Category Archives: News 2018

July 15, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

July 15, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
July 14 at 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
July 19 Noxious Weed Day
July 21 10am CPR Class at the Fire Station
July 26 Final Festival planning meeting 4pm Community Hall
July 28 Ride to Roosevelt
July 28 Big Creek Lodge Grand Opening party 8am to ?
August 3, 4, 5 Music and Harmonica Festival
August 11 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 8 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Budget Hearing
September 8 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting

(details below)
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Village News:

Lost Dogs

Lost in Yellow Pine July 4th

Has anyone seen a 15 year old pug in Yellow Pine? He is blind and deaf. Been missing since Tuesday the 4th.

Please contact Lindsay Mosqueda link:

Lost on Landmark/Johnson Creek July 7th

If anyone finds a brown and white cattle dog, we lost one on the way out today. We took Landmark. Message me if anyone sees her. The dog’s name is Annabelle may have been spotted a mile or so from Wapiti Meadow Ranch on July 9th.

Please contact Deborah Pogue FB link:

Still lost on the South Fork Salmon River

Howdy Yellow Piners, Levi Anderson called Tuesday (June 26) to report he lost his dog Chewie near the trailhead on the South Fork for 2-bit, 6-bit creek on Sunday. Chewie is a black mini Auzzie. If you find the dog, please call (208) 630-4894 or (208) 630-3596. As of July 1st the dog has not been found. Chewie’s family is very concerned.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not dump household appliances at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

However, there is a burn pile for woody debris only. “Bring it, Don’t Burn it.”
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Pests

Lots of mosquitoes and no-see-ums this year, long-legged wasps are out. Remember to secure your trash, bears are hungry.
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Local Events:

July 19 (free) Noxious Weed Day

Steve has scheduled his visit to Yellow Pine for Thursday July 19th. The staging area will be the Fire Department. He will bring up the Chemicals and spray equipment. Backpack sprayers, pump up sprayers, ATV tanks and he needs to know how many of these we need. He will leave everything there for the weekend and pick it all up Monday.

Those folks who are interested in obtaining supplies and equipment, need to contact Jeff Forster, Ann Forster or Lorinne Munn for the procedure for getting your supply. Due to a family issue I will not be here. – Kathleen Hall

link to form:
Steve Anderson from Valley County Weed Control
Office: (208)382-7199
e-mail: SAnderson @ co.valley.id.us
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Jul 28, 2018 Ride to Roosevelt

$20.00/vehicle

The ride will leave from the Yellow Pine Community Hall at 10 am. After leaving town, riders will head up Stibnite Road. Approximately 45 minutes later there will be a short pause at the “Glory Hole” in Stibnite; with information provided by Midas Gold Idaho. The ride continues up and over Monumental Summit (NF-375) – there is a monument at the summit with information about the area. Over Monumental Summit, the ride heads for the Roosevelt Trail Head. Lunch will be served at the trail head. The riders will return to Yellow Pine via the same route.

There are opportunities to see old mine sites (along the route); the town site of Roosevelt (after a short hike); side trails; and wildlife.

This out-and-back ride is expected to take about 6 hours.
https://www.ypescapade.org/atv-utv-events
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Big Creek Lodge announcement

It has taken 5 years and $1.2 million and the efforts of many, many volunteers and professionals — and now Big Creek Lodge is about ready to serve the public once again beginning August 1. In celebration of this milestone, the Idaho Aviation Foundation (IAF) is announcing a public Grand Opening party on Saturday July 28 from 8am-?, you can come and go whenever you like. The IAF is the non profit that rebuilt the lodge and will operate it as a non profit with a Special Use Permit from the Payette National Forest.

This is a unique project within our public lands. There are lodges that operate in National Forest; but we aren’t aware of any with these circumstances and non-profit status. The IAF did it because we were concerned that some backcountry lodges were closing their doors to the public (let’s face it, there are not many who get rich running a backcountry lodge), and IAF wanted to have a place for the PUBLIC to enjoy that was off the grid, had history and natural beauty, plus road and aircraft access. Big Creek Lodge is that place – and is a gift to you from the aviation community! So, come and enjoy it.

We invite Yellow Pine residents to make the drive over to have breakfast, hear and tell stories about the Lodge, enjoy the beautiful building and tour the site, participate in some of the activities, and just chill. Here’s the low-down on food, drink and odds n ends for Sat Jul 28:

* Breakfast donation is $15 and will be served from 8-10am. It will include pancakes, sausage, eggs and juice/coffee;. Lunch and dinner are TBD but will be available

* Beer and wine will be available for sale along with soft drinks, tea, etc.

* If you wish to bring your own picnic for this event, no problem!

* We will have live music during the day for your enjoyment;

* If you want to bring your own alcohol, please enjoy it away from the lodge premises since we have our own permit and we don’t want to lose it on our first weekend!

* Bring your own lawn chairs and/or blankets, bug spray, sunscreen and all that jazz

* Several Yellow Pine friends have donated money and/or their time to help in the project – we’ll have Big Creek Community cards for people to fill out to explain what Big Creek means to you and what you did to help make it come to life. Those cards will be placed in a book for future visitors to enjoy and learn how so many people helped to make this happen.

* Wifi will not be available;

* We hope to have a fun nighttime activity such as star gazing; a bonfire if fires are allowed at that time; and/or movie night under the stars if we can get the right equipment by then;

* We appreciate your patience with us if we don’t quite have everything running perfectly. Thanks!

Help Wanted:

* Want to get involved and have a full tummy too? We have an on-going program for volunteers: Simply provide 2 hours of help when help is needed and directed by the Caretakers, and get a free breakfast! This is available on the 28th and thereafter. Just check with the Caretakers (managers@bigcreeklodgeidaho.com) or on the volunteer chalkboard at the lodge to see if we need help that day!

* On the 28th, we could use help with set up, clean up, table prep, and happy people helping people.

* It might also be fun to have a few knowledgeable volunteers show some of the visitors around (short destinations like Smith Crk TH and the mining ruins on Big Creek, the Logan Crk cemetery, or show people around the lodge site (penstock, old pelton wheel, water tanks, etc). Interested? If you have knowledge and can take an hour or so to show folks around, email Colleen at marketing@bigcreeklodgeidaho.com

A Note on Overnight Accommodations for the 28th:

We anticipate most people staying for the day or part of the day, but a few may need to overnight. Lodging won’t officially be available on the 28th. BUT, we do want to be flexible and try to accommodate people willing to donate if possible. We have the Kif Brown Yurt at Big Creek that sleeps 8, 2 small cabin rooms each with half baths, and 4 lodge rooms (each with full bath and room heat) that accommodate 2-3 adults each. If you need to overnight, come prepared to sleep in your own sleeping bag/tent for a small fee at the USFS campground BUT send us a request if you also wish to be ‘under roof’ and we will try to accommodate you. We still need funds for startup operations, and someone asked what donation was appropriate if we accommodate people in our buildings. Here’s suggestions – these are less than our normal rates and don’t include meals: Yurt ($20 per person), Cabin ($35 per person), or Lodge ($50 per person for a room, $25 for floor space) — if that doesn’t work for you remember there are campsites available at the USFS campground. So, please send Colleen an email at marketing @ bigcreeklodgeidaho.com if you want to be on the list for a place to stay at the lodge (not the campground; that is first come first served).

You can check our new website http://www.bigcreeklodgeidaho.com to learn what the lodge is all about.

See you soon,
Colleen Back
Idaho Aviation Foundation & Big Creek Lodge
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Congrats Dave McClintock on your retirement. Please conserve water and remember – no outside watering on weekends or holidays.
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VYPA News:

Agenda Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting July 14, 2018 2pm at the Community Hall

Call to Order

* Reading of the Minutes
* Treasurer’s Report
* Cemetery Committee Report
* Community Hall Report
* Harmonica Festival Report

Old Business

This will be the vote on the motion to change the By Laws so the offices of Harmonica and Chairperson of the Village of Yellow Pine Association cannot be held concurrently by the same officer.

Report by the Ad Hoc Committee on the Dan Stiff Ditch Situation.

Report by Willie Sullivan on progress toward the Community Hall bathroom construction.

Nomination list for Officers for the Association to be presented by Ann Forster.

Election of Council Members Vice Chairman and Secretary.

Election of Cemetery Commissioner.

New Business

YPWUA meeting summary.

Discussion by Midas on the Proposed Alternative Routes around the Stibnite Gold Project and Final presentation of the Community Partnership Program and Midas Gold Foundation.

Submitted by Lorinne N. Munn, Secretary Yellow Pine Association

VYPA Summer Meeting Schedule:

July 14, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
August 11, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 8, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
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YPFD News:

CPR Training Class

CPR class coming to YP July 21st 10am at the Fire Station (includes AED). If interested please notify Jeff or Ann.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911@ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

YP Fire Budget Hearing: September 8, 2018 – 10am Community Hall

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

The Helispot needs a lot of work and a base needs to be put down before officially being used. I’m currently in discussion with some folks to help with the ground prep and to put the base down. Life Flight and other agencies will need to do an inspection as well before using the helispot.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

Jeff F.

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
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2018 Festival:

The last planning meeting will be July 26

August 3, 4, 5 Music and Harmonica Festival

Please remember all state and forest laws and regulations apply while you are at the festival. Law enforcement will be present.
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Now open for summer (208) 633-3377
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Yellow Pine Tavern

Summer Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine.
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The Corner 633-3325

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Local Propane Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
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Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430

We have a great price on wild bird seed. $19.99 for a 50 lb bag. 12.99 for a 25 lb bag. We also sell suet blocks (peanut crunch, and cherry) for $1.99 per block. Niger Thistle seed $13.25 for 5 lbs. Also black oil sunflower seeds in 40# bags.
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling

(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho. Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (July 9) overnight low of 46 degrees, clear sky this morning. Loud airplane at 725am. A white-breasted and a couple red-breasted nuthatches, a few jays, pine siskins and finches this morning. One swallow chick still in the nest, hatch-mates out flying with the adults. Some clouds coming in from the south and hot by early afternoon, nice breezes, high of 98 degrees. Young pine and ground squirrels running amuck. Slowly cooling off after sunset, clear and calmer. Robins calling at dusk, swallows flying low.

Tuesday (July 10) overnight low of 48 degrees, partly cloudy (little cotton balls) this morning. A 6-pack of porta potties parked near hole #17. A few finches at the feeder. Gusty breezes by lunch time and quite warm. More finches, a few pine siskins and hummingbirds after lunch time. Flickers whooping out in the forest, juvenile pine squirrels out exploring. Sunny, hot, breezy, dusty afternoon, high of 88 degrees. Female hairy woodpecker visited late afternoon. Hawk in the neighborhood early evening. Calm and cooling off after sundown. The last swallow chick is still in the nest. Shooting at dusk, sounds like it is down by the cement bridge. Night hawks “vooming” at dark.

Wednesday (July 11) overnight low of 45 degrees, clear sky with a slight haze of smoke this morning. A few finches and several pine siskins at the feeder, hairy woodpecker calling from the forest and a red-naped sapsucker drumming on the power pole. Flock of brown-headed cowbirds in the neighborhood and stellar jays, flickers calling from the trees. Sunny hot afternoon, light breezes, high of 88 degrees. Swallows flying low at dusk, robins hunting bugs. Getting rather breezy after 9pm.

Thursday (July 12) overnight low of 46 degrees, clear sky with a slight haze of smoke again this morning. Low water pressure all morning (better by evening.) Finches, pine siskins, white and red-breasted nuthatches and a pine squirrel at the feeders this morning. After lunch a juvenile steller jay (barely 3 feathers in its crest) found the feeders. A small flock of brown headed cowbirds visiting. The last swallow chick left the nest early afternoon. Hot sunny day, high of 91 degrees. Cooling off after sundown, mosquitoes out and hungry. Loud dirt bike brapping around the village about 9pm. Night hawk “vooming” just before full dark.

Friday (July 13) overnight low of 48 degrees, clear sky with a slight haze of smoke again this morning. Finches, pine siskins and cowbirds visiting, swallows swooping low, juveniles perched on top of the bird houses begging to be fed. Loud dirt bike revving and roaring around down by the cross roads before 11am. Hot and sunny by mid-day, very light breezes. Hot and dry afternoon, high of 96 degrees. Some high thin clouds moving in after sunset and a bit muggy. Not as many swallows around by late evening. Juvenile pine squirrel exploring the fence art. Robins quiet.

Saturday (July 14) overnight low of 49 degrees, clear sky with a light haze of smoke again this morning. Female rufous and calliope hummers at the feeders. Finches, pine-siskins and chipmunks visiting. Swallows are still here, feeding juveniles perched on bird houses. Clear sky, hot and breezy mid-day, high of 95 degrees. Juvenile steller jay was very entertaining late afternoon. Warm clear and calm evening, light haze of dust and smoke in the air. Night hawk “vooming” out in the forest at dark.

Sunday (July 15) overnight low of 48 degrees, clear sky this morning. Finches, pine siskins and few hummingbirds at the feeders. Flickers whooping it up out in the forest and tree swallows are still around. Hot dry and light breezes mid-day. A rough sounding airplane flying over a little after 1pm. Clouds came in before 4pm, high of 96 degrees. Overcast and warm early evening, light breezes.
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Idaho News:

Big Creek Lodge to hold re-opening celebration July 28

The Star-News July 12, 2018

The historic, backcountry Big Creek Lodge will hold a grand re-opening celebration on Saturday, July 28, beginning at 8 a.m.

The event will include breakfast, lunch and dinner available for purchase as well as live bluegrass music in the afternoon and a meet and greet with some of the project’s volunteers and workers.

The nonprofit Idaho Aviation Foundation spent five years and $1.2 million restoring the off-the-grid lodge, which had burned down in 2008. More than 100 volunteers and professionals helped with the project.

The foundation will operate the Big Creek Lodge as a nonprofit under a special use permit from and in cooperation with the Payette National Forest.

Volunteers are needed next week to help move furniture, set up beds and other similar work. Helpers are also needed the day of the event. For more information on volunteering, email info@bigcreeklodgeidaho.com.

For information, contact marketing @ bigcreeklodgeidaho.com To learn more about the lodge, visit http://bigcreeklodgeidaho.com

source:
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Summer Newsletter 2018 – UI Extension, Valley County

Thank you for joining us in 2018 for life long learning, leadership, and volunteering!

link to newsletter:
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Vandals cause extensive damage to Donnelly Elementary School

Officials say two youths, 13, admit to the crime

By Tom Grote for The Star-News July 12, 2018

Vandals caused extensive damage to Donnelly Elementary School last Friday, the Valley County Sheriff’s Office said.

Two Donnelly youths, both age 13, were taken into custody and were being held at the Ada County Juvenile Detention Center in Boise this week, Sheriff’s office spokesperson Lt. Jason Speer said.

The youths, both boys, admitted to dumping rubber cement and using spray paint in various areas of the school, Speer said. Their names were not released.

“Almost every room of the school is damaged in some way along with floors in the building,” he said. “This is a very disturbing case.”

continued:
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A Decent Act

McCall man finds, returns Boise man’s wallet 20 years after being lost

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News July 12, 2018

Brian Harvey was happy to find a wallet when he urgently dug through a lounge chair in his living room, except there was a surprise. The wallet did not belong to Harvey and it had been in the overstuffed chair for 20 years.

Instead of finding his own ID so he could drive to work, the McCall resident found a wallet that belonged to Mike Fornander of Boise along with an array of expired bank cards, slips of paper and $115 in cash.

Last week, Harvey returned the wallet to Fornander, including the cash.

“This guy lost his wallet 20 years ago! This is insane,” said Harvey, 44. “There’s not a bill newer than 1998.”

continued:
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Construction to begin on Idaho 55 between NM and McCall

The Star-News July 12, 2018

The Idaho Transportation Department will begin a project next week to resurface Idaho 55 between New Meadows and McCall and construct a new retaining wall.

From July to late August, crews will work between Zachary Road in McCall and Goose Lake Road.

Crews will work from noon Monday to noon Friday. All lanes will be open on weekends.

During the week, Idaho 55 will be reduced to one lane both day and night with a pilot car directing traffic. The speed limit will be reduced and 12-foot width restrictions will be in place.

“This will be a tight construction zone and we are asking for drivers’ patience during the work week,” said ITD Project Manager Jim Hoffecker.

Construction will move to the area between Goose Lake Road and Goose Creek Grade in late August. The project is expected to be completed this fall.

source:
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Warren Wagon Road closures to begin later in July

Southern roadblock to start at ‘Simplot Point’

By Tom Grote for The Star-News July 12, 2018

Four-hour closures of Warren Wagon Road north of McCall will not begin until later this month, according to federal highway officials.

A story in The Star-News last week said the closures would start this week, but work will be limited to surveying, putting up signs, and other preliminary work through next week, said John Henderson, the lead engineer on the project for Western Federal Lands Highway Division of the Federal Highway Administration.

Also, The Star-News said last week that the closure would begin 2.2 miles north of McCall. The actual closure point on the south end of the project will be about four miles north of McCall beyond what is commonly called “Simplot Point,” Henderson said.

When the closures begin, traffic will be stopped between 8 a.m. and noon and 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays.

The closures will be lifted between noon and 1 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and between 5 p.m. and 8 a.m. on those days. There will be no closures on Saturdays or Sundays.

The road will need to be closed for “several days” after Labor Day to replace fish-passage culverts at Wagon Bay Creek and Sylvan Creek, Henderson said.

continued:
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Idaho 55 reopened after grass fire burns near Avimor

The fire broke out near the Avimor subdivision and quickly grew to more than 200 acres.

KTVB July 9, 2018

Eagle, Idaho – A grass fire forced the closure of a section of Idaho 55 for about nine hours on Sunday, one of the busiest travel days of the summer.

Both lanes were shut down shortly after 2 p.m., causing major backups on the highway.

According to the Idaho Transportation Department, the highway was blocked along a six-mile stretch between Floating Feather Road and Horseshoe Bend Hill Summit. The road was reopened at about 11 p.m.

continued:
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Idaho 21 reopens after crash north of Boise

Both lanes were closed for about three hours while crews worked to clear the crash.

KTVB July 8, 2018

Boise – A section of Idaho 21 north of Boise has reopened after a crash closed the busy highway for several hours on Sunday.

The crash happened just after 1:30 p.m. Sunday about 13 miles north of Boise, near Robie Creek Road.

Police say 56-year-old Michael Tetrick of Middleton had parked his Ford F-250 with a trailer on Mores Creek Rim and exited the vehicle. That’s when the brakes on the truck failed, and it rolled down the road and off a cliff, before landing on a Chevrolet pickup that had been passing by on Highway 21.

The driver and passenger in the Chevrolet were both wearing seat belts and were not taken to the hospital, police said. There is no word on if they suffered any minor injuries.

Both lanes of Idaho 21 were closed for about three hours while crews worked to clear the crash. The road reopened shortly after 4 p.m.

source:
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Enforcing new trespassing law may be difficult for local law enforcement

Mike Price, East Idaho News.com Idaho Falls June 18, 2018

Anyone who has ever been in the backcountry knows there are fences everywhere. Amendments to Idaho’s trespassing laws now make it harder to tell if it’s private property on the other side of those fences, and crossing one could land you in court or jail.

Bonneville County Sheriff Paul Wilde and a group of local ranchers and farmers gathered at the Winther Ranch in Dehlin Thursday and discussed the implications of changes to the law.

The amendment, which goes into effect July 1, removes language from Idaho Code that required “No Trespassing” signs or fence posts painted bright orange every 660 feet. Signage is now only required at fence corners, gates, streams and roads entering the private property.

continued:
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Over 80K artifacts, specimens donated to Idaho Falls museum

AP July 12, 2018

Idaho Falls, Idaho – Private landowners have donated 80,000 artifacts and specimens that were found inside caves on their land to the Museum of Idaho.

The collection contains archaeologically significant elements up to 14,000 years old, such as Columbian mammoth, bison, and camel remains, as well as Folsom points and other goods used by some of the earliest humans in what is now East Idaho.

continued:
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Mining News:

Ask Midas: Should Cyanide Be a Concern at the Stibnite Gold Project Site?

June 20

Midas Gold Idaho wants to keep the community informed about the work we are doing at the Stibnite Gold Project site. The Ask Midas blog series gives the experts in our company a chance to answer some of the community’s most frequently asked questions and help clear up any misconceptions around the project.

Miners have relied on cyanide to extract gold and silver from ore for more than 100 years. Throughout this period of time, we’ve learned a lot about how to use this chemical in a way that is safe for both humans and the environment and we will implement these advances at the Stibnite Gold Project. Although cyanide can be toxic in high concentrations, we have a plan to use it safely and without any harm to the environment, wildlife or our employees, just as many operating mines across the U.S. currently do. Let me explain how.

Is It Safe to Use Cyanide at the Stibnite Gold Project Site?

Cyanide is a naturally occurring compound made up of carbon and nitrogen; elements that are common in nature and abundant in our own bodies. Like any compound or chemical, including salt, soap or ammonia, cyanide can be toxic at high concentrations. However, like other chemicals, low concentrations of cyanide are useful. Cyanide is present in many of the products we use each day and is found in the foods we eat. It is added as a stabilizer in table salt and occurs naturally in the pits of apples, plums and apricots. Cyanide is also incredibly helpful for processing gold.

At the Stibnite Gold Project, we will use a weak sodium cyanide solution to extract gold from the ore we mine. Cyanide has a natural tendency to bond with metals, even when they occur in microscopic amounts, such as gold and silver in ore. This method of gold recovery has been popular for over a century. Advances in technology have allowed companies to use less and less of cyanide to achieve similar results.

continued:
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Fire Season:

Burn near Crouch now a wildfire, resources increased

July 14, 2018
Contact: Mike Williamson (208) 373-4105 Email: mcwilliamson@fs.fed.us

Emmett, Idaho, July 14, 2018 — The Boise National Forest has declared a prescribed burn, originally ignited April 24, as a wildfire in order to be more competitive for fire resources and allowing a wider variety of tactical options as they continue full suppression actions. Pockets of smoldering heat in heavy fuels, combined with recent warmer weather, have resulted in a creeping fire that is causing smoke to settle into nearby Crouch and threatening to grow outside the project boundary.

The Lodgepole Fire is now approximately 1,600 acres and 25 percent contained. It is located about 14 miles north of Crouch along National Forest System (NFS) road 671.

“We have been actively engaged in fighting this fire for about two weeks now with all of the resources at our disposal, but with the anticipated future weather, difficult terrain, and challenges obtaining additional fire-fighting resources, I have decided to declare this prescribed burn a wildfire,” said Emmett District Ranger Richard Newton. “To date, the fire has remained within the original planning unit and we are doing our best to keep it there. Declaring this burn a wildfire will give us more tools to ensure the fire stays where it is supposed to be.

“We regret the smoke impacts that citizens of Crouch have had to deal with, it certainly was not our intent to have smoke lingering this long. And that is part of why we are moving forward and being more aggressive in putting it out.”

There are approximately 113 firefighters on the ground and are receiving support from three helicopters. Their strategy is to use direct attack on hot spots within the project’s interior and to construct and reinforce fireline to limit the fire’s spread.

There are currently two temporary spur road closures in the vicinity of the fire. They are NFS road 671B1 and 671A, both of which are signed on the ground. An area closure will likely be placed in the near future, within the fire perimeter, for public and firefighter safety. The public is asked to be mindful of fire traffic on the 671 road to Silver Creek Plunge.

Silver Creek Plunge and campgrounds in the area remain open.

For more information, contact Mike Williamson (208) 373-4105.

Location Map

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Fire potential well above normal for the summer months in Idaho

McKenna King Jul 9, 2018 KIVI TV

Wildfire season is well under way in the western United States, and while Idaho is flying under the radar so far, the National Interagency Fire Center says the fire rise has increased to above normal.

We are just over one week into July, and the hot temperatures keep getting hotter, meaning the dry weather continues.

Right now, just Southern Idaho is seeing above average fire potential. As we move into August, however, almost the entire state has well above average fire potential. Those warnings are pertaining to Idaho’s neighboring states as well.

continued:
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BLM urges shooters to be cautious

Local New 8 July 10, 2018

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Bureau of Land Management investigators have determined the 181-acre Liberty Fire, 8-acre Lava Rock Fire and the 41-acre Cinder Fire were all caused by target shooting.

“When you have hot, windy conditions you only need a small spark to ignite dry grass,” said Fire Management Officer Joel Gosswilller. “Shooting certain kinds of ammunition and exploding targets create an easy ignition source.”

The BLM Fire Prevention Order, issued earlier this year, prohibits discharge of incendiary, steel core, tracer ammunition, and exploding targets on BLM lands from May 10th to October 20th.

Violation of the order is a misdemeanor and violators could also be held liable for the costs of fire suppression, rehabilitation, and property damage.

BLM is also asking shooters to be aware of other activities around them. During the Cinder Fire near Idaho Highway 33 in Jefferson County, people were still shooting around the perimeter while firefighters were working to put out the fire.

continued:
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Crews gaining on huge Nevada wildfire visible from space

by Scott Sonner, Associated Press Tuesday, July 10th 2018


This July 8, 2018 satellite image from NASA’s Suomi NPP satellite shows a wildfire, shown in red, also known as the Martin Fire, in Nevada, and smoke reaching to Idaho. The NASA satellite captured infrared imaging of the fire that has burned nearly 700 square miles (1,813 sq. kilometers) of mostly sage brush, grasses and rangeland, an area almost half the size of the state of Rhode Island, according to the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. (NASA via AP)

Reno, Nev. (AP) — More than 600 firefighters slowed the progress Tuesday of a massive wildfire in a remote part of northern Nevada that is generating so much heat and smoke that it’s now visible from space.

A NASA satellite captured infrared imaging of the fire that has burned nearly 700 square miles (1,813 sq. kilometers) of mostly sage brush, grasses and rangeland — an area almost half the size of the state of Rhode Island, according to the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center.

Dubbed the Martin Fire, the National Interagency Fire Center said Tuesday it was the largest wild land fire burning in the United States.

continued:
— — —

Massive wildfire burning near Idaho-Nevada line human-caused

More than 600 firefighters continue to battle temperatures approaching triple-digits in difficult high-desert terrain about 20 miles south of the Idaho line.

Associated Press, KTVB July 11, 2018

Boise — Fire officials have determined that humans started the massive wildfire that has burned nearly 700 square miles in a remote area of northern Nevada.

The National Fire Interagency Center in Boise confirmed Wednesday the Martin Fire is human-caused.

Investigators say they suspect that Fourth of July campers started the blaze that first was reported on July 5 near the rural town of Paradise Valley about 200 miles northeast of Reno. But the specific cause remains under investigation.

continued:
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Public Lands:

BC YP May 2018 draft meeting minutes

link:
— — —

BC YP SF June 28th Meeting Notes Draft

link:
— — —

Next Meeting – July 26th from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm at the E.O.C. in Cascade, ID
————————–

Letters to Share:

from Jim Hagedorn  July 14, 2018
Executive Director
The Gamebird Foundation
thegamebirdfoundation.org

Raising up a population

Game Bird Foundation director makes effort to populate Potlatch parcel with pheasants

By Garrett Cabeza, Moscow-Pullman Daily News Jul 11, 2018

20180711GamebirdFoundation-a
William Weber holds a pheasant chick on Tuesday at Jim Hagedorn’s house in Viola. Weber and his family will be raising 75 of the chicks until they are old enough to release into the wild. Geoff Crimmins /Daily News

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game partnered with a regional landowner and the Game Bird Foundation in 2016 to provide youth pheasant hunting opportunities on a 975-acre parcel on the Palouse River north of Potlatch.

One and a half years later, GBF Executive Director Jim Hagedorn said the foundation has received overwhelmingly positive feedback from those who have hunted the area.

“They can’t wait until this year,” Hagedorn said.

The 975-acre space was made possible by Access Yes! – a program designed to improve access to private land, or improve access through private land to public land, by compensating willing landowners who provide the access, according to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

continued:

[Note: if you have trouble accessing the link, let me know and I can email the PDF file.]
— — — — — — — — — —

Mystic Farm Raffle

7/14/2018

Get your raffle tickets and support the rescue! Remember, Mystic Farm operates 100% on donations and volunteers. By purchasing raffle tickets, you can help with the care and feeding of the orphaned and injured fawns. And who knows? You may even win!

Tickets are $5.00 each or 5 for $20.00

Purchase by mail:
Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.
710 Sanctuary Hills
Sagle, ID 83860

Purchase by PayPal:
mysticfarmrescue@yahoo.com
(state the payment is for tickets and include mailing address)

Thank you
Dory McIsaac
——————————

Critter News:

Pet talk – Intervertebral Disc Disease

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt July 13, 2018 IME

Intervertebral disc disease is one of the most common spinal cord conditions in the dog. Cats sometimes have disc problems, but less frequently. The spine is composed of bones called vertebrae. The vertebrae form a canal that surrounds the spinal cord. Between adjacent vertebrae are discs that act as cushions between vertebrae and provide strength and flexibility to the spine.

Whenever a disc is displaced and protrudes into the spinal canal, the spinal cord becomes impinged. This causes pain to the back, and can cause paralysis if severe impingement occurs. This is called a herniation of the disc and secondary compression of the spinal cord.

There are many classifications of herniated disc disease in dogs. These classifications often need MRIs or CT scans to know exactly what impingement on the spinal cord is occurring.

Most common breeds affected by intervertebral disc disease are dogs with short legs and long backs, especially dachshunds, corgis, Lhasa apsos, shih-tzus and beagles. Older dogs can also have disc disease due to chronic wear and tear on the back because of excessive exercise and jumping. This commonly occurs in German shepherds, Labradors and other large breed dogs.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Woman surrounded by wolves climbs tree to escape

A student surveying an area of Central Washington put her tree climbing skills to the test when she encountered a pack of wolves.

KREM July 13, 2018

Okanogan County, Wash. — A helicopter had to rescue a research student Thursday afternoon after a group of wolves surrounded her in Central Washington state.

Okanogan County dispatch received a call around 12:30 p.m. from the student who was surveying the area when she came across the wolves. Officials said she had climbed 30 feet up a tree and a pack of wolves was surrounding her.

Okanogan County deputies were told if they arrived on the scene and the wolves were still surrounding the woman they were to shoot the wolves on sight, authorities said.

The Department of Natural Resources was then notified, and they said they would be sending a helicopter to the woman’s location. When the helicopter arrived, the wolves were still there, but the helicopter was able to land and rescue the student.

Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers said he does not know if it was a den or a possible kill site, but his team is trying to find out if there is a possible threat or danger to those who use the recreational area. He said he is concerned that some may not be prepared for or even know of the possible encounters with wolves, which may result in the danger to human life.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wolf News Roundup

By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online! 7/8/2018

Wolf advocates are urging the U.S. Forest Service to revoke a New Mexico rancher’s cattle grazing permit after the man pleaded guilty to killing a Mexican gray wolf, a criminal misdemeanor. A reporter in Oregon tackles the issue of living with wolves in his state. An Illinois man in stirring up media attention with his claim that he’s got a pack of wolves on his property. The wolf population in France is experiencing a high growth rate, and plans are in place to keep boosting the population. The Alps are home to a population of about 600 wolves, and a cross-border coalition of alpine regions now argue that wolves no longer need special protected status…

link:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wyoming game commission OKs increased wolf hunting season

By Bob Moen – 7/11/18 AP

Cheyenne, Wyo. — The Wyoming Game and Fish Commission on Wednesday approved a wolf hunting season this fall that allows for hunters to take up to 58 wolves, which is up from the 44 wolves that were allowed to be hunted last year.

There are about 350 wolves roaming Wyoming, including about 210 in areas where the state manages their numbers with hunting.

State game managers who are tasked with trying to control the animals that can prey on domestic livestock want to see that 210 brought down to about 160.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wolf fatally shot, tied to weight and dumped in lake

Wolf fatally shot, tied to concrete weight and dumped in lake

Deutsche Welle July 12, 2018

An $8,100 reward has been offered for information that leads to the arrest of a wolf killer, the German Organization for the Protection of Wolves announced on Wednesday.

The reward is tied to the killing of a 1-year-old wolf in Saxony, whose body had been found on June 10 floating in a lake near the city of Bautzen.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Education International

Newsletter 7/11/2018

France to let wolf population grow by 40% despite anger from farmers

Backlash after Italian councils allow bears and wolves to be shot

When Hunting’s Gunfire Becomes a Dinner Bell

Habituation, Taming, Social Dominance Assertions, and “Freedom of the Woods”
— — — — — — — — — —

Budweiser Clydesdales appear in downtown Idaho Falls

By Katie Keleher July 11, 2018 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Downtown Idaho Falls hosted many celebrities today, but not the human kind.

The Budweiser Clydesdales made an appearance. They delivered beer to several local bars before hanging out at the Alive After 5 events near the Civitan Plaza. They are in town for the 50th Annual Anheuser-Busch Grower Days. They honor Idaho barley farmers that supply the beer company.

“Barley is the main ingredient in our beer so having quality barley, you know, helps us make our quality beer,” said Shelby Zarobinski, a Budweiser Clydesdale handler.

source:
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3 Simple steps for preventing the spread of aquatic invasive species to Idaho waters

by Sarah Jacobsen Wednesday, July 11th 2018


(KBOI Staff Photo)

The Idaho State Department of Agriculture is reminding boaters to be cautious this summer when it comes to invasive species. they have some simple tips to keep invasive species… like quagga and zebra mussels out of Idaho.

“What we are concerned about is zebra mussel and quagga mussels which is a very small mussel, that attaches to boats,” says ISDA Invasive Species Coordination and Outreach Section Leader Nic Zurfluh.

“Currently Idaho has no Zebra or Quagga infestations that we know of, so prevention efforts as boats come in is very effective.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
July 13, 2018
Issue No. 878
Table of Contents

* With Temperatures Rising, Corps Cools Snake River With Dworshak Water To Aid Endangered Snake River Sockeye
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441108.aspx

* Council Fish/Wildlife Committee Discusses Tribal Plans To Restore Pacific Lamprey To Historic Range
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441107.aspx

* Study Looks At Harbor Seal Predation, Wild Chinook Survival In Washington, British Columbia Waters
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441106.aspx

* Council Fish/Wildlife Committee Talks Policy About BPA Project Funding Cuts, Columbia Basin Fish Accords
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441105.aspx

* Council Briefed On Status, Funding Of Efforts To Halt Invasive Mussels With Watercraft Inspections
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441104.aspx

* Summer Chinook Angling Ends Upstream Of Bonneville Dam, Treaty Fishing Gets Three More Days
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441103.aspx

* U.S. Transboundary Commission Members Seek Data On Canada Mine Pollution Into Kootenai River Drainage
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441102.aspx

* New NOAA Fisheries Draft Plan Aims For Ecosystem-Based Management Principles On West Coast
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441101.aspx
——————————-

Fish & Game News:

Fish and Game moves grizzly bear that was repeatedly seen near campground

The grizzly spotted near Mill creek Campground in Island Park was relocated to remote forest

By James Brower, Regional Volunteer Coordinator
Thursday, July 12, 2018

Fish and Game personnel trapped a sub-adult male grizzly bear from the Mill Creek Campground in Island Park on July 11 after receiving multiple reports of a bear in, or close to, the campground and a nearby subdivision.

The bear appeared to have lost some of its natural fear of humans, which is referred to as “habituation,” a condition that can be dangerous to humans and the bear.

After being captured, the grizzly was sedated, tagged, and fitted with a GPS collar. The bear was transported and released in a remote portion of the Caribou-Targhee National Forest near Snow Creek Butte.

Fish and Game officials say the stress of being captured and transported may cause the bear be more wary of humans in the future, and they will monitor the bear using data from its GPS collar, which allows department staff to pinpoint its location.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Fire Department nurses hummingbird back to health

by Stephen Pimpo Jr./ABC7 Monday, June 25th 2018


(Photo, Fairfax County Fire Department)

The Fairfax County Fire Department is generally “humming” with activity but that took on a very literal meaning when one of their stations got a special patient.

Crews at Station 31 in Fox Mill discovered a hummingbird inside the fire station they say looked “weak and lethargic.” They then fed the bird sugar water with a syringe until it was well enough to fly away.

source:
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Seasonal Humor:

SummerMosquitoesBad-a
————————

Tips & Advice:

Need to Know Bear Facts and Safety Tips

By Brian Dykstra, Scott Jackson, and Stephanie Coppeto, U.S. Forest Service

Be Bear Aware

Bears exist in and around a majority of our public lands across the United States and are native and natural members of the wildlife community. Seeing a bear can be an exciting experience, one that will form a lasting memory of your visit. By learning more about bears and their curious nature, you can better prepare for your visit to bear country and make it a positive experience for both you and the bears.

About Bears

Bears are curious and intelligent animals, capable of learning and modifying their behavior based on life experiences. Bears have an excellent sense of smell that can span miles and their eyesight is similar to a human’s. The Native Americans have a poignant saying: “A pine needle fell. The eagle saw it. The deer heard it. The bear smelled it.” Smell is a bear’s most fundamental and important sense.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Simple garden hose can save your A/C from disaster

by Scott Logan July 13th 2018

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — With these soaring temperatures, experts say there are two basic things you can do to avoid making a repair call on your air conditioning unit and one of them is to make sure your outside condenser coil is clean.

A garden hose will do it.

Zac Barnes with Western Heating and Air Conditioning in Boise explains how the dirt and grime can cause issues with your A/C unit.

“What that does is causes restriction in air flow, causing all pressures of the unit to run higher amps,” Barnes said, “It works a lot harder than it needs to, especially when you reach temperatures over 95 degrees, this needs to be cleaned off.”

Barnes says washing off the condenser unit with a garden hose will do the trick.

continued:
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Advertisements

July 8, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

July 8, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
July 14 at 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
July 19 Noxious Weed Day
July 21 10am CPR Class at the Fire Station
July 26 Festival planning meeting
July 28 Ride to Roosevelt
July 28 Big Creek Lodge Grand Opening party 8am to ?
August 3, 4, 5 Music and Harmonica Festival
August 11 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 8 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Budget Hearing
September 8 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting

(details below)
———-

Village News:

Lost Dogs

Lost on Johnson Creek July 7

If anyone finds a brown and white cattle dog, we lost one on the way out today. We took Landmark. Message me if anyone sees her.
Deborah Pogue FB link:

Still lost on the South Fork Salmon River

Howdy Yellow Piners, Levi Anderson called Tuesday (June 26) to report he lost his dog Chewie near the trailhead on the South Fork for 2-bit, 6-bit creek on Sunday. Chewie is a black mini Auzzie. If you find the dog, please call (208) 630-4894 or (208) 630-3596. As of July 1st the dog has not been found. Chewie’s family is very concerned.
— — — —

Yellow Pine 4th of July Parade

20180704ParadeBellTomH-a

Bell Ringer – Tom Harriman
Grand Marshall – Darwin DeBois
Miss Yellow Pine – Christy Petersen

link to FB photo album – lots of photos:
— — — —

Spring Summit Adventures

Elk Summit elevation nearly 9000 feet (open July 4)

A report on June 27 from the YP Tavern:

“Folks hoping to Travel the loop from Yellow Pine to Warren by way of Big Creek by motorcycle or UTV or car please wait a bit. These Boys went over yesterday, they met up with a previous group of 4 and it took 5 to haul their bikes over the snow drifts on a Vertical area.” – LM

20180627Bikers-a

Meanwhile, “A Subaru tried going to Big Creek from Warren [via Elk Summit] and Avalanched into a tree, walked to Big Creek got a ride for 10 miles then continued walking over Profile into Yellow Pine last night and spent all morning trying to get a tow truck to go back there.” – LM

Brown Towing reported July 28:

“He [Subaru driver] tried really hard to get out, he even cut down about a 5 inch tree with a tire iron, I was impressed,” They got the car out (photo below.) “It was 11 hour round trip, he was glad to have towing insurance.”

