss of 3340 homes destroyed by wildfire:

Ornamental vegetation created an unpredictable and significant fuel source that blew into attic vents and eaves and spread through neighborhoods by torching, crowning, or throwing embers. Structures became involved from ember attack from the inside out rather than flame impingement.

This creates a dilemma for homeowners. Many vents use wire mesh coverings. Some building codes set the minimum mesh size for these at 1/4 inch. Smaller mesh sizes can become clogged by paint, cobwebs, debris, etc. that will reduce air flow. Unfortunately, the 1/4-inch mesh is not effective in preventing ember entry into the attic, eave, and crawl space vents. For existing homes, consider the following:

* Replace 1/4-inch mesh with 1/8-inch mesh, if building codes and required air flow allow. Be sure to keep the mesh openings unclogged.
* Use metal wire mesh, not plastic or fiberglass.
* Don’t store combustible materials, such as paper, clothing, etc. in the attic or crawl space.
* Clear fallen pine needles, leaves, dried grass and other debris from around vents (a particular problem with through-roof vents, such as a dormer or ridge vent).
* Do not plant shrubs in front of or underneath vent openings.
* Create pre-made covers out of plywood to install over vent openings if wildfire is approaching and there is time. In an emergency situation, it may help to fold several layers of aluminum foil and staple over vent openings.

New ember resistant vent designs are becoming available to consumers. Check with your local fire marshal for advice on these and other measures to reduce the potential of embers entering your home.

[h/t Fire Chief Jeff]
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Fla. medical director on ’60 Minutes’: We all need to learn ‘Stop the Bleed’

Dr. Peter Antevy said given how common mass casualty events have become in the U.S., everyone needs to be prepared

Nov 5, 2018

Broward County, Fla. — The day after the Parkland high school mass shooting, Broward County Medical Director Dr. Peter Antevy said his kids woke up for school, heard what happened and his son looked at him with the “fear of God that he had to go to school that day.”

“My first instinct was he needs a bleeding kit. My son, today, has a bleeding kit on his person,” Antevy told CBS News’ Scott Pelley during a segment on “60 Minutes” this past weekend.

The segment takes a deep look into the difference between wounds sustained from a handgun and injuries from an AR-15 style rifle round. Pelley spoke with Don Deyo, a former paramedic and Green Beret with firsthand experience with battlefield wounds.

continued:

[h/t YPFD]
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Idaho News:

Local Election Results

The Star-News November 8, 2018

Valley County Commission – District 3

Dave Bingaman – 2,385 – 46%
Cec Tyler – 2,162 – 42%
Ed Allen – 616 – 12%

Valley County Treasurer

Gabe Stayton – 2,928 – 62%
Greg Price – 1,786 – 38%

Valley County Road Tax Advisory Vote

Yes – 3,478 – 69%
No – 1,550 – 31%

Adams County Commission – District 3

Viki Purdy – 1,208 – 65.5%
Jeff Luff – 636 – 34.5%

Idaho Legislature State Senator, District 8

Steven Thayn – 14,128 – 71.0%
Bill Sifford – 4,500 – 22.6%
Kirsten Faith Richardson – 1,265 – 6.4%

State Representative, Position A, District 8

Terry F. Gestrin – 14,670 – 70.1%
Jon W. Glick – 6,265 – 29.9%

State Representative, Position A, District 9

Ryan Kerby – 1,700 – 75.6%
Allen Schmid – 3,768- 24.4%

State Representative, Position B, District 9

Judy Boyle – 11,554- 74.7%
Chase Van Weerdhuizen – 3,921- 25.3%

source:
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Unofficial 2018 General Election Valley County

With 9 of 9 precincts reporting.

Last updated Nov 7 2018 12:44AM

Link:
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Valley voters endorse higher taxes for roads

Commissioners will consider tax increase for 2020 budget

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Nov 8, 2018

Voters in Valley County endorsed by a large margin on Tuesday higher property taxes to maintain and improve county roads.

The advisory ballot for the tax levy was 3,478 in favor, or 69 percent and 1,550 opposed, or 31 percent.

The vote endorsed a proposal by Valley County commissioners to adopt a property tax increase that would add up to $252 in taxes per year for a property worth $300,000.

The levy would provide the road department with an additional $3.3 million, according to estimates.

Commissioners will not make a final decision on enacting the levy until September 2019, when they set the budget for 2020. The first increased taxes would not be collected until December 2019.

continued:
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Cascade seeks member to serve on Midas Gold advisory council

The Star-News Nov 8, 2018

The City of Cascade seeking interested individuals to serve on the Stibnite Advisory Council.

The Cascade City Council voted on Oct. 22 to sign the community agreement offered by Midas Gold, which is proposing a gold and antimony mine in the Stibnite area of Valley County.

The agreement is not an endorsement of the Stibnite Gold Project and does not contain any obligation to endorse the project.

Cascade’s representative to the advisory council would serve a one-year term.

The city is also seeking someone interested in serving as a board member on the Stibnite Foundation for one year.

Applicants should submit statements of interest no later than Monday, Nov. 19, to mayor@cascadeid.us, City of Cascade, PO Box 649, Cascade, ID 83611, in person at Cascade City Hall.

source:
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First Idaho flu-related death of the season reported

by CBS 2 News Staff Friday, November 9th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare says the first flu-related death of the 2018-2019 flu season has been reported.

Officials say the victim is a northern Idaho woman over the age of 50.

“The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare is reminding residents that flu can be serious” said Randi Pedersen, the Idaho Influenza Surveillance Coordinator in a press release. “The most important action to take to prevent serious illness is to get a flu vaccine now.”

continued:
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Mining News:

from Midas Gold (via FB)

City of McCall: the Environment

6:00PM – Nov 13, 2018

The City of McCall is hosting a meeting on Tuesday, November 13 to discuss the impacts mining can have on the environment and today’s reclamation standards. Reclamation standards and expectations have changed drastically since miners first discovered the historic Stibnite Mining District. Initially, there were no standards miners were required to meet but today that is not at all the case.

Do you have a question you would like to ask? Submit it online! Submitted questions will be answered by Midas Gold and the other panelists during the meeting.

If you believe in our project and support Midas Gold, we could use your support and would love to see you at the meeting. It starts at 6 p.m. on November 13 and will be held at the Northfork Lodge.Please join us and help city leaders understand McCall residents believe in the Stibnite Gold Project and support Midas Gold.

source:
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Public Lands:

The Fire Before the Fire

Controlled burns helped contain spread of Mesa Fire

By Max Silverson for The Star-News November 8, 2018

Controlled burns set three months before the Mesa Fire last summer are being credited with helping slow the spread of the blaze east of Council, Payette National Forest officials said.

Because of the controlled burns, the Mesa Fire proved to be relatively easy to contain, despite being active during some of the hottest and driest days of the summer, Payette officials said.

Firefighters were able to slow the advance of the fire, plan a more precise strategy and reduce risk to firefighters, Fire Management Specialist David LaChapelle said.

“This was some of the easiest burning to catch in an August wildfire because of treatments to the forest,” LaChapelle said.

Controlled burns are lit during the spring and fall to burn small portions of a forest. The lack of undergrowth, duff and small trees slows the progress any unplanned wildfires.

The burns in the area where the Mesa Fire came through were part of the Mill Creek-Council Mountain restoration project.

continued:
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Boise and Payette National Forests begin Christmas Tree Permit Sales November 17

Date: November 7, 2018
Contacts: Brian Harris, Public Affairs Officer, 208-634-0784 office, 208-634-6945 cell.
Venetia Gempler Phone: (208) 373-4105 Email: vgempler@fs.fed.us

McCall, ID – Christmas Tree Permits will be available for purchase on Saturday, November 17th. On that date, the commercial vendors will begin selling Christmas Tree Permits. On Monday, November 19, permits will be available at National Forest Offices. All tree permits are valid to December 25th.

Each permit allows one tree to be cut, with a limit of three permits per family. For both Forests, the cost of a permit for one tree is $10, and the maximum height of a permitted tree is 12 feet. Permits are valid on both the Payette and Boise National Forest – one permit works for both Forests.

All purchasers are provided with information about where a Christmas tree may be harvested, restrictions and helpful tips.

A Christmas Tree Permit is for personal use only, and use of permits for commercial purposes is prohibited. Permits are non-refundable.

In coordination with the “Every Kid in a Park” program, fourth-graders who are participating in the Every Kid in a Park program can receive a free Christmas tree Permit. The U.S. Forest Service is among several federal agencies that support the Every Kid in a Park initiative which is a nationwide call to action to build the next generation of outdoor enthusiasts. The initiative provides a free pass to all fourth-grade students who first go to http://www.EveryKidinaPark.gov and complete the application process.

To receive a free Christmas tree permit, the fourth-grader and a parent must go to a Forest Service office in person with the “voucher” they received from the online website at: http://www.EveryKidinaPark.gov.

Commercial vendors will not be issuing a free Christmas tree permit to participants of the Every Kid in a Park program, and free Christmas tree permits cannot be sent through the mail or electronically. Participation in the Every Kid in a Park program also offers benefits at National Parks and on other public lands and facilities across the United States.

Harvesting a Christmas tree is a fun adventure and often a traditional family event. Please review the Christmas tree brochure and map for optimal areas and be fully prepared for winter travel.

If an unusually heavy snowfall occurs in southwest Idaho, and forest roads become a safety concern for the public, some areas may be closed early to Christmas tree gathering. Forest roads are not plowed. Call ahead and check websites for road conditions before heading out. Please do not block private or county roadways at any time.

To provide for family safety, officials advise a few simple guidelines:

* Use the brochure with instructions provided.

* Practice winter survival and driving techniques.

* Bring the right tools, such as a saw and a shovel, so the tree can be cut to within 6” of the ground’s surface.

* Take along emergency equipment, plenty of food and water, and try to use a 4-wheel drive vehicle if you are planning to travel in snow country.

* Always inform neighbors and family friends of the route you intend to take, include a map of your destination, and the time that you plan to be gone.

* Be prepared for the possibility of a long hike or snowmobile ride while searching for the perfect tree.

* According to Idaho state law, any vehicle carrying a load that extends more than 4 feet past the tailgate, must display a red or florescent orange flag tied on the end of the load to caution other drivers.

Where to get a Christmas Tree Permit

Boise National Forest Offices
https://www.fs.usda.gov/boise
Interagency Visitor Information Center 208-373-4007
Sells permits for the Payette and Boise National Forests
1387 South Vinnell Way
(BLM State Office – West of Walmart on Overland Road, Boise)
Hours: M-F 7:45-4:30 p.m. (Vendors and offices are closed Thanksgiving Day)

The Idaho City Ranger District 208-392-6681
3833 Highway 21
Idaho City, ID
Hours: M-F 8 a.m. – 4:30p.m
Idaho City Ranger District may or may not be open on weekends. Please call ahead

Lowman Ranger District 208-259-3361
7359 Highway 21
Lowman, ID 83637
Hours: M-F 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Emmett Ranger District 208-365-7000
1805 Highway 16, Room 5
Emmett, ID 83617
Hours: M-F 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Cascade Ranger District 208-382-7400
540 North Main Street
Cascade, ID 83611
Hours: M-F 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Mountain Home Ranger District 208-587-7961
3080 Industrial Way
Mountain Home, ID 83647
Hours: M-F 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Boise National Forest Vendors

Idaho City Grocery (208) 392-4426
3868 Highway 21
Idaho City, ID 83631
Open: Mon-Thursday, 8 a.m. – 9 p.m.
Fri-Sun, 7 a.m. – 9 p.m.

Tom’s Service/Sinclair (208) 392-4900
243 State Highway 21
Idaho City, ID 83631
Open: Everyday, 5 a.m. -11 p.m.

Seasons (208) 392-9777
200 Main Street
Idaho City, ID 83631
Open: Everyday, 7 a.m.-10 p.m.

Donna’s Place (208) 392-9666
110 E Granite Street
Placerville, ID 83666
Open: Everyday, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.

East Cleveland Beverage (208) 459-6442
2518 E Cleveland
Caldwell, ID 83605
Open: Everyday, 6 a.m. – 10 p.m.

B & W Fuels (208) 365-2291
1900 N. Washington
Emmett, ID 83617
Open: Sun – Thursday, 6 a.m. – 9 p.m.; Fri-Sat, 6 a.m. -10 p.m.

D & B Supply (208) 963-7035
111 State Highway 16
Emmett, ID 83617
Open: Mon – Sat, 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.; Sunday 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Valley View Chevron (208) 793-4321
459 State Highway 55
Horseshoe Bend, ID 83629
Open: Everyday, 5:30 a.m. – 10 p.m.

Ray’s Corner Market (208) 793-2391
445 State Highway 55
Horseshoe Bend, ID 83629
Open: Sun-Sat, 6 a.m. – 10 p.m.

Garden Valley Chevron (208) 462-3869
P.O. Box 447
Garden Valley, ID 83622
Beginning Nov.21 – open: Everyday – 7 a.m. – 9 p.m.

Payette National Forest Offices
https://www.fs.usda.gov/payette

All Payette National Forest offices are open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Vendors and offices closed on Thanksgiving.

McCall Forest Supervisor’s Office
500 North Mission Street, McCall, ID
208-634-0700

Council Ranger District Office
2092 Highway 95, Council, ID
208-253-0100

New Meadows Ranger District Office
3674 Highway 95, New Meadows, ID
208-347-0300

Weiser Ranger District Office
851 E Ninth St., Weiser, ID
208-549-4200

McCall Ranger District Office
102 West Lake St., McCall, ID
208-634-0400

Payette National Forest Vendors

Weiser: Ridley’s Food and Drug (208) 549-1332
652 E First St., Weiser, ID
Open: Everyday 7 a.m. – 11 p.m.

Weiser: Farmer’s Supply Cooperative (208) 549-0654
622 E Commercial St., Weiser, ID
Open: Everyday 5 a.m. – 10 p.m.

Cambridge: Jay’s Sinclair (208) 257-5000
Corner of Hwy 95 and Hwy 71, Cambridge, ID
Open: Everyday 7 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Council: Farmer’s Supply Cooperative (208) 253-4266
2030 N. Highway 95, Council, ID
Open: Everyday 6 a.m. – 10 p.m.

McCall: Albertsons (208) 634-8166
132 E. Lake Street, McCall, ID
Open: Everyday 6:30 a.m. -11 p.m.

New Meadows: C & M Lumber (208) 347-3648
3625 Walker Ln, New Meadows, ID
Open: Mon – Sat 8 a.m. – 6 p.m.
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USFS Regional Intermountain News

Volume 2 Issue 14 November 7, 2018

Welcome to another edition of the Regional Intermountain Newsletter! We appreciate the support we have received in regards to the information and content of our Regional Newsletter.

link:
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Letters to Share:

Mystic Farm “Swag”

11/4/2018

Great for Christmas! Hoodie and denim:$25. Long sleeved T’s: $17. Kids and adult short sleeved T’s (all styles):$12. Hats:$12. Cloth bags and backpacks:$12. Ask me about colors available in both T’s and bags! And, of course, all those wonderful Mystic Farm handmade candles! All proceeds go to support the care and feeding of the fawns at Mystic Farm. Local delivery available and we do ship!

Dory McIsaac
mysticfarmrescue @ gmail.com
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The Gamebird Foundation

11/8/2018

Notice

Spare rib feed Sunday evening December 2nd, 4 to 7 pm: Potluck. Gamebird foundation will furnish ribs and soft drinks. Bring your favorite dish, salad or desert. We must have an RSVP on email or a phone call to reserve your reservation, which we close by November 25th, or before when we reach 175 people. We need to know how many ribs to buy. All reservations will have an envelope at the door with a wristband in it for each member of the family. If you have no wristband, you get no food.

“Bear Grass” will play the music.

Bring your checkbook, as the Foundation will have some exciting items for silent auction/live auction to purchase. 6-foot tall chain sawed carved black bear, 1 each hand carved and painted pheasant and quail signed by Ralph Horn, great pheasant print signed by Fred Boyce, gift cards $75 and $25.00, lady’s silver belt buckle, jewelry, hand tied steelhead fly’s by Leroy Hyatt, gift cards for oil changed by Troy Motors and more items to be added. The funds from the auction will help with the cost of the evening, rent for this wonderful community center, ribs and other cost.

For RSVP and Reservations, Call Jim Hagedorn.

1-208-883-3423, EMAIL jhag1008 @ gmail.com

All This at the Viola Community Center as It Is Now Open for Business.
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Critter News:

FDA investigating link between dog diets and a deadly heart disease increasing nationwide

Meg Shaw Nov 8, 2018 KIVI TV

Cleveland, Ohio — It’s a problem most dog owners can’t even see, but when they hear the diagnosis they’re in complete shock.

… Lucy was diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy, also known as DCM. It’s a heart disease where the heart becomes enlarged and pumps poorly, thus decreasing the amount of blood throughout the body.

Dr. Heaney said it could lead to congestive heart failure, and in some cases, even worse.

… Typically dogs who have the condition are older, large breed, but now, scattered across the country, mid-sized dogs and puppies are suffering from DCM, just like Lucy.

At this point, the FDA believes it could be a dietary problem.

full story:
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2 ranchers in eastern Oregon to try new strategy with wolves

by AP Thursday, November 8th 2018

Salem, Ore. (AP) — Two ranchers in eastern Oregon are working with the state to test a new strategy for preventing livestock attacks by wolves with the hope of breaking an impasse between conservationists and ranchers on how to manage the predators.

Rodger Huffman, president of the Union County Cattlemen’s Association, and Cynthia Warnock, president of the Wallowa County Stockgrowers Association, will develop plans that emphasize non-lethal methods such as range riders, alarm boxes and electrified fencing to keep wolves away from their livestock, the Capital Press reported Thursday.

If wolves continue to attack, then ranchers could ask the state to kill them — a more streamlined approach than currently exists, the newspaper reported.

continued:
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter Nov 5, 2018

Wolves may be moving to Western Washington

Have Doubts That Wolves Are Ravaging Idaho? Come See For Yourselves.

2018 Depredation Chart

Newsletter Nov 8, 2018

Norway’s wolf cull pits sheep farmers against conservationists

State orders killing of wolves from 2 more packs

Federal judge blasts Fish and Wildlife Service, says endangered wolves cannot be shot
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Mountain caribou in lower 48 states being sent to Canada

by Associated Press Monday, November 5th 2018

Spokane, Wash. (AP) — The six mountain caribou remaining in the lower 48 states will be relocated farther north into Canada, a move that ends decades of efforts to reintroduce the large animals into Idaho and Washington state.

The Spokesman Review says biologists hope to breed the few survivors of the South Selkirk herd in captivity north of Revelstoke, British Columbia.

“This is what extinction looks like, and it must be a wake-up call for wildlife and habitat managers in both Canada and the United States,” said Joe Scott, international programs director for Conservation Northwest.

continued:
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Family gives warning about bats after man becomes Utah’s first fatal rabies case in over 70 years

November 8, 2018, by Amanda Gerry, Fox 13

Moroni, Utah — A Utah man is dead in what’s believed to be the first fatal case of rabies in Utah in over 70 years.

“It started with his neck and back pain. He was seen by a chiropractor. That relieved some of the pain initially, but then numbness and tingling into his arms,” his daughter Crystal Sedgwick said.

Sedgwick said her father, 55-year-old Gary Giles, started experiencing these initial symptoms back in mid-October, and from there, it only got worse.

continued:
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Idaho utility’s lawsuit against EPA involving salmon on hold

By Keith Ridler – 11/10/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — A lawsuit by an Idaho utility against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency concerning water temperature standards below a hydroelectric project where federally protected fall chinook salmon reproduce has been put on hold.

A U.S. District Court judge last week agreed to stay the lawsuit by Idaho Power against the EPA while the federal agency works to complete tasks requested by the state of Idaho in 2012.

“Essentially, this is what we wanted for six years,” Idaho Power spokesman Brad Bowlin said Friday. “We’re optimistic things are moving in the right direction. This is definitely a good step forward.”

continued:
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Study shows pesticide exposure can dramatically impact bees’ social behaviors

November 8, 2018, Harvard University

For bees, being social is everything.

Whether it’s foraging for food, caring for the young, using their bodies to generate heat or to fan the nest, or building and repairing nests, a bee colony does just about everything as a single unit.

While recent studies have suggested exposure to pesticides could have impacts on foraging behavior, a new study, led by James Crall, has shown that those effects may be just the tip of the iceberg.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Motorists urged to slow down and watch for wildlife

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Friday, November 9, 2018

With big game animals on the move, wildlife-vehicle collisions tend to peak this time of year.

Mangled carcasses of deer, elk, and other wildlife along Idaho’s roadways should be a flashing warning sign to motorists.

Three mule deer were hit recently by a pickup on Highway 93 near North Fork, Idaho, and just last week, one person was hospitalized after hitting a moose near Leadore. Another driver is lucky to be alive after swerving off the highway near Gibbonsville to miss an elk and rolling his truck into the North Fork Salmon River.

continued:
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F&G Director Virgil Moore announces retirement

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, November 7, 2018


All rights reserved. Idaho Fish and Game

Moore has had a 42-year career in wildlife management

Idaho Fish and Game Director Virgil Moore on Nov. 6 announced he will retire from the department in Jan. 2019 after a 42-year career in fish and wildlife management. Moore has served as director since 2011, and intends to remain until his replacement has been selected by the Fish and Game Commission and is in place.

“It has been an honor to serve Idahoans, the governor and the Fish and Game commission as director the last eight years, and as a state employee for over 42 years,” Moore said. “Working together, Fish and Game and our wildlife resources are in excellent shape and ready to be handed off to new leadership.”

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Intoxicated Goat Arrested by Police

Bridgeport Times, 1913


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Seasonal Humor:


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Advertisements

Nov 4, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Nov 4, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
November 22 at 4pm Thanksgiving Potluck at the Yellow Pine Tavern

(details below)
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Village News:

End of Hunting Season Potluck Yellow Pine Tavern

Nov 3rd

FB photo gallery:
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Yellow Pine US Mail Winter Delivery

Three day a week mail delivery from Cascade starts November 1, 2018. The Post Office in Yellow Pine will be open six days a week. Be sure to buy your holiday stamps here.
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Wolf Hunters – be sure of your target!

“There’s two German shepherds running around down by the Eiguren Ranch. Look like wolf pups from far. I mentioned to the owner he might want to keep them closer, just an FYI.” – JB
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Boise NF Local Fall Rx Burns

The Boise NF crews came and burned the slash piles on the golf course this last week, minimal smoke. Thank you from Yellow Pine.
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Firewood Permits

Permits available May 15, 2018 through November 30, 2018 at The Corner.

Fuelwood permits have been reduced to $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum and a 10-cord maximum per household.

link to more info:
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.


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Ice Hole Campground Closed

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
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Pests

No recent reports of bear activity, but they are still around fattening up for winter. Please do not leave pet food outside and secure your trash. Mice are looking for a warm place to winter.

Video Link Bear Visitor Aug 20, 2018
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Local Events:

Thanksgiving Potluck at the Yellow Pine Tavern

Thursday November 22 at 4pm

Turkey, dressing, mashed potatoes and gravy provided
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

September Yellow Pine water update excerpts

The good news is the second sand filter is online and operating well. We have refurbished and upgraded the chlorinator and purchased new chlorine monitoring tools that will help us more accurately adjust the amount of chlorine injected into the water. Additionally, we received the $10,000 grant from Midas. We are looking at all options but it seems that for 2018 we must raise user fees a minimum of a $150 per year.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx

Was there a YPWUA meeting in October. (?)

