Category Archives: News 2018

Dec 30, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Dec 30, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Firewood Season is Closed
December 31 New Year’s Eve at the Yellow Pine Tavern
~ 2019 Events ~
May 25, 2019 ATV-UTV Scavenger Hunt Memorial Day Weekend
Jul 13, 2019 Ride to Big Creek
Sep 14, 2019 Ride to Cinnabar

(details below)
———-

Village News:

Downgrade of Enhanced or E911 linesVCoLogo

Valley County Board of County Commissioners
219 N. Main Street, Cascade, Idaho
(208) 382-7100

To Property Owners of Warm Lake and Yellow Pine
Greetings Citizens,

In the continual effort to maintain fiduciary responsibility we have looked at the high cost of the E911 lines to the above areas. Valley County upgraded to the Enhanced 911 system in 2009. That upgrade required additional phone lines and Valley County has been paying in excess of $25,400 a year for these enhanced lines. Enhanced of E911 lines can give a location of the 911 call when it comes into the Valley County Sheriff’s Office Communication Center. A location will only come up when the call comes in on a non-cell call. While this information can be very helpful, we have only received 39 calls from the above areas in the last 3 years. 25 of these calls were from the Yellow Pine Fire Department and the enhanced system was not needed to locate the incident. The Enhanced System was only used in 2 of the remaining 14 calls. With reverting to the previous system, we will still maintain Caller ID which will assist in determining the location. Another factor in this decision is the ever increasing cost of maintenance and upgrade to the system. When the E911 lines are removed you will still dial 911 for emergencies. The only difference will be the location not appearing with the incoming call. Every land line phone and cell phone registered in these areas is paying $1.25 a month to support the costs of these services. Given the low number of phones in these areas, we are deficit spending every month to pay for the service. Another factor is the large amount of seasonal homes in the area which reduces the revenue when they are deactivated for the winter. Reducing to the standard 911 lines which are currently active as well will save over $25,000 a year. When we return Yellow Pine and Warm Lake back to the standard 911 lines, we will be using the original system before the upgrades.

If the Warm Lake and Yellow Pine area ever experiences a large population growth, we can look at adding this feature back. Right now we are expending more money than we are bringing in to this fund and these changes must be made. We want to be clear; you will still dial 911 to reach emergency services. Nothing will change on your end of this process.

Please contact your Board of County Commissioner’s if you have any questions.

Respectfully,
Gordon Cruickshank
Bill Willey
Elting Hasbrouck
— — — —

Christmas Day in Yellow Pine

Christmas Dinner pot-luck at the Yellow Pine Tavern, Tuesday, December 25, 2018 at 3pm.

“No one went away hungry.”

20181225GiftBags-a

Santa’s Helpers Gift Bags, Yellow Pine Tavern.
— — — —

Wreck on the EFSF road

The county plow truck was involved in an accident on the (EFSF) East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River Road this last Sunday (Dec 23) while pushing rocks off the road. Apparently a visitor coming into YP for the holiday slid into the County truck. Both vehicles were disabled, no injuries reported.
— — — —

Lower Johnson Creek Plowing

Note: when traveling to the dump, please use the river side of the road for wheeled vehicles so the hill side can be for snowmobilers. Turnouts will be plowed.

– CD
— — — —

Come Spring…

“To Yellow Pine residents. I will be making several trips next spring and summer hauling out metal, appliances, etc. . If you need anything hauled away please get on the list. Vehicles require a title. I will be hauling gravel back if anyone is interested.”

Contact Mike Amos
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

We are on 3-day a week mail delivery from Cascade. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Be sure to buy your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Thursday (Dec 20) the road to the dump is icy, 3 of the 4 dumpsters were full.

Report (Dec 15) that folks were once again dumping boxes and furniture outside of the transfer station. Please remind friends and neighbors about the rules.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.


— — — —

Ice Hole Campground Closed

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
— — — —

Predators

It should be safe to put bird feeders back out, bears are hibernating (according to Jon Hunter our F&G CO.) However, foxes are coming around and they do like bird seed.

Please remember to keep trash secured, it will draw foxes, coyotes and loose dogs.
———-

Local Events:

New Year’s Eve

The Yellow Pine Tavern will be open for New Year’s Eve.
— — — —

2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine.

Link
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx
— — — —

VYPA News:

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 18th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th. Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.
— — — —

YPFD News:

The next meeting to be May 18th, 2019 at the Community Hall

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sundays at 11am will resume in the Spring.

The YPFD has 2 Size Chimney Brushes with extension rods that were donated for use around YP. If you would like to borrow one, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you. The YPFD also has loanable mitigation tools, (Weed-Whacker, Hedge Trimmer, backpack blower and 16’ pole saw). If you would like to borrow one or all, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you.

It’s also time to check the Smoke Alarm batteries and Fire Extinguishers. Please test the alarm and replace Smoke Alarm Batteries every year, if you have the replaceable battery type. Fire Extinguishers should be checked as well and should be easily seen and reachable. A good location for the Fire Extinguishers would be the kitchen and near the wood stove and/or fireplace. The needle should be in the green.

If you need a Smoke Detector or Fire Extinguisher for your YP residence please contact Jeff F.
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for winter
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Closed for winter
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Winter Hours at the Tavern: 9am-2pm and 4-8pm Mon, Wed, Fri, Sat and 9am-2pm Sun. Or call 208 633-2233 the phone rings into the house.
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC

Link to FB page:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430 – 50# bag of Polar Ice Melt available for $7.99. Breaks the Ice Barrier. Quick Melting action, even in heavy snow.
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
Cleaning chimneys and stoves
307-258-8951 – We’re moving from Idaho City to Donnelly in a few months and service all over Idaho, including Yellow Pine.
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Dec 24) snowed most of the night, turned to rain by 10am (31 degrees), and by 11am breaks in the clouds. We have 2″ new snow and average 7″ snow on the ground. Two jays and a pair (M/F) northern flickers visiting this morning. Breaks in the clouds and filtered sunlight mid-day, warmed up and dripping, high of 38 degrees. Mostly cloudy by sundown and quiet (except the “elk repellent”.) Cloudy cold night.

Tuesday (Dec 25) overnight low of 17 degrees, overcast (top of VanMeter socked in) and estimate 7″ of snow on the ground. Male northern flicker visiting at lunch time. Breaks in the clouds and breezy mid-afternoon, icicles dripped for a short time, high of 34 degrees. Mostly clear evening, temperature dropping. Single digits and cloudy after midnight.

Wednesday (Dec 26) overnight low of 1 degree, mostly cloudy this morning and nippy, snow is really squeaky, measured 6.5″ of old crusty snow on the ground. Raven calling from the east after lunch time. Gray cloudy cold day, below freezing, no drips, high of 26 degrees. Quiet afternoon, a little bit of traffic. Cloudy and rather cold at dusk.

Thursday (Dec 27) probably snowed lightly most of the night, 2″ new snow and about 8″ total snow on the ground, 23F at 1030am, occasional flakes falling. Heard jays and a raven calling and perhaps geese? Female hairy woodpecker stopped by for lunch. A few cow elk sighted just south of the village. Cold and flaking a little snow all morning and into the afternoon, barely a trace, high of 29 degrees. Cloudy at dark. A little more traffic than usual.

Friday (Dec 28) overnight low of 14 degrees, mostly clear this morning, estimate 8″ of snow on the ground. Strong sun started icicles dripping while the temperature was below freezing. Sleek pine squirrel visited for lunch. High thin clouds by early afternoon and filtered sunshine, high of 29 degrees. Temperature dropping with the sun, and in the teens by dark. Snowed during the night/early morning.

Saturday (Dec 29) received 1″ of new snow overnight, about 8.5″ of snow on the ground and overcast this morning, 24F at 1030am. Heard ravens calling as they flew over the village – headed west. Female flicker stopped by for lunch (she likes millet) then 3 jays showed up. Overcast and below freezing by mid-afternoon, high of 34 degrees. Elk tracks in the neighbor’s yard. Scarlet clouds after sunset. Snowmobiler racing up and down main street at dusk. Overcast at dark. Breezy and light snow falling after midnight. Snowed all night.

Sunday (Dec 30) received 1.5″ of new snow overnight, 10″ total snow on the ground, broken clouds at observation time and 29 degrees. Female hairy woodpecker and stellar jay visiting. Light snow on and off until noon, then steady snow stacking up at 1230pm, socked in to the valley floor. Pair of flickers and red-breasted nuthatches visiting early afternoon. By 3pm we had about 2″ of new snow since this morning, high of 32 degrees. Cloudy and lightly snowing at dark.
——————————

RIP

Tom Richter 1954 – 2018

Memorial service for Tom Richter will be at Flahiff Funeral Chapel (624 Cleveland Blvd, Caldwell, ID) on January 11th at 2 PM.

We look forward to seeing everyone who can make it.
————————–

Tips & Advice:

Be Ember Aware! Tip Series

“Used with permission from University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and the Living With Fire program.”

Be Ember Aware Tip #11 – Will Your Home Survive When the Embers Arrive?

The most common reason homes burn during wildfire are because windblown embers become lodged in something easily ignited on or near your home.

In Summary

* Replace wood shake or shingle roofs with fire resistant types.
* Keep rain gutters and roofs free of pine needles, leaves and other debris.
* Move your wood pile at least 30 feet away from the house.
* Remove pine needles and other plant debris from between deck boards and from the surface and enclose the undersides of the deck, making sure to provide adequate ventilation when you enclose.
* Cover vents with 1/8-inch wire mesh or install ember resistant vents.
* Create a noncombustible, or low combustible, area within five feet of the house.
* Avoid planting evergreen shrubs adjacent to the house, and particularly not in front or below vent openings or in front of windows.
* Do not use wood, bark or rubber mulches near homes, especially houses that have wood, vinyl or other plastic siding.
* A fuel break around your neighborhood is not enough.
* Replace single-pane windows with at least double-paned types.
* Cover open ended barrel roof tiles.
* Remove dead vegetation from around the home.
* Assume extreme fire conditions when assessing your home’s vulnerabilities to ember attack.

During wildfires, your home may be exposed to thousands of embers that rain down on your home. Take action now to reduce the ember threat.

[h/t Fire Chief Jeff]
——————–

Idaho News:

Dozens of Santas hit the slopes

by CBS 2 News Staff Tuesday, December 25th 2018

Donnelly Idaho — Dozens of riders dressed as Santa Claus hit the slopes at tamarack today.

It was at the annual Santa ski day at the resort.

Today, the lift tickets were free for everyone who arrived at the resort dressed as old Saint Nick

They’re celebrating the consistent snowfall they’ve recently received.

In the last 48 hours the mountain has seen 7 new inches.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

El Niño may bring lump of coal for skiers

NOAA updates outlook for winter precipitation

Peter Jensen Dec 26, 2018 IME

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s updated forecast for precipitation and temperatures in the winter months of 2019 may portend bad news for skiers and snowboarders in central Idaho.

NOAA issued its most recent forecast last week, and it predicts a strong chance of above-normal temperatures in the Pacific Northwest in January, February and March, and lower-than-normal precipitation. The strongest chances are in western Washington and western Oregon, but elevated chances extend into central Idaho as well.

The forecasts are probabilistic and do not preclude the possibility of large storms moving through the northern Rocky Mountains and dropping a significant amount of snow.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

McCall, other Long Valley cities using recruiting to promote year-round economy

by Deni Hawkins Monday, December 24th 2018

McCall, Idaho (CBS 2) — Cities like McCall, Idaho are often labeled as seasonal mountain towns — towns known for having a tempo that changes with the seasons. McCall and its neighboring towns in the West Central Mountains like Cascade, Donnelly and New Meadows tend to swell in size during the summer and winter months, and then return to a slower pace in the ‘shoulder’ seasons.

But located some 100 miles from Boise, these cities have a need for a full-time workforce beyond the summer and holiday months. One group is working to straighten out what it calls misconceptions about the seasonality of this area, in order to promote a healthy, year-round economy.

Valley County boasts some 3,700 square miles of land, and is home to more than 10,600 people. The city of McCall’s population was listed at just over 3,350 people in 2017, according to the most recent U.S. Census estimates.

continued:
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Mining News:

Forest Service taking comments on Idaho open-pit mine plan

By Keith Ridler – 12/26/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — The U.S. Forest Service is taking comments and holding a public meeting on proposed exploratory drilling for an open-pit molybdenum mine being considered in Boise National Forest in Idaho.

The meeting comes two years after a federal judge rejected a previous Forest Service environmental assessment as lacking information about a rare plant called Sacajawea’s bitterroot.

The judge ruled in a lawsuit brought by environmental groups that the Forest Service didn’t adequately consider the exploratory drilling’s impact on the plant because officials hadn’t taken into account a 2014 wildfire that tore through the area.

continued:
— — — —

Sacajawea’s bitterroot (Lewisia sacajaweana)

By Edna Ray-Vizgirda

A species new to science, Sacajawea’s bitterroot (Lewisia sacajaweana), is the first plant species to be named in honor of Sacajawea.

An Idaho native, this rare and beautiful plant occurs nowhere else in the world but central Idaho. Just over two dozen populations of Sacajawea’s bitterroot are known to exist, roughly three-fourths of them on the Boise National Forest. Scattered populations also occur on the Payette, Sawtooth, and Salmon-Challis National Forests.

A high country resident, Sacajawea’s bitterroot can be found in montane and subalpine habitats ranging from 5,000 to 9,500 feet. The plant is dormant most of the year, like its relative, the common bitterroot, Lewisia rediviva (Montana’s state flower). Shortly after snowmelt, a rosette of succulent leaves emerges, followed by showy white flowers that hug the ground. After flowering, all aboveground signs of the plant disappear, with the tuberous carrot-like root hidden just below the surface.

continued:
—————————-

Public Lands:

Public access to Boise Ridge Road

By Natasha Williams Dec 23, 2018 KIVI TV

The Idaho State ATV Association has announced it has secured public access to Boise Ridge Road near Bogus Basin.

The agreement with DF Development allows access to off-highway vehicles (like ATV’s, UTV’s and motorcycles) during non-snow seasons, and requires riders to stay on the designated road. Access will begin in Spring of 2019.

The association also secured access across a DF Development property on the south and east sides of Herrick Reservoir near Cascade. The Idaho State Snowmobile Association has also secured public snowmobiling access to groomed routes, crossing DF Development property in Adams and Valley counties, in the New Meadows Area.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wilks brothers to allow use of roads near Cascade, NM

Agreement will reopen routes to backcountry, snowmobile trails

By Tom Grote for The Star-News December 27, 2018

Snowmobile routes in the New Meadows area and summer access to backcountry areas near Cascade will be reopened under new agreements signed with the owner of private lands in the area.

The deals were struck with DF Development, the Texas company that purchased 172,000 acres of private land in west-central Idaho in 2016.

“This is a wonderful Christmas gift to all recreationists,” Valley County Parks and Recreation Director Larry Laxson said.

The Idaho State Snowmobile Association secured snowmobile access to groomed routes crossing DF Development property in Adams and Valley counties in the New Meadows area, a news release said.

The historical groomed routes provide snowmobile access from Idaho 55 near New Meadows to winter play areas in the East Fork Weiser River drainage.

Access will be only during the winter and users must stay on groomed trails, according to the agreement. The trails have been groomed and are open, the release said.

A separate agreement between DF Development and the Idaho State ATV Association will open summer access of a road on DF Development property on the south and east sides of Herrick Reservoir near Cascade.

The road provides access to Forest Road 417 and the East Mountain area. The popular route serves as a starting point for off-road enthusiasts to enter the forested backcountry east of Cascade, the news release said.

The access, which will begin April 1, is only for warm-weather months. Users must stay on the designated road and stay off side roads and private land.

continued:
—————————

Letter to Share:

Kids Releasing pheasants

Dec. 25, 2018

2018DecGameBirdPheasants-a

Wow, thanks Amber. Can’t ask for anything better. I know of 5 roosters harvested Saturday. This is what we do. We teach the kids how to handle the birds. Release them and get them involved. The kids and their mentors came in when we started to band and release the roosters. We had 50 roosters and every kid got to handle at least one. We had 2-3 folks with camera’s and videos. Nice sonny cool day December 22nd. Last turn out for the year. The birds are the very best, thanks to Little Canyon Shooting Preserve and Idaho Fish and Game. When we all work together we can do and make things better. This is what the Gamebird Foundation is for. God Bless and have a great New Year.

Jim Hagedorn
Executive Director
The Gamebird Foundation
thegamebirdfoundation.org
——————–

Critter News:

Pet talk – Dystocia

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Dec 28, 2018 IME

Dystocia is the inability to initiate the act of labor or delivery of pups at the end of a pregnancy. Dog breeds at increased risk of dystocia include all “miniature” dogs, and dogs with wide heads such as bulldogs, Pekingese and chihuahuas.

The cause of dystocia can generally be classified into those caused by the mother and those caused by the fetus.

Uterine inertia is a condition in which the uterine muscles either cannot contract or becomes fatigued during labor from persistent straining against a fetus misaligned in the birth canal.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Toxic plant killing wildlife

Deer poisoned by Japanese yew

Dec 28, 2018 by Steve Liebenthal KIVI TV

An ornamental plant called Japanese yew may be attractive, but once again this year it is killing wildlife in Idaho. At least two deer have been found dead in the gem state with the highly toxic plant in their stomachs.

“It’s very attractive and it’s green and it’s beautiful, and that’s one of the reasons people plant it,” said IDFG Deer and Elk Coordinator Daryl Meints. “But unfortunately it’s very toxic to wildlife.”

Meints says he receives reports every year about deer and elk being poisoned by the plant, and awareness about Japanese yew hit a peak during the harsh winter two years ago. Dozens of animals desperate for food died from eating the shrub, including more than fifty pronghorn antelope near Payette.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Misdemeanors make up bulk of hunting and fishing violations

By Jonathan Hogan – 12/25/18 AP

Idaho Falls, Idaho — An Ashton man was driving along Fisherman’s Drive in Ashton on Oct. 20 when he saw a pheasant near the road. He stepped out of his car and shot the bird.

It would have been a good shot if the man hadn’t broken Fish and Game rules in the process. The bird was on private property, and the shooter was still standing on the road when he fired the shot. A witness contacted law enforcement.

“I just shot and didn’t even think,” the man told the Idaho Fish and Game officer who responded, according to an incident report. He told the officer he knew it was illegal to shoot the pheasant from the road and he “(s)houlda just took one more step.”

Fish and Game violations cover incidents of illegal or improper hunting in Idaho.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Fish and Game sting results in one arrest

Hunting from public roads is against the law – one man in Bonner Co. found that out the hard way when he shot a decoy deer staged by Idaho Fish and Game officers.

Taylor Viydo December 28, 2018 KTVB

Idaho Fish and Game officers set up a sting operation off of a Forest Service Road near Hoodoo Mountain in Bonner County, which resulted in one person’s arrest.

Court documents indicate officers weren’t targeting a specific person, but were prepared to catch anyone breaking the law.

That particular law? People hunting and shooting deer from a public road.

In this case, officers had set up a decoy deer off the road and waited in bushes nearby. Around 6 p.m., as someone approached, an officer wrote that he started rolling his camera phone.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Citing government shutdown, Interior blocks public comments on greater sage grouse habitat

Shutdown: Interior blocks online portal

Author: Benjamin Spillman, Reno Gazette Journal December 25, 2018

Reno, Nev. – Citing the government shutdown, the Department of the Interior is denying online access to documents outlining a proposal to change conservation rules over 83 million acres of greater sage grouse habitat in six states.

The denial comes despite the fact the planning process to implement the changes is in the midst of a 30-day period in which the public is allowed to provide feedback.

The conservation group Western Watersheds Projected noticed the denial Monday when attempting to access the documents on the department’s website.

continued:
————————–

Fish & Game News:

Eight reasons to renew your hunting and fishing licenses now for 2019

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Thursday, December 27, 2018

A 2019 resident Sportsman’s Package is as low as $124.25 and gives you almost all of Idaho’s hunting and fishing opportunities

You need a new hunting and fishing license before your first outing of 2019. You might procrastinate, and then run around looking for an open store to buy a hunting or fishing license because you’re leaving early for your first trip, or buy it right away and have peace of mind, as well as a full year of hunting and fishing.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Forget dogs and cats. The most pampered pets of the moment might be our backyard chickens

Backyard chickens join dogs, cats as most pampered pets

Gene Sloan, USA TODAY December 25, 2018


Giselle Raad, 11, collects eggs from “The Breakfast Club” chicken coop on her family’s property in Michigan. The coop features painted and hand-stenciled walls, art work and vintage decor including a chandelier and a painted shelf. Danielle Raad

When it came time to decorate the new Amish-built house on her 26-acre property near Lansing, Michigan, Danielle Raad went all out.

She painted the interior walls a lustrous eggshell blue, and spent hours hand-stenciling one with an intricate pattern. She lined rooms with handmade art, including her own work and that of her kids. She brought in vintage objects such as a chandelier and a painted shelf. Her mother added items covered in decoupaged roses.

Raad put her father in charge of prettying up the outside, which features barn-red siding, white picket fencing, flower boxes and a scarecrow.

continued w/photo gallery:
———————–

Seasonal Humor:


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Dec 23, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Dec 23, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: Yahoo has been blocking emails from the Yellow Pine Times. There is nothing I can do about it. If you know a subscriber that uses Yahoo, please ask them to send me a different email address. – Thanks

Community Calendar:

Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
Firewood Season is Closed
December 25 Christmas Dinner at the YP Tavern 3pm
December 31 New Year’s Eve
~ 2019 Events ~
May 25, 2019 ATV-UTV Scavenger Hunt Memorial Day Weekend
Jul 13, 2019 Ride to Big Creek
Sep 14, 2019 Ride to Cinnabar

(details below)
———-

Village News:

Yellow Pine Tavern

Christmas Dinner in Yellow Pine at the Yellow Pine Tavern, Tuesday, December 25, 2018 at 3pm


— — — —

Yellow Pine Santa’s Elves….

“Christmas bags are at Yellow Pine Tavern, stop on by and add your goodies to them!!”

Contact Nicki
— — — —

Lower Johnson Creek Plowing

Note: when traveling to the dump, please use the river side of the road for wheeled vehicles so the hill side can be for snowmobilers. Turnouts will be plowed.

– CD
— — — —

Come Spring…

“To Yellow Pine residents. I will be making several trips next spring and summer hauling out metal, appliances, etc. . If you need anything hauled away please get on the list. Vehicles require a title. I will be hauling gravel back if anyone is interested.”

Contact Mike Amos
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

We are on 3-day a week mail delivery from Cascade. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Be sure to buy your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Thursday (Dec 20) the road to the dump is icy, 3 of the 4 dumpsters were full.

12/15/2018 – Report that folks are once again dumping boxes and furniture outside of the transfer station. Please remind friends and neighbors about the rules.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.


— — — —

Ice Hole Campground Closed

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
— — — —

Predators

It should be safe to put bird feeders back out, bears are hibernating (according to Jon Hunter our F&G CO.) However, foxes are coming around and they do like bird seed.

Please remember to keep trash secured, it will draw foxes, coyotes and loose dogs.
———-

Local Events:

2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine.
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx
— — — —

VYPA News:

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 18th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th. Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.
— — — —

YPFD News:

The next meeting to be May 18th, 2019 at the Community Hall

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sundays at 11am will resume in the Spring.

The YPFD has 2 Size Chimney Brushes with extension rods that were donated for use around YP. If you would like to borrow one, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you. The YPFD also has loanable mitigation tools, (Weed-Whacker, Hedge Trimmer, backpack blower and 16’ pole saw). If you would like to borrow one or all, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you.

It’s also time to check the Smoke Alarm batteries and Fire Extinguishers. Please test the alarm and replace Smoke Alarm Batteries every year, if you have the replaceable battery type. Fire Extinguishers should be checked as well and should be easily seen and reachable. A good location for the Fire Extinguishers would be the kitchen and near the wood stove and/or fireplace. The needle should be in the green.

If you need a Smoke Detector or Fire Extinguisher for your YP residence please contact Jeff F.
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for winter
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Closed for winter
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Winter Hours at the Tavern: 9am-2pm and 4-8pm Mon, Wed, Fri, Sat and 9am-2pm Sun. Or call 208 633-2233 the phone rings into the house.
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC

Link to FB page:
https://www.facebook.com/idahoelkhunts/
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430 – 50# bag of Polar Ice Melt available for $7.99. Breaks the Ice Barrier. Quick Melting action, even in heavy snow.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
Cleaning chimneys and stoves
307-258-8951 – We’re moving from Idaho City to Donnelly in a few months and service all over Idaho, including Yellow Pine.
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Dec 17) early morning rain, stayed just above freezing during the night, overcast and misting this morning. Rain on packed snow has turned to ice, very slippery – boot cleat season! Raven calling and flying over the village early afternoon. Misting and drizzling on and off in the afternoon and cloudy, high of 38 degrees. Elk “repellent” fired off to the east at dusk. Breaks in the clouds and getting foggy at dark.

Tuesday (Dec 18) overnight low of 28 degrees, rain/snow mix and gusty breezes early morning, low clouds – socked in nearly to the valley floor. A trace of new snow and about 4″ of old snow (on top of a layer of ice.) Small birds twittering from the trees, wet glops of snow mixed with rain before lunch. All rain after lunch time, cloudy and breezy at times, high of 36 degrees. Quiet afternoon. Raining, breezy and foggy low clouds at dark. Not raining at 1030pm.

Wednesday (Dec 19) overnight low of 30 degrees, a trace of graupel (little snowballs) fell before 10am, overcast and about 4″ old snow on the ground. Female hairy woodpecker visiting. A bit of traffic this morning. A short little snow flurry after lunch, then cloudy and melting, high of 38 degrees. More traffic than normal in the afternoon. Partly clear at dark, fat waxing moon rising.

Thursday (Dec 20) overnight low of 25 degrees, mostly cloudy skies this morning, average of 4″ of crusty frozen snow on the ground, very icy paths. Jays and hairy woodpecker visiting. Breezy and mostly cloudy by early afternoon, melting and dripping a little. High thin clouds and bits of clear sky late afternoon, high of 47 degrees. At dusk there appears to be less clouds, high haze, breezy and fat nearly full moon coming up over the ridge. Thicker clouds and breezy later in the evening and raining by midnight. Turned to snow before 2am and probably done by 4am.

Friday (Dec 21) overnight low of 27 degrees, mostly cloudy this morning, 3/4″ new snow and an average of 5″ on the ground – crusty on top of frozen slush. Female hairy woodpecker visiting. Partly clear and scattered sunshine around lunch time, high of 34 degrees. By mid-afternoon it was overcast and below freezing. Cloudy at dusk.

Saturday (Dec 22) low this morning of 11 degrees, clear sky, estimate 5″ old crusty snow on the ground. Sunrise (down here) at 1044am. Jays and hairy woodpecker visiting. Quiet morning, no traffic. A bit of high haze by lunch time, high of 32 degrees. Mid-afternoon icicles dripping and only 30 degrees. Cloudy at dusk. Quiet evening, fuzzy moon.

Sunday (Dec 23) started snowing early this morning, about 1/2″ by 1030am and 26 degrees, overcast and snowing. Fresh squirrel tracks in the new snow. Female hairy woodpecker visited. Very light snowfall all morning and into mid-afternoon, below freezing and slight breeze. Light snowfall all afternoon (about 1/4″ accumulation), high of 31 degrees. Still snowing at dusk.
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Tips & Advice:

Be Ember Aware! Tip Series

“Used with permission from University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and the Living With Fire program.”

Be Ember Aware Tip #10 – Dead or Alive?

Dead vegetation poses a much greater fire hazard than living plants. Actively growing plants can control the amount of water in their tissues by drawing on moisture from the soil to get more or by transpiring moisture to reduce the amount. Through irrigation, we can ensure that living plants in our landscape have plenty of moisture in their leaves and stems, which is a good thing during fire season.

On the other hand, the water content of dead vegetation is largely controlled by the amount of moisture in the air. If it is a hot, sunny, windy day, with low humidity, dead vegetation will be very dry. The drier the vegetation, the more easy is will be to ignite it and the faster it will burn. Dead vegetation should be routinely removed from around the home, roof, deck and wooden fences during fire season.