20180628car-a

July 2nd report from The Corner:

“We have had a few motorcyclists make it over Elk Summit from Warren in the past few days so that may be sketchy but passable on motorbikes and ATV’s.” – MH

July 3rd report from The Corner:

“Had some folks in today that dug their way through Elk Summit and is now passable with a full size truck.” – MH

Monumental Summit elevation 8590 feet (open as of June 23)

Last fall (November 12) “Three young men, out-of-state hunters from Bozeman, MT, drove almost to the trailhead at Roosevelt Lake to start their hunt. After cutting several downed trees they finally decided to just park on the road and hike the rest of the way. They hiked down past the pioneer cemetery several miles, spent several nights camping and finally got a nice buck. That night it really snowed. They got their deer and gear back to the truck to discover they were in serious trouble. They shoveled snow (it sounded like two days) then realized that wouldn’t work as the snow was getting steadily deeper. They packed four days of rations (& the deer) and started taking turns breaking trail and working their way through waist deep snow. About eleven o’clock they heard a snowmobile…..Matt was breaking trail for the guide Al B. The three & packs were rescued by riding on snowmobile sled. They arranged for Matt to get the rest of their stuff, and waited a few days here in YP to ride out with Heather. We’ll see them next summer when they come back to get their truck. Amazing that Matt arrived at the right place at the right time.” LI

This spring (June 23)

(June 23) “Road is in good shape. Both sides of Monumental Summit are snow-free.” “There is an abandoned vehicle halfway down the back side of Monumental Summit.” SA

20180624truck-a

July 2nd report from The Corner:

“The guys that owned the truck in Monumental have retrieved it and are cleaning the rat’s nests out of it by my shop. Unfortunately, someone decided that they needed their rifles and other hunting gear more than their owners did and stole them from the truck while it was out there. We did set up a trail camera on the truck and are working thru the footage to see who relieved them of their gear. Any information to help these guys get there gear back and not hurt the prospect of future hunters in the area would be greatly appreciated.” MH

July 4th report from The Corner:

“Deputy Dave Putnam tracked [the guys with the recovered truck] down in Bear Valley today and returned their missing items. Some concerned citizen had relieved them of their high dollar items but decided not to tell them about it. Luckily it was returned after the search was on and they have their gear back.” – MH
— — — —

July 4th High Temperatures in Yellow Pine:

2018 = 88
2017 = 92
2016 = 81
2015 = 97
2014 = 95
2013 = 89
2012 = 83
2011 = 90
2010 = 75
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Friday, June 29th, a report the dumpsters had been recently emptied. Also a report that the road is much better since it had been graded.

Please do not dump household appliances at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

However, there is a burn pile for woody debris only. “Bring it, Don’t Burn it.”
— — — —

Pests

Lots of mosquitoes and no-see-ums this year, long-legged wasps are out. Remember to secure your trash, bears are hungry.
———-

Local Events:

July 19 (free) Noxious Weed Day

Steve has scheduled his visit to Yellow Pine for Thursday July 19th. The staging area will be the Fire Department. He will bring up the Chemicals and spray equipment. Backpack sprayers, pump up sprayers, ATV tanks and he needs to know how many of these we need. He will leave everything there for the weekend and pick it all up Monday. Please call Kathy Hall 208 633-6270 for forms and information.

link to form:
Steve Anderson from Valley County Weed Control
Office: (208)382-7199
e-mail: SAnderson @ co.valley.id.us
— — — —

Jul 28, 2018 Ride to Roosevelt

$20.00/vehicle

The ride will leave from the Yellow Pine Community Hall at 10 am. After leaving town, riders will head up Stibnite Road. Approximately 45 minutes later there will be a short pause at the “Glory Hole” in Stibnite; with information provided by Midas Gold Idaho. The ride continues up and over Monumental Summit (NF-375) – there is a monument at the summit with information about the area. Over Monumental Summit, the ride heads for the Roosevelt Trail Head. Lunch will be served at the trail head. The riders will return to Yellow Pine via the same route.

There are opportunities to see old mine sites (along the route); the town site of Roosevelt (after a short hike); side trails; and wildlife.

This out-and-back ride is expected to take about 6 hours.
https://www.ypescapade.org/atv-utv-events
— — — —

Big Creek Lodge announcement

It has taken 5 years and $1.2 million and the efforts of many, many volunteers and professionals — and now Big Creek Lodge is about ready to serve the public once again beginning August 1. In celebration of this milestone, the Idaho Aviation Foundation (IAF) is announcing a public Grand Opening party on Saturday July 28 from 8am-?, you can come and go whenever you like. The IAF is the non profit that rebuilt the lodge and will operate it as a non profit with a Special Use Permit from the Payette National Forest.

This is a unique project within our public lands. There are lodges that operate in National Forest; but we aren’t aware of any with these circumstances and non-profit status. The IAF did it because we were concerned that some backcountry lodges were closing their doors to the public (let’s face it, there are not many who get rich running a backcountry lodge), and IAF wanted to have a place for the PUBLIC to enjoy that was off the grid, had history and natural beauty, plus road and aircraft access. Big Creek Lodge is that place – and is a gift to you from the aviation community! So, come and enjoy it.

We invite Yellow Pine residents to make the drive over to have breakfast, hear and tell stories about the Lodge, enjoy the beautiful building and tour the site, participate in some of the activities, and just chill. Here’s the low-down on food, drink and odds n ends for Sat Jul 28:

* Breakfast donation is $15 and will be served from 8-10am. It will include pancakes, sausage, eggs and juice/coffee;. Lunch and dinner are TBD but will be available

* Beer and wine will be available for sale along with soft drinks, tea, etc.

* If you wish to bring your own picnic for this event, no problem!

* We will have live music during the day for your enjoyment;

* If you want to bring your own alcohol, please enjoy it away from the lodge premises since we have our own permit and we don’t want to lose it on our first weekend!

* Bring your own lawn chairs and/or blankets, bug spray, sunscreen and all that jazz

* Several Yellow Pine friends have donated money and/or their time to help in the project – we’ll have Big Creek Community cards for people to fill out to explain what Big Creek means to you and what you did to help make it come to life. Those cards will be placed in a book for future visitors to enjoy and learn how so many people helped to make this happen.

* Wifi will not be available;

* We hope to have a fun nighttime activity such as star gazing; a bonfire if fires are allowed at that time; and/or movie night under the stars if we can get the right equipment by then;

* We appreciate your patience with us if we don’t quite have everything running perfectly. Thanks!

Help Wanted:

* Want to get involved and have a full tummy too? We have an on-going program for volunteers: Simply provide 2 hours of help when help is needed and directed by the Caretakers, and get a free breakfast! This is available on the 28th and thereafter. Just check with the Caretakers (managers@bigcreeklodgeidaho.com) or on the volunteer chalkboard at the lodge to see if we need help that day!

* On the 28th, we could use help with set up, clean up, table prep, and happy people helping people.

* It might also be fun to have a few knowledgeable volunteers show some of the visitors around (short destinations like Smith Crk TH and the mining ruins on Big Creek, the Logan Crk cemetery, or show people around the lodge site (penstock, old pelton wheel, water tanks, etc). Interested? If you have knowledge and can take an hour or so to show folks around, email Colleen at marketing@bigcreeklodgeidaho.com

A Note on Overnight Accommodations for the 28th:

We anticipate most people staying for the day or part of the day, but a few may need to overnight. Lodging won’t officially be available on the 28th. BUT, we do want to be flexible and try to accommodate people willing to donate if possible. We have the Kif Brown Yurt at Big Creek that sleeps 8, 2 small cabin rooms each with half baths, and 4 lodge rooms (each with full bath and room heat) that accommodate 2-3 adults each. If you need to overnight, come prepared to sleep in your own sleeping bag/tent for a small fee at the USFS campground BUT send us a request if you also wish to be ‘under roof’ and we will try to accommodate you. We still need funds for startup operations, and someone asked what donation was appropriate if we accommodate people in our buildings. Here’s suggestions – these are less than our normal rates and don’t include meals: Yurt ($20 per person), Cabin ($35 per person), or Lodge ($50 per person for a room, $25 for floor space) — if that doesn’t work for you remember there are campsites available at the USFS campground. So, please send Colleen an email at marketing@bigcreeklodgeidaho.com if you want to be on the list for a place to stay at the lodge (not the campground; that is first come first served).

You can check our new website http://www.bigcreeklodgeidaho.com to learn what the lodge is all about.

See you soon,
Colleen Back
Idaho Aviation Foundation & Big Creek Lodge
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7 at 3pm in the Community Hall.

Please remember, no outside watering on weekends or holidays.
— — — —

VYPA News:

VYPA Summer Meeting Schedule:

July 14, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
August 11, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 8, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
— — — —

YPFD News:

CPR Training Class

CPR class coming to YP July 21st 10am at the Fire Station (includes AED). If interested please notify Jeff or Ann.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911@ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

YP Fire Budget Hearing: September 8, 2018 – 10am Community Hall

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

The Helispot needs a lot of work and a base needs to be put down before officially being used. I’m currently in discussion with some folks to help with the ground prep and to put the base down. Life Flight and other agencies will need to do an inspection as well before using the helispot.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

Jeff F.

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
— — — —

2018 Festival:

The last planning meeting will be July 26

August 3, 4, 5 Music and Harmonica Festival

Please remember all state and forest laws and regulations apply while you are at the festival. Law enforcement will be present.
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Now open for summer (208) 633-3377
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern

Summer Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine.
— — — —

The Corner 633-3325

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
— — — —

Local Propane Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
— — — —

Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430

We have a great price on wild bird seed. $19.99 for a 50 lb bag. 12.99 for a 25 lb bag. We also sell suet blocks (peanut crunch, and cherry) for $1.99 per block. Niger Thistle seed $13.25 for 5 lbs. Also black oil sunflower seeds in 40# bags.
— — — —

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling (208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho
Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (July 2) overnight low of 41 degrees, clear sky this morning. Finches and pine siskins at the feeders. Sunny and clear all day, very nice, high of 76 degrees. Young pine squirrels chirping from the trees and playing on the fence art. Swallows swooping low, looks like they are finding plenty of bugs to feed their growing babies. Mosquitoes and gnats out during the evening. Robins calling after sundown.

Tuesday (July 3) overnight low of 36 degrees, mostly cloudy this morning. Finches, pine siskins, red-breasted nuthatches and jays at the feeders, hummingbirds active, young ground and pine squirrels running about. Increased air traffic. Mourning dove hanging out before lunch, hawk in the neighborhood scaring the birds and chickens. Mostly clear sunny cool day, high of 70 degrees. Female hairy woodpecker joined the wild birds at the feeders this afternoon. Juvenile pine squirrels yelling for peanuts this evening, swallows bringing big bugs to the nest to feed the growing chicks. Mourning dove and evening grosbeaks visited during the evening. Clear sky at sunset.

Wednesday (July 4) overnight low of 37 degrees, overcast this morning. Increasing air traffic buzzing the village. Finches, pine siskins, nuthatches and hummers visiting the feeders, swallows flying low catching bugs. Female hairy woodpecker and a jay joined the flock at the feeders after lunch. Parade up main street around 2pm. Cloudy warm day, some pretty gusty afternoon breezes, high of 88 degrees. More traffic late afternoon, dust hanging in the air. Intermittent firecrackers after 9pm, Village fireworks started at 10pm and lasted nearly 15 minutes. A few stray bottle rockets, then quiet by 11pm.

Thursday (July 5) overnight low of 47 degrees, clear sky this morning and dry, no dew. A few early airplanes. Heard a grosbeak calling. Finches, pine siskins, jays and nuthatches at the feeders. Swallow babies are really growing, the largest one has wings as long as its tail and can get up to the door hole to be fed. Adult swallows still taking feathers to the nests. Hot sunny and gusty winds after lunch, high of 96 degrees. Increased traffic and dust. Mail truck was running late today. Long-legged wasps are out. Still pretty hot this evening, 90 degrees at 7pm. Red smoky haze to the west at sundown, clear to the east. Mosquitoes out and hungry.

Friday (July 6) overnight low of 47 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning with some haze. Airplane traffic over the village. The usual wild birds at the feeders. Clouds coming in by lunch time, gusty warm breezes. Jays joined the finches and nuthatches at the feeders in the afternoon, a few hummingbirds buffeted by the gusty winds. Only 2 swallow babies left in the nest, the first one is on top of the box taking practice flights in the wind. Cloudy hot breezy afternoon, high of 89 degrees. Shooting to the west in the forest started after 630pm for about half an hour. Cloudy and cooler evening. Late night traffic after bar closing time.

Saturday (July 7) overnight low of 50 degrees, clear sky this morning and warming up quickly. A few finches and a pine squirrel visiting. Pine siskins, a white-breasted nuthatch and a female yellow-headed blackbird joined the regulars around lunch time. A few clouds, warm and gusty breezes after lunch. Pretty hot afternoon, mostly clear and light breezes, high of 88 degrees. Getting crunchy out in the forest, annual grasses have turned brown. Slow to cool down after sunset, robins calling and bright Jupiter high in the sky.

Sunday (July 8) overnight low of 46 degrees, partly cloudy sky this morning. A couple of extra loud planes around 840am with the morning air traffic. Increased OHV traffic raising dust. Finches, a few jays and pine siskins at the feeders. Clouds building up, hot and rather muggy early afternoon, high of 94 degrees. Second swallow chick left the nest today, leaving little #3 cheeping in the door hole. Quiet by early evening and still pretty warm outside. Shooting to the west after 8pm.
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Idaho News:

Warren Wagon Road project to have 4-hour delays

Two-year project scheduled to start on Monday

By Tom Grote for The Star-News July 5, 2018

Warren Wagon Road will be closed up to eight hours per day in four-hour blocks when work starts next week to rebuild 5.5 miles of the road north of McCall.

The work zone will begin 2.2 miles north of McCall and extend to where Warren Wagon Road meets East Side Drive north of Payette Lake. The $9.9 million federally funded project is expected to be completed by the fall of 2019.

Warren Wagon Road will be closed from 8 a.m. to noon and from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, said Cody Brown, a spokesperson for M.A. DeAtley Construction of Clarkston, Wash., the general contractor for the project.

No construction will be done on Saturdays or Sundays unless otherwise posted, Brown said.

The project will rebuild that section of the road and provide shoulders between three feet and four feet wide on either side of the road to accommodate bicycles.

continued:
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Upper access to Goose Creek Falls temporarily closed

The Star-News July 5, 2018

Goose Creek Falls Trail is closed on weekdays near the upper parking lot through Wednesday.

The closure is due to logging operations. The trail will be open on weekends and holidays. The lower access to the falls from Last Chance Campground remains open.

Tree felling and skidding will be occurring in the vicinity of the upper access resulting in falling trees, and rocks potentially landing in the trail.

Skidding of felled trees will also be occurring across the trail. Log trucks will be hauling out of the closed road adjacent to the trail head at the parking lot. Access to the parking lot will not be effected.

The logging is part of the Brundage Wildland Urban Interface/Bear Basin Restoration project. The project is designed to provide for community protection from wildfires by thinning over crowded stands of trees, provide timber and restore forest health, a news release said.

source:
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Memorial benefit held for mother, daughter killed in house fire

The 1SG Erin R. and Autumn McCall Family Foundation hosted their first fundraiser on Friday in Eagle.

Morgan Boydston July 6, 2018 KTVB

Eagle, Idaho — It’s been one year since a tragic house fire in Donnelly took the lives of four people.

Two Idaho National Guard members and two children were killed when flames ripped through the cabin they were staying in near Tamarack Resort. In honor of two of the victims, loved ones created a foundation to help other military families. The 1SG Erin R. and Autumn McCall Family Foundation hosted their first fundraiser on Friday in Eagle.

continued:
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Central Idaho Historical Museum to open Tuesday for the summer

The Star-News July 5, 2018

The Central Idaho Historical Museum in McCall will open for the summer beginning Tuesday.

The museum is located at 1001 State St. across from St. Luke’s McCall hospital and will be open from noon to 3 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays through Labor Day.

The exhibits will be monitored by volunteers of The Pump House, the used book store next to the museum that is operated by the Friends of the McCall Public Library. All tours will be self-guided as there will be no museum staff on site.

The museum occupies five acres that consists of log structures built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1937 for the Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association.

All eight buildings are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The site is currently owned by the City of McCall.

Exhibits focus on local and regional subjects such as fire lookouts, logging, Smokey the Bear, forestry and area history.

Attractions include the Split Creek Aermotor Lookout Cab and “The Worker,” a bronze statue commemorating the young men of the CCC.

Special open houses will be held July 19 and Aug. 16 to allow the public to tour the historic Fire Warden’s House, an example of American Rustic Architecture combined with a Scandinavian influence.

The Finnish craftsman techniques include dovetail corners, hand-peeled varnished log interior walls, hand-fitted door casings and trim, and hand-made furnishings. For information, go to http://cihmuseum.org.

source:
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A recap of June’s weather, 20th driest on record

by Nathan Larsen Tuesday, July 3rd 2018

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — As we transition from spring to summer June typically is the month of the changeable temperatures. During the month, high temperatures ranged from the low 60’s to the mid 90’s with the overall trend being fairly close to average. June’s average temperature was just one degree above normal with and average high of 81.9 degrees, our average low was 54.6 degrees. Also, we typically see 6 days where highs reach or exceed 90 degrees, which is exactly played out in June.

June is typically our 4th driest month with an average precipitation amount of 0.69″, we ended the month with just 0.25″ which makes us tied for 20th driest along with June 1957. The most precipitation that has ever fallen in June was in 1941, where 3.41″ fell.

Drier weather is likely in store for the next several months as July, August, and September are usually the months with the least amount of precipitation. July and August usually see around a 0.25″ of rainfall with September at just over half an inch.

source:
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Yellow Pine June Precipitation History:

Year: Rain / Snow
2018: 1.87″ / 0″
2017: 2.95″ / 0″
2016: 0.77″ / 0″
2015: 1.06″ / 0″
2014: 1.67″ / 0″
2013: 1.48″ / 0″
2012: 1.28″ / 0″
2011: 2.12″ / T
2010: 4.85″ / 0″
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VA warns veterans of qualifications for emergency care

Veterans are getting stuck with medical bills because they don’t visit the VA often enough.

A.J. Lagoe & Katie Wilcox July 5, 2018 (KTVB)

The Department of Veterans Affairs has begun taking enhanced steps to warn veterans about what they need to do to qualify for emergency medical care.

The move comes in the wake of a yearlong KARE 11 investigation entitled “A Pattern of Denial.” That reporting led members of Congress to call for a nationwide Inspector General Investigation of VA emergency room bill denials.

That federal investigation remains underway; however, the VA is already making changes.

continued:
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Fire Season:

Eagle Fire Department: believe 200 acre grass fire near Avimor started by roadside vehicle

Karen Lehr, Natasha Williams Jul 8, 2018

Fire crews in Ada County are on the scene of a grass fire burning in the Boise foothills near the Avimor subdivision that started Sunday afternoon.

The Eagle Fire Department believes a roadside vehicle caused a spark which ignited the fire. Eagle Fire says the grass fire started small, then spread to a little more than 200 acres.

… Highway 55 is still closed for travelers. …

continued:
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Crews respond to grass fire in Boise caused by fireworks

by Abigail Taylor and KBOI News Staff Tuesday, July 3rd 2018

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Fireworks are to blame for a grass fire Tuesday night in Boise.

It was just after 8 p.m. when Ada County Dispatch said the call came in about a fire in the 3600 block of North Jackie Place, which is north of the intersection of Maple Grove and Ustick roads.

… Two homes were threatened during the fire, but firefighters were able to extinguish it before any damage was done.

While cleaning up, firefighters say two men came up and admitted to police it was them who started the fire. They said they were setting off bottle rockets, which are illegal here, and a tree caught on fire.

full story:
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42-year-old Dietrich man charged with arson; accused of starting Blaine County fire

by KBOI News Staff Thursday, July 5th 2018

Hailey, Idaho (KBOI) — A 42-year-old Dietrich man is accused of starting a small fire July 4 that forced an evacuation of people attending an Independence Day event.

The Blaine County Sheriff’s Office says Sean Michael Newman lit cotton seeding covering the ground on fire along the Bowe Bridge trail near Lyons Park.

continued:
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Fireworks spark multiple fires in Boise over Fourth of July

Independence Day kept Boise City firefighters busy, with more than a dozen fires and several rescues in the Boise River

KTVB July 6, 2018

Boise — Independence Day kept Boise City firefighters busy, with more than a dozen fires and several rescues in the Boise River

On July 3, Boise Fire responded to five fires, with three sparked by fireworks and two with unknown causes. Those numbers ramped up on the Fourth of July, will 13 total fires starting.

Five of the 13 were caused by fireworks, officials say, with the others either undetermined or sparked by something else. Three more fires started July 5, all caused by fireworks.

continued:
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BLM confiscates illegal fireworks

Katie Keleher Jul 06, 2018 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) The Bureau of Land Management prevented possible wildfires with the seizure of fireworks.

BLM says they found hundreds of illegal fireworks on their public lands near the St. Anthony Sand Dunes. They issued fines to those who had the fireworks. BLM says they’ve increased the number of officers patrolling and looking for illegal fireworks. They want to remind everyone that possessing fireworks on public lands is illegal.

“Never bring any fireworks out to public lands,” said Kelsey Griffee, public information officer for BLM. “You’re lighting something on fire. We don’t need anymore fireworks caused fires. And we do have our law enforcement out there and additional patrols from our county partners.”

The BLM also asks people to be more aware when going target shooting because they’ve seen an increase in target shooting caused fires. They say people were setting up targets and shooting off fireworks while firefighters worked to put out the Cinder Fire near Menan yesterday afternoon. Firefighters were even getting shot at while putting out the fire. They are asking the public to pay better attention.

continued:
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Boise BLM responds to multiple wildfires

For Immediate Release: July 5, 2018
Contact: Boise District Fire Information Line (208) 384-3378
Twitter: @BLMIdahoFire

The Boise District BLM responded to six wildfires on Independence Day. Fire crews made great progress overnight and hope to have remaining active fires controlled in the next couple of days. The Boise BLM urges everyone to take all necessary fire safety precautions when recreating on public lands. Please check http://www.IdahoFireInfo.com for fire restrictions and wildfire prevention tips.

Charcoal Fire
* Located approximately 3 miles northeast of Lucky Peak Dam, ID
* Estimated at 60 acres
* Cause under investigation
* Fire resources –1 helicopter, 2 engines, 1 hand crew and 1 dozer
* Estimated contain – 7/5/18 at 1200, estimated control – 7/5/18 at 2000

Five Cent Fire
* Located approximately 3 miles southwest of Mountain Home Air Force Base, ID
* Estimated at 2,250+ acres
* Cause under investigation
* Fire resources – 2 dozers, 4 engines and 1 water tender
* No estimated contain or control time

Pump Fire
* Located approximately 15 miles south of Mountain Home, ID
* Approximately 52 acres
* Cause under investigation
* Fire resources – 1 engine and 1 water tender
* Contained – 7/4/18 at 2100, estimated control – 7/5/18 at 1500

Dewy Fire
* Located approximately 10 miles west of Emmett, ID
* Approximately 9 acres
* Cause under investigation
* Contained – 7/4/18 at 2000, Controlled – 7/4/18 at 2200

Nicolsen Fire
* Located approximately 10 miles southwest of Boise, ID
* Approximately 1 acre
* Cause under investigation
* Contained – 7/4/18 at 1830, Controlled – 7/4/18 at 2100

Cove Rec Fire
* Located approximately 8 miles northwest of Bruneau, ID
* Approximately 0.1 acre
* Cause under investigation
* Contained and Controlled – 7/4/18 at 2400

For More Information, Jared Jablonski, Fire Information and Prevention Office, 208 384-3210
Idaho Wildfires visit http://www.IdahoFireInfo.com
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Man-caused fire near Malad

Jul 08, 2018 Local News 8

Malad, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) Eastern Idaho Interagency Fire crews are battling a human caused fire about one mile southeast of Malad on the Caribou-Targhee National Forest. The fire started about 8 p.m. Saturday east of Interstate 15 near milepost 13.

The Two-Mile fire was burning in steep country and growing uphill. It was initially estimated at 80 acres and growing.

continued:
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Wildfire risk increases for central Idaho in July

Many heavy fuels are still damp from wet spring

Peter Jensen July 6, 2018 IME

A large wildfire burning in a remote area of Northern California has already blanketed San Francisco in smoke and ash, and 144 large wildfires have been reported and are burning 63,000 acres throughout the U.S.

The wildfire season in Western states has begun, and while Idaho has not experienced any large wildfires, the risk level for the southern and central regions of the state has increased to above normal, according to the Boise-based National Interagency Fire Center.

The agency’s most recent forecast on July 1 predicted above-normal wildland fire potential for Blaine County for July and August, and normal potential in September and October.

continued:
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USFS Regional Intermountain Wildfire

July 3, 2018

Regional Intermountain Newsletter Special Issue

link:
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Public Lands:

Idaho gears up to boost logging, restoration on federal land

Idaho has more than doubled the number of workers assigned to logging and restoration projects on federal lands within the state with the goal of doubling timber harvest and restoration treatments on federal lands by 2025.

By Kieth Ridler, Associated Press July 5, 2018

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Idaho has more than doubled the number of workers assigned to logging and restoration projects on federal lands within the state with the goal of doubling timber harvest and restoration treatments on federal lands by 2025.

The Idaho Department of Lands starting this week is increasing from five to 13 the number of workers taking part in a federal-state partnership allowing state workers to manage timber sales on U.S. Forest Service land.

One of the eight new workers is for projects on U.S. Bureau of Land Management land. The state workers are paid from timber sales and federal funds.

The partnership is made possible under the Good Neighbor Authority passed by Congress more than a decade ago and expanded in the 2014 Farm Bill.

source:
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Payette National Forest July 2018 – September 2018 Schedule of Proposed Actions (SOPA)

July 2, 2018

Here is the link to the Payette NF SOPA web page: Payette NF Schedule of Proposed Actions

link:
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USDA Forest Service Boise National Forest SOPA Update

July 2, 2018

The Boise National Forest’s “Schedule of Proposed Actions” (SOPA) for July 1, 2018 through September 30, 2018 is now available on the Boise National Forest Schedule of Proposed Actions webpage. The Forest Service produces the SOPA every three months to keep the public informed about projects that the Forest is currently working on or planning to analyze in the near future.

The SOPA has been standardized across all National Forests from a national database to track key project planning information. The SOPA reports for the all National Forests are available at http://www.fs.fed.us/sopa. The Forest Service automatically posts the SOPA four times a year in January, April, July, and October.

If you have questions about a specific project please contact the project leader listed in the SOPA. If you have general questions about the SOPA, please feel free to contact me.

link:

Sincerely,
Melissa Yenko
Forest Environmental Coordinator
Boise National Forest
1249 South Vinnell Way, Suite 200
Boise, ID 83709
Phone: 208-373-4245
Email: myenko @ fs.fed.us
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Letter to Share:

Gamebird Foundation Auction

 

20180703GambirdFoundation-a

… Hand carved, hand painted birds that were done and signed by Ralph Horn from Potlatch Idaho. This bird has been donated to the Gamebird Foundation. It will go up for silent auction very soon on our http://www.thegamebirdfoundation.org web and Facebook. This is a one of a kind and the only one like it. Ralph has quit carving and there will be no more. If you know have one of his carvings you know how valuable and how very hard they are to come by. Keep your eye here and take a look at the beautiful workmanship that Ralph does. 1 more to come later.

Jim Hagedorn
Executive Director
The Gamebird Foundation
thegamebirdfoundation.org
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Bone tumors in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt July 6, 2018 IME

Bone tumors are malignancies that either begin in bone or spread to bone from other parts of the body. They rarely occur in cats.

Primary bone tumors begin in the bones, and are the most common type. These are called osteosarcomas and chondrosarcomas. Secondary bone tumors, those that spread to bones from other tissues, are much more rare.

Seventy-five percent of primary bone tumors occur in leg bones, but they can also occur in ribs, the spine or the skull. Primary tumors commonly appear in only one location in one bone, whereas secondary tumors often occur in multiple sites in multiple bones.

The cause of bone tumors is unknown; however they can occur at previous fracture sites or sites of previous orthopedic procedures.

continued:
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Dog found covered in blood, urine and feces after fleeing fireworks

Dog severely injured after fleeing fireworks

Christina Hall, Detroit Free Press July 3, 2018

Lenka Perron let her two greyhounds out to use the bathroom Saturday night in her fenced yard at her Michigan home in what should have been an uneventful routine.

Instead, it quickly turned into a nightmare.

While the trio was outside about 10:30 p.m., Perron said, fireworks erupted nearby, illuminating her entire backyard and bringing noises “like a succession of cannons.”

Within a split second, one of the dogs, Dwight, a 55-pound rescue, panicked, squeezed through a gate slat and tore off toward Jefferson Avenue.

Perron and her family ran after him, tracing his bloody paw prints on the cement in their attempt to find him. Dwight was running so hard and scared, all of the pads on his paws ripped off, Perron said.

continued:
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Wild bear that entered Idaho zoo is captured

A wild black bear made it past a perimeter fence and climbed a large tree.

Associated Press July 3, 2018


Photo: KIFI

Pocatello – An eastern Idaho zoo reopened Tuesday after wildlife officials captured a wild black bear that somehow made it past a perimeter fence and climbed a large tree.

Officials with the city of Pocatello say wildlife officers with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game captured the bear and put on a collar and ear tag for tracking.

Zoo Idaho Director Peter Pruett says the bear climbed a Ponderosa tree and was about 50 feet off the ground at one point.

Pruett says the zoo already has two black bears and doesn’t need another.

Officials say the bear is likely a young male looking for new territory.

source:
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Lions eat alleged poachers who snuck into South African game reserve

By Jessie Karangu July 05, 2018 Circa

Officials in South Africa say between two and three alleged poachers were killed at a South African game reserve by lions.

It is believed that the poachers were mauled to death. BBC reports a high profiled rifle, a silencer, wirecutters and an axe were found at the scene. CNN also reports three pairs of boots and gloves were discovered.

“We’re almost 100% sure this is connected to rhino poaching,” Sibuya Game Reserve owner Nick Fox told CNN.

continued:
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Mustang Mania show this weekend at the Ford Idaho Horse Park

Date: July 2, 2018
Contact: Heather Tiel-Nelson, 208-736-2352

Nampa, Idaho – The Mustang Mania Trainer Incentive Program (TIP) Challenge will return to Nampa on July 7-8, 2018, beginning at 7:30 a.m. at the Ford Idaho Horse Park (16200 N. Idaho Center Blvd). The Challenge is an in-hand competition featuring both youth and adult trainers who have worked with a wild mustang for 90 days and will now show off their progress in a series of classes, including Conditioning and Handling, In-Hand Trail and Freestyle.

On July 8, there will be an open mustang show with a full slate of classes including Halter, Showmanship, Western English, Specialty and Versatility. A saddle will be offered to the winner of the Versatility division, and a host of ribbons, buckles and prize money are available to the high point winners of both shows.

The TIP Challenge is a segment of the Mustang Heritage Foundation’s Trainer Incentive Program. The mission of the Mustang Heritage Foundation is to increase the adoption of BLM-housed American mustangs and burros through innovative gentling (training) competitions and awareness programs. In keeping with this mission, the TIP Challenge was created to place these animals in adoptive homes. Youths 8-17 years old and adults 18 and up participate in the challenges by adopting and training the mustangs and burros. TIP Challenge participants also help promote the adoption of these national treasures by showcasing their value and trainability through in-hand competition.

TIP and Extreme Mustang Makeover trainers Matt and Stacie Zimmerman are hosting the Mustang Mania TIP Challenge. Matt and Stacie have helped well over 100 mustangs find good homes in the past five years alone. In 2016, they opened a storefront wild horse training business in partnership with the Mustang Heritage Foundation and the BLM to continue placing trained mustangs into private care. For more information about the Mustang Mania event, please contact Matt or Stacie Zimmerman at (541) 212-0035.
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Moose makes himself at home in Utah resident’s living room

by Jennifer Weaver Thursday, July 5th 2018


(Photo: Sheri Prucka / KPCW)

Park City, Utah — (KUTV) — It’s not every day that wildlife shows up in your living room unless its broadcast on the home TV, but that’s what happened to Sheri and Matt Prucka of Park City when a moose invited himself into their Bald Eagle home.

According to KPCW, the Pruckas left their front door open to enjoy a breezy, summer afternoon, June 24, when a young male moose wandered inside their home on Hawk Court.

continued w/video:
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Fish & Game News:

South Fork Salmon River to close for Chinook fishing July 5

Managers expect harvest share to be caught by ending of fishing hours on July 5

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Tuesday, July 3, 2018

Based on harvest information and catch rates available as of July 3, Fish and Game Bureau of Fisheries and Regional fishery managers estimate that sport fishery harvest for Chinook Salmon on the South Fork Salmon River will meet objectives by the end of fishing hours on July 5, 2018, at which time the fishing season will close for the year.

Anglers have caught and kept 418 adult hatchery Chinook through July 2.

“We are now looking at a harvest share of likely less than 600,” Fish and Game biologists Dale Allen said.

He added that there are fewer Chinook available than managers earlier anticipated.

“The fish have not shown up in the Snake River at an average rate, so we adjusted to conversions to what we are seeing between the Snake River dams,” he said.

Other Chinook fisheries remain open, and to see what river sections are available, go to the Chinook seasons and rules page.

source:
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Upper Salmon River between Idaho 93 and Idaho 75 to close to Chinook fishing July 7

Chinook fishing remains open in other areas of the Salmon River

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Tuesday, July 3, 2018

Based on information available as of July 3, Fish and Game fisheries managers estimate the sport fishery harvest for Chinook on a portion of the Upper Salmon River between the Highway 93 bridge located 0.3 miles south near Challis upstream to the posted boundary below Sawtooth hatchery will meet the harvest share by the end of fishing hours on July 7, so Chinook angling will close.

Anglers had some good fishing in that stretch and caught a lot of hatchery Chinook.

“We had the stars align this past week and weekend with perfect conditions,” Regional Fisheries Manager Greg Schoby said. “We had a big batch of fish, great river conditions, relatively cool weather, and a fair amount of angler pressure and people catching fish most of the day, which racked up a bunch of our harvest share.”

To see which areas remain open for Chinook fishing, go to the Season and Rules page.

source:
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2018 deer, elk, pronghorn, black bear, and turkey results now available

Controlled hunt applicants must log in to licensing system to get results

By Staff Writer
Friday, July 6, 2018

Hunters can now check to see if they drew controlled hunt tags for deer, elk, pronghorn, black bear, and turkey. Results are posted through Fish and Game’s licensing system at https://idfg.idaho.gov/buy-online for those who have already have an account.

Those without an online license system account can get step-by-step instructions on the Controlled Hunt Results web page. Hunters who were successful in the drawing will receive a postcard in the mail.

source:
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Margarita-loving bear takes a dip in a California hot tub

by Alina Hartounian, Associated Press Tuesday, July 3rd 2018


(Mark Hough via AP)

Mark Hough had barely taken a sip of his Friday afternoon margarita when he heard twigs snapping and leaves rustling in his lush Altadena, California, backyard.

At first he brushed it off as the sounds of his neighbor pottering next door, but the noise grew louder.

“So I got up, looked over in the bushes and lo and behold there’s a bear climbing up over my fence,” Hough said Monday.

continued:
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Tips & Advice:

Fireworks injuries are becoming common with America’s birthday

Fourth of July is becoming as known for its injuries as it is for BBQs and fireworks displays.

Accidents are a commonplace with nation’s birthday fireworks becoming more available to the public. Last year about 13,000 injuries were treated around the Independence Day holiday and there were eight deaths, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission.


US Consumer Product Safety Commission

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

Celestial Fireworks


NASA has released a fireworks-like image of a nebula in the constellation Carina.
NASA, ESA, R. O’Connell (University of Virginia), F. Paresce (National Institute for Astrophysics, Bologna, Italy), E. Young (Universities Space Research Association/Ames Research Center), the WFC3 Science Oversight Committee, and the Hubble Heritage Team


The giant nebula NGC 3603 contains thousands of young stars.
NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage
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July 1, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

July 1, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
July 4 Parade 2pm
July 4 (after Parade) Ice Cream Sundaes
July 4 Fireworks at dusk
July 4 Live Music at The Corner
July 6-7 Live Music at The Corner
July 7 Community Hall Yard Sale 9am to Noon
July 7 YPWUA meeting 3pm, Community Hall
July 14 at 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
July 19 Noxious Weed Day
July 21 10am CPR Class at the Fire Station
July 26 Festival planning meeting
July 28 Ride to Roosevelt
August 3, 4, 5 Music and Harmonica Festival
August 11 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 8 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Budget Hearing
September 8 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting

(details below)
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Village News:

Lost Dog on the South Fork Salmon River

Howdy Yellow Piners, Levi Anderson called Tuesday (June 26) and again today (July 1) to report he lost his dog Chewie near the trailhead on the South Fork for 2-bit, 6-bit creek on Sunday. Chewie is a black mini Auzzie. If you find the dog, please call (208) 630-4894 or (208) 630-3596. As of July 1st the dog has not been found. Chewie’s family is very concerned.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Friday, June 29th, a report the dumpsters had been recently emptied. Also a report that the road is much better since it had been graded.

Please do not dump household appliances at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters. However, there is a burn pile for woody debris only. “Bring it, Don’t Burn it.”
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Pests

Lots of mosquitoes and no-see-ums this year. Remember to secure your trash, bears are hungry.
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Local Events:

4th of July Golf Tournament June 30th

Cannon shot at 1017am to start the tourney.

3rd place:
Men’s: Joel & Bill with a score of 67
Mixed: Gary & Chris with a score of 80

2nd place:
Men’s: Tom & Tom with a score of 64
Women’s: Tim’s Sister & her Daughter with a score of 81
Mixed: Kyle & Krysta with a score of 68

1st place:
Men’s: Jeff & Dan with a score of 63
Women’s: Connie & Ridge with a score of 79
Mixed: Larry & Connie with a score of 63

Closest to the pin on #1 was Joel Fields!

Congratulations to all for a successful 20th Annual Golf Tournament!
Thanks to all those that helped to make it possible!

Link to photo gallery on FB:

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Weekend of June 30th

Live Music at The Corner

Folk Family Revival Friday night (June 29) at the Corner Restaurant.

20180629TheCornerFolkFamilyRevival-a
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4th of July

Parade at 2pm

Independence Day Parade will be Wednesday, July 4th at 2pm.

If you want to be in the parade, meet near the Fire House at 1:30pm. All family-friendly entries are welcome.

If you need decorations for your pet, bike, ATV, trailer, car, whatever, they will be available near the Fire House at noon.

After the parade: Ice Cream Sundaes will be for sale. $3 for one scoop; $4 for two scoop; your choice of toppings. Proceeds support the Community Hall.