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.
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VYPA News:

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 18th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th. Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.
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YPFD News:

The next meeting to be in May 18th, 2019 at the Community Hall
Sept 22nd YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Sept. 30th Yellow Pine Times.
October 6 YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Oct 21st Yellow Pine Times.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11am all are welcome

The YPFD has 2 Size Chimney Brushes with extension rods that were donated for use around YP. If you would like to borrow one, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you. The YPFD also has loanable mitigation tools, (Weed-Whacker, Hedge Trimmer, backpack blower and 16’ pole saw). If you would like to borrow one or all, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you.

It’s also time to check the Smoke Alarm batteries and Fire Extinguishers. Please test the alarm and replace Smoke Alarm Batteries every year, if you have the replaceable battery type. Fire Extinguishers should be checked as well and should be easily seen and reachable. A good location for the Fire Extinguishers would be the kitchen and near the wood stove and/or fireplace. The needle should be in the green.

If you need a Smoke Detector or Fire Extinguisher for your YP residence please contact Jeff F.

Smoke Alarm Info:

Cooking safety in the home:
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open for summer
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

We sell FS wood cutting permits.

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC

Buck Horn Outfitters in Idaho’s west Central Mountains in Units 25, 20 A, & 19 A. Providing Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Mountain lion, & Wolf Hunts. We offer Guided Rifle or Archery Hunts & Drop Camps. We are not about Quantity we are about providing Quality Hunts. My husband and I have been in the back country all our lives, we offer Deluxe camps with great food & our Guides know hunting, the back country and Stock.

Link to FB:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430 – 50# bag of Polar Ice Melt available for $7.99. Breaks the Ice Barrier. Quick Melting action, even in heavy snow.
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 29) probably rained most of the night, low of 33 degrees. Very low overcast this morning, socked in nearly to the valley floor, light rain with occasional blobs of snow until just before 11am. Snow line appears to be around 6000 feet. FS lighting off golf course slash piles before 11am. Took a lot of drips from the torches to get the piles going, crews spent the day going from pile to pile, checking and raking a ring down to dirt. By evening most of the piles had been consumed. Rain showers on and off all day, breaks in the clouds and sunshine once in a while, chilly breezes, high of 48 degrees. Low overcast at sundown, light misty rain. No rain during the night.

Tuesday (Oct 30) overnight low of 31 degrees, mostly cloudy this morning. Ed Staub propane truck in the village today. Steller jay flying and calling over the neighborhood. Pine squirrel and jay visited at lunch time. Overcast and chilly mid-day, an occasional drop of rain, high of 41 degrees. Flock of starlings in the neighborhood. Breaks in the clouds by early evening, pretty much calm, humidity is up.

Wednesday (Oct 31) overnight low of 28 degrees, snowing before sunrise, very low overcast, ridges socked in nearly to valley floor. Still snowing pretty good at lunch time, nearly an inch on the ground. Raining by 130pm and melting snow. Rain showers on and off all afternoon and evening, low foggy clouds, most of the morning snow had melted and snowline rising on the hills, high of 36 degrees. Sprinkles on and off during the night and more rain before sunrise.

Thursday (Nov 1) raining this morning and warmer than it was during the day yesterday. Low clouds and foggy belts midway up the hills. Heard a robin calling and a raven. Amerigas in town topping off tanks. Sprinkles and low clouds early afternoon, high of 42 degrees. Quiet rainy afternoon and evening. Probably sprinkled most of the night.

Friday (Nov 2) overnight low of 36 degrees, low foggy clouds and light sprinkles this morning. Quiet and very little traffic. Rained all day until around 3pm, then broken clouds and bits of sunshine, high of 47 degrees. At sunset larger clear patches in the cloud cover, damp and foggy looking towards the river.

Saturday (Nov 3) overnight low of 34 degrees, overcast and damp roofs this morning. Pine squirrel scolding from somewhere in the neighborhood and a lone chipmunk running about. Gray cloudy day, rather calm and humid, high of 41 degrees. FS burning more slash piles to the south west but not much smoke in the village. Gray and cloudy at sundown, no rain.

Sunday (Nov 4) early morning rain, overnight low of 35 degrees, overcast and low foggy clouds this morning and sprinkling. Light drizzles mid-day, low foggy clouds, high of 48 degrees. Rain stopped mid-afternoon, breaks in the clouds and bits of sunshine on and off. Quiet evening, no traffic. With the time change, it is dark at 6pm.
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Tips & Advice:

Be Ember Aware! Tip Series

“Used with permission from University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and the Living With Fire program.”

Be Ember Aware Tip #3 – Deck Danger

Decks are a common feature of Idaho homes situated in high fire hazard areas. They are also one of the parts of your home that are vulnerable to embers during wildfire. This applies to decks comprised of wood boards as well as those made from plastic and wood-plastic composite deck boards. If your deck ignites, the flames can ignite your combustible siding, break the glass on an adjacent window or sliding glass door, or climb to the eave and burn into your attic. If you have a deck and live in a high fire hazard area, you should consider the following tips:
* Keep the gaps between deck boards free of pine needles, leaves and other debris. This tip also applies to intersection between your deck and your house. Embers can become lodged in the gaps and ignite the deck. Also, don’t allow fallen pine needles and other dead plant material to accumulate on the deck surface during fire season.
* The area underneath the deck is particularly susceptible to ember attack. Don’t store firewood, gas cans, lawn mowers, cardboard or other combustible materials under the deck and keep it free of weeds, pine needles and leaves. Consider enclosing the deck with solid skirting, such as siding that is properly vented, or with 1/8-inch wire mesh to limit ember penetration and reduce maintenance. Don’t enclose it with wooden lattice.
* Rotted or otherwise poor condition wood is more easily ignited by embers than wood in good condition. Replace deteriorated wooden deck boards and posts with new ones.
* Install metal flashing between the deck and the side of the house. Be sure the flashing is installed to allow proper drainage of water.
* If wildfire is threatening, remove combustible materials from the deck, including newspapers and magazines, baskets, door mats, dried flower arrangements, and place them inside the house or garage. Propane tanks should be placed at a distance 30-ft or more from the house.

Decks are an important and attractive feature to many homes in the wildland-urban interface. Unfortunately, they can also contribute to the wildfire threat to your home. Take steps now, before fire season, to reduce the deck danger.

[h/t Fire Chief Jeff]
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Letter to Share:

Commissioner Cruickshank’s October 2018 Newsletter

November 4, 2018

From the desk of Commissioner Cruickshank,

Monday October 1st
This morning I attended the West Central Mountains Economic Summit in McCall. Topic included recapping progress made after last years Summit, a report from the Department of Labor on the job situation with unemployment down to 2.8%, business incentives to help people stay at work, housing solutions, broadband needs and we heard from a writer on 13 Ways to Kill your community.

Tuesday October 2nd
I worked on emails this morning. This afternoon I met with an attorney concerning a lawsuit against Valley County.

Wednesday October 3rd
This afternoon I was deposed on the lawsuit mentioned above.

Thursday October 4th
I attended a Payette Forest Coalition sub-committee concerning Roads and Trails in the Granite Meadows project.

Friday October 5th
I reviewed a document by the National Forest Counties and Schools Coalition concerning the need for Secure Rural Schools payments to continue.
This afternoon I participated in a National Association of Counties (NACo) Executive Board call where we discussed re-organization of how NACo does business including staff changes.

Monday October 8th
I drove to Boise for an early flight tomorrow.

Tuesday October 9th
I flew to La Jolla, CA for a NACo Executive Board meeting with NACo sponsors and to have an Executive Board meeting to discuss the re-organization of NACo in more detail. (travel and expenses paid by NACo)

Wednesday October 10th
Met with many of the NACo Sponsors in an informal meeting and dinner after.

Thursday October 11th
Intense Workshop with the NACo Sponsors, NACo Executive Board and other NACo Chairs of Committees to better understand how the partnerships work to enhance county government work.

Friday October 12th
This morning was the NACo Executive Board meeting to discuss paths forward for NACo and understanding where the value of NACo is for counties.
I flew to Boise this afternoon.

Sunday October 13th
I registered for Large Urban County Caucus and NACo Board Meeting to be held in December. (travel and expenses paid by the Idaho Association of Counties)
I created and sent out my newsletter for August and September.
I sent emails to NACo Sponsors who I met while at the meeting in La Jolla to invite them to visit with the West Central Mountains Economic Development Executive Director on Housing, Marketing and Data.

Monday October 15th
Today was a commissioner day. Please find the minutes of our meetings on our website at Valley County Idaho Official Site and then clicking on the commissioners section where you will find the minutes once approved a few weeks after the meeting. The commissioners also performed a Jail Inspection today as one of our duties.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday October 16th
This morning I worked on responding to emails and sent emails to set up meetings or provide information for future discussions.
This afternoon I attended a Valley Adams Planning Partnership meeting to discuss grant opportunities for the region and support for the prioritizing of the road work.
I worked on information to speak to the Road Levy Advisory Vote being asked of the citizens this November for the Thursday night forum.

Wednesday October 17th
I sent out a reminder and agenda for my NACo West Region conference call I host each month.
I discussed snow grooming authorities with other counties and how their programs worked to insure ours was in compliance.

Thursday October 18th
I listened in on a NACo Public Lands Conference call early this morning.
At 10:00 AM I hosted the NACo West Region Call where we heard from many states on what their concerns were to help all understand the diversity of the issues in the West Region I represent. I then prepared and sent out the notes from the call that I captured during the discussion.
Tonight I attended the Candidate Forum where I spoke on the Advisory Vote for a Road Levy to maintain our county roads. During the discussion with county candidates it was questioned about spending funding to attend meetings in Washington D C. I explained that the majority of my travel and expenses was paid by either the Idaho Association of Counties as I represent the 44 counties of Idaho and the National Association of Counties where I represent the 15 Western States as their Regional Representative. I believe the return on the investment of this travel far outweighs the funding Valley County receives from the Secure Rural Schools and Payment in Lieu of Taxes.

Friday October 19th
I had a phone conversation with Lakeshore Disposal on their operations and how this is working with Valley County.
I attended the Community Agreement meeting on Midas Gold to hear what the other communities were considering with the Community Agreement process. Valley County has not signed on to this agreement and are still studying the document as to how it pertains to Valley County with our other Conditional Use Process.

Monday October 22nd
I returned a phone call concerning the upcoming Advisory Vote for the Road Levy this morning.
Commissioner day today. Please see the Valley County website for the minutes of this meeting once approved.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/
Tonight I received a phone call concerning the snow removal on Johnson Creek Road as well as personal visit after our Commissioner meeting on the same topic.
I sent out emails to folks about a future meeting with the Johnson Creek folks and snow removal the following Monday.
I drove to Boise for an early flight to Washington D C tomorrow.

Tuesday October 23rd
I flew to Washington D C to attend a NACo Finance meeting as the NACo Executive Board was invited to attend. A more in depth review of the financial status of NACo was gone over concerning the 2018 budget. We also had a presentation by an investment firm to better understand the investment strategy for the future of NACo.
Tonight I attended a dinner event for all the attendees.
This evening the four NACo Regional Representatives had an informal meeting to discuss topics of interest as it relates to our duties for NACo.

Wednesday October 24th
This morning the NACo Finance meeting continued as we looked into the future for 2019 and discussed the changes we will need to make. All this will be presented to the full NACo Board of Directors in December.
At noon the four Regional Representatives met with the NACo Executive Director to discuss our duties as Regional Representatives.
This afternoon I attended a meeting with the US Customs and Border Patrol to learn more about their duties of protecting our borders on all sides. A lot of information was shared on how many different areas they work in along our borders.
This afternoon I flew to Minneapolis only to miss my connection to Boise due to my flight being delayed in Washington D C.
I spent the night in the airport.

Thursday October 25th
I was able to catch a flight to Boise this afternoon and then drove home. (travel and expenses was paid by NACo for this meeting)

Friday October 26th
I visited the Transfer Site to look at a structure build to cover the fuel and waste oil tanks.

Sunday October 28th
I sent out some additional information concerning the upcoming Advisory Vote for the Road Levy.

Monday October 29th
Commissioner meeting today. Please find the minutes once approved on the Valley County website.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/
This afternoon we had a workshop with Elected Officials and Department Heads to discuss all areas of concern with their respective duties.

Wednesday October 31st
I returned a call to the McCall District Ranger on wanting to set up a meeting to discuss the recent UTV Takeover event as they want to come again next year.
I reviewed my deposition document and corrected some spelling errors or made corrections.

Well I trust Halloween treated you well and the kids still got most of the candy and treats.

Before I sent out another newsletter Thanksgiving will be past so I want to wish everyone an early Happy Thanksgiving.

Also don’t forget to VOTE on November 6th as every vote counts.

Thanks for reading my news and please don’t hesitate to ask for more information and I will do my level best to find an answer if I can.

Gordon
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Idaho News:

Fall back! Daylight saving time ends Sunday

Doyle Rice, USA TODAY November 1, 2018 KTVB

It’s one of the rites of autumn, along with pumpkin spice, football games and raking leaves: The end of daylight saving time, which will occur at 2:00 a.m. Sunday November 4.

So if you’re sick of dark mornings on your way to school or work, it’s your time to rise and shine. But if you dread driving home in the dark, you’re out of luck for the next few months.

At 2:00 a.m. on the 4th – or the night before – the few analog clocks still around must “fall back” an hour, turning 1:59:59 a.m. into 1 a.m. Microwaves and ovens are on a short list of household appliances that will need a manual adjustment.

Since most of our computers, smartphones and DVRs do it automatically, it’s not as much of a chore as it used to be.

continued:
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More Taxes For Roads?

Valley County voters will see advisory question on Tues. ballot

By Max Silverson For The Star-News Nov 1, 2018

Voters in Valley County will get to express their opinion on Tuesday whether they are willing to pay more property taxes to improve and maintain county roads.

If a majority of voters endorse the levy, Valley County commissioners will be encouraged to adopt a property tax increase that would add up to $252 in taxes per year for a property worth $300,000.

The levy would provide the road department with an additional $3.3 million, according to estimates.

Commissioners would not make a final decision on enacting the levy until September 2019, when they set the budget for 2020, commission Chair Gordon Cruickshank said.

The first increased taxes would not be collected until December 2019.

Federal funding for local roads has decreased so extensively that the Valley County budget is barely adequate to keep up with basic services, Cruickshank said.

“Our paved roads are in dire need of management with either overlays or chip seals to maintain their function,” he said. “If the funding is not available then we will be forced to return these roads to gravel surfaces.”

Commissioners have the authority to levy the tax without voter approval, but opted to put the proposal to an advisory vote.

Commissioners could make a decision to enact the maximum levy rate, or possibly a lesser rate, depending on the outcome of the vote.

“I believe the commissioners would need to have a good discussion to decide how to proceed no matter what the vote,” he said.

“Depending on the decision we may not need to use a full levy rate if we receive revenue from other sources.”

The levy would tax all residents of Valley County, with most of the work done on county roads.

“Intent is for funds to be used for county road maintenance, however that doesn’t prevent the county partnering with the city on a road project,” Cruickshank said.

Historically, the road department budget in Valley County has been propped up by a federal revenue sharing program that allocated 25 percent of revenue from timber harvests on national forests to counties.

In the 1990s timber harvest numbers began to decline, and in 2000 congress passed the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act to fill the gap.

In 2000, the Valley County road department received $2 million in total funding from the law.

In 2017, the law was not reauthorized, leaving the road department with only $74,725 in funding from timber harvests, he said.

source:
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Airbnb agrees to begin paying McCall local-option tax

By Drew Dodson The Star-News

Short-term rental company Airbnb has reached a settlement with the City of McCall to reimburse uncollected local-option tax revenue since Jan. 1.

The settlement includes an undisclosed amount for estimated tax revenue dating to Jan. 1 and an agreement clarifying rules and responsibilities for tax collection moving forward.

“City staff has reviewed the proposed settlement amount and believes it is reasonable and fair based on comparisons to other short-term rental market remittances,” City Clerk Bessie Jo Wagner told McCall City Council members at their regular meeting last week.

The settlement amount was kept confidential as required by a city ordinance restricting the disclosure of tax repayment information, Wagner said.

Currently, there are 306 Airbnb properties registered in McCall at an average of $153 per night.

If all units were rented out, the city’s applicable local-option tax rate of 7 percent on short-term rentals could bring in about $3,300 per day.

New legislation that became effective Jan. 1 requires short-term rental companies like Airbnb, VRBO and HomeAway to collect and remit both state and local taxes.

However, Airbnb failed to collect the appropriate taxes in several Idaho cities, including McCall, Ketchum and Driggs.

The alternative to a settlement would’ve been a full audit of Airbnb’s rental records dating to Jan. 1, but that approach would’ve been time consuming and costly, Wagner said.

Some homeowners registered with Airbnb had managed tax collection themselves, but Airbnb is responsible for collecting all taxes moving forward, she said.

The city’s contract law firm, White Peterson of Nampa, negotiated the settlement. The firm also negotiated a settlement between Airbnb and the City of Ketchum.

Airbnb did not respond to a request by The Star-News for comment on the settlement.

The city currently has two local-option taxes in place affecting short-term rentals like Airbnb.

The tourism tax levies a 3 percent tax on hotels, motels and short-term rentals. The streets tax also levies a 3 percent tax on short-term rentals, plus a general sales tax of 1 percent except for groceries.

Revenue from the taxes can be used to enhance tourism, improve public amenities, infrastructure and city streets, among other uses.

source:
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You can now text 911 in Boise County as resource to help rural residents expands

“This is going to help a lot,” one local business owner says of the service, which is being adopted in a growing number of Idaho counties.

Shirah Matsuzawa KTVB October 31, 2018

Idaho City — We all know that you call 911 when you have an emergency. Now, Boise County is joining at least eight other Idaho counties in a system that will allow residents to both call and text 911.

“If you’re up here recreating and you have your cell and you can’t make a call, then you can simply text 911 and it’ll come to the dispatch center and they’ll reply with text,” Boise County Emergency Manager Bob Showalter said.

The Text-to-911 system is especially important in Boise County, because a lot of areas don’t have the best service.

continued:
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Tree Falls on Two Homes in Terrace Lakes

October 29, 2018 BCC


Two homes were in the path of a very large tree, probably 18 inches in diameter or more. Removal of the tree was first order of business on Monday and tarping the roof to prevent rain adding to the problems. Photo by Janet Juroch

October 28, 2018: In the Terrace Lakes community, a circle lane of homes sit, with tall pine trees that whisper in the wind and provide wonderful shade in the hot summer. Every so often, these trees can come tumbling down with certain weather conditions or during a storm. But this time it was not Mother Nature causing a tree to fall.

This time a planned tree falling with a professional company went awry, and a large tree decided it was going to fall in its own direction. Tree falling is a serious business and can sometimes not go as planned. It came crashing down on two homes, damaging a couple of cars as well. The tree originally sat between two homes near the road, fell towards the homes instead of the path between. Fortunately, no one was in the homes at the time. One owner was away, and the other was at some neighbors waiting for the tree faller to finish their job. Neighbors were saying, “When the tree fell, we knew it did not hit the ground first.”

continued:
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Richie Outfitters continues search for woman missing in Idaho County, using her dog Ace

by Sarah Jacobsen Wednesday, October 31st 2018


Richie Outfitters continues search using found dog for woman missing in Idaho County

Boise, ID (KBOI) — “Mike and I got ace for Connie, so it’s just a close, tight knit deal,” says owner of Richie Outfitters Dawn Richie. “It’s been really really close to home.”

The search for 76 year old Connie Johnson continues today.

“Mike flew back in today, he is going to take Ace and go back in there and hes going to take him in one on one and ride around that country,” Dawn says.

This time, with a much smaller search party. A man and a dog.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Boise family receives $500 from BHA for turning in illegal motorists on public lands

Contact: Venetia Gempler Phone: (208) 373-4105 Email: vgempler@fs.fed.us

Boise, Idaho, October 29, 2018 – The Moore family recently collected a financial reward for reporting the illegal use of a motorized vehicle in a non-motorized area on the Emmett Ranger District of the Boise National Forest. Brothers Hunter (17) and Clay (14) observed a white jeep driving beyond the trailhead well into the non-motorized area; impacting their bear hunt and other law abiding users’ opportunities.

The brothers had the foresight and education to document the illegal activity and contact the local Emmett Ranger District. Their report and photographs helped the local law enforcement officer conduct an investigation culminating in citing the driver of the Jeep for a violation of the motor vehicle use map (MVUM) resulting in a $230 fine.

“This citation would not be possible without your awareness and assistance. We need more community minded folks like you to help us manage our public lands,” said Emmett District Ranger, Richard Newton.

The award given to the Moore family was from the Back Country Hunters and Anglers (BHA) Idaho Chapter’s reward fund. BHA encourages sportsman to help maintain habitat and opportunities by reporting illegal motor vehicle use.

To read the entire story please visit:

For additional information on BHA Rewards visit:
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Letter to Share:

Save the Day, I Need RSVP

Nov. 4, 2018

Hey all, remember to save Sunday evening Dec. 2, from 4 to 7 PM, for The Game Bird Foundation’s BBQ spare rib feed fundraiser Potluck dinner at Viola, Idaho, in the new Viola Community Center. The Game Bird Foundation is furnishing the ribs and (non-alcoholic drinks), plates and utensils. Please bring favorite dish, salad or dessert for the potluck.

Also bring your checkbook, as we will have several great auction items to bid on during our silent auction (sporting goods, gift certificates, etc.), and a live auction for a few choice items including a 6-foot carved black bear! All this plus music furnished by “Bear Grass” during the evening.

We are limited to 175 people and it is starting to fill up. You must give me a call or an email RSVP by November 25 so I can assign you a wristband to get ribs. We need to know so we can have enough ribs and drinks for everyone.

Call 208-883-3423 or email me at jhag1008 @ gmail.com for a wrist band, no charge. I need your name and number of people attending. Your wristband(s) will be waiting at the door.

Jim Hagedorn
Executive Director
The Gamebird Foundation
thegamebirdfoundation.org
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Critter News:

Pet talk – Halloween chocolate is bad for dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Nov 1, 2018 IME

Chocolate contains caffeine and theobromine, both of which are methylxanthines, a class of compounds that occur naturally in certain plants, including the fruit of the coffee plant and the seeds of the cacao plant. Caffeine is found in coffee, tea, chocolate, colas and some human stimulant drugs. Theobromine is present in chocolate, colas and tea.

Methylxanthines all act as a central-nervous-system stimulant. The most common cause of poisoning in small animals is ingestion of chocolate, though toxicity has occurred following ingestion of coffee grounds, tea bags or human medications. Cocoa powder contains the highest amount of caffeine and theobromine, followed by unsweetened baker’s chocolate, semi-sweet chocolate and milk chocolate.

The most common signs of chocolate toxicity are restlessness and hyperactivity, vomiting, diarrhea and a rapid and irregular heartbeat. Hyperactivity may progress to tremors and seizures when large amounts of chocolate are ingested.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Dog shoots owner in bizarre hunting accident

by Associated Press Thursday, November 1st 2018

Las Cruces, N.M. (AP) — A New Mexico man is recovering after he says his dog Charlie shot him.

Yes, he said his 120-pound Rottweiler-mix shot him in the back.

