Category Archives: News 2019

Aug 18, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Aug 18, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: The Village water will be shut off at 9am, Monday August 26th to look for leaks. The boil water order and water restrictions are still in effect.

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire Training
May 10 – Burn “permits” required
May 15 – Firewood Season opens
July 22 – Daytime closures on So. Fk road begin
Aug 26 – 9am Village Water Shut Down
Sept 14 – 10am YPFD meeting at the Fire Hall budget meeting
Sept 14 – Ride to Cinnabar
Sept 21 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall

(details below)
———-

Local Events:

2019 Yellow Pine Escapades Sept 14 – Ride to Cinnabar

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine. link:
———-

Village News:

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
— — — —

Roads

South Fork
Starting July 22 the South Fork road will be closed Monday through Friday from 7am to 4pm on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends.
More info:
Map w/info for August 12 through August 16:

YP to Stibnite Road
Update from Valley County Road Dept. Aug 13: Open with cautions – expect delays in the work area. “we strongly advise people need to be very cautious of a few dump trucks working between Stibnite and Yellow Pine. The contractor will begin laying a crushed rock surface on the repairs probably next week.”
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

Note: August 10th was Dean’s last day of driving the mail truck for Arnold Aviation. Many thanks for your deliveries of mail, freight and groceries through all kinds of weather and hazardous road conditions.

June 1st started the 6-day a week mail delivery. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
— — — —

Wasp Season

Long legged wasps are out, invading sheds and seeking to come indoors. A LOT of yellowjackets around, watch for nests.


— — — —

Reminder for people living in bear country:

* Garbage should be stored inside the house or in a secure garage or storage building.
* If garbage cannot be stored in a secure location, a bear-resistant container approved by the Interagency Bear Committee is recommended.
* Avoid using bird feeders from March through November. Birds do not need supplemental feeding this time of year.
* Pet food should not be left outside.
* BBQ grills or anything with a strong odor should not be left out at night.
* Protect gardens, beehives, and compost piles with electric fencing.
* Never intentionally feed bears. A food-conditioned bear may pose a threat to human safety and usually results in the removal of the bear.
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Update Aug 18:

Unfortunately the leak that Idaho Rural thought they found turned up no leak.

On Monday August 26th, the water will be shut down for a few hours beginning at 9am. I am going to try to isolate the leak.

– Thanks for your patience Steve

Update Aug 9:

We are currently trying to coordinate a date that works to shut the town water supply down to repair the leak. When that date is set, everyone will be notified.
– Steve Holloway

Update Aug 7:

Donations to the Water Department

We have received two donations to the water department totaling $1,750.

First one came from Tom Keffer of the Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers. They donated $1,150. Tom and the Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers brought in the Highland Games to Yellow Pine. Last year they raised money for the Helipad. The Highland Games will be coming back to Yellow Pine next June 27th. Thank you Tom and the highland family.

The second one was from Keith and Delta Holloway. They raised $600 from the sales of corn dogs during this year’s Harmonica Festival. Thank you Mom and Dad for your continued support of Yellow Pine.
– Steve Holloway

Water Update July 25:

On July 19th a crew from Idaho rural water came in and found a substantial leak on the east side of the east fork bridge. We are still on a boil order due to the large capacity of water lost and low chlorine contact time. We still request that everyone conserves water by not watering lawns because we are borderline to running the town out of water.
– Steve H YPWUA

Water Update June 7:

1. The “boil order” is still in effect.
2. There is still large water leaks in the system. We continue to look.
3. A grant for $39,000 was approved for improvements to the system.
3. Work is currently being done on the new contact tank.
4. Please, no lawn watering until we find and repair the major leaks.
– Steve Holloway

The yearly Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the community hall. (no minutes yet)

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update
— — — —

VYPA News:

If you have interest in being the chairman of the Music and Harmonica committee, please contact one of the VYPA council members. The 2020 chairman will be selected by August 30th.

Next meeting September 14th – 2pm at the Community Hall.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes August 10, 2019.
link to: 20190810 YPVA Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes July 20, 2019
link to: 20190720 Yellow Pine Village Association Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for June 8, 2019
link to: 20190608 Village of Yellow Pine Association

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 8th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th – 2pm at the Community Hall.
— — — —

YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

Link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Next Meeting Sept 14 at 10am YPFD meeting in the Fire Hall

Last meeting July 13 – minutes forthcoming.

