Category Archives: News 2018

Sept 16, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 16, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
September 22 at 10am Community Hall YPFD Budget Hearing
September 22 Celebration of Life for Chris Petersen at 2pm, YP Tavern
September 29 Wildland Firefighter Foundation Fund Raiser and Yellow Pine Community BBQ

(details below)
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Village News:

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

The Yellow Pine and Warm Lake Transfer sites are seeing other material deposited into the Woody Debris pile which violates our agreement with the Forest Service to have the Woody Debris allowed to be there. The Valley County Commission is requesting assistance from the folks in Yellow Pine to help police the Yellow Pine Transfer site. Valley County and/or Lakeshore employees are working to clean up the site this fall. To avoid losing the ability to have the Transfer Site be a place for woody debris to be allowed to be used. The Forest Service will continue to burn the debris but only if the other material is removed from the debris pile.

Other items being left on site is also not appreciated as this site is designed to just have Household Waste in the bins. Furniture and appliances left require additional costs and are not in our program. However with working with others we continue to handle the issues but maybe better education would help.

Gordon Cruickshank, Valley County Commissioner


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Chris Petersen Celebration September 22

The Celebration of Chris Petersen’s life in Yellow Pine is set for 9/22/18 at 2pm at the YP Tavern. We will provide the main course., side dishes or desserts are welcome. Thank you. – ST
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Wildland Firefighter Foundation Fund Raiser and Yellow Pine Community BBQ September 29

Midas Gold Idaho and The Corner are proud to sponsor the 5EV Memorial Run.

This 3.6 mile trail run is a fund raiser for the 5EV Memorial Trail Fund and Wildland Firefighter Foundation. Donations are greatly appreciated. The race starts at 10:00 am at the Williams Peak Trailhead on the East Fork Rd. and ends at the summit of the trail; a 3021 ft. elevation change.

A Community BBQ will be held after the race at 4:00 pm, at The Corner in Yellow Pine, Idaho. The roasted pig is provided by Midas Gold Inc. with great food by The Corner and the volunteers of the Yellow Pine Community.

Proceeds from this event will be shared 50/50 between the 5EV Memorial Trail Fund and the Wildland Firefighters Foundation.

For additional information or to sign up for the race, contact: Matt Huber Matt @ ypcorner.com 208/633-3325
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Lost Tablet – Reward

On July 21 one of our crews lost a Samsung tablet on the Profile Road between the switchback below Red Metals mine road and Missouri Creek road. They realized it was missing almost immediately and went back and gridded the road for it, but could not find it. It could have bounced into the roadside brush, or been picked up off the road by someone traveling from Big Creek or Yellow Pine or vice versa.

This tablet has a summers worth of field data and we would sure like to have it back. Would you please spread the word that Ranger Botello will pay a handsome reward of cheeseburger, fries, pop and ice cream for its safe return!?

Contact: Anthony B. Botello, District Ranger, p: 208-634-0601, c: 208-634-9286
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Ice Hole Campground

The Cascade Ranger District [has] temporarily closed Ice Hole Campground for reconstruction beginning Monday, Aug. 6, 2018.

The Campground will remain closed for the remainder of the 2018 season. Project funding was provided by local Tribes and a State RV Grant.

Forest Service crews and contractors will repair existing resource damage, enabling visitors to have an improved recreational experience in the future.

link to project:

Ice Hole Update

Progress made with renovation and remodel of Cascade Ranger District – Ice Hole Campground!

Thanks for the photo shares from Boise NF employees Marie Willis and Danelle Highfill.

link to FB photo gallery:

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Possible Problem Bear

A report Sunday (Aug 19) of a “BIG bear” hanging out in the upper village. Be “Bear Aware” – Remember to secure your trash and pet food.

Update Friday (Aug 24) “it has been back but still not getting into anything.”

Video Link Bear Visitor Aug 20, 2018

Sept 16 – no recent reports of bear activity.
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Pests

Yellow Jackets are late this year, but really mean. Long legged wasps are not as numerous, but around. Mosquito population dropped during the hot dry summer. Lots of gnats out now. Numerous grasshoppers clacking about. Colombian ground squirrels have gone into hibernation. Chipmunks had a population boom this summer. Pine squirrels are not as numerous as in past years. Bears have been roaming the Abstein orchard looking for apples.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not dump appliances or tires at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

“Bring it, Don’t Burn it.” There is a burn pile for woody debris only. Please don’t put trash, construction debris or cardboard in the burn pile.
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Local Events:

Welch Labor Day Golf Tournament Sept. 1st

(No results by press time Sunday 9-16.)
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

July 24th Yellow Pine water update:

It is good to go back to the even/odd watering schedule. Even/odd means if your address is 315 Yellow Pine Avenue, you can water on odd days such as the 1st, 3rd, 5th etc. And if your address is 316, water in even numbered days. The only request is that watering be done between 6am and 1pm. Also please limit to one sprinkler at a time.

Also it is requested that no lawn watering be done August 1st through the 6th to be able to withstand the draw from Harmonica.

Our second sand filter will be on line soon and give us more capacity. Thank you everyone for your patience during the high water demand time. – SH

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.
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VYPA News:

The last 2018 meeting of the VYPA was September 8, 2pm, at the Community Hall, minutes pending approval.

Midas Gold and Yellow Pine

August 28, 2018

Attached is the Community Partnership Agreement the Village of Yellow Pine signed with Midas Gold.

link to: 2018 Community Partnership Agreement.pdf
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YPFD News:

September Meeting Date Changed:

One of our Fire Commissioners will not be able to make the scheduled YPFD 2018-19 budget meeting on the 8th.

The YPFD Budget Meeting will be rescheduled for September 22, 2008, 10:00 AM at the Yellow Pine Community Hall

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.

Yellow Pine Fire District Budget for Fiscal Year 2018 – 2019

Notice has been given that the Yellow Pine Fire District will hold a public hearing for consideration of the proposed budget, including the estimated revenue for the fiscal year, October 1, 2018 to September 20, 2019, pursuant to County Law chapter 14, Section 31-1419A. Said hearing will be held at the Yellow Pine Community Hall in Yellow Pine, Idaho on Saturday September 08, 2018, at 10:00 AM. At said hearing all interested persons may appear and show cause, if any they have, why said proposal budget should be adopted.

Proposed Expenditures:

The following budget is an estimate set forth in said budget of the total proposed expenditures and accruing indebtedness of the Yellow Pine Fire District for the Fiscal year 2018 – 2019.

Yellow Pine Fire District Budget for 2018 – 2019:

* Fire Fighting/Rescue: $8,132
* Wages: $0
* Advertising: $2,000
* Repairs and Maintenance: $4,000
* Utilities (Fixed Cost*) $4,000

Total:
Fixed: $4,000
Includes Insurance $2,500
Total $18,132

I, Dan Stiff, Chair Yellow Pine Fire Commissioner, Yellow Pine, Idaho, do hereby certify that the above is a true and correct statement of the proposed expenditures for the fiscal year 2018 – 2019. All have been tentatively approved and entered into district records. I further certify Yellow Pine Fire District did give notice for said hearing in two (2) conspicuous places in the fire district, by order of the commissioners. Residents are invited to attend the budget hearing on September 08, 2018, at 10:00 AM at the Yellow Pine Community Hall, and have the right to approve written or oral comments concerning the fire district budget. A copy of the proposed fire district budget in detail is available at 320 Westside Ave, Yellow Pine, Idaho, 83677.

Dated this 15th day of August 2018

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911 @ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

A lot of progress has been made on the new Helipad near the crossroads.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

– Fire Chief Jeff

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Open for summer (208) 633-3377
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Yellow Pine Tavern 633-2233

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
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The Corner 633-3325

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Sept 10) overnight low of 36 degrees, clear sky, dry (not much dew) and moderate haze of smoke and dust. One finch, one jay and a female hairy woodpecker visiting. Red flag fire weather warning for this afternoon and evening for dry and gusty winds. High thin clouds coming in before lunch, mostly cloudy and quite breezy by early afternoon and smoky, Gusty and warm afternoon, high of 80 degrees. By evening clear sky, haze of smoke and calmer.

Tuesday (Sept 11) overnight low of 35 degrees, mostly cloudy sky, light dew, variable breeze and light haze of smoke. Female hairy woodpecker calling from the forest, then visited at lunch time. By noon it was mostly clear and getting breezy. Mid-afternoon back to mostly cloudy and getting rather gusty, fairly good air quality, high of 74 degrees. Windy during the afternoon, overcast by sundown and calmer. Dry doe wandering down Pioneer Street at dusk.

Wednesday (Sept 12) overnight low of 34 degrees, overcast and haze of smoke. Power blipped off and on at 850am. One finch stopped by. Partly cloudy before noon, light chilly breezes and light haze of smoke. Around lunch time 3 muffled “booms” off in the distance, sounded like a cannon. Dark clouds and blustery winds mid-afternoon, cool, high of 63 degrees. Two cold looking fluffed up finches visited this afternoon. Mostly cloudy evening, calmer and light haze of smoke. Mama doe with twins and an extra on Pioneer Street after sundown. Driver hardly slowed down for them as they scrambled to find a place to get off the street. Smoke settling in during the night.

Thursday (Sept 13) overnight low of 33 degrees, mostly cloudy, dry (not much dew) and haze of smoke. Heard a robin and a couple of finches, a pine squirrel scolding somewhere in the neighborhood. Cool and cloudy mid-day. A couple of chilly looking fluffed up finches visiting at lunch time. Gusty breezes after 1pm. Sprinkles on and off after 130pm until a little after 2pm, cool and variable breezes, high of 63 degrees. Not enough rain to wet anything, barely made the roof damp. Clouds breaking up and by evening lots of blue sky, better air, slight haze.

Friday (Sept 14) overnight low of 27 degrees, heavy frost, clear sky, haze of smoke (smells like wet campfire.) A couple of fluffed up finches visiting. Streets are dusty, yesterday’s rain wasn’t enough. Flicker visiting at lunch time. Partly cloudy, light breezes, haze of dust and smoke mid-day. Mostly cloudy mid-afternoon and windy, high of 74 degrees. Local streets are very dusty. Lots of blue dragonflies this year, and quite a few grasshoppers. By sun down partly cloudy, lighter breezes and better air quality. Two robins calling at dark.

Saturday (Sept 15) did not get below freezing last night, no frost (not much dew), mostly cloudy sky, light breeze and haze of smoke. Light traffic kicking up dust. Pine squirrel and a female cassins finch visiting. Dark clouds by lunch time. Windy front with a little rain hit at 240pm, not enough rain to settle the dust, then steady rain after 330pm, high of 69 degrees. By sundown clouds breaking up and lighter breezes. Young deer bouncing around the golf course at dusk. A report that it is “duck-em and dodge-em” traffic on the South Fork road with hunting season open.

Sunday (Sept 16) overnight low of 33 degrees, clear sky, light frost, heavy dew and slight breeze. Very light haze of smoke up high, low level smoke from local wood stoves. A few finches visiting in the morning. Wind kicking up by lunch time. Young jay stopped by for lunch, a few robins in the neighborhood. Clear, sunny, mild temps and quite windy early afternoon, high of 72 degrees. Local streets have dried out and weekend traffic kicking up a lot of dust this afternoon. Clear and calmer toward evening. Bright half moon shining high to the south after sunset. Light haze of smoke and dust in the air.
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Idaho News:

Warren Wagon Road to be closed Mon-Friday next two weeks

Closures will allow installation of culverts for fish passage

By Drew Dodson for the Star-News September 13, 2018

A section of Warren Wagon Road north of McCall will be closed Monday through Friday for the next two weeks as part of a project to rebuild the road.

The road will be closed from 8 a.m. Monday to 5 p.m. Friday, Sept. 21, starting at Sharlie Lane about three miles north of McCall, to East Side Drive.

The same closure hours will be in effect for Sept. 24-28, but the southern closure will begin at Simplot Point, which is about four miles north of McCall.

The extended closure is needed while two large culverts are installed at Wagon Bay Creek and Sylvan Creek, said Cody Brown, a spokesperson for M.A. DeAtley Construction of Clarkston, Wash., the general contractor for the project.

The road will be closed off entirely to through traffic, but an access will be available for local residents as well as emergency vehicles, Brown said.

continued:
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Toxic blue-green algae found in Lake Cascade

DEQ advises humans, animals to stay out of water

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 13, 2018

A widespread bloom of toxic blue-green algae has been detected throughout Lake Cascade, prompting officials to issue a warning against human and animal contact.

“The algae is spread throughout a majority of the reservoir,” Idaho Department of Environmental Quality Watershed Coordinator Chase Cusack said.

Cusack took water samples at the Van Wyck, Crown Point, and Sugarloaf areas and found the algae at all sites extending to lake banks.”

“Toxin levels vary throughout the reservoir,” Cusack said.

Symptoms brought on by exposure to the toxic bacteria include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, difficulty breathing, skin irritation, allergic responses, liver damage, or neurotoxic reactions such as tingling fingers and toes, an advisory from the Central District Health Department and DEQ said.

Swimming, wading or other activities with full body contact of water should be avoided, the advisory said.

Pets and livestock are vulnerable to cyanobacteria and their toxins and should stay out of water where blooms are visible. Pets and livestock can be exposed to the toxins through drinking, swimming, or self-grooming by licking their wet coat or paws, the advisory said.

continued:
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Prepared for the Worst: Drill gives responders experience with mass casualty disaster

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 13, 2018

Covered in fake blood and sporting gruesome mock wounds, volunteers from McCall based Scout troop 246 gave their best theatrical performances, screaming and crying as local emergency services swarmed the scene in a mass casualty practice drill on Saturday.

The drill, which took place in the parking lot of the Donnelly Fire Department, was designed to stress local emergency services to the limit of their resources and capacity by simulating a car purposefully driving through a Scout troop during a parade.

In total there were 12 victims in the simulation and over 46 personnel from the combined responding agencies.

continued:
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Cascade among 29 ‘underperforming’ schools in Idaho

State to step in to help students in grades 6-8

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 13, 2018

The Cascade School District is one of 29 in Idaho that have been classified as “underperforming” and will receive state funding to help improve student performance.

The state will give Cascade schools about $73,000 each year for the next three years to help bring up testing scores, Cascade Superintendent Jeff Blaser said.

Cascade was named to the list due to the school’s low growth in achievement in grades 6-8, Blaser said.

Criteria include student achievement on math and English language arts on standardized tests, according to Idaho Education News.

continued:
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Damage by Vandals to Donnelly Elementary School set at $24,000

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 13, 2018

Damage done to Donnelly Elementary School by two youths in July totaled about $26,500, McCall-Donnelly School District Superintendent Jim Foudy said Monday.

The school district’s insurance company paid about $24,000 to fix the damage while the district paid a $2,500 deductible, Foudy told M-D trustees at their regular meeting.

Franklin Building Supply donated a window to aid in the restoration, and an anonymous donor gave $1,000, he said.

The clean-up was finished in time for the opening day of school on Aug. 28, Foudy said.

continued:
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Sept. 24 meeting set for proposed McCall charter school

The Star-News September 13, 2018

An informational meeting on a proposed public charter school in McCall is scheduled to begin at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 24, at the McCall Public Library.

Those attending will hear about the progress of the proposed McCall Community School and learn more about the proposed curriculum and school mission.

The meeting will be a follow-up to a meeting held in March where proponents of a charter school have said they hope to open in time for the 2019-20 school year.

The McCall Community School would initially enroll students in kindergarten through eighth grade. The school is meant to operate as an alternative to traditional classroom education

continued:
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Budget office warns Idahoans may face bigger tax bills

By Kimberlee Kruesi – 9/10/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idahoans may see smaller refunds when filing their 2018 taxes next year because of major changes tied to the new tax law, Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter’s budget office warned on Monday.

According to the Division of Financial Management, the state’s tax revenue has faced a shortfall for the past two months because of individual income tax revenue failing to meet estimated forecasts.

As a result, fiscal year-to-date collections have come in about $12.7 million under than anticipated. This means $568.3 million in tax revenue has been received since July 1, less than the projected $581 million.

“The two months of shortfalls to the general fund’s largest and most reliable revenue source is inconsistent with the Gem State’s healthy job market,” wrote Jani Revier, Otter’s budget chief, in an August general fund revenue report.

continued:
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Gas prices in Idaho 40 cents higher than national average

by Chaz Ricks Tuesday, September 11th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Whether you’re commuting to work or planning a road trip with your family or friends.

Gas prices are still high in Idaho and continue to be a challenge for local families.

The average in Idaho for regular unleaded fuel is $3.23 a gallon, which is almost 40 cents more than the national average.

In Boise, the average is $3.45 a gallon. Nearly 60 cents more than the national average!

Prices across the state are up almost 50 cents a gallon compared to a year ago.

source:
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Mining News:

A Purpose Driven Company

August 29 Midas

Midas Gold says it is a different kind of mining company, but what does that mean? Historically, mining companies have been seen as profit driven and everything else – including the environment, worker safety and communities – was an afterthought. We take a different approach. We believe it is time for mining companies to be purpose driven.

It is no longer enough for projects to just meet basic regulatory requirements. We believe modern, progressive mining companies must encompass a holistic view of their enterprise. Mines must be about more than profit, they need to be about employees, community, protection of the environment and mines must win the support of the communities closest to their sites in order to operate. These concepts are at the heart of Midas Gold.

It is no secret that the mining companies of the past left behind questionable legacies. We understand this has made people skeptical of the mining industry and it is no surprise some of this skepticism extends to us. We understand we have to earn the community’s trust by doing things differently than our predecessors and following through on our promises.

continued:
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Fire Season:

Sept 16, 2018 Fire update:
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Boise National Forest remains under Stage 1 restrictions

Boise, Idaho, Sept. 13, 2018 –Boise National Forest fire managers are waiting for measurable precipitation before lifting the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions. Conditions are extremely dry and any spark could result in a wildfire.

Dry and warmer weather conditions are predicted to return and continue through the weekend. Winds are expected to increase in the late afternoons.

Boise National Forest visitors may have a campfires within designated fee campgrounds and within established fire structures.

The Idaho Fire Info website has information about wildfires and restrictions for the entire state. http://www.idahofireinfo.com/

The 115 acre Casner Fire is 92 percent contained and was located 13 miles east of Lowman. Firefighters are being released back to their home units. The 26 acre German Fire was contained on 9-12-2018. Fires will be monitored and may continue to smoke until a significant amount of moisture arrives on the forest.

An area closure near Grandjean for the Wapiti Fire remains in effect. Information is available on Inciweb at: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6176/

If you need more information regarding road and area closures or fire restrictions, please visit the Boise National website:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices
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Big swath of US forest reopens after fire near Idaho/Nevada border

by Associated Press Friday, September 14th 2018

Elko, Nev. (AP) — Hundreds of square miles of national forest in northeast Nevada have reopened for public use after a closure ordered nearly a month ago due to a raging wildfire.

The Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest announced the reopening of the area Wednesday in the ranger district stretching from the Idaho line to southwest of Wild Horse State Reservoir.

District Ranger Josh Nicholes says the area was cleared following a safety assessment by an emergency response team.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Proposed Lochsa River designation draws strong opposition

9/13/18 AP

Lewiston, Idaho — Residents fear that agencies will have more authority over a northern Idaho river if it is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

A majority of people who attended a Wednesday meeting in Grangeville voiced strong objections to the idea to place the Lochsa River corridor on the national register, the Lewiston Tribune reported.

The corridor was nominated by the Nez Perce Tribe.

The corridor contains numerous cultural sites that are important to the tribe and its more than 1,000 years of using trails in the area, said Nakia Williamson, director of cultural resources for the tribe.

continued:
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Gastric Foreign Bodies in Pets

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Sept 14, 2018 IME

A gastric foreign body is any item that is swallowed into the stomach and can’t pass into the small intestines. Some gastric foreign bodies can cause severe vomiting due to irritations of the stomach wall. Some foreign objects, such as metals or coins, can poison the pet because of metal toxicities that cause red blood cell destruction.

Gastric foreign bodies occur when something is swallowed but cannot leave the stomach. These can usually include rocks, sticks, large bone fragments, balls, socks, coins and underwear. Some animals eat unusual items as part of a behavioral problem. The consumption of unusual items is called pica.

The most common clinical sign of a gastric foreign body is vomiting. If the foreign body is made of zinc, as is present in many coins, the animal will develop an anemia. Lead foreign bodies can cause lead poisoning. Most foreign bodies are found when X-rays are performed on an animal that is vomiting.

continued:
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Dogs were flying high at the Zamzows Frisbee Fest

Sept 16, 2018 KBOI (Boise)

The Zamzows Frisbee Fest filled Ann Morrison park Saturday in Boise. The event is a competition in which dogs try and catch a frisbee throw by their owner.

link to photo gallery:
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State says wolves attacked 5 calves in Ferry County Washington

by AP Monday, September 10th 2018

Spokane, Wash. (AP) — The state of Washington says wolves attacked at least five calves in Ferry County last week, killing one and injuring four.

The attacks occurred Wednesday through Friday in an area once occupied by the Profanity Peak wolf pack, which was wiped out last year.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife says it is studying the latest attacks and weighing non-lethal ways to prevent future wolf attacks.

continued:
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Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary plans open house Sept. 22

The Star-News September 13, 2018

Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary near McCall will host it’s annual open house from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22.

The open house is the only time during the year the public can tour the grounds and see wildlife displays and demonstrations.

Those attending are urged to bring a picnic lunch and enjoy the scenic view of Lake Fork Creek from the bridge.

Snowdon is located seven miles out Lick Creek Road east of McCall at end of the pavement

Snowdon’s mission is to rehabilitate and return injured and orphaned wildlife to the wild, and provide hands-on education to promote a healthy coexistence with wildlife and the ecosystem.

Snowdon specializes in the rehabilitation of local wildlife, including orphaned baby birds and mammals and injured small mammals, songbirds, waterfowl, and raptors.

The 35-acre sanctuary has a number of animal pens and enclosures, and a clinic equipped to care for ill and injured birds and animals.

Go to http://snowdonwildlife.org for more information.

source:
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Mexican wolf found dead in Arizona and in New Mexico

9/15/18 AP

Phoenix — Arizona wildlife officials say two endangered Mexican gray wolves, including one in New Mexico, have died.

The Arizona Game and Fish Department said in a news release Friday that both animals were found dead in August, bringing the total number of documented deaths to eight. Authorities did not release any details about the circumstances or where exactly the wolves were found.

Their deaths are under investigation.

continued:
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Wolf Education International

September 10, 2018 Newsletter

Washington Wolf Killed After Judge Approves Lethal Action

Wolves kill dog on Tofino beach

September 15 Newsletter

Dr. V. Geist Speech: Big Game Forever Banquet and Wolf Symposium
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Man injured in bear encounter

Sep 11, 2018 AP

Cody, Wyo. (AP) – A 48-year-old hiker from Minnesota has been injured in a bear encounter in northern Wyoming.

Park County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Lance Mathess says Bradley D. Johnson of Plymouth, Minnesota, received severe injuries to his arm, shoulder and back when he encountered two bears on Sunday afternoon in the Beartooth Mountains near the Wyoming-Montana border.

continued:
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Wyoming wardens move 4 grizzlies

Sep 11, 2018 Local News 8

Jackson, Wyo. (KIFI/KIDK) – Wyoming Game and Fish wardens trapped and relocated an adult female grizzly and her two cubs Thursday, September 6. A second sub-adult female grizzly was captured and relocated on Friday.

The family group was captured in response to cattle depredation on private lands in the Cody region. The bear and her cubs were relocated into the Snake River drainage about 10 miles northwest of Moran Junction. The second grizzly was relocated to the Blackrock drainage about 20 miles northeast of Moran Junction.

continued:
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US judge delays grizzly bear hunts in Rockies 2 more weeks

By Matthew Brown – 9/13/18 AP

Billings, Mont. — A U.S. judge on Thursday delayed for two more weeks the first grizzly bear hunts in the Lower 48 states in almost three decades, saying he needed more time to consider if federal protections for the animals should be restored.

The ruling by U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen left the fate of the bruins in and around Yellowstone National Park in limbo, more than a year after federal officials declared the population had recovered from near extermination.

Up to 23 bears could be killed in the hunts planned in Wyoming and Idaho. Christensen already delayed them once, in an order that came two days before grizzly season was set to open Sept. 1.

continued:
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Grizzlies suspected in fatal Wyoming attack trapped, killed

The body of Mark Uptain, a hunting outfitter, was found Saturday in the Teton Wilderness east of Grand Teton National Park.

Associated Press September 16, 2018

Jackson, Wyo. – Wyoming officials have trapped and killed two grizzly bears they believe killed a hunting outfitter and injured his client.

Wyoming Game and Fish Department regional supervisor Brad Hovinga said Sunday the grizzlies that were killed matched the description of those that killed 37-year-old outfitter Mark Uptain.

Uptain’s body was found Saturday in the Teton Wilderness east of Grand Teton National Park. Corey Chubon of Florida had leg, chest and arm injuries but was released from a hospital.

continued:
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Photos: Bobcat spotted near Barber Park

KBOI Sept 14, 2018 (Boise)

A bobcat was spotted Wednesday near Barber Park during a conference. (Photo courtesy City of Boise)

link to photo gallery:
— — — — — — — — — —

‘She fought hard’: Oregon hiker killed by cougar fought for her life, sister says

Wildlife officials said they believe it would be the first fatal wild cougar attack in Oregon history.

KGW September 12, 2018

Welches, Ore. — A missing hiker who was found dead in the Mount Hood National Forest area was killed in a suspected cougar attack, according to the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office.

Wildlife officials said they believe it would be the first fatal wild cougar attack in Oregon history.

“This does have every indication that this is the first fatal attack of a human by a cougar in Oregon,” said Brian Wolfer, watershed manager with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

continued:
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Oregon wildlife officials to hunt for killer cougar

By Andrew Selsky – 9/12/18 AP

Salem, Ore. — Oregon wildlife officials with guns and dogs will hunt for a cougar believed to have killed a woman while she was hiking in rugged terrain near the state’s highest peak, a wildlife official said Wednesday.

Diana Bober, who at 55 was an avid and experienced hiker, apparently fought the cougar with repellent, a sharp object and a stick, her sister said.

Bober’s body was found Monday, almost two weeks after she was last heard from. She was the first person known to have been killed by a cougar in the wild in Oregon, and the second in the Pacific Northwest this year.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho horse quarantined after being exposed to deadly virus

A Colorado horse infected with equine infectious anemia has put hundreds of other horses at risk.

Gretchen Parsons KTVB September 11, 2018

Boise — State officials are taking extreme caution after a horse that could be infected with a fatal and contagious virus was brought into Idaho.

The animal was purchased in northern Colorado where it was exposed to another horse diagnosed with equine infectious anemia.

When horses become infected with equine infectious anemia, or EIA, they must either be quarantined for life or euthanized, which was the case for this sick horse in Colorado.

But before it was put down and the owners were aware it had contracted the virus, the horse came into contact with hundreds of others, potentially putting them at risk.

continued:
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Elk knocks man to ground in Yellowstone

Local News 8 Sept 14, 2018

Mammoth Hot Springs (KIFI/KIDK) – An elk knocked a man to the ground in Yellowstone Thursday.

Boyce Schall captured this video of two bull elk fighting in Mammoth Hot Spring when one of them charged visitors and knocked a man to the ground.

Officials remind you elk mating season can be very active. Be alert and always stay at least 75 feet from all elk.

source w/video:
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Fish & Game News:

F&G asks grouse hunters to place wings in collection barrels

The Star-News September 13, 2018

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game asks grouse hunters to donate forest grouse wings to help with conservation and tracking efforts on West Mountain this fall.

Wings should be deposited into five collection barrels placed on West Mountain. Hunters are encouraged to detach and deposit the right wing from ruffed, spruce and dusky grouse into the barrels. Instructions are located on each barrel.

Fish and Game uses grouse wings to determine a bird’s age and sex, allowing biologists to track population trends over time.

Hunters are asked to look for wing collection barrels at these locations:

• No Business Road (Forest Road 186).

• Poison Creek Road (Forest Road 436).

• Anderson Creek Road (Forest Road 435).

• Snowbank Mountain Road (Forest Road 446).

• East Fork, Weiser River Road (Forest Road 172).

source:
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Idaho hunters, anglers contend with disappearing ink routine

Fish and Game says some licenses and tags have fading print and are turning into blank pieces of paper.

KTVB September 11, 2018

Boise — Idaho anglers and hunters not only have to contend with elusive fish and wildlife, now even their licenses and tags are vanishing.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game in a statement Tuesday says some licenses and tags have fading print and are turning into blank pieces of paper.

Fish and Game spokesman Roger Phillips says it’s the old disappearing ink routine apparently caused by faulty heat-sensitive paper.

The agency says that hunters and anglers who purchased the fading documents that allow them to legally hunt and fish can get replacements free of charge.

Hunters and anglers can visit any regional Fish and Game office or mail them in to get a replacement.

source:
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Here are rules and reminders for hunting on Idaho state endowment lands

F&G recently signed an agreement to keep 2.3 million acres of endowment lands open to hunting, angling and trapping

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, September 13, 2018

As you head out to hunt on Idaho Department of Lands parcels, the please keep these three things in mind:

Fire season isn’t over yet, and people cause most fires.

Although temperatures are expected to drop and relative humidity to rise in the coming weeks, we are still very much in fire season and will be through the end of October. Fires will continue to burn until we experience a “season-ending weather event,” meaning enough rain or snow for fire managers to call the fire season to an end.

Most wildfires today are not naturally occurring. On lands protected by the State of Idaho, people – not lightning – are responsible for more than three-quarters of the fires this year, accounting for 98.4 percent of the acres burned.

There are still restrictions on campfires and smoking outdoors right now in parts of southern Idaho. View current fire restrictions online here. If campfires are allowed where you plan to hunt, make sure your campfire is cool to the touch before leaving it so you do not unintentionally start a wildfire. View other campfire safety tips here.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Get the facts about bats, including how to remove one from your house

Podcast and video will help you better understand an oft-misunderstood animal

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Many people’s interest in bats peaks around Halloween when they’re used as scary decorations, but Idaho’s bats are much more than a prop. They’re an interesting and important Idaho wildlife species, and Rita Dixon, Fish and Game’s wildlife action plan coordinator, recently shared her expertise about bats in a podcast at Boise State Public Radio.

Most people will never encounter a bat more closely than one flying around their homes and eating insects, but in the unlikely event one finds its way into your home, here’s a safe way to deal with it.

source w/video:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Huge squirrel population chomps crops, driving farmers nuts

by David Sharp, Associated Press Sunday, September 16th 2018


In this Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018 photo a squirrel carries a walnut in Portland, Maine. A bumper crop of acorns, pine cones and other staples last year led to a population boom of squirrels. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

(AP) — There’s a bumper crop of squirrels in New England, and the frenetic critters are frustrating farmers by chomping their way through apple orchards, pumpkin patches and corn fields.

The varmints are fattening themselves for winter while destroying the crops with bite marks.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

HuntingSchool-a
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Tips & Advice:

How to protect your eyes from the smokey air

By Katie Keleher Sep 10, 2018 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Smokey skies are causing eyes to become irritated, itchy and watery. Optometrist Lisa Porter says she’s seen a lot of patients lately affected by the smoke and allergens in the air.

… She recommends using over the counter eye drops to alleviate the effects. She also says don’t wait too long to get your eyes taken care of or you may need a steroid. Another way to prevent symptoms is putting in an artificial tear such as Refresh or Systane before going outside.

“If you can put that tear in before you go out and then again when you come back in, it’s actually going to alleviate some of those allergens and toxins that can get in your eye and cause that swelling and redness and edema,” Dr. Porter said.

If your eyes are puffy due to the air, use something cool to alleviate the swelling.

full story:
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Advertisements

Sept 9, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 9, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
September 22 at 10am Community Hall YPFD Budget Hearing
September 22 Celebration of Life for Chris Petersen at 2pm, YP Tavern
September 29 Wildland Firefighter Foundation Fund Raiser and Yellow Pine Community BBQ

(details below)
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Village News:

Chris Petersen Celebration

The Celebration of Chris Petersen’s life in Yellow Pine is set for 9/22/18 at 2pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern. We will provide the main course., side dishes or desserts are welcome. Thank you. – ST
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Wildland Firefighter Foundation Fund Raiser and Yellow Pine Community BBQ

Midas Gold Idaho and The Corner are proud to sponsor the 5EV Memorial Run.

This 3.6 mile trail run is a fund raiser for the 5EV Memorial Trail Fund and Wildland Firefighter Foundation. Donations are greatly appreciated. The race starts at 10:00 am at the Williams Peak Trailhead on the East Fork Rd. and ends at the summit of the trail; a 3021 ft. elevation change.

A Community BBQ will be held after the race at 4:00 pm, at The Corner in Yellow Pine, Idaho. The roasted pig is provided by Midas Gold Inc. with great food by The Corner and the volunteers of the Yellow Pine Community.

Proceeds from this event will be shared 50/50 between the 5EV Memorial Trail Fund and the Wildland Firefighters Foundation. For additional information or to sign up for the race, contact: Matt Huber Matt @ ypcorner.com 208/633-3325
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Lost Tablet – Reward

On July 21 one of our crews lost a Samsung tablet on the Profile Road between the switchback below Red Metals mine road and Missouri Creek road. They realized it was missing almost immediately and went back and gridded the road for it, but could not find it. It could have bounced into the roadside brush, or been picked up off the road by someone traveling from Big Creek or Yellow Pine or vice versa.

This tablet has a summers worth of field data and we would sure like to have it back. Would you please spread the word that Ranger Botello will pay a handsome reward of cheeseburger, fries, pop and ice cream for its safe return!?

Contact: Anthony B. Botello, District Ranger, p: 208-634-0601, c: 208-634-9286
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Caton Fire

The fire is located 7 miles southwest of the Village of Yellow Pine near Indian Point and has been moving east into the Caton Creek drainage.

On Wednesdays and Thursday of last week warm, dry and windy conditions increased fire activity on the west and northwest sides of the fire, backing up towards Indian Peak. The fire is not in Caton Creek, and no fire activity has been seen east of Caton Creek. Click the map tab above to view the IR Flight Map from 10:05 p.m., September 6, 2018.

Cooler weather is expected through the weekend that will decrease fire activity. The fire is not anticipated to move to the east – no threats to Yellow Pine or other values exist at this time, and none are threat expected.

Previous fire activity in the area is expected to confine the fire in the immediate area around Indian Peak.

Caton Fire 9-4-2018 around 6pm from Yellow Pine

Indian Ridge Trail Closure
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/6177/47537/

Caton Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6177/
— —

Bum Creek Fire

We detected a new smoke today [9-7-2018]. We are calling it the Bum Creek Fire and we estimate 1/4 – 1/2 acre in size. It is just north of the confluence of Bum and Tamarack Creeks in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. Because of the time of year, lack of values at risk, exposure to responders and cost, we have decided to manage this fire for resource benefit. We will monitor the fire and take action if it poses a threat to come outside the Wilderness toward anything of value.

At this time there are no trail or area closures for this fire.

Attached photos:

– Anthony B. Botello, Krassel District Ranger, Payette National Forest (email)
— —

Kiwah Fire – Meadow Crk Road Open

The Kiwah fire is burning east of Yellow Pine in the Wilderness in the Indian Creek drainage. Meadow Creek road is open. – B Harris PNF

Kiwah Fire 9-4-2018 around 6pm

Sept 5 345pm update: Summary on fire activity on the Kiwah Fire is as follows: Fire activity remains minimal throughout the fire area with very light fire activity in the Papoose Creek and Indian Creek drainages, within the interior of the burn area.
– Amy Baumer, Public Affairs Officer, Salmon-Challis National Forest (via email)

Kiwah Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5995/
— —

Johnson Fire – Contained

8-23-2018 Update: It was declared contained today. Most resources will be off the fire by Saturday. Folks may still see some smoke from time to time as there are numerous snags in the interior of the fire that make it too dangerous to completely mop it up. Our folks will continue to monitor the fire until the rains or snows come.
– Jake Strohmeyer, BNF Cascade Ranger

Note: On Friday pilots reported seeing smoke on the west side of Johnson Creek in the Cemetery area, but no fire found.
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Ice Hole Campground

The Cascade Ranger District [has] temporarily closed Ice Hole Campground for reconstruction beginning Monday, Aug. 6, 2018.

The Campground will remain closed for the remainder of the 2018 season. Project funding was provided by local Tribes and a State RV Grant.

Forest Service crews and contractors will repair existing resource damage, enabling visitors to have an improved recreational experience in the future.

link to project:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49637

Ice Hole Update

Progress made with renovation and remodel of Cascade Ranger District – Ice Hole Campground!

Thanks for the photo shares from Boise NF employees Marie Willis and Danelle Highfill.

link to FB photo gallery:

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Possible Problem Bear

A report Sunday (Aug 19) of a “BIG bear” hanging out in the upper village. Be “Bear Aware” – Remember to secure your trash and pet food.

Update Friday (Aug 24) “it has been back but still not getting into anything.”

Video Link Bear Visitor Aug 20, 2018
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Pests

Yellow Jackets are late this year, but really mean. Long legged wasps are not as numerous, but around. Mosquito population has dropped during the hot dry summer. Lots of gnats out now. Lots of grasshoppers clacking about. Colombian ground squirrels have gone into hibernation. Chipmunks had a population boom this summer. Pine squirrels are not as numerous as in past years. Bears are roaming the Abstein orchard looking for apples.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not dump appliances or tires at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

“Bring it, Don’t Burn it.” There is a burn pile for woody debris only. Please don’t put trash, construction debris or cardboard in the burn pile.
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Local Events:

Welch Labor Day Golf Tournament

The cannon for the Labor Day Golf Tournament went off at 1140am on Saturday September 1st to start the golfers.

(No results by press time Sunday 9-9.)
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

July 24th Yellow Pine water update:

It is good to go back to the even/odd watering schedule. Even/odd means if your address is 315 Yellow Pine Avenue, you can water on odd days such as the 1st, 3rd, 5th etc. And if your address is 316, water in even numbered days. The only request is that watering be done between 6am and 1pm. Also please limit to one sprinkler at a time.

Also it is requested that no lawn watering be done August 1st through the 6th to be able to withstand the draw from Harmonica.

Our second sand filter will be on line soon and give us more capacity. Thank you everyone for your patience during the high water demand time. – SH

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.
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VYPA News:

The last 2018 meeting of the VYPA was September 8, 2pm, at the Community Hall, minutes pending approval.