Fireworks at Dusk

Live Music at The Corner – Folk Family Revival
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Yard Sale – Saturday, July 7 9am-Noon

The garage sale is July 7th from 9-noon. Everyone can bring their items anytime to the community hall. I will have a space marked for the items.

Please remember this is a Donation and Everything Must Work.

If you want your items back if they don’t sell you must pick them up at 12:30 on July 7th.

The proceeds of the Garage Sale will go to the maintenance of the Community Hall.

If you have questions please call Kathy Hall at 208 633 6270 or text to 630 915 1544

Thank you everyone for your support of the Yellow Pine Community Hall
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Weekend July 7th

Live Music at The Corner – Willie and the Singlewides
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July 19 (free) Noxious Weed Day

Steve has scheduled his visit to Yellow Pine for Thursday July 19th. The staging area will be the Fire Department. He will bring up the Chemicals and spray equipment. Backpack sprayers, pump up sprayers, ATV tanks and he needs to know how many of these we need. He will leave everything there for the weekend and pick it all up Monday. Please call Kathy Hall 208 633-6270 for forms and information.

link to form:
Steve Anderson from Valley County Weed Control
Office: (208)382-7199
e-mail: SAnderson @ co.valley.id.us
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Jul 28, 2018 Ride to Roosevelt

$20.00/vehicle

The ride will leave from the Yellow Pine Community Hall at 10 am. After leaving town, riders will head up Stibnite Road. Approximately 45 minutes later there will be a short pause at the “Glory Hole” in Stibnite; with information provided by Midas Gold Idaho. The ride continues up and over Monumental Summit (NF-375) – there is a monument at the summit with information about the area. Over Monumental Summit, the ride heads for the Roosevelt Trail Head. Lunch will be served at the trail head. The riders will return to Yellow Pine via the same route.

There are opportunities to see old mine sites (along the route); the town site of Roosevelt (after a short hike); side trails; and wildlife.

This out-and-back ride is expected to take about 6 hours.
https://www.ypescapade.org/atv-utv-events
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Congratulations, Dave McClintock!

After decades of dedicated service to the Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Dave McClintock retired June 30, 2018.

We wish you many more years of fishing and fun!

20180630DaveYPWUA-a

YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7 at 3pm in the Community Hall.

Please remember, no outside watering on weekends or holidays.
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VYPA News:

VYPA Summer Meeting Schedule:

July 14, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
August 11, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 8, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
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YPFD News:

CPR Training Class

CPR class coming to YP July 21st 10am at the Fire Station (includes AED). If interested please notify Jeff or Ann.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911@ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

YP Fire Budget Hearing: September 8, 2018 – 10am Community Hall

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

The Helispot needs a lot of work and a base needs to be put down before officially being used. I’m currently in discussion with some folks to help with the ground prep and to put the base down. Life Flight and other agencies will need to do an inspection as well before using the helispot.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

Jeff F.

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
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2018 Festival:

The last planning meeting will be July 26

August 3, 4, 5 Music and Harmonica Festival

Please remember all state and forest laws and regulations apply while you are at the festival. Law enforcement will be present.
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Now open for summer (208) 633-3377
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Yellow Pine Tavern

Summer Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine.
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The Corner 633-3325

Live music for Independence Day, both weekends. Folk Family Revival will be here the weekend before and on the actual fourth. Willie and the Singlewides will be the weekend after the fourth.

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Local Propane Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
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Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430

We have a great price on wild bird seed. $19.99 for a 50 lb bag. 12.99 for a 25 lb bag. We also sell suet blocks (peanut crunch, and cherry) for $1.99 per block. Niger Thistle seed $13.25 for 5 lbs.
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling

(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (June 25) overnight low of 45 degrees, clear sky this morning and warming up quickly. Finches, pine siskins, red-breasted nuthatches and female hummingbirds visiting this morning. A few early morning airplanes. Streets are starting to get dusty. Breezy warm day, cloudy by early afternoon, high of 86 degrees. Swallow chicks in the nest we are watching are getting little pin feathers on their wings. Flicker chicks hang way out the door hole of their nest calling for food. Really loud airplane at 309pm, engine sounded rather strange. Jays and red-breasted nuthatches joined the finches late afternoon. Cloudy, muggy and warm before sunset. Bat flitting about at dark and a night hawk “vooming”.

Tuesday (June 26) overnight low of 44 degrees, almost clear sky this morning and a little bit of dew. A young male flicker was hanging out the nest opening today, parents nearby in the trees. The 3 swallow chicks we are watching via the nest-cam are growing, the larger 2 are getting little pin feathers, parents are bringing big bugs to feed the babies. Finches, pine siskins, a few evening grosbeaks, a jay and red-breasted nuthatches visiting, also a rufous hummingbird chasing females and calliopes away from the feeder. Sunny warm day, very light breezes, high of 79 degrees. There were 8 hummingbirds at the feeders this evening. Skeeters and gnats out in droves around sunset, cooling off quickly. Large hawk flew through the yard before dusk.

Wednesday (June 27) overnight low of 39 degrees, clear and very blue sky this morning. Lots of cassins finches at the feeders. Air traffic on and off during the morning and hot afternoon, high of 87 degrees. Female hairy woodpecker, a few steller jays and red-breasted nuthatches enjoying seeds and suet this afternoon. Hummingbirds active, and a pair of tree swallows chasing a pine squirrel away from their nest. Clear warm evening, Jupiter high in the sky at dusk.

Thursday (June 28) overnight low of 45 degrees, almost clear sky and warming up quickly this morning. Lots of cassins finches and pine siskins, a few jays and nuthatches at the feeders, swallows swooping around for bugs to feed their growing chicks. Wispy clouds coming in early, then almost overcast by noon. Several hummingbirds, a noisy jay and a female hairy woodpecker joined the finches at the feeders. Very light sprinkles of rain on and off in the afternoon and evening, cloudy and cooler temperatures, high of 79 degrees. Robins calling at dusk. A few sprinkles after dark.

Friday (June 29) overnight low of 46 degrees, partly cloudy this morning. White-breasted nuthatch joined the finches, pine siskins and red-breasted nuthatches at the feeders. Female Calliope and male Rufous hummingbirds at their feeders. Pine squirrel and golden mantels (and ground) squirrels active. More traffic than usual in the early afternoon, mostly ATVs and UTVs. Pleasant cool evening, robins calling at dusk, high of 71 degrees. A few revelers buzzing up and down the hill on main street after dark.

Saturday (June 30) overnight low of 40 degrees, partly cloudy this morning and light breezes. Early morning loud airplanes over the village, loud dirt bike racing up and down Westside Ave. Finches, pine siskins, jays and hummingbirds visiting the feeders. Two of the three swallow babies have their eyes open. Cannon shot at 1017am to start the golf tourney. Warm and partly cloudy today, high of 77 degrees. Young pine squirrels are out of the nest and running about. Looks like another generation of ground squirrels are out too. Hummers and swallows active at sundown, partly clear sky. Young pine squirrels calling from the trees. Sounds like some folks having fun uptown after dark – “Yahoo!”

Sunday (July 1) overnight low of 45 degrees, mostly cloudy this morning and a bit humid. A couple of early loud airplanes. Finches, pine siskins and nuthatches at the feeders. Getting pretty warm before noon, more airplane traffic. Hairy woodpecker visited after lunch time, jays and young pine squirrels raiding the feeders. The swallow nest-cam showed the two bigger babies are nearly as large as their parents, the runt (4 days younger) is still much smaller and eyes not open yet. Pretty warm and partly cloudy afternoon, high of 80 degrees. Quiet and warm evening, swallows active and robins calling.
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RIP:

Laurabelle Cecilia Goodwin

obitLauraGoodwin-a

Laurabelle Cecilia Goodwin [formerly of Yellow Pine] died peacefully in Twin Falls on Thursday, June 14, 2018 at the age of 88.

Laura was born in Glen Ullin, N.D., to Ben and Cecelia Wetzstein. She married Harley Goodwin on June 25, 1947 in Buhl.

Laura led a full and busy life centered around family. She loved spending time with family, visiting with friends, reading and sewing. She enjoyed collecting angels and apples.

She spent time moose hunting, snowmobiling and valued shopping at thrift stores. Her soul will be greatly missed by her family and friends.

Laura is survived by a large family, the immediate of whom are her children, Laurie Winters (Ken), Harley Jr. (Robin), Jess (Brenda), and Clark (Cindy) of McCall, as well as seven grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren who she loved dearly

She was preceded in death by her husband, Harley Goodwin; daughter, Irene Swanson, and two grandsons.

In lieu of flowers donations may be made to The Idaho Veterans Cemetery, 10100 Horseshoe Bend Rd, Boise, ID 83714.

A celebration of life was held Tuesday, June 26, 2018, at Serenity Funeral Chapel Life Celebration Center and Cremation Services of Idaho in Twin Falls.

Randee Goodwin, her granddaughter, officiated the ceremony and a reception followed in the Great Room at Bridgeview Estates.

Condolences may be shared at http://serenityfuneralchapel.com

source: The Star-News June 28, 2018
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Idaho News:

Yellow Pine to host full schedule of holiday events

The Star-News June 28, 2018

The tiny community of Yellow Pine east of McCall will host a full slate of Independence Day events.

The annual Fourth of July Parade will begin at 2 p.m. Wednesday and the day will end with fireworks at dusk.

The 20th annual Yellow Pine Golf Tournament will take place on Saturday, with proceeds to go toward the Yellow Pine Medical Training and Supply Fund.

The cost for the event is $20 per person or $50 will buy a sponsorship and play for two players.

To reserve a place in the tournament contact Jeff or Ann Forster at aforsterrn@aol.com or call 208-633-1010.

The Corner in Yellow Pine will host live music by the band Folk Family Revival on three nights. The band will perform starting at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday as well as and Wednesday after the fireworks.

source:
[Note: Ice Cream Sundaes after the parade benefit the Community Hall.]
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Family-Friendly Fourth Goes To Third Year

Bans on alcohol to continue in McCall lakefront parks, North Beach

By Tom Grote for The Star-News June 28, 2018

The campaign by McCall, Valley County and the State of Idaho to make McCall more family-friendly during the Fourth of July holiday will mark its third year for the holiday period starting this weekend.

For the third year in a row, alcoholic drinks will not be allowed in lakefront parks in the City of McCall during the Independence Day holiday.

Alcohol at Legacy Park, Brown Park, Art Roberts Park and Rotary Park will be restricted between 8 p.m. on Tuesday and 8 a.m. on July 5.

The duration of the ban was shortened over previous years since July 4 falls on a Wednesday this year.

Alcohol restrictions in city parks the last two years has been credited with ridding the parks of rowdy young adults who in past years had drawn complaints for drunkenness, explicit language and various stages of undress. Those complaints peaked in 2015, when July 4 fell on a Saturday.

continued:
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Safe and Sane Fireworks Description


(click image for larger size)
source: Boise County Connection


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Being safe and considerate with fireworks

By Michaela Leung Jun 25, 2018 Local News 8

With firework sales starting in preparation for the Fourth of July, you may be hearing them in your neighborhoods or using them yourself but it’s important to be safe and considerate of others.

Fireworks are a known cause of fires especially during this drier time of year.

“We really want to see people utilize fireworks that are safe and sane that they can let their family have a good time but keeping low to the ground or on the ground. The other part is, be in an area where you’re not going to have active fire starts such as large low grass green grass areas,” says Bill Arsenault with the Idaho Falls Fire Department.

continued:
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Boise fire chief serious about holding sellers of illegal fireworks liable

by Scott Logan Tuesday, June 26th 2018

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — This Fourth of July, Boise Fire Chief Dennis Doan says he’s serious about holding any fireworks vendor liable for the cost of putting out a fire in the city limits if the blaze can be traced back to illegal aerial fireworks sold by the vendor.

When we asked one fireworks vendor about the chief’s plan, John Palomarez of John’s Discount Fireworks near Caldwell said this: “I feel trying to put the news out saying he going to come after the vendors is like similar to coming after a gun vendor for selling a gun used in crime.”

But Tuesday Chief Doan says there’s a big difference.

“Illegal fireworks are illegal. Guns are not illegal,” the chief said. “I compare it more to selling marijuana. Marijuana is illegal in Idaho, would we allow somebody to sell it and sign an affidavit so they can take out of of the state to smoke? Of course we wouldn’t.”

Doan says state law is clear about aerial fireworks.

“There’s a deputy attorney general’s opinion that there’s no loophole,” Doan said. “That selling aerial fireworks is illegal. It almost sounds funny saying it, that selling illegal fireworks is illegal.”

source:
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Local agencies to host ‘Pull Together’ day for weed

The Star-News June 28, 2018

The City of McCall and Valley County will host a “Pull Together” noxious weed control day on Tuesday, July 17.

Mixed herbicide, limited spray equipment, personal protective gear and safe-use instructions will be provided to pre-registered landowners within the city.

Scout groups, hiking clubs and other organizations are invited to assist in return for prizes provided by local merchants.

Plastic garbage bags, registration and safety instruction will be available at city parks shops on Park Street next to the McCall Public Library.

For information, contact Communications Manager Erin Greaves at 208-634-8966 or visit http://mccall.Id.us.

Anyone having noxious weeds needing treatment should call Al Becker at 208-315-3627 or Eddie Heider at 208 634-6609.

source:
[Note: Weed Abatement Day in Yellow Pine is July 19th.]
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61-year-old McCall woman killed after crashing into store

by KBOI News Staff Monday, June 25th 2018

McCall, Idaho (KBOI) — A 61-year-old McCall woman died late Sunday after crashing her vehicle on Highway 55.

Idaho State Police says Cherie Crandall was driving north on the highway near Lenora Street when she drifted across the southbound lane, drove onto the sidewalk and then crashed into The McCall Store.

She was transported to St. Luke’s McCall where she later died of her injuries. Troopers say she was not wearing a seat belt.

The crash remains under investigation.

source:
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McCall businesses struggling to find workers

The mayor says 80 percent of McCall’s workforce commutes from other areas, and 42 percent of those people travel 50 or more miles, one way, to go to work.

KTVB Natalie Shaver June 25, 2018

McCall, Idaho – For nearly 70 years, locals and visitors coming into McCall have made the Pancake House their first stop of the day.

“It’s a great business,” said owner Bonnie Bertram. “When we got into this big place we didn’t think it was going to be quite as busy as it’s been.”

While business is good, Bertram says they’re struggling.

“I’ve been doing this 40 years and this is the worst year I’ve ever seen,” she said.

The problem: They’re short staffed and can’t find people to hire.

continued:
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Roll Out the Orange Barrels

First project to start in four-year rebuild of downtown McCall streets

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News June 28, 2018

Work will begin next month on the first of a planned series of major street projects in McCall’s downtown core over the next four years.

The first project will focus on replacing water, sewer and stormwater lines beneath Second and Lenora streets.

The work will be divided into four stages to avoid snarling traffic and keeping local businesses accessible, McCall Public Works Director Nathan Stewart said.

continued:
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B of R to close road across Cascade Dam for maintenance

The Star-News June 21, 2018

The Bureau of Reclamation will temporarily close the roadway across Cascade Dam to the public while maintenance work is performed between Monday and next Friday, June 29, from Lake Way to Shore Drive.

The maintenance work fix potholes in the road. Material will be brought in, laid out, and graded for drainage purposes.

Maintenance of the roadway is necessary for the continued safe and reliable access of the public, operating personnel, and emergency services to and across Cascade Dam, a news release said.

“We realize that this temporary roadway closure will be an inconvenience to the public, but it is essential for public safety and to provide a safe working environment for the crews,” said Vicki Hoffman, Middle Snake Field Office operations and maintenance manager.

Temporary access restrictions on Cascade Dam Road will include vehicles and pedestrians. Lake Way or Vista Point Boulevard may be used as alternate routes for recreation access during the closure.

Cascade Dam is located on the North Fork of the Payette River about one-half mile northwest of Cascade.

Cascade Dam was constructed in 1948 and serves as a multipurpose facility, providing water for irrigation, hydropower, recreation, and flood control.

source:
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Riggins looking for solution to human waste disposal

Scat machine removed from the popular rafting town

Steve Liebenthal Jun 30, 2018

Riggins, Idaho – Every year people from all over the country come to to float the famous “River of No Return”, but when they do return to civilization, they have a bit of a mess to deal with. The only scat machine in the Riggins area is gone.

Floaters on the Salmon River are required to carry out all waste, including human waste, and this year, they’re facing new challenges on how to dispose of it. Floaters who have no access to outhouses along the salmon river are required to carry their human waste with them, and the scat machine was where they dumped that waste for processing. But the operators said keeping the scat machine running was difficult and expensive, so they removed it. Now the nearest machine is more than two hours away, in Asotin Washington. With hundreds of floaters getting off the river near Riggins, city managers became concerned some would dump their waste inappropriately..

continued:
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West Nile virus found in Payette County

County officials say mosquitoes found just north of Payette have tested positive for the West Nile virus.

KTVB June 29, 2018

Payette County, Idaho – Payette County officials are warning people about the dangers of West Nile Virus after mosquitoes tested positive just north of Payette.

According to the mosquito abatement district there, they plan to increase mosquito surveillance in the area and continue to locate and treat larvae infested waters.

Officials urge you to protect yourself against West Nile by following the “7 D’s” to avoid infection:

continued:
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Man rescued after falling, causing avalanche on Mount Borah

6/25/18 AP

Challis, Idaho — Officials in central Idaho say a Pennsylvania man had to be rescued after falling on Idaho’s tallest mountain, triggering a small avalanche.

According to the Custer County Sheriff’s office, 23-year-old Hao Yan of Devin, Pennsylvania, fell Saturday while climbing the north face of Mount Borah — which summits at 12,657 feet (3,858 meters) and attracts climbers from all over the world annually.

Dispatchers say Yan called 911 with his cellphone around 9:30 p.m. while lying partially buried in the snow.

continued:
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Bill up for U.S. Senate panel hearing Wed. would compensate Idaho downwinders who got cancer from nuke tests

by Betsy Z. Russell June 26, 2018 Idaho Press

The fallout from the atomic bombs that were set off at the Nevada Test Site has been part of Preston J. Truman’s life as long as he can remember, writes Post Register reporter Nathan Brown. “The first thing I can remember from childhood was setting on my father’s knee out with our cattle, watching an A-bomb go off moments before dawn and watching the fallout clouds come over,” Truman said.

Tona Henderson of Emmett has 38 family members who have had cancer, and 14 have died from it. “Idaho did not know we were in the direct line of fire from the test site,” she said. “We didn’t know we were dying with cancer because of the test site, until 2004. Then life changed for me — that is when I realized all the family members that had cancer and had died from cancer were all here in the Emmett area during the testing times.”

She heads Idaho Downwinders, and will testify at a Senate committee hearing Wednesday on legislation to make Idahoans who were exposed to radiation through nuclear tests eligible for the same compensation as other “downwinders.”

continued:
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Fire Season:

Fireworks Mitigation Minute


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Sky Lanterns


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Wildfire starts near Arrowrock Reservoir

Boise, Idaho, June 25, 2018– Forest Service fire crews are responding to the Twin Fire, located approximately 10 miles northeast of the intersection of Highway 21 and National Forest System road 268 (Middle Fork road leading to Atlanta). The fire is currently at 65 acres and 30 percent contained, with full containment expected late tomorrow afternoon. The cause is under investigation.

Approximately 90 firefighters are assigned to the fire: Three 20-person crews, 2 helicopters, 3 engines, and fire prevention and investigation personnel.

There are currently no road or area closures in place. However, all motorists traveling on NFS road 268 are advised to use caution due to fire personnel and equipment in the area.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Trio of blazes signals start of fire season

Rising temperatures bring smoky Wednesday in the Wood River Valley

Mark Dee June 29, 2018 IME

After a quiet start to summer, three fires were sparked Wednesday afternoon—two in the canyons near Hailey and one at the Sun Valley Horsemen’s Center—opening fire season in earnest as temperatures in the valley climbed toward the 90s for the first time this year.

The largest blaze, at Winn Compost near the Ohio Gulch Transfer Station, was still burning Thursday morning, according to Wood River Fire & Rescue, and is expected to continue for up to two weeks.

continued:
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Compost piles continue burning in central Idaho

6/30/18 AP

Hailey, Idaho — Authorities in central Idaho say they have no estimate for when fires in several large mulch piles north of Hailey will be extinguished.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management tells The Times-News in a story on Friday that the size of the compost piles and the amount of heat being generated is making it difficult to fight the fires.

continued:
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Prescribed fire still smokes north of Crouch

Emmett, Idaho, June 29, 2018 — The Forest Service’s Lodgepole prescribed fire, located approximately 14 miles north of Crouch along National Forest System (NFS) road 671, continues to burn and is causing smoke to be visible along the Middle Fork of the Payette and into the town of Crouch.

Recent warmer weather has resulted in needle litter and heavier fuels rapidly drying out, which is allowing the fire to slowly spread into adjacent unburned areas. The fire still remains within the designated project area.

Fire crews are putting in a fireline to reduce its spread and also work directly on putting out flames found in heavy fuels.

There are currently no closures in effect, however fire managers are assessing possible closure needs due to public safety. The public is asked to be mindful of fire traffic on the road to Silver Creek Plunge.

The prescribed burn took place on April 24 and was approximately 1,250 acres, with the objective to improve forest vegetation and wildlife habitat conditions.

For more information, contact the Emmett Ranger District: (208) 365-7000.
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Idaho fire officials anticipate ‘robust’ wildfire season

Fire officials anticipate this summer being above average for fire activity.

Gretchen Parsons June 28, 2018 KTVB

Boise – Friday marks the two-year anniversary of the devastating Table Rock Fire that set the foothills ablaze.

And with the Fourth of July next week, state fire officials are taking this time to urge Idahoans to practice fire safety as the 2018 wildfire season is anticipated to be above average.

“It should be a very robust fire season across southern and especially southwestern Idaho,” says Bryan Henry with the National Interagency Fire Center.

continued:
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Be Fire Safe During the Fourth of July on the National Forest – It’s All Yours. Go. Play.

USFS Regional Intermountain Wildfire Newsletter Special Issue 06/27/2018

The coming Fourth of July weekend on the National Forest brings an increase of forest visitors. This year, the weather is predicted to be warm and mostly sunny in the days prior to and through the Fourth of July and fire managers on the Forest are reminding visitors to be careful with fire.

Fireworks are prohibited on all national forests year-round. No fireworks of any kind may be discharged anywhere within the Forest, regardless of weather conditions or holidays. Even if it’s “green,” please practice good sense by using caution with fire and smoking at all times.

While the National Forest may look green, fire danger is always a concern. Fires can start quickly and will burn in vegetation that seems green but continues to dry out as the conditions get hotter during the summer. Pour water and add dirt to your campfire until it is cold to the touch. One spark is all it takes to start a wildfire.

continued:
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Mining News:

Work begins on Yankee Fork restoration project

Intent is to address dredging damage

IME June 29, 2018

After years of planning, crews with the Salmon-Challis National Forest have begun implementing a project to improve fish habitat in an area impacted by dredging on the Yankee Fork.

Between 1940 and 1952, the Yankee Fork dredge worked its way up a 5.4-mile section of the river, a tributary of the Salmon River east of Stanley. While the operation effectively removed gold from the valley floor, it also significantly altered the Yankee Fork, side channels, riparian vegetation and floodplain. Those changes substantially reduced the ability of the Yankee Fork to support fish, the Forest Service stated in a press release.

The project also left large mounds rock tailings piles on the valley floor near the old mining town of Bonanza. Though more than 60 years have passed since the dredging occurred, the area has been unable to revert back to a natural condition, the Forest Service stated.

The expected three-year project covers about 46 acres of private and national forest land, along 1.3 miles of the river. Work this year will focus on removing tailings from the project area, whereas work in 2019 and 2020 will re-create river, side channel, riparian and floodplain habitats.

continued:
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Public Lands:


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Forest Service reminds visitors: No fireworks

Boise, Idaho, June 28, 2018 — Boise National Forest is reminding visitors and campers that all fireworks and other pyrotechnic devices are prohibited on National Forests lands year-round. The forest hosts large numbers of visitors over the Fourth of July holiday and the increased activity could lead to human caused fires.

With the recent warmer weather, finer fuels like grasses are beginning to dry out and the potential for wildfires is escalating. Forest visitors should take precautions to ensure they do not accidentally start a wildfire.

* Be especially careful when towing trailers or boats as dragging safety chains can cause sparks and ignite roadside vegetation.
* Use provided metal campfire rings in developed sites.
* Don’t leave campfires unattended and make sure they are dead out when you leave.
* All-terrain vehicles (ATVs) and motorcycles, should have properly installed and maintained spark-arresters.
* Exploding targets and tracer or incendiary bullets are prohibited on National Forest lands.

Designated campgrounds are expected to fill up rapidly and reservations are recommended. Reservations can be made at: http://www.recreation.gov

The Forest would also like to remind the public that Trinity Mountain Recreation Area remains closed to motorized use until July 15.

Please be aware that some National Forest System roads and trails may closed due to fire damage or logging activity. For all forest closures visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices
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Upper Access to Goose Creek Falls Temporarily Closed

Date: June 27, 2018
Contacts: Brian Harris, Public Affairs Officer, 208-634-0784 office, 208-634-6945 cell.

New Meadows, ID – Goose Creek Falls trail #354 will be closed on weekdays near the upper elevation parking lot beginning Monday 6/27 through 7/11, for public safety due to logging operations. The trail will be open on weekends and holidays. The lower access to the falls from Last Chance Campground remains open.

Tree felling and skidding will be occurring in the vicinity of the upper access resulting in falling trees, and rocks potentially landing in the trail. Skidding of felled trees will also be occurring across the trail. Log trucks will be hauling out of the closed road adjacent to the trail head at the upper elevation parking lot. Access to the parking lot will not be effected.

The logging operation underway in the area is part of the Brundage Wildland Urban Interface/Bear Basin Restoration project. The project is designed to provide for community protection from wildfires by thinning over crowded stands of trees, provide timber to our local communities through timber sales, and restore the health of the forested area by returning it to more of a natural ecosystem.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
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Erin Phelps Named as the New Meadows District Ranger

Ranger Kim Pierson Moves to the Idaho Panhandle National Forest

Date: June 27, 2018
Contact: Brian Harris, (208) 634-6945

McCall, ID – Payette National Forest Supervisor, Keith Lannom is pleased to announce that Erin Phelps has been selected as the New Meadows District Ranger. Phelps replaces Kim Pierson who moved to the Idaho Panhandle National Forest as the Deputy Forest Supervisor.

“Ranger Pierson played a key role as the New Meadows District Ranger regarding our landscape scale forest restoration and building a productive relationship with the Payette Forest Coalition,” said Lannom. “Her eight years on the District were immensely productive, she will be missed, and we wish her well in her new duty assignment.”

Incoming Ranger Phelps is an Idaho native and went to college at Eastern Oregon University, where she played volleyball and received a Bachelor of Arts in English Writing.

She began her federal career in wildland fire with the Boise BLM, then with the Forest Service on Interagency Hotshot Crews in Arizona. In 2010, Erin moved into environmental planning as a Writer/Editor. For three years, she served as the Forest Service Project Manager for the innovative Flagstaff Watershed Protection Project, a large initiative funded in large part by the citizens of Flagstaff to fund fire hazard reduction treatments on the National Forest adjacent to the city. In 2015, Erin was appointed the District Ranger on the historic Ninemile Ranger District of the Lolo National Forest in Montana.

Erin is excited to join the Payette National Forest and the New Meadows Community as she’s been recreating and visiting New Meadows since she was 10 years old. “It’s always been where I can go to reconnect with family and the outdoors,” said Phelps. “Some of my all-time favorite trail runs are on the New Meadows District, including the trail to Pollock Lookout.” Phelps is happy to soon call New Meadows home, and added, “This area has always been a special place to me, and I’m looking forward to joining the community and the employees of the Payette National Forest in their effort to affect positive change at a landscape level.”

Phelps will continue the work of her New Meadows predecessors to identify the most informed and collaborative solutions to shared forest management issues. She will report to the Forest on August 19, 2018. Dustin Doane will continue as the Acting District Ranger until that time.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
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Environmental group appeals massive juniper removal in Idaho

AP Jun 29, 2018

Boise, Idaho (AP) – An environmental group is challenging one of the largest-ever projects to remove juniper trees that federal officials say will protect habitat for imperiled sage grouse and also benefit cattle ranchers in southwestern Idaho.

Western Watersheds Project in an administrative appeal filed Thursday contends the U.S. Bureau of Land Management’s project benefits mainly cattle and sheep grazing at the expense of sage grouse habitat that will be harmed by an influx of invasive weeds.

The appeal filed by the group takes aim at the BLM’s scientific review and approval of the Bruneau-Owyhee Sage-Grouse Habitat Project released earlier this year.

The agency plans to remove juniper trees from about 1,100 square miles within a 2,600-square-mile area in Owyhee County over about 15 years.

source:
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Letter to Share:

Wildlife release form

July 1, 2018

Hi all, happy July 1st. Hope this finds you all well and ready for Independence Day. There will be NO baby pheasant chicks this week July 3rd. Little Canyon will have a very large hatch come off July 9th. So all of you folks that can handle some chicks, we are ready. Joel Wagner is building brooders and he has 2 ready to go this weekend. It will give you a week to get set up and ready for chicks the 9th. We need wild game release form filled out for all those raising birds. If you have NOT filled out the form and sent it to me, you can click on the www. Form below and it will take you to the form and you can fill it out and submit it at the bottom and I will get it.

Have a very safe and happy 4th. No fires. Make sure you water down or have a bucket of water to drop burnt stuff left over into.

Please fill out the form at the link below.
http://www.thegamebirdfoundation.org/wlr.html

Jim Hagedorn
Executive Director
The Gamebird Foundation
thegamebirdfoundation.org
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Critter News:


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Keep dogs safe during Fourth of July fireworks

The Star-News June 28, 2018

Dog owners should take steps to keep their pets safe long before the Independence Day weekend fireworks blast off, according to MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter.

Dogs should be kept inside, kept in a fenced area or on a leash so they don’t run off.

Every year MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter receives dogs of visiting and local residents who have been found after the fireworks.

If a dog is lost, call MCPAWS at 634-3647 and leave a detailed message with phone number if the shelter is closed.

source:
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Heroic puppy recovering after jumping into harms way to protect owner from rattlesnake

While walking down a hill, Paula Godwin said she nearly stepped on a rattlesnake. But, she said, her “hero of a puppy” saved her.

Hayden Packwood July 1, 2018 KTVB

His name is Todd, but you could call him a hero, because that’s exactly what his owner is doing.

Todd and his owner, Paula Godwin, were out and about early for a hike near 7th Street and the Carefree Highway Friday.

… But that beautiful morning would take a scary turn. While walking down a hill, Godwin said she nearly stepped on a rattlesnake. But, she said, her “hero of a puppy” saved her.

Godwin said Todd jumped right in front of her leg where she “surely would have got bit.”

Todd took the bite, right to the face.

full story:
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Pet Talk – Canine influenza

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt June 30, 2018 IME

Canine influenza is a newer influenza strain that was first reported in 2004 at a Florida greyhound track. Dogs are the only known susceptible species. This strain (HCN8) is not known to infect humans.

Canine influenza is caused by an H3NB strain of the influenza A virus family. Healthy dogs of all ages are susceptible. It is transmitted by an infected dog sneezing or coughing on another dog, much the same as influenza is spread among humans. It can also be transmitted via contaminated inanimate objects (fomites) and by people who touch both infected and uninfected dogs. The incubation period is two to five days. About 80 percent of infected dogs develop clinical signs. Infected dogs that do not exhibit clinical signs can still shed the virus and spread the infection.

The disease may be mild or severe. The most common clinical sign is a cough that lasts 10 to 30 days despite treatment with antibiotics and cough suppressants. At times, this cough can be confused with kennel cough. Some dogs run a low-grade fever and have a nasal discharge that is purulent (contains pus).

continued:
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Begging to ditch the poop scooper? This Boise company has a solution for pet owners

by Deni Hawkins Friday, June 29th 2018

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — If you’re a dog owner, you love your dog, but most can agree that picking up after them isn’t the favorite household chore.

… Michael Roberts, who owns the pet service company Poop 911, sniffed success out of these sentiments.

“We get various stories about…how people don’t like to do it,” he said. “They can’t get their kids to do it, they can’t get their husbands to do it.”

Realizing that they could capitalize on the chore, Roberts and his wife agreed to bring the company ‘Poop 911’ to Boise back in 2010.

full story:
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Police dog trained to perform CPR

Officers posted video of demonstration to Facebook

Jun 26, 2018 Local News 8

Spanish police have posted a video to Facebook of a dog that has been trained to perform CPR.

The video shows Poncho the police dog promptly responding to its partner who pretended to be unresponsive. Poncho repeatedly used its front paws to pound on his partner’s chest, mimicking cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Poncho then paused to put its ear on his partner’s neck to try to detect a pulse. The dog repeated the actions until the officer stood up.

Police wrote Poncho “did not hesitate for an instant” to save a life.

source w/video:
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Elmore County cat tests positive for plague

Posted by Betsy Z. Russell June 26, 2018 Idaho Press

One month after a child in Elmore County was infected with plague — the first human case of the disease in Idaho since 1992 — an Elmore County cat now has tested positive for plague. The cat had had recent contact with a rodent, possibly a ground squirrel, before becoming sick. Like the child, the cat is recovering, according to the Idaho Department of Health & Welfare.

“It is important to take precautions to avoid contact with ground squirrels and their fleas,” said Dr. Leslie Tengelsen, Idaho state public health veterinarian. “Make sure your pets have proper flea control and keep them away from ground squirrel habitat, if possible.”

People are being asked to avoid wild rodents, and also to take sick pets to the vet, particularly if they may have had contact with sick or dead rodents in the desert areas south and east of Boise and Mountain Home. Plague can cause serious illness in pets, particularly in cats.

In 2015, an Idaho dog tested positive for plague, and in 2016, six cats contracted the disease, mostly from the Mountain Home area. Ground squirrel die-offs were reported from the disease in the desert south of the Boise Airport and around Mountain Home in 2015 and 2016.

source:
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Rabies: Preventable and rare, but very deadly

By Max Cohan Jun 25, 2018 Local News 8

Pocatello, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – When most people hear the word ‘rabies,’ they either think of raccoons or people foaming at the mouth.

While this isn’t necessarily the wrong way to look at it, there are other things people should know.

For one, bats make up the largest portion of the rabies reservoir in Idaho. Bats won’t generally make an attempt to bite or attack you, but if you wake up with a bat in your room or house, that is grounds to go see a doctor.

It is also very important for people to know that you must capture the animal you suspect to be rabid. This is the way doctors can check and actually see whether or not you were exposed.

continued:
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Judge: Agency failed to justify Idaho wildlife-killing plans

By Keith Ridler – 6/26/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — A federal agency’s justifications for killing coyotes and mountain lions and other predators in Idaho to protect livestock and other wildlife such as elk violate environmental laws because they lack a scientific review, a federal court has ruled.

U.S. District Court Judge B. Lynn Winmill in a decision Friday said the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s reasons for not doing the scientific review “were not convincing or objective.”

The Agriculture Department’s Wildlife Services kills and removes predators that kill livestock in many states, especially in the U.S. West. In Idaho, the agency killed nearly 4,000 coyotes in 2016.

continued:
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Mid June, 2018
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US proposes shrinking last endangered red wolf habitat

By Jonathan Drew – 6/27/18 AP

Raleigh, N.C. — The Trump administration announced a proposal Wednesday to shrink the habitat of the only endangered red wolves left in the wild, and to give landowners more leeway to kill any of the animals that stray onto private property.

Conservation groups call the proposal an extinction sentence that would doom the very last wild wolves.

“Wolves don’t read maps,” said Ben Prater, southeast program director of the non-profit Defenders of Wildlife.

continued:
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter June 29, 2018

Wolf Attacks Two Children in Poland
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Biologists begin grizzly bear research trapping in Caribou-Targhee National Forest

Jun 27, 2018 Local News 8

Island Park, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Idaho Fish and Game officials will be trapping grizzly bears for research in the Upper Snake Region until the end of August.

This research is part of on-going efforts required by the 2016 Conservation Strategy for the Grizzly Bear in the Yellowstone Ecosystem to monitor grizzly bears.

When trapping operations are being conducted, the area around the trap site will be marked with bright warning and closure signs.

It is important you respect these signs and not enter posted areas.

continued:
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Grizzly bear advocates aim to buy hunting licenses

AP Jun 26, 2018

Jackson, Wyo. (AP) – Wyoming’s planned grizzly bear hunt this fall is structured in a way that allows the possibility of disruption by those opposed to the hunt.

And wildlife activist Lisa Robertson says that is what she plans to do by applying for one of the limited number of tags although she has no intention of hunting a bear.

The Jackson Hole News & Guide reports the maneuver amounts to a form of legal protest against the state’s planned grizzly bear hunt this fall.

continued:
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Moose on the loose in Rigby

Local News 8 Jun 25, 2018

Rigby, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Rigby Police Department says there have been several reports of a moose running throughout Rigby.

Officials said the moose may have been struck by a vehicle and may be injured and scared.

Police ask you be careful around the animal.

continued w/video:
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Horses can make facial expressions like humans

Horses can make 17 facial movements

By Bianca Britton Jun 26, 2018 Local News 8

Over time, we’ve learned how to read the body language of horses — from understanding whether the movement of its ears, head, legs and tail mean its relaxed, anxious, angry or alert.

But it turns out horses are capable of pulling faces just like humans, too — which may shed more light on what they’re feeling.

In fact, horses can make 17 facial movements — which is at least three more than our relatives, the chimpanzees, and just 10 less than humans.

continued:
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Section of South Cole Road lined with dead birds

by Scott Logan Friday, June 29th 2018

Near Kuna, Idaho (KBOI) — A section of South Cole Road south of Kuna is literally littered with the bodies of hundreds of young gulls who are hit and killed by traffic.

The gulls are nesting across the road at an evaporation pond.

What’s happening is many of the young birds are learning to fly and they’re not flying that well as they come across the road and are struck and killed by traffic.

continued:
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Salmon numbers in Idaho take a nose dive

Steve Liebenthal Jun 27, 2018 KIVI TV

Riggins, Idaho – It has been 20 years since the push for breaching dams to save salmon was gaining traction in the Pacific Northwest. But, in the last few years, fish returns have taken a nose dive.

Three years ago, Kerry Brennan turned his Riggins guide shop into a tackle shop. It was his retirement plan after 30 years guiding anglers who wanted to catch salmon and steelhead. But, his timing was not good. For the second year in a row, the fishing season is being cut short.

This year’s return of spring Chinook salmon from the Pacific Ocean is the worst this century. The result, for river communities like Riggins, is a major decrease in money spent by salmon anglers.

continued:
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Boise man cited after poaching a sturgeon below Swan Falls Dam

by KBOI News Staff Thursday, June 28th 2018


(Photo courtesy Idaho Fish and Game)

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — A two-foot white sturgeon was caught below Swan Falls Dam on the Snake River by a Boise man who has now been cited for keeping the fish.

A Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) call triggered the investigation.

32-year-old Michael Melton caught the sturgeon on Jun 17, and placed the fish in his vehicle. Moments later, Idaho Fish and Game says another angler told Melton that sturgeon fishing on the river was catch and release only.