YPFD June 16, 2019 Meeting minutes
link to: 20190615 YPFD Meeting Notes_Final

Meetings will be held at the fire station at 10am and everyone is welcome to attend. June 15th; July 13th; and Sept 14th (which will also be the budget meeting as well).

Every Sunday 11am – Training

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Training: Sunday Fire/EMS training has begun. Sundays at 11:00 AM unless otherwise posted. If Jeff F is in town the trainings will be held. All are welcome.

YP Helispot: We are working with Valley County Road Department and the Boise National Forest for the rock base for the road leading into the Helispot and the actual Helispot itself. We are also receiving rock for the Fire Hydrants, water tank foundations, etc. The rock will come from the Valdez pit and will be less expensive than having it trucked in from Cascade.

Stop the Bleed Course: This course was well attended in the Fall and Jeff F and Ann F will be presenting another course when the new instructor material comes out. There are “Stop The Bleed” kits at the Tavern in an emergency.

Siren Testing: The YPFD siren will be tested only once this year on the first of May at noon. 3 blasts of the siren is a test, more than 3 is an Emergency.

-JF
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Call for reservations
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Our hours will be 11-8 every day, except closed on Tuesdays. We are open for breakfast by request and always have good coffee starting at 6am.
The Corner has firewood permits in stock now. 4 cord minimum at $6.25 per cord. Please bring drivers license and cash is preferred, no CC.
The Corner Store will also be open with snacks, groceries, fresh produce, soda, ice and packaged beer. If you know you will be coming in over the summer and need special grocery orders, let me know and I will order it in for you while you are here, 2 deliveries a week. The best way to get a hold of me is to call or stop by and say hello.
Karaoke is back at The Corner! Choose your favorite songs from our online music library and entertain your friends up on stage through our professional sound system.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Summer Hours Daily 8am to Close
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
Website:
FB page:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News
subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Aug 12) overnight low of 40 degrees, mostly clear sky and heavy dew this morning. Internet connection spotty. Crusher clanging and belching dust. Hairy woodpecker and red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Mostly sunny and mild mid-day. Nate from MTE was in town. Partly cloudy and very pleasant mid-afternoon, high of 79 degrees. Streets are drying out and getting dusty again. Clear and cooling off at sundown. Doe wandering through the neighborhood. High hazy clouds obscured the Perseid meteor shower.

Tuesday (Aug 13) overnight low of 40 degrees, clear sky this morning. Two early loud airplanes. Water shut off on south end of village for local water repairs. Diamond Fuel truck delivering. Crusher putting up clouds of dust. Mostly sunny and warm mid-day. Warm mid-afternoon and mostly cloudy, high of 87 degrees. Red-breasted nuthatches, calliope hummingbirds and finches visiting. Clearing off by evening and quiet. At dusk it was clear, calm and cooling off. High haze and bright moon before midnight.

Wednesday (Aug 14) overnight low of 42 degrees, almost clear sky this morning. Huge clouds of dust rising from the crusher. Pine siskins, finches and several calliope hummingbirds visiting. Columbian ground squirrels are mostly staying underground, lots of chipmunks and a few pine squirrels. Mail truck made it in on time. Warming up by lunch time and partly cloudy. Light traffic early afternoon, crusher belching dust. Mostly cloudy, warm and breezy by mid-afternoon, high of 89 degrees. Gray overcast, warm and light breezes before sunset. Hawk in the neighborhood. High thin rosy clouds at dusk.

Thursday (Aug 15) overnight low of 44 degrees, clear sky this morning. Very large cloud of dust hanging over the east side of the village from the crusher. A few evening grosbeaks are back. Also heard a flicker and some finches, red-breasted nuthatches and pine siskins visiting. No ground squirrels around but lots of chipmunks. Warm and hazy mid-day, high of 86 degrees. Light traffic, dusty streets. Mostly cloudy and warm mid-afternoon and breezy. Still mostly cloudy before sundown, slight haze in the lower air. Quiet evening. Mostly clear at dusk, a few rosy clouds.