Midas Gold and Yellow Pine

August 28, 2018

Attached is the Community Partnership Agreement the Village of Yellow Pine signed with Midas Gold.

link to: 2018 Community Partnership Agreement.pdf
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YPFD News:

September Meeting Date Changed:

One of our Fire Commissioners will not be able to make the scheduled YPFD 2018-19 budget meeting on the 8th.

The YPFD Budget Meeting will be rescheduled for September 22, 2008, 10:00 AM at the Yellow Pine Community Hall

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.

Yellow Pine Fire District Budget for Fiscal Year 2018 – 2019

Notice has been given that the Yellow Pine Fire District will hold a public hearing for consideration of the proposed budget, including the estimated revenue for the fiscal year, October 1, 2018 to September 20, 2019, pursuant to County Law chapter 14, Section 31-1419A. Said hearing will be held at the Yellow Pine Community Hall in Yellow Pine, Idaho on Saturday September 08, 2018, at 10:00 AM. At said hearing all interested persons may appear and show cause, if any they have, why said proposal budget should be adopted.

Proposed Expenditures:

The following budget is an estimate set forth in said budget of the total proposed expenditures and accruing indebtedness of the Yellow Pine Fire District for the Fiscal year 2018 – 2019.

Yellow Pine Fire District Budget for 2018 – 2019:

* Fire Fighting/Rescue: $8,132
* Wages: $0
* Advertising: $2,000
* Repairs and Maintenance: $4,000
* Utilities (Fixed Cost*) $4,000

Total:
Fixed: $4,000
Includes Insurance $2,500
Total $18,132

I, Dan Stiff, Chair Yellow Pine Fire Commissioner, Yellow Pine, Idaho, do hereby certify that the above is a true and correct statement of the proposed expenditures for the fiscal year 2018 – 2019. All have been tentatively approved and entered into district records. I further certify Yellow Pine Fire District did give notice for said hearing in two (2) conspicuous places in the fire district, by order of the commissioners. Residents are invited to attend the budget hearing on September 08, 2018, at 10:00 AM at the Yellow Pine Community Hall, and have the right to approve written or oral comments concerning the fire district budget. A copy of the proposed fire district budget in detail is available at 320 Westside Ave, Yellow Pine, Idaho, 83677.

Dated this 15th day of August 2018

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911 @ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

A lot of progress has been made on the new Helipad near the crossroads.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

– Fire Chief Jeff

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Open for summer (208) 633-3377
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Yellow Pine Tavern 633-2233

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
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The Corner 633-3325

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Sept 3) overnight low of 36 degrees, clear very blue sky and good air this morning. Finches calling and flying, a female hairy woodpecker and a white-breasted nuthatch visiting. Quiet morning. Warm and sunny mid-day, light breezes. Lots of grasshoppers clacking about. Gusty afternoon breezes, sunny and warm, high of 84 degrees. A few high wispy pink clouds after sunset. Very quiet at dark.

Tuesday (Sept 4) overnight low of 38 degrees, clear blue sky, slight breeze, roofs wet with dew and good air this morning. A few finches flying and calling. A few little cotton ball clouds around lunch time, then a few medium sized clouds early afternoon, warm and light breezes, very dry, light haze of smoke, high of 84 degrees. Increasing smoke late afternoon. A couple of jays visited, not many birds around. By 6pm a smoke column over the Caton Fire and could see smoke from the Kiwah Fire. Before sundown a little ash and burned pine needles falling, poor air quality.

Wednesday (Sept 5) overnight low of 39 degrees, clear sky, light haze of smoke, roofs wet with dew and breezy. Early morning loud airplanes. Finches flying and calling, a couple of jays visited. By 1130am you could see a haze of smoke rising in the direction of the Caton Fire. By early afternoon there was quite a bit of smoke rising from the Caton Fire and quite a “smudge” on the horizon in the direction of the Kiwah Fire. One finch and no hummingbirds this afternoon. Hot, dry, breezy, smoky afternoon, high of 89 degrees. Late afternoon gusty winds, hot and smoky. Calmer towards evening, after sundown there was a gray smudge on the horizon to the north east, and the mass of smoke to the south west had died down somewhat. Breezy after dark.

Thursday (Sept 6) overnight low of 46 degrees, mostly cloudy, light haze of smoke, dry – very little dew. A few early loud airplanes. A few finches and a raven flying and calling, a young jay visiting. Early afternoon mostly cloudy, warm and a bit muggy, breezy and haze of smoke. No hummers yet today, one jay has all the feeders to itself. Hot, cloudy smoky afternoon, high of 89 degrees. Thunder around 5pm, gusty breezes and smoky air, lightning map shows strikes in the T. Mtn area and upper South Fork, later a couple more to the south on Antimony Ridge. After sundown better air quality and lighter breezes. Breezy around midnight.

Friday (Sept 7) overnight low of 45 degrees, partly cloudy, light breezes, light haze of smoke and dust. Finches flying and calling, a flicker passing through and a robin looking for bugs. A few loud airplanes, traffic kicked up a plume of dust on main street in front of the Veterans Memorial. A couple of finches visiting early afternoon, no hummingbirds. Warm, cloudy, smoky DUSTY afternoon. Pilots reported smoke west of Johnson Creek across from the cemetery, no fire found – so far. Caton Fire is putting up a smoke plume again this afternoon. Hot, cloudy, smoky, dusty and breezy, high of 89 degrees. Quite a bit of smoke (Kiwah Fire) on the eastern horizon this evening. Poor air quality (can smell the smoke.)

Saturday (Sept 8) overnight low of 45 degrees, appears to be partly clear above the smoke, sun light casts a red haze and poor air quality. Very few birds around, no squirrels either. By lunch time it appeared to be clear above the smoke, starting to get a little breezy. Group of UTVers visiting the Vets Monument after lunch. Warm, smoky, mostly clear and breezy early afternoon, poor air quality, high of 82 degrees. One finch visited in the afternoon. Light traffic kicking up a lot of dust. Late afternoon smoke, breezy and slightly better air quality. By sundown mostly clear and light haze of smoke, calmer and quiet. A bat flitting around the neighborhood just at dark.

Sunday (Sept 9) overnight low of 36 degrees, dry (not much dew), clear sky, slight haze of smoke – pretty good air quality. A couple of early airplanes. Not many summer birds, one finch and a pine squirrel visiting. The young neighborhood jay stopped by for lunch. Clear, breezy, mild temperatures and good air in the early afternoon, high of 82 degrees, light traffic and dust. Female hairy woodpecker visited this afternoon, no finches. Pleasant evening, good air, clear sky, light traffic (and dust.)
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Idaho News:

Active Harmful Algal Bloom Advisories

Valley Co., ID — In cooperation with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (IDEQ), Central District Health Department (CDHD) is issuing a health advisory due to the presence of a cyanobacteria harmful algal bloom (HAB) at Lake Cascade in Valley County. Recent samples taken indicate concentrations of toxin-producing cyanobacteria (sometimes called blue-green algae) are present that may cause illness to humans and animals.

Cyanobacteria occur naturally. Cyanobacteria blooms occur in waters with high levels of nutrients such as phosphorus and nitrogen. Under certain conditions, some types of algae can release toxins into the water that are harmful to people, pets, and livestock. Recent tests indicate that these toxins are present. The blooms are generally green, or blue-green, and may form thick mats along shorelines. These may look like a surface scum, resembling pea soup and can have an unpleasant odor or stench.

CDHD and DEQ advise the following precautions be taken where harmful algal blooms are known to be present:

· Humans and animals should stay out of the affected water. Swimming, wading, or other activities with full body contact of pond water should be avoided.

· Humans, pets, and livestock should not drink the affected water.

· Fish should be cleaned and rinsed with clean water. Only the fillet portion should be consumed. All other parts should be discarded.

· Pets and livestock are vulnerable to cyanobacteria and their toxins and should stay out of water where blooms are visible. Pets and livestock can be exposed to cyanobacteria and their toxins through drinking, swimming, or self-grooming by licking their wet coat or paws. A reaction will likely require immediate veterinary attention.

· Do not allow pets to eat dried algae.

· If affected water contacts skin or pet fur, wash with clean with potable water as soon as possible.

· Areas of visible algae accumulation should be avoided.

Samples taken indicate unsafe bacteria cell counts, so everyone should heed these precautions and avoid contact with the water.

Symptoms of Exposure

People who are exposed to water with high concentrations of cyanobacteria or cyanotoxins may experience nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, difficulty breathing, skin irritation, allergic responses, liver damage, or neurotoxic reactions such as tingling fingers and toes. Anyone with symptoms should seek medical attention. Boiling or filtering the water will not remove cyanotoxins.

More Information on HABs

For more information about harmful algal blooms, including a map of advisories currently in effect throughout Idaho, visit DEQ’s website at http://www.deq.idaho.gov/…/su…/recreation-health-advisories/

Additional Resources:

Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) – Harmful Algal Blooms Webpage
— — — — — — — — — —

Cascade fire district approves higher taxes

Money will be used to add firefighter, bolster pay

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 6, 2018

The Cascade Rural Fire Protection District board last week approved a tax increase of $98,020 to pay the salary of one more full time firefighter and also recruit and train more volunteers.

The new money will also allow the district to provide more training and to buy equipment as well as make other improvements.

District property owners will see an increase of about $1.75 per month for each $100,000 of assessed value.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

St. Luke’s McCall starts phase two of road work to prepare for expansion

By Laura Crawford for The Star-News September 6, 2018

St. Luke’s McCall’s has begun the second phase of road and utility improvements on the streets surrounding the hospital.

The work is in preparation for a new two-story building planned for the site.

Phase one work focused on road and utility improvements on Forest Street. The street was paved and opened last week, while a sidewalk will be completed this fall.

On Tuesday, State Street from Lake Street (Idaho 55) to Hewitt Street was closed, blocking access to the hospital from that direction. The second phase of work is expected to last through October.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

McCall completes $1.3 million rehab of airport apron

By Dew Dodson for The Star-News September 6, 2018

A $1.3 million paving project covering 3.1 acres of asphalt was completed this week at the McCall Municipal Airport.

The work, which was done by Granite Excavation of Cascade, replaced 135,000 square feet of asphalt ranging in age from 30 years to nearly 50 years around the airport’s commercial apron.

The project also laid a new 75-feet by 75-feet concrete pad in front of the airport’s fuel station, which will reduce damage caused by any spills.

The new asphalt will have a life span of 20 to 25 years and was needed to reduce hazards to aircrafts and resolve past problems with puddles, Airport Manager Jay Scherer said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Donnelly Public Library to host grand opening Sept. 21

The Star-News September 6, 2018

A celebration will be held on Friday, Sept. 21, to note the grand opening of the Donnelly Public Library.

The festivities will run from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the library, located at 150 E. State St.

There will be games and activities for youths as well as a bounce house.

continued:
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Keep your eye out for purple loosestrife

Purple loosestrife is an aggressive, invasive noxious weed that can spread rapidly.

KTVB September 8, 2018

Boise — You’ve probably seen them, tall purple flowers blooming near the edge of a ditch, pond or stream.

They are pretty to look at but Idaho noxious weed officials don’t want you to let their appearance fool you!

They say there’s a good chance those flowers are purple loosestrife, an aggressive, invasive noxious weed.

continued:
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At least 100 killed during Idaho’s 100 Deadliest Days

By Katie Keleher Sep 04, 2018 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Idaho’s 100 Deadliest Days are over. There was nearly one death per day on the road.

It marks the number of road deaths between Memorial Day weekend and Labor Day weekend. The Idaho Department of Transportation says as of six this morning there were at least 100 deaths. That number could grow in the coming days. Idaho State Police have up to 72 hours to report deaths.

Last year 91 people were killed during the 100 deadliest days.

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Scam alert:

Better Business Bureau warns of fake check scam

By Katie Keleher Sep 06, 2018 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Better Business Bureau says to watch out for a check scam.

The BBB says it is mostly an employment scam. Scammers will offer to hire you, but want to pre-pay you. They will send you a check, ask you to deposit it, and then ask to send some money back to them. Or, you will be told you won a prize, they will send you money and then ask you to send some back. The BBB says about 500,000 people have fallen for the scam, most who are between 20 and 29-years old. They say to not trust it, if it is asking for money back.

“If something seems too good to be true, it usually is,” said Jeremy Johnson with the Better Business Bureau. “As far as employment scams go most legitimate companies will not prepay you or pay you and then ask you to return some of the money. So that’s just something definitely to watch out for, should be a red flag.”

If you do deposit a fake check, it is the victim’s responsibility to pay the bank back, not the scammer. If you are scammed, you can report it here.
https://www.bbb.org/scamtracker/us

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Fire Season:

Weather, firefighters corral wildfires

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 6, 2018

Rattlesnake Creek Fire declared 90 percent contained

Efforts on the Rattlesnake Creek Fire over the past week have stopped the advance of the fire, which was 90 percent contained on Tuesday, the Forest Service said.

“We don’t expect any fire growth,” Forest Service Public Information Officer Sandra Lopez said.

… The fire, which is located south of Riggins, was discovered on July 23 and is classified as “human-caused,” but an exact cause had not been released as of Tuesday.

Caton Fire

The Caton Fire located seven miles southwest of Yellow Pine was still active on Tuesday, but has done little more than smolder for the past week, Payette National Forest Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said.

… “We do not expect this fire to grow in size and the community of Yellow Pine is not threatened by this fire,” he said.

… Six firefighters were assigned to monitor the Caton Fire, which cost about $184,000 as of Tuesday.

Kiwah Fire

The Kiwah Fire had stagnated at 14,603 acres as of Tuesday. The fire is located in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness within the Indian Creek drainage.

… Currently only one person is assigned to monitor the Kiwah Fire, which had cost $525,000 as of Tuesday, Baumer said.

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Firefighters work to contain lightning caused fires

Boise National Forest
Contact: Stephaney Kerley Phone:(208) 591-1575

Boise, Idaho, Sept. 9 2018 — Firefighters continue to make progress toward containment with wildfires that were started during a lightning storm late Thursday night. Remaining fires are currently staffed and additional resources have arrived. Firefighters were challenged Saturday with strong winds and poor visibility.

Of the new starts reported, three fires remain active.

The 45 acre Casner Fire, located within the Lowman Ranger District, is 2 miles west of the Warm Springs Airstrip and staffed with a Type 3 Management Team. The fire is well established in Casner Creek. Helicopters are supporting over 100 firefighters in their efforts to secure a perimeter line in very steep terrain with sparse fuels and pine overstory.

The German Fire is approximately 30 acres, and 20 percent contained. Located 9 miles east of Idaho City, and under the management of a Type 4 Management Team. Over 90 firefighters on scene were additionally challenged by windy conditions on Saturday.

Thirdly, the Wren Fire is approximately 7 acres and 50 percent contained. Located 17 miles east and northeast of Idaho City. Fire managers anticipate full containment Sunday, Sept. 9.

Resources respond quickly and efficiently when new fires are reported. Thursday’s lightning event involved multiagency coordination and cooperation involving crews, helicopters, single engines air tankers, smokejumpers, helicopters, rappel crews, fire prevention and investigation personnel.

Aircraft detection flights will patrol and monitor for additional fires that may have held over and flare up. Weather predictions include cooling temperatures, however the fuels remain extremely dry.

There are currently no road or area closures in place for the new fire starts, however the Wapiti Fire Area Closure near Grandjean remains in effect. Stage 1 Fire Restrictions also remain in effect for the Boise National Forest. If you need more information regarding road and area closures or fire restrictions, please visit the Boise National website: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices
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Wildfire activity ‘above average’ in Idaho this season

by Haley Kramer Tuesday, September 4th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — Right now there are 14 wildfires actively burning across our state scorching more than 147 thousand acres of land.

While fire activity usually comes to a fairly quick end by mid September Predicative Services Meteorologist Bryan Henry with the National Interagency Fire Center says this year it could take a little longer.

“Last year was a little bit busier than this year,” Henry said. “This year has still been above average across Idaho and across the country as a whole.”

Idaho is ranked 4th in the top five states with the most acres burned. Since January 1 fires have burned more than 530 thousand acres of land in the state.

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Smoke and haze courtesy of California wildfires

by Nathan Larsen Saturday, September 8th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Little improvement was noted today in regards to air quality, even though a front moved through. Some models indicated that we might get some relief from smoke and haze behind the passage of a cold front, but it appears that folks north of the Treasure Valley are the only ones reporting slightly better air.

Air quality is currently in the yellow/moderate category and will likely remain there through the remainder of the weekend and into early next week. The majority of our smoke in the region can be traced back to fires that are burning in northern California, the Delta and the Hirz fires have each burned over 40,000 acres just north of Shasta Lake. The Hirz Fire is 90% contained this evening but the Delta Fire just exceeded 40,000 acres and is 0% contained.

Little improvement is likely in the coming days as west-southwest flow is expected to continue through Monday. A larger Pacific storm system will likely impact the region towards to middle of next week, maybe we’ll catch some relief then.

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Idaho reviews prison fire crews after inmate accused of rape

By Lindsay Whitehurst – 9/5/18 AP

Salt Lake City — Idaho is reviewing its program for temporarily releasing prison inmates to help fight wildfires after an inmate was charged with raping a woman working at a remote Utah firefighting base camp.

Idaho prison officials are working with the state’s lands department as they scrutinize which inmates are allowed to serve, the training they receive and how they are deployed, said Idaho Department of Correction spokesman Jeff Ray. Five crews of Idaho inmates were returned to prison after the charge was filed last week.

Most states in the U.S. West have similar programs allowing low-level offenders to be temporarily released to help firefighting efforts. In California, hundreds of minimum-security inmates fought on the front lines of the state’s largest-ever blaze this year.

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The ultimate guide to wildfire defense: Preparation and prevention

KBOI August 30, 2018

Smokey Bear isn’t joking around when he says, “Only you can prevent wildfires.” In Idaho, the number one cause of wildfires is people. And according to the National Interagency Fire Center, 63,546 human-caused wildfires burned nearly 5 million acres across the country in 2017.

What’s even scarier? These wildfires don’t seem to be calming down any time soon. Just as of August 2018, 43,077 fires have burned 6,463,893 acres across the United States, and 13 large fires have smoked through 211,634 acres in Idaho. So, what can you do to keep these fires from burning? Or to prevent new ones from starting? Idaho Firewise has plenty of steps you can take to prevent a fire and to prepare for a worst-case scenario.

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30 years after the 1988 Yellowstone fires

By Frederica Kolwey – 9/5/18 AP

Jackson, Wyo. — Four convection columns of smoke rose more than 20,000 feet into the air as high winds whipped across eerily empty walkways around Old Faithful Inn.

“In all directions that we looked, it looked like the world was coming to an end,” Joan Anzelmo recalled.

It was “Black Saturday,” the name given to Aug. 20, 1988, when wildfires burned about 150,000 acres of Yellowstone National Park in a day.

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Mining News:

Stibnite: Protesters Tell Midas Water More Precious Than Gold

By Monica Gokey Sept 4, 2018 Boise State Public Radio

About 120 people staged a protest in McCall over the holiday weekend with the message that re-opening the Stibnite mine could cause irreparable harm to the Salmon River watershed.

Alice Anderson of McCall was one of several area residents who attended the rally to voice skepticism about Midas Gold’s plan to restore the Stibnite mine while actively mining it.

“I want to be sure open-pit mining doesn’t destroy the South Fork of the Salmon River,” Anderson said. “I think it really needs to be investigated thoroughly before any decisions are made.”

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Gold mining company ordered to pay pollution fine by Friday

9/8/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — A federal judge has rejected a mining company’s request to extend a deadline to pay a $251,000 fine for not doing enough to staunch the flow of arsenic into streams that supply some of Boise’s drinking water.

The Idaho Statesman reports that Chief U.S. Magistrate Judge Ronald Bush in a ruling late last month rejected Atlanta Gold mining company’s request to extend the deadline to the end of this year.

Bush says the court doesn’t have any confidence in the company’s plan to raise money by selling a cryptocurrency that would exist electronically.

Bush says the company met other financial obligations but didn’t prioritize paying the pollution fines. He ordered Atlanta Gold to pay the fine by Friday.

The company says the area it wants to mine contains up to $5 billion in gold and silver.

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Public Lands:

New fence installed at Big Creek to help protect fish habitat.

The fence was built to improve habitat conditions in McCorkel Creek within the Forest Service pasture at the Big Creek station and airstrip. McCorkel Creek provides habitat for Endangered Species Act listed fish, and flows directly into Big Creek.

Protecting cold, headwater streams will help provide resilience to climate change for cold water organisms like fish and amphibians.

link to FB photo gallery:

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Join Us on the Secesh River to Celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Wild & Scenic Rivers Act, and the 25th Anniversary of National Public Lands Day

Date: September 7, 2018
Contacts: Brian Harris, Public Affairs Officer, 208-634-0784 office, 208-634-6945 cell.

McCall, ID – To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Wild & Scenic Rivers Act, and the 25th anniversary of National Public Lands Day, the Payette National Forest is hosting a hike up the Secesh River from Ponderosa Campground on the Krassel Ranger District.

Mark your calendar for September 22, register to join us, then meet us at Ponderosa Campground at 1130 AM. Please bring a lunch, water, appropriate clothing and footware for a 4 mile moderate hike. Layer your clothing as weather conditions tend to be on the cool side at this time of year.

The hike up Forest Service Trail #080 is hosted by Steve Kimball, Natural Resource Staff Officer on the Forest, who served as the Forest Service’s Wilderness and Wild and Scenic Rivers Program Manager for the Northern Region and Alaska Region.

For more information, click this link:
https://www.neefusa.org/npld/ponderosa-campground/secesh-river-hike
To register, please send an email to skimball@fs.fed.us

The event will start with a short lunchtime talk about the Secesh River. The hike will be approximately 2 miles up the river, then return. The terrain is fairly easy without much gain in elevation. All family members are encouraged to attend.

The 45-mile Secesh River is recommended for National Wild & Scenic River designation. The Wild & Scenic River Act was created by Congress in 1968 to preserve certain rivers with outstanding natural, cultural, and recreational values in free-flowing conditions for the enjoyment of present and future generations.

National Public Lands Day is the nation’s largest single day event for public lands, and brings together hundreds of thousands of people across the county.

Directions to Ponderosa Campground: From McCall, travel 31 miles to reach the southern end of the Secesh River Trail. The drive to trailhead will go over Lick Creek Summit and through Lick Creek Canyon. With its rock falls, hanging valleys and waterfalls, this canyon is one of the most picturesque drives on the Forest.
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Intermountain Region Forest Service: Outreach Notice – 2019 Seasonal Positions

09/06/2018

The Intermountain Region is looking for a committed, hardworking, highly skilled workforce to work with the 12 National Forests located in Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada and California. Working for the U.S. Forest Service is a rewarding experience and requires talented people working safely as part of a team in a variety of specialized positions throughout the Intermountain Region.

The U.S. Forest Service, Intermountain Region encompasses nearly 34-million acres of National Forest System land. The Regional Office in Ogden, Utah provides administrative oversight and support to 12 National Forests (Ashley, Boise, Bridger-Teton, Caribou-Targhee, Dixie, Fishlake, Humboldt-Toiyabe, Manti-LaSal, Salmon-Challis, Sawtooth, Payette and Uinta-Wasatch-Cache). The National Forest Supervisor’s Offices are the headquarters for forest activities and provide oversight and support to the Ranger District offices within the forest boundaries. Ranger Districts are the units that directly manage the national forests and grasslands. Types of management that occur on each district vary significantly. Some districts manage ski areas, wilderness areas, wild and scenic rivers, and resource management programs and extensive recreational uses. So if you’re interested in one of the many positions that are available within the U.S. Forest Service be sure to check out
https://fsoutreach.gdcii.com/Outreach
and http://www.usajobs.gov for current or upcoming vacancies (see Outreach Announcement below).

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USFS Regional Intermountain News

Volume 2 Issue 12 September 5, 2018

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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Spinal cord trauma in pets

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt 9-7-2018 IME

The spinal cord is protected within the spinal column, which is composed of small bones called vertebrae. The spinal cord transmits neurological information between the brain and the rest of the body. Spinal cord trauma disrupts this transmission, causing nerve damage and pain.

The most common causes of acute spinal cord trauma are automobile accidents and falling. Chronic spinal cord trauma results from the wear and tear of heavy exercise. Trauma to the spinal cord can cause vertebral fractures and dislocations of the spine, which can cause severe pain, paresis and, worst of all, permanent paralysis. Chronic spiral cord trauma causes pain, but rarely paralysis.

Clinical signs of spinal cord trauma are dependent on the area of the spinal cord affected and the severity of the trauma. Mild injury may result in only pain at the injured site. Moderate injury results in what we call paresis, or partial paralysis. When the injury is very severe, affected pets are unable to use their legs, and urinate and defecate properly. All four legs may be affected if the spinal cord in the neck is injured. Only the hind legs are affected if the injury occurs in the upper or lower back region.

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Shelter dog PTSD: ‘You have to work with them on it’

by Abigail Taylor Friday, September 7th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Post traumatic stress is often talked about regarding humans, but according to the Idaho Humane Society it can effect our pets, as well.

Sam Kennedy with the Idaho Humane Society told CBS 2 News this is something families should be aware of before adopting a new pet.

Kennedy said she has worked with hundreds of dogs over the years — each with little personalities of their own.

Many of them, however, with trauma in their background — from abuse to neglect and under socialization.

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N. Idaho family looking for answers after dog shot in driveway

Sophie, a four-year-old yellow lab mix, was shot in the 32000 block of N. Kelso Drive. Her family is offering a $2,000 reward leading to the killer’s arrest.

Alexa Block, KTVB September 5, 2018

Spirit Lake, Idaho — The Kootenai County Sheriff’s Office Animal Control Division is asking for the public’s help identifying the person who shot and killed a 4-year-old yellow lab mix near Spirit Lake.

When Sophie’s owners heard her cry, they went outside and saw the dog dead in their driveway by an obvious gunshot wound.

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State wildlife marksman shoots wolf from helicopter

9/3/18 AP

Olympia, Wash. — A Washington state wildlife marksman fatally shot a member of the Togo wolf pack from a helicopter Sunday.

The Seattle Times reports the shooting near Danville came days after a Thurston County judge gave the go-ahead for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to kill the animal.

Wildlife officials said they hunted the wolf on foot Friday and Saturday but weren’t able to find it.

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Wolf Watch

9/4/18: Feds reject wolf depredation information request
(By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online!) There have been a record number of confirmed livestock depredations by wolves in Idaho this year, but Western Watersheds Project (WWP) alleges that’s because federal animal damage control officials and ranchers are inflating the number of kills, according to the Associated Press. WWP has filed a lawsuit seeking details of the investigations of wolf kills on livestock, but federal officials have withheld the information, stating that it is exempt under the federal Freedom of Information Act….. (Click on the link above for the complete story.)

9/4/18: Togo pack update – Lethal control okayed
(By Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife) A Thurston County Superior Court judge issued an order permitting the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to initiate lethal action to remove the adult male wolf from a pack that has repeatedly preyed on livestock in northeast Washington. Judge Carol Murphy denied a request for a preliminary injunction by two environmental groups which would have prohibited the wolf’s removal. In rejecting the plaintiffs’ request, Murphy said they had not met the legal standard required for her to issue an injunction…… (Click on the link above for the complete story.)
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US approves sheep grazing research in grizzly bear area

by Keith Ridler, Associated Press Thursday, September 6th 2018

Boise, Idaho (AP) — A federally-run sheep experiment facility in Idaho long targeted by environmental groups will start grazing sheep again in the Centennial Mountains of Idaho and Montana.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture says the Sheep Experiment Station will resume grazing in 2019 on 25 square miles (65 square kilometers) of sheep station land and 5 square miles (13 square kilometers) of U.S. Forest Service land.

Tom France of the National Wildlife Federation said Thursday the department is ignoring information that the area is premier grizzly bear habitat.

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Wildlife roaming into human territory

Sep 06, 2018 Local News 8


A bull moose was tranquilized near Jackson recently while wardens removed a net wrapped around its antlers.

Jackson, Wyo. (KIFI/KIDK) – As regional wildlife makes preparations for winter, there are an increased number of calls about animals wandering into residential areas, especially moose and bears.

Wyoming Game and Fish is asking people to be aware of the possibility and remove anything on their property that might entangle them or entice them into trouble.

Bear attractants should be stashed away. “It has been a relatively quiet summer with regard to bear conflicts, but this is typically the time of year we start receiving an increasing number of reports of black bears being seen in developed areas around Jackson,” said Jackson Large Carnivore Biologist Mike Boyce. “As natural foods begin to dry up, bears commonly start showing up in residential areas. While bears may just be passing through, it’s important they do not get any food rewards, such as improperly stored garbage, that would encourage them to stay.”

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Mule Deer feeding at MK Nature Center

Deer in downtown Boise

Steve Liebenthal Sep 6, 2018 KIVI TV

Boise, Idaho – The MK Nature Center is more than just a fish pond.

Various wildlife, including mule deer find temporary refuge in the heart of Boise. The center is located between Municipal Park and the Boise River Greenbelt. It is right behind Idaho Fish and Game’s office on Walnut.

If you are there at the right time of year and the right time of day, you might be fortunate enough to have an up close and personal meeting with mule deer munching on tomato plants and apples in the center’s garden of native plants.

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Have you herd? Moose, bighorn sheep pass on migration tips

By Malcolm Ritter – 9/6/18 AP

Looking for the best place to eat? Ask a local. Now scientists say that same insider knowledge shapes the springtime migrations of moose and bighorn sheep.

Animals learn from experienced members of the herd about where to find the best food, building sort of a cultural know-how that’s passed through generations and improves over the course of decades, new research indicates.

While scientists have speculated before that this happens in hoofed animals, this is the first conclusive test of the idea, said Matthew Kauffman, a U.S. Geological Survey researcher who was part of the study released Thursday by the journal Science.

Researchers tracked the movements of 267 bighorn sheep and 189 moose in Wyoming, Idaho and South Dakota that wore GPS devices on collars. They used satellite data to track where and when vegetation along the migration routes reached the stage of growth that the animals prefer for eating.

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Rabid bat found in Blackfoot

Sep 06, 2018 Local News 8

Blackfoot, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Southeastern Idaho Public Health (SIPH) has confirmed a bat has tested positive for rabies within Blackfoot city limits.

This is the seventh bat to test positive for rabies in Idaho this year.

Rabies is a fatal viral illness in humans and other animals. Household pets and other animals can be exposed to the virus by playing with sick bats. This is why it is important for people to make sure their animals are vaccinated against rabies.

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Lake Cascade yields record perch

Idaho man breaks world record

Steve Liebenthal Sep 5, 2018 KIVI TV

Cascade, Idaho – In the early two thousands, fish managers from the Idaho Department of Fish and Game started trucking perch into Lake Cascade, hoping to revive a world class perch fishery that had slowly declined.

Now, nearly two decades later, the perch are back and people who fish there are catching fish so big they set not only state records, but world records.

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Fish & Game News:

Young grizzly removed from Eastern Idaho and sent to a wildlife sanctuary

Bear will now live the remainder of its life in captivity

By Jeremy Nicholson, Regional Wildlife Biologist
Friday, September 7, 2018

Idaho Fish and Game removed a third bear (two grizzlies, one black bear) from the wild in Eastern Idaho this summer because the bears were attracted to food left out by people. In early September, a young grizzly bear was trapped and later transferred to a Texas wildlife sanctuary, where it will remain.

The grizzly bear population and grizzly range has increased in Southeast Idaho over the last 20 years, but despite the increase, conflicts in recent years have been relatively low. However, Fish and Game has recently had to respond to an increase in bear conflicts, most of which involved homeowners and campers leaving food and other attractants unsecured, such garbage, bird feed and more.

Unlike the first two bears that were lethally removed this summer in Eastern Idaho, the most recent bear was relocated on Sept. 4 to the International Exotic Animal Sanctuary in Texas.

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Anglers: See proposed fishing rule changes for the Salmon region and comment here

People have until Oct. 7 to comment on proposed fishing rule changes

By Mike Demick, Conservation Information Supervisor
Friday, September 7, 2018

Idaho Fish and Game is seeking public comments on a new set of proposed fishing rules for 2019, and a new draft of its six-year, statewide Fisheries Management Plan.

Idaho fishing seasons and rules are approved by the Idaho Fish and Game Commission every three years, and the commission is scheduled to set new rules in November. All public comments must be received by Oct. 7.

Anglers can provide their opinions about the proposed changes by completing online surveys (below), submitting written comments by email or mail, or by attending regional open houses.

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Attention Anglers: give your comments on proposed fishing rules and statewide fish management plan

Public has until Oct. 7 to comment on rule changes and management plan

By Martin Koenig, Natural Resource Program Coordinator
Friday, September 7, 2018

Idaho Fish and Game is seeking public comments on a new set of proposed fishing rules for 2019, and a new draft of its six-year, statewide Fisheries Management Plan.

Idaho fishing seasons and rules are approved by the Idaho Fish and Game Commission every three years, and the commission is scheduled to set new rules in November. All public comments must be received by Oct. 7.

Anglers can provide their opinions about the proposed changes by completing online surveys (below), submitting written comments by email or mail, or by attending regional open houses.

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More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Michigan man fights ticket for turkey who moved into yard

by The Associated Press Friday, August 3rd 2018

Garden City, Mich. (AP) — A suburban Detroit man who found himself facing fines after a wild turkey moved into his overgrown backyard has made friends with the massive bird.

Garden City bans residents from keeping wild animals as pets. The city fined Mark Johnston $100 for harboring the turkey and another $100 for dumping brush at his curb after he cleaned up his backyard in an effort to get the 30-pound turkey to leave.

The Detroit News reports that the city eventually dismissed the turkey ticket since Johnston wasn’t keeping the animal as a pet. Johnston is still fighting the other one.

Meanwhile, the turkey remains in Johnston’s yard. Johnston says as far as he’s concerned, the bird can stay as long as he wants.

State officials say wild animals can only be moved if they’re a nuisance or a threat.

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Seasonal Humor:

HuntingMushrooms-a
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Sept 2, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 2, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
September 8 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Budget Hearing
September 8 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 22 Celebration of Life for Chris Petersen at 2pm, YP Tavern

(details below)
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Village News:

Chris Petersen Celebration

The Celebration of Chris Petersen’s life in Yellow Pine is set for 9/22/18 at 2pm at the YP Tavern. We will provide the main course., side dishes or desserts are welcome. Thank you. – ST
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Lost Tablet – Reward

On July 21 one of our crews lost a Samsung tablet on the Profile Road between the switchback below Red Metals mine road and Missouri Creek road. They realized it was missing almost immediately and went back and gridded the road for it, but could not find it. It could have bounced into the roadside brush, or been picked up off the road by someone traveling from Big Creek or Yellow Pine or vice versa.

This tablet has a summers worth of field data and we would sure like to have it back. Would you please spread the word that Ranger Botello will pay a handsome reward of cheeseburger, fries, pop and ice cream for its safe return!?

Contact: Anthony B. Botello, District Ranger, p: 208-634-0601, c: 208-634-9286
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Caton Fire

The fire is about 400 acres and located 7 miles southwest of the Village of Yellow Pine near Indian Point and has been moving east into the Caton Creek drainage.

Caton Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6177/
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Johnson Fire – Contained

8-23-2018 Update: It was declared contained today. Most resources will be off the fire by Saturday. Folks may still see some smoke from time to time as there are numerous snags in the interior of the fire that make it too dangerous to completely mop it up. Our folks will continue to monitor the fire until the rains or snows come.
– Jake Strohmeyer, BNF Cascade Ranger
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Kiwah Fire – Meadow Crk Road Open

The Kiwah fire is burning east of Yellow Pine in the Wilderness in the Indian Creek drainage. Meadow Creek road is open.

Kiwah Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5995/
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Ice Hole Campground

The Cascade Ranger District [has] temporarily closed Ice Hole Campground for reconstruction beginning Monday, Aug. 6, 2018.

The Campground will remain closed for the remainder of the 2018 season. Project funding was provided by local Tribes and a State RV Grant.

Forest Service crews and contractors will repair existing resource damage, enabling visitors to have an improved recreational experience in the future.

link to project:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49637

Ice Hole Update

Progress made with renovation and remodel of Cascade Ranger District – Ice Hole Campground!

Thanks for the photo shares from Boise NF employees Marie Willis and Danelle Highfill.

link to FB photo gallery:

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Possible Problem Bear

A report Sunday (Aug 19) of a “BIG bear” hanging out in the upper village. Be “Bear Aware” – Remember to secure your trash and pet food.

Update Friday (Aug 24) “it has been back but still not getting into anything.”

Video Link Bear Visitor Aug 20, 2018
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Pests

Yellow Jackets are late this year, but really mean. Long legged wasps are not as numerous, but around. Mosquito population has dropped during the hot dry summer. Colombian ground squirrels have gone into hibernation. Chipmunks had a population boom this summer. Pine squirrels are not as numerous as in past years. Bears up in the Abstein orchard looking for apples.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not dump appliances or tires at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

“Bring it, Don’t Burn it.” There is a burn pile for woody debris only. Please don’t put trash or cardboard in the burn pile.
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Local Events:

Welch Labor Day Golf Tournament

The cannon for the Labor Day Golf Tournament went off at 1140am on Saturday September 1st to start the golfers.

(No results by press time Sunday.)
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

July 24th Yellow Pine water update:

It is good to go back to the even/odd watering schedule. Even/odd means if your address is 315 Yellow Pine Avenue, you can water on odd days such as the 1st, 3rd, 5th etc. And if your address is 316, water in even numbered days. The only request is that watering be done between 6am and 1pm. Also please limit to one sprinkler at a time.

Also it is requested that no lawn watering be done August 1st through the 6th to be able to withstand the draw from Harmonica.