The Las Cruces Sun-News reports Sonny “Tex” Gilligan told police Charlie accidentally pulled the trigger during a hunt for jackrabbits in the desert west of Las Cruces.

According to the 74-year-old Gilligan, Charlie got his foot in the trigger of the gun while in the back seat of Gilligan’s parked truck, slipped off and pulled the trigger.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

October 24, 2018
— — — — — — — — — —

Wolf News Roundup – Oct. 28, 2018

by Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online! October 27, 2018

Wyoming Hunt

The hunting season for wolves in the trophy game area of northwestern Wyoming opened Sept. 1. According to the Wyoming Game & Fish Department, 22 wolves have been harvested as of Oct. 26. The agency set a total quota of 58 wolves in the state’s 14 hunt areas for wolves. The hunting season remains open until Dec. 31 or until hunt-area quotas are reached. There have also been 27 wolves killed in Wyoming’s predator zone so far in 2018.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Grizzly bear killed in North Idaho:’Loss of a breeding female is a major setback’

by CBS 2 News Staff Saturday, November 3rd 2018

Bonners Ferry, Idaho (CBS 2) — Idaho Department of Fish and Game reported that an adult female grizzly bear was shot and killed near Spruce Lake in norther Boundary County, over the Labor Day weekend.

Grizzly bears are protected by both state and federal law.

The report went on to state that the loss of a breeding female is a major setback to the bear’s recovery in the Cabinet-Yaak Ecosystem.

Any information regarding this poaching should be submitted to Senior Conservation Officer Brian Johnson at 208-267-4085.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Montana woman rescues wandering llama from Yellowstone park

11/2/18 AP


Susi Huelsmeyer-Sinay via AP)

Idaho Falls, Idaho — A pack llama that escaped from a guided hike in southern Yellowstone National Park in August was rescued by a Montana outfitter last weekend, just days before most of the park’s entrances were to close for winter preparations.

“I just had to help him,” Susi Huelsmeyer-Sinay with Yellowstone Llamas in Bozeman, Montana, said Friday. “He was abandoned.”

Wilderness Ridge Trail Llamas owner Kirstin Baty of Idaho Falls, Idaho, tells the Jackson Hole News & Guide that Ike ran off after guides loosened his halter because it irritated the spot of a previously abscessed tooth.

“Ike slipped out of the halter completely,” Baty said, “because he’s sneaky, and he knows he can.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

International Bat Conservation Week

October 24, 2018

(The following is a news release published by the United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, on October 24, 2018.)

Bat Week is an annual, international celebration of the role of bats in nature. Bat Week is organized by a team of representatives from across the United States and Canada from conservation organizations and government departments. This year, it falls on October 24-31.

Worldwide, there are more than 1,300 species of bats, which is almost 20 percent of all mammal species. Bats live everywhere on Earth except the most extreme desert and Polar Regions. So, no matter where you live, chances are there are bats living near you.

Bats are the only mammals that can truly fly. The structure of the bat’s wing is actually a modified hand. The finger bones are elongated to support a thin membrane of skin that extends between each finger, arms, and body. The membrane of a bat’s wing is living tissue similar to the tiny flaps of skin joining the bases of our human fingers. These “hands” have been adapted for flight, and the flexible skin and many moveable joints make bats exceptionally agile fliers.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
November 2, 2018
Issue No. 889
Table of Contents

* Evaluation Of Columbia River Harvest Reforms Shows Expected Economic Benefits Have Not Materialized
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441755.aspx

* ESA-Listed Chum Salmon Arrive Early Below Bonneville Dam; Flow Operations Begin To Protect Spawning
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441754.aspx

* Independent Science Panel Review Of Salmon Survival Study Shows Concern Over Low Smolt-To-Adult Returns
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441753.aspx

* Which Way The Weather Blows: Portland Meteorologists Take Their Shots At Predicting Coming Winter
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441752.aspx

* Science Panel Reviews Monitoring/Evaluation Plan For Walla Walla Spring Chinook Supplementation Hatchery
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441751.aspx

* Study Looks At Injuries To Coho In Purse Seine Nets That Determine Survival Or Mortality After Capture
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441750.aspx

* Oregon Extends One Steelhead Bag Limit For Snake River, Tribs; Very Low Steelhead Passage At Lower Granite
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441749.aspx

* Deschutes River Clean Water Case Headed To The Ninth Circuit; Briefs Due Early 2019
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441748.aspx

* WDFW Uses Drone To Collect Habitat Restoration Data In Lower Columbia River
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441747.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Doe and Kitty Videos

(facebook video link)

and

—————————-

Seasonal Humor:


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Oct 28, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 28, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
October 29 Valley County Commissioner Meeting 130pm Cascade Courthouse
Oct 29 – Nov 2 BNF Rx burns planned, Johnson Crk and YP
November 1st week Amerigas Propane delivery call (208) 634-8181
November 22 at 4pm Thanksgiving Potluck at the Yellow Pine Tavern

(details below)
———-

Village News:

Snow maintenance Johnson Creek Commissioners Meeting Monday 29th

This topic will be discussed again. I encourage all YP people to attend Monday 29th 1:30 Commissioners meeting room [Cascade] courthouse. See Facebook Yellow Pine Area and tell others .. We need to make a good decision.

– LI
— — — —

Boise NF Local Fall Rx Burns Planned Oct 29 – Nov 2

Update 10-25-2018

Looks like we will be down there Monday the 29th for burning, the Yellow Pine Blowdown (golf course) and the helispot and some of the thinning piles near Johnson Creek airstrip and Cox Ranch. We hope to burn everyday next week until we finish the thinning piles along Johnson Creek.

Tim Dulhanty
Fuels Technician, Boise National Forest, Cascade Ranger District

* Lower Johnson Thinning (95 acres): Is a project designed to reduce hazardous fuels within the WUI. This project is located approximately 7 miles south of Yellow Pine along NFS road 413 and Johnson Creek.

* Yellow Pine Blowdown (40 acres): is located approximately 62 miles from Cascade, Idaho and is adjacent to the community of Yellow Pine. Hand Ignitions will be used to ignite machine piles along NFS roads 412, 413.

The Cascade RD is planning to burn both the Lower Johnson Thinning and Yellow Pine Blow Down units this fall, both of these projects will be pile burning only NO Broadcast Burning is planned.

The Lower Johnson Project (thinning & piling) was completed last summer, these handpiles are located along Johnson Creek road, Wapiti Ranch, Cox Ranch, Bryant Ranch/ Johnson Creek Airstrip.

Hand Ignition for Lower Johnson should take about a week to complete, once those piles have been completed, the crews will relocate to Yellow Pine to burn the logging slash piles.

If you have any addition questions please contact Tim Dulhanty tdulhanty@fs.fed.us (208-382-7400) or myself at 208-382-7400 or send me an email.

James Bishop
Fuels AFMO, Boise National Forest
— — — —

“Bald Hill” Rx Burn Oct 20-21

We are very happy with the fire effects we got from this fall burn. The objective was to reintroduce fire to reduce ground and ‘ladder’ fuels and have minimal effect on mature tree canopy. Our folks were successful in accomplishing that objective. If you look at some of the photos, and from our monitoring, there was no, or very few mature trees which torched and were killed.

Prescribed fires act and have different fire effects in the fall than ones in the spring. Spring burns are effective in burning duff (needles and leaf litter), brush and light to moderate woody fuels. The heavy dead and downed wood fuels are usually too wet in the spring to be receptive to fire. In the fall, such as we saw in this burn, the heavy log component was very receptive and was mostly consumed by this ground fire and the effects if this fall ignition, was a very nice cleanup of the forest floor.

What this fire allowed us to accomplish was to burn the ground fuels and even the lower rungs of branches on the mature trees to raise the canopy of the overstory. This will allow these stands of trees to be more resistant in the event of a natural fire to keep the fire on the ground and not facilitate it spreading into the canopies of and therefore torching and killing mature trees. All in all, this burn was very effective in treating over 1100 acres of forest.

I know Sunday got a little smoky in Yellow Pine and a apologize for that, but this burn will help make Yellow Pine and the East Fork more resistant to natural fire in the future.

Thanks to the community for all your support, if anyone has an questions, they can always call.

Anthony B. Botello
District Ranger, Krassel Ranger District, Payette National Forest
p: 208-634-0601
c: 208-634-9286
abbotello@fs.fed.us
10/24/2018

photos:

October 20, 2018

October 21, 2018


— — — —

Firewood Permits

Permits available May 15, 2018 through November 30, 2018 at The Corner.

Fuelwood permits have been reduced to $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum and a 10-cord maximum per household.

link to more info:
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.


— — — —

Ice Hole Campground Closed

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
— — — —

Pests

No recent reports of bear activity, but they are still around fattening up for winter. Please do not leave pet food outside and secure your trash. Mice are looking for a warm place to winter.

Video Link Bear Visitor Aug 20, 2018
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Local Events:

October 27 Halloween Party at the Yellow Pine Tavern

Our annual Halloween party at the Tavern was enjoyed by young and old, hunters and travelers and locals. Great food and conversation and Boise State football.

Photo gallery at the Tavern’s FB page:
— — — —

Thanksgiving Potluck at the Yellow Pine Tavern

Thursday November 22 at 4pm

Turkey, dressing, mashed potatoes and gravy provided
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

September Yellow Pine water update excerpts

The good news is the second sand filter is online and operating well. We have refurbished and upgraded the chlorinator and purchased new chlorine monitoring tools that will help us more accurately adjust the amount of chlorine injected into the water. Additionally, we received the $10,000 grant from Midas. We are looking at all options but it seems that for 2018 we must raise user fees a minimum of a $150 per year.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx

There will be a YPWUA meeting in October. (?)

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.
— — — —

VYPA News:

Community Hall October Update

Hello to the Yellow Pine Family,

I would like to give you all an update on the things going on at the community hall.

First and most exciting is we have HEAT in the community hall. So if anyone wants to use the community hall this winter, contact me and I will get the heat set up.

Next you will see that the picnic table are reading for winter. Thanks to Terry Hall for tarping them. The water has been turned off and flex seal has been put on one wall as a test to see if we can stop all water from coming in the basement.

The inventory on the cloud has been updated. This will assist the Harmonica team to plan their needs. Also added to the inventory for all groups to use is a baseball diamond chalk marker. This will be used for marking parking spaces for Harmonica. Should anyone need to borrow it please let me know.

I want to thank Dawn Brown for the nice job done to clean up after her use of the community hall. And for the check to the community hall of $250.

Speaking of money, the community hall as of Oct 1, 2018 has $1877.60. Some of this is being used for the heat and propane tanks and tarps. I have also requested an estimate from Cecil Dallman to knock down the outhouses behind the CH. Then I will have the fire department safely burn them away from power lines. We have trees and bushes to be cut down and burned at the same time, along with an old table and door by the air conditioner. I believe we still need new piano wheels put on.

Mike Amos has agreed to take the small trailer from behind the CH. He knows someone who can use it. Thank You Mike

We also have 6 new white portable folding tables thanks to Harmonica. I am working with Bill MacIntosh regarding kitchen flooring. Still reviewing Cost vs Use vs Safety.

Now for the planned events for 2019:

May 25 2019 YPCH ATV UTV Photo Scavenger Ride 10am-3pm
July 1-7 2019 Garage Sale time to be announced
July 6 2019 Golf Outing and Breakfast
July 13 2019 ATV UTV Big Creek Ride and Lunch starting at 9am all day
July 20 2019 VYPA meeting 2pm
September 7 VYPA meeting 2pm
September 14 ATV UTV Ride to Cinnabar Mine and Lunch 10am start

All details will be coming out soon.

Finally our little critters from outside have been asked to leave and so far so good. I will keep my eyes open for any returning visitors.

As always, if you have questions or concerns or corrections please let me know.

Kathleen Hall
75hallker@att.net
208 633 6270
630 915 1544
or drop by 385 Behne Ave.

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 18th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th. Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.

Midas Gold and Yellow Pine

August 28, 2018

Attached is the Community Partnership Agreement the Village of Yellow Pine signed with Midas Gold.

link to: 2018 Community Partnership Agreement.pdf
— — — —

YPFD News:

The next meeting to be in May 18th, 2019 at the Community Hall
There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.
There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.
Sept 22nd YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Sept. 30th Yellow Pine Times.
October 6 YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Oct 21st Yellow Pine Times.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11am all are welcome

The YPFD has 2 Size Chimney Brushes with extension rods that were donated for use around YP. If you would like to borrow one, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you. The YPFD also has loanable mitigation tools, (Weed-Whacker, Hedge Trimmer, backpack blower and 16’ pole saw). If you would like to borrow one or all, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you.

It’s also time to check the Smoke Alarm batteries and Fire Extinguishers. Please test the alarm and replace Smoke Alarm Batteries every year, if you have the replaceable battery type. Fire Extinguishers should be checked as well and should be easily seen and reachable. A good location for the Fire Extinguishers would be the kitchen and near the wood stove and/or fireplace. The needle should be in the green.

If you need a Smoke Detector or Fire Extinguisher for your YP residence please contact Jeff F.

Smoke Alarm Info:

Cooking safety in the home:
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open for summer
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

We sell FS wood cutting permits.

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC

Buck Horn Outfitters in Idaho’s west Central Mountains in Units 25, 20 A, & 19 A. Providing Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Mountain lion, & Wolf Hunts. We offer Guided Rifle or Archery Hunts & Drop Camps. We are not about Quantity we are about providing Quality Hunts. My husband and I have been in the back country all our lives, we offer Deluxe camps with great food & our Guides know hunting, the back country and Stock.

Link to FB:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430 – 50# bag of Polar Ice Melt available for $7.99. Breaks the Ice Barrier. Quick Melting action, even in heavy snow.
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 22) overnight low of 28 degrees, mostly clear this morning, dry – light frost, and haze of smoke. Stellar jay perched on the fence watching the chickens. Power off and back on at 1033am. By lunch time we had great air quality, just a few high thin clouds and lots of sunshine, high of 67 degrees. By mid-afternoon the smoke was back, smelled like being on the wrong side of a campfire. Raven flying over the village and calling. Mostly cloudy late afternoon. A starling was hanging around, trying to get into the eves of the house. Partly clear and smoky at sundown. Orange moon rising over Antimony Ridge after dark, poor air quality. Mostly cloudy at midnight.

Tuesday (Oct 23) did not freeze overnight, overcast and light rain started before 9am, much better air quality. Raven calling to the east. Sprinkles all morning, ending early afternoon, good air quality. Streets are damp, no dust. Cloudy afternoon and evening, high of 51 degrees. Partly clear at 1030pm, fat bright moon.

Wednesday (Oct 24) overnight low of 33 degrees, mostly cloudy and damp this morning, good air quality. Quiet day, sound of a woodsplitter off in the distance, folks getting ready for winter. Mostly cloudy afternoon, mild temps and nearly calm, high of 60 degrees. Pine squirrel running down the fence with a big pine cone. Quiet evening, very little traffic. Mostly cloudy at sunset around 6pm and dark by 7pm. Fuzzy fat moon up at 10pm.

Thursday (Oct 25) overnight low of 37 degrees, high flat gray overcast sky and calm this morning, good air quality. Partly clear by early afternoon and a light haze of smoke seen against the hillsides, high of 60 degrees. By sundown overcast again, persistent light haze of smoke. Fat moon peeking out of cracks in the clouds at 10pm.

Friday (Oct 26) stayed well above freezing overnight, mostly cloudy – high thin haze and wisps – this morning. A couple of loud airplanes and weekend traffic starting early. Two steller jays calling and flying around the neighborhood. Small pine squirrel with very large pine cone running down the fence rail. Light sprinkles late afternoon for about half an hour, high of 68 degrees. Gun shots late afternoon from various directions. Overcast at sundown. Sprinkles and showers during the evening. Cloudy at dark. Fat moon peeking out from cracks in the clouds at 10pm.

Saturday (Oct 27) in the 40’s overnight, rain early morning, pounding down at 5am, sprinkles at daylight ending around sunrise, low foggy clouds on the mountains (no snow.) Breaks in the clouds early afternoon, high of 57 degrees. Rough sounding airplane around 2pm. A lone chipmunk sitting on the fence this afternoon. Partly clear later in the afternoon and evening, mild and hardly a breeze. Weekend traffic.

Sunday (Oct 28) overnight low of 37 degrees, light rain showers started before sunrise, chilly breezes and overcast this morning. Rain ended before lunch time and a few cracks in the clouds. Small flock of starlings in the neighborhood. Rain showers mid-afternoon and breezy, high of 56 degrees. Dark clouds before sunset and steady rain (thunder? at 6pm), ground fog out in the forest, the mountains cloaked in clouds and mist.
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RIP:

Roger Ross

Roger Ross, 81 of Emmett, passed away in a Boise hospital Oct. 19, 2018.

Roger was born June 18, 1937 in Council to Cliff and Wilma Ross. He joined sisters Glenna and Wanda at home in Indian Valley.

The family moved to Stibnite in 1941. He lived there until 1958 when he moved to McCall.

He worked for Brown Tie and Lumber there, and for Boise Cascade in McCall and Cascade. He finished his working years at Medley Sports in McCall.

In 1960 he married Gerry Evans and they lived in McCall until 2013 then moved to Emmett. They spent several winters in Yuma, Ariz., as snow birds where he learned to play shuffle board.

Roger loved to hunt, fish, and visit everyone.

He was preceded in death by his parents and both sisters.

He is survived by his wife Gerry, son Duane, and three grandchildren, Alex, Clifford, and Makayla, several nieces and nephews, and lots of friends.

A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018, at Bowman Funeral Parlor, 10254 W. Carlton Bay Dr. in Garden City, with Pastor Larry Jones officiating.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorial donations in Roger’s name be made to Ronald McDonald House Charities of Idaho 101 Warm Springs Avenue Boise, ID 83712

Please visit Roger’s memorial webpage online at http://bowmanfuneral.com

source: The Star-News October 25, 2018
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Tips & Advice:

Be Ember Aware! Tip Series

“Used with permission from University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and the Living With Fire program.”

Be Ember Aware Tip #2 – Chucking Your Wood

How much wood could a woodchuck chuck? If he lived in one of Idaho’s high fire hazard areas, he should chuck all of it at least 30 feet from his home.

One of the most common ember hazards homeowners create is the placement of firewood stacks next their home. During a wildfire, hundreds of burning embers could become lodged within the stack. The dry, high winds that often accompany wildfire can fan the embers and cause ignition. Once burning, the firewood stack can jeopardize just about any home, regardless of construction material, because of its ability to ignite combustible siding, provide a flaming exposure to windows and break the glass, or climb to the eave and possible enter into the attic.

Firewood should be stored at least 30 feet from the house, deck, and other structures during fire season. If the firewood stack is located uphill, make sure burning logs won’t roll downhill and ignite the home. Don’t place the stack under tree branches or adjacent to wood fences that are connected to the house. Bring just enough wood for the winter in close to the house after fire season is over. Another option is to store firewood inside the garage, but make sure embers can’t enter your garage though gaps between the door and framing. Don’t let your firewood stack be the kindling for your house fire.

[h/t Fire Chief Jeff]
— — — — — — — — — —

How to safely keep your home warm this winter

Fireplaces, furnaces and space heaters are great appliances to keep warm but they can also pose fire risks.

By Gretchen Parsons KTVB October 23, 2018

Boise — With temperatures cooling, it’s about that time of year when many of us crank up the heat inside our homes, if we haven’t already.

Unfortunately, every year home heating appliances will spark a fire.

“About half of all of our home heating fires start in December, January and February so October and November are a great time to be prepared for that,” said Deputy Chief Romeo Gervais, Boise Fire Department.

Part of being prepared means calling a professional to check out your appliances once a year.

continued:
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Letters to Share:

Road Levy info

Attached is some information I have created concerning the upcoming vote to impose a road levy for the county roads.

October 28, 2018 (via email)

The History of County Road Funding off the National Forest and why a road levy is being considered today.

When the National Forests were created President Theodore Roosevelt proposed a concept of revenue sharing. Since 1908 25 percent of the revenues from the National Forests, primarily timber harvest, was shared with counties and schools. In Idaho 70% went to maintain county roads and 30% to the schools. The following is an explanation on the 70% share for county road funding.

In the 1990’s the timber harvests were declining and revenues were dwindling. In 2000 Congress created the Secure Rural Schools and Communities Act (SRS) which provided offsets to back fill the decrease in the 25% Timber Harvest funds. Each year after Congress funded SRS payments however at a reduced rate each year and in 2017 we received only the 25% Timber Harvest receipts.

Let me recap in 2000 Valley County Road Department received $2,079,000.00 in total funding. In 2015 the amount received was $1,102.755.00. In 2017 actual Timber Harvest 25% receipts received by the Road Department was $74,725.00 as Congress did not authorize any SRS funding. In 2018 Congress authorized another 2 years of funding at the 2015 level minus 5% so we received $1,052,148.00 in funding and will receive SRS again in 2019 reduced by another 5% which will be estimated at $999,541.00.

Attempting to work within our funding levels the Road Department has reduced staff, cut back on routine maintenance, did limited paving, have not done chip sealing, not been able to crush gravel and have not been able to do any major roadway improvements without utilizing grants. Additionally we are unable to purchase equipment to maintain our fleet and repairs increase with operating older equipment.

Our paved roads are in dire need of management with either an overlay or chip seals to maintain their function. One mile of overlay costs approximately $250,000.00 and one mile of reconstruction is approximately $1,000,000.00. If the funding is not available then we will be forced to return these roads to gravel surfaces.

Trying to work within a $4,000,000.00 budget just allows us to do minimal maintenance on the roadways. Currently Fuel Tax revenue provides 2.4 million in funding and this year we received the 1 million in SRS funding which still leaves a shortfall of $600,000 in revenue. If the SRS funding is not reauthorized then the shortfall becomes $1,600,000.00. This is not a sustainable way to provide viable county road maintenance without some additional funding.

That is why we are asking you the citizens of Valley County if the Commissioners should impose Idaho Code 40-801(b) a Levy to sustain county road maintenance. This levy rate is capped at $0.00084 per $100,000.00 of market value if the commissioners use the full levy. A property worth $300,000.00 would pay $252.00. If the commissioners use the full levy rate it would provide 3.3 million in revenue for the county road maintenance program.

In the event SRS is reauthorized the Road Department could use this portion for major improvements, purchasing equipment or crushing material for the roadways. We would use this funding for one time purchases as it is becoming an unreliable source of revenue for ongoing operations and maintenance.

Citizens the choice is yours will you want a better county road system or are you willing to allow the roads to continue to degrade?

Thank you,
Gordon Cruickshank, Chairman Valley County Commissioners
commissioners@co.valley.id.us
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Voters have a choice on level of service for Valley County roads

By Gordon Cruickshank

As a Valley County commissioner who has fought to keep revenue from the national forests continuing, I have been convinced that the future of this revenue source will not sustain the funding needed for good county road maintenance.

Since 1908 until the 1990s timber harvest dollars kept the burden off Valley County taxpayers. Phil Davis, prior Valley County commissioner, watched the declining revenues and went to work to find other funding.

Working with former Idaho Sen. Craig, he along with others were able to create what we know as Secure Rural Schools funding. For the past 17 of the 18 years Valley County received an estimated $28.5 million in funding that has helped keep that tax burden away.

However the SRS funding was never designed to be the revenue of the future, and the payments were declining each year as counties were told they needed to find other sources of revenue.

