Category Archives: News 2018

Boise NF Local Fall Rx Burn Oct 29

Boise NF Local Fall Rx Burns

Update 10-25-2018

Looks like we will be down there Monday the 29th for burning, the Yellow Pine Blowdown(golf course) and the helispot and some of the thinning piles near Johnson Creek airstrip and Cox Ranch. We hope to burn everyday next week until we finish the thinning piles along Johnson Creek.

Tim Dulhanty
Fuels Technician, Boise National Forest, Cascade Ranger District

* Lower Johnson Thinning (95 acres): Is a project designed to reduce hazardous fuels within the WUI. This project is located approximately 7 miles south of Yellow Pine along NFS road 413 and Johnson Creek.

* Yellow Pine Blowdown (40 acres): is located approximately 62 miles from Cascade, Idaho and is adjacent to the community of Yellow Pine. Hand Ignitions will be used to ignite machine piles along NFS roads 412, 413.

The Cascade RD is planning to burn both the Lower Johnson Thinning and Yellow Pine Blow Down units this fall, both of these projects will be pile burning only NO Broadcast Burning is planned.

The Lower Johnson Project (thinning & piling) was completed last summer, these handpiles are located along Johnson Creek road, Wapiti Ranch, Cox Ranch, Bryant Ranch/ Johnson Creek Airstrip.

Hand Ignition for Lower Johnson should take about a week to complete, once those piles have been completed, the crews will relocate to Yellow Pine to burn the logging slash piles.

If you have any addition questions please contact Tim Dulhanty tdulhanty@fs.fed.us (208-382-7400) or myself at 208-382-7400 or send me an email.

James Bishop
Fuels AFMO, Boise National Forest
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Oct 21, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 21, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
October 20-21 PNF Rx Burn West of YP
October 27 Halloween Party at the Yellow Pine Tavern
November 1st week Amerigas Propane delivery call (208) 634-8181

(details below)
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Village News:

Outages

The power went off Monday morning (Oct 15) at 1030am in Yellow Pine, back on at 1108am.
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Search & Rescue

On October 16, 2018 Valley County Search & Rescue (VCSAR) had a call out on a missing hunter near Yellow Pine. Members of VCSAR responded along with three members from Yellow Pine. Jeff, Gary and Dayle from Yellow Pine responded with ATV’s and medical equipment to set up the incident command center at Trout Creek. Jeff was designated the Incident Commander for the rescue mission of 4 sheriffs, 2 fish & game, one Boise LEO, 12 VCSAR members, and one tracking dog. Several airplanes and a helicopter also added to the search efforts. Everyone did an amazing job in working together in the search effort that ended well. The hunter, later that day, wandered into the command center in good condition. It was a successful ending to a multi-agency search. Later that evening at the VCSAR meeting in Donnelly, Jeff was officially appointed as the East Lieutenant for VCSAR.

Anyone wanting to join VCSAR, please contact https://www.valleycountysar.org
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“Bald Hill” Rx Burn

The PNF conducted a prescribed burn west of Yellow Pine on Oct 20th in the area of the EFSF between Deadman and Reegan creeks as part of the Bald Hill project to reduce fire risk in the wildland-urban interface.

Smoke visible to the north east in Yellow Pine Oct 20th early afternoon.

Smoke settled into our valley by Saturday afternoon (Oct 20) and very smoky evening. Sunday morning (Oct 21) we still had a haze of smoke and poor air quality. Increasing smoke during the day and by afternoon it was “hazardous” to breath. The smoke was starting to thin a little by evening.
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Local Fall Rx Burns

* Lower Johnson Thinning (95 acres): Is a project designed to reduce hazardous fuels within the WUI. This project is located approximately 7 miles south of Yellow Pine along NFS road 413 and Johnson Creek.

* Yellow Pine Blowdown (40 acres): is located approximately 62 miles from Cascade, Idaho and is adjacent to the community of Yellow Pine. Hand Ignitions will be used to ignite machine piles along NFS roads 412, 413.

The Cascade RD is planning to burn both the Lower Johnson Thinning and Yellow Pine Blow Down units this fall, both of these projects will be pile burning only NO Broadcast Burning is planned.

The Lower Johnson Project (thinning & piling) was completed last summer, these handpiles are located along Johnson Creek road, Wapiti Ranch, Cox Ranch, Bryant Ranch/ Johnson Creek Airstrip.

Hand Ignition for Lower Johnson should take about a week to complete, once those piles have been completed, the crews will relocate to Yellow Pine to burn the logging slash piles.

If you have any addition questions please contact Tim Dulhanty tdulhanty@fs.fed.us (208-382-7400) or myself at 208-382-7400 or send me an email.

– Thanks
James Bishop, Fuels AFMO, Boise National Forest
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Firewood Permits

Permits available May 15, 2018 through November 30, 2018 at The Corner.

Fuelwood permits have been reduced to $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum and a 10-cord maximum per household.

link to more info:

Stay Out Of Riparian Areas!

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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.


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Ice Hole Campground Closed

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
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Pests

No recent reports of bear activity, but they are still around fattening up for winter. Please do not leave pet food outside and secure your trash. Mice are looking for a warm place to winter. Chipmunks and pine squirrels are still running about.

Video Link Bear Visitor Aug 20, 2018
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Local Events:

October 27 Halloween Party at the Yellow Pine Tavern

Chili Dogs provided, bring snacks if you want to. Costume Contest.
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

September Yellow Pine water update excerpts

The good news is the second sand filter is online and operating well. We have refurbished and upgraded the chlorinator and purchased new chlorine monitoring tools that will help us more accurately adjust the amount of chlorine injected into the water. Additionally, we received the $10,000 grant from Midas. We are looking at all options but it seems that for 2018 we must raise user fees a minimum of a $150 per year.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx

There will be a YPWUA meeting in October. (?)

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.
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VYPA News:

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 18th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th. Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.

Midas Gold and Yellow Pine

August 28, 2018

Attached is the Community Partnership Agreement the Village of Yellow Pine signed with Midas Gold.

link to: 2018 Community Partnership Agreement.pdf
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YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Department Meeting, October 6, 2018

Attendees: Cecil Dallman, Fire Commissioner District 1; Jeff Forster, Fire Chief; Merrill Saleen, Ann Forster, Jenny Bartholomew, Nikki Saleen – Secretary/Treasurer

Absent: Dan Stiff, District 2 Fire Commissioner; Tom Richter, District 3 Fire

The 2018 – 2019 Budget has been approved. Two of the three commissioners, Cecil Dallman and Tom Richter, approved the budget:

2018 Yellow Pine Fire Department Budget:
Firefighting/Rescue: $8,132
Wages: $0
Advertising: $2,000 This covers costs of posting notices in the Star News.
Repairs/Maintenance: $4,000
Utilities (Fixed Costs): $4,000 – includes $2,500 insurance
Total: $18,132

Resignation of Tom Richter, Fire Commissioner District 3:
Tom Richter has submitted his resignation as Fire Commissioner. Concurrent with his resignation, Tom nominated Merrill Saleen as temporary Fire Commissioner for District 3. This was seconded by Cecil.
Merrill has extensive experience in wildland fire and will be an asset to the Fire Department. He spent several of his early years living in Yellow Pine and attended school here. His grandfather, Fred Erickson was the Justice of the Peace for Yellow Pine. Merrill signed the required Oath of Office.

State Auditor’s Legislature Budget:
The Yellow Pine Fire Department budget has to be entered into the Idaho State Local Governing Entities Central Registry. Legislators had raised concerns about the ability to access financial information related to local governments and special districts across the state. Previously there had been no transparency with the State. Idaho passed legislation in 2014 that established a central registry to provide a comprehensive list of all local governing entities authorized to operate within the State of Idaho and required these entities to submit their approved budget and expenditures. It also provides for penalties when Local Government Entities are not compliant with the registration requirement. Nikki will enter our budget info on the website with help from Jeff. The data must be entered by December 1.

Jeff provided updates on the account balance as of today. Recognize that more money will come in as taxes are paid. Currently we have $13,984.14 in the bank. We have $4162.50 earmarked for the helispot. Previous meetings authorized expenditures for the Helispot.
The general fund account can be carried over year to year. Another opportunity is to look at is Grants. Money can go into the general fund.

Expenditures: Cecil proposed than any expenditures over $500 need to be approved by two of the three Commissioners, with an exception for emergencies that involve life safety. Approvals can be made via email. Merrill seconded the proposal. This is approved as written.

Priorities:
A discussion ensued about developing a list of priorities for budget expenditures and looking to future needs for the Yellow Pine Fire Department. The following items were listed according to priority. Relative discussions follow each item.

Budget Priorities:
New Engine/ Apparatus: We are looking for a surplus engine with quick response capability. We would like to get a pickup truck w/ a 300-gallon slide-in tank and foam injection. The advantage of this size engine is the driver does not need a CDL, and it is easily maneuvered on Yellow Pine roads. Surplus engines are typically available in the fall after fire season. More engines are available after active fire seasons (like this year) as departments/agencies have money to replace their older engines. Jeff has found an excess 2004/2005 300-gallon Type 6/Model 43 engine in very good condition in Colorado. It will go up for bid later this fall. With excess properties, Agencies and Fire Departments get first option to purchase over private interests. Jeff expects the bid price to be around $10,000. If we fail to acquire this engine at the right price, there are other options to purchase surplus engines thru the varying agencies.
The Commissioners need to be available to approve this expenditure when this engine goes up for bid. There will not be much time to make the commitment of money.

Concurrently we would like to excess the deuce-and-a-half tanker truck. The tanker does not meet present day safety standards – the soft top does not provide rollover protection and there are other safety issues. Drivers are required to have CDLs and need experience with this size of engine before responding with it to an emergency.

Helispot improvements: One of our highest priorities is finishing the helispot. We recognize that we need to finalize the helispot budget. This is complicated because we have been verbally told we will be getting some donations of labor and supplies but these have not been confirmed. Some of these potential donations are big-ticket items like gravel for the pad itself. In addition, we will not be able to use some of the labor/supply donations until next spring. At this time, we have had $6,457 in donations. Action Item: We need to get on agenda w/ VYPA to give update on helipad & budget needs. Presentation will be by Merrill. Ann will get this on the VYPA agenda for June.

Extrication cutters: YPFD has 3 members who are Certified by the State to use Heavy Hydraulic Extrication tools to extricate victims trapped (pinned) in or under vehicles. The spreaders can also lift heavy objects off someone who is crushed by a heavy object. Recently YPFD took delivery of Professional battery-operated Spreaders (Jaws-of-Life) which are capable of spreading or lifting with a spreading force of 38.000 pounds! The future purchase will be the hydraulic cutters, currently vehicle manufactures are making vehicles with exotic metals that cannot be cut with anything we have in Yellow Pine. The next available extrication tools are in Cascade with CFD. These specific tools weigh approximately 48 pounds and are portable.

Additional bay for Fire Department needs. We are currently discussing with Stu E. about the future need to design another bay. Since the Fire Department building is on a Forest Service lease, we will need to have design and funding in place before requesting an amendment to the Forest Service lease. Adding another bay will allow us the opportunity to add additional fire-fighting apparatus for future needs.

Other updates:
* There is a lease agreement for use of the radio repeaters and telephones thru the Department of Agriculture, that are used at the Fire Station. This is part of our Use Permit through the BNF. This is in response to nationwide needs for interoperability across emergency response units. We do not know what the lease will cost us. They use a Dept of Ag. Billing Team to assess our needs and costs. It is likely they will come to Yellow Pine and do an inspection and audit of our communication systems.
* The Yellow Pine repeater, which is linked into the Thunderbolt repeater, is now working. It has been inoperable for a year. During its down time, we have had to work off the Meadow Ck. Tower. Now that we are back on Thunderbolt, we will be able to reach from here to Deadman, and supposedly up Quartz Ck. with our radios on our Yellow Pine Repeater.
* We have not heard from Jake about seed for the helispot. We have had two incidences of 1 – 2 inches of snow this week. We have great conditions for seeding.
* Action Item: Cecil will make appointment to meet w/ Jake.
* Work is in progress to reinforce the suspension for the Fire Department Polaris Ranger. With 75 gallons and Foam system with accessories and rescue equipment, the current suspension is inadequate and a safety hazard. Jeff is working with Walker Evans Suspension to develop a better suspension system for the UTV. Jeff will get back to us in 1 – 2 weeks. This is an opportunity to be a prototype for Walker Evans with significant discount on costs.
* We need to begin an inventory of items in the Fire Station. Action Item: Nikki will make an inventory form for property. Will get w/ Cecil & Jeff next time she come up to start the inventory.

Public Information/Updates:
* If have a medical emergency – PLEASE always dial 911 first! They have the ability to locate our emergency responders quickly. This saves considerable time in response time and allows the dispatcher to have Cascade Ambulance and fire respond as well. Avoid the temptation to find Jeff or Ann first – you could be wasting valuable minutes in locating them.
* Sunday Training continues on Sunday mornings at 11:00 at the Fire Station. Please check with Jeff to make sure the training will occur. Training will be suspended during the Winter months and will continue in the Spring.
* In response to complaints about the monthly siren testing, it is proposed that we do it a minimum of 3 times a year:
– The siren will sound on May 1, August 1, and November 1 at noon.
– Cecil proposed the motion, Merrill seconded it, we will now do it a minimum of 3 times/year.
– If the siren blows 3 times it is a test. If it blows 4 times it is a real emergency. We encourage everyone to go to the fire department for additional details. You can help with many things even if you are not an emergency responder. This could include being a radio operation or performing logistics duties such as tracking equipment or prepositioning supplies. There are two sirens in town. The main siren is at the Fire Station and the second siren at the Hotel next to the YP Tavern and Corner Bar. The switch to activate the siren is inside but will be relocated to the outside in the future.

The next meeting to be in May 18th, 2019 at the Community Hall. We encourage the YP Village Council to attend.

YPFD Meetings:

The next meeting to be in May 18th, 2019 at the Community Hall
There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.
There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.
Sept 22nd YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Sept. 30th Yellow Pine Times.
October 6 YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Oct 21st Yellow Pine Times.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sundays at 11am, all are welcome

The YPFD has 2 Size Chimney Brushes with extension rods that were donated for use around YP. If you would like to borrow one, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you. The YPFD also has loanable mitigation tools, (Weed-Whacker, Hedge Trimmer, backpack blower and 16’ pole saw). If you would like to borrow one or all, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you.

It’s also time to check the Smoke Alarm batteries and Fire Extinguishers. Please test the alarm and replace Smoke Alarm Batteries every year, if you have the replaceable battery type. Fire Extinguishers should be checked as well and should be easily seen and reachable. A good location for the Fire Extinguishers would be the kitchen and near the wood stove and/or fireplace. The needle should be in the green.

If you need a Smoke Detector or Fire Extinguisher for your YP residence please contact Jeff F.

Smoke Alarm Info:

Cooking safety in the home:
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open for summer
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

We sell FS wood cutting permits.

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC

Buck Horn Outfitters in Idaho’s west Central Mountains in Units 25, 20 A, & 19 A. Providing Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Mountain lion, & Wolf Hunts. We offer Guided Rifle or Archery Hunts & Drop Camps. We are not about Quantity we are about providing Quality Hunts. My husband and I have been in the back country all our lives, we offer Deluxe camps with great food & our Guides know hunting, the back country and Stock.

Link to FB page:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 15) overnight low of 18 degrees, clear and frosty this morning, bit of snow remaining in the shade. Power out 1030am to 1108am, reason unknown. Sunny and mild with light breezes early afternoon, high of 59 degrees. Locals are busy getting ready for winter. Clear quiet evening.

Tuesday (Oct 16) overnight low of 21 degrees, clear but not much frost this morning – dry, skiff of snow in the shade. Sunrise around 1030am. Sunny and clear afternoon, mild breezes, high of 64 degrees. Sunset about 630pm. Around 7pm – 710pm one loud close gunshot to the west, then 3 very loud gunshots to the east up on the hill. Clear after dark, stars out.

Wednesday (Oct 17) overnight low of 25 degrees, clear and light frost this morning. Helicopter flying in the area at 1154am. Sunny warm afternoon, very light breezes, high of 69 degrees. Quiet and light traffic today. Calm pleasant evening. Tamaracks like golden flames in the sunset.

Thursday (Oct 18) overnight low of 26 degrees, clear and light frost this morning, looked like a slight haze of smoke. Pine squirrel and jay are squabbling over a few peanuts. Clear, sunny and warm afternoon, light breezes, high of 70 degrees. Increased traffic this afternoon, folks are getting ready for winter. Some high thin clouds this evening, sunset just before 624pm. Hazy crescent moon rising south of Golden Gate peak around 7pm.

Friday (Oct 19) overnight low of 26 degrees, clear and light frost, light haze of smoke in the draws. Sunny and warm, very light haze of smoke, slight breezes, high of 72 degrees. Increased traffic, folks getting ready for winter. Quiet evening.

Saturday (Oct 20) overnight low of 27 degrees, clear and light frost, light haze of smoke in the draws. Local jay visiting. Sunrise just after 1030am. Higher than normal weekend traffic. One steller jay visiting. Sunny warm afternoon, pretty calm, high of 74 degrees. Smoke visible to the north west from Rx burn down the EFSF. By 330pm the smoke was coming up river and hanging low across the golf course. By 4pm the valley was full of smoke – very poor air quality. Sunset around 608pm, hard to see with the smoke. White and black ash falling from the sky. High than normal traffic still buzzing about after sunset. Blood red moon rising over Antimony ridge after dark.

Sunday (Oct 21) overnight low of 28 degrees, mostly clear, dry – no frost, and smoky – poor air quality. By lunch time a few high thin clouds and better air quality. At 1pm the smoke started coming up river and visible out in the forest – poor air quality. At 230pm very thick smoke, eye burning “hazardous” air quality, cannot see the hills, the sun or the sky. Warm dry smoky day, a few high thin clouds in the afternoon, high of 68 degrees. At 530pm the smoke was just a bit thinner, can see father out into the forest and the outline of Golden Gate hill, but the air quality is still “hazardous”. Thinner smoke at sunset, but still yucky, a few high thin clouds.
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Tips & Advice:

Be Ember Aware! Tip Series

“Used with permission from University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and the Living With Fire program.”

Be Ember Aware Tip #1 – Unclutter the Gutter

Rain gutters attached to the edge of your roof are the perfect contraptions for catching embers during wildfire. Burning embers can land in the gutters and if they are filled with dried leaves, pine needles, and twigs, a fire can start and possibly ignite the roof, roof sheathing, and fascia. Even houses with fire rated roofs are vulnerable to this type of ember attack. Rain gutters made of vinyl will melt and drop into flower beds, igniting plants next to the house and maybe even combustible siding. To keep your home safe, we suggest that you:

* Remove all dried leaves, pine needles or other materials from your rain gutters before fire season. Over the winter, debris often accumulates in them.

* Keep your ladder handy and check your rain gutters throughout the fire season, cleaning them out as necessary.

* If a wildfire is approaching and there is no time to clean out the debris, plug the rain gutter down spout with a tennis ball, or something similar so that the down spout will be plugged, and fill the rain gutter with water.

[h/t Fire Chief Jeff]
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Idaho News:

Wilks brothers want to close two roads

Gates needed to prevent threats, arson, says rep

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 18, 2018

DF Development, the company name for the Wilks brothers of Texas, plans to close sections of Flat Creek Road and Corral Creek Road, Valley County commissioners were told on Monday.

Flat Creek Road runs from Gold Fork Road by Davis Creek Lane to the Smalley Reservoir and is about 10 miles long.

The Flat Creek Road bisects about 10,000 acres of DF Development land, company representative Colin Chambers said told commissioner.

Corral Creek Road runs from Idaho 55 south of Cascade to Horsethief Road south of YMCA property and is about three miles long.

“That whole road bisects a lot of private property, and there’s no public ground there,” Chambers said.

“It’s not restricting access to Horsethief because you can still get to Horsethief from the north end,” he said.

DF Development owns the land surrounding Corral Creek Reservoir, Chambers said.

“A big deal for us is security,” he said. “We have threats of harm to individual employees, we have threats of harm to the property as far as arson.”

continued:
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Wood For the Winter

Cascade volunteers pitch in to gather, split firewood

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 18, 2018

Volunteers gathered last week in Cascade to collect and split firewood for people who might otherwise spend the winter without adequate heat.

More than a dozen volunteers gathered and cut about 12 cords of wood from U.S. Bureau of Reclamation land near the Crown Point Cemetery.

The wood was taken to the Western Idaho Community Action Partnership building in downtown Cascade, where it was split and stacked.

The wood gathering session was organized by WICAP. Volunteers worked in cooperation with Valley County, Forest Service and B of R staff.

continued:
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McCall food bank to offer free flu vaccinations

The Star-News Oct 18, 2018

Free flu vaccinations for adults and children will be available from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Wednesday at Heartland Hunger Resource Center, 556 Deinhard Lane. No appointment is necessary.

Flu vaccinations are free for adults and children who do not have health insurance. If children are covered by insurance, including Medicaid, insurance will be billed.

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that everyone age six months and older be vaccinated annually against influenza.

Young children, pregnant women, people over age 65, and those with chronic health conditions are at highest risk of flu complications.

The clinic is sponsored by Central District Health Department, the Community Medical Fund and St. Luke’s McCall. For more information call, 208-630-2379.

source:
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State lifts health warning over Lake Cascade algae

Toxic bloom spread over most of reservoir in September

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 18, 2018

A health advisory for toxic blue-green algae in Lake Cascade was lifted Tuesday after officials found that levels of the harmful bacteria had subsided.

The advisory, which was issued by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality in cooperation with the Central District Health Department, had been in place since Sept. 7, when high concentrations of the dangerous algal bloom of cyanobacteria were detected.

“There is a section of the northern part of the lake that has cyanobacteria, but toxin levels prove to be very low,” Department of Environmental Quality Watershed Coordinator Chase Cusack said.

No injuries or sicknesses were reported in relation to the bloom in Lake Cascade, he said.

continued:
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Former Cascade police chief charged with theft of guns

Ryan Redmon accused of taking city-owned pistols

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 18, 2018

Former Cascade Police Chief Ryan Redmon has been charged with two felony counts of grand theft in connection with five pistols belonging to the City of Cascade that went missing.

One charge claims Redmon took a pistol for himself after leaving the force in 2013. The second count says Redmon gave the remaining guns to other officers formerly employed by the department.

Redmon has pleaded not guilty to both charges. He is scheduled to appear in Valley County Magistrate’s Court on Tuesday.

continued:
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70-year-old from Homedale dies in head-on Highway 55 crash

by CBS 2 News Staff Tuesday, October 16th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — A 70-year-old from Homedale died in a head-on crash on Highway 55 Tuesday afternoon.

The crash occurred at milepost 81, about three miles north of Banks.

Police Identified the 70-year-old as Fredrik Egurrola.

According to police Egurrola was driving northbound in a dodge pickup when he crossed the center line into the southbound lane and struck a Volvo semi-truck pulling a trailer.

continued:
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Search called off for woman missing from Idaho County hunting camp

Officials have called off the search for 76-year-old Connie Johnson.

Associated Press October 17, 2018


Photo: Idaho County Sheriff

Grangeville, Idaho (AP) – Officials have called off the search for a 76-year-old woman missing from a north-central Idaho hunting camp.

Idaho County Sheriff Doug Giddings tells The Lewiston Tribune that the search that started Oct. 5 for Connie Johnson ended Tuesday. Aircraft and teams with tracking dogs took part in the search.

The Nezperce resident was working as the cook at the hunting camp accessible only by horseback in the Fog Mountain area. She had her pet border collie, Ace, with her.

Hunters left the camp Oct. 2. When they returned three days later, Johnson was gone. Giddings says the hunters had radio contact with Johnson on Oct. 3 but couldn’t understand what she was saying.

Giddings says the possibility of foul play is unlikely.

source:
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Idaho owes about $20 million for 2018 wildfire season

10/16/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idaho will owe about $20 million in firefighting costs for the 2018 wildfire season.

Officials with the Idaho Department of Lands told the Idaho Land Board on Tuesday that this year’s wildfire season is below the 20-year-average for acres burned and number of fires.

But officials say 202 wildfires in Idaho were caused by humans, while just 56 were caused by lighting.

continued:
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Idaho official: Only public voter records were on dark web

10/17/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idaho Secretary of State Lawerence Denney says Idaho voter records that were offered for sale on the dark web contained only publicly available information.

Idaho was among 19 states that had their records offered for sale on a dark web online forum.

Security researchers said Monday the offering did not mean voter databases had been breached. Rather, the estimated 35 million records could have been stolen from resellers who buy voter data from states for use by campaigns and get-out-the-vote efforts.

In prepared statement released Monday, Denney said Idaho’s information was already available publicly for legitimate, political or research purposes. But Denney said state law prohibits anyone from using the information for commercial purposes, so he’ll work with the Attorney General’s office to prosecute any misuse of the information.

source:
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Mining News:

Ask Midas: What Does Factor of Safety Mean?

October 5

Midas Gold Idaho wants to keep the community informed about the work we are doing at the Stibnite Gold Project site. The Ask Midas blog series gives the experts in our company a chance to answer some of the community’s most frequently asked questions and help clear up any misconceptions around the project.

What Does Factor of Safety Mean?

At Midas Gold, we often talk about the factor of safety for our proposed facilities – especially our tailings storage facility. This facility is where the ore will be sent after we extract the profitable metals from the ore. Our tailings facility is designed so that it will have a superior factor of safety. But what does that really mean?

Factor of safety is a rating that compares the design strength of a structure to the stresses put on it. You can determine the factor of safety by dividing the calculated design strength by the expected stresses put on the structure.

continued:
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Discovering Copper and Molybdenum Deposits: A Brief History of Idaho CuMo Project

October 18, 2018 Boise County Connection


CuMo Mine site. Photo by Linda Ruppel DDS

Idaho CuMo Mining gave a presentation at the Crouch Community Hall last week to update people about the Molybdenum (moly) mine in Boise County. By all assessments, the project is running its course, following permitting processes, staying in compliance with federal and state agencies, and is carefully making sure the project would be sustainable for years to come. Every decision looks at the environmental, social and economic impact of the local areas. A mining project often takes 20 years or more to become a reality due to heavy regulations and environmental studies.

But one may wonder … just how did this moly deposit even get discovered? A tour to the proposed mining site was offered to people who wanted to go so that they could see the area for themselves and ask these questions. Tour guest, Linda Ruppel of Garden Valley, explained what Shaun Dykes, M.Sc. (Eng) and CEO of CUMO had to say to the group. Dykes explained that in 1969 somebody brought in some sediment samples from the creek that contained Copper and Molybdenum. Interested people then followed the sediment along the creek up to the mine site. Amex came along and drilled another 20 holes to look at potential deposits. Unfortunately, by 1981, the Moly market had collapsed, and the project was left alone for a while.

continued:
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Idaho, environmental group settle mine pollution lawsuit

By Keith Ridler – 10/19/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — An environmental group and Idaho officials have reached a tentative settlement over toxic discharge from an abandoned silver and lead mine in central Idaho near one of the world’s top ski destinations.

The Idaho Conservation League in federal court documents made public Thursday agreed to have its lawsuit dismissed as long as state officials get a federal permit involving discharge from the Triumph Mine. Such a permit could require expensive cleanup by the state. A judge has to approve the deal.

The lawsuit filed in September contends Idaho officials are discharging arsenic and other pollutants into the east fork of the Big Wood River in violation of the Clean Water Act.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Weather and conditions permitting, the Boise National Forest is planning ignition of several 2018 fall prescribed burns.

Contact: Venetia Gempler Phone: (208) 373-4105 Email: vgempler @ fs.fed.us

Boise, Idaho, Oct. 16, 2018 – Two Ranger Districts within the Boise National Forest plan to ignite several prescribed burns this week to reduce fuels and improve wildlife habitat.

The Mountain Home Ranger District (RD) is planning hand and aerial ignition of approximately 1000 acres, Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct. 16, & 17, in the Cottonwood II Prescribed burn area. The burn is located 22 miles Northeast of Boise, ID in Boise County. Some smoke is anticipated in the Lucky Peak area for a few days. If you need further information, you may call the Mountain RD at 208-587-7961.

Advisory: The Mountain Home Ranger District has a temporary closure in effect for the Cottonwood II Prescribed Burn Area to provide for public safety during burn activities. The area will be closed beginning Monday, Oct. 15, 2018, and 12:01 a.m. and shall remain in effect, until Oct. 25, 2018, at 11:59 p.m. unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-01-86)

The closures and maps for the burns are available at:

https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices

The Cascade RD is planning the hand ignition of approximately 100 acres Wednesday, Oct. 17, in the Crawford Prescribed burn area. The burn is located 4 miles east of Cascade. Some smoke may be visible in the Cascade area for a few days. If you need further information, you may call the Cascade RD at 208-382-7400.

Advisory: The Cascade Ranger District has a closure of the Eagles Nest Trail #111 near the Crawford Prescribed area to provide for public safety and protection from hazards associated with the Crawford Prescribed burn. The area will be closed beginning Oct. 17, 2018, and shall remain in effect, until Nov. 1, 2018, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-01-81)

The Cascade RD is also planning the hand and possible aerial ignition of approximately 250 acres Thursday and Friday, Oct. 18, and 19, in the Horsethief Prescribed burn area. The burn is located 3 miles east of Cascade. Some smoke may be visible in the Cascade area for a few days. If you need further information, you may call the Cascade RD at 208-382-7400.

Links:

0402-01-86 Cottonwood II Prescribed Fire Area Closure MAP.PDF

10-16-2018 – 10402-04-81 Eagles Nest Trail #111 Prescribed Fire SIGNED.pdf

Crawford burn 2

0402-01-86 Cottonwood II Prescribed Fire Area Closure SIGNED.PDF

Horsethief burn 3

0402-04-81 Eagles Nest Trail #111 Prescribed Fire MAP.pdf
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Prescribed Burns planned for Fall 2018

Date Sept 19, 2018

The Krassel Ranger District, Payette National Forest is planning to implement prescribed burns in the Bald Hill and Four Mile project areas this fall. In the Bald Hill Project area we will be working in areas of Reegan Creek and Deadman Creek from the East Fork road up to Rainbow Ridge. In the Fourmile Project area we will be working on both sides of the South Fork, between Blackmare and Holdover Creeks on the west side of the river and in the Fourmile Creek drainage on the east side. See attached map for more specific areas. Ignitions will likely take place in September or October, dependent on weather and fuel conditions. Primary ignitions will take 1-3 days for each burn block, with residual smoke and flame present until the next significant rain. Please do not hesitate to give a call or email with questions, my contact information is lenelson@fs.fed.us or desk phone is 208-634-0622.

Thanks and have a nice day,

Laurel Ingram
Fuels Technician
Payette National Forest
Krassel Ranger District

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing a prescribed burn on the south facing aspect between Deadman Creek and Reegan Creek along the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River Oct 20-21. The edge of burn block E is about 5 miles west of Yellow Pine. See map below.

(click here for larger image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622.

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing the Four Mile Prescribed fire project this fall. Ignitions may take place between Reed Ranch and Poverty Flat Camp Ground on both sides of the South Fork of the Salmon River. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 2 or more days in September or October.

(click here for larger image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622
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Note from Cascade Ranger District:
(no date yet)

The Cascade RD is planning to burn both the Lower Johnson Thinning and Yellow Pine Blow Down units this fall, both of these projects will be pile burning only NO Broadcast Burning is planned.

The Lower Johnson Project (thinning & piling) was completed last summer, these handpiles are located along Johnson Creek road, Wapiti Ranch, Cox Ranch, Bryant Ranch/ Johnson Creek Airstrip.

Hand Ignition for Lower Johnson should take about a week to complete, once those piles have been completed, the crews will relocate to Yellow Pine to burn the logging slash piles.

If you have any addition questions please contact Tim Dulhanty tdulhanty@fs.fed.us (208-382-7400) or myself at 208-382-7400 or send me an email.

Thanks
James Bishop
Fuels AFMO
Boise National Forest
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October BCYPSR Meeting, Oct 25th, Commissioners Room

The meeting next week will be in the Valley County Commissioners Room.

Agenda

Big Creek/Yellow Pine/South Fork Collaborative Meeting
Payette National Forest
October 25th, 2018; 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM
Valley County Commissioners Room
Conference Line Phone Number: 208-229-8030; Conference ID: 968706
(Notify facilitator if you will be calling in, the zoom link is available upon request)

Note: Attendees to supply their own lunch.
The schedule is sequential, but flexible to allow time for questions and discussion.

Desired Outcomes: Find consent on proposal subcommittee matrix updates

Address Action Items from June meeting:

Subcommittee leaders should be prepared to discuss the sites at the July (October) meeting.

Larry will submit the McCall Stibnite Road Re Route Letter to the County for the Commissioners meeting

link to: BCYPSR July Meeting Notes .docx
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French Hazard-Notification of Decision

Oct 15, 2018

The Decision Notice (DN) for the French Hazard WUI Project has been signed.

The French Hazard WUI Project is a hazardous fuels reduction and vegetation restoration project that addresses the need to treat within the WUI to reduce the risk of wildfire to values such as private property, forest infrastructure, wildlife habitat, visuals, and water quality.

Based upon the review of the effects analysis documented in the EA and consideration of the public comments received throughout the process, Alternative B, with modification has been selected. The project will implement a suite of vegetation management treatments which includes commercial and noncommercial thinning, prescribed burning, and mastication. In addition, associated road maintenance, construction, and decommissioning activities will occur. The project design includes environmental protection measures (design features) and post-implementation restoration activities. Implementation of this decision is scheduled to begin in the early fall of 2018

The DN can be downloaded from the project website located at:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49636

If you have questions, please contact Jake Strohmeyer, Cascade District Ranger at 208-382-7402.
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Two popular Idaho City Ranger District destinations are re-opened

Boise, Idaho, October 19, 2018 — Two popular areas to visit within the Idaho City Ranger District are open.

The Grayback Gulch Road/Bridge and the Graham road were damaged in 2017 by spring wash out and closed due to road failure.

Effective Saturday, Oct. 20, 2018, at 12:01 a.m. the Grayback Gulch Road/Bridge (NFS road 347) is open. The campground is closed for winter and the gate may be closed, but not locked. Visitors may push the gate open and access the area and campground. Be aware there are no services including water, trash disposal or toilet facilities. Please observe the pack in and pack out guidelines.

Also, effective Oct. 18, 2018, NFS road 312 (Pikes Fork) to Graham is open to all motorized access.

Reservations will be available for Grayback Campground and Graham Cabin at http://www.recreation.gov for the 2019 season. The site is being upgraded and your patience is appreciated.

Photos provided by John Henderson / Project Engineer / Warren Wagon Rd ProjectWestern Federal Lands Highway Division.


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BLM seeks volunteers for sagebrush planting

Date: October 16, 2018
Contact: Michael Williamson mwilliamson@blm.gov 208-384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management is hosting a volunteer event to plant native plants as part of efforts to rehabilitate the area burned in the 2013 Kuna Butte Fire. The event will take place Oct. 20 beginning at 9:30 a.m. at Kuna Butte.

“By planting sagebrush and wildflowers, volunteers will be helping to re-establish habitat for raptors, their prey species and to support traditional land uses.” said BLM Ecologist Joe Sirotnak. “While this is an all day event, people can stay as long as they want. We appreciate any and all help. ”

This is part of a shared conservation stewardship effort with partners including the Birds of Prey NCA Partnership, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, City of Kuna, and Boise State University Club Sports.

Volunteers will be broken into groups and directed to planting locations around Kuna Butte. Please consider the following:

* While shovels and some work gloves will be available, volunteers are encouraged to bring their own.
* Wear weather-appropriate outdoor work clothes including boots, long-sleeved shirts, and long pants.
* Bring water and any food you may need.
* While this is a family-friendly activity, minors must be accompanied by an adult.

Those interested in participating are encouraged to RSVP by email (jsirotnak@blm.gov) by Oct. 18 to help with logistical planning, though anyone may volunteer on the day of the event.

Kuna Butte is located approximately one-half mile west of the intersection of Swan Falls Road and West Kuna Mora Road (Google Maps). The group will meet at the parking area at the base of Kuna Butte.

For more information, contact Joe Sirotnak at (208) 384-3300.
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Critter News:

Caldwell women given jail, 25-year hunting ban for poaching

Shannan Norris described as leader of conspiracy

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News October 18, 2018

A Caldwell woman on Tuesday was sentenced to 60 days in jail and given a 25-year hunting, fishing and trapping license suspension stemming from an Adams County poaching conspiracy.

Shannan Norris, 46, previously pleaded guilty to felony charges of criminal conspiracy and destruction of evidence.

The charges stemmed from her illegal use and re-use of game tags, hunting out of season and misleading investigators.

The sentence was handed down by Third District Court Judge Christopher Nye during a hearing at the Adams County Courthouse in Council.

Nye also sentenced Norris to 10 years of probation, plus restitution and fines in an amount to be determined.

“When you go out and kill everything you see, you’re robbing the future of hunting,” Nye told Norris.

Norris will begin serving her 60 days at the Adams County Jail before the end of the year.

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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

October 17th Wolf Report
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Mexican wolves found dead in Arizona, New Mexico

10/18/18 AP

Phoenix, N.M. — Arizona wildlife officials say authorities are investigating the deaths of three endangered Mexican gray wolves, including one found in southwestern New Mexico.

The Arizona Game and Fish Department announced this week that male wolves belonging to the Bear Wallow and Saffel packs were found dead in Arizona in September. The packs are known to roam parts of Arizona’s Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest.

The wolf found dead in New Mexico was a member of the SBP pack.

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Conservationists ask court to step in as red wolf plan looms

By Jonathan Drew – 10/17/18 AP

Raleigh, N.C. — Conservationists told a federal judge Wednesday that an imminent government plan to shrink the territory of the only red wolves living in the wild would hasten the animal’s extinction in violation of federal law.

Lawyers for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, however, countered that new rules for the red wolf program, set to be finalized next month, mean that the conservationists’ legal arguments are moot — and that they must file another lawsuit if they want to challenge the new plans.

The current lawsuit by the Red Wolf Coalition, Defenders of Wildlife and Animal Welfare Institute argues that the federal government has neglected the wolves in recent years, allowing their population to decline. An estimated 35 wild red wolves remain — all in eastern North Carolina — down from about 120 a decade ago. Another 200 currently live in captive breeding programs.

continued:
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter Oct 18, 2018

Coyotes feeding on pets, prompting fear among humans
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Idaho man survives grizzly bear attack in Montana wilderness

10/15/18 AP

Coeur d’Alene, Idaho — A roughly 500-pound (230-kilogram) grizzly bear attacked a Hayden, Idaho, man, and the man lived to tell about it.

The Coeur d’Alene Press reports the bear attacked Bob Legasa Saturday morning while Legasa and his hunting partner, Greg Gibson, were bow hunting elk south of Livingston, Montana.

The pair spotted the grizzly and her 2-year-old cub about 12 yards (11 meters) away. The youngling reared up and growled, then made way for the mama bear to charge.

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Forage reserve created in eastern Idaho for livestock

10/20/18 AP

American Falls, Idaho — Federal authorities say a reserve forage area in eastern Idaho for livestock displaced by wildfires, drought or other problems will be available next summer.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management says the 345-square-mile (890-square-kilometer) reserve northwest of American Falls is intended to feed sheep and cattle forced off other grazing areas.

BLM spokeswoman Sarah Wheeler tells the Capital Press in a story on Thursday that the reserve gives livestock producers an option to still make a living when things get tough.

Wheeler says a wildfire can keep livestock off federal public lands for several years.

The federal agency says the reserve is in an area that includes old homesteads and other areas previously seeded with crested wheatgrass.

source:
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Federal court: Salmon must have protection from warm water

10/18/18 AP

Portland, Ore. — A federal court has ruled that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency must come up with a plan to protect salmon from warm water temperatures, which can be fatal for the fish species. ‘

Oregon Public Broadcasting reports Thursday that record-high water temperatures in rivers across the Pacific Northwest in 2015 led environmental groups to sue the agency.

That summer, around 250,000 adult sockeye died in the Columbia and Snake rivers.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Idaho wildlife official resigns after killing baboon family

10/16/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — A top Idaho wildlife official has resigned amid outrage over a photo of him posing with a baboon family he killed in Africa.

Idaho Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter said in a statement that he asked for and accepted Blake Fischer’s resignation on Monday, three days after the Idaho Statesman newspaper published the first report about a photo of Fischer smiling with four dead baboons propped in front of him.

Fischer and his wife shot at least 14 animals in Namibia according to the photos and descriptions in an email he sent to more than 100 recipients.

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Make the call to catch poachers, (800) 632-5999

By Mike Demick, Conservation Information Supervisor
Thursday, October 11, 2018

Poaching Hotline (800-632-5999) available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

With many hunting seasons underway, the Idaho Fish and Game asks the public to call the Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) hotline if they witness a violation of wildlife laws.

“Those who ‘Make the Call’ are instrumental in catching poachers stealing game and fish from the Idaho citizens,” said David Silcock, Idaho Fish and Game regional conservation officer based in Salmon. “Many poaching cases would not be detected, let alone, solved without the public’s extra eyes and ears.”

Callers to the hotline, 1-800-632-5999, can report wildlife law violations anonymously, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Cash rewards are available to callers who provide information leading to the citation of suspected wildlife law violators.

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Four wolf trapper courses scheduled across the state in November and December

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Conservation Educator
Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Class is mandatory for wolf trappers

Attention new wolf trappers: There are 4 upcoming wolf trapper education classes scheduled for Nov and Dec in Idaho. If you plan to trap wolves this season, please plan to attend one of these classes.

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Idaho Fish and Game finds old loon from Nevada tangled in net near Cascade

by CBS 2 News Staff Friday, October 19th 2018


Photo Courtesy Idaho Fish and Game

Cascade, Idaho (CBS2) — 500 miles is a long distance to travel.

But that didn’t stop a loon that was found entangled in a net on Cascade Reservoir.

McCall fish management crews were conducting their annual fall fish survey of Cascade Reservoir, and found the banded common loon in one of the nets.

After releasing the loon unharmed, they discovered it was banded at Walker Lake, NV which is just east of Reno.

The oldest living loon recorded is 25-years-old, but Fish and Game says this loon was 21-years-old!

continued:
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Pheasant releases expand hunting opportunity in the Clearwater through Dec. 31

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Conservation Educator
Monday, October 15, 2018

Palouse River and Lloyd Ranch access areas

The opening weekend of youth pheasant season on the Palouse River Youth Only Upland Game Area was a great success. This youth area was completely booked on opening weekend with 5 hunter/mentor pairs per day. With the help of Jim Hagedorn and the Game Bird Foundation, we are looking forward to another successful weekend. All hunters must sign in online. The sign-in can be found on the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Access Yes! website under the Palouse Area. The Game Bird Foundation will be releasing birds every week through the rest of the season, so be sure you take advantage of this opportunity.

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More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Osprey: The Ultimate Fisher

Have you ever seen a bird shake water off like a dog does?

There are 3 sequences in this one video:

1st sequence – catches half a dozen fish in one strike.
2nd sequence – plunges talons into deep water to grab the Flounder.
3rd sequence – captures a big old fish that looks as if it weighs more than he does!

[h/t B]
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Seasonal Humor:


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Bald Hill Prescribed Burn Oct 20-21

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing a prescribed burn on the south facing aspect between Deadman Creek and Reegan Creek along the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River Oct 20-21. The edge of burn block E is about 5 miles west of Yellow Pine. See map below.

(click here for larger image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622.

Oct 14, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 14, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
October 17 Ed Staub & Sons Fall Fuel delivery call (208) 634-3833
October 20 Dave Bingaman for V. Co. Commissioner at The Corner 430pm-630pm
October 27 Halloween Party at the Yellow Pine Tavern
November 1st week Amerigas Propane delivery call (208) 634-8181

(details below)
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Village News:

Outages

The power went off Tuesday evening (Oct 9) at 641pm in Yellow Pine, including Johnson Creek and the Warm Lake area. Power back on at 1128pm.

Planned MTE internet/phone outage Wednesday (Oct 10) started around 1230pm and was up before 3pm. The message said it was for “upgrades”.
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Diamond Fuel Delivery

Nathan brought fuel on Monday (Oct 8), two days early because of snow in the forecast for Wednesday.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.


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Local Fall Rx Burns

* Lower Johnson Thinning (95 acres): Is a project designed to reduce hazardous fuels within the WUI. This project is located approximately 7 miles south of Yellow Pine along NFS road 413 and Johnson Creek.