Our second sand filter will be on line soon and give us more capacity. Thank you everyone for your patience during the high water demand time. – SH

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.
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VYPA News:

Midas Gold and Yellow Pine

August 28, 2018

Attached is the Community Partnership Agreement the Village of Yellow Pine signed with Midas Gold.

link to: 2018 Community Partnership Agreement.pdf
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1SwVurPPSBkYS4N_wqU5_ceJmXdxoXWeX/view

Next VYPA Meeting:

September 8, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Agenda

September 8, 2018 at 2:00 at Community Hall
I. Call to Order
I. Reading of the minutes
II. Treasurer’s report
III. Cemetery Committee Oral Report
IV. Community Hall Committee Oral Report
V. Harmonica Festival Committee Written Report
VI. Old Business:
• Review Description/decisions on VYPA Infrastructure Fund
• Review Infrastructure maintenance tasks needed for Spring run-off & “help wanted” plans
• Update on Labor Day Golf Tournament (if representative is available)
• Update from Midas (if representative is available)
• Update on water system (if representative is available)
• Update on Heli-spot (if representative is available)
• Update on Fire Dept. (if representative is available)
• Update on Schoolhouse Museum (if representative is available)
VII. New Business
• Opening Dialog on Community Hall Toilets
VIII. Next Meetings:
• June 8, 2019
• July 20, 2019 – change in normal schedule due to Village event planned on July 13th.
• August 10, 2019
• September 14, 2019
Adjournment
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YPFD News:

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.

Next meeting September 8 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Budget Hearing

Yellow Pine Fire District Budget for Fiscal Year 2018 – 2019

Notice has been given that the Yellow Pine Fire District will hold a public hearing for consideration of the proposed budget, including the estimated revenue for the fiscal year, October 1, 2018 to September 20, 2019, pursuant to County Law chapter 14, Section 31-1419A. Said hearing will be held at the Yellow Pine Community Hall in Yellow Pine, Idaho on Saturday September 08, 2018, at 10:00 AM. At said hearing all interested persons may appear and show cause, if any they have, why said proposal budget should be adopted.

Proposed Expenditures:

The following budget is an estimate set forth in said budget of the total proposed expenditures and accruing indebtedness of the Yellow Pine Fire District for the Fiscal year 2018 – 2019.

Yellow Pine Fire District Budget for 2018 – 2019:

* Fire Fighting/Rescue: $8,132
* Wages: $0
* Advertising: $2,000
* Repairs and Maintenance: $4,000
* Utilities (Fixed Cost*) $4,000

Total:
Fixed: $4,000
Includes Insurance $2,500
Total $18,132

I, Dan Stiff, Chair Yellow Pine Fire Commissioner, Yellow Pine, Idaho, do hereby certify that the above is a true and correct statement of the proposed expenditures for the fiscal year 2018 – 2019. All have been tentatively approved and entered into district records. I further certify Yellow Pine Fire District did give notice for said hearing in two (2) conspicuous places in the fire district, by order of the commissioners. Residents are invited to attend the budget hearing on September 08, 2018, at 10:00 AM at the Yellow Pine Community Hall, and have the right to approve written or oral comments concerning the fire district budget. A copy of the proposed fire district budget in detail is available at 320 Westside Ave, Yellow Pine, Idaho, 83677.

Dated this 15th day of August 2018

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911 @ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

A lot of progress has been made on the new Helipad near the crossroads.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

– Fire Chief Jeff

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Open for summer (208) 633-3377
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Yellow Pine Tavern

Boo to the End of Summer Potluck, Saturday September 1 at 5pm, Potluck and Fireworks Fundraiser. Burgers and Dogs provided.

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
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The Corner 633-3325

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Aug 27) Rain! Moderate rainfall started early this morning, puddles in the low spots, low clouds – can’t see VanMeter but Antimony ridge is visible, overnight low of 46 degrees. A couple of young hummingbirds at the feeder this morning. Late morning a small flock of finches, lots of pine siskins, a male downy woodpecker visiting the feeders. Rain stopped before 1130am, a few breaks in the clouds above, ridges still socked in, the clouds lifted just long enough to reveal fresh snow on top of VanMeter. A white-breasted nuthatch and a young steller jay also visited around lunch time. Short light shower mid-afternoon with dark clouds and chilly breeze, high of 59 degrees. Quiet cloudy evening, a few chipmunks scurrying around.

Tuesday (Aug 28) overnight low of 36 degrees, low overcast – ridges socked in, Green AQ. Male downy and female hairy woodpeckers and calliope hummingbird visiting this morning. Chilly morning, clouds lifted before lunch time and starting to warm up. The sounds of “firewood season” drifted across the village today. A few finches and pine siskins visited in the afternoon. Clear and mild afternoon, good air and light breezes, high of 74 degrees. Quiet cool evening, clear sky.

Wednesday (Aug 29) overnight low of 36 degrees, clear sky, light breezes and damp with dew, Green AQ. Finches, pine siskins, and a white-breasted nuthatch visiting this morning. Sounds like the gravel trucks are working today. Young stellar jay along with more finches visited for lunch time. A couple of chipmunks and a young golden mantel squirrel being pests. Warm, sunny, breezy afternoon, good air quality, high of 81 degrees. After sundown there were a few wispy clouds to the north, light haze of smoke to the west, and light breezes. Cooling off quickly after sundown.

Thursday (Aug 30) overnight low of 40 degrees, mostly clear sky, light haze of smoke. Sounds like the gravel trucks are working today. Several finches flying and calling in the neighborhood. Female hairy woodpecker and a white-breasted nuthatch stopped by for lunch. Breezy and some clouds moving in mid-day. Gusty breezes, mostly cloudy and warm afternoon, high of 82 degrees, appears to be more smoke in the direction of the Caton Fire. Stellar jay and young rufous hummingbird visited early evening. Overcast after sundown, calmer and can smell smoke.

Friday (Aug 31) overnight low of 46 degrees, clear sky, light breeze and good air (Green AQ.) Gravel trucks are working today. Finches and a few pine siskins visiting this morning. Dry and streets are getting dusty again. A quartet of hummingbirds at lunch time, plus a young stellar jay. Increasing traffic on the side roads, dusty. Cool breezes and warm sun this afternoon, partly cloudy and good air quality, high of 78 degrees. Young golden mantel squirrel and a chipmunk running amuck. Hummingbirds are still here this evening, but no finches. Folks out playing golf before dark. Clear and cooling off after sundown.

Saturday (Sept 1) overnight low of 37 degrees, clear sky, roofs wet with dew and good air (Green AQ.) August was very dry, rain total = 0.51″, most of it came in one storm. Raven calling from the east side of the village, and finches at the feeders. Cannon shot at 1140am for golf tourney. Gunfire to the west started at 120pm (lasted about an hour) while people were golfing. Mild temperatures, light breezes and lots of sunshine early afternoon, high of 81 degrees. Female hairy woodpecker, white-breasted nuthatch and a couple of young hummingbirds visited. Clear after sundown and temps dropping, smells like burning garbage. Increased traffic (and dust) after dark.

Sunday (Sept 2) overnight low of 36 degrees, clear sky, roofs wet with dew, light breeze and good air (except for one smoky campfire.) Low loud airplane around 915am. Finches flying and calling, a pine squirrel calling from the fence (have not seen them around for a while.) Streets are dusty, dust abatement has worn off main street by the monument. A few hummingbirds visiting for lunch. Loud airplane circled over the village a little before 145pm. Warm clear and sunny early afternoon, light pleasant breeze, high of 84 degrees. Traffic kicking up dust all afternoon. Warm, sunny and breezy late afternoon. People golfing (and driving) on the golf course before sundown. Clear and a little hazy (more dust than smoke) at sundown.
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RIP:

For Elvin Elliott’s friends in Yellow Pine, he passed away on Aug 26 2018 from cancer. Thank you all for your thoughts and prayers.

From Betty Elliott

Elvin Elliott

Elvin A. Elliott, 84, of Nampa, died Sunday, August 26, 2018. Funeral Home: All Valley Cremation, Nampa

Published in Idaho Press Tribune on Aug. 28, 2018
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Idaho News:

Services in Valley County suspended due to ‘live device’

by CBS 2 News Friday, August 31st 2018 KBOI

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office says services at the county’s offices, including the DMV, were suspended and closed Friday morning after someone brought in what appeared to be a “live device” to the building.

The sheriff’s office says the person found the device in a deceased family member’s belongings.

Details on the nature of the device have not been released.

The sheriff’s office says, as a precaution, they evacuated the area within 500 feet of the device and requested a team from Mountain Home to dispose of it.

The offices will be closed until Tuesday morning due to the evacuation and Monday being a holiday.

source:

Valley County Sheriff’s Office Update

8/31/2018 615pm

Earlier today we reported that we had an incident occur at the Sheriff’s Office and the Court House offices. Below you will see a video of the unknowingly live grenade that was brought to the Sheriff’s Office, being detonated by the 366th Explosive Ordinance Disposal Squad from Mountain Home Air Force Base. The grenade was brought to property belonging to Valley County Commissioner, Elt Hasbrouck with his permission for detonation. The video is a little bit of an optical illusion, the animals and all responding units in the video are way outside of the danger zone, they are more than 1200 feet away from the explosion, there was no chance of shrapnel reaching the animals or the responders. We wanted to share with everyone what had happened and are appreciative of everyone’s patience in this situation.

link to FB video:

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Chief: Speeders are part of life in a resort town

Education of visitors a constant process

By Dew Dodson for The Star-News Aug 30, 2018

Speeding motorists on residential streets in McCall are an unfortunate part of a busy tourist season, McCall Police Chief Justin Williams told the McCall City Council last Thursday.

Complaints of speeders this summer from residents on Lick Creek Road, Davis Avenue and other streets prompted city officials to look into adding more signs and police patrols.

Existing signage was determined to be adequate, but the steady influx of new visitors makes continued enforcement and education crucial, Williams told council members.

“To my knowledge, we haven’t stopped the same person twice,” he said. “Most of the people that we stop on Lick Creek are visitors and so we continue to educate the population.”

Lick Creek Road has seven posted speed limit signs about 500 feet apart, but the long, flat, straight road makes the posted limit of 25 miles per hour easy to abuse, Williams said.

continued:
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Boise musician helps rescue man after boat goes up in flames

Ben Burdick was in McCall to perform but ended up helping save a man’s life.

Shirah Matsuzawa August 30, 2018 KTVB

McCall, Idaho — What might have been a typical gig for musician Ben Burdick is now a day he’ll never forget!

Ben, along with a team of others, helped rescue a man after his boat burst into flames outside of the Mile High Marina in McCall.

… “We weren’t there not even a couple of minutes and we looked up to see a man staggering out of a boat that was on fire by the gas pumps,” said Burdick.

That man got caught between the boat and a gas pump.

full story:
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Idaho auctions Priest Lake lots for $25.6 million

The state has now sold nearly 400 residential sites on Priest Lake and Payette Lake for about $177 million.

Associated Press August 28, 2018

Coeur d’Alene, Idaho — Idaho officials have auctioned 51 state-owned lakefront lots on Priest Lake for $25.6 million.

Officials say the auction by the Idaho Department of Lands on Friday and Saturday brought in $625,000 over the appraised value.

Out of the 51 lots, 46 were purchased by current leaseholders, four were purchased by someone other than the current leaseholder, and one of the lots was unleased.

Five of the lots drew competitive bidding, with one selling for $415,000 above its appraised value.

continued:
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71-year-old hiker recovering after being struck by boulders

8/29/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — A 71-year-old Boise man is recovering after two boulders fell on him while he was hiking in the Sawtooth Mountains in central Idaho.

The Idaho Statesman reports Dick Ross suffered two broken legs Thursday when a refrigerator-sized boulder rolled over them.

He was also struck in the chest and pinned to the ground by a second boulder that was about the size of an ottoman.

He spent the night trapped under a boulder in an area southeast of Grandjean Peak until he was rescued Friday.

continued:
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This summer has been 10th driest on record

by Nathan Larsen Tuesday, August 28th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Monday’s storm system packed quite a punch for the region. It brought autumn-like temperatures to the Valley and our first dusting of snow up at some ski resorts. It lacked, however, any real significant precipitation. This is an area we’ve been struggling in all summer.

In fact, this summer is shaping up to be the 10th driest on record with just 0.36″ of precipitation reported for the months of June, July, and August. Monday’s storm system barely brought measurable precipitation with 0.01″ reported in Boise, McCall was in better shape with 0.27″.

continued:
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Idaho sheriffs say DMV software causing headaches, delays

By Kimberlee Kruesi – 8/28/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Top Idaho officials on Tuesday said they were fed up with the state’s latest driver’s license system, arguing the $10.5 million contract has failed to live up to its promises and instead has resulted in lengthy delays and chaotic conflicts for customers over the past year.

Idaho sheriffs have called on Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter to address the driver’s license system. Meanwhile, the Idaho Transportation Department announced it would temporarily halt using the software provided by the contracted vendor after confirming DMV computers were experiencing outages.

To date, there have been 11 incidents — totaling roughly 32 hours — where DMV computers slowed or stopped.

continued:
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Crashes in Idaho have killed 93 people since Memorial Day

8/30/18 AP

Pocatello, Idaho — An Idaho Transportation Department spokesman says 93 people have died in crashes on Idaho roads since Memorial Day.

The Idaho State Journal reports the number of deaths caused by crashes in Idaho this year between Memorial and Labor Day has surpassed the 91 deaths that occurred during the same time period last year, known as the 100 Deadliest Days of Summer.

There have been 160 deaths on Idaho roads since January, up from 156 in the same timeframe last year.

continued:
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Fire Season:

Evacuation orders lifted for Rattlesnake Creek Fire

Caton Fire near Yellow Pine grows to 400 acres

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Aug 30, 2018

A wild fire that started near Yellow Pine on Friday quickly spread to about 400 acres by Sunday before rain muted its intensity, fire officials said.

The Caton Fire was detected about seven miles southwest of Yellow Pine last Friday and is suspected to have been caused by lightning, according to Forest Service reports.

“Initial attack by smokejumpers, helirappellers, and a ground crew were aided by single-engine air tankers, a heavy air tanker and Very Large Air Tankers, but the fire quickly grew in the hot, dry, windy conditions,” the Forest Service said.

“The fire has not grown over the past two days,” Payette National Forest Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said. “The cool, rainy weather has helped to hold this fire in place.”

“No closures are in effect and the fire is not posing a threat to Yellow Pine,” Harris said.

Six firefighters are assigned to monitor the Caton Fire and additional resources will be assigned as needed, Harris said.

The Caton Fire had cost $150,000 as of Tuesday, Harris said.

continued:
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Land Management Agencies lift Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in all Zones, Except the Weiser River Zone of the Payette Fire Restriction Area

Date: August 29, 2018
Contact: Brian Harris, Payette National Forest, 208-634-6945

McCall, Idaho – With cooler temperatures and chances of precipitation increasing into next week, local land management agencies will lift Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in all zones except the Weiser River Zone beginning Friday, August 31, 2018, just after midnight at 0001 hours. The Fire Restrictions are rescinded by agencies managing state, private and public lands in the area, including the United States Forest Service (USFS), United State Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association (SITPA), and the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL). Restrictions in the Weiser River Zone will remain in effect until further notice. See map for the location of the Weiser River Zone.

The restrictions were put into effect on August 3 when fire danger and burning conditions were unusually high. Recent storms have brought moisture with much cooler temperatures to the area, and with the days getting shorter, fire conditions have moderated. Forest visitors are reminded that vegetation is still dry, and to be careful with all use of fire in the outdoors. The accidental start of a wildfire can still be devastating.

Be alert and be aware. Follow these tips to help prevent wildfire:

* NEVER leave a camp fire unattended
* Keep water, dirt and a shovel near your fire at all times
* Make sure your fire is dead out and cold to the touch before you leave it
* Fireworks are never allowed on National Forest and State lands, and are prohibited on BLM lands during closed fire season (May 10 through October 20).
* Exploding targets or tracer rounds are prohibited on all public lands.

Area closures due to active wildfires are still in effect on some public lands, including the areas affected by the Rattlesnake Creek and Mesa wildfires on the Payette National Forest. Contact the land management agency for your area of interest for specific information regarding fire closures.

Fire restrictions are being lifted, but burn bans may still be in place in some areas. Fire

Restrictions and burn bans address different types of activities. Burn bans pertain to controlled burning activities such as debris burning, slash burning, or agricultural burning, for which a fire safety burn permit from IDL is required. Visit http://burnpermits.idaho.gov/ for more information.
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Smoke Eaters: Scientists in McCall measure wildfire smoke, effects on people

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Aug 30, 2018

Scott Herndon works with equipment so precise it can detect a single particle in 100 billion. That comes in handy when Herndon is trying to measure fire smoke in the air over McCall.

Herndon is lead scientist and vice president of field measurement research for Aerodyne Research Inc. of Boston.

He and his colleagues have camped their moving-van sized truck at The Activity Barn near McCall to analyze the behavior of forest fire smoke.

A nozzle outside the truck sucks in air, which is then processed by specialized equipment inside to detect and analyze exactly what makes up the local atmosphere.

The smoky skies of McCall will serve as a source of data to determine how forest fire smoke travels and the effects those emissions have on humans and weather, Herndon said.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Bridge repairs cause road closure along SF Boise River

Boise, Idaho, Aug. 27, 2018 — The Mountain Home Highway District will enact a closure on a portion of Prairie Road (Forest Road 121), located about 7 miles south of Prairie near the Danskin boat ramp, beginning Sept. 5 for around 14 days while repairs are made to the Pierce Creek Bridge footings.

This closure will affect boaters on the South Fork Boise River who typically end their float at the Danskin boat ramp, as it will prevent road access to the ramp from upstream. The ramp itself will remain open, but only accessible if driving in from the north.

“Closing this portion of the road is expected to impact recreationalists, local residents and businesses,” said Acting Mountain Home District Ranger Holly Hampton. “We ask that travelers in the area reconsider their routes.”

Since the 2012 Trinity Ridge Fire, there has been a significant amount of debris flow on Pierce Creek that has impacted the bridge footings and making repairs necessary. This work is being done with funding from the Forest Service and MHHD.

This portion of the road is managed and maintained by MHHD.

For more information contact the Mountain Home Highway District, 208-587-3211.

Map:

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Area Closures that may affect you this Labor Day weekend

Lowman, Idaho, Aug 30, 2018 – Area closures related to the Wapiti and Bible Back Fires may affect visitors to the Sawtooth and Boise National Forests this Labor Day weekend. While many locations on the forests are open for recreationists, there are some closures that provide for firefighter and public safety.

Wapiti Fire in the Grandjean Area- Developed campgrounds at Stanley Lake and access to Stanley Lake will be open. Dispersed camping in the Stanley Lake area is currently not allowed. Trap Creek, Sheep Trail, Elk Creek Campgrounds along Hwy 21 are also open.

Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Inlet Trailhead including access to Baron Lakes, and all lakes and trailheads in the southern Sawtooth Wilderness are open. Closed areas are: Alpine and Sawtooth Lakes and Grandjean, Stanley Lake, Elk Meadow, and Elk Mountain Trailheads.

Bible Back Fire in the southern White Cloud Mountains- Fourth of July Road (FR #209) is open but access to these trails and lakes is closed: Fourth of July Lake and Washington Lake, Phyllis Lake, and Champion Lakes.

Upper Pole Creek Road (FR #197) is closed beyond the Grand Prize Trailhead, although Grand Prize Trailhead is open. Access to the following trailheads and destinations is closed: Champion Creek Cut-Off Trailhead and access to Champion Lakes; Washington Creek and Washington Basin Trailheads and access to Washington Peak, Washington Lake and Chamberlain Basin; Three Cabins Creek Trailhead and access to Germania Creek and Chamberlain Basin.

For additional information please visit:
Sawtooth NF Area Closures: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/sawtooth/alerts-notices
Facebook: U.S. Forest Service – Sawtooth National Forest
Facebook: U.S. Forest Service – Boise National Forest
Boise NF Twitter: @BoiseNF
Boise NF Website: https://www.fs.usda.gov/boise
Fire Restrictions: https://www.idahofireinfo.com/p/fire-restrictions.html
InciWeb – Wapiti Fire: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6176/
Hunting information: https://idfg.idaho.gov/hunt
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Caterpillars in the Boise National Forest leave campers with rashes, allergic reactions

The Douglas-fir tussock moth caterpillars recently left several campers in the Sage Hen recreation area with allergic reactions and skin irritation.

Shirah Matsuzawa August 29, 2018 KTVB

Boise — A warning for anyone who may plan on camping near the Sage Hen recreational area this Labor Day weekend.

The Boise National Forest is warning campers to not touch Douglas-fir tussock moth caterpillars because they may cause skin irritation.

Campers should also avoid coming into contact with the hair of the caterpillars because that, too, could cause people to break out into a rash.

continued:
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Wilderness Airstrip Maintenance Work Will Begin Soon

Payette National Forest Aug 27, 2018

Cabin Creek and Cold Meadows airstrips in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness area will receive maintenance work in the near future. Cabin Creek airstrip is schedule for August 30th through September 4th, and Cold Meadows airstrip is scheduled for September 5th through the 9th.

The airstrips will remain open during maintenance work, but pilots are requested to land only if necessary, or only if work is not actively taking place – the work is being done with animal stock, and it takes a fair amount of time to clear the stock and the equipment from the airstrip each time a plane approaches for a landing.

link to photos on FB:

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Boise ski area gets approval for snow-making system

8/31/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Federal officials have given a Boise ski area permission to build a snow-making system.

The U.S. Forest Service gave the Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area permission on Thursday to begin burying water and electrical lines on the Deer Point and Coach portion of the mountain.

The organization had already begun installation work in the Morning Star chairlift area, which the resort owns, said General Manager Brad Wilson.

continued:
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BLM advisory council to meet in September

Date: August 30, 2018
Contact: Holly Hovis, hhovis@blm.gov, (208) 384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management announced today it will hold a meeting of the Boise Resource Advisory Council (RAC). The public is welcome to attend the meeting, which will occur on Sept. 13, 2018, at 3948 Development Ave., Boise, ID, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Resource Advisory Councils provide advice and recommendations for the BLM on resource and land management issues within the BLM. The Bureau of Land Management maintains 38 chartered advisory committees located in the West. Resource Advisory Councils are sounding boards for BLM initiatives, regulatory proposals and policy changes. Each citizen-based council consists of 10 to 15 members from diverse interests in local communities, and they assist in the development of committee recommendations that address public land management issues. Resource councils are critical in assisting the BLM in continuing to be a good neighbor in the communities the agency serves.

Planned agenda items at the meeting include a field trip to a proposed recreation site near Perjue Canyon on the Bruneau Field Office. There will also be a briefing on the Boise District’s wild horse program and other field office updates.

“The RAC’s feedback helps us make more informed decisions, resulting in better projects on the ground,” said BLM Boise District Manager Lara Douglas. “The members represent diverse public interests and provide invaluable input for managing our public lands.”

A half-hour comment period, during which the public may address the RAC, will begin at 9 a.m. Depending on the number of people wishing to comment and time available, the amount of time for individual oral comments may be limited. For more information about the upcoming RAC meeting, please contact Holly Hovis at (208) 384-3393 or hhovis@blm.gov
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BLM to host public field tour of Perjue Canyon

Date: August 30, 2018
Contact: Holly Hovis, hhovis@blm.gov, (208) 384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management is hosting a field tour on Sept. 13, 2018, to share information on proposed recreation site development at the Perjue Canyon area near the Little Jacks Creek Wilderness. The area of potential development is a Hands on the Land education site and has an existing trailhead off the Mud Flat Road Scenic Byway south of Grand View.

The BLM is considering options to develop the 10-acre parcel that could provide additional parking, camping sites, horseback riding opportunities and infrastructure options, such as shade shelters and picnic tables for local school field trips. Upgrading the site to meet current accessibility standards and providing access for all abilities would be a key component of the proposal.

The BLM is hosting the tour to solicit feedback and recommendations from the public on the proposed development options and to identify issues to be addressed in the environmental assessment. The BLM will prepare an environmental assessment in the fall of 2018 to evaluate the impacts of the proposed project.

“This diverse landscape has so much to offer to the public in terms of spectacular vistas, homesteading history and a rugged wilderness experience at a location that is relatively close to Grand View,” said BLM Outdoor Recreation Planner Casey Steenhoven. “We are looking forward to providing access and recreational and educational opportunities for all abilities at this site.”

The field tour will meet at the junction of Mud Flat Road and the Oreana Cutoff Road at 11:15 a.m. Anyone interested in attending the tour or needing additional information may contact BLM Bruneau Field Office Manager Tanya Thrift at (208) 384-3300.
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US official reiterates push to move land agency out West

By Brady McCombs – 8/28/18 AP

Ogden, Utah — A high-ranking U.S. Interior Department official on Thursday reiterated the agency’s strong interest in moving its Bureau of Land Management headquarters to the American West.

The move isn’t a done deal, Susan Combs, an assistant secretary at Interior, said as she visited a northern Utah city that is among those under consideration for the new location. But she spoke passionately during a round table in Ogden about the need to bridge the gap between bureaucrats and the people affected by their decisions.

The bureau, which is overseen by Interior, manages nearly 388,000 square miles (1 million square kilometers) of land nationwide, and 99 percent is in 12 Western states.

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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Aspiration pneumonia in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Aug 31, 2018 IME

Aspiration pneumonia results from the inhalation of liquid, food or bacteria into the lungs. Material that is aspirated usually originates from the stomach or esophagus. Normally, the larynx, the opening to the lungs, closes during swallowing, to prevent liquids and foods from entering the lungs through the windpipe. Any disorder that increases the reflux of stomach and esophageal contents into the mouth can increase the probability of aspiration.

Any disorder of the larynx that prevents the larynx from opening and closing properly also increases the risk of aspiration. Dilation of the esophagus (megaesophagus) and recurrent vomiting are common causes of aspiration. Sometimes animals under anesthesia will regurgitate. This is why animals are fasted before anesthesia and are intubated to prevent aspiration.

Clinical signs are the sudden onset of difficult breathing, coughing, panting and fever. Affected animals are depressed and often don’t eat. Progressive respiratory impairment may be life-threatening.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

US rejects request for information on Idaho wolf attacks

The U.S. Department of Justice says the requested documents contain information that’s exempt from Freedom of Information Act requests.

Keith Ridler Associated Press August 31, 2018

Boise — The U.S. government says it doesn’t have to release information to an environmental group concerning investigations into livestock deaths in Idaho that can result in wolves being killed for preying on cattle and sheep.

The U.S. Department of Justice in documents filed Thursday in U.S. District Court says the requested documents contain information that’s exempt from Freedom of Information Act requests.

Western Watersheds Project says it wants the reports because it suspects the U.S. Department of Agriculture and ranchers are inflating the number of wolf kills of livestock.

The group says it will press ahead with the lawsuit to get the information.

Federal workers through mid-July killed 49 wolves in Idaho following what investigators said were 61 confirmed wolf kills of livestock.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Officials say rancher shot, injured wolf in NE Washington

8/29/18 AP

Olympia, Wash. — Washington state wildlife officials say a rancher in northeast Washington shot and injured a wolf last week.

The Department of Fish and Wildlife said Tuesday that biologists found the collared wolf on Monday injured but mobile. The shooting happened in the range of the Togo wolf pack.

The agency earlier said the rancher shot the adult wolf in self-defense Thursday as it barked and approached.

continued:
— —

Judge: State can proceed with killing member of wolf pack

8/31/18 AP

Olympia, Wash. — A judge has ruled that a male wolf in a pack that killed a cow and injured two calves in northeast Washington can be killed by the state Department of Fish and Wildlife.

After a Friday morning hearing, Thurston County Superior Court Judge Carol Murphy declined to extend a restraining order that was issued by another judge earlier in the month and was set to expire later in the day, the Capital Press reported .

Since the earlier restraining order was issued, a rancher said he shot at the wolf in self-defense and apparently wounded it in the left rear leg. Fish and Wildlife officials say that the wolf, which is wearing a radio collar that transmits its GPS locations, remains mobile, and that they believe attacks on livestock will continue.

Murphy said that the two environmental groups that had obtained the restraining order — The Center for Biological Diversity and Cascadia Wildlands — had failed to show that they would suffer irreparable harm if the department shot the wolf.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Two wolf pups born south of Mount Hood in Oregon

Wolves in western Oregon are protected by the federal Endangered Species Act.

Associated Press August 30, 2018

Mount Hood, Ore. (AP) — Two wolf pups have been seen near Mount Hood, marking the first known reproduction by wolves in the northern part of the Cascade Mountains in Oregon since wolves began returning to the state in the past decade.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife said Wednesday that a remote camera on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation captured images of two pups on Aug. 10.

Wolves in western Oregon are protected by the federal Endangered Species Act.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Education International

9-2-2018

Would you welcome a wolf in your back yard?
— — — — — — — — — —

Fish and Game says higher number of black bear problems reported in McCall

By Max Silverson For The Star-News Aug 30, 2018

August has seen a sharp uptick in reported cases of black bears causing problems in McCall as they ransack curbside trash and outdoor garbage cans in a search for food.

Beyond causing a nuisance to residents, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game is often left with no choice but to kill bears that develop a habit of seeking food from residential neighborhoods.

Black bears can become dangerous when they grow accustomed to easily finding trash as a food source, causing the promise of food to overpower their fear of humans, Regional Wildlife Manager for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Regan Berkley said.

“Last week, Fish and Game killed a bear that had become habituated to human food sources in the Rio Vista neighborhood,” Berkley said.

“This was a direct result of the bear having access to human foods such as trash,” she said.

Simply capturing and releasing bears that have learned to seek food from humans has been unsuccessful in the past.

“These bears cannot be moved, because research shows they will quickly travel long distances to seek out human foods in their new locations,” Berkley said. “We cannot responsibly move a habituated bear knowing it will likely visit the nearest campground or neighborhood.”

The department has received about 25 reports of black bears causing problems in McCall neighborhoods this August, with 10 complaints coming in the last week alone, she said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Rare footage shows grizzly shortly before IDFG managers killed it

Expanding population prompts controversy over hunt

Steve Liebenthal Aug 29, 2018 KIVI TV

Island Park, Idaho – Grant Pearson and his friend Taylor were on an evening boat ride when they spotted a grizzly bear near a family cabin in Island Park.

… Fish and Game had captured the same bear in the same campground just a few days earlier. Managers moved the grizzly to a remote location twenty two miles away, but within days, the bear was back, and that cost him his life.

“It made a big loop and came back. It was just very persistent in getting into the campground again,” said Grizzly Researcher Jeremy Nicholson. “We kept very close track of the bear cause we had a GPS collar on it, so we knew exactly where the bear was going, but finally it just came down to that it was a threat to humans, so we had to remove that bear.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Judge halts Saturday’s grizzly hunts in Wyoming, Idaho

By Matt Volz and Matthew Brown – 8/31/18 AP

Missoula, Mont. — A federal judge has put a 14-day hold on the first public grizzly bear hunts in Wyoming and Idaho in more than 40 years, as he considers whether the government was wrong to lift federal protections on the animals.

U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen’s order came just two days before the states prepared to open their grizzly bear hunting seasons on Saturday, which would have been the first in the Lower 48 states since Montana’s last hunt in 1991.

“The threat of death to individual bears posed by the scheduled hunts is sufficient” to justify a delay in the state’s hunting seasons, Christensen wrote.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Group buys Idaho ranch to protect bighorn sheep habitat

8/29/18 AP

Lewiston, Idaho — A conservation group bought a 4.5-square-mile (11.7-square-kilometer) ranch in Idaho with the purpose of protecting bighorn sheep.

Portland, Oregon-based Western Rivers Conservancy purchased the Ten Mile Creek Ranch near Lewiston last week, the Lewiston Tribune reported .

The property, which was owned by Rick Rupp of Port Townsend, Washington, and Tucson, Arizona, includes a 5,000-square-foot (465-square-meter) primary residence, a 2,000-square-foot (186-square-meter) caretaker’s home and about 4 miles (6 kilometers) of waterfront property along the Snake River.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Oregon officer rescues baby deer stuck in fence

by The Associated Press Friday, August 31st 2018


(Photo credit: Eugene Police Department)

Eugene, Ore. (AP) – An animal welfare officer in Oregon is getting attention after her rescue of a fawn was captured on her body-worn camera.

The Eugene Police Department on Thursday made public a video and photo of Officer Shawni McLaughlin freeing a terrified fawn that got stuck in a backyard fence.

continued w/video:
— — — — — — — — — —

Oregon hunter rescued after hanging upside-down for 2 days

8/30/18 AP

La Grande, Ore. — An Oregon hunter who fell out of his tree stand and got tangled in his safety harness has been rescued after hanging upside-down for two days about 30 feet (9 meters) from the ground.

The Union County Sheriff’s Department says Thursday another hunter found the man and drove to a nearby highway to get cellphone reception to call 911.

Rescuers used a bucket truck and ladder to reach him.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Plague confirmed in rural Wyoming

Aug 29, 2018 Local News 8

Cheyenne, Wyo. (KIFI/KIDK) – The Wyoming Department of Health in Sheridan County has confirmed a cat in the town of Big Horn is infected with the plague. There have been no human cases identified in the area.

The animal is known to wander outdoors.

The diagnosis was confirmed by the Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory in Laramie earlier this week.

“Plague is a serious bacterial infection that can be deadly for pets and for people if not treated as soon as possible with antibiotics,” said Dr. Alexia Harrist, state health officer and state epidemiologist with WDH. “The disease can be transmitted to humans from ill animals and by fleas coming from infected animals. We want people to know of the potential threat in the cat’s home area as well as across the state.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
August 30, 2018
Issue No. 884
Table of Contents

* States Close Columbia River To Steelhead Retention; Run Downgraded 48 Percent From Preseason Forecast
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441423.aspx

* Construction Begins On New $16 Million Yakama Nation Coho Supplementation Hatchery
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441422.aspx

* GAO Report Examines Columbia River Basin Restoration Program Under Clean Water Act
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441421.aspx

* Compact Approves One Shortened Mainstem Gillnet Period, Opens Two-Day Sturgeon Fishery
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441420.aspx

* Snake River Sockeye Continue To Arrive In Sawtooth Valley, 79 Fish Trapped
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441419.aspx

* Idaho, BPA Sign $24 Million Albeni Falls Dam Wildlife Habitat Agreement
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441418.aspx

* Deschutes River Alliance Asks Court To Reopen Dismissed Water Quality Case On Dissolved Oxygen Issue
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441417.aspx

* Study Looks At Issues Regarding Sockeye Reintroduction Using Residualized Kokanee
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441416.aspx

* WDFW Authorizes Cooke Aquaculture To Transfer Atlantic Salmon To Puget Sound Net Pens
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441415.aspx

* Researchers Profiling Cooler Areas In Yakima River That May Act As Salmon Safe Havens When Temperatures Rise
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441414.aspx

* NOAA Fisheries Releases Final Recovery Plan For Southern Population Of Green Sturgeon
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441413.aspx

* Walleye Discovered In Idaho’s Lake Cascade; Illegally Stocked Fish Could Pose Threat To Fisheries
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441412.aspx
—————————–

Fish & Game News:

2018 outlook: Hunters should have fair-to-excellent deer and elk hunting

Elk and whitetail harvests are both at near records, and mule deer hunting should improve

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Monday, August 27, 2018

Hunters can look forward to a good fall season in 2018, with similar elk and white-tailed deer populations as last year and likely more mule deer in many areas.

Despite a setback in 2017 following a hard winter that mostly affected mule deer, most of Idaho’s deer and elk herds and harvests have been at or near historic highs in recent years and well above long-term averages. Hunters should see similar numbers this fall.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Some Horsethief Reservoir Campgrounds Closing Early

The campground closures will have no impact on fishing or boating activities at Horsethief.

By Evin Oneale, Regional Conservation Educator
Thursday, August 30, 2018

Several Horsethief Reservoir area campgrounds will be closing just after Labor Day weekend and will remain closed until the spring of 2019. The closures come about three weeks earlier than normal.

Ospreys Bay, Easters, Timber Bay and Bear Knob Campgrounds, all located on the west shore of Horsethief, will be closed on September 4th. Only Kings Point campground will remain open, including the Kings Point boat ramp. The entire east side of Horsethief has been closed this season as campground construction upgrades continue in that area.

Horsethief Reservoir is managed cooperatively by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game and the YMCA. Fish and Game oversees Horsethief’s popular trout fishery, while the YMCA is responsible for campground management.

The campground closures will have no impact on fishing or boating activities at Horsethief.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Time for boots on the ground, lots of hunting starts on Aug. 30 and more in September

Big game archery seasons, bird and upland game hunting and mourning doves open in August and September

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Aug. 30 kicks off many archery seasons for deer and elk, general hunts for bear, mountain lion and wolves, as well as seasons for some upland game birds and animals with more seasons opening in September.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Brush up on the new trespassing law before you go hunting or fishing

Basic rules remain the same, you need permission to be on private lands

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Idaho’s new trespass laws took effect July 1, and hunters, anglers and other sportsmen and women should be aware of what’s changed before they head into the field, but also what’s unchanged.

Before delving into the changes, there a few things to remember:

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Photo shows mama duck with 76 ducklings

Likely a ‘duck daycare,’ expert says

July 27, 2018 Local News 8


Photographer Brent Cizek of Bemidji, Minnesota, captured this photo on Lake Bemidji.

Duluth, Minn. – Some parents have their hands full with only one child, but a photographer in Bemidji, Minnesota, happened to catch a mother duck with 76 ducklings.

That’s right – 76.

Brent Cizek told CBC he “couldn’t have asked for a better photo opportunity” when he was at Lake Bemidji.

The images he captured of the duck and all those ducklings hit the internet and went viral and was featured in media around the world.

Before you think to yourself, “Wow! Mom of the Year!”, it’s important to add some context to the scene.

continued:
———————————–

Seasonal Humor:

HuntingSeasonBC-a
——————————–

Aug 26, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Aug 26, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
September 1 Welch Labor Day Golf Tournament
September 1 5pm Boo to the End of Summer Potluck Yellow Pine Tavern
September 2 public meeting at the Big Creek Ranger Station re: Big Creek Hazardous Fuel Reduction
September 8 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Budget Hearing
September 8 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting

(details below)
———-

Village News:

Caton Fire Info and Progression

Payette National Forest
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Friday August 24th, 2018 approx. 11:30 AM
Location The fire is located 7 miles southwest of the Village of Yellow Pine near Indian Point and has been moving east into the Caton Creek drainage.
Total Personnel 6
Size 400 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Aug 24 Water Drop Video
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/photograph/6177/0/86684

InciWeb link:


Caton and Kiwah fires thermal map 8-26-2018

Caton Fire 8/24/18 1300hrs: At about 12 noon today, we detected a fire, north and west of Caton Lake. Basically right near Indian Peak. We jumped 8 smokejumpers on the fire, we have a heavy helicopter with bucket dropping water and an air attack directing the air operations. The Air Attack ordered 2 heavy air tankers and a Single Engine Air Tanker (SEAT) for retardant. I have notified the Cascade District Ranger as well.