Friday (Aug 16) overnight low of 44 degrees, clear sky this morning. Haze of dust to the east from the noisy crusher. Hawk in the neighborhood, then finches and jays came back, flicker calling from the trees. Lots of chipmunks but no ground squirrels out. Partly cloudy mid-day. Light traffic. Warm, partly cloudy and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 85 degrees. Quiet afternoon. Mostly clear and mild before sundown. Light traffic kicking up dust. High thin clouds before midnight.

Saturday (Aug 17) overnight low of 43 degrees, pretty much overcast with thin spots showing a little blue this morning. Hardly any birds around except a couple of finches and a juvenile jay. Mostly cloudy and breezy mid-day. Increasing street traffic and dust. Mostly cloudy, not too hot and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 82 degrees. Lots of chipmunks, a few pine squirrels, a couple of golden mantels but no ground squirrels around. Fairly low helicopter about 650pm, then a wonky sounding airplane at 658pm. High thin overcast and light breezes before sunset. High thin clouds at dusk.

Sunday (Aug 18) overnight low of 41 degrees, clear sky this morning. A few early (loud) airplanes. Finches, pine siskins and chipmunks visiting. No tree swallows or columbian ground squirrels. Mostly clear and warm mid-day. Increased traffic, neighborhood streets are really dusty. Warm, partly cloudy and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 88 degrees. Clear before sunset and light breezes.
—————————

Idaho News:

Stibnite Reunion No. 67 August 4th

Picture of those who came to the reunion this last Sunday.

20190804StibniteReunion67-a

Left to Right Front Row
Laural Sayers Midas Gold Pres., Joyce Hillman, Not sure of the next four, Marline Bailey, Joe Icenhower, Lorie McRae Icenhower, Linda Demoss, Elie Anderson, Lynn Colman, Claudia Clarkson King, Mike Hoobler, Hooblers Wife.

Back Row Left to Right
Chris Dahl Midas Gold, Kyle Fend Midas Gold, Sandy Sanders grandson, Sandy McRae, Sandy Sanders, David Shaw, Craig Demoss, Not sure, Jim Colman, Curt Clarkson

It was a good get together. Midas had geologists and their president in attendance as well.

– Sandy McRae
— — — — — — — — — —

New Tamarack Resort owner pays $686K in past-due taxes

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Aug 15, 2019

The new owners of Tamarack Resort have paid more than $686,000 in past due property taxes to Valley County, Valley County Treasurer Gabe Stayton said.

The payment made Aug. 2 by Tamarack Resort Holdings brings the new owners of the four-season resort southwest of Donnelly up to date on nearly all of its past-due taxes, Stayton said.

The payment included $344,000 due on 174 parcels that would have been seized by the county if not paid by Monday.

… A total of 156 of the 174 parcels are located in Village Plaza, the multi-building complex that has sat idle since the resort’s original developers went bankrupt in 2008.

The past-due amounts were accumulated by previous owners of the parcels and not by Tamarack’s new owners.

… The $686,208.79 that was paid is the amount that was certified by Valley County, Stayton said.

The county has since found several miscellaneous parcels associated with Tamarack Resort that were previously missed and are also past-due on property taxes, Stayton said.

Once the county has completed its review of those parcels, it will submit the additional amount owed to the new owners, he said.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

New owners take the bait at Tackle Tom’s

KTVB August 14, 2019

Cascade, Idaho — A beloved tackle shop in Cascade is under new leadership for the first time in decades.

John and Tina Christoffersen officially took over Tackle Tom’s Aug. 5 from longtime owner Tom McGlashen. McGlashen told KTVB back in May that he planned to retire and sell the place after 31 years slinging lures and licenses.

John Christoffersen has been a customer of Tackle Tom’s since he was a boy. He spotted the “For Sale” sign posted outside the shop this summer, and knew it was meant to be.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Household hazardous wastes to be accepted on Aug. 24

The Star-News Aug 15, 2019

Valley County residents can bring their household hazardous waste to the Valley County Shop Building in Lake Fork on Saturday, Aug. 24, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. for proper collection and disposal.

The event is for household waste only. No waste generated by businesses will be accepted.

Common items that are acceptable include household cleaners, pesticides, poisons, paints, solvents, herbicides, automotive products, fuels, mercury bulbs, batteries and antifreeze.

Items that are usually not acceptable include biological and radiological waste, ammunition, explosives and prescription drugs.

Residents should take care to safely transport all waste items. There will be people to help safely unload the waste at the dump site.