Today the SRS funding, when funded, isn’t keeping up with demands of county road maintenance, and if not funded severely impacts our county road budget to the extent that regular maintenance will no longer be normal. Snow removal will not happen on the day it snows in all areas and summer maintenance will be less than it is now which many say is not acceptable.

In 2017 the actual timber dollars was $74,725.48 and this is all Valley County received, as SRS was not authorized that year. It is difficult to maintain a budget when the amount of revenue coming is not known.

With the cost of living increasing the cost of doing business increases. Wages, equipment, trucks, pickups, supplies and materials all cost more today, however the revenue has not kept up with the increase in costs as all are needed to maintain a good road system or make regular improvements.

Idaho Code 40-801 (b) allows county commissioners to implement the following: “A special levy of eighty-four thousandth per cent (0.0084%) of market value for assessment purposes to be used for any one (1) or all of the following purposes:

1. Bridge maintenance;
2. Matching state and federal highway funds;
3. Secondary highway construction;
4. Secondary highway maintenance and improvements;
5. Maintenance during an emergency;

No part of this levy shall be apportioned to any incorporated city.

Should Valley County commissioners utilize this levy to help fund a portion of the county road maintenance and improvements? If approved at the current market value this would provide $3.391 million in funding and the maximum levy rate of 0.0084 percent.

No one likes to have their taxes raised and the commissioners have struggled to consider this option however the decision must be made. That is why we are asking the citizens of Valley County for an advisory vote on whether to impose this road levy to sustain the road maintenance funding into the future.

The choice is yours whether you can live with rough roads, limited snow removal and taking paved roads back to gravel, or helping fund the road maintenance into the future with a sustainable known amount of revenue.

(Gordon Cruickshank is the chairman of the Valley County commissioners.)

source: The Star-News October 25, 2018
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Idaho News:

20% of Valley registered voters request early ballots

By Max Silverson for The Star-News October 25, 2018

Valley County has sent ballots for early voting to 20 percent of registered voters for the Nov. 6 general election.

As of Tuesday, 1,165 requests for ballots had been filled of 6,616 registered voters, Valley County Clerk Doug Miller said.

Early voting has been so popular that the clerk’s office was forced to order 400 additional ballots to complement its initial order of 1,200 ballot.

The number of ballots sent out already exceeds the 1,106 ballots returned for the 2012 general election and the 852 ballots returned for the 2014 general election, Miller said.

The figure falls short of the the 1,867 ballots returned for the 2016 general election, he said.

“I would say that there might be a lot of new residents to the county that are choosing to vote absentee in this election, but I haven’t studied to see the amount of new registrations for our area,” Miller said.

“The other factor is that I think we have done a better job of getting the word out that people have the option to vote absentee,” he said.

“It’s nice to have the ability to mail in your request, have your ballot sent to you at home, and then mail that ballot back to us,” Miller said.

The deadline for the clerk’s office to receive ballot requests is Friday, and the last day to vote early in person at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade is Nov. 2, Miller said.

source:
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2018 Candidate Profiles Valley County Commission

Ed Allen

Age: 76
Occupation: Retired, US Forest Service wildfire management.
Born/Raised: Barnardsville, N.C.
Education: Bachelor of Science in Education from Lewis Clark
State College 1970, Associate in Arts in pre-forestry from Warren Wilson Junior College in Swannanoa N.C., 1963.
How Long Lived in Valley County: 50 years

Experience: Valley County Planning and Zoning Commissioner for the past 15 years. Worked for the United States Forest Service in wildfire management from 1967-1994.

Community Service: President and primary coordinator and organizer for the Payette Lakes Ski Club 1995-2008. President of the McCall Folk Lore Society for six years. Organized the Summer Music Festival at the Roseberry Event Center. President of the Organizing Committee for the 2008 Masters World Cup cross country ski races.

Awards: Recipient of The Star News Community Service Award.

Family members at home: Wife, Debbie, and Rosie the poodle.

Allen cites P&Z experience, would seek collaboration

Ed Allen would draw upon his experience on the Valley County Planning and Zoning Commission and protect and enhance access to public lands if elected as Valley County commissioner.

“There are many lesser issues, but a common denominator for resolution of any issue is a collaborative and transparent approach,” he said. “My goal is to create an atmosphere that achieves collaborative and thoughtful resolutions to all issues.”

The greatest challenge facing Valley County, has been and continues to be growth and development, Allen said. As a member of the P&Z, he believes he is well positioned to work in that field.

Allen will vote in favor of the advisory vote on a property tax levy to fund Valley County roads.

“I think that a tax levy is the only logical solution to continuing road maintenance and improvement at this time,” he said. “If we can come up with other revenue sources in the future the levy can be adjusted.”

Allen would like to see some provision placed into law by the federal government that permanently recognizes its responsibility as landowners to help support schools and roads.

“Going forward we have to have a more secure funding source,” he said.
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Dave Bingaman

Age: 48
Occupation: Carpenter/Avalanche Forecaster
Born/Raised: Born in Bluffton, Ind., Raised in Salt Lake City
Education: BA Whitman College with a combined major in environmental studies and sociology, minor in geology that specialized in the social and economic issues of resource use in the Northwest.

Experience: Participated in many groups and collaborations including local trail maintenance collaboratives, and the rewrite of the Frank Church River of No Return Management Plan. Had close interaction with multiple agencies including the BLM and several USFS Ranger Districts while owning a local river business. For the last 10 years, has worked seasonally for the USFS as an Avalanche Forecaster and Trail Crew at McCall R.D. Never held any political office. Have also worked extensively over the last two years with Idaho Department of Lands and the Payette National Forest building and maintaining local trails.

Community Service: Idaho Outfitters and Guides Association, American Avalanche Association, National Registry of EMTs, Idaho Emergency Responders. Currently sit on the board of the Central Idaho Mountain Bike Association, Friends of Payette Avalanche center, Payette Area Composite Youth MTB team.

Awards: St Luke’s/McCall Chamber 2018 Spirit of Giving award for community volunteerism. Certificate of Merit from the USFS in 2012 for directing operations of the Payette Avalanche Center and the McCall/New Meadows Ranger District Trail Crew.

Family members at home: Wife Sidney, daughters Olivia and Catherine, dog Fast Eddy.

Bingaman eyes growth, loss of access to public lands

Dave Bingaman said he is running for county commissioner to make a difference in Valley County’s future.

“I have been here since 1994 and I have seen the area change,” he said. “I want to work to maintain the quality of life and the unique character of the area that we have here and also promote sensible growth and the transition from a resource based economy to a recreation based economy.”

“I haven’t seen any of the other candidates or the current county leadership adequately address this change or the growth that is already occurring,” he said.

Bingaman was motivated to run for county commissioner not only by the effects of Treasure Valley’s exponential growth on Valley County but also by the loss of access to public lands in Valley County.

“I did not see anyone stepping up to address either of these issues,” he said. “These are potentially the two biggest issues that we have to address if we want to maintain the quality of life we all enjoy in Valley County.”

“If we don’t plan for the growth now and get in front of the access issues, we are going to lose what we love about the county,” Bingaman said.

Two goals Bingaman would like to accomplish if elected are improving access to public land and improving infrastructure like roads, communications and emergency medical services.

“We need to improve and maintain access and easements to our local public lands and open spaces before we lose more of them,” he said. “We must work to ensure our access as the property near these areas changes ownership.”

“If we can negotiate for these easements that would be ideal, but I think our county leadership must be willing to take legal actions if needed,” he said.

Bingaman sees growth as the greatest challenge facing Valley County.

“Idaho is the fastest growing state and that growth is affecting us now,” he said. “We have to get in front of it before it is too late.”

Bingaman is in favor of the proposed property tax levy to fund the county road and bridge department.

“If we want better maintenance on our roads we need more money to do it,” Bingaman said. “It really is that simple.”

“The levy would guarantee that funding and allow for the creation of a reserve for catastrophic events, grant matches or major repairs,” Bingaman said. “We are also going to have to continue to rely on whatever additional funding from the federal government and seek additional grant opportunities wherever possible.”
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Cec Tyler

Age: 61
Occupation: Retired U.S. Army Officer (Colonel); former small business owner
Born/Raised: Born in McCall and raised in Donnelly
Education: Bachelor of Business in Accounting from Idaho State University, 1978. Master of Science in Mineral Economics with a concentration in operations research and systems analysis from the Colorado School of Mines, 1987. Master of Science in National Resource Strategy with concentrations in space operations and cyber security from the Industrial College of the Armed Forces, National Defense University, 2000.

How Long Lived in Valley County: Resident from 1956-2004 (retained Idaho residency while on active duty); Returned to Idaho in 2010; Resident 56 of my 61 years

Experience: 27 years active duty in the U.S. Army.

Community Service: Past president of the Greater Donnelly Area Chamber of Commerce. American Legion Post 60. President of the Valley County Republican Women. Idaho Federation of Republican Women Armed Services Chair. Association of the United States Army. Armed Forces Communication-Electronics Association. Donnelly Bible Church.

Awards: Defense Superior Service Medal, six Meritorious Service Medals, two Army Commendation Medals, an Army Achievement Medal, two National Defense Service Medals, and a Global War on Terrorism Service Medal. When selected to a command a battalion by a board of senior Army officer, I was among the first women to be honored by this recognition and selection. My most recent achievement was leading the VCRW to earn the National Federation of Republican Women’s Diamond Achievement Award.

Family members at home: Husband, Gene Tyler.

Tyler would work on roads, growth management

Cecilia Tyler said she has the leadership, team building, and analytical skills that are needed to be a Valley County commissioner.

“I have extensive experience in building large budgets and implementing fixes,” she said. “If given the privilege to serve, I will draw on these skills as I work for the citizens of Valley County.”

If elected, Tyler would implement a comprehensive road plan with a realistic budget as well as partner with schools and businesses to establish trade schools and apprenticeship programs.

Tyler is in favor of partnering with developers like Midas Gold and hiring a full-time grant writer or administrator to seek outside funding.

“Valley County can no longer rely on the federal government to provide large portions of the funds necessary to fix and maintain our roads,” she said.

“It is not enough to say our roads are broken,” she said. “We must be specific and identify what it will take and how long to make the fixes.”

“I favor the commissioners asking residents their opinion on the tax levy; I will vote yes, as we need funding beyond what is currently available,” she said.

She sees the need to manage growth as the greatest challenge facing Valley County.

“We must ensure growth is not just more second homes but businesses that will bring jobs beyond service industry jobs,” she said.

Valley County must find ways to increase affordable housing and to ensure growth does not damage the area’s rural and natural resources available for the enjoyment of residents, she said.

source: The Star-News October 25, 2018
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Cascade High School students plant willows on riverbank

The Star-News October 25, 2018

One hundred potted willows were planted by Cheyenne Jedry’s Cascade High School science students last week along the east bank of the North Fork of the Payette River near Cascade.

Students Alea Stahl, Trent Sayers and Blake Thurston joined volunteers from the Idaho Department of Fish and Game and the Valley Soil and Water Conservation District to plant the trees in an effort to restore an eroded bank.

The science students and Cascade fourth graders also worked with Idaho Soil and Water Conservation Commission State Engineer Bill Lillibridge on the west bank of the river to install additional river barbs, which are woven with willows and cattails to slow and redirect floodwaters.

source:
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Search may resume after woman’s dog emerges from woods

10/25/18 AP

Grangeville, Idaho — The search by law enforcement for a 76-year-old woman missing for three weeks in Idaho could resume after a dog that was with her wandered out of the woods, authorities said.

The border collie named Ace belonging to Connie Johnson appeared Wednesday at a camp near Moose Creek Ranger Station, where private searchers had gathered, Idaho County Sheriff Doug Giddings said.

“There’s a possibility that if we would take the dog back in there, he might lead us to where she was,” Giddings said. “We believe she’s in there; we just don’t know where.”

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Mining News:

Yellow Pine Mine C. 1943


link to larger FB photo courtesy Midas Gold:
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Cascade votes to sign Midas Gold agreement

Pact would form foundation funded by mining company

By Max Silverson for The Star-News October 25, 2018

The Cascade City Council voted to sign the Stibnite Gold Project Community Agreement following a town hall meeting on Monday.

Cascade becomes the third entity that has voted to sign the agreement, said Anne

Labelle, attorney for Midas Gold.

Previously, the City of New Meadows and the community of Yellow Pine have agreed to sign, Labelle said.

Decisions to signs are still pending by the cities of McCall, Donnelly, Council and Riggins as well as county commissioners in Valley, Adams and Idaho counties, she said.

At the end of the town hall meeting, Cascade Mayor Julie Crosby asked the audience for a show of hands to determine who was in favor of signing the agreement. Twenty-one people were in favor, and two were opposed or undecided.

Questions were raised during the meeting about the proposed gold mine’s effects on the Cascade’s hospital, schools, emergency medical services and housing.

About 250 people will be working at the mine at any one time with shifts working two weeks on and two weeks off, Labelle said.

Labelle emphasized that the agreement is “over and above” all commitments for which the company would be bound through the federal permitting process.

“This is not meant to cover all project impacts,” Labelle said. “If the mitigating dollar amount is ‘X,’ this agreement will be on top of that number.”

Under the agreement, each community that signs on will appoint an individual to serve on the Stibnite Advisory Council. The council will meet regularly to get updates from Midas Gold on the Stibnite Gold Project.

Each of the communities will also appoint one person to serve on the Stibnite Foundation, a charitable community foundation to be established to support projects that benefit communities surrounding the project.

The signers also agree to submit letters to the Forest Service as part of an effort by Midas Gold to encourage community participation in the permitting process.

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Nez Perce Tribe opposes proposed Stibnite gold mine

Members say project threatens Chinook recovery

By Tom Grote for The Star-News October 25, 2018

The governing body of the Nez Perce Tribe has voted to formally oppose the proposed Stibnite Gold Project in Valley County.

The resolution by the Nez Perce Tribal Executive Committee said the mine, proposed by Midas Gold, “poses a threat to the tribe’s treaty-reserved resources and the livelihood, health, and socio-economic well-being of Nez Perce Tribal members,” a news release said.

“For the Nez Perce Tribe, the value of the land, wildlife, and resources will always be worth more than any amount of gold,” committee Chair Shannon F. Wheeler said.

“Damage to our natural resources will have long-term impacts on everyone, and the impacts will still be felt by people here long after the company, and gold, have left the country,” Wheeler said.

The tribe’s Department of Fisheries Resources Management spends $2.5 million dollars each year to restore Chinook salmon runs in the South Fork of the Salmon River downstream from Midas Gold’s proposed mine, he said.

“Gold mining, by its very nature, destroys and contaminates resources and habitat – resources and habitat that the tribe heavily relies on and is currently working to restore,” Wheeler said.

“We have yet to see a mine that does more good than harm and it is our responsibility to look out for our future generations,” he said.

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‘Pioneering’ plan for scarred Idaho tract may rock industry

Dylan Brown, E&E News reporter Greenwire: Thursday, October 25, 2018


The proposed site of the Stibnite Gold Project in central Idaho. Dylan Brown/E&E News

Yellow Pine, Idaho — Twenty-five miles out, the road turns to gravel and follows a creek to the closest thing to a speck of a town in what might be the most remote place in the Lower 48.

Turning right at the Corner, which offers the last hot meal until Montana, 100 miles of wilderness away, the road reaches the Salmon River and then hugs the edge of the canyon for a heart-pounding 14 miles until it arrives at the Stibnite Mining District.

Stibnite, a mining hotbed since 1899, is where a Canadian company envisions a different future for mining and where environmentalists see the same old calamity.

Midas Gold Corp. plans to build one of the country’s biggest open-pit mines on 2,000 acres near the source of the Salmon, known as the “River of No Return” and famed for its fishing, whitewater and solitude, in a region already scarred by decades of mining.

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Ask Midas: What Goes Into Permitting a Mine?

October 22

Midas Gold Idaho wants to keep the community informed about the work we are doing at the Stibnite Gold Project site. The Ask Midas blog series gives the experts in our company a chance to answer some of the community’s most frequently asked questions and help clear up any misconceptions about the project.

Permitting a mine is not a quick or easy process, nor should it be. The process is based in rigorous scientific review and analysis. It takes years to collect the information for baseline studies of a proposed mine site and even more time to develop a plan for a project and fully evaluate the impacts it may have on the environment and surrounding communities. Midas Gold has been exploring the Stibnite Gold Project site since 2009 and in the permitting process since 2016.

In this week’s Ask Midas, I want to help you understand the process of permitting a mine and all the scientific research it involves.

What Goes Into Permitting a Mine?

Permitting a mine closely follows the scientific process – you ask a question, conduct lots of research, develop a hypothesis, thoroughly test it and then make your final conclusions.

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CuMo Presentation in Garden Valley Highlights a Long-Term Partnership

October 25, 2018 BCC


CuMo Presentation in Garden Valley. Photo by Janet Juroch

A recent presentation of Idaho CuMo Mining Corporation (ICMC) at the Crouch Community Hall was attended by community members wanting to be informed about the project and ask questions of the staff. Some attendees were newcomers who are just learning about a proposed mine in the county. Others follow the project updates.

ICMC is the wholly-owned subsidiary of American CuMo Mining Corporation, a Canadian natural resource exploration and development company. CuMo regularly has presentations to keep the communities who will be impacted by the mine, to stay on top of the news and project updates. Questions and answers were part of the program after a fundraiser dinner was catered by the Garden Valley Senior Center.

A PowerPoint presentation was shown and different CuMo representatives spoke about different aspects of the project, from scientific to financial, environmental to economic concerns. The project is in the developmental and exploration stage. Every decision must meet a high level of criteria. The project is a big investment and ICMC wants to make sure the communities receive regular updates though various ways of website, social media, face to face presentations and other media news.

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Public Lands:

Work starts to replace collapsed Idaho suspension bridge

AP Oct 26, 2018


Stoddard Bridge before damage March of 2016

North Fork, Idaho (AP) – Exploratory drilling has started to find anchor points for a new bridge over the Salmon River in east-central Idaho to replace a suspension bridge that collapsed.

Dan Slanina of the Western Federal Lands Highway Division tells the Post Register in a story on Wednesday that workers are searching for areas that could support the structure.

The Stoddard Bridge over the Salmon River in east-central Idaho that provided access to the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness collapsed earlier this year.

The 348-foot-long bridge was built in 1937 by the Civilian Conservation Corp. The site is about 40 miles west of North Fork, and just downstream of the confluence of the Salmon River and Middle Fork Salmon River.

Officials say hikers, hunters and anglers used the bridge to access the wilderness area.

source:
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Forest Service keeps tabs on bugs that threaten fir forests

10/22/18 AP

Lewiston, Idaho — State and federal entomologists are tracking the spread of a tiny invasive insect that feeds on fir forests.

The Lewiston Tribune reports the Idaho Department of Lands says the balsam woolly adelgid has the ability to rearrange the species composition of Northwestern forests, and it’s already been found in northern Idaho.

The wingless insect is from Europe and was first introduced to North America in the early 20th century. With no native predators, the bug has flourished.

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Woman turns tragedy into change for avalanche safety

By Tristan Lewis Oct 27, 2018 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – One woman is taking a tragedy and using it to make a difference in the motor sports community.

Summer Andersen lost her husband, Adam, in an avalanche on Jan. 10 near Island Park. Since then, she has been trying to raise awareness about avalanche safety.

“That kind of just spurred me into wanting to do more, raise awareness and make sure everyone has the right gear, everyone has access to the gear, which is what I’ve been doing,” said Andersen.

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Federal stream gauge information knocked out in 43 states

By Keith Ridler – 10/26/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — About 10 percent of a national network of 8,300 stream gauges used to measure potential flooding isn’t reporting information and workers are giving highest priority to fixing gauges where expected rainfall could cause flooding, officials said Friday.

The U.S. Geological Survey said it’s working with the National Weather Service and other federal, state and local agencies to determine which gauges in 43 states should get back online first.

Don Cline of the Geological Survey said a type of computer chip failed simultaneously in 1,100 gauges for unknown reasons about a week ago. The chips transmit information to a satellite.

continued:

[Note: Neither the Johnson Creek or South Fork stream gauges were affected – both are still online.]
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Critter News:

A deadly snack for Fido or Fluffy

October 27, 2018 KIVI TV

Halloween candy can be deadly for your dog or cat. No candy is healthy, but anything that’s sugar-free, or contains raisins or chocolate can quickly cause seizures, even organ failure.

“Pets are 32 percent more likely to experience food poisoning during Halloween week,” said Cara Meglio, content and communications manager for Petplan, a pet insurance company.

It can be all too easy for your pet to sneak a snack while your children inspect their haul, so be sure to put your furry friend in another room before bringing out the sweet stuff.

If pets do get hold of raisins, sugar-free candy or chocolate, call your vet immediately. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has a poison hot line, too: (888) 426-4435.

If poisoned, your pet might need his or her stomach pumped. According to Petplan, the average cost of treatment for food poisoning last year was $730.17, but can easily rise to $1,100 or more depending on the severity of the poisoning and any complications.

Pet costumes are a growing trend, especially among millennials, says the National Retail Federation’s annual survey. Choose costumes that aren’t too restrictive, especially around the throat, say vets, and beware of loose costume bits that can be chewed off and swallowed.

Those, along with lollipop sticks, glow sticks and foil or cellophane wrappers can create digestive blockages you might not notice for days. In 2017 the average cost of surgical removal of a foreign object lodged in the intestines of a pet was $2,062.13. “As with food poisoning cases, more severe or complicated occurrences can cost much more,” said Petplan’s Meglio.

excerpted from: 13 of the scariest health hazards of Halloween
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Pet Talk – Elimination Problems in Dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Oct 26, 2018 IME

Urinating or defecating inside the home is a common behavioral problem of dogs. If the problem is not rectified, the dog may be banished from the home to a backyard, taken to an animal shelter or even euthanized.

There are many reasons for elimination problems. They include incomplete puppy training, anxiety disorders, underlying medical disorders and submissive behavior.

Dogs that are incompletely house-trained deposit urine or stool at inappropriate locations in the home. It is common in puppies, but rare in adult dogs. Urine marking can occur in intact male dogs in territorial, sexual and conflict situations. Urine marking develops after sexual maturity, at 1 year of age. Dogs with separation anxiety or noise phobias may exhibit inappropriate elimination when they are anxious. Submission urination occurs when dogs perceive threats or dominance signals from other dogs or humans. Excitement urination occurs when the dog is very excited, often when owners return home, when greeting new dogs and people. Many medical disorders result in house-soiling due to alterations in function of the urinary or digestive systems, decreased mobility or poor awareness of the environment.

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State will kill remaining 2 wolves of pack killing cattle

10/26/18 AP

Spokane, Wash. — The state has decided to kill the remaining two wolves from a pack that has repeatedly preyed on cattle in the Kettle River Range of Ferry County.

The state Department of Fish and Wildlife says it documented another wolf depredation on Tuesday, bringing the total to 16 attributed to the Old Profanity Territory pack.

Agency Director Kelly Susewind on Friday ordered the remaining two wolves killed.

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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

October 24, 2018
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Officials planning to move Canadian wolves to Isle Royale

10/25/18 AP

Houghton, Mich. — Officials plan to relocate several gray wolves from the Canadian province of Ontario to Isle Royale National Park this winter.