* Yellow Pine Blowdown (40 acres): is located approximately 62 miles from Cascade, Idaho and is adjacent to the community of Yellow Pine. Hand Ignitions will be used to ignite machine piles along NFS roads 412, 413.

The Cascade RD is planning to burn both the Lower Johnson Thinning and Yellow Pine Blow Down units this fall, both of these projects will be pile burning only NO Broadcast Burning is planned.

The Lower Johnson Project (thinning & piling) was completed last summer, these handpiles are located along Johnson Creek road, Wapiti Ranch, Cox Ranch, Bryant Ranch/ Johnson Creek Airstrip.

Hand Ignition for Lower Johnson should take about a week to complete, once those piles have been completed, the crews will relocate to Yellow Pine to burn the logging slash piles.

If you have any addition questions please contact Tim Dulhanty tdulhanty@fs.fed.us (208-382-7400) or myself at 208-382-7400 or send me an email.

– Thanks
James Bishop, Fuels AFMO, Boise National Forest
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Firewood Permits

Permits available May 15, 2018 through November 30, 2018 at The Corner.

Fuelwood permits have been reduced to $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum and a 10-cord maximum per household.

link to more info:

Stay Out Of Riparian Areas!

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Ice Hole Campground Closed

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
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Pests

No recent reports of bear activity, but they are still around fattening up for winter. Please do not leave pet food outside and secure your trash. Mice are looking for a warm place to winter. Colombian ground squirrels have gone into hibernation. Chipmunks had a population boom this summer. Pine squirrels are not as numerous as in past years.

Video Link Bear Visitor Aug 20, 2018
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Local Events:

Dave Bingaman For Valley County Commissioner District #3

Dave will be at The Corner on October 20th from 430pm-630pm for a happy hour meet and greet and to chat about Yellow Pine issues during his campaign for Valley County Commissioner.

“This is the man that will help preserve the Valley County we all know and love while allowing it’s citizen’s and community to prosper. This is Your Voice in Valley County and our New Generation of Leadership.”

Web is: http://davebingaman.com/
FB is Dave Bingaman for Valley County Commissioner
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October 27 Halloween Party at the Yellow Pine Tavern
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

September Yellow Pine water update excerpts

The good news is the second sand filter is online and operating well. We have refurbished and upgraded the chlorinator and purchased new chlorine monitoring tools that will help us more accurately adjust the amount of chlorine injected into the water. Additionally, we received the $10,000 grant from Midas. We are looking at all options but it seems that for 2018 we must raise user fees a minimum of a $150 per year.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx

There will be a YPWUA meeting in October.

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.
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VYPA News:

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 18th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th. Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.

Midas Gold and Yellow Pine

August 28, 2018

Attached is the Community Partnership Agreement the Village of Yellow Pine signed with Midas Gold.

link to: 2018 Community Partnership Agreement.pdf
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YPFD News:

There was a YPFD Commissioners Meeting October 6, no minutes yet.

Sept 22nd YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Sept. 30th Yellow Pine Times.

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

A lot of progress has been made on the new Helipad near the crossroads.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

– Fire Chief Jeff

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open for summer
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

We sell FS wood cutting permits.

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC

Buck Horn Outfitters in Idaho’s west Central Mountains in Units 25, 20 A, & 19 A. Providing Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Mountain lion, & Wolf Hunts. We offer Guided Rifle or Archery Hunts & Drop Camps. We are not about Quantity we are about providing Quality Hunts. My husband and I have been in the back country all our lives, we offer Deluxe camps with great food & our Guides know hunting, the back country and Stock.

Link to FB:
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Deadwood Outfitters

We’re currently interviewing for winter caretakers. A remote location and snowmobile only access in winter.
Duty services include:
Guest cabin up keep
Preparing meals
Keeping porches shoveled
And enjoying lots of solitude.
For more info. deadwoodoutfit @ gmail.com
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 8) overnight low of 26 degrees, frosty and mostly cloudy this morning, good air quality. Report of a 6 point bull elk seen in the village early this morning. Diamond Fuel delivery today (driver said the weather looked bad for Wednesday, so he came 2 days early.) Red-breasted nuthatch visited after lunch time. Nearly solid overcast by early afternoon, cool light breezes, high of 53 degrees. Leaves falling off trees and bushes, but lots of color still around. Tamarack trees are turning golden. Gray overcast by evening and almost calm. Rain after midnight.

Tuesday (Oct 9) probably rained all night, low of 31 degrees, hard rain for a while around 7am, light rain at 10am. Low overcast, hills and peaks socked in. Snow line appears to be at least 6500′ or lower. By mid-afternoon the snow line had risen, low clouds and rained until around 6pm, high of 44 degrees. Power outage 641pm to 1128pm, the outage was for all of Yellow Pine and included Johnson Creek to Warm Lake. Thinner clouds at sunset.

Wednesday (Oct 10) overnight low of 35 degrees, low overcast this morning cloaking the top of VanMeter. Planned internet/phone outage started around 1230pm and back up before 3pm. Cool overcast afternoon, chilly breezes, high of 46 degrees. Report of bear scat up the EFSF road the other day. Breaks in the clouds by evening, cool and the air is good.

Thursday (Oct 11) overnight low of 34 degrees, mostly cloudy, light dew and chilly breeze this morning. Snow up high on VanMeter. Heard a flicker in the neighborhood. Decreasing clouds during the day, mild temperatures and chilly breezes, high of 54 degrees. Flock of starlings in the neighborhood this evening and one jay calling. Almost clear at dusk.

Friday (Oct 12) overnight low of 25 degrees, clear sky and frosty this morning. Sun starting to peek between the trees on the top of Golden Gate Hill just after 10am. Jay calling. Sunny mid-day, just a few tiny clouds to the south. Nice afternoon, dry, light breezes and lots of sunshine, high of 64 degrees. Quiet evening, temps dropping with the sun.

Saturday (Oct 13) our first snow of the season early this morning, a bit unexpected (not in the forecast) enough snow to make the ground white. Mostly cloudy at sunrise and 31 degrees. Raven flying over the neighborhood and calling. Flaking snow just after 1pm for a little while. Six pine squirrels in a group traveling together, looked like a mother and 5 grown offspring following in a straight line. Spitting snow, then rain/snow mix, then heavy snow 445pm-530pm, windy and very low clouds (about 1/2″ accumulation), then breaks in the clouds and a little melting, high of 50 degrees. Clearing up by 10pm and getting cold.

Sunday (Oct 14) overnight low of 17 degrees, clear sky and about 1/4″ of snow on the ground from yesterday’s storm. Sunny and some melting by lunch time. A few loud gunshots to the west before 1pm. Clear, cool and chilly stiff breezes after lunch. Increased traffic. Clear sunny afternoon, high of 48 degrees, most of the snow melted except in the shade.
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Letter to Share:

August and September newsletter

October 14, 2018

From the desk of Commissioner Cruickshank,

Thursday August 2nd
I attended a Farm Bureau Dinner event in Adams County where they discussed current topics of concern on legislation both current and proposed.

Monday August 6th
Today was a Commissioner meeting day. Please find the minutes once approved on the Valley County website at Valley County Idaho | Official Site and click on the commissioners section where minutes can be found.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday August 7th
I worked on emails and returning phone calls.

Wednesday August 8th
I sent out a reminder for a National Association of Counties (NACo) West Region Call for tomorrow.

Thursday August 9th
I hosted the NACo West Region Call where we learned more about the NACo High Performance Leadership Academy program.
Tonight I attended a portion of the McCall City Council meeting to hear reports on the use of Local Option Tax funding.

Friday August 10th
I participated in the NACo Executive Board Conference call. Discussion was on the reorganization of NACo.

Saturday August 11th
Valley County Fair Livestock Auction today where I assisted with the auction as a Ring Man to collect bids on livestock being sold. So proud of our Valley County Youth for participating in the programs to learn more about living in Valley County.

Monday August 13th
Commissioner Meeting day. Please see the Valley County website to review the minutes.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday August 14th
I had a phone conversation with the Idaho Association of Counties (IAC) Executive Director on the Payment in Lieu of Taxes Fly In and upcoming IAC election process as there are several positions open for representing IAC.

Wednesday August 15th
I had a phone conversation with a staff person with Senator Risch on the Payette Forest Coalition Tour tomorrow to see if I was attending.

Thursday August 16th
I attended to Payette Forest Coalition Tour to view past Restoration work completed and see look at the next section of landscape to be worked on.

Monday August 20th
Commissioner meeting day. Please see the Valley County website.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday August 21st
I responded to emails on the proposed Road Levy to fund the Road Department and booked a flight for an upcoming NACo Executive Board meeting in California.

Wednesday August 22nd
Replied to emails today.

Sunday August 26th
Returned phone calls from being out of service for a few days.

Monday August 27th
Commissioner meeting day. Please see the Valley County website.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday August 28th
Responded to emails and a request to attend a meeting on Community Agreements with Midas Gold for Friday.

Wednesday August 29th
I reviewed our Firewise Consulting Contract for renewal and replied to the Forest Service on who has jurisdiction on certain roads in the Stibnite area.
I hauled the County Excavator to the Transfer Site and piled Woody Debris this afternoon. The ability to drop off Woody Debris free has brought in a large amount of material and we needed more room. This is good as it helps prevent a fire when we don’t need it during dry conditions.

Thursday August 30th
I met with Lakeshore Disposal officials to discuss future operation of the Solid Waste program for Valley County.

Friday August 31st
I operated the Excavator at the Transfer Site piling more brush today. Also happening today was the discovery of a LIVE Grenade found in a residence. The Mountain Home Bomb Squad was brought in to dispose of the grenade.

Tuesday September 4th
Commissioner meeting day. All minutes of commissioners meeting can be found at http://www.co.valley.id.us by clicking on the commissioner section and finding the minutes. Once minutes are approved they are posted so it may take a few weeks.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Friday September 7th
I participated in a NACo Executive Board call today to discuss the recent Payment in Lieu of Taxes Fly-In which was one of the best NACo has had to work with Congressional Offices. We also learned that 1,428 individuals from 45 counties are involved with NACo Committees which is the highest to date. Additionally we learned that 130 people
signed up for the Leadership online Academy.

Monday September 10th
Commissioner meeting day. Please see the Valley County website.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday September 11th
I reviewed upcoming events for NACo in December during which a NACo Board of Directors meeting will be held. I sent out a reminder of the NACo West Region call on Thursday. I received a call to set up a time to meet with some folks looking at the Tamarack Resort. I participated in a NACo Transportation Leadership Call to discuss issues of importance with transportation. As one of 4 Vice Chairs on this committee the discussion was important to hear.

Wednesday September 12th
I returned to the Transfer Site and piled more brush from the Woody Debris collection program.

Thursday September 13th
I hosted the NACo West Region call where we had multiple people from various western states speak on topic of concern. I also complied notes from this call and sent them to members of the West Region.

Monday September 17th
Commissioner meeting day. Please see the website for the minutes.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/

Tuesday September 18th
I had a discussion with the Valley County Clerk on an upcoming agenda where the commissioners will have limited time to discuss items.
I booked a flight for an upcoming NACo Budget meeting in Washington D C.
This afternoon I met with staff at D F Development to discuss roads in Valley County.

Wednesday September 19th
I met with some people interested in the Tamarack Resort. Their interest is in Valley County process that happened in prior years and how that process is today. I hope I provided a better understanding for them as they consider this potential.

Thursday September 20th
My day started of with returning a call to a concerned citizen on the Idaho Department of Lands allowing cell tower installation without Public Comment.
Next was a call from a Septic Tank cleaning company concerned that the Payette Lakes Water and Sewer District were discontinuing the ability to dump septage at the McCall site.
I also returned a call to an Emergency Services Director in North Dakota who wanted to discuss various topics as they were a prior Montana Commissioner and wanted to learn more about my involvement with NACo and the Western Region.
This evening I reviewed proposed legislation on the Secure Rural Schools program that is expiring.

Friday September 21st
This morning I participated in a NACo Western Interstate Region call to discuss the Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) Fly-In where 25 county folks participated in 16 Hill meetings, a White House meeting with the Office of Management and Budget and USDA Natural Resource and Environment officials. There seemed to be positive feedback on the understanding of PILT. Also discussed was a document NACo and the Forest Service are working on.
I then attended the Community Agreement meeting at Midas Gold to review and comment on the draft agreements that are being considered by communities.
At noon I participated in the NACo Executive Board call where we continued the discussion on the reorganization of NACo. Discussion revolved around Membership Engagement, Policy Advancement both Federal and Nationally, Leadership, Financial Health Long Term, Culture and Wellness. This lead to a discussion on what is beneficial as we can’t do all that the membership asks.

Monday September 24th
Commissioner meeting today. Please see the Valley County website for the minutes.
http://www.co.valley.id.us/
This afternoon was the start of the Idaho Association of Counties (IAC) Fall Conference in Boise. I attended the Opening General Session and then the IAC Transportation Committee meeting.

Tuesday September 25th
This morning started with another General Session where we heard about Best Practices in Emergency Management, then I attended a workshop on Public Purchasing where we learned about changes in procurement of goods, this afternoon was a Public Lands committee meeting and to end today’s events was a General Session on Economic Development in Changing Times. Tonight was the Annual Social and Banquet along with the Annual Awards Presentations.

Wednesday September 26th
My morning started off with an IAC Legislative Committee meeting to review proposed legislative resolutions passed by the IAC Committees, then we had an IAC Business meeting where we installed the New Officers of IAC and Voted on 2019 Resolutions.
This afternoon was a IAC Commissioners meeting to discuss statewide concerns such as the Department of Motor Vehicle disruptions by the new programs rolled out by the Idaho Transportation Department.
Late afternoon the IAC Legislative Committee met to create a list of the top ten Resolutions we felt would be best to present as proposed legislation for the upcoming 2019 Legislative Session while we keep an eye of the remaining resolutions in the event they have similar legislation proposed by others.

Thursday September 27th
This morning was an IAC Board Meeting. As the IAC Representative to the NACo Board of Directors it provides a seat on the IAC Board as well. Today we discussed the future of IAC, learned who the incoming or remaining chairs were for IAC Committees, had a staffing update by the Executive Director, discussed corporate partner programs, scholarship funding and reviewed Strategic Goals and Objectives.

Friday September 28th
I drove out to Warm Lake to review the Satellite Transfer Site for Solid Waste as the Bears have been bending the metal doors and getting access to the garbage.

Well I combined two months into this newsletter as it has been a busy summer.

Thanks for reading what interests you.

Gordon
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Idaho News:

Fire Damages Home

The Star-News October 11, 2018

2018LakeForkHousefire-a
Photo courtesy Donnelly Fire & EMS

Photo shows a fire that broke out about 9:44 a.m. last Thursday in the roof of a home at 13775 Raptor Loop east of Lake Fork. The home’s owner, Brett Bittenbender, and his sister, whose name was not available, were in the home at the time of the blaze and escaped injury. Firefighters from Donnelly Fire & EMS and McCall Fire & EMS responded and quickly extinguished the blaze, Donnelly Fire Marshal Jess Ellis said. The fire started in the chimney chase and extended into the ceiling of the structure, causing extensive damage, Ellis said.

source:
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The Star-News to host election forum in McCall Oct. 18

The Star-News October 11, 2018

The Star-News will host a public forum in McCall on Thursday, Oct. 18, for candidates and issues that will appear on the Nov. 6 general election ballot.

The forum will begin at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 18 at the downstairs Community Room at Idaho First Bank, 475 E. Deinhard Ln. in McCall.

Candidates for contested races have been invited, including candidates for Valley County Commissioner, Valley County Treasurer, and the Idaho Legislature from District 8, which includes Valley County.

A representative of Valley County also has been invited to discuss the advisory question on higher taxes for roads that will appear on the ballot.

The forum will be moderated by The Star-News Co-Publisher Tom Grote. Opening statements will be made followed by the asking of written questions submitted from the audience.

source:
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McCall ranked among the top weekend family getaways in the Northwest

Travel experts say there is nothing like a weekend getaway in McCall to bring a quick fix of family fun.

KTVB Staff October 11, 2018

Boise — A popular Idaho vacation destination has been ranked among the “25 Best Family Weekend Getaways with Kids,” according to TripAdvisor, the self-proclaimed world’s largest travel website.

Travel experts say there is nothing like a weekend getaway in McCall to bring a quick fix of family fun.

They say nature-loving families will enjoy this Idaho resort town for its abundance of outdoor activities from camping and bonfires in Ponderosa State Park to whitewater rafting on the Salmon River. There is so much for both children and adults to do.

continued:
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2 people missing in Idaho’s largest county

10/8/18 AP

Grangeville, Idaho — Two people are missing in separate incidents in Idaho’s largest county.

The Idaho County Sheriff’s Office says search efforts are underway for 76-year-old Connie Johnson, a Nezperce resident who was working as the cook at a hunting camp in the Fog Mountain area. Searchers are also looking for 27-year-old Terrence Woods, of Maryland, who was separated from his film crew while working on a project in the area.

Officials say other members of Johnson’s party arrived at the camp Friday and were unable to find the woman or her dog, Ace. No tracks were found at the site. Woods was last seen near the Penman Mine in the Orogrande area and reported missing Friday.

continued:

Idaho County Sheriff: One missing persons case isn’t an accident

by Sarah Jacobsen Wednesday, October 10th 2018

Boise, ID (KBOI) — Crews are actively searching Idaho County again today after they say yesterdays rain hampered their search efforts in two separate missing persons cases.

Multiple crews are searching various areas in Idaho County for 76-year-old Nez Perce resident Connie Johnson and 27-year-old Terrence Woods from Maryland.

“And they’ve got dogs in there right now. They’ve got guys on horseback,” says Sheriff Giddings.

Search conditions are extremely difficult for crews due to a rugged landscape.

continued:

Idaho authorities stop search for missing Maryland filmmaker

10/12/18 AP

Grangeville, Idaho — Authorities in Idaho have called off the search for a Maryland filmmaker who became lost while filming a documentary.

The Baltimore Sun reports the search for 27-year-old Terrence Woods ended Thursday afternoon. Woods was reported missing Oct. 5 when he became separated from his crew, which was in the Orogrande area filming a documentary on the Penman Mine.

continued:

Where are they? Relatives and friends speak out about missing people in Idaho County

by CBS 2 News Thursday, October 11th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — More relatives and friends are speaking out about two missing people in Idaho County.

They’re hoping someone, anyone, has seen or heard something, about Terrence Woods and Connie Johnson.

Both have been missing since Friday. There are many unanswered questions about their cases, which the sheriff says are unrelated.

continued:
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Ransomware attack knocks out E. Idaho county’s system

10/11/18 AP

Rexburg, Idaho — Officials in eastern Idaho’s Madison County say a ransomware attack has left the county struggling to conduct business.

County Commissioner Brent Mendenhall tells the Post Register in a story on Wednesday that county employees have been unable to send emails since Sunday.

Madison County Clerk Kim Muir says the county is using backup data from Saturday to issue paychecks Thursday.

continued:
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New Idaho State Museum is for everyone

By Hope Benedict Oct 10, 2018 IME

This week, the wholly reimagined Idaho State Museum is set to open in Boise. After several years of planning, fundraising and implementation, we’re finally ready to say, “Here we are, Idaho.”

Idaho is a vast and geographically diverse state, and some may wonder what a new museum in Boise has to do with our lives here in central Idaho. As this region’s trustee of the Idaho State Historical Society, I wanted to take a moment to highlight why Idahoans living outside Boise should be excited about this milestone.

First, it’s important to know that the reopening of the Idaho State Museum brings with it new technology that will allow us to take parts of the museum to classrooms and living rooms across the state. Planning is underway for virtual field trips that will make it possible for Idahoans to experience the museum’s collections from anywhere. After that, the museum will be working on a plan to take our show on the road, with traveling exhibits.

continued:
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Mining News:

Idaho seeks to force Texas oil company to turn over records

By Keith Ridler – 10/10/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idaho officials sought to force a Texas oil company to turn over records following an evaluation showing what the state calls “discrepancies” involving production records.

The Idaho Oil and Gas Conservation Commission voted 5-0 on Wednesday to authorize subpoenas for Houston-based Alta Mesa to obtain documents and witnesses to appear before the commission.

The action follows the evaluation by the Idaho Department of Lands of Alta Mesa natural gas and oil records dating back to 2014. The company has missed deadlines to turn over additional information following that evaluation.

continued:
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New mining claims banned on prized land near Yellowstone

by Matthew Brown, Associated Press Monday, October 8th 2018

Emigrant, Mont. (AP) — U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke approved a 20-year ban on new mining claims in the towering mountains north of Yellowstone National Park on Monday, after two proposed gold mines raised concerns that an area drawing tourists from the around the globe could be spoiled.

As Zinke signed the mineral ban at an outdoor ceremony in Montana’s Paradise Valley, a bank of clouds behind him broke apart to reveal the snow-covered flank of Emigrant Peak. The picturesque, 10,915-foot (3,327-meter) mountain has been at the center of the debate over whether mining should be allowed.

The former Montana congressman was joined by local business owners and residents who pushed for the ban after companies began drafting plans for new mines in an area frequented by wolves, elk, bears and other wildlife.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Payette National Forest October 2018 – December 2018 Schedule of Proposed Actions (SOPA)

link:
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Closure Order terminated for the Rattlesnake Creek Fire, hazards remain

Date: October 10, 2018
Contact: Sandra Dingman 208-634-0435 or Brian Harris cell: (208) 634-6945

McCall, Idaho – The Closure Order for the Rattlesnake Creek Fire was terminated on October 4th. With the change in weather patterns and associated precipitation in the fire area, fire behavior has decreased to creeping and smoldering in the Squirrel and Pony Creek drainages, and is no longer a threat to containment objectives. Fire suppression resources continue to work in the area and some smoke may still be visible.

New Meadows District Ranger Erin Phelps said, “There are still hazards in the area, including fire-weakened trees, smoldering fire, and heavy equipment operating in and around the fire area. We still have some fire suppression repair work to complete, namely a dozer line out of the Hillman Basin area that we’ve used to access the fire, and a contingency line along the southern flank, where we have a number of log decks that were generated as a result of suppression activities. We’re currently pursuing options for those decks, including potentially offering a small timber sale.”

A burned landscape presents a number of safety hazards that either did not exist prior to the fire or have been exacerbated by the effects of the fire. Those traveling or recreating in the burned area are reminded to be very aware of your surroundings and follow warming signs and directions from agency personnel. Hazards include unstable terrain, displaced wildlife, hazard trees, burned stump holes and root chambers, and the possibility of flash flooding and debris flows. Additional information about these hazards is available in a handout called “Traveling and recreating safely in a burned landscape” available at district offices on the Payette National Forest.

The Rattlesnake Creek fire, southwest of Riggins, Idaho, is a human caused fire that has burned since July 23, 2018 on lands managed by the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests and Payette National Forest, the Bureau of Land Management, the Idaho Department of Lands, and privately owned land.

Additional information about the termination of the closure order, traveling in the burned area, and rehab activities can be found at
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5999/

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
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Southwest Idaho Fall prescribed burning planned

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Boise, Idaho. Sept. 26, 2018 — Southwest Idaho interagency fire managers anticipate favorable weather conditions for planned low-intensity prescribed burns this fall. Prescribed burns are designed to reduce hazardous vegetation (fuels), minimize wildfire potential near communities and improve wildlife habitat.

Weather and fuel conditions permitting, prescribed burns are scheduled to start in October and continue through November. Approximately 2,600 acres are planned for controlled ignitions in 13 project areas within the Boise National Forest.

Public and firefighter safety is always the first priority in all public land fire operations. Fire managers develop burn plans that consider: safety, specific fuel and weather prescriptions and smoke management. All prescribed burns are closely evaluated and are only approved when conditions are favorable.

Fire officials strongly advise forest visitors and homeowners to prepare and plan activities around the proposed dates and locations of burns. Prescribed burns may impact individual’s that are sensitive to smoke. Recreationists should use extreme caution near prescribed fire areas and comply with closures.

Access to areas immediately within or adjacent to burning operations may be temporarily restricted for public health and safety. Specific information and signage will be posted in advance of ignitions and remain in place until operations are completed. Please be cautious of firefighters and additional equipment within these areas as visibility will be decreased with smoke.

The http://www.rxfire.com website is updated with information regarding southwest Idaho burns planned within Idaho Department of Lands, Bureau of Land Management, Payette National Forest and Boise National Forest.

The Boise National Forest prescribed burn hotline: (208)-373-4208.

Idaho City Ranger District

* Alder Ridge (100 acres): located 1 mile north of Placerville, Idaho. This is a landscape burn (ground fire), using hand ignitions to reduce fuel in the wildland urban interface (WUI).
* Amber (300 acres): located 2 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho. This is a modified tree well burn.
* Buckskin (200): located approximately 3 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho.
* Little Ophir (100 acres): located 4 miles west of Pioneerville, Idaho. A landscape burn using hand ignitions that will reduce fuel in the WUI.
* Mores South-Granite Creek (250 acres): located 3 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho. This is a landscape burn (ground fire) using hand ignitions to reduce fuels in the WUI.

Cascade Ranger District

* Horsethief (360 acres): located about 1 mile east/northeast of Horsethief Reservoir. This burn involves helicopter and hand ignitions to reduce fuels throughout the area that is within the WUI.
* Westside Restoration Unit 39 (25 acres): This project is located on National Forest System (NFS) road 435 along West Mountain. It is approximately 10 miles west of Cascade, Idaho. This will be hand ignitions burn to reduce fuels within the WUI.
* Crawford (100 acres): located approximately 4 miles east of Cascade, Idaho adjacent to the Crawford Guard Station, located off of NFS road 22, northeast of Davis reservoir; within WUI area.
* Lower Johnson Thinning (95 acres): Is a project designed to reduce hazardous fuels within the WUI. This project is located approximately 7 miles south of Yellow Pine along NFS road 413 and Johnson Creek.
* Yellow Pine Blowdown (40 acres): is located approximately 62 miles from Cascade, Idaho and is adjacent to the community of Yellow Pine. Hand Ignitions will be used to ignite machine piles along NFS roads 412, 413.
* Rainbow Point (19 acres): This project is located approximately 25 miles northwest of Cascade, Idaho. Machine Piles located within the Rainbow Point campground will be ignited by hand to reduce fuel accumulations throughout the campground.

Mountain Home Ranger District

* Cottonwood II Rx (1000 acres): This project is located about 17 miles NE of Boise, Idaho along NFS roads 203 and 377 in the Cottonwood Creek drainage, north of Arrowrock Reservoir.

Emmett Ranger District

* Miscellaneous Administrative Piles (1-2 acres): At Garden Valley work center.
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Note from Cascade Ranger District:

The Cascade RD is planning to burn both the Lower Johnson Thinning and Yellow Pine Blow Down units this fall, both of these projects will be pile burning only NO Broadcast Burning is planned.

The Lower Johnson Project (thinning & piling) was completed last summer, these handpiles are located along Johnson Creek road, Wapiti Ranch, Cox Ranch, Bryant Ranch/ Johnson Creek Airstrip.

Hand Ignition for Lower Johnson should take about a week to complete, once those piles have been completed, the crews will relocate to Yellow Pine to burn the logging slash piles.

If you have any addition questions please contact Tim Dulhanty tdulhanty@fs.fed.us (208-382-7400) or myself at 208-382-7400 or send me an email.

– Thanks
James Bishop
Fuels AFMO
Boise National Forest
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Prescribed Burns planned for Fall 2018

Date Sept 19, 2018

The Krassel Ranger District, Payette National Forest is planning to implement prescribed burns in the Bald Hill and Four Mile project areas this fall. In the Bald Hill Project area we will be working in areas of Reegan Creek and Deadman Creek from the East Fork road up to Rainbow Ridge. In the Fourmile Project area we will be working on both sides of the South Fork, between Blackmare and Holdover Creeks on the west side of the river and in the Fourmile Creek drainage on the east side. See attached map for more specific areas. Ignitions will likely take place in September or October, dependent on weather and fuel conditions. Primary ignitions will take 1-3 days for each burn block, with residual smoke and flame present until the next significant rain. Please do not hesitate to give a call or email with questions, my contact information is lenelson@fs.fed.us or desk phone is 208-634-0622.

Thanks and have a nice day,

Laurel Ingram
Fuels Technician
Payette National Forest
Krassel Ranger District

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing a prescribed burn on the south facing aspect between Deadman Creek and Reegan Creek along the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River this fall. The edge of burn block E is about 5 miles west of Yellow Pine. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 1-3 days in September or October 2018.

(click here for larger image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622.

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing the Four Mile Prescribed fire project this fall. Ignitions may take place between Reed Ranch and Poverty Flat Camp Ground on both sides of the South Fork of the Salmon River. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 2 or more days in September or October.

(click here for larger image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622
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Yellowstone geyser barfs up ‘strange’ garbage dating back to the 1930s

Curators considered placing the items in the park’s archives as a reminder not to use the springs as a trash can.

Josh Hafner, USA TODAY (KTVB) October 9, 2018

A typically quiet geyser in Yellowstone National Park erupted last month, spewing water up to 30 feet in the air. Afterward, park employees found a slew of garbage surrounding its vent, including a Hamm’s beer can, a vintage pacifier, a shoe heel and dozens of coins.

Curators considered placing the items in the park’s archives as a reminder: Please, don’t use the springs as a trash can. The park posted a photograph of the “strange” items after last month’s eruption of the geyser called Ear Spring.

“Foreign objects can damage hot springs and geysers,” said the park. “The next time Ear Spring erupts we hope it’s nothing but natural rocks and water.”

continued:
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Rocky Mountain spotted fever

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt October 12, 2018 IME

Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a disease that affects dogs and humans in North America and South America. It is caused by bacteria called rickettsia, which is transmitted by ticks. This is why all veterinarians stress tick prevention in dogs.

The bacteria, or rickettsia, that causes this disease infects red blood cells, platelets and white blood cells. “Spotted fever” is the result of hemorrhages on the skin, much like measles, that occur as the blood-clotting mechanism is affected by low platelets. Platelets are necessary to stop skin hemorrhages, and the rickettsia destroys our platelets.

Besides “spots” on the skin, common clinical findings are fever and lethargy. Sometimes, joint and muscle pain and lameness occur. Rarely, seizures and neurological abnormalities occur. It’s all from a tick bite that contains this horrible rickettsia organism.

continued:
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Dog dies after ingesting chewing gum

WZTV by Kaylin Jorge Oct 10, 2018

Ashland City, Tenn. (WZTV) — A middle Tennessee family is sharing its heartbreak over the loss of their dog due to ingesting chewing gum.

Christy Figlio said her Husky mix Cannon was a 3-year-old playful pup who loved to eat. So when the Figlio’s noticed Cannon didn’t run right to his food Saturday night, they knew something might be wrong. Little did they know, that within 12 hours Cannon would be gone forever, poisoned from Xylitol, a sweetener found in low-sugar gum.

continued:
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Championship Sheepdog Trials

Oct 10, 2018 IME

The 2018 Championship Sheepdog Trials will be held on Oct. 12-13 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Oct. 14 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Quigley Canyon Fields in Hailey. The trails give spectators a chance to watch a high-finesse version of what border collies do on a working sheep ranch.

The competition challenges the dog, under the command of a handler, to move five sheep around panels at several locations on a field and then into a pen. The handler has to stand at one spot and give commands by voice and, when the dog’s farther away, by a whistle.

There’s a maximum time allowed to complete the tasks, though speed isn’t part of the competitors’ scores. Rather, the dogs are judged by how straight a line they can move the sheep in from one point to the next.

Big white dogs keep sheep safe

Guard dogs come from ancient breeds

Greg Moore Oct 10, 2018 IME

For many centuries in the Old World, large white dogs of various breeds have protected bands of sheep from predators. That tradition has been continued in the Wood River Valley.

Guard dogs used in the Western United States include the great Pyrenees from France and Spain, the akbash from Turkey, the maremma from Italy and the Polish tatra from Poland. They often reach 24-28 inches tall and weigh 100-130 pounds.

The most common breed in the Wood River Valley, whether pure-bred or in mixes, is the great Pyrenees. In their native France, they are “le chien de Montagne des Pyrenees” or “le chien des Pyrenees.”

continued:
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Central Idaho sheep ranchers persist amid change

By Mark Dee – 10/10/18 AP

Bellevue, Idaho — On a recent Friday morning in September, rancher John Peavey stood waiting outside Wood River Welding on Main Street in Bellevue. His flock, the 2,800 ewes of the Flat Top Sheep Co., was waiting, too, 10 miles south of town. Peavey’s trailer broke an axle hauling the metal piping of a portable corral to meet them for shearing, an annual rite of fall.

“The horses, the dogs, the sheep — they seem to get along without any extra effort,” he said. “It’s this mechanical stuff I’m not so sure about.”

Three weeks on from his 85th birthday, Peavey’s been in the sheep industry long enough to remember a time before all that.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Second week of October 2018
— — — — — — — — — —

Oregon eyes plan for managing wolves to protect livestock

10/13/18 AP

Pendleton, Ore. — Oregon officials are proposing a new framework for managing wolves that prey on livestock.

The East Oregonian reports that a possible deal emerged Tuesday that involves ranchers making clearly defined efforts to protect livestock and ward off wolves with non-lethal deterrents.

If ranchers follow those rules and still lose livestock to wolves, and the wolves meet the state’s definition of “chronic depredation,” ranchers can ask that the wolves be killed.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Education International

Newsletter Oct 12, 2018

Oregon to craft new proposal for managing wolves

How much would you pay to protect an endangered species?
— — — — — — — — — —

BLM captures 1,178 mustangs, removes 873 near Nevada-Idaho line

The agency ordered an emergency roundup because a large wildfire destroyed more than 600 square miles of rangeland.

Associated Press October 8, 2018


Photo: KTVB

Reno, Nev. — The U.S. Bureau of Land Management has completed the emergency capture of more than 1,000 wild horses on federal land in northern Nevada near the Idaho line.

The agency ordered the emergency roundup in the Owyhee complex in Elko and Humboldt counties because a large wildfire that broke out June 5 burned more than 600 square miles of rangeland, resulting in significant forage loss.

Bureau officials say they gathered a total of 1,178 mustangs and removed 873 they declared as “excess” between Sept. 21 and Oct. 4.

continued:


(photo Sinclair)
— — — — — — — — — —

Geese recovering after being shot with blow darts

by Haley Kramer Monday, October 8th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — Volunteers and workers from Idaho Department of Fish and Game are still trying to capture the ducks that were seen with blow darts in their heads and necks at Julia Davis Park.

Laurie Whittaker, a supervisor at the Ruth Melichar Bird Center says one goose has been caught, treated and released and two others are recovering.

“They had gone to the vet and had the darts removed. One was in the chest, one was in the shoulder,” Whittaker said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Groups want steelhead fishing closed in Idaho

10/11/18 AP

Lewiston, Idaho — Environmental groups that want Idaho to close steelhead fishing to protect wild steelhead have filed a 60-day notice of intent to sue.

The Lewiston Tribune reports in a story on Thursday that Idaho Rivers United, Friends of the Clearwater and others filed the notice.

The groups say fishing for hatchery steelhead leads to the incidental killing of some wild steelhead that are protected as threatened under the Endangered Species Act.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
October 12, 2018
Issue No. 887
Table of Contents

* NOAA Releases Preliminary 2018 Juvenile Salmonid Survival Estimates Through Columbia/Snake Dams
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441656.aspx

* Where Did Northern Pike In Columbia Basin Come From? Detection, Suppression Necessary To Slow Invasion
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441655.aspx

* Groups Issue Notice To Sue Over Steelhead Fishing In Idaho; Say Harming Wild Summer Steelhead, Violating ESA
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441654.aspx

* Study Looks At How Warmer Columbia/Snake Water Temps Affect Adult Salmonid Migration Timing, Survival
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441653.aspx

* Council Hears Update On Latest BPA Funding Reductions To Fish And Wildlife Program Projects
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441652.aspx

* IDFG Reaches Agreement With USFWS To Operate Hatchery Raising 1.6 Million Upper Salmon River Basin Steelhead
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441651.aspx

* Council Approves ‘Asset Management’ Plan Aimed At Maintaining 14 Basin Hatcheries, 1,041 Screens
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441650.aspx

* Federal Judge Denies Request To Reopen Deschutes River Clean Water Case
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441649.aspx

* Wood Fiesta: Yakama Nation Salmon Habitat Project Transports By Helicopter Logs To Streams
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441648.aspx

* Research: Reconnecting Side Channels Throughout Columbia River Basin Would Increase Rearing Capacity
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441647.aspx

* Council Looks At Resetting Budgets For Science Review Panels; Nominees Sought
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441646.aspx

* Fall Chinook Upriver Bright Forecast Gets Run-Size Boost, Still Far Below 10-Year Average
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441645.aspx

* Providing Water Cover For ESA-Listed Chum Salmon Redds Below Bonneville Dam Could Be Tough This Year
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441644.aspx

* Hanford Reach Fishing Derby To Provide Live Fall Chinook for Grant PUD Hatchery
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441643.aspx

* Canada Study Links Steelhead Life Cycle To Environment Factors, Pink Salmon Abundance
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441642.aspx

* Land-Locked Atlantic Salmon May Not Lose Navigation Skills; Concern If Escape Net Pens, Invade New Habitat
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441641.aspx

* Bonneville Power Administration Makes Annual U.S. Treasury Payment, $862 Million
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441640.aspx

* BiOp Operation: John Day Reservoir Level To Be Higher, Fluctuate Through December
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441639.aspx
———————–

Fish & Game News:

Idaho F&G commissioner gets backlash, calls to resign after hunting trip in Africa

by CBS 2 News Staff Friday, October 12th 2018

BOISE, Idaho (CBS 2) — An Idaho Fish and Game commissioner who emailed photos of himself posing with a family of baboons he shot and killed during a recent hunting trip in Africa has led to a group of former commissioners asking for his resignation.

According to emails and photos obtained by CBS 2 News through Gov. Butch Otter’s office, commissioner Blake Fischer emailed several pictures of his kills to numerous people highlighting his hunting trip.

The pictures received swift backlash.

continued (WARNING PHOTOS):
— — — — — — — — — —

Make the call to catch poachers, (800) 632-5999

Poaching Hotline (800-632-5999) available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

By Mike Demick, Conservation Information Supervisor
Thursday, October 11, 2018

With many hunting seasons underway, the Idaho Fish and Game asks the public to call the Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) hotline if they witness a violation of wildlife laws.

“Those who ‘Make the Call’ are instrumental in catching poachers stealing game and fish from the Idaho citizens,” said David Silcock, Idaho Fish and Game regional conservation officer based in Salmon. “Many poaching cases would not be detected, let alone, solved without the public’s extra eyes and ears.”

Callers to the hotline, 1-800-632-5999, can report wildlife law violations anonymously, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Cash rewards are available to callers who provide information leading to the citation of suspected wildlife law violators.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct. 10 is new opener for wolf trapping in some units

These changes were approved by the F&G Commission in August.

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Wednesday, October 10, 2018

Idaho Fish and Game Commission recently approved extending hunting and trapping seasons for wolves in many units, which will take place this year, but are not reflected in the 2017-18 Big Game Seasons and Rules booklet.

Units that have changes to the opening and closing dates are noted in red.

Wolf hunting season changes

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Pair of mountain lions caught brawling in road

Couple caught it on video

August 8, 2018 Local News 8

Yaak, Mt. – A couple traveling on a Montana road ran into something unexpected: a pair of mountain lions brawling in the middle of the street!

“My boyfriend and I were driving back to Troy from the Yaak to go to a rugby tournament,” the filmer wrote. “We were on the Libby side of the drive when these two mountain lions jumped about and were either playing or fighting in the road. They played for a couple minutes and then jumped over the guard rail and took off.”


source:
———————

Seasonal Humor:

LionHuntSlingshot-a
—————————–

Oct 7, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 7, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
October 8 Ed Allen for V. Co. Commissioner at The Corner 4p-6p
October 10 Diamond Fuel & Feed Fall delivery call (208) 382-4430
October 17 Ed Staub & Sons Fall Fuel delivery call (208) 634-3833
October 20 Dave Bingaman for V. Co. Commissioner at The Corner 430pm-630pm
November 1st week Amerigas Propane delivery call (208) 634-8181

(details below)
———-

Village News:

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.


— — — —

Local Fall Rx Burns

* Lower Johnson Thinning (95 acres): Is a project designed to reduce hazardous fuels within the WUI. This project is located approximately 7 miles south of Yellow Pine along NFS road 413 and Johnson Creek.

* Yellow Pine Blowdown (40 acres): is located approximately 62 miles from Cascade, Idaho and is adjacent to the community of Yellow Pine. Hand Ignitions will be used to ignite machine piles along NFS roads 412, 413.

The Cascade RD is planning to burn both the Lower Johnson Thinning and Yellow Pine Blow Down units this fall, both of these projects will be pile burning only NO Broadcast Burning is planned.

The Lower Johnson Project (thinning & piling) was completed last summer, these handpiles are located along Johnson Creek road, Wapiti Ranch, Cox Ranch, Bryant Ranch/ Johnson Creek Airstrip.

Hand Ignition for Lower Johnson should take about a week to complete, once those piles have been completed, the crews will relocate to Yellow Pine to burn the logging slash piles.

If you have any addition questions please contact Tim Dulhanty tdulhanty@fs.fed.us (208-382-7400) or myself at 208-382-7400 or send me an email.

– Thanks
James Bishop, Fuels AFMO, Boise National Forest
— — — —

Firewood Permits

Permits available May 15, 2018 through November 30, 2018 at The Corner.

Fuelwood permits have been reduced to $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum and a 10-cord maximum per household.

link to more info:

Stay Out Of Riparian Areas!

— — — —

Ice Hole Campground Closed

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
— — — —

Pests

No recent reports of bear activity, but they are still around fattening up for winter. Please do not leave pet food outside and secure your trash. Mice are looking for a warm place to winter. Colombian ground squirrels have gone into hibernation. Chipmunks had a population boom this summer. Pine squirrels are not as numerous as in past years.

Link to Video of Bear Visitor Aug 20, 2018
———-

Local Events:

Welch Labor Day Golf Tournament was Sept. 1st

The Labor Day golf tournament sponsors reported they raised: $700 for the fireworks fund; $225 to give to Cecil Dallman for snow plow work on local, un-maintained, roads; $225 to help develop the helicopter landing pad.
— — — — —

Wildland Firefighter Foundation Fund Raiser and Yellow Pine Community BBQ September 29

The 5EV Memorial Run was a success. Craig Utter, a former Heli-Rapeller from Krassel led the charge and won the race with Dan Booth from the McCall Smokejumpers coming in with a close second. A surprise appearance from the Payette National Forest Supervisor Keith Lannom was well received as he took third overall covering the entire 3.2 miles and 3100 vertical feet in less than an hour and a half. The fundraiser for the trail improvements and the Wildland Firefighter Foundation went off just as well. Midas Gold provided the Pig to be roasted and the Kyle to stay up all night to do the roasting, thank you very much. Donations were accepted with prizes that were provided by the Wildland Firefighter Foundation and other generous locals were raffled/auctioned off.

Thank you all.

With almost two thousand dollars raised, we will be making this an annual event to continue the support.

– MH

Pig Roast at The Corner

Photo by Dick Filler
— — — —

Fish Fry

Our Annual Fish Fry was a great success about 50 folks showed up for great food and visiting with friends and family. Thanks to Stu and Tom for the fish: cod, halibut and salmon. Also to the good job of the cooks Jeff, Ann, and Merle. And the great potluck dishes from the attendees.

Yellow Pine Tavern FB photo gallery link:

— — — —

Ed for Valley County Commissioner 2018

Ed Allen who is running for County Commissioner will be at The Corner tomorrow afternoon between 4-6 to discuss local issues with folks.

“In my opinion, local government management is about keeping the lights on, the roads open, citizens safe, and the schools supported. In addition, I believe citizens deserve fair and equitable treatment by a transparent and accountable government. I personally do not believe there is any room for party politics in county government,; therefore, I have decided to run for this position as an Independent. I thank you in advance for your support in November.”

Website: https://edforvalleycounty.com/about-ed-allen/
— — — —

Dave Bingaman For Valley County Commissioner District #3

Dave will be at The Corner on October 20th from 430pm-630pm for a happy hour meet and greet and to chat about Yellow Pine issues during his campaign for Valley County Commissioner.

“This is the man that will help preserve the Valley County we all know and love while allowing it’s citizen’s and community to prosper. This is Your Voice in Valley County and our New Generation of Leadership.”