Currently the fire is 3+ acres, moderately active, in continuous fuel and we have warm temps and strong winds predicted. We are using available resources we have, including borrowing aircraft from the Rattlesnake, to catch this fire. We will provide updates as they are available.

Caton Fire 8/24/18 1530hrs: The fire is now 25-30 acres, we have ordered another 3 crews. We have dropped multiple loads of retardant with SEATs, heavy air tankers and air attack has ordered a VLAT (very large air tanker).

Caton Fire 8/25/18 0930hrs: Caton Fire update. From our detection at noon yesterday, we engaged the fire with smokejumpers and rappellers when it was at 2 acres. With high winds, low relative humidly and warm temps the fire moved quickly through the mature timber. We used Single Engine, C-130 and Very Large Air Tankers to drop many loads of retardant to try to box it in, until fire fighters could establish an anchor and begin to flank the fire. By late afternoon the fire was 60+ acres with a large spot fire ½ mile ahead of itself. Because of other large fires in the geographic area, our orders for additional crews went unfilled.

Due to its rapid growth and our limited firefighting resources, we are reassessing the strategy of this fire. Currently we are developing a point protection strategy to keep the fire up on the hill and prevent impacts to the East Fork, Johnson Creek, Eiguren Ranch, Yellow Pine and other values at risk.

We will keep you and folks in Yellow Pine informed as we have information.

Caton Fire Update 8/26/18 1000hrs: we ordered an Infrared flight yesterday to get and accurate map of the fires location and size, but the order was not filled. We very roughly estimate the size to be around 400+ acres, but that number will likely change once we get and accurate IR flight. At this time, the fire is still located near Indian Point and not posing a threat to the East Fork, Johnson Creek, Eiguren Ranch or the Village of Yellow Pine.

With our Geographic Area experience Planning Level 5 (high fire activity), crews and aircraft have been sent to other large fires in the Area and our firefighting resources are very hard to get.

Yesterday was a warm, dry, windy day and the fire did grow and move a bit. We are not expecting a lot of movement to the north, but the fire did move east into or toward Caton Creek.

We have firefighters stationed at Krassel who are keeping eyes on the fire and making sure none of our established Management Action Points are triggered.

We are expecting a change in the weather beginning today. The prediction is for much cooler temps and good chance of a wetting rain, maybe up to .20” After the weather system moves through, we will check fire growth and make sure we are still meeting objectives.

– PNF Krassel Ranger Anthony Botello

Photos Caton Fire 8-24-2018


– PNF Krassel Ranger Anthony Botello


8-24 Evening smoke plume from Yellow Pine.


(link to larger size)
Topo Map, Caton Lake at the bottom, red “X” marks approximate fire location, Yellow Pine is in upper right corner.
— —

Johnson Fire – Contained

Boise National Forest
Location – The fire is above Johnson Creek between Coffee and Halfway creeks, just a short distance above the Ditch Creek road.
Lat / Long: 44.768583, -115.654
Fire Discovery Date/Time: 8/20/2018, 4:36:26 PM
Incident ID: 2018-IDBOF-000923
Cause – Lightning
Acreage: 6.3 [total]
Strategy: Full Suppression
Resources – 65 people and 3 helicopters
Contained – August 23, 2018

8-23-2018 Update: It was declared contained today. Most resources will be off the fire by Saturday. Folks may still see some smoke from time to time as there are numerous snags in the interior of the fire that make it too dangerous to completely mop it up. Our folks will continue to monitor the fire until the rains or snows come.
– Jake Strohmeyer, BNF Cascade Ranger
— —

Kiwah Fire – Meadow Crk Road Open

The Kiwah fire is burning east of Yellow Pine in the Wilderness in the Indian Creek drainage.

8-24 Update: With the decrease in fire activity on the Kiwah fire, we have terminated the closure of Meadow Creek road. While the safety risks to the public are currently reduced, people in the fire area should be aware that hazards do still exist such as; unexpected fire movement, falling trees, ash pits, and debris slides.

We will maintain a public safety awareness posting in the location of our previous closure signs.

– Brian Harris PNF PAO
— — — —

Ice Hole Campground

The Cascade Ranger District [has] temporarily closed Ice Hole Campground for reconstruction beginning Monday, Aug. 6, 2018.

The Campground will remain closed for the remainder of the 2018 season. Project funding was provided by local Tribes and a State RV Grant.

Forest Service crews and contractors will repair existing resource damage, enabling visitors to have an improved recreational experience in the future.

link to project
— — — —

Possible Problem Bear

A report Sunday (Aug 19) of a “BIG bear” hanging out in the upper village. Be “Bear Aware” – Remember to secure your trash and pet food.

Update Friday (Aug 24) “it has been back but still not getting into anything.”
— — — —

Problem Mule Deer Doe

The old mean doe is still around. A report that she killed a small dog (Doogie?) in its yard on the west side of Yellow Pine last week. (Probably the same doe that has stomped other dogs in Yellow Pine!) Please watch your dogs and kids, and your back.

— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not dump appliances or tires at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

“Bring it, Don’t Burn it.” There is a burn pile for woody debris only. Please don’t put trash or cardboard in the burn pile.
———-

Local Events:

Welch Labor Day Golf Tournament

Saturday September 1, check in at 11:30 am. Cannon start at 12 noon

$20 per person, $50 per pair to be sponsor

Boo to the End of Summer Potluck

Saturday September 1 at 5pm, Potluck and Fireworks Fundraiser at the Yellow Pine Tavern. Burgers and Dogs provided.
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

July 24th Yellow Pine water update:

It is good to go back to the even/odd watering schedule. Even/odd means if your address is 315 Yellow Pine Avenue, you can water on odd days such as the 1st, 3rd, 5th etc. And if your address is 316, water in even numbered days. The only request is that watering be done between 6am and 1pm. Also please limit to one sprinkler at a time.

Also it is requested that no lawn watering be done August 1st through the 6th to be able to withstand the draw from Harmonica.

Our second sand filter will be on line soon and give us more capacity. Thank you everyone for your patience during the high water demand time. – SH

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.
— — — —

VYPA News:

Next VYPA Meeting:

September 8, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
— — — —

YPFD News:

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.

Next meeting September 8 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Budget Hearing

Yellow Pine Fire District Budget for Fiscal Year 2018 – 2019

Notice has been given that the Yellow Pine Fire District will hold a public hearing for consideration of the proposed budget, including the estimated revenue for the fiscal year, October 1, 2018 to September 20, 2019, pursuant to County Law chapter 14, Section 31-1419A. Said hearing will be held at the Yellow Pine Community Hall in Yellow Pine, Idaho on Saturday September 08, 2018, at 10:00 AM. At said hearing all interested persons may appear and show cause, if any they have, why said proposal budget should be adopted.

Proposed Expenditures:

The following budget is an estimate set forth in said budget of the total proposed expenditures and accruing indebtedness of the Yellow Pine Fire District for the Fiscal year 2018 – 2019.

Yellow Pine Fire District Budget for 2018 – 2019:

* Fire Fighting/Rescue: $8,132
* Wages: $0
* Advertising: $2,000
* Repairs and Maintenance: $4,000
* Utilities (Fixed Cost*) $4,000

Total:
Fixed: $4,000
Includes Insurance $2,500
Total $18,132

I, Dan Stiff, Chair Yellow Pine Fire Commissioner, Yellow Pine, Idaho, do hereby certify that the above is a true and correct statement of the proposed expenditures for the fiscal year 2018 – 2019. All have been tentatively approved and entered into district records. I further certify Yellow Pine Fire District did give notice for said hearing in two (2) conspicuous places in the fire district, by order of the commissioners. Residents are invited to attend the budget hearing on September 08, 2018, at 10:00 AM at the Yellow Pine Community Hall, and have the right to approve written or oral comments concerning the fire district budget. A copy of the proposed fire district budget in detail is available at 320 Westside Ave, Yellow Pine, Idaho, 83677.

Dated this 15th day of August 2018

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911 @ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

A lot of progress has been made on the new Helipad near the crossroads.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

– Fire Chief Jeff

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Now open for summer (208) 633-3377
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern

Boo to the End of Summer Potluck, Saturday September 1 at 5pm, Potluck and Fireworks Fundraiser. Burgers and Dogs provided.

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
— — — —

The Corner 633-3325

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Aug 20) overnight low of 48 degrees, a few clouds to the south and smoky haze (Yellow AQ.) A few finches and a couple of pine siskins this morning. It appears the gravel trucks are working this morning (sound of jake brakes just after 9am.) Female hairy woodpecker visited. Cloudy and gusty breezes at lunch time. Around 130pm the wind started gusting pretty good, huge clouds of dust rolling in off the golf course, especially behind the school house, pine needles raining down like hail, thunder boomers. Lightning strike on Johnson Creek ridge just before 2pm. Thunder, wind and 7 minutes of rain at 215pm (first rain in 51 days!) then calmer and much cooler, high of 75 degrees. Seems like the storm brought more smoke instead of clearing the air. Female hairy woodpecker visiting at sundown. After sundown there was a helicopter flying slow above Johnson Creek ridge. Orange smoky waxing moon at dusk.

Tuesday (Aug 21) overnight low of 40 degrees, good amount of dew, clear sky above yucky smoke (Yellow AQ.) A few finches, a female hairy woodpecker and a hummingbird this morning. Several chipmunks and no ground squirrels. Good water pressure. Gravel trucks running down the back Stibnite road. A few clouds in the early afternoon, haze of smoke, light breezes and milder temperatures, high of 81 degrees. Chunky white-breasted nuthatch stopped by. Local streets are extremely dusty. Someone out tidying up the golf course again today. By evening the air quality had improved, light haze persists, mostly clear and cooling down. Fat waxing white moon rising over Antimony ridge before dusk.

Wednesday (Aug 22) overnight low of 41 degrees, dew on the metal roofs, mostly clear sky (high thin wisps) and smoky. Several very loud airplanes this morning, one especially low and loud at 9am. No birds around. Gravel trucks running down the back Stibnite road out Johnson Creek. Hairy woodpecker flying in the neighborhood. A few pine siskins and a chipmunk visited after lunch. Mild afternoon temperatures, high of 78 degrees, appears to be mostly cloudy above an obscuring layer of smoke (can barely see VanMeter Hill), light breezes. Increasing clouds and overcast by mid-afternoon, report of thunder, smells like rain and smoke. By evening dark overcast, breezy and a few drops of rain a little after 8pm, then very light sprinkles, steady rain at 855pm for 15 minutes. Broken clouds at moon rise.

Thursday (Aug 23) overnight low of 39 degrees, clear sky, light breeze and haze of smoke (Yellow AQ.) Finches flying and calling. Warm sunny day, high of 86 degrees, light breezes. A couple of finches and a pine siskin visiting early afternoon, two hummingbirds visiting their feeder, and a young golden mantel squirrel climbing around the porch. Increasing smoke in the afternoon. Female hairy woodpecker visited early evening. Clear, smoky and light breezes after sundown. Fat orange smoky moon rose over Antimony ridge after dark.

Friday (Aug 24) overnight low of 43 degrees, mostly cloudy from an earlier passing dry front and smoky (Orange AQ.) About half a dozen finches and pine siskins, a red breasted nuthatch and a hummingbird visiting this morning. A couple of loud airplanes. Trio of golden mantel squirrels raiding the bird feeders. Early afternoon a female hairy woodpecker, a hummingbird, a white-breasted nuthatch, a juvenile jay and a flicker stopped by. Most of the day yucky smoke – smells like a campfire, can’t see the sky (probably partly cloudy) breezy and Orange AQ, high of 80 degrees. Better air quality by evening, mostly clear and could see the smoke plume from the Caton Fire (photo in village news.) Small deer bounding through the golf course (hole #3) just after sundown. Clouds(?) at 10pm and cooling off.

Saturday (Aug 25) overnight low of 38 degrees, clear sky, light haze of smoke, dry (no dew), and light breezes (Green AQ.) Several cassins finches, a few pine siskins and a couple hummingbirds visiting this morning. A white-breasted nuthatch and a female hairy woodpecker joined the birds at the feeders for lunch. Getting breezy and light smoke by lunch time. By early afternoon the sky was about 80% white with smoke and a few real clouds, Yellow AQ, and high of 80 degrees. The smoke plume from the Caton Fire is growing in height and width. Jeep, UTV and ATV visitors on main street this afternoon. By evening thicker smoke (Orange AQ) mostly cloudy and lighter breezes. A family of flickers, one robin and a couple of red-breasted nuthatches visited at dusk.

Sunday (Aug 26) overnight low of 46 degrees, overcast, dry (no dew), light breezes and haze of smoke (Yellow AQ.) No birds around until late morning, then a female calliope humming bird, a jay and a few finches visited, female grosbeak sighting in the neighborhood. Cooler and cloudy early afternoon, high of 65 degrees, light breeze and light haze of smoke. Starting to rain at 520pm! Good steady rain this evening and much cooler, haze of smoke persists.
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Idaho News:

Captain John Coombs retires from Valley County Sheriff’s Office.

On 07/31/18 Captain John Coombs retired from service with the Valley County Sheriff’s Office after 21 years of service. It is a very bittersweet moment for all of us here at the Sheriff’s Office. Captain Coombs began his distinguished career with us in 1997 as a patrol deputy and he also served as a detective. He was promoted to Chief Deputy by then Sheriff Britt Durfee. We wish Captain Coombs the best on his well deserved retirement, he has been an integral part of our agency for a long time and will be missed greatly!

link to FB photo:

Congratulations are in order!

Valley County Sheriff’s Office

We are excited to announce the promotion of Lt. Jason Speer to Captain Jason Speer. On 08/01/18, Jason Speer was promoted by Sheriff Patti Bolen to the position of Chief Deputy. Captain Speer has been a member of the Sheriff’s team for 17 years. He started out his career with us as a patrol deputy, climbed the ranks as the Marine Sergeant, canine handler, Lieutenant of Operations and now as the Chief Deputy. He started his career in Law Enforcement by serving 8 years in the Air Force as a Security Policeman and received the accolades of Security Police Airman of the year while he served in the Air Force. Captain Speer has worn many hats in our agency and he will continue to serve our team and the citizens of Valley County with pride.

link to FB photo:

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Valley puts advisory vote on road taxes on Nov. 6 ballot

Commissioners seek advice on replacing federal funds

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Aug 23, 2018

Valley County voters will be asked on Nov. 6 if they want county commissioners to raise property taxes to fund road maintenance and improvements.

Commissioners on Monday voted to put an advisory question on the ballot whether they should levy a two-year property tax increase to raise an estimated $3.4 million per year for the county’s roads. The result of the vote will carry no legal authority.

“I believe an advisory vote is appropriate to hear from the citizens,” Commission Chair Gordon Cruickshank said.

Commissioners have the authority to institute a two-year levy without seeking voter approval, but were hesitant to do so without an advisory vote.

Any tax increase would be spent on pavement overlays, chip sealing and rock crushing to produce road mix to place on gravel roads, Cruickshank said.

The county would also paint stripes on major roads like Farm to Market Road, replace aging equipment, increase snowplowing capabilities and raise employee wages in order to increase retention, he said.

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ITD ‘exploring’ possible fix to Highway 55/Banks-Lowman Road intersection

Lots of people have called and written the Idaho Transportation Department to express safety concerns about the intersection.

KTVB Staff August 21, 2018

Boise — The Idaho Transportation Department says it is exploring several possible solutions to congestion at Highway 55 and the Banks-Lowman Road, but we won’t see any of them in the immediate future.

In an article called “The Sunday Backup,” posted on its own website, ITD acknowledges that many people have called and written to the department about congestion and safety concerns regarding the Highway 55/Banks-Lowman intersection.

The most popular suggestion: putting in a traffic signal.

Others include a roundabout or adding a third lane on Idaho 55.

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Higher wages intended to keep, attract workers

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Aug 23, 2018

Employees of Valley County would receive a raise of 3 percent or more under the proposed 2019 budget.

The raises are intended to help retain county employees, especially in the road department and Valley County Sheriff’s Office.

A public hearing on the budget is scheduled for 1 p.m. Monday at the commissioners’ meeting room in the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade. The 2019 budget year starts Oct. 1.

Most of the county’s 137 employees would receive a 3 percent raise next year but others would get a higher increase, Valley County Clerk Doug Miller said.

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Cascade fire district proposes $98,020 property tax hike

Money needed to increase manpower, shorten response times

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Aug 23, 2018

The Cascade Rural Fire Protection District proposes to raise property taxes by $98,020 to hire more full-time employees and to increase incentive pay to its volunteers.

The new money also would allow the district to provide more training and to buy equipment and make other improvements.

The district is proposing to add back all of the property taxes in its foregone account, where property taxes not levied by the district in previous years are held for possible future use.

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Land Board boosts payouts for public schools, sets new record for all endowments for fiscal year 2020

Idaho Department of Lands – News Release
August 21, 2018

(Boise) – The State Board of Land Commissioners (Land Board) today approved a 3.5-percent year-over-year increase in the fiscal year (FY) 2020 payout from the eight endowment funds that support Idaho’s public school system, universities and other beneficiaries.

The $80,918,000 total distribution to all endowment beneficiaries sets a new record. The money comes from timber sales and leases on endowment lands and earnings from invested funds.

Idaho’s public school system will receive $51,260,000 in FY20 – 1.9-percent more than the FY19 distribution. Other endowment trusts provide long-term support to higher education, state hospitals for the mentally ill, state veterans homes, the Idaho School for the Deaf and Blind, Idaho’s juvenile corrections system, and Idaho’s prison system.

The endowment fund that supports State Hospital South saw the largest year-over-year increase at 18.5 percent. The State Hospital South Endowment Fund will receive $5,955,000 in FY20.

The endowment fund that supports Lewis-Clark State College and Idaho State University also saw a large bump in payouts for FY20 with a 12.2 percent increase in distributions, for a total of $4,946,000 in FY20.

The Endowment Fund Investment Board (EFIB) manages the funds from the use of endowment lands and recommended the distributions.

The Land Board also approved the EFIB recommendation to transfer $50,309,000 of earnings reserves to the permanent fund in an effort to grow the permanent fund and boost long-term beneficiary distributions.

“The recommendations represent an appropriate balance between the interests of current and future beneficiaries,” EFIB Manager of Investments Chris Anton said.

The Land Board provides direction to the Idaho Department of Lands in its management of more than 2.4 million acres of endowment trust lands in Idaho and the EFIB in its management of $2.2 billion in trust funds generated from the use of the lands. The Land Board is comprised of the Governor, Attorney General, Secretary of State, State Controller, and Superintendent of Public Instruction.
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Idaho Land Board votes to keep endowment lands open for recreation

Steve Bertel Aug 21, 2018 KIVI TV

Boise – The State Land Board voted Tuesday to adopt a new recreation policy that allows continued recreational access on state endowment lands.

“The new recreation policy recognizes the Land Board is meeting its fiduciary obligation to maximize long-term financial returns from the use of endowment lands, consistent with the Idaho Constitution, while continuing to allow recreational access where it does not interfere with those obligations,’ said Idaho Department of Lands spokesperson Sharla Arledge.

The Land Board also approved an agreement with the Idaho Fish and Game Commission for continued access for hunting, fishing and related uses to approximately 2.3 million acres of endowment lands.

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Audit of oil and gas royalties on State of Idaho leases released

Idaho Department of Lands – News Release
August 21, 2018

(Boise) – An audit released Tuesday examines oil and gas royalties paid to the State of Idaho on three wells under State of Idaho leases.

The Idaho Department of Lands (IDL) asked for the audit to determine whether royalties paid to the State of Idaho for oil and gas produced under State leases complied with Idaho law and IDL lease agreements.

Texas-based energy consulting firm Opportune LLP secured the IDL contract in 2017 to conduct the audit, and presented its findings at the State Board of Land Commissioners (Land Board) meeting in Boise today.

The audit is available at this link:
https://www.idl.idaho.gov/oil-gas/leasing/audit_9-082118-oil-gas-royalty-audit-v0816.pdf

The IDL informational memo to the Land Board on the audit’s findings and the agency’s planned actions is available here:
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Small town recall election surrounded in big controversy

By Katie Keleher Aug 24, 2018 Local News 8

Atomic City, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Atomic City may only be a town of about 30 people, but there is big drama happening there. And a lot of it has to do with city ordinances.

A petition has been signed by many to recall one of its three city council members. The mayor says it’s so they can get things done in the city, but the councilman thinks differently.

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Fire Season:

Kiwah Fire allowed to burn

Aug 21, 2018 Local News 8

Salmon, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The lightning-caused Kiwah Fire, detected at approximately 5:30 p.m. on July 17, is estimated at 15,437 acres.

The fire is burning in a mixed conifer forest on the Middle Fork Ranger District and is being allowed to play, as nearly as possible, its natural ecological role in the environment while providing for firefighter and public safety.

The fire is located in steep, inaccessible terrain northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station within the Indian Creek drainage in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

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Residents in path of Rattlesnake Creek Fire evacuated for five days

‘Go’ orders rescinded after danger subsides

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Aug 23, 2018

Residents in Hillman Basin and Boulder Creek south of Riggins were allowed go home on Tuesday, five days after being told to evacuate as the Rattlesnake Creek Fire moved toward their homes.

The Adams County Sheriff’s Office downgraded the evacuation order for the area from “go” to “set.”

The order for residents on the west side of U.S. 95 between mile markers 178 to 182 were also downgraded on Tuesday from “set” to “be ready” after the fire burned past the area.

… The Rattlesnake Creek Fire had grown to 8,135 acres as of Wednesday. The fire was declared 28 percent contained on Wednesday with 386 people assigned to the fire.

… The Rattlesnake Creek Fire had cost a total of $19 million as of Tuesday. …

Kiwah Fire

The Kiwah Fire had grown to an estimated 15,437 acres as of Wednesday in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness within the Indian Creek drainage.

… Firefighters have placed sprinklers and large water tanks for dipping by buckets from helicopters to protect the Stibnite area near Yellow Pine.

The efforts are in addition to efforts by Midas Gold Corp. to protect their buildings and equipment in the area.

The cost of the Kiwah Fire was set at $373,000, Payette Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said.

Mesa Fire

The Mesa Fire east of Council was fully contained as of Wednesday with only limited “creeping and smoldering” occurring, the Forest Service said. The fire burned a total of 34,700 acres.

… The Mesa Fire has cost $14.3 million, Harris said.

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Wildfire in Boise County’s Grandjean area destroys four cabins

The Wapiti Fire about 100 miles northeast of Boise, Idaho, has grown to at least 4,000 acres. The road from Idaho 21 to Grandjean is now closed.

Jeremy Stiles August 26, 2018 KTVB


Wapiti Fire August 25, 2018, from Sawtooth Lodge, Grandjean Road, in Boise County, Idaho. (Photo from @soundslikesarah via Twitter)

Boise County — A wildfire first reported Saturday afternoon in the Grandjean area west of Stanley has destroyed four cabins and an outbuilding, the Boise County Sheriff’s Office says.

What is now called the Wapiti Fire was reported at 2:12 p.m. Saturday, and quickly grew to 1,200 acres. The fire continued to burn actively Sunday morning, and has grown to an estimated 4,000 acres. There is no estimate regarding an expected containment date.

An area closure is being put in place around the Grandjean area for public and firefighter safety. National Forest System Road 524, which connects Grandjean to Idaho Highway 21, is closed.

The Boise County Sheriff’s Office says the following areas have been evacuated: Sawtooth Lodge, Grandjean campground, and summer homes and hiking trails in the area. Cabin owners and people who had to leave campgrounds during the evacuation are asked to call the Lowman Ranger District at (208) 259-3361 for information about when it will be possible to access the area again.

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Drought conditions begin to creep into Treasure Valley, West Central Mountains

by Associated Press Tuesday, August 21st 2018

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Idaho is seeing more hot, dry weather and with it some parts of the state are experiencing drought.

Data from the U.S. Drought Monitor shows about 31 percent of the state is experiencing a moderate drought. Boise State Public Radio reports the drought regions include much of the Treasure Valley, the West Central Mountains, several counties in the southeast corner of the state and the tip of the Idaho panhandle.

The only areas untouched by the summer dry spell so far include counties in eastern Idaho near the border with Montana and Wyoming.

The U.S. Drought Monitor says states experiencing the most significant droughts include Arizona, Colorado, Missouri, Oregon and Utah. The U.S. Drought Monitor is a weekly map by the National Integrated Drought Information System that uses climatic and other data to track drought conditions nationwide.

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Don’t vacuum while wildfire smoke is in the air

A doctor says that vacuuming can stir up unhealthy wildfire smoke particulates in your carpet and recirculate them inside your home. He advises avoiding the chore while our air is unhealthy.

KTVB August 21, 2018

The air quality in the Pacific Northwest is so poor due to wildfire smoke that we’re now being told not to vacuum our carpets.

Doctors warn that vacuuming can kick up particulate matter, potentially making unhealthy air even worse.

Northwest residents should avoid vacuuming for up to a week as they wait for the wildfire smoke that has again descended over the lowlands to clear.

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Smoky conditions create difficulties for small plane pilots

KIVI TV Aug 23, 2018

Treasure Valley – Flying into the beautiful Idaho backcountry in the summer should be an enjoyable experience.

“Right now we fly a lot of guided raft trips, in fact most of the charter operators, that’s the share of the business that they’re doing right now. We also service a bunch of the ranches in the Frank Church Wilderness Area,” said William Foote, chief pilot, SP Aircraft, Boise.

He says visibility can be much less due to smoke from wildfires and they have a minimum visibility to fly.

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Decreasing Number of Rainy Days in Summer Has Increased Western Wildfire

USDA 8-20-2018

Missoula, Mont. Aug. 20, 2018 – The number and size of large wildfires have increased dramatically in the western United States during the past three decades. Contrary to previous understanding, new research shows that significant declines in summer precipitation and lengthening dry spells during summer are major drivers of the increase in fire activity. Prior understanding was that the increase in fires was attributable mainly to warming temperatures and earlier snowmelt.

The study, “Decreasing fire season precipitation increased recent western US forest wildfire activity,” was published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and was conducted by a team of scientists from the USDA Forest Service and the University of Montana.

The research team contrasted the effects of snowmelt timing, warming summer temperatures and variations in the volume and distribution of summer precipitation on forest area burned. They found that summer precipitation totals and the duration of dry spells were the strongest controls on forest area burned by wildfire.

“Summer dry periods are tightly coupled to how warm and dry the air is during the fire season,” said Zack Holden, USDA Forest Service scientist and lead author of the study. “Longer windows without rain lead to more surface heating, which dries out woody fuels.”

“The maps of declining precipitation help us think about patterns of future drought, which can help us focus work near communities likely to experience continuing declines,” said Charlie Luce, USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station scientist and co-author of the study.

“This new information can help us better monitor changing conditions before the fire season to ensure that areas are prepared for increased wildfire potential. Further, it may improve our ability to predict fire season severity,” said Matt Jolly, USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station scientist and co-author of the study.

The study, funded by NASA and USDA, was conducted as part of a larger project aimed at improving wildfire danger and drought monitoring.

This news release is issued jointly with the University of Montana.

The Rocky Mountain Research Station is one of seven units within the U.S. Forest Service Research and Development. RMRS maintains 14 field laboratories throughout a 12-state territory encompassing parts of the Great Basin, Southwest, Rocky Mountains, and the Great Plains. RMRS also administers and conducts research on 14 experimental forests, ranges and watersheds and maintains long-term research databases for these areas. While anchored in the geography of the West our research is global in scale. To find out more about the RMRS go to http://www.fs.fed.us/rmrs. You can also follow us on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/usfs_rmrs.
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Regional Intermountain Newsletter Special Issue

USFS Regional Intermountain Wildfire August 21, 2018

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Mining News:

How the Stibnite Mining District Shortened WWII

August 20 Midas Gold

During World War II, while many U.S. citizens were sent to Europe and Asia to complete their military service, some were sent to the hills outside of Yellow Pine, Idaho. To continue fighting the war against the Axis Powers, the U.S. desperately needed critical metals such as antimony and tungsten and one of the few places to find these in the U.S. was in Idaho.

Why Was Tungsten So Important in the War?

Tungsten is an incredibly hard metal and it retains its strength at high temperatures. In fact, at 6,152 degrees Fahrenheit, tungsten has the highest melting point of any metal known to man. The Germans tapped into the strength of tungsten by inventing armor-piercing shells. Suddenly, they had bullets that could cut through armored vehicles and even military tanks. This advancement in warfare left the allies scrambling to keep up.


George Nock photo from Bradley Mining Company Collection, photo courtesy Jim Collard

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Public Lands:

BCYPSR August Meeting CANCELED

(via email Aug 20)

The steering committee met today and decided to cancel the August forest collaborative meeting. There will not be a meeting this week. Please get in touch with your sub committee leaders if you have any questions.

The next meeting will be on Thursday September 27th. Melissa will be facilitating through the last few months of meetings so make sure you use mbhamilton@uidaho.edu for questions about meetings. Facilitating has been a really valuable learning experience for me and I’m glad I got the chance to be a part of it all. I hope you all can work together to finalize that matrix.

Josie Greenwood
STEAM and Environmental Educator
UI Valley County Extension Office
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Payette National Forest Whitebark Pine Conservation Effort

Over the last several decades, Whitebark pine decline has been extensive due to whitepine blister rust, mountain pine beetle infestations, wildfire and climate change has been pronounced. As a result, Whitebark pine has been placed on the Payette National Forest’s Sensitive plant list and on the Federal list of Candidate plant species.

Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) is a slow growing, long-lived pine of high-elevation forests and timberlines of the northwestern United States and southwestern Canada. It occupies harsh, cold sites characterized by rocky, poorly developed soils and snowy, wind-swept exposures.

Whitebark pine can be distinguished from other pines because it is the only 5 needle per bunch pine to grow at high elevations. It is a critical food source for Clark’s nutcracker (the primary seed disperser), grizzly bears and squirrels.

Fortunately, some Whitebark pine trees on the Payette National Forest offer hope of recovery to the species as a whole! Our Forest is home to populations of Whitebark pine trees that have a relatively high level of resistance to the whitepine blister rust fungus. Due to this increased resistance, we are conducting a cone collection project with the intent to locate, propagate and eventually plant back into Whitebark pine habitat, those seedlings of Whitebark trees that are most resistant to the whitepine blister rust fungus.

After extensive resistance studies are conducted, the seedlings of resistant trees will be grafted onto rootstock, planted back into Whitebark pine habitat, and left to grow and produce new seed cones. The grafting technique tricks the seedlings into producing seeds in 5-10 years, rather than waiting the 50+ years it would take for a “nature-grown” Whitebark pine to produce viable seed cones.

It is through efforts such as this, and through the conservation of highly-resistant, cone-producing Whitebark pine trees, that Whitebark pine will have a chance at recolonizing ridges and mountain tops.

source (FB) and photos:
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Public reminded not to remove timber along streams

Boise, Idaho, Aug. 21, 2018 — The Boise National Forest would like to remind woodcutters not to cut or gather fuelwood from areas alongside streams, called the Riparian Conservation Area (RCA).

RCAs are used to protect valuable fish and streamside wildlife habitat by not allowing the cutting or gathering of fuelwood within 300 feet of a flowing stream, or 150 feet for intermittent streams and lakes. Consult your Fuelwood Brochure for more detailed information.

“Within the Pioneer Fire we have several areas where roadside hazard trees were cut down and in some cases piled,” said Boise National Forest Supervisor Cecilia Seesholtz. “While personal fuelwood can be collected from these areas please be mindful of areas marked closed for active timber sales and that you not remove any downed timber from the RCA.”

Downed trees and other large woody debris in the RCA serve many important physical, biological and ecological functions. They act to slow runoff from storms and snowmelt that reduces the amount of sediment entering streams. Large woody debris is also important to stream channel function by creating deep scour pools which makes for excellent fish habitat.

For more information contact Mike Williamson, Acting Public Affairs Officer, 208-373-4105.
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BLM seeks comments on Ridge to Rivers trail development

Date: August 22, 2018
Contact: Holly Hovis, hhovis@blm.gov, 208-384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management would like to invite the public to provide input on a proposal for new trail and trailhead development in the Boise Foothills Ridge to Rivers planning area. A public meeting on the proposal will be held in conjunction with a City of Boise and Ridge to Rivers Open House on Aug. 29 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Boise Depot, 2603 Eastover Terrace, Boise, ID 83706.

The BLM will be providing information on the 14.8 miles of proposed non-motorized trails, approximately 6 miles of which would occur on BLM land. Four single track trails and one mountain bike flow trail are proposed within the Ridge to Rivers trail network. The Cartwright Trailhead would also be expanded to accommodate additional parking spaces and to install a vault toilet. These developments are being proposed in response to increased public interest in and use of the Ridge to Rivers network. The project aims to reduce crowding on existing trails by providing new opportunities for hiking and biking.

More information about the proposed project can be found at: https://go.usa.gov/xUF7k (please note: the address is case sensitive).

The scoping period for this proposed project starts on Aug. 29 and ends on Sept. 14, 2018. The scoping period allows the public, organizations and other interested parties to provide input on the proposed trail and trailhead developments and identify potential issues, which the BLM may opt to include in the environmental analysis. Interested individuals may provide input at the public meeting or directly to the following email: BLM_ID_FRFO_R2R@blm.gov.

For more information, contact Dave Draheim, Four Rivers Outdoor Recreation Planner, at (208) 384-3300.
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US agencies OK Idaho wilderness plans for pristine areas

By Keith Ridler – 8/24/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — The final management plan has been approved for the last two of Idaho’s three most recent wilderness areas that protect some of the most pristine landscapes in central Idaho.

The signing on Tuesday of the Hemingway-Boulders and Cecil D. Andrus White Clouds Wilderness Management Plan by the U.S. Forest Service puts the finishing touches on a nearly two-decade effort by Republican U.S. Rep. Mike Simpson of Idaho.

The Forest Service and U.S. Bureau of Land Management signed off on the Jim McClure-Jerry Peak Wilderness Plan earlier this month.

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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Hotspots in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Aug 24, 2018 IME

A hotspot is an area of acute moist dermatitis, or an area of local skin irritation that arises when some primary problem leads to self-trauma. The self-trauma causes further irritation, and this is called an itch-scratch cycle. It can occur in any breed and at any age.

Acute moist dermatitis is common in animals with parasites and ear infections. Other common causes are environmental allergies, food allergies and contact allergies. Hotspots occur most often in hot and humid weather. Predisposed animals tend to have a dense undercoat, such as golden retrievers, German shepherds and Labrador retrievers.

Acute moist dermatitis is an intensely itchy to sometimes painful irritation of the skin surface. It develops rapidly and can spread very rapidly, as well. There is hair loss, redness to the skin and a moist skin surface. The outer thighs, neck and face are common sites of infection.

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US denies liability after boy is sprayed by its cyanide trap

By Keith Ridler – 8/22/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — The U.S. government said an Idaho family is to blame for any injuries it alleges a boy received after he was doused with cyanide by a predator-killing trap that a federal worker mistakenly placed near their home.

Any injuries were caused by the negligence of the parents and child, the U.S. Department of Justice said in documents filed Monday in U.S. District Court, and asked for the family’s lawsuit to be dismissed.

Mark and Theresa Mansfield of Pocatello sued in June seeking more than $75,000 in damages and more than $75,000 for pain and suffering.

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4 wolf pups found dead on public land in Wyoming

The wolf pups were found dead on public land south of Jackson, Wyoming.

Associated Press August 20, 2018

Jackson Hole, Wyo. — Authorities are releasing few details about four wolf pups that were found dead on public land south of Jackson.

The Jackson Hole News and Guide reports Wyoming Game and Fish Department spokesman Mark Gocke could give no more details other than saying the pups were reported dead Thursday within Game and Fish’s “trophy game” wolf hunting area, where there are defined seasons and rules on killing wolves.

A Wyoming law prohibits wildlife managers from identifying anyone who legally kills a wolf – or releasing information that could lead to their identity being revealed.

The four wolf pups were born this year, so they would have been about 4 or 5 months old. They were taken to the Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory in Laramie for necropsies.

source:

Wildlife officials: Wolf pups likely died of natural causes

AP August 23, 2018

Jackson Hole, Wyo. (AP) – Officials say four wolf pups found dead last week in the Horse Creek area near Jackson likely died of natural causes.

The Jackson Hole News and Guide reports Wyoming Game and Fish Department spokesman Mark Gocke says the agency won’t know for sure until they get the necropsies back from the lab.

Game and Fish officials initially said they could not release much information, citing a Wyoming statute that’s intended to protect the identity of people who legally kill wolves.

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Washington judge blocks kill order on wolves to save cattle

By Nicholas K. Geranios – 8/21/18 AP

Spokane, Wash. — A judge in Washington has issued an emergency order blocking the state from killing members of a wolf pack that have been preying on cattle.

The Department of Fish and Wildlife had announced Monday morning that it would immediately begin efforts to kill members of the wolf pack who had been preying on cattle in Washington’s northeastern Ferry County, near the Canadian border.

Members of the Togo wolf pack have preyed on cattle three times in the past 30 days and six times in the past 10 months, which exceeds the state’s threshold to take action, the agency said.

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Wolf Education International

August 20, 2018 Newsletter

In Search of the Hidden Public Costs of Wolves

Togo wolf pack members kill another cow in northeast Washington

134 sheep killed by wolves; farmers demand money for electric fences

August 26, 2018 Newsletter

Austrian region: rubber bullets OK to scare off wolves
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Bear attack injures 10-year-old boy in Yellowstone park

8/23/18 AP

Helena, Mont. — A bear charged a family hiking in Yellowstone National Park on Thursday, knocking down and injuring a 10-year-old boy before his parents were able to drive the animal off with bear spray, park officials said.

The unidentified boy from Washington state was transferred to a hospital for puncture wounds to his back, wounds around his buttocks and an injured wrist, park officials said in a statement. It’s unclear how serious his injuries are, spokeswoman Morgan Warthin said.

The park is home to grizzly and black bears, both of which are a top draw for the more than 4 million tourists who visit each year. It’s not clear whether the bear that attacked the boy was a grizzly or a black bear.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Man accused of taunting bison sentenced to 130 days in jail

by Heidi Meili and Deion Broxton Thursday, August 23rd 2018

Missoula, Mont. — An Oregon man was sentenced to 130 days in jail for taunting a bison in Yellowstone National Park, resisting arrest and disorderly conduct.