Dead vegetation includes:

* Dried grass, such as cheatgrass, and dried weeds
* Fallen pine needles and leaves
* Dead branches on the ground or still attached to living plants
* Dead shrubs and trees
The presence of dead vegetation on or near your home greatly increases your vulnerability to ember attack during wildfire. Keep your landscape plants healthy, green, and irrigated during fire season.

[h/t Fire Chief Jeff]
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Idaho News:

Our snowpack is below normal

by Roland Steadham, Chief Meteorologist Monday, December 17th 2018

Our snowpack levels are below normal throughout southwest Idaho. We gauge how our winter season is doing by these numbers. For example, the Boise Basin is at 60%. That means that we are 60% “of” normal. If we were where we need to be for this time of the year, that number would be 100%. So far, we only have a little more than half our normal snowpack. It’s a good thing the pattern is still looking active for the next 7-10 days!

continued:
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Valley: Snowmobile trails to be open for Christmas

County network includes 400 miles of groomed trails

By Max Silverson for The Star-News December 20, 2018

Only about 20 percent of snowmobile trails in the area had enough snow this week to be groomed for snowmobilers, Valley County Recreation Director Larry Laxson said.

But Laxon was confident more trails will be open if forecasted snow arrives.

“Absolutely, people will be able to go snowmobiling over the holiday,” he said. “We’ll get stuff open, and we’ll get it to where people can enjoy their Christmas.”

When fully operational, the snowmobile trail network includes about 400 miles of groomed trails in Valley, Adams and Idaho counties. About 50 miles of trail were groomed this week.

“For everything to be open, the trails would need about two feet of snow with a lot of moisture in it that would allow us to actually build a trail,” Laxson said.

The route to Burgdorf Hot Springs from the Francis Wallace parking lot on Warren Wagon Road north of McCall was open this week, but grooming past the turnoff to the hot springs has been difficult.

“We’ve been to Warren once, but we can’t get through Secesh right now,” Laxson said.

Also groomed have been trails to Fisher Creek Saddle and Granite Lake originating from the Gordon Titus parking lot near Brundage Mountain Resort, he said.

The trail to No Business Saddle and Little 4-Corners has been groomed from the Tamarack Falls parking lot on West Mountain Road, Laxson said.

From the Anderson Creek parking lot, groomers have been able to make it to 4-Corners Saddle and Beer Bottle Crossing, but no further, he said.

These trails are groomed and maintained under an agreement between the counties involved and the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation.

continued:
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Child struck by car in McCall while sledding, later dies in hospital

by CBS 2 News Staff Friday, December 21st 2018

McCall, Idaho (CBS2) — A child has died after being hit by a car while sledding Friday in McCall, police say.

Police say the crash happened on Lake Ridge Drive.

Two kids were sledding in a driveway and one slid out into the road into the path of a Land Rover.

The driver attempted to stop, but was unable to do so in time.

continued:
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Jan. 3 open house to show plans for Horsethief improvements

The Star-News December 20, 2018

An open house will be held in Nampa on Thursday, Nov. 3, about campground improvements at Horsethief Reservoir east of Cascade.

The open house will be held from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Fish and Game’s Nampa Regional Office, 3101 S. Powerline Rd.

Fish and Game plans to apply for grants from the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation’s RV program to provide electrical infrastructure to the entire west side of Horsethief Reservoir.

The grants also would more fully develop sites and roads in the Osprey Bay and Easters Cove loops.

During the last couple of years, Fish and Game has received grants for improving camping amenities and infrastructure at Horsethief, including installing more fire rings and picnic tables at some sites, as well as developing campground host sites to reduce the possibility of closures from lack of qualified hosts.

Comments may be submitted to joe.kozfkay@idfg.idaho.gov or by calling 208-475-2764.

source:
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Whooping cough found in schools

Health District: ‘Several students’ diagnosed with contagious respiratory disease

Mark Dee 12/19/2018 IME

“Several students” in the Blaine County School District have come down with pertussis, a highly contagious respiratory infection commonly known as whooping cough, according to the South Central Public Health District.

At least three students have been diagnosed in the Wood River Valley, according to Health District spokeswoman Brianna Bodily. On Friday morning, the School District confirmed the cases in an email sent to parents, staff and community members.

… This has been a big year for whooping cough across South Central’s eight-county purview, though the disease is highly cyclical, according to Bodily. So far, 30 confirmed cases have been reported districtwide in 2018, 12 of which were in Blaine County. Last year, there were only three, with a single case locally.

full story:
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Scam Alerts:

New tax scam targeting Idaho residents

Dec 17, 2018 By Steve Bertel KIVI TV

Boise – Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden and the State Tax Commission are alerting Idahoans to a new tax scam targeting Idaho residents.

The alert comes after a Nampa woman contacted the Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Division to verify the legitimacy of a document she had received in the mail. The mailer was not legitimate; it falsely claimed she owed $15,390 in income taxes to the State of Idaho.

The mailer was labeled as a “Notice of Default Pending Execution” and included two seals –- though not official state seals –- at the top. The scammers included a working telephone number in order to continue the fraud attempt via phone.

continued:
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Social Security phone scam circulating

Dec 20, 2018 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Idaho Falls-Bonneville County Crimestoppers is warning of a new scam, involving people pretending to represent the Social Security Administration.

According to the group, callers claim there has been suspicious activity on your social security number. The scam call may even appear to be a valid number for Social Security on your Caller ID.

Posing as a Social Security Worker, scammers will ask for personal information or a payment.

If you have provided information to a scammer, take identity theft protection steps right away. Those include checking your credit report and issuing a credit freeze with credit bureaus.

source:
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Mining News:

Community Agreement Moves Forward With Seven Cities & Counties

December 14 Midas Gold Idaho

We are excited to share the news! Midas Gold and seven of the communities surrounding the Stibnite Gold Project site have officially established a community agreement. The agreement, signed on November 30, creates a collaborative environment for local communities to work together with us throughout the life of our project. It also provides a venue for cities and counties to address concerns and opportunities directly with our company and establishes the Stibnite Foundation to support community projects.

We are looking forward to working with the members of the Stibnite Advisory Council. Working alongside communities has always been an important pillar of the Stibnite Gold Project. We’ve spent a lot of time out in the communities, speaking with our neighbors and listening to their ideas because we know this information helps make our project stronger. Through this agreement, we’ve formalized this philosophy and given every signatory to the agreement a voice and seat at the table throughout the life of our project. Plus, working together with all of these communities ensures we develop regional solutions and that each city and county, regardless of size, is treated equally.

Since August, Cascade, Council, Donnelly, Idaho County, New Meadows, Riggins and Yellow Pine all voted unanimously to become part of the community agreement. We are so grateful for the hard work Anne Labelle, Midas Gold Idaho Board Member, and Belinda Provancher, community relations manager for Midas Gold Idaho, put into this agreement. They both worked closely with each of the communities to gather their feedback and incorporate it into the final document.

continued:
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Effort to reopen Bunker Hill Mine runs into problems

By Becky Kramer – 12/17/18 AP

Kellogg, Idaho — For nearly a century, the Bunker Hill Mine in Kellogg was the source of tremendous wealth.

The massive underground mine produced lead for bullets fired in two world wars and zinc for rust-proofing steel. Paychecks from the Bunker supported generations of Idaho workers and their families, and the profits enriched shareholders far beyond the Silver Valley.

These days, however, the closed mine costs U.S. taxpayers about $1 million annually. Polluted water gushes out of the Bunker Hill’s portal at a rate of 1,300 gallons per minute, traveling by ditch to a treatment plant run by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The federal government spends about $80,000 each month to remove toxic levels of heavy metals from the water.

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Public Lands:

USDA Forest Service Midvale Telephone extension Update

12/17/2018

The Forest Service is seeking scoping comments for the proposed buried copper telephone line on the McCall Ranger District of the Payette National Forest. The enclosed scoping document provides more detailed information about the project. The scoping document is also available on the project’s webpage at http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=55239

The Forest Service is contacting interested individuals, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by January 16, 2019, and make your comments as specific as possible.

The project webpage provides you tools to engage this process as you wish. From “Get Connected” on the right hand side of the page, click on “Subscribe to Email Updates” if you wish to receive electronic communication about this project. Use the “Comment/Object on project” link to access a simple webform to submit your comments on this project. The “Public Comment/Objection Reading Room” are the published comments received on this project.

Webform submission is preferred but hardcopy comments concerning this project will be accepted. Comments for the project may be submitted to the McCall Ranger District at 102 W. Lake Street, McCall, ID 83638. Hand delivered comment letters may be delivered during regular business hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, excluding holidays.

Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection and will be released in their entirety if requested pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act. Comments received in response to this request will also be available for public inspection on the “Public Comment Reading Room” on the project webpage.

For further information on this project, please contact Denise F. Cobb at 208-634-0446 or denise.cobb@usda.gov.

Sincerely,
Lisa Klinger, McCall District Ranger
Payette National Forest
Midvale Telephone Extension Scoping Document.pdf
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USDA Forest Service Kamp Claims 1-3 Bulk Sampling Project Update

12/17/2018

The Forest Service is seeking scoping comments for the proposed Kamp Claims 1-3 Bulk Sampling project on the McCall Ranger District of the Payette National Forest. The scoping document is available on the project’s webpage at https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=55235

The Forest Service is contacting interested individuals, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by January 16, 2019, and make your comments as specific as possible.

To submit comments using the web form select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project website. Only those who subscribe to the GovDelivery mailing list or submit comments will receive future correspondence on this project. Comments submitted anonymously will be accepted and considered; however, without an associated name and address, receiving further correspondences concerning these projects will not be possible.

Webform submission is preferred but hard copy comments concerning this project will be accepted. Comments for the project may be submitted to the McCall District Office 102 West Lake Street McCall, Idaho 83638. Hand delivered comment letters may be delivered during regular business hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, excluding holidays.

Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection and will be released in their entirety if requested pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act. Comments received in response to this request will also be available for public inspection on the “Public Comment Reading Room” on the project webpage.

For further information on this project, please contact Clint Hughes, Geologist at 208-634-0756.

Sincerely,
Lisa J. Klinger
McCall District Ranger
Payette National Forest
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Forest Service seeks public comment on CuMo Exploration Project SREA

12/21/2018

Boise, Idaho, December 21, 2018 — The 2018 CuMo Exploration Project, presented in the form of a supplemental “redline” environmental assessment (SREA) has been prepared and the Forest is seeking comment.

The SREA contains information from the 2011 environmental assessment (EA) and 2015 supplemental environmental assessment (SEA) that is still relevant and did not change; that information remains in black text, while any new information, updates, and/or clarifications are presented in red text. As was done in the 2011 EA and 2015 SEA, the 2018 SREA evaluates three alternatives in detail: Alternative A – Proposed Action, Alternative B – Reduced Roads, and Alternative C – No Action. It is important to note that the SREA discloses the analyses of the mineral exploration specifically core sample drilling activities. This current environmental assessment does not consider mine development.

Following issuance of the 2016 Court Order, the Pioneer Fire began on July 18, 2016. This fire burned approximately 190,000 acres, including 1,578 acres (55 percent) of the CuMo Exploration Project area. As identified in the 2017 scoping documents for this project, consideration of changed conditions resulting from the 2016 Pioneer Fire and updates to most resource baseline conditions and effects analyses were needed.

One public meeting will be held during the 30-day Notice and Comment Period. The public meeting will be conducted in an open house format with the overall goal to share with the public the current supplemental environmental analysis. The meeting will be held on January 9, 2018 from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. at the Best Western Plus – Vista Inn at the Airport, 2645 Airport Avenue, in Boise, Idaho.

Written, facsimile, hand-delivered, and electronic comments concerning this SREA will be accepted for 30 calendar days following the publication of the legal notice for public comment in the Idaho Statesman, the newspaper of record for the Boise National Forest. The publication date in the newspaper of record is the exclusive means for calculating the comment period for this analysis.

Those wishing to comment should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source. The regulations prohibit extending the length of the comment period. Please submit specific written comments to Rick Wells, Project Team Leader; at Boise National Forest, 1249 South Vinnell Way, Suite 200; Boise, Idaho 83709; or by fax at 208-373-4111. Office hours for those submitting hand-delivered comments are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding Federal holidays.

For additional information regarding this project, please contact Rick Wells by phone at 208-373-4100 or by email at: rickywells@fs.fed.us.

Comments may be submitted through the CuMo Exploration Project web page using the web form located at: https://cara.ecosystem-anagement.org/Public/CommentInput?project=52875

Email comments may be submitted with attachments in MS Word (.doc) or Adobe (.pdf) format to: comments-intermtn-boise@fs.fed.us. Please include “CuMo Exploration Project” in the subject line of the email.
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Idaho, USDA sign logging and forest restoration agreement

Dec 18, 2018 By Steve Bertel KIVI TV

Boise — Idaho has signed an agreement with federal authorities to increase logging and restoration work on millions of acres of U.S. Forest Service lands that experts say are increasingly plagued with insect infestations and destructive wildfires.

Idaho Governor “Butch” Otter, Gov.-elect Brad Little and U.S. Department of Agriculture Undersecretary Jim Hubbard signed the Shared Stewardship Agreement on Tuesday — that officials say could serve as a template for other Western states.

The agreement calls for ramping up a federal-state partnership of the federally approved Good Neighbor Authority that allows state workers to assist on timber sales and restoration work on Forest Service land.

continued:
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Critter News:

Should you give pets as gifts for the holidays?

December 21, 2018 Circa

We recently went to the Humane Rescue Alliance in Washington to answer some questions about pets and the holidays. Specifically, is it OK to give a pet as a gift for Christmas?

We spoke with Becca Stern, the director of adoptions, to determine if there were any negative consequences to the practice. She said that it isn’t always a great idea, but there’s no hard and fast rule.

“It’s great to add an animal to your home for the holidays or a family or a friend’s home, but just remember nobody likes the gift of surprise responsibility,” Stern said.

What you might want to avoid is giving the gift of a pet when the receiver won’t be able to pay enough attention to it. New pets, especially young ones, need a lot of attention to get used to new environments. For instance, if the receiver of your gift is hosting a big holiday party soon, it would be best to hold off on gifting the pet until after the party.

continued:
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Idaho’s dog ownership is the highest in the US

12/23/18 AP

Idaho is one of the most pet-friendly places in the country and tops the charts when it comes to dog ownership, a recent study has found.

The Idaho Statesman reports Idaho had the highest percentage of dog ownership in the country at the end of 2016, the most recent year the full dataset is available.

The American Veterinary Medical Association says 38 percent of households in the U.S. have a pet dog, but in Idaho, 58 percent of households have a dog.

That’s 6 percentage points higher than the next-highest states, Montana and Arkansas.

When it comes to cats, Idahoans are significantly less enthusiastic. Only 33 percent of Idaho households have a cat as a pet. Still, Idaho made the top 10 list for cat ownership, coming in eighth on a roster led by Vermont.

source:
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Pet Talk – Fatty tumors in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Dec 21, 2018 IME

Fatty tumors are called lipomas. They are benign tumors that arise from the growth of fat cells. They are very common in overweight middle-age to older dogs. All breeds of dogs can be affected, but Labrador retrievers are overly represented. Though only one tumor may be present, more often several lipomas develop over time.

The exact cause is unknown. These tumors also can develop in people.

Lipomas are well-defined, soft, oval-to-round growths that can be felt under the skin. They usually feel smooth and soft and can be easily moved around under the skin. Most occur on the trunk of the dog, especially under the chest. They start out small but can become as large as an orange or grapefruit. Most lipomas do not cause clinical signs and are discovered by the owner petting their dog. Some lipomas can cause problems with walking if they involve one of the dog’s joints. In rare instances, lipomas can develop in the abdomen or around the heart, where they can cause more clinical signs of distress.

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Wolf killed by Wildlife Services

Action in September followed attack on sheep near Sun Valley

Greg Moore Dec 21, 2018 IME

The federal Wildlife Services agency killed a young male wolf in the upper Corral Creek drainage in September in response to a report of depredation by wolves on 10 sheep. It was the first killing of a wolf in response to livestock depredation in the Wood River Wolf Project’s area of operation since it began providing ranchers with nonlethal deterrent tools in 2008.

The U.S. Forest Service’s Ketchum district ranger, Kurt Nelson, said he was informed by Wildlife Services state Director Todd Grimm in early August that Flat Top Sheep Co. had reported a total of six ewes and lambs killed and four injured.

Flat Top owner John Peavey said in an interview that he had about 700 ewes and 750-800 lambs grazing in the East Fork of the Big Wood River drainage just over the ridge south of the Corral Creek drainage.

continued:
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Wolf Education International

12/22/2018 Newsletter

Idaho Farm Bureau policy priorities include wolves

“You can only find the boots of the unfortunates”
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Idaho appeals ruling that restored grizzly protections

December 21, 2018 AP

Attorneys for the state of Idaho are appealing a judge’s decision that blocked grizzly bear hunts and restored federal protections for the animals in and around Yellowstone National Park.

U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen in Montana ruled in September that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service should not have removed threatened species protections for the Yellowstone bears in 2017.

The ruling blocked the first grizzly hunts in decades in Wyoming and Idaho.

continued:
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Groups plan suit over Idaho, Wyoming bear baiting

Environmental groups the government to prohibit hunters from using bait to lure bears.

Associated Press December 20, 2018

Jackson, Wyoming — Environmental groups say they will sue the U.S. government for not prohibiting hunters from using bait to lure bears in national forests in two Western states.

Most bear hunters practice bear baiting, especially during the springtime.

Erik Molvar with the Western Watersheds Project tells the Jackson Hole News & Guide that bear baiting by hunters pursuing black bears causes grizzly bears to be killed.

continued:
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Fawn dies after eating toxic plant

December 21, 2018 Local News 8

Rexburg, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – A mule deer fawn died of yew toxicity after ingesting a large amount of Japanese yew.

Conservation Officer Andrew Sorensen received a call about the deceased mule deer fawn on the outskirts of Rexburg on Dec. 19.

The fawn belonged to a group of about 25 mule deer that hang out on the south end of town every winter.

Japanese yew is a non-native plant that is often used an ornamental shrub for landscaping. It is often sold by local nurseries and chosen by homeowners due to the plants ability to stay green and lush all year. Japanese yew is highly toxic when ingested by domestic livestock or by wildlife such as deer, elk, pronghorn and moose. Eating only a few ounces of the plant may result in the death of the animal.

continued:
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Agreement reached on salmon survival plan

Dec 19, 2018 Local News 8

Portland, Or. (KIFI/KIDK) – Key parties have agreed on a plan designed to improve salmon survival while managing costs of hydropower production.

Federal, state, and tribal partners have developed an agreement focusing on the operation of federal dams in the Columbia River System. The parties involved include the states of Oregon, Washington, the Nez Perce Tribe, the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the Bureau of Reclamation. Idaho and Montana are also supporting the flexible operation.

It covers up to three years of fish passage spill operations at eight lower Columbia and Snake River dams. The agreement avoids litigation while the lead agencies complete a Columbia River System Operations Environmental Impact Statement.

continued:
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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
December 21, 2018
Issue No. 893
Table of Contents

* Parties Sign Agreement On Flexible Spill For Fish Passage At Columbia/Snake Dams; Agree Not To Continue Spill Litigation
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441945.aspx

* Hells Canyon Agreement: No Salmonid Reintroduction Above Dams For Now, Stresses Habitat Restoration, Research
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441944.aspx

* Council Receives Proposed Amendments To Columbia Basin Fish And Wildlife Program, Comments Due Feb. 4
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441943.aspx

* Inslee Budget Includes Over $1 Billion For Orcas/Salmon; $750,000 For Stakeholder Task Force On Lower Snake Dams
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441942.aspx

* Northern Pikeminnow Sport Reward Program Removes 180,000 Fish In 2018, Top Angler Over $71,000
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441941.aspx

* Study Looks At How Carbon Emissions Absorbed By Ocean Impact Salmon’s Sense Of Smell
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441940.aspx

* Upper Columbia Basin Bull Trout Study Finds Small Populations Declining, At Risk
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441939.aspx

* Drought/Climate Outlook Conference Suggests Region-Wide, Below-Average Snowpack For Coming Months
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441938.aspx

* Over 6 Million Chinook Salmon Fry Die After Windstorm Cuts Power At Washington Hatchery
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441937.aspx

* Excess Algae, Aging Infrastructure Likely Cause Of Chinook Egg, Fry Loss At Oregon Hatchery
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441936.aspx

* Deputy Director Schriever Named New Director Of Idaho Fish And Game
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441935.aspx

* Feedback: Redoing Total Maximum Daily Load Determinations For Oregon Rivers
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441934.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

Dec. 19: Lake Cascade ice conditions and fishing update

By Paul Janssen, Fisheries Regional Biologist
Wednesday, December 19, 2018

We had snow and rain for two days, which has removed all the snow on the ice and has caused mixed ice conditions around the lake.

At Poison Creek boat ramp area on the west side of lake there was 5 1/2 to 6 inches of original ice. On top of that there was 2 to 3 inches of water and a thin layer of ice. With each step you go through the thin layer of ice and into water on top of the original ice. Bring rubber boots if your going to fish in this area. There was a couple groups of anglers there and there were three or four groups out off the Boulder Creek boat ramp on the east side south of Donnelly.

Sugarloaf Campground road on the east side north of Cascade is still very passable with 2 to 3 inches of snow. At the boat ramp the ice had receded a couple feet from the ramp from all the rain. All the snow is gone off the ice and there was 1/2 inch or so of water under 1/2 inch of ice on top of the original ice. A little spooky to walk on. Still 3 1/2 to 4 inches of original ice here.

continued:
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Lake Cascade should continue to produce good perch fishing, but jumbos may decline

By Paul Janssen, Fisheries Regional Biologist
Wednesday, December 19, 2018

Lake has produced two world record perch and several state records in recent years

Since 2012, Fish and Game’s McCall fisheries staff has conducted annual fall surveys on Lake Cascade by using gillnets and recording the species and sizes captured in the nets.

Overall, perch numbers are similar to 2017 numbers, but down from annual surveys since 2012 (see below). Also perch greater than 10 inches dominate the population, and have since 2014-15.

continued:
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Need a last minute gift? Hunt/fish licenses and Super Hunt entries make great stocking stuffers

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Thursday, December 20, 2018

You can buy gift certificates at regional offices to be redeemed for licenses

Give the gift of the great outdoors – gift certificates for a fishing license, hunting license, or Super Hunt entry make excellent stocking stuffers.

Fishing and hunting provide a good excuse to get outside, see the beauty of Idaho, and spend precious time with family and friends. For outdoor enthusiasts, there is a fishing or hunting season open throughout the year.

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More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Rocco The Cheeky Parrot Keeps Using Amazon’s Alexa To Order Snacks

The African grey interacts with the virtual assistant up to 40 times a day, asking it to tell him jokes and play his favorite music.

By David Barden Dec 16, 2018

A mischievous parrot who was booted from an animal sanctuary for his foul mouth has found a friend in Amazon’s Alexa device.

Rocco, an African grey, was caught using the virtual assistant to play his favorite music, tell jokes and even order snacks, The Times of London reports.

Thankfully the device’s parental lock system prevented the clever boy from actually purchasing any items – which included strawberries, ice cream and even a kettle.

Owner Marion Wischnewski told The Times she took the parrot in after he was removed from a sanctuary operated by the UK’s National Animal Welfare Trust for swearing too much.

Rocco, who was taught to curse by a previous owner, is evidently loving his new home, interacting with Alexa up to 40 times a day and mastering countless household sounds.

“He knows the telephone and can make different mobile ringtones,” Wischnewski said. “He can do the microwave or the squeaking door on my fridge. He can do the ice cream van in the summer, and a truck reversing so loud you think it’s in your living room.”

source:
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Seasonal Humor:


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Dec 16, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Dec 16, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
Firewood Season is Closed
December 21, Winter Solstice
December 25 Christmas Dinner at the YP Tavern 3pm
December 31 New Year’s Eve
~ 2019 Events ~
May 25, 2019 ATV-UTV Scavenger Hunt Memorial Day Weekend
Jul 13, 2019 Ride to Big Creek
Sep 14, 2019 Ride to Cinnabar

(details below)
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Village News:

Midas Gold Holiday Celebration December 8th

We feel very lucky to call the people of Yellow Pine our neighbors and, in many ways, family. We had a great time on Saturday and appreciate everyone who came to celebrate the holiday with good cheer and of course banana cream and apple crisp.

Moving forward, we hope that the community will continue to reach out to us with questions and ideas on the project or how we can work together.

Mckinsey Lyon, Midas Gold Inc.
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Stibnite Advisory Council

December 5, 2018 Meeting Synopsis

Attendance:
Lynn Imel – Yellow Pine
Glenna Young – Cascade
Gene Tyler – Donnelly
Julie Good – New Meadows
Bob Crump – Riggins
Tami Testa – Council
Denis Duman – Idaho County
Anne Labelle – Midas Gold

Synopsis prepared by: Anne Labelle, Midas Gold Idaho, Inc.

* Chair – Until bylaws are approved, Anne Labelle will serve as the existing Chair.

* Meetings – Meetings will be monthly, generally on the second Thursday of each month, 10:00 AM to noon, Midas Gold Idaho’s Donnelly office, with call-in option.

* Working Group for Stibnite Advisory Council Bylaws – Bylaws for the Stibnite Advisory Council will be developed and proposed by Julie Good – New Meadows, Gene Tyler – Donnelly and Anne Labelle—Midas Gold. The working group will work to present final bylaws to the full advisory council for approval by the deadline of March 31, 2019.

* Working Group for Stibnite Foundation – The Stibnite Foundation working group will consist of Julie Good – New Meadows and Anne Labelle—Midas Gold Deadline for Midas Gold to create the Foundation is February 28, 2019. The contribution of $100,000 cash plus 1.5 million MGC shares will be provided within a further 60 days of the Foundation creation date. The additional $100,000 contribution for calendar 2019 is due in Q1/19 so not later than March 31, 2019 provided the Foundation has been created.

* Stibnite Gold Project Presentation January 10, 2019 – The Stibnite Advisory Council would like an overview of the project at their January 10, 2019 meeting. From that initial presentation, the Advisory Council will determine which working groups they would like to organize, if any. The Advisory Council will provide us with a list of topics they would like covered by December 31.

* Form of Reporting to Communities – We determined that the obligation of the Stibnite Advisory Council to report back to the Communities will take the form of a meeting summary and minutes distributed to the elected entity for each Community (for example the City of Cascade, Yellow Pine Village Association, etc.). The elected entity will likely distribute in their meeting packets, but this is up to the individual community re how to distribute.
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Lower Johnson Creek Plowing

Note: when traveling to the dump, please use the river side of the road for wheeled vehicles so the hill side can be for snowmobilers. Turnouts will be plowed.

– CD
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December 14 Wind

Saturday was pretty blustery in Yellow Pine with some impressive gusts. Got a report on Sunday that trees were down on the EFSF and South Fork roads, a path had been cut wide enough for vehicles.

On Sunday a crew from Yellow Pine went out and cleaned up the EFSF road, then checked Johnson Creek road and found more downed trees to clean up.

(Waiting on update from Valley Co. Road Dept. on the South Fork situation.)
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Yellow Pine Santa’s Elves….

“Christmas bags are at Yellow Pine Tavern, stop on by and add your goodies to them!!”

Contact Nicki
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Yellow Pine Tavern

Christmas Dinner in Yellow Pine at the Yellow Pine Tavern, Tuesday, December 25, 2018 at 3pm


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Come Spring…

“To Yellow Pine residents. I will be making several trips next spring and summer hauling out metal, appliances, etc. . If you need anything hauled away please get on the list. Vehicles require a title. I will be hauling gravel back if anyone is interested.”

Contact Mike Amos
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Yellow Pine US Mail

We are on 3-day a week mail delivery from Cascade. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Be sure to buy your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

12/15/2018 – Report that folks are once again dumping boxes and furniture outside of the transfer station. Please remind friends and neighbors about the rules.


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Ice Hole Campground Closed

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
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Predators

It should be safe to put bird feeders back out, bears are hibernating (according to Jon Hunter our F&G CO.) However, foxes are coming around and they do like bird seed.

Please remember to keep trash secured, it will draw foxes, coyotes and loose dogs.
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Local Events:

2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine.

https://www.ypescapade.org/atv-utv-events
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx

There was to be a YPWUA meeting in October. (?)
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VYPA News:

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 18th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th. Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.
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YPFD News:

The next meeting to be May 18th, 2019 at the Community Hall

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sundays at 11am will resume in the Spring.