Web is: http://davebingaman.com/
FB is Dave Bingaman for Valley County Commissioner
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

September Yellow Pine water update excerpts

The good news is the second sand filter is online and operating well. We have refurbished and upgraded the chlorinator and purchased new chlorine monitoring tools that will help us more accurately adjust the amount of chlorine injected into the water. Additionally, we received the $10,000 grant from Midas. We are looking at all options but it seems that for 2018 we must raise user fees a minimum of a $150 per year.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx

A report there will be a YPWUA meeting in October.

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting July 7, no minutes yet.
— — — —

VYPA News:

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 18th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th. Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.

Harmonica Festival 2018 Written Report Sept 8, 2018

2018 showed an overall increase in revenue up by $3,740.25 from 2017 as of August 7, 2018. This doesn’t include presale activity nor more bills to pay and credits from pay pal and advertising.

The Souvenir booth showed a total of $7,530 this year an increase of $1,212 over last year. Wristbands $895 with $400 paid out. The Auctions had a total of $5,263 an increase of $652. The Community Breakfast total was $2,549 an increase of $1,166. Bingo total was $109 a decrease of $41 a mix up on the schedule may have accounted for this loss. The Huff and Puff had $336 an increase of $4. Vendor fees were $620 down $672 from last year will have to revue this. Face painting was $134.30 an increase of $46.30. Wristband was $895 with net of $400 paid out. The Harmonica Workshop was $85 an increase of $25, The Crowdpleaser was $54 down $106 but had no one running this activity so did well considering. Sponsorship was $500 there are no figures on last yea this is pure profit. Square charges were 142.65 this year no figures on last year. The sound system was $1,325 the same as last year. Overall a good job by all!

The Souvenir Booth was run by Marj Fields with the booth manned by residents family and friends. The Auctions Silent and Live were headed up by Sherry Gordon with major assistance by Bill and Lorraine McIntosh in collecting Auction items. The Live Auction was run by Denny Ledford with great assistance of numerous family members. Community Breakfast was headed up by Kathy Hanggi with support of Lorinne Munn and a great crew of cooks and a bartender. Bingo was run by Lynn Imel. The Huff and Puff by Matt Huber. Face painting by Rhonda Rogers and Cindy Earl. The Children’s area and stage was managed by Dawn Brown and her brother, reports are favorable. Dan Stiff did a great job as announcer with assistance of Steve Malm. Joel Fields as treasurer kept up with us all, collecting the money, setting up the square. Deb Filler ran the workshop and Friends of the Festival. She also is continuing to maintain the website a vital part of our communication and organization. Thank you Deb.

With our huge increase in advertising headed up by Bill McIntosh we are thinking our increase in revenue was due to the advertising. At the Tavern I noticed a reasonable increase in sales so am grateful for that. We had Idaho Poster distribute 700 posters in the valley Sarah Unger designed our last poster and is working on next year’s poster as well. Radio and TV ads also went out and were noticed by many folks.

I have had many favorable comments by folks at the festival and beyond, so all in all I think it went well. We had a few issues with booth placement and porta potty placement and are working on that. We decreased the potties by 6 up town and feel that was acceptable. I feel we can also decrease the number among the campers by a few. The potties are our greatest expense so saving here would be good. The sound system had some issues we are working on and the band scheduling is getting some review. The Huff and Puff race may be expanded due to interest from the Pellegrini’s who are hoping to interest Fit Bit as a sponsor. Rhonda Rogers is interested in expanding the Children’s area. We are thinking of scheduling a few bands on the stage Thursday evening. We will be working on these ideas this winter and spring.

Please contact me if you want to be advised of our meetings or have further comments and ideas. Our next meeting will be October 21 at 10am at Deb Filler’s house. We will be posting requests for bands and volunteers in November on the Website. Further meetings will start in February.

Submitted by, Lorinne N. Munn, Yellow Pine Harmonica and Music Festival Chairman

Midas Gold and Yellow Pine

August 28, 2018

Attached is the Community Partnership Agreement the Village of Yellow Pine signed with Midas Gold.

link to: 2018 Community Partnership Agreement.pdf
— — — —

YPFD News:

There was a YPFD Commissioners Meeting October 6, no minutes yet.

Sept 22nd YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Sept. 30th Yellow Pine Times.

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

A lot of progress has been made on the new Helipad near the crossroads.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

– Fire Chief Jeff

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Open for summer (208) 633-3377
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern 633-2233

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
— — — —

The Corner 633-3325

We sell FS wood cutting permits.

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC

Buck Horn Outfitters in Idaho’s west Central Mountains in Units 25, 20 A, & 19 A. Providing Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Mountain lion, & Wolf Hunts. We offer Guided Rifle or Archery Hunts & Drop Camps. We are not about Quantity we are about providing Quality Hunts. My husband and I have been in the back country all our lives, we offer Deluxe camps with great food & our Guides know hunting, the back country and Stock.

Link to FB:
— — — —

Deadwood Outfitters

We’re currently interviewing for winter caretakers. A remote location and snowmobile only access in winter.
Duty services include:
Guest cabin up keep
Preparing meals
Keeping porches shoveled
And enjoying lots of solitude.
For more info. deadwoodoutfit @ gmail.com
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 1) overnight low of 30 degrees, damp and mostly cloudy this morning, slight breeze. Breezy after lunch time, cooler and mostly cloudy, high of 68 degrees. Northern flicker hanging around and one jay bird. Increased traffic this afternoon. Little pine squirrel packing a big pine cone. Overcast and nearly calm after sunset.

Tuesday (Oct 2) did not get below freezing overnight, early morning sprinkles around 6am. It was 50 degrees at 10am and overcast. Light rain at 1pm, dark overcast. Low clouds at 245pm – top of VanMeter socked in and still raining. Two northern flickers visiting the yard and ant pile. Rain ended around 5pm, high of 62 degrees. Breaks in the clouds at sunset. A few stars out before midnight.

Wednesday (Oct 3) overnight low of 39 degrees, damp and mostly clear this morning with a light breeze. Good air quality. Light traffic and no dust. Clear and sunny mid-day. Mild temperatures and lots of sunshine this afternoon, high of 68 degrees. Northern flicker visiting. High thin clouds before sundown. Doe on the side of the road this evening, big hawk flew through the yard and scared the chickens at sundown.

Thursday (Oct 4) did not go below 39F last night, early morning rain showers started at 515am (heavy until 6am) and still raining at sunup, low overcast – top of VanMeter and Johnson Creek ridge socked in. Ground is getting soft and pot holes filled with water. Steady rain to light sprinkles all morning until around 4pm, low clouds hiding the top of Golden Gate after lunch time, high of 43 degrees. Northern Flicker hanging out part of the day. Loose large brindle dog in the neighborhood early afternoon. Sound like folks are practicing their elk bugles this afternoon. Three little does on the side of the road early evening. Fresh snow on top of VanMeter this evening.

Friday (Oct 5) overnight low of 35 degrees, partly clear sky with mid-level fog on the mountains and light breeze. Streets are damp, pot holes full of water. Light traffic and no dust! Mostly cloudy by lunch time, chilly light breezes. Dark clouds all afternoon, but no rain, warmer than yesterday, high of 52 degrees. Quiet evening, dark before sunset. Rain after midnight, on and off during the night.

Saturday (Oct 6) stayed above freezing and rain on and off during the night, low overcast this morning – ridges socked in, and an occasional drop of rain. Great air quality. A little extra traffic this morning, pot holes full of water and no dust. Very light sprinkles on and off from around 1pm to about 230pm, chilly breezes and low clouds, high of 52 degrees. Thinner clouds by sunset.

Sunday (Oct 7) overnight low of 38 degrees, mostly cloudy this morning with foggy bottom clouds sitting on top of VanMeter, looks like snow on the peak. Good air quality. Heard a robin calling. We had 0.01″ of rain yesterday giving us a total of 0.93″ for the month of October – so far. Partly cloudy and warm sunshine early afternoon, light cool breezes, high of 59 degrees. Snow on top of VanMeter had melted by afternoon. Doe and 2 fawns (no spots) in the neighborhood after sunset.
———————–

Idaho News:

Walk-In flu vaccinations to continue this month

The Star-News October 4, 2018

Walk-in flu vaccination clinics for adults and children will be held at St. Luke’s Clinic – Family Medicine in McCall, New Meadows and Riggins this month. No appointment is necessary.

Clinic Schedule:

McCall – 9 to 4 p.m., Oct. 5, 8, 9, 10 15, 16
Riggins – 9 to 4 p.m., Oct. 9,
New Meadows – 9 to 4 p.m., Oct. 11

Insurance will be billed for those who have insurance.

Appointments for a flu vaccination can be scheduled through myChart, St. Luke’s electronic medical record account. Those without an account can sign up at http://stlukesonline.org

A yearly flu vaccine is your best bet against a variety of flu viruses. The Center for Disease Control recommends that everyone age six months and older, who do not have contraindications, receive the vaccine. Young children, pregnant women, people over age 65, and those with chronic health conditions are at highest risk of flu complications. But anyone can get the flu.

By getting vaccinated, you protect yourself and you avoid spreading the flu to people who might be more severely affected by the flu.

For more information call, 208-634-2225.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

McCall urges state to be ‘good neighbor’

Letter raps decision to allow cell tower near homes

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News October 4, 2018

The City of McCall has sent a letter to Gov. Butch Otter protesting the construction of a cell phone tower on state land near homes on Lick Creek Road

McCall Mayor Jackie Aymon signed the letter, which was approved by McCall City Council members during last week’s regular council meeting.

Aymon’s letter to Otter voiced residents’ worries about an Idaho Department of Lands decision to ignore the city’s zoning laws governing cell towers.

“While IDL has legally done nothing wrong…IDL is not operating under a ‘good neighbor’ philosophy,” the letter said.

Residents particularly lamented the decision to construct the tower about 100 feet from homes.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Sewer district to replace pressure lines along Warren Wagon

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News October 4, 2018

Sewer system upgrades along Warren Wagon Road were approved last week by the Payette Lakes Recreational Sewer and Water District board of directors.

At a special meeting, the board awarded a contract worth about $387,000 for the replacement of three original pressure sewer lines that had reached the end of their service life.

“If for some reason one of those lines were to fail, we’re on the hook for everything, including if it happens to get into the lake,” Sewer District Manager Dale Caza told board members at a recent meeting.

The work, which will be completed by next summer, was scheduled to take place at the same time as the current reconstruction of six miles of Warren Wagon Road.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Lake Cascade health warning still in effect

Levels of toxic algae begin to decrease

By Max Silverson for The Star-News October 4, 2018

A health advisory was still in effect this week over a bloom of blue-green algae in Lake Cascade despite decreased concentrations of toxic bacteria, Idaho Department of Environmental Quality officials said.

Two samples taken from Lake Cascade a week apart still show high enough concentrations to warrant a continued health advisory.

“Toxin results show the numbers are coming down,” DEQ Watershed Coordinator Chase Cusack said.

“We still have a lot of visible algae and the warmer temps seemed to breathe a bit of new life into the bloom,” he said. “We will hold off on pulling the advisory and continue monitoring.”

Another water sample will be taken from the lake this week, Cusack said.

The advisory was issued Sept. 7 and health officials have advised that humans and animals should stay out of the affected water.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Breadloaf Rock parcel for sale near Horseshoe Bend

An Idaho landmark is up for grabs.

KTVB October 2, 2018

Horseshoe Bend, Idaho — An Idaho landmark is up for grabs near Horseshoe Bend.

A 42-acre parcel, on which sits the famous Breadloaf Rock, has been listed for sale for $200,000.

Breadloaf Rock – which resembles a loaf of bread from which a single slice has been cut – has waned in fame in recent years. The landmark used to be easy to spot from the old Idaho 55, but is obscured from the new route.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Payette Land Trust opens online survey on perception

The Star-News October 4, 2018

The Payette Land Trust has posted an online survey to better understand public perception of the organization, its functions and priorities.

The online link is plt.questionpro.com and the survey will be open until Tuesday, Oct. 16.

The trust, which is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, is dedicated to conserving for future generations the scenic, agricultural, historic and wildlife values of Idaho.

The trust allows landowners to make arrangements such as restricting use of the land to logging or cattle grazing or preserving land as a wilderness or public recreation area. Landowners may also donate their land to a trust.

The short survey, which is expected to take 5 to 10 minutes to complete, will help the organization and its board of directors in the next strategic planning session.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

3 people dead after plane crash in southwest Idaho

10/1/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Authorities say three people died during a plane crash in a remote area of southwest Idaho.

The cause of Sunday morning plane crash remains unknown.

The plane went down between Reynolds Creek and Silver City in the Owyhee Mountains.

The Owyhee County Sheriff’s Office says a dog also died in the crash.

continued:
—————————

Scam Alert:

Voter registration phone scam hits Idaho

Steve Bertel Oct 2, 2018 KIVI TV

Boise – Idaho Secretary of State Lawerence Denney is warning Idahoans to beware of a voter registration phone scam.

Officials in two states have confirmed residents have received phone calls requesting personal information — while claiming to register them to vote. These calls are currently being investigated by both the FBI and Department of Homeland Security.

“Idaho does not allow voter registration by phone. Neither election officials nor legitimate voter advocacy groups will ever offer to register voters or mail out absentee ballots solely based on a phone conversation,” Denney said,

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Mining News:

Release of Midas Gold study pushed back

Draft environmental plan now expected in May

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News October 4, 2018

A draft environmental study of Midas Gold’s Stibnite Project will not be released until next May of 2019, the Vancouver, B.C., company announced this week.

The study, which is being conducted by the Forest Service, was originally expected to be completed by next March.

The delay will also postpone a draft decision until February 2020, delaying final approval for the project to that summer. Previously, the company had hoped for final approval by early 2020.

The updated timeline is the result of 107 additional information requests from agencies involved in the permitting process. So far, 103 of those requests have been fulfilled, with the final four expected to be complete this month, the news release said.

“We will continue to provide the highest quality and up-to-date scientific information to the Forest Service and other agencies for their review,” Midas Gold Corp. President and CEO Stephen Quin said.

Extra time was needed to allow for thorough review of new information submitted and to make any necessary tweaks to existing analysis, the news release said.

A public comment period will be opened following publication of the draft study. All comments will be considered prior to the final environmental study and draft decision.

Another brief public comment period will be held before a final decision is published.

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Midas Gold pitches cleanup via capitalism for Stibnite

Nicole Foy Oct 6, 2018 Idaho Press

Stibnite [Idaho] — Midas Gold has spent a decade and millions of dollars to convince Idaho that industry can fix the environment, but conservation groups are skeptical.

The Canadian mining company is in the federal permitting process to start open-pit mining along the Salmon River, east of McCall. Their target is the Stibnite Mining District and its 4.5 million ounces of gold and 100 million pounds of antimony, a metal used in batteries. But, company officials say, they’re committed to an extensive restoration plan that could repair damage done by past mining operations. Midas Gold estimates actual mining operations will last 15 years and they could be working in the area up to 25 years.

“We knew going into this that mining had a bad reputation,” said Laurel Sayer, president and CEO of Midas Gold Idaho. Sayer was previously the executive director of the Idaho Coalition of Land Trust, worked on natural resource issues for U.S. Rep. Mike Simpson and Sen. Mike Crapo, and helped get the Boulder-White Clouds designated as a protected wilderness area. “We will be restoring as we go. Because it’s a historic mining site, we knew that we had to be different.”

While Midas Gold works on federal approval, company officials are working a parallel track to win over community members. The company’s expensive and multiyear campaign to inform the public includes economic and environmental appeals to neighbors who have become self-taught scholars on extraction.

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Group cites central Idaho mine pollution in lawsuit

The Idaho Conservation League filed the lawsuit last month.

Keith Ridler Associated Press October 2, 2018

Boise — An environmental group has filed a federal lawsuit contending state officials are violating federal law by failing to prevent toxic discharge from the abandoned Triumph Mine in central Idaho.

The Idaho Conservation League in the lawsuit filed last month says Idaho officials are discharging arsenic and other pollutants from the former silver and lead mine into the East Fork of the Big Wood River in violation of the Clean Water Act.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1993 proposed adding the mine to the national Superfund list. But local residents fearing a drop in property values opposed the listing as did officials in Blaine County, which relies heavily on tourism.

Idaho then took over responsibility for the mine in a deal with the EPA. The mining company filed for bankruptcy.

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Zinke expected to OK block on mining claims near Yellowstone

By Matthew Brown – 10/4/18 AP

Billings, Mont. — U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has scheduled a visit next week to Montana, where he’s expected to finalize a proposal to block new mining claims on the forested public lands just outside Yellowstone National Park.

Zinke, a former Montana congressman, plans to sign documents and make a “major announcement” about conservation on Monday in the Paradise Valley area, Zinke spokeswoman Heather Swift said Thursday.

Swift declined to give further details except to say it was an issue Zinke had been working on for years.

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Public Lands:

Texas billionaires put up gate that could shut down popular public hunting road

Hunters worried about access

Roland Beres Oct 2, 2018 KIVI TV

Two Texas billionaires could throw a wrench in your hunting plans when the season opens next week.

The Wilks brothers own thousands of acres near a popular hunting area behind Bogus Basin and they’ve just installed a new gate that could restrict access to that public land.

Driving to that public hunting ground involves a scary trip … With huge drop offs …And a one lane dirt road.

But hunters love it.

“This is really popular. This is unit 39. It’s the closest unit to the Treasure Valley.” says Brian Brooks, Executive Director of the Idaho Wildlife Foundation.

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Permanent toilet completed at trailhead to Boulder, Louie lakes

By Max Silverson for The Star-News October 4, 2018

A permanent vaulted toilet has been installed at the Boulder Meadows trailhead, replacing temporary portable toilets.

The popular trailhead and camping site sits directly below Boulder Meadows Reservoir and provides access to Boulder Lake, Louie Lake and an extensive network of trails.

“Even though this trailhead is one of the most popular collection of hiking trails in Valley County, there were no restroom facilities and the area was hugely compromised with human waste,” Valley County Soil and Water Conservation District Representative Durena Farr said.

The need for a permanent toilet was brought to the attention of the district three years ago, when a board member was hiking in the area, Farr said.

Since that time, the district has funded portable toilets at the campsite as a short-term solution.

The project required the cooperation of several agencies, including the Idaho Department of Lands, and the Valley County road and recreation departments, Farr said.

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USDA Forest Service Boise National Forest SOPA Now Available

October 1, 2018

The Boise National Forest’s published “Schedule of Proposed Actions” (SOPA) report for October 1, 2018 through December 31, 2018 is now available on the Boise National Forest Schedule of Proposed Actions webpage. The Forest Service produces the published SOPA report every three months to keep the public informed about projects that the Forest is currently working on or planning to analyze in the near future.
https://www.fs.fed.us/sopa/forest-level.php?110402

The SOPA has been standardized across all National Forests from a national database to track key project planning information. The SOPA reports for the all National Forests are available at
https://www.fs.fed.us/sopa/

The Forest Service automatically posts the SOPA four times a year in January, April, July, and October.

If you have questions about a specific project please contact the project leader listed in the SOPA. If you have general questions about the SOPA, please feel free to contact me.

Sincerely,
Melissa Yenko
Forest Environmental Coordinator
Boise National Forest
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Boise National Forest visitors asked to participate in recreation surveys

Contact: Venetia Gempler Phone: (208) 373-4105

Boise, Idaho, Oct.3, 2018 — Beginning in October and continuing through next September, visitors to the Boise National Forest may see employees gathering information for the National Visitor Use Monitoring Program (NVUM). The program was developed to gather information about recreation sites along Forest Service roads. Employees will wear bright orange vests and be near a sign that says “Traffic Survey Ahead.” A similar survey was conducted five years ago.

The approximately 10 minute confidential surveys gather basic visitor information. Questions include: where they recreated on the Forest, how many people they traveled with, how long they stayed, what other recreation sites they visited, and how satisfied they were with the facilities and services provided. About a third of the visitors will be asked to complete a confidential survey on recreation spending during their trip.

“These well-trained interviewers will use the information about a visit to the national forest to help with forest planning and local community tourism planning,” said Danelle Highfill, Boise National Forest Recreation Program Manager. “It is entirely voluntary, and the information will indicate recreation trends over the years which improve facility development and economic benefit in our local area.”

Information gathered provides an estimate of how many people actually recreate on federal lands and what activities they engage in. It also includes how satisfied people were with their visit and the economic effect on the local economy.

This periodic on-going national forest survey was last conducted in 2014. The current survey updates information previously gathered and looks at recreation trends over time.

Information collected is used in local forest planning, at the state level, and even by Congress. The information helps managers provide better service.

“Although the survey is entirely voluntary, we sure would appreciate it if local and out-of-area visitors would pull up and answer a few questions,” Highfill added. Further information about this program is at: https://www.fs.fed.us/recreation/programs/nvum/
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Recreation on US land generates billions for western states

10/1/18 AP

Idaho Falls, Idaho — A new study from several wildlife-related groups has found that recreation on U.S. land administered by the Bureau of Land Management land contributes billions of dollars to western states’ economies.

The study by Southwick Associates was done on behalf of The Pew Charitable Trusts, Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, Wildlife Management Institute, Trout Unlimited, Archery Trade Association and the American Fly Fishing Trade Association.

The Post Register newspaper in Idaho Falls, Idaho reports the study found that wildlife-related recreation on the land in 12 western states generates more than $3 billion in economic activity. That figure includes about 26,500 jobs, $1 billion in salaries and wages and $421 million in federal, state and local tax revenue.

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Interior Secretary Zinke visits Grand Teton National Park, discusses infrastructure

By Katie Keleher Oct 06, 2018 Local News 8

Grand Teton National Park (KIFI/KIDK) – U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke made a stop in Grand Teton National Park this morning to discuss a variety of topics, from forest management to park infrastructure.

Zinke says he is looking to the next 100 years as he makes plans for parks and lands in the U.S. A big topic of the day was park infrastructure. Grand Teton National Park has a $200 million maintenance backlog. There’s a nearly $12 billion backlog for all the national parks. Zinke introduced a bill that has received bipartisan support to fix infrastructure in the parks.

“Our parks are being loved to death,” Zinke said. “We want to make sure that the visitor experience remains as it was when I grew up, as what the public expects, which is five-star, making sure the trail systems are well maintained, the bathrooms are clean and the environment behind us is protected in perpetuity.”

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USFS Regional Intermountain News

Volume 2 Issue 13 October 1, 2018

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Fire News:

Note: This is the last Fire Update for 2018 unless something significant occurs. Will send out any updates on Rx Burns scheduled for this fall.
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Wildfire risk has gone down but hasn’t gone away

Frankie Katafias Oct 5, 2018 KIVI TV

Nampa, Idaho – With temperatures beginning to cool down and Fall starting just a few weeks ago it’s only natural to assume we’re out of fire season. Today, the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, Idaho spoke to 6 On Your Side about this past fire season and why fire season has been renamed “fire year”.

Fire season has been re-named “fire year” due to the fact fire weather can start in January and end approximately in December. The National Interagency Fire Center encourages Idahoans to adopt this new term.

… While the risk for fires has gone down, officials say it hasn’t gone away. How does this affect Idahoans? For anyone recreating across the state keeps in mind that cooler temperatures do not mean lower fire risks, “those that are out hunting and recreating this time of year…still be careful with campfires or your recreation vehicles” because they can still pose a serious risk says the National Interagency Fire Center Public Affairs spokesperson, Christine Schuldheisz.

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BAER Plan approved for Mesa Fire on the Payette National Forest

Date: September 24, 2018
Contact: Sandra Dingman 208-634-0435 or Brian Harris cell: (208) 634-6945

McCall, Idaho – The Mesa Fire burned 34,719 acre east of Council, Idaho, including lands in the Payette National Forest. Even before the fire was contained on August 25, 2018 a team of Forest Service specialists were conducting field assessments to prescribe burned area emergency response (BAER) treatments. BAER is a specific effort to reduce further damage due to the land being temporarily exposed in a fragile condition. Loss of vegetation exposes soil to erosion; water runoff may increase and cause flooding; sediment may move downstream and damage houses or fill reservoirs, putting habitat and community water supplies at risk. The BAER program is designed to address these situations through the key goals of protecting life, property, water quality, and deteriorated ecosystems.

Led by West Zone Hydrologist Melanie Vining, the Mesa Fire BAER Team used satellite imagery of the burned area to classify the landscape into low, moderate, and high burn severity. Of the total burned area, there were 14,856 acres of low severity, 15,222 acre of moderate severity, and 1,078 acres of high severity within the burned area. The burned area was initially classified using the satellite imagery and adjustments in classification were made based on ground surveys resulting in a final soil burn severity map. The entire burned area was mapped, though the field work and treatments are limited to only the 16,560 acres of burned area on the Payette National Forest. Soil burn severity information was also shared with other agencies, including Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), and the National Weather Service. A BAER Plan with treatments totaling $73,042 has been approved to be implemented over the next 12 months using federal dollars on federal lands. The planned treatments are briefly described below.

The field assessment found Cottonwood Creek to be an area of concern for post-fire watershed effects as approximately 30% of the subwatershed burned with moderate to high severity and there are private lands and structures downstream at risk of post-fire flooding. Information has been provided to the private landowners and adjacent federal lands so they can make informed decisions based on this new threat. To provide for public safety along NFS Road 50199 (Cottonwood Creek Road), it will remain closed this winter under a temporary closure order that is currently in effect and travelers are directed to use an alternate route (Forest Road 50165) to access FS lands east of the drainage. Additionally, road treatments to be implemented on Cottonwood Creek Road to protect it from damage due to increased runoff common in a post-fire environment include: grade the roadway to prevent road capture of increased runoff; clean ditches to reduce the potential of cross drainage culverts plugging; reduce imminent hazards by removing hazardous downfall and rocks along road, in-slope ditch and protect the road template by installing 12-16 dips below culverts at all minor drainages and a large armored dip below Wood Gulch on the NFS Road 50199. In addition, there is a treatment to protect the road template on NFS Road 50591 (White Licks Road) by installing 6-8 dips below culverts at minor drainages and below cross drains. In addition, the Forest Service will patrol and monitor the Cottonwood Creek and Cabin Creek roads for expected rollout and removal of material blocking road drainage until winter closes the road and as soon as snow melts in the spring.

Significant portions of two National Forest System (NFS) trails exist within the burned area: 4.35 miles of Trail 332 (Sheep Creek) is a 2-wheel motorized trail within the burned area, and all 1.68 miles of Trail 203: (Warm Springs) is a non-motorized trail. The lowest section (approximately 0.25 mi.) of Trail 332 lies on private land with an existing easement, consisting of a 10 ft. right of way and 0.16 acre parking area, and this area also burned. Under the BAER Plan, emergency trail work will be accomplished next spring and early summer prior to mid- and late- summer thunderstorms (excepting that trail burned area warning signs will be places as soon as possible). Treatments are to: clear trails impacted by fire of trees and rocks, repair drainage, and reconstruct tread only where needed to provide access to emergency treatment sites; replace and install water diversions structures to accommodate additional runoff and reduce potential for trail washouts prior to the spring runoff; and monitor effectiveness of emergency treatments after each damage-producing storm events and during the first snowmelt runoff.

The potential for post-fire spread of noxious weeds is greatest in Wood Gulch and north of Cottonwood Creek where there were known weed populations prior to the fire, as well as along dozer and handlines built during fire suppression and repaired over the past month. The exposed soil and abundant nutrients following fire set up a condition for increased weed growth and spread. The invasion of noxious weeds is likely to alter soil stability, nutrient cycling, wildlife habitat, and fire regimes with consequences for long-term ecological diversity and stability. The BAER plan includes treatment of selected burned areas and fire-suppression damaged areas within or adjacent to source weed populations in the fall of 2018, spring of 2019, fall of 2019, to prevent the expansion of State of Idaho listed noxious weeds including rush skeletonweed, Canada thistle, houndstongue, spotted knapweed, Scotch thistle, field bindweed and invasive non-listed weeds including Bull thistle, Common mullein, common tansy, Sulphur cinquefoil and St. Johnswort.

Continued livestock grazing would have an immediate adverse effect on range condition, both short-term and long-term. Cattle that were pushed out of the fire area immediately returned, though cattle will be continuously pushed out of the area for the remainder of the 2018 season. Research has shown that bluebunch wheat grass and Idaho fescue should receive rest post-fire. The BAER treatment is to remove livestock grazing from the high soil burn severity areas (Cottonwood Creek, Wood Gulch, Cookhouse Gulch, Arbuckle Basin and portions of the Middle Fork of the Weiser River) for one grazing season, until approximately October 15, 2019; this will be accomplished through riding to push cattle out of these areas as they are allowed to graze the adjacent allotment. At this time, vegetation condition and recovery will be evaluated to see if livestock grazing can resume or if additional rest is needed for another growing season. The Forest botanist, soil scientist, and Zone range specialist will conduct a field visit in the spring of 2019 to determine this. This would allow native vegetation to recover and help prevent soil erosion and the spread of noxious weeds and new infestations.

While the BAER program does not prescribe treatments on non-federal lands, the assessment and hydrologic risk analysis can be useful to adjacent and downstream landowners to inform their own range of possible treatments. The Mesa BAER team continues to share information with Adams County officials, the National Weather Service, and the Natural Resource Conservation Service who in turn coordinate with affected landowners.

Mesa Fire Burn Severity Map

Wood Gulch upstream of Cottonwood Creek confluence showing post fire erosion. USFS photo.

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Initial BAER Plan approved for Rattlesnake Creek Fire

Date: September 28, 2018
Contact: Sandra Dingman 208-634-0435 or Brian Harris cell: (208) 634-6945

McCall, Idaho – The Rattlesnake Creek fire, southwest of Riggins, Idaho, is a human caused fire that has burned since July 23, 2018 on lands managed by the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests and Payette National Forest, the Bureau of Land Management, the Idaho Department of Lands, and privately owned land. The initial BAER assessment has already been completed so that BAER treatments can be implemented even while fire suppression personnel work to secure the fire perimeter.

The fire remains as an active fire incident as it is not yet fully contained due to fire activity in areas that are steep, rugged and difficult to access on the Payette National Forest. However, fire suppression resources are still engaged with the fire and taking action where they can be effective. The Rattlesnake Creek Fire BAER Team used satellite imagery of the burned area to classify the landscape into low, moderate, and high burn severity. Of the total burned area, there were 3,030 acres of low severity, 1,551 acres of moderate severity, and 89 acres of high severity (approximately 1 percent of the entire fire area). The burned area was initially classified using the satellite imagery and adjustments in classification were made based on ground surveys resulting in a final soil burn severity map. The entire burned area was mapped and those numbers are listed above, though the field work and treatments are limited to only the 7,049 acres of burned area on National Forest lands. Soil burn severity information was also shared with other agencies, including Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), and the Idaho Department of Lands. An initial BAER Plan with treatments totaling $38,163 has been approved to be implemented over the next 12 months using federal dollars on National Forest System lands.

Post-fire emergency stabilization treatment objectives are to mitigate and protect, to the extent possible, threats to personal injury or human life of forest visitors and Forest Service employees. Another objective is to protect and minimize damage to National Forest System investments.

The field assessment on the Rattlesnake Creek Fire found that the primary post-fire damages that are expected to occur are the damage to trail prisms as a result of post-fire watershed effects in areas of moderate soil burn severity and the loss of native plant communities due to invasion by noxious weeds.

Work is approved to protect the trail tread of 3 miles of established National Forest System Trails, namely #178 Rapid River Ridge, 3185 Trail Creek, #350 Campbell’s Cow Camp Bypass, #181 Cow Camp, and #327 Fall Creek. Treatments include efforts to construct or clean waterbars, check dams, and grade dips to aide in the removal of excess water from the trail prism and build land retention/retaining structures out of native materials to meet Forest Service specifications consistent with the trail type. Forest Service employees will strive to remove hazardous fire weakened trees that pose a threat to crews working in the area and forest visitors; however crews will not be able to mitigate all hazards in the burn area. To that end, warning signs will be posted near the burn area and developed recreation sites to warn of the possible dangers associated with a burned area. The signs will specify hazards to be aware of when entering a burn area such as falling trees and limbs, rolling rocks, and flash floods.

To protect native, and naturalized plant communities from noxious weeds on National Forest System lands increased weed treatment efforts have been funded. If new noxious weed infestations are detected, they are treated as necessary using an early detection and rapid response approach. Any known noxious weed populations that have potential to spread due to fire suppression activities will be monitored and treated. Approximately 1,615 acres are targeted for monitoring and treatment during Fall 2018 and Spring 2019.

Rattlesnake Fire burn severity and BAER treatments

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Federal officials to expand Pocatello air base

10/3/18 AP

Pocatello, Idaho — Federal officials are expanding a firefighting air base in eastern Idaho.

The air base at the Pocatello Regional Airport is busier than ever, as its traditional service area has spread further into Wyoming, Oregon and Nevada, officials said.

Just this Monday, a pair of DC-10 air tankers, which carry up to 9,400 gallons (35,582 liters) of retardant, launched from the air base to help contain a fire in Elko, Nevada, said Robert Barnes, an aviation officer with the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S Forest Service.

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Lyle Springs Fire started by unattended campfire

Oct 02, 2018 Local News 8

Island Park, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – UPDATE 10/2/18: U.S. Forest Service officials report the Lyle Springs Fire was started on Sept. 18 due to an unattended campfire.

It was less than one mile south of Harriman State Park and less than one mile west of Pinehaven subdivision when the firefighters got it corralled.

The fire was pushed by the wind that fanned the flames into the tops of the trees and under the trees through the grass.

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Brush fire started by lawn mower

Oct 01, 2018 Local News 8

Fort Hall, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – A brush fire on the north side of ‘No Name’ road in Fort Hall threatened residential homes on the west side of the fire around 1:00 p.m. Monday.

Officials report the fire was contained in the field where it started and burned about 5 acres.

There were no injuries or loss of property.

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Critter News:

MCPAWS to host Tails on Trails, Oktoberfest Saturday

The Star-News October 4, 2018

MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter will host a race for canines and their human companions as well as a live music festival on Saturday to raise money for the animal shelter.

The activities will kick off with the dog-friendly Tails on Trails 5K fun run at 9 a.m. at Brundage Mountain Resort.

Registration is $35 for adults and $25 for youth under 21. The race fee includes a long-sleeved T-shirt, goodie bag and registration for Oktoberfest later that day.

Race registration is available at http://ultrasignup.com by searching for “Tails on Trails At Brundage”.

The festivities will continue with Oktoberfest from noon to 6 p.m. at the Alpine Village. The event will feature live music by Bottom Line Band and the Treasure Valley Musik Meisters as well as a costume contest, raffle, craft goods, activities for children and food and drinks.

Entry fee is $10 and includes a free beer and event koozie. Raffle tickets are $5 and may be purchased at the event.

Alpine Village is located at 616 N. Third St. in McCall.

All proceeds will benefit the dogs and cats at the MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter. For more information on the shelter and the day’s activities, visit http://mcpaws.org

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Annual “See Spot Walk” fundraiser takes over Julia Davis Park

Jessica Taylor Oct 6, 2018 KIVI TV

You might have seen a few thousand muddy paw prints along the Greenbelt in Julia Davis Park today.

Pups and their owners trotted around the park for the annual “See Spot Walk” fundraiser this morning. Dogs of every shape and size played together, while their human counterparts helped raise awareness for shelter animals and raise money for the Idaho Humane Society.

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Pet talk – Three-legged dogs and cats

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt October 5, 2018 IME

Limb amputation is the removal of a portion of a limb. Dogs and cats, in general, function extremely well following limb amputations as three-legged pets. Poor candidates for limb amputation are obese dogs, very large-breed dogs and dogs with orthopedic or neurologic conditions that affect multiple limbs.

Amputations are performed for numerous reasons, especially trauma, cancer and infection to a leg that cannot be treated with routine treatments. Neurologic damage such as paralysis to one or more nerves to the leg can make the leg nonfunctional. Some severe bone infections rarely don’t respond to antibiotics and may warrant limb amputation. In cases of bone cancers, amputation is done to relieve pain, but bone cancers commonly metastasize to the lungs, so amputation is usually not curative.

Amputation of the front leg is usually performed by removing the whole leg along with the shoulder blade. Amputation of the rear leg is usually performed at the mid-thigh. These surgical approaches result in a more cosmetic appearance. Unfortunately, prosthetic devices generally work poorly in our domestic pets.

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Test results show 5 wolf pups died from skin disease

AP Oct 02, 2018

Jackson, Wyo. (AP) – Test results show that a litter of deceased wolf pups that were found south of Jackson this summer died primarily from a skin disease commonly known as mange.

Wyoming Game and Fish Department wolf biologist Ken Mills says the final diagnosis for the five dead wolf pups was severe scabies, with associated cutaneous yeast infection and severe emaciation.

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Washington kills another wolf that preyed on cattle

by AP Monday, October 1st 2018

Spokane, Wash. (AP) — The state of Washington has killed a second wolf from a pack that has been preying on cattle in Ferry County.

The Department of Fish and Wildlife says a marksman shot an adult female wolf on Friday.

The wolf is from the Old Profanity Territory pack that has repeatedly attacked cattle in the Kettle River Range.

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Wolf Watch

By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online

9/5/18: Wolf News Roundup 9/5/2018
(By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online!) A male wolf from the Togo pack in Washington has been removed by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife for repeated depredations on area livestock. The pack’s territory is just south of the US-Canada border east of Danville. The wolf was collared, which provided location data. The killing of the wolf was controversial and opposed by environmental groups who went to court to stop the removal. Wolf managers have confirmed the pack’s involvement in six separate depredation incidents since November 2017. In Oregon, increasing wolf populations causing depredations on livestock have concerned groups getting together to talk about wolf management…… (Click on the link above for the complete story.)

9/4/18: Elk antlers as predator deterrents
(By University of Montana) University of Montana researchers and their partners recently published a study in Nature Ecology and Evolution chronicling an evolutionary tie between wolves and when bull elk shed their antlers. They discovered that wolves in Yellowstone National Park preferentially hunted bulls who already had shed their antlers over those who still had them during late winter. The finding suggests that antlers are used for more than just competing for cows – that they help deter predators, too – which could help explain why bulls shed their antlers long after the rut. But as a whole, elk shed their antlers months later compared to other North American deer species, and shedding is staggered over a two month period beginning in March, suggesting there might be other reasons to keep antlers around a little longer….. (Click on the link above for the complete story.)

9/22/18: Wolf News Roundup 9/22/2018
(By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online!) The hunting season for wolves in the trophy game area of northwestern Wyoming opened Sept. 1. According to the Wyoming Game & Fish Department, eight wolves have been harvested as of September 21. The agency set a total quota of 58 wolves in the state’s 14 hunt areas for wolves. There have also been 21 wolves killed in Wyoming’s predator zone so far in 2018…. (Click on the link above for the complete story.)

9/25/18: Wolves headed to Isle Royale
(By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online!) The National Park Service (NPS) announced Friday the beginning of implementation of the Record of Decision of the Plan to Address Wolf Presence on Isle Royale National Park that was signed in June. This fall, the NPS working with partners and other agencies, plans to translocate up to six wild wolves from the mainland to Isle Royale National Park during the first phase of a three to five year effort to relocate up to 20-30 wolves to the isolated island park. This many wolves are needed to establish adequate genetic variability to accomplish the overall goal of restoring predation as a key part of the ecosystem on the island…. (Click on the link above for the complete story.)
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter October 1, 2018

Wolves kill guard dog at SW Oregon ranch

Global Distribution of Alveolar and Cystic Echinococcosis

ESA Bill Amendment Proposal to Require Public Availability of Science and Litigation Costs

Newsletter October 3, 2018

Ranchers Face Wolves at the Gate

Confirmation of Echinococcus canadensis G8 and G10 in Idaho Gray Wolves (Canis lupus) and Cervids.

California Wolf Attacks on Livestock Increase as Packs Grow

Echinococcus in wild canids in Québec (Canada) and Maine (USA)

Cystic Echinococcosis in Spain: Current Situation and Relevance for Other Endemic Areas in Europe

Newsletter October 5, 2018

U.S. House Subcommittee Passes Wolf Delisting Bill
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Environmentalists want grizzlies in Central Idaho

Fish and Game disappointed about re-listing

Oct 3, 2018 KIVI TV

Boise, Idaho – Last week a federal judge in Montana ruled that the population of grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem is not enough to justify last year’s removal of protection from the Endangered Species Act.

One of the plaintiffs, says the 700 or so Yellowstone grizzlies comprise a fraction of the species’ historic population.

“Grizzly bears still only occupy less than five percent of their historic range,” said Andrea Santarsiere of the Center for Biological Diversity. “Yellowstone grizzly bears are completely isolated from any other grizzly bear population, and that’s just not recovery under the Endangered Species Act.”

Last week’s ruling effectively stopped hunts for grizzly bears in Idaho and Wyoming.

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Grizzly weekend in NW Wyoming

Oct 01, 2018 Local News 8

Cheyenne, Wyo. (KIFI/KIDK) – Wyoming Game and Fish personnel report multiple incidents involving grizzly bear and humans in the northwest corner of the state last weekend.

At least four grizzly bears occupied a corn maze near Clark. Three grizzlies were frequenting a residential area near Wapiti. They were snacking on pet food and were seen trying to enter the back door of an occupied house.

Other incidents involved bear spray being deployed by people dealing with aggressive-acting bears. In another case, hazing and aversive conditioning techniques were used to resolve a conflict.

continued:
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Bear, cubs kill worker at remote silver mine owned by Idaho company

By Becky Bohrer, Associated Press Tuesday, October 2nd 2018

Juneau, Alaska (AP) — A female bear and her two cubs mauled and killed a young man working at a remote mine site on a southeast Alaska island with one of the highest bear densities in the state, authorities said Monday.

Anthony David Montoya, 18, a contract worker from Hollis, Oklahoma, died at a remote drill site accessible only by helicopter, according to Hecla Greens Creek Mine and authorities. Mine officials said workers receive training on how to deal with bears because of the large number in the area.

Alaska State Troopers said Montoya was mauled by the three bears, all of which were killed before they arrived. It was not immediately clear who killed them.

Montoya worked for Idaho-based Timberline Drilling, which provides core drilling services at Greens Creek, the mine said in a release. His body was being taken to the state medical examiner’s office for an autopsy.

continued:
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Multiple ducks and geese found in Julia Davis Park with blow darts in faces, necks

by CBS 2 News Staff Thursday, October 4th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — Warning, some may find the following material disturbing.

Multiple ducks and geese were found in Julia Davis Park with blow darts impaling their faces and necks.

A photographer Brian Rodenspiel saw the ducks Wednesday night.

Idaho Fish and Game are at the park trying to catch the injured birds.

continued:
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Amended sage-grouse plan out for comment

Oct 04, 2018 Local News 8

Ogden, Utah (KIFI/KIDK) – A 90-day public comment period opened Thursday on a Draft Environmental Impact Statement on management plans for greater sage-grouse in the west. The plans will affect Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah.

The plan is aimed at improving the clarity, efficiency, and implementation of greater sage-grouse plans, including promoting landscape-scale alignment with state efforts.

The bird has faced a variety of threats, including the loss of habitat to wildfire and invasive weeds. Federal management plans were amended in 2015 in an effort to keep the species from being listed as “threatened” under the Endangered Species Act. But, the federal agencies contend new science and management details emerged and will be incorporated into revised plans.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

F&G: Deer and elk hunters should have food luck this season

By Andrew Weeks The Star-News October 4, 2018

Hunters going afield for deer and elk this fall may have a good chance of bringing home some food for the freezer.

The forecast for this fall is that hunters should experience “fair to excellent deer and elk hunting,” Idaho Department of Fish and Game spokesman Roger Phillips said.

That’s good news statewide, including for the McCall region. The local perspective is that hunters should have better opportunities this fall than last year.

“In general things are looking pretty good,” said Regan Berkley, regional wildlife manager with the McCall F&G office.

Elk and whitetail deer populations around McCall will likely see improved mule deer numbers.

Mother Nature has been tougher on mule deer than whitetail deer and elk, “but hunters should expect to see a modest increase this fall” as upward trends continue, Phillips said.

continued:
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Please buy your deer tags early; nonresident general deer tags sold out, whitetail tags available

General any-weapon deer season opens Oct. 10 in most areas

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Monday, October 1, 2018

Please don’t wait until the last minute to buy your hunting license and deer tags. Fish and Game is anticipating high volumes of sales immediately before the opening day of deer season on Oct. 10. Avoid the long lines and potential wait by buying your tags early.

Nonresident general deer tags have sold out, but nonresident/second whitetail deer tags remain. You can see how many remain on the nonresident tag sales page, but beware it’s only updated once per week, so it may not reflect the actual number of tags available. Nonresident elk tags sold out in late September.