It’s the next step in rebuilding the depleted wolf population at the Lake Superior park. Only two remained until crews took four more wolves to the island from Minnesota this fall. Park spokeswoman Liz Valencia says the goal is to get four from Ontario in coming months.

Plans call for transporting 20-30 mainland wolves to Isle Royale in the next few years. The predators are considered essential for keeping the park’s moose from overpopulating and eating too much greenery.

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Wolf Education International

Newsletter 10/23/2018

Wolves on the rebound across B.C. — here’s how to live with them

Mexican wolves found dead in Arizona, New Mexico

Conservationists ask court to step in as red wolf plan looms

Newsletter 10/27/2018

Guest Column: Wolf expansion has ranchers worried about their livelihoods

Global Socioeconomic Impact of Cystic Echinococcosis

Maps: Wolves in France 2008 vs. 2016
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IDFG: Multiple mountain lion sightings reported in McCall

by CBS 2 News Staff Monday, October 22nd 2018

McCall, Idaho (CBS2) — Idaho Fish and Game say they have received several reports of mountain lion sightings in McCall over the past three weeks.

Fish and Game says that mountain lions move through McCall often, but it usually takes place at night.

Mountain lions are drawn to McCall because of the large deer population. Idaho Fish and Game says they discourage feeding deer in town to avoid attracting predictors.

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Hiker killed in likely cougar attack suffered broken neck, had puncture wounds to neck

The five-page report doesn’t list an official cause of death for the 55-year-old Diana Bober.

Associated Press October 25, 2018

Portland, Ore. (AP) — Records released this week show that an Oregon woman likely killed in a cougar attack near Mount Hood suffered a broken neck and had over a dozen puncture wounds to the nape of her neck.

Those injuries and others on Diana Bober’s hands “appeared to be consistent with an animal attack,” staff in the Clackamas County medical examiner’s office determined, according to a state police report.

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Law enforcement investigates shooting of deer in McCall

The Star-News October 25, 2018

Law enforcement officials are investigating the shooting of a deer near the corner of Lick Creek Road and Davis Avenue in McCall last week.

The deer was reported shot at about 3:15 p.m. on Oct. 16 near the intersection, McCall Police Chief Justin Williams said.

“Upon arrival, it was determined that a juvenile subject had discharged a firearm at a deer within the city limits, resulting in the demise of the animal,” Williams said.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game was called to the scene and began an investigation, District Conservation Officer Marshall Haynes said.

“Once the investigation is complete it will be referred to the prosecutor to decide on the appropriate charges,” Haynes said.

The animal was a doe mule deer and the carcass was preserved as evidence, he said.

The deer was almost certainly part of what is know as McCall’s “town herd,” F&G Regional Wildlife Manager Regan Berkley said.

“There are individuals who feed deer near Davis Beach and in the Spring Mountain neighborhood, and therefore several deer that never leave that side of town,” Berkley said.

source:
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Residents upset after hunter kills deer in city park

Oct 28, 2018 KIVI TV

Coeur d’Alene, Idaho (AP) – Residents of one Coeur d’Alene neighborhood are upset that steps aren’t being taken to prevent hunting in a popular city park.

A deer gut pile found in the park recently prompted concerns from residents who fear getting shot by hunters.

City police said the deer was killed with archery equipment by a resident who did not know that killing deer with bow and arrow in the city was illegal.

continued:
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Crow management plan in Nampa prepares to chase away upcoming crow invasion

Steve Dent Oct 26, 2018 KIVI TV

Nampa – The City of Nampa is preparing for the crow invasion that happens around this time every year, crows can cause a public safety hazard but more than anything the crows can be a nuisance.

That is why several volunteers have teamed up with city officials and students from Boise State University in an effort to be ready to chase the crows away so they don’t roost in Nampa.

However, it is a tricky situation because the crows are protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, the city can kill crows if a big enough concentration causes a serious public safety hazard, but the crow management plan calls for non-lethal deterrents.

continued:
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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
October 26, 2019
Issue No. 888
Table of Contents

* Willamette Falls Pinniped Task Force Recommends Lethal Removal Of California Sea Lions
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441726.aspx

* Trump Administration Memo Cuts Basin Salmon/Steelhead BiOp Schedule By One Year, Trims Regs For Water Projects
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441725.aspx

* Federal Court Orders EPA To Complete Water Temperature Protections For Columbia/Snake Salmon, Steelhead
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441724.aspx

* Federal Agencies, Tribes, States Sign Extended Columbia Basin Fish Accords; $400 Million For Fish/Wildlife Mitigation
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441723.aspx

* Introduction Project Sees First Adult Coho Enter NE Oregon’s Lostine River In Nearly 40 Years
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441722.aspx

* Sea Lions At Bonneville Dam Took Summer Break Then Returned To Feast On Fall Chinook
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441721.aspx

* Independent Science Panel Reviews Research Projects For NW Power/Conservation Council
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441720.aspx

* Fundraising Underway To Purchase Easement Key To Returning Sockeye Salmon To Wallowa Lake
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441719.aspx

* Lead Diplomat For U.S. Sizes Up Ongoing Columbia River Treaty Negotiations
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441718.aspx

* EPA Proposes Trimming Size of Portland Harbor Superfund Site By 17 Acres
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441717.aspx

* BPA Selects New Executive Vice-President For Environment, Fish, Wildlife
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441716.aspx

* Washington Federal Court Approves Water Quality Settlement Aimed At Bolstering Salmon Protections
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441715.aspx

* UW Study Reveals Sockeye Carcasses Tossed On Shore For 20 Years Spurred Tree Growth
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441714.aspx

* NOAA’s Winter Outlook Predicting Warmer Temperatures For The West, Drier Than Average In Northern Rockies
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441713.aspx

* Researchers Identify Invasive Algae From Japanese Tsunami Debris Hitting PNW Coast; None Gain Foothold
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441712.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

Check stations show mix of success for deer/elk hunters for Oct. 20-21 weekend

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Deer and elk hunts continue through October and into November in many areas

Oct. 20-21 was the second weekend of deer hunting and the first weekend of elk hunting in many parts of the state. Fish and Game was running its check stations in most of its traditional areas and adding new ones as well.

While its difficult to judge how the hunting season is going based on one weekend of check stations, there are some interesting details about the hunting season so far. In many parts of the state, it’s been warm and sunny well into fall, which typically isn’t the best conditions for hunters to be successful.

Harvest rates at check stations over the Oct. 20-21 weekend varied wildly, from a low of less than 1 percent at a Panhandle check station to 26 percent success at a check station in the Salmon Region.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Respect and courtesy are essential when hunting private land

By Mike Demick, Conservation Information Supervisor
Friday, October 26, 2018

Private landowners are generally tolerant of hunters, and hunting private land is a special privilege

Hunters should get permission before hunting on private land, and Idaho Fish and Game urges them to act responsibly so access to private lands can be preserved.

“We are fortunate that the majority of hunters are respectful and considerate to landowners,” said Sal Palazzolo, private lands coordinator for Idaho Fish and Game. “But each year, we deal with problems related to irresponsible behavior of a few.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Please fill out your hunter report after your hunt ends

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist

Friday, October 26, 2018

Hunter reports provide first-hand information that is critical to wildlife management and season settings

General season big game hunts and controlled hunts are in full swing and it’s time to remind hunters to fill out their mandatory hunter reports after their hunts end. It will only take a few minutes of your time, and it will provide critical information so Fish and Game can continue to preserve, protect and perpetuate Idaho’s wildlife.

You can submit your hunter reports online or by calling (877) 268-9365. The phone option is available 24 per day and seven days per week. Please have your hunting tag number when calling.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct. 24-31 is National Bat Week, and you can learn more about these fascinating creatures

By Rita Dixon, Wildlife Natural Resource Program Coordinator
Thursday, October 25, 2018

Bat week highlights these often misunderstood animals

Governor C.L. Butch Otter has proclaimed October 24–31 to be National Bat Week in Idaho and called upon Idahoans to join him in celebrating the significance of bats with observances and activities. This year’s theme is “Be a Bat Hero!”

Bat Week is a time to celebrate our bats and to spread the word about how we can help to protect them. To learn more about bats, visit the Idaho Department of Fish and Game’s Bat Week table at Cabela’s in Boise on Saturday, Oct. 27 from 1 to 2 p.m.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Do not dress up pet chickens for Halloween

Joey Greaber Oct 24, 2018

With Halloween right around the corner, the CDC is reminding owners of chickens to not dress them up this year due to a strain of salmonella.

According to the CDC, when dressing up a chicken, it raises the chances of a person coming in contact with harmful bacteria that includes salmonella. “Live poultry might have Salmonella germs in their droppings and on their bodies (feathers, feet, and beaks), even when they appear healthy and clean,” the CDC said.

Reports indicate at least 92 people in 29 states have been infected with a strain of multidrug-resistant salmonella. No deaths have been reported.

The CDC also says to not kiss your birds or snuggle them and always wash your hands with soap and water.

source:
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Seasonal Humor:


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Boise NF Local Fall Rx Burn Oct 29

Boise NF Local Fall Rx Burns

Update 10-25-2018

Looks like we will be down there Monday the 29th for burning, the Yellow Pine Blowdown(golf course) and the helispot and some of the thinning piles near Johnson Creek airstrip and Cox Ranch. We hope to burn everyday next week until we finish the thinning piles along Johnson Creek.

Tim Dulhanty
Fuels Technician, Boise National Forest, Cascade Ranger District

* Lower Johnson Thinning (95 acres): Is a project designed to reduce hazardous fuels within the WUI. This project is located approximately 7 miles south of Yellow Pine along NFS road 413 and Johnson Creek.

* Yellow Pine Blowdown (40 acres): is located approximately 62 miles from Cascade, Idaho and is adjacent to the community of Yellow Pine. Hand Ignitions will be used to ignite machine piles along NFS roads 412, 413.

The Cascade RD is planning to burn both the Lower Johnson Thinning and Yellow Pine Blow Down units this fall, both of these projects will be pile burning only NO Broadcast Burning is planned.

The Lower Johnson Project (thinning & piling) was completed last summer, these handpiles are located along Johnson Creek road, Wapiti Ranch, Cox Ranch, Bryant Ranch/ Johnson Creek Airstrip.

Hand Ignition for Lower Johnson should take about a week to complete, once those piles have been completed, the crews will relocate to Yellow Pine to burn the logging slash piles.

If you have any addition questions please contact Tim Dulhanty tdulhanty@fs.fed.us (208-382-7400) or myself at 208-382-7400 or send me an email.

James Bishop
Fuels AFMO, Boise National Forest
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Oct 21, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 21, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
October 20-21 PNF Rx Burn West of YP
October 27 Halloween Party at the Yellow Pine Tavern
November 1st week Amerigas Propane delivery call (208) 634-8181

(details below)
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Village News:

Outages

The power went off Monday morning (Oct 15) at 1030am in Yellow Pine, back on at 1108am.
— — — —

Search & Rescue

On October 16, 2018 Valley County Search & Rescue (VCSAR) had a call out on a missing hunter near Yellow Pine. Members of VCSAR responded along with three members from Yellow Pine. Jeff, Gary and Dayle from Yellow Pine responded with ATV’s and medical equipment to set up the incident command center at Trout Creek. Jeff was designated the Incident Commander for the rescue mission of 4 sheriffs, 2 fish & game, one Boise LEO, 12 VCSAR members, and one tracking dog. Several airplanes and a helicopter also added to the search efforts. Everyone did an amazing job in working together in the search effort that ended well. The hunter, later that day, wandered into the command center in good condition. It was a successful ending to a multi-agency search. Later that evening at the VCSAR meeting in Donnelly, Jeff was officially appointed as the East Lieutenant for VCSAR.

Anyone wanting to join VCSAR, please contact https://www.valleycountysar.org
— — — —

“Bald Hill” Rx Burn

The PNF conducted a prescribed burn west of Yellow Pine on Oct 20th in the area of the EFSF between Deadman and Reegan creeks as part of the Bald Hill project to reduce fire risk in the wildland-urban interface.

Smoke visible to the north east in Yellow Pine Oct 20th early afternoon.

Smoke settled into our valley by Saturday afternoon (Oct 20) and very smoky evening. Sunday morning (Oct 21) we still had a haze of smoke and poor air quality. Increasing smoke during the day and by afternoon it was “hazardous” to breath. The smoke was starting to thin a little by evening.
— — — —

Local Fall Rx Burns

* Lower Johnson Thinning (95 acres): Is a project designed to reduce hazardous fuels within the WUI. This project is located approximately 7 miles south of Yellow Pine along NFS road 413 and Johnson Creek.

* Yellow Pine Blowdown (40 acres): is located approximately 62 miles from Cascade, Idaho and is adjacent to the community of Yellow Pine. Hand Ignitions will be used to ignite machine piles along NFS roads 412, 413.

The Cascade RD is planning to burn both the Lower Johnson Thinning and Yellow Pine Blow Down units this fall, both of these projects will be pile burning only NO Broadcast Burning is planned.

The Lower Johnson Project (thinning & piling) was completed last summer, these handpiles are located along Johnson Creek road, Wapiti Ranch, Cox Ranch, Bryant Ranch/ Johnson Creek Airstrip.

Hand Ignition for Lower Johnson should take about a week to complete, once those piles have been completed, the crews will relocate to Yellow Pine to burn the logging slash piles.

If you have any addition questions please contact Tim Dulhanty tdulhanty@fs.fed.us (208-382-7400) or myself at 208-382-7400 or send me an email.

– Thanks
James Bishop, Fuels AFMO, Boise National Forest
— — — —

Firewood Permits

Permits available May 15, 2018 through November 30, 2018 at The Corner.

Fuelwood permits have been reduced to $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum and a 10-cord maximum per household.

link to more info:

Stay Out Of Riparian Areas!

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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.


— — — —

Ice Hole Campground Closed

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
— — — —

Pests

No recent reports of bear activity, but they are still around fattening up for winter. Please do not leave pet food outside and secure your trash. Mice are looking for a warm place to winter. Chipmunks and pine squirrels are still running about.

Video Link Bear Visitor Aug 20, 2018
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Local Events:

October 27 Halloween Party at the Yellow Pine Tavern

Chili Dogs provided, bring snacks if you want to. Costume Contest.
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

September Yellow Pine water update excerpts

The good news is the second sand filter is online and operating well. We have refurbished and upgraded the chlorinator and purchased new chlorine monitoring tools that will help us more accurately adjust the amount of chlorine injected into the water. Additionally, we received the $10,000 grant from Midas. We are looking at all options but it seems that for 2018 we must raise user fees a minimum of a $150 per year.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx

There will be a YPWUA meeting in October. (?)

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.
— — — —

VYPA News:

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 18th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th. Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.

Midas Gold and Yellow Pine

August 28, 2018

Attached is the Community Partnership Agreement the Village of Yellow Pine signed with Midas Gold.

link to: 2018 Community Partnership Agreement.pdf
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YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Department Meeting, October 6, 2018

Attendees: Cecil Dallman, Fire Commissioner District 1; Jeff Forster, Fire Chief; Merrill Saleen, Ann Forster, Jenny Bartholomew, Nikki Saleen – Secretary/Treasurer

Absent: Dan Stiff, District 2 Fire Commissioner; Tom Richter, District 3 Fire

The 2018 – 2019 Budget has been approved. Two of the three commissioners, Cecil Dallman and Tom Richter, approved the budget:

2018 Yellow Pine Fire Department Budget:
Firefighting/Rescue: $8,132
Wages: $0
Advertising: $2,000 This covers costs of posting notices in the Star News.
Repairs/Maintenance: $4,000
Utilities (Fixed Costs): $4,000 – includes $2,500 insurance
Total: $18,132

Resignation of Tom Richter, Fire Commissioner District 3:
Tom Richter has submitted his resignation as Fire Commissioner. Concurrent with his resignation, Tom nominated Merrill Saleen as temporary Fire Commissioner for District 3. This was seconded by Cecil.
Merrill has extensive experience in wildland fire and will be an asset to the Fire Department. He spent several of his early years living in Yellow Pine and attended school here. His grandfather, Fred Erickson was the Justice of the Peace for Yellow Pine. Merrill signed the required Oath of Office.

State Auditor’s Legislature Budget:
The Yellow Pine Fire Department budget has to be entered into the Idaho State Local Governing Entities Central Registry. Legislators had raised concerns about the ability to access financial information related to local governments and special districts across the state. Previously there had been no transparency with the State. Idaho passed legislation in 2014 that established a central registry to provide a comprehensive list of all local governing entities authorized to operate within the State of Idaho and required these entities to submit their approved budget and expenditures. It also provides for penalties when Local Government Entities are not compliant with the registration requirement. Nikki will enter our budget info on the website with help from Jeff. The data must be entered by December 1.

Jeff provided updates on the account balance as of today. Recognize that more money will come in as taxes are paid. Currently we have $13,984.14 in the bank. We have $4162.50 earmarked for the helispot. Previous meetings authorized expenditures for the Helispot.
The general fund account can be carried over year to year. Another opportunity is to look at is Grants. Money can go into the general fund.

Expenditures: Cecil proposed than any expenditures over $500 need to be approved by two of the three Commissioners, with an exception for emergencies that involve life safety. Approvals can be made via email. Merrill seconded the proposal. This is approved as written.

Priorities:
A discussion ensued about developing a list of priorities for budget expenditures and looking to future needs for the Yellow Pine Fire Department. The following items were listed according to priority. Relative discussions follow each item.

Budget Priorities:
New Engine/ Apparatus: We are looking for a surplus engine with quick response capability. We would like to get a pickup truck w/ a 300-gallon slide-in tank and foam injection. The advantage of this size engine is the driver does not need a CDL, and it is easily maneuvered on Yellow Pine roads. Surplus engines are typically available in the fall after fire season. More engines are available after active fire seasons (like this year) as departments/agencies have money to replace their older engines. Jeff has found an excess 2004/2005 300-gallon Type 6/Model 43 engine in very good condition in Colorado. It will go up for bid later this fall. With excess properties, Agencies and Fire Departments get first option to purchase over private interests. Jeff expects the bid price to be around $10,000. If we fail to acquire this engine at the right price, there are other options to purchase surplus engines thru the varying agencies.
The Commissioners need to be available to approve this expenditure when this engine goes up for bid. There will not be much time to make the commitment of money.

Concurrently we would like to excess the deuce-and-a-half tanker truck. The tanker does not meet present day safety standards – the soft top does not provide rollover protection and there are other safety issues. Drivers are required to have CDLs and need experience with this size of engine before responding with it to an emergency.

Helispot improvements: One of our highest priorities is finishing the helispot. We recognize that we need to finalize the helispot budget. This is complicated because we have been verbally told we will be getting some donations of labor and supplies but these have not been confirmed. Some of these potential donations are big-ticket items like gravel for the pad itself. In addition, we will not be able to use some of the labor/supply donations until next spring. At this time, we have had $6,457 in donations. Action Item: We need to get on agenda w/ VYPA to give update on helipad & budget needs. Presentation will be by Merrill. Ann will get this on the VYPA agenda for June.

Extrication cutters: YPFD has 3 members who are Certified by the State to use Heavy Hydraulic Extrication tools to extricate victims trapped (pinned) in or under vehicles. The spreaders can also lift heavy objects off someone who is crushed by a heavy object. Recently YPFD took delivery of Professional battery-operated Spreaders (Jaws-of-Life) which are capable of spreading or lifting with a spreading force of 38.000 pounds! The future purchase will be the hydraulic cutters, currently vehicle manufactures are making vehicles with exotic metals that cannot be cut with anything we have in Yellow Pine. The next available extrication tools are in Cascade with CFD. These specific tools weigh approximately 48 pounds and are portable.

Additional bay for Fire Department needs. We are currently discussing with Stu E. about the future need to design another bay. Since the Fire Department building is on a Forest Service lease, we will need to have design and funding in place before requesting an amendment to the Forest Service lease. Adding another bay will allow us the opportunity to add additional fire-fighting apparatus for future needs.

Other updates:
* There is a lease agreement for use of the radio repeaters and telephones thru the Department of Agriculture, that are used at the Fire Station. This is part of our Use Permit through the BNF. This is in response to nationwide needs for interoperability across emergency response units. We do not know what the lease will cost us. They use a Dept of Ag. Billing Team to assess our needs and costs. It is likely they will come to Yellow Pine and do an inspection and audit of our communication systems.
* The Yellow Pine repeater, which is linked into the Thunderbolt repeater, is now working. It has been inoperable for a year. During its down time, we have had to work off the Meadow Ck. Tower. Now that we are back on Thunderbolt, we will be able to reach from here to Deadman, and supposedly up Quartz Ck. with our radios on our Yellow Pine Repeater.
* We have not heard from Jake about seed for the helispot. We have had two incidences of 1 – 2 inches of snow this week. We have great conditions for seeding.
* Action Item: Cecil will make appointment to meet w/ Jake.
* Work is in progress to reinforce the suspension for the Fire Department Polaris Ranger. With 75 gallons and Foam system with accessories and rescue equipment, the current suspension is inadequate and a safety hazard. Jeff is working with Walker Evans Suspension to develop a better suspension system for the UTV. Jeff will get back to us in 1 – 2 weeks. This is an opportunity to be a prototype for Walker Evans with significant discount on costs.
* We need to begin an inventory of items in the Fire Station. Action Item: Nikki will make an inventory form for property. Will get w/ Cecil & Jeff next time she come up to start the inventory.

Public Information/Updates:
* If have a medical emergency – PLEASE always dial 911 first! They have the ability to locate our emergency responders quickly. This saves considerable time in response time and allows the dispatcher to have Cascade Ambulance and fire respond as well. Avoid the temptation to find Jeff or Ann first – you could be wasting valuable minutes in locating them.
* Sunday Training continues on Sunday mornings at 11:00 at the Fire Station. Please check with Jeff to make sure the training will occur. Training will be suspended during the Winter months and will continue in the Spring.
* In response to complaints about the monthly siren testing, it is proposed that we do it a minimum of 3 times a year:
– The siren will sound on May 1, August 1, and November 1 at noon.
– Cecil proposed the motion, Merrill seconded it, we will now do it a minimum of 3 times/year.
– If the siren blows 3 times it is a test. If it blows 4 times it is a real emergency. We encourage everyone to go to the fire department for additional details. You can help with many things even if you are not an emergency responder. This could include being a radio operation or performing logistics duties such as tracking equipment or prepositioning supplies. There are two sirens in town. The main siren is at the Fire Station and the second siren at the Hotel next to the YP Tavern and Corner Bar. The switch to activate the siren is inside but will be relocated to the outside in the future.

The next meeting to be in May 18th, 2019 at the Community Hall. We encourage the YP Village Council to attend.

YPFD Meetings:

The next meeting to be in May 18th, 2019 at the Community Hall
There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.
There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.
Sept 22nd YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Sept. 30th Yellow Pine Times.
October 6 YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Oct 21st Yellow Pine Times.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sundays at 11am, all are welcome

The YPFD has 2 Size Chimney Brushes with extension rods that were donated for use around YP. If you would like to borrow one, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you. The YPFD also has loanable mitigation tools, (Weed-Whacker, Hedge Trimmer, backpack blower and 16’ pole saw). If you would like to borrow one or all, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you.

It’s also time to check the Smoke Alarm batteries and Fire Extinguishers. Please test the alarm and replace Smoke Alarm Batteries every year, if you have the replaceable battery type. Fire Extinguishers should be checked as well and should be easily seen and reachable. A good location for the Fire Extinguishers would be the kitchen and near the wood stove and/or fireplace. The needle should be in the green.