According to Idaho Fish and Game, Melton ignored the angler and left the area.

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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
June 29, 2018
Issue No. 877
Table of Contents

* U.S. House Approves Bill Streamlining Sea Lion Removal Process For Columbia River, Tributaries
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441026.aspx

* With Run Downgrade, Summer Chinook Fishing Below Bonneville Dam Ends Early; Sockeye Far Above Forecast
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441025.aspx

* Corps’ Second Spill Report To Court Details Impacts Of High Flows, Involuntary Spill In May
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441024.aspx

* Spill Begins Late At Detroit Dam To Aid Wild Spring Chinook, Steelhead In North Santiam River
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441023.aspx

* Research Shows How Large Numbers Of Hatchery Pink Salmon Impacting Food Availability In Northern Seas
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441022.aspx

* Commission Selects Kelly Susewind As New Washington Department Of Fish And Wildlife Director
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441021.aspx

* Groups Amend Court Filing In Effort To End Hatchery Releases In North, South Santiam Rivers
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441020.aspx

* Council: Regional Power Supply Good For Two More Years, More Capacity Needed After 2022
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441019.aspx

* Deschutes River Alliance Amends Complaint In Clean Water Case As PGE Argues Dismissal
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441018.aspx

* NOAA Fisheries Using Saildrones To Gather Data On West Coast Fish Populations
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441017.aspx

* PNNL Researchers Work Toward Systematic Assessment Of Climate Models
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441016.aspx

* Washington Adopts Plan For Evaluating New Ocean Projects, Protecting Fisheries
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441015.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

Lower Salmon River closed to Chinook fishing, Lochsa and North Fork Clearwater will close July 1

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Friday, June 15, 2018

Fish and Game has closed all salmon fishing in the two remaining portions of the Lower Salmon River. The Little Salmon River will reopen to salmon fishing during this next four-day interval, June 28 to July 1.

Fish and Game’s fisheries managers report that by the end of fishing hours on July 1, 2018, the sport fishery harvest for the North Fork Clearwater and Lochsa rivers will have been met, so fishing for Chinook salmon on those rivers will close at the end of fishing hours on Sunday, July 1.

The South Fork of the Salmon River and the Upper Salmon River are open for Chinook fishing under these rules.

* Fishing open seven days per week.
* Bag limits for South Fork of Salmon and Upper Salmon, four per day, of which only two may be adults, and 12 in possession of which six may be adults.

continued:
— —

June 28: Chinook fishing update for South Fork Salmon River and Upper Salmon River

South Fork is in prime shape and fish are throughout the river

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Anglers wanting to fish for Chinook in the South Fork of the Salmon River better get there soon because the harvest share may not last until Fourth of July.

Fisheries manager Dale Allen said within four days of the season opener 25 percent of the harvest share of about 700 fish had already been caught. Some fish have arrived at the fish trap, and they’re distributed throughout the river.

Allen noted the number of anglers has been going up and the angling hours per fish caught has been inching down, and if those trends continue, the season could be over before the Fourth of July.

continued:
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New laws taking effect July 1 pertain to trespassing, animal salvage, and trapper education

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Monday, June 25, 2018

Hunters, anglers and trappers should familiarize themselves with new laws

Many new Idaho laws that passed in the last legislative session take effect July 1, including laws that affect outdoor recreationists, including hunters, anglers and trappers.

New trespass law

Idaho’s new trespass law changes July 1 and people are now required to have written permission or other lawful permissions to enter private property.

continued:
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F&G officers continuing search for wounded grizzly bear near Kilgore

People should be cautious in the area around McGarry Canyon, where bear was recently spotted

By James Brower, Regional Volunteer Coordinator
Saturday, June 30, 2018

On Friday, June 29, Idaho Fish & Game Conservation Officers along with law enforcement officers from the U.S. Forest Service responded to reports of an injured grizzly bear in the West Camas Creek drainage near Kilgore, Idaho. Attempts to locate the bear Friday were unsuccessful and resumed early Saturday morning.

“We received a report from a camper in the McGarry Canyon area that said he had sighted the bear,” Fish and Game regional supervisor Jim White said.

Local agency personnel are continuing to search the area. Wildlife officials have placed several live traps in the area in an effort to capture the injured grizzly. Although the animal may have moved on, White encourages people to be cautious and use “Bear Aware” safety techniques in the area.

The Dubois District of the U.S. Forest Service is considering a closure order for the McGarry Canyon area. Go to the Caribou Targhee National Forest website for travel closure information.

source:
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Michigan golfer attacked by goose: ‘I started sprinting’

Hasan Dudar, Detroit Free Press April 25, 2018

Detroit — Soon after a high school golfer teed off on the 7th hole at the Wolf Creek Golf Course on Saturday, he was met by the wrath of a teed-off Canada goose.

Isaac Couling, 16, said as he was walking to his ball, he saw a female goose under a tree and he tried to avoid her because he didn’t want to rile her up.

“And then I look behind me and there’s a goose flying about five feet from me, and that’s when I started sprinting in the first photo,” Couling said.

continued:
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Hazardous golf: Utah couple flees lumbering moose

by The Associated Press Friday, June 1st 2018

Park City, Utah (AP) — A Utah couple ran into a different sort of hazard during a round of golf on Memorial Day near Salt Lake City.

A young moose bigger than their golf cart chased them off the links at the Park City Golf Club.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:


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Tips & Advice:

A Guide To Mosquito Repellents, From DEET To … Gin And Tonic?

June 30, 2018 Susan Brink – NPR

People do the darnedest things in hopes of avoiding mosquito bites. They burn cow dung, coconut shells or coffee. They drink gin and tonic. They eat bananas. They spray themselves with mouthwash or slather themselves in clove/alcohol solution. And they rub themselves with Bounce. “You know, those heavily perfumed sheets you put in your dryer,” says Dr. Immo Hansen, professor at the Institute of Applied Biosciences at New Mexico State University.

None of those techniques have been tested to see if they actually keep mosquitoes away. But that doesn’t stop people from trying them, according to a study that will be published this summer by Hansen and colleague, Stacey Rodriguez, lab manager at the Hansen Lab at NMSU, which studies ways to prevent mosquito-borne diseases. They and colleagues asked 5,000 people what they did to protect themselves against mosquitoes. Most used conventional mosquito repellents.

Then researchers asked about their traditional home remedies. That’s when the cow dung and dryer sheets came out. In interviews, Hansen and Rodriguez shared some of the responses they received. Their paper will be published this summer in the peer-reviewed journal PeerJ.

Beyond folklore and traditional remedies, there are proven ways to protect against mosquitoes and the diseases they carry.

continued:
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June 24, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

June 24, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
June 25 Dust Abatement Application. Please have your vehicles off the street that morning.
June 29-30 Live Music at The Corner
June 30 Golf Tournament
July 4 Parade 2pm
July 4 (after Parade) Ice Cream Sundaes
July 4 Fireworks at dusk
July 4 Live Music at The Corner
July 6-7 Live Music at The Corner
July 7 Community Hall Yard Sale 9am to Noon
July 7 YPWUA meeting 2pm, Community Hall
July 14 at 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
July 19 Noxious Weed Day
July 21 10am CPR Class at the Fire Station
July 26 Festival planning meeting
July 28 Ride to Roosevelt
August 3, 4, 5 Music and Harmonica Festival
August 11 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 8 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Budget Hearing
September 8 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting

(details below)
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Village News:

12th Annual Yellow Pine Vet Clinic

20180620DrRubelShadow-b
(photo by Local Color Photography)

Dr. Keith Ruble and crew from Cascade Vet Clinic were in Yellow Pine on Wednesday June 20th. (They were a little late due to an emergency in Cascade.) Several locals brought their cats and dogs down to see the Vet, receive a thorough examination and get up to date on vaccinations (along with a few cookies.) A total of 8 cats and 7 dogs were seen at the Pioneer Street location, then the crew headed up to Main Street to see 6 more dogs and another cat up at the Post Office.

Many thanks to Dr. Ruble and Jenny for making the yearly journey to the little village of Yellow Pine and for taking such good care of our critters.
— — — —

Community Hall Clean Up update

Thanks goes to Dan Stiff for helping Terry with the grass cutting. Thanks to Deb Filler for the help with cleaning windows. Also thanks to Deb and Cindy Holford for help with cleaning the first refrigerator. Also a big thanks to Terry Hall for the repair, sanding, and painting of all 8 picnic tables. We still have more weed whipping to be done as grass grows.

– KH
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Community Hall Ice Cream Sundae Sale

20180623-IceCream-a

The Ice Cream sale during the Highland Games [June 23] was good. Our gross were sales $196.00..

We will be reviewing all input prior to the sale on the 4th of July. Thanks to Ronda Rogers, Deb Filler and Joan Brockett for all your help.

– KH
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Highland Games June 23

20180623HighlandGames-a

It was a day of “Throwing Rocks, Sticks, & Hammers”.

There was more than just skirts flying as the kilted competitors put their muscles to the test at the Highland Games in Yellow Pine.

In their original form many centuries ago, Highland Games revolved around athletic and sports competitions. Though other activities were always a part of the festivities, many today still consider Highland athletics to be what the games are all about — in short, that the athletics are the Games, and all the other activities are just entertainment. Regardless, it remains true today that the athletic competitions are at least an integral part of the events and one — the caber toss — has come to almost symbolize the Highland games.

Thanks to Steve & Sue Holloway for organizing this event to benefit the Helispot for Yellow Pine.

Thanks to the Village of Yellow Pine for cooking the breakfasts, being gracious hosts and spectators to the athletes, their family, and friends.

– AF
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Dust Abatement Application June 25

Dust Abatement is Monday, June 25th. Please have your vehicles off the street that morning.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not dump household appliances at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

However, there is a burn pile for woody debris only. “Bring it, Don’t Burn it.”
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Pests

Reports that ticks are still active, mosquitoes and no-see-ums are out. Pine pollen is not as bad the last few days. Remember to secure your trash, bears are hungry.
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Local Events:

4th of July Golf Tournament June 30th

Our 20th annual Yellow Pine Golf Tournament will take place on June 30th 2018. The proceeds will go towards the Yellow Pine Medical Training and Supply Fund. By giving to this annual event, you’ll be supporting the village of Yellow Pine and our growing EMS service.

Thanks to Cascade Fire/EMS Fire Commissioners, Chief Steve Hull and the EMS Director Keri Donica, Yellow Pine is now a Cascade Fire/EMS Paramedic Ambulance Sub-station. This allows us to have equipment available in Yellow Pine to treat and care for patients in the field, not only First Aid but Advanced Life Support. Yellow Pine now has Nationally Registered: 4 EMR’s, 1 RN-EMT, and 1 Paramedic in Yellow Pine.

The cost for the event is $20/person or $50 will give you a sponsorship and pay for 2 players!

As a sponsor, your name will be put on a plaque, or you can provide your own sign for the event. This plaque will be posted on one of our 18 holes during the tournament.

To reserve a place in the tournament please contact Jeff or Ann Forster @ aforsterrn@aol.com or call (208) 633-1010.

You can mail your payments to: P.O. Box 38 Yellow Pine, ID. 83677.

Please make checks payable to “Cascade Fire EMS” attn: YP Golf Tournament.

Thanks in advance for your consideration.

Sincerely,
Jeff Forster – Paramedic & Ann Forster – BS, RN, EMT
Event Coordinators
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Weekend of June 30th

Live Music at The Corner – Folk Family Revival
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4th of July

Parade at 2pm

Independence Day Parade will be Wednesday, July 4th at 2pm.

If you want to be in the parade, meet near the Fire House at 1:30pm. All family-friendly entries are welcome.

If you need decorations for your pet, bike, ATV, trailer, car, whatever, they will be available near the Fire House at noon.

After the parade, Ice Cream Sundaes will be for sale. $3 for one scoop; $4 for two scoop; your choice of toppings. Proceeds support the Community Hall.

Fireworks at Dusk

Live Music at The Corner – Folk Family Revival
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Yard Sale – Saturday, July 7 from 9am-Noon

The garage sale is July 7th from 9-noon. Everyone can bring their items anytime to the community hall. I will have a space marked for the items.

Please remember this is a Donation and Everything Must Work.

If you want your items back if they don’t sell you must pick them up at 12:30 on July 7th.

The proceeds of the Garage Sale will go to the maintenance of the Community Hall.

If you have questions please call Kathy Hall at 208 633 6270 or text to 630 915 1544

Thank you everyone for your support of the Yellow Pine Community Hall.

– KH
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Weekend July 7th

Live Music at The Corner – Willie and the Singlewides
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July 19 (free) Noxious Weed Day

Steve has scheduled his visit to Yellow Pine for Thursday July 19th. The staging area will be the Fire Department. He will bring up the Chemicals and spray equipment. Backpack sprayers, pump up sprayers, ATV tanks and he needs to know how many of these we need. He will leave everything there for the weekend and pick it all up Monday. Please call Kathy Hall 208 633-6270 for forms and information.

link to form:
Steve Anderson from Valley County Weed Control
Office: (208)382-7199
e-mail: SAnderson @ co.valley.id.us
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Jul 28, 2018 Ride to Roosevelt

$20.00/vehicle

The ride will leave from the Yellow Pine Community Hall at 10 am. After leaving town, riders will head up Stibnite Road. Approximately 45 minutes later there will be a short pause at the “Glory Hole” in Stibnite; with information provided by Midas Gold Idaho. The ride continues up and over Monumental Summit (NF-375) – there is a monument at the summit with information about the area. Over Monumental Summit, the ride heads for the Roosevelt Trail Head. Lunch will be served at the trail head. The riders will return to Yellow Pine via the same route.

There are opportunities to see old mine sites (along the route); the town site of Roosevelt (after a short hike); side trails; and wildlife.

This out-and-back ride is expected to take about 6 hours.
https://www.ypescapade.org/atv-utv-events
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Shareholder’s meeting July 7 at 2pm in the Community Hall.

Please remember, no outside watering on weekends or holidays.
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VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting June 9, 2018

Officers in Attendance: Deb Filler Chairman, Lorinne Munn Secretary, Joel Fields Treasurer, Kathy Hall Member at Large. Lynne Imel Vice Chair was absent. Also in Attendance 13 other members of the community and Belinda Provancher from Midas Gold.

Meeting was called to order at 2PM by Deb Filler Chairman.

Minutes of the September 9th 2017 meeting were approved as posted by Lorinne Munn.

Joel Fields gave the Treasurer’s report as follows:

a. As of May 31, 2018, Total Community Funds $30,934.47
b. General Village Fund $3,743.15
c. Cemetery Fund $5,432.38
d. Harmonica Fund $14,130.53
e. Community Hall Fund $327.65
f. Restroom Fund $7,300.76
g. $3,000.00 or so of Harmonica money has recently been spent on various supplies, Harmonica posters and Harmonica Festival hats.

Cemetery report by Willie Sullivan: He has repaired the fence and trimmed trees and will mow the lawn tomorrow. He is ordering signs that say, No Camping, as there has been a problem with this. The plot realignment is in the final stages. He will be placing stakes with a ring on each numbering each stake and lettering each row. The new board he is replacing will express the realignment numbers and letters. A headstone is in the works for a recent double burial. The Parks family has installed a Monument Bench in the corner above the Welch plot. The cemetery road will soon be graded by the county. Elections for Cemetery Commissioners is coming up. Willie and Candy Sullivan are declining a vote next month to continue as commissioners. They are letting Deb know so that can be reflected on the ballot.

Willie Sullivan also mentioned this is the Sullivan’s last year for running the Yellow Pine Fireworks. Someone is needed to collect monies to run the fireworks. Working with the Heck Family from Rocky Mountain Fur and Fireworks to purchase insurance for the event. Purchasing the fireworks, of which the Heck Family has always donated a portion of the fireworks. Picking up the fireworks, and also setting up and lighting the fireworks while working with our Fire Department to do so. Matt Huber expressed an interest in knowing more about the program.

Kathy Hall gave the Community Hall report: A Community Hall cleanup is scheduled for June 12. Help is needed with washing windows, cutting grass and painting the picnic tables which Terry Hall has repaired and sanded. The inventory reflects 3 or 4 tables short of the white folding tables. Please let us know where they might be. The chili contest this last winter brought in $60.00, The recent Rally brought in $500.00 after $100.00 in prize money was deducted. The Rally also connected Yellow Pine with a different group of folks that are now interested in Yellow Pine. This has led to scheduling a ride to Roosevelt “The Yellow Pine Escapades” scheduled for July 28. This ride is to get folks acquainted with the area. They will leave Yellow Pine at 10Am on to Stibnite where Midas Gold will speak at the Glory Hole, then on to Roosevelt. At the trailhead Lynn Imel will speak about history of the area, and a lunch will be served, provided for by Midas Gold. Invitations to this ride are being sent out to the Rally folks, who are also involved in the ATV, UTV Clubs of Idaho. The Ride is on the website ypescapade.org. Other fundraising plans are to cook the breakfasts for the Highland Games on June 23 and 24, and to sell Ice Cream Sundays at the 4th of July Celebration. A Community Yard Sale is also being planned for July 7 please bring your items to the Community Hall, and also please come to the Yard Sale. The monies from all of these efforts now over $700.00 will be used to paint the Community Hall once the bathrooms are in place. To install linoleum in the kitchen near the grilling area. To purchase some more of the white folding tables, and maybe have a better heater installed.

Lorinne Munn gave the Harmonica Festival Report: Lorinne Munn is running the Stage and scheduling the Performers along with help from Deb Filler who is still running the Web Site. Deb has also agreed to continue with the Harmonica Workshop and the Parade. Dawn Brown is Co-Leading with Lorinne and focusing on the Booths. Thank You Deb, for continuing on, advising both Lorinne and Dawn. Things appear to be going on schedule with the folks from the last few years still running the various parts of festival activities. Marj Fields is continuing with the T Shirts, please sign up to help with a shift at the souvenir booth. Joel Fields is still our Treasurer and helping with our charging system. Bill and Lorraine McIntosh are continuing with running the Pulled Pork Dinner at the School House, and collecting items for the Auction please see them for your donations. Sherry Gordon is still running the Auction. Heather and Matt will continue running the Huff and Puff Race. Lynn Imel is still scheduled for Bingo at the Community Hall. We still have no one to head up the Harmonica Breakfast as we have sadly lost Cinda DeBoise, we are so grateful to her years of service. I do have several helpers signed up just looking for a leader. Something new this year is a planned Children’s area up at Cindy Fortin’s Huckleberry area.

Deb Filler brought up Dust Abatement. It will be provided the week of June 25th. It is now $1.58 per gallon up 2 cents from last year. See Deb 208 633-6945 to be put on the list for Abatement.

This was the 3rd and final reading of the motion to change the By Laws so the offices of Harmonica and Chairperson of the Village of Yellow Pine Association cannot be held concurrently by the same Officer. This would be added to section 7.3. The vote will be taken in August.

Old Business

Deb Filler covered the ditch situation. During the fall it was discussed to continue funding for the ditch treatment that was engineered a few years ago. Ditches further up hill had been dug out at that time. Dave McClintock was given $600.00 to finish up the section behind the Community Hall, the area bordering the Kuenzli place and the ditch along Sarge’s place. Dan Stiff pointed out that now access to his property has been blocked off by the dirt left from the ditch digging. Deb Filler said it was so late in the year when the digging was done that the dirt wasn’t removed. She also suggested it was now on Dan’s property and was his responsibility to remove the dirt. Which Dan says the ditch is not on his property, it is in the Right of Way Access to his property. Ann Forster said why can’t we work as a community to solve this problem. Willie Sullivan said he has a culvert that might work. Candy Sullivan said she needs dirt for fill in her yard. Matt Huber suggested there is a lack of oversight on maintenance of the ditches. Willie Sullivan made a motion for the council to form an ad hoc committee to explore the cost to repair the public access on Pioneer Street and report back, Ann Forster seconded the motion, motion was passed. Matt Huber, Tim Rogers and Dan Stiff volunteered to be on the ad hoc committee. Matt Huber and Cecil Dallman gave ideas as to how to work together removing the dirt and getting gravel for over the culvert at Dan Stiff’s property. Joel Fields suggested we create a Road and Ditch Maintenance fund. Willie Sullivan made a motion that we create a Road and Ditch Maintenance fund and Dan Stiff seconded the motion, the motion was passed. Joel Fields suggested the council look at the general fund and determine where excess money can be placed to use for the Road and Ditch fund, looking at this at the September meeting. Willie Sullivan suggested we set up the guidelines and document where the money can be used.

Willie Sullivan reported on progress towards building of the bathrooms at the Community Hall. He said the plans have just been submitted to the county. There was an issue with the snow load that is being addressed. Construction will begin as soon as there is approval from the county.

New Business

Ann Forster volunteered to head up the Nominating Committee to select candidates for the offices of Vice Chairman and Secretary, the terms that are up this year. The voting for these offices will be held at the July meeting.

Kathy Hall introduced the Noxious Weed Program to the group. She said the County will drop off the chemicals and equipment on Thursday July 19 and pick up the equipment on the following Monday July 23. Please contact Kathy 208 633-6270 if you are interested in controlling the noxious weeds on your property.

Willie Sullivan, Cecil Dallman and Lorinne Munn gave a presentation on the proposed Alternative Routes around the Stibnite Gold Project. Lynn Imel also on the committee was absent. Midas Gold and our Yellow Pine committee have presented 2 alternate routes to be added to The Midas Gold proposal to the Forest Service. So far this addition to their proposal seems positive. The 2 routes are to the west of the proposed pit. Midas Gold has asked our committee to present to the Yellow Pine residents their desire to form a Community Partnership Program which would include communities in Valley County as well as a few in Adams and Idaho County. This group would have one representative from each community which seems positive to be represented on an equal basis. This group would be the liaison between Midas Gold and the respective communities. An added proposal is the formation of a Midas Gold Foundation which would be an avenue in which monies are dispersed to the communities for projects Midas can support. An additional or the same representative would be chosen by the communities involved. Midas Gold is asking for letters of support for the Midas Gold Project from the signatories of these programs. Midas Gold will be making a presentation to the Yellow Pine Community on these proposals on July 14th in Yellow Pine, at our Association meeting.

Meeting was adjourned at 3:44PM by Deb Filler.

Next meeting is July 14, 2018.

Submitted by Lorinne N. Munn,
Secretary Yellow Pine Association

VYPA Summer Meeting Schedule:

July 14, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
August 11, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 8, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
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YPFD News:

CPR Training Class

CPR class coming to YP July 21st 10am at the Fire Station (includes AED). If interested please notify Jeff or Ann.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911@ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

YP Fire Budget Hearing: September 8, 2018 – 10am Community Hall

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

The Helispot needs a lot of work and a base needs to be put down before officially being used. I’m currently in discussion with some folks to help with the ground prep and to put the base down. Life Flight and other agencies will need to do an inspection as well before using the helispot.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

Jeff F.

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
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2018 Festival:

June 22 4pm Festival meeting Community Hall
The last planning meeting will be July 26

August 3, 4, 5 Music and Harmonica Festival
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Now open for summer (208) 633-3377
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Yellow Pine Tavern

Summer Hours: 8am to close, 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine.
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The Corner 633-3325

Live music for Independence Day, both weekends. Folk Family Revival will be here the weekend before and on the actual fourth. Willie and the Singlewides will be the weekend after the fourth.

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Local Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
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Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430

We have a great price on wild bird seed. $19.99 for a 50 lb bag. 12.99 for a 25 lb bag. We also sell suet blocks (peanut crunch, and cherry) for $1.99 per block. Niger Thistle seed $13.25 for 5 lbs.
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling (208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho
Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (June 18) rain last night, overnight low of 43 degrees, overcast this morning. Finches, robins and a clarks nutcracker calling. Low rough sounding airplane at 939am. Cloudy cool morning and early afternoon, high of 67 degrees. Cassins finches, pine siskins, little woodpecker, red-breasted nuthatch, jays and hummingbirds visiting today. Two babies (and 4 eggs) in the swallow nest, both parents feeding, cleaning and keeping them warm. Very windy after 4pm, rain showers late afternoon, then again in the early evening. Mourning dove calling to the east around sundown. Light rain showers late evening. Robins chirping just before full dark.

Tuesday (June 19) rain early this morning, overnight low of 49 degrees, low overcast sitting down on the ridges. Flock of finches at the feeders, mourning dove visiting, red-naped sapsucker drumming on the power pole, swallows swooping for feathers and bringing bugs to the hatchlings. Third swallow egg hatched this morning in the nest we are watching. Jays joined the finches at the feeders after lunch, hummingbirds are active (finch trying to drink sugar water!) Little buck with velvety nubbins visiting yards in the neighborhood. Rain shower after 2pm, high of 68 degrees. Cool cloudy evening. Robins and swallows calling at dusk.

Wednesday (June 20) overnight low of 50 degrees, clear sky this morning. County road grader on main street early and airplanes buzzing about. Finches, pine siskins and evening grosbeaks visiting, swallows flying low, bringing bugs to the hatchlings. Three babies and 3 unhatched eggs in the nest this morning. Very low (gray) airplane circled over just after 1020am. Dark clouds building from the south. Red-naped sapsucker drumming on the power pole, Eurasian collared dove hanging out with the chickens and a female yellow-headed blackbird joined the finches and grosbeaks at the feeders. Doe on the edge of the forest, browsing down west side of the road. The Vet Clinic was successful, 8 cats and 7 dogs were examined and received vaccinations at the first stop, then the crew headed ‘up town’ to see more pets. Cloudy and humid mid-day, almost felt drops of rain, high of 75 degrees. Cool pleasant evening, robins sound happy.

Thursday (June 21) overnight low of 49 degrees. Thunderstorm 7am-9am, very loud thunder at 822am. Robins calling, red-naped sapsucker drumming on the power pole. Finches, pine siskins and grosbeaks visiting. Three chicks and three unhatched eggs in the swallow nest, the biggest is getting stripes of down feathers. Flickers are feeding babies in their nest box and a female hairy woodpecker enjoying the beef suet. Jays and a golden mantel squirrel also raiding the seed feeders. Eurasian collared dove hanging out with the chickens. Loud shooting to the west started at 155pm, sounded like it was on the west edge of the golf course. Gusty winds after 2pm and mostly cloudy, high of 74 degrees. Rough sounding airplane at 247pm (windy.) Shooting to the west started up again at 254pm. Rain showers and thunder rumbling in the afternoon and more rain early evening.

Friday (June 22) overnight low of 47 degrees, almost clear sky this morning. Rough sounding low flying airplane circled over around 930am. Red-breasted nuthatches and finches visiting, red-naped sapsucker drumming on the power pole, swallows swooping low hunting feathers (and bugs.) Warm, cloudy and muggy mid-day, high of 78 degrees. Afternoon wind storm brought a little rain before 6pm (and a report of a tree down blocking the EFSF road, it had been drug out of the road that evening.) Partly clear and mild at sunset, robins calling.

Saturday (June 23) overnight low of 42 degrees, mostly cloudy sky this morning. Several loud airplanes over the village, increasing traffic on the ground. Swallows swooping for feathers, chicks in the nest growing fast, parents bringing big bugs. A few finches and a red-breasted nuthatch at the feeders, colombian and golden mantel ground squirrels running about. Lots of people in town this weekend, Highland Games uptown. Shooting to the west around 245pm. Cool breezes and partly cloudy evening, high of 72 degrees. Robins calling at dusk. Moon in conjunction with Jupiter at 10pm.

Sunday (June 24) overnight low of 43 degrees, partly clear sky this morning and warming up quickly. A few loud airplanes flying over, several more parked at the airstrip. Finches and robins calling this morning, pine siskins and jays at the feeders, swallows swooping low for feathers (the babies in the nest are growing fast), looks like the flicker chicks are getting ready to fledge (large male chick poking his head out of the nest hole), red-naped sapsucker drumming on the power pole. Warm afternoon, mostly blue sky with a few clouds, high of 82 degrees. Airplanes going over during the heat of the day, streets drying out and getting a little dusty from the traffic. A few finches calling and red-breasted nuthatches tapping. Female hummer buzzing about this evening.
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Idaho News:

Yellow Pine to host full schedule of holiday events

The Star-News June 21, 2018

The tiny community of Yellow Pine east of McCall will host a full slate of Independence Day events.

The annual Fourth of July Parade will begin at 2 p.m. Wednesday, July 4 and the day will end with fireworks at dusk.

The 20th annual Yellow Pine Golf Tournament will take place on Saturday, June 30 with proceeds to go towards the Yellow Pine Medical Training and Supply Fund.

The cost for the event is $20 per person or $50 will buy a sponsorship and play for two players.

To reserve a place in the tournament please contact Jeff or Ann Forster at aforsterrn@aol.com or call 208-633-1010.

The Corner in Yellow Pine will host live music by the band Folk Family Revival on three nights. The band will perform starting at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, June 29-30, and Wednesday, July 4, after the fireworks.

source:
Note: There will be Ice Cream Sundaes after the Parade to support the Community Hall.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Two Payette Lake lots lessees lose homes in auction

Two others had to bid far above minimum to hold onto homes

By Ben Fletcher for The Star-News June 21, 2018

Tears welled-up in Donna Day’s eyes on Friday when multiple groups submitted competing bids and she realized her long-time McCall vacation home was gone.

The half-acre lot at 997 Chipmunk Trail eventually sold for $220,000, or $124,000 above the required minimum bid.

But Day and her son, Andrew Jacobs, had already left the room.

“It was above what an old Idaho family can afford,” Jacobs said.

The scene took place at the Stueckle Sky Center at Bronco Stadium at Boise State University, where nine state-leased cottage sites on Payette Lake were sold at a public auction by the Idaho Department of Lands.

A second state lessee lost out to a competing bid and two other lessees had to spend tens of thousands of dollars more than the appraised value of the lots in order to hold onto them.

Jacobs said the Boise family had occupied the lot since 1912.

continued:
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Hawkins to serve 30 days in jail for auto death of wife, son

Investigators say car was moving at least 89 mph when crash occurred

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News June 21, 2018

A McCall man on Tuesday was sentenced to 30 days in jail and 600 hours of community service stemming from an auto accident last August that left his wife and child dead.

Devin Hawkins pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor vehicular manslaughter charge on Tuesday in Valley County Magistrate Court.

Valley County Magistrate Lamont Berecz sentenced Hawkins to 90 days in jail, but gave Hawkins 10 hours of community service for each of the 60 days of the sentence.

He is required to serve the 30 remaining days in jail within 120 days.

continued:
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30-year-old Nampa woman killed in Highway 55 crash near Banks

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, June 20th 2018


Idaho State Troopers and Boise County Sheriff’s deputies responded to a multi-vehicle crash in Banks at the intersection of State Highway 55 and County Highway 17.

Banks, Idaho (KBOI) — A 30-year-old Nampa woman died on Wednesday after a multiple vehicle crash along Highway 55.

Idaho State Police says Kristine Stapleton was stopped at the intersection of Highway 17 (Banks-Lowman) when she failed to yield to traffic as she turned onto Highway 55. She was struck by a Ford passenger van towing a trailer.

Stapleton died at the scene of the crash.

Twelve children were in the van that were part of an out-of-state group going to McCall on a rafting trip. Six of those children were taken to St. Alphonsus with minor injuries.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Intersection along Idaho 55 has deadly history

Some believe more safety measures should be installed at the intersection of Banks-Lowman Road and Idaho 55.

Gretchen Parsons KTVB June 21, 2018

Banks, Idaho – The latest deadly car crash at a notoriously dangerous intersection in Boise County has a lot of people agreeing it’s time to make the crossing safer.

It’s the intersection right where Banks-Lowman Road meets Idaho 55 about 30 miles north of Boise.

“People speed through here, it’s incredible,” says Linda Bayliss who works at the cafe nearby the intersection.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Be Careful Out There!

Give full attention to driving and speed limits. Hwy 55 is very busy during the summer.

Incident: Daily Ops 2018

Details: There was a one vehicle accident at MM 55 on Hwy 55 this morning between 6 and 7 am. The vehicle rolled and was upside down for about an hour. The IC (Jason Gifford with HSB fire) said there was about 10 gallons of diesel and oil combined spilled next to the roadway. Vehicle was headed southbound but ended up on the northbound side. HSB fire applied material to soak up what they could and ACT towing cleaned that up. Contact POC if more information is needed.

CO 6B Emergency Coordinator – bob.showalter at 09:22:08 on 06/21/2018

source: Boise County Connection
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Burglar strikes businesses in New Meadows, Riggins

The Star-News June 21, 2018


(Idaho County Sheriff)

Police are looking for a Florida man who is a suspect in the burglaries of the Kahili Club in New Meadows and four businesses in Riggins.

Joseph Coleman Hodge, 55, of Jacksonville, Fla., is a “person of interest” in the burglaries, the Idaho County Sheriff’s Office said.

Hodge is believed to be driving a Honda Odyssey van displaying a Florida license plate. The van appears to have been home spray painted dark blue or black, the sheriff’s office said.

Hodge is a suspect in the June 13 burglary at the Kahili Club where entry was made by breaking a door, the Adams County Sheriff’s Office said.

The Idaho Lottery dispenser in the club was broken into, along with the tavern’s till, the sheriff’s office said. The amount of money taken was not disclosed.

The break-in was estimated to have occurred between midnight and 9 a.m.

Earlier on June 13, River Adventures, River Rock Café, Canyon Creamery, and Wilderness Eatery in Riggins all reported break-ins and money taken from cash drawers and in money bags, the Idaho County sheriff said.

Anyone with information on Hodge should call the Idaho County Sheriff’s Office at 208-983-1100.

source:
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Valley County accepts unwanted pesticides by appointment

The Star-News June 21, 2018

Valley County residents can properly dispose of old, unwanted pesticides by taking them to the Valley County Weed and Pest Control Offices near Cascade.

Residents must call and make an appointment to hand over their items, such as rat, weed and bug killers. Pesticides must be in their original, labeled containers.

The offices are located at 55 Gold Dust Road south of Cascade. To make an appointment, call 208-315-0368 or 208-382-7199 or write to Sanderson@co.valley.id.us

source:
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Central Idaho city eyes avalanche-zone rental homes

6/23/18 AP

Ketchum, Idaho — Officials in the central Idaho town of Ketchum have approved doing an inventory of homes within avalanche zones not engineered to withstand avalanches and discussing the appropriate restrictions as rentals.

The Idaho Mountain Express reports that the Ketchum City Council on Monday approved the inventory work by city workers.

City officials say they’ve identified 132 single-family homes in avalanche zones.

continued:
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Health Advisory issued at Little Camas Reservoir due to blue-green algae

by KBOI News Staff Saturday, June 23rd 2018

Mountain Home, Idaho (KBOI) — If you had plans heading to the Little Camas Reservoir in the near future, you might want to think again.

The Central District Health Department said Saturday the Elmore County reservoir is now under a health advisory due to blue-green algae. The toxic-producing organisms can make people and animals sick.

Little Camas is located northeast of Mountain Home off Highway 20. People are encouraged to avoid recreating in or near the water.

If folks do decide to head to the reservoir they’re encouraged to avoid swallowing or inhaling water and avoid direct contact with water containing visible algae. Drinking water from the reservoir is especially dangerous and the toxins cannot be removed by boiling or filtering the water. Children and pets are particularly susceptible to illness related to blue-green algae. If people choose to eat fish from the reservoir, it is recommended that they remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking since toxins are more likely to collect in those tissues.

Blue-green algae blooms occur in water with high levels of nutrients such as phosphorus and nitrogen, often during warmer weather months. The blooms are generally green or blue-green in color, and may form thick mats along shorelines. They may look like surface scum, resembling pea soup and can have an unpleasant odor.

source:
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Idaho family sues US after child sprayed by cyanide trap

By Keith Ridler – 6/19/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — An Idaho couple has sued the U.S. government, saying their teenage son still suffers headaches after a predator-killing trap that federal workers mistakenly placed near their home doused him with cyanide.

Mark and Theresa Mansfield of Pocatello filed the lawsuit Monday in U.S. District Court in Idaho seeking more than $75,000 in economic damages and more than $75,000 for pain and suffering.

Their son, Canyon Mansfield, then 14, was playing with his dog last year when he triggered the trap that the U.S. Department of Agriculture placed to kill coyotes. The dog named Casey started convulsing and then died.

continued:
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Idaho becoming anti-vaccination hot spot

Michelle Edmonds Jun 20, 2018 KIVI TV

Boise, Idaho – Idaho is being labeled as an anti-vaccination hot spot. That’s according to PLOS Medicine, a peer-reviewed journal.

A study, published in the journal, shows eight Idaho counties rank in the nation’s top 10 for kindergartners opting out of vaccinations.

State law allows parents to not have their children vaccinated for medical, religious or philosophical reasons. The number-one opt-out county in the nation is Camas County where 26.7 percent of students coming into school are not immunized.

Valley and Boise counties also checked in, ranking third and seventh nationally. In Idaho, schools have no say over the issue of vaccinations until there is an outbreak.

continued:
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Mining News:

Ask Midas: Is Midas Gold Really Different Than Other Mining Companies?

June 13

Midas Gold Idaho wants to keep the community informed about the work we are doing at the Stibnite Gold Project site. The Ask Midas blog series gives the experts in our company a chance to answer some of the community’s most frequently asked questions and help clear up any misconceptions around the project.

Mining has a long history in Idaho. The Stibnite Mining District alone has seen more than 100 years of activity. When many people think of the Stibnite Gold Project, they try to draw connections to historic operations such as Butte, Montana, the Silver Valley area of the northern Idaho Panhandle and Grouse Creek in south central Idaho, specifically in the Yankee Fork drainage basin. But the Stibnite Gold Project will be very different.

Is the Stibnite Gold Project Going to Be Like Other Mining Projects We’ve Seen Come Before It?

The simplest answer is no. There are multiple reasons, but the primary one relates to changes in perceptions around protecting the environment and the resulting strengthening of regulations for modern mining operations.

Prior to 1970, there were no significant state or federal regulations for environmental protection and reclamation at metallic mines. Pre-modern era mines were designed, built and operated to maximize production and minimize cost. Government and industrial managers did not see environmental pollution as a problem at this time or they simply did not have regulatory authority to do anything about it. For example, many tailings facilities from the pre-regulatory mining era were often designed to release the tailings directly into rivers and streams. Historically, Stibnite was no exception – tailings from former operations at our site were directly deposited in drainages from the early 1920s until 1952.

continued:
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Fire Season:

One Less Spark


— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Fire in central Oregon doubles in size

The smaller fire burning near Culver triggered the mandatory evacuation of about 100 homes.

Associated Press, KGW Staff June 23, 2018

Maupin, Ore. (AP) – Wildfire season in Oregon is underway after a lightning storm sparked at least two major fires that are now burning in the central part of the state.

The smaller of the two fires, called the Graham Fire, burning near Culver, has triggered the evacuation of about 100 homes.

The fire has burned two homes and five other structures, but many were saved by firefighters, the Oregon State Fire Marshal said on Saturday.

continued:
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Public Lands:

BCYPSR Collaborative Meeting Agenda June 28th

6/22/2018

The Big Creek Yellow Pine Salmon River Collaborative will meet next week, Thursday June 28th, from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm at the E.O.C in Cascade.

Attached to the email is an agenda which includes links from the google drive to documents for the meeting.