The YPFD has 2 Size Chimney Brushes with extension rods that were donated for use around YP. If you would like to borrow one, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you. The YPFD also has loanable mitigation tools, (Weed-Whacker, Hedge Trimmer, backpack blower and 16’ pole saw). If you would like to borrow one or all, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you.

It’s also time to check the Smoke Alarm batteries and Fire Extinguishers. Please test the alarm and replace Smoke Alarm Batteries every year, if you have the replaceable battery type. Fire Extinguishers should be checked as well and should be easily seen and reachable. A good location for the Fire Extinguishers would be the kitchen and near the wood stove and/or fireplace. The needle should be in the green.

If you need a Smoke Detector or Fire Extinguisher for your YP residence please contact Jeff F.

Smoke Alarm Info:

Cooking safety in the home:
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for winter
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

Closed for winter
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Winter Hours at the Tavern: 9am-2pm and 4-8pm Mon, Wed, Fri, Sat and 9am-2pm Sun. Or call 208 633-2233 the phone rings into the house.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC

Link to FB page:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430 – 50# bag of Polar Ice Melt available for $7.99. Breaks the Ice Barrier. Quick Melting action, even in heavy snow.
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Dec 10) overnight low estimated around 20 degrees, it was 24F at 1030am, fine light snow falling (started around 10am) just a trace so far, measured 3″ of old snow on the ground. Stellar jays visiting, 2 ravens flying and calling to the northwest. A couple of hairy woodpeckers visited after lunch. Snowed nearly an inch by 1pm, a break in the snow for a couple hours then more snow until after 9pm, high of 30 degrees.

Tuesday (Dec 11) overnight low of 16 degrees, 1″ new snow (4″ total snow) high thin overcast and breezy. Steller jays, a pine squirrel and a hairy woodpecker visiting. Sounded like a wolf howling to the south this morning. Flaking snow on and off early afternoon, then the wind kicked up and the clouds lowered nearly to the valley floor late by afternoon, light steady snow and a trace on the ground by dark, high of 35 degrees. Light snow until around midnight then moderately heavy snow for a few hours.

Wednesday (Dec 12) overnight low around 23 degrees, 2.5″ new snow and 6″ total snow on the measuring board, overcast and flaking. Jays, woodpecker and red-breasted nuthatch visiting. Sort of snowed on and off all morning, no accumulation. Mail truck was only a few minutes late, said the roads had not been plowed yet. A few flakes on and off in the afternoon, breaks in the clouds and scattered sun, high of 37 degrees. A little more traffic than usual for a Wed. Clearing after dark, lots of stars out and cold.

Thursday (Dec 13) overnight low of 4 degrees, overcast and cold light breeze this morning, 5″ of old snow on the ground (the trace that came down yesterday melted before dark.) Hairy woodpecker, pine squirrel and jays visiting. Partly cloudy by early afternoon, light chilly breeze, icicles dripping, high of 35 degrees. Quiet afternoon. Clear sky by dark, bright crescent waxing moon in the sky.

Friday (Dec 14) overnight low of 8 degrees, high thin overcast and filtered sunshine this morning, 5″ of old snow on the ground. Heard a raven calling while flying over the village and a flock of small birds twittering in the trees, steller jays, a hairy woodpecker and a pine squirrel visiting. Amerigas truck in the village topping off customers (Dan had to bring the big truck, the little truck would not start.) A little extra traffic early afternoon. Warm gusty breezes early afternoon and partly cloudy, high of 51 degrees! Brief late afternoon rain shower and gusty winds. Breezy cloudy evening. Rain splatters after dark, windy. Rain turned to snow during the night.

Saturday (Dec 15) overnight low probably just under freezing, 32F at 1030am and high thin overcast, filtered sun, 3/4″ new snow, about 4″ total snow (with frozen rain under.) Jays visiting and small birds twittering from the trees. A report of trees down on the EFSF and SF roads from the wind yesterday, locals went out to clean them up. Hairy woodpecker and pine squirrel stopped by for lunch. Partly cloudy and breezy early afternoon, once in a while a few flakes of snow, warming and icicles dripping, high of 41 degrees. Cloudy by dark.

Sunday (Dec 16) overnight low of 26 degrees, overcast this morning, 4″ old snow on the ground. Jays and pine squirrel visiting, small birds twittering from the trees. Thinner clouds and filtered sunshine around lunch time, gusty breezes. Warm early afternoon, icicles dripping and gusty breezes, high of 54 degrees. Clouds in front of the moon at dark.
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Tips & Advice:

Be Ember Aware! Tip Series

“Used with permission from University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and the Living With Fire program.”

Be Ember Aware Tip #9 – Don’t Wait

Most homes are destroyed by wildfire because wind driven burning embers come into contact with something easily ignited on, in or near the home. When evaluating your home and property’s vulnerability to embers, you should do it in the context of wildfire conditions. You should assume:

* Hot temperatures, very low humidity, and strong gusting winds.
* Poor visibility due to smoke.
* No electricity.
* Little or no water pressure.
* No telephone, including cell phone service.
* Panicking people acting irrationally.
* Firefighters will not be protecting your home and will likely not even be in your neighborhood.
* You and your family will not be present.
* Thousands of burning embers coming from burning pieces of bark, pine cones, branches, and construction materials are being driven by winds into your house and onto your roof.

Now assume that your home is exactly as you left it this morning when you left for work or are out of town. Would it survive under these conditions? Did you leave a window open? Did you forget to close the shop door? Is the firewood pile stacked next to the house? Are the garbage cans on the back porch full and not covered by lids? Take steps now to reduce the ember threat to your home. Waiting until the fire starts may cost you your home.

[h/t Fire Chief Jeff]
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Idaho News:

Dec. 20 deadline noted for Valley, Adams property taxes

The Star-News December 13, 2018

The deadline for the first half of the year’s property taxes for Valley and Adams counties will be next Thursday, Dec. 20.

Payments will be accepted through 5 p.m. Dec. 20 at the county courthouses in Cascade and Council. The treasurer offices in both counties are staffed Monday through Friday, including the lunch hour.

Late charges begin on Friday, Dec. 21, and interest begins on Jan. 1, so mailed payments must be postmarked by Dec. 20.

Valley County property owners can also pay their taxes with credit cards at http://co.valley.id.us/departments/treasurer

For more information, contact the treasurer’s office at 208-382-7110 or treasurer@co.valley.id.us.

Online credit card payments are available in Adams County at http://co.adams.id.us. For questions, call 208-253-4263 extension 6 or write to christy.roach@co.adams.id.us

Payments also can be left in the payment drop box just outside the main courthouse entrance in Council.

source:
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Stambaugh promoted to lieutenant with Valley County sheriff

The Star-News December 13, 2018

David Stambaugh has been named a lieutenant with the Valley County Sheriff’s Office.

Stambaugh has worked for the sheriff’s office for over a year. He retired from the Los Angeles Police Department after 28 years and moved to Valley County, starting as a patrolman in the patrol division.

At the LAPD he was assigned various positions over his career including, patrol, Metropolitan K-9 Division, patrol sergeant and captain adjutant with the officer-involved shooting section.

“Lt. Stambaugh with his training and experience will be a great addition to my supervision team,” Valley County Sheriff Patti Bolen said.

source:
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Wyden, Crapo Introduce Legislation to Provide Much-needed Certainty for Secure Rural Schools Program

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Senators Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, today introduced legislation to provide much-needed financial certainty for rural counties to ensure they have the long-term funding needed for schools, road maintenance, law enforcement and other essential services.

The bipartisan Forest Management for Rural Stability Act makes the Secure Rural Schools program—which expired at the end of FY 2018—permanent by creating an endowment fund to provide stable, increasing and reliable funding for county services.

“Without a permanent fiscal solution, forested counties in Oregon and across the country will continue to slide into financial uncertainty. Oregonians will continue to be left with fewer teachers and law enforcement officers, forced to close libraries, and unable to repair broken bridges and roads,” said Wyden. “This bipartisan, bold approach will finally end the financial roller coaster and provide Oregonians living and working in rural counties the security they need and deserve.”

“Establishing a growing endowment for the Secure Rural Schools program will end the need for short-term or retroactive reauthorizations of this program.” said Crapo. “The Secure Rural Schools program has become vital in budgeting for essential services in Idaho’s forested counties with large tracts of tax-exempt federal lands. This endowment will stabilize the program for generations and maintain the important link between economic growth and forest management in our forested counties, while ending the perpetual temporary band-aids that create instability and uncertainty. In the coming year, I will work with Senator Wyden to advance and refine today’s proposal by gathering the input of other stakeholders and our Senate colleagues. The Secure Rural Schools program is important to dozens of states and this proposal should receive strong, bipartisan support.”

continued:

Video of Senator Crapo’s remarks can be viewed here online:

[h/t Gordon C]
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Scam Alert:

Telephone Fraud

Valley County Sheriff’s Office (via FB) Dec 11, 2018

Telephone fraud and scams are still happening to everyone, especially this time of year. Please make sure that if you are not familiar with the phone number, don’t answer, let it go to voicemail. These scams target the elderly, so make sure you educate your parents and grand parents of these types of calls. The phone numbers may come from familiar phone numbers, as there are apps out there that can change your phone number or pick a random one, so blocking them sometimes doesn’t work. Here is a great article from the Federal Trade Commission on what you can do to help prevent them.

Stopping unwanted phone calls and text messages

August 13, 2015 by Alvaro Puig Consumer Education Specialist, FTC

Unwanted phone calls or random text messages seem to come at all hours. They bug you at work, interrupt your dinner, or wake you up when you’re sound asleep. I think we can all agree they’re a real nuisance. Did you know they could also be a scam?

If your phone number is one of the more than 217 million numbers on the Do Not Call Registry, you’ve taken action to stop most unwanted sales calls. The law allows political calls, calls from charitable organizations, informational calls, calls about debts you owe, and phone surveys, as well as calls from companies you’ve done business with or gave permission to call.

If you get an unwanted sales call or a robocall—a recorded message that’s pitching a product or service— it’s probably a scam. The unscrupulous businesses behind these calls use autodialers to make thousands of calls a minute and don’t bother to check if the numbers are on the Do Not Call Registry. Don’t press buttons to request to speak to someone or be taken off the call list. You’ll just end up getting more unwanted calls. Hang up and report it to the Federal Trade Commission at complaints.donotcall.gov or 1-888-382-1222.

If you’re getting repeated calls from the same number, you might want to ask your service provider to block the number; for calls from different numbers, ask if they offer a service to block unwanted calls. You can also buy a call blocking device. Getting calls on your mobile phone? There’s an app for that. Actually, there’s more than one. Look in your mobile app store or marketplace.

What about those random text messages? It’s illegal for a company to send you a text message if it doesn’t have your permission, barring a few exceptions. If you get a random text message from a number you don’t recognize that says you won something or asks you to confirm some personal information, don’t text back or click on links. Report it to your provider at 7726 (SPAM) and to the FTC at ftc.gov/complaint or 1-888-382-1222.
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Mining News:

Midas Gold advisory council gets to work

Group will spend next few months getting organized

By Tom Grote for The Star-News December 13, 2018

The group that is the direct link between Midas Gold and communities near the company’s proposed gold mine spent its first meeting last week talking about getting organized.

The Stibnite Advisory Council met for two hours on Dec. 5 at the Midas Gold office in Donnelly.

The Dec. 5 meeting was closed to the public, as will the next few meetings until the group drafts its by-laws, Midas Gold representative Anne Labelle said.

Council members will decide if future meetings should be open to the public, Labelle said.

The group will next meet on Jan. 10 to hear an overview of the proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine, Labelle said.

The advisory council is one of two entities formed by the Community Agreement between Midas Gold and local communities.

That agreement, which took effect Nov. 30, has been signed by the cities of Cascade, Donnelly, New Meadows, Riggins and Council plus Idaho County. The Village of Yellow Pine, which is not an incorporated city, is also a signer to the agreement.

The City of McCall, Valley County and Adams County have yet to decide whether to sign the agreement.

Initial members appointed by their governing boards are:

• Cascade: Glenna Young.
• Donnelly: Gene Tyler.
• New Meadows: Julie Good.
• Riggins: Bob Crump.
• Council: Tami Testa.
• Idaho County: Denis Duman.
• Yellow Pine: Lynn Imel.

Meeting summaries will be issued to the signers following each meeting for them to distribute as they see fit, Labelle said.

“I can say all is going well,” Tyler told The Star-News. “I am pleased, and just trying to get the finer details nailed down.”

Young told The Star-News that the group was “very organized, focused on getting the committee moving.”

After the Jan. 10 briefing, council members will decide if smaller working groups should be formed to focus on specific topics, Labelle said.

The Stibnite Advisory Council will “serve as the principal forum for communication among the parties regarding the Stibnite Gold Project now and throughout the life of the project,” according to wording in the Community Agreement.

The council will receive comprehensive updates of the project as it moves through construction and operation if it receives needed permits from regulatory agencies, the agreement said.

Topics would not limited to the project itself but would include housing, traffic, recreation, police and fire, education and recycling, under the agreement.

The Community Agreement also authorizes the formation of The Stibnite Foundation, which will be formed early next year and funded by Midas Gold to issue grants for community projects.

Separate appointments will be made to the foundation board by the governing boards of the signing agencies.

Midas Gold is the name being used for Midas Gold Idaho, the operating company for the Stibnite Gold Project, and its parent company, Midas Gold Corp. of Vancouver, B.C.

source:
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Midas Gold strikes separate pact with Yellow Pine for $30,000

Agreement with backcountry community was signed in July

By Tom Grote for The Star-News December 13, 2018

Midas Gold agreed to give $30,000 to Yellow Pine months before an agreement was signed with other communities that would be affected by the proposed Valley County gold mine.

The Yellow Pine Community Partnership Agreement was signed July 14 between Midas Gold and “The Village of Yellow Pine.”

Yellow Pine is located 14 miles west of the site of the proposed mine in the historical Stibnite Mining District.

The town is not an incorporated city and has no taxing powers. The Village of Yellow Pine Association, a nonprofit organization, oversees maintenance of the Community Hall and Pioneer Cemetery.

The village’s water system is overseen by the Yellow Pine Water Users Association, another nonprofit group that is a separate entity from the village association. The system serves about 115 users.

Under the agreement, Midas Gold donated $10,000 last summer to the water users association for improvements, said Willie Sullivan, a member of the water users group.

The $10,000 from Midas Gold will be used as matching funds to obtain a grant, Sullivan said.

Midas Gold has pledged to give a second payment of $10,000 by June 30, 2019 and a final payment of $10,000 by June 30, 2020.

No decision has been made where to spend the additional $20,000, said Lynn Imel, a member of the village association board.

“The final decision will be made at the appropriate time at association meetings,” Imel said.

This $30,000 mirrors what the company has provided in the past for infrastructure improvements, Midas Gold representative Anne Labelle said.

“We currently have a very collaborative relationship with the village and have been helping to fund many of their projects,” Labelle said.

Midas Gold has provided more than money in the past, Imel said.

“Yellow Pine has benefited from Midas Gold’s manpower, equipment use on roads when needed, help with dust abatement, and frequent presentations at village meetings,” she said.

Yellow Pine is located 55 miles by road northeast of Cascade. The winter population is estimated by current residents at between 20 and 25 while the summer population can grow to 150 or more on weekends.

The July agreement is separate from the Community Agreement that went into effect Nov. 30 between Midas Gold and communities near the proposed mine.

That agreement has been signed by the cities of Cascade, Donnelly, New Meadows, Riggins and Council and Idaho County. “The Village of Yellow Pine” also is a signer of the agreement.

The City of McCall, Valley County and Adams County have yet to decide whether to sign the agreement.

Signers agree to write comments about the proposed project once a draft environmental review is released by the Payette National Forest next year.

The signers also appoint members to the Stibnite Advisory Council, which had its first in-person meeting last week, and to the board of The Stibnite Foundation.

The foundation is expected to be formed by the end of February with initial funding from Midas Gold expected by the end of April.

Signers to the Community Agreement get no money from Midas Gold. Those communities, and anyone else, may apply for grants from The Stibnite Foundation.

source:
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Valley commissioners delay vote on Midas Gold Community Agreement

By Max Silverson for The Star-News December 13, 2018

Valley County commissioners on Monday put off a vote on the Midas Gold Community Agreement. Commissioners decided to schedule more public meetings before making a decision.

Commissioners heeded requests from the public for more meetings that would be accessible to a greater number of people.

“It’s apparent that there’s people who want to comment on this,” Commissioner Elt Hasbrouck said.

Monday’s meeting at the Valley County Courthouse saw 18 people speak against signing the agreement and three people speaking in favor.

Many of those who spoke against signing urged commissioners to wait until after the Forest Service releases a draft study next year of the proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine.

Opponents were also worried about the perception the agreement could be seen as a form of bribery and that the transfer of Midas Gold stock to the soon-to-be-formed Stibnite Foundation might violate the state constitution.

“For you to enter into an agreement that provides money to the community, and especially stock in a company, presents a clear conflict of interest,” Susan Bechdel said in opposition to signing the agreement.

“Perhaps the Midas attorneys are able to structure it to be legal, but it still holds the perception of conflict and you should not be in a position to have to decide between what is best for Valley County and what is best for the bottom line of Midas,” Bechdel said. “Stockholders are bound to do what’s in the best interest of the company, and you’re elected to do what’s in the best interest of the county,” she said.

The agreement has already been signed by seven agencies and the first meeting of the Stibnite Advisory Council was held last week.

Signing the agreement would allow Valley County to appoint a member to the advisory council as well as to the board of The Stibnite Foundation.

Plans call for Midas Gold to give The Stibnite Foundation $100,000 in cash and 1.5 million shares of Midas Gold Corp. stock early next year.

Midas Gold would add another $100,000 in 2019 and also at the beginning of 2020 regardless of the status of the project. Funding after those milestones becomes tied to the company’s growth.

The Community Agreement has been signed by the cities of Cascade, Donnelly, New Meadows, Riggins and Council plus Idaho County. The Village of Yellow Pine, which is not an incorporated city, is also a signer to the agreement.

Besides Valley County, the City of McCall and Adams County have yet to decide whether to sign the agreement.

source:
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Giving Back by Planting Trees

Midas Gold Idaho Dec 13, 2018

For the past seven years, Midas Gold has planted trees on and around our project site in the historic Stibnite Mining District. This is an opportunity for us to do more than improve the environment up at site, we also use it as a way to give back to our community.

For the last several years, we have partnered with school districts and community groups and donated $1 to their organization for every tree they help us plant. This year, we decided to give our employees a chance to plant trees and raise money for the causes that matter most to them. Collectively, the team planted 3,200 trees and raised money for two Idaho charities.

Chuck Eilers, our lead equipment operator for Midas Gold Idaho, encouraged the team to plant 1,600 trees this fall for the Women’s and Children’s Alliance. This Boise-based organization strives to provide safety, healing and freedom from domestic abuse and sexual assault. Chuck wrote a letter to the Women’s and Children’s Alliance to send in along with Midas Gold’s donation. We wanted to share a part of it with you so you can understand why he and the team chose this organization:

continued:
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Public Lands:

Mesa Salvage and Reforestation Project

USDA FS 12/13/2018

The Forest Service is seeking scoping comments for the proposed Mesa Salvage and Reforestation Project on the Council Ranger District of the Payette National Forest. The enclosed scoping document provides more detailed information about the project. The scoping document is also available on the project’s webpage at http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=55109.

The Forest Service is contacting interested individuals, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by December 28, 2018, and make your comments as specific as possible.

The project webpage also provides a tool to engage in this process as you wish. From “Get Connected” on the right hand side of the page, click on “Comment /Object on Project” link to access a simple webform to submit your comments on this project. To be most useful, interested parties should submit issues pertinent to this proposal on the webpage by December 28, 2018.

Webform submission through the project website is preferred but written comments concerning these projects will be accepted. Comments for the project may be submitted to: Ronda Bishop, Council and Weiser District Ranger, Payette National Forest, 2092 Highway 95, Council, Idaho 83612. Hand delivered comment letters may be delivered during regular business hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, excluding holidays.

Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection and will be released in their entirety if requested pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act. Comments received in response to this request will also be available for public inspection on the “Public Comment Reading Room” on the project webpage http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=55109.

For further information on this project, please contact Mark Fox, Environmental Coordinator, mark.fox@usda.gov, 208-253-0164.

Thank you for your continued involvement in the management of the Payette National Forest.

Sincerely,
Keith Lannom
Forest Supervisor

MesaSalvageCE_ScopingDocument.pdf
— — — — — — — — — —

Reward offered for N. Idaho timber theft from federal land

by Associated Press Wednesday, December 12th 2018

Pinehurst, Idaho (AP) — Federal officials are offering a $2,500 reward to find those responsible for an illegal timber harvest on federal land in northern Idaho.

Kurt Pavlat of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management tells The Spokesman-Review in a story on Tuesday that the illegal harvest occurred the week of Nov. 11 near the West Fork of Pine Creek.

Pavlat says thieves cut down Douglas fir trees worth more than $5,000. He says the trees probably ended up as commercial firewood.

continued:
————————-

Critter News:

Tips to keep your pet safe this winter

Frankie Katafias Dec 10, 2018 KIVI TV

Boise, Idaho – As temperatures continue to drop and snow begins to fall, it’s important to remember that even our furry friends are affected by harsh weather conditions. That walk around the block, forgetting to take that sweater off your pup and even having festive plants around the house could harm or even kill your pet. The Idaho Humane Society spoke with 6 On Your Side to share these helpful tips.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Pet Talk – Canine Alzheimer’s Disease

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt December 14, 2018 IME

The incidence of canine cognitive dysfunction syndrome, or canine Alzheimer’s disease, is an estimated 14 percent of dogs 8 and older. Signs of CDS are slowly progressive in dogs, just like in people. Dogs can go from symptom-free to exhibiting mild to severe signs of CDS within six months. Screening dogs for behavioral and cognitive health should be as routine as screening for medical issues such as dental and joint health.

CDS is a “rule-out” diagnosis. It cannot be detected with a single blood test or exam. Questions asked by your veterinarian include: Is there a difference in activity level? Are there mentation changes or new anxieties? Your veterinarian has to figure out whether the pet is suffering from medical problems, behavioral problems, neurological problems or all of the above.

Veterinarians will look for disorientation, changes in social interactions, changes in the sleep cycle, changes in behavior at home, changes in activity and increased anxiety.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho ranked among top pet-friendly states in the nation

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, Idaho is number one for dog ownership.

KTVB December 11, 2018

Idaho has the highest percentage of households in the U.S. with dogs, according to recently released data from the American Veterinary Medical Association.

The 2017-2018 edition of the AVMA Pet Ownership and Demographics Sourcebook, is a comprehensive source of data on pet ownership that found nearly 57 percent of all U.S. households owned a pet at end of 2016.

Idaho is among the most pet-friendly states.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

2017 Yellowstone Park wolf report released

Dec 14, 2018 Local News 8

Yellowstone National Park (KIFI/KIDK) – Yellowstone National Park has released a detailed report of wolf activity within the park during 2017.

According to the report, there were at least 97 wolves in 11 packs (3 breeding pairs) living primarily in Yellowstone at the end of December 2017. Each of the packs ranged from 2 to 21, averaging 8.8 animals per pack.

Overall wolf numbers have not varied much from 2009 to 2017. The overall numbers have ranged between 83 to 108 animals. The number of breeding pairs (defined as a male and female with two pups) has typically been two to three times higher than it was last year.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Conservation groups appeal BLM sagebrush project

Agency says intent is to help sage grouse

Greg Moore December 14, 2018 IME

Disputing the BLM’s claims for potential benefits to sage grouse, two locally based environmental organizations have appealed a decision by the agency to sow native bunch grass seeds and cut Douglas firs on up to 245 square miles in east-central Idaho.

On Nov. 1, Challis Field Office Manager Todd Kuck and Salmon Field Office Manager Linda Price signed the decision to carry out the project over the next 10 years. Depending on funding, it could sow grass seeds on up to 139,000 acres, mostly in the Pahsimeroi Valley but also in the valleys between Challis and Mackay, and cut conifers on up to 18,000 acres, mostly in an area just north of the eastern end of Trail Creek Road.

An environmental assessment released the same day states that wildfires, invasive annual grasses, historic overgrazing and conifer encroachment have fragmented sagebrush habitat and created plant communities that lack the herbaceous understory needed by sage grouse.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho utility, Idaho and Oregon make deal on fish passage

12/14/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — An Idaho utility, Idaho and Oregon have reached a deal involving the operation of a hydroelectric project on the Snake River on the Idaho-Oregon border.

The agreement made public Friday means water-quality certifications from each state for Idaho Power to operate the Hells Canyon Complex of dams can move forward. The environmental quality departments of each state are taking public comments on those certifications through about mid-February.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
December 14, 2018
Issue No. 892
Table of Contents

* Legislation Awaiting President’s Signature Would Allow Significant Increase In Killing Of Salmon-Eating Sea Lions
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441918.aspx

* CRITFC Briefs Council On Need To Develop Common Metrics To Assess Predation Effects On Returning Salmonids
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441917.aspx

* Agreement Allows Idaho Steelhead Fishing While NOAA Reviews State Steelhead Plan
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441916.aspx

* Council Recommends BPA Funding For 25 Existing Basin F&W Research Projects Reviewed By Science Panel
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441915.aspx

* Flows Managed To Aid ESA-Listed Chum Salmon Continuing To Arrive Below Bonneville Dam
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441914.aspx

* Drought Conditions Continue In Columbia Basin As El Nino Chance Now 90 Percent; Warmer, Drier Winter
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441913.aspx

* Groups Ask Court To Order Immediate Changes At Willamette Dams To Benefit Salmon, Steelhead
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441854.aspx

* Applications Accepted For $5.8 Million In Habitat Projects In Deschutes River Basin Benefitting Salmon, Steelhead
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441912.aspx

* Washington Salmon Recovery Funding Board Announces $18 Million In Salmon Habitat Projects Statewide
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441911.aspx

* Federal Judge Orders Oregon To Produce New Water Quality Standards For Several Basin Rivers; Wants Schedule By March 11
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441910.aspx

* BPA Releases Power, Transmission Rates Proposal For 2020, 2012; Stresses Spending Reductions
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441909.aspx

* Removing Diversion Dam In Washington’s Kittitas County Brings Back Mid-Columbia Steelhead To 20 Miles Of Habitat
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441908.aspx

* Study: Human Actions Leading To Loss Of Chinook ‘Spring-Run Gene’ May Mean Irreversible Loss Of Spring Run
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441907.aspx

* Research: Sierra Nevada Mountain Peak Snowpack Will Drop 79 Percent By 2100
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441906.aspx

* NOAA Issues Report On Economic Impacts of Commercial, Recreational Fishing In 2016
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441905.aspx
——————-

Fish & Game News:

Deputy Director Ed Schriever named as new Director of Idaho Fish and Game

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Friday, December 14, 2018

Schriever has worked for the department for 35 years

Idaho Fish and Game Director Virgil Moore on Friday, Dec. 14 announced the hiring of Ed Schriever as the new Fish and Game Director. Schriever will replace Moore on Jan. 13, who in November announced his retirement.

Schriever, 59, has been Fish and Game’s Deputy Director of Operations since 2015, and was the Fisheries Bureau Chief from 2008 to 2015. He held various other positions within the agency, including Clearwater Regional Fisheries Manager, fish biologist and hatchery manager during his 35-year career with Fish and Game.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Hunter comments wanted for moose, sheep, and mountain goat season proposals

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Public input for deer, elk, pronghorn, lion, bear and wolf seasons also encouraged

Idaho Fish and Game biologists in the Salmon Region want to hear from hunters on proposed changes to moose, bighorn sheep and mountain goat seasons for 2019 and 2020.

Hunters are encouraged to attend any of two open houses where they can visit with local wildlife biologists about the proposals and provide their comments.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Steelhead fishing continues uninterrupted with two new area closures

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Friday, December 7, 2018

F&G Commission approved agreement with groups to continue steelhead fishing in Idaho with area closures

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission on Friday, Dec. 7 approved an agreement to keep most steelhead seasons open, but steelhead fishing in two areas closed effective 11:59 p.m. Dec. 7, 2018.