Here are your buying options for hunting licenses and tags. If you choose to purchase online or by phone, please remember to allow seven to 10 business days for your tags to arrive. The license will be immediately available as a PDF.

continued:
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Check your licenses and tags for fading, and here’s what to do if they’re faded

New printers and new paper are the source of fading Fish and Game licenses and tags.

By Staff Writer
Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Hunters and anglers who have poorly printed licenses and fading tags can get a replacement tag or license free of charge.

Idaho Fish and Game is providing a couple ways for sportsmen and women to get new copies.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Please don’t call police about ‘drunk’ birds, department says

The Gilbert Police Department put out a press release this week stating they are well aware of the birds that appear to be “under the influence” and there’s no need for alarm.

KARE 11 Staff October 4, 2018

Police in northern Minnesota are asking the public to please stop calling them about the influx of “drunk” birds flying around. Yes, you read that correctly.

The Gilbert Police Department put out a press release this week stating they are well aware of the birds that appear to be “under the influence” and there’s no need for alarm.

Apparently, the birds have been eating berries that have fermented much earlier than usual — thanks a lot, early frost! — and since many have not migrated south yet, they’re flying around the town, or more accurately, flying into windows, cars and yes, generally speaking “acting confused,” the department said.

This has caused the interesting and strange occurrence of drunken birds to seem more prevalent than previous years.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

HuntingSeason3-a
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Tips & Advice:

McCall Fire & EMS to note Fire Prevention Week next week

The Star-News October 4, 2018

McCall Fire & EMS will note Fire Prevention Week next week by encouraging residents to “Look. Listen. Learn.”

The fire district and the National Fire Protection Association promotes the week to educate the public about basic but essential ways to quickly and safely escape a home fire.

Statistics show that the number of U.S. home fires has been steadily declining over the past few decades, according to the association.

However, the death rate per 1,000 home fires that are reported to fire departments was 10 percent higher in 2016 than in 1980.

“We know that people often make choices in fire situations that jeopardize their safety or even cost them their lives,” McCall Firefighter/Paramedic Jon Metz said.

This year’s “Look. Listen. Learn.” campaign highlights three steps people can take to help quickly and safely escape a fire:

• Look for places fire could start.

• Listen for the sound of the smoke alarm.

• Learn two ways out of every room.

While NFPA and McCall Fire & EMS are focusing on home fires, these fire safety messages apply to virtually anywhere.

“No matter where you are, look for available exits,” Metz said. “If the alarm system sounds, take it seriously and exit the building immediately.”

For more information, call 208-634-7070 or go to http://firepreventionweek.org

source:
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Tips for fire prevention month

By Brady Halbleib Oct 02, 2018 Local News 8

Pocatello, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Are you going to burn your house down this fall?

October is Fire Prevention Month, and there are many things you can do from within your own home to ensure your own safety and prevent that from happening.

Each home is different from the next, therefore fire evacuation plans and where you place your fire extinguisher and smoke alarms will vary from home to home.

Having a comprehensive safety guide will not only save your home from fire damage, but it can also save your life.

continued:
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Sept 30, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 30, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
October 6 YPFD Commissioners Meeting 10am YP Community Center

(details below)
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Village News:

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Dear Village of Yellow Pine Members:

I hope that everyone has read the message on the Yellow Pine Times regarding the WOODY DEBRIS pile from our Valley County Commissioner, Gordon Cruickshank. If you missed it here it is.

The Yellow Pine and Warm Lake Transfer sites are seeing other material deposited into the Woody Debris pile which violates our agreement with the Forest Service to have the Woody Debris allowed to be there. The Valley County Commission is requesting from the folks in Yellow Pine to help police the Transfer site. Valley County and/or Lakeshore employees are working to clean up the site this fall. To avoid losing the Woody Debris Transfer Site I am asking for your help. The Forest Service will continue to burn once the NON-Woody Debris is removed.

Other items being left on site is also not in our agreement. The bins provided by Lakeshore are for Household Waste. Furniture and appliances left require additional cost and is not in our agreement. Please clean up this issue. Thank you for attending to this matter.

– Gordon Cruickshank, Valley County Commissioner

Losing the Transfer Station would truly be an inconvenience to all of us. The Village Council received many great suggestions from residents for resolving this issue. So, the Village Council is working on putting these suggestions in place:

* Getting the current problem cleaned up (while the transfer stations outside the VYPA area of responsibility, the Council agrees it affects all residents.}

* In addition to cleaning up the current problem, the following is in the works:

– Better signage to give everyone clearer information on what goes where in the Transfer Station.

– Educational Material for all current and future residents.

– Prevention Strategies to keep the problem from happening in the future.

The Council is hopeful that all residents will help us keep our Transfer Station in good condition.

All questions and suggestions should be sent by email to the Village Council Members below:

Kathleen Hall 75hallker @ att.net
Ronda Rogers
Lynn Imel
Deb Filler fillerd2 @ live.com


Note to Share Re: Transfer Station

Sept 27, 2018

Today the transfer station was cleaned by some anonymous YP residents.

There is now a pile of cardboard boxes, a pile of construction wood and furniture wood, a pile of sofas and recliners, an area with appliances, and a pile of “yard debris”. Lynn Imel is working on having the piles loaded and hauled out with the exception of the “yard debris”.

Photos (courtesy Ann F):

20180927YellowPineTransferStation-a
Yellow Pine Transfer Station

20180927YellowPineTransferStation2-a
Construction debris, furniture and appliances to be hauled out

20180927YellowPineTransferStation3-a
Cardboard pile to be hauled out

20180927YellowPineTransferStation4-a
Burn pile – Woody Debris ONLY!!
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The Cascade Ranger District has temporarily closed Ice Hole Campground

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
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Local Fall Rx Burns

* Lower Johnson Thinning (95 acres): Is a project designed to reduce hazardous fuels within the WUI. This project is located approximately 7 miles south of Yellow Pine along NFS road 413 and Johnson Creek.

* Yellow Pine Blowdown (40 acres): is located approximately 62 miles from Cascade, Idaho and is adjacent to the community of Yellow Pine. Hand Ignitions will be used to ignite machine piles along NFS roads 412, 413.

The Cascade RD is planning to burn both the Lower Johnson Thinning and Yellow Pine Blow Down units this fall, both of these projects will be pile burning only NO Broadcast Burning is planned.

The Lower Johnson Project (thinning & piling) was completed last summer, these handpiles are located along Johnson Creek road, Wapiti Ranch, Cox Ranch, Bryant Ranch/ Johnson Creek Airstrip.

Hand Ignition for Lower Johnson should take about a week to complete, once those piles have been completed, the crews will relocate to Yellow Pine to burn the logging slash piles.

If you have any addition questions please contact Tim Dulhanty tdulhanty@fs.fed.us (208-382-7400) or myself at 208-382-7400 or send me an email.

– Thanks
James Bishop
Fuels AFMO
Boise National Forest
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2018 Fuelwood permit cost reduced

Permits available May 15, 2018 through November 30, 2018 at The Corner.

Personal use fuelwood permits for the Payette, Sawtooth and Boise National Forests are changing to reflect new minimum permit requirements as well as a cost reduction.

Fuelwood permits have been reduced to $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum and a 10-cord maximum per household.

link to more info:

Stay Out Of Riparian Areas!

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Pests

Bears have been roaming the Abstein orchard looking for apples (and any human/pet food they can find.) Please do not leave pet food outside and secure your trash. Long legged wasps are getting more numerous and invading sheds for shelter. Yellow Jackets are late this year, but really mean. Mosquito population dropped during the dry weather. Lots of gnats out now. Numerous grasshoppers clacking about. Colombian ground squirrels have gone into hibernation. Chipmunks had a population boom this summer. Pine squirrels are not as numerous as in past years.

Video Link Bear Visitor Aug 20, 2018
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Local Events:

The 5EV Memorial Run

Community Pig Roast potluck that was held yesterday afternoon in support of the 5EV Memorial and the Wildland Firefighters Foundation.

20180929MidasCornerPigRoast-a

photo by Dick Filler

Event Info

Wildland Firefighter Foundation Fund Raiser and Yellow Pine Community BBQ September 29

Midas Gold Idaho and The Corner are proud to sponsor the 5EV Memorial Run.

This 3.6 mile trail run is a fund raiser for the 5EV Memorial Trail Fund and Wildland Firefighter Foundation. Donations are greatly appreciated. The race starts at 10:00 am at the Williams Peak Trailhead on the East Fork Rd. and ends at the summit of the trail; a 3021 ft. elevation change.

A Community BBQ will be held after the race at 4:00 pm, at The Corner in Yellow Pine, Idaho. The roasted pig is provided by Midas Gold Inc. with great food by The Corner and the volunteers of the Yellow Pine Community.

Proceeds from this event will be shared 50/50 between the 5EV Memorial Trail Fund and the Wildland Firefighters Foundation.
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Welch Labor Day Golf Tournament was Sept. 1st (No results by press time Sunday 9-23.)
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

September Yellow Pine water update excerpts

The good news is the second sand filter is online and operating well. We have refurbished and upgraded the chlorinator and purchased new chlorine monitoring tools that will help us more accurately adjust the amount of chlorine injected into the water. Additionally, we received the $10,000 grant from Midas. We are looking at all options but it seems that for 2018 we must raise user fees a minimum of a $150 per year.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx

There will be a YPWUA meeting in October.

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.
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VYPA News:

Ditches

Attached is the ditch maintenance work that will be occurring during October 2018.

Residents can expect the work:

* along Abstein Rd. to happen during the first half of October;
* along Yellow Pine Ave. to happen in mid-October, and;
* along Profile & Riverside to happen during the last half of October.

Funds for this work are from the Road and Ditch Maintenance fund.

link to: 2018 October Ditch Maintenance Work.pdf

Yellow Pine Village Association
P.O. Box 10
Yellow Pine, ID 83677

Minutes: September 8, 2018 (updated with missing letters)

Officers present: Deb Filler, Chairman; Ronda Rogers, Vice Chairman; Lynnea Imel, Secretary; Kathy Hall, Member at Large. Absent: Joel Fields, Treasurer

The meeting opened at 2:00 by Deb Filler.

There being no objections or corrections, the minutes of the August 11, 2018, were accepted as posted on Facebook and community bulletin boards. Minutes and VYPA announcements will be e-mailed to property owners shown on the Secretary’s list. You can opt out by notifying limel @ ruralnetwork.net They are also available on Facebook via yptimes2 @ ruralnetwork.net

Treasurer’s Report Report submitted by Joel Fields, Treasurer (See attached) YP General Ledger printout, 7/8/2018 -8/31/2018;

link to: VYPA Financials – 8_10_2018.pdf

Cemetery Report was presented by Tim Rogers. The family of Chris Peterson will be placing a headstone. The Chris Peterson memorial gathering will be September 22nd in Yellow Pine. The committee plans to make fence repairs this Fall.

Lorinne Munn read a letter from the Welch and Sullivan families (see attached). In this letter the writers suggest that the Cemetery Fund transfer some money to the “Life Flight Landing Pad” project and the Restroom Fund to allow for moving these two projects forward. The Cemetery Committee has a copy of the letter and will respond.

Community Hall Report was presented by Kathy Hall, committee Chairman (see attached 9/8/2018 and General Ledger 7/8/18 – 8/31/18) Planned events next year:

* May 25th. Memorial Day ATV/UTV Fun run. See Kathy with your suggestions/ideas/help.

* Garage Sale the week of July 1-7. Bring donation to Community Hall after June 15, 2019

* July 13th ATV/UTV Ride to Big Creek, Smith Creek and back. See Kathy Hall.

The VYPA has title to a small camp trailer in back of the building. To be gifted free. Mike Amos has indicated an interest. The committee wishes to remove to outhouse in back of the Community Hall. Free. See Kathy Hall.

Several trees growing close to the building will be removed. A table and door outside should be removed. Flex Seal will be used in the basement to seal cracks. Picnic tables are to be moved and covered for winter. Lynn Imel has purchased new wheels for the piano; help is needed to install them. The kitchen floor is being reviewed, addressing cost/use/safety.

Thank You, Kathy Hall, for organizing work on the Community Hall this past year!

Harmonica & Music Festival Report by Lorinne Munn, committee Chairman. Some payments are still out-standing including one vendor fee from an un-authorized vendor. The event income is greater than the 2017 Festival. The breakfasts were particularly successful. All who volunteered are congratulated and thanked for their work. The committee works all year so there may be a meeting in November, but definitely starts with frequent meetings after February.

Old Business

Deb Filler has supplied maps of proposed ditch/culvert maintenance and repairs for this Fall and future projects. (see attached) The locations were identified by YP residents; there will be annual reviews to establish a priority list for maintenance and repairs to alleviate flooding and water damage to roads. A detailed work order form has been developed (see attached) so anyone wishing to work on a project/portion of a project can submit a proposal to the VYPA council. There are seven projects on the list to be done by October 31st. Copy and complete the form, mail it to Box 10 Yellow Pine, ID 83677 or give it to a Council member. VYPA Council will prioritize work and hire workers with full disclosure and publicizing. NOTE the deadline (9/20/18) and short time line for this year’s ditches, culverts, silt traps.

link to: Water Run-off – October 2018 Tasks Map.pdf

link to: Work Order for Maintenance Work.pdf

The Labor Day golf tournament sponsors reported they raised: $700 for the fireworks fund; $225 to give to Cecil Dallman for snow plow work on local, un-maintained, roads; $225 to help develop the helicopter landing pad. (fireworks are not sponsored by VYPA; helicopter pad is not a part of VYPA; VYPA does hire snowplow work and dust abatement on main roads. The golf tournaments are privately organized and frequently donate money to various Yellow Pine projects of their own choosing. See attached letters.)

Midas Gold sent their representative, Belinda Provancher. Groups opposed to the Stibnite mine re-opening recently held a rally in McCall. Midas continues to work with Valley County towns to develop Community Agreements to cultivate open dialogue between citizens and the mining company. The community delegates are meeting September 21st to create a written agreement that will be proposed to all Valley County communities.

link to: 2018 Community Partnership Agreement.pdf

Midas recently donated $10,000 to Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc. Lynn Imel reminded the attendees that a former mining company gave the water company approximately $80,000 to build water infrastructure improvements; this Midas donation is not without precedence.

Yellow Pine Water Users’ Assoc. submitted a written report to keep the community informed. (see attached) Residents need to be aware that there will be a considerable increase in the 2019 service fees. A Water Users’ meeting is planned for October. The date has not yet been arranged. The company is separate from the VYPA and residents may purchase shares if they wish to vote and participate in the management. See Willie Sullivan.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx

Heli-spot landing pad Anne Forster reported that the pad should be ready for use this coming winter after Danny Saleen did considerable work with his tractor. Removing additional trees at the site would be helpful and would allow for landing two helicopters, but that can only be done by Boise National Forest. The site is on the East Fork road near the Yellow Pine/Johnson Creek intersection. Contact Cecil Dallman and Merle Saleen with questions. Yellow Pine Fire Protection District (YPFD) is actively involved in the project.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection Dist. Anne Forster reported that the YPFD has brush clearing and chimney cleaning equipment for residents to borrow. The trucks and other equipment are kept ready even during the winter, inside the building. The Fire Commissioners are investigating the purchase of a new truck to replace one currently used. Training occurs every Sunday during Summer months and everyone is encouraged to become involved. The Commissioners are talking with Big Creek/Edwardsburg residents to assist them in improving their fire protection. There are two “pumpkins”, above ground collapsible water containers used for firefighting, available. Florescent paint and tape were recently applied to mark the fire hydrants. With current dangerous fire conditions, the local area is closely monitored by citizens.

New Business

Restroom construction at the Community Hall: Lorinne Munn read a letter from the Welch and Sullivan families (see attached). Please read this letter, and the letter regarding the Golf Tournaments, so everyone in the community understands this project and the funding.

link to: 20180902WelchSullivanletter1.pdf

link to: 20180902WelchSullivanletter2.pdf

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019 June 18th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th. Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.

[Note: all letters have now been uploaded to the cloud, click the links to read.]

Midas Gold and Yellow Pine

August 28, 2018

Attached is the Community Partnership Agreement the Village of Yellow Pine signed with Midas Gold.

link to: 2018 Community Partnership Agreement.pdf
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YPFD News:

Next meeting: YPFD Commissioners Meeting October 6, 2018 10am YP Community Center

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.

Yellow Pine Fire District Meeting Minutes

September 22, 2018

Attendees:

Cecil Dallman, Fire Commissioner District 1; Jeff Forster, Fire Chief; Dayle Bennett, Ann Forster, Nikki Saleen, Merrill Saleen, Steve Malm, Danny Saleen. Absent: Dan Stiff, District 2 Fire Commissioner; Tom Richter, District 3 Fire Commissioner

Discussion:

Nikki Saleen has been appointed Secretary/Treasurer for the Fire District. She has many years managing the wildland fire budget for the Payette National Forest and assisted with the national wildland fire budget for the Forest Service.

Cecil opened the meeting. He informed the group that Tom Richter; Fire Commissioner would not make the meeting today. However, Tom has verbally approved the budget. Dan Stiff, Fire Commissioner is not available. Cecil will obtain Tom Richter’s signature to finalize budget approval.

Action Item: Cecil will get the required signatures to approve the budget.
Proposed 2018 – 2019 Budget:
Firefighting/Rescue: $8,132
Wages: $0
Advertising: $2,000 – This covers costs of posting notices in the Star News
Repairs/Maintenance.: $4,000
Utilities (Fixed Costs): $4,000 – includes $2,500 insurance
Total: $18,132

Questions:

Merrill: Can/do you include capital improvements in the budget? This would be a continuing, ongoing fund that you add money to each year and build up the account over time. The money would be used to replace large items such as engines, when needed. It has been discussed that the District could use a smaller quicker response engine. How do you deal with that kind of acquisition?

Cecil: We would like to get a Type 6 engine w/ foam injection in the future.

Jeff: We are not allowed by the County Assessor’s Office to hold money without declaring what the expenditure is for. Apparatus is bundled into firefighting/rescue which is the fund we use to buy new equipment. We should not be carrying money over year to year, unless we identify a specific purpose for those expenditures. As we get more detailed with our budget, we can identify these large items that are needed in the future and work with the Assessors office on how to manage a large purchase with our future funding.

Merrill: The excess property program through the government usually requires expenditures of $5,000 to $10,000 to purchase used fire engines at a significant discount. We would need money available to purchase one in the future.

Jeff: It’s not that difficult to get approval to save up for this kind of purchase. We would need to talk to the County Assessor to understand more of the process. We could seek out potential Grants to help – the process is somewhat complicated and we would need a Grant Writer to help us.

Cecil: We need to line out our priorities. This is how I see them:

* Need to complete the helipad.
* We would like a smaller Type 6 engine with foam injection capabilities and a storage area for our extrication equipment (the use of foam injection increase the effectiveness of water and extends the useful life of water when used on a fire).
* Would like to excess the army truck.
* Would like to increase our Emergency Medical Services budget.
* Would like to join the Idaho State Fire Commissioners Association (www.isfca.org/). Their mission is “Informing, educating, representing, leading, and serving fire districts of Idaho in the preservation and protection of life and property”. Dues cost $50/year. The Association provides training, seminars, workshops, budget advice, and one hour of free legal advice. I would like to vote on us joining the ISFCA at our next meeting. Need the approval of one more Commissioner.

Jeff: The yearly budget is working for our current situation. Looking to the future – we will probably have bigger expenditures coming up with the need for better and more appropriate apparatus for our environment. I’m comfortable with the Yellow Pine Fire District as an organization if called upon – we can do something for the calling party or situation and do it as professionally as we can until backup comes, which can be 2 – 3 hours away. We just need to continue to get the right kind of equipment.

Nikki: What about getting reimbursements for search and rescue? Do we get any money back when we do a rescue? Will I need to do anything as treasurer?

Jeff: The State gives EMS/Rescue money and Valley County gets its portion. The County Commissioners has given $5,000 per year to Cascade Fire/EMS for Yellow Pine rescue/medical needs since the YP Ambulance has been placed into service. We work with Cascade Fire/EMS for any Rescue reimbursements; if YPFD is requested by the County to respond for a vehicle collision/rescue we would have the ability to receive reimbursement through the insurance carrier. We will work with you (Nikki) on that. As for EMS priorities, we will eventually need a newer ambulance that is designed for use in the backcountry.

Danny – Helipad update:

* We are looking into seeding the helipad area before winter. The Forest Service requires a specific seed mix. We may have to purchase the seed. Hydroseeding would be ideal if we could work with the Forest Service to get it done when they are in the area working on other projects that require Hydroseeding.
* We are in the process of acquiring “No Access – 24 hour Helispot” signs to post at the Helipad.
* Lifeflight gave us a windsock and frame. We will need one more windsock – costs around $300 to $400. Merrill mentioned that the Idaho Division of Aeronautics has made windsocks available to other airstrips/helibases in the past, maybe they would donate one.

Action Item: Cecil will contact Idaho Division of Aeronautics to see if they can provide another windsock.

Action Item: Jeff will coordinate with necessary parties on posting information on our next meeting.

Meeting adjourned. Next meeting will be at 10:00 am on October 6, 2018 at the Community Center.

Search & Rescue Training

Yesterday [9-29-2018] Valley County Search and Rescue (VCSAR) along with Yellow Pine Fire Protection District SAR members, and Cascade Fire & EMS – participated in a Search and Rescue training session near Herrick Reservoir.

It was an great day of training and many areas were addressed from – SAR set-up and orientation, GPS and map orientation, radio communication, rescue operations from incident command (IC) to field operations, EMS assessment of patient with field treatment – packaging – and transportation, as well as teamwork with SAR members and other agencies such as search dogs, pilots, law enforcement and others were addressed. After lunch there was a demonstration of rigging for rescue by YPFD team members.

Plans are underway to continue this working relationship and training in the future.

20180929YPFDSRTraining-a
(courtesy Ann F.)

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911 @ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

A lot of progress has been made on the new Helipad near the crossroads.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

– Fire Chief Jeff

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Open for summer (208) 633-3377
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Yellow Pine Tavern 633-2233

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
— — — —

The Corner 633-3325

We sell FS wood cutting permits.

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC

Buck Horn Outfitters in Idaho’s west Central Mountains in Units 25, 20 A, & 19 A. Providing Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Mountain lion, & Wolf Hunts. We offer Guided Rifle or Archery Hunts & Drop Camps. We are not about Quantity we are about providing Quality Hunts. My husband and I have been in the back country all our lives, we offer Deluxe camps with great food & our Guides know hunting, the back country and Stock !!

Link to FB:
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Deadwood Outfitters
We’re currently interviewing for winter caretakers. A remote location and snowmobile only access in winter.
Duty services include:
Guest cabin up keep
Preparing meals
Keeping porches shoveled
And enjoying lots of solitude.
For more info. deadwoodoutfit @ gmail.com
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Sept 24) overnight low of 27 degrees, mostly clear sky, frosty and smoky again. Rising sun painted the yellow leaves bright gold. Very quiet, a few finches flying and calling and a pine squirrel hunting cones. Rivers are below average for this time of year. Mostly cloudy at lunch time. A couple of finches visited in the afternoon, pine squirrel running down the fence. Cooler and partly cloudy in the afternoon, a little breezy at times, high of 62 degrees. Clear after sundown, calmer and fairly good air quality. Full Harvest Moon.

Tuesday (Sept 25) overnight low of 25 degrees, overcast, dry – very little frost or dew, and smoky haze. Power blipped off and back on at 1120am. Not many birds around today and one chipmunk. Mostly clear all day, haze of smoke, high of 68 degrees. Quiet evening.

Wednesday (Sept 26) overnight low of 26 degrees, mostly clear, dry – very little frost or dew and smoky haze. Pine squirrel and hairy woodpecker looking for snacks. Smoke was worse at lunch time, a few high thin clouds. Mid-afternoon mostly cloudy, a little breezy and better air quality, high of 75 degrees. Sounds like a helicopter flying around at 314pm. Late afternoon there was quite a bit of smoke way to the south in the Johnson Creek ‘notch’, might be from the Prospect Fire in the wilderness? Calm and cool at sunset, light haze of smoke.

Thursday (Sept 27) probably did not get below freezing overnight, very dry – no dew, appears to be mostly high thin clouds above eye burning smoke this morning. A few finches still around. Mostly clear before lunch time, haze of smoke. By mid-afternoon it was warm, mostly clear, light breezes, local haze of smoke and thicker smoke to the south, high of 80 degrees. Clear at sunset, somewhat better air quality, but smoke settled in after dark.

Friday (Sept 28) overnight low of 33 degrees, clear sky, dry – little bit of dew, and smelly haze of smoke. Clear, breezy and smoky at lunch time. Warm dry smoky afternoon, light breezes, high of 79 degrees. A northern flicker visited late afternoon. Clear, dry and smoky at sunset.

Saturday (Sept 29) overnight low of 33 degrees, mostly cloudy sky, dry – no dew, haze of smoke. A few critters this morning, 2 jays, a northern flicker, a pine squirrel and a chipmunk. Crunchy dry out in the forest. Local streets are very dusty. Pine martin crossing the road after lunch time. Overcast and quite smoky by early afternoon. Lots of long legged wasps. Increased traffic and dust. Warm, cloudy and smoky late afternoon and early evening, high of 77 degrees.

Sunday (Sept 30) did not get below freezing overnight, early morning rain 5am-6am, then after 7am to around 830am, then clouds breaking up and partly cloudy by 930am, better air quality, however there is still a slight haze of smoke in the air. Pine squirrel visiting at sunup. A couple of low flying airplanes around 1045am. Northern flicker visiting, hunting for bugs. Cloudy again before lunch time. Thunder and light sprinkle of rain just after 1pm. Strike map shows some hits near YP, on Johnson Creek across the river from Antimony camp, one up Profile Creek and another strike near the Missouri Ridge trail. More thunder than rain. Later afternoon rain showers for about an hour, high of 59 degrees. Clouds breaking up before sundown.
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Idaho News:

2019 property tax collections to rise $621K in Valley County

Agencies request $29.3 million for government operation

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 27, 2018

About $29.3.million in property tax revenue will be collected in Valley County in 2019, an increase of about $621,000 compared to the total raised this year, according to figures from the Valley County Clerk’s Office.

Valley County will have 22 taxing districts requesting property taxes next year, one more than this year due to the creation of the Donnelly Public Library District.

McCall-Donnelly School District has requested the most money, at about $8 million, although that total is $90 less than the amount the district levied this year.

Valley County had the next largest balance to be levied with $6.9 million, followed by the City of McCall at $6 million.

Taxes for Valley County government will increase by a total of $331,000 next year and the City of McCall’s dollar amount will increase by almost $500,000.

… Commissioners decided to use taxing authority set aside from previous years to hire more employees and increase the pay of volunteers.

… The smallest amount of property taxes requested next year is $18,132 for the Yellow Pine Fire District.

full story:
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Valley waits for applicants for business tax break

New ordinance gives 5-year discount to investment of $500,000 or more

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 27, 2018

An ordinance that gives property-tax breaks to new businesses in Valley County has been on the books since June, but so far there have been no takers.

The new rules give tax relief for up to five years to new non-retail businesses that invest more than $500,000 in a plant or facility within Valley County.

If approved, a property tax exemption would be granted with businesses enjoying a 90 percent deduction for year one, 80 percent for year two, 60 percent for year three, 40 percent for year four, and 20 percent for year five before being taxed at 100 percent each year thereafter.

“Non-retail” is defined broadly, including housing developments or agricultural manufacturing, Valley County Planning and Zoning Administrator Cynda Herrick said.

No business has applied for the tax break this year, Herrick said.

continued:
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Adjust your paycheck withholding now to avoid a tax shock

Sep 12, 2018 Local News 8

Boise, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Idaho State Tax Commission is urging you review your federal Form W-4 now to ensure you’re withholding enough from your paycheck for state and federal income taxes.

With significant changes to state and federal tax laws, you could be among many taxpayers who are having too little money withheld from your paychecks to cover the taxes you’ll owe for 2018.

That’s especially true if you have more than one job or both you and your spouse work.

continued:
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Idaho water organization gets workforce training grant

9/27/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — The Idaho Rural Water Association of Boise is getting a $1.4 million federal grant to build a workforce training center.

The grant was announced by the U.S. Department of Commerce on Thursday. The Idaho Rural Water Association of Boise estimates the project could help create or retain 550 jobs.

The center will be used to recruit and train members of the Idaho Water/Wastewater Agency Response Network to protect water and wastewater facilities during major flooding events. It will also be used to store special equipment that can be used in the event of a natural disaster.

The money comes from $600 million Congress appropriated for disaster relief and recovery as a result of wildfires and Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria in 2017.

source:
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Scam Alerts:

Card skimmers placed on ATMs around Boise

“Thieves have the technology to hide skimmers in plain sight and the card user is none the wiser,” said Boise Police Sgt. John Terry.

KTVB September 26, 2018

Boise — Thieves have been using credit card skimmers hidden inside ATMs around Boise to steal money from more than a dozen victims in the last month, according to Boise Police.

The culprits appear to have more than one skimming device, and investigators say the devices are likely being moved to different ATMs around town. Police are urging residents to check their bank statements for any unusual activity, and asking local businesses that use card readers to check their equipment.

“Boise Police have heard from over a dozen victims whose financial information has been compromised due to a card skimmer. Thieves have the technology to hide skimmers in plain sight and the card user is none the wiser,” said Boise Police Sgt. John Terry. “The only way a citizen will know they’ve been victimized is to see a charge they didn’t make on the statement from their bank or financial institution.”

continued:
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Social Security and Medicare scam calls heating up: What to expect

New Social Security scam targeting your phone

Susan Tompor, Detroit Free Press September 30, 2018 (KTVB)

Hang up and keep hanging up. Or better yet, just don’t answer.

Scammers are hitting mobile phones and landlines with all sorts of wacky pitches – including false claims about what you need to do to get a new Medicare card.

“The best thing you can do is not answer calls you are not familiar with,” said Mark Fetterhoff, a senior program specialist with the AARP Foundation as part of a recent robocall town hall promoted by AARP and the Federal Communications Commission.

Even if it looks like a local call, it’s probably not. Many times, scammers are engaging in “neighbor spoofing” to make the number look like it’s local. Fraudsters can spoof phone numbers easily and change that spoofed number regularly. You’re more likely to answer it if it’s a new number, experts said.

continued:
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Fire Season:

Boise National Forest plans fall prescribed burning

Contact: Stephaney Kerley
Phone: (208) 373-4105

Boise, Idaho. Sept. 26, 2018 – Boise National Forest fire managers anticipate favorable weather conditions for planned low-intensity prescribed burns this fall. Prescribed burns are designed to reduce hazardous vegetation (fuels), minimize wildfire potential near communities and improve wildlife habitat.

Weather and fuel conditions permitting, prescribed burns are scheduled to start in October and continue through November. Approximately 2,600 acres are planned for controlled ignitions in 13 project areas within the Forest.

Public and firefighter safety is always the first priority in all public land fire operations. Fire managers develop burn plans that consider: safety, specific fuel and weather prescriptions and smoke management. All prescribed burns are closely evaluated and are only approved when conditions are favorable.

Fire officials strongly advise forest visitors and homeowners to prepare and plan activities around the proposed dates and locations of burns. Prescribed burns may impact individual’s that are sensitive to smoke. Recreationists should use extreme caution near prescribed fire areas and comply with closures.

Access to areas immediately within or adjacent to burning operations may be temporarily restricted for public health and safety. Specific information and signage will be posted in advance of ignitions and remain in place until operations are completed. Please be cautious of firefighters and additional equipment within these areas as visibility will be decreased with smoke.

The http://www.rxfire.com website is updated with information regarding southwest Idaho burns planned within Idaho Department of Lands, Bureau of Land Management, Payette National Forest and Boise National Forest.

The Boise National Forest prescribed burn hotline: (208)-373-4208.

Planned Boise National Forest fall prescribed burns include:

Idaho City Ranger District

* Alder Ridge (100 acres): located 1 mile north of Placerville, Idaho. This is a landscape burn (ground fire), using hand ignitions to reduce fuel in the Wildland Urban Interface (WUI).

* Amber (300 acres): located 2 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho. This is a modified tree well burn.

* Buckskin (200): located approximately 3 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho.

* Little Ophir (100 acres): located 4 miles west of Pioneerville, Idaho. A landscape burn using hand ignitions that will reduce fuel in the WUI.

* Mores South-Granite Creek (250 acres): located 3 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho. This is a landscape burn (ground fire) using hand ignitions to reduce fuels in the WUI.

Cascade Ranger District

* Horsethief (360 acres): located about 1 mile east/northeast of Horsethief Reservoir. This burn involves helicopter and hand ignitions to reduce fuels throughout the area and within the WUI.

* Westside Restoration Unit 39 (25 acres): This project is located on National Forest System (NFS) road 435 along West Mountain. It is approximately 10 miles west of Cascade, Idaho. This will be hand ignitions burn to reduce fuels within the WUI.

* Crawford (100 acres): located approximately 4 miles east of Cascade, Idaho adjacent to the Crawford Guard Station, located off of NFS road 22, northeast of Davis reservoir; within WUI area.

* Lower Johnson Thinning (95 acres): Is a project designed to reduce hazardous fuels within the WUI. This project is located approximately 7 miles south of Yellow Pine along NFS road 413 and Johnson Creek.

* Yellow Pine Blowdown (40 acres): is located approximately 62 miles from Cascade, Idaho and is adjacent to the community of Yellow Pine. Hand Ignitions will be used to ignite machine piles along NFS roads 412, 413.

* Rainbow Point (19 acres): This project is located approximately 25 miles northwest of Cascade, Idaho. Machine Piles located within the Rainbow Point campground will be ignited by hand to reduce fuel accumulations throughout the campground.

Mountain Home Ranger District

* Cottonwood II Rx (1000 acres): This project is located about 17 miles NE of Boise, Idaho along NFS roads 203 and 377 in the Cottonwood Creek drainage, north of Arrowrock Reservoir.

Emmett Ranger District

* Miscellaneous Administrative Piles (1-2 acres): At Garden Valley work center

Note from Cascade Ranger District:

The Cascade RD is planning to burn both the Lower Johnson Thinning and Yellow Pine Blow Down units this fall, both of these projects will be pile burning only NO Broadcast Burning is planned.

The Lower Johnson Project (thinning & piling) was completed last summer, these handpiles are located along Johnson Creek road, Wapiti Ranch, Cox Ranch, Bryant Ranch/ Johnson Creek Airstrip.

Hand Ignition for Lower Johnson should take about a week to complete, once those piles have been completed, the crews will relocate to Yellow Pine to burn the logging slash piles.

If you have any addition questions please contact Tim Dulhanty tdulhanty@fs.fed.us (208-382-7400) or myself at 208-382-7400 or send me an email.

– Thanks
James Bishop
Fuels AFMO
Boise National Forest
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Prescribed Burns planned for Fall 2018

Date Sept 19, 2018

The Krassel Ranger District, Payette National Forest is planning to implement prescribed burns in the Bald Hill and Four Mile project areas this fall. In the Bald Hill Project area we will be working in areas of Reegan Creek and Deadman Creek from the East Fork road up to Rainbow Ridge. In the Fourmile Project area we will be working on both sides of the South Fork, between Blackmare and Holdover Creeks on the west side of the river and in the Fourmile Creek drainage on the east side. See attached map for more specific areas. Ignitions will likely take place in September or October, dependent on weather and fuel conditions. Primary ignitions will take 1-3 days for each burn block, with residual smoke and flame present until the next significant rain. Please do not hesitate to give a call or email with questions, my contact information is lenelson@fs.fed.us or desk phone is 208-634-0622.

Thanks and have a nice day,

Laurel Ingram
Fuels Technician
Payette National Forest
Krassel Ranger District

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing a prescribed burn on the south facing aspect between Deadman Creek and Reegan Creek along the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River this fall. The edge of burn block E is about 5 miles west of Yellow Pine. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 1-3 days in September or October 2018.

(click here for larger image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622.

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing the Four Mile Prescribed fire project this fall. Ignitions may take place between Reed Ranch and Poverty Flat Camp Ground on both sides of the South Fork of the Salmon River. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 2 or more days in September or October.

(click here for larger image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622
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Prospect Fire in Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness grows to more than 6,000 acres

The fire started Tuesday, and is burning in steep terrain. An emergency closure includes the Dagger Falls and Boundary Creek campgrounds as well as a section of Boundary Creek Road.


Photo: Salmon-Challis National Forest

KTVB September 29, 2018

Valley County — Emergency road and recreation site closures are in effect on part of the Salmon-Challis National Forest due to the Prospect Fire, burning east of Cascade in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

The fire has burned an estimated 6,247 acres of timber, brush, and tall grass. It is burning in steep, inaccessible terrain in the Prospect Creek and Morehead Creek drainages.

The fire had crossed to the east of the Middle Fork of the Salmon River toward Big Soldier Mountain on Friday. Activity moderated on Saturday with the cloud cover, according to a news release from the Salmon-Challis National Forest.

continued:
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Mining News:

Midas Gold proposes foundation for community projects

Agreement could mean millions of dollars if fully funded

By Tom Grote for The Star-News September 27, 2018

Midas Gold has proposed forming a foundation that could contribute millions of dollars into local communities during the life of the project and beyond.

The Stibnite Foundation would offer grants to a board made up of members of each community.

Governing bodies of cities and counties in Valley, Adams and Idaho counties have been asked to sign what Midas Gold calls a “Community Agreement “ that would be binding on both sides.

Midas would initially give the Stibnite Foundation $100,000 in cash and 1.5 million shares of Midas Gold Corp. stock, which was worth nearly a million dollars at the 66 cents per share stock price on Monday.

Midas Gold would add another $100,000 at the beginning of next year and at the beginning of 2020 regardless of the status of the project. Funding after this point becomes tied to the company’s growth.

Another $100,000 would be given to the foundation if the Forest Service gives approval to the project, an action projected for early 2020.

An additional $100,000 and another 1.5 million shares of stock would be given to the foundation once Midas Gold receives all permits to allow construction to begin.

Once construction begins on the project, the company would give the foundation $250,000 each year during the projected three-year construction phase.

That would be a total of $1.15 million in cash and 3 million shares of stock before Midas would extract an ounce of gold from its proposed mining project near Yellow Pine.

Once the Stibnite mine begins producing gold, Midas Gold would give 1 percent of its net profits to the foundation over the expected 12-year life of the project.

That pledge would be at least $500,000 per year, Midas Gold Idaho President & CEO Laurel Sayer said.

The company would give the foundation a final payment of $1 million when mining has been completed and reclamation efforts begin.

The intent of the foundation is to develop a lasting endowment and enable the foundation to continue to exist after the mine is closed, Sayer said.

Only signers of the Community Agreement would be able to appoint members to the foundation board, but anyone would be eligible to apply for grants, the draft agreement said.

The foundation is intended to provide a structured forum for communities and groups who want Midas Gold to help pay for community improvements, Sayer said.

“We don’t want to be the ones to judge the worthiness of a request,” she said.

“We believe Idahoans understand the issues facing their communities better than anyone else,” Sayer said. “We want to put local experts in control of community funding decisions.”

Midas Gold would continue to make charitable contributions and fund sponsorships, which totaled $125,000 and 1,700 hours of employee time in 2017, Sayer said.

The agreement also would form a Stibnite Advisory Council composed of representatives of each government to “discuss topics of interest,” including the proposed gold mine as well as jobs, housing, infrastructure and any other topic.

The agreement also would require each community to “take reasonable steps to be informed” about the project and make formal comments to the Forest Service about the project.

There is no requirement that the comments endorse the project, but the provision is intended to ask communities to “provide direct input on how we might make the project better” Sayer said in a Sept. 5 letter to the McCall City Council.

continued:
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McCall raises questions about proposed Midas Gold agreement

City to host lectures on Stibnite mine project

By Tom Grote for The Star-News September 27, 2018

Midas Gold has been working for the last two months to sign up communities for a proposed agreement that would see millions of dollars given for civic improvements.

But the process has been slowed by misunderstandings and questions about the agreement, especially by the McCall City Council, Midas Gold Idaho President & CEO Laurel Sayer said.

In July, Midas Gold representatives began meeting with city councils and county commissioners in Valley, Adams and Idaho counties to ask them for comment on the proposed Community Agreement.

The majority of the communities have provided comments but none of the governments have yet agreed to sign the agreement, which would form the Stibnite Foundation and the Stibnite Advisory Council.

Midas Gold would donate cash and company stock to the foundation, which would have an independent board of directors that would accept applications for community grants.

The advisory council would provide a forum for the communities in the area to stay abreast of the proposed gold mine near Yellow Pine as the project progresses.

Most communities have expressed support for the concept of the agreement but the most questions have been raised in front of the McCall City Council.

On July 26, a presentation by Midas and representatives from the West Central Mountain Community Partnership on the agreement was followed by several speakers, most of who expressed opposition to the mining project.

The protests led the council to schedule a series of meetings called the Stibnite Lecture Series. The first meeting will be held Oct. 9 with subsequent meetings scheduled for Oct. 23 and Nov. 13.

The McCall council will not make a decision to sign the agreement until after the lecture series.

Also, the Cascade City Council will hold a town hall meeting on Oct. 22 prior to its regular meeting to review the proposed agreement, Mayor Julie Crosby said.

The initial round of meetings has prompted some changes to the draft agreement to make the language more concise and clarify its intent, Sayer said.

A clarification letter was sent Sept. 5 to the McCall council by Sayer.

“We recognize we did not clearly communicate our intentions behind the Agreement and can understand why you and your constituents want to know more,” the letter said.

The agreement would commit Midas Gold to contribute to the foundation regardless of changes in management of the company, Sayer said.

There has been misunderstanding about a provision of the agreement that requires each community that signs it to provide formal comments to the Forest Service, which is reviewing the project, Sayer said.

“The Agreement does not specify the content of such a letter, or whether it must be supportive, only that a letter must be submitted,” she said.

Last Friday, Midas convened a meeting of representatives of several of the communities as a “working group” to review the draft agreement.

The meeting was held at the Midas Gold offices in Donnelly, but was limited to invited participants and was not open to the public.

Sayer said Monday that the meeting did not result in substantive changes in the agreement.

“Changes will be mostly style, consistency and clarity of terms and meaning,” she said.

Midas remains confident that the Stibnite Foundation and the Stibnite Advisory Council will be formed before the end of the year, Sayer said.

“However we understand that each community needs to go through their own process of public review,” she said.

continued:
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Restoring mined forest land with more mining?

Midas Gold says their new mine will improve land

Sep 26, 2018 KIVI TV

Stibnite, Idaho – For more than a century, prospectors and miners have been interested in the land upstream from Yellow Pine, Idaho in a place called Stibnite.

The area is rich with valuable minerals including gold and antimony. During World War Two and the Korean War, antimony used to make ammunition, was in high demand and the Stibnite Mine was booming.

But the mining here has scarred the land surrounding the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River, prime habitat for endangered salmon and steelhead.

continued:
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Public comment opens on new open pit mine

Sep 28, 2018 Local News 8


Smoky Canyon

Soda Springs, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Plans for expanding the Smoky Canyon phosphate mine, east of Soda Springs, are now out for public review.

The Bureau of Land Management in Idaho Falls and the Caribou-Targhee National Forest released a draft environmental impact statement Friday analyzing different alternatives.

If approved, J.R. Simplot Company said the East Smoky Panel Mine Project would develop a single linear open pit in seven sequential phases. It would enable the use of waste rock to backfill previously mined portions of the pit. The company said that would reduce certain impacts associated with the mining process.

continued:
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Ninth Circuit Upholds Oregon Law Banning Motorized Gold Mining In Salmon Streams

9/28/2018 CBB

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals recently handed down a ruling affirming an Oregon law that bans motorized gold mining in salmon streams, with potential ramifications for other states that choose to adopt environmental regulations pertaining to mining.

The Sept. 12 ruling rejected a challenge to Oregon’s 2017 Suction Dredge Reform Bill, also known as Senate Bill 3, that was filed by a coalition of Oregon miners and mining groups, such as the Galice Mining District, Millennium Diggers and the Willamette Valley Miners.

continued:
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Forest Service Recommendation To Withdraw 340,000 Acres In Methow Valley From Mining Applauded

9/28/2018 CBB

U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-WA), the top Democrat on the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, U.S. Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA), and U.S. Rep. Dan Newhouse (R-WA, 4th District) applauded a recommendation made by the U.S. Forest Service to the Bureau of Land Management to withdraw 340,000 acres in the Methow Valley from consideration for mining for a 20 year period.