Josie Greenwood
STEAM and Environmental Educator
UI Valley County Extension Office
501 Kelly’s Parkway Cascade, ID 83611
208-382-7190 | cell 509-939-6562

link: 6-28-18 Agenda.pdf
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Cove Recreation Site upgrades potable water supply

Date: June 20, 2018
Contact: Dave Walsh, 208-384-3393

Grand View, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management announced today that water system improvements to the Cove Recreation Site campground are expected to begin July 9. The campground, located on the south shore of C.J. Strike Reservoir and southeast of Grand View, Idaho, will be upgraded with new freshwater supply lines throughout the recreation site.

The construction work is expected to continue past Labor Day weekend.

During construction, BLM campground managers will make every effort to keep campsites accessible to visitors and minimize construction impacts wherever they can.

“We anticipate that most of the Cove’s campsites will be available this season. But we recommend that visitors contact the BLM office at (208) 384-3300 for updated information,” said Amanda Hoffman, Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area manager.

The Cove Recreation Site campground has 38 campsites.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Craters national park push stalls

June 20, 2018 By Nathan Brown – Post Register

A push to get Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve designated as a national park is on hold, and the idea’s backers aren’t optimistic that it will go anywhere anytime soon given the political situation.

“We kind of had to take a step back for a while,” said Rose Bernal, a Butte County Commissioner who has been helping lead the push for the designation for the past few years.

One reason, she said, is because this is an election year, always a more difficult time to get anything passed. Another, she said, is the political climate in Washington D.C. The Trump administration has been looking to reduce the size and scope of national monuments. While the U.S. Department of the Interior didn’t recommend any changes to Craters after a review late last year, Bernal said now might not be the right time to try to create a new national park.

continued:
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USFS Releases Supplemental Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

June 22, 2018

Ogden, Utah – The Forest Service published a Supplemental Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register this week to create a Draft Environmental Impact Statement, beginning a 30 day comment period. The Forest Service is proposing to amend the Forest Service land management plans that were amended in 2015 regarding greater sage-grouse conservation in the states of Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah. The NOI lists several categories of potential changes, but specific proposed adjustments to the text in the plans can be found for each state at: https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/r4/home/?cid=stelprd3843381. Commenters are encouraged to comment on the textual edits that are being considered.

The purpose of proposed changes are to improve the clarity, efficiency, and implementation of greater sage-grouse plans, including better alignment with Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and state plans, in order to benefit greater sage-grouse conservation on the landscape scale. The agency will use lessons learned from new science, scoping and implementing during the last three years to make revised plans more efficient. Proposed actions are intended to improve sage-grouse conservation and although some management areas, such as Sagebrush Focal Areas may change in name designation, limits to development and other protections will remain.

After reviewing comments to the June 20 NOI, the Forest Service plans to continue the planning process with multi-regional draft and final Environmental Impact Statements, and have plan amendments finalized in the spring of 2019.

To read and comment on the Supplemental NOI, visit:
https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2018-06-20/pdf/2018-13260.pdf
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Pollinator Week June 18-24, 2018

USFS Regional Intermountain Newsletter Special Issue June 20, 2018

Happy Pollinator Week!

The Forest Service is eager to educate the public about the importance of pollinators and pollinated plants. Worldwide, more than 1,000 plant grown food, beverages, fibers, spices and medicines need to be pollinated by animals and insects. A misconception about pollinators is that they are only bees. They are a large contributor but other pollinators include ants, bats, beetles, birds, butterflies, flies, moths, wasps, and other small animals. Pollinators are also responsible for assisting 80 percent of the world’s flowering plants. Without them, humans and wildlife would not have much to eat, beautiful scenery to look at, or important materials to use.

continued:
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Urinary incontinence in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt June 22, 2018 IME

Urinary incontinence is the involuntary release of urine from the bladder. Incontinence is not the same as urinary accidents. Accidents are when the dog is aware it is urinating, squats to urinate, but may be unable to wait for an appropriate time or place to urinate. Incontinence arises when the bladder sphincter muscle becomes weak, or lax, allowing urine to leak from the bladder. The sphincter muscle is the muscle that keeps the bladder closed. Urinary incontinence is very uncommon in cats.

The main cause of urinary incontinence in dogs is the lack of estrogen. Estrogen is produced by the ovaries. When your veterinarian performs an ovarian hysterectomy or “spay,” the ovaries are removed. If they aren’t, the dog continues to go into “heat” every six months, which is undesirable. The ovaries are the primary source of estrogen in dogs. Incontinence that occurs in spayed dogs is called estrogen-deficient incontinence or spay incontinence. In this condition, the bladder sphincter muscle is weak due to the lack of estrogen.

Urine may dribble constantly, but usually only when the dog is relaxed while sleeping or laying down. With estrogen-deficiency incontinence, other signs of bladder disease, like straining to urinate, are absent. If other signs of bladder disease, such as urgency or bloody urine, a secondary cause of incontinence is more likely.

continued:
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Dog refuses to leave owner’s body, survives a week in N. Idaho wilderness

When crews came across Anderson’s body, they also found his dog Kiera by his side. The 10-year-old Jack Russell terrier had survived in the wilderness for a week.

Taylor Viydo June 21, 2018 KTVB

Coeur D’ Alene, Idaho– A North Idaho family mourning the loss of a family member is taking some comfort knowing that the man’s beloved dog never left his side during his death.

Over the weekend, the Kootenai County Sheriff’s Office reported that search and rescue crews had located the body of Lyle Anderson, 86, in the Coeur d’Alene National Forest. Anderson, who had been reported missing on June 10th, was found over a mile away from his car in the Hayden Creek area. Family members said it was common for Anderson, who lived in Hayden, to take drives through the forest.

continued:
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Reports of coyote scuffling with dogs, following hikers in Boise Foothills

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, June 20th 2018

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — A protective mamma coyote isn’t messing around in the Boise Foothills.

Ridge to Rivers said Wednesday that it’s received two reports of a coyote following hikers and tussling with dogs along Crestline Trail in the Boise Foothills trail system.

“Idaho Fish and Game suspects that there is likely a den nearby and that the response from the coyote is a result of that,” Ridge to Rivers said on social media.

Officials are encouraging to keep dogs on a leash in the area or avoid Crestline.

source:
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Mid-June 2018
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Oregon allows rancher to kill a wolf after calves attacked

6/21/18 AP

Enterprise, Ore. — Oregon wildlife managers have issued a permit that allows a rancher in Eastern Oregon to kill a wolf after three of his calves were injured by the predators last week.

The Department of Fish and Wildlife said Thursday they confirmed that the calves were hurt by wolves over three days in Wallowa County.

continued:
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8 pups being fostered by surrogate wild wolf parents

6/21/18 AP

Albuquerque, N.M. — Eight Mexican gray wolf pups are being raised by surrogate parents in the wild as federal biologists look to improve the genetic diversity of the wild population in Arizona and New Mexico.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says four pups were placed into wild dens in late April — two in Arizona and two in New Mexico. Four more pups were placed with a New Mexico pack in May.

continued:
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Deputy frees trapped bear from car

Jun 21, 2018 LAKANA

A California police officer freed a trapped bear from a woman’s Subaru by breaking the car’s window.

Deputy Dave Lade responded after police received the call about a bear in a car in Lake Tahoe. Lade carefully broke out one of the car’s windows and ran as the bear escaped. The car’s interior was damaged, but officials say there were no injuries.

Police say bears have learned how to open car doors in search of food, but they aren’t as good at getting themselves out.

source:

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Wisconsin game warden helps cub escape basement with ladder

6/20/18 AP

Eagle River, Wis. — A Wisconsin game warden was smarter than the average bear.

Department of Natural Resources warden Dave Walz was called to an Eagle River home in northern Wisconsin early Wednesday to help rescue a bear cub trapped in a newly built open basement.

Walz and the homeowner decided to use a ladder to rescue the crying cub. Video shot by Walz shows the animal climbing the ladder to freedom with some off-camera coaching.

The cub’s mother was watching from a distance. After scaling the ladder, the cub ran off.

source:

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Poaching contributing to bird population decline in Idaho

by Associated Press Wednesday, June 20th 2018

Boise, Idaho (AP) — The long-billed curlew bird population is declining in southwestern Idaho because of poachers, researchers said.

One of the birds was poached in the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area southwest of Boise on June 1, Boise State University researchers said.

Of the 16 birds fitted with transmitters, it’s the seventh that has been killed by suspected poachers since 2013, the Idaho Statesman reported.

continued:
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Forest Service proposes changes to sage grouse protections

by Keith Ridler, Associated Press Wednesday, June 20th 2018

Boise, Idaho (AP) — The U.S. Forest Service proposed changes Wednesday to sage grouse protections in six Western states that call for eliminating special designations for crucial habitat as well as keeping areas open for mining.

The agency also said restrictions on water development for livestock will be removed as will other requirements that could limit some livestock grazing.

continued:
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With warmer weather, rattlesnakes emerge

Dog in southern valley dies from snakebite

Tony Evans Jun 20, 2018 IME

Numerous sightings of rattlesnakes have been reported in the southern Wood River Valley this spring. One dog was recently killed by a rattlesnake bite, prompting pet owners to take warning in certain areas.

“There have been tons of sightings but only one actual bite reported here,” said Kimberly Berry, a veterinary technician at the Sawtooth Animal Center in Bellevue.

Berry said “a very large dog” was brought to the clinic with a mysterious illness that was later shown to be the result of a rattlesnake bite. It later died.

“We have been doing a lot of snake-venom vaccines the last month or so,” said Berry, who, along with other veterinarians in the valley, offers a $19 injection to protect against snakebites.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Chinook seasons for South Fork Salmon, Upper Salmon and Lochsa rivers open June 23

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Friday, June 15, 2018 – 2:10 PM MDT

Fishing will be open seven days per week, but harvest share could be caught fast

Chinook fishing seasons on the South Fork of the Salmon, Upper Salmon and Lochsa rivers to open June 23 and rules include:

* Fishing open seven days per week.
* Bag limits for South Fork of Salmon and Upper Salmon, four per day, of which only two may be adults, and 12 in possession of which six may be adults.

continued:
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F&G to begin gill netting in Payette Lake for lake trout

The Star-News June 21, 2018

Idaho Department of Fish and Game biologists will begin some test gill netting in Payette Lake in the next few weeks.

Biologists will be targeting lake trout to test different sizes of gillnets in their effectiveness. The department is considering using gillnets to capture and remove lake trout from the lake, F&G Regional Fishery Manager Dale Allen said.

F&G is considering removal of lake trout in response to high angler interest in restoring a kokanee fishery. Lake trout are a major predator of kokanee.

The lake trout also have out-paced their available food supply and are in poor body condition, Allen said.

Biologists will document catch rates using the gillnets and look at all areas of the lake to see if a removal project is feasible, Allen said.

The only visible change will be orange plastic buoys showing up around the lake, he said.

“The nets are well out of the way of boating activities because they are sitting on the bottom of the lake,” he said. Call 208-634-8137 for questions.

source:
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Funny Critter Stuff:

Woodchucks to blame for missing veterans’ flags

June 19, 2018 AP

Adams, Mass. (AP) — Authorities say furry critters, not vandals, are likely to blame for American flags that disappeared from veterans’ graves in Massachusetts.

The flags at Bellevue Cemetery, in Adams, were first reported missing earlier this month. Residents volunteered to replace the flags by hand, but then those went missing, too.

Police were called to investigate, and Chief Richard Tarsa told The Boston Globe on Monday that officers found evidence that a woodchuck is likely using the flags in its burrow.

Tarsa says a similar incident happened in New York in 2012, where police linked a woodchuck to about 75 flags that disappeared from Cedar Park Cemetery.

source:
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Zsa Zsa, the English bulldog, wins World’s Ugliest Dog title

by The Associated Press Sunday, June 24th 2018


(AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Petaluma, Calif. (AP) — A 9-year-old English bulldog was named the winner of the 2018 World’s Ugliest Dog contest in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Zsa Zsa won the title Saturday night at the Sonoma-Marin Sonoma-Marin Fairgrounds in Petaluma.

The dog’s owner Megan Brainard of Anoka, Minnesota, will receive $1,500 for Zsa Zsa’s win. Brainard found Zsa Zsa on a pet-finding site, according to the contest bio.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

VetClinicSurvey-a
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Tips & Advice:

How to build a butterfly and pollinator garden in seven steps

Monarch butterflies and pollinators are in trouble. You can help by planting a pollinator garden! You can plant a garden anywhere – your yard, school, church, business or even in a pot for your front steps.

A simple, native flower garden will attract beautiful butterflies to your yard and help pollinators stay healthy. In addition to nectar from flowers, monarch butterflies need milkweed to survive, so if you notice the leaves on your milkweed have been chomped, don’t worry, it’s a great sign!

Gather your supplies and research what varieties of milkweed and wildflowers are native to your area. You can also look up pollinator-friendly plant lists for your region. If you’re starting from seeds, find a local seed supplier.

continued:
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June 17, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

June 17, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
June 20 Yellow Pine Vet Clinic call 208-382-4590 for appointment
June 22 4pm Festival meeting Community Hall
June 23 Highland Games, Ice Cream Sundaes 2pm-4pm
June 25 Dust Abatement Deadline
June 29-30 Live Music at The Corner
June 30 Golf Tournament
July 4 Parade 2pm
July 4 (after Parade) Ice Cream Sundaes
July 4 Fireworks at dusk
July 4 Live Music at The Corner
July 6-7 Live Music at The Corner
July 7 Community Hall Yard Sale 9am to Noon
July 14 at 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
July 19 Noxious Weed Day
July 21 10am CPR Class at the Fire Station
July 26 Festival planning meeting
August 3, 4, 5 Music and Harmonica Festival
August 11 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 8 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Budget Hearing
September 8 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting

(details below)
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Village News:

Dust Abatement Sign-up Deadline now June 25

It’s time to think dust abatement again.

Checks for dust abatement are due by June 25th. Please make them payable to North American Dust Control.

This year’s Dust Abatement cost is $.0702/sq. ft + tax. Contact me if you want dust abatement. I will need your payment by Saturday, June 25th. Deb Filler, fillerd2 @ live.com, 208-633-6945
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Looking for White Folding Tables

The Community Hall is missing some white folding tables. Please check your area and return the tables to the Community Hall.

Thank You – Kathleen Hall
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Thursday, June 7th, a report the dumpsters had been emptied and the Transfer Station was clean. The road was rough between Yellow Pine and the dump.

Please do not dump household appliances at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

However, there is a burn pile for woody debris only. “Bring it, Don’t Burn it.”
— — — —

Pests

Reports that ticks are still active, mosquitoes and no-see-ums are out. Pine pollen is not quite as bad. Lots of ground squirrels this year. Remember to secure your trash, bears are hungry.
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Local Events:

Yellow Pine Vet Clinic June 20

Dr. Keith Ruble from Cascade Vet Clinic will be in Yellow Pine on Wednesday June 20th. You must sign up via the clinic by calling (208) 382-4590 (M-W-F) so they can bring charts and meds.

All dogs must be on leashes, thank you.
— — — —

June 23 Highland Games & Ice Cream Sundaes

Located behind the Yellow Pine Tavern, burly men in kilts that like to throw heavy stuff. Games to benefit the Yellow Pine LifeFlight Helipad

Ice Cream Sundaes will be for sale on Saturday near the Highland Games from 2pm to 4pm. $3 for one scoops; $4 for two scoops; your choice of toppings. Proceeds support the Community Hall.

FB link to Flyer:

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4th of July Golf Tournament June 30th

Our 20th annual Yellow Pine Golf Tournament will take place on June 30th 2018. The proceeds will go towards the Yellow Pine Medical Training and Supply Fund. By giving to this annual event, you’ll be supporting the village of Yellow Pine and our growing EMS service.

Thanks to Cascade Fire/EMS Fire Commissioners, Chief Steve Hull and the EMS Director Keri Donica, Yellow Pine is now a Cascade Fire/EMS Paramedic Ambulance Sub-station. This allows us to have equipment available in Yellow Pine to treat and care for patients in the field, not only First Aid but Advanced Life Support. Yellow Pine now has Nationally Registered: 4 EMR’s, 1 RN-EMT, and 1 Paramedic in Yellow Pine.

The cost for the event is $20/person or $50 will give you a sponsorship and pay for 2 players!

As a sponsor, your name will be put on a plaque, or you can provide your own sign for the event. This plaque will be posted on one of our 18 holes during the tournament.

To reserve a place in the tournament please contact Jeff or Ann Forster @ aforsterrn@aol.com or call (208) 633-1010.

You can mail your payments to: P.O. Box 38 Yellow Pine, ID. 83677.

Please make checks payable to “Cascade Fire EMS” attn: YP Golf Tournament.

Thanks in advance for your consideration.

Sincerely,
Jeff Forster – Paramedic & Ann Forster – BS, RN, EMT
Event Coordinators
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Weekend of June 30th

Live Music at The Corner – Folk Family Revival
— — — —

4th of July

Parade at 2pm

Independence Day Parade will be Wednesday, July 4th at 2pm.

If you want to be in the parade, meet near the Fire House at 1:30pm. All family-friendly entries are welcome.

If you need decorations for your pet, bike, ATV, trailer, car, whatever, they will be available near the Fire House at noon.

After the parade: Ice Cream Sundaes will be for sale. $3 for one scoop; $4 for two scoop; your choice of toppings. Proceeds support the Community Hall.

Fireworks at Dusk

Live Music at The Corner – Folk Family Revival
— — — —

Yard Sale – Saturday, July 7 9am-Noon

The garage sale is July 7th from 9-noon. Everyone can bring their items anytime to the community hall. I will have a space marked for the items.

Please remember this is a Donation and Everything Must Work.

If you want your items back if they don’t sell you must pick them up at 12:30 on July 7th.

The proceeds of the Garage Sale will go to the maintenance of the Community Hall.

If you have questions please call Kathy Hall at 208 633 6270 or text to 630 915 1544

Thank you everyone for your support of the Yellow Pine Community Hall
— — — —

Weekend July 7th

Live Music at The Corner – Willie and the Singlewides
— — — —

July 19 (free) Noxious Weed Day

Steve has scheduled his visit to Yellow Pine for Thursday July 19th. The staging area will be the Fire Department. He will bring up the Chemicals and spray equipment. Backpack sprayers, pump up sprayers, ATV tanks and he needs to know how many of these we need. He will leave everything there for the weekend and pick it all up Monday. Please call Kathy Hall 208 633-6270 for forms and information.

link to form:
Steve Anderson from Valley County Weed Control
Office: (208)382-7199
e-mail: SAnderson @ co.valley.id.us
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Local Groups:

VYPA News:

Summer Meeting Schedule:

July 14, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
August 11, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 8, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
— — — —

YPFD News:

YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting June 09, 2018 10:00

Yellow Pine Community Hall

Commissioners Present:
District 1: Cecil Dallman
District 2: Dan Stiff
District 3: Tom Richter
Fire Chief: Jeff Forster

Banking Balance:
Umpqua: $38,000
Mountain America: $18,840
Total: $56,840.49
Bills -0-
Petty Cash: $100.00

Discussion regarding closing the Mountain America Bank account and consolidating it in with the Umpqua bank account. We would have only one account. Decision to move to one bank, which will be Umpqua Bank.

Voted to do the consolidation and it was unanimously approved.
Approval of $10,000 in emergency reserve

Proposed Expenditures: 2018

– Extrication Tool – (Spreaders) (Battery Operated), $10,000
* Approved
– Struts $5,000 with Pickets and straps
* Approved
– Thermal Imager (TIC) $2,500
* Approved
– Windshield cutter and Dewalt drill $300.00
* Approved
– Sun Valley Trauma Conference for 4: $2,000
* Approved
– Portable repeater, $300.00
* Approved
– Printer – (Laser Color) Used Computer $1,500
* Approved
– Trailer $1,200
* Approved, along with approval to purchase two new tires and a Spare wheel mount with tire and cargo box for the trailer.
– Rope Rescue equipment. Various pullies and new (extra) Haul line $500.00
* Approved
– Harness $200.00
* Approved
– Bob Auth YPFD T-shirts Lic for $150.00
* Approved
Total: $23,650

Discussion Items: Priorities in order

– Helispot Cecil: Meral/Danny Saline LifeFlight/Krassel Helitack
* Cecil and Jeff gave a run down on the progress of the Helispot. We, Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Commissioners and Fire Chef, met with the Midas Gold Rep: Sam, Krassle Ranger District Flight safety Rep, Chris, Meral and Danny S. at the Helispot location to discuss layout and removal of the last few trees for helicopter for safer ingress and egress. Cecil has the lead on the construction of the Helispot. Jeff will continue to work with the Boise Natl. Forest for authorization of removal of existing trees.

– New Engine to replace Army Truck?
* We agreed to sell the Army Truck. Dan is responsible for listing the Fire Truck. We are in the process of purchasing a new engine that is better suited for our environment.

– New Bay?
* We agreed to look into the cost of building an additional bay on the North side of the current Fire Station.
* It was agreed to looking to the cost and then begin the process.

Other Discussion items:

– Grants?
* Willie S. agreed to help with Grant writing along with Jeff F.

– Use permit for Fire Station and Helispot (20 years)
* We are compliant with the Boise Natl. Forest with a 20 year Use Permit.

– Power of Attorney David K. (McCall)
* It was agreed that we continue to use our Power or Attorney to do our taxes.

– YP Repeater (PA bad) Thunderbolt Tower?
* Jeff explained what was wrong with or County Communication Tower and the proposed solution.

– Pumpkin 3,000 gallon from Larry K.
– Sam/Nate with Midas will begin Fire Orientation in the near future

– YPFD ditch and property owner burns
* If property owners ask for assistance in burning ditches on their property we will continue to provide that service if the weather and conditions exist to burn. Adjoining property owners will be notified of the burn when necessary.

– Siren Test
* We will continue to test the Emergency Siren May 1st until October 1st at 12:00 Noon on the 1st of each month and then suspend the test during the winter months.

New Business: None
Adjourn 11:20am
Dated: June 16, 2018

YPFD Training 06.17.18

Sunday’s fire training was a simulated critical trauma victim. The simulation training was to practice radio communications, patient assessment, treatment, immobilization, stabilization and transport by our Yellow Pine’s 1st responders. Randy the victim is a 160 pound manikin purchased for us by Cascade Fire/EMS.

20180617YPFDTraining-a
– JF

CPR Training Class

CPR class coming to YP July 21st 10am at the Fire Station (includes AED). If interested please notify Jeff or Ann.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911@ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

YP Fire Budget Hearing: September 8, 2018 – 10am Community Hall

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

The Helispot needs a lot of work and a base needs to be put down before officially being used. I’m currently in discussion with some folks to help with the ground prep and to put the base down. Life Flight and other agencies will need to do an inspection as well before using the helispot.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

Jeff F.

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
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2018 Festival:

June 22 4pm Festival meeting Community Hall
The last planning meeting will be July 26

August 3, 4, 5 Music and Harmonica Festival
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Now open for summer (208) 633-3377
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Yellow Pine Tavern

Summer Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine.
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The Corner 633-3325

Live music for Independence Day, both weekends. Folk Family Revival will be here the weekend before and on the actual fourth. Willie and the Singlewides will be the weekend after the fourth.

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Local Propane Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
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Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430

We have a great price on wild bird seed. $19.99 for a 50 lb bag. 12.99 for a 25 lb bag. We also sell suet blocks (peanut crunch, and cherry) for $1.99 per block. Niger Thistle seed $13.25 for 5 lbs.
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (June 11) rain during the night/early morning, overnight low of 37 degrees, low dark overcast w/foggy belts on the mountains and new snow above 6000′. No sign of the male tree swallows, females stuck on the nests. Robins and finches calling. The male swallows showed up late in the morning. The flicker house is emitting a lot of little “cheeping” noises. Red-naped Sapsucker drumming on the power pole. Breaks in the clouds and scattered sunshine in the afternoon, high of 61 degrees. Rufous humming birds (male and female), jays and a red-breasted nuthatch visited along with the cassins finches today. Clear sky in the evening, temperature dropping quickly at sundown.

Tuesday (June 12) overnight low of 29 degrees, ice on the water pans this morning and clear sky. Loud airplanes. Swallows mobbing for feathers early. Amerigas tech checking tanks this morning in Yellow Pine and Stibnite. Swallows, finches and robins calling. Male Rufous hummer guarding the feeder. Cowbirds joined the chickens after it warmed up a little. Really blue sky at noon. Warm and sunny day, light pleasant breezes, high of 77 degrees. Pine siskins joined the finches at the feeders in the afternoon. Swallows active (and taking feathers to the nests.) Several hummingbirds visiting during the afternoon, good to see them back. Red-breasted nuthatch likes the new suet (from Diamond) and a few cow birds hanging out with the chickens. High haze and wispy clouds before dark.

Wednesday (June 13) overnight low of 36 degrees, clear sky this morning. Increasing air traffic. Red-breasted nuthatches, finches and pine siskins visiting, jays calling and hopping around in the trees. Sunny, hot and windy mid-day, high of 83 degrees. Cowbirds and jays joined the finches at the feeders this afternoon. High hazy clouds, then mostly clear by sundown. Still a bit of light at 10pm, longer days.

Thursday (June 14) overnight low of 45 degrees, partly cloudy this morning. Lots of airplanes flying over the village. Jays, finches, cowbirds and nuthatches visiting. Swallows mugging for more feathers to carry to the nests, females setting on eggs. Some afternoon clouds, a little breezy at times and very pleasant, high of 74 degrees. Several jays stopped by this afternoon and finished off the store-bought suet cake, then jumped around on the roof making a lot of noise. Mostly cloudy after sunset, robins chirping and swallows flying low.

Friday (June 15) overnight low of 41 degrees, clear sky this morning. Several loud airplanes flew over the village. Swallows flying low and mobbing for feathers, rowdy jays and finches calling. Increasing clouds and light breezes late morning. Loud gunshot at noon. A couple more shots after 1pm. Cloudy afternoon, mild temperatures, high of 71 degrees. Late afternoon rain showers. Gentle rain before sunset – sun setting after 8pm now. Red and white-breasted nuthatches, finches and a little swarm of hummingbirds this evening. Robins cheerfully chirping after sundown.

Saturday (June 16) overnight low of 36 degrees, partly clear and slight breeze this morning. Early (loud) air traffic. Red-naped sapsucker drumming on the power pole, swallows mobbing for feathers, finches and jays calling. Really loud low airplane circling at 114pm. Calliope hummers (mostly females) at the feeders while the Rufous was absent. Watched a pine squirrel chase a golden mantel squirrel off a bird feeder while a ground squirrel was waiting below for dropped seeds. Shots fired around 550pm, sounded like it was up near main street. First swallow egg hatched this afternoon. Female hairy woodpecker visited. Mostly clear at sundown, high of 70 degrees, robins calling at dusk.

Sunday (June 17) overnight low of 41 degrees, early morning rain, low clouds draped across the mountains. Second swallow egg hatched, both parents keeping the little squiggles warm, clean and fed. Some finches, a few pine siskins, a red-breasted nuthatch and a couple of jays visiting. Loud airplanes over the village at 935am. Light gentle rain all morning. Cowbirds joined the finches and pine siskins at the feeders after lunch time, male rufous hummer chasing calliopes away from the feeder in the rain. Dark clouds, cool and sprinkles on and off late afternoon, high of 55 degrees. A clarks nutcracker and steller jay were competing for the suet feeder. Hummingbirds feeding during the rain (Rufous and Calliope.) Quiet evening, windy and wet. Happy Father’s Day.
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RIP:

LauraBelle Cecelia Goodwin

September 16, 1929 ~ June 14, 2018 (Age 88)

LauraBelle Goodwin, 88, of Twin Falls [formerly of Yellow Pine], died Thursday, June 14, 2018 at St. Luke’s Magic Valley Medical Center, Twin Falls. A celebration of life will be held at 2:00p.m., Tuesday, June 26, 2018 at Serenity Funeral Chapel Life Celebration Center and Cremation Services of Idaho, 502 2nd Ave. North, Twin Falls, Idaho. Condolences may be shared at http://www.serenityfuneralchapel.com.

source:
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Idaho News:

Wednesday is deadline to pay property taxes

The Star-News June 14, 2018

Wednesday at 5 p.m. is the deadline for property owners in Adams and Valley counties to pay the second half of their yearly property taxes.

Late charges and interest will begin on June 21, with interest retroactive from Jan. 1, 2018, so mailed payments should be correctly stamped by date.

The treasurers’ offices in both counties are open during the lunch hour Mondays through Fridays.

Valley County accepts credit card payments at http://co.valley.id.us or by calling 208-382-7110.

In Adams County, payments can be placed in the drop box at the main courthouse entrance in Council.

The office has credit card, debit card or echeck payment options online at http://co.adams.id.us or by calling 208- 253-4263 Ext. 6 for questions.

source:
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Valley County accepts unwanted pesticides by appointment

The Star-News June 14, 2018

Valley County residents can properly dispose of old, unwanted pesticides by taking them to the Valley County Weed and Pest Control Offices near Cascade.

Residents must call and make an appointment to hand over their items, such as rat, weed and bug killers. Pesticides must be in their original, labeled containers.

The offices are located at 55 Gold Dust Road south of Cascade. To make an appointment, call 208-315-0368 or 208-382-7199 or write to Sanderson@co.valley.id.us

source:
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Eighth auction of Payette Lake state-owned lots to set for Friday

Lessees have volunteered to compete in public bidding

By Tom Grote for The Star-News June 14, 2018

The eighth public auction in eight years for state-leased land around Payette Lake occupied by vacation homes will be held Friday in Boise.

The auction by the Idaho Department of Lands will begin at 1 p.m. Friday at the Stueckle Sky Center at Bronco Stadium at Boise State University.

The auction will feature nine properties, including three lakefront parcels.

Here is the list of properties to be offered along with their minimum bids:

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St. Luke’s McCall expansion site work to begin Monday

The Star-News June 14, 2018

After more than 10 years of planning and preparation, construction for the St. Luke’s McCall hospital expansion project is set to begin Monday, pending permit approval by the City of McCall.

Initial work will span three phases and includes property structure removals on and rerouting of Hewitt Street, road improvements and utility upgrades. The work is anticipated to continue through October.

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World’s best kayakers prepare for the North Fork Championship

by Natalie Hurst Thursday, June 14th 2018

Banks, Idaho (KBOI) – This weekend, the world’s best kayakers descend upon the North Fork of the Payette River for one of the world’s toughest whitewater races.

The North Fork Championship.

It’s grueling test – and even the local paddlers say it’s the biggest challenge they’ll ever face on the water.

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Boise man drowns in Lake Cascade near Donnelly

The Star-News June 14, 2018

A Boise man was found floating face down in Lake Cascade near Donnelly last week, the Valley County Sheriff’s Office said.

The body of Conrad Hansen, 25, was discovered floating in the lake near 12833 Dawn Drive about 4 p.m. June 6, sheriff’s office spokesperson Lt. Jason Speer said.

An autopsy found Hanson drowned, Valley County Coroner Scott Carver said. The cause of death was “accidental,” Carver said.

Responders from Donnelly Fire & EMS were called to the scene by Hansen’s grandmother, Speer said.

The grandmother said Hansen had been fishing on the dock at the Dawn Drive address. She went to check on him and found him floating on the water, unresponsive.

The grandmother removed Hansen from the water and responders began life-saving efforts without success, Speer said.

source:
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Man dies after raft overturns in Central Idaho wilderness

The sheriff’s office says David J. Glenn, 53, of North Las Vegas, and his son were in a raft that overturned in rapids.

KTVB June 13, 2018

Cascade, ID – A Las Vegas man has died during a rafting accident in the central Idaho wilderness, the Valley County Sheriff’s Office said on Tuesday.

The accident happened on Saturday afternoon on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

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Hunter’s body found weeks after crash into Selway River

The 22-year-old’s remains were found about 43 miles downriver from the spot where an SUV carrying six people plunged into the water last month.

KTVB June 14, 2018

Idaho County — The body of a 22-year-old hunter has been recovered from the Selway River, more than three weeks after his vehicle plunged into the fast-moving water.

The remains of Reece Rollins of Terrebone, Oregon were found Tuesday east near Cupboard Creek above Selway Falls. According to the Idaho County Sheriff’s Office, a hiker spotted the body and alerted a nearby U.S. Forest Service trail crew.

Rollins was one of four hunters who had been missing since their SUV went off the road and flipped into the river during the early morning hours of May 21. Two men in the SUV – identified as Jesse Gunin and Jason Lewis of Georgia – were able to escape.

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2nd body found after SUV with 6 hunters crashes into river

6/15/18 AP

Lowell, Idaho — Idaho authorities say a second body has been recovered after a vehicle carrying six hunters crashed into a fast-moving river last month.

The Idaho County Sheriff’s Office says crews recovered the body of 21-year-old Koby Clark of Bozeman, Montana, on Thursday about 6 miles (9.5 kilometers) east of the community of Lowell.

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Life Flight Network offers special deal for its 40th anniversary

By Brandon Stokes Jun 13, 2018 Local News 8

Life Flight Network the largest not-for-profit air medical transport service in the United States, is celebrating its 40th anniversary by offering $40 new memberships in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington.

The $40 annual memberships (for new members only) will be offered through Labor Day. Members of the network incur no out-of-pocket expense if flown for medically necessary emergent conditions by Life Flight Network or one of their reciprocal partners. Membership covers the primary membership holder, their spouse or domestic partner, and dependents claimed on their income tax return.

Elderly and disabled family members living in the same household can also be covered. Memberships are normally $65. To enroll, visit http://www.lifeflight.org/membership or call the Life Flight Network membership office at 800-982-9299.

source:
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From July Fourth chaos to family fun in Idaho mountain town

Crouch is known for throwing one of the craziest free-for-all, Wild West fireworks frenzies on Independence Day. But the town is losing that reputation.

KTVB Morgan Boydston June 11, 2018

Crouch, Idaho – Believe it or not, the Fourth of July is just three and half weeks away!

One tiny mountain town in Idaho is known for throwing one of the craziest free-for-all, Wild West fireworks frenzies on Independence Day. But Crouch is losing that reputation.

Last year, they said enough is enough, and voted to ban all fireworks in certain areas of the city limits. Those same rules are in play this year.

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Pests to look out for outdoors

By Michaela Leung Jun 11, 2018 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – A lot of people are taking advantage of the warm weather we’ve been having. But you need to be sure you’re being safe.

Make sure you’re protecting yourself from ticks.

“They’re coming out from their winter dormancy and looking for that first blood meal. So make sure to cover up as best as you can. Stay away from brushing up against trees and bushes where ticks kind of hang out. And double check yourself when you’re finished with your day’s activities,” says Mike Taylor, Epidemiologist for Eastern Idaho Public Health.

Mosquitoes are also out…With some being carriers of the West Nile Virus. There are some precautions you can take.

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Mosquitoes test positive for West Nile near Parma

Warm weather and the onset of summer in the Treasure Valley means pool days, barbecues, camping – and the return of warnings about West Nile Virus.

KTVB June 12, 2018

Parma, ID — Warm weather and the onset of summer in the Treasure Valley means pool days, barbecues, camping – and the return of warnings about West Nile Virus.

Officials in Canyon County announced Tuesday that the mosquitoes collected near Parma have tested positive for the virus, the first such positive reading this year.

According to Canyon County Mosquito Abatement District Director Ed Burnett, the infected insects were collected Friday off of Hexon Road and Scott Pitt Road, near the Fort Boise Wildlife Management Area. The samples were sent to the Idaho Bureau of Laboratories, which confirmed the positive test Monday.

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Officials confirm Idaho’s first human plague case since 1992

6/13/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — An Idaho child was infected with the plague this week, the first human diagnosis in the state since 1992, health officials confirmed.

The child, from Elmore County, is recovering after receiving antibiotics, the Idaho Statesman Journal reported .

The disease is spread to humans through a bite from an infected flea, Central District Health Department epidemiologist Sarah Correll said.

Cases of plague in Idaho were diagnosed in squirrels as recently as 2016, though none have been found in southern Ada County or Elmore County this year. It is unknown whether the child was exposed to the disease in Idaho or during a recent trip to Oregon.

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Scam Alert:

BBB alerts customers of misleading mailings from a Boise company

by KBOI News Staff Monday, June 11th 2018

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — The Better Business Bureau Northwest + Pacific is alerting people across the country of mailings from Senior Supplemental Referral Service from Boise.

The BBB says the advertising campaign has led to BBB Accreditation resignation and an agreement with the Iowa Attorney General.

Senior Supplemental Referral Service is also known as Need-A-Lead. According to the BBB, Direct Processing Center sends postcards to consumers across the country offering more information about “state-approved plans.”

Consumers say the postcards look like urgent official government notices regarding their insurance and the advertising failed to disclose that information collected from recipients will be sold to third-party insurance sales agents.

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Fire Season:

BLM: Target shooting is a major cause of fires

Three grass fires in the last month were sparked by target shooting, and now the BLM is asking the public to shoot smart.

KTVB Joe Parris June 13, 2018

Boise — It is a hot one Wednesday across the Treasure Valley; some places are seeing temperatures in the 90s!

Every year with the sizzling summer weather comes the risk of wildfires out on the dry landscape.

The Bureau of Land Management is now asking everyone to monitor target shooting behavior to help prevent grass and wildfires.

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Local fire crews take to the sky to survey Boise Front

Fire crews took to the skies in a helicopter to check out the Boise Front.

Morgan Boydston June 13, 2018 KTVB

Boise – With fire season expected to be above average this year in southwest Idaho, local fire departments say it’s key they get ahead of it.

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Eagle and Boise fire crews took to the skies today in a helicopter to scope out the Boise Front. They’re working to improve coordination and check out on-the-ground resources from a bird’s eye view.

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Small grass fire reported north of Hill Road in Boise Foothills

by KBOI News Staff Friday, June 15th 2018

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — A small grass fire was reported early Friday morning in the Boise Foothills.

Dispatchers say the call came in for the small fire north of Hill Road and Lost Sage Lane at about 3:30 a.m.

No structures were damaged and no injuries were reported. No word yet on what sparked the fire.

source:
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Coldwater Fire burns southwest of American Falls

Local News 8 June 14, 2018

American Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – UPDATE 10:00 p.m.The Bureau of Land Management reports the Coldwater Fire has burned approximately 800 acres.

Officials said the fire started around 2:00 p.m. and is burning in grass, brush and juniper.

… The fire is burning about 5 miles southwest of the Rim Fire, which started on Friday.

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Grass fire scorches pickups, boat, sheds in Sand Hollow

A Caldwell Fire Dept. battalion chief says a controlled burn got out of control when the wind picked up.

KTVB June 16, 2018

Canyon County – Crews are mopping up after a grass fire that burned an estimated ten to 15 acres Saturday afternoon in the Sand Hollow area.

The fire started at about 3:45 p.m. Saturday in the area of Oasis and Labor Camp roads.

The Sand Hollow Rural Fire Department responded first, followed by crews from Caldwell, Middleton and Parma.

Caldwell Fire Dept. Battalion Chief Tim Scott says the fire started with a controlled burn, and grew as the wind picked up, carrying embers onto the grass and fanning the flames.