Closure areas include:

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Baby elephant born at Columbus Zoo, shows off its cuteness immediately

WSYX/WTTE Thursday, December 6th 2018


Asian Elephant Calf (Courtesy: Columbus Zoo)

Columbus, Ohio — Meet your newest baby obsession.

The Columbus Zoo welcomed an elephant calf early Thursday morning, and the small pachyderm is already showing off its star power with a series of photos that highlight cuteness. The gender of the calf has not yet been determined, but zoo officials say it appears strong.

continued w/photo gallery:
—————–

Seasonal Humor:

XmasTweet-a
———————-

Dec 9, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Dec 9, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
Firewood Season is Closed
December 21, Winter Solstice
December 25, Christmas
December 31, New Year’s Eve
~ 2019 Events ~
May 25, 2019 ATV-UTV Scavenger Hunt Memorial Day Weekend
Jul 13, 2019 Ride to Big Creek
Sep 14, 2019 Ride to Cinnabar

(details below)
———-

Village News:

Midas Gold Holiday Celebration

There was a good turn out on Dec 8th, 12pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern. Dessert Social, update on the Community Agreement and celebration of 2018
— — — —

Lower Johnson Creek Plowing

Note: when traveling to the dump, please use the river side of the road for wheeled vehicles so the hill side can be for snowmobilers. Turnouts will be plowed.

– CD
— — — —

Christmas

“Santa’s Yellow Pine Elves, it is time to think of Christmas Bags again!! Let me know if you want to help!!”

Contact Nicki
— — — —

Come Spring…

“To Yellow Pine residents. I will be making several trips next spring and summer hauling out metal, appliances, etc. . If you need anything hauled away please get on the list. Vehicles require a title. I will be hauling gravel back if anyone is interested.”

Contact Mike Amos
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

We are on 3-day a week mail delivery from Cascade. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Be sure to buy your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.


— — — —

Ice Hole Campground Closed

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
— — — —

Predators

It should be safe to put bird feeders back out, bears are hibernating (according to Jon Hunter our F&G CO.) However, foxes are coming around and they do like bird seed.

Please remember to keep trash secured, it will draw foxes, coyotes and loose dogs.
———-

Local Events:

2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine.

https://www.ypescapade.org/atv-utv-events
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1IN-a1ltv9ismxIN2muRB_g7DdsJIs0qQ/view

There was be a YPWUA meeting in October. (?)
— — — —

VYPA News:

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 18th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th. Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.
— — — —

YPFD News:

The next meeting to be May 18th, 2019 at the Community Hall

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.
There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.
Sept 22nd YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Sept. 30th Yellow Pine Times.
October 6 YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Oct 21st Yellow Pine Times.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sundays at 11am will resume in the Spring.

The YPFD has 2 Size Chimney Brushes with extension rods that were donated for use around YP. If you would like to borrow one, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you. The YPFD also has loanable mitigation tools, (Weed-Whacker, Hedge Trimmer, backpack blower and 16’ pole saw). If you would like to borrow one or all, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you.

It’s also time to check the Smoke Alarm batteries and Fire Extinguishers. Please test the alarm and replace Smoke Alarm Batteries every year, if you have the replaceable battery type. Fire Extinguishers should be checked as well and should be easily seen and reachable. A good location for the Fire Extinguishers would be the kitchen and near the wood stove and/or fireplace. The needle should be in the green.

If you need a Smoke Detector or Fire Extinguisher for your YP residence please contact Jeff F.

Smoke Alarm Info:

Cooking safety in the home:
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for winter
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Winter Hours (?)
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall Hours: 9am to 2pm and 4pm to 8pm 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC

Buck Horn Outfitters in Idaho’s west Central Mountains in Units 25, 20 A, & 19 A. Providing Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Mountain lion, & Wolf Hunts. We offer Guided Rifle or Archery Hunts & Drop Camps. We are not about Quantity we are about providing Quality Hunts. My husband and I have been in the back country all our lives, we offer Deluxe camps with great food & our Guides know hunting, the back country and Stock.

Link to FB:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430 – 50# bag of Polar Ice Melt available for $7.99. Breaks the Ice Barrier. Quick Melting action, even in heavy snow.
— — — —

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Dec 3) overnight low of 20 degrees, overcast and a few flakes of snow for 5-10 minutes, 1″ new snow and 4″ total snow on the ground. Fresh fox tracks, jays visiting, raven calling and flying over the village. A little more traffic than usual. Breaks in the clouds and scattered sunshine after lunch. Cool and mostly cloudy afternoon (broken clouds), high of 32 degrees. After sunset it was getting pretty cold but looked cloudy. Clearing during the night.

Tuesday (Dec 4) overnight low of 0 (zero!) degrees, clear sky this morning, very blue over the white snow covered trees. Stellar jay and hairy woodpecker visiting. Clear chilly afternoon, lots of sunshine, a few icicles dripping in the sun but below freezing, high of 30 degrees. Very little traffic, quiet day. Temps dropping with the sun, getting cold.

Wednesday (Dec 5) overnight low of -5 degrees, clear sky this morning and frosty. Fresh fox tracks. Still way below freezing at lunch time. Steller jay visiting. Mail truck was about half an hour late, driver reported no problems. Clear cold afternoon, the sun is making icicles drip even tho it is below freezing, high of 23 degrees. Single digits and dropping by sundown. Very cold night.

Thursday (Dec 6) overnight low of -7 degrees, clear sky, dry – little frost this morning. Fresh fox tracks and looks like a large deer or small elk wandered down the side of our road. Hairy woodpecker visiting early. Steller jays dropped by for lunch. Clear cold afternoon, just a hint of a breeze, high of 23 degrees. Light traffic. Clear sky and single digits by sundown. Lots of stars sparkling during the night.

Friday (Dec 7) overnight the low was probably around zero (-4F on the gizmo from the previous morning), it was 9 degrees at 1030am with clear sky and moderate frost. Steller jays, hairy woodpecker and a pine squirrel visiting for lunch. Clouds coming in after lunch time, mostly cloudy by early afternoon, high of 29 degrees. Gunfire started around 2pm, sounded like it was on this side of the river went on for quite some time. Overcast and “warm” late afternoon (warmer than it has been.) Days are getting shorter, nearly full dark by 545pm.

Saturday (Dec 8) overnight low was probably around 20 degrees (9F from yesterday morning was the low in the last 24 hours) it was 25 degrees at observation time and overcast. Jays and hairy woodpecker were early visitors. Light traffic this morning. Icicles dripping early afternoon even tho it was still below freezing and clouds blocked the sun, high of 30 degrees. Mostly clear at dusk but not as cold as previous evenings. Clear and stars sparkling at 10pm.

Sunday (Dec 9) overnight low of 8 degrees, mostly high thin wispy hazy clouds this morning, frosty and inversion building (smells like a city!) Heard some small birds twittering up on the hill. Moderate traffic today. Woodpecker visited at lunch time. Partly clear at noon, then overcast by early afternoon and icicles dripping, high of 38 degrees. Quiet late afternoon and evening. Looked overcast at dark.
————————

Tips & Advice:

Be Ember Aware! Tip Series

“Used with permission from University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and the Living With Fire program.”

Be Ember Aware Tip #8 – Window Warnings

Typically, the weakest parts of the exterior walls of your home during a wildfire are windows. Radiant heat and direct contact by flames can break window glass. This happens because the window glass that you can see heats to a different temperature than the glass protected by the window frame. This difference in temperature causes the glass to crack. If the broken glass falls out during a wildfire, embers can enter your home and ignite it from the inside. An open, screen-less window, is the most vulnerable to ember attack. Our “Be Ember Aware” window tips include the following:

* Install windows that are least dual paned with tempered glass. It will resist greater fire intensities than single pane windows. The type of frame material used, such as vinyl, wood, or metal, is not as important as the type of glass.
* Remove wooden flowerboxes from under windows or construct them of fire resistant materials and use fire resistant plants. Do not use wood or bark mulches in the planter boxes.
* Do not place the firewood stack under windows.
* Prepare 1/2-inch plywood covers that are sized and labeled for your windows. If there is time, you can attach these covers before you evacuate. Shutters (instead of the plywood covers) can also be used.
* Decayed wood window sills should be replaced. Decayed wood is easier to ignite than wood in good condition.
* Move easily ignited materials, such as curtains and overstuffed furniture, away from the window. If the window glass breaks and falls away, embers could enter the house and ignite them.

Before evacuating, make sure all your windows are closed. These include basements, garage, and vehicle windows.

[h/t Fire Chief Jeff]
— — — — — — — — — —

Protect your home (and more) from winter’s freeze

Presented by Wood River Insurance Nov 9, 2018

Freezing temperatures may be good for ice skating or building snowmen, but sub-freezing temperatures can be dangerous for the average person and his or her home.

Cold weather often leaves people scurrying to do whatever is necessary to safeguard themselves from the big chill. But it’s important homeowners also protect their homes in cold weather.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho mail carriers look to customers to keep them safe

Clear snow and ice away from mailboxes to help.

Dec 7, 2018 KIVI TV

Idaho Post Offices are asking customers to help keep carriers safe by clearing snow and ice from around mailboxes and walkways as soon as possible after it snows. Many mail carriers are hurt every year from slipping on the ice near mailboxes.

“We want our carriers to return home healthy each night,” said Boise Postmaster Dan Corral. “Keeping a path clear to your mailbox will go a long way toward keeping our carriers safe and ensuring mail delivery each day.”

Idaho postal carriers, who each make an average of more than 600 deliveries daily, will continue to do their best to deliver the mail, according to Corral, however when mailboxes and approaches to mailboxes are buried in snow and ice it can make it difficult for carriers to make deliveries safely. Unsafe conditions such as icy sidewalks or large amounts of snow blocking mailboxes can prevent mail delivery.

continued:
—————————-

Idaho News:

Dec. 20 deadline noted for Valley, Adams property taxes

The Star-News December 6, 2018

The deadline for the first half of the year’s property taxes for Valley and Adams counties will be Thursday, Dec. 20.

Payments will be accepted through 5 p.m. Dec. 20 at the county courthouses in Cascade and Council. The treasurer offices in both counties are staffed Monday through Friday, including the lunch hour.

Late charges begin on Friday, Dec. 21, and interest begins on Jan. 1, so mailed payments must be postmarked by Dec. 20.

Valley County property owners can also pay their taxes with credit cards at http://co.valley.id.us/departments/treasurer.

For more information, contact the treasurer’s office at 208-382-7110 or treasurer@co.valley.id.us.

Online credit card payments are available in Adams County at http://co.adams.id.us. For questions, call 208-253-4263 extension 6 or write to christy.roach @ co.adams.id.us.

Payments also can be left in the payment drop box just outside the main courthouse entrance in Council.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Dec. 13 hearing set on 12% hike in Cascade fire district rates

By Max Silverson for The Star-News December 6, 2018

The Cascade Rural Fire Protection District will hold a public hearing next week on a proposed 12 percent increase in billing rates for services.

The hearing will begin at 5 p.m. next Thursday, Dec. 13, at the district’s fire station at 109 E. Pine St, in Cascade.

The proposed rates would be charged to the insurance carrier of anyone receiving services for motor vehicle, hazardous materials, water and backcountry or special rescue incidents, said Pamela DeChambeau, who serves as the district’s secretary and treasurer.

“No one is exempt from these charges, but if they don’t have insurance, they are not charged,” she said.

Current rates have been in place since 2016.

This proposed increase in rates will not increase the property taxes charged to district land owners, DeChambeau said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

McCall bans shooting firearms within city limits

Change closes loophole discovered after deer shooting

By Tom Grote for The Star-News December 6, 2018

Shooting firearms in the City of McCall was banned last week by the McCall City Council.

The council split 4-1 to close a loophole in the current city code that was revealed when a deer was shot in October inside the city limits.

McCall Police Chief Justin Williams proposed the change following the Oct. 16 shooting of a deer near the corner of Lick Creek Road and Davis Avenue.

The police department asked the Valley County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office to prosecute the shooter, a juvenile, under the previous city code.

No charges were brought because the previous code prohibited shooting air rifles and BB guns in the city limits, but did not mention firearms, Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Serhiy Stavynskyy told The Star-News.

Hunting inside city limits is not prohibited under state law unless it would violate a city law, such as disturbing the peace, Stavynskyy said.

The juvenile, who was from Boise and was accompanied by his parents, had a valid hunting license and a deer tag, Stavynskyy said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

New Meadows passes update to city code on neighborhood clean-ups

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News December 6, 2018

The first major update in two decades to a clean-up ordinance in the City of New Meadows has been passed by the New Meadows City Council.

The ordinance requires violators to remove public nuisances like inoperable vehicles, furniture, waste and old appliances visible from the street or neighboring properties from their yards.

The intent of the update is to make the ordinance more enforceable and understandable to the public. Subjective language in the original 1998 ordinance hindered these efforts, according to city officials.

The updated ordinance avoids redundancy and confusion by relying more heavily on language in the state’s code that already applies to cities.

Excessive weed growth is also more rigidly defined as any growth over eight inches tall that creates a public safety or health hazard.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Sheriff fears trespass conflicts will result in death

IWF says it has proof gates are illegal

Dec 5, 2018 KIVI TV

Boise County, Idaho – People who love Idaho’s outdoors are outraged about what some are calling the theft of tens of thousands of acres of public land.

Now the Idaho Wildlife Federation says they have proof that gates installed by the billionaire Wilks brothers are illegal… And one of Idaho’s top sheriffs says he thinks the growing conflict will result in people being killed.

Since the Wilks brothers started purchasing Idaho forest land, no trespassing signs and orange gates dot the landscape.

… “The road by Horsethief Reservoir, the road to Fish Lake up by New Meadows, the road to Corral Creek Reservoir by Cascade, there are roads up in the Cabartan, there’s roads over by Council, and these are just roads blocked by the Wilks’s…. it’s all over the place.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

US to shut down Idaho nuclear waste processing project

By Keith Ridler – 12/8/18

Boise, Idaho — Federal officials will shut down an Idaho nuclear waste treatment project after determining it would not be economically feasible to bring in radioactive waste from other states.

The U.S. Department of Energy in documents made public this week said the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project that employs 650 workers will end next year.

Officials said workers are wrapping up processing 85,000 cubic yards (65,000 cubic meters) of radioactive waste at the department’s 890-square-mile (2,300-square-kilometer) site that includes the Idaho National Laboratory.

continued:
————————-

Scam Alert:

Scammers posing as Boise Fire, Ada paramedics ask for ‘donations’

Ada County Paramedics said the fraudulent calls appear to be part of a nationwide scam effort.

KTVB December 4, 2018

Boise — Scammers targeting people in the Treasure Valley have found a new tactic: Posing as local emergency responders seeking “donations.”

Officials say the criminals are trying to take advantage of their victims’ Christmastime charitable giving.

continued:
————————-

Mining News:

Midas Gold convenes advisory council without 3 agencies

Foundation will be formed with $820K start-up money

By Tom Grote for The Star-News December 6, 2018

Midas Gold has convened an advisory council of local governments, but three of the 10 prospective members have not yet decided if they will join.

A telephone conference was held on Friday with the initial members of the Stibnite Advisory Council, which will meet regularly with officials of Midas Gold to get updates on the planned gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine.

The first in-person meeting of the council was scheduled to be held Wednesday at the Midas Gold office in Donnelly.

The cities of Cascade, Donnelly, New Meadows, Council and Riggins as well as Idaho County and the village of Yellow Pine all have agreed to sign the Community Agreement with the Vancouver, B.C., company. The agreement took effect last Friday.

Still to decide on joining are the City of McCall, Valley County and Adams County.

Valley County commissioners will hold a workshop at 1 p.m. Monday at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade.

continued:
— — —

Valley commissioners set Monday workshop on Midas Gold agreement

The Star-News December 6, 2018

Valley County Commissioners have scheduled a public meeting on Monday to discuss the county’s possible involvement in the Midas Gold Community Agreement.

The meeting is scheduled for 1 p.m. Monday at the Valley County Courthouse.

Public comment is encouraged at the meeting, which is on the commissioner’s agenda as a two-hour workshop.

Under the agreement, each community that signs on would appoint an individual to serve on the Stibnite Advisory Council.

The council would meet regularly to get updates from Midas Gold on the Stibnite Gold Project.

Each of the communities would also appoint one person to serve on the Stibnite Foundation, a charitable community foundation to be established to support projects that benefit communities surrounding the project.

The signers also agree to submit letters to the Forest Service as part of an effort by Midas Gold to encourage community participation in the permitting process.

Under the proposed agreement, Midas Gold would give the Stibnite Foundation cash and company stocks at various stages of the permitting process, construction and operation of the mine. There would be no restrictions on how the money given to the foundation would be spent.

source:
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DEQ work crews work to fix second Triumph Mine tunnel collapse

Settlement reached in mine waste discharge case

Tony Evans Dec 7, 2018 IME


More than 200 million gallons of toxic water is backed up in tunnels behind plugs in the Triumph Mine. Express photo by Willy Cook

Department of Environmental Quality work crews have cleared a new tunnel collapse at the Triumph Mine in East Fork and released 30,000 gallons of toxic water into a surge pond reservoir.

It is the latest of efforts to secure 200 million gallons or more of toxic mine drainage in numerous tunnels in the abandoned mine.

A recent federal court case will ensure that more regular monitoring of mine waste discharge is undertaken by state agencies

From 1882 until 1957, the Triumph Mine—northeast of Hailey—produced silver, zinc and lead, and left tailings and water discharge from the mine tunnel contaminated with the heavy metals. In 1988, the DEQ found elevated levels of arsenic, zinc and manganese in nearby surface water.

continued:
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BLM releases Caldwell Canyon mine proposal

Dec 04, 2018 Local News 8

Soda Springs, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Idaho Falls District Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has slated two public meetings to discuss the proposed Caldwell Canyon Mine.

BLM has released a draft environmental impact statement analyzing a mine and reclamation plan from P4 Productions, LLC. P4 is a subsidiary of Bayer. The plan would develop several phosphate leases the company owns on Schmidt Ridge, about 13 miles east-northeast of Soda Springs.

If approved, the Caldwell Canyon Mine would sustain about 185 mining jobs and 585 plant jobs for an additional 40 years. BLM said it would aid the region by providing $49 million in annual payroll, taxes, royalties, purchases and sustaining support and service jobs.

continued:
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Montana judge nixes Idaho mining company’s challenge to ‘bad actor’ label

The Idaho mining company’s CEO was the former chief financial officer at Pegasus Mining, which went bankrupt in 1998 and saddled Montana with more than $35 million in pollution cleanup costs.

Associated Press December 8, 2018

Billings, Mont. — A Montana judge dismissed a lawsuit filed by an Idaho mining company seeking to overturn its designation as an industry “bad actor” because of pollution tied to its CEO.

District Judge Mike Menahan said Friday the complaint from Hecla Mining Co. was premature because the state’s designation is not final.

Montana’s bad actor law blocks individuals and companies who don’t clean up their old mines from starting new ones.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Payette: Project would help prevent disastrous wildfires

Granite Meadows project would thin forests near McCall, NM

By Max Silverson for The Star-News December 6, 2018

Keith Lannom told an audience in McCall last week that the proposed Granite Meadows project was essential to protecting McCall and surrounding areas from devastation similar to the Camp Fire in California.

“That’s the absolute worst case scenario,” said Lannom, who is supervisor of the Payette National Forest. “That’s the kind of stuff that makes me not sleep at night.”

Lannom and other Payette personnel presented specifics on the proposed 83,000-acre Granite Meadows landscape restoration project at a public meeting at the supervisor’s office in McCall.

The project is proposed for two large tracts of land north and west of McCall as well as north of New Meadows. This area includes Brundage Mountain Resort and Bear Basin.

… Public comments on the Granite Meadows project can be submitted until Dec. 15. Public comments will also be accepted following the draft environmental impact statement, which is expected to be completed in summer 2019. Comments can be submitted by mail, email at comments-intermtn-payette@fs.fed.us or through the project webpage at http://fs.usda.gov/goto/granitemeadows.

continued:
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Software developed at ISU aids wildfire response

12/3/18 AP

Pocatello, Idaho — Computer software that developed at Idaho State University to aid in post-wildfire recovery efforts is now being used by some fire managers during active fires.

The RECOVER software system takes 26 different types of data and layers them into one information map. The data includes topography like roadways, housing locations, soil types, water bodies and vegetation, and the program helps officials anticipate what might happen during or after a fire to make better management decisions.

Keith Weber is Idaho State University’s geographic information system director. He told the Idaho State Journal that the software has helped emergency responders make decisions on 50 fires this season alone, including the massive Woolsey Fire that burned more than 600 structures in Malibu, California.

continued:
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BLM Idaho Releases Greater Sage-Grouse Final EIS and Proposed RMP Amendments

BLM Proposes Increased Flexibility and Access in Sage-Grouse Plans

Date: December 6, 2018
Contact: BLM_Press@blm.gov

Proposed amendments would align conservation efforts at state and federal levels

Boise, Idaho – In keeping with Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke’s commitment to work closely with states to enhance conservation, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) today announced the availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and proposed plan amendments addressing Greater Sage-Grouse conservation on public land in Idaho.

The proposed plan amendments aim to better align BLM resource management plans with state plans for conserving sage-grouse populations, strike a regulatory balance and build greater trust among neighboring interests in Western communities. The proposed amendments and final EISs also addresses the issues remanded to the agency by a March 31, 2017, order by the U.S. District Court for the District of Nevada, which determined that the BLM had violated the National Environmental Policy Act when it finalized the 2015 Nevada plan.

“We have appreciated the opportunity to work with Governor Otter’s team on a carefully crafted amendment to the 2015 plans,” said Deputy Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt. “We know the successful conservation of the Greater Sage-Grouse requires the shared stewardship vision of the states, private citizens, landowners and federal land management agencies including those within the Department of the Interior.”

Bernhardt continued, “With today’s action we have leaned forward to address the various states’ issues, while appropriately ensuring that we will continue to be focused on meaningfully addressing the threats to the Greater Sage-Grouse and making efforts to improve its habitat.”

The BLM developed the changes in collaboration with Idaho Gov. Butch Otter, state wildlife managers, and other concerned organizations and individuals, largely through the Western Governors Association’s Sage-Grouse Task Force.

“It is refreshing to have a federal agency willing to listen to the people in Idaho on an issue so important to our state and the West,” Gov. Otter said. “I appreciate Secretary Zinke’s commitment to upholding our state-based conservation plan for sage-grouse. We worked hard to develop a plan that was based in science and appropriately tailored to address the primary threats in Idaho.”

The proposed changes refine the previous management plans adopted in 2015. Under the 1976 Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA), the BLM is required by law to work cooperatively with states on land-use plans and amendments.

“This plan has garnered wide support from a variety of stakeholders, including private industry, state agencies, and non-profit organizations that recognize the importance of conserving Greater Sage-Grouse while sustaining the multiple uses on BLM lands that are critical to Idaho’s economy,” said Peter Ditton, Acting BLM Idaho State Director.

In Idaho, the proposed amendments would establish buffer distances corresponding to the state’s three types of habitat management areas; remove the Sagebrush Focal Area designation from the 2015 plans; and adjust objectives for grazing allotments that contain or overlap with sagebrush-steppe habitat. The amendment process also offered an opportunity for the BLM to align its mitigation requirements under FLPMA with those established under Idaho law.

The BLM has also published Final EISs for lands it manages in Colorado, Oregon, Nevada/ northeastern California, Utah and Wyoming.

Publication of the Final EIS and proposed amendments in tomorrow’s Federal Register initiates a 30-day protest period, which will run through January 8, 2019. The Idaho Governor also has 60 days to review the proposed amendments for consistency with state and local laws and regulations. The process will conclude with a Record of Decision (ROD) following resolution of any protests received during the 30-day review period.

Approval of BLM’s Idaho Final EIS Proposed Plan Amendment would require amendments to 21 current BLM resource management plans: Bennett Hills/Timmerman Hills, Big Desert, Big Lost, Bruneau, Cascade, Cassia, Challis, Craters of the Moon National Monument, Jarbidge (1988 and 2015 Revision), Kuna, Lemhi, Little Lost-Birch Creek, Magic, Medicine Lodge, Monument, Owyhee, Pocatello, Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area, Sun Valley and Twin Falls.

Anyone who participated in the process for the Idaho EIS and who has an interest that is or may be adversely affected by the proposed land use plan amendments in the Final EIS will have the opportunity to protest the proposed plan amendments.

The Final EIS is now available online at https://goo.gl/Jd8uVf. Instructions for filing a protest with the Director of the BLM regarding the Proposed RMPA/Final EIS are found online at https://www.blm.gov/programs/planning-and-nepa/public-participation/filing-a-plan-protest. All protests must be in writing and mailed to the appropriate address or submitted electronically through the BLM ePlanning project website. To submit a protest electronically, go to the ePlanning project webpage https://goo.gl/Jd8uVf and follow the instructions at the top of the home page.

If submitting a protest in hard copy, it must be mailed to one of the following addresses:

* U.S. Postal Service Mail: BLM Director (210), Attention: Protest Coordinator, WO-210, P.O Box 71383, Washington, D.C. 20024-1383

* Overnight Delivery: BLM Director (210), Attention: Protest Coordinator, WO-210, 20 M Street SE, Room 2134LM, Washington, D.C. 20003

Protests submitted electronically by any means other than the ePlanning project website will be invalid unless a protest is also submitted in hard copy. Protests submitted by fax will also be invalid unless also submitted either through ePlanning project website protest section or in hard copy.

Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personally identifiable information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment – including your personally identifiable information – may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask the BLM in your comment to withhold your personally identifiable information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so.
— — — — — — — — — —

USFS Regional Intermountain News

Volume 2 Issue 15 December 4, 2018

link:
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Letter to Share:

Greetings Mystic Farm Followers!

I actually made a video of Hubcap choosing the two winning pork raffle tickets out of the big jug…unfortunately – try as I might – being a techno-weenie got the best of me and I couldn’t figure out how to download the video from my phone to this email. So, you will have to take my word for it:

And the winners are: Kathleen Bradley and Brian Harvey!

Thank you to everyone that purchased tickets with hopes of winning a half of gourmet heritage processed pork…and the fawns thank you! Also, a HUGE thank you to Makers Long Acres for donating the hog and to Panhandle Custom Meats for doing the processing. Great local businesses both.

Mystic Farm has a new logo! Check it out below. Definitely has a lot of the ‘cute factor’ going on, doesn’t it?

2018mysticfarmslogo-a

Finally, a reminder to get your Christmas orders in for Mystic Farm all natural candles, T-shirts, hoodies, hats and swag bags. Shipping is no problem!

Your continued support means more than you know. Couldn’t do any of this without you.

Dory McIsaac
Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.
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Critter News:

Valley County Magistrate Court

The Star-News December 6, 2018

Wayne LaRoy Fregien, 81, Yellow Pine, Idaho Department of Fish and Game – unlawful hunting and taking of game animals, birds or furbearers, $25 fine.

excerpted from:
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Freezing temps pose major risks to pets in winter

Brady Halbleib Dec 05, 2018 Local News 8

December marks the first month of the winter season. Snow and cold weather are beginning to become the norm around southeast Idaho. Keeping warm outside can be a challenge for many, but what about your pets? The cold weather poses a major threat to dogs during the winter.

Here are some tips to keep your animals safe during the winter months.

continued:
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Pet Talk – Bronchitis in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Dec 7, 2018 IME

Bronchitis is an onset of inflammation or irritation of the small airways (bronchioles) and medium-size airways (bronchi) in the lungs of the dog. It usually lasts seven to 10 days and is associated with coughing. Causes of bronchitis in dogs include bacterial and viral infections, inhaled foreign objects, the rare parasitic infection and irritation from dust, smoke or fumes. Allergies are also very common causes. Very rarely, tumors arise in the lungs that press on the bronchi and cause coughing and bronchitis.

Your veterinarian always classifies the cough as dry and hacking, or moist and producing phlegm and mucus. A dry, hacking cough is typical of a viral infection, whereas a moist-sounding cough is more common with a bacterial infection. Sometimes the dog is systematically ill, especially if the lungs are involved in the infection.