“From salmon to farming and outdoor recreation, the Methow Valley holds a special place in the Washington way of life,” Cantwell said. “We can’t afford to lose this area to copper mining. I am encouraged the Forest Service is taking this important step, and I will continue working with the Department of the Interior and the local community to move the process forward and protect the Methow Valley for generations to come.”

continued:
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Letter to Share:

Youth Pheasant hunt

9/30/2018

Hi All, I finally got hold of IDFG to find out if we would have birds for the hunt for kids on the river? I finally caught some one yesterday and we will have birds next Friday Oct. 5th to release Friday evening for the morning of the Oct. 6th when youth hunting starts on the youth Access area on the Palouse river about 2 ½ miles below Potlatch Idaho of Wellesley Road. Hunt limited to 5 hunters at a time and those that hunt need to be registered and must sign up at the sign up area at the river bridge. I don’t know if IDFG has their sign up ready or not. You can call me or email me and I will make sure you are registered. Your time when registering will be recorded and you will be given a time slot. The birds that we plant will have a leg tag. We need you to report the tag numbers to IDFG or call or email me and I will get them registered. For more information, give me a call or call IDFG. I hope to have a number to call Mondays morning Oct 1st. We had a great time last year and hope it will be better this year. We need volunteers to help release birds.

Jim Hagedorn
Executive Director
The Gamebird Foundation
thegamebirdfoundation.org
208-883-3423
Jhag1008 @ gmail.com

Youth 17 years old and younger can hunt with a licensed adult

Youth 17 years old and younger with an Idaho hunting license can participate in the youth pheasant hunt so long as they’re accompanied by an Idaho licensed hunter age 18 years or older.

The youth hunt runs from Saturday, Oct. 6 through Oct. 12.

Pheasant hunting starts a half hour before sunrise, except on C.J. Strike, Cartier Slough, Fort Boise, Market Lake, Montour, Mud Lake, Niagara Springs, Payette River, and Sterling wildlife management areas where pheasants are stocked. Shooting hours begin at 10 a.m. at those locations.

The daily bag limit is three cocks, and the possession limit is nine, except on nine WMA’s in southern Idaho where pheasants are stocked. On these WMA’s, the daily limit is two cocks and six in possession.

Youth hunters do not need a WMA upland game bird permit, but they are required to wear hunter orange above the waist during the pheasant season while hunting on these WMA’s. A hunter orange hat meets this requirement.

Young hunters who have never had a hunting license and have not taken hunter education can still participate in the hunt through Idaho’s Hunting Passport Program.
https://idfg.idaho.gov/licenses/hunter-passport

For more details about pheasant hunting, see the Upland Game, Furbearer and Turkey Seasons and Rules, or get the printed brochure available at Fish and Game license vendors.
https://idfg.idaho.gov/hunt/rules/upland-furbearer-turkey

General pheasant hunts for all ages start Oct. 13 or Oct. 20, depending which part of the state you’re in. There’s map of pheasant zones on page 12 of the rules brochure. Really need to thank Rodger Phillips for getting the above on IDFG web site so we could know what is happening.
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Critter News:

MCPAWS to host Tails on Trails, Oktoberfest on Oct. 6

The Star-News September 27, 2018

MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter will host a race for canines and their human companions as well as a live music festival on Saturday, Oct. 6, to raise money for the animal shelter.

The activities will kick off with the dog-friendly Tails on Trails 5K fun run at 9 a.m. at Brundage Mountain Resort.

Registration is $35 for adults and $25 for youth under 21. The race fee includes a long-sleeved T-shirt, goodie bag and registration for Oktoberfest later that day.

Race registration is available at http://ultrasignup.com by searching for “Tails on Trails At Brundage”.

The festivities will continue with Oktoberfest from noon to 6 p.m. at the Alpine Village. The event will feature live music by Bottom Line Band and the Treasure Valley Musik Meisters as well as a costume contest, raffle, craft goods, activities for children and food and drinks.

Entry fee is $10 and includes a free beer and event koozie. Raffle tickets are $5 and may be purchased at the event.

Alpine Village is located at 616 N. Third St. in McCall.

All proceeds will benefit the dogs and cats at the MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter. For more information on the shelter and the day’s activities, visit http://mcpaws.org

source:
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Pet Talk – Twisted stomachs in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Sept 28, 2018 IME

A twisted stomach is called a gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) and is always an acute and life-threatening emergency. Gastric dilation is the sudden accumulation of excessive air, food and fluid in the stomach, and is commonly called bloat. Volvulus is the twisting of a bloated stomach so that the openings into and out of the stomach are blocked. This twisting causes blood flow to the stomach to be compromised and secondary shock ensues.

Nobody knows the exact reason for stomach bloating. Older larger and giant-breed dogs with deep chests are at the highest risk. Many veterinarians feel there is a heredity risk, but most veterinarians feel it involves the feeding of large amounts of food, then exercise that includes the swallowing of air and causes a pendulum effect on the stomach and subsequent twisting.

Affected dogs will be restless and agitated, salivate excessively, retch and try to regurgitate. The abdomen is obviously distended and painful. These physical abnormalities will lead your veterinarian to suspect a torsion or block. X-rays of the abdomen let your veterinarian assess the position of the stomach and ascertain if there is a bloat or a twist. An electrocardiogram (ECG) is indicated as irregular heart rhythms are common. Other lab tests are performed to see if other organs have been affected.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Hunters urged to keep noxious weed seeds from spreading

The Star-News September 27, 2018

Hunters and other outdoor enthusiasts are being asked to take caution to not spread noxious weed seeds with their vehicles, ATVs and pack animals. “This time of year hunters and recreationalists can unknowingly spread huge amounts of noxious weed seed from one area to another,” said Roger Batt, the Idaho Weed Awareness Campaign’s coordinator.

Noxious weeds can choke out native vegetation, which deprives deer, elk, big horn sheep, and other wildlife of their natural food sources, resulting in starvation or migration to other areas, Batt said.

Noxious weeds and seeds can easily become lodged in ATVs, off-road vehicles and trailers that have been used in the summer and carried to a new location when the rigs are used during hunting season, he said.

Pack animals, bird dogs, and hunting gear also can carry noxious weeds to other areas, Batt said.

“Hunters and outdoor recreationalists should keep their pickups, ATVs, and off-road vehicles only on designated roads and trails and away from weed-infested areas,” he said.

Noxious weed seeds can be spread in the waste droppings of horses and pack animals. Preparation for hunting trips should include using feed certified as noxious weed free, Batt said.

A list of outlets selling certified weed free hay and forage is available at http://idahoweedawareness.com

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Last week of September 2018
— — — — — — — — — —

Wolf attack kills guard dog in southern Oregon

by AP Thursday, September 27th 2018

Prospect, Ore. (AP) — State wildlife officials say a dog guarding cattle in southern Oregon has died after being attacked by a wolf.

The report released Wednesday says an examination of the Tibetan mastiff’s body revealed 25 puncture wounds and scrape marks all over its body.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife says the attack early Monday occurred in an area frequented by a gray wolf known as OR-7 and his pack.

The incident happened southeast of Prospect.

The last confirmed attack by OR-7 and his pack was in January when two calves were killed two days apart near Butte Falls.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Education International

Newsletter 9/27/2018

Wolves Continue Killing Cattle In Northwest Minnesota

A Systematic Review of the Epidemiology of Echinococcosis in Domestic and Wild Animals
— — — — — — — — — —

Protections restored for grizzly bears; hunts blocked

By Matthew Brown – 9/25/18 AP

Billings, Mont. — A U.S. judge ordered federal protections restored for grizzly bears in the Northern Rocky Mountains on Monday, a move that blocks the first grizzly hunts planned in the Lower 48 states in almost three decades.

Wyoming and Idaho had been on the cusp of allowing hunters to kill up to 23 bears this fall. U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen had twice delayed the hunts, and the latest order blocking them was due to expire later this week. The hunts would have been the first in U.S. outside Alaska since 1991.

Christensen wrote in his ruling that the case was “not about the ethics of hunting.” Rather, he said, it was about whether federal officials adequately considered threats to the species’ long-term recovery when they lifted protections for more than 700 bears living around Yellowstone National Park.

continued:
— — —

Blocked US grizzly hunts fuel call for species law changes

By Matthew Brown – 9/26/18 AP

Billings, Mont. — A court ruling that blocked grizzly bear hunts in the U.S. West carries far wider political implications amid a push by Congress for sweeping changes to how imperiled species are managed.

The ruling restored protections for more than 700 grizzlies in and around Yellowstone National Park. It will likely force federal wildlife officials to reconsider their piecemeal approach to restoring bruins across the Northern Rockies.

As wildlife advocates celebrated the ruling, it was quickly seized upon by Republicans as the latest example of supposed flaws in the Endangered Species Act, a 1973 law meant to shield plants and animals from potential extinction.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho authorities euthanize cougar wandering near day care

9/25/18 AP

Coeur d’Alene, Idaho — Coeur d’Alene authorities say they euthanized a male cougar that was wandering across a parking lot near a day care center.

On Monday, Idaho Fish and Game officials and the Coeur d’Alene Police waited until the cougar settled in a tree to dart and euthanized the cougar.

Idaho Fish and Game Biologist Jim Hayden says the male cougar was likely looking for “a place to settle down.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Cat in Nampa recovering after being shot by crossbow

by Haley Squiers Monday, September 24th 2018


(CBS 2 News Photo)

Nampa, Idaho (CBS 2) — A cat was shot in its side by a crossbow in a Nampa area neighborhood Sunday afternoon.

The cat, Charlie, was first seen with the crossbow in his side when the owner’s boyfriend went onto the porch and found the cat sitting on a lawn chair.

Keesha Boyum tells CBS 2 News her boyfriend then took the crossbow bolt out of the cat’s side, before he took the cat to a nearby veterinarian clinic.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Bald eagle with lead poisoning recovering at raptor center

By Brian Walker – 9/24/18 AP

Coeur d’Alene, Idaho — This wasn’t how Janet Medley wanted to spot a bald eagle.

The Athol woman and her family were enjoying Lake Pend Oreille over Labor Day weekend when they found a helpless male eagle on the bank.

“He was wet and very sick and weak,” Medley told the Coeur d’Alene Press . “It got our blood pumping because we wanted to do something.”

The eagle was captured until the nonprofit Birds of Prey Northwest responded to care for it.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
September 28, 2018
Issue No. 886
Table of Contents

* New U.S.-Canada Pacific Salmon Treaty Would Reduce Alaska, British Columbia Harvests When Forecasts Low
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441565.aspx

* Commerce Department Declares West Coast Fishery Disaster, 2015-17; Warm Water Impacts
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441564.aspx

* Bureau Awards $76 Million For Juvenile Fish Passage Facilities At Cle Elum Dam In Upper Yakima Basin
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441563.aspx

* Yakama Nation, Chelan PUD Agree To 15-Year, $9.7 Million Program For Mid-Columbia Coho Reintroduction
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441562.aspx

* Orca Task Force Recommendations Include Focus On Salmon Runs; Change Non-Native Game Fish To ‘Predatory’
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441561.aspx

* Research: Beaver Dams Create Habitat Complexity Benefiting Juvenile Steelhead In John Day Tributary
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441560.aspx

* Study: New Scientific Tool Uses Otolith Geochemistry To Identify Source Of Illegally Introduced Invasive Fish
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441559.aspx

* Council Draft Report ‘Energy, Fish, Wildlife: the Columbia River Basin In Fiscal Year 2018’ Out For Review
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441558.aspx

* Tribes Get More Fishing Days Above Bonneville; Steelhead Numbers Still A Concern
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441557.aspx

* Warm Ocean Temperatures Off NW Coast Forced Forage Fish To Eat Less Energy Rich Food
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441556.aspx

* NOAA Fisheries Says Updated Management Blueprint For Blue Mountains Prioritizes Habitat Restoration For Salmonids
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441555.aspx

* Ninth Circuit Upholds Oregon Law Banning Motorized Gold Mining In Salmon Streams
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441554.aspx

* Forest Service Recommendation To Withdraw 340,000 Acres In Methow Valley From Mining Applauded
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441553.aspx

* NOAA: A Warm, Dry Columbia Basin Will Continue That Way Through October, With El Nino Guiding Winter
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441552.aspx

* Corps Seeks Comments For Next Stage Of Draft Mid-Columbia Master Plan
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441551.aspx

* National Science Foundation Awards $220 Million For Ocean Observatories Initiative; Includes OSU, UW
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441550.aspx
————————–

Fish & Game News:

Getting ready to buy your hunting license? Consider a three-year license

Three-year license saves money and keeps you hunting

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, September 27, 2018

Idaho hunters can buy a three-year hunting license or three-year hunting/fishing combo and not have to worry about buying another license until 2021.

The price for a three-year resident hunting license is $34.75 (plus vendor fees) and $97 (plus vendor fees) for a three-year combo license.

Benefits of a three-year license include:

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Trapper Instructor-led Course

Saturday, October 6, 2018 10:00am – 4:00pm

Located at:
IDFG Office
555 Deinhard Lane
McCall, ID 83638

Course Fee $9.75

This course includes trapping laws, ethics, avoiding non-target catch, trapping laws, basic trapping methods, and safety.

Trapper Education certification cards will be awarded to students upon successful completion of the course, which includes attending all class sessions, passing the field exercises and a written test.

Age Requirements:

* Minimum age is 9 unless accompanied by a parent or guardian.
* A parent must check in students under age 18.

registration link:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

This moose has “Old Glory” stuck to his antlers

By Michael VanZetta 9/27/2018 Circa

Jackson Hole has tons of wildlife, but none are as patriotic as this moose.

Mary Jo Maher was with her husband, Roger, outside Jackson Hole, Wyoming when they saw the moose.

Maher took the video of it with “Old Glory” stuck to its antler. People cannot get enough of this once in a lifetime sighting.

There’s no word on how the moose ended up in this patriotic predicament.

source with video:
————————–

Seasonal Humor:

HuntingMooseCall-a
————————

Sept 23, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 23, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
September 29 Wildland Firefighter Foundation Fund Raiser and Yellow Pine Community BBQ
October 6 YPFD Commissioners Meeting 10am YP Community Center

(details below)
———-

Village News:

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

The Yellow Pine and Warm Lake Transfer sites are seeing other material deposited into the Woody Debris pile which violates our agreement with the Forest Service to have the Woody Debris allowed to be there. The Valley County Commission is requesting assistance from the folks in Yellow Pine to help police the Yellow Pine Transfer site. Valley County and/or Lakeshore employees are working to clean up the site this fall. To avoid losing the ability to have the Transfer Site be a place for woody debris to be allowed to be used. The Forest Service will continue to burn the debris but only if the other material is removed from the debris pile.

Other items being left on site is also not appreciated as this site is designed to just have Household Waste in the bins. Furniture and appliances left require additional costs and are not in our program. However with working with others we continue to handle the issues but maybe better education would help.

– Gordon Cruickshank, Valley County Commissioner


— — — —

Ice Hole Campground

The Cascade Ranger District [has] temporarily closed Ice Hole Campground for reconstruction beginning Monday, Aug. 6, 2018.

The Campground will remain closed for the remainder of the 2018 season. Project funding was provided by local Tribes and a State RV Grant.

Forest Service crews and contractors will repair existing resource damage, enabling visitors to have an improved recreational experience in the future.

link to project:

Ice Hole Update

Progress made with renovation and remodel of Cascade Ranger District – Ice Hole Campground!

Thanks for the photo shares from Boise NF employees Marie Willis and Danelle Highfill.

link to FB photo gallery:
— — — —

Lost Tablet – Reward

On July 21 one of our crews lost a Samsung tablet on the Profile Road between the switchback below Red Metals mine road and Missouri Creek road. They realized it was missing almost immediately and went back and gridded the road for it, but could not find it. It could have bounced into the roadside brush, or been picked up off the road by someone travelling from Big Creek or Yellow Pine or vice versa.

This tablet has a summers worth of field data and we would sure like to have it back. Would you please spread the word that Ranger Botello will pay a handsome reward of cheeseburger, fries, pop and ice cream for its safe return!?

Contact: Anthony B. Botello, District Ranger, p: 208-634-0601, c: 208-634-9286
— — — —

Pests

Yellow Jackets are late this year, but really mean. Long legged wasps are getting more numerous and invading sheds for shelter. Mosquito population dropped during the hot dry summer. Lots of gnats out now. Numerous grasshoppers clacking about. Colombian ground squirrels have gone into hibernation. Chipmunks had a population boom this summer. Pine squirrels are not as numerous as in past years. Bears have been roaming the Abstein orchard looking for apples (and any human/pet food they can find.)

Link to Bear Visitor video Aug 20, 2018
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not dump appliances or tires at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

“Bring it, Don’t Burn it.” There is a burn pile for woody debris only. Please don’t put trash, furniture, construction debris or cardboard in the burn pile.

Note 9-23: Please stop dumping cardboard boxes on the burn pile!!!
———-

Local Events:

Chris Petersen Celebration

The Celebration of Chris Petersen’s life in Yellow Pine was 9/22/18 at 2pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern.
— — — —

Wildland Firefighter Foundation Fund Raiser and Yellow Pine Community BBQ September 29

Midas Gold Idaho and The Corner are proud to sponsor the 5EV Memorial Run.

This 3.6 mile trail run is a fund raiser for the 5EV Memorial Trail Fund and Wildland Firefighter Foundation. Donations are greatly appreciated. The race starts at 10:00 am at the Williams Peak Trailhead on the East Fork Rd. and ends at the summit of the trail; a 3021 ft. elevation change.

A Community BBQ will be held after the race at 4:00 pm, at The Corner in Yellow Pine, Idaho. The roasted pig is provided by Midas Gold Inc. with great food by The Corner and the volunteers of the Yellow Pine Community.

Proceeds from this event will be shared 50/50 between the 5EV Memorial Trail Fund and the Wildland Firefighters Foundation.

For additional information or to sign up for the race, contact: Matt Huber Matt @ ypcorner.com 208/633-3325

Update: Community Pig Roast Potluck:

Saturday, September 29, 2018, 4:00 pm at The Corner – To support the 5EV Memorial Run and the Wildland Firefighters Foundations, a Community Pig Roast Potluck will be held after the race at 4:00 pm, at The Corner in Yellow Pine, Idaho. The roasted pig is provided by Midas Gold Inc. and Macaroni & Cheese by The Corner. We are expecting approximately 50 folks. Please bring a dish to share like: Scalloped Potatoes, Rice dishes, Green Salads, Sauerkraut, Vegetable Salads, Veggie Tray, Vegetable dishes, Deviled Eggs, Applesauce, Dinner Rolls, Cake, Cookies, Cobbler. Let’s support the folks who help protect us.

Link to: 2018 WFF Race event flyer.pdf
— — — —

Welch Labor Day Golf Tournament was Sept. 1st
(No results by press time Sunday 9-23.)
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

July 24th Yellow Pine water update:

It is good to go back to the even/odd watering schedule. Even/odd means if your address is 315 Yellow Pine Avenue, you can water on odd days such as the 1st, 3rd, 5th etc. And if your address is 316, water in even numbered days. The only request is that watering be done between 6am and 1pm. Also please limit to one sprinkler at a time.

Also it is requested that no lawn watering be done August 1st through the 6th to be able to withstand the draw from Harmonica.

Our second sand filter will be on line soon and give us more capacity. Thank you everyone for your patience during the high water demand time. – SH

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.
— — — —

VYPA News:

Yellow Pine Village Association
P.O. Box 10
Yellow Pine, ID 83677

Minutes: September 8, 2018

Officers present: Deb Filler, Chairman; Ronda Rogers, Vice Chairman; Lynnea Imel, Secretary; Kathy Hall, Member at Large. Absent: Joel Fields, Treasurer

The meeting opened at 2:00 by Deb Filler.

There being no objections or corrections, the minutes of the August 11, 2018, were accepted as posted on Facebook and community bulletin boards. Minutes and VYPA announcements will be e-mailed to property owners shown on the Secretary’s list. You can opt out by notifying limel @ ruralnetwork.net They are also available on Facebook via https://www.facebook.com/The-Yellow-Pine-Times-278419589262862/

Treasurer’s Report Report submitted by Joel Fields, Treasurer (See attached) YP General Ledger printout, 7/8/2018 -8/31/2018;

link to: YPVA Financials – 8_10_2018.pdf

Cemetery Report was presented by Tim Rogers. The family of Chris Peterson will be placing a headstone. The Chris Peterson memorial gathering will be September 22nd in Yellow Pine. The committee plans to make fence repairs this Fall.

Lorrine Munn read a letter from the Welch and Sullivan families (see attached). In this letter the writers suggest that the Cemetery Fund transfer some money to the “Life Flight Landing Pad” project and the Restroom Fund to allow for moving these two projects forward. The Cemetery Committee has a copy of the letter and will respond.

Community Hall Report was presented by Kathy Hall, committee Chairman (see attached 9/8/2018 and General Ledger 7/8/18 – 8/31/18) Planned events next year:

* May 25th. Memorial Day ATV/UTV Fun run. See Kathy with your suggestions/ideas/help.

* Garage Sale the week of July 1-7. Bring donation to Community Hall after June 15, 2019

* July 13th ATV/UTV Ride to Big Creek, Smith Creek and back. See Kathy Hall.

The VYPA has title to a small camp trailer in back of the building. To be gifted free. Mike Amos has indicated an interest. The committee wishes to remove to outhouse in back of the Community Hall. Free. See Kathy Hall.

Several trees growing close to the building will be removed. A table and door outside should be removed. Flex Seal will be used in the basement to seal cracks. Picnic tables are to be moved and covered for winter. Lynn Imel has purchased new wheels for the piano; help is needed to install them. The kitchen floor is being reviewed, addressing cost/use/safety.

Thank You, Kathy Hall, for organizing work on the Community Hall this past year!

Harmonica & Music Festival Report by Lorrine Munn, committee Chairman. Some payments are still out-standing including one vendor fee from an un-authorized vendor. The event income is greater than the 2017 Festival. The breakfasts were particularly successful. All who volunteered are congratulated and thanked for their work. The committee works all year so there may be a meeting in November, but definitely starts with frequent meetings after February.

Old Business

Deb Filler has supplied maps of proposed ditch/culvert maintenance and repairs for this Fall and future projects. (see attached) The locations were identified by YP residents; there will be annual reviews to establish a priority list for maintenance and repairs to alleviate flooding and water damage to roads. A detailed work order form has been developed (see attached) so anyone wishing to work on a project/portion of a project can submit a proposal to the YPVA council. There are seven projects on the list to be done by October 31st. Copy and complete the form, mail it to Box 10 Yellow Pine, ID 83677 or give it to a Council member. YPVA Council will prioritize work and hire workers with full disclosure and publicizing. NOTE the deadline (9/20/18) and short time line for this year’s ditches, culverts, silt traps.

Link to: Water Run-off – October 2018 Tasks Map.pdf

Link to: Work Order for Maintenance Work.pdf

The Labor Day golf tournament sponsors reported they raised: $700 for the fireworks fund; $225 to give to Cecil Dallman for snow plow work on local, un-maintained, roads; $225 to help develop the helicopter landing pad. (fireworks are not sponsored by YPVA; helicopter pad is not a part of YPVA; YPVA does hire snowplow work and dust abatement on main roads. The golf tournaments are privately organized and frequently donate money to various Yellow Pine projects of their own choosing. See attached letters.)

Midas Gold sent their representative, Belinda Provancher. Groups opposed to the Stibnite mine re-opening recently held a rally in McCall. Midas continues to work with Valley County towns to develop Community Agreements to cultivate open dialogue between citizens and the mining company. The community delegates are meeting September 21st to create a written agreement that will be proposed to all Valley County communities.

link to: 2018 Community Partnership Agreement.pdf

Midas recently donated $10,000 to Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc. Lynn Imel reminded the attendees that a former mining company gave the water company approximately $80,000 to build water infrastructure improvements; this Midas donation is not without precedence.

Yellow Pine Water Users’ Assoc. submitted a written report to keep the community informed. (see attached) Residents need to be aware that there will be a considerable increase in the 2019 service fees. A Water Users’ meeting is planned for October. The date has not yet been arranged. The company is separate from the YPVA and residents may purchase shares if they wish to vote and participate in the management. See Willie Sullivan.

Heli-spot landing pad Anne Forster reported that the pad should be ready for use this coming winter after Danny Saleen did considerable work with his tractor. Removing additional trees at the site would be helpful and would allow for landing two helicopters, but that can only be done by Boise National Forest. The site is on the East Fork road near the Yellow Pine/Johnson Creek intersection. Contact Cecil Dallman and Merle Saleen with questions. Yellow Pine Fire Protection District (YPFD) is actively involved in the project.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection Dist. Anne Forster reported that the YPFD has brush clearing and chimney cleaning equipment for residents to borrow. The trucks and other equipment are kept ready even during the winter, inside the building. The Fire Commissioners are investigating the purchase of a new truck to replace one currently used. Training occurs every Sunday during Summer months and everyone is encouraged to become involved. The Commissioners are talking with Big Creek/Edwardsburg residents to assist them in improving their fire protection. There are two “pumpkins”, above ground collapsible water containers used for firefighting, available. Florescent paint and tape were recently applied to mark the fire hydrants. With current dangerous fire conditions, the local area is closely monitored by citizens.

New Business

Restroom construction at the Community Hall: Lorrine Munn read a letter from the Welch and Sullivan families (see attached). Please read this letter, and the letter regarding the Golf Tournaments, so everyone in the community understands this project and the funding.

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019 June 18th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th. Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.

[Note: Missing letters from YPWUA and from the Welch and Sullivan families at press time 9-23]

Midas Gold and Yellow Pine

August 28, 2018

Attached is the Community Partnership Agreement the Village of Yellow Pine signed with Midas Gold.

link to: 2018 Community Partnership Agreement.pdf
— — — —

YPFD News:

Next meeting: YPFD Commissioners Meeting October 6, 2018 10am YP Community Center

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.

There was a YPFD Budget Hearing September 22, no minutes yet.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911 @ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

A lot of progress has been made on the new Helipad near the crossroads.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

– Fire Chief Jeff

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Open for summer (208) 633-3377
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern 633-2233

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
— — — —

The Corner 633-3325

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
— — — —

Deadwood Outfitters
We’re currently interviewing for winter caretakers. A remote location and snowmobile only access in winter.
Duty services include:
Guest cabin up keep
Preparing meals
Keeping porches shoveled
And enjoying lots of solitude.
For more info. deadwoodoutfit @ gmail.com
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Sept 17) overnight low of 29 degrees, almost clear sky and light frost this morning, light chilly breeze. Traffic kicking up a lot of dust. A female hairy woodpecker and a couple of fluffed up finches visiting. Convoy of trucks and trailers headed up main street around 1pm. Sunny warm day, breezy afternoon, high of 78 degrees. Partly cloudy at sundown and calmer. Raven flying and calling at dusk.

Tuesday (Sept 18) overnight low of 29 degrees, dry – not much frost or dew, almost clear sky except for the haze of smoke (and dust) in the air, light breezes. Two fluffed up finches visiting this morning. A few noisy airplanes and light traffic kicking up dust this morning. Increasing smoke and decreasing visibility by 11am. Early afternoon mostly cloudy, lighter breezes, a little better air quality, high of 76 degrees. Low loud airplane circled over the village a little after 1pm, windy and warm. Clarks nutcracker and a steller jay flying around the neighborhood and calling. Mostly clear at dusk, fat waxing moon over Antimony Ridge.

Wednesday (Sept 19) overnight low of 31 degrees, frost and dew wetting roofs, clear sky and moderate haze of smoke. Looks like a fly-in on the airstrip camera, loud airplanes buzzing the village off and on during the morning and again during the heat of the afternoon. Raven flying and calling, not many song birds around. Increasing traffic and dust in the afternoon. Warm and mostly cloudy, stiff afternoon breezes, high of 73 degrees. Calmer and better air quality after sundown. Smoky yellow/orange moon at dark.

Thursday (Sept 20) overnight low of 29 degrees, dry – not much frost/dew, looks clear to mostly clear above moderate haze of smelly smoke, poor air quality. Multiple loud airplanes flying over the village at 1018am. Clear and smoky at lunch time, a little breezy. Another group of airplanes buzzed the village at 135pm. Breezy and mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, a little better air quality, high of 69 degrees. High wispy clouds at sundown, slight breeze and much better air quality. Fat fuzzy orange waxing moon rising above Antimony ridge at dark.

Friday (Sept 21) overnight low of 29 degrees, dry – hardly any dew/frost, appears to be mostly clear above layer of smoke – poor air quality. One finch visiting, hardly any birds around. Pine squirrel scolding from the trees. A pack of noisy airplanes buzzing the village after sunup. Warm, dry early afternoon, a few high wispy clouds and lighter haze of smoke, somewhat better air quality. Long legged wasps are active. Multiple shots fired to the west starting at 233pm. Warm afternoon, increasing clouds, high of 77 degrees. Overcast by evening, calmer and better air quality – light haze of smoke and dust.

Saturday (Sept 22) overnight low of 33 degrees, dry – not much dew, looks partly cloudy above the smoke – poor air quality again. Young pine squirrel scolding from the fence. Mostly cloudy by early afternoon, thinner smoke and better air quality, high of 76 degrees. By evening the smoke was getting thicker again, mostly cloudy and nearly calm at sundown.

Sunday (Sept 23) overnight low of 39 degrees, morning rain showers (0.04″), mostly cloudy and much better air quality. Heard a hairy woodpecker flapping and calling in the neighborhood. Partly cloudy, warm and breezy early afternoon, good air quality, high of 68 degrees. Lots of long legged wasps looking to get inside sheds. Fall colors brightening up the hills. A few gun shots to the west at 620pm. Partly cloudy at sundown, good air quality and slight breeze.
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Idaho News:

Sept. 29 fun run to aid Wildland Firefighter Foundation

The Star-News September 20, 2018

The 5EV Memorial Run near Yellow Pine on Saturday, Sept. 29 will raise money for the 5EV Memorial Trail Fund and Wildland Firefighter Foundation.

This 3.6 mile trail run will start at 10 a.m. Sept 29 at the Williams Peak Trailhead on the East Fork Road and end at the summit of the trail, a 3,021 feet elevation change.

A community barbecue will be held after the race at 4 p.m. at The Corner in Yellow Pine, with the roasted pig provided by Midas Gold Inc.

For additional information or to sign up for the race, contact Matt Huber at matt@ypcorner.com or 208-633-3325.

source:
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CPR, First Aid classes to be held in Donnelly

The Star-News September 20, 2018

The Donnelly Fire Station will host a CPR/AED class on Tuesday, Oct. 2, and a First Aid class on Wednesday, Oct. 3, at 6 p.m.

Cost is $20 for both courses, and space is limited. To register, call 208-325-8619.

The Donnelly Fire Station is located at 244 W. Roseberry Road.

source:
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Lake Cascade algae declines, but health warning still in place

2018algae-a

Satellite photo shows extent of algae bloom in Lake Cascade on Sept. 11

 

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 20, 2018

A health advisory was still in effect this week over a bloom of blue-green algae in Lake Cascade, but the toxic bacteria is on the decline, Idaho Department of Environmental Quality officials said.

 

Satellite photos taken on Sunday show the bloom breaking up and it appears less widespread than before, DEQ Watershed Coordinator Chase Cusack said.

There are still some concentrated areas of the algae towards the south end of the lake by the dam and north of Sugarloaf Campground, he said.

“We’re hopeful that with the cooling weather that the health advisory could be over soon,” Cusack said.

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A Place in History: McCall seeks to place airport hangar on national register

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News September 20, 2018

Most people driving by the red hangar at the McCall Airport only see an old, battered building. But when Walt Sledzieski drives by, he sees an important part of McCall’s past.

Sledzieski heads the McCall Historic Preservation Commission, which plans to nominate the former Johnson Flying Service hangar at the airport to the National Register of Historic Places.

In doing so, he hopes to spur a passion for the history of McCall’s aviation establishment in local residents, especially youths.

Known as the “red hangar” or the “Elevation 5,021’” building, the hangar is the airport’s oldest building at about 80 years, Sledzieski said. The building covers 4,758 square feet.

Johnson Flying Service was founded by Bob Johnson in 1924 and headquartered in Missoula, Mt.. The service operated out of the hangar beginning at its completion in the mid-1930s until about 1980.

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Fall Newsletter 2018 – UI Extension, Valley County

link:
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New trespass law impacts hunters

Major increase in punishment

Steve Liebenthal Sep 19, 2018 KIVI TV

Pat Ewing loves to hunt in Adams County. On this day, he is looking for grouse but he says a new trespass law makes him leery about hunting in this area.

“Down in the woods I just saw a grouse fly out to the left through the forest. I would like to go hunt and pursue that grouse. I don’t know if I can because of the private property law that passed, I could be in big trouble and get big fines if I go on private property and hunt.”

The new law that went into effect July first dramatically harshens the penalty for trespassing, while easing landowners requirements to identify private property. “The new thing is that the requirement for landowners to post their property every 660 feet is no longer part of the code,” said IDFG’s Matt O’Connell. “So now it’s a reasonable person standard where if the property is marked in such a way that a reasonable person would believe it’s private, that’s the main requirement.”

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Absentee ballots go out by mail this week in Idaho

by Scott Logan Tuesday, September 18th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — In-person early voting begins Oct. 15th in Ada County but the election really starts on Friday when absentee ballots are mailed out throughout Idaho.

“The very first ballots will go out live to voters on Friday,” said Phil McGrane, chief deputy clerk for Ada County. “It’s all our absentee ballot requests that have been coming in from voters throughout the community as well as any military and overseas voters. We start 45 days out.”

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Mining News:

Ask Midas: What Are Your Plans for Accessing the Site?

July 19

Midas Gold Idaho wants to keep the community informed about the work we are doing at the Stibnite Gold Project site. The Ask Midas blog series gives the experts in our company a chance to answer some of the community’s most frequently asked questions and help clear up any misconceptions around the project.

The Stibnite Gold Project is located 39 miles east of McCall and just outside the village of Yellow Pine. To get there today, you have to travel on narrow, winding dirt roads right alongside major fish-bearing creeks and rivers. When we were developing our plan for the redevelopment and restoration of the Stibnite site, we wanted to find the safest way for our employees to get to the site during mining while minimizing our impacts on, and risks to, the environment. Today, I want to give you more details about our plans to access the site during construction, operations and restoration.

What Your Plans for Traveling to and From the Site?

Under our plan, we propose to upgrade Burntlog Road starting at Landmark in order to access the site utilizing existing Forest Service roads wherever possible. This route will allow us to stay away from major fish-bearing creeks and rivers, avoid known avalanche sites in the winter and reduce potential conflicts with other folks who use the South Fork and Johnson Creek Roads. We believe it will take us one year to upgrade Burntlog Road and connect it to the existing Thunder Mountain Road, once our plan is approved. We would continue to use the South Fork, Johnson Creek and Stibnite roads until the upgrades are complete.

Our plans for travel to and from the project site were designed to prioritize the safety of our employees and Idahoans, given the frequent avalanches and rock falls that occur along the South Fork and Stibnite roads as well as the presence of local residents and road users. We know that continued access is a very important issue for many Idahoans, so our plan tries to maintain recreational access so that Idahoans can continue to safely hike, hunt, fish, snowmobile and explore the areas surrounding the site much as they do today. This is why, after hearing feedback from the public, we submitted an additional proposal for regulators to consider allowing public access to Thunder Mountain on Stibnite Road from Yellow Pine and through the site when it is safe and feasible, in addition to access along the improved Burntlog Road. Temporary closures would still occur seasonally, and when needed, because of activity at site. During construction and operations, we will be using very large equipment and, at times, we will need to us explosives to break ore and development rock. We don’t want to take any unnecessary risks that could jeopardize people’s safety, so would keep people clear at these times, usually once per day.

We know Thunder Mountain is an important place for Idahoans and, no matter what, the community will still be able to access the area during construction and operations of our project by using Trapper Flats Road and Landmark to Burntlog Road. We believe strongly in protecting public lands and maintaining Idahoans access to the backcountry.

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US agency endorses plan to block new mining near Yellowstone

By Matthew Brown – 9/21/18 AP

Billings, Mont. — U.S. officials recommended approval on Friday of a plan to block new mining claims for 20 years on the forested public lands that make up Yellowstone National Park’s mountainous northern boundary.

Regional Forester Leanne Marten submitted a letter to the Bureau of Land Management endorsing the plan to withdraw 30,000 acres (12,140 hectares) in Montana’s Paradise Valley and the Gardiner Basin from new claims for gold, silver, platinum and other minerals, U.S. Forest Service spokeswoman Marna Daley said.

A final decision is up to the office of U.S. Interior Sec. Ryan Zinke, who favors the withdrawal. Zinke said in a statement that it could be finalized in coming weeks.

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Fire Season:

Prescribed Fires on the Payette National Forest

Date: September 21, 2018
Contact: Brian Harris (208) 634-0784 cell: (208) 634-6945

McCall, Idaho – The Payette National Forest will be conducting multiple prescribed fires (broadcast and pile burning) this fall. Depending on weather conditions, prescribed fire could take place anytime from now through early November.

“Fire is one of the most important natural agents of change in our forested ecosystems,” said Keith Lannom, Payette National Forest Supervisor. “Our previous use of prescribed fire played a role in reducing fuels within the Mesa wildfire area this summer. That reduction of fuels from prescribed fire allowed our firefighters to aggressively attack the Mesa fire.”

Prescribed fire plays a major role in forest restoration efforts by reducing accumulated fuels, while promoting long-term ecosystem integrity and sustainability by reducing the risk to communities and wildlife habitat from high-severity wildland fire.

The Council and Weiser Ranger Districts plans to apply fire to 2,000 acres in East Fork of the Weiser River and 30 acres in the area of the community of Bear.

The McCall and New Meadows Ranger Districts plans to burn 1,500 acres in the Lost Creek area, 5,000 acres in Rapid River (southwest of Pollock Mountain), 700 acres in the Upper Weiser River drainage, 300 acres near Rock Flat, and 300 acres in Bear Basin.

The Krassel Ranger District plans to ignite 2,500 acres in the Fourmile drainage, and 1,800 acres in the Bald Hill project area.

Trail heads and roads that lead into these areas will be posted with caution signs and a map of the prescribed fire locations. Fire personnel will work closely with the Idaho/Montana Airshed Group, the National Weather Service, and the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality to insure that smoke impacts are minimized. The decision to ignite on any given day will depend on favorable weather conditions and the need to reduce smoke effects as much as possible.

Smoke from these prescribed fires will be much less than what would be expected from a wildfire. If smoke concentrations approach air quality standards fire ignition may be delayed until air quality improves. Residual smoke may be visible for up to 2 weeks following ignition, but most of the smoke from the fires will dissipate 1-2 days after ignition.

These prescribed fires will reduce fuels near communities and improve current big game habitat by opening timber stands (maintaining the large tree component) and rejuvenating the herbaceous and browse component. In addition, birds and small mammals generally benefit from an increase in snags and/or coarse woody debris. Reducing accumulated fuels will not only increase available forage, but also promote long-term ecosystem integrity and sustainability by reducing the risk to habitat from high-severity wildland fire.

Smoke sensitive individuals may call Patrick Schon (McCall and New Meadows RDs; 347-0300), Justin Pappani (Krassel RD; 634-0600), or Phil Graeve (Council and Weiser RDs; 549-4200) with any concerns they may have about the planned prescribed fires. The public may also call the Ranger District for more information.

Prescribed fire is an important component of forest restoration and part of the comprehensive fire management program on the Payette National Forest. For more information, please call: Council RD: 253-0100; Krassel RD: 634-0974; McCall RD: 634-0400; New Meadows RD: 347-0300; Weiser RD: 549-4200

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
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Idaho’s firefighting season bills come to $17 million

9/19/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — The state of Idaho’s bills for this year’s wildfire season has come in at about $17 million, in line with averages from recent years.

The Idaho Press reports the total expenditures from firefighting on state-protected lands this year came to more than $21 million, but more than $4 million of that is reimbursable from other agencies. The Idaho Legislature’s Joint Finance-Appropriations Committee set aside $20 million earlier this year to cover the state’s firefighting season costs.

Acting state Lands Department Director David Groeschl told members of the Land Board on Tuesday that moderate weather in September with more moisture weakened the state’s fire conditions, and restrictions on campfires and some other activity on state lands are being lifted this week. Fire crews have a solid handle on the remaining wildfires on state land, he said.

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Public Lands:

BCYPSR Collaborative – Meeting Sept 27th Canceled

Here is an update from the Steering Committee:

Kyle, Wes, Nathan, and Sandra met last month and are inching closer to reaching a final grand plan for the EFSFSR. We are confident that we will reach the finish line by the next collaborative meeting in October to get feedback from the collaborative as a whole. We will still shoot for having November be the last meeting should we be able to reach consensus.

The next meeting will be on Thursday, October 25th.
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Prescribed Burns planned for Fall 2018

Date Sept 19, 2018

The Krassel Ranger District, Payette National Forest is planning to implement prescribed burns in the Bald Hill and Four Mile project areas this fall. In the Bald Hill Project area we will be working in areas of Reegan Creek and Deadman Creek from the East Fork road up to Rainbow Ridge. In the Fourmile Project area we will be working on both sides of the South Fork, between Blackmare and Holdover Creeks on the west side of the river and in the Fourmile Creek drainage on the east side. See attached map for more specific areas. Ignitions will likely take place in September or October, dependent on weather and fuel conditions. Primary ignitions will take 1-3 days for each burn block, with residual smoke and flame present until the next significant rain. Please do not hesitate to give a call or email with questions, my contact information is lenelson@fs.fed.us or desk phone is 208-634-0622.

Thanks and have a nice day,

Laurel Ingram
Fuels Technician
Payette National Forest
Krassel Ranger District

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing a prescribed burn on the south facing aspect between Deadman Creek and Reegan Creek along the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River this fall. The edge of burn block E is about 5 miles west of Yellow Pine. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 1-3 days in September or October 2018.

(click here for larger image size)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622.

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing the Four Mile Prescribed fire project this fall. Ignitions may take place between Reed Ranch and Poverty Flat Camp Ground on both sides of the South Fork of the Salmon River. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 2 or more days in September or October.

(click here for larger image size)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622
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Land management agencies to lift Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in southwest Idaho

Date: 9/19/2018
Contacts: Bureau of Land Management – Jared Jablonski 208-384-3378
Forest Service – Stephaney Kerley 208-373-4105
Idaho Department of Land – Sharla Arledge 208-334-0233

Boise, Idaho – With cooler temperatures lowering the threat of wildfires, state and federal land management agencies will lift Stage 1 Fire Restrictions on all lands within southwest Idaho effective Sept. 21, 2018 beginning at 12:01 a.m.

The Stage 1 fire restrictions will be lifted in the Treasure Valley, West Central Mountains, Snake/Weiser River, and Owyhee Mountains of Idaho, which includes all federal, state and private forestland and rangeland in:

* Ada, Adams, Canyon, Gem, Payette, Elmore, Boise, Valley, Washington and Owyhee Counties
* Within Washington County, all Bureau of Reclamation lands surrounding Mann Creek Reservoir
* Within Valley County, all Bureau of Reclamation lands surrounding Lake Cascade
* Within Elmore and Boise counties, all Bureau of Reclamation lands surrounding Arrowrock and Anderson Ranch reservoirs

These restrictions are being lifted by agencies managing or providing wildland fire protection, including the U.S Forest Service (USFS), Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL). Fire managers divide Idaho into zones and fire restrictions will be lifted in the following zones:

Snake/Weiser River Zone:

* All state, private and BLM lands east of the Snake River, north and west of Highway 95 to the Little Weiser River, and north of the Little Weiser River to the Payette NF boundary. The boundary then follows the Payette NF boundary back to the Snake River.

Treasure Valley Fire Restrictions Zone

* All of Ada, Canyon, Gem, Payette and Washington counties. Portions of Boise County including the administrative boundary of Lucky Peak Lake to Arrowrock Dam, south shore of Arrowrock Reservoir and that portion of Elmore County that lies south of the South Fork Boise River to Anderson Ranch Dam, south along Anderson Dam Road (FS Rd 134) to Highway 20, east on Highway 20 to the Elmore/Gooding County line south to Interstate 84. The Treasure Valley Restriction area is bounded by the Idaho/Oregon boundary to Oreana then follows the Bachman Grade to Triangle and continues east-northeast of the Owyhee Front to the Bruneau River. The northern boundary begins near Weiser, Idaho and follows Highway 95 to Indian Valley, then generally follows the Little Weiser River to the Payette and Boise National Forest boundary lines.