Items should be delivered in original manufacturer’s containers if possible. For more information, call 208-634-7712.

The Valley County Shop Building is located at 50 E. Lake Fork Road.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

A message from the U.S. Forest Service in regards to the 579 FS RD, Landmark to Stanley Road.

courtesy Valley County Sheriff’s Office Aug 14, via FB

Forest road 579 temporary closure planned from September 16th – Sept. 29th for maintenance.

Lowman, Idaho, August 14, 2019 – The Boise National Forest wants to let visitors know that Forest road 579 is scheduled to have a temporary closure from Sept. 16 – Sept. 29 to replacing an existing culvert with a larger one called an Aquatic Organism Passage (AOP) structure. The planned AOP will accommodate post fire flows or runoff as a result of the Bearskin Fire. When awarded, the work will be managed by Valley County and a local contractor.

“We want to give the public, particularly archery hunters, enough notice since some may have plans to hunt in this area of unit 34 (Sawtooth Zone) during construction,” said John Kidd, Lowman District Ranger. “They need to plan accordingly because a section of Forest road 579 is expected to be closed and impassable for a short time. Once the project is awarded we will send out another notice closer to implementation.”

A detour around the road closure will be via Forest roads 555, 591, 510, 582 and 563. Forest users should also travel cautiously since they may encounter logging traffic along the detour route.

The Bearskin Fire Burned Area Emergency Report completed in 2017 recommended this treatment to avoid impacts to water quality and riparian areas. The existing culvert is a migration barrier and upgrading this culvert to an AOP structure will open up about 0.6 miles of stream habitat to bull trout colonization within the Deer Creek drainage as well as reduce sediment delivery to critical bull trout habitat.

The work will also reduce the risk of culvert failure which could damage the popular NFS road which is used by summer recreationists and winter snowmobilers.

Once the closure is in place it will be posted here:
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise boy, 10, drowns in kayaking accident on Payette River

KTVB August 15, 2019

Boise, Idaho — A 10-year-old boy was pronounced dead at a Boise hospital Wednesday night, after a kayaking accident on the South Fork of the Payette River near Lowman.

Ada County Coroner Dotti Owens identified the boy as Maximus Samuel Hansen, of Boise. The cause of death is listed as freshwater drowning due to a kayaking accident.

According to the Boise County Sheriff’s Office, the boy and his family were all wearing life jackets when the accident happened.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Missing Idaho man found, treated for injuries from ATV crash

Aug 12, 2019 Local News 8

Athol, Idaho (AP) – A northern Idaho man who was missing since Thursday night was found Sunday afternoon, pinned by an all-terrain vehicle that had crashed.

The Coeur d’Alene Press reports 66-year-old Howard Coates of Athol was taken to a nearby hospital, where he was being treated for injuries that were not life-threatening.

A family riding dirt bikes on Sunday found Coates in northern Kootenai County. Sheriff’s deputies said he was pinned against a tree by an ATV that had crashed off the roadway and out of sight. He had been pinned there since Thursday night.

Coates’ family filed a missing person report when he didn’t return on Thursday, and search and rescue teams and volunteers had been searching for him.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Small plane crash in north-central Idaho kills 2

Aug 13, 2019 Local News 8

Grangeville, Idaho (AP) – The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating after a small plane crash in north-central Idaho killed two people.

The Lewiston Tribune reported Tuesday Carl and Joelle Lindros, both 83 and believed to be from Santa Barbara, California, were in the Lancair IV aircraft when it crashed near Kooskia, Idaho late Sunday morning. Officials think the couple was traveling from Montana to Sacramento at the time.

Idaho County Sheriff Doug Giddings says it’s not yet known why the plane crashed, but it apparently burst into flames and was destroyed on impact. Giddings says the wreckage has made it hard for authorities to tell if there were any other people on board.

Giddings says officials are working with the couple’s son in California to learn more. Both the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho experiences a major increase in Hepatitis A cases

Gretchen Parsons August 12, 2019 KTVB

Boise, Idaho — The number of people sickened by Hepatitis A in Idaho has increased by 550% between 2018 and 2019.

In 2019, there have been 44 Hepatitis A cases, 26 of those in Ada, Boise, Elmore, and Valley counties, also referred to as the central district. In 2018 there were only eight cases.