Prosecutors charged Raymond Reinke, 55, with disturbing wildlife in the park and carrying an open container of alcohol in a vehicle.

He faced various charges from other national parks as well.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Angler catches a 19-inch illegally stocked walleye in Lake Cascade

by CBS 2 News Friday, August 24th 2018


(Google Earth + Idaho Fish and Game)

Cascade, Idaho (CBS 2) — An angler fishing for smallmouth bass and perch on Lake Cascade caught something they shouldn’t have — a 19-inch adult walleye, which is not supposed to be in Lake Cascade.

Idaho Fish and Game says the fish was illegally stocked in the reservoir and it’s the first-ever confirmed report of walleye in Lake Cascade.

“This illegal introduction was carefully thought out,” said Dale Allen, Idaho Fish and Game fisheries manager. “The closest walleye fishery is more than 200 miles from Cascade. To survive the extended transport time, this fish – and possibly others – would have required clean, cold, aerated water for a number of hours.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Angler catches massive catfish in Horseshoe Bend Pond

by CBS 2 News Friday, August 24th 2018


Idaho Fish and Game

A woman caught a massive channel catfish in Horseshoe Bend Pond recently.

Craig Mickelson with Fish and Game captured Tammy Thomas reeling in the big surprise on video.

The Fish and Game says Thomas had her hopes of originally catching a bluegill or bass.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
August 24, 2018
Issue No. 883
Table of Contents

* Columbia Basin Partnership Develops Preliminary Abundance Goals For Salmon, Steelhead; All Delisted Within 100 Years
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441382.aspx

* Survey Details Salmon, Steelhead Spawning In White River After Condit Dam Removal
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441381.aspx

* New Research Shows Coming Impacts Of Melting Glaciers In Cascade Mountains At Watershed Level
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441380.aspx

* NW Power/Conservation Council Approves Lamprey Restoration Plan, Funding Uncertain
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441379.aspx

* Salmon Migration Model Seeks Greater Accuracy In Matching Modeled Predictions, Observed Abundance
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441378.aspx

* Biologist Explains Why Last Year’s Idaho Wild Steelhead B-Run Better Than Dam Counts Showed
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441377.aspx

* Lower Granite Water Remains Cool; Snake River Sockeye Run Nearly Complete At 272 Fish
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441376.aspx

* Review Of Surface Collectors Show Some Designs Better At Getting Juvenile Fish Through A Dam
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441375.aspx

* Work Begins On Culvert To Bring Salmon Back To Portland’s Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441373.aspx

* Comments Sought On Proposal For New Off-Channel Storage Reservoir At McNary Dam Pool
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441372.aspx

* Judge Issues Temporary Restraining Order Prohibiting WDFW From Lethal Wolf Removal
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441371.aspx

* New ‘Droughty’ Soils Model Can Enhance Forest Health Efforts, Landscape Restoration
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441370.aspx
——————————-

Fish & Game News:

Reward Offered for Illegal Walleye Stocking in Lake Cascade

News from Idaho Fish and Game 8-24-2018

An angler fishing for smallmouth bass and perch on Lake Cascade near Crown Point earlier this week instead reeled in an adult walleye, measuring more than 19 inches in length. Fish and Game regional fisheries manager Dale Allen positively identified the fish on Wednesday, August 22.

The fish was illegally stocked in the reservoir and is the first-ever confirmed report of a walleye in Lake Cascade. Because of the illegal stocking and the threat walleye pose to Cascade’s and other downstream fisheries, Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) is offering a cash reward for information regarding this criminal case. Call the CAP hotline anytime at 1-800-632-5999.

Idaho has just a few walleye fisheries, all established by Fish and Game, and all in isolated reservoirs. Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in south central Idaho is one example; no outlets from the reservoir exist that might allow walleye to escape to other waters. It is because of their potential threat to existing fisheries that walleye have not been more widely stocked in other Idaho waters.

The Department receives angler requests to establish new walleye populations every year. For the reasons noted, these requests are courteously denied. Unfortunately, some self-serving anglers are not willing to take no for an answer, instead taking matters into their own hands. “This illegal introduction was carefully thought out,” Allen noted. “The closest walleye fishery is more than 200 miles from Cascade. To survive the extended transport time, this fish – and possibly others – would have required clean, cold, aerated water for a number of hours.”

The Department may not know the extent or severity of this illegal stocking for several years. Because of the high stakes, resources will be diverted from other projects to expand fish sampling in Lake Cascade later this year to see if more adult walleye are present and to determine whether reproduction has occurred.

“This incident is particularly disheartening for Cascade,” Allen said. “Fish and Game spent years rebuilding a world-class perch fishery, and the reservoir is also full of big trout and trophy smallmouth bass. Adding another top predator like walleye will almost certainly impact these other sport fish.”

The negative ramifications of this illegal stocking extend well beyond the shores of Lake Cascade. With thousands of acre feet of irrigation water released from the reservoir on an annual basis, it’s no stretch that walleye could move through the Payette River system into Brownlee Reservoir and the Hells Canyon section of the Snake River.

Please contact fisheries manager Dale Allen at the Fish and Game McCall office (208-634-8137) should you have questions.
— — — — — — — — — —

Last fall’s wild steelhead return exceeded expectations because of unusually small fish

Idaho “B” run fish are famous for their large size, but not all achieve it

By Brett Bowersox, Fisheries Staff Biologist
Friday, August 17, 2018 – 3:44 PM MDT

Last year’s Idaho steelhead run received a lot of attention for the wrong reason. It was a low run year, and Fish and Game biologists did not initially see as many fish back as they would have liked, but they were pleasantly surprised in the spring.

The wild run of large fish known as “B-runs” destined for the upper Clearwater, Middle Fork and South Fork of the Salmon rivers received even more attention because of a very low return based on window counts at dams as steelhead migrated up the Columbia and Snake rivers.

The low return focused the attention and concerns of fisheries managers and anglers alike. But data from last fall also suggested the return of wild “B-runs” wasn’t as low as window counts estimated, and information gathered during spring in spawning streams confirmed it. The run wasn’t great by any stretch, but not catastrophic, either.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

F&G Commission approves agreement to continue recreation access on state endowment lands

Fish and Game will provide money and services to continue public access for hunting, fishing and trapping

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, August 23, 2018

Idaho Fish and Game Commission on Aug. 23 approved a memorandum of agreement with the Idaho Department of Lands to continue public access for hunting, fish, trapping and other recreation on about 2.3 million acres of state endowment lands.

Fish and Game will provide $.25 per acre annually to the Department of Lands – about $580,000 – which includes credit for in-kind, law-enforcement services provided by Fish and Game conservation officers on endowment lands.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

F&G traps and relocates North Idaho grizzly spotted on private lands

F&G staff is monitoring bear to see if it returns, or continues to frequent private property

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, August 23, 2018

Idaho Fish and Game recently trapped and released a sub-adult grizzly bear that was spotted several times in North Idaho. F&G conservation officers hauled a trap to a location near where the bear was spotted digging up and eating a goat that had been buried on private property near Chilco.

Officers caught the bear in a culvert trap baited with a portion of the goat. The bear was then transported to McArthur Lake WMA where it was fitted with a transmitter collar. Biologists also took DNA samples, then transported the bear to a remote area of the Cabinet Mountains near the Montana border.

After release, the bear had moved down toward the eastern end of the Kootenai Valley, and biologists are monitoring it and preparing to trap it if it appears likely it will get back into trouble.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Tips & Advice:

Be Bear Aware – Nature’s Calling (June 2018)


— — — — — — — — — —

Be Bare Aware

Residential Areas

* Minimize odors and the availability of food rewards through out your yard and neighborhood. Report all residential wildlife encounters to your local wildlife management agency and police department, and notify your neighbors of the situation

* Remove any dense brush that could provide cover for a bear or cougar and make a surprise encounter likely. Also remove brush piles that snakes may hide in.

* If a bear or other wild animal repeatedly enters your yard, look for what attractants are drawing it there and remove them.

* Put out garbage on the day of pick up, not the night before. Store in a sturdy building or place in an approved bear-resistant trash receptacle.

* Do not leave pet food out. Hang bird feeders out of a bears reach and take down during periods of high bear activity.

* Keep bar-b-ques clean and grease free. Store with livestock/pet feed and other attractants inside a sturdy building.

* Fruit trees: Pick all ripe fruit from the tree and surrounding ground.

* Compost piles may attract wildlife, especially bears. Do not put meat, fish and other pungent scraps in compost piles. Add lime to reduce odors and accelerate decomposition.

* Electric fences are an effective way to keep bears and other animals out of orchards, gardens, compost piles and beehives. Follow appropriate safety precautions.

* Never feed wildlife. Feeding marmots and deer can attract cougars. Feeding chipmunks and ground squirrels can increase the possibility of hantavirus and rabies. Feeding ducks and fish can attract alligators.

* All wildlife can be dangerous. Do not attempt to chase or harass an animal out of your yard, especially if it is a bear or alligator. Contact the appropriate authority for assistance.

* Be sure to seal holes and spaces around your home to prevent insects, snakes and rodents from entry.

Bear activity may intensify in the spring when bears are hungry and emerging from their dens, in the fall when bears are bulking up for hibernation, and during drought periods. This is due to natural foods often being scarce.

source w/more info:
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Caught on video: Fox steals golfer’s ball

August 23, 2018 (Local News 8)

West Springfield, Mass. – A Massachusetts golfer lost a golf ball to a fox that was sharing the green with him.

Video posted to the Facebook shows two foxes sitting on the course near the hole the golfer was playing at Springfield Country Club.

The curious foxes watch as the golfer’s ball lands just beyond its mark, and a few seconds pass before one fox casually trots over, picks up the ball with its mouth, and scampers away almost playfully.

The Facebook post made by the country club had a lighthearted caption: “If your ball has mysteriously disappeared over the past month………we think we know why!”

source w/video:
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Seasonal Humor:

SmokeSeason-a
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Aug 19, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Aug 19, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
September 2 Public meeting at the Big Creek Ranger Station re: Big Creek Hazardous Fuel Reduction
September 3 Labor Day
September 8 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Budget Hearing
September 8 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting

(details below)
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Village News:

Possible Problem Bear

A report Sunday (Aug 19) of a “BIG bear” hanging out in the upper village. Be “Bear Aware” – Remember to secure your BBQ, trash and pet food.
— — — —

Problem Mule Deer

The old mean doe is still around. A report that she killed a small dog (Dougie?) in its yard on the west side of Yellow Pine this last week. (Probably the same doe that has stomped other dogs in Yellow Pine!) Please watch your dogs and kids, and your back.
— — — —

Kiwah Fire

The Kiwah fire is burning east of Yellow Pine in the Wilderness in the Indian Creek drainage. Meadow Creek Road is Closed and the Mule Hill trail leading down into Indian Creek is closed.

8/11 PM update: The Meadow Creek Road above Stibnite has an emergency closure as the Kiwah Fire has bumped the road above Indian Creek. No other closures are in effect at this time. The road is open to Thunder Mountain, but members of the public are asked to limit traffic on the road as firefighters are working along the road and in Thunder Mountain. A future closure of the Thunder Mountain area may be necessary… Helicopters are assisting firefighters with water bucket drops throughout the north side of the fire. – Brian Harris PNF

8/19 Point Protection Measure at Stibnite
link to FB photo:

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Ice Hole Campground

The Cascade Ranger District [has] temporarily closed Ice Hole Campground for reconstruction beginning Monday, Aug. 6, 2018.

The Campground will remain closed for the remainder of the 2018 season. Project funding was provided by local Tribes and a State RV Grant.

Forest Service crews and contractors will repair existing resource damage, enabling visitors to have an improved recreational experience in the future.

link to project
https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49637
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not dump appliances or tires at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

“Bring it, Don’t Burn it.” There is a burn pile for woody debris only. Please don’t put trash or cardboard in the burn pile.
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Local Events:

Will there be a Labor Day Golf Tourney ???

(List your event here for free!)
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

July 24th Yellow Pine water update:

It is good to go back to the even/odd watering schedule. Even/odd means if your address is 315 Yellow Pine Avenue, you can water on odd days such as the 1st, 3rd, 5th etc. And if your address is 316, water in even numbered days. The only request is that watering be done between 6am and 1pm. Also please limit to one sprinkler at a time.

Also it is requested that no lawn watering be done August 1st through the 6th to be able to withstand the draw from Harmonica.

Our second sand filter will be on line soon and give us more capacity. Thank you everyone for your patience during the high water demand time. – SH

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.
— — — —

VYPA News:

Yellow Pine Village Association Minutes: August 11, 2018

Officers Present: Deb Filler, Chairman; Vice Chairman, Ronda Rogers; Treasurer, Joel Fields; Secretary, Lynn Imel; Absent: Member-at-large, Kathy Hall

The meeting was opened at 2:00 by Deb Filler

There being no objections or corrections, the minutes of the July meeting were accepted as written and posted on Facebook and community bulletin boards.

Treasurer’s report. See attached [below]. Joel Fields reported there are outstanding invoices related to the Harmonica Festival; he expects those will be presented and paid before November. Bill McIntosh explained that the grant from the McCall Chamber of Commerce for advertising required matching money to be paid out; the reimbursement and grant money of about $7,000 should be received by December.

Cemetery Report was presented by Tim Rogers. He has received the cemetery records from past Commissioner, Willie Sullivan. The financial account records are kept by the Village Treasurer, Joel Fields, who will meet with Tim to review the cemetery finances. Cemetery money is a separate fund administered by three elected Commissioners. The graves sites are being marked with numbers that correlate with the (repaired) board to be placed at the cemetery. Marge Fields reported that the map of grave sites has been digitized and each site is being identified as containing a burial, cremated remains, or a memorial stone without remains. A designation will be made for members of the Armed Forces. Burial plots can be reserved for $100. The availability of water was discussed; at present there is no water. (see below: Ron Earl elected to serve as the third commissioner on the board)

Community Hall report: Deb Filler provided the report for Kathy Hall, Chairman of that committee. The improvements in the community hall will be prioritized by the committee and financed by that fund. (see Treasurer’s report for fund amount)

Harmonica/Music Festival report: Lorrine Munn, Chairman, presented the report on the event. Thanks to numerous volunteers the event was very successful. A complete financial printout will be provided at the September meeting. The gross so far recorded is greater than the previous year’s event.

Election of Cemetery Commissioner: Ron Earl was unanimously elected to the Cemetery Board. Tim Rogers, Ron Earl and Marge Fields serve on that Board.

Old Business

Steve Holloway provided an up-date on the status of the water supply provided by Yellow Pine Water Users Association.

* The main focus of the water board is the create and maintain a safe system for users and staff.

* The second bay of the sand filter is functioning and approved by DEQ.

* Chlorine level is being adjusted as required. It may fluctuate during peak use.

* Please cooperate on lawn watering. Odd addresses water on odd days; even addresses on even days. Water lawns in the morning, use only one sprinkler, shut off by 1:00 p.m. so chlorine levels can be adjusted.

* Weekend users water lawns when they are in YP. Full time residents during the week days.

* No lawn watering on Harmonica Festival weekend.

* Warren Drake has been hired as a licensed operator ($1,200/mo.) as required by regulations. He makes required adjustments, manages samples, and deals with DEQ when necessary. He also works for other small water companies.

* If air gets into the water lines, DEQ requires that a notice be issued to boil domestic water.

* Work is underway to create an accurate map of all water lines and plan future work.

* Dave McClintock has agreed to help if there is an emergency in the winter.

* The Board will try to have a member attend YP town meetings to answer questions.

(YPWU Board: Willie Sullivan, Stu Edwards, Dawn Brown, Steve Holloway, Dave Prouty. The YPWU is not administered or affiliated with the Village of Yellow Pine Association.)

Midas Gold will be giving the Yellow Pine community three $10,000 donations over the next three years. Yellow Pine selected four representatives to work as liaisons between the community and Midas Gold. (Lorrine Munn, Cecil Dallman, Willie Sullivan, Lynn Imel) They identified community needs and selected the water supply system as being the most important need. The $10,000 donation will be made directly to the YPWU. The Water Board will decide the best use of the money. The remaining two annual donations will be designated at later dates.

Noxious Weed program: The county coordinator has completed the Yellow Pine spraying project and accounted for all of the equipment loaned.

Golf Tournament Joel Fields, Marge Fields, and Kathy Hall announced they will be organizing the 2019 July 4th golf tournament. (Golf tournaments are not affiliated with the Village of Yellow Pine Assoc.)

Harmonica/Music Festival 2019 chairman: Lorrine Munn offered to serve as chairman for next year’s event. Unanimously approved.

New Business

There being no further topics for discussion, the meeting was adjourned.

Submitted for publishing by Lynn Imel

Financial report to accompany minutes:

Fund Description 8/10/18 Balance
General Village Fund $1,724.51
Cemetery Fund $5,732.38
Harmonica Fund $20,419.19
Community Hall Fund $1,817.16
Restrooms Fund $6,050.76
Road & Ditch Fund $500.00
Total Community Funds $36,244.00

Next VYPA Meeting:

September 8, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
— — — —

YPFD News:

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.

Yellow Pine Fire District Budget for Fiscal Year 2018 – 2019

Notice has been given that the Yellow Pine Fire District will hold a public hearing for consideration of the proposed budget, including the estimated revenue for the fiscal year, October 1, 2018 to September 20, 2019, pursuant to County Law chapter 14, Section 31-1419A. Said hearing will be held at the Yellow Pine Community Hall in Yellow Pine, Idaho on Saturday September 08, 2018, at 10:00 AM. At said hearing all interested persons may appear and show cause, if any they have, why said proposal budget should be adopted.

Proposed Expenditures:

The following budget is an estimate set forth in said budget of the total proposed expenditures and accruing indebtedness of the Yellow Pine Fire District for the Fiscal year 2018 – 2019.

Yellow Pine Fire District Budget for 2018 – 2019:

* Fire Fighting/Rescue: $8,132
* Wages: $0
* Advertising: $2,000
* Repairs and Maintenance: $4,000
* Utilities (Fixed Cost*) $4,000

Total:
Fixed: $4,000
Insurance $2,500
Total $18,132

I, Dan Stiff, Chair Yellow Pine Fire Commissioner, Yellow Pine, Idaho, do hereby certify that the above is a true and correct statement of the proposed expenditures for the fiscal year 2018 – 2019. All have been tentatively approved and entered into district records. I further certify Yellow Pine Fire District did give notice for said hearing in two (2) conspicuous places in the fire district, by order of the commissioners. Residents are invited to attend the budget hearing on September 08, 2018, at 10:00 AM at the Yellow Pine Community Hall, and have the right to approve written or oral comments concerning the fire district budget. A copy of the proposed fire district budget in detail is available at 320 Westside Ave, Yellow Pine, Idaho, 83677.

Dated this 15th day of August 2018

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911 @ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Next meeting:

YP Fire Budget Hearing: September 8, 2018 – 10am Community Hall

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

A lot of progress has been made on the new Helipad near the crossroads.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

– Fire Chief Jeff

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Open for summer (208) 633-3377
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern

Summer Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine.
— — — —

The Corner 633-3325

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Aug 13) overnight low of 43 degrees, clear sky and light haze of smoke this morning, Yellow AQ. Gravel truck/trailer turning around on the residential streets with back-up beepers before 830am. Good water pressure this morning. A few finches and a couple of pine siskins visiting. Getting breezy before noon, clear and good air. Increasing haze late afternoon, hot and breezy, high of 89 degrees. Cooling off some after sundown, lighter breezes.

Tuesday (Aug 14) overnight low of 42 degrees, clear sky and light haze of smoke this morning, Green AQ. It has been 45 days since our last drop of rain, very dry! Low water pressure. Gravel truck traffic from the pit going up Johnson Creek road. Female hairy woodpecker and a couple of female/juvenile hummingbirds, pine squirrel “chipping” from the fence and a couple of chipmunks dashing about. Local streets are very dusty. A few pine siskins visited early after lunch. Clear, sunny, hot and gusty hot breezes early in the afternoon, high of 92 degrees. Increasing smoke to the west later in the afternoon. Little male downy woodpecker visited this evening and a raven calling from the forest. Clear, warm, hazy and almost calm after sundown. Yellow AQ.

Wednesday (Aug 15) overnight low of 41 degrees, clear sky and moderate haze of smoke this morning, Yellow AQ. Gravel trucks hauling from the pit up Johnson Creek. Good water pressure. A few pine siskins and a red-breasted nuthatch, not many birds around. Getting a bit breezy by lunch time. Hot by early afternoon, moderate haze of smoke (Yellow AQ) and hot variable breezes, high of 94 degrees. Quiet and very warm evening, female/juvenile calliope hummingbird at the feeder. Warm evening, haze of smoke and setting sun paints everything with a golden glow. Slow to cool down after sunset.

Thursday (Aug 16) overnight low of 50 degrees, mostly cloudy above the smoke this morning, Yellow AQ. A couple of loud airplanes around 9am. (Airport Webcam is not reporting.) Low water pressure. A couple of juvenile jays trying to figure out the suet feeder, not many birds around. Two hummingbirds visited at lunch time, one was a young male calliope. Hot, cloudy and smoky by early afternoon, light hot breezes, very dry, high of 93 degrees. Quiet evening, better water pressure. Mostly cloudy after sundown and warm. Golden crescent moon in the southwest at dark.

Friday (Aug 17) overnight low of 52 degrees, mostly cloudy to partly clear above the smoke this morning, Yellow AQ. A few cassins finches and a couple of hummingbirds visiting. Good water pressure. Raven calling just before lunch time. Hot this afternoon, high of 90 degrees, cloudy, smoky and breezy. This evening towering thunderheads to the east (partly cloudy) variable breezes and perhaps the sound of thunder (or dump trucks) and haze of smoke. Slow to cool off after sundown, a little breezy before midnight.

Saturday (Aug 18) overnight low of 49 degrees, clear sky above haze of smoke, Yellow AQ. It appears the thunderstorms tracked north of McCall last evening, no rain or lightning. Finches and hummingbirds visiting this morning, several chipmunks scurrying around. Gravel truck/trailer parked on main street, not sure if they are hauling today. Pine siskins showed up for a lunch time seed snack. Mid-afternoon “chunky” clouds, warm and light breezes, haze of smoke, high of 86 degrees. Dusty streets! Comical juvenile stellar jay visited. Increasing smoke this evening. Female hairy woodpecker visited before sundown. Low smoke coming upriver this evening (probably from the Rattlesnake Creek fire), and high “clouds” of smoke in an otherwise clear sky. Fat first quarter moon tinted orange in the south west just at dark.

Sunday (Aug 19) overnight low of 45 degrees, clear sky above haze of smoke, Yellow AQ. Finches, pine siskins and red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Getting breezy before lunch time. Water pressure down a little. A few small clouds by early afternoon, thicker haze of smoke, hot and breezy. Hot dry afternoon, high of 90 degrees, haze of smoke and some thin high clouds streaking the sky, light breezes. Female hairy woodpecker and a juvenile jay visited the suet feeder early this evening. Not seeing as many colombian ground squirrels, but plenty of chipmunks. Low smoke coming up river before sundown, yellow air quality.
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RIP:

Gene Battles

June 14, 1937 – August 4, 2018

Gene was born on Flag Day (June 14), 1937 to Paul and Gracie Battles in Hanford, Calif. They soon moved to Coalinga, Calif. where his dad worked in the oil fields.

He was joined by two brothers and two sisters. He had a good childhood growing up in a small town and getting into all the mischief one did at that time with friends.

In 1954 he enlisted in the Army. After basic training in Atlanta he was sent to Ft. Richardson, Alaska, near Anchorage. He really liked Alaska and wanted to stay, but had to return to California when his enlistment was up for his separation from the service.

It took him 11 years to return. In the meantime he married Betty Lindsay, they had two daughters, Debbie and Brenda. He became an iron worker and welder.

He still wanted to go back to Alaska, so he packed up his family and headed up the Alcan for what the Betty felt was a “hair raising” trip. He went to work building metal buildings and later working on the oil drilling platforms out in the Kenai Inlet and on the North Slope preparing for the oil pipeline to be built.

He and Betty parted ways. Cold weather hit and work shut down, so he and Elaine left for California to find winter work and see family. While there, his sister Claudia introduced them to the Bomengens, who owned West Mountain Lodge in Cascade. They were looking for a manager for the lodge and cabins on the west side of Cascade Lake.

Gene was always going back to Alaska but thought a couple of years on the way would be okay. That turned into 45 years.

After two years at the lodge, they started Gene’s Pump Service installing water pumps working with Gary Wilson of Gary’s Well Drilling. The next year his brother Clay and his family moved to Cascade. They partnered and began also installing septic systems and built some log houses.

In 1988 they went to New Zealand with Elaine’s parents and brother and his wife. They stayed for six weeks renting a van and touring both islands. His mother-in-law said she never laughed so much or had such a good trip. I attribute that to Gene’s good nature and fun ways.

Work dried up with a downturn in the economy. So, Gene bought a truck and began delivering freight for Action Express out of Boise to Cascade, McCall and New Meadows. When that slowed down he went to work for Ray Arnold driving Ray’s truck coast to coast. He got to see a lot of country and Elaine got to go with him, too, sometimes.

After being away from home most of the time for five years, he quit and went to work for Harp Oil delivering fuel locally and to the back country, Stibnite, Thunder Mountain, Big Creek and Warren. He became manager when Bud Harp retired.

After 11 years he retired from that. He and Elaine bought a travel trailer and made many great trips all around the country reconnecting with old friends and family.

Even though he never made it back to Alaska, except for visits, his 45 years in Cascade were very good until he began experiencing Alzheimer’s and they stayed home close to family. It is a terrible disease that slowly steals your abilities, your memories, your personality and then your life.

He was preceded in death by his parents, Paul and Gracie Battles and his daughter Brenda.

He is survived by his wife, Elaine, daughters Debbie (Mark) Duty, Vicki (Carl) Nickels and Doneva Daggett. Also brothers Clay and Dennis and sisters Helen Brown and Claudia Beswick and two half sisters Linda and Robin plus numerous grand and great grandchildren, nieces and nephews..

He received excellent care from Ashley Manor – Highmont in Boise and from Auborn Crest Hospice. They were wonderful to him and to his family.

We will have a celebration of his life at the American Legion on Sept 22, 2018, giving his family and friends all time to be able to come. He was the best partner I could ever ask for.

source: The Star-News
https://www.mccallstarnews.com/

Note: For those who wish to send a card to Elaine, email me for her address. – rrS
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Frances Elen Olson

Frances Elen Olson, 81 of Cascade, passed away peacefully at her home after a four year battle with cancer.

Frances was born on Dec. 13, 1937, in Caldwell to Obie and Lottie Haskins. Frances spent all of her youth and most of her adult life in Cascade. Frances attended K-12 at the Cascade School as well as did all her children.

In 1952 the love of her life Thomas N. Olson moved to town. In March of 1956 (their senior year) Tom and Frances snuck off to Lovelock Nevada and got married. When they returned home to Cascade they each went home like nothing happened and kept it a secret from family and friends until after they graduated.

Later that year the first of five children were born a son Tammy followed by daughters Tronnie and Rorie and sons Tom Jr. and Tobie.

After graduation Tom worked for J.I. Morgan and they lived in New Meadows for a couple years before settling back in Cascade.

Upon returning to Cascade the two built their forever home where they spent over 60 years together raising their family. Frances raised kids while working as a swim instructor, where she shared her love to swim, teaching the community children.

She spent time helping at the hospital, worked part time at the Boise Cascade mill and remained active in the electoral committee until recent years. In 1979 Tom and Frances started their own business, Olson’s Excavating, and for 35 years she was the secretary and chief bottle washer.

Most of the crew knew her as “Gram” and the only trouble at work scarier than having to answering to Tom in the field was having to answer to “Gram” in the office.

In 2004 Tom and Frances retired and sold the business to Tobie. After retiring they spent time together around Cascade in the summers and traveled to Arizona during the winters to enjoy time with old friends and new acquaintances.

Frances lived her entire life with her focus on her family. She was a loving wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, aunt, sister and friend to all that knew her. She always stood firm for what she believed.

Frances never knew a stranger. Her home and kitchen was open day or night to anyone that needed it. She loved to cook and have her family near.

She loved music and did not always stick to singing in the shower. It was no surprise to find her humming or singing along to a tune in the grocery store or yodeling in the kitchen to entertain the kids or grandkids while she prepared a meal.

Frances gave a whole new meaning to:

Dance as though no one is watching
Love as though you have never loved before
Sing as though no one can hear you
Live as though heaven is on earth

Frances truly loved life and her family and had a strong religious belief that carried her through. Frances was so much too so many, her legacy will live forever, she will be greatly missed by all of those that had the pleasure to know this truly amazing woman.

Frances is survived by Husband Tom Sr., children Rorie, Tom Jr., and Tobie; and 10 grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren.

She is preceded in death by parents Obie and Lottie, son Tammy, daughter Tronnie, brother’s Jessie, Albert, and Roy

A funeral service will be held Saturday Aug. 25, 2018 at 11 a.m. at the American Legion Hall located at 105 E Mill Street, Cascade with a potluck to follow.

source: The Star-News
https://www.mccallstarnews.com/
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Idaho News:

Is Your 911 Dollar Going to the Right County?

Valley County Sheriff’s Office August 15, 2018

Have you recently moved to Valley County or have you changed your provider recently?

Many of you may not know that your Federal mandated dollar might be going to the wrong Public Safety entity. When you move to Valley County and you have had your cell phone activated in another area, your 911 dollar is still going to the original County that your cell phone was set up in. We are encouraging our citizens to double check their cell phone bill to see if the 911 money is actually coming to Valley County and not where you use to live. To do this, check your bill or call your cell phone provider and ask them. If it is still going to your old residence’s agency, then have them switch it to Valley County. The 911 money is federally mandated to come out of a phone bill and help the Public Safety Agency in which you live in to pay for 911 equipment in your area. This does not apply to a home phone or a hard line, that is automatically done at the phone company and goes off of your physical address, this is only for cell phones. So please check and make sure that your contribution is going to the right place.

source: Valley County Sheriff’s Office FB
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McCall hosts housing forum in an attempt to combat one of the biggest problems in Valley County

Steve Dent Aug 13, 2018 KIVI TV

McCall – Tourism continues to grow in McCall and the surrounding Valley County and that was pretty evident with the traffic and people at the beach on a Monday afternoon.

“Tourism is the bread and butter for a lot of our communities in the west central mountains,” said Andrew Mentzer the executive director of the West Central Mountains Economic Development Council.

Although the tourism industry is booming, business face a shortage of workers and fueling that is the lack of affordable housing in the McCall.

“It is a huge challenge, a lot of our service industries our restaurants have had to cut back services because they don’t have enough workers,” said McCall Mayor Jackie Aymon. “Local housing, workforce housing or whatever you want to call it is probably the number one issue and one of the biggest obstacles of economic development in our community.”

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Valley County Sheriff: 17-year-old falls in Payette Lake, in ‘grave condition’

by CBS 2 News Staff Tuesday, August 14th 2018

Cascade, Idaho (CBS2) — Sunday afternoon emergency services responded to Payette Lake after reports of a 17-year-old fell into the water as he was paddle boarding.

Deputies say the 17-year-old’s father called 911 and reported that his son was on a paddle board near their pontoon boat when he collapsed into the water. The father said his son was not breathing and they were trying to get them on the pontoon boat.

The sheriff’s office says the 17-year-old was wearing a US Coast Guard approved life jacket at the time.

Valley County Marine Patrol responded in three minutes.

The 17-year-old was brought over to the sheriff’s office patrol boat where first aid was rendered and finally CPR was performed on the male. While doing this, the Marine Patrol took the male to the McCall Fire and EMS boat and was transferred to St. Luke’s McCall and then by air ambulance to St. Luke’s Downtown where the sheriff’s office says he is in “grave condition”.

source:
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Public Utility

UTV owners gather at Brundage Mountain for ‘takeover’

By Max Silverson for The Star-News August 16, 2018

Erika Christensen and her family gathered at Brundage Mountain Resort on Friday to watch barrel racing, but there was not a horse in sight.

Instead, the Christensen family watched contestants riding in UTVs taking turns ripping around in circles.

The races were just one event of the UTV Takeover, which drew an estimated 1,000 to 2,000 people to Brundage, which served as a base for outings and tours.

Activities throughout the event were intended to foster a family-friendly environment.

… Activities during the week included 100-mile group rides to places like Yellow Pine and Warren, plus shorter 50 mile rides to places like Granite Lake, Hazard Lake and the Brundage Mountain fire lookout.

full story:
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Whooping cough outbreak worsens in southwestern Idaho

Whooping cough has sickened roughly 122 people in the region. Health officials say those numbers could go higher when school starts.

Rebecca Boone Associated Press August 14, 2018

Boise — Health officials say a whooping cough outbreak has now sickened roughly 122 people in southwestern Idaho, and they’re warning those numbers could increase with the start of the school year.

Whooping cough, also called pertussis, can be avoided with a series of vaccines. But the illness can be serious or even fatal for infants because the vaccine series takes multiple months to complete.

Cases of pertussis have been found throughout the Southwest District Health region, which includes Adams, Canyon, Gem, Owyhee, Payette and Washington counties. But the bulk of them have occurred in Canyon County, where 94 people have contracted the disease.

District environmental health supervisor Jami Delmore says people who have a cough that lasts two weeks should see a health care provider to determine if the illness is pertussis. The disease is treatable with a five-day course of antibiotics.

source:
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CDC monitoring measles outbreak in 21 states, including Oregon

Some 107 people have contracted the measles thus far in 2018, according to the CDC.

Mark Bergin August 15, 2018 KTVB

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is monitoring the spread of measles in 21 states, including Florida.

The Florida Department of Health said Monday it is investigating a case of measles in an unvaccinated child in Pinellas County.

The other states included are Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, and Washington, and Washington D.C.

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Idaho Falls couple rescued after being lost in cave for nearly 2 days

AP August 14, 2018

Jackson Hole, Wyo. (AP) – A man and woman got lost inside a mazelike ice cave in Wyoming for nearly two days and were hypothermic when rescuers found them.

Teton County Undersheriff Matt Carr told the Jackson Hole News and Guide the Idaho Falls couple had burned their backpacks and other gear to stay warm after getting soaked by a waterfall in the Darby Canyon Ice Cave.

The 27-year-old man and his 24-year-old wife left Idaho Falls at 7 a.m. Saturday to explore the caves. Their family called authorities when they didn’t return.

Carr says rescuers found them shivering and “unable to move” and helped them out of the cave around 11 p.m. Sunday.

The undersheriff says the cave system is mazelike and unmapped and only experienced spelunkers are encouraged to enter.

source:
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Pilot makes emergency landing into Snake River

Steve Bertel Aug 14, 2018 KIVI TV


picture by Doug Locksmith

Owyhee County – A pilot suffering an undisclosed health condition was apparently forced to make an emergency landing Tuesday morning into the Snake River.

It happened about 10:30 a.m., near the Sunrise Skypark in Owyhee County, according to an Owyhee County Sheriff’s Office dispatcher.

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Plane crashes in Caribou County

The pilot and passengers were sent to the hospital

By Lindsay Kerr August 13, 2018 Local News 8

Caribou County, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Caribou County Sheriff’s Office along with the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating a plane crash that happened Monday morning.

The Lincoln County, Wyoming Sheriff’s office received a 911 call around 9 a.m. about a plane crash in a heavily wooded area northwest of the Smoky Canyon Mine in Caribou County.

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Officials release names of individuals in plane crash

The pilot and passengers were sent to the hospital

By Lindsay Kerr August 15, 2018 Local News 8

The Caribou County Sheriff’s Office has released the names of those involved in a plane crash that happened Monday morning.

Pilot John Craig Koehler, 66, of Afton, Wyoming, passenger Evan Zane Hathaway, 29, of Afton, Wyoming and passenger Tristan Brant Smith, 41, of Smoot, Wyoming were rescued from the crash.

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Two dead after plane leaves Caldwell and crashes in Baker City

by CBS 2 News Monday, August 13th 2018


(Photo courtesy Baker County Sheriff)

Caldwell, Idaho (CBS2) — Deputies say two people died Saturday after their plane crashed in a Baker City hay field.

The hay field was located near Lindley Road and I84.

According to Baker County Sheriff, 77-year-old William Watts and 70-year-old Mihoko Matsuda Nelsen died in the crash.

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Judge: Idaho violated US Constitution with oil leases order

by Keith Ridler Associated Press Tuesday, August 14th 2018

Boise, Idaho (AP) — A federal judge has ruled that Idaho officials violated the U.S. Constitution by forcing several mineral rights owners to sell their natural gas and oil to a Texas company without giving them a meaningful way to fight the state’s decision.

The ruling Monday in U.S. District Court in Boise could have significant ramifications for a state-approved process intended to prevent a minority of mineral rights owners from stopping natural gas and oil production.

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Fire News:

August 19, 2018 Fire Update

link:
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Three firefighters injured on Rattlesnake Creek Fire

Feared high winds never arrived, aiding efforts

By Max Silverson for The Star-News August 16, 2018

Three people were injured this week on the Rattlesnake Creek Fire south of Riggins, while the Kiwah Fire in eastern Valley County crept closer to the area proposed for gold mining by Midas Gold Corp.

Two members of the Navajo Interagency Hotshot team received burns when a large snag fell on them while working near the end of their shift, Forest Service Public Information Officer Al Koss said.

… A total of 22 people had been injured as of Tuesday on the Rattlesnake Creek Fire, Koss said.

“Injuries vary from heat stroke to cuts, bruises and sprains to serious injuries such as snags falling on the hotshot members,” he said.

A third person working on the Rattlesnake Creek Fire was hospitalized in an incident on Monday unrelated to the accident involving the two hotshots, Koss said.

… Midas Gold may be forced to evacuate personnel at the Stibnite mine if the Kiwah Fire closes in, Midas Gold Inc. Vice President of Public Affairs Mckinsey Lyon said.

The fire is burning within the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness with minimal intervention from firefighters.

Firefighters will be used stop the fire’s spread and protect structures should it move closer to the Stibnite area, Payette National Forest Public Affairs Office Brian Harris said.