If you need a Smoke Detector or Fire Extinguisher for your YP residence please contact Jeff F.

Smoke Alarm Info:

Cooking safety in the home:
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open for summer
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

We sell FS wood cutting permits.

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC

Buck Horn Outfitters in Idaho’s west Central Mountains in Units 25, 20 A, & 19 A. Providing Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Mountain lion, & Wolf Hunts. We offer Guided Rifle or Archery Hunts & Drop Camps. We are not about Quantity we are about providing Quality Hunts. My husband and I have been in the back country all our lives, we offer Deluxe camps with great food & our Guides know hunting, the back country and Stock.

Link to FB page:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 15) overnight low of 18 degrees, clear and frosty this morning, bit of snow remaining in the shade. Power out 1030am to 1108am, reason unknown. Sunny and mild with light breezes early afternoon, high of 59 degrees. Locals are busy getting ready for winter. Clear quiet evening.

Tuesday (Oct 16) overnight low of 21 degrees, clear but not much frost this morning – dry, skiff of snow in the shade. Sunrise around 1030am. Sunny and clear afternoon, mild breezes, high of 64 degrees. Sunset about 630pm. Around 7pm – 710pm one loud close gunshot to the west, then 3 very loud gunshots to the east up on the hill. Clear after dark, stars out.

Wednesday (Oct 17) overnight low of 25 degrees, clear and light frost this morning. Helicopter flying in the area at 1154am. Sunny warm afternoon, very light breezes, high of 69 degrees. Quiet and light traffic today. Calm pleasant evening. Tamaracks like golden flames in the sunset.

Thursday (Oct 18) overnight low of 26 degrees, clear and light frost this morning, looked like a slight haze of smoke. Pine squirrel and jay are squabbling over a few peanuts. Clear, sunny and warm afternoon, light breezes, high of 70 degrees. Increased traffic this afternoon, folks are getting ready for winter. Some high thin clouds this evening, sunset just before 624pm. Hazy crescent moon rising south of Golden Gate peak around 7pm.

Friday (Oct 19) overnight low of 26 degrees, clear and light frost, light haze of smoke in the draws. Sunny and warm, very light haze of smoke, slight breezes, high of 72 degrees. Increased traffic, folks getting ready for winter. Quiet evening.

Saturday (Oct 20) overnight low of 27 degrees, clear and light frost, light haze of smoke in the draws. Local jay visiting. Sunrise just after 1030am. Higher than normal weekend traffic. One steller jay visiting. Sunny warm afternoon, pretty calm, high of 74 degrees. Smoke visible to the north west from Rx burn down the EFSF. By 330pm the smoke was coming up river and hanging low across the golf course. By 4pm the valley was full of smoke – very poor air quality. Sunset around 608pm, hard to see with the smoke. White and black ash falling from the sky. High than normal traffic still buzzing about after sunset. Blood red moon rising over Antimony ridge after dark.

Sunday (Oct 21) overnight low of 28 degrees, mostly clear, dry – no frost, and smoky – poor air quality. By lunch time a few high thin clouds and better air quality. At 1pm the smoke started coming up river and visible out in the forest – poor air quality. At 230pm very thick smoke, eye burning “hazardous” air quality, cannot see the hills, the sun or the sky. Warm dry smoky day, a few high thin clouds in the afternoon, high of 68 degrees. At 530pm the smoke was just a bit thinner, can see father out into the forest and the outline of Golden Gate hill, but the air quality is still “hazardous”. Thinner smoke at sunset, but still yucky, a few high thin clouds.
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Tips & Advice:

Be Ember Aware! Tip Series

“Used with permission from University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and the Living With Fire program.”

Be Ember Aware Tip #1 – Unclutter the Gutter

Rain gutters attached to the edge of your roof are the perfect contraptions for catching embers during wildfire. Burning embers can land in the gutters and if they are filled with dried leaves, pine needles, and twigs, a fire can start and possibly ignite the roof, roof sheathing, and fascia. Even houses with fire rated roofs are vulnerable to this type of ember attack. Rain gutters made of vinyl will melt and drop into flower beds, igniting plants next to the house and maybe even combustible siding. To keep your home safe, we suggest that you:

* Remove all dried leaves, pine needles or other materials from your rain gutters before fire season. Over the winter, debris often accumulates in them.

* Keep your ladder handy and check your rain gutters throughout the fire season, cleaning them out as necessary.

* If a wildfire is approaching and there is no time to clean out the debris, plug the rain gutter down spout with a tennis ball, or something similar so that the down spout will be plugged, and fill the rain gutter with water.

[h/t Fire Chief Jeff]
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Idaho News:

Wilks brothers want to close two roads

Gates needed to prevent threats, arson, says rep

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 18, 2018

DF Development, the company name for the Wilks brothers of Texas, plans to close sections of Flat Creek Road and Corral Creek Road, Valley County commissioners were told on Monday.

Flat Creek Road runs from Gold Fork Road by Davis Creek Lane to the Smalley Reservoir and is about 10 miles long.

The Flat Creek Road bisects about 10,000 acres of DF Development land, company representative Colin Chambers said told commissioner.

Corral Creek Road runs from Idaho 55 south of Cascade to Horsethief Road south of YMCA property and is about three miles long.

“That whole road bisects a lot of private property, and there’s no public ground there,” Chambers said.

“It’s not restricting access to Horsethief because you can still get to Horsethief from the north end,” he said.

DF Development owns the land surrounding Corral Creek Reservoir, Chambers said.

“A big deal for us is security,” he said. “We have threats of harm to individual employees, we have threats of harm to the property as far as arson.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wood For the Winter

Cascade volunteers pitch in to gather, split firewood

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 18, 2018

Volunteers gathered last week in Cascade to collect and split firewood for people who might otherwise spend the winter without adequate heat.

More than a dozen volunteers gathered and cut about 12 cords of wood from U.S. Bureau of Reclamation land near the Crown Point Cemetery.

The wood was taken to the Western Idaho Community Action Partnership building in downtown Cascade, where it was split and stacked.

The wood gathering session was organized by WICAP. Volunteers worked in cooperation with Valley County, Forest Service and B of R staff.

continued:
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McCall food bank to offer free flu vaccinations

The Star-News Oct 18, 2018

Free flu vaccinations for adults and children will be available from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Wednesday at Heartland Hunger Resource Center, 556 Deinhard Lane. No appointment is necessary.

Flu vaccinations are free for adults and children who do not have health insurance. If children are covered by insurance, including Medicaid, insurance will be billed.

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that everyone age six months and older be vaccinated annually against influenza.

Young children, pregnant women, people over age 65, and those with chronic health conditions are at highest risk of flu complications.

The clinic is sponsored by Central District Health Department, the Community Medical Fund and St. Luke’s McCall. For more information call, 208-630-2379.

source:
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State lifts health warning over Lake Cascade algae

Toxic bloom spread over most of reservoir in September

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 18, 2018

A health advisory for toxic blue-green algae in Lake Cascade was lifted Tuesday after officials found that levels of the harmful bacteria had subsided.

The advisory, which was issued by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality in cooperation with the Central District Health Department, had been in place since Sept. 7, when high concentrations of the dangerous algal bloom of cyanobacteria were detected.

“There is a section of the northern part of the lake that has cyanobacteria, but toxin levels prove to be very low,” Department of Environmental Quality Watershed Coordinator Chase Cusack said.

No injuries or sicknesses were reported in relation to the bloom in Lake Cascade, he said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Former Cascade police chief charged with theft of guns

Ryan Redmon accused of taking city-owned pistols

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 18, 2018

Former Cascade Police Chief Ryan Redmon has been charged with two felony counts of grand theft in connection with five pistols belonging to the City of Cascade that went missing.

One charge claims Redmon took a pistol for himself after leaving the force in 2013. The second count says Redmon gave the remaining guns to other officers formerly employed by the department.

Redmon has pleaded not guilty to both charges. He is scheduled to appear in Valley County Magistrate’s Court on Tuesday.

continued:
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70-year-old from Homedale dies in head-on Highway 55 crash

by CBS 2 News Staff Tuesday, October 16th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — A 70-year-old from Homedale died in a head-on crash on Highway 55 Tuesday afternoon.

The crash occurred at milepost 81, about three miles north of Banks.

Police Identified the 70-year-old as Fredrik Egurrola.

According to police Egurrola was driving northbound in a dodge pickup when he crossed the center line into the southbound lane and struck a Volvo semi-truck pulling a trailer.

continued:
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Search called off for woman missing from Idaho County hunting camp

Officials have called off the search for 76-year-old Connie Johnson.

Associated Press October 17, 2018


Photo: Idaho County Sheriff

Grangeville, Idaho (AP) – Officials have called off the search for a 76-year-old woman missing from a north-central Idaho hunting camp.

Idaho County Sheriff Doug Giddings tells The Lewiston Tribune that the search that started Oct. 5 for Connie Johnson ended Tuesday. Aircraft and teams with tracking dogs took part in the search.

The Nezperce resident was working as the cook at the hunting camp accessible only by horseback in the Fog Mountain area. She had her pet border collie, Ace, with her.

Hunters left the camp Oct. 2. When they returned three days later, Johnson was gone. Giddings says the hunters had radio contact with Johnson on Oct. 3 but couldn’t understand what she was saying.

Giddings says the possibility of foul play is unlikely.

source:
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Idaho owes about $20 million for 2018 wildfire season

10/16/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idaho will owe about $20 million in firefighting costs for the 2018 wildfire season.

Officials with the Idaho Department of Lands told the Idaho Land Board on Tuesday that this year’s wildfire season is below the 20-year-average for acres burned and number of fires.

But officials say 202 wildfires in Idaho were caused by humans, while just 56 were caused by lighting.

continued:
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Idaho official: Only public voter records were on dark web

10/17/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idaho Secretary of State Lawerence Denney says Idaho voter records that were offered for sale on the dark web contained only publicly available information.

Idaho was among 19 states that had their records offered for sale on a dark web online forum.

Security researchers said Monday the offering did not mean voter databases had been breached. Rather, the estimated 35 million records could have been stolen from resellers who buy voter data from states for use by campaigns and get-out-the-vote efforts.

In prepared statement released Monday, Denney said Idaho’s information was already available publicly for legitimate, political or research purposes. But Denney said state law prohibits anyone from using the information for commercial purposes, so he’ll work with the Attorney General’s office to prosecute any misuse of the information.

source:
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Mining News:

Ask Midas: What Does Factor of Safety Mean?

October 5

Midas Gold Idaho wants to keep the community informed about the work we are doing at the Stibnite Gold Project site. The Ask Midas blog series gives the experts in our company a chance to answer some of the community’s most frequently asked questions and help clear up any misconceptions around the project.

What Does Factor of Safety Mean?

At Midas Gold, we often talk about the factor of safety for our proposed facilities – especially our tailings storage facility. This facility is where the ore will be sent after we extract the profitable metals from the ore. Our tailings facility is designed so that it will have a superior factor of safety. But what does that really mean?

Factor of safety is a rating that compares the design strength of a structure to the stresses put on it. You can determine the factor of safety by dividing the calculated design strength by the expected stresses put on the structure.

continued:
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Discovering Copper and Molybdenum Deposits: A Brief History of Idaho CuMo Project

October 18, 2018 Boise County Connection


CuMo Mine site. Photo by Linda Ruppel DDS

Idaho CuMo Mining gave a presentation at the Crouch Community Hall last week to update people about the Molybdenum (moly) mine in Boise County. By all assessments, the project is running its course, following permitting processes, staying in compliance with federal and state agencies, and is carefully making sure the project would be sustainable for years to come. Every decision looks at the environmental, social and economic impact of the local areas. A mining project often takes 20 years or more to become a reality due to heavy regulations and environmental studies.

But one may wonder … just how did this moly deposit even get discovered? A tour to the proposed mining site was offered to people who wanted to go so that they could see the area for themselves and ask these questions. Tour guest, Linda Ruppel of Garden Valley, explained what Shaun Dykes, M.Sc. (Eng) and CEO of CUMO had to say to the group. Dykes explained that in 1969 somebody brought in some sediment samples from the creek that contained Copper and Molybdenum. Interested people then followed the sediment along the creek up to the mine site. Amex came along and drilled another 20 holes to look at potential deposits. Unfortunately, by 1981, the Moly market had collapsed, and the project was left alone for a while.

continued:
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Idaho, environmental group settle mine pollution lawsuit

By Keith Ridler – 10/19/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — An environmental group and Idaho officials have reached a tentative settlement over toxic discharge from an abandoned silver and lead mine in central Idaho near one of the world’s top ski destinations.

The Idaho Conservation League in federal court documents made public Thursday agreed to have its lawsuit dismissed as long as state officials get a federal permit involving discharge from the Triumph Mine. Such a permit could require expensive cleanup by the state. A judge has to approve the deal.

The lawsuit filed in September contends Idaho officials are discharging arsenic and other pollutants into the east fork of the Big Wood River in violation of the Clean Water Act.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Weather and conditions permitting, the Boise National Forest is planning ignition of several 2018 fall prescribed burns.

Contact: Venetia Gempler Phone: (208) 373-4105 Email: vgempler @ fs.fed.us

Boise, Idaho, Oct. 16, 2018 – Two Ranger Districts within the Boise National Forest plan to ignite several prescribed burns this week to reduce fuels and improve wildlife habitat.

The Mountain Home Ranger District (RD) is planning hand and aerial ignition of approximately 1000 acres, Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct. 16, & 17, in the Cottonwood II Prescribed burn area. The burn is located 22 miles Northeast of Boise, ID in Boise County. Some smoke is anticipated in the Lucky Peak area for a few days. If you need further information, you may call the Mountain RD at 208-587-7961.

Advisory: The Mountain Home Ranger District has a temporary closure in effect for the Cottonwood II Prescribed Burn Area to provide for public safety during burn activities. The area will be closed beginning Monday, Oct. 15, 2018, and 12:01 a.m. and shall remain in effect, until Oct. 25, 2018, at 11:59 p.m. unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-01-86)

The closures and maps for the burns are available at:

https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices

The Cascade RD is planning the hand ignition of approximately 100 acres Wednesday, Oct. 17, in the Crawford Prescribed burn area. The burn is located 4 miles east of Cascade. Some smoke may be visible in the Cascade area for a few days. If you need further information, you may call the Cascade RD at 208-382-7400.

Advisory: The Cascade Ranger District has a closure of the Eagles Nest Trail #111 near the Crawford Prescribed area to provide for public safety and protection from hazards associated with the Crawford Prescribed burn. The area will be closed beginning Oct. 17, 2018, and shall remain in effect, until Nov. 1, 2018, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-01-81)

The Cascade RD is also planning the hand and possible aerial ignition of approximately 250 acres Thursday and Friday, Oct. 18, and 19, in the Horsethief Prescribed burn area. The burn is located 3 miles east of Cascade. Some smoke may be visible in the Cascade area for a few days. If you need further information, you may call the Cascade RD at 208-382-7400.

Links:

0402-01-86 Cottonwood II Prescribed Fire Area Closure MAP.PDF

10-16-2018 – 10402-04-81 Eagles Nest Trail #111 Prescribed Fire SIGNED.pdf

Crawford burn 2

0402-01-86 Cottonwood II Prescribed Fire Area Closure SIGNED.PDF

Horsethief burn 3

0402-04-81 Eagles Nest Trail #111 Prescribed Fire MAP.pdf
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Prescribed Burns planned for Fall 2018

Date Sept 19, 2018

The Krassel Ranger District, Payette National Forest is planning to implement prescribed burns in the Bald Hill and Four Mile project areas this fall. In the Bald Hill Project area we will be working in areas of Reegan Creek and Deadman Creek from the East Fork road up to Rainbow Ridge. In the Fourmile Project area we will be working on both sides of the South Fork, between Blackmare and Holdover Creeks on the west side of the river and in the Fourmile Creek drainage on the east side. See attached map for more specific areas. Ignitions will likely take place in September or October, dependent on weather and fuel conditions. Primary ignitions will take 1-3 days for each burn block, with residual smoke and flame present until the next significant rain. Please do not hesitate to give a call or email with questions, my contact information is lenelson@fs.fed.us or desk phone is 208-634-0622.

Thanks and have a nice day,

Laurel Ingram
Fuels Technician
Payette National Forest
Krassel Ranger District

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing a prescribed burn on the south facing aspect between Deadman Creek and Reegan Creek along the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River Oct 20-21. The edge of burn block E is about 5 miles west of Yellow Pine. See map below.

(click here for larger image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622.

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing the Four Mile Prescribed fire project this fall. Ignitions may take place between Reed Ranch and Poverty Flat Camp Ground on both sides of the South Fork of the Salmon River. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 2 or more days in September or October.

(click here for larger image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622
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Note from Cascade Ranger District:
(no date yet)

The Cascade RD is planning to burn both the Lower Johnson Thinning and Yellow Pine Blow Down units this fall, both of these projects will be pile burning only NO Broadcast Burning is planned.

The Lower Johnson Project (thinning & piling) was completed last summer, these handpiles are located along Johnson Creek road, Wapiti Ranch, Cox Ranch, Bryant Ranch/ Johnson Creek Airstrip.

Hand Ignition for Lower Johnson should take about a week to complete, once those piles have been completed, the crews will relocate to Yellow Pine to burn the logging slash piles.

If you have any addition questions please contact Tim Dulhanty tdulhanty@fs.fed.us (208-382-7400) or myself at 208-382-7400 or send me an email.

Thanks
James Bishop
Fuels AFMO
Boise National Forest
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October BCYPSR Meeting, Oct 25th, Commissioners Room

The meeting next week will be in the Valley County Commissioners Room.

Agenda

Big Creek/Yellow Pine/South Fork Collaborative Meeting
Payette National Forest
October 25th, 2018; 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM
Valley County Commissioners Room
Conference Line Phone Number: 208-229-8030; Conference ID: 968706
(Notify facilitator if you will be calling in, the zoom link is available upon request)

Note: Attendees to supply their own lunch.
The schedule is sequential, but flexible to allow time for questions and discussion.

Desired Outcomes: Find consent on proposal subcommittee matrix updates

Address Action Items from June meeting:

Subcommittee leaders should be prepared to discuss the sites at the July (October) meeting.

Larry will submit the McCall Stibnite Road Re Route Letter to the County for the Commissioners meeting

link to: BCYPSR July Meeting Notes .docx
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French Hazard-Notification of Decision

Oct 15, 2018

The Decision Notice (DN) for the French Hazard WUI Project has been signed.

The French Hazard WUI Project is a hazardous fuels reduction and vegetation restoration project that addresses the need to treat within the WUI to reduce the risk of wildfire to values such as private property, forest infrastructure, wildlife habitat, visuals, and water quality.

Based upon the review of the effects analysis documented in the EA and consideration of the public comments received throughout the process, Alternative B, with modification has been selected. The project will implement a suite of vegetation management treatments which includes commercial and noncommercial thinning, prescribed burning, and mastication. In addition, associated road maintenance, construction, and decommissioning activities will occur. The project design includes environmental protection measures (design features) and post-implementation restoration activities. Implementation of this decision is scheduled to begin in the early fall of 2018

The DN can be downloaded from the project website located at:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49636

If you have questions, please contact Jake Strohmeyer, Cascade District Ranger at 208-382-7402.
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Two popular Idaho City Ranger District destinations are re-opened

Boise, Idaho, October 19, 2018 — Two popular areas to visit within the Idaho City Ranger District are open.

The Grayback Gulch Road/Bridge and the Graham road were damaged in 2017 by spring wash out and closed due to road failure.

Effective Saturday, Oct. 20, 2018, at 12:01 a.m. the Grayback Gulch Road/Bridge (NFS road 347) is open. The campground is closed for winter and the gate may be closed, but not locked. Visitors may push the gate open and access the area and campground. Be aware there are no services including water, trash disposal or toilet facilities. Please observe the pack in and pack out guidelines.

Also, effective Oct. 18, 2018, NFS road 312 (Pikes Fork) to Graham is open to all motorized access.

Reservations will be available for Grayback Campground and Graham Cabin at http://www.recreation.gov for the 2019 season. The site is being upgraded and your patience is appreciated.

Photos provided by John Henderson / Project Engineer / Warren Wagon Rd ProjectWestern Federal Lands Highway Division.


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BLM seeks volunteers for sagebrush planting

Date: October 16, 2018
Contact: Michael Williamson mwilliamson@blm.gov 208-384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management is hosting a volunteer event to plant native plants as part of efforts to rehabilitate the area burned in the 2013 Kuna Butte Fire. The event will take place Oct. 20 beginning at 9:30 a.m. at Kuna Butte.

“By planting sagebrush and wildflowers, volunteers will be helping to re-establish habitat for raptors, their prey species and to support traditional land uses.” said BLM Ecologist Joe Sirotnak. “While this is an all day event, people can stay as long as they want. We appreciate any and all help. ”

This is part of a shared conservation stewardship effort with partners including the Birds of Prey NCA Partnership, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, City of Kuna, and Boise State University Club Sports.

Volunteers will be broken into groups and directed to planting locations around Kuna Butte. Please consider the following:

* While shovels and some work gloves will be available, volunteers are encouraged to bring their own.
* Wear weather-appropriate outdoor work clothes including boots, long-sleeved shirts, and long pants.
* Bring water and any food you may need.
* While this is a family-friendly activity, minors must be accompanied by an adult.

Those interested in participating are encouraged to RSVP by email (jsirotnak@blm.gov) by Oct. 18 to help with logistical planning, though anyone may volunteer on the day of the event.

Kuna Butte is located approximately one-half mile west of the intersection of Swan Falls Road and West Kuna Mora Road (Google Maps). The group will meet at the parking area at the base of Kuna Butte.

For more information, contact Joe Sirotnak at (208) 384-3300.
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Critter News:

Caldwell women given jail, 25-year hunting ban for poaching

Shannan Norris described as leader of conspiracy

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News October 18, 2018

A Caldwell woman on Tuesday was sentenced to 60 days in jail and given a 25-year hunting, fishing and trapping license suspension stemming from an Adams County poaching conspiracy.

Shannan Norris, 46, previously pleaded guilty to felony charges of criminal conspiracy and destruction of evidence.

The charges stemmed from her illegal use and re-use of game tags, hunting out of season and misleading investigators.

The sentence was handed down by Third District Court Judge Christopher Nye during a hearing at the Adams County Courthouse in Council.

Nye also sentenced Norris to 10 years of probation, plus restitution and fines in an amount to be determined.

“When you go out and kill everything you see, you’re robbing the future of hunting,” Nye told Norris.

Norris will begin serving her 60 days at the Adams County Jail before the end of the year.

continued:
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

October 17th Wolf Report
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Mexican wolves found dead in Arizona, New Mexico

10/18/18 AP

Phoenix, N.M. — Arizona wildlife officials say authorities are investigating the deaths of three endangered Mexican gray wolves, including one found in southwestern New Mexico.

The Arizona Game and Fish Department announced this week that male wolves belonging to the Bear Wallow and Saffel packs were found dead in Arizona in September. The packs are known to roam parts of Arizona’s Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest.

The wolf found dead in New Mexico was a member of the SBP pack.

continued:
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Conservationists ask court to step in as red wolf plan looms

By Jonathan Drew – 10/17/18 AP

Raleigh, N.C. — Conservationists told a federal judge Wednesday that an imminent government plan to shrink the territory of the only red wolves living in the wild would hasten the animal’s extinction in violation of federal law.