In the central district of Idaho, which includes Ada, Boise, Elmore, and Valley counties, there have been two people with Hepatitis A who work in the foodservice industry – one sick person worked at the Red Robin off Parkcenter in Boise and the other worked at Saint Lawrence Gridiron in downtown Boise.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

First human cases of West Nile virus confirmed in Washington County

The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare says two people have tested positive for the virus.

KTVB August 16, 2019

Boise, Idaho — For the first time this year in Idaho, West Nile has spread to humans.

Two people in Washington County have tested positive for the virus.

That’s according to the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare.

continued:
——————————

Scam Alert:

Social Security scams prompt warnings

Aug 15, 2019 Local News 8

Boise, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – An increase in consumer complaints has prompted Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden to renew warnings about a Social Security imposter scam sweeping the state.

Wasden said overall complaints have increased over the summer, spiking in the past week. As a result, some Idahoans have revealed sensitive information like Social Security numbers and dates of birth. Some have even mailed gift cards after falling victim to the scammers.

… The Social Security Administration will never call and ask for your Social Security number or ask you to pay a fee. It won’t call to threaten your benefits, either.

full story:
————————

Fire Season:

link to: Fire Updates Aug 18, 2019
————————

Tips & Advice:

Protect Your Pets from Wildfire Smoke

Your pets can be affected by wildfire smoke. If you feel the effects of smoke, they probably do, too! Smoke can irritate your pet’s eyes and respiratory tract. Animals with heart or lung disease and older pets are especially at risk from smoke and should be closely watched during all periods of poor air quality.

continued:
— —

Protect Your Large Animals and Livestock from Wildfire Smoke

Your animals can be affected by wildfire smoke. If you feel the effects of smoke, they probably do too! High levels of smoke are harmful. Long exposure to lower levels of smoke can also irritate animals’ eyes and respiratory tract and make it hard for them to breathe. Reduce your animals’ exposure to smoke the same way you reduce your own: spend less time in smoky areas and limit physical activity. Animals with heart or lung disease and older animals are especially at risk from smoke and should be closely watched during all periods of poor air quality. Take the following actions to protect your large animals and livestock against wildfire smoke.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Heat Safety Tips and Resources

Heat Cramps, Exhaustion, Stroke

During extremely hot and humid weather, your body’s ability to cool itself is challenged. When the body heats too rapidly to cool itself properly, or when too much fluid or salt is lost through dehydration or sweating, body temperature rises and you or someone you care about may experience a heat-related illness. It is important to know the symptoms of excessive heat exposure and the appropriate responses.


———————-

Mining News:

Payette: Stibnite Gold traffic could go on Johnson Creek Road

Midas Gold wants to improve Burntlog Road to the east

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Aug 15, 2019

Johnson Creek Road could be the main access to the proposed Midas Gold mine near Yellow Pine, according to a Payette National Forest proposal.

The use of Johnson Creek Road is one of the alternatives being considered by the Payette forest as it reviews the proposed operating plan of the company.

Midas Gold does not want to use Johnson Creek Road but wants to rebuild and extend the Burntlog Road further to the east, Midas Gold Permitting Manager Dale Kerner said.

Kerner has been provided with documentation about the Payette alternative, which he presented last month to the Stibnite Advisory Council, the citizens panel that receives monthly briefings on the project.

The Payette forest has not released the alternative plan and will not discuss it until a draft study of the Midas Gold plan is released at the end of the year, Payette Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said.

“All alternatives are in a draft form, subject to change and will be finalized for public review and comment,” Harris said.

The Payette is required to generate alternatives for the mine according to the federal review process, he said.

Kerner told The Star-News that Payette officials have not stated a reason for revisiting the Johnson Creek Road route, which was first considered by Midas Gold in the plan of operations it submitted in 2016.

Midas Gold opposes using the Johnson Creek Road because it means mining traffic would share the road with recreational traffic, he said.

Using the road also would see mine traffic running through Yellow Pine on the way to Stibnite, Kerner said.

“Using the current roads would mean about 50 trucks per day through Yellow Pine for 12 years, or even longer than that with construction,” he said.

From Cascade, the Johnson Creek route would be about 75 miles long and would require significant improvements along about 40 miles of unpaved, single-lane roads.