… Kiwah Fire

The Kiwah Fire had grown to an estimated 15,437 acres as of Wednesday in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness within the Indian Creek drainage.

The fire was ignited by a lightning strike on July 17 and has been largely allowed to play its natural role in the wilderness under Forest Service policies.

Currently 17 firefighters are assigned to the Kiwah Fire. On Tuesday the fire was active in the basin to the east of Battle Axe Mountain, the Forest Service said.

The Kiwah fire was burning about 3.5 miles from the Midas Gold operations on Tuesday, Lyon said.

“Under our current plan, if a fire reaches within 1.5 miles of . . . . potential evacuation routes, or if USFS Fire Crews advise, we have instructed our employees to leave the site,” she said.

Midas Gold has taken measures to protect buildings and equipment at the site and will rely on firefighters if the Kiwah fire approaches, Lyon said.

The site houses offices, a shed housing core drilling samples, employee housing, a solar power facility and a fuel storage area, Lyon said.

Most of Midas’ buildings on site are sided and roofed with metal, which makes them less likely to burn, she said.

The company’s operations on the site are minimal while it awaits an environmental review of its proposed gold and antimony mine in the area.

full story:
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Land, roads reopen in fire’s wake

Sharps Fire now 90 percent contained

Mark Dee August 17, 2018 IME

With closures lifting and the Sharps Fire 90 percent contained Thursday morning, crews continued to scale back efforts on the 64,853-acre burn.

The Southern Idaho Type 3 team, which marshals the 100 or so firefighters now assigned to the blaze, plans to hand over operations to a smaller, local unit on Saturday morning, according to the U.S. Forest Service.

Their main task will be to monitor the burnout and rehab land upended during suppression, including removing berms and repairing bulldozed fire lines—just the first steps in a long process of restoring the burnout, almost three weeks after the fire was first sparked east of Bellevue.

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Mining News:

Full Midas Press Release – Kiwah Fire

As of August 14, the Kiwah fire was burning approximately 3.5 miles from our project location.

Our first concern is the safety of all employees, contractors and other visitors to site. We have watched the situation closely and cannot thank the USFS fire crews enough for their assistance, clear and consistent communication and their dedication to keeping everyone safe.

Our current standard operating procedure for evacuating the camp in the event of a wildfire is based on the limited size crew and personal property at site. We are currently operating under the terms of our emergency fire response and evacuation plan and in the future, when we are in construction and operations, we will further develop this plan to comply with company and Mining Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) requirements (PRO 8-27) for expanded personnel and activities on site.

Under our current plan, if a fire reaches within 1.5 miles of Stibnite, the Yellow Pine Stibnite road, Profile Creek Jct. or Monumental Summit, which are potential evacuation routes, or if USFS Fire Crews advise, we have instructed our employees to leave the site. The fire did get close to this boundary over the weekend but the fire has since moved to the north east and away from our site.

1. What buildings, equipment, supplies, etc. are in place at the site that could be in harm’s way?

a. Current infrastructure at the site includes our offices, core shed, employee housing, solar power facility, fuel storage area and laydown yards.

b. Most of Midas’ buildings on site are sided and roofed with metal which makes them less likely to be impacted by fire.

c. We also have vehicles and machinery up at site that we use in our day-to-day operations.

d. We’ve done as much as we can to reduce the likelihood any existing infrastructure will be in harm’s way. Over the years, the Forest Service has implemented wildland fire mitigation measures to trim and thin potential hazards around site. We have also implemented many preventative measures like thinning vegetation, keeping the site clear of debris and creating fire-safe perimeters around buildings located on private land.

e. A lot of the area surrounding the immediate site has been impacted by forest fires in the past. This means most of the land package held by Midas Gold has been impacted by forest fire so there is limited fuel left in the area to burn.

2. Is Midas Gold sending its own personnel and equipment to the area to implement protection and set up patrols? If so, how many people and what sort of equipment?

a. We have staff on site 24 hours a day. However, if the fire gets within the 1.5 mile boundary, we will leave the site. We are most concerned with keeping our team safe and letting the crews at the USFS do their job.

b. The current fire location and our project are within the USFS fire protection zone boundary. We are not allowed, or trained, to fight forest fires. The Forest Service has the training and the expertise to protect Stibnite.

c. Until a fire reaches the evacuation perimeter, and we have to leave, we will help firefighters in any way we can. We have large (2,000-3,000 gallon) water tanks placed near the infrastructure at site and in locations for fire crews to use, if needed. In the past and, if requested by the Forest Service, we can provide access to our water well and airstrip to facilitate the Forest Service activities.

d. Our fuel storage area is protected by multiple containments to make sure it is protected in situations like this. The fuel is stored in double walled containers which are placed in a cement enclosure with an impermeable liner. In addition, the cement enclosure is surrounded by an unvegetated buffer zone with cement knee walls to minimize risk of fire entering the area. As one final layer of protection, the water tank near the fuel storage area is equipped to spray a fine mist over the fuel storage area in case we need to leave the site.

3. Which resources are considered the most critical and would receive the highest level of protection?

a. The absolute most important resource at site is our team. Our employees and people at the site receive the highest level of protection, which is why we instruct our crews to not engage in fighting the fire.

b. This summer we have 2-17 staff members on site plus contractors who are working to complete special projects.

4. What kinds of protection will be implemented? Foam? Foil wraps? Sprinkler systems? All of the above?

a. As mentioned above, we’ve implemented many preventative measures like thinning vegetation, keeping the site clear of debris and creating fire-safe perimeters around buildings. The Forest Service would implement Point Protection measures at our facilities but the metal structures at Stibnite do not require wrapping or foaming.

b. At this stage in our operations, we will not deploy additional protections other than water tanks located next to our infrastructure.

5. Will Midas rely on fire managers to provide protection or will Midas supplement those methods as needed?

a. We have taken the preventative measures we feel are necessary to protect the existing infrastructure at the site. We will now rely on fire managers to provide protection in the case of a wildfire. In these extreme situations, everyone is safer when the trained experts can do their job without interference or interruption.

Mckinsey Lyon
Director of Public Affairs
Midas Gold Inc.
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Commission takes up bridge concerned in gold haul route

By Lorie Palmer August 14, 2018 Idaho County Free Press

Grangeville, ID — Concern for a bridge – mainly, for who would be liable for injuries and repairs if it failed under freight weight – is expected to hold up new Orogrande-area gold digs for a month or more while Idaho County researches road history details and prepares to enter an agreement that may involve residents and the company now leasing the old Friday Mine.

Following an Aug. 7 Idaho County Commission meeting, the Lewiston Tribune reported Wednesday morning, Aug. 8, that a project by Sweden-based Endomines could yield 75,000 ounces of gold while employing 10-plus workers for seven to 10 years.

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Lawsuit: Dredge mining done without permits in Idaho river

By Keith Ridler – 8/15/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — A conservation group has filed a federal lawsuit contending a miner in Idaho is ignoring environmental laws and encouraging unpermitted mining by other gold seekers.

In its citizen enforcement lawsuit filed Friday in U.S. District Court, the Idaho Conservation League contends that suction dredge mining by Shannon Poe of Concord, California, is violating the federal Clean Water Act on the South Fork of the Clearwater River.

… Federal and state agencies have repeatedly notified Poe of the violations, but Poe denies he is subject to the Clean Water Act, the lawsuit says. Poe didn’t respond to a phone message Wednesday.

full story:
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Public Lands:

BC-YP-SF August 23rd Meeting

This is just a reminder that the August meeting will be held at 10:00 am at the E.O.C in Cascade Thursday the 23rd next week.

Josie Greenwood
STEAM and Environmental Educator
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Appeals court ruling halts giant forest project in Idaho

By Keith Ridler – 8/16/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — A giant forest project in Idaho is on hold following a ruling by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

The decision Monday halts the 125-square-mile (325-square-kilometer) project on the Payette National Forest that includes commercial timber sales, work to improve fish passage, prescribed burning to reduce forest fire risks and the closing of some roads.

The Alliance for the Wild Rockies filed the lawsuit and appeal. It contends the project allows more logging of mature forests, which harms species that rely on old-growth. The group also said the project harms fish habitat for federally protected bull trout.

Other environmental groups backed the project.

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Portion of Long Gulch Road closed for bridge construction

Mountain Home, Idaho, Aug. 16, 2018 — The Boise National Forest is announcing that a portion of Long Gulch Road (Forest Road 213), located approximately 7 miles northwest of Prairie, will be closed while the bridge over Rattlesnake Creek is replaced.

The Mountain Home Highway District (MHHD) will enact the closure and begin construction on Aug. 20, with work expected to be completed before the Labor Day weekend. This portion of the road is managed and maintained by MHHD.

The existing timber bridge has exceeded its designed life and is being replaced with funding from the Forest Service, MHHD, and the Southwest Idaho Resource Advisory Committee. Once complete, the new structure will be wider and longer to better accommodate higher stream flows and trailer travel.

For more information contact the Mountain Home Highway District, 208-587-3211.
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Critter News:

Photos: Corgi Fest packs Ann Morrison Park with puppy love

Saturday Corgi Fest packed Ann Morrison Park with corgis from around Idaho. The event benefits Idaho Humane Society and Fuzzy Paws Rescue.

photo Gallery:
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Pet Talk – Prostate Cancer in Dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt August 17, 2018 IME

Prostate cancer is the development of a malignant tumor of the prostate. It occurs in both neutered and unneutered dogs. Although castration protects against most other prostatic diseases, it does not always prevent prostate cancer. Castration does not increase the risk of prostate cancer. The most common type of prostate cancer is called transitional cell carcinoma, which typically spreads from the bladder or urethra. Occasionally, other types of cancer can spread to the prostate (metastasis) from cancers in other organs of the body. The only way to distinguish the different types of cancer is to biopsy the dog’s prostate and send the biopsy samples to a veterinary pathologist.

Clinical signs occur as the tumor enlarges and presses on the urethra, the tube conveying urine from the bladder to the penis. Bloody urine, bloody or yellow discharges from the penis, straining to urinate and straining to defecate may all occur. If the tumor grows into the urethra, it can obstruct urine flow. Prostate cancer can spread to the backbone, leading to pain or difficulty at the rear legs while walking. An enlarged and irregular prostate can be detected by rectal palpitation, just like in humans.

Diagnostic tests are always performed. These include blood tests, urinalyses and abdominal X-rays. Chest X-rays may be indicated to search for metastases. Examination of tissue specimens is necessary to confirm the diagnosis. Cells are attained by needle aspiration of the prostate using ultrasound to guide the needle into the prostatic tumor. These cells are sent to a pathologist to confirm the diagnosis.

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MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter receives $530 grant

The Star-News August 16, 2018

MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter in McCall has received a $530 Petfinder Cat Enrichment Grant from the Petfinder Foundation.

The Cat Enrichment Grant program was awarded to Petfinder organizations by providing funds to purchase cat enrichment toys to stimulate their minds, making them more adoptable.

The Petfinder.com Foundation assists the 12,000+ animal shelters and rescue groups that post their adoptable pets on Petfinder.com

full story:
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Big Hole range rider tracks wolves toward middle ground

By Ted Mcdermott – 8/11/18 AP

Jackson, Mont. — Chet Robertson found the spot he was headed to on a recent morning by doing what he’s done six hours a day, July through September, for the last eight summers: following wolves.

The wolves that led Robertson here, to a little island made by the braiding of Miner Creek, on the west side of the Big Hole, had cornered some elk and wounded one of them.

“But they headed right down this trail here,” Robertson says, “so off I go.”

A range rider hired by the Big Hole Watershed Commission, a Divide-based conservation nonprofit, Robertson’s job is, at its core, profoundly simple.

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Famous Oregon wolf OR-7 sires 5th consecutive litter of pups

8/15/18 AP

Portland, Ore. — A wolf known as OR-7 that established the first gray wolf pack in western Oregon in six decades has sired at least one pup for his fifth consecutive year, wildlife biologists said Wednesday.

Three wolf pups were captured frolicking in front of a remote camera set up in southwest Oregon by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, said Amaroq Weiss, of the Center for Biological Diversity. The footage was recorded in early July and released this week.

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Togo wolf pack responsible for killing cattle

8/14/18 AP

Spokane, Wash. — Members of the Togo wolf pack in the Colville National Forest of eastern Washington state killed one cow and injured another last week.

The state Department of Fish and Wildlife says the Togo pack is responsible for five depredations in the past 10 months, including two last November and one in May.

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Fish and Game set traps to catch young grizzly bear roaming around N. Idaho homes

Idaho Fish and Game officials said they received several calls about the bear raiding chicken coops near Athol.

Taylor Viydo KTVB August 15, 2018

Athol, Id. — The race is on to catch a young grizzly bear spotted near some homes in Kootenai County.

Idaho Fish and Game officials said they received several calls about the bear raiding chicken coops near Athol.

As of Tuesday, Fish and Game has just one trap in this area to get a hold of the two-and-a-half-year-old grizzly.

continued:

Idaho wildlife officials relocate chicken-chasing grizzly

8/17/18 AP

Athol, Id. — Wildlife officials in northern Idaho have trapped and relocated a young grizzly bear that was reportedly raiding chicken coops and damaging sprinkler heads near the small town of Athol.

Idaho Department of Fish and Game regional conservation officer Craig Walker told the Coeur d’Alene Press that the bear was seen roaming for five days between Chilco and Athol. After the grizzly was spotted digging up a dead goat that had been recently buried in a field, authorities brought in a trap and used a chunk of the goat as bait.

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Health officials: Boise County bat tests positive for rabies

Steve Bertel Aug 16, 2018 KIVI TV

Boise – A bat found in Boise County has tested positive for rabies, making it the second rabid bat discovered in Idaho this season, health officials said.

“The bat was found inside a Boise County home where it had potential contact with a dog. The dog was current on its rabies vaccine. Those who were staying at the home are being assessed for potential exposure,” said Central District Health Department spokesperson Christine Myron.

… “It’s important that people have their pets vaccinated to protect them in case they interact with a rabid bat or other wild animal. It’s also important for parents to talk to their kids about not touching wild animals.”

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Boaters urged to avoid Chinook salmon spawning nests

Steve Bertel Aug 14, 2018 KIVI TV

Stanley, Idaho – Starting Wednesday, Aug. 15, all boaters on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River will be urged to steer clear of Chinook salmon spawning nests — known as redds — as they navigate the 100-mile-long National Wild and Scenic River in the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness.

“The Chinook spawning season on the main-stem Middle Fork occurs for a month, from August 15 to September 15. The Middle Fork Ranger District will mark key salmon spawning areas, so boaters know which areas to avoid,” said Steve Stuebner, spokesman for the Middle Fork Outfitters Association.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
August 17, 2018
Issue No. 882
Table of Contents

* Report Summarizes Tribes’ Work, Results From 10 Years Of Columbia River Fish Accords
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441301.aspx

* Willamette Falls Sea Lion Task Force Meets Three Days Next Week To Review Lethal Removal Request
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441299.aspx

* Deadline Extended For Amendments To Columbia River Basin Fish And Wildlife Program
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441298.aspx

* BPA Briefs NW Power/Conservation Council On The Spring Spill Surcharge Numbers
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441297.aspx

* Commercial Fishing For Columbia River Fall Chinook To Open For Treaty, Non-Treaty Gillnetters
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441296.aspx

* Council Gets Update On BPA Efforts To Reduce Funding For Fish/Wildlife Program Projects
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441295.aspx

* WDFW Restricts Fisheries On Columbia River, Two Tributaries To Support Steelhead Run
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441294.aspx

* Council Approves Letter Inviting Nominees To Regional Science Review Panels, Approves Members
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441293.aspx

* Lawsuit Filed Calling For Expanding, Revising Critical Habitat For Southern Resident Killer Whales
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441292.aspx

* Study Suggests Young Salmon May Leap To Remove Parasitic Sea Lice
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441291.aspx

* Basin Climate Outlook: Continued Hot, Dry Weather Expected For Coming Months, With More Wildfire Potential
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441290.aspx

* WDFW Seeking Public Comment On Draft Blue Mountains Elk Herd Plan
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441289.aspx
——————————–

Fish & Game News:

New rules in effect to prevent chronic wasting disease from entering Idaho

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Tuesday, August 14, 2018

The disease has never been found in Idaho, but is in neighboring states

At its July 26 meeting in Idaho Falls, Fish and Game Commission approved several new rules to prevent chronic wasting disease from entering Idaho, or managing the disease if it ever is found in Idaho.

continued w/new rules:
— — — — — — — — — —

Hunters should check for wildfires in their hunting areas before their trips

Large wildfires are burning in Central and North Idaho and there are land closures

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Friday, August 17, 2018

Hunters planning their first trips want to pay close attention to fire closures and be prepared to alter their plans if necessary.

Large fires are currently burning in Central and North Idaho and are likely to be burning when archery season opens at the end of August. Fires have created large closure areas that will temporarily curb hunters’ access to some areas. To see current area closures and fire boundaries go to Fish and Game’s Idaho Fire Map.

Boundaries change as summer progresses and we get into fall, but it’s important that hunters know fire closures often extend far beyond the boundaries of the active fires.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Warm weather hunters can avoid meat spoilage with extra preparation

Cooling meat immediately is critical during hot weather

By Mike Demick, Conservation Information Supervisor
Friday, August 17, 2018

Idaho’s big game early season hunts have started and hunters are already heading to the woods to take advantage of what looks to be a great season. While these early hunts have some advantages, hunting during warm weather requires extra preparation and special care to prevent spoiling of game meat.

Plan Ahead

Besides packing your gear, you should always have a plan before you leave home for handling the meat should the hunt be successful. Knowing how to quickly get the animal out of the woods and where to take the meat are questions every early season hunter should ask themselves.

“With daytime temperatures reaching the 80-90’s, you don’t have time to look for friends to help or call around to multiple cold storage facilities,” says David Silcock, Idaho Fish and Game Regional Conservation Officer based in Salmon. “Always know in advance who can help and where you can take the meat to cool and store it.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Cooling off on a hot day


— — — — — — — — — —

Firefighters battling California wildfires care for dehydrated fawn

Zac Self Aug 13, 2018 KIVI TV

Firefighters battling the Holy Fire in Southern California took care of a dehydrated fawn Monday afternoon.

Officials with the Cleveland National Forest tweeted that the firefighters stumbled upon the fawn and discovered she was heat exhausted and dehydrated.

The men can be seen in a photo giving the fawn a much-needed drink of water before helping get her back on her feet.

source w/more photos:
————————-

Seasonal Humor:

SummerTea-a
————————–

Aug 12, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Aug 12, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
August 15 Fields b-day at the Tavern 4pm-7pm, bring snacks
September 2 public meeting at the Big Creek Ranger Station re: Big Creek Hazardous Fuel Reduction
September 8 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Budget Hearing
September 8 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting

(details below)
———-

Village News:

Kiwah Fire

The Kiwah fire is burning east of Yellow Pine in the Wilderness in the Indian Creek drainage.

8/11 PM update: The Meadow Creek Road above Stibnite has an emergency closure as the Kiwah Fire has bumped the road above Indian Creek. No other closures are in effect at this time. The road is open to Thunder Mountain, but members of the public are asked to limit traffic on the road as firefighters are working along the road and in Thunder Mountain. A future closure of the Thunder Mountain area may be necessary depending on the impact of an expected high level of fire activity today. Helicopters are assisting firefighters with water bucket drops throughout the north side of the fire.

Smoke plume visible from Yellow Pine Thursday and Friday.

P1000420-20180810Smoke
Friday Aug 10th around 7pm.

20180812KiwahFireMODIS-a
Sunday’s thermal map (8/12)
— — — —

Ice Hole Campground

BNF Aug 3, 3018

The Cascade Ranger District will temporarily close Ice Hole Campground for reconstruction beginning Monday, Aug. 6, 2018.

The Campground will remain closed for the remainder of the 2018 season. Project funding was provided by local Tribes and a State RV Grant.

Forest Service crews and contractors will repair existing resource damage, enabling visitors to have an improved recreational experience in the future.

link to project
https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49637

Letter to Share

I looked at the plans today at the Ice Hole. They looked OK to me. 2 large double spots for trailers. I think 4 spots for single trailers. A large parking area for swimmers. Yes there is a fence but it is only 18 inches high. This is to keep 4-wheelers from going in the creek. The only objection I see is a gate at both ends that will be closed at end of season. I asked when that would be and they said when the snow flies. I feel we need to send letters to Jake Strohmeyer [jstrohmeyer@fs.fed.us] explaining that we still have hunters in after the snow flies and this is a good place for snow mobiliers to catch fresh snow when the road is icy. Also we have seen folks snow camping there.

– VH 8/6/2018
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not dump household appliances at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

However, there is a burn pile for woody debris only. “Bring it, Don’t Burn it.”
— — — —

Good News!

The orphan twin fawns have been “adopted” by the other mother doe that also had twins. Mother and both sets of twins were seen together in a little herd and doing well.
— — — —

Pests

Lots of mosquitoes and no-see-ums this year, long-legged wasps are out, grasshoppers are over an inch long. Be “Bear Aware” – Remember to secure your trash.
———-

Local Events:

August 15th B-Day Party

70+70=140 You are invited to Joel and Marj Fields joint birthday on Wednesday, August 15th from 4-7 at the Tavern. The drinks are on us! Snacks are welcome, no gifts please. – MF
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

July 24th Yellow Pine water update:

It is good to go back to the even/odd watering schedule. Even/odd means if your address is 315 Yellow Pine Avenue, you can water on odd days such as the 1st, 3rd, 5th etc. And if your address is 316, water in even numbered days. The only request is that watering be done between 6 am and 1 PM. Also please limit to one sprinkler at a time.

Also it is requested that no lawn watering be done August 1st through the 6th to be able to withstand the draw from Harmonica.

Our second sand filter will be on line soon and give us more capacity. Thank you everyone for your patience during the high water demand time. – SH

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7 at 3pm in the Community Hall, no minutes yet.
— — — —

VYPA News:

VYPA Summer Meeting Schedule:

There was a VYPA meeting August 11th at the Community Hall, minutes to follow.

Next Meeting:
September 8, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
— — — —

YPFD News:

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911@ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Next meeting:

YP Fire Budget Hearing: September 8, 2018 – 10am Community Hall

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

A lot of progress has been made on the new Helipad near the crossroads.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

– Fire Chief Jeff

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Now open for summer (208) 633-3377
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern

Summer Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine.
— — — —

The Corner 633-3325

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Aug 6) overnight low of 43 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning, light haze of smoke and a little bit of dew. A few finches and pine siskins, a red-breasted nuthatch and a juvenile jay visiting. A few more campers leaving. Thick layer of dust on everything, the forest is crunchy dry. Clouds and a little smoke moving in early afternoon, hot and light breezes, high of 89 degrees. Most of the campers had cleared out before 2pm in our neck of the woods. Water pressure is good this evening, clear sky at dusk.

Tuesday (Aug 7) overnight low of 49 degrees, clear sky with haze of dust and smoke. Sounds like heavy equipment over on the south end of the Stibnite Road. A couple of finches, pine-siskins, a red-breasted nuthatch and several hummingbirds visiting. Honey Dippers picking up the potties at noon. Little Downy woodpecker visiting after lunch. Increasing haze, Yellow AQ and hot breezes under cloudless sky by early afternoon, high of 92 degrees. Not many birds around this afternoon, hot and dry. Slowly cooling off after sundown and quiet.

Wednesday (Aug 8) overnight low of 46 degrees, clear sky with high haze of smoke. Gravel trucks running from the pit up Johnson Creek road. Low flying airplane over the village around 910am. A few finches and pine siskins and a pine squirrel visiting this morning. Increasing smoke (Yellow AQ) by 11am. Red-breasted nuthatches and a female hairy woodpecker at the feeders, red-shafted flicker on the power pole, and a long legged robin looking for bugs before lunch time. By early afternoon it was pretty hot, with hot light breezes, high of 96 degrees and the sky was nearly white with high level smoke. Shots fired at 840pm.

Thursday (Aug 9) overnight low of 48 degrees, clear sky and smoky. Red-breasted nuthatches, 2 juvenile jays, pine siskins and a couple of finches visiting. Bumper crop of chipmunks out and about. At 940am clanking and screeching up towards the village, heavy equipment? Water pressure dropping by 945am. A couple of white-breasted nuthatches visited before lunch. Gravel trucks running from the pit out Johnson Creek. Low water pressure at 2pm. Pretty hot by early afternoon, no clouds – sky covered in moderately thick haze of smoke, light hot breezes. Very hot late afternoon, high of 101 degrees, hot breezes, can smell the smoke in the air. Moderate water pressure at 830pm. Very smoky sky after sundown, the smoke was shaped like clouds, thicker along the river. The weather (visible) satellite map showed a big plume rising from the Kiwah fire this afternoon. Mars was very bright and very red rising above Antimony ridge. Water pressure still rather low at 10pm.

Friday (Aug 10) overnight low of 51 degrees, no clouds, hazy smoky sky, Yellow AQ. A few finches and pine siskins visiting. Fairly low water pressure by 930am. Streets are VERY dusty. Really hot by early afternoon, high of 103 degrees, breezy and smoky, small smoke plume visible to the east (Kiwah fire) overall haze and Yellow AQ. Better water pressure early afternoon. By late afternoon could see a huge smoke plume to the east (Kiwah fire). A couple of hummingbirds this evening. Better water pressure by sundown. Slow to cool off, still 80F at 9pm, clear sky, smoke plume to the east is subsiding.

Saturday (Aug 11) overnight low of 52 degrees, partly cloudy over haze of smoke, Yellow AQ, light breeze. Not many birds around but lots of chipmunks. Decent water pressure mid-day. A few finches and several pine siskins visited for lunch (and lots of chipmunks.) Hot and appears to be mostly cloudy above the smoke early afternoon, light variable breezes. A couple of pine skiskins, a finch and a hummingbird visiting early afternoon. Hot and gusty winds this afternoon, high of 97 degrees. By evening the clouds were gone, but high haze of smoke and thicker smoke along the river (no plumes.) Shooting to the west in the forest after 8pm. Slow to cool off after sunset.

Sunday (Aug 12) overnight low of 50 degrees, clear sky above smoky haze, Yellow AQ, very dry. A few pine siskins and red-breasted nuthatches, lots of chipmunks. Sunny warm morning, getting breezy by mid-day. Not much traffic but kicking up a lot of dust. A few finches and a hummingbird joined the pine siskins for lunch. Breezy, clear sky early afternoon, better air quality (nudged into the “Green” zone.) A female hairy woodpecker stopped by for a bit of suet cake. Sunny and hot afternoon, high of 91 degrees. Neighborhood streets are very dusty. Clear sky and slight haze of smoke after sundown, and cooling off.
————————-

RIP:

Eugene Battles

Battles, Eugene, 81, of Cascade, died Saturday, August 4, 2018 at a local care center. Arrangements are under the direction of Accent Funeral Home and Cremation, Meridian. 208-888-5833. http://www.AccentFuneral.com.

source: Idaho Statesman August 7, 2018
——————–

Letter to Share:

Commissioner Cruickshank’s July Newsletter

August 8, 2018

From the Desk of Commissioner Cruickshank

Monday July 2nd
Commissioner Day today. Please see the minutes of this meeting once approved on the Valley County website at Valley County Idaho Official Site by clicking on the commissioners section and then find the minutes.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Also today was a Board of Equalization meeting where we heard from several folks concerning their Market Value Assessments for this year.

Monday July 9th
Another Commissioner meeting day. Minutes are posted on the Valley County website once approved.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday July 10th
I flew to Davidson County (Nashville), Tennessee to attend the National Association of Counties (NACo) Annual Conference.

Thursday July 12th
I attended a NACo Ambassadors meeting

Friday July 13th
In the morning I attended the NACo Transportation Committee meetings. This afternoon I attended the NACo Executive Board Meeting as I represent the 15 Western States as the NACo West Region Representative on the Executive Board. Late afternoon I attended a Policy Meeting to listen in on proposed Resolutions to be heard during the conference.
Tonight I attended a NACo Past President’s Dinner.

Saturday July 14th
My morning started with attending a Legislative Update session where NACo Staff spoke on pending and past legislation passed by congress.
My next meeting this morning was attending the NACo Rural Action Caucus. This afternoon I attended the NACo Western Interstate Region Board of Directors meeting. Late afternoon the NACo Board Forum was held which I attended. Tonight was the NACo Board of Directors Reception held at Woolworth’s in downtown Nashville. I also stopped by the NACo President’s Leadership Reception held at the hotel.

Sunday July 15th
This morning started with a Breakfast where many of the smaller Western States get together for networking and discussing voting on leadership positions at this conference.
I then attended the NACo Board of Directors meeting.
Next was a Luncheon for the NACo Achievement Awards where counties are recognized for specific new ideas they have done to assist others.
Tonight I attended a National Conference of Republican County Officials held at the Wildhorse Saloon and then attended the NACo Rural Action Caucus Reception held at a refurbished Feed and Grain facility in downtown Nashville.

Monday July 16th
This morning I attended another Policy meeting to see final resolutions before being voted on by the membership.
Next was the NACo General Session where we voted on Resolutions and Elected the NACo 2nd Vice President from Boone County, Kentucky. Then I facilitated the NACo West Region Caucus meeting where we discussed Wildfire Awareness and other disasters and how to prepare. This afternoon was a General Session where Marian Wright Edelman spoke on her Children’s Defense Fund and Songwriters Tom Douglas, Natalie Harvey and Tim Nichols spoke on what inspires their songwriting.
I then attended the NACo New Board of Directors Organizational meeting for the upcoming year.
Tonight was the NACo Closing Celebration Event held at the Grand Ole Opry House.

Tuesday July 17th
I flew home from Tennessee.

Monday July 23rd
Commissioner day today. Please see the Valley County website for minutes of this meeting.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Friday July 27th
I participated in a NACo Executive Board conference call.

Monday July 30th
Commissioner Day. Please see the Valley County website for minutes of this meeting once approved in a future commissioners meeting.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday July 31st
I attended a fire meeting in Adams County to learn more about the Mesa Fire which has the potential to move into Valley County. With many fires in the region we are now living with smoke everyday.

Well the hot summer days are here and no relief in sight for a week or so.

Thanks for reading the news of my work.

Gordon
——————————-

Idaho News:

Visitors seek out unique experience of Yellow Pine music festival

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News August 9, 2018

Tammy Davidson and her daughter, Kathryn, traveled nearly 2,000 miles to search for the spirit of Idaho before finding it in Yellow Pine at the 29th annual Harmonica Festival last weekend.

We wanted to try to find small-town USA and we feel we’ve come to the place,” said Tammy, 55, of Leesburg, Va.

The Great Harmonica Huff n’ Puff Race on Saturday morning checked off Tammy’s 48th state and Kathryn’s 33rd in their quest to run a race in all 50 states that embodies each state’s culture.

The three-day festival offered the genuine Idaho experience the pair had hoped for as street vendors sold elk burgers, cowboy hats, cigar box guitars and more to hundreds of enthusiastic festival-goers.

The sounds of musicians ripping on fiddles and pouring their souls into spirited harmonica solos could be heard all over the village and amplified each night after the sun went down.

continued:
https://www.mccallstarnews.com/
— — — — — — — — — —

Pioneer Picnic in Roseberry Aug. 19 to feature Willey family

The Star-News August 9, 2018

This year’s Long Valley Pioneer Picnic to be held Sunday, Aug. 20, at Historic Roseberry, located one mile east of Donnelly.

The festivities will begin at 11 a.m. at The Barn at Roseberry with registration and conversation. Those attending should bring a dish to share and their own table service.

The afternoon will feature a presentation from the Willey family. Live music will be provided by Mountain Fever, also known as Jon and Bonnie Glick.

Those attending are invited to help update the museum’s photo archives by bringing their old family photos to be scanned or donated.

Picnic attendees are also invited to bring copies of written family stories from the early days of Long Valley to add to the museum’s family history archives.

For questions, write to Lucy Chronic at lmchronic @ gmail.com

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Homedale woman hurt in when motorcycle runs off Idaho 55

The Star-News August 9, 2018

A Homedale woman remained hospitalized on Wednesday after she was injured last week in a motorcycle accident on Idaho 55 north of Donnelly, the Valley County Sheriff’s Office said.

Colleen Durbin, 48, of Homedale, was listed in stable condition Wednesday at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, a hospital spokesperson said.

Durbin was a passenger on a motorcycle driven by Jimmy L. Anderson, 41, of Caldwell when it slid off the road and into a ditch about two miles north of Donnelly about 1:55 p.m. last Thursday, the sheriff’s office said.

Anderson told investigators that he was heading north when he saw the vehicle in front of him slow and stop rapidly in an area marked as a utility construction zone.

Anderson tried to slow down but veered toward the ditch when he realized he could not avoid hitting the vehicle, the sheriff’s office said.

Both Anderson and Durbin were thrown from the bike but Anderson suffered minor injuries. Durbin was taken by ambulance to St. Luke’s McCall and transferred to St. Al’s via air ambulance.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Family of missing Grangeville woman offers reward for info

Nearly four months have passed since Shawnta LaRae Pankey vanished.

KTVB August 7, 2018

Idaho County — Nearly four months have passed since Shawnta LaRae Pankey vanished.

Despite extensive searches and investigation by the Idaho County Sheriff’s Office, officials have found no trace of the missing Grangeville woman.

On Tuesday, Pankey’s family announced a $3,500 reward for information that could lead them to the 25-year-old, or to her body.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Man rescued from under his pickup after several days in a ravine

August 7, 2018 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – A 21-year-old man who had been missing for several days was rescued from his overturned pickup in the vicinity of Taylor Mountain Road and Henry Creek Road Monday night.

Someone who was actively searching for him discovered the three-quarter ton white pickup about one-half mile off Canyon Road, about 20 minutes southeast of Idaho Falls.

When firefighters and law enforcement arrived, they found the vehicle had rolled down a ravine and landed on its top in a small, narrow creek bed, according to the Bonneville County Sheriff’s Office. The man had been ejected and was pinned under the vehicle. Part of his body was in the water.

continued:

Man trapped under truck for several days talks about how he survived

By Tristan Lewis August 10, 2018 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The young man who had been missing for several days and found alive beneath an overturned truck in the foothills of Bonneville County this week talks about how he survived.

Joesph “Joe” Rightmire, 21, of Idaho Falls was found Monday night near Taylor Mountain Creek and Henry Creek Road and has been at Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center since.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

West Nile Virus found in Ada County mosquito trap

KIVI TV Aug 7, 2018

Ada County – Mosquitoes trapped in Ada County have tested positive for West Nile Virus, according to the Ada County Mosquito Abatement District.

The officials have confirmed the West Nile virus in mosquitoes for the first time in Ada County this year.

Two pools of mosquitoes tested positive for the virus came from mosquitoes trapped in Garden City near the cross streets of W. Riverside Drive and Lakemont Lane, and in East Boise near the cross streets of Bown Crossing and Parkcenter Way.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

West Nile Virus pool confirmed in Bingham County

August 9, 2018 Local News 8

Pocatello, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Southeastern Idaho Public Health (SEIPH) has confirmed a second West Nile Virus (WNV) positive mosquito pool.

The pool was located in Bingham County. The first was located in Power County earlier this summer. One human WNV case has been reported earlier this month in Canyon County.

West Nile is a potentially serious illness that is usually spread to animals and humans through the bite of an infected mosquito.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Curtailment orders face some eastern Idaho irrigators

August 8, 2018 Local News 8

Boise, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – 36 water users have been ordered to stop diverting groundwater from the Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer.

The Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR) issued the order, dated July 31, instructing watermasters to shut off diversions from those groundwater wells by the beginning of the 2018 irrigation season.

continued:
—————————-

Fire News:

Today’s fire report (8/12) was a bit sketchy due to InciWeb being down all morning.

link:
— — — — — — — — — —

Rupert man accused of starting wildfire with flare gun at Craters of the Moon

KTVB August 7, 2018

Blaine County — A 41-year-old Rupert man is at the center of a criminal investigation after authorities say he started a wildfire using a flare gun at the Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve.

The Blaine County Sheriff’s Office said in a Facebook post on Tuesday that 41-year-old Daniel C. Jones started the fire on Saturday near the Idaho monument’s Bear Trap Lava Tube.

A BLM fire investigator told deputies that Jones had been target shooting in the area with family members when he began using firing flares from a “flare launcher.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Grassy Ridge assistance programs to be outlined

August 8, 2018 Local News 8

Dubois, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – There may be programs available to help farmers and ranchers impacted by the Grassy Ridge Fire near Dubois.

Representatives from several agencies have called a public meeting to discuss federally funded programs and other available assistance. The federally funded programs are aimed at helping producers who have experienced livestock and grazing losses, conservation structures, and fences destroyed or damaged by the fire.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wildfire damages one structure, threatens others in Hells Canyon

A wildfire burning in Hells Canyon has destroyed one structure and is threatening others. One resident said the destroyed structure is an iconic spot in the area.

KTVB August 10, 2018

Nez Perce County, Idaho — A wildfire burning in Hells Canyon along the Snake River in Idaho has destroyed one structure and is threatening others, officials said.

Idaho Department of Lands fire crews are on scene fighting the fire.

Authorities said the fire has burned 400 acres of grass and is growing.

Evacuations are in effect for people living along the Idaho side of the Snake River from Corral Creek to Dough Creek. Zaza Road is closed at the intersection of Zaza Road and Deer Creek.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Researchers studying the chemistry of wildfire smoke first-hand

Researchers from across the country are in Boise to study smoke from wildfires by flying aircraft into the smoke and measuring it in real time.

KTVB August 11, 2018

The largest, most comprehensive attempt at measuring and analyzing smoke from wildfires is happening in Boise.

A multi-agency, multi-disciplinary team is studying the wildfire smoke by flying two aircraft into it, then measuring the smoke in real time.

The project is called the “Western Wildfire Experiment For Cloud Chemistry, Aerosol Absorption And Nitrogen” (WE-CAN).

continued:
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Forest Service to Introduce White Cards for Emergency Medical Responders

Article by Rae Brooks August 11, 2018

Carey, Idaho — All firefighters are issued red cards. Before too long, some of them will carry white cards, too.

A National Emergency Medical Services program that will eventually be recognized across the U.S. Forest Service is set to be introduced in select areas of the country as early as this fall.

Currently, Forest Service firefighters trained as Emergency Medical Technicians can’t legally treat their fellow crew members, when they leave the state in which they are licensed because of the diversity of licensing standards across states.