Diagnosis of bronchitis in dogs is based on a thorough physical exam, especially excellent auscultation of the heart and lungs by your veterinarian with his stethoscope. Occasionally, heart abnormalities can cause a cough and secondary bronchitis. If the heart is normal, then your vet listens to the quality and types of lung sounds-squeaks, whistles, rasps, gurgles, dry or moist. X-rays of the lungs will usually show patterns of bronchitis diseases, and also pneumonias and tumors. Blood tests often show elevated white blood cell counts in the cases of bacterial bronchitis.

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Meridian vet helps little dog recover after having close call with hawk

by CBS 2 News Staff Monday, December 3rd 2018

Meridian, Idaho (CBS2) — A little dog named Rocky had a close call with a hawk last week.

River City Veterinary Hospital helped Rocky recover after his owners heard a scuffle in the bushes and the hawk flew away.

Rocky didn’t fly off with the hawk, but he had several wounds and punctures in his chest and sides. River City Veterinary Hospital also fixed up a deep laceration through his tongue.

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FDA approves drugs for dogs scared by loud noise; is it right for your pet?

Corey Rangel Dec 7, 2018 KIVI TV

For dog owners, it can be a helpless feeling to see their pet panic. A newly approved drug hopes to help pets left paralyzed by the sound of fireworks and other loud noises.

“We have all the way from very mild to very severe cases, where dogs are going through windows and escaping through crates during noise events,” says Dr. Amy Pike, a veterinary behaviorist.

Dr. Pike is excited about a new drug, which was just approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to help dogs who get stressed out by loud noises.

continued:
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Last week of November 2018
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Boise wildlife project complete on Highway 21

by Scott Logan Thursday, December 6th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — It’s that time of year again when snow drives wildlife from the high country.

“This time of year we get anything between 5,000 and 8,000 mule deer coming from as far away as Stanley into the Treasure Valley, especially the Boise Wildlife Management Area,” said Krista Biorn, habitat biologist with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. “And as many as 1,800 elk migrate down here to their winter range.”

And this will be the first winter that the Idaho Fish and Game Department finds out how a new deer guard works to reduce collisions between deer and elk and people driving on Highway 21.

continued:
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Idaho to pay $260,000 in legal fees in dairy spying lawsuit

Animal rights activists, civil rights groups and media organizations sued the state over its 2014 law making it a crime to surreptitiously videotape agriculture operations.

Associated Pres December 4, 2018

Idaho will have to pay $260,000 to attorneys for animal rights groups after federal courts ruled Idaho’s ban on spying at farms, dairies and slaughterhouses violated free speech rights.

U.S. District Court Chief Judge B. Lynn Winmill issued the order Friday as part of a settlement between Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden and the Animal Legal Defense Fund and others.

continued:
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Grand Teton seeks to eliminate mountain goats to help bighorns

AP Dec 04, 2018

Moose, Wyo. (AP) – Spotting a mountain goat perched high on a cliff might thrill many visitors to a national park in Wyoming but park officials say the agile animals might need to go.

Grand Teton National Park officials say the park’s 100 or so mountain goats threaten a herd of about 80 bighorn sheep.

The bighorn sheep herd had as many as 125 animals just a few years ago. The goats are thriving but spread disease and compete with the bighorns for food.

continued:
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Businesses brace for impact of suspended steelhead season

12/3/18 AP

Idaho businesses that rely on steelhead fishing are bracing for the financial impact of the fishing season’s suspension.

Fishing outfitters and guides along the Salmon River already are seeing spring booking cancellations due to the unknown status of spring steelhead season, the Post Register reported .

“It’s going to hurt the whole community, all of the communities along the Salmon River and the Clearwater,” said Jess Baugh, owner of Mountain River Outfitters, a family-owned fishing outfitter based in Riggins.

continued:
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Celebrations planned in Riggins as city reacts to reopening of Idaho steelhead fishing season

The community feared economic devastation from the shutdown, but now the steelhead season is reopened. “There is a huge weight lifted off of our community’s shoulders,” said Richard Friend, the owner of River Adventures Riggins. “We were facing economic disaster without our winter steelhead season.”

Joe Parris December 7, 2018 KTVB

Riggins, Idaho — Update: The Idaho Fish and Game Commission made an agreement to reopen the steelhead fishing season. The community of Riggins is now planning to celebrate the decision.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Steelhead fishing continues uninterrupted with two new area closures

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Friday, December 7, 2018

F&G Commission approved agreement with groups to continue steelhead fishing in Idaho with area closures

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission on Friday, Dec. 7 approved an agreement to keep most steelhead seasons open, but steelhead fishing in two areas will close effective 11:59 p.m. Dec. 7, 2018.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

True horsepower: Equines pull semi tractor-trailer up icy hill

By Circa and Storyful Dec 7, 2018

A pair of hardy Belgian draft horses pulled a semitractor-trailer up Lizzie and Jacob Hershberger’s steep and icy driveway in southern Minnesota on Wednesday after the owner of the truck, Craig Helgeson, got in a bit of trouble trying to make the journey.

Helgeson stepped out of the truck and let driver Josie Swartzentruber take over as the Hershbergers’ team of equines helped get the truck up the hill.

go to link for 2 videos:
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We Hope Your Day Is As Great As This Snow-Loving Panda’s

Bei Bei in the Snow

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Seasonal Humor:

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Dec 2, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Dec 2, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Nov 30 Firewood Season Closed
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
Dec 8 12pm Midas Gold Holiday Celebration at the YP Tavern
~ 2019 Events ~
May 25, 2019 ATV-UTV Scavenger Hunt Memorial Day Weekend
Jul 13, 2019 Ride to Big Creek
Sep 14, 2019 Ride to Cinnabar

(details below)
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Village News:

Johnson Creek Plowing

Note: when traveling to the dump, please use the river side of the road for wheeled vehicles so the hill side can be for snowmobilers. Turnouts will be plowed.

– CD
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Yellow Pine people involved in Alaska earthquake

Reinhold and Sharon Trager report they are okay following the earthquake near Anchorage, AK. The total blackout created by the power outage created a scramble for flashlights, the shaking caused things to be thrown onto the floor, and Sharon found her interrupted shower a bit disconcerting, but overall they’re okay.

– LI
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Christmas

“Santa’s Yellow Pine Elves, it is time to think of Christmas Bags again!! Let me know if you want to help!!”

Contact Nicki Harnar
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Come Spring…

“To Yellow Pine residents. I will be making several trips next spring and summer hauling out metal, appliances, etc. . If you need anything hauled away please get on the list. Vehicles require a title. I will be hauling gravel back if anyone is interested.”

Contact Mike Amos
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Yellow Pine US Mail

Three day a week mail delivery from Cascade started November 1, 2018. The Post Office in Yellow Pine will be open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Be sure to buy your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.


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Ice Hole Campground Closed

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
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Wolf or Dog?

A report of a “black wolf” (or a dog that looks wolfish) was seen Monday (Nov 19) evening near the Eiguren ranch.
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Bears

It should be safe to put bird feeders back out, bears are hibernating (according to Jon Hunter our F&G CO.)

Please remember to keep trash secured, it will draw foxes, coyotes and loose dogs.
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Local Events:

Midas Gold Holiday Celebration

Dec 8th, 12pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern. Dessert Social, update on the Community Agreement and celebration of 2018
— — — —

2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine.

https://www.ypescapade.org/atv-utv-events
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx

There was be a YPWUA meeting in October. (?)
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VYPA News:

December 1, 2018

The Yellow Pine Village Council met Saturday to select representatives and their alternates to participate on the Midas Gold Foundation and the Midas Gold Community Advisory Board. YP residents were contacted via the “Master List” and were invited to volunteer for the four job assignments. The Council considered personal abilities and interests, availability to attend monthly meetings, and the best way to use each volunteer to benefit the community.

The YP representative on the Stibnite Foundation will be Ronda Rogers, the alternate will be Lynn Imel. Ronda will be attending the monthly meetings in Donnelly as the Foundation gets organized and later considers financially assisting community-related projects in areas affected by Midas Gold. This charitable foundation will be funded by Midas Gold and administered by representatives from communities that may be impacted by Midas operations.

The Yellow Pine representative on the Midas Gold Community Advisory Board is Lynn Imel and Ronda Rogers will be the alternate. This group is also made up of community members from areas that want to participate in keeping open lines of communication with Midas Gold. They will meet monthly to discuss topics of concern and questions with Midas Gold staff.

These representatives are volunteers and are not funded by VYPA. The two groups will be meeting for many years and Yellow Pine will be seeking volunteers every year. The current representatives will be serving for the 2019 year.

Other opportunities for you to participate, with less time commitment, will occur throughout the year as small work-groups are formed around specific topics and issues.

– DF

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 18th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th. Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.
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YPFD News:

The next meeting to be May 18th, 2019 at the Community Hall

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.
There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.
Sept 22nd YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Sept. 30th Yellow Pine Times.
October 6 YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Oct 21st Yellow Pine Times.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sundays at 11am will resume in the Spring.

The YPFD has 2 Size Chimney Brushes with extension rods that were donated for use around YP. If you would like to borrow one, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you. The YPFD also has loanable mitigation tools, (Weed-Whacker, Hedge Trimmer, backpack blower and 16’ pole saw). If you would like to borrow one or all, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you.

It’s also time to check the Smoke Alarm batteries and Fire Extinguishers. Please test the alarm and replace Smoke Alarm Batteries every year, if you have the replaceable battery type. Fire Extinguishers should be checked as well and should be easily seen and reachable. A good location for the Fire Extinguishers would be the kitchen and near the wood stove and/or fireplace. The needle should be in the green.

If you need a Smoke Detector or Fire Extinguisher for your YP residence please contact Jeff F.

Smoke Alarm Info:

Cooking safety in the home:
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for winter
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall Hours: 9am to 2pm and 4pm to 8pm 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

Winter Hours (?)
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC

Buck Horn Outfitters in Idaho’s west Central Mountains in Units 25, 20 A, & 19 A. Providing Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Mountain lion, & Wolf Hunts. We offer Guided Rifle or Archery Hunts & Drop Camps. We are not about Quantity we are about providing Quality Hunts. My husband and I have been in the back country all our lives, we offer Deluxe camps with great food & our Guides know hunting, the back country and Stock.

Link to FB:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430 – 50# bag of Polar Ice Melt available for $7.99. Breaks the Ice Barrier. Quick Melting action, even in heavy snow.
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Nov 26) overnight low of 10 degrees, partly cloudy this morning (high wispy “mare’s tails”) and a cold light breeze. Overcast by lunch time. A little more traffic than normal for a Monday. Cloudy cool afternoon, slight chilly breeze, high of 37 degrees. Still a bit of a breeze at sundown, cloudy and below freezing.

Tuesday (Nov 27) snowing this morning around 9am, low overcast – ridges socked in, light breeze, trace of new snow, 1″ of old snow. Honey Dipper truck in town. Light rain by 11am. Drips, drops and sprinkles mid-day, low clouds. Chilly cloudy, drippy, wet afternoon. It is getting pretty slick where the ground is frozen and the rain is freezing into ice, high of 35 degrees. Jays and a pine squirrel visited. Probably sprinkled most of the night, turning to snow before morning.

Wednesday (Nov 28) overnight low of 32 degrees, 1/4″ new snow on top of slush and frozen rain (1.25″ total snow), mostly cloudy with small patches of blue and thick fog on the flanks of the mountains. Medium sized canine tracks in the new snow. Jays and a female hairy woodpecker visiting. Mail truck was a bit late. Broken clouds mid-day, above freezing, dripping and melting some, where the ground is frozen the rain turned to ice and very slick, high of 42 degrees. Quiet evening. Cloudy at dusk and sort of misting a few drops (more like moisture condensing out of the air.)

Thursday (Nov 29) overnight low of 24 degrees, high thin haze covering the sky, filtered sunshine, about 1″ of old (frozen) snow on the ground. Female hairy woodpecker and a jay visiting. A little more traffic than normal for a Thursday. Solid cloud cover mid-afternoon, a few icicles dripping and icy paths, high of 41 degrees. By dusk the clouds were thinner and more open sky, below freezing.

Friday (Nov 30) overnight low of 17 degrees, overcast sky this morning, light frost and about an inch of old frozen snow. Steller jays visiting. Snowed for a couple hours in the afternoon – about an inch, overcast and below freezing, high of 30 degrees. Snowed another half inch during the night/early morning.

Saturday (Dec 1) overnight low of 22 degrees, overcast and flaking snow this morning, 1.5″ new snow and 2.5″ total snow (on top of ice.) Female hairy woodpecker, a red-breasted nuthatch and 2 jays visiting. Occasional flakes of snow on and off all day under a gray overcast sky, high of 34 degrees. Light snowfall late afternoon and evening, a little skiff of accumulation before dark. Snowed during the night.

Sunday (Dec 2) overnight low of 24 degrees, thin overcast and foggy mountains this morning, 1.25″ new snow and 3″ total snow (on top of ice.) Fox tracks in the fresh snow. A trio of jays visiting and later a female hairy woodpecker. Short little snow flurry at 11am, and again at noon. Thinner clouds early in the afternoon, then back to gray and cold breezes mid-afternoon, high of 33 degrees. Snowed pretty good for 30 minutes late afternoon, then snowing again at dark. Some critter out on the golf course “chirping” (fox or young elk?)
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RIP

Thomas “Tom” Allen Richter

1954 – 2018

Thomas “Tom” Allen Richter, 64, of Yellow Pine, passed away on November 28, 2018 at St. Alphonsus in Boise.

Memorial services will be held on Friday, January 11, 2019 in the Flahiff Funeral Chapel, Caldwell, 624 Cleveland Blvd.
— — — — —

Harold “Gene” Amos

December 29, 1948 – November 29, 2018.

Harold Gene Amos (formerly of Yellow Pine) passed away Nov 29, 2018

Survived by wife Merle and sons Mike, Scott and Toby.
— — — — —

Candi Lysiak

May 14, 1970 ~ November 30, 2018

We are saddened to learn of the passing of Candi Lysiak, 48, Bonners Ferry, who died unexpectedly while visiting her daughter Friday morning, November 30. Our heartfelt condolences to her family, loved ones and friends.

source: Kootenai Valley Times

Preceded in death by Mother Nancee Riggs (of Riggins) and survived by her children, sister Kendi and father Larry “Mayor Chappy” Chapman of Yellow Pine and Riggins.
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Tips & Advice:

Be Ember Aware! Tip Series

“Used with permission from University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and the Living With Fire program.”

Be Ember Aware Tip #7 – Don’t Be “Fuelish”

In recent years, there has been a lot of effort put into the creation of fuel breaks around some of Idaho’s high fire hazard communities. Fuel breaks are usually a strip of land where flammable vegetation has been removed and less hazardous vegetation has been retained or planted. In our area, this often means mowing sagebrush and bitterbrush with machinery and leaving the grasses and wildflowers. Fuel breaks vary in width, ranging from 30 feet or less to more than 100 feet.

Surprising to many people, the primary purpose of a fuel break is not necessarily to stop an oncoming fire. Typically, fuel breaks are created to improve the ability of firefighters to control an advancing wildfire. A fuel break can reduce fire intensity, provide an area to light a backfire, improve access for firefighters, and improve the effectiveness of fire retardants dropped from aircraft.

Unfortunately, fuel breaks can also provide a false sense of security to the members of a community. Some homeowners assume that once the fuel break is created, they are fire safe and that no further action on their part is required. This is not true. Wind driven embers can be transported over the fuel break and ignite new fires on the other side. Homes that have not prepared for the ember threat are vulnerable despite the presence of the fuel break.

While community level fuel breaks are important in reducing the wildfire threat, they are not enough. Homeowners must continue to do their part by creating defensible space around their home and making their properties resistant to ignition from embers.

[h/t Fire Chief Jeff]
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AmeriGas Guidelines For A Worry Free Winter

(via email 11/27/2018)

Thank you for your business. Below are helpful tips to ensure your propane appliances run smoothly and continuously throughout the winter.

* Keep Driveway Clear of Snow and Ice- To ensure safe access to your propane tank, please keep snow and ice cleared from your driveway and sand all inclines. A propane delivery truck is approximately two feet wider than a passenger car and much taller, so please keep trees/bushes that line your driveway trimmed, including low-hanging branches. If our delivery driver is unable to navigate your driveway without obstruction, we will not be able to fill your tank, which could result in a special delivery/trip charge and/or you running out of gas. To avoid injury, please also be mindful of any objects in your yard that when hidden in snow would be slippery or cause our employees to trip and fall.

* Keep Equipment Clear of Snow and Ice – To prevent a gas leak, please keep your propane tank, equipment and piping clear of snow and ice accumulation, and heavy snowfall (including snow sliding off your roof). The weight of snow and ice could break gas connections and lead to serious injury or property damage.

* Keep Gas Appliance Vents Clear of Snow and Ice – To avoid hazardous gases, such as carbon monoxide, from becoming trapped in your home, please make sure that your chimney and rooftop, as well as all gas appliances are adequately vented and functioning properly, and the roof or walls remain clear of snow and ice. Should snow or ice cover a vent, the appliance may malfunction.

* Mark Location of Underground Tanks – Please mark the location of your underground tank and provide a clear pathway. This will aid our efforts to keep you supplied with gas all winter.

Seasonal/Vacation Home Important Notice:

Due to varying propane usage in weekend/vacation homes, we are not aware when the home is in use and it is difficult to forecast your usage. Please take special precautions to monitor your propane levels. You are encouraged, for example, to use a tank monitoring device and ask a year-round neighbor to periodically check the gauge on your propane tank. When the percentage falls below 30%, call us for a delivery to ensure that you do not run out of gas. If there is no gauge on the tank, call us if your propane usage increases.

Will-Call Customer Important Notice:

You must keep track of the propane in your tank and call for deliveries. Please note that by law, we must perform a gas leak check any time the gas flow is interrupted, including out-of-gas situations. Please regularly monitor your gas tank gauge reading. Call us to schedule a delivery when the percentage falls below 30% to avoid running out of gas. If your tank runs out of gas and/or you require an emergency delivery, additional charges may apply.

If you have any questions, please contact your local office. Visit our company website for additional consumer safety information.

If we are unable to safely access your tank or home to make a delivery, AmeriGas Propane will not honor claims for any damages due to freeze-ups or related problems caused by an out-of-gas situation. If you have any questions, please contact your local AmeriGas Propane office. Visit http://www.propanesafetyfirst.com for additional safety information.
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Letter to Share:

Commissioner Cruickshank’s November Newsletter

December 1, 2018

From the desk of Commissioner Cruickshank,

Thursday November 1st
I discussed concerns of the Snowmobile Grooming Program with Staff at Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation when Valley County employees are grooming in a bordering county.

Sunday November 4th
I created and sent out my October newsletter.

Monday November 5th
Today was a commissioner meeting day. Please find the minutes, once approved, for this meeting on the Valley County website at Valley County Idaho Official Site and click on the Commissioners section.

Tuesday November 6th through Monday [November] 12th I was out of the office.

Tuesday November 13th
Regular commissioners meeting today. Please see the minutes on the website once approved.

Wednesday November 14th
I attended the Winter Recreation meeting in McCall to explain the concerns of grooming in a bordering county.

Thursday November 15th
I attended a meeting to discuss last summers UTV Takeover Event as the UTV folks are wanting to return in 2019. Representatives from Valley and Adams County, City of McCall, McCall Snowmobile Club, Little Ski Hill met to discuss concerns raised with the recent event and what could work better including possible dates when they would hold the event.

I then attended the Payette Forest Coalition meeting held at the Payette National Forest Supervisors Office.

Friday November 16th
I participated in a National Association of Counties (NACo) Executive Board Conference Call.

Monday November 19th
Commissioner meeting today. Please find the minutes on the website once approved.

Tuesday November 20th
I participated in a National Forest Counties and Schools Coalition Conference Call to discuss efforts to reauthorize the Secure Rural Schools Payment program as 2018 will be the last payment made unless reauthorization by Congress happens.

I participated in a NACo Transportation Committee Conference Call to discuss topics of interest from a recent survey and to hear information on GoRail which is a program of the Rail Freight Industry on Safety for materials being shipped by railroads.

Friday November 23rd
I started the review of 19 applications for a Judge Position in Ada County. Valley County shares the 4th Judicial District with Ada, Boise and Elmore Counties so each County has a seat on the Magistrate Commission to review and interview successful applicants for Judge positions in this District. We also have Mayors, Attorneys, Judges and At-Large participants on this Commission.

Monday November 26th
Commissioner meeting today. The minutes of this meeting will not be approved for the website until a meeting in December when they will be posted on the website.

Tuesday November 27th
I reviewed 110 pages of a document for a NACo Fall Board meeting I will be attending next week.
I worked on more review of the Judge Applications as we are having a conference call on Thursday to discuss the applicants.

Wednesday November 28th
I did additional review of Judge Applicants this morning.

I drove to Meridian to attend a County Officials Institute Training on Thursday and Friday.

Thursday November 29th
I attended the County Officials Institute Training which is for new elected officials as I had been invited to speak on a panel concerning ethics as an elected official.

Friday November 30th
I attended Day Two of the County Officials Institute Training as today the sessions were on Open Meeting Rules, Executive Sessions, Records Retention, Ethics in Government, Liability Coverage for Elected Officials, Highway Maintenance, Emergency Management and funding sources.

I drove home after this event.

Well that wraps up my November.

I want to wish all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year as it will have come and gone by the time I send out my December news.

Thanks to all who take the time to read my newsletter and if there are any topics that you need more clarification please do not hesitate to ask.

Gordon
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Idaho News:

New Tamarack Resort owners say they will get to work

Investment group takes over ski run lease, plans to finish Village Plaza

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Nov 29, 2018

The new owners of Tamarack Resort near Donnelly say they will open the resort’s ski area next month and get to work on finishing what the original developers abandoned 10 years ago.

A company called Tamarack Resort Holdings announced last week it had acquired key pieces of the four-season resort, including the unfinished Village Plaza that was originally intended to be the heart of the project.

The announcement was made the same day the State Board of Land Commissioners approved the transfer of the lease of 2,100 acres of state endowment land to the new company. The ski runs are located on the endowment land.

The new company consists of a consortium of companies in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., and Atlanta, Ga., called Imperium Blue.

The consortium has been working for the past two years to acquire the resort, said Kyle Mowitz, president and co-founder Imperium Blue.

continued:
— — —

Land trade for sewer bonds paved way for Tamarack Resort deal

State gets 532 acres in return for forgiveness of $15 million debt

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Nov 29, 2018

Last week’s announcement of the acquisition of Tamarack Resort by a consortium of Florida investors would not have happened if a land exchange between the state and Tamarack homeowners did not occur a month prior.

On Oct. 17, the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality took ownership of 532 acres of bare ground on the southern end of the four-season resort near Donnelly.

The land, known as the Heritage Property, was part of the original master plan of the resort but was never developed.

The state took the land in return for forgiving principal and interest totaling about $15 million on bonds attached to resort properties.

The bonds were issued in 2005 to finance the extension to the resort of sewer lines and pumping stations operated by the North Lake Recreational Sewer and Water District.

The 532 acres swapped for the debt was owned by the Tamarack Homeowners Acquisition Company, composed of property owners of the resort.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Cascade council decides not to sell former police department HQ

Space will be used to to help new businesses

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Nov 29, 2018

Cascade City Council members voted to retain ownership of the former headquarters of the disbanded police department and lease the property in a public hearing on Monday.

The council voted to begin drafting a lease agreement that would see the space used as an incubator for startup businesses.

“If leasing the building is the way to get the incubator in there and see if that can stimulate the economy of cascade, I would much rather do that than sell the building,” council member Rachel Huckaby said.

continued:
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Wilks brothers’ gates on Forest Service road illegal, Idaho Wildlife Federation says

“This is about more than just gates,” IWF Executive Director Brian Brooks said. “This is about wealthy individuals flaunting Idaho’s laws and illegally claiming public resources as their own without repercussions.”

Sean Deter, Morgan Boydston November 28, 2018 KTVB

The gates installed by a pair of Texas billionaire brothers on an Idaho Forest Service road through their property near Bogus Basin are illegal, according to the Idaho Wildlife Federation.

Dan and Farris Wilks have raised the hackles of hunters and other outdoor recreationists who rely on access to Idaho public lands after their controversial purchases of vast swaths of private land in the state.

The tensions raised by the Wilkses have reached a fever pitch as of late, with the installation of gates on Forest System road 374 – known as Boise Ridge Road – by their company, DF Development LLC. They recently put up sets of bright orange gates on the popularly-traveled Forest Service road through their property just miles from Bogus Basin, surrounded by the Boise National Forest, and “No Trespassing” signs on their private property.

continued:
— — —

Wilks brothers defend gates on Forest Service road in Idaho

DF Development wrote a letter to the Forest Service, saying they’re willing to work with the agency but want to protect their private property in Boise County.

Morgan Boydston November 30, 2018 KTVB

Boise County — KTVB has new developments to a story we’ve been following for months. On Thursday, we told you the Forest Service determined a pair of gates on a popular road through Boise County are illegal.

The Wilks brothers’ company DF Development put up the gates on Forest System road 374 – known as Boise Ridge Road – earlier this year. The Forest Service sent the company a letter in October, outlining easements they have – and don’t have – and informing DFD they must remove the gates because they’re on the public right-of-way.

continued:
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Idaho regulators agree to settlement with Texas oil company

11/29/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — A Texas oil company has agreed to pay $4,000 for not complying with Idaho rules, state oil and gas regulators said.

The state Oil and Gas Conservation Commission approved the settlement this week with Houston-based Alta Mesa, the Idaho Statesman reported .

The company holds hundreds of oil and gas leases on private and state land in Payette County.

continued:
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Important shipping deadlines for the holiday season

Here are some reminders about when you need to mail packages during the holidays.

KTVB November 28, 2018

Boise — If you still have gifts to buy and send, here are some important shipping deadlines you’ll want to keep in mind.

If you are mailing things via the U.S. Postal Service, you have to send them by December 14 for ground, December 20 for first class, and December 22 for priority express.

continued:

Note to locals: Remember, our mail only goes out 3 days a week now.
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Scam Alerts:

Boise Fire Department warns of phone scam

Steve Bertel Nov 27, 2018 KIVI TV

Boise – Officials are warning Treasure Valley residents of a phone scam involving someone claiming to be raising money for the Boise Fire Department.

A retired firefighter reported recently receiving a call from a person claiming to be collecting donations for the fire department. He stated the caller asked for funds in the name of the fire chief –- but, when asked by the retired firefighter, the caller could not give the name of the chief. The call came from a 208 area code.

Officials say, if you receive a call like this, promptly hang up.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

USPS warns people to be aware of change of address scam, especially around holidays

Sabirah Rayford Nov 27, 2018 KIVI TV

It’s a crime the U.S. Postal Service says you need to be aware of, especially this holiday season.

They can go to a store or do it online. All a criminal needs is your name and address to change where your mail is sent.

“It’s just like any other crime,” Ivan Ramirez said. “Crimes of opportunity, snatch and grabs or purse snatching.”

But Ramirez, a USPS inspector, says there are steps you can take to prevent yourself from becoming a victim.

continued:
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Scammers drain senior citizen bank accounts during the holidays

by Abigail Taylor Friday, November 30th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — This holiday season, scammers are looking to turn the nest eggs that seniors have been building up their whole lives into their Easter eggs.

As temperatures drop — utility scams are especially on the rise.

The scams typically come in as a phone call or email, urging victims to send money for a ‘late’ bill or they will have their power cut off.

“They claim that they’re from Idaho Power, Intermountain Gas, or any number of these utilities,” said Emily Valla with the Better Business Bureau. “They say you haven’t paid and if you don’t pay right away, your internet, your power, your gas, your water will be shut off.”

Their biggest target are the most vulnerable — seniors.

continued:
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Mining News:

Valley commissioners set Dec. 10 workshop on Midas Gold pact

The Star-News Nov 29, 2018

Valley County Commissioners have scheduled a public meeting to discuss the county’s possible involvement in the Midas Gold Community Agreement.

The meeting is scheduled for Monday, Dec. 10 at 1 p.m. at the Valley County Courthouse.

Public comment is encouraged at the meeting, which is on the commissioner’s agenda as a two-hour workshop.

Under the agreement, each community that signs on would appoint an individual to serve on the Stibnite Advisory Council.

The council would meet regularly to get updates from Midas Gold on the Stibnite Gold Project.

Each of the communities would also appoint one person to serve on the Stibnite Foundation, a charitable community foundation to be established to support projects that benefit communities surrounding the project.