West Central Mountains Fire Restrictions Zone

* Boise National Forest, Boise District BLM and State and Endowment Lands within Elmore County, Boise County, and Valley County to include all Bureau of Reclamation lands surrounding Lake Cascade. From the point where the Boise National Forest boundary intersects State Highway 20 near Dixie following the Boise National Forest boundary west and north along the ridge of the Danskin to Boise Front foothills and extending north encompassing the Idaho Department of Lands to its intersection back with the Boise National Forest boundary near Sage Hen Reservoir. The far northern boundary includes all Boise National Forest lands, excluding the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. All lands north of Sage Hen Reservoir including Tripod Mountain and West Mountain within the North Fork Payette River drainage north to near Tamarack Resort.

Owyhee Fire Restrictions Zone

* All of Owyhee County west of the Bruneau Canyon.

Fire managers are asking the public to continue to be extra cautious when spending time in the outdoors. As a reminder, fireworks are prohibited on state and private forestland and rangeland during closed fire season (May 10 through Oct. 20), and on public lands, roads and trails in Idaho all times of the year.

Controlled burning restrictions may be in place due to air quality through the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality. Information about DEQ burn bans is available here: http://deq.idaho.gov/air-quality.aspx. The IDL fire safety burn permit is required during closed fire season, and local burn permits may be as well. To obtain permits for controlled burning activities, visit: http://burnpermits.idaho.gov/

For more information about fire restrictions and to view an interactive map, visit http://www.idahofireinfo.com

If you are planning a visit to public lands in these areas, please check with the Boise National Forest (www.fs.usda.gov/boise), the BLM Idaho (www.blm.gov/idaho), or the Idaho Department of Lands (www.idl.idaho.gov) websites for the latest information or visit http://www.idahofireinfo.com

Link to: 9-21-2018+-+0402-00-55+BNF+2018+Stage+1+TERMINATION.pdf

Link to: 9-19-2018+Stage+1+Fire+Restrictions+Lifted+BOI+%26+Payette.pdf
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Reminders for hunters on National Forest Lands

Boise, Idaho. September 21, 2018 – Forest Service law enforcement officers on the Boise, Payette and Sawtooth National Forests have received numerous complaints from hunters regarding illegal OHV use on designated trails and National Forest Systems (NFS) roads.

Motor Vehicle Use Maps (MVUM) that delineate the designated system of open roads and trails authorized for public motorized travel are a must have item for individuals operating any type of motorized vehicle.

MVUMs are free of cost, and are updated annually. They are available at all USFS district offices or can be downloaded to electronic devices through the Avenza App.

• All Boise National Forest (MVUM) can be downloaded here:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/boise/maps-pubs/?cid=stelprdb5053223

• All Payette National Forest (MVUM) can be downloaded here:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/detailfull/payette/home/?cid=stelprdb5112468&width=full

• All Sawtooth National Forest (MVUM) can be downloaded here:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/sawtooth/maps-pubs/?cid=stelprdb5421960

The penalty for violating National Forest Systems land regulations is a misdemeanor and can include up to a $5,000 fine, six months in jail, or both. The Forest Service may seek restitution for the repair of damaged areas, which often times costs thousands of dollars. Individuals witnessing illegal OHV usage are encourage to report violations to their local Ranger District.

Know before you go by visiting the Forest Alerts and notices pages that list all current closures:

• Boise National Forest: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices.

• Payette National Forest: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/payette/alerts-notices

• Sawtooth National Forest: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/sawtooth/alerts-notices
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Forest Products Modernization Announcement

Nora Rasure by payetteforestcoalition on 09/20 10:27 AM

Forests across the nation are facing serious challenges. Having sustainable, healthy, resilient forests in the future depends on our ability to address these challenges today. In 2017, the Forest Service began a strategic effort designed to better align our culture, policies, and procedures for how we manage and sell forest products with current and future forest restoration needs. The goal of this effort is to increase the pace and scale of restoration, improve forest conditions, and improve efficiency of forest products delivery.

Forest Products Modernization (FPM) is an overarching Forest Service effort to better train its employees, reform policy, increase use of technology, and adjust processes to improve efficiency. To achieve our goals, we need your help. We recognize the importance of strengthening existing and developing new relationships with our stakeholders and partners in this effort.

You may have heard of another parallel change effort going on within the Forest Service, called Environmental Analysis and Decision Making (EADM). These two change efforts are distinct, but connected. EADM is focused on increasing efficiency and reducing the cost of our environmental analysis and decision-making processes, while FPM is focused on better aligning the agency’s business practices for delivering forest products with current and future forest restoration needs. Together, these two efforts will allow us to get more work done on the ground and improve the overall conditions of our national forests.

In partnership with the National Forest Foundation, we are launching a series of FPM partner feedback sessions across the country, designed to enable two-way discussion and exploration between the Forest Service and our partners and stakeholders, presented virtually with satellite locations at select Forest Service units. An initial session in our Washington, DC headquarters took place on September 11, 2018. Regional sessions to present this same material are scheduled for:

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The U.S. Forest Service is hiring 1,900 seasonal staffers

Kate Streit Sep 14, 2018 KIVI TV

If you’re seeking a cure for those end-of-summer blues, just think of all the adventure next summer might bring — like perhaps a new job with the U.S. Forest Service, which is currently hiring more than 1,900 seasonal workers for spring and summer 2019.

The agency oversees 154 national forests and 20 national grasslands. Many of the jobs are located in two main regions, with about 1,000 positions available in the Pacific Northwest and 900 positions in the Rocky Mountain Region.

Both areas are known for their beautiful natural scenery and would be ideal places for outdoor enthusiasts to work. The other seven regions are also hiring for some positions.

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Tourist arrested after walking onto Old Faithful geyser, apparently urinating into hot spring

A video of the incident was posted on Facebook and widely shared.

Author Trevor Hughes, USA TODAY September 18, 2018 (KTVB)

Park rangers arrested a tourist after he walked onto the Old Faithful geyser and apparently urinated into it in front of hundreds of horrified tourists at Yellowstone National Park.

Video of the Friday incident has been widely shared online after a Wyoming woman recorded rangers screaming at the man to get off the dangerous geyser known for spewing boiling water. Rangers confirmed the incident but have refused to release the man’s identity or the charges he faces. The man, who was wearing a black shirt and maroon pants, ignored multiple warning signs and left a protective boardwalk to reach the hot spring.

“This is the Park Service,” a ranger yells to the man in the now viral video. “Get on the boardwalk.”

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Yellowstone geyser-walk suspect arrested again, in Cheyenne

AP Sep 20, 2018

Cheyenne, Wyo. (AP) – A man accused of walking dangerously close to Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park faces additional charges after a police chase in Cheyenne.

Police said Thursday they arrested 27-year-old Gabriel Villalva, of Greeley, Colorado, after he drove recklessly around Wyoming’s capital city. Cheyenne is a 7-hour drive from Yellowstone.

Police say they stopped Villalva with spike strips after a 15-minute chase Wednesday. They say Villalva spun his wheels and his SUV caught fire.

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Letters to Share:

Nuisance bear problems continue in McCall area

During the past two weeks, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game has removed three more bears that became too habituated to human foods.

Unfortunately, when bears find human food even once, they will visit that area over and over to find those foods again. Just one trash can or bird feeder can start the cycle, which is then very hard to break.

We do not want to manage bears by killing them. Ideally, the bears that live near McCall would never find human food on their occasional trips through town. But we need everyone’s help to make that happen.

If you don’t have a bear-resistant dumpster, please get one – even if you are outside city limits. Do not feed birds or hummingbirds at this time of year. A bear can get more calories from one bird feeder than from a whole pound of huckleberries.

Most importantly, talk to your neighbors. If you see they have bird feeders out, or their trash can is too full and won’t latch, talk to them about what that means for bears and for your neighborhood. Help make sure visitors and part-time residents get this information, too. They’re hard for us to reach.

Regan Berkley, Regional Wildlife Manager, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, McCall

source: The Star-News September 20, 2018
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Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.

9/18/2018

Greetings from Mystic Farm:

This may be the hardest post I have ever had to write. My sweet Murphy – my LGD – my faithful buddy – chased down and brutally killed one of the fawns – one of the innocent fawns he was to protect. There is no coming back from that. Today I am grieving two losses…the beautiful little fawn I so deeply loved and cared for all these months – and my Murphy. He has been turned over to a rescue group that will be in charge of vetting and finding him the perfect home. I just have to let go – but my heart hurts like I never thought possible…

On a happier note, all the rest of the fawns (12) are doing great on their soft release. We looked out the window yesterday and eight of the group were prancing off into the woods behind a resident doe! They were gone for most of the day – but did return for their nighttime bottle (after which they are locked in for their safety and released again in the morning). All are fat, happy, and enjoying their freedom…

Remember to put October 20th on your calendars. Mystic Farm will be at the Ponderay Event Center with the wonderful handmade candles, T-shirts, hats, and raffle tickets for your purchase! There are still some vendor spaces available if you wish to be a part of the fun – let me know and I will put you in contact with the person organizing the event.

Speaking of the raffle…the event on October 20th will be the last day to purchase your tickets to win half a gourmet hog (cut and wrapped) generously donated by Maker’s Long Acres. You can purchase your tickets by mail – just let us know how many and we will fill them out and throw them in the hamper for you…the honor system works for us. Just send a check or PayPal for your purchase (make sure to put “raffle” in the subject line). Tickets: $5.00 each or five for $20.00. No limit on how many you can purchase!

Finally, a huge thank you to everyone donating apples and garden produce this year for the fawns. Feeding 13 fawns gets to be quite expensive! This year Safeway in Sandpoint came on board – along with Tango Cafe and Winter Ridge – and has provided the babes with plenty of fresh goodies to supplement their natural browse and bottles.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support…couldn’t do this without you.

Sincerely,
Dory and all
Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.
710 Sanctuary Hills
Sagle, ID 83860

FB: http://www.facebook.com/mysticfarmwildliferescue
Website: http://www.mystic-farm.com
PayPal: mysticfarmrescue @ yahoo.com
208 241-7081
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Critter News:

FDA: Your pets’ flea and tick medicine could cause them neurological issues

Justin Boggs Sep 20, 2018 KIVI TV

The FDA warned pet owners on Thursday that some flea and tick medicine could cause neurologic adverse events for dogs and cats.

The flea and tick medicine are in the isoxazoline class. Drugs in this class include Bravecto, Credelio, Nexgard and Simparica.

The FDA said that these products can and have been safely used in the majority of dogs and cats, pet owners should consult with their veterinarian to review their pets’ medical histories and determine whether a product in the isoxazoline class is appropriate for their pet.

The FDA said that neurologic events such as muscle tremors, ataxia and seizures could be caused by the aforementioned medicines.

continued w/link to more info:

Note from Cascade Vet Clinic

9-23-2018

Some oral flea/tick preventatives can cause neurologic signs in dogs (the drugs listed include bravecto, simparica, nexgard, Credelio)

– Keep in mind that these side effects happen in a very small percentage of pets and that serious side effects from over-the-counter flea controls can actually be worse.

– Furthermore, serious diseases and conditions carried or caused by the FLEAS and TICKS that these products prevent are far more likely to cause pets (and their humans) problems than this class of flea controls themselves.

– We have seen very few (1 or 2 cases) which MIGHT have a link to these products.

– Our staff and doctors continue to use these products on their own personal pets as the benefits far outweigh the risks. Please talk to us with any concerns! We will keep you apprised of any major concerns!
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Therapy dogs help patients, staff at Saint Alphonsus

by Haley Squiers Tuesday, September 18th 2018


(CBS 2 News Staff Photo)

Boise, Idaho — Going to the hospital for any reason usually involves some level of stress.

“Helping Idaho Dogs” is a group of dogs that are working to help.

And, it’s a job that therapy dogs, Bernie and Blaze do very well.

“They bring a level of comfort,” said Blaze’s handler and owner, Nancy Eimer. “Just touching their soft fur or seeing those warm brown eyes looking at you can just make a total difference in how the day has gone.”

continued:
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Boise high school student saves dog from drowning in pond

When Timberline High School senior Will Hall went to check on an irrigation pump, he saw a golden retriever fighting for his life.

Author: Tami Tremblay September 20, 2018 KTVB

Boise — A Timberline High School student is being credited with saving a dog’s life. The senior found a golden retriever named Thor fighting for his life in an irrigation pond and jumped in to make sure the dog didn’t drown.

It happened on Monday and started with a pair of dogs jumping a fence and going on an adventure. They live with their owners just past the Idaho Shakespeare Festival along Warm Springs Avenue.

The rescue happened about five hours later, only about a mile away, when a 17-year-old went to check on an irrigation pump.

continued:
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Charges will not be filed against man who shot 2 Rigby dogs

One dog killed while the other is treated

By Matthew Cooper Sep 19, 2018 Local News 8

Rigby, ID – Charges will not be filed against the man who shot the two dogs in Rigby.

The dogs’ owner says his neighbor admitted to shooting at them when they got into his chicken coop. The neighbor claims he was protecting his hens, but did not intend to hurt the dogs. He said he only wanted to scare them off.

Rigby Police Chief, Sam Tower, says the neighbor was within his rights, so he will not be charged. The neighbor’s name has not been released.

continued:
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State marksman kills wolf from pack in northeast Washington

9/18/18 AP

Olympia, Wash. — A marksman with Washington state has shot and killed a young member of a wolf pack that was targeted because it attacked cattle in northeast Washington.

The state Department of Fish and Wildlife said Tuesday that a wolf from the so-called Old Profanity Territory was shot from a helicopter Sunday.

Agency director Kelly Susewind authorized the killing of one or more wolves last week after state officials documented several cattle attacks in Ferry County this month.

continued:
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Deputies investigating suspicious colt death

By Michael Collett Sep 18, 2018 Local News 8

Madison County (KIFI/KIDK)- – The Madison County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the killing of a colt in Thornton.

The owners of the colt live 4 to 5 miles away from the pasture where it was at.

Madison County deputies received a call at 7:30 Monday morning about the colt.

continued:
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Court sets trial dates for man accused in horses’ deaths

Sep 18, 2018 AP

Ontario, Ore. (AP) – A southwestern Idaho man who was charged with misdemeanor animal abuse after four of his horses were found dead in a pasture earlier this year will go to trial in January.

The Argus Observer newspaper in Ontario, Oregon reports Shannon Pearce has been scheduled for trial on Jan. 9 and 10. The horses were found dead in a Payette County pasture in mid-July, and police say the water trough in the pasture was dry.

Pearce has pleaded not guilty to the charges.

Animal abuse is generally a misdemeanor in Idaho with a maximum penalty of a $1,000 fine and one year in jail.

source:
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Pocatello considers wildlife feeding ordinance

Sep 19, 2018 Local News 8

Pocatello, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Pocatello City Council will hold a public hearing Thursday to consider an ordinance aimed at regulating the feeding of wildlife within city limits.

The city has seen a number of recent incidents involving not-always welcome wildlife encounters involving mountain lions, deer, two varieties of turkeys, moose, bears, and other animals.

The ordinance would prohibit citizens living in identified urban wildlife interface zones “from intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly feeding or attracting wildlife within city limits.” Those zones are defined as areas where wild lands and its wildlife meet and overlap in an urban setting.

continued:
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Boise Firefighters rescue falcon on Boise State Campus

by CBS 2 News Staff Monday, September 17th 2018


The falcon was found in the stairwell of the Lincoln Parking Garage. (Photo courtesy Boise Fire)

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — A falcon was trapped in a Boise State parking garage and Boise Fire shared some photos of the little guy Monday afternoon.

“Sometimes we respond to calls that are a bit out of the ordinary,” they said in the post.

continued w/photos:
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Idaho city seeks volunteers to scare off crowds of crows

9/20/18 AP

Nampa, Idaho — City officials in Idaho are looking for volunteers to help ward off what has become a local sign of fall: The arrival of roughly 10,000 crows to the city of Nampa.

Nampa Chief of Staff Robert Sanchez tells Boise television station KTVB that he expects the annual migration of crows to start in the next week or two. The birds congregate around businesses downtown, creating a public health hazard with their droppings and sometimes breaking tree branches because of their combined weight.

Sanchez is looking for volunteers to help track when and where the crows show up to roost, and to use noisemakers and hand-held laser devices to scare the crows away.

The animals are protected by the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act, so the city takes only non-lethal approaches to crow control.

source:
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$1,000 reward issued for info on illegal stocking of walleye in Lake Cascade

by CBS 2 News Staff Friday, September 21st 2018

Cascade, Idaho (CBS 2) — A $1,000 reward is being offered for information on who illegally stocked walleye into Lake Cascade.

Idaho Fish and Game says the fish was illegally stocked in the reservoir and it’s the first-ever confirmed report of walleye in Lake Cascade.

“This illegal introduction was carefully thought out,” Dale Allen, Idaho Fish and Game fisheries manager said in August. “The closest walleye fishery is more than 200 miles from Cascade. To survive the extended transport time, this fish – and possibly others – would have required clean, cold, aerated water for a number of hours.”

Fish and game says walleye in Lake Cascade threatens one of the country’s premiere yellow perch fisheries.

Anyone with information about the incident is asked to call 1-800-632-5999.

source:
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International 10-year salmon preservation plan advances

By Gillian Flaccus – 9/17/18 AP

Portland, Ore. — Canada and the U.S. states of Alaska, Oregon and Washington would all reduce their catch of fragile salmon species under the terms of an updated international agreement that, if approved, will spell out the next decade of cooperation between the U.S. and Canada to keep the migratory fish afloat in Pacific waters.

Members of the Pacific Salmon Commission on Monday recommended a conservation plan that stretches to 2028 after two years of intense negotiations involving fishermen, tribes on both sides of the border and state and federal officials. It must be approved by both the U.S. and Canadian governments.

The international commission first met in 1985 to create more cooperation between Canada and the U.S. on protecting salmon, which migrate thousands of miles from inland streams to the Pacific Ocean and then back to their spawning place. The agreement covers pink, Coho, sockeye, chum and chinook salmon and spans a territory from Cape Falcon, Oregon, in the south to southeast Alaska in the north. The current agreement expires Dec. 31.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

F&G dropping Stage 1 fire restrictions starting Friday, Sept. 21

Change means campfires are allowed in usual places

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Idaho Fish and Game will remove the stage 1 fire restrictions from lands it owns or manages, which will be in conjunction with Idaho Department of Lands removing restrictions statewide, effective Friday, Sept. 21.

Fish and Game may continue to prohibit fires in localized areas, which will be posted to notify the public of continued fire restrictions.

Fire season is winding down in Idaho, but land closures from recent fires, planned or active prescribed fires, and other fire-related restrictions could remain. To get more details, go to the Fire Information Page.

source:
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Youth Pheasant Hunts scheduled in Salmon and Challis

By Mike Demick, Conservation Information Supervisor
Friday, September 21, 2018

Idaho Department of Fish and Game will host Youth Pheasant Hunts for Salmon and Challis-area youth age 10-17 on Saturday, October 6. Both hunts will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in Salmon and Challis.

continued:
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Gov. Otter proclaims Saturday, Sept. 22 as Idaho Hunting and Fishing Day

The day highlights the contributions hunting and fishing make to the state

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Friday, September 21, 2018

C.L. “Butch” Otter, Governor of Idaho, has proclaimed Saturday, Sept. 22, 2018 to be Hunting and Fishing Day.

According to the proclamation, Idaho has a rich and storied tradition of hunting and angling that dates to before statehood, and carries forward to this day.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Funny Critter Stuff:

Hungry bear rips apart cars at Tahoe trailhead

Forest Service tweets photos of cars

“DO NOT leave any scented items in your car or it may look like this when you return,” the Forest Service tweeted.

Both the insides and the outsides of the cars had damage during the attacks, which happened Wednesday.
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Seasonal Humor:

BearHotel-a
[h/t SMc]

HuntingDeerTeeth-a.jpg
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Sept 16, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 16, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
September 22 at 10am Community Hall YPFD Budget Hearing
September 22 Celebration of Life for Chris Petersen at 2pm, YP Tavern
September 29 Wildland Firefighter Foundation Fund Raiser and Yellow Pine Community BBQ

(details below)
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Village News:

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

The Yellow Pine and Warm Lake Transfer sites are seeing other material deposited into the Woody Debris pile which violates our agreement with the Forest Service to have the Woody Debris allowed to be there. The Valley County Commission is requesting assistance from the folks in Yellow Pine to help police the Yellow Pine Transfer site. Valley County and/or Lakeshore employees are working to clean up the site this fall. To avoid losing the ability to have the Transfer Site be a place for woody debris to be allowed to be used. The Forest Service will continue to burn the debris but only if the other material is removed from the debris pile.

Other items being left on site is also not appreciated as this site is designed to just have Household Waste in the bins. Furniture and appliances left require additional costs and are not in our program. However with working with others we continue to handle the issues but maybe better education would help.

Gordon Cruickshank, Valley County Commissioner


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Chris Petersen Celebration September 22

The Celebration of Chris Petersen’s life in Yellow Pine is set for 9/22/18 at 2pm at the YP Tavern. We will provide the main course., side dishes or desserts are welcome. Thank you. – ST
— — — —

Wildland Firefighter Foundation Fund Raiser and Yellow Pine Community BBQ September 29

Midas Gold Idaho and The Corner are proud to sponsor the 5EV Memorial Run.

This 3.6 mile trail run is a fund raiser for the 5EV Memorial Trail Fund and Wildland Firefighter Foundation. Donations are greatly appreciated. The race starts at 10:00 am at the Williams Peak Trailhead on the East Fork Rd. and ends at the summit of the trail; a 3021 ft. elevation change.

A Community BBQ will be held after the race at 4:00 pm, at The Corner in Yellow Pine, Idaho. The roasted pig is provided by Midas Gold Inc. with great food by The Corner and the volunteers of the Yellow Pine Community.

Proceeds from this event will be shared 50/50 between the 5EV Memorial Trail Fund and the Wildland Firefighters Foundation.

For additional information or to sign up for the race, contact: Matt Huber Matt @ ypcorner.com 208/633-3325
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Lost Tablet – Reward

On July 21 one of our crews lost a Samsung tablet on the Profile Road between the switchback below Red Metals mine road and Missouri Creek road. They realized it was missing almost immediately and went back and gridded the road for it, but could not find it. It could have bounced into the roadside brush, or been picked up off the road by someone traveling from Big Creek or Yellow Pine or vice versa.

This tablet has a summers worth of field data and we would sure like to have it back. Would you please spread the word that Ranger Botello will pay a handsome reward of cheeseburger, fries, pop and ice cream for its safe return!?

Contact: Anthony B. Botello, District Ranger, p: 208-634-0601, c: 208-634-9286
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Ice Hole Campground

The Cascade Ranger District [has] temporarily closed Ice Hole Campground for reconstruction beginning Monday, Aug. 6, 2018.

The Campground will remain closed for the remainder of the 2018 season. Project funding was provided by local Tribes and a State RV Grant.

Forest Service crews and contractors will repair existing resource damage, enabling visitors to have an improved recreational experience in the future.

link to project:

Ice Hole Update

Progress made with renovation and remodel of Cascade Ranger District – Ice Hole Campground!

Thanks for the photo shares from Boise NF employees Marie Willis and Danelle Highfill.

link to FB photo gallery:

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Possible Problem Bear

A report Sunday (Aug 19) of a “BIG bear” hanging out in the upper village. Be “Bear Aware” – Remember to secure your trash and pet food.

Update Friday (Aug 24) “it has been back but still not getting into anything.”

Video Link Bear Visitor Aug 20, 2018

Sept 16 – no recent reports of bear activity.
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Pests

Yellow Jackets are late this year, but really mean. Long legged wasps are not as numerous, but around. Mosquito population dropped during the hot dry summer. Lots of gnats out now. Numerous grasshoppers clacking about. Colombian ground squirrels have gone into hibernation. Chipmunks had a population boom this summer. Pine squirrels are not as numerous as in past years. Bears have been roaming the Abstein orchard looking for apples.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not dump appliances or tires at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

“Bring it, Don’t Burn it.” There is a burn pile for woody debris only. Please don’t put trash, construction debris or cardboard in the burn pile.
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Local Events:

Welch Labor Day Golf Tournament Sept. 1st

(No results by press time Sunday 9-16.)
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

July 24th Yellow Pine water update:

It is good to go back to the even/odd watering schedule. Even/odd means if your address is 315 Yellow Pine Avenue, you can water on odd days such as the 1st, 3rd, 5th etc. And if your address is 316, water in even numbered days. The only request is that watering be done between 6am and 1pm. Also please limit to one sprinkler at a time.

Also it is requested that no lawn watering be done August 1st through the 6th to be able to withstand the draw from Harmonica.

Our second sand filter will be on line soon and give us more capacity. Thank you everyone for your patience during the high water demand time. – SH

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.
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VYPA News:

The last 2018 meeting of the VYPA was September 8, 2pm, at the Community Hall, minutes pending approval.

Midas Gold and Yellow Pine

August 28, 2018

Attached is the Community Partnership Agreement the Village of Yellow Pine signed with Midas Gold.

link to: 2018 Community Partnership Agreement.pdf
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YPFD News:

September Meeting Date Changed:

One of our Fire Commissioners will not be able to make the scheduled YPFD 2018-19 budget meeting on the 8th.

The YPFD Budget Meeting will be rescheduled for September 22, 2008, 10:00 AM at the Yellow Pine Community Hall

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.

Yellow Pine Fire District Budget for Fiscal Year 2018 – 2019

Notice has been given that the Yellow Pine Fire District will hold a public hearing for consideration of the proposed budget, including the estimated revenue for the fiscal year, October 1, 2018 to September 20, 2019, pursuant to County Law chapter 14, Section 31-1419A. Said hearing will be held at the Yellow Pine Community Hall in Yellow Pine, Idaho on Saturday September 08, 2018, at 10:00 AM. At said hearing all interested persons may appear and show cause, if any they have, why said proposal budget should be adopted.

Proposed Expenditures:

The following budget is an estimate set forth in said budget of the total proposed expenditures and accruing indebtedness of the Yellow Pine Fire District for the Fiscal year 2018 – 2019.

Yellow Pine Fire District Budget for 2018 – 2019:

* Fire Fighting/Rescue: $8,132
* Wages: $0
* Advertising: $2,000
* Repairs and Maintenance: $4,000
* Utilities (Fixed Cost*) $4,000

Total:
Fixed: $4,000
Includes Insurance $2,500
Total $18,132

I, Dan Stiff, Chair Yellow Pine Fire Commissioner, Yellow Pine, Idaho, do hereby certify that the above is a true and correct statement of the proposed expenditures for the fiscal year 2018 – 2019. All have been tentatively approved and entered into district records. I further certify Yellow Pine Fire District did give notice for said hearing in two (2) conspicuous places in the fire district, by order of the commissioners. Residents are invited to attend the budget hearing on September 08, 2018, at 10:00 AM at the Yellow Pine Community Hall, and have the right to approve written or oral comments concerning the fire district budget. A copy of the proposed fire district budget in detail is available at 320 Westside Ave, Yellow Pine, Idaho, 83677.

Dated this 15th day of August 2018

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911 @ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

A lot of progress has been made on the new Helipad near the crossroads.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

– Fire Chief Jeff

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Open for summer (208) 633-3377
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Yellow Pine Tavern 633-2233

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
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The Corner 633-3325

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Sept 10) overnight low of 36 degrees, clear sky, dry (not much dew) and moderate haze of smoke and dust. One finch, one jay and a female hairy woodpecker visiting. Red flag fire weather warning for this afternoon and evening for dry and gusty winds. High thin clouds coming in before lunch, mostly cloudy and quite breezy by early afternoon and smoky, Gusty and warm afternoon, high of 80 degrees. By evening clear sky, haze of smoke and calmer.

Tuesday (Sept 11) overnight low of 35 degrees, mostly cloudy sky, light dew, variable breeze and light haze of smoke. Female hairy woodpecker calling from the forest, then visited at lunch time. By noon it was mostly clear and getting breezy. Mid-afternoon back to mostly cloudy and getting rather gusty, fairly good air quality, high of 74 degrees. Windy during the afternoon, overcast by sundown and calmer. Dry doe wandering down Pioneer Street at dusk.

Wednesday (Sept 12) overnight low of 34 degrees, overcast and haze of smoke. Power blipped off and on at 850am. One finch stopped by. Partly cloudy before noon, light chilly breezes and light haze of smoke. Around lunch time 3 muffled “booms” off in the distance, sounded like a cannon. Dark clouds and blustery winds mid-afternoon, cool, high of 63 degrees. Two cold looking fluffed up finches visited this afternoon. Mostly cloudy evening, calmer and light haze of smoke. Mama doe with twins and an extra on Pioneer Street after sundown. Driver hardly slowed down for them as they scrambled to find a place to get off the street. Smoke settling in during the night.

Thursday (Sept 13) overnight low of 33 degrees, mostly cloudy, dry (not much dew) and haze of smoke. Heard a robin and a couple of finches, a pine squirrel scolding somewhere in the neighborhood. Cool and cloudy mid-day. A couple of chilly looking fluffed up finches visiting at lunch time. Gusty breezes after 1pm. Sprinkles on and off after 130pm until a little after 2pm, cool and variable breezes, high of 63 degrees. Not enough rain to wet anything, barely made the roof damp. Clouds breaking up and by evening lots of blue sky, better air, slight haze.

Friday (Sept 14) overnight low of 27 degrees, heavy frost, clear sky, haze of smoke (smells like wet campfire.) A couple of fluffed up finches visiting. Streets are dusty, yesterday’s rain wasn’t enough. Flicker visiting at lunch time. Partly cloudy, light breezes, haze of dust and smoke mid-day. Mostly cloudy mid-afternoon and windy, high of 74 degrees. Local streets are very dusty. Lots of blue dragonflies this year, and quite a few grasshoppers. By sun down partly cloudy, lighter breezes and better air quality. Two robins calling at dark.

Saturday (Sept 15) did not get below freezing last night, no frost (not much dew), mostly cloudy sky, light breeze and haze of smoke. Light traffic kicking up dust. Pine squirrel and a female cassins finch visiting. Dark clouds by lunch time. Windy front with a little rain hit at 240pm, not enough rain to settle the dust, then steady rain after 330pm, high of 69 degrees. By sundown clouds breaking up and lighter breezes. Young deer bouncing around the golf course at dusk. A report that it is “duck-em and dodge-em” traffic on the South Fork road with hunting season open.

Sunday (Sept 16) overnight low of 33 degrees, clear sky, light frost, heavy dew and slight breeze. Very light haze of smoke up high, low level smoke from local wood stoves. A few finches visiting in the morning. Wind kicking up by lunch time. Young jay stopped by for lunch, a few robins in the neighborhood. Clear, sunny, mild temps and quite windy early afternoon, high of 72 degrees. Local streets have dried out and weekend traffic kicking up a lot of dust this afternoon. Clear and calmer toward evening. Bright half moon shining high to the south after sunset. Light haze of smoke and dust in the air.
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Idaho News:

Warren Wagon Road to be closed Mon-Friday next two weeks

Closures will allow installation of culverts for fish passage

By Drew Dodson for the Star-News September 13, 2018

A section of Warren Wagon Road north of McCall will be closed Monday through Friday for the next two weeks as part of a project to rebuild the road.

The road will be closed from 8 a.m. Monday to 5 p.m. Friday, Sept. 21, starting at Sharlie Lane about three miles north of McCall, to East Side Drive.

The same closure hours will be in effect for Sept. 24-28, but the southern closure will begin at Simplot Point, which is about four miles north of McCall.

The extended closure is needed while two large culverts are installed at Wagon Bay Creek and Sylvan Creek, said Cody Brown, a spokesperson for M.A. DeAtley Construction of Clarkston, Wash., the general contractor for the project.

The road will be closed off entirely to through traffic, but an access will be available for local residents as well as emergency vehicles, Brown said.

continued:
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Toxic blue-green algae found in Lake Cascade

DEQ advises humans, animals to stay out of water

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 13, 2018

A widespread bloom of toxic blue-green algae has been detected throughout Lake Cascade, prompting officials to issue a warning against human and animal contact.

“The algae is spread throughout a majority of the reservoir,” Idaho Department of Environmental Quality Watershed Coordinator Chase Cusack said.

Cusack took water samples at the Van Wyck, Crown Point, and Sugarloaf areas and found the algae at all sites extending to lake banks.”

“Toxin levels vary throughout the reservoir,” Cusack said.

Symptoms brought on by exposure to the toxic bacteria include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, difficulty breathing, skin irritation, allergic responses, liver damage, or neurotoxic reactions such as tingling fingers and toes, an advisory from the Central District Health Department and DEQ said.

Swimming, wading or other activities with full body contact of water should be avoided, the advisory said.

Pets and livestock are vulnerable to cyanobacteria and their toxins and should stay out of water where blooms are visible. Pets and livestock can be exposed to the toxins through drinking, swimming, or self-grooming by licking their wet coat or paws, the advisory said.

continued:
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Prepared for the Worst: Drill gives responders experience with mass casualty disaster

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 13, 2018

Covered in fake blood and sporting gruesome mock wounds, volunteers from McCall based Scout troop 246 gave their best theatrical performances, screaming and crying as local emergency services swarmed the scene in a mass casualty practice drill on Saturday.

The drill, which took place in the parking lot of the Donnelly Fire Department, was designed to stress local emergency services to the limit of their resources and capacity by simulating a car purposefully driving through a Scout troop during a parade.

In total there were 12 victims in the simulation and over 46 personnel from the combined responding agencies.

continued:
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Cascade among 29 ‘underperforming’ schools in Idaho

State to step in to help students in grades 6-8

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 13, 2018

The Cascade School District is one of 29 in Idaho that have been classified as “underperforming” and will receive state funding to help improve student performance.

The state will give Cascade schools about $73,000 each year for the next three years to help bring up testing scores, Cascade Superintendent Jeff Blaser said.

Cascade was named to the list due to the school’s low growth in achievement in grades 6-8, Blaser said.

Criteria include student achievement on math and English language arts on standardized tests, according to Idaho Education News.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Damage by Vandals to Donnelly Elementary School set at $24,000

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 13, 2018

Damage done to Donnelly Elementary School by two youths in July totaled about $26,500, McCall-Donnelly School District Superintendent Jim Foudy said Monday.

The school district’s insurance company paid about $24,000 to fix the damage while the district paid a $2,500 deductible, Foudy told M-D trustees at their regular meeting.

Franklin Building Supply donated a window to aid in the restoration, and an anonymous donor gave $1,000, he said.

The clean-up was finished in time for the opening day of school on Aug. 28, Foudy said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Sept. 24 meeting set for proposed McCall charter school

The Star-News September 13, 2018

An informational meeting on a proposed public charter school in McCall is scheduled to begin at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 24, at the McCall Public Library.

Those attending will hear about the progress of the proposed McCall Community School and learn more about the proposed curriculum and school mission.

The meeting will be a follow-up to a meeting held in March where proponents of a charter school have said they hope to open in time for the 2019-20 school year.

The McCall Community School would initially enroll students in kindergarten through eighth grade. The school is meant to operate as an alternative to traditional classroom education

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Budget office warns Idahoans may face bigger tax bills

By Kimberlee Kruesi – 9/10/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idahoans may see smaller refunds when filing their 2018 taxes next year because of major changes tied to the new tax law, Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter’s budget office warned on Monday.

According to the Division of Financial Management, the state’s tax revenue has faced a shortfall for the past two months because of individual income tax revenue failing to meet estimated forecasts.

As a result, fiscal year-to-date collections have come in about $12.7 million under than anticipated. This means $568.3 million in tax revenue has been received since July 1, less than the projected $581 million.

“The two months of shortfalls to the general fund’s largest and most reliable revenue source is inconsistent with the Gem State’s healthy job market,” wrote Jani Revier, Otter’s budget chief, in an August general fund revenue report.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Gas prices in Idaho 40 cents higher than national average

by Chaz Ricks Tuesday, September 11th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Whether you’re commuting to work or planning a road trip with your family or friends.

Gas prices are still high in Idaho and continue to be a challenge for local families.

The average in Idaho for regular unleaded fuel is $3.23 a gallon, which is almost 40 cents more than the national average.

In Boise, the average is $3.45 a gallon. Nearly 60 cents more than the national average!

Prices across the state are up almost 50 cents a gallon compared to a year ago.

source:
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Mining News:

A Purpose Driven Company

August 29 Midas

Midas Gold says it is a different kind of mining company, but what does that mean? Historically, mining companies have been seen as profit driven and everything else – including the environment, worker safety and communities – was an afterthought. We take a different approach. We believe it is time for mining companies to be purpose driven.

It is no longer enough for projects to just meet basic regulatory requirements. We believe modern, progressive mining companies must encompass a holistic view of their enterprise. Mines must be about more than profit, they need to be about employees, community, protection of the environment and mines must win the support of the communities closest to their sites in order to operate. These concepts are at the heart of Midas Gold.

It is no secret that the mining companies of the past left behind questionable legacies. We understand this has made people skeptical of the mining industry and it is no surprise some of this skepticism extends to us. We understand we have to earn the community’s trust by doing things differently than our predecessors and following through on our promises.

continued:
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Fire Season:

Sept 16, 2018 Fire update:
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise National Forest remains under Stage 1 restrictions

Boise, Idaho, Sept. 13, 2018 –Boise National Forest fire managers are waiting for measurable precipitation before lifting the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions. Conditions are extremely dry and any spark could result in a wildfire.

Dry and warmer weather conditions are predicted to return and continue through the weekend. Winds are expected to increase in the late afternoons.

Boise National Forest visitors may have a campfires within designated fee campgrounds and within established fire structures.

The Idaho Fire Info website has information about wildfires and restrictions for the entire state. http://www.idahofireinfo.com/

The 115 acre Casner Fire is 92 percent contained and was located 13 miles east of Lowman. Firefighters are being released back to their home units. The 26 acre German Fire was contained on 9-12-2018. Fires will be monitored and may continue to smoke until a significant amount of moisture arrives on the forest.

An area closure near Grandjean for the Wapiti Fire remains in effect. Information is available on Inciweb at: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6176/

If you need more information regarding road and area closures or fire restrictions, please visit the Boise National website:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices
— — — — — — — — — —

Big swath of US forest reopens after fire near Idaho/Nevada border

by Associated Press Friday, September 14th 2018

Elko, Nev. (AP) — Hundreds of square miles of national forest in northeast Nevada have reopened for public use after a closure ordered nearly a month ago due to a raging wildfire.

The Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest announced the reopening of the area Wednesday in the ranger district stretching from the Idaho line to southwest of Wild Horse State Reservoir.

District Ranger Josh Nicholes says the area was cleared following a safety assessment by an emergency response team.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Proposed Lochsa River designation draws strong opposition

9/13/18 AP

Lewiston, Idaho — Residents fear that agencies will have more authority over a northern Idaho river if it is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

A majority of people who attended a Wednesday meeting in Grangeville voiced strong objections to the idea to place the Lochsa River corridor on the national register, the Lewiston Tribune reported.

The corridor was nominated by the Nez Perce Tribe.

The corridor contains numerous cultural sites that are important to the tribe and its more than 1,000 years of using trails in the area, said Nakia Williamson, director of cultural resources for the tribe.

continued:
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Gastric Foreign Bodies in Pets

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Sept 14, 2018 IME

A gastric foreign body is any item that is swallowed into the stomach and can’t pass into the small intestines. Some gastric foreign bodies can cause severe vomiting due to irritations of the stomach wall. Some foreign objects, such as metals or coins, can poison the pet because of metal toxicities that cause red blood cell destruction.

Gastric foreign bodies occur when something is swallowed but cannot leave the stomach. These can usually include rocks, sticks, large bone fragments, balls, socks, coins and underwear. Some animals eat unusual items as part of a behavioral problem. The consumption of unusual items is called pica.

The most common clinical sign of a gastric foreign body is vomiting. If the foreign body is made of zinc, as is present in many coins, the animal will develop an anemia. Lead foreign bodies can cause lead poisoning. Most foreign bodies are found when X-rays are performed on an animal that is vomiting.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Dogs were flying high at the Zamzows Frisbee Fest

Sept 16, 2018 KBOI (Boise)

The Zamzows Frisbee Fest filled Ann Morrison park Saturday in Boise. The event is a competition in which dogs try and catch a frisbee throw by their owner.

link to photo gallery:
— — — — — — — — — —

State says wolves attacked 5 calves in Ferry County Washington

by AP Monday, September 10th 2018

Spokane, Wash. (AP) — The state of Washington says wolves attacked at least five calves in Ferry County last week, killing one and injuring four.

The attacks occurred Wednesday through Friday in an area once occupied by the Profanity Peak wolf pack, which was wiped out last year.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife says it is studying the latest attacks and weighing non-lethal ways to prevent future wolf attacks.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary plans open house Sept. 22

The Star-News September 13, 2018

Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary near McCall will host it’s annual open house from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22.

The open house is the only time during the year the public can tour the grounds and see wildlife displays and demonstrations.

Those attending are urged to bring a picnic lunch and enjoy the scenic view of Lake Fork Creek from the bridge.

Snowdon is located seven miles out Lick Creek Road east of McCall at end of the pavement

Snowdon’s mission is to rehabilitate and return injured and orphaned wildlife to the wild, and provide hands-on education to promote a healthy coexistence with wildlife and the ecosystem.

Snowdon specializes in the rehabilitation of local wildlife, including orphaned baby birds and mammals and injured small mammals, songbirds, waterfowl, and raptors.

The 35-acre sanctuary has a number of animal pens and enclosures, and a clinic equipped to care for ill and injured birds and animals.

Go to http://snowdonwildlife.org for more information.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Mexican wolf found dead in Arizona and in New Mexico

9/15/18 AP

Phoenix — Arizona wildlife officials say two endangered Mexican gray wolves, including one in New Mexico, have died.

The Arizona Game and Fish Department said in a news release Friday that both animals were found dead in August, bringing the total number of documented deaths to eight. Authorities did not release any details about the circumstances or where exactly the wolves were found.

Their deaths are under investigation.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Education International

September 10, 2018 Newsletter

Washington Wolf Killed After Judge Approves Lethal Action

Wolves kill dog on Tofino beach

September 15 Newsletter

Dr. V. Geist Speech: Big Game Forever Banquet and Wolf Symposium
— — — — — — — — — —

Man injured in bear encounter

Sep 11, 2018 AP

Cody, Wyo. (AP) – A 48-year-old hiker from Minnesota has been injured in a bear encounter in northern Wyoming.

Park County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Lance Mathess says Bradley D. Johnson of Plymouth, Minnesota, received severe injuries to his arm, shoulder and back when he encountered two bears on Sunday afternoon in the Beartooth Mountains near the Wyoming-Montana border.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wyoming wardens move 4 grizzlies

Sep 11, 2018 Local News 8

Jackson, Wyo. (KIFI/KIDK) – Wyoming Game and Fish wardens trapped and relocated an adult female grizzly and her two cubs Thursday, September 6. A second sub-adult female grizzly was captured and relocated on Friday.

The family group was captured in response to cattle depredation on private lands in the Cody region. The bear and her cubs were relocated into the Snake River drainage about 10 miles northwest of Moran Junction. The second grizzly was relocated to the Blackrock drainage about 20 miles northeast of Moran Junction.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

US judge delays grizzly bear hunts in Rockies 2 more weeks

By Matthew Brown – 9/13/18 AP

Billings, Mont. — A U.S. judge on Thursday delayed for two more weeks the first grizzly bear hunts in the Lower 48 states in almost three decades, saying he needed more time to consider if federal protections for the animals should be restored.

The ruling by U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen left the fate of the bruins in and around Yellowstone National Park in limbo, more than a year after federal officials declared the population had recovered from near extermination.

Up to 23 bears could be killed in the hunts planned in Wyoming and Idaho. Christensen already delayed them once, in an order that came two days before grizzly season was set to open Sept. 1.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Grizzlies suspected in fatal Wyoming attack trapped, killed

The body of Mark Uptain, a hunting outfitter, was found Saturday in the Teton Wilderness east of Grand Teton National Park.

Associated Press September 16, 2018

Jackson, Wyo. – Wyoming officials have trapped and killed two grizzly bears they believe killed a hunting outfitter and injured his client.

Wyoming Game and Fish Department regional supervisor Brad Hovinga said Sunday the grizzlies that were killed matched the description of those that killed 37-year-old outfitter Mark Uptain.