“If you have a license in Idaho, and you have a fire in Utah or Montana, technically you can’t legally provide care [to your crew mates] because you don’t have a license in those states,” said Kaili McCray, medical unit leader at the Sharps Fire.

Similarly, if Forest Service employees with state-specific EMT qualifications move to new jobs in other parts of the country, their qualifications don’t travel with them. To add to the problem, different Forests also have different training and qualification standards for emergency medical responders.

After studying various options, the Forest Service opted to adopt a long-established National Parks Service program. Three decades ago, the NPS decided that, to be ready to provide emergency medical aid to staff and vacationers in parks throughout the country, it needed to develop a single EMS standard, so its career-mobile employees could render aid in any park.

NPS chose the standard of the national agency that certifies training and testing of emergency medical responders. The National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians solved the problem of inter-state recognition by considering the NPS as a separate state. Other states reciprocally recognize the credentials of emergency responders from this “51st state.” Parks employees are certified to provide assistance within park borders anywhere in the country.

Two people leading the implementation of the Forest Service EMS program visited the Sharps Fire last week. Jennifer Symonds, the Forest Service’s first and only physician, was involved with the creation of the program, which Vivian Chen will manage.

Symonds and Chen received a briefing and toured the medical unit at the incident command post in Carey, then visited EMTs working on the fire line.

After a limited roll-out this fall, the EMS program is expected to be implemented across the country within the next couple of years, said Symonds, a member of the Fire and Aviation Management staff at the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise. Initial EMS training will continue to be provided through local courses, with local medical advisors helping with yearly refreshers and skills evaluation.

Forest Service EMT-qualified employees will then be issued “white cards,” documenting their qualifications to provide aid in any state while working. White-card holders will have to update their qualifications annually with continuing-education credits and fulfill other requirements.

“It’s a big deal [to firefighters] that the Forest Service is developing a national EMS program,” said McCray, the Sharps Fire medical unit leader. “We are national resources. A program like this will improve our ability to take care of ourselves when responding to fires in any state.”

source: Idaho Fire Info (FB)
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USFS Regional Intermountain Wildfire Newsletter

August 9, 2018

If you enjoy fresh air and clear skies it is probably no surprise to you that its fire season here in the west. When asked where all the smoke is coming from, the answer is everywhere and the end of fire season is not in the near future according to the predictive services office.

We are at a Preparedness Level 5 Nationally and in the Great Basin. This means there is still high possibilities of wildland fire occurring and the resources we have are heavily committed to fires already. The Geographic Area’s Coordination Center is working with the National Interagency Coordination Center prioritizing resources as they become available into the system.

There are about 2,700 people assigned to fires in the Great Basin and Nationally about 27,500 people are assigned. We are tracking about 41 fires in the Great Basin and about a dozen of them are high priority for resource allocation. You can see the priority order of our fires every morning in the National Incident Management Situation Report. https://www.nifc.gov/nicc/sitreprt.pdf

link to newsletter:
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Public Lands:

BC-YP-SR July Meeting Minutes DRAFT

Here are the draft meeting minutes from our July meeting. I also attached the USGS and EPA presentations.

BCYPSR July Meeting Notes Draft .docx

EPA Report to Collaborative July 26 2018.pdf

USGS Presentation.pdf
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Tussock caterpillars may cause skin irritation

Boise, Idaho, Aug. 7, 2018 — The Boise National Forest is reporting an outbreak of the Douglas-fir tussock moths in and around Sage Hen Reservoir, a popular recreation area located 5 miles west of Smiths Ferry. Currently in the Caterpillar stage of their life cycle, they have long bristly hairs that may cause allergic-like reactions for some individuals if touched.

“It’s unfortunate that the tussock moth outbreak in occurring in areas frequented by the recreating public” said Emmett District Ranger Richard Newton. “While the Sage Hen area is being hit, we have received a few other reports of moths scattered across the Boise National Forest.”

The caterpillars are expected to be present around the area for another three weeks.

The moth, which is native to western North America, feeds on the needles of fir trees and can cause substantial defoliation throughout a stand that may result in trees dying. Population outbreaks usually happen on a 3-4 year cycle.

For information regarding Caterpillar stings, go to https://www.poison.org/articles/2014-jun/caterpillar-stings
— —

Spotted Tussock Moth

Lophocampa maculata

Observed in County(s)
Boise
Bonner
Bonneville
Cassia
Clearwater
Franklin
Idaho
Kootenai
Latah
Lewis
Madison
Nez Perce
Shoshone
Twin Falls
Valley
Washington

source: Idaho F&G
— —

Don’t Touch! These little caterpillars roaming Idaho woods can leave nasty rash

by KBOI News Staff Friday, June 15th 2018

McCall, Idaho (KBOI) — Here’s a good (very good) example of looks can be deceiving.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is warning folks who venture out into the woods of Idaho, to avoid the Douglas-fir Tussock Moth caterpillars.

Officials say Idaho’s currently seeing an outbreak of the native species, which is typical every three to four years.

If you do happen to touch, people can experience itching, rashes, welts, blisters, watery eyes, runny noise, cough, and sometimes even shortness of breath, wheezing and chest tightness.

The USDA says huckleberry pickers, especially should wear long sleeved shirts and gloves.

source:
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Final plan for central Idaho wilderness area approved

By Keith Ridler – 8/10/18 AP


Photo: William Campbell / Getty Images

Boise, Idaho — A final management plan is in place for one of three new central Idaho wilderness areas.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service on Thursday signed the Jim McClure-Jerry Peak Wilderness Plan.

The plan covers 183 square miles (474 square kilometers) and is described by federal officials as a middle-ground plan when it comes to restrictions on human visitors and activities.

continued:
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Mining News:

Ask Midas: What Are Your Plans for Housing Employees?

July 25

Midas Gold Idaho wants to keep the community informed about the work we are doing at the Stibnite Gold Project site. The Ask Midas blog series gives the experts in our company a chance to answer some of the community’s most frequently asked questions and help clear up any misconceptions around the project.

It will take hundreds of employees to bring the Stibnite Gold Project to life. With so many different people needed on the project – from construction workers, to office staff, to miners – we’ve been asked where all of these folks might live. We’ve given a lot of thought to this question and I’m excited to share our plans with you.

What Are Your Plans for Housing Employees?

As a company, we’ve made a commitment to look to Idaho first for human resources and talent. This means we want to hire as many Idahoans for our project as possible. Given the number of employees we will need, there currently aren’t enough individuals living in the communities near our project to fill all of the positions we will have open. In addition, the two to three-hour drive one way from Cascade to site is too far for a safe daily commute. So, of course, housing is a huge concern for us and for communities near the site.

As proposed in our Plan of Restoration and Operations, we plan to build the Stibnite Lodge to house more than 500 employees up at site. The lodge will be very similar to a hotel. Our employees will have their own rooms, laundry and housekeeping services, gym facilities and access to food around the clock. Employees will be required to stay at the Stibnite Lodge during their shifts to minimize traffic on the road, decrease the risk of accidents, reduce dust from the gravel roads and have less impact on local road users. To further reduce the number of cars on the road, 90 percent of our employees will travel to and from the site by bus.

continued:
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Letter to Share:

News From the Pheasant Gamebird Foundation

August 8th 2018

The last of the baby pheasant chicks came from the incubator last Tuesday. The baby chick season is over and the larger poults are just now being released from the soft release pens. The soft release pens are holding pens that 3-4 week old chicks are put in, to develop more, as we like to keep the poults till they are 8 to 10 weeks old. At that time the poults are released to the outside habitat, where feed grain and water are provided. In just a few days the poults start moving out on their own and then they become a part of nature and the wild birds.

We now have 4 large release pens and we will be building more this summer and fall. We like these release pens to be about 25 feet wide and 50 to 100 feet long. This helps to have less contact with the pheasants and keeps them wild.

We will be having an email ready to send out to all the folks that they can sign up to become a member of the Gamebird Foundation. We know that all can’t raise chicks and poults, but it does cost money and becoming a member you can help in that way. Membership is $20.00 per year for a family membership.

The Gamebird Foundation and IDFG is starting to get things lined up for the rooster pheasant release on the youth Access Yes area for the fall hunt. Birds will be released on Friday evenings for the weekend hunting. Remember you must be signed up and registered to hunt. Last year some missed out as they were not registered and there was the limited amount of hunters already signed up.

You can get hold of me and I will walk you through the course. Jim Hagedorn 208-883-3423. Jhag1008@gmail.com Pheasants will be released before the Youth season starts.

We do need volunteers to help haul grain and bag grain. We need help to get ready for the fall, we need folks to turn rooster pheasants loose at the Access yes youth area. We will be building more soft release pens. More brooders for next year. Please get involved. Give me a call or email.

Jim Hagedorn
Executive Director
The Gamebird Foundation
thegamebirdfoundation.org
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Acute Colitis in Pets

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Aug 10, 2018 IME

Colitis is an inflammation of the colon. The colon is where dogs and cats store their stool before having a bowel movement.

The most common causes of acute colitis are dietary indiscretion (eating something that does not agree with the pet’s gastrointestinal tract) and bacterial infection from eating spoiled food. Some parasites of the gastrointestinal tract and certain drugs can also cause colitis. Stress, such as being put into a kennel or hospital, can also cause acute colitis.

The major clinical sign of colitis is diarrhea. There is also an increased urgency to defecate. The pet may be anxious, wanting to go outdoors frequently and even have accidents indoors. Often the animal tries to attempt to pass a bowel movement and unproductive straining may happen, which is often confused by owners as constipation. When diarrhea occurs, it is usually very soft to watery and often small amounts of blood and mucus can be noted. Some animals with severe colitis can become dehydrated and listless. Rarely, pets will vomit due to the severe pain of the colitis.

continued:
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FDA: Dog heart disease, grain-free dog food may be connected

Food usually contains peas, lentils, potatoes

August 8, 2018 Local News 8

Dogs on a “grain free” diet may be at risk for heart problems, the Food and Drug Administration said.

The condition, canine dilated cardiomyopathy, is more common in certain breeds, but it’s turning up in breeds that are not usually susceptible, the FDA said.

The agency did not name any brands, but said the ingredients in these foods include peas, lentils, other legumes, or potatoes.

Dogs with the disease develop an enlarged heart, which then struggles to function properly. They can develop congestive heart failure, which can be fatal.

Symptoms include lethargy, weight loss and, sometimes, a cough.

Some breeds of dog have a genetic predisposition, including great Danes, Newfoundlands, boxers, Doberman pinschers and St. Bernards.

source:
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Idaho Humane Society asking for help after 70 cats rescued from one place

The Idaho Humane Society hopes to know whether a judge will grant them custody to this week. At that point, they can start the adoption process for the 73 cats.

Author: Morgan Boydston MDT August 7, 2018

Boise — A sad case of animal cruelty landed more than 70 cats and kittens at the Idaho Humane Society.

The influx in mid-July is taxing the shelter and its resources. The Idaho Humane Society says the Ada County Prosecutor is handling the case, and they hope they’ll be awarded the cats.

After a few weeks of taking care of the rescued animals, the humane society hopes to know whether a judge will grant them custody this week. At that point, they can start the adoption process for the 73 cats.

continued:
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Beginning of August 2018
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Wolf Watch

7/26/18: Idaho depredations reach record high
(By Idaho Rangeland Resources Commission) With 61 confirmed wolf-livestock kills already documented in the state of Idaho from January to June 2018, federal authorities are expecting a busy summer after wolves killed seven sheep in three separate attacks in the Sawtooth National Recreation Area between July 9th and July 13th, officials said. In fact, 23 years after wolves were reintroduced to Idaho beginning in 1995, federal authorities responded to a record 113 different sheep and cattle ranches in the 2018 state fiscal year to perform necropsies on wolf-livestock kills, where livestock kills were confirmed, and 217 ranch properties to investigate wolf kills overall, officials said. Both of those numbers set records…..(Click on the link above for the complete story.)

7/26/18: Oregon’s depredation problem
(By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online!) Northeastern Oregon’s livestock losses to wolves are causing budget problems, according to a new article in High Country News. Reports of missing cattle have skyrocketed, even though the number of confirmed cattle kills hasn’t, according to HNC. Since compensation for depredations is supposed to increase acceptance of wolf presence, HNC questions whether there are better ways to “incentivize coexistence.” ….(Click on the link above for the complete story.)

7/17/18: Researcher safe after wolf encounter
(By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online!) In July, 2018, a seasonal U.S. Forest Service employee completing research surveys in the Okanogan Wenatchee National Forest encountered two adult gray wolves. The individual observed wolf tracks and heard yipping and barking for a period of time before the wolves approached. After unsuccessful attempts to scare the wolves away (including yelling, waving and deploying a can of bear spray in the direction of the wolves) the individual climbed a tree and used a radio to call for assistance. A Department of Natural Resources fire crew extracted the researcher in a helicopter dispatched through a multi-agency fire center in Colville. Wildlife officials believe the researcher had come close to a denning site….(Click on the link above for the complete story.)
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter August 9, 2018

Panel Roundtable: Canadian Gray Wolf Introduction into Yellowstone

Why do dingoes attack people, and how can we prevent it?

Rescue response delayed for woman treed by wolves in Okanogan Co.

Umatilla County OKs reimbursement for wolf costs

Wolves, coyotes and foxes roaming Trenton streets, councilman says

Newsletter August 10, 2018

Wolf encounters rare, but not unknown in Washington

Hydatid Cysts Found In Lungs of Elk

Analysis/Commentary: Cost of Wolves Calculable
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Food-conditioned black bear lethally removed from Island Park

August 10, 2018 Local News 8

Island Park, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Idaho Department of Fish and Game officials lethally removed a black bear on Bill’s Island in Island Park Thursday.

The bear had been spotted by residents for at least a couple of weeks, and officials say the bear could not be relocated because it had become severely habituated and food-conditioned as it repeatedly found improperly stored garbage and other attractants on the Island.

Officials say it was very comfortable near people and was spotted sleeping under porches, walking on decks and was active day and night.

IDFG reports habituated, food-conditioned bears pose much more of a threat to human safety than bears exhibiting typical bear behavior.

source:
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2 bull elk shot and left to waste

Reward offered for information leading to citation

Local News 8 August 07, 2018

Howe, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Idaho Fish and Game officials are looking for information regarding two bull elk shot and left to waste in unit 63 during the first week of August.

The elk were found less than 100 yards apart on Idaho National Laboratory property just east of Howe.

Officials say both elk died close to the road not far from where they were initially shot.

Anyone with information is asked to call the Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) hotline 1-800-632-5999.

A $300 reward per elk is available for information leading to a citation.

source:
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Fish kill in American Falls numbers in the hundreds

By Max Cohan August 07, 2018 Loal News 8

American Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Along the banks of the Snake River reservoirs, anglers are out making catches. But floating downstream are hundreds of dead fish, the result of a recent oxygen drop in the river.

“This time of year, the bottom part of the reservoir gets really low in oxygen and that started to impact the water that was coming into the dam and moving downstream, late last Thursday, early Friday morning,” David Tuescher of Idaho Fish & Game explained. “Oxygen levels in the water coming into the dam dropped from five milligrams per liter down to zero.”

Drops like this are naturally occurring and while this one resulted in the deaths of hundreds of fish, Tuescher says it could have been much worse.

continued:
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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
August 10, 2018
Issue No. 881
Table of Contents

* Legislation Streamlining Sea Lion Removal In Columbia River Basin Clears Senate Committee
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441259.aspx

* Judge Dismisses Deschutes River Case, Says PGE Not Violating Clean Water Certificate
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441258.aspx

* Hot Water Temperatures Prompt Oregon/Washington To Close Deschutes, Yakima River Mouths To Fishing
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441256.aspx

* River Managers Opt To Save Cool Dworshak Water For Upcoming Salmon/Steelhead Migration In Clearwater/Lower Snake
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441255.aspx

* Construction Expected To Begin Soon On New Walla Walla Hatchery To Produce Half-Million Salmon Smolts
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441254.aspx

* Scientists Review Yakama Nation Master Plan For Coho Salmon Reintroduction, Supplementation
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441253.aspx

* Corps Holding Public Meetings On Detroit Dam Temperature Control, Fish Passage
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441252.aspx

* Low Oxygen Levels Responsible For Fish Kill Below American Falls Dam On Snake River
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441251.aspx

* Agencies Prioritize West Coast Salmon Stocks For Southern Resident Killer Whale Recovery
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441250.aspx

* State Of The Climate Report: 2017 Was Third Warmest Year On Record
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441249.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

F&G to host Aug 18 field day for online hunter ed students

The Star-News August 9, 2018

The Idaho Fish and Game will conduct an Online/Home Study Hunter Education field day and course completion class on Saturday, Aug. 18, in McCall.

The class will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 18 at a location to be determined.

The field day is part of the online and independent home-study courses available for future hunters age 9 or older who may have difficulty fitting the regular course into their busy schedule.

Both courses are designed to allow students to do much of the course at their convenience and are ideal for busy students, shift workers, business travelers or students needing extra time to study.

The Aug. 18 course completion class will allow students to receive Idaho-specific training and be required to pass the written exam and field exercises required of all hunter education students.

Cost is $9.75. Apply online at Idaho Fish and Game website or contact the McCall Fish and Game Office at 208-634-8137 or kevin.primrose@idfg.idaho.gov

source:
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F&G seeks comments on proposal to extend check times for winter wolf snaring in two units

Rule would only apply to game management units 7 and 9, and only between Jan. 1 and Feb. 15

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Wednesday, August 8, 2018

The proposed rule would extend the time period by which any person must visit every snare placed for gray wolves to not exceed 192 hours (8 days) for that portion of Game Management Unit 7 including and upstream from the Gold Creek and Mosquito Creek drainages, and in Game Management Unit 9.

If approved, the proposed rule would only apply between Jan. 1 and Feb. 15. Snares are set with the intention of being quickly lethal to a captured wolf. The proposed rule would not apply to foothold traps.

Because of the limited winter access in these remote units, it is impractical for most trappers to run a trap line in compliance with the current 72-hour requirement. Because snares are typically lethal very quickly, the 72-hour check frequency is unnecessary. The Jan. 1 through Feb. 15 period is designed to reduce possible conflicts with other people using those areas.

If adopted by the Fish and Game Commission as a proposed rule, the rule must be upheld by the 2019 Legislature, and earliest it could take affect would be Jan. 1, 2020.

People wishing to comment on the proposal can do so on the public comment page.

source:
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Fish and Game provides option for fading licenses and tags

New printers and new paper are the source of fading Fish and Game licenses and tags.

By Vicky Osborn, Television/Radio Specialist
Tuesday, July 31, 2018

For hunters and anglers who are experiencing poorly printed licenses and fading tags, it is now possible to get a replacement tag or license free of charge.

Idaho Fish and Game is providing a couple ways for sportsmen and women to get new copies.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

From the Point of View of a Cat

This is my Man. I am not afraid of him. He is very strong, for he eats a great deal; he is an Eater of All Things. What are you eating? Give me some!

He is not beautiful, for he has no fur. No having enough saliva, he has to wash himself with water. He meows in a harsh voice and a great deal more than necessary. Sometimes in his sleep he purrs.

Let me out!

I don’t know how he has made himself Master; perhaps he has eaten something sublime.

He keeps my rooms clean for me.

In his paws he carries a sharp black claw and he scratches with it on white sheets of paper. That is the only game he plays. He sleeps at night instead of by day, he cannot see in the dark, he has no pleasures. He never thinks of blood, never dreams of hunting or fighting; he never sings songs of love.

Often at night when I can hear mysterious and magic voices, when I can see that the darkness is all alive, he sits at the table with his head bent and goes on and on, scratching with his black claw on the white papers. Don’t imagine that I am at all interested in you. I am only listening to the soft whispering of your claw. Sometimes the whispering is silent, the poor dull head does not know how to go on playing, and then I am sorry for him and I meow softly in sweet and sharp discord. Then my Man picks me up and buries his hot face in my fur. At those times he divines for an instant a glimpse of a higher life, and he sighs with happiness and purrs something which can almost be understood.

But don’t think that I am at all interested in you. You have warmed me, and now I will go out again and listen to the dark voices.

Translated by Dora Round; revised by the editor. Original published in Intimate Things, 1935.
— — — — — — — — — —

Santa Maria Times, 1931

PotShot-a
[h/t SMc]
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Seasonal Humor:

SummerHotFridge-a
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Aug 5, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Aug 5, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
August 6 YPFD Commissioners meeting 10am at the Community Hall
August 11 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
August 15 Fields b-day at the Tavern 4pm-7pm, bring snacks
September 2 public meeting at the Big Creek Ranger Station re: Big Creek Hazardous Fuel Reduction
September 8 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Budget Hearing
September 8 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting

(details below)
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Village News:

Ice Hole Campground

BNF Aug 3, 3018

The Cascade Ranger District will temporarily close Ice Hole Campground for reconstruction beginning Monday, Aug. 6, 2018.

The Campground will remain closed for the remainder of the 2018 season. Project funding was provided by local Tribes and a State RV Grant.

Forest Service crews and contractors will repair existing resource damage, enabling visitors to have an improved recreational experience in the future.
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Weekend Photos

P1000419-20180804Festus
Festus and his people came over from Challis

P1000418-20180804Deputies
Valley County Deputies on patrol

P1000417-20180804BNF
Boise National Forest signage
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not dump household appliances at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

However, there is a burn pile for woody debris only. “Bring it, Don’t Burn it.”
— — — —

Pests

Lots of mosquitoes and no-see-ums this year, long-legged wasps are out, grasshoppers are over an inch long. Be “Bear Aware” – Remember to secure your trash.
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Local Events:

August 15th B-Day Party

70+70=140 You are invited to Joel and Marj Fields joint birthday on Wednesday, August 15th from 4-7 at the Tavern. The drinks are on us! Snacks are welcome, no gifts please. – MF
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

July 24th Yellow Pine water update:

It is good to go back to the even/odd watering schedule. Even/odd means if your address is 315 Yellow Pine Avenue, you can water on odd days such as the 1st, 3rd, 5th etc. And if your address is 316, water in even numbered days. The only request is that watering be done between 6 am and 1 PM. Also please limit to one sprinkler at a time.

Also it is requested that no lawn watering be done August 1st through the 6th to be able to withstand the draw from Harmonica.

Our second sand filter will be on line soon and give us more capacity. Thank you everyone for your patience during the high water demand time. – SH

Note: We had low water pressure several times over the weekend.

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.
— — — —

VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting July 14, 2019

Officers in Attendance: Deb Filler Chairman, Lynn Imel Vice Chairman, Lorinne Munn Secretary, Joel Fields Treasurer, Kathy Hall Member at Large. Also in Attendance 17 members of the community. Also in Attendance Anne Labelle, Belinda Provancher, Dale Kerner and Kyle Fend from Midas Gold.

1. Meeting was called to order at 2PM by Deb Filler Chairman.

2. Minutes of the June 9th meeting were approved as posted by Lorinne Munn.

3. Joel Fields gave the Treasurer’s report as follows:

a. As of June 30,2018 Total Village Funds $25,920.34
b. General Village Fund $3177.65
c. Cemetery Fund $5,432.38
d. Harmonica Fund $10,182.49
e. Community Hall Fund $577.06
f. Restroom Fund $6,050.76
g. Road and Ditch Fund $500.00

Recently for Dust Abatement Midas Gold has contributed $1488.14 toward Dust Abatement and the Village has paid $1952.47.
The Harmonica Committee has purchased shirts and hats, And there is $500.00 of presales of t shirts and hats that has come in.
$1000.00 was paid to Willie Sullivan from the bathroom fund for permitting and initial materials.

4. Cemetery report by Willie Sullivan he has posted no camping signs. The cemetery was mowed and cleaned and flags put out for the 4th of July. We are not watering due to lack of a watering system. There is one additional reservation of a lot. Stakes will soon be put into the ground with the new numbering system and the Kiosk built reflecting the new numbering system.

5. Kathy Hall reported on the Community Hall. Tom Harriman fixed the light switch. Rhonda Rogers and Deb Filler helped sell ice cream sundaes at the Highland Games and it was a great success. At the 4th of July ice cream sales Candy Hardisty and Sam Donalson helped out. There are a few tubs of this ice cream left for sale. Please contact Kathy Hall if interested. The garage sale was a huge success a profit of $688. The UTV rally earned $502. The Highland Games ice cream sale $126. The 4th of July ice cream sale $87. A total of $1,390.20 was made for the Community Hall. Kathy will get with her committee and decide what can be done toward maintenance and repair. It was pointed out that Kathy and Terry did a great job repairing and painting the picnic tables.

6. Lorinne Munn gave the Harmonica Report. Dan Stiff has agreed to run the Stage and we have 3 additional announcers. Kathy Hanggi has agreed to supervise the Community Breakfast we have 5 or 6 other folks that will help out. Idaho Poster is putting our great posters designed by Sarah Unger out, and Lorinne has posted some in Cascade, Donnelly and McCall. Dawn is ordering 50 more to sell at the T Shirt booth. Deb Filler is doing a great job with the Web Site and has gotten our final schedule of performers out with 23 bands scheduled, she also has more folks than ever scheduled for the workshop. Dawn Brown has cut off the vendor applications as we have a full roster of food and craft booths. Bill McIntosh is using our grant money for advertising to pay for the posters, and radio and TV ads. Bill can always use more items for the auction, contact him if you have anything to donate. Marj has gotten her t shirts ready to sell with some presales already. Sherry Gordon is looking for more Auction helpers. Dawn Brown is getting the Children’s area together.

Old Business:

1. This was the vote on the motion to change the By Laws so the offices of Harmonica and Chairperson of the Village of Yellow Pine Association cannot be held concurrently by the same person. When asked to elaborate on the reason for this motion Dan Stiff expressed a concern for too much control by one person of the Village funds. The vote was 9 yes to 11 no, so the motion failed. Changes to the By Laws require a 2/3 majority vote.

2. On the Dan Stiff ditch situation Dan says he has a culvert, all he needs is gravel to cover it about a yard should do It, he won’t pay for the gravel. He expressed concern that his electric line was dug up and the ditch goes in a zig zag and is not in the area of the original ditch. Deb Filler said the council will have a meeting to resolve the gravel issue.

3. Willie Sullivan gave a report on the Community Hall bathroom. He said we finally have a permit and the county gave it to us for free. He will move ahead with ordering materials. He said a licensed person is needed for some of the construction.

4. For the office of Secretary Lynn Imel was nominated by Deb Filler per recommendation by Ann Forster of the nominating committee. Willie Sullivan moved she be elected by unanimous consent since no other nominations were forthcoming. Dan Stiff seconded the motion. Lynn Imel is now Secretary of the Village Association.

5. For the office of Vice Chairman Lorinne Munn was nominated by Deb Filler per recommendation by Ann Forster of the nominating committee. Rhonda Rogers was nominated by Tim Rogers. A vote by secret ballot made Rhonda Rogers the Vice Chairman of the Village Association.

6. For the vacant Cemetery Commissioners Rhonda Rogers nominated Tim Rogers. Willie Sullivan moved he be elected by unanimous consent; Dan Stiff seconded the motion. Tim Rogers is a Cemetery Commissioner. For the second Cemetery Commissioner Marj Fields was nominated and also elected by unanimous consent.

New Business:

Willie Sullivan gave an overview of the Yellow Pine Water Users Association meeting held July 7. As of June 30 Dave McClintock retired. We didn’t have a person to cover for him so he was asked to continue until the Board could hire a licensed replacement. Dave chose not to serve after the June retirement so we have operated without a licensed water operator for a two week period. Steve Holloway, Nicki Harner and Willie Sullivan have been continuing his duties. The Board met with Warren Drake of McCall to take over as water manager. He is manager of several other small communities. This last Thursday the north sand filter was drained and cleaned at first the tank was filling back up but as people watered their lawns it started to go back down. We have a gravity feed system so as the water storage gets lower homes at the top lose water. Dale Bennet reports his water was interrupted 4 times in the last 4 days now it is down to a drizzle. We are producing 15 gal per minute; a large volume sprinkler can take 10 gal per minute this sucks the system down in a hurry. The Board is implementing an odd even/day by residents home address watering schedule. If you have an odd number address water on odd numbered days and even numbers on even days. Not using high volume sprinklers will help the situation. We put in a new sand filter and storage tank in 2016 but those are not in service yet, the sand in the filter has to mature, it will be ready very soon but meanwhile we still have the same issues we have been having for years. We will face periods of very low water and the Board will issue requests to reduce water use and avoid watering lawns to let tank storage build up. Since 1996 our system has not been meeting standards. Between 1996-2008 there were negotiations with the DEQ. In 2009 the Attorney General filed with the court declaring Yellow Pine out of compliance with water quality standards and we have been out of compliance all of this time. Finally in 2010 Engineering was started to repair our water and storage tanks. Those plans were replaced by new plans in 2013, those plans were approved but no action was taken until 2016 at that time the Attorney General warned a fine would be implemented if the project wasn’t wrapped up. At that point our new tank was installed and now the filter sand must mature. Once the new tank is on board the water situation should be better. Then in the fall when there are fewer people here, the old tank must be shut down and the sand and gravel in that tank replaced. We are hoping to work with Mr. Drake to get the maximum flow out of what we have and our storage tank situation needs to be fixed so more water can be stored. We have joined the Rural Water User’s Association. We are working on getting grants and having a capital improvement fund so maintenance can be addressed instead of waiting for a crisis.

Midas Gold representatives next gave a report on issues relating to Yellow Pine. Kyle Fend says OK Gravel has finished working on the Stibnite Road and is now working on the Johnson Creek Road. They will reshape the outside of the road to prevent sediment delivery to the Spawning areas along Johnson Creek.

Dale Kerner from the Boise office went over the alternative routes through the Stibnite mining operation via the Stibnite Road. These routes will be considered for analysis by the Forest Service. The proposed Burnt Log route will have to build 30 percent in new areas. Doug Christison asked how the water is provided to the mine site now. Dave had made an agreement for them to take 3,000 gal per month from the Nelson house in Yellow Pine. Our new Water Board will go over this agreement. It was mentioned that in 10 minutes a large volume sprinkler can run 100 gal of water, so 3,000 gallons in a month isn’t a lot.

Anne Labelle who is now a board member at Midas Gold has done a lot of agreements with communities. She is now working on a West Central Mountains Partnership Agreement with Yellow Pine and 13 other communities who may be affected by the presence of the proposed mining in our area. Along with this is a proposed charitable foundation to portion out money to these communities as requested. Each of these communities will choose a representative for the partnership and for the foundation. The representative can be the same for both entities or there can be a representative for each one. Apart from this since October 4, 2017 Midas has been meeting with the 4 representatives of Yellow Pine to work on issues directly relating to our community. We have designated 3 areas which we would like some help on. The water system, the helipad and community roads and ditches. Midas has agreed to give us funding and we will determine how it is to be spent. Willie Sullivan made a motion to sign an agreement between Midas Gold and Yellow Pine Lynn Imel seconded the motion. The motion passed and Deb Filler as representative of our community will sign the agreement. This has nothing to do with the greater community partnership that will come later on as those communities come on board. Over a 3 year period Yellow Pine will receive a $10,000.00 donation each year from Midas Gold towards community projects.

Kathy mentioned the Valley County weed control folks will be bringing in the spray and equipment on July 19 they will be back to pick up the equipment and unused spray the following Tuesday. She also mentioned the ride to Roosevelt will be held July 28 sign up at 9AM the money will go to the village.

3:40PM the meeting was adjourned by Deb Filler.

Submitted by Lorinne N. Munn
Secretary Village of Yellow Pine Association

VYPA Summer Meeting Schedule:

August 11, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 8, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
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YPFD News:

Update July 31st

Work begins on the HeloSpot in YP! – AF

20180731HelispotWork-a

YPFD August 1st

Alex testing the fire alarm at noon.

20180801AlexYPFD-a

Note: Our medical team was very busy over the weekend.

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911@ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

YPFD Commissioners meeting on August 6th at 10am at the community hall.
YP Fire Budget Hearing: September 8, 2018 – 10am Community Hall

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

The Helispot needs a lot of work and a base needs to be put down before officially being used. I’m currently in discussion with some folks to help with the ground prep and to put the base down. Life Flight and other agencies will need to do an inspection as well before using the helispot.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

– Fire Chief Jeff

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Now open for summer (208) 633-3377
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Yellow Pine Tavern

Summer Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine.
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The Corner 633-3325

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (July 30) overnight low of 46 degrees, clear sky and light haze of smoke. Gravel trucks running from the pit out Johnson Creek and back. The “University of Yellow Pine” sign in the school yard is leaning and about to fall down. A few finches, a pine siskin and a couple of hummingbirds visiting, olive-sided flycatcher calling from the forest. Increasing traffic kicking up dust, even main street is getting dusty. Hot and very dry mid-day, increasing haze of smoke (and dust), high of 95 degrees. A few finches and hummingbirds this evening. More camps on the golf course. Smoky sky (orange air quality) and a couple of small clouds at sunset. Red moon after midnight.

Tuesday (July 31) overnight low of 50 degrees, probably some clouds above rather thick smoke and very dry. Increasing traffic and dust, a few loud airplanes, Gravel trucks coming down the back Stibnite road headed up Johnson Creek. More camps on the golf course. Water pressure dropping late morning. A few finches and pine siskins, jays and chipmunks at the feeders, a few hummingbirds too. Female hairy woodpecker visited at lunch time, mama doe with twin spotted fawns ambled down Westside Ave, then bounced off into the forest. Red-breasted nuthatch visiting mid-afternoon, female (or juvenile) calliope and rufous hummingbirds sharing a feeder. More traffic (and dust) in the afternoon. Mostly cloudy and hot, a little muggy and quite smoky, high of 96 degrees. More campers pulling in this evening. Still quite warm at dusk and smoky. we have not had a drop of rain the entire month of July!

Wednesday (Aug 1) overnight low of 57 degrees, looks mostly cloudy above the yucky smoke and very dry. Everything is coated with a layer of dust. Gravel trucks on the back Stibnite road. A few finches and pine siskins, olive-sided flycatchers and a mourning dove calling. Pine Squirrel scolding the jays, raven calling. Power blipped off and back on at 1033am. Female hairy woodpecker and 2 E-doves visiting for lunch. Hot cloudy smoky afternoon, high of 96 degrees. More traffic, dust and campers pulling in. Between the dust and smoke the air is unhealthy, Orange AQ. Still pretty warm after sundown. Campers still pulling in after dark.

Thursday (Aug 2) overnight low of 50 degrees, appears to be partly cloudy above the smoke, very dry. Early morning airplanes, increasing traffic and dust, gravel trucks running from the pit up Johnson Creek road. A few finches and several pine siskins visiting. Flicker and olive-sided flycatcher calling from the forest. More campers pulling in after lunch, big clouds of dust rolling over the neighborhood. Early afternoon breeze blowing from the west, hot and smoky. Late afternoon some clouds above the smoke, hot, dry, dusty and light breezes, high of 91 degrees. Increasing traffic thru the neighborhood stirring up dust, more campers pulling in this evening. Found the missing YP GeoCache out in a slash pile in the forest. Sounded like a gunshot out on the golf course west of the school at 953pm. Campers still pulling in at midnight, dust hanging in the air in the school yard light.

Friday (Aug 3) overnight low of 45 degrees, appears to be partly cloudy above the smoke, very dry. Early loud airplanes, porta potty doors slamming, traffic and dust. A jay and a few pine siskins visiting. Mail truck driver is having a hard time delivering beer to the bars due to the roads being closed. A bit cooler today, mostly clear early afternoon, light breezes and better air quality, high of 85 degrees. Very low water pressure in the afternoon. Campers pulling in all afternoon. Cooler, less smoke and more dust. Cooling off nicely after sundown, increasing traffic (and dust!) Great music from the stage echoing in the canyon after dark. Water pressure back up before midnight. Couple of campfires out on the golf course.

Saturday (Aug 4) overnight low of 41 degrees, clear sky and slight haze of smoke and dust. A few early morning loud airplanes, ATV and UTV traffic, potty doors slamming. A white-breasted and a couple of red-breasted nuthatches, a few pine siskins and a couple of finches visiting. Low water pressure before 10am. More campers pulling in, traffic kicking up a lot of dust. Getting rather breezy after lunch time, air quality still pretty good. Water pressure much better by 230pm. Mostly clear breezy afternoon, not as hot, less smoke and more dust, high of 85 degrees. Campers still pulling in this afternoon. Low water pressure again by evening. Juvenile jay on the fence begging. Dusty smoky haze at sundown. Beautiful music echoing across the village after dark. Campfire west of the school house after dark. Fairly quiet right after midnight. A few “wa-hooers” after 2am.

Sunday (Aug 5) overnight low of 46 degrees, clear sky and light haze of smoke and dust. A bunch of early morning loud airplanes and 4 wheeler traffic, potty doors slamming and dogs barking. A few cassins finches and a couple of pine siskins. Good water pressure at lunch time. Lots of people leaving right after noon, huge clouds of dust. Picked up trash along the road. Really good water pressure at 2pm. Two white-breasted and a red-breasted nuthatch visiting. Warm, partly cloudy afternoon, light breezes, better air quality, high of 86 degrees. Most of the campers on the golf course had departed by evening. High haze of smoke moving in from the west. A few camps remain on the golf course after sundown.
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RIP:

Chris Petersen 9/18/1968 – 7/28/2018


2004 photo

Christopher Gerard Petersen, 49, of Emmett, died Saturday, July 28, 2018 in Yellow Pine of natural causes.

Arrangements are under the care of Flahiff Funeral Chapel, Caldwell. 208-459-0833

Chris Petersen’s services will be held Thursday, August 9th at 2pm at Elevation Worship Center 444 Hwy 16, Emmett, Id 83617

There will be a celebration of life for Chris in Yellow Pine this fall. This will be his final resting place that he loved.

Obituary of Christopher Petersen

ChrisPetersenObit-a

Christopher Gerard Petersen

9/18/68-7/28/18

Chris, as he was known to family and friends, was born in Tacoma, Washington on Sept. 16, 1968. He spent his early years in Emmett, Idaho. When he was 6 years old, his family moved to Boise, Idaho where he attended school. Each summer he spent vacation weeks with his grandparents in Yellow Pine, Idaho. Chris loved the mountains, fishing, hunting, trapping and even a bit of gold panning. He had artistic and musical talents. Chris did well at anything he applied himself to. He had many varied hobbies and interests, including tying flies, stamp collecting and antiquing to name a few.