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Wildfires in Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona force closure of large chunks of forest

Rangers close large chunks of public forest in West as wildfires burn

Trevor Hughes, USA TODAY June 12, 2018


In this Saturday, June 9, 2018, photo, helicopter works the wildfire on the east side of Hermosa Cliffs near Hermosa, Colo. (Jerry McBride/The Durango Herald via AP)

Extreme fire danger in the southwest has prompted federal land managers to take the unusual step of indefinitely closing public access to an area of national forests larger than Connecticut.

Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona are struggling with an usually hot spring that came after a winter with little snowfall, priming the forests to burn. And rangers say campers are failing to extinguish their campfires, creating an untenable situation.

Multiple wildfires are already burning in the area, including the 23,000-acre 416 Fire near Durango, Colorado, and the 41,000-acre Buzzard Fire in west-central New Mexico.

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USFS Regional Intermountain Wildfire Newsletter

June 15, 2018

link:
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Public Lands:

French Hazard WUI Project – Opportunity to Object

June 11, 2018

The Boise National Forest, Cascade Ranger District, has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) and Draft Decision Notice/Finding of No Significant Impact (DN/FONSI) for the French Hazard WUI Project. The French Hazard project area is located approximately 7 miles west of Cascade, Idaho, in Valley County.

The EA and Draft DN/FONSI are available on the project website at http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49636. Hard copies of these documents are available upon request from Jim Bishop, Team Leader, at jjbishop@fs.fed.us or by phone at 208-382-7400.

The draft DN/FONSI identifies Alternative B as the selected alternative. Alternative B will conduct vegetation management treatments (commercial and noncommercial thinning, prescribed burning, and mastication) and associated road management activities on approximately 6,223 acres. All treatments with commercial product removal will be followed by noncommercial tree thinning and activity fuel abatement treatments. Transportation management activities will include constructing 2.4 miles of new NFS roads. These roads will be classified as Maintenance Level (ML) 2 roads (open to administrative use only; constructing 6.5 miles of temporary roads on new prism and 2.1 miles on existing road prisms. To facilitate commercial sawlog removal 49.4 miles of road maintenance activities will be conducted. In addition, 4.6 miles of NFS roads will be decommissioned. The Project will make no changes to the Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM). An estimated 47,391 CCF of wood products will be provided to local/regional processing facilities.

I am now informing you of the opportunity to object to this project pursuant to 36 CFR 218 Subpart B.

Eligibility to File Objection

Objections will be accepted only from those who have previously submitted specific written comments regarding the proposed project either during scoping or other designated opportunity for public comment in accordance with §218.5(a). Issues raised in objections must be based on previously submitted timely, specific, written comments regarding the proposed project unless they are based on new information arising after designated opportunities.

Individual members of organizations must have submitted their own comments to meet the requirements of eligibility as an individual. Objections received on behalf of an organization are considered as those of the organization only. If an objection is submitted on behalf of a number of individuals or organizations, each individual or organization listed must meet the eligibility requirement of having previously submitted comments on the project (§ 218.7). Names and addresses of objectors will become part of the public record.

Content of an Objection

Incorporation of documents by reference in the objection is permitted only as provided for at §218.8(b). Minimum content requirements of an objection identified at §218.8(d) include:

* Objector’s name and address with a telephone number if available; with signature or other verification of authorship supplied upon request;
* Identification of the lead objector when multiple names are listed, along with verification upon request;
* Name of project, name and title of the responsible official, national forest/ranger district where project is located, and
* Sufficient narrative description of those aspects of the proposed project objected to, specific issues related to the project, how environmental law, regulation, or policy would be violated, and suggested remedies, which would resolve the objection.
* Statement demonstrating the connection between prior specific written comments on this project and the content of the objection, unless the objection issue arose after the designated opportunity for comment.

Filing an Objection

The Objection Reviewing Officer is the Intermountain (R4) Regional Forester. Written, facsimile, hand delivered, and electronic objections will be accepted. It is the responsibility of Objectors to ensure their objection is received in a timely manner (§ 218.9). Objections received in response to this request will be available for public inspection in the “Public Comment/Objection Reading Room” on the Project webpage

Send written objections, including any attachments, to: Objection Reviewing Officer, Intermountain Region, USFS, 324 25th Street, Ogden, Utah 84401; or fax to 801-625-5277; or by email to: objections-intermtn-regional- office@fs.fed.us, within 30 days following the publication date of the legal notice in the newspaper of record. The Ogden Utah office’s business hours for those submitting hand-delivered objections are: 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Email objections must be submitted in a format such as an email message, pdf, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), and Word (.doc or .docx). Objections may also be submitted through a web form on the French Hazard WUI Project webpage (http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49636). To submit comments using the web form select “Comment/Object on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s webpage.

Objections, including attachments, must be filed with the appropriate reviewing officer within 30 days of the publication of the legal notice in the newspaper of record. The publication date of the legal notice is the exclusive means for calculating the time to file an objection to this project. The legal notice is scheduled to be published in the Idaho Statesman (Newspaper of Record) on June 12, 2018. The legal notice will be published on the project website (http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49636) within 4 calendar days of publication. Those wishing to object to this proposed project should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source.

The Responsible Official for this project is Deputy Forest Supervisor Tawnya Brummett. Further information about this project may be obtained from Jim Bishop, Team Leader, at jjbishop@fs.fed.us or by phone at 208-382-7400.
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USDA Forest Service French Hazard WUI – CORRECTION of Opportunity to Object pursuant to 36 CFR 218, Subpart A and C Notification

June 14, 2018

You are receiving a second message regarding the opportunity to object pursuant to 36 CFR 218 subparts A and C on the French Hazard WUI Project due to incorrect citations to the 36 CFR 218 regulations in the original message. The citations have been corrected in the message below. In response to the incorrect citations, a corrected legal notice has been submitted to the Idaho Statesman (newspaper of record) and is anticipated to be published on June 18, 2018. Publication of the corrected legal notice will re-start the 30-day objection filing period for the French Hazard WUI Project. The corrected legal notice will be posted to the project website (http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49636) within 4 calendar days of publication (36 CFR 218.7 (d)). The publication date of the corrected legal notice is the exclusive means for calculating the 30-day objection filing period. Those wishing to object to this proposed project should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source. It is the responsibility of objectors to ensure that objections are received in a timely manner (36 CFR 218.32 (a)).

Corrections of references to the 36 CFR 218 regulations have also been made in the Draft DN/FONSI and the document has been published to the project webpage: https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49636.

Please feel free to contact myself or Terre Pearson-Ramirez at 208-382-7457 with questions regarding the opportunity to object to this project.

Sincerely,
Melissa Yenko
Forest Environmental Coordinator
Boise National Forest
1249 South Vinnell Way, Suite 200
Boise, ID 83709
Phone: 208-373-4245
Email: myenko@fs.fed.us
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More groups oppose bikes in wilderness

Senate bill introduced in May

Greg Moore June 13, 2018 IME

Following the reintroduction of a bill in the U.S. Senate on May 17 to end the prohibition of mountain bikes in wilderness areas, 150 conservation groups have signed a letter opposing the measure.

The letter, dated June 6, is being sent to all the members of the Senate by Missoula, Mont.-based Wilderness Watch. It follows an earlier letter signed by 133 conservation groups sent in December to the members of a House of Representatives subcommittee following the reintroduction of a similar bill there.

HR 1349, reintroduced in the House by Rep. Tom McClintock, R-Calif., in March 2017, would amend the 1964 Wilderness Act to state that it does not prohibit the use of nonmotorized wheeled vehicles in wilderness areas. It was passed by the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Federal Lands in December.

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Critter News:

Puppy dies after eating toxic mushroom in Idaho City

Just hours after ingesting a mushroom, a six-month-old puppy died and now her owners are sending out a warning to other pet owners.

Alex Livingston June 11, 2018 KTVB


A local expert says Amanita pantherina is one of the deadliest mushrooms in our area.

Boise, ID – When you bring a puppy into your home, you typically make sure you puppy-proof just about everything like making sure your cleaning supplies are safely out of reach. What you may not think about is keeping an eye out for mushrooms.

For one couple, a mushroom that most would have overlooked caused a six-month-old puppy named Logan to die.

“When they pop up, they pop up, and there isn’t much rhyme or reason to it,” said Mike Feiger, Logan’s owner. “I’ve been up there for 11 years and I’ve never seen that mushroom in my yard or in the vicinity.”

continued:
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Pet Talk

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Jun 15, 2018 IME

Bone infections are called osteomyelitis. Osteomyelitis is bone inflammation caused by infection. Infection most commonly arises from external sources of contamination such as puncture wounds, shearing injuries over a bone from an animal being dragged by a car, or when a fracture is compounded, its bone fragments protruding through the skin. Osteomyelitis can also occur because of surgical contamination. Occasionally, infection can spread to bone via the bloodstream from other areas of the body.

Bacteria are the most common cause of osteomyelitis; these include staph, strep and E. Coli. Several fungal infections also occur, especially the cause of “valley fever,” coccidioidomycosis, very prevalent in dogs from central California and Arizona. The bone infected may be swollen, painful and hot to the touch. Usually, there is lameness, lethargy and poor appetite. Often, there is drainage of pus to the outside of the skin. This is called a draining tract.

Diagnosis of osteomyelitis requires X-rays, cultures of the bone or draining tracts, and a thorough history and physical exam. Sometimes surgical exploration of the site of infection is necessary to provide bone samples to the lab for appropriate tests.

continued:
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Dog missing after I-84 crash reunited with family

Huck the yellow Lab was thrown from the pickup he was riding in during a rollover wreck Friday.

KTVB June 12, 2018


Photo: Courtesy of Tracy King

Boise — A dog that was thrown from the pickup it was riding in during a rollover crash has been found.

Huck, a 3-year-old yellow lab, had been missing since the wreck happened Friday.

continued:
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Dogs suffer when people underestimate heat

People may endanger dogs without thinking

Craig Smith Jun 11, 2018 KIVI TV

When the weather’s this hot, people can hurt their pets without even knowing.

… Dogs have an especially tough time coping with heat. They can only shed heat through their tongues and the pads on their feet.

… Sometimes people will leave their dog in the yard in the morning, thinking the dog will have plenty of shade throughout the day but they failed to account for the way the sun angle will change as the day goes on so a dog that might have plenty of shade at one time of the day, could have little or no shade at the other part.

full story:
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N. Idaho neighbors complain about loud dogs then owners retaliate with donkeys, birds

Homeowners in Emida claimed that the breeders have more than 250 dogs on their land and that the animals would bark nonstop. According to court documents, the breeders retaliated by bringing even more animals on their land.

Taylor Viydo KTVB June 14, 2018

Emida, Idaho – Two North Idaho dog breeders were sued by their neighbors, who alleged the dog owners retaliated against them and caused them emotional distress.

Homeowners in Emida claimed that the breeders had more than 250 dogs on their land and that the animals would bark nonstop. According to court documents, the breeders retaliated by bringing even more animals on their land.

According to the complaint filed this week, the neighbors confronted the breeders in 2017 about the noise, but nothing improved.

continued:
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2 Mexican wolves found dead in Arizona last month

6/15/18 AP

Phoenix — Arizona wildlife managers say two endangered Mexican gray wolves died, bringing the statewide total of dead this year to six.

The Arizona Game and Fish Department said in a news release Friday that the animals were found dead in May. Authorities did not release any details about the circumstances or where the wolves were found.

Their deaths are under investigation.

continued:
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Arizona counties want more funds for Mexican wolf recovery

6/13/18 AP

Bisbee, Ariz. — The Cochise County Board of Supervisors is requesting more federal funding for Mexican wolf recovery efforts.

They’re sending a letter to Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, asking him to consider a fairer compensation plan for the eastern Arizona communities hosting the recovery program and the state agencies managing it.

continued:
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Census suggests Michigan wolf population stable, thriving

6/14/18 AP

Lansing, Mich. — State biologists say Michigan’s gray wolf population appears to be leveling off after several decades of steady growth.

The Department of Natural Resources says a census this winter produced an estimate of 662 wolves in the Upper Peninsula. That’s up slightly from 618 in the previous count two years ago.

The survey found 139 packs — 15 more than in 2016. The average pack size was down slightly, to fewer than five wolves.

continued:
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Agency considers dropping wolf protections

By John Flesher – 6/14/18 AP

Traverse City, Mich. — The federal government is considering another attempt to drop legal protections for gray wolves across the lower 48 states, reopening a lengthy battle over the predator species.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Thursday told The Associated Press it has begun a science-based review of the status of the wolf, which presently is covered by the Endangered Species Act in most of the nation and cannot be killed unless threatening human life.

If the agency decides to begin the process of removing of the wolf from the endangered species list, it will publish a proposal by the end of the year.

continued:
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter June 16, 2018

Wölfe am Hochstand auf der Lauer (Wolf at the high stand in wait)

Large fenced reserves could reintroduce wolves in Scottish Highlands

As Oregon wolves rebound, tensions rise over livestock attacks

The Economic Effect of Wolf Predation on Ranching Families and Rural Communities
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Grizzly bear dies after eating pesticides in garage

6/13/18 AP

Great Falls, Mont. — A grizzly bear died after eating pesticides in an open garage between Great Falls and Fort Benton in north-central Montana.

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks officials say the sub-adult female and a sibling were seen in the area about 11 miles northwest of Carter in recent days. The 143-pound grizzly died Monday within hours of ingesting the chemicals.

continued:
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Idaho F&G officials relocate two young ‘maverick moose’ from downtown Burley

by Betsy, Idaho Press Jun 11, 2018


Doug Meyer/Idaho Fish & Game

A young moose was spotted in Burley on June 3, and the Cassia County Sheriff’s office notified Idaho Fish & Game; conservation officers and wildlife staff responded, and the out-of-place moose was tranquilized near a Maverik gas station on east Main Street around 5 p.m.

Then, just hours later, another moose was reported in the same area. About 10:30 the next morning, officers darted a second moose there.

“The two animals were of a similar age class and found in a similar location, suggesting that they could be siblings or just good friends,” Idaho Fish & Game reported in a news release. “They were released in a similar location and reunited in a less population portion of Unit 55.”

source:
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Deer with leash found dead near Pocatello

By Brandon Stokes Jun 15, 2018 Local News 8

Pocatello, Idaho – The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is investigating after a deer was found dead with a leash around its neck in the Gibson Jack area south of Pocatello.

Fish and Game say the leash had been intentionally strapped around the yearling buck’s neck either in an attempt to make it a pet or to harass the animal causing the deer to experience a long slow death.

Fish and Game officers responded to multiple calls about the deer in March but each time they showed up the deer was either gone, or it could not be caught due to other conditions.

It is against the law to keep wildlife as pets or to harass a deer like this one was.

Fish and Game asks anyone with information about this case to call the Pocatello office at (208) 232-4703 or Citizens Against Poaching at 1-800-632-5999. Callers can remain anonymous.

source:
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BLM releases 26 wild horses in Idaho following 2015 fire

6/14/18 AP

Nampa, Idaho — The Bureau of Land Management has released 26 wild horses into the Sands Basin Herd Management Area in southwestern Idaho.

The Idaho Press reported Wednesday that this marks the first time BLM-managed wild horses will roam in the area in three years following a 2015 wildfire.

The BLM says nearly all the Sands Basin Herd Management Area was burned by the fire that swept through southeast Oregon and southwest Idaho.

continued:
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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
June 15, 2018
Issue No. 876
Table of Contents

* Council Approves $4.5 Million For Five-Year Program To Suppress, Monitor Invasive Pike In Lake Roosevelt
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440951.aspx

* New Water Chemistry Strategies By IDFG Increase Survival Of Snake River Sockeye Smolts
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440950.aspx

* Study Identifies Ocean Distribution Of Fall Chinook; Should Help Managers In Targeting Or Avoiding Certain Stocks
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440949.aspx

* Tie Vote In U.S. Supreme Court Upholds Lower Court Rulings In Washington State Fish Culverts Case
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440948.aspx

* Bonneville Power Looking At Spending Reductions In Columbia Basin Fish/Wildlife Spending
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440947.aspx

* Pacific Lamprey Return To Umatilla River In Record Numbers; From Functionally Extinct To Over 2600 Returning Fish
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440946.aspx

* Fish/River Managers Have Differing Interpretations On What ‘Spill To The Gas Cap’ Looks Like
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440945.aspx

* Judge Rejects Dismissal Of Deschutes River Clean Water Case, Says Tribes Should Also Be Defendant
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440944.aspx

* IDFG Biologists Seek Help From Anglers In Researching Land-Locked Chinook Salmon
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440943.aspx

* Ocean’s Wild Forage Fish Populations Under Pressure As Key Food Source For Farmed Fish
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440942.aspx

* Study Says International Fisheries Agreements Outpaced By Movement Of Fish Species Due To Climate Change
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440941.aspx

* Oregon State Receives $88 Million To Lead Construction Of Second Ship For Nation’s Academic Research Fleet
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440940.aspx
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Don’t Touch! These little caterpillars roaming Idaho woods can leave nasty rash

by KBOI News Staff Friday, June 15th 2018


The U.S. Department of Agriculture is warning folks who venture out into the woods of Idaho, to avoid the Douglas-fir Tussock Moth caterpillars. (File Photo + USDA)

McCall, Idaho (KBOI) — Here’s a good (very good) example of looks can be deceiving.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is warning folks who venture out into the woods of Idaho, to avoid the Douglas-fir Tussock Moth caterpillars.

Officials say Idaho’s currently seeing an outbreak of the native species, which is typical every three to four years.

If you do happen to touch, people can experience itching, rashes, welts, blisters, watery eyes, runny noise, cough, and sometimes even shortness of breath, wheezing and chest tightness.

The USDA says huckleberry pickers, especially should wear long sleeved shirts and gloves.

source:
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Bumblebee blues: Pacific Northwest pollinator in trouble

By Keith Ridler – 6/17/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Hundreds of citizen scientists have begun buzzing through locations across the Pacific Northwest seeking a better understanding about nearly 30 bumblebee species.

Bumblebees, experts say, are important pollinators for both wild and agricultural plants, but some species have disappeared from places where they were once common, possibly because of the same factors that have been killing honeybees.

“It’s really important for us as humans to study these species systems for animals that are the little guys that make the world go around,” said Ann Potter of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, one of the entities in three states — Oregon and Idaho are the others — participating in the three-year Pacific Northwest Bumble Bee Atlas project.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

F&G to begin gill netting in Payette Lake for lake trout

Idaho Department of Fish and Game biologists will begin some test gill netting in Payette Lake in the next few weeks.

Biologists will be targeting lake trout to test different sizes of gillnets in their effectiveness. The department is considering using gillnets to capture and remove lake trout from the lake, F&G Regional Fishery Manager Dale Allen said.

F&G is considering removal of lake trout in response to high angler interest in restoring a kokanee fishery. Lake trout are a major predator of kokanee.

The lake trout also have out-paced their available food supply and are in poor body condition, Allen said.

Biologists will document catch rates using the gillnets and look at all areas of the lake to see if a removal project is feasible, Allen said.

The only visible change will be orange plastic buoys showing up around the lake, he said.

“The nets are well out of the way of boating activities because they are sitting on the bottom of the lake,” he said. Call 208-634-8137 for questions.

source: The Star-News June 14, 2018
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Chinook seasons for South Fork Salmon, Upper Salmon and Lochsa rivers

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Monday, June 4, 2018

Season to open June 23 and open seven days per week, but harvest share could be caught fast

Idaho Fish and Game Commission on June 6 set the Chinook fishing seasons on the South Fork of the Salmon, Upper Salmon and Lochsa rivers to open June 23.

Upper Salmon River, South Fork of the Salmon River and Lochsa River seasons and rules include:

* Opening date June 23, closing date as ordered by Director of Fish and Game.
* Fishing open seven days per week.
* Bag limits for South Fork of Salmon and Upper Salmon, four per day, of which only two may be adults, and 12 in possession of which six may be adults.

continued:
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Anglers are needed to catch Chinook for research

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Monday, June 11, 2018


c. Joseph R. Tomelleri

Biologists need samples from fish caught in three SW Idaho reservoirs and a north Idaho lake

Many anglers look forward to fishing for Chinook in Idaho rivers, but there are other places to fish for them. They’re not Chinook that come from the ocean, Fish and Game stocks land-locked Chinook in lakes and reservoirs, and biologists are asking anglers to help them learn more about these fish in Anderson Ranch, Lucky Peak and Deadwood reservoirs in southwest Idaho and Spirit Lake in North Idaho.

Biologists are installing signs and drop boxes at those locations and want anglers who catch a Chinook to leave a small tissue sample from the fish for research.

continued:
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Idaho resident hunters can apply for grizzly bear hunt June 15 through July 15

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, June 14, 2018

One tag will be issued for a hunt in a portion of Eastern Idaho, drawing expected in early August

Fish and Game will accept applications for a 2018 grizzly bear tag starting June 15, and the deadline to apply is July 15. The drawing is limited to Idaho residents with a valid Idaho hunting license.

Hunters can apply at any Fish and Game license vendor, at Fish and Game regional offices, online at idfg.huntfishidaho.net, or by mail. All mailed applications must be postmarked no later than July 15.

continued:
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Cow on the loose: Cow escapes cattle sale, trots about Lewiston neighborhoods

by Shannon Moudy, KLEW Thursday, June 14th 2018

Lewiston, Idaho (KLEW) — Early Wednesday, a cow escaped and ran all throughout the city of Lewiston for several hours causing a frenzy for police and animal control.

KLEW News reports how all of the “cow-motion” started.

“I was sitting at my table in my house with the front door open and I see this big brown object going by out front, course I have to get up and check it out,” said Shirley Womack who witnessed the animal.

Strolling through alleys, moseying across lawns, with animal control not far behind, a cow was loose in a Lewiston neighborhood.

continued w/video:
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Seasonal Humor:

Fatherdrivethru-a

SpringBirdNest-a
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Tips & Advice

A Word about Food

June 12, 2018 by Lisa Marie Krysiak

Summer is here, so this means that many of us will plan outdoor festivities with food and drinks. Grocery shopping becomes a little challenging when we know that the food will be exposed to air for a period of time, so beginning with storing the food properly after it’s purchased is important. I’ll share some tips I’ve learned and some of which surprised me.

Starting with meat, people usually store it in the freezer the minute they get home, but it doesn’t necessarily mean its freezer ready. Average meat wrappers found in your local grocers let in airflow, which means that the exposure can produce bacteria, lowering the quality of your meat. You should always rewrap your meat with freezer paper, forcing out any additional air before freezing it.

Fresh vegetables should be blanched before you freeze them. The boiling water will help stop enzymatic action, which usually strip the flavor and freshness from your vegetables. If you do this prior to any outdoor activity…it will help keep them fresher vs just washing and storing them in your refrigerator. Crisp is best.

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To Rinse Or Not To Rinse: How Washing Some Foods Can Help You Avoid Illness

June 13, 2018 by Jill Neimark – NPR

This spring, millions of Americans worried that salad was no longer safe to eat: The U.S. was hit by the largest E. coli outbreak in a decade, with 172 people in 32 states sickened by contaminated romaine lettuce. Eighty-nine of those individuals were hospitalized, and at least five died.

Would rinsing lettuce have prevented the outbreak? Likely not, because the E. coli organism that caused the outbreak is so hardy that only a few bacteria are necessary to cause illness. And E. coli can survive in frozen or refrigerated temperatures. It is only destroyed through cooking or pasteurization, according to Colorado State University.

Rinsing does help prevent other illnesses associated with food. But it can sometimes cause more problems by splashing bacteria onto sinks and countertops. As summer and outdoor eating events beckon, here are some tips on what foods to rinse, how to rinse, and why.

continued:
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June 10, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

June 10, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
June 12 10am to 2pm Community Hall Clean Up Day
June 20 Yellow Pine Vet Clinic call 208-382-4590 for appointment
June 30 Golf Tournament
July 4 Parade 2pm and Fireworks at dusk
July 7 Community Hall Yard Sale 9am to Noon
July 14 at 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
July 19 Noxious Weed Day
July 21 10am CPR Class at the Fire Station
August 3, 4, 5 Music and Harmonica Festival
August 11 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 8 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Budget Hearing
September 8 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting

(details below)
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Village News:

Sunday Morning Snow

link to FB photo:

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Dust Abatement Sign-up

It’s time to think dust abatement again. Word from North American Dust Control is that they will be in YP sometime in June. Please let me know if you are interested in having dust abatement done. fillerd2 @ live.com or 633-6945. – Deb F.
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Looking for White Folding Tables

Hi Yellow Pine

The Community Hall is missing some white folding tables. Please check your area and return the tables to the Community Hall.

Thank You
Kathleen Hall
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Life Flight

The Helicopter Landing Zone (HLZ) class was on June 5th at 2pm. “It was a great turn-out of at least 22 people!” The presentation with Life Flight will started at the fire station and ended at Johnson Creek Airport with a helicopter landing.

Photo album on Facebook:

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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Thursday, June 7th, a report the dumpsters had been emptied and the Transfer Station was clean. The road was rough between Yellow Pine and the dump.

Please do not dump household appliances at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

However, there is a burn pile for woody debris only. “Bring it, Don’t Burn it.”
— — — —

Ticks, Skeeters and Pollen

Getting reports that ticks are still pretty bad and the mosquitoes are out in droves. Pine pollen time, puddles have yellow “bathtub” rings.
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Local Events:

Community Hall Clean Up Day June 12 10am to 2pm, Mark Your Calendar

Hi Yellow Pine Folks;

Yes it is clean up time getting ready for Summer.

I need help, please.

Kitchen Floor Prepped for Linoleum
Clean Fridge and Freezer
Main Room
Wash Floor
Wash Windows
Outside
Cut and Weed Whack Grass
Burn Hard Wood Behind Community Hall
Put Corrugated Panels Behind Community Hall
Clean Steps of Bird Poop
Paint Picnic Tables
Basement
Remove Trash

Things That We Need
Rags
Paint Brushes
Paper Towels
Trash Bags

Thank you to everyone for your support of your Community Hall.
Kathleen Hall
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Yellow Pine Vet Clinic June 20

Dr. Keith Ruble from Cascade Vet Clinic will be in Yellow Pine on Wednesday June 20th. You must sign up via the clinic by calling (208) 382-4590 (M-W-F) so they can bring charts and meds.

The clinic will be at 125 Pioneer Street (white house, green roof) in the morning.
— — — —

4th of July Golf Tournament June 30th

Our 20th annual Yellow Pine Golf Tournament will take place on June 30th 2018. The proceeds will go towards the Yellow Pine Medical Training and Supply Fund. By giving to this annual event, you’ll be supporting the village of Yellow Pine and our growing EMS service.

Thanks to Cascade Fire/EMS Fire Commissioners, Chief Steve Hull and the EMS Director Keri Donica, Yellow Pine is now a Cascade Fire/EMS Paramedic Ambulance Sub-station. This allows us to have equipment available in Yellow Pine to treat and care for patients in the field, not only First Aid but Advanced Life Support. Yellow Pine now has Nationally Registered: 4 EMR’s, 1 RN-EMT, and 1 Paramedic in Yellow Pine.

The cost for the event is $20/person or $50 will give you a sponsorship and pay for 2 players!

As a sponsor, your name will be put on a plaque, or you can provide your own sign for the event. This plaque will be posted on one of our 18 holes during the tournament.

To reserve a place in the tournament please contact Jeff or Ann Forster @ aforsterrn@aol.com or call (208) 633-1010.

You can mail your payments to: P.O. Box 38 Yellow Pine, ID. 83677.

Please make checks payable to “Cascade Fire EMS” attn: YP Golf Tournament.

Thanks in advance for your consideration.

Sincerely,
Jeff Forster – Paramedic & Ann Forster – BS, RN, EMT
Event Coordinators
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Yard Sale – Saturday, July 7 9am-Noon

Garage Sale Date Change

Due to the busy day we will have on June 30, I have decided to more the garage sale to July 7 from 9-noon.

Everyone can bring their items anytime to the community hall. I will have a space marked for the items.

Please remember this is a Donation and Everything Must Work.

If you want your items back if they don’t sell you must pick them up at 12:30 on July 7th.

The proceeds of the Garage Sale will go to the maintenance of the Community Hall.

If you have questions please call Kathy Hall at 208 633 6270 or text to 630 915 1544

Thank you everyone for your support of the Yellow Pine Community Hall
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July 19 (free) Noxious Weed Day

Steve has scheduled his visit to Yellow Pine for Thursday July 19th. The staging area will be the Fire Department. He will bring up the Chemicals and spray equipment. Backpack sprayers, pump up sprayers, ATV tanks and he needs to know how many of these we need. He will leave everything there for the weekend and pick it all up Monday. Please call Kathy Hall 208 633-6270 for forms and information.

link to form:
Steve Anderson from Valley County Weed Control
Office (208)382-7199
e-mail: SAnderson @ co.valley.id.us
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Local Groups:

VYPA News:

Summer Meeting Schedule:

July 14, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
August 11, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 8, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
— — — —

YPFD News:

June 3 – Training today consisted of General Orientation for some and Rope training for others.

Link to photo gallery on FB:

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required. The free permits show the fire officials who has a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, the fire department can then see if that person has their burn permit or if they need to go and address the source of the unknown smoke.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911 @ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

YP Fire Budget Hearing: September 8, 2018 – 10am Community Hall

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Test of the fire siren will resume beginning June 1, at 12:00 noon and go through November

CPR class coming to YP July 21st 10am at the Fire Station (includes AED). If interested please notify Jeff or Ann.

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

The Helispot needs a lot of work and a base needs to be put down before officially being used. I’m currently in discussion with some folks to help with the ground prep and to put the base down. Life Flight and other agencies will need to do an inspection as well before using the helispot.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

Jeff F.

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
— — — —

2018 Festival:

The next planning meeting will be June 22

August 3, 4, 5 Music and Harmonica Festival
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Now open for summer (208) 633-3377
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern

Hours: 9am to 8pm daily

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine.
— — — —

The Corner 633-3325

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
— — — —

Local Propane Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
— — — —

Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430

We have a great price on wild bird seed. $19.99 for a 50 lb bag. 12.99 for a 25 lb bag. We also sell suet blocks (peanut crunch, and cherry) for $1.99 per block. Niger Thistle seed $13.25 for 5 lbs.
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (June 4) a few sprinkles of rain after midnight, overnight low of 46 degrees, dry and partly cloudy this morning. Big pileated woodpecker drumming on the power pole, then flapped over to the ant pile. Swallows taking feathers to the nests this morning, finches singing. There are now 6 eggs in the swallow nest we are watching. Increasing clouds during the day, thicker with dark bottoms and some pretty hard gusts of wind in the afternoon, high of 80 degrees. Red-breasted nuthatch tapping seeds open and cassins finches at the feeders. Calmer and cloudy by sunset, then almost clear at dark with one long “roll” cloud stretching from north to south. A bear dashed across the golf course before dark.

Tuesday (June 5) overnight low of 44 degrees, high haze and thin clouds over most of the sky this morning, not much dew. Swallows swooping for feathers. Finches and robins calling. Not many birds around. A couple of jays hanging out with the chickens. Mamma swallow covered her eggs with feathers while she was gone to feed, but mostly setting on her 6 eggs today. Warm afternoon, high thin clouds, high of 77 degrees. Helicopter (Life Flight class) hovered (landed?) by the cross roads. Slowly cooling off after sundown under hazy skies. Loud robins calling just before dark.

Wednesday (June 6) overnight low of 39 degrees, solid high overcast and light breezes. Swallows swooping low, finches and red-breasted nuthatches at the feeders. Ground squirrels wrestling in the grass. Lilacs are about done blooming, mountain ash is blooming well. Warm day, high of 82 degrees. A couple of jays visiting this afternoon, no sign of grosbeaks. Swallows flying low at dusk.

Thursday (June 7) overnight low of 47 degrees, mostly cloudy (thin) this morning and dry. A few early airplanes. Finches visiting and swallows swooping low. Amerigas was in delivering propane this morning. Thick dark clouds after lunch time and impressive thunder, light short showers. Pileated woodpecker drumming on a power pole down here, answered by another to the north. Papa swallow took his turn setting on the 6 eggs while Mamma swallow went out for a bite to eat. Rufous (male) hummingbird visited after the rain shower. Ground squirrels and golden mantels active in the afternoon. Very dark clouds in the afternoon, thunder and gusty breezes and sprinkles of rain, high of 80 degrees. Light showers before sundown and again after midnight.

Friday (June 8) overnight low of 45 degrees, almost clear this morning, one little patch of foggy clouds on Johnson Creek ridge. Finches, grosbeaks, nuthatches and a couple of jays at the feeders, swallows swooping and calling. Both parents take turns setting on the eggs, the male comes in when the female leaves to feed. Clouds building after lunch time, dark bottoms and fluffy tops, warm and light breezes, high of 80 degrees. Pileated woodpecker drumming on the power pole and some grosbeaks and brown headed cowbirds showed up later in the afternoon. Mostly clear and mild at sundown. Skeeters and gnats are out.

Saturday (June 9) overnight low of 44 degrees and partly clear, clouds coming in. Helicopter and airplane traffic early. Finches and cowbirds at the feeders. Swallows still taking feathers to the nest, spy-cam shows female setting on eggs and arraigning new feathers. Dark clouds and gusty winds after lunch, light sprinkles after 3pm, high of 74 degrees. More finches after the rain. Evening rain showers, cool and dark clouds. Female evening grosbeak at the feeder in the rain, white-breasted nuthatch visited. Female swallows in the bird houses, males sitting in the rain on the power line at dusk. Rained most of the night.

Sunday (June 10) overnight low of 35 degrees, damp and mostly cloudy / partly clear this morning. Fresh snow on the ridges above 6000′. Robins, finches and swallows calling. Cool and breezy today, high of 55 degrees (so far), partly clear / mostly cloudy. This afternoon the male swallows are not around, females are sitting on eggs. Young colombian ground squirrels out and about, couple of golden mantel squirrels cleaning up under the bird feeders this afternoon, and a red-breasted nuthatch visited.
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RIP:

John Charles (Skip) Gould
1950-2018
SkipGould

John Charles (Skip) Gould, 67 of Yellow Pine, Idaho died from cancer on May 26th, 2018 at a family member’s home in Meridian, Idaho.

Skip was born on September 7th, 1950 to Orpha and Larry Gould Sr. in Caldwell, Idaho. He had two older Siblings, Pat Hurley and Larry (Butch) Gould.

He grew up in Caldwell and graduated from Caldwell High School in 1968, later that year he joined the Marines and spent two years serving his country doing a one year tour in Vietnam.

After his return to Idaho, Skip worked – traveled to numerous countries with his close friend Bob Wennstrom – worked, and then seeing what the world had to offer, settled down in the small community of Yellow Pine when he was employed by Canadian Superior for the Stibnite Mining project in the mid- 1970s. After his employment with Superior ended, he remained in Yellow Pine at the “Cabin” and was only gone when his work required temporary residence throughout the U.S. This was from the Arctic Circle in Alaska to the Mexican borderlands in New Mexico, from Pennsylvania to the Columbia River gorge windmill country, and to Louisiana, he and his wife, Shizuko saw very much of what this vast country’s diversity provided.

Skip met Shizuko in Caldwell and then got married in her homeland of Okinawa where her family lives.

He was preceded in death by his parents. He is survived by his wife, Shizuko, his sister Pat and his brother Butch.

Skip’s wishes were not to have a service.

Memories and condolences may be shared with the family on Skip’s memorial webpage at http://www.summersfuneral.com

Published in Idaho Statesman on June 6, 2018
Guest Book:
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Yellow Pine Memory 2004

20040117skirace3-ABig Excitement in Downtown Yellow Pine

The Pioneer Military Cross Country Ski Challenge was held in Yellow Pine on Saturday, January 17th, 2004. The Army and Marines were represented by good men, (names withheld upon request.) The race started about 1pm at the dump, and the contestants crossed the finish line at the Yellow Pine NCO Club (a.k.a. The Corner Bar) about 40 minutes later, in a photo finish!

A crowd of well wishers assembled at the finish line when the skiers were first sighted at the edge of town. To 20040117skirace4-Athe strains of “Chariots of Fire” on the loud speakers – and cheers from the crowd – Army and Marine matched stride for stride up the main street. Suddenly, the Marine fell down, but as a good soldier would help a fellow comrade in arms, Army stopped and helped him to his feet.

Again, they started for the finish line, with the music swelling in the background, and the crowd going wild (and 4 video camera running), the skiers crossed the finish line – in a DEAD HEAT.

[Note: Both our good friends in the photos have passed, Sarge (Army) and Skip (Marine).
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Letter to Share:

Noxious weeds a problem even at high elevation

We’re lucky here in Valley County, if you can call it lucky. Because of our higher elevation and short growing season we don’t have near the problem with noxious weeds than some of our neighboring counties do.

We only have about 18 of the 67 weeds on the Idaho Noxious Weed List. Noxious weeds effects everyone!, but it is the private landowners’ responsibility to control weeds on their own property, If you have a 1/4-acre lot in town or 25,000 acres of rangeland and pasture you must do whatever is necessary to control the spread of noxious and invasive plants.

There is some help available through the landowners assistance “Cost Share” program. We received some funding from the Idaho State Department of Agriculture to purchase herbicide to give out to private landowners to help treat noxious weeds only.

We can help you Identifying noxious weeds, we have herbicide at no charge and equipment we loan out, and we can offer advice on that is the best method to control your weeds.

Contact the Valley County Weed Department at 208-382-7199 or e-mail me at SAnderson@co.valley.id.us

Please leave a message with a return phone number and please be patient, we are still short-staffed and will return your call as soon as we can.

Steve Anderson, Valley County, Weed and Pest Control

source: The Star-News
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Idaho News:

Assessor: Property values rise in McCall

Some commercial properties see big jump

By Tom Grote for The Star-News June 7, 2018

Property values increased by an average of 10.3 percent in Valley County this year over last year, according to figures released this week by the Valley County Assessor’s Office.

Commercial properties often saw large increases, some at least 60 percent, to make up for those properties being undervalued in past years, according to the assessor’s office.

The report comes as owners of 24,673 parcels of property in Valley County received their 2018 assessment notices beginning this week.

Residential values in McCall increased the most due to a surge in real estate sales and construction the past two years. Residential values in the Donnelly and Cascade areas also increased, but not as much as McCall, the figures said.

An increase in valuation does not necessarily mean property taxes, Statistician Anthony Francesconi of the assessor’s office said.

State law caps increases in budgets by local governments to 3 percent per year, Francesconi said. “In theory, when assessed value increases, the levies go down,” he said.

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June 20 deadline noted to pay Adams, Valley property taxes

The Star-News June 7, 2018

June 20 at 5 p.m. is the deadline for property owners in Adams and Valley counties to pay the second half of their yearly property taxes.

Late charges and interest will begin on June 21, with interest retroactive from Jan. 1, 2018, so mailed payments should be correctly stamped by date.

The treasurers’ offices in both counties are open during the lunch hour Mondays through Fridays.

Valley County accepts credit card payments at http://co.valley.id.us or by calling 208-382-7110.

In Adams County, payments can be placed in the drop box at the main courthouse entrance in Council.

The office has credit card, debit card or echeck payment options online at http://co.adams.id.us or by calling 208- 253-4263 Ext. 6 for questions.

source:
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Searchers find body of missing McCall man

Relatives located 60-year-old Shayne Upshaw Friday evening.

KTVB June 8, 2018

Valley County – The body of a missing 60-year-old McCall man was found by searchers at around 6:30 p.m. Friday, the Valley County Sheriff’s Office said.