The signers also agree to submit letters to the Forest Service as part of an effort by Midas Gold to encourage community participation in the permitting process.

Under the proposed agreement, Midas Gold would give the Stibnite Foundation cash and company stocks at various stages of the permitting process, construction and operation of the mine.

There would be no restrictions on how the money given to the foundation would be spent.

source:
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The Facts About Road Closures

November 27

At Midas Gold, we believe in being good neighbors, working with the communities closest to our project and communicating transparently with Idahoans. This is why we feel compelled to address some misconceptions we’ve been hearing about road closures outside of Yellow Pine.

Recently, we have heard some confusion about three distinct points of access. The first is Sugar Creek Road, which the U.S. Forest Service administratively closed in 2008. The second is Stibnite Road, which Midas Gold maintains as a part of our permit to access the Stibnite Gold Project site. The last access point is Stibnite Road as it runs through our site.

In 2008, the U.S. Forest Service made the decision to close Sugar Creek Road as a part of its McCall and Krassel Ranger Districts Snow-free Season Travel Management Plan. Midas Gold was not involved in this decision. In fact, our company didn’t even exist yet.

We understand Sugar Creek Road is important to many people who live in Yellow Pine and know people are upset with its recent physical closure. Lately, we’ve seen comments come into Midas Gold criticizing us for closing the road and that is why we want to clear up the confusion and give you all of the information we have on the roads.

continued:
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Ask Midas: How Do You Set Money Aside for Reclamation?

June 27

Midas Gold Idaho wants to keep the community informed about the work we are doing at the Stibnite Gold Project site. The Ask Midas blog series gives the experts in our company a chance to answer some of the community’s most frequently asked questions and helps clear up any misconceptions around the project.

Midas Gold is committed to restoring the site and leaving the area better than we found it. We know this will take a solid plan and a significant amount of money. We have developed our plan and, as soon as our project is permitted, we will be required to set aside all of the funds for reclamation before mining ever begins. Financial assurance funding, also known as bonding, has changed significantly over the years and on this week’s Ask Midas blog, I want to explain how it works today.

How Does a Mining Company Provide Financial Assurance to Cover Its Reclamation Efforts?

When miners first came to Stibnite well over 100 years ago, there were no reclamation standards. Miners were only focused on mineral production and weren’t expected to restore the areas they had mined. Today, things are drastically differently.

continued:
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Public Lands:

USDA Forest Service Krassel Ranger District Developed & Dispersed Site Improvement Project Update

November 28, 2018

Dear Interested Party,

The Forest Service is seeking scoping comments for the proposed Krassel Developed and Dispersed Site Improvement project on the Krassel Ranger District of the Payette National Forest. The enclosed scoping document provides more detailed information about the project. The scoping document is also available on the project’s webpage at http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=55120.

The Forest Service is contacting interested individuals, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by December 28, 2018, and make your comments as specific as possible.

The project webpage provides you tools to engage this process as you wish. From “Get Connected” on the right hand side of the page, click on “Subscribe to Email Updates” if you wish to receive electronic communication about this project. Use the “Comment/Object on project” link to access a simple webform to submit your comments on this project. The “Public Comment/Objection Reading Room” are the published comments received on this project.

Webform submission through the project website is preferred but written comments concerning these projects will be accepted. Comments for the project may be submitted to Krassel Ranger District 500 North Mission Building 1 McCall, ID 83638. Hand delivered comment letters may be delivered during regular business hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, excluding holidays.

Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection and will be released in their entirety if requested pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act. Comments received in response to this request will also be available for public inspection on the “Public Comment Reading Room” on the project webpage http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=55120.

For further information on this project, please contact Joshua Simpson; jtsimpson@fs.fed.us; 208-634-0616.

Sincerely,
Anthony B. Botello
Krassel District Ranger

link to: 20181120 Krassel Rec Improvements Scoping Document.pdf

Note: Comments are due by December 28th.
— — — — — — — — — —

BLM protects road surface with annual winter closure of Eighth Street

Date: November 29, 2018
Contact: Michael Williamson mwilliamson@blm.gov 208-384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management would like to remind the public of the annual seasonal road closure of upper Eighth Street in the Boise Foothills to prevent road damage during wet conditions.

This seasonal closure pertains only to full-sized vehicles and is in effect from Dec. 1 to May 15. The closure begins 2.8 miles from the Jim Hall Foothills Learning Center. The route remains open year-round for off-highway vehicles 50 inches or less in width, motorcycles, mountain bikes and all other non-motorized use.

“The purpose of this seasonal road closure has always been to prevent road damage from full-size vehicle use when the road bed is wet and easily rutted,” said David Draheim, BLM outdoor recreation planner. “This annual closure has gone a long way towards minimizing erosion and road maintenance costs, and preventing other resource damage from occurring each year.”

The BLM appreciates the public’s cooperation in respecting the road closure and helping to protect resources while maintaining access for recreational users. For more information, please contact the BLM Boise District Office at 208-384-3300.
— — — — — — — — — —

Smoke May Be Home To Helpful And Harmful Microbes, Research Finds

By James Dawson Nov 26, 2018 Boise State Public Radio

You know the old saying, where there’s smoke, there’s fire? Scientists at University of Idaho found where there’s smoke, there are microbes.

Tiny bacteria or fungi get sucked up from the soil or burning plant life and are cast through the air inside the smoke plume.

U of I Professor Leda Kobziar led the research team. She says it’s not clear if these microbes can survive long trips in smoke, but, “Research that has addressed long distance transport of fungi and bacteria – and even viruses – through dust clouds has shown that they can survive across continent transport.”

continued:
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Critter News:

Pet talk – What is heartworm disease?

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Nov 30, 2018 IME

Heartworms are parasites that live in the arteries of the lungs and right side of the heart in dogs and wild canines. They can live up to seven years and eventually cause right-heart failure and death.

The official name for heartworms is dirofilarial immitis. They are found in most parts of the world and in every state of the United States. Heartworms also occur in cats, ferrets and California sea lions. Heartworms are spread from an infected animal to other animals by mosquitoes. Heartworm disease is only spread by the bite of mosquitoes that contain immature heartworms (larvae) in their bodies.

Once a dog is bitten by an infected mosquito, the larvae travel to the lungs, where they develop into adult worms. The adult worms cause damage to the pulmonary arteries and lining of the heart.

Most dogs with early heartworm disease have no clinical signs, and the disease is detected by routine blood tests by your veterinarian. As the infestation of worms worsens, clinical signs include lethargy, decreased activity and especially coughing. As the disease worsens, breathing rate and effort increase. With advanced disease and right-heart failure, fluid builds up in the abdomen, and weight loss occurs.

continued:
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Dog food recalled due to potentially harmful levels of vitamin D

KIVI TV – Dec 1, 2018


photo by FDA

Sunshine Mills, the maker of several brands of pet food, is recalling three of its puppy and dog food products, citing potentially high levels of vitamin D that could lead to “serious health issues,” including kidney failure.

The brands affected are Evolve, Sportsman’s Pride and Triumph, the company said in a statement that is also posted on the US Food and Drug Administration’s website.

“Vitamin D, when consumed at very high levels, can lead to serious health issues in dogs including renal dysfunction,” the company said. Symptoms include vomiting, loss of appetite, increased thirst and urination, excessive drooling and weight loss.

continued:
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EPA denies petition to ban ‘cyanide bombs’

Several environmental groups filed a petition with the EPA seeking to ban the devices.

KTVB Staff November 27, 2018

Boise — The Environmental Protection Agency has refused a request to ban so-called “cyanide bombs.”

The traps made national headlines last year when a 14-year-old Pocatello boy and his dog were sprayed with cyanide after accidentally triggering a trap which had been set by federal workers to kill coyotes.

The boy became ill and the dog died.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Last week of November 2018
— — — — — — — — — —

Feds extend review of red wolf management

11/30/18 AP

Raleigh, N.C. — Federal authorities say they’ll extend their review of red wolf management in North Carolina after a judge ruled that a plan to shrink the territory of the only wild population of the animals violates endangered species protections.

In a statement posted online Thursday, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service called the additional time an opportunity to evaluate the decision’s implications.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Possible tracks found of rare wolf that escaped in Colorado

11/28/18 AP

Divide, Colo. — Wildlife managers have found tracks that might have been left by an endangered Mexican wolf that escaped from a Colorado wildlife center, but the animal hasn’t been seen for two weeks.

The year-old, captive-born male got out of the Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Center on Nov. 11. It had been taken there to breed with other wolves.

continued:
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Motorists warned of elk herd in southeastern Idaho

Drivers need to be careful on U.S. Route 30 because of an elk herd that frequently crosses the highway.

Associated Press November 27, 2018

Montpelier, Idaho — Authorities in southeastern Idaho are warning motorists to be careful on U.S. Route 30 due to a large herd of elk.

The Bear Lake County Sheriff’s Office tells the Idaho State Journal in a story on Tuesday that the herd frequently crosses the highway.

The sheriff’s office says the herd is typically in the area this time of year.

The sheriff’s office says no collisions with elk have been reported so far.

source:
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Controversy over ridding wild turkeys from Gibson Jack road

By Brady Halbleib Dec 01, 2018 Local News 8

Pocatello, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Some residents on Gibson jack road in Pocatello are upset over the euthanization 24 turkeys that became a nuisance in the area. Pocatello Fish and Game captured the turkeys and donated them to the Idaho Food Bank. However, many believe that they could have relocated the turkeys instead of killing them.

Gibson Jack is known for its beautiful trails and excellent hiking. However, recently, it’s been known for its wild turkeys. Many deer signs line the road, but it’s the Turkeys, that have made the pastures, along with Gibson Jack Road their home.

Jim Betty, a resident near Gibson Jack and former Chapter President of the National Turkey Federation says, “wild turkeys are cool when there are 3 or 4 of them, they’re not cool when you got a 100 of them on your porch.”

continued:
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Group forms in wake of decision to close steelhead season

11/30/18 AP

Lewiston, Idaho — Fishing outfitters, business owners and community members from two Idaho towns have come together to insert themselves into negotiations or maneuverings that could stop the pending closure of the state’s steelhead fishing season or lead to an earlier reopening.

The group on Thursday collectively created the Idaho River Community River Alliance, elected board members and hired attorney Bill Mauk of the Boise law firm Mauk and Miller, the Lewiston Morning Tribune reported .

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission is closing Idaho’s steelhead season starting Dec. 8 to stave off a threatened lawsuit from six conservation organizations. The suspended season is expected to harm the economies of the two small towns — Riggins and White Bird — that depend on income from steelhead anglers in the late winter and spring.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
November 30, 2018
Issue No. 891
Table of Contents

* Federal Climate Report Suggests More Warm Years Such As 2015 Will Be A Reality For Columbia River Basin
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441849.aspx

* Council Committee Updated On Final BPA Fish/Wildlife Project Expenses For FY2018, Accords, Future Cuts
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441848.aspx

* Court Puts Idaho Power’s Hells Canyon Water Quality Lawsuit Against EPA On Hold Until March
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441847.aspx

* With Threat Of Lawsuit, Idaho Suspends Steelhead Angling Until Obtains Incidental Take Permit
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441846.aspx

* Leading Practitioners Of eDNA Science Gather To Discuss New Tool’s Possibilities; Can Confirm Fish Species Presence
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441845.aspx

* PNW Coastal Forests, Western Cascades Will Be Less Vulnerable To Drought, Fire Than Rocky Mountains, Sierras
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441844.aspx

* UW Climate Impacts Group, Tribes Develop Resources For Tribes To Evaluate Their Vulnerability To Climate Change
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441843.aspx

* New Interactive Tool Allows Any User To Interact With PNW Historical Temperatures, Precipitation, See Changes
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441842.aspx

* Lawsuit Challenges EPA On Identifying Oregon Waters Impaired By Ocean Acidification
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441841.aspx

* Extensive, Five-Year Predator-Prey Study To Resume In NE Washington With Radio Collaring Deer
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441840.aspx

* $5,000 In Rewards Offered In Killing Of Collared Grizzly Bear In Northern Idaho
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441839.aspx

* Supreme Court Sends ESA Case Back To Appeals Court For Another Look At ‘Critical Habitat’
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441838.aspx

* Court Settlement Commits Oregon DEQ To Clearing Backlog Of Water Quality Permits, Addressing Causes Of Delays
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441837.aspx
————————–

Fish & Game News:

Governor fills empty Idaho Fish & Game vacant commissioner seat after viral photos mishap

by CBS 2 News Staff Thursday, November 29th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — Idaho Gov. Butch Otter has appointed a new person to the seven-person Idaho Fish and Game Commission panel after photos of a former commissioner’s hunting trip to Africa went viral.

Otter appointed Tim Murphy, to the seat. Murphy is a former BLM director and also worked as director of fire and aviation at the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise.

“Among the challenges facing wildlife management in Idaho, I always keep a keen focus on the value of agricultural land to Idaho’s wildlife and open space,” Murphy said in a news release. “Hunting, fishing, trapping, and other wildlife based recreation are key components of life in Idaho. I’m pleased to join the Department as a commissioner for the southwest region and look forward to opportunities to hear and address issues and needs important to Idahoans.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Winter feeding – not the act of kindness some may think

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Friday, November 30, 2018

Winter feeding of deer and elk near homes cannot only be harmful to them, but can ultimately be dangerous, according to Jason Husseman, Idaho Fish and Game district wildlife biologist based in Salmon.

While feeding that cute little fawn in your yard may seem helpful, Fish and Game says the unintentional consequences can actually be detrimental to their health for several reasons.

“Feeding deer and elk is not the act of kindness some people think, but it can actually do more harm than good,” said Husseman. “It often begins with just a few animals, but their numbers can quickly grow and become overwhelming.”

Wildlife receiving supplemental feed often congregate in unnaturally high numbers in small areas, which increases the chances of diseases spreading among the population. Malnourished animals and crowding stress creates conditions ideal for serious disease outbreaks, which is a serious concern to livestock producers and wildlife managers alike.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Helicopter surveys of big game to begin soon

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Friday, November 30, 2018

Disturbance to the animals is kept to the minimum, generally less than a few minutes

Beginning in early December, Idaho Fish and Game staff will take to the air to get a closer look at deer and elk numbers, including several low-level helicopter surveys planned throughout the state.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Confiscated game meat donated to those in need

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Friday, November 30, 2018

Each year, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game seizes unlawfully taken fish and wildlife that is often processed and donated to charity organizations.


Mike Demick – IDFG

After each case in finalized through the court system and with the magistrate’s approval, Fish and Game donates the edible meat and fish to local food banks, church groups and helping-hand organizations that distribute to those in need. Most of the game meat is confiscated in the fall, so donations usually increase during the holiday months, allowing some to have more food on the table during Thanksgiving and Christmas.

According to Justin Williams, Fish and Game district conservation officer in Salmon, several recent wildlife violation cases involving multiple animals taken illegally have resulted in hundreds of pounds going to those in need.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Rare albino white tail 12 point buck spotted in Tennessee

By Adrian Mojica, WZTV Staff Monday, November 26th 2018


Albino white tail buck-Photo courtesy Amy Henderson Hall

Nashville, Tenn. (WZTV) – A Tennessee hunter captured a rare sighting of an albino deer on video last week.

Amy Henderson Hall took video of the deer in Williamson County, Tennessee saying the deer frequents the Brentwood and Nolensville areas.

continued w/more photos:
— — — — — — — — — —

Rare albino raccoon captured in Tennessee

By Adrian Mojica, WZTV Friday, October 19th 2018


Photo Courtesy of Matt Caldwell

Nashville, Tenn. (WZTV) — An extremely rare albino raccoon was captured in Tennessee this week when trappers responded to a Memphis resident’s home.

Alpha Wildlife, a company which specializes in animal trapping, prevention, and repairs, responded to a Collierville home to remove raccoons.

Co-owner Matt Caldwell says he was ready for the first raccoon trapped and removed but the second one was a surprise. “I was excited and taken aback at the same time,” Caldwell says. “I’ve seen pictures online but never in person.”

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:


—————————-

Nov 25, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Nov 25, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
~ 2019 Events ~
May 25, 2019 ATV-UTV Scavenger Hunt Memorial Day Weekend
Jul 13, 2019 Ride to Big Creek
Sep 14, 2019 Ride to Cinnabar

(details below)
———-

Village News:

Small Earthquake 11/20

November 20th at 339pm a couple of folks felt a mild earthquake in Yellow Pine. Turns out there was a M 4.1 – 25km ENE of Grangeville, Idaho.

Link to quake at USGS:


— — — —

Thanksgiving Potluck at the Yellow Pine Tavern

Thanksgiving at the Tavern, as usual great food and good conversation

Tavern’s FB photo gallery link:
— — — —

November 24 “Stop the Bleed” Training

A big THANK YOU! to Jeff and Anne Forster. The YP community benefits greatly from Jeff and Anne Forster’s many hours of certified training in rescue and first aid. Saturday they instructed a group in the latest methods for treating life threatening and severe bleeding. The “Stop the Bleed” project is first aid training designed by several nationally recognized organizations that have united to develop a response to mass casualty events. Your quick, correct response at an accident could save a life……and in the Yellow Pine area an injured person needs trained people to help until EMT/Paramedics arrive. They will be providing more training next summer in Yellow Pine; involve your family. That tourniquet method you learned in school health class has been replaced by methods tested by the military and quick response groups. Just as the old methods for resuscitation were up-graded by CPR, there are new, improved ways to treat injuries. Check out Bleedingcontrol.org Get training Get first aid equipment.

– LI
— — — —

Christmas

“Santa’s Yellow Pine Elves, it is time to think of Christmas Bags again!! Let me know if you want to help!!”

Contact Nicki Harnar
— — — —

Come Spring…

“To Yellow Pine residents. I will be making several trips next spring and summer hauling out metal, appliances, etc. . If you need anything hauled away please get on the list. Vehicles require a title. I will be hauling gravel back if anyone is interested.”

Contact Mike Amos
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

Three day a week mail delivery from Cascade started November 1, 2018. The Post Office in Yellow Pine will be open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Be sure to buy your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Wolf or Dog?

A report of a “black wolf” (or a dog that looks wolfish) was seen Monday (Nov 19) evening near the Eiguren ranch.
— — — —

Bears

It should be safe to put bird feeders back out, bears are hibernating (according to Jon Hunter our F&G CO.)

Please remember to keep trash secured, it will draw foxes, coyotes and loose dogs.
— — — —

Firewood Permits

Firewood Season ends November 30, 2018. Permits available at The Corner.

Fuelwood permits have been reduced to $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum and a 10-cord maximum per household.

link to more info:
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.


— — — —

Ice Hole Campground Closed

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
———-

Local Events:

2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine.

https://www.ypescapade.org/atv-utv-events
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx

There was be a YPWUA meeting in October. (?)
— — — —

VYPA News:

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 18th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th. Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.
— — — —

YPFD News:

The next meeting to be May 18th, 2019 at the Community Hall

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.
There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.
Sept 22nd YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Sept. 30th Yellow Pine Times.
October 6 YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Oct 21st Yellow Pine Times.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11am all are welcome (training on pause for winter, will resume in the spring.)

The YPFD has 2 Size Chimney Brushes with extension rods that were donated for use around YP. If you would like to borrow one, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you. The YPFD also has loanable mitigation tools, (Weed-Whacker, Hedge Trimmer, backpack blower and 16’ pole saw). If you would like to borrow one or all, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you.

It’s also time to check the Smoke Alarm batteries and Fire Extinguishers. Please test the alarm and replace Smoke Alarm Batteries every year, if you have the replaceable battery type. Fire Extinguishers should be checked as well and should be easily seen and reachable. A good location for the Fire Extinguishers would be the kitchen and near the wood stove and/or fireplace. The needle should be in the green.

If you need a Smoke Detector or Fire Extinguisher for your YP residence please contact Jeff F.

Smoke Alarm Info:

Cooking safety in the home:
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for winter
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall Hours: 9am to 2pm and 4pm to 8pm 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

We sell FS wood cutting permits.

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC

Buck Horn Outfitters in Idaho’s west Central Mountains in Units 25, 20 A, & 19 A. Providing Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Mountain lion, & Wolf Hunts. We offer Guided Rifle or Archery Hunts & Drop Camps. We are not about Quantity we are about providing Quality Hunts. My husband and I have been in the back country all our lives, we offer Deluxe camps with great food & our Guides know hunting, the back country and Stock.

Link to FB:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430 – 50# bag of Polar Ice Melt available for $7.99. Breaks the Ice Barrier. Quick Melting action, even in heavy snow.
— — — —

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Nov 19) overnight low of 14 degrees, clear sky, dry – very little frost, smaller patches of old snow in the shade. Several jays visiting. Clear sunny day, mild temperatures, high of 45 degrees. Light traffic on main street. Raven calling and flying over the village. Bright gibbous moon rising in the saddle north of Golden Gate around 530pm. At 6pm a p/u pulled out of the museum parking lot with no headlights on.

Tuesday (Nov 20) overnight low of 17 degrees, clear sky, moderate frost and smaller patches of old snow in the shade. Several jays visiting. A few wispy clouds by mid-afternoon and nearly calm, high of 50 degrees. The patchy snow in the shade isn’t melting, the ground is frozen. Small earthquake shook the house at 339pm. There was a M 4.1 earthquake north of us. Mostly clear at dusk, can hear the river. Fat almost full golden moon rising in the saddle north of Golden gate around 6pm.
Link to quake felt in YP:

Wednesday (Nov 21) overnight low of 15 degrees, mostly cloudy sky, moderate frost and persistent patches of old snow in the shade (ground is frozen.) A few jays and a hairy woodpecker visiting. Mail truck made it in on time. Overcast by mid-afternoon, feels colder than it looks (humidity seems to be up), high of 47 degrees. Thinner clouds after sunset and chilly light breeze. Dropped a little below freezing by 10pm, then warmed up during the night.

Thursday (Nov 22) a few sprinkles of rain early this morning, overcast and chilly light breeze. Jays and a hairy woodpecker visiting. Blustery before lunch time, dark clouds by early afternoon and sprinkles of rain for a while, high of 44 degrees. Holiday weekend traffic. Blustery and cloudy at sundown. Rain after dark turned to snow probably around midnight.

Friday (Nov 23) a little snow overnight 1/4″ new snow, low of 30 degrees, fine light snow falling and low overcast this morning. Steller jays visiting. Holiday weekend traffic. Light snowfall all day, bigger flakes after lunch for a bit. Snowed lightly all afternoon, barely above freezing and low clouds, but not much snow accumulation, high of 33 degrees. Quiet evening. About an inch of snow by 10pm, probably snowed very lightly during the night.

Saturday (Nov 24) overnight low of 26 degrees, overcast and light snowfall this morning, 1.25″ new snow, 1.5″ total snow. Raven calling and flying over the village, a couple of jays, a red-breasted nuthatch and a female hairy woodpecker visiting. Break in the snow around lunch time, then flaking snow and chilly breeze early afternoon, high of 33 degrees. Cold cloudy afternoon/evening, no new snow accumulation. Clearing during the night and cold.

Sunday (Nov 25) overnight low of 9 degrees, clear sky this morning, 1.5″ of snow on the ground. A couple of jays visited. A little bit of high haze in the sky around lunch time. Mostly clear sky and chilly light breeze mid-afternoon, high of 36 degrees. Quiet evening. Partly cloudy at dusk and below freezing.
——————————–

Tips & Advice:

Be Ember Aware! Tip Series

“Used with permission from University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and the Living With Fire program.”

Be Ember Aware Tip #6 – Much About Mulches

Mulches play an important role in northern Idaho landscapes. They can reduce the water requirements of plants, cool soil temperatures, reduce the occurrence of weeds, control soil erosion and dust, and can visually enhance the landscape. Unfortunately, some popular mulches are also combustible, a bad attribute for residential landscapes located in high fire hazard areas, and can be easily ignited by embers during a wildfire.

Organic mulches are made from plant materials. Examples include pine needles, wheat straw, pine bark nuggets of various sizes, shredded western red cedar and redwood sometimes referred to as “gorilla hair” mulch, and wood chips from recycled pallets or wildfire fuel reduction projects. These materials vary considerably in terms of size, shape, and texture; factors that also influence their flammability.

Experiments conducted by the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, Nevada Tahoe Conservation District, Carson City Fire Department and the University of California Cooperative Extension, indicate that pine needle and gorilla hair mulches pose the greatest fire hazard of the organic mulches. Test results show that they are easily ignited, burn fast, and produce considerable heat. Other organic mulches, such as bark nuggets and wood chips, burn somewhat slower but also produce considerable heat. Partially composted wood chips produce very little flame and burn much slower than the other mulches, but burn hot via glowing combustion.

Inorganic mulches are derived from non-plant materials and include rock, stone, and gravel. Most inorganic mulches are noncombustible and are good choices for homes located in high fire hazard areas. The important exception would be ground or shredded recycled rubber. Rubber mulch products, which are often used in playgrounds, burn very intensely and are difficult to extinguish.

Some important mulch tips for homeowners living in high fire hazard areas are:

* Do not use organic mulches within 3 to 5 feet of the house. This is particularly important for wood or other combustible material (e.g, vinyl and other plastic materials sided houses. During a wildfire, burning embers may accumulate in this area, thus providing ample sources of ignition for wood and bark mulches.
* Keep organic mulches at least several feet away from combustible materials such as wood posts, firewood stacks, wooden fences, decks, stairs, etc.
* Irrigating organic mulches, as in a flowerbed, may improve their ignition resistance, although the surface layers of mulch will dry out quickly during wildfire weather conditions.
* Do not allow thick layers of pine needles to accumulate within 30 feet of the house.
* Do not use ground rubber mulches within 30 feet of the house or deck.
* Near the home, emphasize the use of inorganic mulches such as rock and gravel.

[h/t Fire Chief Jeff]
— — — — — — — — — —

Thanksgiving leftovers: How long are they good for?

Susan Gonzalez Nov 24, 2018 KIVI TV

The best part of Thanksgiving is the food, and you’ll be hard pressed to find anyone who argues otherwise.

But as the holiday weekend winds down, it’s time to confront the horrible truth: that turkey isn’t going to last forever.

So instead of calling up mom and asking “How long are Thanksgiving leftovers good for?” just take a gander at this breakdown of when to toss the holiday foodstuff.

continued:
——————–

Idaho News:

Two earthquakes reported in Idaho today

by CBS 2 News Staff Tuesday, November 20th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — According to the USGS, two earthquakes were felt in Idaho today.

One was in the Challis National Forest around midnight last night with a magnitude 3.0.

The other happened at about 3:39 p.m. east of Grangeville and registered at 4.1.

USGS’ shake map shows the impact could be felt as far as Kamiah, Orofino, and Riggins.

Boise State’s seismology lab says the Grangeville earthquake was about eight miles depth. They say it produced weak ground shaking on the intensity scale as far as Lewiston, and some people in Boise are said to have felt it.

The most prominent fault in the area is the Salmon River fault but it cannot be confirmed if this is the fault that moved. Little is known about the history of this fault.

source:
[Note: The M4.1 quake was felt by at least 2 Yellow Piners.]
— — — — — — — — — —

Cascade man accused of sexually assaulting teenage girls

Investigators say the suspect may have additional victims.

KTVB November 22, 2018

Valley County — A Cascade man is facing charges after investigators say he had sexual contact with a 17-year-old girl and a 13-year-old girl.

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office began investigating Nov. 2 after deputies were called to the Arrowhead RV Park.

When they arrived, they found 29-year-old Danial James (DJ) Bixler and a 17-year-old. Bixler had been stabbed, deputies say, but the sheriff’s office has not released whether he was injured by the girl or someone else.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Warren Wagon Road rebuild project shuts down for the winter

Monday-Friday closures to resume next spring

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Nov 21, 2018

Work on a two-year project to reconstruct 5.5 miles of Warren Wagon Road between McCall and Eastside Drive shut down for the winter last week.

The $9.9 million federally-funded project is expected to resume in May, but could begin as early as April, said Cody Brown, a spokesperson for M.A. DeAtley Construction of Clarkston, Wash., the general contractor for the project.

Work next summer will focus on widening and stabilizing the roadway at the southern end of the project, which starts about 2.2 miles north of McCall, as well as securing slopes that were scaled back as part of work this year, Brown said.