Chris enlisted in the army at age 17. He received awards for his abilities on the rifle range. He specialized in radio communications. After his army experience he returned to Idaho. He worked in the mining industry around Yellow Pine, both at Stibnite and Thunder Mountain. For a time he worked in Riggins, building log homes. He quit that job to return to Yellow Pine to become care taker for his grandmother, Bernice Parks, when she was diagnosed with dementia, caring for her until she needed full time medical care.

He met the love of his life, Christy Harris, at Warm Lake, Idaho in 2009. They were married in Emmett, Idaho on June 7, 2012. Not only did Chris acquire a wife, but her two children, as well. He loved Hailey and Hayden like they were his own. They made their home in Emmett and spent summers and many weekends in Yellow Pine. Chris continued to work at Stibnite, his last job being logistics supervisor for Midas Gold until a sudden health issue forced his retirement.

Chris made many friends throughout his life and had multitudes of family, who will miss his ready and unique laugh, his sense of humor, many wise cracks and his willingness to always lend a helping hand to friends and strangers alike.

Chris is survived by his wife, Christy Petersen; step-children, Hailey Harris and Hayden Clayton; his mother and step-father, Dick and Sharon Terry; sister, Denilyn Lequerica; step-brother, John Terry; step-sister, Sidney Alley; his niece, Kymber Hunt; nephews, Kevin Hunt and Kade Lequerica as well as numerous aunts, uncles and cousins.

He was proceeded in death by his grandparents, Pete and Ruth Petersen and Gene and Bernice Parks; his father, Dennis Petersen; his uncle, Joey Parks; John Petersen and his in laws, Warren and Karen Harris.

A Memorial Service for Chris will be held on Thursday, August 9, 2018 at 2:00 pm at the Elevation Worship Center located at 444 HWY 16, Emmett, ID. 83617. A dinner will follow at the church. Internment will be held at a later date in Yellow Pine, ID. Condolences and memories of Chris may be shared on his memorial website

source:
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Idaho News:

UTV Takeover expected to draw 3,000 to 5,000 people to Brundage Mountain

By Tom Grote for The Star-News August 2, 2018

Between 3,000 and 5,000 people are expected to gather at Brundage Mountain Resort next week to celebrate the freedom and versatility of UTVs.

The UTV Takeover is scheduled to begin Wednesday and run through Sunday, Aug. 12.

The event is expected to draw owners of between 500 to 1,000 UTVs from Idaho, Washington, Oregon, California and Utah, according to organizer Steve McCarthy Jr. of Silverton, Ore.

“Our event is designed to give everyone the chance to get out and enjoy the great outdoors, enjoy their UTV and meet fellow riders and new friends along the way,” McCarthy said.

Among the attractions will be 30 vendors on-site selling the latest products.

Activities during the week will include 100-mile group rides to places like Yellow Pine and Warren, plus shorter 50 mile rides to places like Granite Lake, Hazard Lake and the Brundage Mountain fire lookout.

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Brewery to host ‘Beers for Bear Cubs’ to aid Snowdon

The Star-News August 2, 2018

The Salmon River Brewery will host the 3rd annual “Beers for Bear Cubs” event to benefit the Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary on Friday, Aug. 10, from 3 to 7 p.m.

Snowdon will have an educational booth featuring Merlin, their live bird ambassador.

Bear art and Snowdon merchandise will be available for purchase as well as collectible beer glasses and special bear-themed appetizers.

All proceeds will benefit the rescue and care of orphaned and injured bear cubs and other wild animals. For more information, contact Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary at 208-634-8050.

source:
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Pioneer Picnic in Roseberry Aug. 19 seeks old photos, family stories

The Star-News August 2, 2018

Old photos and family stories from the early days of Long Valley are being sought for this year’s Long Valley Pioneer Picnic to be held at Historic Roseberry on Sunday, Aug. 19

The festivities begin at 11 a.m. at The Barn at Roseberry with registration and conversation. Those attending should bring a dish to share and their own table service.

The afternoon will feature a presentation from the Willey family. Live music will be provided by Mountain Fever, also known as Jon and Bonnie Glick.

Those attending are invited to help update the museum’s photo archives by bringing their old family photos to be scanned or donated.

Picnic attendees are also invited to bring copies of written family stories from the early days of Long Valley to add to the museum’s family history archives.

For questions, write to Lucy Chronic at lmchronic@gmail.com

source:
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Semi crash blocks Highway 55 for hours

A semi-truck hauling plywood blocked traffic on Highway 55 after driving off the road south of Smiths Ferry on Monday.

KTVB July 30, 2018

Smiths Ferry — A semi-truck hauling plywood crashed south of Smiths Ferry on Monday, blocking traffic on Highway 55 for hours.

According to Idaho State Police, Joshua Wilson, 38, from Kalispell, Montana, was driving south when he drove off the right side of the road, rolling the truck and flatbed trailer.

continued:
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West Nile Virus found in Adams County mosquito trap

Steve Bertel Aug 2, 2018 KIVI TV

Adams County – Mosquitoes trapped in Adams County have tested positive for West Nile Virus, according to the Southwest District Health Department.

The mosquitoes carrying the virus were trapped in Indian Valley and Fruitvale, areas not located inside a mosquito abatement district.

Residents are encouraged to take extra precautions to avoid being bitten. Precautions include draining any standing water on your property and wearing repellent when outdoors, health officials said.

continued:
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Human case of West Nile virus confirmed in Canyon County

Health officials say the man in his 50s is the first confirmed human case of West Nile virus in Idaho this year.

KTVB Staff August 2, 2018

Caldwell — A Canyon County man in his 50s has tested positive for West Nile virus, health officials announced on Thursday.

The Southwest District Health Department said that the man lives in Canyon County, but may have been exposed in Adams County as well.

The man – who is the first confirmed human case of West Nile in Idaho this year – fell ill but has since recovered, SWDH spokesperson Katrina Williams told KTVB.

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Federal agency to regulate oil injection wells in Idaho

The injection wells are used to return water and other fluids to the ground that come to the surface in the process of drilling for oil and gas.

Keith Ridler Associated Press July 31, 2018

Boise — The federal government has taken over regulating underground injection wells in Idaho needed by the state’s oil and natural gas industry to economically dispose of wastewater.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Monday issued a final rule transferring a portion of the state’s Underground Injection Control program.

The Idaho Department of Water Resources requested the change after failed attempts by the state to get approval from the EPA to regulate what are called class II injection wells.

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Scam Alert:

Northwest BBB warns of investment scams targeting elderly

by Abigail Taylor Tuesday, July 31st 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2 News) — Imagine working your entire life to save for retirement only to have your bank account completely drained — there are scam artists who do just that.

Investment scams targeting the elderly can be some of the most detrimental, according to the Northwest Better Business Bureau.

“When you look at the data, we are all susceptible to scams. In fact, sometimes it is even more difficult to get the elderly to fall for a scam, but when they do we see big, big dollar losses,” said Dale Dixon with the BBB.

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Fire News:

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions are in effect

link to Sunday’s Fire Update:
https://yellowpinetimes.wordpress.com/2018/08/05/fire-updates-aug-5-2018/
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Sharps Fire Investigation – Suspect Identified

August 1, 2018 8:00 pm Blaine County Sheriff


Photo Credit: Flat Top Sheep Company

Detectives from the Blaine County Sheriff’s Office and Idaho Department of Lands investigators have identified the individual responsible for starting the Sharps Fire that began east of Bellevue, Idaho on Sunday July 29, 2018.

“As of 5:00 p.m. Wednesday, an individual was interviewed by detectives and admitted to starting the fire by shooting an exploding target,” said Sheriff Harkins. Official charges are pending a review by the Blaine County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office. The identity of the individual is not being released at this time. “We ask that the public be patient and allow us to fully complete the investigation and so this case can successfully go through the judicial process,” added Harkins.

The Blaine County Sheriff would like to recognize the excellent inter-agency cooperation with the Idaho Department of Lands and commend the exceptional work of all the detectives and investigators involved in this solving case.

The Sharps Fire, which has so far burned approximately 38,360 acres in Blaine County, Idaho is under the management of a Great Basin Incident Management Team #1.

– Sheriff Steve Harkins
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Central Idaho wildfire enters remote, mountainous terrain

8/4/18 AP

Bellevue, Idaho — A central Idaho wildfire grew to 100 square miles (260 square kilometers) on Saturday and entered remote, mountainous terrain.

Nearly 500 firefighters are battling the Sharps Fire about 6 miles (10 kilometers) east of the small city of Bellevue that is burning timber, grass and brush.

Authorities say the wildfire’s transition into more remote areas means aircraft and firefighters on foot will be used rather than fire engines and bulldozers.

The fire is 43 percent contained, with full containment expected by Aug. 12.

Authorities say the fire was started by a Bellevue man shooting exploding targets on July 29. He could be held responsible for the cost of fighting the fire, which reached $2 million on Friday.

source:
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Drone nearly caused mid-air collision at Grassy Ridge Fire

KIVI TV Aug 1, 2018

St. Anthony, Idaho – Officials said a drone was spotted flying over the Grassy Ridge Fire, 15 miles northwest of St. Anthony and nearly caused a mid-air collision on Wednesday.

About 9:20 a.m., during an aerial reconnaissance mission, one of the helicopters assigned to the Grassy Ridge Fire had a drone fly within several feet of their aircraft. “Fortunately, the pilot spotted the other aircraft just in time to take evasive action and narrowly avoid a midair collision,” according to a news release from Great Basin Incident Management Team #3.

All aircraft fighting the Grassy Ridge Fire were immediately grounded and will remain so — hampering the fire suppression and repair efforts — until it can be verified that the airspace over the fire is safe to fly in again, the release said.

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Area fire, law enforcement agencies worked together to protect Dubois

By Katie Keleher July 31, 2018 Local News 8

Dubois, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Grassy Ridge fire is now mostly under control and a large part of that is thanks to local fire departments helping out.

“I got a phone call from the BLM that just stated that the fire has now jumped the Kilgore A-2 road and that it has broken into two different fronts and that it was coming my way and I had about 30 minutes before it hit Dubois and I needed to get it evacuated,” said Clark County Sheriff Bart May.

May was keeping track of the Grassy Ridge Fire long before it threatened the town of on Dubois Saturday evening. He spent the days prior driving all around the surrounding area, putting out lightning-caused fires and protecting ranchers’ homes. It wasn’t long before the fire became a threat and the county knew they would need some help.

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Rabbit Foot fire closes roads and trails, expected to merge with two other fires

By Michael Collett August 05, 2018 Local News 8

Salmon, ID (KIFI/KIDK)- – Fire crews from the Great Basin Incident Management team are battling fires that is currently more than 2,500 acres.

They are known as the Rabbit Foot, Weasel and Morgan Fires.

All three are expected to merge.

The Rabbit Foot fire was started by lightning on Thursday afternoon around 12:30 p.m. the fire started near the vicinity of the Rabbit Foot Mine which is north of Morgan Creek Summit and West of Panther Creek Road.

continued:
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Fire organizations ask community to stop donating to firefighters

KTVB Shirah Matsuzawa August 3, 2018

Boise — Multiple fires are burning across Idaho and that has ignited a lot of people’s urge to show their appreciation for our fire crews.

The problem is there are health concerns associated with any edible items that you may make at home.

On Wednesday, the inciweb for the Rattlesnake Creek Fire posted an announcement thanking people for their donations but informing the public that those donations are not necessary.

“We really appreciate all of the support and donations from the communities, however, our firefighters are well-supplied, they have plenty of food, water and other supplies such as clothing,” said Carrie Bilbao with the National Interagency Fire Center.

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Mining News:

Agencies find issues with some miners working on Idaho river

8/2/18 AP

Lewiston, Idaho — Federal and state officials say some suction dredge miners seeking gold on the South Fork of the Clearwater River in north-central Idaho aren’t adhering to state and federal rules.

The Lewiston Tribune reported Wednesday that the Idaho Department of Water Resources is considering issuing notices of violations to at least two of the miners.

Tim Luke, the water compliance bureau chief for the agency, says some miners are not following terms stated in permits issued by the department.

continued:
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Idaho company in legal fight with Montana halts mine cleanup work

by Matthew Brown, Associated Press Tuesday, July 31st 2018

Billings, Mont. (AP) — An Idaho mining company notified environmental regulators Tuesday that it was halting reclamation work at a closed silver and copper mine in northwest Montana, amid a legal fight with the state over cleanup expenses at other sites.

Hecla Mining Co. will evaluate the potential legal risks of continuing cleanup work at Troy Mine near Libby after the Montana Department of Environmental Quality sued the company’s CEO, Phillips S. Baker Jr., last month, according to the company’s general manager in Montana, Doug Stiles.

State officials blamed Hecla for the work stoppage while Republican lawmakers backed the company and said the state’s lawsuit was at fault.

The dispute underscores growing tensions over allegations by the state that Baker bears responsibility under Montana’s “bad actor law” for ongoing pollution at several mines owned by his former employer, Pegasus Mining.

The state has paid more than $35 million for cleanup at those sites after Pegasus went bankrupt. Officials want that money reimbursed before Hecla moves forward with plans for two new mines in the Libby area.

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Public Lands:

Ice Hole Campground

BNF Aug 3, 3018

The Cascade Ranger District will temporarily close Ice Hole Campground for reconstruction beginning Monday, Aug. 6, 2018.

The Campground will remain closed for the remainder of the 2018 season. Project funding was provided by local Tribes and a State RV Grant.

Forest Service crews and contractors will repair existing resource damage, enabling visitors to have an improved recreational experience in the future.
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Big Creek Hazardous Fuel Reduction Update

The scoping document and other project information is available on the project’s webpage at http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=54260

We will be conducting a public meeting to provide more information to those interested. The open-house style meeting is scheduled for Sunday September 2, 2018, 11am-1230 p.m., at the Big Creek Ranger Station near Edwardsburg, Idaho. The Project Lead and the District Ranger will be available to discuss the project with interested members of the public during that time.

source w/more info:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/nfs/11558/www/nepa/109583_FSPLT3_4389242.pdf

Note – comments due by 9/7/2018
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Land Management Agencies to Implement Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in Central Idaho

July 31, 2018

McCall, Idaho – With the threat of wildfire danger increasing rapidly throughout central Idaho, local land management agencies will implement Stage I Fire Restrictions in the Payette Dispatch Area beginning at 12:01 a.m. on Friday, August 3, 2018 and will remain in effect until rescinded by the jurisdictional agencies. These restrictions are being implemented by agencies managing state, private, and public lands in the area, including the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), United States Forest Service (USFS), Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association (SITPA), and the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL). Fire restrictions are intended to decrease the risk of any human caused wildfires in the designated areas.

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions will be in effect within the Payette Fire Restriction Area. There are five zones within this area (Lower Snake/Weiser River Zone, Payette National Forest West Zone and East Zone, Long Valley/Meadows Valley Zone, and the Little Salmon River Zone) and all of them will be under Stage I Restrictions. This area includes the Payette National Forest (excluding the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness), Idaho State Lands, Boise and Cottonwood BLM Field Offices, and private lands in central Idaho. For a detailed map of the Payette Fire Restriction Area see below and visit: http://www.idahofireinfo.com/p/payette-mountains-fire-restrictions.html.

Fire, fuels, and weather conditions as they relate to fire restrictions will continue to be monitored – based on these conditions, restrictions can be rescinded or additional restrictions issued if conditions warrant. The land management agencies would like to thank the public for their attention to fires in Idaho so far this season and ask for their help in preventing any future unwanted fire with drying fuels and hotter temperatures expected to continue into this fall.

Under the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions, the following acts are prohibited on the restricted state, private, and federal lands:

* Building, maintaining, attending or using a fire, campfire or stove fire, except within a designated recreation site, or on their own land, and only within a permanent land owner-provided structure. (See liquid petroleum fueled stove exemption below).

* Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle, building, or designated recreation site, or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials,

The following are exemptions to the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions:

* Persons using metal fire pans (sides must be 3 inches high with a metal grate on top) within ¼ mile of the Main Salmon River from the Corn Creek launch site, its mouth at the Snake River. *Pack-out of ashes is required.

* Persons with a written special use authorization specifically exempting them from the effect of this order.

* Persons using a stove or grill that is fueled solely by liquid petroleum fuels. Such devices, including propane campfires, may be used only in an area cleared of flammable material.

* Persons using a stove fire (a fire built inside a fully enclosed metal stove, grill, or sheep herder type stove that is outfitted with a chimney that is at least five (5) feet in length that is equipped with a spark arrester consisting of a mesh screen with screen opening of 1/4 inch or less).

* Persons smoking while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is clear of all flammable materials.

* Any federal, state or local officer or member of an organized rescue or firefighting force in the performance of an official duty.

* All land within a city boundary is exempt.

With the volume of wildfires burning throughout central Idaho, fire managers are asking the public to be extra cautious when spending time in the outdoors. Idahoans are also reminded that the use of fireworks are never allowed on National Forest Lands, and are prohibited on state forest and range lands in Idaho during closed fire season (May 10 through October 20).

Please visit http://www.idahofireinfo.com/p/fire-restrictions.html for current information regarding fire restrictions or contact the local land management office.
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Land management agencies to implement Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in southwest Idaho

Date: August 1, 2018
Contact: Bureau of Land Management – Jared Jablonski 208-384-3378
Forest Service – Mike Williamson 208-373-4105
Idaho Department of Land – Sharla Arledge 208-334-0286

Boise, Idaho – With the threat of wildfire danger increasing rapidly, state and federal land management agencies will implement Stage 1 Fire Restrictions on all lands within southwest Idaho effective Aug. 3, 2018 beginning at 12:01 a.m. Fire restrictions limit certain activities in the outdoors to decrease the chance of any preventable fires in the designated areas.

The Stage 1 fire restrictions will be in effect until further notice in the Treasure Valley, West Central Mountains, and Owyhee Mountains of Idaho which includes all federal, state and private forestland and rangeland in:

* Ada, Canyon, Gem, Payette, Elmore, Boise, Valley, Washington and Owyhee Counties

* Within Washington County, all Bureau of Reclamation lands surrounding Mann Creek Reservoir

* Within Valley County, all Bureau of Reclamation lands surrounding Lake Cascade

* Within Elmore and Boise counties, all Bureau of Reclamation lands surrounding Arrowrock and Anderson Ranch reservoirs

These restrictions are being implemented by agencies managing or providing wildland fire protection, including the U.S Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management and the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL). Fire managers divide Idaho into zones and the fire restrictions will affect the following zones:

Treasure Valley Fire Restrictions Zone

* All of Ada, Canyon, Gem, Payette and Washington counties. Portions of Boise County including the administrative boundary of Lucky Peak Lake to Arrowrock Dam, south shore of Arrowrock Reservoir and that portion of Elmore County that lies south of the South Fork Boise River to Anderson Ranch Dam, south along Anderson Dam Road (FS Rd 134) to Highway 20, east on Highway 20 to the Elmore/Gooding County line south to Interstate 84. The Treasure Valley Restriction area is bounded by the Idaho/Oregon boundary to Oreana then follows the Bachman Grade to Triangle and continues east-northeast of the Owyhee Front to the Bruneau River. The northern boundary begins near Weiser, Idaho and follows Highway 95 to Indian Valley, then generally follows the Little Weiser River to the Payette and Boise National Forest boundary lines.

West Central Mountains Fire Restrictions Zone

* Boise National Forest, Boise District BLM and State and Endowment Lands within Elmore County, Boise County, and Valley County to include all Bureau of Reclamation lands surrounding Lake Cascade. From the point where the Boise National Forest boundary intersects State Highway 20 near Dixie following the Boise National Forest boundary west and north along the ridge of the Danskin to Boise Front foothills and extending north encompassing the Idaho Department of Lands to its intersection back with the Boise National Forest boundary near Sagehen Reservoir. The far northern boundary includes all Boise National Forest lands, excluding the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. All lands north of Sagehen Reservoir including Tripod Mountain and West Mountain within the North Fork Payette River drainage north to near Tamarack Resort.

Owyhee Fire Restrictions Zone

* All of Owyhee County west of the Bruneau Canyon.

Under the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions, the following acts are prohibited on private, state and federally managed or protected lands, roads, and trails:

* Building, maintaining, attending, or using a fire, campfire or stove fire except within a designated recreation site within a permanent concrete or metal fire ring, or on their own land within an owner-provided structure.

* Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle, building, or designated recreation site, or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials.

The following are exemptions to the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions:

* Persons with a written permit that specifically authorizes the otherwise prohibited act.

* Persons using fire fueled solely by liquid petroleum or liquid petroleum gas fuels. Such devices, including propane campfires, may be used only in an area cleared of flammable material.

* Persons conducting activities in those designated areas where the activity is specifically authorized by written posted notice.

* Any federal, state or local officer or member of an organized rescue or firefighting force in the performance of an official duty.

* All land within a city boundary is exempted.

* Other exemptions unique to each agency.

Fire managers are asking the public to be extra cautious when spending time in the outdoors. As a reminder, fireworks are prohibited on state and private forestland and rangeland during closed fire season (May 10 through Oct. 20), and on public lands, roads and trail in Idaho all times of the year.

Controlled burning restrictions may be in place due to air quality through the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). Information about DEQ burn bans is available here: http://deq.idaho.gov/air-quality.aspx. The IDL fire safety burn permit is required during closed fire season, and local burn permits may be as well. To obtain permits for controlled burning activities, visit: http://burnpermits.idaho.gov/

For more information about Stage 1 fire restrictions and to view an interactive map, visit http://www.idahofireinfo.com

With the fire season well underway, the placement of these restrictions is intended to keep visitors to public lands safe as well as prevent the catastrophic effects of wildland fire. If you are planning a visit to public lands in these areas, please check with the Boise National Forest (www.fs.usda.gov/boise), BLM Idaho (www.blm.gov/idaho), or the Idaho Department of Lands (www.idl.idaho.gov) websites for the latest information or visit http://www.idahofireinfo.com
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BLM to celebrate 25 years of the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey Area

Date: August 1, 2018
Contact: Holly Hovis, hhovis@blm.gov, (208) 384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management is hosting a commemoration event on Friday, Aug. 3, celebrating the 25th anniversary of the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area. The program will be held at 9:30 a.m. at Dedication Point and will include guest speakers Tyler Nelson and Steve Stuebner, musical performances by Water for Life and The Great Turtle, and a plaque ceremony.

The Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area was established by Congress in 1993 and includes protections for nesting raptors and their habitat across approximately 26,000 acres and along 81 miles of the Snake River. An influential advocate for raptors, Morley Nelson worked for decades to educate the public about and build support for birds of prey. This event will recognize his legacy and the support network that was formed as a result of his work with local universities, government agencies, Boise-based corporations and citizens.

“The rich history of people caring so passionately about this area is important,” said Amanda Hoffman, BLM Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area Manager. “At this celebration, we will recognize and show our appreciation for the people who were involved with the designation and the ongoing conservation efforts that make this place special.”

Parking for the event will be available at Swan Falls Dam. The shuttle from Swan Falls Dam to the event at Dedication Point will depart at 9 a.m. For more information, contact Amanda Hoffman at the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area Office: (208) 384-3336.
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Boise Ridge Forest Health Project – Scoping Started

August 1, 2018

The Mountain Home Ranger District of the Boise National Forest is proposing a couple of projects to address forest health and hazardous fuel concerns. The Sinker Creek and Boise Ridge Forest Health projects are the first phase of projects being moved forward. A future project is being considered in the Clear Creek area (Phase 2) if access issues can be remedied; however, at this time the Boise NF is not considering this a reasonably foreseeable action as it is not known if and when the access issues can be resolved. Proposed treatments and additional information about the projects, in addition to what is presented here, can be found on the Boise Ridge Forest Health and Sinker Creek project webpages. (Click on the Scoping tab to access the scoping letter.) Forest Supervisor Cecilia Seesholtz is requesting feedback on the projects during scoping to identify any potential issues that have not already been identified during the collaborative process being used to develop this project.
https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=53722

There is potential to use Categorical Exclusions (CEs) for these projects (discussed in more detail in the Proposed Action document posted on the project webpages). If CEs are used, there would not be an additional period where written comments are solicited for the project; however, comments can be submitted at any time for consideration. It should be understood that some aspects of the proposed actions could change prior to a decision being signed based on comments received during scoping, conversations with the Boise Forest Coalition and additional field work and analysis conducted by specialists.

In order for your scoping comments to be reviewed and considered in a timely manner, we ask that you please submit comments by August 31, 2018. Comments specific to the proposed action that identify a cause-effect relationship are most helpful. Comments received in response to this solicitation, including names and addresses of those who comment, will be considered part of the public record for this project and will be available for public inspection. The following options are available for submitting comments.

Electronic comments can be submitted online by selecting “Comment/Object on Project” on the project webpage (see link to project webpages above) or can be emailed to the Mountain Home Ranger District Comment Inbox. Please be sure to include “Sinker Creek” and/or “Boise Ridge” in the email subject line. An automated response should confirm your electronic submission has been received. Acceptable formats for electronic submission are text or html e-mail, Adobe portable document format (PDF), and formats viewable in Microsoft Office applications (e.g. Word).

Hardcopy comments can be mailed, hand-delivered or faxed as follows:

Mailed to:
Boise National Forest, Mountain Home RD
Attn: Joshua Newman
3080 Industrial Way
Mountain Home, ID 83647
(Specify comments are for Sinker Creek and/or Boise Ridge projects)

Hand delivered to:

Mountain Home Ranger District (3080 Industrial Way, Mountain Home, ID 83647)

Front Desk, 8am-4pm (Specify comments are for Sinker Creek and/or Boise Ridge projects)

Faxed to 208-587-9217. Be sure to annotate on the cover page that these are comments for the Sinker Creek and/or Boise Ridge projects, Attn: Josh Newman.

Thank you for taking the time to review the actions proposed for this project. If you have any questions, please direct them to Josh Newman, Project Leader, at 208-587-7961.

Sincerely, Tera Little – Forest Planner (208-373-4157)
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Sinker Creek Project – Scoping Started

August 1, 2018

The Mountain Home Ranger District of the Boise National Forest is proposing a couple of projects to address forest health and hazardous fuel concerns. The Sinker Creek and Boise Ridge Forest Health projects are the first phase of projects being moved forward. A future project is being considered in the Clear Creek area (Phase 2) if access issues can be remedied; however, at this time the Boise NF is not considering this a reasonably foreseeable action as it is not known if and when the access issues can be resolved. Proposed treatments and additional information about the projects, in addition to what is presented here, can be found on the Boise Ridge Forest Health and Sinker Creek project webpages. (Click on the Scoping tab to access the scoping letter.) Forest Supervisor Cecilia Seesholtz is requesting feedback on the projects during scoping to identify any potential issues that have not already been identified during the collaborative process being used to develop this project.
https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=53721

There is potential to use Categorical Exclusions (CEs) for these projects (discussed in more detail in the Proposed Action document posted on the project webpages). If CEs are used, there would not be an additional period where written comments are solicited for the project; however, comments can be submitted at any time for consideration. It should be understood that some aspects of the proposed actions could change prior to a decision being signed based on comments received during scoping, conversations with the Boise Forest Coalition and additional field work and analysis conducted by specialists.

In order for your scoping comments to be reviewed and considered in a timely manner, we ask that you please submit comments by August 31, 2018. Comments specific to the proposed action that identify a cause-effect relationship are most helpful. Comments received in response to this solicitation, including names and addresses of those who comment, will be considered part of the public record for this project and will be available for public inspection. The following options are available for submitting comments.

Electronic comments can be submitted online by selecting “Comment/Object on Project” on the project webpage (see link to project webpages above) or can be emailed to the Mountain Home Ranger District Comment Inbox. Please be sure to include “Sinker Creek” and/or “Boise Ridge” in the email subject line. An automated response should confirm your electronic submission has been received. Acceptable formats for electronic submission are text or html e-mail, Adobe portable document format (PDF), and formats viewable in Microsoft Office applications (e.g. Word).

Hardcopy comments can be mailed, hand-delivered or faxed as follows:

Mailed to:
Boise National Forest, Mountain Home RD
Attn: Joshua Newman
3080 Industrial Way
Mountain Home, ID 83647
(Specify comments are for Sinker Creek and/or Boise Ridge projects)

Hand delivered to:

Mountain Home Ranger District (3080 Industrial Way, Mountain Home, ID 83647)

Front Desk, 8am-4pm (Specify comments are for Sinker Creek and/or Boise Ridge projects)

Faxed to 208-587-9217. Be sure to annotate on the cover page that these are comments for the Sinker Creek and/or Boise Ridge projects, Attn: Josh Newman.

Thank you for taking the time to review the actions proposed for this project. If you have any questions, please direct them to Josh Newman, Project Leader, at 208-587-7961.

Sincerely, Tera Little – Forest Planner (208-373-4157)
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USFS extends Public Comment Period on Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

Ogden, Utah – On August 1, 2018, the Forest Service extended the public comment on a Supplemental Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement which would amend the Forest Service land management plans regarding greater sage-grouse. The comment period is extended by 14 days and will now end August 15, 2018. The extension is in response to requests for additional time from various state agencies and partners because of an overlap of the Forest Service comment period with the comment period for the Bureau of Land Management’s Draft Environmental Impact Statements on sage-grouse management.

The Forest Service is proposing to amend, with ongoing input and collaboration from affected states, the land management plans that were amended in 2015 regarding greater sage-grouse conservation in the states of Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah. There is no proposal to alter plans in Montana.

The purpose of proposed changes is to improve the clarity, efficiency, and implementation of greater sage-grouse plans, including better alignment with Bureau of Land Management and state plans, in order to benefit greater sage-grouse conservation on the landscape scale. The agency will use lessons learned from new science, scoping and implementing during the last three years to make revised plans more efficient. Proposed actions are intended to improve sage-grouse conservation and although some management areas, such as Sagebrush Focal Areas may change in name designation, limits to development and other protections will remain.

Commenters are encouraged to comment on the textual edits that are being considered. After reviewing comments to the corrected NOI, the Forest Service plans to continue the planning process for amending plans on units in Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah, with multi-regional draft and final Environmental Impact Statements. Plan amendments should be finalized in the summer of 2019.

To read and comment on the Supplemental NOI, please visit:
https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2018-08-01/pdf/2018-16556.pdf
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USDA Forest Service Region 4 Payette News Releases Update

July 2018

link:
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USFS Regional Intermountain News

Volume 2 Issue 11 August 2, 2018

link:
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – ACL tears in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Aug 3, 2018 – IME

The anterior cruciate ligament is the primary ligament that stabilizes the knee in dogs. The ligament degenerates over time, and causes pain, instability and osteoarthritis. Eventually the ligament ruptures, causing further pain and instability in the knee joint. Usually, clinical signs of lameness are not readily appreciated until the ligament ruptures.

ACL tears usually affect middle-age large and giant breed dogs, but can also occur in smaller dogs and even cats. The disease usually occurs in one leg, but rupture of the ACL in the other leg commonly occurs within six to 12 months. Cartilages within the knee called menisci are torn in about 50 percent of all cases. The cause of ACL tears is greatly debated. The shape of the tibial plateau, the large bone just below the knee, combined with other factors, is thought to be the major cause of ACL tears in dogs. Some dogs have acute tears of their ACL during strenuous exercise, but this is not as common as the chronic disease. Orthopedic examination reveals stiffness, fluid, pain and crepitus (a crunching sound) when the knee is palpated. While the animal is underneath sedation, the veterinarian can feel an anterior drawer sign, which is where the tibia moves excessively forward compared to the upper thigh bone, or femur. X-Rays will show the extent of the degenerative arthritis present in the knee, but they won’t show the ruptured ligament or meniscus damage.

continued:
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Wolf Depredations in Valley County

August 2, 2018 (personal correspondence)

There have been a lot of wolf depredations in Valley County this year, so far. Unfortunately, August is always the worst month. There have already been 28 confirmed depredations in Valley County this year. Most of those have been within 5 miles of Cascade. There were 39 confirmed wolf depredations in Valley County in 2017. Last year by this date, there had been 16 confirmed wolf depredations to give you an idea of what we might expect.

Todd Grimm
State Director
USDA WS – Idaho
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Wolf kills prompt review of protection efforts

Wood River Wolf Project has limited resources

Greg Moore Aug 1, 2018 IME

Wolf depredation incidents on seven sheep in the Sawtooth Valley and the subsequent killing of three wolves by the federal Wildlife Services agency last month have prompted thinking on the part of the Wood River Wolf Project to expand its protection efforts.

The project was started in 2008 by the nonprofit conservation group Defenders of Wildlife to save the lives of both livestock and wolves by facilitating the use of nonlethal deterrents to wolf depredation. Since 2016, it has been overseen by the Lava Lake Institute for Science & Conservation, a nonprofit organization founded by Brian and Kathleen Bean, co-owners of the Hailey-based sheep-producing business Lava Lake Land & Livestock.

The project works with five regional sheep producers, and trains their herders in deterrent techniques such as fladry (strips of cloth strung along the outside of sheep bands at night), noisemakers and lights.

continued:
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Beginning of August, 2018
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Rescue response delayed for woman treed by wolves in Washington

The wolves are part of the known Loup Loup pack.

by Whitney Ward August 3, 2018 KTVB

Okanogan County, Wash. – Officials said the wolves who surrounded a young woman in Okanogan County, forcing her to climb a tree for safety, in July were part of a known wolf pack.

The wolves are part of the known Loup Loup pack. It is believed there are six to eight wolves in that pack. According to a map from Fish and Wildlife, experts believe their territory may be changing.

The entire area where they were spotted is very remote, but it is well known. It is heavily used by campers, hikers, and hunters.

The good thing is, the woman who encounter the wolves was safely rescued. However, when we were initially told it took 14 minutes to get to her. It turns out, that’s not exactly what happened.

There was a great deal of confusion as Okanogan County dispatchers tried to launch a rescue operation. They said they kept getting met with resistance from the state. As a result, that young researcher sat in a tree, surrounded by a pack of wolves for over an hour.

Search and rescue crews were told by Washington Fish and Wildlife to stand down.

continued:
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Yellowstone bison wanders into Idaho

Local News 8 July 30, 2018

Island Park, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – It’s rare sight out of Yellowstone National Park.

A bison wandered out of the park and was walking along a highway in Island Park last week.

The state veterinarian says the bison poses risks to people, and it can also spread a disease to cattle in the area.

State officials who were tracking the animal say it eventually traveled back to Montana.

Idaho Fish and Game say capturing bison is difficult so, when a bison leaves Yellowstone, the department tries to get the bison to return to the park.

source w/video:
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Federal agency pauses tree-removal plan to help sage grouse

By Keith Ridler – 8/1/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — The federal government on Wednesday put on hold one of the largest-ever projects to remove juniper trees to help an imperiled species after an appeal by an environmental group seeking to halt the plan.

A U.S. Department of the Interior administrative panel granted the U.S. Bureau of Land Management’s motion to set aside its decision in May to remove juniper trees from about 1,100 square miles (2,800 square kilometers) in Idaho’s Owyhee County.

The Bureau of Land Management in initially approving the project said it would protect habitat for imperiled sage grouse and benefit cattle ranchers.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

IDFG imposes fire restrictions on IDFG-owned and managed lands statewide

Local News 8 August 02, 2018

Because of the current fire risk condition throughout Idaho, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) is imposing a Stage I Fire Restriction on IDFG-owned and managed lands statewide, effective immediately.

Until further notice, the following restriction applies to all Wildlife Management Areas and fishing access areas owned or managed by IDFG.

continued:
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Unsold nonresident tags go on sale as second tags August 1

Nonresident deer and elk tags sales are up and could be sold out by mid-October.

By Vicky Osborn, Television/Radio Specialist
Tuesday, July 31, 2018

On August 1, all hunters can buy nonresident deer and elk tags as second tags for an additional hunting opportunity this fall. Tags are sold at the full nonresident price of $301.75 for deer and $416.75 for elk.

Fish and Game administration bureau chief Michael Pearson said that at current sales rate, nonresident deer tags and elk tags could be sold out quickly.

Fish and Game keeps a tally of the tags on the license, tags and permits webpage.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

New kids on the block: 118 hungry goats descend on Boise neighborhood

“They kind of just like took over this neighborhood this morning.”

KTVB August 3, 2018

Boise — A herd of goats caused a stir Friday morning after they escaped their enclosure and went on a snacking tour through a West Boise neighborhood.

Residents say the 118 adult and baby goats first showed up on Summerwind Drive off of Five Mile Road at about 7 a.m.

… As it turns out, the goats were the property of local company We Rent Goats, which dispatches the herds to clear weeds and suppress plant growth on public and private land.

full story w/video and photo gallery:
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Small Dogs Pee Higher to Lie About Their Size, New Study Concludes

Ryan F. Mandelbaum Aug 3, 2018

You just can’t trust a little dog.

We all know dogs can communicate through scent. They urinate on new areas, their own home turf, and certainly things that other dogs have peed on. We also know that some male dogs lift their legs in order to pee higher. But new research found that smaller dogs lift their legs at an even higher angle than larger dogs, perhaps to make themselves appear larger.

“Our findings… provide additional evidence that scent marking can be dishonest,” the authors said in the study published recently in the Journal of Zoology.

continued:
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Tips & Advice:

Common weeds

Jim Duthie shows us a few common weeds you might find in your yard and what you can do to control them.

Jim Duthie August 2, 2018 KTVB

Boise — It’s mid-summer, and the growing season is well underway. And whether you’re having success with your garden, or it’s struggling a bit, there’s one thing that all of us can grow really well without any effort, and that’s weeds.

Even the best lawns and gardens have to contend with weeds, garden master Jim Duthie shows us a few common Idaho weeds that you might find in your yard, and what you can do to control them.

Bindweed is a climbing or creeping perennial plant that’s part of the morning glory family. This isn’t the pretty variety that many gardeners grow on purpose. Instead, bindweed is a tough little vine, spreading by seeds and roots through flower beds and shrubs, and growing up fences and trellises. It has small white, funnel-shaped flowers and arrowhead-shaped leaves. It will quickly grow to choke out other cultivated plants, and it’s hard to get rid of. One plant can produce 500 seeds, which can remain viable in the soil for up to 50 years. And since the vine wraps around other plants’ stems and leaves, it’s hard to remove. One of the best ways to control it is to use a thick layer of mulch in the garden or flower bed.

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Seasonal Humor:

SummerTouristSeason2-a
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