Shayne A. Upshaw was reported missing on Wednesday. His family said no one had seen him in more than five days. The sheriff’s office was told that Upshaw suffered from diabetes and may have had other medical issues.

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Cascade Schools staffers to take early retirement to save teachers’ jobs

Last week, the Cascade School District announced they were going to have to cut four positions. But to ensure nobody had to lose their job, two tenured staffers stepped up – helping close the budget gap.

Morgan Boydston KTVB June 7, 2018

Cascade, Idaho — A scenario rural school districts across the state are dealing with is playing out in the mountain town of Cascade.

As the school district struggles with funding and dwindling enrollment, they’re left to make cuts in staff and resources. Last week, the Cascade School District announced they were going to have to cut four positions; they said they were going to leave two positions vacant (two teachers are leaving the district) and lay off two other teachers – what is known as a Reduction in Force (RIF) to save money and get out of deficit spending.

But to ensure nobody had to lose their job, two tenured staffers stepped up – helping close the budget gap. Educator, technology director, and bus driver, Chris Hinze, and English and drama teacher, Roni Rankin, have been with the district for more than three decades. They are now making a sacrifice and set to take retirement early.

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Study: Cascade Airport in good condition, but some work needed

By Max Silverson for The Star-News June 7, 2018

The Cascade Airport is in good condition and does not require substantial improvements over the next 20 years, according to the airport’s newly updated master plan.

A public hearing on the updated plan will be held before the Cascade City Council starting at 5 p.m. Monday at Cascade City Hall.

The airport is located two miles south of the city along Idaho 55 and is owned, operated and managed by the city.

The 4,300-foot runway is “excellent” condition, having been rebuilt in 2012, and there is no need to extend or widen the runway in the next 20 years, the study said.

However, the apron, where planes are parked adjacent to the runway, is in poor condition, showing multiple deep cracks.

The city has requested funding to design a renovation of the apron, said Rob Terry, the former Cascade mayor who is chair of the city’s Airport Advisory Committee.

Most of the $166,700 cost of the design will be paid by the Federal Aviation Administration and the Idaho Department of Aeronautics, but the city’s share will be about $10,000, Terry said.

The airport sees about 8,150 take-offs and landings per year, of which about 75 percent are the takeoffs and landings of planes from Arnold Aviation, which supplies mail to backcountry locations, Terry said.

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Farmers market to open in Donnelly on Wednesday

The Star-News June 7, 2018

Valley County will get another farmers market when the Donnelly Farmers Market opens on Wednesday.

The market will operate each Wednesday, except for July 4, from 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at the Donnelly City Park, located on F.W. Gestrin Street across from Donnelly Elementary School.

The market will be operated by a nonprofit group and will offer locally and regionally grown fruits and vegetables as well as honey, eggs, baked goods and crafts.

The market’s opening day will also have several interactive activities for children, along with blood pressure checks and dental screenings, for adults.

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Logging in

‘Bold Betties’ clear Arling Trail near Tamarack Resort and surprise themselves

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News June 7, 2018

Laura Feeney could watch two-person crosscut saws make quick work of downed logs all day if she wasn’t on one end of the saw herself.

Feeney and seven other women spent last weekend working to clear Arling Trail on West Mountain near Tamarack Resort.

The cleanup effort was the result of a partnership between the Boise Bold Betties and the Idaho Trails Association.

“It felt so amazing to help open a trail and know that people will be able to use it and hopefully gain some peace and maybe even some strength,” said Pam Bond, who is a member of both the Bold Betties and the trails association board of directors.

In all, the group cut out 18 downed trees, built two drainage dips and spent several hours clearing brush from the trail corridor, said Bond, the project co-leader.

Each downed log cleared from the trail was immediately followed by loud cheering and congratulations all around.

“I was excited to put together an all-woman trail maintenance trip and I knew the Bold Betties were just the gals for it,” Bond said.

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Bold Betties Idaho Working as a crew!

link to photos on Facebook:

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Idaho to take over regulating water pollution from EPA

By Keith Ridler – 6/5/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idaho will take over regulating pollution discharge into the state’s lakes and rivers from the federal government under an agreement signed Tuesday by the head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt said the agreement was the culmination of a tremendous amount of work and partnership between the state and the federal agency.

“Congratulations to the state of Idaho,” he said. “We are excited to sign this and look forward to working with Idaho as we go forward on these issues.”

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Idaho utility sues EPA over Hells Canyon dams requirement

Idaho Power seeks to force the EPA to allow warmer water temperatures in the Snake River below the Hells Canyon Complex.

Keith Ridler Associated Press June 7, 2018

Boise – An Idaho utility has filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency contending the agency failed to act on a request by the state of Idaho to modify water temperature standards below a hydroelectric project on the Idaho-Oregon border.

The lawsuit filed Wednesday by Idaho Power Company in U.S. District Court seeks to force the agency to approve a 2012 request by Idaho allowing warmer water temperatures in the Snake River below the Hells Canyon Complex.

The area is a key spawning spot for federally protected fall chinook salmon.

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Nearing the end of spring runoff season

by Nathan Larsen Friday, June 8th 2018


Bureau of Reclamation Storage Levels.

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Now that we’re heading into the middle of June, much of the snowpack in the higher elevations has melted and we’ve seen the peak of spring runoff season. Many of the reservoirs are stuffed to capacity and water resource managers are cutting back the amount being released from the dams now that natural flow rates are falling. Flow rates along the Boise River have dropped to just over 2,220 cubic feet per second(cfs) from roughly 4,500 cfs earlier in the week.

As it currently sits, the Boise River system is in great shape, sitting at just over 910,000 acre-feet compared the average of 802,000 acre-feet. The Payette River and Boise River systems are at 99% and 96% of overall capacity, respectively. The water supply being above average, not from this years below average snowpack levels, but from the abundance of carryover from the 2016-2017 water year.

Now that the river levels are dropping it won’t be too long before it’s ‘safe’ to be out recreating on them, however, depending on how quickly the remaining snowpack melts off could spike the levels a little bit. Be sure to be safe this weekend, rivers are still flowing swiftly and water temperatures are remain very chilly.

source:
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Mining News:

Ask Midas: How Do I See the Site?

May 30

Midas Gold Idaho wants to keep the community informed about the work we are doing at the Stibnite Gold Project site. The Ask Midas blog series gives the experts in our company a chance to answer some of the community’s most frequently asked questions and help clear up any misconceptions around the project.

The history of the Stibnite Mining District is important to understanding why we have proposed our project the way we have. We think the best way for people to understand why we want to restore the site is to come and see the Stibnite Gold Project site for yourself this summer.

How Can I Visit the Stibnite Gold Project Site?

Every summer, when the roads are no longer muddy and the weather has warmed up, we invite community members to join us on a tour of the Stibnite Gold Project site. On the tour, we show guests the former Stibnite town site, the Yellow Pine Pit, the former Meadow Creek Mine and mill site, as well as the location of the legacy tailings and heap leach facilities. At each of these stops, we share the history of the site and point out the legacies that have been left behind.

Tours are offered on a first-come, first-serve basis and leave from McCall, Cascade and Yellow Pine. To find out the dates of the tours this summer and to reserve your spot, call (208) 669-2380 or email couture@MidasGoldInc.com. Typically, we leave Cascade or McCall at 8:00 a.m. or Yellow Pine at 10:00 a.m. and return to Yellow Pine by 3:00 p.m., and Cascade or McCall a couple of hours later. We also provide snacks, lunch and water. If you have a group larger than 10 people, we may be able to set up a special tour date just for you and your group. We hope you’ll consider joining us this summer!

If you have a question you would like us to answer, please email it to community@midasgoldcorp.com

source:
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Fire News:

Fire season underway as Boise BLM responds to multiple wildfires

For Immediate Release: June 5, 2018, 9:30pm
Contact: Boise District Fire Information Line (208) 384-3378
Twitter: @BLMIdahoFire

A clear indication that fire season has arrived, the Boise District BLM responded to four wildfires this afternoon. Fire crews hope to have all fires controlled by the end of shift tomorrow. As fuels continue to dry out, the Boise BLM urges the public to take all necessary fire safety precautions when recreating on public lands.

MM 28 HWY 78 Fire
* Located approximately 3 miles north of Murphy, ID
* Approximately 25 acres
* Cause under investigation
* Boise BLM fire resources – 4 engines and 1 dozer

Baja Fire
* Located approximately 10 miles northwest of GrandView, ID
* Approximately 208 acres
* Cause under investigation
* Boise BLM fire resources – 2 engines and 1 water tender

Sommer Fire
* Located approximately 6 miles southwest of Marsing, ID
* Approximately 212 acres
* Cause under investigation
* Boise BLM fire resources – 2 engines and 1 water tender
* The Marsing Rural Fire Department and the Owyhee Range Fire Protection Association also responded to this incident

Dale Fire
* Located approximately 6 miles southwest of Kuna, ID
* Approximately 1/2 acre
* Cause under investigation
* This incident was controlled today at 2:00pm

For More Information
Jared Jablonski, Fire Information and Prevention Office, 208 384-3210
Idaho Wildfires visit http://www.IdahoFireInfo.com
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Large brush fire burning near Massacre Rocks State Park

Local News 9 June 10, 2018

A brush fire is burning west of American Falls near Massacre Rocks State Park.

The fire began Saturday afternoon and has burned over several acres north of the Snake River.

Firefighters say heavy winds are pushing the fire larger.

continued:
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Joe Winters Cabin fire June 9, 2018

River Joe Cabin fire June 9, 2018, a sad day here at Massacre Rocks State Park. Since 1935, Joe Winters hermit cabin was a landmark here at the park, but a range fire burned the 83-year old cabin to the ground today.

link to FB album:

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Boise Fire issues warning on illegal fireworks: ‘the consequences can be devastating’

Idaho law prohibits the sale of aerial fireworks to the general public, but that doesn’t keep people from getting their hands on them and setting them off.

KTVB June 5, 2018

Boise – With annual Independence Day celebrations just a month away, the Boise Fire Department is reminding everyone that only “safe and sane” fireworks are legal in Idaho.

Safe and sane fireworks are essentially fireworks that stay on the ground. Idaho law prohibits the sale of aerial fireworks to the general public.

The Boise Fire Department says they want fireworks vendors to know that if an illegal firework sold from their stand causes a fire, they will be held responsible.

Anyone who sparks a wildfire can be required to pay restitution for the cost of fighting the fire. Last year, a Boise man who started the Table Rock Fire of 2016 pleaded guilty to unlawful use of fireworks, and was ordered to pay almost $400,000 in restitution.

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Regional Intermountain Newsletter Special Issue

June 8, 2018

link:
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Public Lands:

Westside Divide Projects – Scoping Started

The Emmett Ranger District of the Boise National Forest is proposing a series of projects to address forest health and hazardous fuel concerns along the west side of the District. The Cottonwood, Ola Summit, and Tripod project areas collectively comprise the West Side Divide (WSD) project (see enclosure). Proposed treatments and additional information about the WSD project, in addition to what is presented here, can also be found on the Tripod project webpage. (Click on the Scoping tab to access the scoping letter.)
https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=54015

Proposed treatments are intended to manage forest structure and species composition to improve forest landscape resiliency to recover from uncharacteristic insect and disease disturbances, while promoting development of the large-tree size class dominated by seral tree species, and achieve Forest Plan desired vegetation and wildlife source habitat conditions. Proposed actions include commercial and non-commercial thinning, other product removal (e.g. firewood), slash treatment including lop and scatter, mastication, and pile and burn, and prescribed burning. Implementation would begin in 2020 in the Cottonwood area, with the Ola Summit and Tripod areas likely starting implementation in 2021.

District Ranger Newton is requesting public input (scoping) on all three WSD project areas to identify any potential issues that have not already been identified during interdisciplinary team efforts to develop this project.

There is potential to use the Farm Bill Categorical Exclusion (CE) for these projects. If a CE is used, there would not be an additional period where written comments are solicited for the project. However, it should be understood that some aspects of the proposed actions could change prior to a decision being signed based on comments received during scoping, collaboration with the Boise Forest Coalition, Tribal Consultation, and additional field work and analysis conducted by resource specialists.

In order for your scoping comments to be reviewed and considered in a timely manner, we ask that you please submit them within 30 calendar days following the date of signature on this letter. Comments specific to the proposed action that identify a cause-effect relationship are most helpful. Comments received in response to this solicitation, including names and addresses of those who comment, will be considered part of the public record for this project and will be available for public inspection. Several options are available for submitting comments.

Electronic comments can be sent to the Emmett Ranger District Comment Inbox. For those receiving a hardcopy, the email address is: comments-intermtn-boise-emmett@fs.fed.us. Please be sure to include “West Side Divide” in the email subject line. An automated response should confirm your electronic submission has been received. Acceptable formats for electronic submission are text or html e- mail, Adobe portable document format (PDF), and formats viewable in Microsoft Office applications (e.g. Word). Electronic comments can also be submitted via the project comment web form.
https://cara.ecosystem-management.org/Public//CommentInput?Project=54015

Hardcopy comments can be:

Mailed to:

Boise National Forest, Emmett Ranger District
Attn: Deb Lozinski
1805 Hwy 16, Room 5
Emmett, ID 83617

Hand delivered to:
Emmett Ranger District (1805 Hwy 16, Room 5 Emmett, ID 83617)
Front Desk (Specify comments are for West Side Divide)

Faxed to:
(208) 365-7037, Attn: Deb Lozinski (Specify on the cover page that these are comments for the West Side Divide projects)

Thank you for taking the time to review the actions proposed for this project. If you have any questions, please direct them to Deb Lozinski, Project Leader, at 208-365-7016.

Sincerely, Tera Little (208-373-4157)
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BLM to release wild horses to Sands Basin Herd Management Area

Contact: Heather Tiel-Nelson (208) 736-2352
June 5, 2018

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management Owyhee Field Office will release 26 wild horses to the Sands Basin Herd Management Area (HMA) southwest of Homedale on June 13, 2018. Nearly all of the Sands Basin HMA was burned by the 279,144-acre Soda Fire in 2015.

The BLM gathered 279 wild horses from the three HMAs in the Owyhees directly following the fire and has been caring for those that will return to the range at both the Boise Wild Horse Corrals and Bruneau Off-Range Corrals since that time. Over 80 of the horses gathered have been adopted.

“We are very pleased to see the wild horses released to Sands Basin,” said Lara Douglas, BLM Boise District Manager. “Maintaining viable wild horse herds on healthy public rangelands is important to the BLM.”

Three trailer loads of horses will be released, and the process happens fairly quickly. If members of the public are interested in watching the release, BLM staff will meet at the I-O-N Truck Plaza, 5644 Buntrock Road, in Marsing at 10:30 a.m. on June 13 to caravan to the observation area. Visitors will need to provide their own transportation – preferably a vehicle with high clearance, four-wheel drive and a spare tire – and be prepared to walk a short distance over uneven terrain to the viewing area. Please expect the road to the viewing area to be rough and dusty.

For more information about the release, please contact Heather Tiel-Nelson, (208) 736-2352.
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Forest Service Intermountain Region News

Volume 2 Issue 9 June 8, 2018

link:
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Letter to Share:

News From the Gamebird Foundation

June 6th, 2018 Newsletter

Things have been busy for the Foundation this spring. We had the KIDS FREE DAY AT LITTLE CANYON SPORTING. There was small bore riffle shooting, shooting at clays with shot guns, hunting for ring neck rooster pheasants, and then, after all that, there was one heck of a lunch for all the kids and their mentors. The only cost was driving up to Little Canyon Sports above Peck, Idaho. There were approximately 60 + kids that had completed their hunter ed. that hunted pheasants. We really want to thank Sonny, Andy, and the crew that made this happen. I would like to again thank all the sponsors and volunteers that came and offered to help and provided ammunition and food.

Moving on, we are into the pheasant chick raising stage. We are into the 3rd week of the season now. The members of the foundation have brought in about 3000 chicks so far to raise and release into wildlife habitat. The chicks come from Little Canyon Hatchery. Idaho Fish and Game (IDFG), supplies money for the chicks. To raise chicks, we require that you have a current membership with the Gamebird Foundation. There is a special form that has to be filled out for IDFG because they need to know where the Pheasants have been raised. The pheasant chicks are free to the Gamebird Foundation members and we have baby chick feed at a reduced rate. We are currently in need of a place in Orofino, Kamiah, or Kooskia to store grain for the chicks. It would be nice to find a place to store about 10 to 15 50 lb. bags.

We are in the process of building brooders that will handle 100 to 125 baby chicks. We are getting some donated material, but need to buy heaters, feeders, and waterers for them. Some folks are building their own; we have a couple folks that are building them as we get the material for them. They cost money, so if you find a few dimes to spare we could use them in the form of a donation or even just becoming a member. All the membership and donation money goes into this project.

We are also working on the fall project of releasing full-grown rooster pheasants for youth hunting on “Access Yes” land. This program started last year with IDFG furnishing the rooster pheasants from Little Canyon. We have a place on the Palouse River where The Gamebird Foundation releases the birds every Friday evening for the kids to hunt on Saturday and the rest of the week. Last year we released 250 roosters. This year we will have more to release. More on this later. The Gottchalk family has donated this property for the “Access Yes” hunts, but we are looking for more ground for additional hunts. If you know of some or have some let us know and we will help you to get into a program.

Membership for the Gamebird Foundation is $20.00 for the family. All funds that we can raise from membership and donations goes into raising and releasing the birds into good habitat. We are a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization so your donations are tax deductible. We have no paid employees, as we are all volunteers. Come join us, as we can use a donation in any form – volunteer help and cash. We have some great items that have been donated for silent auction, which will be released later.

Please pass on to friends and family.

Jim Hagedorn
Executive Director
GamebirdFoundation
The Gamebird Foundation
208-883-3423
Jhag1008 @ gmail.com
PO Box 100, Viola, Idaho 83872
http://www.thegamebirdfoundation.org
Promoting Habitat Protection and Responsible Land Management
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – What is a corneal ulcer?

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Jun 1, 2018 IME

The cornea is the outermost layer of our eye. Light shines through the cornea, then through the lens, then hits the rods and cones in the retina, which read light. A corneal ulcer occurs when the protective surface layer of the cornea is scratched. The deeper layers of the cornea are then infected and, because they have many nerves, the eye becomes very painful. Corneal ulcers range from superficial abrasions and small circular lesions to deep craters that can perforate.

Many things can cause corneal ulcers. The most common are foreign objects such as plant material getting stuck under the lids and rubbing on the cornea. Trauma to the cornea such as cat scratches is also common, as are abnormalities of the eyelids and eyelashes. Exposure to irritants can also cause ulcers, as can poor tear production.

Pain and squinting and pawing at the eye are commonly seen. The eye is usually reddened and often has a purulent discharge. The presence of a corneal ulcer is confirmed by applying a stain to the eye, then washing the stain out. An ulcer will absorb the stain, which then can be outlined and characterized by size, depth and severity.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Pet Talk Tumors of the spleen in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Jun81, 2018 IME

Hemangiosarcoma is a highly malignant tumor of the blood vessels. It commonly arises in the spleen, an organ in the abdomen. Growth of a mass on the spleen may go undetected until it becomes quite large or ruptures, which may result in life-threatening bleeding into the abdomen. Hemangiosarcoma has a high propensity to spread quickly to other organs (metastasis), especially to the liver. Most dogs are middle-age, and affected breeds are Labradors, golden retrievers and German shepherds.

No one knows what causes this tumor to develop. Clinical signs are usually related to internal bleeding that arises from rupture of the splenic mass. This causes acute weakness, collapse, pale gums, abdominal distention and shock. Often, the bleeding stops on its own, and the above signs slowly subside. However, signs often recur due to repeated episodes of bleeding. These can result in death if left untreated.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Asian Lady Beetles: Could They Harm Your Dog?

By Paula Fitzsimmons

When a graphic image of Bailey, the dog with over 40 Asian lady beetles stuck to the roof of her mouth, surfaced in 2016, pet parents were naturally alarmed. Fortunately, her veterinarian was able to remove the beetles, and Bailey was restored to good health.

As a good dog parent, you’d like to know if Asian lady beetles are a threat to your pet. The short answer is yes. But the good news is that these encounters are rare, and when they do occur, they’re usually quite treatable.

Find out whether your dog is at risk, how to prevent encounters with Asian lady beetles, and what to do if she ends up like Bailey.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Household Items That Are Hazardous to Cats!

As any cat-lover will know, our feline friends can get their nose into almost every corner of the house. From closets and cupboards, sheds to shoe-boxes, cats really do love a good nosy! ?

And, while it’s impossible to protect your kitty companion from every danger she might encounter, there are a few items that vets agree should be kept out of the reach of naughty paws. Take a look at our list of household items that are hazardous to cats…

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Groups appeal ruling on killing wolves

June 6, 2018 By Eric Barker Lewiston Tribune

A coalition of environmental groups has asked the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to overturn a January ruling by a federal judge in Idaho that said a small federal agency doesn’t need to complete a new environmental study before killing wolves in the state.

The Boise-based Advocates for the West filed the appeal late last week for its clients, the Friends of the Clearwater, Western Watersheds Project, Center for Biological Diversity, WildEarth Guardians and Predator Defense. The groups claimed Wildlife Services must follow the National Environmental Policy Act and complete an EIS before killing wolves at the behest of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

Wildlife Services has killed more than 100 wolves, at the request of state wildlife managers, in the Lolo Zone near the Idaho-Montana state line since 2011, in an effort to aid ailing elk herds there. That number includes 10 this year.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

US officials OK plan to rebuild Isle Royale wolf population

By John Flesher – 6/7/18 AP

Traverse City, Mich. — With the wolves of Isle Royale National Park on the verge of dying out, federal officials Thursday announced a plan to relocate 20-30 of the elusive predators from the mainland to the Lake Superior archipelago over the next several years, starting as early as this fall.

The National Park Service formally committed to rebuilding the island’s gray wolf population after three years of study and debate, acknowledging the move was contrary to the usual hands-off approach toward designated wilderness areas.

Superintendent Phyllis Green described the move as a necessary trade-off to prevent the park’s moose from becoming so abundant they overeat its trees and shrubs, damaging the environment and eventually threatening their own food supply.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Report: Wisconsin wolf population may be stabilizing

6/6/18 AP

Madison, Wis. — The state’s wolf population may be stabilizing after decades of growth, according to a report from the Wisconsin Department of Resources.

Volunteer trackers reported between 900 and 950 wolf sightings this winter, a slight decline compared to the numbers from the previous year, Wisconsin Public Radio reported.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Education International

Newsletter June 4th, 2018

Video: Wolves continue to kill livestock in northwest Minnesota

Guest Column: Wolf expansion has ranchers worried about their livelihoods

The Economic Impact of Wolves

Commissioners right to be wary of wolves

Newsletter June 9th, 2018

Cattle producer says wolves cause breeding problems

Urban Coyote Attacks Increasing on Humans and Deer
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

 

Justify claims Triple Crown with Belmont Stakes win

(Reuters) – June 9, 2018

Justify won the Belmont Stakes in New York on Saturday to claim U.S. thoroughbred racing’s coveted Triple Crown, becoming just the second horse to achieve the feat since 1978 and the 13th overall.

The favored three-year-old chestnut colt seized an early lead he never relinquished as he stormed around the 1.5 mile (12-furlong) course in two minutes 28.18 seconds for the wire-to-wire win at Belmont Park in Elmont, New York.

The 24-1 long-shot Gronkowski battled from the back of the pack to cross the line second, almost two lengths behind Justify, while the 5-1 Hofburg finished third amid overcast but dry conditions.

continued w/video:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

51-year-old woman seriously injured by elk

Jun 04, 2018 Local News 8

Yellowstone National Park (KIFI/KIDK) – Yellowstone National Park officials report a 51-year-old Las Vegas woman was attacked by a cow elk behind the Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel on Sunday, June 3.

The elk reportedly reared up and kicked Charlene Triplett multiple times with its front legs hitting Triplett’s head, torso and back.

Triplett was flown to the trauma center at Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center because of the severity of her injuries.

According to officials, the elk was protecting a calf bedded down roughly 20 feet away and hidden by other cars.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Another woman injured by elk in accidental encounter

Local News 8 June 5, 2018

Yellowstone National Park (KIFI/KIDK) – Yellowstone National Park Officials report another woman was injured by a cow elk in an accidental encounter behind the Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel on the morning of Tuesday, June 5.

Penny Allyson Behr, 53, from Cypress, Texas was walking between two cabins when she was surprised by an elk bedded along the cabin wall with a calf nearby. She attempted to back away, but the elk pursued and struck her with its legs in the head and torso.

An ambulance transported Behr to Livingston Memorial Hospital.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Tourist gored by bison in Yellowstone National Park

The woman is the third person to be injured by wildlife in Yellowstone in just four days.

KTVB June 7, 2018

Yellowstone National Park — A tourist who got too close to a male bison in Yellowstone National Park was gored when the animal charged her Wednesday.

The incident marks the fourth person injured by Yellowstone wildlife in just over a month.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Rock chuck latches onto 6-year-old girl’s finger

By Tristan Lewis Jun 08, 2018 Local News 8


Photo by Wanda Bates 2000

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – You see them in your neighborhood, and around town; they’re known to be harmless. But a recent report of a 6-year-old being bitten by a rock chuck, or marmot, has one local mother wanting something done about the nuisances.

Wednesday afternoon, Kayla Bradshaw was outside her home in Idaho Falls. Her daughter was walking their Yorkshire terrier on a sidewalk when a rock chuck appeared on a neighbor’s front lawn. The marmot went after the dog, and Bradshaw’s daughter immediately picked the dog up.

“In the process of doing that, she was bitten by this fairly large rock chuck,” said Bradshaw.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Sage grouse DNA study maps crucial mating grounds in US West

By Keith Ridler – 6/5/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Sage grouse have a vast network of mating grounds in the U.S. West akin to interconnected regional airport hubs that the imperiled species is using to maintain genetic diversity across its entire range, a DNA study has revealed.

The 19-page report by the U.S. Forest Service that appeared in a scientific journal in early May involved nearly 6,000 sage grouse samples collected from 2005 to 2015 and maps of some 1,200 mating sites in 10 western states and the Canadian province of Saskatchewan.

Scientists say identifying mating sites that are the most critical hubs can help land managers avoid decisions that could cut the genetic exchange sage grouse need to remain a viable species.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Tick-borne illness rare in Idaho, but very serious

The Idaho Department of Health & Welfare says “it’s been quiet” so far, in terms of diseases in humans, this year. However, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever is one nasty disease not many people are aware of.

Morgan Boydston KTVB June 7, 2018

Eagle — It’s a topic that can make your skin crawl: ticks. And we’re hearing they’re out in force this season.

With more ticks, may come more tick-borne illnesses. But the good news is the Idaho Department of Health & Welfare says “it’s been quiet” so far in terms of diseases in humans this year.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Mormon crickets invade town of Murphy

A KTVB crew in town for another story captured video of the migrating insects crawling everywhere.

KTVB June 7, 2018

Murphy, Idaho – An unwanted seasonal visitor is back in Southwest Idaho. The town of Murphy is being overrun by Mormon crickets.

On Wednesday, a KTVB crew in town for another story spotted the swarming insects crawling all over the exterior walls of the Owyhee County Courthouse.

Deputy clerk Lena Johnson says the crickets are making the walk into into and out of her office a little more difficult.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
June 8, 2018
Issue No. 875
Table of Contents

* Spring Chinook Fishing Extended With Increased Bag Limit; So Far, Jacks Passage Very Low
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440892.aspx

* Study: Less Healthy Adult Sockeye Migrate Earlier Than Healthy Fish To Freshwater
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440891.aspx

* NOAA Fisheries Delivers First Court-Ordered Spring Spill For Fish Report; Shows Complex Operations
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440890.aspx

* Flows Drop on Columbia/Snake, Allows Transition Back To Court-Ordered Spill; Water Supply Forecasts Well Above Average
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440889.aspx

* Idaho Power Files Suit Against EPA Over Water Temperature Standards In Snake River
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440888.aspx

* Washington Stops Boat With Invasive Mussels East Of Spokane; Was Traveling Michigan To Alaska
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440887.aspx

* 2017 Montana Wolf Report Estimates Over 900 Wolves; Says 255 Wolves Harvested 2017-18 Season
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440886.aspx

* Deschutes River Alliance Urges District Court To Maintain Jurisdiction In Clean Water Case
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440885.aspx

* Study Shows Even Small Amounts Of Running Water Can Make a Big Difference For Coastal Coho
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440884.aspx

* Study: Ocean Warming Cause Of Massive Seabird Die-Off On West Coast In 2014
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440883.aspx
———————————–

Fish & Game News:

Public comment period is open for proposed F&G rules requiring legislative approval

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, June 7, 2018

Proposed rules are being considered by the Fish and Game commission, but require legislation

People have until June 27 to enter their comments on these proposals. People can read the full proposals and comment by going to F&G’s Rulemaking Page and filling out online comments.

continued:
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Moose, Bighorn sheep and mountain goat results now available

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Friday, June 8, 2018

Controlled hunt applicants must log in to licensing system to get results

Hunters can now check to see if they drew controlled hunt tags for moose, bighorn sheep and mountain goat. Results are posted through Fish and Game’s licensing system at huntfishidaho.net for those who have already have an account.

Those without an account can get step-by-step instructions on the Controlled Hunts web page. Hunters who were successful in the drawing will receive their tags in the mail.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Funny Critter Stuff:

Snake slithers out of car’s vent as Va. woman drives down the road

by Elizabeth Tyree Wednesday, June 6th 2018


A 2½-foot snake came out of the air vent in a woman’s SUV as she was driving it on her lunch break Monday in Warrenton, Va. (Lora Goff)

Warrenton, Va. (WSET) — A woman got a big shock while driving down Main Street in downtown Warrenton.

Lora Goff told the Washington Post that she was on her lunch break when she looked down next to her steering wheel to see a snake slithering out of the air vent.

Goff said she tried to remain calm as she pulled off the road, jumped out of the SUV, and called police.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

SpringBirdBaby-a
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June 3, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

June 3, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
June 5 at 2pm Helicopter Landing Zone (HLZ) class
June 5 Diamond Fuel Delivery – call (208) 382-4430 to get on the delivery list
June 9 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Commissioner Meeting
June 9 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
June 12 10am to 2pm Community Hall Clean Up Day
June 20 Yellow Pine Vet Clinic call 208-382-4590 for appointment
June 30 Golf Tournament
July 4 Parade 2pm and Fireworks at dusk
July 7 Community Hall Yard Sale 9am to Noon
July 14 at 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
July 19 Noxious Weed Day
August 3, 4, 5 Music and Harmonica Festival
August 11 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 8 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Budget Hearing
September 8 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting

(details below)
———-

Village News:

Dust Abatement Sign-up

It’s time to think dust abatement again. Word from North American Dust Control is that they will be in YP sometime in June. Please let me know if you are interested in having dust abatement done. fillerd2 @ live.com or 633-6945. – Deb F.
— — — —

Looking for White Folding Tables

Hi Yellow Pine

The Community Hall is missing some white folding tables. Please check your area and return the tables to the Community Hall.

Thank You
Kathleen Hall
— — — —

Memorial Day – Cemetery

Cara Heisey and her friend Patti Walker, and their husbands, I think, placed flowers at each gravesite. Cara has decorated the cemetery each year she was in YP for Memorial Day. – Bill Mc
— — — —

Fuel Delivery

We will be delivering fuel June 5th. Have everyone call to place their fuel order and get on the schedule. Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Mail Delivery

We now have 6 day a week mail delivery.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not dump household appliances at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

However, there is a burn pile for woody debris only. “Bring it, Don’t Burn it.”
— — — —

Public Toilets

The vault toilet at Fire Hall was pumped Thursday May 31st by the Forest Service. A report that the outhouses at the Devils Bathtubs campgrounds were cleaned too.
— — — —

Ticks, Skeeters and Pollen

Getting reports that ticks are still pretty bad and the mosquitoes have come out in droves recently. Pine pollen time, drying mud puddles have a rim of yellow pollen.
———-

Local Events:

Community Hall Clean Up Day June 12 , 2018 10am to 2pm Mark Your Calendar

Hi Yellow Pine Folks;

Yes it is clean up time getting ready for Summer.

I need help, please.

Kitchen Floor Prepped for Linoleum
Clean Fridge and Freezer
Main Room
Wash Floor
Wash Windows
Outside
Cut and Weed Whack Grass
Burn Hard Wood Behind Community Hall
Put Corrugated Panels Behind Community Hall
Clean Steps of Bird Poop
Paint Picnic Tables
Basement
Remove Trash

Things That We Need
Weed Whacker
Rags
Paint Brushes
Paper Towels
Trash Bags

Thank you to everyone for your support of Your Community Hall.
Kathleen Hall
— — — —

Yellow Pine Vet Clinic June 20

Dr. Keith Ruble from Cascade Vet Clinic will be in Yellow Pine on Wednesday June 20th. You must sign up via the clinic by calling (208) 382-4590 (M-W-F) so they can bring charts and meds.
— — — —

4th of July Golf Tournament June 30th

Our 20th annual Yellow Pine Golf Tournament will take place on June 30th 2018. The proceeds will go towards the Yellow Pine Medical Training and Supply Fund. By giving to this annual event, you’ll be supporting the village of Yellow Pine and our growing EMS service.

Thanks to Cascade Fire/EMS Fire Commissioners, Chief Steve Hull and the EMS Director Keri Donica, Yellow Pine is now a Cascade Fire/EMS Paramedic Ambulance Sub-station. This allows us to have equipment available in Yellow Pine to treat and care for patients in the field, not only First Aid but Advanced Life Support. Yellow Pine now has Nationally Registered: 4 EMR’s, 1 RN-EMT, and 1 Paramedic in Yellow Pine.

The cost for the event is $20/person or $50 will give you a sponsorship and pay for 2 players!

As a sponsor, your name will be put on a plaque, or you can provide your own sign for the event. This plaque will be posted on one of our 18 holes during the tournament.

To reserve a place in the tournament please contact Jeff or Ann Forster @ aforsterrn@aol.com or call (208) 633-1010.

You can mail your payments to: P.O. Box 38 Yellow Pine, ID. 83677.

Please make checks payable to “Cascade Fire EMS” attn: YP Golf Tournament.

Thanks in advance for your consideration.

Sincerely,
Jeff Forster – Paramedic & Ann Forster – BS, RN, EMT
Event Coordinators
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Yard Sale – Saturday, July 7 9am-Noon

Garage Sale Date Change

Due to the busy day we will have on June 30, I have decided to more the garage sale to July 7 from 9-noon.

Everyone can bring their items anytime to the community hall. I will have a space marked for the items.

Please remember this is a Donation and Everything Must Work.

If you want your items back if they don’t sell you must pick them up at 12:30 on July 7th.

The proceeds of the Garage Sale will go to the maintenance of the Community Hall.

If you have questions please call Kathy Hall at 208 633 6270 or text to 630 915 1544

Thank you everyone for your support of the Yellow Pine Community Hall
— — — —

July 19 (free) Noxious Weed Day

Steve has scheduled his visit to Yellow Pine for Thursday July 19th. The staging area will be the Fire Department. He will bring up the Chemicals and spray equipment. Backpack sprayers, pump up sprayers, ATV tanks and he needs to know how many of these we need. He will leave everything there for the weekend and pick it all up Monday. Please call Kathy Hall 208 633-6270 for forms and information.

link to form:

Steve Anderson from Valley County Weed Control
Office (208)382-7199
e-mail: SAnderson @ co.valley.id.us
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Local Groups:

VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Agenda June 9, 2018 at the Community Hall

Call to Order
Reading of the minutes
Treasurer’s report
Cemetery Committee report
Community Hall report
Harmonica Festival report

Old business

This will be the 3rd and final reading of the motion to change the By Laws so the offices of Harmonica and Chairperson of the Village of Yellow Pine Association cannot be held concurrently by the same officer.

Deb Filler will give a State of the Ditch Review. A review of the work done on the ditches this fall.

New business

Selection of a Nominating Committee for the selection of candidates for the offices that the terms are up this year.

Presentation by Kathy Hall on the Noxious Weed Program for Yellow Pine

Presentation by Willie Sullivan, Lorinne Munn, Lynn Imel and Cecil Dallman on the proposed Alternative Routes around the Stibnite Gold Project. Also presenting a proposal by Midas Gold to form a Community Partnership Program and also a Midas Gold Foundation.

Submitted by Lorinne N Munn,
Secretary Yellow Pine Association

Summer Meeting Schedule:

June 9, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
July 14, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
August 11, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 8, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
— — — —

YPFD News:

June 3 – Training today consisted of General Orientation for some and Rope training for others.

Link to photo gallery on FB:

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required. The free permits show the fire officials who has a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, the fire department can then see if that person has their burn permit or if they need to go and address the source of the unknown smoke.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911 @ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

The Helicopter Landing Zone (HLZ) class is June 5th at 2pm. Tuesday’s Presentation with Life Flight will start at 2pm at the fire station and end at Johnson Creek Airport with a helicopter landing.

YP Fire Commissioner Meeting, June 9, 2018 – 10am Community Hall

YP Fire Budget Hearing: September 8, 2018 – 10am Community Hall

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Test of the fire siren will resume beginning June 1, at 12:00 noon and go through November

CPR class coming to YP in June; Class details to be announced in the near future. If interested please notify Jeff or Ann.

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot:

The Helispot needs a lot of work and a base needs to be put down before officially being used. I’m currently in discussion with some folks to help with the ground prep and to put the base down. Life Flight and other agencies will need to do an inspection as well before using the helispot.

LifeFlight:

LifeFlight has a new Base Manager. Doug advised me that LifeFlight will come out to YP to do a site visit to look at the Helispot and provide a Landing Zone class for anyone who would like to participate, all are welcome. As soon as I receive a date I’ll pass it along.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

Jeff F.

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
— — — —

2018 Festival:

The next planning meeting will be June 22

August 3, 4, 5 Music and Harmonica Festival
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Now open for summer (208) 633-3377
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern

Hours: 9am to 8pm daily

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine.
— — — —

The Corner 633-3325

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
— — — —

Local Propane Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
— — — —

Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430

We have a great price on wild bird seed. $19.99 for a 50 lb bag. 12.99 for a 25 lb bag. We also sell suet blocks (peanut crunch, and cherry) for $1.99 per block. Niger Thistle seed $13.25 for 5 lbs.
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (May 28) overnight low of 47 degrees, mostly cloudy and muggy this morning. Lots of birds calling early morning, swallows taking feathers to their nests, cassins finches, pine siskins and a golden mantel at the feeders. Low airplane at 1004am. Shooting to the west after lunch time. Mostly sunny warm afternoon, high of 78 degrees. Swallows flying high in the evening, raven flew over the village. Mostly clear at dusk and quiet.

Tuesday (May 29) overnight low of 40 degrees, clear sky and damp with dew this morning. A few finches this morning, swallows mobbing for feathers, the nest we are watching looks ready for eggs. Have not seen any grosbeaks for the last few days. Beautiful blue sky today, light pleasant breezes and warm, high of 79 degrees. Swallows breeding on the power line. A report that the dump is full. Bright yellow male American Goldfinch at the feeder this afternoon. Evening grosbeaks are back, cassins finches, pine siskins and stellar jays visiting. Calliope hummer buzzed by. Lots of traffic for a Tuesday. Mostly clear at sundown and quiet. Rain showers before and after midnight.