Part of the work will include installing mesh to prevent any falling rocks from endangering motorists, pedestrians or bicyclists along slopes that were stabilized by rock scaling crews this year.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Public lands access clashes with private property rights as Wilkses lock up land

As Texas billionaires Dan and Farris Wilks buy up hundreds of square miles of private forest land in Idaho, they are blocking off roads on their property that connect to vast swaths of public land. And that has many who have historically used those roads for recreation purposes crying foul.


A gate blocks an access road in Valley County. Paul Boehlke/KTVB

Morgan Boydston November 19, 2018 KTVB

Boise — Idahoans treasure their public lands, but also respect and stand firmly behind private property rights.

As the uber-wealthy Wilks brothers buy up hundreds of square miles of private timber land across the Gem State, they’re locking it up, and in some cases, they’ve shut Idahoans out of accessing public lands or roads that have always been open.

… “I mean everybody talks about the quality of life: the clean air, a place to go mountain bike, a place to go ride your motorcycle, a place to snowmobile, a place to cross country ski, fishing, hunting,” said Valley County Commissioner Gordon Cruickshank. “We have it all here in Idaho and I think people really embrace that.”

… But the new owners aren’t open to a free-for-all, prompting gates on portions of their nearly 200,000 acres in Boise, Valley, Adams and Idaho counties.

“They have gates on probably every place they have seen major activity,” Cruickshank said.

full story w/video:

[h/t Gordon C]
— — — — — — — — — —

Tamarack Resort gets new owner, vows to complete Village Plaza

Tamarack Resort Holding plans close the deal by the end of the month. Work could begin on the Village Plaza in early 2019.

KTVB Staff November 20, 2018

Donnelly, Idaho — Tamarack Resort has a new owner.

The announcement was made today after the Idaho Land Board approved transferring the state lands lease to the new owner, Tamarack Resort Holding (TRH), for continued operations on the mountain.

According to a news release, TRH is a partnership of investors and managers with decades of development and operations experience at premier resort properties across North America. A purchase price has not been disclosed.

TRH has entered into an agreement to purchase all Tamarack Resort operations and key assets in Donnelly, Idaho. That includes operating the resort now, future expansion plans and investing immediately to complete Village Plaza.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

State approves event venue on Payette Lake without McCall review

Lease of 28 acres exempt from local zoning laws

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Nov 21, 2018

Plans for an event venue on Payette Lake were approved by the Idaho Department of Lands two months ago, but the City of McCall and neighboring residents only recently found out.

The 10-year lease encompasses 28 acres of state lands between the Tamarack Bay Condominiums and Paradise Point on Eastside Drive, including the northern six acres of Shellworth Island. The lease rate is $4,000 per year.

The lakefront event venue will be called “The Lookout on the Lake.” Construction is set to begin in the spring with a goal of a July 1 opening to host weddings, family reunions and other events.

Plans call for a parking and drop-off area, access gates, temporary sheds, a paver patio covered by a party tent and a redwood deck overlooking Payette Lake, all of which will be removed at the end of the lease, project developer Travis Leonard of McCall said.

continued:
— — —

Tamarack Bay condo owners tell Otter Payette Lake lease is illegal

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Nov 21, 2018

The Tamarack Bay Homeowners Association has written a letter to Idaho Gov. “C.L.” Butch Otter requesting the termination of a recent Idaho Department of Lands lease on Payette Lake.

The letter to Otter, who serves as chairman of the Idaho Land Board, argues that the lease is in violation of constitutional obligations of the land department.

… One violation is that the $4,000 for the parcel is well below market value of between $35,000 and $50,000 paid annually for similar lakefront parcels, said letter, written by attorney Deborah Nelson of the Givens Pursley law firm in Boise.

A mandate in the Idaho Constitution requires state land leases to generate as much money as possible from the use of the lands.

Another violation is that a public auction for the property was not held, which would make the lease void, the letter said.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Lawsuit dismissed against deputies in death of Idaho rancher

By Keith Ridler – 11/21/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — A judge has dismissed a federal wrongful death lawsuit filed by the family of an Idaho rancher who was fatally shot by deputies in a dispute that occurred after one of his bulls was hit by a car.

The judge tossed the lawsuit Tuesday after an apparent settlement was reached between the family of rancher Jack Yantis, Adams County, its sheriff and the two deputies.

Widow Donna Yantis said Wednesday she couldn’t comment about specifics of the case.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho attorney general, other AGs urge FCC to act against robocalls

by Scott Logan Monday, November 19th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — With the advent of the National Do Not Call registry, the Idaho Attorney General’s Do Not Call list was folded into that national program.

But the Idaho AG continues to fight against illegal robocalls and is asking the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to do more.

“We’re urging the FCC, saying look robocalls are a plague upon us,” said Brett DeLange, deputy attorney general. “We’d like to figure out more ways to block them. You (FCC) have the technological wherewithal, we’re urging you to spend some serious time on this.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho group asks Supreme Court to block Medicaid Expansion

11/21/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — A conservative group is asking the Idaho Supreme Court to overturn the voter-approved expansion of Medicaid coverage to potentially more than 60,000 low-income adults across the state.

The lawsuit filed on behalf of the Idaho Freedom Foundation Wednesday alleges that the language of the measure is unconstitutional, the Idaho Statesman reported . The plaintiff named in the lawsuit is Brent Regan, an IFF board member.

The group has been the most vocal opponent of Medicaid expansion, or Proposition 2, and officials had said after voters approved it that they would challenge the measure. Voters approved the proposition Nov. 6 by a 60 percent margin.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

New jobs report shows stagnant Idaho wages

Madeline White Nov 21, 2018 KIVI TV

New research from the Idaho Center for Fiscal Policy reveals wages across the country have risen by more than 21 percent in the last 40 years, while Idaho wages have barely moved at all.

Fiscal Policy Analyst Sasha Pierson says even though each dollar stretches about 7 percent further in Idaho, due to our relatively low cost of living, it doesn’t make up for our difference in wages, since Idaho is more than 20 percent below the national average.

continued:
————————–

Mining News:

Valley commissioners set Dec. 10 workshop on Midas Gold agreement

The Star-News November 21, 2108

Valley County Commissioners have scheduled a public meeting to discuss the county’s possible involvement in the Midas Gold Community Agreement.

The meeting is scheduled for Monday, Dec. 10 at 1 p.m. at the Valley County Courthouse.

Public comment is encouraged at the meeting, which is on the commissioner’s agenda as a two-hour workshop.

Under the agreement, each community that signs on would appoint an individual to serve on the Stibnite Advisory Council.

The council would meet regularly to get updates from Midas Gold on the Stibnite Gold Project.

Each of the communities would also appoint one person to serve on the Stibnite Foundation, a charitable community foundation to be established to support projects that benefit communities surrounding the project.

The signers also agree to submit letters to the Forest Service as part of an effort by Midas Gold to encourage community participation in the permitting process.

Under the proposed agreement, Midas Gold would give the Stibnite Foundation cash and company stocks at various stages of the permitting process, construction and operation of the mine.

There would be no restrictions on how the money given to the foundation would be spent.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

What Are The Potential Impacts From An Open Pit Mine In Idaho’s West Central Mountains?

By Frankie Barnhill & Monica Gokey Nov 17, 2018 Boise State Public Radio


The Yellow Pine pit blocks natural passage of the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River, a barrier to Chinook reaching their historic spawning grounds. It’s also a source of heavy metal leaching into the river. MIDAS GOLD

Wanna Know Idaho traveled to Idaho’s West Central Mountains to answer this question from McCall resident Fred Coriell: “What impacts will an open-pit mining operation, like the one proposed by Midas Gold, have on our region?” Cascade-based reporter Monica Gokey has the story for this episode of the podcast.

… What are the mine’s potential impacts, Coriell wonders, on a beautiful scene like this? He tells us his concerns are two-fold — he worries about the boom-bust cycle of the mining industry, and about the environmental consequences of a mine.

“And I’m thinking generations … I’m thinking of my grandchildren and great grandchildren,” he says.

The Stibnite mine has been dormant for nearly 20 years, but a new company, Midas Gold, sees Stibnite as economically attractive again. Midas Gold is currently in the permitting process to open a new mine at Stibnite, and the new plans are bigger than ever before.

continued:
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Montana Resources has high-tech ways of hazing birds

By Ted Mcdermott – 11/17/18 AP

Butte, Mont. — On a recent afternoon, Ian Fairweather, president of Fairweather IT, remotely navigated a six-propeller drone his company designed and built toward an exhausted snow goose that had recently landed on the placid, reflective water of the Berkeley Pit.

But the snow goose resisted the attempts to be hazed from the toxic, artificial lake, swimming away from the drone but refusing to take flight.

… According to Swant, those techniques have been largely successful since an estimated 3,000 to 4,000 geese perished in the pit in December 2016. Though MR has run a bird-hazing program since 1996, the 2016 die-off sparked a renewed effort to come up with a science-based approach to keep migratory waterfowl away.

full story:
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Public Lands:

Court decision is a temporary setback for Payette forest project

The news of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals decision on the Lost Creek-Boulder Creek Landscape Restoration project was disheartening. The three groups that litigated the project are simply opposed to logging. That is clear based on the content of their court filings.

The court’s decision halted not just the logging, but the entire forest restoration project that included restoration efforts such as culvert replacement designed to improve fish habitat, road work that reduces the amount of sediment from reaching streams, and the non-commercial thinning operations and prescribed burning that reduces hazardous fuel loads and creates safer spaces for wildland firefighters to manage wildfires. Because the logging and thinning operations were halted, the contractors may have to lay off staff.

The project originated from consensus recommendations from the Payette Forest Coalition. The groups that litigated refused to come to the table to do the hard work of collaboration – understanding others’ perspectives and compromising to find solutions that all can support. It is easier to wait for the Forest Service to approve a project and then litigate. It’s dispiriting, and somewhat ironic, that environmental groups who choose not to come to the table, shut down a forest health restoration project.

The appeals court decision is a temporary setback. Payette National Forest staff are already working to address the issues the judges identified. We will clarify how the proposed timber harvests and thinning operations comply with the Payette forest management plan.

We will issue a new record of decision. And then, barring more litigation, we will resume the important work of improving forest conditions, reducing wildfire potential, and creating jobs in our communities through the delivery of forest products.

Keith Lannom, Supervisor, Payette National Forest

source: The Star-News November 21, 2108
— — — — — — — — — —

Coalition votes to cut 250 acres of timber from Mesa Fire area

By Max Silverson for The Star-News November 21, 2018

Members of the Payette Forest Coalition voted last Thursday to pursue a salvage timber harvest of up to 250 acres in the most severely burned areas of the Mesa Fire located on Forest Service land.

The collaborative group pondered what salvage measures would be the best course of action in the area burned by the fire east of Council last summer.

The vote was 13-0, with two abstentions, to cut a maximum of 250 acres of timber and create no more than a half-mile of temporary road.

Additional salvage logging is also planned within the Middle Fork Weiser River timber sale. But since the area is already slated for commercial timber harvest, no action was required to conduct salvage operations.

The Mesa Fire burned 34,000 acres primarily within the 50,000-acre Mill Creek-Council Mountain restoration project, which is managed by the Payette National Forest, but under recommendations made by the coalition.

continued:
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Critter News:

Local marine reunited with lost dog: ‘It means the world to me’

by CBS 2 News Staff Saturday, November 24th 2018

The dog of a local marine was reunited with his owner Saturday morning after a viewer recognized the dog in their neighbor’s backyard.

In a phone interview with CBS 2 News, marine Vince Apodaca said they received a phone call Saturday morning from a family in the Horseshoe Bend area, saying they might have his dog. Pictures were sent and confirmed that it was the three-year-old German Shepard/Pit mix, named Doogie.

“I got the news that he was missing only a couple days before I got back, and I knew it wasn’t really going to be the holidays without him,” Vince said. “It’s so great that we were able to get him back and that we’ll have him for Christmas and all that. It means the world to me. It really does.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Missing North End dog found in Memphis after five months

“I just haven’t given up,” Lisa Corbett said. “Not a bit. Never.”

KTVB Katie Terhune November 23, 2018

Boise — After Lisa Corbett’s Australian shepherd Jake disappeared from her Boise backyard in June, she was distraught.

Corbett went door to door, asking neighbors if they seen Jake. She papered the North End with flyers, offering a reward for his safe return. She even paid more than $100 to a website that promised to send out an “alert” about her missing dog, she said, only to later learn she had been scammed.

Corbett, who had raised the dog from a puppy, said at first she thought her dog might wander home on his own.

continued:
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Second week of November 2018
— — — — — — — — — —

Arizona man gets probation for Mexican gray wolf killing

11/16/18 AP

Flagstaff, Ariz. — An Arizona man has pleaded guilty to shooting and killing an endangered Mexican gray wolf.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced Friday that Jason William Kunkel, of Peoria, Arizona, was sentenced to five years of unsupervised probation after pleading guilty to the slaying of a Mexican wolf in December 2017.

Federal authorities say Kunkel shot and killed a wild-born, female Mexican wolf in the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest.

continued:
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Endangered Mexican wolf escapes at Colorado wildlife center

By Dan Elliott – 11/21/18 AP

Denver — An endangered Mexican wolf escaped from a Colorado wildlife center where it had been taken to breed with other captive wolves, authorities said Wednesday.

The year-old, captive-born male got out of an enclosure at the Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Center in the town of Divide, 55 miles (90 kilometers) south of Denver.

It escaped Nov. 11, the same day it arrived in Colorado with two other wolves, all from the California Wolf Center.

continued:
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter 11/19/2018

‘Rogue Pack’ Wolves Kill Calves at Jackson County Ranch

Wolf De-Listing Bill A Win For Hunters

Wolf war howls between western and eastern Washington
— — — — — — — — — —

Record breaking northern pike caught in Lake Coeur d’Alene

This monster fish broke the previous record that was set last March and weighed in at 32 pounds.

KTVB November 19, 2018

Coeur d’Alene — There’s a new catch-and-release record-breaking northern pike in Lake Coeur d’Alene for Idaho anglers to match, and it’ll be a challenge to beat.

Idaho Fish and Game say the 46-inch beast was caught on Nov. 3 by Mark Mills from Spokane, Wash. Mills weighed the fish on a digital scale at 32 pounds.

continued:
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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
November 19, 2018
Issue No. 890
Table of Contents

* Oregon Plan To Euthanize Sea Lions At Willamette Falls Approved By NOAA Fisheries
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441816.aspx

* 27-Pound Pike Caught In Lake Roosevelt; Council Oks Plan For Science, Economic Review Of Pike Predation
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441815.aspx

* Council Committee Recommends $11.6 Million To Continue BPA Funding For 25 Research Projects
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441814.aspx

* River Managers Reduce Downstream Bonneville Dam Flows For Spawning Chum Salmon
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441813.aspx

* Seven New Lamprey Conservation, Restoration Projects To Go To Council For Approval
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441812.aspx

* Orca Recovery Task Force Recommendations Include Considering Removal Of Lower Snake Dams
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441811.aspx

* Science Panel Completes Review Of Klickitat River Spring Chinook Master Plan
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441810.aspx

* Four-Year, $48 Million MOA Between Kootenai Tribe, BPA Out For Review
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441809.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

Time to shop for 2019 hunting and fishing license deals

By Ian Malepeai, Marketing Manager
Monday, November 19, 2018

You can save a few bucks on licenses, and they make good gifts

With Black Friday and holiday shopping deals going on, here are some Idaho Fish and Game “hacks” you may not be aware of that can save you money and increase your opportunities.

continued:
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Gift Certificates, Wildlife Guides, and Wildlife Prints– Let Fish and Game Help You with Your Holiday Shopping!

By Jennifer Jackson, Regional Communications Manager
Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Looking for a simple way to fill those holiday wish lists, especially for those who are hard to buy for?

Shop at your regional Fish and Game office!

continued:
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Information sought on Mule Deer buck shot from Tammany Rd. Nov 10

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Communications Manager
Friday, November 23, 2018

Officers looking for information on mule deer buck shot from road

Conservation officers are seeking information regarding a Mule deer buck that was shot from Tammany Creek Road around 3:45 p.m. Saturday November 10, 2018. The buck was shot from the roadway and died in a hay field a short distance away.

“After the buck was shot, the suspects were alarmed by passing traffic and left the deer in the field”, said Conservation Officer Rick Cooper. “Someone may have that piece of information that could help us identify them.”

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

These Are the Finalists of 2018 Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards, and They’re Hilarious

September 14, 2018 by Dunja Djudjic


Jonathan Irish/The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2018

There are plenty of great wildlife photographers who take awe-inspiring and interesting shots. But when these animals do funny things and take silly poses: it adds a whole new level to wildlife photography.

The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards is centered on the photos of animals that are sure to improve your day.

continued w/lots of neat photos:
[h/t Boise NF]
————————

Seasonal Humor:


(FB link to larger size)
Image: Collection of John T. Richards, great-grandson of Governor Frank Steunenberg

This 1924 photo gives a whole new meaning to the term “jailbirds.”

These gobblers were part of a special flock raised by the inmates at the Old Idaho Penitentiary in Boise.

The guy who started the poultry program: Harry Orchard, who was convicted of murdering Idaho’s Governor Frank Steunenberg in 1905 by placing a bomb at the gate to governor’s residence in Caldwell, Idaho.

One of the many “turkey men” over the years who maintained the penitentiary’s turkeys was Charles George, also convicted of murder. With a team of dogs, George led his “herd” through the Boise foothills to graze. Under his watch, the Idaho Penitentiary turkey flock grew to nearly 3,000, one of the largest in the country.

George’s turkeys eventually found their way to Treasure Valley Thanksgiving and Christmas tables.

(courtesy Idaho Experience)
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Nov 18, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Nov 18, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: You have 4 days left to order a 2019 Yellow Pine calendar, deadline is Thanksgiving.

Community Calendar:

May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
November 22 at 4pm Thanksgiving Potluck at the Yellow Pine Tavern
November 24 “Stop the Bleed” Training YPFD
2019 Events
May 25, 2019 ATV-UTV Scavenger Hunt Memorial Day Weekend
Jul 13, 2019 Ride to Big Creek
Sep 14, 2019 Ride to Cinnabar

(details below)
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Village News:

Yellow Pine US Mail

Three day a week mail delivery from Cascade starts November 1, 2018. The Post Office in Yellow Pine will be open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Be sure to buy your holiday stamps here.
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Firewood Permits

Season May 15 through November 30, 2018 Permits available at The Corner.

Fuelwood permits have been reduced to $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum and a 10-cord maximum per household.

link to more info:
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.


— — — —

Ice Hole Campground Closed

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
— — — —

Bears

It should be safe to put bird feeders back out, bears are hibernating (according to Jon Hunter our F&G CO.)

Please remember to keep trash secured, it will draw foxes, coyotes and loose dogs.
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Local Events:

Thanksgiving Potluck at the Yellow Pine Tavern

Thursday November 22 at 4pm

Turkey, dressing, mashed potatoes and gravy provided
— — — —

November 24 “Stop the Bleed” Training

Jeff and I are now instructors for the National Program from the American College of Surgeons on educating the public on “Stop the Bleed”. We are going to hold a class here in YP the Saturday after Thanksgiving November 24, 2018 at the YP Fire Station and will do more once we return from our winter break. We are in the process of building “stop the bleed” packets to be placed in the businesses around town as well.

Background: Motivated by the 2012 tragedy in Sandy Hook and multiple tragedies that have occurred in the ensuing years, what has become known as the Hartford Consensus was convened to bring together leaders from law enforcement, the federal government, and the medical community to improve survivability from manmade or natural mass casualty events. The resulting injuries from these events generally present with severe bleeding which, if left unattended, can result in death. The participants of the Hartford Consensus concluded that by providing first responders (law enforcement) and civilian bystanders the skills and basic tools to stop uncontrolled bleeding in an emergency situation, lives would be saved. The first responder program has received very good response and is widely being used across the country. The next step is to focus on needs of civilian bystanders.

Need: Civilians need basic training in Bleeding Control principles so they are able to provide immediate, frontline aid until first responders are able to take over care of an injured person. Due to many situations, there may be a delay between the time of injury and the time a first responder is on the scene. Without civilian intervention in these circumstances, preventable deaths will occur.

Mission/Objective: The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma is leading the effort to save lives by teaching the civilian population to provide vital initial response to stop uncontrolled bleeding in emergency situations. This will be accomplished by the development of a comprehensive and sustainable bleeding control education and information program targeted to civilians that will inform, educate and empower the 300+million citizens of the United States.

Copyright © 2017 by the American College of Surgeons
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2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine.

https://www.ypescapade.org/atv-utv-events
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx

There will be a YPWUA meeting in October. (?)
— — — —

VYPA News:

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 18th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th. Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.
— — — —

YPFD News:

The next meeting to be May 18th, 2019 at the Community Hall

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.
There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.
Sept 22nd YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Sept. 30th Yellow Pine Times.
October 6 YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Oct 21st Yellow Pine Times.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11am all are welcome

The YPFD has 2 Size Chimney Brushes with extension rods that were donated for use around YP. If you would like to borrow one, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you. The YPFD also has loanable mitigation tools, (Weed-Whacker, Hedge Trimmer, backpack blower and 16’ pole saw). If you would like to borrow one or all, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you.

It’s also time to check the Smoke Alarm batteries and Fire Extinguishers. Please test the alarm and replace Smoke Alarm Batteries every year, if you have the replaceable battery type. Fire Extinguishers should be checked as well and should be easily seen and reachable. A good location for the Fire Extinguishers would be the kitchen and near the wood stove and/or fireplace. The needle should be in the green.

If you need a Smoke Detector or Fire Extinguisher for your YP residence please contact Jeff F.

Smoke Alarm Info:

Cooking safety in the home:
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open for summer
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

We sell FS wood cutting permits.

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC

Buck Horn Outfitters in Idaho’s west Central Mountains in Units 25, 20 A, & 19 A. Providing Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Mountain lion, & Wolf Hunts. We offer Guided Rifle or Archery Hunts & Drop Camps. We are not about Quantity we are about providing Quality Hunts. My husband and I have been in the back country all our lives, we offer Deluxe camps with great food & our Guides know hunting, the back country and Stock.

Link to FB:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430 – 50# bag of Polar Ice Melt available for $7.99. Breaks the Ice Barrier. Quick Melting action, even in heavy snow.
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Nov 12) overnight low of 9 degrees, clear sky, dry – not much frost, and chilly light breeze. There is still about an inch of snow in the shade but more open ground. Clear skies and lots of sunshine early afternoon, a little snow melting but still frozen in the shade, high of 42 degrees. Quiet afternoon and evening, no traffic. Mostly clear at sundown and below freezing.

Tuesday (Nov 13) overnight low of 16 degrees, mostly high thin clouds, dry – hardly any frost. Two hairy woodpeckers visited looking for the missing feeder. Checked with F&G, bears are hibernating, OK to put feeders back out. Happy woodpeckers. Clouds thickening and by early afternoon the sky was overcast with thick white haze, high of 44 degrees. Quiet afternoon and evening, very little traffic. Faint fuzzy crescent moon up at dark. Some stars visible at 9pm.

Wednesday (Nov 14) overnight low of 20 degrees, mostly clear sky, dry – light frost, patchy snow in the shade. Truck traffic on main street this morning. Female Hairy woodpecker visiting. Mail truck made it in on time. High thin clouds covered most of the sky mid-afternoon, nearly calm air, high of 54 degrees. Overcast by sundown.

Thursday (Nov 15) overnight low of 25 degrees, mostly clear sky, dry – very light frost, chilly light breezes, about 1/2″ old patchy snow in the shade. Mid-afternoon warmer, high haze over most of the sky, nice day, high of 54 degrees. Quiet afternoon, a little traffic. Stellar jay visiting. Fuzzy half full moon at dark, dew starting to condense on metal roofs.

Friday (Nov 16) overnight low of 25 degrees, overcast this morning, slight bit of frost, about 1/2″ patchy old snow still in the shade. Steller jay visiting. Overcast and chilly breezes mid-day, high of 44 degrees. Raven calling and flying over the village. Airplane traffic at 3pm. Female hairy woodpecker stopped by. Decreasing clouds by sunset, bright half moon following Mars at dusk.

Saturday (Nov 17) overnight low of 20 degrees, clear sky this morning, light frost, patches of old snow in the shade. A couple of steller jays visiting. Clear sunny day, mild temperatures and cold light breezes, high of 43 degrees. Shots fired south west of the school around 245pm. Pine squirrel visiting. Clear sky at dusk, fat moon rising over Golden Gate peak, temperatures dropping.

Sunday (Nov 18) overnight low of 12 degrees, partly clear sky this morning – high haze, moderate frost and light breezes, smaller patches of snow in the shade. A female hairy woodpecker fighting with a starling, 2 jays and a pine squirrel visiting. Power went off and back on at 145pm. Mostly clear by early afternoon, a few clouds to the south, sunny and mild, high of 42 degrees. Quiet evening, fat moon peeking over the north shoulder of Golden Gate hill at dusk.
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Tips & Advice:

Be Ember Aware! Tip Series

“Used with permission from University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and the Living With Fire program.”

Be Ember Aware Tip #5- A Noncombustible Must

During a wildfire, thousands of windblown embers may pelt your house like hail during a fire storm. Many of the embers that strike the side of the house can fall to the ground and accumulate next to your home. If your neighborhood is asked to evacuate as wildfire approaches, the embers can lie there, glowing unattended for hours or even days. If the embers are in contact with a wood or other combustible material sided house, or something that can ignite in the flowerbed, your home could be in jeopardy.

The vegetation, landscape materials and other items located immediately adjacent to your home have critical influence on house survival during wildfire and ember attack. Homeowners living in high fire hazard areas need to create a “noncombustible (or low combustible) area” within 3 -5 feet of their houses. Some of the important “do’s” and “don’ts” of a noncombustible area include:

Dos…

* Do use hard surfaces such as concrete, brick and rock
* Do use green, healthy well maintained lawn
* Do use gravel or rock mulches
* Do use irrigated herbaceous plants such as annual and perennial flowers and groundcovers
* Do use short, less than 18” in height, deciduous shrubs, but don’t locate them in front of foundation vents

Don’ts…

* Don’t locate the firewood pile, or other combustible materials such as lumber in this area
* Don’t use wood, bark or rubber mulches
* Don’t have uncovered garbage cans or recycling bins here
* Don’t have dried grass and weeds, fallen pine needles and leaves or dead branches located in this area
* Don’t use ornamental evergreen plants, such as shrub junipers

Having a noncombustible (or low combustible) area next to your home is an important part of protecting it from wildfire. Don’t wait – take action now before the embers arrive.

[h/t Fire Chief Jeff]
— — — — — — — — — —

Winter Safe Driving Tips

* Prepare: Ensure your vehicle’s headlights and brake lights are in working condition, along with its tires, heater, defroster, brakes, and windshield wipers, and that you have enough windshield wiper fluid.

* Take Your Time: Give yourself extra time to get where you’re going. Increasing following distance, traveling at slower speeds and accounting for the extra stopping time will all go a long way to help avoid collisions.

* Stay Alert: Give the road your undivided attention. That’s always true and especially important with slick streets and potentially dangerous conditions.

* Don’t Panic: If your vehicle begins to slide or skid, don’t slam on the brakes. Look down the road in the direction you want to go and gently steer your vehicle that way. Release the accelerator until traction returns.

* Emergency Kit: Keep an emergency kit in your car with the tools you need to protect yourself, should a problem arise. Gloves, boots, blankets, flares, a brush, water, jumper cables, a flashlight and something for traction, such as sand or kitty litter are all great things to include.

source: KIVI TV
——————–

Idaho News:

Payette project shutdown could mean loss of dozens of timber jobs

By Max Silverson for The Star-News November 15, 2018

The shutdown of the Lost Creek-Boulder Creek project west of New Meadows could put dozens of people from the local timber industry out of work, according to employers.

The 9th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals ruled against the 80,000 acres project last month, finding that the designation of land within the project was done contrary to the Payette Forest Plan.

McCall-based Ikola Logging was planning to start working within the project, but has since been forced to search for other projects, owner Gerry Ikola said.

“Lost Creek-Boulder Creek was planning to be our winter job, the one we would move to in about two or three weeks,” Ikola said.

“There was enough work on that job to last us through winter and then some,” he said.