Lawyers for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, however, countered that new rules for the red wolf program, set to be finalized next month, mean that the conservationists’ legal arguments are moot — and that they must file another lawsuit if they want to challenge the new plans.

The current lawsuit by the Red Wolf Coalition, Defenders of Wildlife and Animal Welfare Institute argues that the federal government has neglected the wolves in recent years, allowing their population to decline. An estimated 35 wild red wolves remain — all in eastern North Carolina — down from about 120 a decade ago. Another 200 currently live in captive breeding programs.

continued:
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter Oct 18, 2018

Coyotes feeding on pets, prompting fear among humans
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Idaho man survives grizzly bear attack in Montana wilderness

10/15/18 AP

Coeur d’Alene, Idaho — A roughly 500-pound (230-kilogram) grizzly bear attacked a Hayden, Idaho, man, and the man lived to tell about it.

The Coeur d’Alene Press reports the bear attacked Bob Legasa Saturday morning while Legasa and his hunting partner, Greg Gibson, were bow hunting elk south of Livingston, Montana.

The pair spotted the grizzly and her 2-year-old cub about 12 yards (11 meters) away. The youngling reared up and growled, then made way for the mama bear to charge.

continued:
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Forage reserve created in eastern Idaho for livestock

10/20/18 AP

American Falls, Idaho — Federal authorities say a reserve forage area in eastern Idaho for livestock displaced by wildfires, drought or other problems will be available next summer.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management says the 345-square-mile (890-square-kilometer) reserve northwest of American Falls is intended to feed sheep and cattle forced off other grazing areas.

BLM spokeswoman Sarah Wheeler tells the Capital Press in a story on Thursday that the reserve gives livestock producers an option to still make a living when things get tough.

Wheeler says a wildfire can keep livestock off federal public lands for several years.

The federal agency says the reserve is in an area that includes old homesteads and other areas previously seeded with crested wheatgrass.

source:
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Federal court: Salmon must have protection from warm water

10/18/18 AP

Portland, Ore. — A federal court has ruled that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency must come up with a plan to protect salmon from warm water temperatures, which can be fatal for the fish species. ‘

Oregon Public Broadcasting reports Thursday that record-high water temperatures in rivers across the Pacific Northwest in 2015 led environmental groups to sue the agency.

That summer, around 250,000 adult sockeye died in the Columbia and Snake rivers.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Idaho wildlife official resigns after killing baboon family

10/16/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — A top Idaho wildlife official has resigned amid outrage over a photo of him posing with a baboon family he killed in Africa.

Idaho Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter said in a statement that he asked for and accepted Blake Fischer’s resignation on Monday, three days after the Idaho Statesman newspaper published the first report about a photo of Fischer smiling with four dead baboons propped in front of him.

Fischer and his wife shot at least 14 animals in Namibia according to the photos and descriptions in an email he sent to more than 100 recipients.

continued:
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Make the call to catch poachers, (800) 632-5999

By Mike Demick, Conservation Information Supervisor
Thursday, October 11, 2018

Poaching Hotline (800-632-5999) available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

With many hunting seasons underway, the Idaho Fish and Game asks the public to call the Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) hotline if they witness a violation of wildlife laws.

“Those who ‘Make the Call’ are instrumental in catching poachers stealing game and fish from the Idaho citizens,” said David Silcock, Idaho Fish and Game regional conservation officer based in Salmon. “Many poaching cases would not be detected, let alone, solved without the public’s extra eyes and ears.”

Callers to the hotline, 1-800-632-5999, can report wildlife law violations anonymously, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Cash rewards are available to callers who provide information leading to the citation of suspected wildlife law violators.

continued:
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Four wolf trapper courses scheduled across the state in November and December

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Conservation Educator
Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Class is mandatory for wolf trappers

Attention new wolf trappers: There are 4 upcoming wolf trapper education classes scheduled for Nov and Dec in Idaho. If you plan to trap wolves this season, please plan to attend one of these classes.

continued:
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Idaho Fish and Game finds old loon from Nevada tangled in net near Cascade

by CBS 2 News Staff Friday, October 19th 2018


Photo Courtesy Idaho Fish and Game

Cascade, Idaho (CBS2) — 500 miles is a long distance to travel.

But that didn’t stop a loon that was found entangled in a net on Cascade Reservoir.

McCall fish management crews were conducting their annual fall fish survey of Cascade Reservoir, and found the banded common loon in one of the nets.

After releasing the loon unharmed, they discovered it was banded at Walker Lake, NV which is just east of Reno.

The oldest living loon recorded is 25-years-old, but Fish and Game says this loon was 21-years-old!

continued:
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Pheasant releases expand hunting opportunity in the Clearwater through Dec. 31

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Conservation Educator
Monday, October 15, 2018

Palouse River and Lloyd Ranch access areas

The opening weekend of youth pheasant season on the Palouse River Youth Only Upland Game Area was a great success. This youth area was completely booked on opening weekend with 5 hunter/mentor pairs per day. With the help of Jim Hagedorn and the Game Bird Foundation, we are looking forward to another successful weekend. All hunters must sign in online. The sign-in can be found on the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Access Yes! website under the Palouse Area. The Game Bird Foundation will be releasing birds every week through the rest of the season, so be sure you take advantage of this opportunity.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Osprey: The Ultimate Fisher

Have you ever seen a bird shake water off like a dog does?

There are 3 sequences in this one video:

1st sequence – catches half a dozen fish in one strike.
2nd sequence – plunges talons into deep water to grab the Flounder.
3rd sequence – captures a big old fish that looks as if it weighs more than he does!

[h/t B]
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Seasonal Humor:


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Bald Hill Prescribed Burn Oct 20-21

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing a prescribed burn on the south facing aspect between Deadman Creek and Reegan Creek along the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River Oct 20-21. The edge of burn block E is about 5 miles west of Yellow Pine. See map below.

(click here for larger image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622.

Oct 14, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 14, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
October 17 Ed Staub & Sons Fall Fuel delivery call (208) 634-3833
October 20 Dave Bingaman for V. Co. Commissioner at The Corner 430pm-630pm
October 27 Halloween Party at the Yellow Pine Tavern
November 1st week Amerigas Propane delivery call (208) 634-8181

(details below)
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Village News:

Outages

The power went off Tuesday evening (Oct 9) at 641pm in Yellow Pine, including Johnson Creek and the Warm Lake area. Power back on at 1128pm.

Planned MTE internet/phone outage Wednesday (Oct 10) started around 1230pm and was up before 3pm. The message said it was for “upgrades”.
— — — —

Diamond Fuel Delivery

Nathan brought fuel on Monday (Oct 8), two days early because of snow in the forecast for Wednesday.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.


— — — —

Local Fall Rx Burns

* Lower Johnson Thinning (95 acres): Is a project designed to reduce hazardous fuels within the WUI. This project is located approximately 7 miles south of Yellow Pine along NFS road 413 and Johnson Creek.

* Yellow Pine Blowdown (40 acres): is located approximately 62 miles from Cascade, Idaho and is adjacent to the community of Yellow Pine. Hand Ignitions will be used to ignite machine piles along NFS roads 412, 413.

The Cascade RD is planning to burn both the Lower Johnson Thinning and Yellow Pine Blow Down units this fall, both of these projects will be pile burning only NO Broadcast Burning is planned.

The Lower Johnson Project (thinning & piling) was completed last summer, these handpiles are located along Johnson Creek road, Wapiti Ranch, Cox Ranch, Bryant Ranch/ Johnson Creek Airstrip.

Hand Ignition for Lower Johnson should take about a week to complete, once those piles have been completed, the crews will relocate to Yellow Pine to burn the logging slash piles.

If you have any addition questions please contact Tim Dulhanty tdulhanty@fs.fed.us (208-382-7400) or myself at 208-382-7400 or send me an email.

– Thanks
James Bishop, Fuels AFMO, Boise National Forest
— — — —

Firewood Permits

Permits available May 15, 2018 through November 30, 2018 at The Corner.

Fuelwood permits have been reduced to $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum and a 10-cord maximum per household.

link to more info:

Stay Out Of Riparian Areas!

— — — —

Ice Hole Campground Closed

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
— — — —

Pests

No recent reports of bear activity, but they are still around fattening up for winter. Please do not leave pet food outside and secure your trash. Mice are looking for a warm place to winter. Colombian ground squirrels have gone into hibernation. Chipmunks had a population boom this summer. Pine squirrels are not as numerous as in past years.

Video Link Bear Visitor Aug 20, 2018
———-

Local Events:

Dave Bingaman For Valley County Commissioner District #3

Dave will be at The Corner on October 20th from 430pm-630pm for a happy hour meet and greet and to chat about Yellow Pine issues during his campaign for Valley County Commissioner.

“This is the man that will help preserve the Valley County we all know and love while allowing it’s citizen’s and community to prosper. This is Your Voice in Valley County and our New Generation of Leadership.”

Web is: http://davebingaman.com/
FB is Dave Bingaman for Valley County Commissioner
— — — —

October 27 Halloween Party at the Yellow Pine Tavern
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

September Yellow Pine water update excerpts

The good news is the second sand filter is online and operating well. We have refurbished and upgraded the chlorinator and purchased new chlorine monitoring tools that will help us more accurately adjust the amount of chlorine injected into the water. Additionally, we received the $10,000 grant from Midas. We are looking at all options but it seems that for 2018 we must raise user fees a minimum of a $150 per year.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx

There will be a YPWUA meeting in October.

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.
— — — —

VYPA News:

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 18th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th. Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.

Midas Gold and Yellow Pine

August 28, 2018

Attached is the Community Partnership Agreement the Village of Yellow Pine signed with Midas Gold.

link to: 2018 Community Partnership Agreement.pdf
— — — —

YPFD News:

There was a YPFD Commissioners Meeting October 6, no minutes yet.

Sept 22nd YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Sept. 30th Yellow Pine Times.

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

A lot of progress has been made on the new Helipad near the crossroads.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

– Fire Chief Jeff

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open for summer
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

We sell FS wood cutting permits.

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC

Buck Horn Outfitters in Idaho’s west Central Mountains in Units 25, 20 A, & 19 A. Providing Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Mountain lion, & Wolf Hunts. We offer Guided Rifle or Archery Hunts & Drop Camps. We are not about Quantity we are about providing Quality Hunts. My husband and I have been in the back country all our lives, we offer Deluxe camps with great food & our Guides know hunting, the back country and Stock.

Link to FB:
— — — —

Deadwood Outfitters

We’re currently interviewing for winter caretakers. A remote location and snowmobile only access in winter.
Duty services include:
Guest cabin up keep
Preparing meals
Keeping porches shoveled
And enjoying lots of solitude.
For more info. deadwoodoutfit @ gmail.com
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 8) overnight low of 26 degrees, frosty and mostly cloudy this morning, good air quality. Report of a 6 point bull elk seen in the village early this morning. Diamond Fuel delivery today (driver said the weather looked bad for Wednesday, so he came 2 days early.) Red-breasted nuthatch visited after lunch time. Nearly solid overcast by early afternoon, cool light breezes, high of 53 degrees. Leaves falling off trees and bushes, but lots of color still around. Tamarack trees are turning golden. Gray overcast by evening and almost calm. Rain after midnight.

Tuesday (Oct 9) probably rained all night, low of 31 degrees, hard rain for a while around 7am, light rain at 10am. Low overcast, hills and peaks socked in. Snow line appears to be at least 6500′ or lower. By mid-afternoon the snow line had risen, low clouds and rained until around 6pm, high of 44 degrees. Power outage 641pm to 1128pm, the outage was for all of Yellow Pine and included Johnson Creek to Warm Lake. Thinner clouds at sunset.

Wednesday (Oct 10) overnight low of 35 degrees, low overcast this morning cloaking the top of VanMeter. Planned internet/phone outage started around 1230pm and back up before 3pm. Cool overcast afternoon, chilly breezes, high of 46 degrees. Report of bear scat up the EFSF road the other day. Breaks in the clouds by evening, cool and the air is good.

Thursday (Oct 11) overnight low of 34 degrees, mostly cloudy, light dew and chilly breeze this morning. Snow up high on VanMeter. Heard a flicker in the neighborhood. Decreasing clouds during the day, mild temperatures and chilly breezes, high of 54 degrees. Flock of starlings in the neighborhood this evening and one jay calling. Almost clear at dusk.

Friday (Oct 12) overnight low of 25 degrees, clear sky and frosty this morning. Sun starting to peek between the trees on the top of Golden Gate Hill just after 10am. Jay calling. Sunny mid-day, just a few tiny clouds to the south. Nice afternoon, dry, light breezes and lots of sunshine, high of 64 degrees. Quiet evening, temps dropping with the sun.

Saturday (Oct 13) our first snow of the season early this morning, a bit unexpected (not in the forecast) enough snow to make the ground white. Mostly cloudy at sunrise and 31 degrees. Raven flying over the neighborhood and calling. Flaking snow just after 1pm for a little while. Six pine squirrels in a group traveling together, looked like a mother and 5 grown offspring following in a straight line. Spitting snow, then rain/snow mix, then heavy snow 445pm-530pm, windy and very low clouds (about 1/2″ accumulation), then breaks in the clouds and a little melting, high of 50 degrees. Clearing up by 10pm and getting cold.

Sunday (Oct 14) overnight low of 17 degrees, clear sky and about 1/4″ of snow on the ground from yesterday’s storm. Sunny and some melting by lunch time. A few loud gunshots to the west before 1pm. Clear, cool and chilly stiff breezes after lunch. Increased traffic. Clear sunny afternoon, high of 48 degrees, most of the snow melted except in the shade.
——————————

Letter to Share:

August and September newsletter

October 14, 2018

From the desk of Commissioner Cruickshank,

Thursday August 2nd
I attended a Farm Bureau Dinner event in Adams County where they discussed current topics of concern on legislation both current and proposed.

Monday August 6th
Today was a Commissioner meeting day. Please find the minutes once approved on the Valley County website at Valley County Idaho | Official Site and click on the commissioners section where minutes can be found.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday August 7th
I worked on emails and returning phone calls.

Wednesday August 8th
I sent out a reminder for a National Association of Counties (NACo) West Region Call for tomorrow.

Thursday August 9th
I hosted the NACo West Region Call where we learned more about the NACo High Performance Leadership Academy program.
Tonight I attended a portion of the McCall City Council meeting to hear reports on the use of Local Option Tax funding.

Friday August 10th
I participated in the NACo Executive Board Conference call. Discussion was on the reorganization of NACo.

Saturday August 11th
Valley County Fair Livestock Auction today where I assisted with the auction as a Ring Man to collect bids on livestock being sold. So proud of our Valley County Youth for participating in the programs to learn more about living in Valley County.

Monday August 13th
Commissioner Meeting day. Please see the Valley County website to review the minutes.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday August 14th
I had a phone conversation with the Idaho Association of Counties (IAC) Executive Director on the Payment in Lieu of Taxes Fly In and upcoming IAC election process as there are several positions open for representing IAC.

Wednesday August 15th
I had a phone conversation with a staff person with Senator Risch on the Payette Forest Coalition Tour tomorrow to see if I was attending.

Thursday August 16th
I attended to Payette Forest Coalition Tour to view past Restoration work completed and see look at the next section of landscape to be worked on.

Monday August 20th
Commissioner meeting day. Please see the Valley County website.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday August 21st
I responded to emails on the proposed Road Levy to fund the Road Department and booked a flight for an upcoming NACo Executive Board meeting in California.

Wednesday August 22nd
Replied to emails today.

Sunday August 26th
Returned phone calls from being out of service for a few days.

Monday August 27th
Commissioner meeting day. Please see the Valley County website.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday August 28th
Responded to emails and a request to attend a meeting on Community Agreements with Midas Gold for Friday.

Wednesday August 29th
I reviewed our Firewise Consulting Contract for renewal and replied to the Forest Service on who has jurisdiction on certain roads in the Stibnite area.
I hauled the County Excavator to the Transfer Site and piled Woody Debris this afternoon. The ability to drop off Woody Debris free has brought in a large amount of material and we needed more room. This is good as it helps prevent a fire when we don’t need it during dry conditions.

Thursday August 30th
I met with Lakeshore Disposal officials to discuss future operation of the Solid Waste program for Valley County.

Friday August 31st
I operated the Excavator at the Transfer Site piling more brush today. Also happening today was the discovery of a LIVE Grenade found in a residence. The Mountain Home Bomb Squad was brought in to dispose of the grenade.

Tuesday September 4th
Commissioner meeting day. All minutes of commissioners meeting can be found at http://www.co.valley.id.us by clicking on the commissioner section and finding the minutes. Once minutes are approved they are posted so it may take a few weeks.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Friday September 7th
I participated in a NACo Executive Board call today to discuss the recent Payment in Lieu of Taxes Fly-In which was one of the best NACo has had to work with Congressional Offices. We also learned that 1,428 individuals from 45 counties are involved with NACo Committees which is the highest to date. Additionally we learned that 130 people
signed up for the Leadership online Academy.

Monday September 10th
Commissioner meeting day. Please see the Valley County website.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday September 11th
I reviewed upcoming events for NACo in December during which a NACo Board of Directors meeting will be held. I sent out a reminder of the NACo West Region call on Thursday. I received a call to set up a time to meet with some folks looking at the Tamarack Resort. I participated in a NACo Transportation Leadership Call to discuss issues of importance with transportation. As one of 4 Vice Chairs on this committee the discussion was important to hear.

Wednesday September 12th
I returned to the Transfer Site and piled more brush from the Woody Debris collection program.

Thursday September 13th
I hosted the NACo West Region call where we had multiple people from various western states speak on topic of concern. I also complied notes from this call and sent them to members of the West Region.

Monday September 17th
Commissioner meeting day. Please see the website for the minutes.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday September 18th
I had a discussion with the Valley County Clerk on an upcoming agenda where the commissioners will have limited time to discuss items.
I booked a flight for an upcoming NACo Budget meeting in Washington D C.
This afternoon I met with staff at D F Development to discuss roads in Valley County.

Wednesday September 19th
I met with some people interested in the Tamarack Resort. Their interest is in Valley County process that happened in prior years and how that process is today. I hope I provided a better understanding for them as they consider this potential.

Thursday September 20th
My day started of with returning a call to a concerned citizen on the Idaho Department of Lands allowing cell tower installation without Public Comment.
Next was a call from a Septic Tank cleaning company concerned that the Payette Lakes Water and Sewer District were discontinuing the ability to dump septage at the McCall site.
I also returned a call to an Emergency Services Director in North Dakota who wanted to discuss various topics as they were a prior Montana Commissioner and wanted to learn more about my involvement with NACo and the Western Region.
This evening I reviewed proposed legislation on the Secure Rural Schools program that is expiring.

Friday September 21st
This morning I participated in a NACo Western Interstate Region call to discuss the Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) Fly-In where 25 county folks participated in 16 Hill meetings, a White House meeting with the Office of Management and Budget and USDA Natural Resource and Environment officials. There seemed to be positive feedback on the understanding of PILT. Also discussed was a document NACo and the Forest Service are working on.
I then attended the Community Agreement meeting at Midas Gold to review and comment on the draft agreements that are being considered by communities.
At noon I participated in the NACo Executive Board call where we continued the discussion on the reorganization of NACo. Discussion revolved around Membership Engagement, Policy Advancement both Federal and Nationally, Leadership, Financial Health Long Term, Culture and Wellness. This lead to a discussion on what is beneficial as we can’t do all that the membership asks.

Monday September 24th
Commissioner meeting today. Please see the Valley County website for the minutes.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/
This afternoon was the start of the Idaho Association of Counties (IAC) Fall Conference in Boise. I attended the Opening General Session and then the IAC Transportation Committee meeting.

Tuesday September 25th
This morning started with another General Session where we heard about Best Practices in Emergency Management, then I attended a workshop on Public Purchasing where we learned about changes in procurement of goods, this afternoon was a Public Lands committee meeting and to end today’s events was a General Session on Economic Development in Changing Times. Tonight was the Annual Social and Banquet along with the Annual Awards Presentations.

Wednesday September 26th
My morning started off with an IAC Legislative Committee meeting to review proposed legislative resolutions passed by the IAC Committees, then we had an IAC Business meeting where we installed the New Officers of IAC and Voted on 2019 Resolutions.
This afternoon was a IAC Commissioners meeting to discuss statewide concerns such as the Department of Motor Vehicle disruptions by the new programs rolled out by the Idaho Transportation Department.
Late afternoon the IAC Legislative Committee met to create a list of the top ten Resolutions we felt would be best to present as proposed legislation for the upcoming 2019 Legislative Session while we keep an eye of the remaining resolutions in the event they have similar legislation proposed by others.

Thursday September 27th
This morning was an IAC Board Meeting. As the IAC Representative to the NACo Board of Directors it provides a seat on the IAC Board as well. Today we discussed the future of IAC, learned who the incoming or remaining chairs were for IAC Committees, had a staffing update by the Executive Director, discussed corporate partner programs, scholarship funding and reviewed Strategic Goals and Objectives.

Friday September 28th
I drove out to Warm Lake to review the Satellite Transfer Site for Solid Waste as the Bears have been bending the metal doors and getting access to the garbage.

Well I combined two months into this newsletter as it has been a busy summer.

Thanks for reading what interests you.

Gordon
———————————–

Idaho News:

Fire Damages Home

The Star-News October 11, 2018

2018LakeForkHousefire-a
Photo courtesy Donnelly Fire & EMS

Photo shows a fire that broke out about 9:44 a.m. last Thursday in the roof of a home at 13775 Raptor Loop east of Lake Fork. The home’s owner, Brett Bittenbender, and his sister, whose name was not available, were in the home at the time of the blaze and escaped injury. Firefighters from Donnelly Fire & EMS and McCall Fire & EMS responded and quickly extinguished the blaze, Donnelly Fire Marshal Jess Ellis said. The fire started in the chimney chase and extended into the ceiling of the structure, causing extensive damage, Ellis said.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

The Star-News to host election forum in McCall Oct. 18

The Star-News October 11, 2018

The Star-News will host a public forum in McCall on Thursday, Oct. 18, for candidates and issues that will appear on the Nov. 6 general election ballot.

The forum will begin at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 18 at the downstairs Community Room at Idaho First Bank, 475 E. Deinhard Ln. in McCall.

Candidates for contested races have been invited, including candidates for Valley County Commissioner, Valley County Treasurer, and the Idaho Legislature from District 8, which includes Valley County.

A representative of Valley County also has been invited to discuss the advisory question on higher taxes for roads that will appear on the ballot.

The forum will be moderated by The Star-News Co-Publisher Tom Grote. Opening statements will be made followed by the asking of written questions submitted from the audience.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

McCall ranked among the top weekend family getaways in the Northwest

Travel experts say there is nothing like a weekend getaway in McCall to bring a quick fix of family fun.

KTVB Staff October 11, 2018

Boise — A popular Idaho vacation destination has been ranked among the “25 Best Family Weekend Getaways with Kids,” according to TripAdvisor, the self-proclaimed world’s largest travel website.

Travel experts say there is nothing like a weekend getaway in McCall to bring a quick fix of family fun.

They say nature-loving families will enjoy this Idaho resort town for its abundance of outdoor activities from camping and bonfires in Ponderosa State Park to whitewater rafting on the Salmon River. There is so much for both children and adults to do.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

2 people missing in Idaho’s largest county

10/8/18 AP

Grangeville, Idaho — Two people are missing in separate incidents in Idaho’s largest county.