Uptain’s body was found Saturday in the Teton Wilderness east of Grand Teton National Park. Corey Chubon of Florida had leg, chest and arm injuries but was released from a hospital.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Photos: Bobcat spotted near Barber Park

KBOI Sept 14, 2018 (Boise)

A bobcat was spotted Wednesday near Barber Park during a conference. (Photo courtesy City of Boise)

link to photo gallery:
— — — — — — — — — —

‘She fought hard’: Oregon hiker killed by cougar fought for her life, sister says

Wildlife officials said they believe it would be the first fatal wild cougar attack in Oregon history.

KGW September 12, 2018

Welches, Ore. — A missing hiker who was found dead in the Mount Hood National Forest area was killed in a suspected cougar attack, according to the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office.

Wildlife officials said they believe it would be the first fatal wild cougar attack in Oregon history.

“This does have every indication that this is the first fatal attack of a human by a cougar in Oregon,” said Brian Wolfer, watershed manager with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

continued:
— —

Oregon wildlife officials to hunt for killer cougar

By Andrew Selsky – 9/12/18 AP

Salem, Ore. — Oregon wildlife officials with guns and dogs will hunt for a cougar believed to have killed a woman while she was hiking in rugged terrain near the state’s highest peak, a wildlife official said Wednesday.

Diana Bober, who at 55 was an avid and experienced hiker, apparently fought the cougar with repellent, a sharp object and a stick, her sister said.

Bober’s body was found Monday, almost two weeks after she was last heard from. She was the first person known to have been killed by a cougar in the wild in Oregon, and the second in the Pacific Northwest this year.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho horse quarantined after being exposed to deadly virus

A Colorado horse infected with equine infectious anemia has put hundreds of other horses at risk.

Gretchen Parsons KTVB September 11, 2018

Boise — State officials are taking extreme caution after a horse that could be infected with a fatal and contagious virus was brought into Idaho.

The animal was purchased in northern Colorado where it was exposed to another horse diagnosed with equine infectious anemia.

When horses become infected with equine infectious anemia, or EIA, they must either be quarantined for life or euthanized, which was the case for this sick horse in Colorado.

But before it was put down and the owners were aware it had contracted the virus, the horse came into contact with hundreds of others, potentially putting them at risk.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Elk knocks man to ground in Yellowstone

Local News 8 Sept 14, 2018

Mammoth Hot Springs (KIFI/KIDK) – An elk knocked a man to the ground in Yellowstone Thursday.

Boyce Schall captured this video of two bull elk fighting in Mammoth Hot Spring when one of them charged visitors and knocked a man to the ground.

Officials remind you elk mating season can be very active. Be alert and always stay at least 75 feet from all elk.

source w/video:
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Fish & Game News:

F&G asks grouse hunters to place wings in collection barrels

The Star-News September 13, 2018

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game asks grouse hunters to donate forest grouse wings to help with conservation and tracking efforts on West Mountain this fall.

Wings should be deposited into five collection barrels placed on West Mountain. Hunters are encouraged to detach and deposit the right wing from ruffed, spruce and dusky grouse into the barrels. Instructions are located on each barrel.

Fish and Game uses grouse wings to determine a bird’s age and sex, allowing biologists to track population trends over time.

Hunters are asked to look for wing collection barrels at these locations:

• No Business Road (Forest Road 186).

• Poison Creek Road (Forest Road 436).

• Anderson Creek Road (Forest Road 435).

• Snowbank Mountain Road (Forest Road 446).

• East Fork, Weiser River Road (Forest Road 172).

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho hunters, anglers contend with disappearing ink routine

Fish and Game says some licenses and tags have fading print and are turning into blank pieces of paper.

KTVB September 11, 2018

Boise — Idaho anglers and hunters not only have to contend with elusive fish and wildlife, now even their licenses and tags are vanishing.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game in a statement Tuesday says some licenses and tags have fading print and are turning into blank pieces of paper.

Fish and Game spokesman Roger Phillips says it’s the old disappearing ink routine apparently caused by faulty heat-sensitive paper.

The agency says that hunters and anglers who purchased the fading documents that allow them to legally hunt and fish can get replacements free of charge.

Hunters and anglers can visit any regional Fish and Game office or mail them in to get a replacement.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Here are rules and reminders for hunting on Idaho state endowment lands

F&G recently signed an agreement to keep 2.3 million acres of endowment lands open to hunting, angling and trapping

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, September 13, 2018

As you head out to hunt on Idaho Department of Lands parcels, the please keep these three things in mind:

Fire season isn’t over yet, and people cause most fires.

Although temperatures are expected to drop and relative humidity to rise in the coming weeks, we are still very much in fire season and will be through the end of October. Fires will continue to burn until we experience a “season-ending weather event,” meaning enough rain or snow for fire managers to call the fire season to an end.

Most wildfires today are not naturally occurring. On lands protected by the State of Idaho, people – not lightning – are responsible for more than three-quarters of the fires this year, accounting for 98.4 percent of the acres burned.

There are still restrictions on campfires and smoking outdoors right now in parts of southern Idaho. View current fire restrictions online here. If campfires are allowed where you plan to hunt, make sure your campfire is cool to the touch before leaving it so you do not unintentionally start a wildfire. View other campfire safety tips here.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Get the facts about bats, including how to remove one from your house

Podcast and video will help you better understand an oft-misunderstood animal

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Many people’s interest in bats peaks around Halloween when they’re used as scary decorations, but Idaho’s bats are much more than a prop. They’re an interesting and important Idaho wildlife species, and Rita Dixon, Fish and Game’s wildlife action plan coordinator, recently shared her expertise about bats in a podcast at Boise State Public Radio.

Most people will never encounter a bat more closely than one flying around their homes and eating insects, but in the unlikely event one finds its way into your home, here’s a safe way to deal with it.

source w/video:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Huge squirrel population chomps crops, driving farmers nuts

by David Sharp, Associated Press Sunday, September 16th 2018


In this Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018 photo a squirrel carries a walnut in Portland, Maine. A bumper crop of acorns, pine cones and other staples last year led to a population boom of squirrels. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

(AP) — There’s a bumper crop of squirrels in New England, and the frenetic critters are frustrating farmers by chomping their way through apple orchards, pumpkin patches and corn fields.

The varmints are fattening themselves for winter while destroying the crops with bite marks.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

HuntingSchool-a
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Tips & Advice:

How to protect your eyes from the smokey air

By Katie Keleher Sep 10, 2018 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Smokey skies are causing eyes to become irritated, itchy and watery. Optometrist Lisa Porter says she’s seen a lot of patients lately affected by the smoke and allergens in the air.

… She recommends using over the counter eye drops to alleviate the effects. She also says don’t wait too long to get your eyes taken care of or you may need a steroid. Another way to prevent symptoms is putting in an artificial tear such as Refresh or Systane before going outside.

“If you can put that tear in before you go out and then again when you come back in, it’s actually going to alleviate some of those allergens and toxins that can get in your eye and cause that swelling and redness and edema,” Dr. Porter said.

If your eyes are puffy due to the air, use something cool to alleviate the swelling.

full story:
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Sept 9, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 9, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
September 22 at 10am Community Hall YPFD Budget Hearing
September 22 Celebration of Life for Chris Petersen at 2pm, YP Tavern
September 29 Wildland Firefighter Foundation Fund Raiser and Yellow Pine Community BBQ

(details below)
———-

Village News:

Chris Petersen Celebration

The Celebration of Chris Petersen’s life in Yellow Pine is set for 9/22/18 at 2pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern. We will provide the main course., side dishes or desserts are welcome. Thank you. – ST
— — — —

Wildland Firefighter Foundation Fund Raiser and Yellow Pine Community BBQ

Midas Gold Idaho and The Corner are proud to sponsor the 5EV Memorial Run.

This 3.6 mile trail run is a fund raiser for the 5EV Memorial Trail Fund and Wildland Firefighter Foundation. Donations are greatly appreciated. The race starts at 10:00 am at the Williams Peak Trailhead on the East Fork Rd. and ends at the summit of the trail; a 3021 ft. elevation change.

A Community BBQ will be held after the race at 4:00 pm, at The Corner in Yellow Pine, Idaho. The roasted pig is provided by Midas Gold Inc. with great food by The Corner and the volunteers of the Yellow Pine Community.

Proceeds from this event will be shared 50/50 between the 5EV Memorial Trail Fund and the Wildland Firefighters Foundation. For additional information or to sign up for the race, contact: Matt Huber Matt @ ypcorner.com 208/633-3325
— — — —

Lost Tablet – Reward

On July 21 one of our crews lost a Samsung tablet on the Profile Road between the switchback below Red Metals mine road and Missouri Creek road. They realized it was missing almost immediately and went back and gridded the road for it, but could not find it. It could have bounced into the roadside brush, or been picked up off the road by someone traveling from Big Creek or Yellow Pine or vice versa.

This tablet has a summers worth of field data and we would sure like to have it back. Would you please spread the word that Ranger Botello will pay a handsome reward of cheeseburger, fries, pop and ice cream for its safe return!?

Contact: Anthony B. Botello, District Ranger, p: 208-634-0601, c: 208-634-9286
— — — —

Caton Fire

The fire is located 7 miles southwest of the Village of Yellow Pine near Indian Point and has been moving east into the Caton Creek drainage.

On Wednesdays and Thursday of last week warm, dry and windy conditions increased fire activity on the west and northwest sides of the fire, backing up towards Indian Peak. The fire is not in Caton Creek, and no fire activity has been seen east of Caton Creek. Click the map tab above to view the IR Flight Map from 10:05 p.m., September 6, 2018.

Cooler weather is expected through the weekend that will decrease fire activity. The fire is not anticipated to move to the east – no threats to Yellow Pine or other values exist at this time, and none are threat expected.

Previous fire activity in the area is expected to confine the fire in the immediate area around Indian Peak.

Caton Fire 9-4-2018 around 6pm from Yellow Pine

Indian Ridge Trail Closure
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/6177/47537/

Caton Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6177/
— —

Bum Creek Fire

We detected a new smoke today [9-7-2018]. We are calling it the Bum Creek Fire and we estimate 1/4 – 1/2 acre in size. It is just north of the confluence of Bum and Tamarack Creeks in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. Because of the time of year, lack of values at risk, exposure to responders and cost, we have decided to manage this fire for resource benefit. We will monitor the fire and take action if it poses a threat to come outside the Wilderness toward anything of value.

At this time there are no trail or area closures for this fire.

Attached photos:

– Anthony B. Botello, Krassel District Ranger, Payette National Forest (email)
— —

Kiwah Fire – Meadow Crk Road Open

The Kiwah fire is burning east of Yellow Pine in the Wilderness in the Indian Creek drainage. Meadow Creek road is open. – B Harris PNF

Kiwah Fire 9-4-2018 around 6pm

Sept 5 345pm update: Summary on fire activity on the Kiwah Fire is as follows: Fire activity remains minimal throughout the fire area with very light fire activity in the Papoose Creek and Indian Creek drainages, within the interior of the burn area.
– Amy Baumer, Public Affairs Officer, Salmon-Challis National Forest (via email)

Kiwah Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5995/
— —

Johnson Fire – Contained

8-23-2018 Update: It was declared contained today. Most resources will be off the fire by Saturday. Folks may still see some smoke from time to time as there are numerous snags in the interior of the fire that make it too dangerous to completely mop it up. Our folks will continue to monitor the fire until the rains or snows come.
– Jake Strohmeyer, BNF Cascade Ranger

Note: On Friday pilots reported seeing smoke on the west side of Johnson Creek in the Cemetery area, but no fire found.
— — — —

Ice Hole Campground

The Cascade Ranger District [has] temporarily closed Ice Hole Campground for reconstruction beginning Monday, Aug. 6, 2018.

The Campground will remain closed for the remainder of the 2018 season. Project funding was provided by local Tribes and a State RV Grant.

Forest Service crews and contractors will repair existing resource damage, enabling visitors to have an improved recreational experience in the future.

link to project:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49637

Ice Hole Update

Progress made with renovation and remodel of Cascade Ranger District – Ice Hole Campground!

Thanks for the photo shares from Boise NF employees Marie Willis and Danelle Highfill.

link to FB photo gallery:

— — — —

Possible Problem Bear

A report Sunday (Aug 19) of a “BIG bear” hanging out in the upper village. Be “Bear Aware” – Remember to secure your trash and pet food.

Update Friday (Aug 24) “it has been back but still not getting into anything.”

Video Link Bear Visitor Aug 20, 2018
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Pests

Yellow Jackets are late this year, but really mean. Long legged wasps are not as numerous, but around. Mosquito population has dropped during the hot dry summer. Lots of gnats out now. Lots of grasshoppers clacking about. Colombian ground squirrels have gone into hibernation. Chipmunks had a population boom this summer. Pine squirrels are not as numerous as in past years. Bears are roaming the Abstein orchard looking for apples.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not dump appliances or tires at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

“Bring it, Don’t Burn it.” There is a burn pile for woody debris only. Please don’t put trash, construction debris or cardboard in the burn pile.
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Local Events:

Welch Labor Day Golf Tournament

The cannon for the Labor Day Golf Tournament went off at 1140am on Saturday September 1st to start the golfers.

(No results by press time Sunday 9-9.)
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

July 24th Yellow Pine water update:

It is good to go back to the even/odd watering schedule. Even/odd means if your address is 315 Yellow Pine Avenue, you can water on odd days such as the 1st, 3rd, 5th etc. And if your address is 316, water in even numbered days. The only request is that watering be done between 6am and 1pm. Also please limit to one sprinkler at a time.

Also it is requested that no lawn watering be done August 1st through the 6th to be able to withstand the draw from Harmonica.

Our second sand filter will be on line soon and give us more capacity. Thank you everyone for your patience during the high water demand time. – SH

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.
— — — —

VYPA News:

The last 2018 meeting of the VYPA was September 8, 2pm, at the Community Hall, minutes pending approval.

Midas Gold and Yellow Pine

August 28, 2018

Attached is the Community Partnership Agreement the Village of Yellow Pine signed with Midas Gold.

link to: 2018 Community Partnership Agreement.pdf
— — — —

YPFD News:

September Meeting Date Changed:

One of our Fire Commissioners will not be able to make the scheduled YPFD 2018-19 budget meeting on the 8th.

The YPFD Budget Meeting will be rescheduled for September 22, 2008, 10:00 AM at the Yellow Pine Community Hall

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.

Yellow Pine Fire District Budget for Fiscal Year 2018 – 2019

Notice has been given that the Yellow Pine Fire District will hold a public hearing for consideration of the proposed budget, including the estimated revenue for the fiscal year, October 1, 2018 to September 20, 2019, pursuant to County Law chapter 14, Section 31-1419A. Said hearing will be held at the Yellow Pine Community Hall in Yellow Pine, Idaho on Saturday September 08, 2018, at 10:00 AM. At said hearing all interested persons may appear and show cause, if any they have, why said proposal budget should be adopted.

Proposed Expenditures:

The following budget is an estimate set forth in said budget of the total proposed expenditures and accruing indebtedness of the Yellow Pine Fire District for the Fiscal year 2018 – 2019.

Yellow Pine Fire District Budget for 2018 – 2019:

* Fire Fighting/Rescue: $8,132
* Wages: $0
* Advertising: $2,000
* Repairs and Maintenance: $4,000
* Utilities (Fixed Cost*) $4,000

Total:
Fixed: $4,000
Includes Insurance $2,500
Total $18,132

I, Dan Stiff, Chair Yellow Pine Fire Commissioner, Yellow Pine, Idaho, do hereby certify that the above is a true and correct statement of the proposed expenditures for the fiscal year 2018 – 2019. All have been tentatively approved and entered into district records. I further certify Yellow Pine Fire District did give notice for said hearing in two (2) conspicuous places in the fire district, by order of the commissioners. Residents are invited to attend the budget hearing on September 08, 2018, at 10:00 AM at the Yellow Pine Community Hall, and have the right to approve written or oral comments concerning the fire district budget. A copy of the proposed fire district budget in detail is available at 320 Westside Ave, Yellow Pine, Idaho, 83677.

Dated this 15th day of August 2018

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911 @ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

A lot of progress has been made on the new Helipad near the crossroads.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

– Fire Chief Jeff

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Open for summer (208) 633-3377
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern 633-2233

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
— — — —

The Corner 633-3325

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Sept 3) overnight low of 36 degrees, clear very blue sky and good air this morning. Finches calling and flying, a female hairy woodpecker and a white-breasted nuthatch visiting. Quiet morning. Warm and sunny mid-day, light breezes. Lots of grasshoppers clacking about. Gusty afternoon breezes, sunny and warm, high of 84 degrees. A few high wispy pink clouds after sunset. Very quiet at dark.

Tuesday (Sept 4) overnight low of 38 degrees, clear blue sky, slight breeze, roofs wet with dew and good air this morning. A few finches flying and calling. A few little cotton ball clouds around lunch time, then a few medium sized clouds early afternoon, warm and light breezes, very dry, light haze of smoke, high of 84 degrees. Increasing smoke late afternoon. A couple of jays visited, not many birds around. By 6pm a smoke column over the Caton Fire and could see smoke from the Kiwah Fire. Before sundown a little ash and burned pine needles falling, poor air quality.

Wednesday (Sept 5) overnight low of 39 degrees, clear sky, light haze of smoke, roofs wet with dew and breezy. Early morning loud airplanes. Finches flying and calling, a couple of jays visited. By 1130am you could see a haze of smoke rising in the direction of the Caton Fire. By early afternoon there was quite a bit of smoke rising from the Caton Fire and quite a “smudge” on the horizon in the direction of the Kiwah Fire. One finch and no hummingbirds this afternoon. Hot, dry, breezy, smoky afternoon, high of 89 degrees. Late afternoon gusty winds, hot and smoky. Calmer towards evening, after sundown there was a gray smudge on the horizon to the north east, and the mass of smoke to the south west had died down somewhat. Breezy after dark.

Thursday (Sept 6) overnight low of 46 degrees, mostly cloudy, light haze of smoke, dry – very little dew. A few early loud airplanes. A few finches and a raven flying and calling, a young jay visiting. Early afternoon mostly cloudy, warm and a bit muggy, breezy and haze of smoke. No hummers yet today, one jay has all the feeders to itself. Hot, cloudy smoky afternoon, high of 89 degrees. Thunder around 5pm, gusty breezes and smoky air, lightning map shows strikes in the T. Mtn area and upper South Fork, later a couple more to the south on Antimony Ridge. After sundown better air quality and lighter breezes. Breezy around midnight.

Friday (Sept 7) overnight low of 45 degrees, partly cloudy, light breezes, light haze of smoke and dust. Finches flying and calling, a flicker passing through and a robin looking for bugs. A few loud airplanes, traffic kicked up a plume of dust on main street in front of the Veterans Memorial. A couple of finches visiting early afternoon, no hummingbirds. Warm, cloudy, smoky DUSTY afternoon. Pilots reported smoke west of Johnson Creek across from the cemetery, no fire found – so far. Caton Fire is putting up a smoke plume again this afternoon. Hot, cloudy, smoky, dusty and breezy, high of 89 degrees. Quite a bit of smoke (Kiwah Fire) on the eastern horizon this evening. Poor air quality (can smell the smoke.)

Saturday (Sept 8) overnight low of 45 degrees, appears to be partly clear above the smoke, sun light casts a red haze and poor air quality. Very few birds around, no squirrels either. By lunch time it appeared to be clear above the smoke, starting to get a little breezy. Group of UTVers visiting the Vets Monument after lunch. Warm, smoky, mostly clear and breezy early afternoon, poor air quality, high of 82 degrees. One finch visited in the afternoon. Light traffic kicking up a lot of dust. Late afternoon smoke, breezy and slightly better air quality. By sundown mostly clear and light haze of smoke, calmer and quiet. A bat flitting around the neighborhood just at dark.

Sunday (Sept 9) overnight low of 36 degrees, dry (not much dew), clear sky, slight haze of smoke – pretty good air quality. A couple of early airplanes. Not many summer birds, one finch and a pine squirrel visiting. The young neighborhood jay stopped by for lunch. Clear, breezy, mild temperatures and good air in the early afternoon, high of 82 degrees, light traffic and dust. Female hairy woodpecker visited this afternoon, no finches. Pleasant evening, good air, clear sky, light traffic (and dust.)
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Idaho News:

Active Harmful Algal Bloom Advisories

Valley Co., ID — In cooperation with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (IDEQ), Central District Health Department (CDHD) is issuing a health advisory due to the presence of a cyanobacteria harmful algal bloom (HAB) at Lake Cascade in Valley County. Recent samples taken indicate concentrations of toxin-producing cyanobacteria (sometimes called blue-green algae) are present that may cause illness to humans and animals.

Cyanobacteria occur naturally. Cyanobacteria blooms occur in waters with high levels of nutrients such as phosphorus and nitrogen. Under certain conditions, some types of algae can release toxins into the water that are harmful to people, pets, and livestock. Recent tests indicate that these toxins are present. The blooms are generally green, or blue-green, and may form thick mats along shorelines. These may look like a surface scum, resembling pea soup and can have an unpleasant odor or stench.

CDHD and DEQ advise the following precautions be taken where harmful algal blooms are known to be present:

· Humans and animals should stay out of the affected water. Swimming, wading, or other activities with full body contact of pond water should be avoided.

· Humans, pets, and livestock should not drink the affected water.

· Fish should be cleaned and rinsed with clean water. Only the fillet portion should be consumed. All other parts should be discarded.

· Pets and livestock are vulnerable to cyanobacteria and their toxins and should stay out of water where blooms are visible. Pets and livestock can be exposed to cyanobacteria and their toxins through drinking, swimming, or self-grooming by licking their wet coat or paws. A reaction will likely require immediate veterinary attention.

· Do not allow pets to eat dried algae.

· If affected water contacts skin or pet fur, wash with clean with potable water as soon as possible.

· Areas of visible algae accumulation should be avoided.

Samples taken indicate unsafe bacteria cell counts, so everyone should heed these precautions and avoid contact with the water.

Symptoms of Exposure

People who are exposed to water with high concentrations of cyanobacteria or cyanotoxins may experience nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, difficulty breathing, skin irritation, allergic responses, liver damage, or neurotoxic reactions such as tingling fingers and toes. Anyone with symptoms should seek medical attention. Boiling or filtering the water will not remove cyanotoxins.

More Information on HABs

For more information about harmful algal blooms, including a map of advisories currently in effect throughout Idaho, visit DEQ’s website at http://www.deq.idaho.gov/…/su…/recreation-health-advisories/

Additional Resources:

Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) – Harmful Algal Blooms Webpage
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Cascade fire district approves higher taxes

Money will be used to add firefighter, bolster pay

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 6, 2018

The Cascade Rural Fire Protection District board last week approved a tax increase of $98,020 to pay the salary of one more full time firefighter and also recruit and train more volunteers.

The new money will also allow the district to provide more training and to buy equipment as well as make other improvements.

District property owners will see an increase of about $1.75 per month for each $100,000 of assessed value.

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St. Luke’s McCall starts phase two of road work to prepare for expansion

By Laura Crawford for The Star-News September 6, 2018

St. Luke’s McCall’s has begun the second phase of road and utility improvements on the streets surrounding the hospital.

The work is in preparation for a new two-story building planned for the site.

Phase one work focused on road and utility improvements on Forest Street. The street was paved and opened last week, while a sidewalk will be completed this fall.

On Tuesday, State Street from Lake Street (Idaho 55) to Hewitt Street was closed, blocking access to the hospital from that direction. The second phase of work is expected to last through October.

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McCall completes $1.3 million rehab of airport apron

By Dew Dodson for The Star-News September 6, 2018

A $1.3 million paving project covering 3.1 acres of asphalt was completed this week at the McCall Municipal Airport.

The work, which was done by Granite Excavation of Cascade, replaced 135,000 square feet of asphalt ranging in age from 30 years to nearly 50 years around the airport’s commercial apron.

The project also laid a new 75-feet by 75-feet concrete pad in front of the airport’s fuel station, which will reduce damage caused by any spills.

The new asphalt will have a life span of 20 to 25 years and was needed to reduce hazards to aircrafts and resolve past problems with puddles, Airport Manager Jay Scherer said.

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Donnelly Public Library to host grand opening Sept. 21

The Star-News September 6, 2018

A celebration will be held on Friday, Sept. 21, to note the grand opening of the Donnelly Public Library.

The festivities will run from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the library, located at 150 E. State St.

There will be games and activities for youths as well as a bounce house.

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Keep your eye out for purple loosestrife

Purple loosestrife is an aggressive, invasive noxious weed that can spread rapidly.

KTVB September 8, 2018

Boise — You’ve probably seen them, tall purple flowers blooming near the edge of a ditch, pond or stream.

They are pretty to look at but Idaho noxious weed officials don’t want you to let their appearance fool you!

They say there’s a good chance those flowers are purple loosestrife, an aggressive, invasive noxious weed.

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At least 100 killed during Idaho’s 100 Deadliest Days

By Katie Keleher Sep 04, 2018 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Idaho’s 100 Deadliest Days are over. There was nearly one death per day on the road.

It marks the number of road deaths between Memorial Day weekend and Labor Day weekend. The Idaho Department of Transportation says as of six this morning there were at least 100 deaths. That number could grow in the coming days. Idaho State Police have up to 72 hours to report deaths.

Last year 91 people were killed during the 100 deadliest days.

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Scam alert:

Better Business Bureau warns of fake check scam

By Katie Keleher Sep 06, 2018 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Better Business Bureau says to watch out for a check scam.

The BBB says it is mostly an employment scam. Scammers will offer to hire you, but want to pre-pay you. They will send you a check, ask you to deposit it, and then ask to send some money back to them. Or, you will be told you won a prize, they will send you money and then ask you to send some back. The BBB says about 500,000 people have fallen for the scam, most who are between 20 and 29-years old. They say to not trust it, if it is asking for money back.

“If something seems too good to be true, it usually is,” said Jeremy Johnson with the Better Business Bureau. “As far as employment scams go most legitimate companies will not prepay you or pay you and then ask you to return some of the money. So that’s just something definitely to watch out for, should be a red flag.”

If you do deposit a fake check, it is the victim’s responsibility to pay the bank back, not the scammer. If you are scammed, you can report it here.
https://www.bbb.org/scamtracker/us

source:
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Fire Season:

Weather, firefighters corral wildfires

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 6, 2018

Rattlesnake Creek Fire declared 90 percent contained

Efforts on the Rattlesnake Creek Fire over the past week have stopped the advance of the fire, which was 90 percent contained on Tuesday, the Forest Service said.

“We don’t expect any fire growth,” Forest Service Public Information Officer Sandra Lopez said.

… The fire, which is located south of Riggins, was discovered on July 23 and is classified as “human-caused,” but an exact cause had not been released as of Tuesday.

Caton Fire

The Caton Fire located seven miles southwest of Yellow Pine was still active on Tuesday, but has done little more than smolder for the past week, Payette National Forest Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said.

… “We do not expect this fire to grow in size and the community of Yellow Pine is not threatened by this fire,” he said.

… Six firefighters were assigned to monitor the Caton Fire, which cost about $184,000 as of Tuesday.

Kiwah Fire

The Kiwah Fire had stagnated at 14,603 acres as of Tuesday. The fire is located in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness within the Indian Creek drainage.

… Currently only one person is assigned to monitor the Kiwah Fire, which had cost $525,000 as of Tuesday, Baumer said.

full story:
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Firefighters work to contain lightning caused fires

Boise National Forest
Contact: Stephaney Kerley Phone:(208) 591-1575

Boise, Idaho, Sept. 9 2018 — Firefighters continue to make progress toward containment with wildfires that were started during a lightning storm late Thursday night. Remaining fires are currently staffed and additional resources have arrived. Firefighters were challenged Saturday with strong winds and poor visibility.

Of the new starts reported, three fires remain active.

The 45 acre Casner Fire, located within the Lowman Ranger District, is 2 miles west of the Warm Springs Airstrip and staffed with a Type 3 Management Team. The fire is well established in Casner Creek. Helicopters are supporting over 100 firefighters in their efforts to secure a perimeter line in very steep terrain with sparse fuels and pine overstory.

The German Fire is approximately 30 acres, and 20 percent contained. Located 9 miles east of Idaho City, and under the management of a Type 4 Management Team. Over 90 firefighters on scene were additionally challenged by windy conditions on Saturday.

Thirdly, the Wren Fire is approximately 7 acres and 50 percent contained. Located 17 miles east and northeast of Idaho City. Fire managers anticipate full containment Sunday, Sept. 9.

Resources respond quickly and efficiently when new fires are reported. Thursday’s lightning event involved multiagency coordination and cooperation involving crews, helicopters, single engines air tankers, smokejumpers, helicopters, rappel crews, fire prevention and investigation personnel.

Aircraft detection flights will patrol and monitor for additional fires that may have held over and flare up. Weather predictions include cooling temperatures, however the fuels remain extremely dry.

There are currently no road or area closures in place for the new fire starts, however the Wapiti Fire Area Closure near Grandjean remains in effect. Stage 1 Fire Restrictions also remain in effect for the Boise National Forest. If you need more information regarding road and area closures or fire restrictions, please visit the Boise National website: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices
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Wildfire activity ‘above average’ in Idaho this season

by Haley Kramer Tuesday, September 4th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — Right now there are 14 wildfires actively burning across our state scorching more than 147 thousand acres of land.

While fire activity usually comes to a fairly quick end by mid September Predicative Services Meteorologist Bryan Henry with the National Interagency Fire Center says this year it could take a little longer.

“Last year was a little bit busier than this year,” Henry said. “This year has still been above average across Idaho and across the country as a whole.”

Idaho is ranked 4th in the top five states with the most acres burned. Since January 1 fires have burned more than 530 thousand acres of land in the state.

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Smoke and haze courtesy of California wildfires

by Nathan Larsen Saturday, September 8th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Little improvement was noted today in regards to air quality, even though a front moved through. Some models indicated that we might get some relief from smoke and haze behind the passage of a cold front, but it appears that folks north of the Treasure Valley are the only ones reporting slightly better air.

Air quality is currently in the yellow/moderate category and will likely remain there through the remainder of the weekend and into early next week. The majority of our smoke in the region can be traced back to fires that are burning in northern California, the Delta and the Hirz fires have each burned over 40,000 acres just north of Shasta Lake. The Hirz Fire is 90% contained this evening but the Delta Fire just exceeded 40,000 acres and is 0% contained.

Little improvement is likely in the coming days as west-southwest flow is expected to continue through Monday. A larger Pacific storm system will likely impact the region towards to middle of next week, maybe we’ll catch some relief then.

source:
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Idaho reviews prison fire crews after inmate accused of rape

By Lindsay Whitehurst – 9/5/18 AP

Salt Lake City — Idaho is reviewing its program for temporarily releasing prison inmates to help fight wildfires after an inmate was charged with raping a woman working at a remote Utah firefighting base camp.

Idaho prison officials are working with the state’s lands department as they scrutinize which inmates are allowed to serve, the training they receive and how they are deployed, said Idaho Department of Correction spokesman Jeff Ray. Five crews of Idaho inmates were returned to prison after the charge was filed last week.

Most states in the U.S. West have similar programs allowing low-level offenders to be temporarily released to help firefighting efforts. In California, hundreds of minimum-security inmates fought on the front lines of the state’s largest-ever blaze this year.

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The ultimate guide to wildfire defense: Preparation and prevention

KBOI August 30, 2018

Smokey Bear isn’t joking around when he says, “Only you can prevent wildfires.” In Idaho, the number one cause of wildfires is people. And according to the National Interagency Fire Center, 63,546 human-caused wildfires burned nearly 5 million acres across the country in 2017.

What’s even scarier? These wildfires don’t seem to be calming down any time soon. Just as of August 2018, 43,077 fires have burned 6,463,893 acres across the United States, and 13 large fires have smoked through 211,634 acres in Idaho. So, what can you do to keep these fires from burning? Or to prevent new ones from starting? Idaho Firewise has plenty of steps you can take to prevent a fire and to prepare for a worst-case scenario.

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30 years after the 1988 Yellowstone fires

By Frederica Kolwey – 9/5/18 AP

Jackson, Wyo. — Four convection columns of smoke rose more than 20,000 feet into the air as high winds whipped across eerily empty walkways around Old Faithful Inn.

“In all directions that we looked, it looked like the world was coming to an end,” Joan Anzelmo recalled.

It was “Black Saturday,” the name given to Aug. 20, 1988, when wildfires burned about 150,000 acres of Yellowstone National Park in a day.

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Mining News:

Stibnite: Protesters Tell Midas Water More Precious Than Gold

By Monica Gokey Sept 4, 2018 Boise State Public Radio

About 120 people staged a protest in McCall over the holiday weekend with the message that re-opening the Stibnite mine could cause irreparable harm to the Salmon River watershed.

Alice Anderson of McCall was one of several area residents who attended the rally to voice skepticism about Midas Gold’s plan to restore the Stibnite mine while actively mining it.

“I want to be sure open-pit mining doesn’t destroy the South Fork of the Salmon River,” Anderson said. “I think it really needs to be investigated thoroughly before any decisions are made.”

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Gold mining company ordered to pay pollution fine by Friday

9/8/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — A federal judge has rejected a mining company’s request to extend a deadline to pay a $251,000 fine for not doing enough to staunch the flow of arsenic into streams that supply some of Boise’s drinking water.

The Idaho Statesman reports that Chief U.S. Magistrate Judge Ronald Bush in a ruling late last month rejected Atlanta Gold mining company’s request to extend the deadline to the end of this year.

Bush says the court doesn’t have any confidence in the company’s plan to raise money by selling a cryptocurrency that would exist electronically.

Bush says the company met other financial obligations but didn’t prioritize paying the pollution fines. He ordered Atlanta Gold to pay the fine by Friday.

The company says the area it wants to mine contains up to $5 billion in gold and silver.

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Public Lands:

New fence installed at Big Creek to help protect fish habitat.

The fence was built to improve habitat conditions in McCorkel Creek within the Forest Service pasture at the Big Creek station and airstrip. McCorkel Creek provides habitat for Endangered Species Act listed fish, and flows directly into Big Creek.

Protecting cold, headwater streams will help provide resilience to climate change for cold water organisms like fish and amphibians.

link to FB photo gallery:

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Join Us on the Secesh River to Celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Wild & Scenic Rivers Act, and the 25th Anniversary of National Public Lands Day

Date: September 7, 2018
Contacts: Brian Harris, Public Affairs Officer, 208-634-0784 office, 208-634-6945 cell.

McCall, ID – To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Wild & Scenic Rivers Act, and the 25th anniversary of National Public Lands Day, the Payette National Forest is hosting a hike up the Secesh River from Ponderosa Campground on the Krassel Ranger District.

Mark your calendar for September 22, register to join us, then meet us at Ponderosa Campground at 1130 AM. Please bring a lunch, water, appropriate clothing and footware for a 4 mile moderate hike. Layer your clothing as weather conditions tend to be on the cool side at this time of year.

The hike up Forest Service Trail #080 is hosted by Steve Kimball, Natural Resource Staff Officer on the Forest, who served as the Forest Service’s Wilderness and Wild and Scenic Rivers Program Manager for the Northern Region and Alaska Region.

For more information, click this link:
https://www.neefusa.org/npld/ponderosa-campground/secesh-river-hike
To register, please send an email to skimball@fs.fed.us

The event will start with a short lunchtime talk about the Secesh River. The hike will be approximately 2 miles up the river, then return. The terrain is fairly easy without much gain in elevation. All family members are encouraged to attend.

The 45-mile Secesh River is recommended for National Wild & Scenic River designation. The Wild & Scenic River Act was created by Congress in 1968 to preserve certain rivers with outstanding natural, cultural, and recreational values in free-flowing conditions for the enjoyment of present and future generations.

National Public Lands Day is the nation’s largest single day event for public lands, and brings together hundreds of thousands of people across the county.

Directions to Ponderosa Campground: From McCall, travel 31 miles to reach the southern end of the Secesh River Trail. The drive to trailhead will go over Lick Creek Summit and through Lick Creek Canyon. With its rock falls, hanging valleys and waterfalls, this canyon is one of the most picturesque drives on the Forest.
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Intermountain Region Forest Service: Outreach Notice – 2019 Seasonal Positions

09/06/2018

The Intermountain Region is looking for a committed, hardworking, highly skilled workforce to work with the 12 National Forests located in Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada and California. Working for the U.S. Forest Service is a rewarding experience and requires talented people working safely as part of a team in a variety of specialized positions throughout the Intermountain Region.

The U.S. Forest Service, Intermountain Region encompasses nearly 34-million acres of National Forest System land. The Regional Office in Ogden, Utah provides administrative oversight and support to 12 National Forests (Ashley, Boise, Bridger-Teton, Caribou-Targhee, Dixie, Fishlake, Humboldt-Toiyabe, Manti-LaSal, Salmon-Challis, Sawtooth, Payette and Uinta-Wasatch-Cache). The National Forest Supervisor’s Offices are the headquarters for forest activities and provide oversight and support to the Ranger District offices within the forest boundaries. Ranger Districts are the units that directly manage the national forests and grasslands. Types of management that occur on each district vary significantly. Some districts manage ski areas, wilderness areas, wild and scenic rivers, and resource management programs and extensive recreational uses. So if you’re interested in one of the many positions that are available within the U.S. Forest Service be sure to check out
https://fsoutreach.gdcii.com/Outreach
and http://www.usajobs.gov for current or upcoming vacancies (see Outreach Announcement below).

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USFS Regional Intermountain News

Volume 2 Issue 12 September 5, 2018

link:
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Spinal cord trauma in pets

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt 9-7-2018 IME

The spinal cord is protected within the spinal column, which is composed of small bones called vertebrae. The spinal cord transmits neurological information between the brain and the rest of the body. Spinal cord trauma disrupts this transmission, causing nerve damage and pain.

The most common causes of acute spinal cord trauma are automobile accidents and falling. Chronic spinal cord trauma results from the wear and tear of heavy exercise. Trauma to the spinal cord can cause vertebral fractures and dislocations of the spine, which can cause severe pain, paresis and, worst of all, permanent paralysis. Chronic spiral cord trauma causes pain, but rarely paralysis.

Clinical signs of spinal cord trauma are dependent on the area of the spinal cord affected and the severity of the trauma. Mild injury may result in only pain at the injured site. Moderate injury results in what we call paresis, or partial paralysis. When the injury is very severe, affected pets are unable to use their legs, and urinate and defecate properly. All four legs may be affected if the spinal cord in the neck is injured. Only the hind legs are affected if the injury occurs in the upper or lower back region.

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Shelter dog PTSD: ‘You have to work with them on it’

by Abigail Taylor Friday, September 7th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Post traumatic stress is often talked about regarding humans, but according to the Idaho Humane Society it can effect our pets, as well.

Sam Kennedy with the Idaho Humane Society told CBS 2 News this is something families should be aware of before adopting a new pet.

Kennedy said she has worked with hundreds of dogs over the years — each with little personalities of their own.

Many of them, however, with trauma in their background — from abuse to neglect and under socialization.

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N. Idaho family looking for answers after dog shot in driveway

Sophie, a four-year-old yellow lab mix, was shot in the 32000 block of N. Kelso Drive. Her family is offering a $2,000 reward leading to the killer’s arrest.

Alexa Block, KTVB September 5, 2018

Spirit Lake, Idaho — The Kootenai County Sheriff’s Office Animal Control Division is asking for the public’s help identifying the person who shot and killed a 4-year-old yellow lab mix near Spirit Lake.

When Sophie’s owners heard her cry, they went outside and saw the dog dead in their driveway by an obvious gunshot wound.

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State wildlife marksman shoots wolf from helicopter

9/3/18 AP

Olympia, Wash. — A Washington state wildlife marksman fatally shot a member of the Togo wolf pack from a helicopter Sunday.

The Seattle Times reports the shooting near Danville came days after a Thurston County judge gave the go-ahead for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife to kill the animal.

Wildlife officials said they hunted the wolf on foot Friday and Saturday but weren’t able to find it.

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Wolf Watch

9/4/18: Feds reject wolf depredation information request
(By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online!) There have been a record number of confirmed livestock depredations by wolves in Idaho this year, but Western Watersheds Project (WWP) alleges that’s because federal animal damage control officials and ranchers are inflating the number of kills, according to the Associated Press. WWP has filed a lawsuit seeking details of the investigations of wolf kills on livestock, but federal officials have withheld the information, stating that it is exempt under the federal Freedom of Information Act….. (Click on the link above for the complete story.)

9/4/18: Togo pack update – Lethal control okayed
(By Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife) A Thurston County Superior Court judge issued an order permitting the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to initiate lethal action to remove the adult male wolf from a pack that has repeatedly preyed on livestock in northeast Washington. Judge Carol Murphy denied a request for a preliminary injunction by two environmental groups which would have prohibited the wolf’s removal. In rejecting the plaintiffs’ request, Murphy said they had not met the legal standard required for her to issue an injunction…… (Click on the link above for the complete story.)
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US approves sheep grazing research in grizzly bear area

by Keith Ridler, Associated Press Thursday, September 6th 2018

Boise, Idaho (AP) — A federally-run sheep experiment facility in Idaho long targeted by environmental groups will start grazing sheep again in the Centennial Mountains of Idaho and Montana.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture says the Sheep Experiment Station will resume grazing in 2019 on 25 square miles (65 square kilometers) of sheep station land and 5 square miles (13 square kilometers) of U.S. Forest Service land.

Tom France of the National Wildlife Federation said Thursday the department is ignoring information that the area is premier grizzly bear habitat.

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Wildlife roaming into human territory

Sep 06, 2018 Local News 8


A bull moose was tranquilized near Jackson recently while wardens removed a net wrapped around its antlers.

Jackson, Wyo. (KIFI/KIDK) – As regional wildlife makes preparations for winter, there are an increased number of calls about animals wandering into residential areas, especially moose and bears.

Wyoming Game and Fish is asking people to be aware of the possibility and remove anything on their property that might entangle them or entice them into trouble.

Bear attractants should be stashed away. “It has been a relatively quiet summer with regard to bear conflicts, but this is typically the time of year we start receiving an increasing number of reports of black bears being seen in developed areas around Jackson,” said Jackson Large Carnivore Biologist Mike Boyce. “As natural foods begin to dry up, bears commonly start showing up in residential areas. While bears may just be passing through, it’s important they do not get any food rewards, such as improperly stored garbage, that would encourage them to stay.”

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Mule Deer feeding at MK Nature Center

Deer in downtown Boise

Steve Liebenthal Sep 6, 2018 KIVI TV

Boise, Idaho – The MK Nature Center is more than just a fish pond.

Various wildlife, including mule deer find temporary refuge in the heart of Boise. The center is located between Municipal Park and the Boise River Greenbelt. It is right behind Idaho Fish and Game’s office on Walnut.

If you are there at the right time of year and the right time of day, you might be fortunate enough to have an up close and personal meeting with mule deer munching on tomato plants and apples in the center’s garden of native plants.

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Have you herd? Moose, bighorn sheep pass on migration tips

By Malcolm Ritter – 9/6/18 AP

Looking for the best place to eat? Ask a local. Now scientists say that same insider knowledge shapes the springtime migrations of moose and bighorn sheep.

Animals learn from experienced members of the herd about where to find the best food, building sort of a cultural know-how that’s passed through generations and improves over the course of decades, new research indicates.

While scientists have speculated before that this happens in hoofed animals, this is the first conclusive test of the idea, said Matthew Kauffman, a U.S. Geological Survey researcher who was part of the study released Thursday by the journal Science.

Researchers tracked the movements of 267 bighorn sheep and 189 moose in Wyoming, Idaho and South Dakota that wore GPS devices on collars. They used satellite data to track where and when vegetation along the migration routes reached the stage of growth that the animals prefer for eating.

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Rabid bat found in Blackfoot

Sep 06, 2018 Local News 8

Blackfoot, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Southeastern Idaho Public Health (SIPH) has confirmed a bat has tested positive for rabies within Blackfoot city limits.

This is the seventh bat to test positive for rabies in Idaho this year.

Rabies is a fatal viral illness in humans and other animals. Household pets and other animals can be exposed to the virus by playing with sick bats. This is why it is important for people to make sure their animals are vaccinated against rabies.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Lake Cascade yields record perch

Idaho man breaks world record

Steve Liebenthal Sep 5, 2018 KIVI TV

Cascade, Idaho – In the early two thousands, fish managers from the Idaho Department of Fish and Game started trucking perch into Lake Cascade, hoping to revive a world class perch fishery that had slowly declined.