Wednesday (May 30) overnight low of 47 degrees, overcast w/clouds sitting down on the ridge tops. Finches and swallows calling. First swallow egg laid this morning. Evening grosbeaks joined the finches and pine siskins at the feeders before lunch time. Bit of sun after lunch, then dark clouds moving in and thundering after 3pm, high of 73 degrees. Swallows flying high in the afternoon, then flying low in the evening. Power blipped off for a couple of seconds and came back on at 832pm. Thunder and splatters of rain on and off into the night. Loud thunderstorms in the middle of the night.

Thursday (May 31) overnight low of 45 degrees, mostly cloudy this morning and damp from last night’s rain. Finches and swallows calling, pine siskins and grosbeaks at the feeders. Second swallow egg laid. Pine squirrel and ground squirrels running around. Power blinked off and back on at 1148am. Red-breasted nuthatches joined the finches at the feeders this afternoon and one hummingbird. Some pretty good rain showers late this afternoon, high of 66 degrees. Raven flying over the village and calling during the evening. Rain showers before dark, more rain before and after midnight and into the night.

Friday (June 1) overnight low of 41 degrees, overcast and foggy clouds draped low on the ridges, damp from last night’s rain. Robins, finches and swallows calling. Male hairy woodpecker drumming on a power pole. Three eggs in the swallow nest. Lots of flowers blooming along the EFSF river, penstemon, scarlet gilla, arrow-leaf balsamroot, heart-leaf arnica, pussy toes, and chokecherry bushes blooming too. Dark clouds all morning, occasional drops of rain. Cloudy most of the day and cool, breaks in the clouds late afternoon, partly clear at sundown, high of 60 degrees. Male rufous hummingbird and possible female visiting.

Saturday (June 2) overnight low of 32 degrees, clear sky and heavy dew this morning. Male hairy woodpecker drumming on the power pole, finches, grosbeaks, robins and swallows calling. 4th egg laid in the swallow nest. Male rufous hummer guarding the feeder, male calliope dashing in for a sip. Sunny day, clear sky, high of 76 degrees. Sounds like there may be babies in the flicker house, male was in the box in the late afternoon. Kayakers enjoying the EFSF. Two does down by the cement bridge after sundown. Quiet evening. Mostly clear and bright Jupiter rising after dark.

Sunday (June 3) overnight low of 39 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning. Female yellow-headed blackbird on the fence, a white-breasted nuthatch, finches, pine siskins and evening grosbeaks at the feeder, swallows swooping low (5th egg laid in the swallow house.) Early morning loud airplane. A few clouds coming in by lunch time, bigger clouds with dark bellies by early afternoon and pretty warm, high of 83 degrees. Found a “mormon” cricket, so far just the one. Robins active, think they are feeding nestlings, mama swallow setting on her eggs, sounds like active chicks in the flicker nest. River flows are dropping some. Quiet evening, finches singing and robins chirping. Some high thin clouds at sundown.
—————————-

RIP:

Skip Gould

Gould, John, 67, of Meridian [and Yellow Pine], died Saturday, May 26, 2018 at his home. Arrangements are pending at Summers Funeral Homes, Ustick Chapel. 208-898-0642.

Published in Idaho Statesman on May 30, 2018
—————————

Letter to Share:

Commissioner Cruickshank’s May Newsletter

June 3, 2018

From the Desk of Commissioner Cruickshank,

Wednesday May 2nd
I sent off an email to my contacts at the Idaho Transportation Department (ITD) requesting the reason why ITD is using straight salt on the roadways in the winter as it is creating trees to die and causes corrosion to vehicles and trailers using the roadways.

I signed several Hazardous Fuel Treatment Landowner Contracts that Valley County will hire contractors to remove hazardous fuels to reduce the fire risk.

I received a call from one of Congressman Labrador’s staff explaining why the Natural Resource Staff person was leaving the Congressman’s office in Washington D. C. to pursue another opportunity.

Thursday May 3rd
I spoke to an Idaho Legislator who understood I had concerns with the recent Trespass Bill that the Idaho Legislature passed this year.

Friday May 4th
I attended a meeting with Midas Gold to work on proposed Community Agreement documents that Midas Gold is working on for the communities and counties in our region.

Monday May 7th
Commissioner meeting day today. The minutes of our Commissioner meetings can be found, once approved a week or so after our meetings, on the Valley County website. Please go to Valley County Idaho | Official Site then find the Commissioners section. Once there click on Agendas and Minutes where you will find the minutes of the meetings.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday May 8th
I responded to the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL) concerning our Hazardous Fuels Treatment projects on grants that are soon to expire. I provided a task of where we were and what we were planning on completing to meet the grant requirements.

I sent out a reminder of my National Association of Counties (NACo) West Region Conference Call for Thursday of this week.

I drove to Boise to attend a meeting with the Intermountain Region Leadership of the Forest Service this evening.

I received the breakdown of the Secure Rural Schools (SRS) funding nationwide. The SRS funding was being sent out to the states and the counties should be receiving their portions soon.

Wednesday May 9th
I drove home from Boise.

Thursday May 10th
I hosted the NACo West Region Conference Call today. Topics discussed were SRS payments being made, analysis of the proposed Farm Bill from the House of Representatives which includes some forest management, no time line for the Farm Bill being mentioned, the Senate has not released any language for their Farm Bill and don’t expect to see the Farm Bill happening this year. We then had an update of the upcoming NACo Western Interstate Region (WIR) Annual Conference which will be in Sun Valley, Idaho the week prior to Memorial Weekend.

I sent an email to City of McCall Planning Department requesting information on lot line corrections that are minor to see if the costs could be waived or reduced when reviewing by the City of McCall.

I received several calls concerning what costs the county will pay when an employee is working away from their home.

Tonight I attended the Snowmobile Advisory Committee meeting in Cascade.

Friday May 11th
I visited with the Valley County Planning and Zoning Administrator on a proposed RV Park that was heard at the Planning and Zoning meeting last night.

I received a call from the Executive Director of the West Central Mountains Economic Development Council to discuss potential duties and projects he is working on.

I participated in the NACo Executive Board Conference Call. I reported on the WIR Conference events planned, concern about the Hawaii Volcanoes, Flooding in Montana due to snow melt with rain falling and the efforts on Opioid awareness I am hearing about in the western states. We also learned a new Finance Director has been hired, one of our Legislative Associates for NACo was hired to be the Executive Director of the National Association of Civil Engineers, another Department Director in the Research Lab is leaving to start her own company and discussed recent efforts to invite counties to join NACo.

Monday May 14th
Commissioner day today. Please find the minutes of this meeting, once approved, on the website.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday May 15th
Today was the Primary Vote.

I sent out emails for nominations to participate on the South West Idaho Resource Advisory Committee. This Committee reviews grant applications and provides recommendations to the Forest Service on projects that enhance the National Forest.

I called a representative of Lakeshore Disposal to discuss possible terms as we look to update the contract we have with Lakeshore for Solid Waste operations in Valley County.

Wednesday May 16th
I received a call from the Forest Service Capitol City Coordinator for Idaho about attending the WIR Conference in Sun Valley and asking for more information on the event.

Thursday May 17th
I emailed agenda’s of committee meetings that will be held at the WIR Conference to the Forest Service person and US Department of Agriculture Rural Development people who would be attending the Conference.

I attended a Living With Fire Post Wrap Up meeting to discuss what we learned from the event hosted in Valley County last month.

I received a phone call from a reporter with Agri/Pulse to discuss the Secure Rural Schools funding and what it means for Valley County and other rural counties with large acreage of Public Lands.

Friday May 18th
I attended a Central District Health Budget meeting in Idaho City, Idaho to approve the budget for next year.

Sunday May 20th
I prepared and sent an email response to the IDL on questions they had asked last week concerning the projects that they felt we either had not completed or didn’t qualify for reimbursement.

Monday May 21st
Another Commissioner day. Please find the minutes once approved on the Valley County Website.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday May 22nd
I drove to Sun Valley to attend the WIR Annual Conference. Mobile tours were happening today however with having a Commissioner day yesterday I didn’t have time to travel and join the tours. I was able to register for the conference late today.

Wednesday May 23rd
My morning started at 7:30 AM with a Public Lands Trust meeting where we discussed the budget for specific travel and efforts for the Payment In Lieu of Taxes (PILT) Program, paying dues to the National Endangered Species Act Committee, paying dues to the Wildland Fire Leadership Council and paying dues to the Western Governors Association which allows us to attend their conference.

At 9:00 AM I attended the WIR Board of Directors meeting. As the Immediate Past President of WIR this will be my last meeting for this position. As a Past President I am still allowed to attend the Board meetings as long as I am an elected official. We heard presentations from the Region IV Forest Service, the USDA California State Director for Rural Development, the Payette Forest Coalition, the Western Governors Association, the Launch of a Wildfire Playbook by the Cohesive Wildfire Strategy and NACo to help folks understand how fire effects you and heard a legislative update from our NACo Legislative Associate assigned to WIR.

At 12:30 PM I participated in a tour for the USDA State Directors on Rural Development to show them the Stanley, Idaho area and talk about Public Land Management, Salmon Recovery using Idaho Fish and Game Hatcheries and USDA Rural Development grants that assisted with projects in the Stanley, Idaho Area. 9 USDA State Directors were able to attend along with the Region IV Forester for the Forest Service, the Sawtooth National Forest Supervisor, The Deputy Director of Idaho Fish and Game and a few staff folks. USDA Rural Development is wanting to build a better partnership with NACo and the WIR to see where they can assist with potential grant opportunities.

Tonight I attended the NACo/WIR Board of Directors evening event held at the River Run Lodge in Ketchum, Idaho.

Thursday May 24th
This morning was the Opening General Session where we heard from Muffy Davis who grew up in Sun Valley and was determined to be an Olympic Downhill Racer until she was injured while practicing which resulted in her being paralyzed from the waist down. Muffy eventually overcame her struggles and created SurThrive and went on to race in the Paralympics earning a Bronze and 3 Silver Medals. Muffy has also climbed Mt. Shasta using a tracked vehicle powered like a hand cycle. She has also raced using a hand cycle and won 3 Gold Medals. Muffy showed how a person can overcome obstacles and accomplish goals.

Next we heard from Dr, Stephanie Witt, Professor at Boise State University. Dr. Witt spoke on the Urban Boom vs the Rural Loss due to people moving to the cities and leaving the small rural areas which creates economic impacts in both areas. Some of her talk was on how do people react and handle the changes.

Then we heard from Michael McKeown, Executive Director, Homeland Security Advisory Council. He spoke on indicators of human trafficking and public awareness of the effort to fight modern day slavery.

At noon was a Conference Attendee Luncheon where everyone was able to visit with new folks they have met at this conference.

This afternoon I attended the NACo Board of Directors meeting where the financial report was heard, new contracts were reviewed with vendors, membership of NACo to build the awareness, how NACo is making a difference in Congressional actions by being asked to help draft legislation rather than commenting after a bill is written and introduced, we heard another NACo perspective to update us on proposed legislation and legislation that will expire soon, funding for elections to assist states, heard an update on iCivics which is an online game NACo has created for people to learn more about how county government works, a report was provided for US Communities for purchasing products that can be utilized by any member county and we heard about the Stepping Up Campaign to understand the Mental Illness and how it is impacting our jails.

Tonight was a Conference Wide Event Dinner Celebration for all conference attendees. Another way for folks to visit with new friends and enjoy dinner. Blaine County also provided a presentation on their Dark Sky Reserve they have created that includes a portion of Blaine and Custer Counties so when visiting you can see the stars at night without the light pollution.

Friday May 25th
This morning started with the WIR Board of Directors business meeting. We elected the new officers for WIR Executive Board. Our WIR President is now from Arizona, 1st VP is from California, 2nd VP is from Montana and Immediate Past President is from Wyoming. They are all great leaders and will serve us well.

We then had another General Session where Commissioner Martin from Colorado received the Dale Sowards Award for outstanding work he has done for county government through the years.
Tim Williams, Deputy Director with the Department of Interior (DOI) External Affairs then spoke to us on how the new administration is a different environment and is here to better understand the issues concerning the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). He commented that the DOI is working to restore the trust with local communities, recognize the traditional use of Public Lands. In 2008 the BLM provided 16 Billion in revenue and in 2016 only 3 Billion which doesn’t cover the BLM Budget and he spoke on energy development.

Next we heard from Dotti Owens, Ada County Coroner. She presented on how the county coroner provides data to see trends in how people are dying. The focus was to understand better the Opioids and how they are increasing deaths. She also pointed out that coroners research has helped with seeing where infectious diseases happen and then working with the medical field to help find cures or ways to combat the diseases.

We closed this General Session with a presentation by Spokane County, Washington who is hosting the 2019 WIR Annual Conference.

My next session was a NACo Board Orientation. Here we learned more about how NACo functions for the membership with legislative oversight, we learned how US Communities is saving counties money by using vendors they have contracted with to provide lower costs and learned more about Nationwide and their options they provide for members.

At noon I had an impromptu meeting with a county commissioner who is traveling to Washington D. C. next month to visit with the Interim Forest Service Chief to discuss concerns. We discussed several topics of discussion that we felt needed addressed including responsible forest management and grazing management of our Public Lands while still recognizing the growing recreational opportunities that exist on the Public Lands.

Saturday May 26th
I drove home from Sun Valley.

Tuesday May 29th
Commissioner day today. The minutes will not be approved until sometime in June. Once approved they can be found on the Valley County website under the Commissioner section.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

This afternoon I returned a call to Lakeshore. We discussed a billing procedure they were concerned about. As our Treasurer’s office handles the billing I asked them to contact their office and find a workable solution.

Wednesday May 30th
I went to the courthouse to pickup some documents so I could review numbers on how the Solid Waste Department has run over the past several years. This will assist in our future budgeting for FY 2019.

Well that wraps up another month.

I hope the newsletter provides a snapshot of the work I did this month. If something perks your interest and you would like to discuss further please drop me an email and I’ll try my best or find someone who knows the answer.

Gordon
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Idaho News:

Cascade schools to cut 4 out of 20 teachers

The school board voted to leave art and music positions unfilled and cut two other teaching positions.

KTVB May 29, 2018

Cascade — In an executive session Monday night, the Cascade School Board decided to cut four positions there.

They passed a motion to leave the art and music positions unfilled and cut two other teaching positions.

The Cascade Education Association says the district will determine who those teachers will be by the end of the week.

There are only 20 teachers in the district.

source:
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Cascade schools to seek $100,000 in additional property taxes

Declining enrollment cited for less state funding

By Max Silverson for The Star-News May 31, 2018

The Cascade School District will seek approval of a supplemental property-tax levy of $100,000 in August to help close a $400,000 gap in the district budget, school district trustee decided on Monday.

Trustees voted unanimously to seek the levy at a special meeting on Monday following a closed session which trustees said was allowed under the Idaho Open Meeting Law.

The levy would be in addition to a $500,000 two-year levy that voters approved in March 2017 to fund staffing and curriculum.

Trustees also voted Monday to try and close the gap by eliminating four teaching positions and making other budget cuts where possible.

“We looked at only reducing the positions of the two staff members that are leaving, but were still $280,000 short of cutting the nearly $400,000 that needs to be cut,” trustees Vice Chair Jason Speer said. The district’s budget year starts on July 1.

The projected deficit is due to a decrease in enrollment, Superintendent Pal Sartori said.

continued:
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Cascade seeks volunteers to join downtown renewal board

The Star-News May 31, 2018

The City of Cascade is seeking applicants to join a downtown revitalization planning group that will help revitalize and rebrand downtown Cascade.

The group will define Cascade’s downtown corridor and create a brand identity as well as review and compile existing plans for the city, Cascade Mayor Julie Crosby said.

Cascade is pursuing funding through the Idaho Downtown Improvement Network Block Grant Program. Grant funding ranges from $50,000 to $500,000, and would be used as directed by the findings of this committee.

Funds can be used for projects like public art, planters and signage; improving amenities like broadband, pedestrian and bike access; and connecting downtown to residential areas with sidewalks.

continued:
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Two-thirds of North Beach to open for boats for Fourth

Alcohol ban, road closures will continue for third year

By Tom Grote for The Star-News May 31, 2018

Two-thirds North Beach on Payette Lake will be opened to boaters during the Independence Day holiday, the Valley County Sheriff’s Office said.

However, the ban on alcohol consumption will continue for a third straight year at the beach, which was a popular gathering site for young adults for nine years until 2015, Lt. Jason Speer said.

The “no-alcohol” restriction will be in effect for 10 days this year, as July 4 occurs on a Wednesday, Speer said. The restriction will run from Friday, June 29, through Sunday, July 8.

continued:
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Contract awarded to rebuild 5.5 miles of Warren Wagon Road

Federal project will include 3-4 foot shoulders for bicycles

By Tom Grote for The Star-News May 31, 2018

A $9.9 million contract was awarded last week to rebuild 5.5 miles of Warren Wagon Road north of McCall.

The federally funded project will see shoulders between three feet and four feet built on either side of the road to accommodate bicycles.

The Federal Highway Administration awarded the contract to M.A. DeAtley Construction of Clarkston, Wash.

The project will begin 2.2 miles north of McCall and extend to where Warren Wagon Road meets East Side Drive north of Payette Lake. The project is expected to be completed by the fall of 2019.

Plans call for building four-foot shoulders for about 1.1 miles on the left side of the road and about 1.2 miles on the right side of the road, Project Manager Dan Slanina said.

continued:
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Family searching for missing Horseshoe Bend man

Richard Gorbet, 32, was last seen Thursday night.

KTVB May 30, 2018

Boise County — The Boise County Sheriff’s Office is asking the public to keep an eye out for a Horseshoe Bend man who has been missing since Thursday night.

Richard Gorbet, 32, was last seen on foot at about 10 p.m. that night. According to Boise County Sheriff’s Sgt. David Anthony, Richard Gorbet was “despondent” after an argument with a family member.

… Gorbet is described as a white, 6’3″ and 235 pounds, with brown hair and brown eyes. He was last seen wearing a T-shirt, dark shorts and tennis shoes.

Anyone who spots Gorbet or has any information about his whereabouts is urged to call the Boise County Sheriff’s Office at 208-392-4411.

full story:
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2 dead, 5 injured after central Idaho UTV crash

5/29/18 AP

[Salmon], Idaho — Authorities in central Idaho say two people have died and five others are injured after a utility terrain vehicle crashed north of Salmon.

The UTV — which is similar to an all-terrain vehicle, and often called a side-by-side — was carrying seven people when it crashed late Sunday morning. The Idaho State Journal reports the Lemhi County Sheriff’s office has not yet released the names of those involved in the accident.

The crash remains under investigation, and officials have not released any details on how it occurred.

source:
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Idaho officials pitch land swap in Lochsa River basin

6/2/18 AP

Lewiston, Idaho — Idaho officials are pitching a north-central Idaho land exchange involving a private timber company and the U.S. Forest Service that could result in Idaho receiving deed to some federal lands.

The proposal calls for Western Pacific Timber to deed 38,000 acres (15,400 hectares) in the Upper Lochsa basin to the U.S. Forest Service.

The Forest Service would then deed selected federal lands to Idaho to be overseen by the Idaho Land Board.

continued:
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Mining News:

Groups say central Idaho mine leaking pollution into river

6/2/18 AP

Hailey, Idaho — An environmental group and environmental law firm say they’ll file a lawsuit against the state of Idaho if Idaho officials continue what the groups say are violations of the Clean Water Act at an abandoned mine in central Idaho.

The Idaho Conservation League and Advocates for the West on Tuesday informed the state of their intention to file the lawsuit involving the Triumph Mine site north of Hailey.

The groups say the state is allowing discharge of arsenic and other pollutants from the former silver and lead mine into wetlands near the East Fork of the Big Wood River without a permit.

Don Carpenter of the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality tells the Idaho Mountain Express that the agency is working on fixing a problem with an infiltration basin.

source:
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Public Lands:

Boise NF has a new fire map of projects for you to see

Boise National Forest: 2018 Prescribed Fires and Mechanical Treatments

link:
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USDA Forest Service Golden Duck Plan of Operations Update

May 30, 2018

On May 30, 2018, I signed the Decision Memo for the Golden Duck Plan of Operations. The Decision Memo and other supporting documents are available on the project’s webpage at
http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=51378

I determined that this action falls within categorical exclusion 36 CFR 220.6(e)(8): Short-term (1 year or less) mineral, energy, or geophysical investigations and their incidental support activities that may require cross-country travel by vehicles and equipment, construction of less than 1 mile of low standard road, or use and minor repair of existing roads.

This project was reviewed in accordance with the categorical exclusion guidelines at FSH 1909.15(30), as updated on May 28, 2014. Following review of the resource conditions identified at 36 CFR 220.6(b), I determined that no extraordinary circumstances exist. In addition, the Interdisciplinary Team’s analysis did not identify any other unusual circumstances or uncertainties about environmental effects associated with the action that would preclude use of a categorical exclusion.

On January 17, 2014, the President signed into law the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014 (Pub. L. No. 113-76). Section 431 of that Act directs that the 1992 and 2012 legislation establishing the 36 CFR 215 (post-decisional appeals) and 36 CFR 218 (pre-decisional objections) processes “shall not apply to any project or activity implementing a land and resource management plan … that is categorically excluded ….under the National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA].” On February 7, 2014, the President signed into law the Agricultural Act of 2014 (Farm Bill) (Pub. L. No. 113-79). Section 8006 of the 2014 Farm Bill repealed the Appeals Reform Act (ARA) (Pub. L. No. 102-381). The ARA’s implementing regulation was 36 CFR 215. The 2014 Farm Bill also directs that the pre-decisional objection process established in the Consolidated Appropriation Act of 2012 shall not be applicable to categorically excluded projects or activities. As a result of these two statutes, the Forest Service no longer offers notice, comment and appeal opportunities pursuant to 36 CFR 215 for categorically excluded projects.

This project will be authorized after the Plan of Operations is revised to include the required mitigation measures and reclamation plan (Appendices A and B of the Decision) as well as acceptable financial assurance is presented. The project is expected to be implemented in summer 2018 and all reclamation actions will be completed within 12 months.

For additional information concerning this decision, contact: Clint Hughes, Geologist and Certified Minerals Examiner, Payette National Forest at 208-634-0756 or cehughes@fs.fed.us.

Sincerely,
Lisa J. Klinger
McCall District Ranger
Payette National Forest
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A Volunteer Campground Host is needed at Mann Creek Campground near Weiser.

Payette NF (via Facebook)

This is a great opportunity to spend time in a wonderful location and meet fellow campers.

Host duties include providing visitor information, assisting campers with campground registration, maintenance projects and general housekeeping. Volunteers work approximately 20 hours a week and, in exchange for those services, are provided with a campsite during their stay with electrical and water hookups, as well as a subsistence stipend.

Furnishing your own camping equipment and a 3-4 night a week commitment is required.

For more information or to apply contact the Weiser Ranger District at (208) 549-4200.
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Interior Collaborates with Idaho Partners to Improve Vital Habitat for Wildlife

Sage-grouse habitat project will remove more than half a million acres of encroaching juniper

Date: May 31, 2018
Contact: Interior_Press@ios.doi.gov

Washington – The U.S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management today signed the Record of Decision for the Bruneau-Owyhee Sage-Grouse Habitat Project. This Decision authorizes the removal of encroaching western juniper on 617,000 acres in a 1.67 million-acre area of sagebrush-steppe habitat in Owyhee County. The project was developed in collaboration with the Idaho Governor’s Office of Species Conservation, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Idaho Department of Lands, Natural Resources Conservation Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

“This vital landscape project demonstrates the Department of the Interior’s commitment to shared conservation stewardship through collaboration with our state partners,” said U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke. “Working together on projects like this enhances conditions on our public lands for wildlife, ranching and recreation.”

“This is great news for Idaho’s continuing efforts to maintain and improve sage-grouse habitat,”Idaho Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter said. “It’s an example of the kind of on-the-ground federal, state and local collaboration that can make a real difference for the species and improve the lives and livelihoods of ranchers, recreationists and other land users in Owyhee County.”

“This project will allow conservation partners to move quickly on landscape habitat restoration projects that are proving to have a tremendous impact for mule deer, sage-grouse and other species dependent on sagebrush rangelands,” said Mule Deer Foundation President/CEO Miles Moretti. “MDF has been actively involved in a number of habitat stewardship projects in recent years that have shown by removing encroaching junipers or replanting native grasses, shrubs, and forbs we can make a difference on restoring our native western rangelands, which is beneficial for wildlife as well as other public land users.”

“Junipers are such significant invasive plants that even small amounts of them cause Sage-grouse to avoid and abandon habitat,” said Virgil Moore, Director of Idaho Fish and Game. “Juniper removal is an effective conservation practice that results in Sage-grouse reoccupancy of treated rangelands. This project on these iconic western lands of Idaho’s Owyhee County is possible because of the strong partnerships forged through collaboration over the past decade with the people who use these working landscapes and desire proper management and conservation to benefit Sage-grouse.”

“When we can work together to respond to the collective needs of species, land, and people, good things happen,” said Idaho Cattle Association President Tucker Shaw. “This project is not only an important step for sage-grouse conservation, but embodies the benefits of localized collaboration to maintain working landscapes in harmony with sound stewardship of our resources.”

Juniper encroachment has been identified as a major threat to western sage-brush ecosystems. As junipers intrude into sagebrush habitat, the steppe vegetation begins to die off because it is unable to compete for water, nutrients, space, and sunlight. Juniper removal helps develop a landscape that is more resilient and promotes a diverse plant community. Over the life of this 15-year project, no juniper will be cut within designated wilderness areas or lands with wilderness characteristics and no old-growth trees will be removed.

Juniper removal projects build on proactive land management policies and practices to conserve the region’s remaining sagebrush habitat, which supports abundant wildlife, including sage-grouse, mule deer, elk, pronghorn antelope and golden eagles, as well as significant economic activity, including ranching and recreation.

The BLM issued the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for this project on Feb. 9, 2018. The Final EIS, Record of Decision and other relevant documents are available on the BLM ePlanning website at https://go.usa.gov/xnAKz. Hard copies of these documents are also available for review at the BLM-Idaho Boise District Office, 3948 Development Ave., Boise, ID, 83705, during regular business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.
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USFS Regional Intermountain Newsletter Special Issue

May 30, 2018

National Wildland Fire Potential Outlook

link:
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Letters to Share:

Don’t be a Fawn Napper!

Greetings from Mystic Farm! It’s that time again…

Don’t Be A Fawn Napper!

Every year, fawns are reported by the caring public as being orphaned or abandoned. Sometimes it is a case of death of the doe, leaving the fawn obviously orphaned. Sometimes it is a case of an injured fawn, causing the doe to abandon her baby. But, unfortunately, it is often a case of not being orphaned at all, but rather the mother just being out of sight.

If you come across a lone fawn, DO NOT TOUCH! Keep a distance and call Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue or your local Idaho Department of Fish and Game officer. An assessment of the situation will be made and proper measures taken if warranted. In the event the fawn truly is orphaned and is deemed a viable candidate for rehabilitation, Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue is available. By providing shelter, food and medical care, trained Mystic Farm staff can help orphaned and/or injured wildlife until they can be ‘soft released’ back into their natural habitat.

Some facts to know:

* Mother deer will leave their fawn for hours while they go off to feed nearby. The mother does this so predators will not see a vulnerable fawn when they see her. She can be gone many hours, leaving the camouflaged and scent free fawn motionless, avoiding detection by predators.

* Is it injured? If a fawn is seen lying upright, eyes wide open, but flattened to the ground, do not touch it! This is a fawn’s camouflage position to blend in with its surroundings. When the fawn is picked up, it will allow its body to become limp and dangle in your hands. The legs are not broken! Put the baby down, walk away, and leave the area.

* If a fawn is obviously ill or injured – lying on its side, kicking and crying, bleeding, etc. – gently pick it up and place in a safe, quiet place. A light cloth placed over the eyes will often calm it. Keep the fawn away from pets and other human activity. Touch, odors, and the sound of the human voice will only add to the stress of the situation and may cause additional harm. Keep the fawn free from cold drafts or keep it cool if the weather is warm. Please do not feed the fawn. Call Mystic Farm immediately.

* The fawn is on the road! Mystic Farm receives many calls regarding fawns in the middle of the road. Why are they there? Because the mom is nearby! If the fawn is in danger of being hit by cars, gently pick it up and place it about twenty feet off the side of the road and leave the area.

* Is it too late to return to the mother if the fawn has been handled by humans? Will she then reject it? NO! That is an “Old Wives Tale.” The mother doesn’t care – she just wants her baby back. She is around human scent all the time. Her maternal instinct is much stronger than her ability to rationalize human scent on her baby.

* What happens to the fawn if a rescue is warranted? After arrival at Mystic Farm, the fawn is evaluated and checked for any injuries, dehydration, etc. Wounds are treated either on the premises or through the services of local veterinarians. The fawn is put on an appropriate diet and feeding schedule. Once the fawns gain strength and can nurse from a bottle on their own, the ‘blind feeding method’ is utilized using “hands off” bottle racks. Human contact is kept to a minimum. The fawns are kept in an isolated area – free from predators and forming their own little “herd.” They are free to browse and live in a large, safe, enclosure. Over the course of the season, the fawns are slowly introduced back into the wild.

Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc. is a non-profit 501 (c) 3 organization. We are a licensed facility available to provide rehabilitation and release back into the wild of orphaned and/or injured animals. None of the caring staff or volunteers at Mystic Farm receive a salary or payment for service. Operating out of love and caring for our precious wildlife, we ask our community to do the same. “Don’t Be A Fawn Napper.” Help us to help the wildlife remain wild!

Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.
710 Sanctuary Hills
Sagle, ID 83860
208 241-7081

*Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc. is not open for tours. The animals in our care are kept to a minimum of human contact. Thank you for your understanding and support.
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Baby Pheasant chicks

May 31, 2018

Hi all, we will be getting more baby pheasant chicks this next Tuesday June 5th. We need to turn the orders in by Sunday night June 3rd. So if you want chicks please let me know at this email jhag1008 @ gmail.com or call Jim at 208-883-3423. As you know IDFG wants us to get a release permit for all raising chicks. We have done this and we wish that all raising chicks will become a member of the Gamebird Foundation. Membership is $20.00. That is much less than the chicks would cost you. We are building brooders as fast as possible and we can help with very good low cost feed. In some cases if you need help we can help provide. If you have any chicken waters or feeders you are not using we can use them.

If you can’t raise pheasants to release into the wild, we could use your help with a donation of labor or some cash. Membership is $20.00 for the family. We will be releasing rooster pheasants for access youth hunts again this fall, we need to raise funds to help defray the cost of this project. Last year with IDFG help we released 250 roosters, this year at will be more. I think we have a couple more places to release this year for access yes hunts. More on this later. The more help with funds the more we can release. If you have any equipment or anything we can yard sale or auction of, we will pick it up if it has value. We now have a 6 foot tall chain sawed grizzly bear, a carved rooster pheasant donated. The carving done by Ralph Horn of Potlatch. We have a silver belt buckle with a pheasant on the buckle that is for a ladies belt. Some jewelry that is really neat. This will be showing up for silent auction soon.

Get your baby pheasant chicks on the way.

Jim Hagedorn
Executive Director
The Gamebird Foundation
thegamebirdfoundation.org
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Critter News:

MCPAWS to host 20th Bark! in the Park on June 16

The Star-News May 31, 2018

MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter will host its 20th annual Bark! in the Park fun walk on Saturday, June 16, at 11 a.m. at Ponderosa State Park.

The event will include a raffle, picnic and shelter dog show as well as contest prizes for Dog Traveling Greatest Distance, Best Dressed Dog and Owner, Dog and Owner Look Alike, Best Dog Trick, Best Tail Wag and Oldest Dog.

Cost is $25 and includes entry fee, goody bag, picnic lunch for one and Bark! in the Park T-shirt.

Participants can also help raise funds for the animal shelter by using a Crowdrise page. Information is available online or in the registration packet. All proceeds from the walk will benefit the dogs and cats at MCPAWS.

Registration is available online at https://mcpaws.org or in person at MCPAWS, 831 S. Third St. Registration forms are also available at MCPAWS Thrift Store, 301 Lenora St., and McCall Pet Outfitters, 200 Lenora St.

source:
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McCall Girl Scouts receive award for making MCPAWS pet-adoption kits

The Star-News May 31, 2018

Two local Girl Scouts were honored for making pet-adoption kits for MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter.

Mia and Keira Rider of Girl Scout Troop No. 255 in McCall gave the animal shelter more than 100 pet adoptions kits filled with pet care information, coupons and toys made from up-cycled materials.

“Our adoption kits were outdated and not as useful as we would have liked,” shelter manager Christa Brown said. “We appreciate the Girl Scouts getting these kits together and the community for supporting them in their efforts”

Mia is a fifth-grader and Keira is a fourth-grader at Barbara R. Morgan Elementary School. They collected donations from the community for toy-making materials and Girl Scout troops in McCall and Donnelly helped make the toys.

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Protecting pets from the dangers caused by ticks in Idaho

Steve Dent May 30, 2018 KIVI TV

Boise – There have been numerous sightings of ticks since the weather started getting nice in Boise and the surrounding areas here in Idaho.

We first reported on the outbreak of ticks about a month ago, giving people advice to stay safe, now we look at the pet perspective and have advice from an animal dermatologist to keep pets free from the diseases that ticks can cause.

“Anybody that takes their dogs up to the foothills, to McCall, or Sun Valley to go hiking with the dogs they are going to encounter ticks,” said Dr. Andrea Cannon.

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Do Dogs Really Prefer Baby Talk? You Might Be Surprised.

“Who’s a good boy?” Scientists investigated whether our pets like the exaggerated tone that many of us use with our canines.

By Linda Lombardi May 31, 2018 National Geographic

Few of us can resist using baby talk with our dogs. Next time someone makes fun of you for it, you can tell them that science is on your side.

Commonplace among languages around the world, baby talk involves speaking to infants in a high-pitched, exaggerated way. It’s thought to help babies learn language, for example by making vowels clearer and strengthening social bonds with parents. (Apes do it, too.)

But dogs aren’t going to learn to speak, so does it make a difference when we talk that way to them? That’s the question posed by a study published this month in the journal Animal Cognition.

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Federal biologists look to boost Mexican wolf genetics

By Maddy Hayden – 5/30/18 AP

Gila National Forest, N.M. — On an early Monday morning, four helpless, tiny creatures that will eventually become some of nature’s top predators found themselves nestled under a commercial airline seat.

The Mexican wolf pups, removed from their mother’s den in captivity in Missouri a few hours earlier, were destined for wild dens in southwestern New Mexico.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is hopeful that this tactic, called cross-fostering, will aid in the recovery of a species that was nearly eliminated and now numbers just over 100 animals in the United States.

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Wolf Education International

Newsletter May 30, 2018

Commission: Don’t bring wolves back to Colorado

FWP: Montana wolf population stabilizing at new, post-hunting levels

Wolves breed problems for Washington ranchers

Disputed wolf hunt in Norway was legal, court rules

Mapping the expansion of coyotes (Canis latrans) across North and Central America

100 sheep savaged in wolf attack in Gegharkunik province
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Plans call for opening Idaho road in grizzly bear habitat

By Keith Ridler Associated Press Friday, June 1st 2018

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Officials say national security concerns require the repairing of a northern Idaho road in important grizzly bear habitat near the Canadian border and lifting travel restrictions on law enforcement.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection says Bog Creek Road would be used by officials to prevent illegal activities. But the east-west road in the Selkirk Mountains would remain closed to the public.

The agency and the U.S. Forest Service on Friday released a draft environmental impact statement for about 6 miles (10 kilometers) of the road.

The plan also closes about 26 miles of Forest Service roads to motor vehicles in the area that’s in the Selkirk Grizzly Bear Recovery Zone.

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Free Fishing Day events to be held June 9 at local ponds

The Star-News May 31, 2018

Idaho Department of Fish and Game’s Free Fishing Day on Saturday, June 9, is exactly as it sounds – a chance for anyone to grab a rod and go fishing with no license required.

At many locations, Fish and Game employees and volunteers will loan gear and give lessons on how to catch a fish.

Here’s a list of local events:

• McCall: Northwest Passage Pond at the North Beach Unit of Ponderosa State Park, 9 a.m. to noon.

• Cascade: Fischer Pond at Cascade Sports Park, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

• New Meadows: MeadowCreek Pond at the entrance to MeadowCreek Golf Resort, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
June 1, 2018
Issue No. 874
Table of Contents

* NOAA Says It Must Complete New Salmon/Steelhead BiOp In 2018 To Ensure ESA Compliance
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440848.aspx

* Spring Chinook Forecast Downgraded, But Managers Say Run Good Enough For More Fishing
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440847.aspx

* River Managers Make Spill Changes To Improve Spring Chinook Adult Passage In Lower Snake
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440846.aspx

* Latest Bi-Weekly Pinniped Report Shows Decline in Steller, California Sea Lions At Bonneville Dam
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440845.aspx

* U.S. Officials Say Columbia River Treaty Negotiations With Canada Off To Good Start; Next Round Set For August
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440844.aspx

* Science Panel Reviews Tribes’ Master Plan For Recovering Pacific Lamprey In Columbia River Basin
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440843.aspx

* Klickitat River Spring Chinook Master Plan Reviewed; Transition To Integrated Hatchery Planned
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440842.aspx

* Study Shows How Pacific Steelhead Adapted To Lake Michigan In Less Than 120 Years
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440841.aspx

* Washington Board Rules Against USFWS On Leavenworth Hatchery Clean Water Issues; Icicle Creek Draft EIS Released
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440840.aspx

* Low Spring Chinook Returns Leads To Extending No-Fishing Area On Cowlitz River
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440839.aspx

* Montana Intercepts Another Boat Carrying Zebra Mussels; Headed From Wisconsin To Alberta
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440838.aspx

* Study Looks At Data Available To Compare Removing Dams Versus Rehabilitation Costs
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440837.aspx
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Mormon crickets have invaded the Village of Murphy in Owyhee County

Steve Dent Jun 1, 2018 KIVI TV

Murphy – Mormon crickets are scattered all over the Village of Murphy, these gigantic creepy crawlers have arrived at an inconvenient time as the village gears up to host Outpost Days this weekend.

Villagers said that the mormon crickets paid the village a visit seven years ago, this year they say they were caught off guard by the bugs and don’t have any bait they used to kill the crickets in the past.

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Fish & Game News:

Catch the Fun on Free Fishing Day June 9

By Mike Demick, Conservation Information Supervisor
Thursday, May 31, 2018

Saturday, June 9 is Idaho’s Free Fishing Day and the Idaho Fish and Game invites anglers, residents and nonresidents, to celebrate the day by fishing without a license.

Lack of fishing experience is no excuse. At special locations around the area, fishing equipment will be available for use and experts will be on hand to help novice anglers learn the ins and outs of fishing. Local events include:

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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

When Noble Lynxes Square Off, The Call Of The Wild Gets A Bit … Whiny

Edward Trist told Canada’s Global News that he had been on a fishing trip with his girlfriend, Nicole Lewis, and their daughter when they happened upon the pair of loud lynxes along a country road.

Two Lynx in Ontario Have Intense Conversation

Credit: Edward Trist via Storyful


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Seasonal Humor:

SpringBirdHouse-a

SpringMosquito-a
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