The Idaho County Sheriff’s Office says search efforts are underway for 76-year-old Connie Johnson, a Nezperce resident who was working as the cook at a hunting camp in the Fog Mountain area. Searchers are also looking for 27-year-old Terrence Woods, of Maryland, who was separated from his film crew while working on a project in the area.

Officials say other members of Johnson’s party arrived at the camp Friday and were unable to find the woman or her dog, Ace. No tracks were found at the site. Woods was last seen near the Penman Mine in the Orogrande area and reported missing Friday.

continued:

Idaho County Sheriff: One missing persons case isn’t an accident

by Sarah Jacobsen Wednesday, October 10th 2018

Boise, ID (KBOI) — Crews are actively searching Idaho County again today after they say yesterdays rain hampered their search efforts in two separate missing persons cases.

Multiple crews are searching various areas in Idaho County for 76-year-old Nez Perce resident Connie Johnson and 27-year-old Terrence Woods from Maryland.

“And they’ve got dogs in there right now. They’ve got guys on horseback,” says Sheriff Giddings.

Search conditions are extremely difficult for crews due to a rugged landscape.

continued:

Idaho authorities stop search for missing Maryland filmmaker

10/12/18 AP

Grangeville, Idaho — Authorities in Idaho have called off the search for a Maryland filmmaker who became lost while filming a documentary.

The Baltimore Sun reports the search for 27-year-old Terrence Woods ended Thursday afternoon. Woods was reported missing Oct. 5 when he became separated from his crew, which was in the Orogrande area filming a documentary on the Penman Mine.

continued:

Where are they? Relatives and friends speak out about missing people in Idaho County

by CBS 2 News Thursday, October 11th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — More relatives and friends are speaking out about two missing people in Idaho County.

They’re hoping someone, anyone, has seen or heard something, about Terrence Woods and Connie Johnson.

Both have been missing since Friday. There are many unanswered questions about their cases, which the sheriff says are unrelated.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Ransomware attack knocks out E. Idaho county’s system

10/11/18 AP

Rexburg, Idaho — Officials in eastern Idaho’s Madison County say a ransomware attack has left the county struggling to conduct business.

County Commissioner Brent Mendenhall tells the Post Register in a story on Wednesday that county employees have been unable to send emails since Sunday.

Madison County Clerk Kim Muir says the county is using backup data from Saturday to issue paychecks Thursday.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

New Idaho State Museum is for everyone

By Hope Benedict Oct 10, 2018 IME

This week, the wholly reimagined Idaho State Museum is set to open in Boise. After several years of planning, fundraising and implementation, we’re finally ready to say, “Here we are, Idaho.”

Idaho is a vast and geographically diverse state, and some may wonder what a new museum in Boise has to do with our lives here in central Idaho. As this region’s trustee of the Idaho State Historical Society, I wanted to take a moment to highlight why Idahoans living outside Boise should be excited about this milestone.

First, it’s important to know that the reopening of the Idaho State Museum brings with it new technology that will allow us to take parts of the museum to classrooms and living rooms across the state. Planning is underway for virtual field trips that will make it possible for Idahoans to experience the museum’s collections from anywhere. After that, the museum will be working on a plan to take our show on the road, with traveling exhibits.

continued:
———————–

Mining News:

Idaho seeks to force Texas oil company to turn over records

By Keith Ridler – 10/10/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idaho officials sought to force a Texas oil company to turn over records following an evaluation showing what the state calls “discrepancies” involving production records.

The Idaho Oil and Gas Conservation Commission voted 5-0 on Wednesday to authorize subpoenas for Houston-based Alta Mesa to obtain documents and witnesses to appear before the commission.

The action follows the evaluation by the Idaho Department of Lands of Alta Mesa natural gas and oil records dating back to 2014. The company has missed deadlines to turn over additional information following that evaluation.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

New mining claims banned on prized land near Yellowstone

by Matthew Brown, Associated Press Monday, October 8th 2018

Emigrant, Mont. (AP) — U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke approved a 20-year ban on new mining claims in the towering mountains north of Yellowstone National Park on Monday, after two proposed gold mines raised concerns that an area drawing tourists from the around the globe could be spoiled.

As Zinke signed the mineral ban at an outdoor ceremony in Montana’s Paradise Valley, a bank of clouds behind him broke apart to reveal the snow-covered flank of Emigrant Peak. The picturesque, 10,915-foot (3,327-meter) mountain has been at the center of the debate over whether mining should be allowed.

The former Montana congressman was joined by local business owners and residents who pushed for the ban after companies began drafting plans for new mines in an area frequented by wolves, elk, bears and other wildlife.

continued:
————————

Public Lands:

Payette National Forest October 2018 – December 2018 Schedule of Proposed Actions (SOPA)

link:
— — — — — — — — — —

Closure Order terminated for the Rattlesnake Creek Fire, hazards remain

Date: October 10, 2018
Contact: Sandra Dingman 208-634-0435 or Brian Harris cell: (208) 634-6945

McCall, Idaho – The Closure Order for the Rattlesnake Creek Fire was terminated on October 4th. With the change in weather patterns and associated precipitation in the fire area, fire behavior has decreased to creeping and smoldering in the Squirrel and Pony Creek drainages, and is no longer a threat to containment objectives. Fire suppression resources continue to work in the area and some smoke may still be visible.

New Meadows District Ranger Erin Phelps said, “There are still hazards in the area, including fire-weakened trees, smoldering fire, and heavy equipment operating in and around the fire area. We still have some fire suppression repair work to complete, namely a dozer line out of the Hillman Basin area that we’ve used to access the fire, and a contingency line along the southern flank, where we have a number of log decks that were generated as a result of suppression activities. We’re currently pursuing options for those decks, including potentially offering a small timber sale.”

A burned landscape presents a number of safety hazards that either did not exist prior to the fire or have been exacerbated by the effects of the fire. Those traveling or recreating in the burned area are reminded to be very aware of your surroundings and follow warming signs and directions from agency personnel. Hazards include unstable terrain, displaced wildlife, hazard trees, burned stump holes and root chambers, and the possibility of flash flooding and debris flows. Additional information about these hazards is available in a handout called “Traveling and recreating safely in a burned landscape” available at district offices on the Payette National Forest.

The Rattlesnake Creek fire, southwest of Riggins, Idaho, is a human caused fire that has burned since July 23, 2018 on lands managed by the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests and Payette National Forest, the Bureau of Land Management, the Idaho Department of Lands, and privately owned land.

Additional information about the termination of the closure order, traveling in the burned area, and rehab activities can be found at
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5999/

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
— — — — — — — — — —

Southwest Idaho Fall prescribed burning planned

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Boise, Idaho. Sept. 26, 2018 — Southwest Idaho interagency fire managers anticipate favorable weather conditions for planned low-intensity prescribed burns this fall. Prescribed burns are designed to reduce hazardous vegetation (fuels), minimize wildfire potential near communities and improve wildlife habitat.

Weather and fuel conditions permitting, prescribed burns are scheduled to start in October and continue through November. Approximately 2,600 acres are planned for controlled ignitions in 13 project areas within the Boise National Forest.

Public and firefighter safety is always the first priority in all public land fire operations. Fire managers develop burn plans that consider: safety, specific fuel and weather prescriptions and smoke management. All prescribed burns are closely evaluated and are only approved when conditions are favorable.

Fire officials strongly advise forest visitors and homeowners to prepare and plan activities around the proposed dates and locations of burns. Prescribed burns may impact individual’s that are sensitive to smoke. Recreationists should use extreme caution near prescribed fire areas and comply with closures.

Access to areas immediately within or adjacent to burning operations may be temporarily restricted for public health and safety. Specific information and signage will be posted in advance of ignitions and remain in place until operations are completed. Please be cautious of firefighters and additional equipment within these areas as visibility will be decreased with smoke.

The http://www.rxfire.com website is updated with information regarding southwest Idaho burns planned within Idaho Department of Lands, Bureau of Land Management, Payette National Forest and Boise National Forest.

The Boise National Forest prescribed burn hotline: (208)-373-4208.

Idaho City Ranger District

* Alder Ridge (100 acres): located 1 mile north of Placerville, Idaho. This is a landscape burn (ground fire), using hand ignitions to reduce fuel in the wildland urban interface (WUI).
* Amber (300 acres): located 2 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho. This is a modified tree well burn.
* Buckskin (200): located approximately 3 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho.
* Little Ophir (100 acres): located 4 miles west of Pioneerville, Idaho. A landscape burn using hand ignitions that will reduce fuel in the WUI.
* Mores South-Granite Creek (250 acres): located 3 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho. This is a landscape burn (ground fire) using hand ignitions to reduce fuels in the WUI.

Cascade Ranger District

* Horsethief (360 acres): located about 1 mile east/northeast of Horsethief Reservoir. This burn involves helicopter and hand ignitions to reduce fuels throughout the area that is within the WUI.
* Westside Restoration Unit 39 (25 acres): This project is located on National Forest System (NFS) road 435 along West Mountain. It is approximately 10 miles west of Cascade, Idaho. This will be hand ignitions burn to reduce fuels within the WUI.
* Crawford (100 acres): located approximately 4 miles east of Cascade, Idaho adjacent to the Crawford Guard Station, located off of NFS road 22, northeast of Davis reservoir; within WUI area.
* Lower Johnson Thinning (95 acres): Is a project designed to reduce hazardous fuels within the WUI. This project is located approximately 7 miles south of Yellow Pine along NFS road 413 and Johnson Creek.
* Yellow Pine Blowdown (40 acres): is located approximately 62 miles from Cascade, Idaho and is adjacent to the community of Yellow Pine. Hand Ignitions will be used to ignite machine piles along NFS roads 412, 413.
* Rainbow Point (19 acres): This project is located approximately 25 miles northwest of Cascade, Idaho. Machine Piles located within the Rainbow Point campground will be ignited by hand to reduce fuel accumulations throughout the campground.

Mountain Home Ranger District

* Cottonwood II Rx (1000 acres): This project is located about 17 miles NE of Boise, Idaho along NFS roads 203 and 377 in the Cottonwood Creek drainage, north of Arrowrock Reservoir.

Emmett Ranger District

* Miscellaneous Administrative Piles (1-2 acres): At Garden Valley work center.
— — — —

Note from Cascade Ranger District:

The Cascade RD is planning to burn both the Lower Johnson Thinning and Yellow Pine Blow Down units this fall, both of these projects will be pile burning only NO Broadcast Burning is planned.

The Lower Johnson Project (thinning & piling) was completed last summer, these handpiles are located along Johnson Creek road, Wapiti Ranch, Cox Ranch, Bryant Ranch/ Johnson Creek Airstrip.

Hand Ignition for Lower Johnson should take about a week to complete, once those piles have been completed, the crews will relocate to Yellow Pine to burn the logging slash piles.

If you have any addition questions please contact Tim Dulhanty tdulhanty@fs.fed.us (208-382-7400) or myself at 208-382-7400 or send me an email.

– Thanks
James Bishop
Fuels AFMO
Boise National Forest
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Prescribed Burns planned for Fall 2018

Date Sept 19, 2018

The Krassel Ranger District, Payette National Forest is planning to implement prescribed burns in the Bald Hill and Four Mile project areas this fall. In the Bald Hill Project area we will be working in areas of Reegan Creek and Deadman Creek from the East Fork road up to Rainbow Ridge. In the Fourmile Project area we will be working on both sides of the South Fork, between Blackmare and Holdover Creeks on the west side of the river and in the Fourmile Creek drainage on the east side. See attached map for more specific areas. Ignitions will likely take place in September or October, dependent on weather and fuel conditions. Primary ignitions will take 1-3 days for each burn block, with residual smoke and flame present until the next significant rain. Please do not hesitate to give a call or email with questions, my contact information is lenelson@fs.fed.us or desk phone is 208-634-0622.

Thanks and have a nice day,

Laurel Ingram
Fuels Technician
Payette National Forest
Krassel Ranger District

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing a prescribed burn on the south facing aspect between Deadman Creek and Reegan Creek along the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River this fall. The edge of burn block E is about 5 miles west of Yellow Pine. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 1-3 days in September or October 2018.

(click here for larger image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622.

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing the Four Mile Prescribed fire project this fall. Ignitions may take place between Reed Ranch and Poverty Flat Camp Ground on both sides of the South Fork of the Salmon River. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 2 or more days in September or October.

(click here for larger image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622
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Yellowstone geyser barfs up ‘strange’ garbage dating back to the 1930s

Curators considered placing the items in the park’s archives as a reminder not to use the springs as a trash can.

Josh Hafner, USA TODAY (KTVB) October 9, 2018

A typically quiet geyser in Yellowstone National Park erupted last month, spewing water up to 30 feet in the air. Afterward, park employees found a slew of garbage surrounding its vent, including a Hamm’s beer can, a vintage pacifier, a shoe heel and dozens of coins.

Curators considered placing the items in the park’s archives as a reminder: Please, don’t use the springs as a trash can. The park posted a photograph of the “strange” items after last month’s eruption of the geyser called Ear Spring.

“Foreign objects can damage hot springs and geysers,” said the park. “The next time Ear Spring erupts we hope it’s nothing but natural rocks and water.”

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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Rocky Mountain spotted fever

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt October 12, 2018 IME

Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a disease that affects dogs and humans in North America and South America. It is caused by bacteria called rickettsia, which is transmitted by ticks. This is why all veterinarians stress tick prevention in dogs.

The bacteria, or rickettsia, that causes this disease infects red blood cells, platelets and white blood cells. “Spotted fever” is the result of hemorrhages on the skin, much like measles, that occur as the blood-clotting mechanism is affected by low platelets. Platelets are necessary to stop skin hemorrhages, and the rickettsia destroys our platelets.

Besides “spots” on the skin, common clinical findings are fever and lethargy. Sometimes, joint and muscle pain and lameness occur. Rarely, seizures and neurological abnormalities occur. It’s all from a tick bite that contains this horrible rickettsia organism.

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Dog dies after ingesting chewing gum

WZTV by Kaylin Jorge Oct 10, 2018

Ashland City, Tenn. (WZTV) — A middle Tennessee family is sharing its heartbreak over the loss of their dog due to ingesting chewing gum.

Christy Figlio said her Husky mix Cannon was a 3-year-old playful pup who loved to eat. So when the Figlio’s noticed Cannon didn’t run right to his food Saturday night, they knew something might be wrong. Little did they know, that within 12 hours Cannon would be gone forever, poisoned from Xylitol, a sweetener found in low-sugar gum.

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Championship Sheepdog Trials

Oct 10, 2018 IME

The 2018 Championship Sheepdog Trials will be held on Oct. 12-13 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Oct. 14 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Quigley Canyon Fields in Hailey. The trails give spectators a chance to watch a high-finesse version of what border collies do on a working sheep ranch.

The competition challenges the dog, under the command of a handler, to move five sheep around panels at several locations on a field and then into a pen. The handler has to stand at one spot and give commands by voice and, when the dog’s farther away, by a whistle.

There’s a maximum time allowed to complete the tasks, though speed isn’t part of the competitors’ scores. Rather, the dogs are judged by how straight a line they can move the sheep in from one point to the next.

Big white dogs keep sheep safe

Guard dogs come from ancient breeds

Greg Moore Oct 10, 2018 IME

For many centuries in the Old World, large white dogs of various breeds have protected bands of sheep from predators. That tradition has been continued in the Wood River Valley.

Guard dogs used in the Western United States include the great Pyrenees from France and Spain, the akbash from Turkey, the maremma from Italy and the Polish tatra from Poland. They often reach 24-28 inches tall and weigh 100-130 pounds.

The most common breed in the Wood River Valley, whether pure-bred or in mixes, is the great Pyrenees. In their native France, they are “le chien de Montagne des Pyrenees” or “le chien des Pyrenees.”

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Central Idaho sheep ranchers persist amid change

By Mark Dee – 10/10/18 AP

Bellevue, Idaho — On a recent Friday morning in September, rancher John Peavey stood waiting outside Wood River Welding on Main Street in Bellevue. His flock, the 2,800 ewes of the Flat Top Sheep Co., was waiting, too, 10 miles south of town. Peavey’s trailer broke an axle hauling the metal piping of a portable corral to meet them for shearing, an annual rite of fall.

“The horses, the dogs, the sheep — they seem to get along without any extra effort,” he said. “It’s this mechanical stuff I’m not so sure about.”

Three weeks on from his 85th birthday, Peavey’s been in the sheep industry long enough to remember a time before all that.

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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Second week of October 2018
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Oregon eyes plan for managing wolves to protect livestock

10/13/18 AP

Pendleton, Ore. — Oregon officials are proposing a new framework for managing wolves that prey on livestock.

The East Oregonian reports that a possible deal emerged Tuesday that involves ranchers making clearly defined efforts to protect livestock and ward off wolves with non-lethal deterrents.

If ranchers follow those rules and still lose livestock to wolves, and the wolves meet the state’s definition of “chronic depredation,” ranchers can ask that the wolves be killed.

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Wolf Education International

Newsletter Oct 12, 2018

Oregon to craft new proposal for managing wolves

How much would you pay to protect an endangered species?
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BLM captures 1,178 mustangs, removes 873 near Nevada-Idaho line

The agency ordered an emergency roundup because a large wildfire destroyed more than 600 square miles of rangeland.

Associated Press October 8, 2018


Photo: KTVB

Reno, Nev. — The U.S. Bureau of Land Management has completed the emergency capture of more than 1,000 wild horses on federal land in northern Nevada near the Idaho line.

The agency ordered the emergency roundup in the Owyhee complex in Elko and Humboldt counties because a large wildfire that broke out June 5 burned more than 600 square miles of rangeland, resulting in significant forage loss.

Bureau officials say they gathered a total of 1,178 mustangs and removed 873 they declared as “excess” between Sept. 21 and Oct. 4.

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(photo Sinclair)
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Geese recovering after being shot with blow darts

by Haley Kramer Monday, October 8th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — Volunteers and workers from Idaho Department of Fish and Game are still trying to capture the ducks that were seen with blow darts in their heads and necks at Julia Davis Park.

Laurie Whittaker, a supervisor at the Ruth Melichar Bird Center says one goose has been caught, treated and released and two others are recovering.

“They had gone to the vet and had the darts removed. One was in the chest, one was in the shoulder,” Whittaker said.

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Groups want steelhead fishing closed in Idaho

10/11/18 AP

Lewiston, Idaho — Environmental groups that want Idaho to close steelhead fishing to protect wild steelhead have filed a 60-day notice of intent to sue.

The Lewiston Tribune reports in a story on Thursday that Idaho Rivers United, Friends of the Clearwater and others filed the notice.

The groups say fishing for hatchery steelhead leads to the incidental killing of some wild steelhead that are protected as threatened under the Endangered Species Act.

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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
October 12, 2018
Issue No. 887
Table of Contents

* NOAA Releases Preliminary 2018 Juvenile Salmonid Survival Estimates Through Columbia/Snake Dams
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441656.aspx

* Where Did Northern Pike In Columbia Basin Come From? Detection, Suppression Necessary To Slow Invasion
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441655.aspx

* Groups Issue Notice To Sue Over Steelhead Fishing In Idaho; Say Harming Wild Summer Steelhead, Violating ESA
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441654.aspx

* Study Looks At How Warmer Columbia/Snake Water Temps Affect Adult Salmonid Migration Timing, Survival
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441653.aspx

* Council Hears Update On Latest BPA Funding Reductions To Fish And Wildlife Program Projects
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441652.aspx

* IDFG Reaches Agreement With USFWS To Operate Hatchery Raising 1.6 Million Upper Salmon River Basin Steelhead
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441651.aspx

* Council Approves ‘Asset Management’ Plan Aimed At Maintaining 14 Basin Hatcheries, 1,041 Screens
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441650.aspx

* Federal Judge Denies Request To Reopen Deschutes River Clean Water Case
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441649.aspx

* Wood Fiesta: Yakama Nation Salmon Habitat Project Transports By Helicopter Logs To Streams
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441648.aspx

* Research: Reconnecting Side Channels Throughout Columbia River Basin Would Increase Rearing Capacity
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441647.aspx

* Council Looks At Resetting Budgets For Science Review Panels; Nominees Sought
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441646.aspx

* Fall Chinook Upriver Bright Forecast Gets Run-Size Boost, Still Far Below 10-Year Average
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441645.aspx

* Providing Water Cover For ESA-Listed Chum Salmon Redds Below Bonneville Dam Could Be Tough This Year
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441644.aspx

* Hanford Reach Fishing Derby To Provide Live Fall Chinook for Grant PUD Hatchery
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441643.aspx

* Canada Study Links Steelhead Life Cycle To Environment Factors, Pink Salmon Abundance
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441642.aspx

* Land-Locked Atlantic Salmon May Not Lose Navigation Skills; Concern If Escape Net Pens, Invade New Habitat
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441641.aspx

* Bonneville Power Administration Makes Annual U.S. Treasury Payment, $862 Million
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441640.aspx

* BiOp Operation: John Day Reservoir Level To Be Higher, Fluctuate Through December
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441639.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

Idaho F&G commissioner gets backlash, calls to resign after hunting trip in Africa

by CBS 2 News Staff Friday, October 12th 2018

BOISE, Idaho (CBS 2) — An Idaho Fish and Game commissioner who emailed photos of himself posing with a family of baboons he shot and killed during a recent hunting trip in Africa has led to a group of former commissioners asking for his resignation.

According to emails and photos obtained by CBS 2 News through Gov. Butch Otter’s office, commissioner Blake Fischer emailed several pictures of his kills to numerous people highlighting his hunting trip.

The pictures received swift backlash.

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Make the call to catch poachers, (800) 632-5999

Poaching Hotline (800-632-5999) available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

By Mike Demick, Conservation Information Supervisor
Thursday, October 11, 2018

With many hunting seasons underway, the Idaho Fish and Game asks the public to call the Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) hotline if they witness a violation of wildlife laws.

“Those who ‘Make the Call’ are instrumental in catching poachers stealing game and fish from the Idaho citizens,” said David Silcock, Idaho Fish and Game regional conservation officer based in Salmon. “Many poaching cases would not be detected, let alone, solved without the public’s extra eyes and ears.”

Callers to the hotline, 1-800-632-5999, can report wildlife law violations anonymously, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Cash rewards are available to callers who provide information leading to the citation of suspected wildlife law violators.

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Oct. 10 is new opener for wolf trapping in some units

These changes were approved by the F&G Commission in August.

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Wednesday, October 10, 2018

Idaho Fish and Game Commission recently approved extending hunting and trapping seasons for wolves in many units, which will take place this year, but are not reflected in the 2017-18 Big Game Seasons and Rules booklet.

Units that have changes to the opening and closing dates are noted in red.

Wolf hunting season changes

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More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Pair of mountain lions caught brawling in road

Couple caught it on video

August 8, 2018 Local News 8

Yaak, Mt. – A couple traveling on a Montana road ran into something unexpected: a pair of mountain lions brawling in the middle of the street!

“My boyfriend and I were driving back to Troy from the Yaak to go to a rugby tournament,” the filmer wrote. “We were on the Libby side of the drive when these two mountain lions jumped about and were either playing or fighting in the road. They played for a couple minutes and then jumped over the guard rail and took off.”


source:
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Seasonal Humor:

LionHuntSlingshot-a
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