Now, nearly two decades later, the perch are back and people who fish there are catching fish so big they set not only state records, but world records.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Young grizzly removed from Eastern Idaho and sent to a wildlife sanctuary

Bear will now live the remainder of its life in captivity

By Jeremy Nicholson, Regional Wildlife Biologist
Friday, September 7, 2018

Idaho Fish and Game removed a third bear (two grizzlies, one black bear) from the wild in Eastern Idaho this summer because the bears were attracted to food left out by people. In early September, a young grizzly bear was trapped and later transferred to a Texas wildlife sanctuary, where it will remain.

The grizzly bear population and grizzly range has increased in Southeast Idaho over the last 20 years, but despite the increase, conflicts in recent years have been relatively low. However, Fish and Game has recently had to respond to an increase in bear conflicts, most of which involved homeowners and campers leaving food and other attractants unsecured, such garbage, bird feed and more.

Unlike the first two bears that were lethally removed this summer in Eastern Idaho, the most recent bear was relocated on Sept. 4 to the International Exotic Animal Sanctuary in Texas.

continued:
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Anglers: See proposed fishing rule changes for the Salmon region and comment here

People have until Oct. 7 to comment on proposed fishing rule changes

By Mike Demick, Conservation Information Supervisor
Friday, September 7, 2018

Idaho Fish and Game is seeking public comments on a new set of proposed fishing rules for 2019, and a new draft of its six-year, statewide Fisheries Management Plan.

Idaho fishing seasons and rules are approved by the Idaho Fish and Game Commission every three years, and the commission is scheduled to set new rules in November. All public comments must be received by Oct. 7.

Anglers can provide their opinions about the proposed changes by completing online surveys (below), submitting written comments by email or mail, or by attending regional open houses.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Attention Anglers: give your comments on proposed fishing rules and statewide fish management plan

Public has until Oct. 7 to comment on rule changes and management plan

By Martin Koenig, Natural Resource Program Coordinator
Friday, September 7, 2018

Idaho Fish and Game is seeking public comments on a new set of proposed fishing rules for 2019, and a new draft of its six-year, statewide Fisheries Management Plan.

Idaho fishing seasons and rules are approved by the Idaho Fish and Game Commission every three years, and the commission is scheduled to set new rules in November. All public comments must be received by Oct. 7.

Anglers can provide their opinions about the proposed changes by completing online surveys (below), submitting written comments by email or mail, or by attending regional open houses.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Michigan man fights ticket for turkey who moved into yard

by The Associated Press Friday, August 3rd 2018

Garden City, Mich. (AP) — A suburban Detroit man who found himself facing fines after a wild turkey moved into his overgrown backyard has made friends with the massive bird.

Garden City bans residents from keeping wild animals as pets. The city fined Mark Johnston $100 for harboring the turkey and another $100 for dumping brush at his curb after he cleaned up his backyard in an effort to get the 30-pound turkey to leave.

The Detroit News reports that the city eventually dismissed the turkey ticket since Johnston wasn’t keeping the animal as a pet. Johnston is still fighting the other one.

Meanwhile, the turkey remains in Johnston’s yard. Johnston says as far as he’s concerned, the bird can stay as long as he wants.

State officials say wild animals can only be moved if they’re a nuisance or a threat.

source:
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Seasonal Humor:

HuntingMushrooms-a
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Sept 2, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 2, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
September 8 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Budget Hearing
September 8 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 22 Celebration of Life for Chris Petersen at 2pm, YP Tavern

(details below)
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Village News:

Chris Petersen Celebration

The Celebration of Chris Petersen’s life in Yellow Pine is set for 9/22/18 at 2pm at the YP Tavern. We will provide the main course., side dishes or desserts are welcome. Thank you. – ST
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Lost Tablet – Reward

On July 21 one of our crews lost a Samsung tablet on the Profile Road between the switchback below Red Metals mine road and Missouri Creek road. They realized it was missing almost immediately and went back and gridded the road for it, but could not find it. It could have bounced into the roadside brush, or been picked up off the road by someone traveling from Big Creek or Yellow Pine or vice versa.

This tablet has a summers worth of field data and we would sure like to have it back. Would you please spread the word that Ranger Botello will pay a handsome reward of cheeseburger, fries, pop and ice cream for its safe return!?

Contact: Anthony B. Botello, District Ranger, p: 208-634-0601, c: 208-634-9286
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Caton Fire

The fire is about 400 acres and located 7 miles southwest of the Village of Yellow Pine near Indian Point and has been moving east into the Caton Creek drainage.

Caton Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6177/
— —

Johnson Fire – Contained

8-23-2018 Update: It was declared contained today. Most resources will be off the fire by Saturday. Folks may still see some smoke from time to time as there are numerous snags in the interior of the fire that make it too dangerous to completely mop it up. Our folks will continue to monitor the fire until the rains or snows come.
– Jake Strohmeyer, BNF Cascade Ranger
— —

Kiwah Fire – Meadow Crk Road Open

The Kiwah fire is burning east of Yellow Pine in the Wilderness in the Indian Creek drainage. Meadow Creek road is open.

Kiwah Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5995/
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Ice Hole Campground

The Cascade Ranger District [has] temporarily closed Ice Hole Campground for reconstruction beginning Monday, Aug. 6, 2018.

The Campground will remain closed for the remainder of the 2018 season. Project funding was provided by local Tribes and a State RV Grant.

Forest Service crews and contractors will repair existing resource damage, enabling visitors to have an improved recreational experience in the future.

link to project:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49637

Ice Hole Update

Progress made with renovation and remodel of Cascade Ranger District – Ice Hole Campground!

Thanks for the photo shares from Boise NF employees Marie Willis and Danelle Highfill.

link to FB photo gallery:

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Possible Problem Bear

A report Sunday (Aug 19) of a “BIG bear” hanging out in the upper village. Be “Bear Aware” – Remember to secure your trash and pet food.

Update Friday (Aug 24) “it has been back but still not getting into anything.”

Video Link Bear Visitor Aug 20, 2018
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Pests

Yellow Jackets are late this year, but really mean. Long legged wasps are not as numerous, but around. Mosquito population has dropped during the hot dry summer. Colombian ground squirrels have gone into hibernation. Chipmunks had a population boom this summer. Pine squirrels are not as numerous as in past years. Bears up in the Abstein orchard looking for apples.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not dump appliances or tires at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

“Bring it, Don’t Burn it.” There is a burn pile for woody debris only. Please don’t put trash or cardboard in the burn pile.
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Local Events:

Welch Labor Day Golf Tournament

The cannon for the Labor Day Golf Tournament went off at 1140am on Saturday September 1st to start the golfers.

(No results by press time Sunday.)
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

July 24th Yellow Pine water update:

It is good to go back to the even/odd watering schedule. Even/odd means if your address is 315 Yellow Pine Avenue, you can water on odd days such as the 1st, 3rd, 5th etc. And if your address is 316, water in even numbered days. The only request is that watering be done between 6am and 1pm. Also please limit to one sprinkler at a time.

Also it is requested that no lawn watering be done August 1st through the 6th to be able to withstand the draw from Harmonica.

Our second sand filter will be on line soon and give us more capacity. Thank you everyone for your patience during the high water demand time. – SH

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.
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VYPA News:

Midas Gold and Yellow Pine

August 28, 2018

Attached is the Community Partnership Agreement the Village of Yellow Pine signed with Midas Gold.

link to: 2018 Community Partnership Agreement.pdf
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1SwVurPPSBkYS4N_wqU5_ceJmXdxoXWeX/view

Next VYPA Meeting:

September 8, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Agenda

September 8, 2018 at 2:00 at Community Hall
I. Call to Order
I. Reading of the minutes
II. Treasurer’s report
III. Cemetery Committee Oral Report
IV. Community Hall Committee Oral Report
V. Harmonica Festival Committee Written Report
VI. Old Business:
• Review Description/decisions on VYPA Infrastructure Fund
• Review Infrastructure maintenance tasks needed for Spring run-off & “help wanted” plans
• Update on Labor Day Golf Tournament (if representative is available)
• Update from Midas (if representative is available)
• Update on water system (if representative is available)
• Update on Heli-spot (if representative is available)
• Update on Fire Dept. (if representative is available)
• Update on Schoolhouse Museum (if representative is available)
VII. New Business
• Opening Dialog on Community Hall Toilets
VIII. Next Meetings:
• June 8, 2019
• July 20, 2019 – change in normal schedule due to Village event planned on July 13th.
• August 10, 2019
• September 14, 2019
Adjournment
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YPFD News:

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.

Next meeting September 8 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Budget Hearing

Yellow Pine Fire District Budget for Fiscal Year 2018 – 2019

Notice has been given that the Yellow Pine Fire District will hold a public hearing for consideration of the proposed budget, including the estimated revenue for the fiscal year, October 1, 2018 to September 20, 2019, pursuant to County Law chapter 14, Section 31-1419A. Said hearing will be held at the Yellow Pine Community Hall in Yellow Pine, Idaho on Saturday September 08, 2018, at 10:00 AM. At said hearing all interested persons may appear and show cause, if any they have, why said proposal budget should be adopted.

Proposed Expenditures:

The following budget is an estimate set forth in said budget of the total proposed expenditures and accruing indebtedness of the Yellow Pine Fire District for the Fiscal year 2018 – 2019.

Yellow Pine Fire District Budget for 2018 – 2019:

* Fire Fighting/Rescue: $8,132
* Wages: $0
* Advertising: $2,000
* Repairs and Maintenance: $4,000
* Utilities (Fixed Cost*) $4,000

Total:
Fixed: $4,000
Includes Insurance $2,500
Total $18,132

I, Dan Stiff, Chair Yellow Pine Fire Commissioner, Yellow Pine, Idaho, do hereby certify that the above is a true and correct statement of the proposed expenditures for the fiscal year 2018 – 2019. All have been tentatively approved and entered into district records. I further certify Yellow Pine Fire District did give notice for said hearing in two (2) conspicuous places in the fire district, by order of the commissioners. Residents are invited to attend the budget hearing on September 08, 2018, at 10:00 AM at the Yellow Pine Community Hall, and have the right to approve written or oral comments concerning the fire district budget. A copy of the proposed fire district budget in detail is available at 320 Westside Ave, Yellow Pine, Idaho, 83677.

Dated this 15th day of August 2018

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911 @ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

A lot of progress has been made on the new Helipad near the crossroads.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

– Fire Chief Jeff

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Open for summer (208) 633-3377
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Yellow Pine Tavern

Boo to the End of Summer Potluck, Saturday September 1 at 5pm, Potluck and Fireworks Fundraiser. Burgers and Dogs provided.

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
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The Corner 633-3325

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Aug 27) Rain! Moderate rainfall started early this morning, puddles in the low spots, low clouds – can’t see VanMeter but Antimony ridge is visible, overnight low of 46 degrees. A couple of young hummingbirds at the feeder this morning. Late morning a small flock of finches, lots of pine siskins, a male downy woodpecker visiting the feeders. Rain stopped before 1130am, a few breaks in the clouds above, ridges still socked in, the clouds lifted just long enough to reveal fresh snow on top of VanMeter. A white-breasted nuthatch and a young steller jay also visited around lunch time. Short light shower mid-afternoon with dark clouds and chilly breeze, high of 59 degrees. Quiet cloudy evening, a few chipmunks scurrying around.

Tuesday (Aug 28) overnight low of 36 degrees, low overcast – ridges socked in, Green AQ. Male downy and female hairy woodpeckers and calliope hummingbird visiting this morning. Chilly morning, clouds lifted before lunch time and starting to warm up. The sounds of “firewood season” drifted across the village today. A few finches and pine siskins visited in the afternoon. Clear and mild afternoon, good air and light breezes, high of 74 degrees. Quiet cool evening, clear sky.

Wednesday (Aug 29) overnight low of 36 degrees, clear sky, light breezes and damp with dew, Green AQ. Finches, pine siskins, and a white-breasted nuthatch visiting this morning. Sounds like the gravel trucks are working today. Young stellar jay along with more finches visited for lunch time. A couple of chipmunks and a young golden mantel squirrel being pests. Warm, sunny, breezy afternoon, good air quality, high of 81 degrees. After sundown there were a few wispy clouds to the north, light haze of smoke to the west, and light breezes. Cooling off quickly after sundown.

Thursday (Aug 30) overnight low of 40 degrees, mostly clear sky, light haze of smoke. Sounds like the gravel trucks are working today. Several finches flying and calling in the neighborhood. Female hairy woodpecker and a white-breasted nuthatch stopped by for lunch. Breezy and some clouds moving in mid-day. Gusty breezes, mostly cloudy and warm afternoon, high of 82 degrees, appears to be more smoke in the direction of the Caton Fire. Stellar jay and young rufous hummingbird visited early evening. Overcast after sundown, calmer and can smell smoke.

Friday (Aug 31) overnight low of 46 degrees, clear sky, light breeze and good air (Green AQ.) Gravel trucks are working today. Finches and a few pine siskins visiting this morning. Dry and streets are getting dusty again. A quartet of hummingbirds at lunch time, plus a young stellar jay. Increasing traffic on the side roads, dusty. Cool breezes and warm sun this afternoon, partly cloudy and good air quality, high of 78 degrees. Young golden mantel squirrel and a chipmunk running amuck. Hummingbirds are still here this evening, but no finches. Folks out playing golf before dark. Clear and cooling off after sundown.

Saturday (Sept 1) overnight low of 37 degrees, clear sky, roofs wet with dew and good air (Green AQ.) August was very dry, rain total = 0.51″, most of it came in one storm. Raven calling from the east side of the village, and finches at the feeders. Cannon shot at 1140am for golf tourney. Gunfire to the west started at 120pm (lasted about an hour) while people were golfing. Mild temperatures, light breezes and lots of sunshine early afternoon, high of 81 degrees. Female hairy woodpecker, white-breasted nuthatch and a couple of young hummingbirds visited. Clear after sundown and temps dropping, smells like burning garbage. Increased traffic (and dust) after dark.

Sunday (Sept 2) overnight low of 36 degrees, clear sky, roofs wet with dew, light breeze and good air (except for one smoky campfire.) Low loud airplane around 915am. Finches flying and calling, a pine squirrel calling from the fence (have not seen them around for a while.) Streets are dusty, dust abatement has worn off main street by the monument. A few hummingbirds visiting for lunch. Loud airplane circled over the village a little before 145pm. Warm clear and sunny early afternoon, light pleasant breeze, high of 84 degrees. Traffic kicking up dust all afternoon. Warm, sunny and breezy late afternoon. People golfing (and driving) on the golf course before sundown. Clear and a little hazy (more dust than smoke) at sundown.
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RIP:

For Elvin Elliott’s friends in Yellow Pine, he passed away on Aug 26 2018 from cancer. Thank you all for your thoughts and prayers.

From Betty Elliott

Elvin Elliott

Elvin A. Elliott, 84, of Nampa, died Sunday, August 26, 2018. Funeral Home: All Valley Cremation, Nampa

Published in Idaho Press Tribune on Aug. 28, 2018
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Idaho News:

Services in Valley County suspended due to ‘live device’

by CBS 2 News Friday, August 31st 2018 KBOI

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office says services at the county’s offices, including the DMV, were suspended and closed Friday morning after someone brought in what appeared to be a “live device” to the building.

The sheriff’s office says the person found the device in a deceased family member’s belongings.

Details on the nature of the device have not been released.

The sheriff’s office says, as a precaution, they evacuated the area within 500 feet of the device and requested a team from Mountain Home to dispose of it.

The offices will be closed until Tuesday morning due to the evacuation and Monday being a holiday.

source:

Valley County Sheriff’s Office Update

8/31/2018 615pm

Earlier today we reported that we had an incident occur at the Sheriff’s Office and the Court House offices. Below you will see a video of the unknowingly live grenade that was brought to the Sheriff’s Office, being detonated by the 366th Explosive Ordinance Disposal Squad from Mountain Home Air Force Base. The grenade was brought to property belonging to Valley County Commissioner, Elt Hasbrouck with his permission for detonation. The video is a little bit of an optical illusion, the animals and all responding units in the video are way outside of the danger zone, they are more than 1200 feet away from the explosion, there was no chance of shrapnel reaching the animals or the responders. We wanted to share with everyone what had happened and are appreciative of everyone’s patience in this situation.

link to FB video:

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Chief: Speeders are part of life in a resort town

Education of visitors a constant process

By Dew Dodson for The Star-News Aug 30, 2018

Speeding motorists on residential streets in McCall are an unfortunate part of a busy tourist season, McCall Police Chief Justin Williams told the McCall City Council last Thursday.

Complaints of speeders this summer from residents on Lick Creek Road, Davis Avenue and other streets prompted city officials to look into adding more signs and police patrols.

Existing signage was determined to be adequate, but the steady influx of new visitors makes continued enforcement and education crucial, Williams told council members.

“To my knowledge, we haven’t stopped the same person twice,” he said. “Most of the people that we stop on Lick Creek are visitors and so we continue to educate the population.”

Lick Creek Road has seven posted speed limit signs about 500 feet apart, but the long, flat, straight road makes the posted limit of 25 miles per hour easy to abuse, Williams said.

continued:
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Boise musician helps rescue man after boat goes up in flames

Ben Burdick was in McCall to perform but ended up helping save a man’s life.

Shirah Matsuzawa August 30, 2018 KTVB

McCall, Idaho — What might have been a typical gig for musician Ben Burdick is now a day he’ll never forget!

Ben, along with a team of others, helped rescue a man after his boat burst into flames outside of the Mile High Marina in McCall.

… “We weren’t there not even a couple of minutes and we looked up to see a man staggering out of a boat that was on fire by the gas pumps,” said Burdick.

That man got caught between the boat and a gas pump.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho auctions Priest Lake lots for $25.6 million

The state has now sold nearly 400 residential sites on Priest Lake and Payette Lake for about $177 million.

Associated Press August 28, 2018

Coeur d’Alene, Idaho — Idaho officials have auctioned 51 state-owned lakefront lots on Priest Lake for $25.6 million.

Officials say the auction by the Idaho Department of Lands on Friday and Saturday brought in $625,000 over the appraised value.

Out of the 51 lots, 46 were purchased by current leaseholders, four were purchased by someone other than the current leaseholder, and one of the lots was unleased.

Five of the lots drew competitive bidding, with one selling for $415,000 above its appraised value.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

71-year-old hiker recovering after being struck by boulders

8/29/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — A 71-year-old Boise man is recovering after two boulders fell on him while he was hiking in the Sawtooth Mountains in central Idaho.

The Idaho Statesman reports Dick Ross suffered two broken legs Thursday when a refrigerator-sized boulder rolled over them.

He was also struck in the chest and pinned to the ground by a second boulder that was about the size of an ottoman.

He spent the night trapped under a boulder in an area southeast of Grandjean Peak until he was rescued Friday.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

This summer has been 10th driest on record

by Nathan Larsen Tuesday, August 28th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Monday’s storm system packed quite a punch for the region. It brought autumn-like temperatures to the Valley and our first dusting of snow up at some ski resorts. It lacked, however, any real significant precipitation. This is an area we’ve been struggling in all summer.

In fact, this summer is shaping up to be the 10th driest on record with just 0.36″ of precipitation reported for the months of June, July, and August. Monday’s storm system barely brought measurable precipitation with 0.01″ reported in Boise, McCall was in better shape with 0.27″.

continued:
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Idaho sheriffs say DMV software causing headaches, delays

By Kimberlee Kruesi – 8/28/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Top Idaho officials on Tuesday said they were fed up with the state’s latest driver’s license system, arguing the $10.5 million contract has failed to live up to its promises and instead has resulted in lengthy delays and chaotic conflicts for customers over the past year.

Idaho sheriffs have called on Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter to address the driver’s license system. Meanwhile, the Idaho Transportation Department announced it would temporarily halt using the software provided by the contracted vendor after confirming DMV computers were experiencing outages.

To date, there have been 11 incidents — totaling roughly 32 hours — where DMV computers slowed or stopped.

continued:
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Crashes in Idaho have killed 93 people since Memorial Day

8/30/18 AP

Pocatello, Idaho — An Idaho Transportation Department spokesman says 93 people have died in crashes on Idaho roads since Memorial Day.

The Idaho State Journal reports the number of deaths caused by crashes in Idaho this year between Memorial and Labor Day has surpassed the 91 deaths that occurred during the same time period last year, known as the 100 Deadliest Days of Summer.

There have been 160 deaths on Idaho roads since January, up from 156 in the same timeframe last year.

continued:
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Fire Season:

Evacuation orders lifted for Rattlesnake Creek Fire

Caton Fire near Yellow Pine grows to 400 acres

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Aug 30, 2018

A wild fire that started near Yellow Pine on Friday quickly spread to about 400 acres by Sunday before rain muted its intensity, fire officials said.

The Caton Fire was detected about seven miles southwest of Yellow Pine last Friday and is suspected to have been caused by lightning, according to Forest Service reports.

“Initial attack by smokejumpers, helirappellers, and a ground crew were aided by single-engine air tankers, a heavy air tanker and Very Large Air Tankers, but the fire quickly grew in the hot, dry, windy conditions,” the Forest Service said.

“The fire has not grown over the past two days,” Payette National Forest Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said. “The cool, rainy weather has helped to hold this fire in place.”

“No closures are in effect and the fire is not posing a threat to Yellow Pine,” Harris said.

Six firefighters are assigned to monitor the Caton Fire and additional resources will be assigned as needed, Harris said.

The Caton Fire had cost $150,000 as of Tuesday, Harris said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Land Management Agencies lift Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in all Zones, Except the Weiser River Zone of the Payette Fire Restriction Area

Date: August 29, 2018
Contact: Brian Harris, Payette National Forest, 208-634-6945

McCall, Idaho – With cooler temperatures and chances of precipitation increasing into next week, local land management agencies will lift Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in all zones except the Weiser River Zone beginning Friday, August 31, 2018, just after midnight at 0001 hours. The Fire Restrictions are rescinded by agencies managing state, private and public lands in the area, including the United States Forest Service (USFS), United State Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association (SITPA), and the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL). Restrictions in the Weiser River Zone will remain in effect until further notice. See map for the location of the Weiser River Zone.

The restrictions were put into effect on August 3 when fire danger and burning conditions were unusually high. Recent storms have brought moisture with much cooler temperatures to the area, and with the days getting shorter, fire conditions have moderated. Forest visitors are reminded that vegetation is still dry, and to be careful with all use of fire in the outdoors. The accidental start of a wildfire can still be devastating.

Be alert and be aware. Follow these tips to help prevent wildfire:

* NEVER leave a camp fire unattended
* Keep water, dirt and a shovel near your fire at all times
* Make sure your fire is dead out and cold to the touch before you leave it
* Fireworks are never allowed on National Forest and State lands, and are prohibited on BLM lands during closed fire season (May 10 through October 20).
* Exploding targets or tracer rounds are prohibited on all public lands.

Area closures due to active wildfires are still in effect on some public lands, including the areas affected by the Rattlesnake Creek and Mesa wildfires on the Payette National Forest. Contact the land management agency for your area of interest for specific information regarding fire closures.

Fire restrictions are being lifted, but burn bans may still be in place in some areas. Fire

Restrictions and burn bans address different types of activities. Burn bans pertain to controlled burning activities such as debris burning, slash burning, or agricultural burning, for which a fire safety burn permit from IDL is required. Visit http://burnpermits.idaho.gov/ for more information.
— — — — — — — — — —

Smoke Eaters: Scientists in McCall measure wildfire smoke, effects on people

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Aug 30, 2018

Scott Herndon works with equipment so precise it can detect a single particle in 100 billion. That comes in handy when Herndon is trying to measure fire smoke in the air over McCall.

Herndon is lead scientist and vice president of field measurement research for Aerodyne Research Inc. of Boston.

He and his colleagues have camped their moving-van sized truck at The Activity Barn near McCall to analyze the behavior of forest fire smoke.

A nozzle outside the truck sucks in air, which is then processed by specialized equipment inside to detect and analyze exactly what makes up the local atmosphere.

The smoky skies of McCall will serve as a source of data to determine how forest fire smoke travels and the effects those emissions have on humans and weather, Herndon said.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Bridge repairs cause road closure along SF Boise River

Boise, Idaho, Aug. 27, 2018 — The Mountain Home Highway District will enact a closure on a portion of Prairie Road (Forest Road 121), located about 7 miles south of Prairie near the Danskin boat ramp, beginning Sept. 5 for around 14 days while repairs are made to the Pierce Creek Bridge footings.

This closure will affect boaters on the South Fork Boise River who typically end their float at the Danskin boat ramp, as it will prevent road access to the ramp from upstream. The ramp itself will remain open, but only accessible if driving in from the north.

“Closing this portion of the road is expected to impact recreationalists, local residents and businesses,” said Acting Mountain Home District Ranger Holly Hampton. “We ask that travelers in the area reconsider their routes.”

Since the 2012 Trinity Ridge Fire, there has been a significant amount of debris flow on Pierce Creek that has impacted the bridge footings and making repairs necessary. This work is being done with funding from the Forest Service and MHHD.

This portion of the road is managed and maintained by MHHD.

For more information contact the Mountain Home Highway District, 208-587-3211.

Map:

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Area Closures that may affect you this Labor Day weekend

Lowman, Idaho, Aug 30, 2018 – Area closures related to the Wapiti and Bible Back Fires may affect visitors to the Sawtooth and Boise National Forests this Labor Day weekend. While many locations on the forests are open for recreationists, there are some closures that provide for firefighter and public safety.

Wapiti Fire in the Grandjean Area- Developed campgrounds at Stanley Lake and access to Stanley Lake will be open. Dispersed camping in the Stanley Lake area is currently not allowed. Trap Creek, Sheep Trail, Elk Creek Campgrounds along Hwy 21 are also open.

Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Inlet Trailhead including access to Baron Lakes, and all lakes and trailheads in the southern Sawtooth Wilderness are open. Closed areas are: Alpine and Sawtooth Lakes and Grandjean, Stanley Lake, Elk Meadow, and Elk Mountain Trailheads.

Bible Back Fire in the southern White Cloud Mountains- Fourth of July Road (FR #209) is open but access to these trails and lakes is closed: Fourth of July Lake and Washington Lake, Phyllis Lake, and Champion Lakes.

Upper Pole Creek Road (FR #197) is closed beyond the Grand Prize Trailhead, although Grand Prize Trailhead is open. Access to the following trailheads and destinations is closed: Champion Creek Cut-Off Trailhead and access to Champion Lakes; Washington Creek and Washington Basin Trailheads and access to Washington Peak, Washington Lake and Chamberlain Basin; Three Cabins Creek Trailhead and access to Germania Creek and Chamberlain Basin.

For additional information please visit:
Sawtooth NF Area Closures: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/sawtooth/alerts-notices
Facebook: U.S. Forest Service – Sawtooth National Forest
Facebook: U.S. Forest Service – Boise National Forest
Boise NF Twitter: @BoiseNF
Boise NF Website: https://www.fs.usda.gov/boise
Fire Restrictions: https://www.idahofireinfo.com/p/fire-restrictions.html
InciWeb – Wapiti Fire: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6176/
Hunting information: https://idfg.idaho.gov/hunt
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Caterpillars in the Boise National Forest leave campers with rashes, allergic reactions

The Douglas-fir tussock moth caterpillars recently left several campers in the Sage Hen recreation area with allergic reactions and skin irritation.

Shirah Matsuzawa August 29, 2018 KTVB

Boise — A warning for anyone who may plan on camping near the Sage Hen recreational area this Labor Day weekend.

The Boise National Forest is warning campers to not touch Douglas-fir tussock moth caterpillars because they may cause skin irritation.

Campers should also avoid coming into contact with the hair of the caterpillars because that, too, could cause people to break out into a rash.

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Wilderness Airstrip Maintenance Work Will Begin Soon

Payette National Forest Aug 27, 2018

Cabin Creek and Cold Meadows airstrips in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness area will receive maintenance work in the near future. Cabin Creek airstrip is schedule for August 30th through September 4th, and Cold Meadows airstrip is scheduled for September 5th through the 9th.

The airstrips will remain open during maintenance work, but pilots are requested to land only if necessary, or only if work is not actively taking place – the work is being done with animal stock, and it takes a fair amount of time to clear the stock and the equipment from the airstrip each time a plane approaches for a landing.

link to photos on FB:

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Boise ski area gets approval for snow-making system

8/31/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Federal officials have given a Boise ski area permission to build a snow-making system.

The U.S. Forest Service gave the Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area permission on Thursday to begin burying water and electrical lines on the Deer Point and Coach portion of the mountain.

The organization had already begun installation work in the Morning Star chairlift area, which the resort owns, said General Manager Brad Wilson.

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BLM advisory council to meet in September

Date: August 30, 2018
Contact: Holly Hovis, hhovis@blm.gov, (208) 384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management announced today it will hold a meeting of the Boise Resource Advisory Council (RAC). The public is welcome to attend the meeting, which will occur on Sept. 13, 2018, at 3948 Development Ave., Boise, ID, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Resource Advisory Councils provide advice and recommendations for the BLM on resource and land management issues within the BLM. The Bureau of Land Management maintains 38 chartered advisory committees located in the West. Resource Advisory Councils are sounding boards for BLM initiatives, regulatory proposals and policy changes. Each citizen-based council consists of 10 to 15 members from diverse interests in local communities, and they assist in the development of committee recommendations that address public land management issues. Resource councils are critical in assisting the BLM in continuing to be a good neighbor in the communities the agency serves.

Planned agenda items at the meeting include a field trip to a proposed recreation site near Perjue Canyon on the Bruneau Field Office. There will also be a briefing on the Boise District’s wild horse program and other field office updates.

“The RAC’s feedback helps us make more informed decisions, resulting in better projects on the ground,” said BLM Boise District Manager Lara Douglas. “The members represent diverse public interests and provide invaluable input for managing our public lands.”

A half-hour comment period, during which the public may address the RAC, will begin at 9 a.m. Depending on the number of people wishing to comment and time available, the amount of time for individual oral comments may be limited. For more information about the upcoming RAC meeting, please contact Holly Hovis at (208) 384-3393 or hhovis@blm.gov
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BLM to host public field tour of Perjue Canyon

Date: August 30, 2018
Contact: Holly Hovis, hhovis@blm.gov, (208) 384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management is hosting a field tour on Sept. 13, 2018, to share information on proposed recreation site development at the Perjue Canyon area near the Little Jacks Creek Wilderness. The area of potential development is a Hands on the Land education site and has an existing trailhead off the Mud Flat Road Scenic Byway south of Grand View.

The BLM is considering options to develop the 10-acre parcel that could provide additional parking, camping sites, horseback riding opportunities and infrastructure options, such as shade shelters and picnic tables for local school field trips. Upgrading the site to meet current accessibility standards and providing access for all abilities would be a key component of the proposal.

The BLM is hosting the tour to solicit feedback and recommendations from the public on the proposed development options and to identify issues to be addressed in the environmental assessment. The BLM will prepare an environmental assessment in the fall of 2018 to evaluate the impacts of the proposed project.

“This diverse landscape has so much to offer to the public in terms of spectacular vistas, homesteading history and a rugged wilderness experience at a location that is relatively close to Grand View,” said BLM Outdoor Recreation Planner Casey Steenhoven. “We are looking forward to providing access and recreational and educational opportunities for all abilities at this site.”

The field tour will meet at the junction of Mud Flat Road and the Oreana Cutoff Road at 11:15 a.m. Anyone interested in attending the tour or needing additional information may contact BLM Bruneau Field Office Manager Tanya Thrift at (208) 384-3300.
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US official reiterates push to move land agency out West

By Brady McCombs – 8/28/18 AP

Ogden, Utah — A high-ranking U.S. Interior Department official on Thursday reiterated the agency’s strong interest in moving its Bureau of Land Management headquarters to the American West.

The move isn’t a done deal, Susan Combs, an assistant secretary at Interior, said as she visited a northern Utah city that is among those under consideration for the new location. But she spoke passionately during a round table in Ogden about the need to bridge the gap between bureaucrats and the people affected by their decisions.

The bureau, which is overseen by Interior, manages nearly 388,000 square miles (1 million square kilometers) of land nationwide, and 99 percent is in 12 Western states.

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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Aspiration pneumonia in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Aug 31, 2018 IME

Aspiration pneumonia results from the inhalation of liquid, food or bacteria into the lungs. Material that is aspirated usually originates from the stomach or esophagus. Normally, the larynx, the opening to the lungs, closes during swallowing, to prevent liquids and foods from entering the lungs through the windpipe. Any disorder that increases the reflux of stomach and esophageal contents into the mouth can increase the probability of aspiration.

Any disorder of the larynx that prevents the larynx from opening and closing properly also increases the risk of aspiration. Dilation of the esophagus (megaesophagus) and recurrent vomiting are common causes of aspiration. Sometimes animals under anesthesia will regurgitate. This is why animals are fasted before anesthesia and are intubated to prevent aspiration.

Clinical signs are the sudden onset of difficult breathing, coughing, panting and fever. Affected animals are depressed and often don’t eat. Progressive respiratory impairment may be life-threatening.

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US rejects request for information on Idaho wolf attacks

The U.S. Department of Justice says the requested documents contain information that’s exempt from Freedom of Information Act requests.

Keith Ridler Associated Press August 31, 2018

Boise — The U.S. government says it doesn’t have to release information to an environmental group concerning investigations into livestock deaths in Idaho that can result in wolves being killed for preying on cattle and sheep.

The U.S. Department of Justice in documents filed Thursday in U.S. District Court says the requested documents contain information that’s exempt from Freedom of Information Act requests.

Western Watersheds Project says it wants the reports because it suspects the U.S. Department of Agriculture and ranchers are inflating the number of wolf kills of livestock.

The group says it will press ahead with the lawsuit to get the information.

Federal workers through mid-July killed 49 wolves in Idaho following what investigators said were 61 confirmed wolf kills of livestock.

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Officials say rancher shot, injured wolf in NE Washington

8/29/18 AP

Olympia, Wash. — Washington state wildlife officials say a rancher in northeast Washington shot and injured a wolf last week.

The Department of Fish and Wildlife said Tuesday that biologists found the collared wolf on Monday injured but mobile. The shooting happened in the range of the Togo wolf pack.

The agency earlier said the rancher shot the adult wolf in self-defense Thursday as it barked and approached.

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Judge: State can proceed with killing member of wolf pack

8/31/18 AP

Olympia, Wash. — A judge has ruled that a male wolf in a pack that killed a cow and injured two calves in northeast Washington can be killed by the state Department of Fish and Wildlife.

After a Friday morning hearing, Thurston County Superior Court Judge Carol Murphy declined to extend a restraining order that was issued by another judge earlier in the month and was set to expire later in the day, the Capital Press reported .

Since the earlier restraining order was issued, a rancher said he shot at the wolf in self-defense and apparently wounded it in the left rear leg. Fish and Wildlife officials say that the wolf, which is wearing a radio collar that transmits its GPS locations, remains mobile, and that they believe attacks on livestock will continue.

Murphy said that the two environmental groups that had obtained the restraining order — The Center for Biological Diversity and Cascadia Wildlands — had failed to show that they would suffer irreparable harm if the department shot the wolf.

source:
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Two wolf pups born south of Mount Hood in Oregon

Wolves in western Oregon are protected by the federal Endangered Species Act.

Associated Press August 30, 2018

Mount Hood, Ore. (AP) — Two wolf pups have been seen near Mount Hood, marking the first known reproduction by wolves in the northern part of the Cascade Mountains in Oregon since wolves began returning to the state in the past decade.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife said Wednesday that a remote camera on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation captured images of two pups on Aug. 10.

Wolves in western Oregon are protected by the federal Endangered Species Act.

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Wolf Education International

9-2-2018

Would you welcome a wolf in your back yard?
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Fish and Game says higher number of black bear problems reported in McCall

By Max Silverson For The Star-News Aug 30, 2018

August has seen a sharp uptick in reported cases of black bears causing problems in McCall as they ransack curbside trash and outdoor garbage cans in a search for food.

Beyond causing a nuisance to residents, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game is often left with no choice but to kill bears that develop a habit of seeking food from residential neighborhoods.

Black bears can become dangerous when they grow accustomed to easily finding trash as a food source, causing the promise of food to overpower their fear of humans, Regional Wildlife Manager for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Regan Berkley said.

“Last week, Fish and Game killed a bear that had become habituated to human food sources in the Rio Vista neighborhood,” Berkley said.

“This was a direct result of the bear having access to human foods such as trash,” she said.

Simply capturing and releasing bears that have learned to seek food from humans has been unsuccessful in the past.

“These bears cannot be moved, because research shows they will quickly travel long distances to seek out human foods in their new locations,” Berkley said. “We cannot responsibly move a habituated bear knowing it will likely visit the nearest campground or neighborhood.”

The department has received about 25 reports of black bears causing problems in McCall neighborhoods this August, with 10 complaints coming in the last week alone, she said.

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Rare footage shows grizzly shortly before IDFG managers killed it

Expanding population prompts controversy over hunt

Steve Liebenthal Aug 29, 2018 KIVI TV

Island Park, Idaho – Grant Pearson and his friend Taylor were on an evening boat ride when they spotted a grizzly bear near a family cabin in Island Park.

… Fish and Game had captured the same bear in the same campground just a few days earlier. Managers moved the grizzly to a remote location twenty two miles away, but within days, the bear was back, and that cost him his life.

“It made a big loop and came back. It was just very persistent in getting into the campground again,” said Grizzly Researcher Jeremy Nicholson. “We kept very close track of the bear cause we had a GPS collar on it, so we knew exactly where the bear was going, but finally it just came down to that it was a threat to humans, so we had to remove that bear.”

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Judge halts Saturday’s grizzly hunts in Wyoming, Idaho

By Matt Volz and Matthew Brown – 8/31/18 AP

Missoula, Mont. — A federal judge has put a 14-day hold on the first public grizzly bear hunts in Wyoming and Idaho in more than 40 years, as he considers whether the government was wrong to lift federal protections on the animals.

U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen’s order came just two days before the states prepared to open their grizzly bear hunting seasons on Saturday, which would have been the first in the Lower 48 states since Montana’s last hunt in 1991.

“The threat of death to individual bears posed by the scheduled hunts is sufficient” to justify a delay in the state’s hunting seasons, Christensen wrote.

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Group buys Idaho ranch to protect bighorn sheep habitat

8/29/18 AP

Lewiston, Idaho — A conservation group bought a 4.5-square-mile (11.7-square-kilometer) ranch in Idaho with the purpose of protecting bighorn sheep.

Portland, Oregon-based Western Rivers Conservancy purchased the Ten Mile Creek Ranch near Lewiston last week, the Lewiston Tribune reported .

The property, which was owned by Rick Rupp of Port Townsend, Washington, and Tucson, Arizona, includes a 5,000-square-foot (465-square-meter) primary residence, a 2,000-square-foot (186-square-meter) caretaker’s home and about 4 miles (6 kilometers) of waterfront property along the Snake River.

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Oregon officer rescues baby deer stuck in fence

by The Associated Press Friday, August 31st 2018


(Photo credit: Eugene Police Department)

Eugene, Ore. (AP) – An animal welfare officer in Oregon is getting attention after her rescue of a fawn was captured on her body-worn camera.

The Eugene Police Department on Thursday made public a video and photo of Officer Shawni McLaughlin freeing a terrified fawn that got stuck in a backyard fence.

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Oregon hunter rescued after hanging upside-down for 2 days

8/30/18 AP

La Grande, Ore. — An Oregon hunter who fell out of his tree stand and got tangled in his safety harness has been rescued after hanging upside-down for two days about 30 feet (9 meters) from the ground.

The Union County Sheriff’s Department says Thursday another hunter found the man and drove to a nearby highway to get cellphone reception to call 911.

Rescuers used a bucket truck and ladder to reach him.

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Plague confirmed in rural Wyoming

Aug 29, 2018 Local News 8

Cheyenne, Wyo. (KIFI/KIDK) – The Wyoming Department of Health in Sheridan County has confirmed a cat in the town of Big Horn is infected with the plague. There have been no human cases identified in the area.

The animal is known to wander outdoors.

The diagnosis was confirmed by the Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory in Laramie earlier this week.

“Plague is a serious bacterial infection that can be deadly for pets and for people if not treated as soon as possible with antibiotics,” said Dr. Alexia Harrist, state health officer and state epidemiologist with WDH. “The disease can be transmitted to humans from ill animals and by fleas coming from infected animals. We want people to know of the potential threat in the cat’s home area as well as across the state.”

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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
August 30, 2018
Issue No. 884
Table of Contents

* States Close Columbia River To Steelhead Retention; Run Downgraded 48 Percent From Preseason Forecast
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441423.aspx

* Construction Begins On New $16 Million Yakama Nation Coho Supplementation Hatchery
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441422.aspx

* GAO Report Examines Columbia River Basin Restoration Program Under Clean Water Act
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441421.aspx

* Compact Approves One Shortened Mainstem Gillnet Period, Opens Two-Day Sturgeon Fishery
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441420.aspx

* Snake River Sockeye Continue To Arrive In Sawtooth Valley, 79 Fish Trapped
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441419.aspx

* Idaho, BPA Sign $24 Million Albeni Falls Dam Wildlife Habitat Agreement
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441418.aspx

* Deschutes River Alliance Asks Court To Reopen Dismissed Water Quality Case On Dissolved Oxygen Issue
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441417.aspx

* Study Looks At Issues Regarding Sockeye Reintroduction Using Residualized Kokanee
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441416.aspx

* WDFW Authorizes Cooke Aquaculture To Transfer Atlantic Salmon To Puget Sound Net Pens
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441415.aspx

* Researchers Profiling Cooler Areas In Yakima River That May Act As Salmon Safe Havens When Temperatures Rise
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441414.aspx

* NOAA Fisheries Releases Final Recovery Plan For Southern Population Of Green Sturgeon
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441413.aspx

* Walleye Discovered In Idaho’s Lake Cascade; Illegally Stocked Fish Could Pose Threat To Fisheries
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441412.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

2018 outlook: Hunters should have fair-to-excellent deer and elk hunting

Elk and whitetail harvests are both at near records, and mule deer hunting should improve

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Monday, August 27, 2018

Hunters can look forward to a good fall season in 2018, with similar elk and white-tailed deer populations as last year and likely more mule deer in many areas.

Despite a setback in 2017 following a hard winter that mostly affected mule deer, most of Idaho’s deer and elk herds and harvests have been at or near historic highs in recent years and well above long-term averages. Hunters should see similar numbers this fall.

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Some Horsethief Reservoir Campgrounds Closing Early

The campground closures will have no impact on fishing or boating activities at Horsethief.

By Evin Oneale, Regional Conservation Educator
Thursday, August 30, 2018

Several Horsethief Reservoir area campgrounds will be closing just after Labor Day weekend and will remain closed until the spring of 2019. The closures come about three weeks earlier than normal.

Ospreys Bay, Easters, Timber Bay and Bear Knob Campgrounds, all located on the west shore of Horsethief, will be closed on September 4th. Only Kings Point campground will remain open, including the Kings Point boat ramp. The entire east side of Horsethief has been closed this season as campground construction upgrades continue in that area.

Horsethief Reservoir is managed cooperatively by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game and the YMCA. Fish and Game oversees Horsethief’s popular trout fishery, while the YMCA is responsible for campground management.

The campground closures will have no impact on fishing or boating activities at Horsethief.

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Time for boots on the ground, lots of hunting starts on Aug. 30 and more in September

Big game archery seasons, bird and upland game hunting and mourning doves open in August and September

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Aug. 30 kicks off many archery seasons for deer and elk, general hunts for bear, mountain lion and wolves, as well as seasons for some upland game birds and animals with more seasons opening in September.

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Brush up on the new trespassing law before you go hunting or fishing

Basic rules remain the same, you need permission to be on private lands

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Idaho’s new trespass laws took effect July 1, and hunters, anglers and other sportsmen and women should be aware of what’s changed before they head into the field, but also what’s unchanged.

Before delving into the changes, there a few things to remember:

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More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Photo shows mama duck with 76 ducklings

Likely a ‘duck daycare,’ expert says

July 27, 2018 Local News 8


Photographer Brent Cizek of Bemidji, Minnesota, captured this photo on Lake Bemidji.

Duluth, Minn. – Some parents have their hands full with only one child, but a photographer in Bemidji, Minnesota, happened to catch a mother duck with 76 ducklings.

That’s right – 76.

Brent Cizek told CBC he “couldn’t have asked for a better photo opportunity” when he was at Lake Bemidji.

The images he captured of the duck and all those ducklings hit the internet and went viral and was featured in media around the world.

Before you think to yourself, “Wow! Mom of the Year!”, it’s important to add some context to the scene.

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Seasonal Humor:

HuntingSeasonBC-a
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