Without a substitute project, the company has no work lined up for a majority of the their employees and 15 to 20 jobs may be lost.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Three Blaze Trail to be reviewed in Nov. 28 presentation

The Star-News November 15, 2018

Central Idaho’s historic Three Blaze Trail will be discussed on Wednesday, Nov. 28, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Payette National Forest Supervisor’s Office.

Forest Service Heritage employees and members of the Idaho Trails Association will join citizen hiker Wallace Kimball in talking about construction of the historic trail and Idaho’s Thunder Mountain Gold Rush of 1902.

Discussions will also include early homesteading in Chamberlain Basin and the historic mining town of Roosevelt as well as modern perspectives on the significance of backcountry trails.

Presentations are free and will be in the Weiser Conference Room at the Payette National Forest Supervisor’s Office, located at 500 N. Mission St.

source:
— —

The Jim Moore Place

Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests Nov 15, 2018

The Jim Moore Place, located approximately 50 miles upriver from Riggins on the Salmon River is an important historic site, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976. Originally from Kentucky, Jim Moore moved to the Salmon River canyon in 1898. He initially claimed the property as a placer mining claim in 1900. Over the next 15 years, he constructed nine log buildings and a rock walled root cellar. He irrigated the adjacent fields with water diverted from Slide Creek via a handmade flume.

During the early days of the Thunder Mountain gold rush there was a need for a direct route from the northwest to the diggings. Demand for such a route resulted in the donation of three thousand dollars from prospectors, miners, and businessmen to construct a trail in 1900. The Three Blaze Trail from Grangeville via Dixie to the Thunder Mountain gold fields was built, passing through Jim Moore’s place on the river. Jim Moore lived on the north side of the river across from Campbell’s Ferry and took advantage of the influx of travelers on the trail and his neighbors’ ferry. In two years, from 1900 to 1902, nearly 1,800 men used this trail going into the Thunder Mountain area. Moore carried on a profitable business in supplying hides and meat to these travelers as well as supplying them with alcohol distilled from his extra fruit.

Jim Moore lived here until his death in 1942 and is buried on his property. Over the next 30 years, the property had several different owners including the Forest Service who had plans to build a guard station and an airstrip at this location. However, by 1971 the withdrawal designating the property as an administrative site was terminated.

In the early 1980s, several restoration projects were performed on some of these buildings. Some of the wall, gable, and roof purlin logs were replaced and new board and batten roofs were installed. Over the past 30+ years, mother-nature has taken her toll and additional maintenance is needed. Last September, South Zone Archaeologist Steve Armstrong and Fred Walters of the Idaho Heritage Trust, visited the site to determine current maintenance needs for the log buildings. A restoration and stabilization project is being planned for the spring of 2019. This will be the first of a multi-year effort to ensure the 100+ year old log buildings will be preserved well into the future for forest visitors to learn from and enjoy while passing through the wild Salmon River Canyon of central Idaho.

link to: FB photo gallery

— — — — — — — — — —

Cascade first-graders to raise money for California fire victims

By Max Silverson for The Star-News November 15, 2018

First graders at Cascade Schools are working to raise money to help people affected by the Camp Fire, currently burning in California.

Students were discussing the question of “how do people help out in the community,” when the idea of a penny drive got started, first grade teacher Melanie Stocks said.

“The students were brainstorming ideas and came up with the idea of helping those impacted by the Camp Fire,” Stocks said.

Students set the goal of raising $500 by Friday, Nov. 30.

The class has made the fundraiser into a competition, offering brownies to the elementary class and high school class that can raise the most money.

All of the funds raised will go directly to victims of the Camp Fire.

As of Tuesday the fire had burned 125,000 acres and is only 30 percent contained. It is the deadliest wildfire in California history, with 42 people confirmed dead and 6,552 residences destroyed, according to news reports.

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Cascade mayor resigns, citing ‘health and well-being’

Julie Crosby stepped down Tuesday, less than a year into her four-year term.

Katie Terhune November 15, 2018 KTVB

Cascade — The mayor of Cascade has stepped down from her position, less than a year into her her four-year term.

Julie Crosby announced her resignation Tuesday night after the city council meeting.

In her resignation letter, Crosby wrote that she had come into the position “with my eyes wide open” but had not foreseen the toll the mayorship would take on her own health.

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Salmon River Brewery in McCall to expand with 1,800-square foot brewhouse

by CBS 2 News Staff Monday, November 12th 2018

McCall, Idaho (CBS 2) — A popular brewery and restaurant in McCall continues to grow.

Salmon River Brewery recently broke ground on a new 1,800 square-foot brew house across the street from its restaurant near the town’s historic railroad depot.

“We could not be more excited to see construction start on this project,” Salmon River Brewery co-owner Matt Hurlbutt says. “The new brew house will enable us to double our beer-making capabilities, as well as expand the community gathering space in the Hotel McCall Courtyard. Plus, the new facility will allow us to offer brewery tours, set aside a dedicated tasting room, and provide other new services.”

With the expansion Salmon River Brewery’s capacity will grow from 1,100 barrels per year to 2,200 barrels annually. It will also sport a tasting room overlooking the brewhouse, a 900-square-foot rooftop deck, and redesigned patio seating between the brewery and the current restaurant.

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Idaho man dies in hunting accident

The 25-year-old died after accidentally shooting himself.

Associated Press November 12, 2018

Lewiston, Idaho (AP) – Authorities say a north-central Idaho man died while hunting Sunday morning after accidentally shooting himself.

The Nez Perce County Sheriff’s Office says 25-year-old Ryan S. Rigney of Lewiston was hunting near Soldiers Meadow Lake when he accidentally discharged his gun.

The Lewiston Tribune reports emergency medical crews were sent to the rural location about 7:42 a.m. but lifesaving measures were unsuccessful and Rigney died at the scene.

Deputy Kris Schmidt said the investigation is continuing but the death appears to be an accidental gunshot.

On social media, Rigney described himself as a dedicated father and avid outdoorsman. Earlier this year, he and his 3-year-old son were the subject of a search when they went missing while hunting for shed antlers. They were later located in Orofino.

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Volunteer firefighters receive FEMA grant

Hailey and Wood River Fire & Rescue are beneficiaries

Alejandra Buitrago Nov 16, 2018 IME

Two Blaine County fire departments have been awarded federal grant funding to help them with recruitment and retention initiatives, as fire departments across the county work to recruit firefighters for firehouses that have become increasingly busier.

Hailey Fire Department and Wood River Fire & Rescue were awarded more than $650,000 from the Federal Emergency Management Agency—FEMA—in a grant called SAFER: Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response. The grant funding will go towards yet-to-be-determined benefits for every volunteer firefighter in both departments.

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Graves at tiny Idaho cemetery remain a mystery

11/12/18 AP

Minidoka, Idaho — A wind-swept parcel of ground on the edge of the tiny town of Minidoka once cradled the remains of at least 40 people.

But now, The Times-News reports no one knows how many grave sites remain.

Minidoka County Historical Museum Curator Melissa Alley says some families moved the remains of their loved ones to other locations as the cemetery fell into disrepair. Only one grave marker is still at the cemetery, and it belongs to Henry Mitchell, who died in 1905. The others have all been removed or crumbled.

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Several small earthquakes strike southeastern Idaho

Michael Coats Nov 13, 2018 Local News 8

Soda Springs, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Several small earthquakes have struck southeastern Idaho near Soda Springs over the past couple of days.

The United States Geological Survey reports the two largest quakes registered at magnitudes of 3.2 and 3.3. Several smaller quakes under a 2.0 have also been picked up by the USGS.

The 3.3 quake struck Monday afternoon, around 4:52 p.m. The 3.2 quake striking Tuesday morning at around 10:17 a.m.

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No damage reported following 3.8-magnitude earthquake

AP Nov 15, 2018

Soda Springs, Idaho (AP) – Authorities in southeastern Idaho say there are no reports of damage following a 3.8-magnitude earthquake.

The U.S. Geological Survey says the temblor struck at about 2:30 a.m. Thursday about 7 miles east of Soda Springs.

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USPS increases stamps price to record-high 55 cents

Kristina Wright Oct 16, 2018 KIVI TV

The cost of mailing a letter is going up in January.

In an effort to improve its financial situation, the U.S. Postal Service has made a 5-cent increase on its first-class stamp, which increases the cost of mailing a one-ounce envelope from 50 cents to 55 cents.

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Scam Alerts:

Hang up on spoofed SSA calls

If you get a call that looks like it’s from the Social Security Administration (SSA), think twice. Scammers are spoofing SSA’s 1-800 customer service number to try to get your personal information. Spoofing means that scammers can call from anywhere, but they make your caller ID show a different number – often one that looks legit. Here are few things you should know about these so-called SSA calls.

These scam calls are happening across the nation, according to SSA: Your phone rings. Your caller ID shows that it’s the SSA calling from 1-800-772-1213. The caller says he works for the Social Security Administration and needs your personal information – like your Social Security number – to increase your benefits payments. (Or he threatens to cut off your benefits if you don’t give the information.) But it’s not really the Social Security Administration calling. Yes, it is the SSA’s real phone number, but the scammers on the phone are spoofing the number to make the call look real.

What can you do if you get one of these calls?

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Thousands of dollars stolen with ‘skimmer’ devices found at a Meridian gas station

Police say the devices were likely sitting idle for months.

Gretchen Parsons November 13, 2018 KTVB

Meridian — Police on Tuesday uncovered and removed at least three skimmer devices used to steal people’s credit card information at a Meridian gas station.

The crooks stole thousands from unsuspecting victims who visited the Jackson’s Chevron on Eagle Road and Goldstone Drive.

Meridian Police Officer Terry Hodges says the criminals are getting slightly more sophisticated.

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Mining News:

Cascade seeks members to serve on Midas Gold council

The Star-News Nov 15, 2018

The City of Cascade seeking interested individuals to serve on the Stibnite Advisory Council.

The Cascade City Council voted on Oct. 22 to sign the community agreement offered by Midas Gold, which is proposing a gold and antimony mine in the Stibnite area of Valley County.

The agreement is not an endorsement of the Stibnite Gold Project and does not contain any obligation to endorse the project.

Cascade’s representative to the advisory council would serve a one-year term.

The city is also seeking someone interested in serving as a board member on the Stibnite Foundation for one year.

Applicants should submit statements of interest no later than Monday to mayor@cascadeid.us, City of Cascade, PO Box 649, Cascade, ID 83611, or in person at Cascade City Hall.

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Groups file lawsuit to stop eastern Idaho gold exploration

By Keith Ridler – 11/15/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Two conservation groups say the federal government violated environmental laws by approving a Canadian company’s plan to search for gold in key wildlife habitat in eastern Idaho.

The Idaho Conservation League and the Greater Yellowstone Coalition in a lawsuit filed Tuesday say the U.S. Forest Service needs to halt British Columbia-based Otis Gold Corporation’s 5-year mining exploration project in the Caribou-Targhee National Forest.

The Forest Service in August approved the project that includes 10 miles (16 kilometers) of new roads and 140 drill stations.

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Public Lands:

Boise, Payette forests to begin Christmas tree permit sales

The Star-News Nov 15, 2018

Vendors will begin selling Christmas tree permits for the Payette and Boise national forests on Saturday.

Area permit vendors are Albertsons in McCall and C&M Lumber in New Meadows.

On Monday, permits will be available at Boise and Payette forest district offices.

Each permit allows one tree to be cut, with a limit of three permits per family. Cost is $10, and the maximum height of a permitted tree is 12 feet.

All purchasers will be provided with information about where a Christmas tree may be harvested as well as restrictions and helpful tips.

Some areas may be closed early to Christmas tree gathering if an unusually heavy snowfall occurs and forest roads become a safety concern, a news release said.

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Court order shuts down 80,000-acre Payette forest project

Logging, environmental work left undone

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Nov 15, 2018

The Payette National Forest’s 80,000-acre Lost Creek-Boulder Creek Project has been forced to shut down after a federal court found fault with the project.

The 9th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals ruled against the project last month, finding that the designation of land within the project was done contrary to the Payette Forest Plan.

“No additional work will be accomplished at this time,” Payette Forest Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said.

The Lost Creek-Boulder Creek project area is located west of New Meadows

About 4,300 acres of commercial timber harvest was not completed before the shutdown, which represents 42 percent of proposed harvests, Harris said.

About 4,000 acres of non-commercial thinning, or 80 percent of the amount proposed, was not completed, Harris said.

Environmental improvement projects were also halted.

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Review of Payette forest landscape restoration projects

The Star-News Nov 15, 2018

Here is a rundown on the projects underway and in the planning stages for the Weiser-Little Salmon Headwaters Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Project on the Payette National Forest.

Mill Creek-Council Mountain

The 50,000-acre Mill Creek-Council Mountain project was the first of the collaborative projects, with implementation of restoration work starting in 2012.

Work on the project located to the east of Council is now winding down and close to completion.

Lost Creek-Boulder Creek

The 80,000-acre Lost Creek-Boulder Creek project located to the west of New Meadows was under way, but was shut down due to a decision last month by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Middle Fork Weiser River

The 50,000-acre Middle Fork Weiser project was approved December 2017 and implementation is in the initial stages.

The project is located to the west of Council adjacent to the Mill Creek-Council Mountain project.

Huckleberry

The Huckleberry Landscape Restoration Project covers 67,000 acres northwest of Council.

The project is in the early stages of public involvement and analysis. A firm plan is projected to be completed in the spring of 2019.

Granite Meadows

The 70,000-acre Granite Meadows project is now open for public comment.

A public meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, Nov. 27, 6:30 p.m. at the Payette National Forest Supervisor’s Office on Mission Street in McCall.

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Public Comments Sought on the Proposed Granite Meadows – Public Meeting November 27, 2018

Date: November 13, 2018
Contact: Erin Phelps (208) 347-0300 cell: (208) 514-5809

New Meadows, ID– The Payette National Forest is seeking comments on the proposed Granite Meadows Project. A public meeting is scheduled for November 27, 2018 from 6:30 to 8:00p.m. at the Forest Supervisors office (500 North Mission Street, McCall, Idaho 83638). Forest Service personnel will be available to share the project proposal and answer questions.

The Granite Meadows Project is the fifth project on the Forest that is part of the Weiser – Little Salmon Headwaters Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration (CFLR) Project. The Granite Meadows Project encompasses approximately 83,000 acres on the McCall and New Meadows Ranger Districts of the Payette National Forest, and is located north of New Meadows and north and west of McCall, primarily in the Little Salmon River watershed.

This project is based in part on recommendations provided by the Payette Forest Coalition (PFC). The PFC is a collaborative group whose recommendations are structured to meet the intent of the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Act (CFLRA). The PFC members represent stakeholders from a broad range of interests, including the environmental community, timber industry, recreational groups, and state and county government. For more information on the PFC visit their website at http://www.spatialinterest.info/main_page.html.

The purpose and need of this landscape-scale project is to improve conditions across multiple resource areas including;

* Forest conditions and ecosystem function
* Wildfire resiliency
* Watershed health
* Recreation.

Regarding vegetation, the intent is to move toward, restoration and management of wildlife habitat, with an emphasis on but not limited to addressing the need to maintain and promote large tree forest structure, early seral species composition (e.g. aspen, western larch, ponderosa pine and Douglas-fir), and forest resiliency; and reducing the risk of uncharacteristic and undesirable wildland fire.

Recreation improvements would include:

* Improving the existing trail system by establishing trails where appropriate, and removing user-created trails that negatively impact natural resources
* Replacing or repairing existing recreation facilities, including restrooms and lake amenities;
* Evaluating authorized and unauthorized roads identified for decommissioning for possible conversion to motorized or non-motorized trails
* Managing or improve dispersed recreation opportunities by hardening and improving sites, closing some sites, and/or install informational signs
* Managing roads (including relocation), posting signage and/or considering closure orders where conflicting use may occur
* Improving skier experience and safety through vegetative treatments within the Brundage Mountain Resort’s ski area.

How to Comment and Timeframe

The Environmental Protection Agency published a Notice of Intent (NOI) for the Proposed Action in the Federal Register on October 31, 2018. Written, facsimile, hand-delivered, and electronic comments concerning this action will be accepted for 45 days following that date. The publication date of the NOI in the Federal Register is the exclusive means for calculating the comment period for a proposed action documented in a DEIS. Those wishing to comment should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source.

The preferred method to submit comments is electronically via the project webpage and must be submitted to: http://www.fs.usda.gov/goto/granitemeadows . Simply click on “how to comment” on the right side of the page and fill out the web form with your comments.

Written comments must be submitted to Keith Lannom, Forest Supervisor, Payette National Forest, 500 North Mission Street Building 2, McCall, Idaho 83638 or by fax to 208-634-0744. The office business hours for those submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 am to 4:30 pm Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.

Electronic comments may also be submitted in a format such as an email message, pdf, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), and Word (.doc or .docx) and must be sent to comments-intermtn-payette@fs.fed.us. Comments must have an identifiable name attached or verification of identity will be required. A scanned signature may serve as verification on electronic comments. For objection eligibility each individual or representative from each entity submitting timely and specific written comments regarding the proposed project must either sign the comments or verify identity upon request.

All comments received will be published with authorship information in the public reading room on the project webpage. Only those who submit timely and specific written comments regarding the proposed project during a public comment period established by the responsible official are eligible to file an objection.

The project file is posted on the Payette National Forest web site at: http://www.fs.usda.gov/goto/granitemeadows For additional information, please contact Erin Phelps, New Meadows District Ranger, New Meadows Ranger District, 208-347-0300.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
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Weak Forest Trees Can Pick Up the Tussock Moth Infestation

November 12, 2018 by Janet Juroch – BCC – Garden Valley

The Tussock Moth outbreak is seen in our region in a cyclical pattern, causing browning of foliage, particularly on the Douglas Fir Trees. Typically, an infestation can last three years in an 8 to 10-year outbreak cycle. The US Forest Service explains that the cycle being seen in our area may be likely to end after 2019. The outbreak has hit other areas in the state, including Craters of the Moon and in the Owyhees.

Aerial detection is the most common way to locate the problem areas. The US Forest Service monitors the moth, so they can predict the cycle and make decisions of what to do about it. The moth is an invasive insect and likes diseased trees or trees that are [un]healthy due to drought or lack of water.

At the recent information meeting held at the Crouch Community Hall, Laura Lowrey, considered the “bug lady” of the local US Forest Service, explained what a Tussock Moth is, its life cycle and the problem it creates in the forest. About 30 people attended the meeting to learn about the insect. Her presentation left everyone with an understanding of how the USFS is managing these outbreaks.

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New BLM program will help boost rural Idaho wildland firefighting

Nov 14, 2018 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Bureau of Land Management is launching a process to transfer excess vehicles, equipment and supplies to local fire departments and Rangeland Fire Protection Associations in Idaho to enhance their wildland firefighting capabilities.

Under BLM’s new Rural Fire Readiness (RFR) program, local wildland firefighting cooperators that meet certain requirements may receive at no cost wildland fire engines, water tenders, radios, pumps, hose, chainsaws, hand tools, personal protective equipment, fire shelters and other items the BLM no longer needs.

“Local fire departments and Rangeland Fire Protection Associations are critical partners of the BLM in wildland firefighting in Idaho,” said Peter J. Ditton, acting BLM Idaho State Director. “We appreciate the opportunity to augment their capability to respond to wildland fires safely and effectively through the Rural Fire Readiness program.”

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Critter News:

Pet buyers beware: Puppy scams on the rise

WMAR Nov 13, 2018

If you’re thinking of getting a pet for the holidays, be extra careful.

The Better Business Bureau says puppy-buying scams are on the rise, and up to 80 percent of sponsored advertisements about pets may be fake.

The BBB says their ScamTracker has 907 reports of this type of fraud and the Federal Trade Commission found 37,000 complaints regarding pets, and a majority of them are believed to be puppy scams.

One couple found three french bulldogs online, spoke with someone on the phone and paid $500, but on their way to pick the dogs up, the scammer called and asked for another $400. They never got the puppies.

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Pet Talk – Breast tumors in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Nov 16, 2018 IME

Breast tumors, or mammary gland tumors, are benign or malignant masses that develop in breast tissue. They usually affect older female dogs. They are the most common tumors found in female dogs. These tumors usually occur in unspayed females, or in dogs that were spayed later in life.

The risk of developing mammary tumors is directly related to the number of heat cycles the dog has experienced. If the dog is spayed before the first heat cycle, the risk is 0.05 percent. Relative risk increases to 8 percent after one heat cycle and to 26 percent after a second heat cycle.

Any swelling in the mammary glands should be brought to the attention of your veterinarian. The mammary gland closest to the rear legs is most commonly affected. Mammary masses that are reddened and painful and ulcerated are usually malignant. Many malignant breast tumors will spread to other organs (metastasis).

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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Second week of November 2018
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Lawsuit seeks to maintain federal gray wolf protections

11/14/18 AP

Minneapolis — An environmental group has sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to preserve federal protections for gray wolves and force the agency to develop a national recovery plan for the species.

The Center for Biological Diversity filed the lawsuit in federal court in Washington, D.C., Wednesday, a day after the service denied the group’s petition for a nationwide recovery plan. The service said its regional approach meets the legal requirements.

But the group says the agency is required under the Endangered Species act to foster the recovery of gray wolf populations across their former range, not just in the northern Rockies, the Great Lakes region and the southwest.

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House passes bill to drop legal protections for gray wolves

The Republican-controlled House has passed a bill to drop legal protections for gray wolves across the lower 48 states, reopening a lengthy battle over the predator species.

By Matthew Daly, Associated Press November 16, 2018

Washington (AP) – The Republican-controlled House has passed a bill to drop legal protections for gray wolves across the lower 48 states, reopening a lengthy battle over the predator species.

Long despised by farmers and ranchers, wolves were shot, trapped and poisoned out of existence in most of the U.S. by the mid-20th century. Since securing protection in the 1970s, wolves have bounced back in the western Great Lakes states of Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin, as well as in the Northern Rockies and Pacific Northwest.

The Fish and Wildlife Service is reviewing the wolf’s status and is expected to declare they’ve recovered sufficiently to be removed from protection under the Endangered Species Act.

The House bill enshrines that policy in law. It was approved, 196-180, and now goes to the Senate.

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Wolf taken to Isle Royale National Park this fall dies

By John Flesher – 11/13/18 AP

Traverse City, Mich. — A gray wolf relocated this fall from mainland Minnesota to Isle Royale National Park has died of unknown causes, officials said Tuesday, a minor setback in a multiyear plan to rebuild the predator species on the Lake Superior archipelago.

The 5-year-old male was among the first two wolves released at the park Sept. 26 . Staff biologists became concerned in late October when his radio tracking collar indicated he was no longer on the move, park spokeswoman Liz Valencia said.

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Pair of critically-endangered red wolves arrive at Akron Zoo

11/15/18 AP

Akron, Ohio — The Akron Zoo says two wolves that are a part of a critically endangered species have come to live at the zoo as part of a Species Survival Plan.

The red wolf is one of the world’s most endangered wolf species, and it is believed only about 60 wolves remain in the wild. Cleveland.com reports the wolf species were decimated by predator-control programs.

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Wolf Education International

Newsletter Nov 13, 2018

Christmas Lights And Pitchforks: Terrified Russian Villagers Try To Keep Encroaching Wolves At Bay
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USDA Forest Service announces public meetings on Greater Sage-grouse Plan amendments

November 13, 2018

Ogden, Utah – The U.S. Forest Service (USFS) will hold four public meetings in Idaho regarding the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for its Sage-Grouse Plan Amendments. On Oct. 5, 2018, the USDA Forest Service published a Notice of Availability (NOA) announcing the release of a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) with proposed amendments to Forest Service land management plans for greater sage-grouse. The affected plans occur within five western states: Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah. The purpose of the proposed changes is to improve the clarity, efficiency, and implementation of the current greater sage-grouse plans, including promoting landscape-scale alignment with state efforts.The USFS is encouraging the public to attend one of the four DEIS public comment open house meetings in Idaho:

* Boise, Nov. 26, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Idaho Fish and Game Headquarters Trophy Room , 600 S. Walnut Street (enter through rear door);
* Jerome, Nov. 29, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Idaho Fish and Game, 324 South 417 East;
* Challis, Dec. 17, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Challis Community Center, 411 Clinic Road;
* Idaho Falls, Dec. 18, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Caribou-Targhee Forest Headquarters Office, 1405 Hollipark Drive.

Several information stations will be located within the meeting venue that will present information on key issues, the planning process and the public commenting process. Forest Service staff will give a short introduction at 5:30 p.m. Attendees can learn about the amendment comment process, ask questions, and provide comments on the actions being considered.

To read and comment on the DEIS please visit the Forest Service Intermountain Region webpage: https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/r4/home/?cid=stelprd3843381

For more information, please contact: Sandra Underhill, Capitol City Coordinator at 307-777-6087 or John Shivik, National Sage grouse Coordinator at 801-625-5667 or johnashivik@fs.fed.us.
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Idaho officials suspend steelhead season in face of lawsuit

11/14/18 AP

Coeur d’Alene, Idaho — Idaho wildlife officials have decided to suspend the current steelhead fishing season because of a possible federal lawsuit by six conservation groups contending the state’s steelhead regulations harm federally protected wild steelhead.

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission on Wednesday voted to end the current season on Dec. 7.

Idaho Rivers United, Friends of the Clearwater and other groups in a notice of their intent to sue last month say Idaho doesn’t have an approved Fisheries Management and Evaluation Plan to allow steelhead fishing.

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Fish & Game News:

F&G Commission votes to continue general hunts for Sawtooth Elk Zone in 2019

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Commissioners reverse earlier decision to convert zone to controlled hunts

Idaho Fish and Game Commission on Nov. 14 voted to continue a general hunt with capped tags for the Sawtooth Elk Zone in 2019, which typically sells out in minutes due to its popularity with hunters.

Commissioners may adjust the number of tags available in the zone when it sets its seasons and rules in March. Those tags will be sold on a first-come, first-served basis on the same dates and times as in 2018.

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Mule Deer Buck Found Shot and Left to Waste in Southeast Idaho

By Jennifer Jackson, Regional Communications Manager
Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Idaho Department of Fish and Game is seeking information regarding a dead buck discovered just off Miles Canyon Road (also known as Mill Canyon Road) near Liberty, Idaho, in Game Management Unit 78. The buck, a large 4×5 mule deer, was shot and left to waste on the south side of the road, approximately 1.2 miles west of the Lanark Road turnoff.

The investigation into this incident was initiated by Fish and Game after a caller submitted information to Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) on November 9.

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See the changes to fishing rules for 2019-21 seasons

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Friday, November 16, 2018

Fish and Game Commission approved new fishing rules at its November 14 meeting.

The Idaho Fish and Game commission set seasons and rules for the 2019-21 fishing seasons at its Nov. 14 meeting in Coeur d’Alene. New rules to take effect Jan. 1 are as follows:

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Steelhead will be released into Boise River Nov. 21

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Friday, November 16, 2018

Boise River steelhead season will not be affected by suspension of steelhead fishing in other rivers

Idaho Fish and Game will stock 150 to 200 hatchery steelhead into the Boise River on Wednesday, Nov. 21. The steelhead are trapped at Hells Canyon Dam on the Snake River, and they will be released in equal numbers at five locations: Glenwood Bridge, Americana Bridge, below the Broadway Avenue Bridge behind Boise State University, at West Parkcenter Bridge and at Barber Park.

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More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

And the fattest bear in Alaska is … 409 Beadnose

Yereth Rosen Oct 9, 2018 Reuters

Anchorage (Reuters) – In an Alaska clash of tubby titans that has become a social media sensation, a shaggy, brown and possibly pregnant mother known as 409 Beadnose was crowned on Tuesday as Fattest Bear of 2018.

Beadnose nosed out a larger Alaska brown bear, a male called 747 – and likened to a jumbo jet – in online votes collected by staff at Katmai National Park and Preserve during a wildly popular event called Fat Bear Week. Male bears are bigger but Beadnose was deemed to be more rotund.

“Her radiant rolls were deemed by the voting public to be this year’s most fabulous flab,” the park said on its Facebook page. “Our chubby champ has a few more weeks to chow down on lingering salmon carcasses before she heads up the mountains to dig herself a den and savor her victory.”

Katmai, which hugs the mountainous Gulf of Alaska coast, is known for its massive, salmon-chomping ursine residents.

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Seasonal Humor:

Funny Thanksgiving Showdown – Farmer vs. Turkey

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