Work would include blasting slopes to accommodate 20-foot-wide travel lanes and 3-foot-wide shoulders, leveling steep sections where possible and paving existing dirt roads.

Using the route would increase risks for potential fuel and chemical spills as well as sedimentation of Johnson Creek and the East Fork South Fork Salmon River during construction, Kerner said.

Widening the road would also result in the road encroaching on several miles of habitat along the banks of multiple waterways, he said.

“It’s going to take an additional couple of years just to build, and that would push our project out for a couple years,” Kerner said.

Slopes adjacent to the Stibnite Road put it at heightened risk for avalanches and landslides that could cut road access to the mine for weeks or months, he said.

“It would impact our operations, but more importantly, what if we need to do a mass evacuation for whatever reason?” Kerner said.

Four avalanches occurred along Stibnite Road last winter, stranding Midas Gold employees at the site and causing the East Fork South Fork Salmon River to wash the road away. It took months to clear and repair the road.

source: (used with permission) © Copyright 2009 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
— — —

Map hosted by City of McCall


— — —

Midas Gold proposes reducing size of waste rock storage at Stibnite

Change would mean 73 fewer acres would be covered at mine site

(Note: This is the first is a series of stories detailing changes proposed by Midas Gold to its Stibnite Gold Project. Next Week: Public Access).

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Aug 15, 2019

Seventy-three fewer acres of the Stibnite mining district near Yellow Pine would be covered with waste rock under changes proposed by Midas Gold.

The change was one of several changes proposed by Midas Gold to the operating plan submitted to the Payette National Forest in 2016.

The changes were made in response to analysis of the original proposal by the Payette and a contractor hired to review the proposal.

The Payette forest is now reviewing the proposal and is expected to issue a draft study by the end of the year.

The proposed changes to waste rock storage would cost Midas Gold more money to implement, but would benefit water quality and reduce environmental impacts, Midas Gold officials said.

Waste rock, also known as development rock, contains little or no gold, silver or other valuable metals. The waste rock is removed in order to reach the ore to be processes.

Unlike tailings, waste rock is never exposed to chemicals used to separate valuable metals from rock during ore processing.

Waste rock would be dumped directly back into unlined storage areas after it is excavated, while tailings must be treated after ore processing to reduce levels of dangerous chemicals.

West End Facility

The modified plan proposes adjusting the mining sequence of two existing open pits at Stibnite to satisfy the Payette’s desire to reduce the depth of the Hangar Flats pit.

The new sequence would eliminate the need for what Midas Gold calls the West End waste rock storage area and associated roads, reducing the project’s footprint by about 73 acres.

Eliminating the West End storage area would improve water quality and fish habitat at Stibnite, according to the modified plan.

Studies predicted the waste rock could leak toxic metals like arsenic into West End Creek, which flows into the East Fork South Fork Salmon River.

Instead, about 20 million tons of waste rock from the West End pit would be used to reduce the depth of the Hangar Flats pit lake from about 600 feet to about 140 feet.

Placing waste rock underwater prevents the rock from generating acid through oxidation by reducing its exposure to oxygen.

Another five million tons of waste rock would be used to completely backfill the existing Midnight pit, eliminating a pit lake that would have filled about 10 years after the end of mining.

Water would have drained from the pit lake into Midnight Creek, but studies predict that the lake water would harm downstream water quality and fish.

Groundwater

The modified plan would also install synthetic covers over waste rock to reduce the risk of rainwater seeping through the piles and leaching contaminants into streams and the ground.

The liner would be beneath about a foot of soil and planted with grass and shrubs to help restore natural habitat and stabilize the ground.

Under Midas Gold’s original plan, a liner would not be included and water draining through the waste rock pile could be contaminated by trace amounts of metal.

In the 2016 proposal, streams and run-off water flowing through the pits would have been routed into open channels during mining operations.

But studies showed that water temperatures would increase during low-flows, negatively affecting downstream fish habitat.

The modified proposal would pipe run-off water in the shade beneath the channels during low flows to keep water temperatures similar to those downstream.

source: (used with permission) © Copyright 2009 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
— — —

Midas Gold, Payette did not announce proposed changes in Stibnite plan

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Aug 15, 2019

Documents detailing several changes to Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite Gold Project were submitted to the Payette National Forest in May, but neither Midas Gold or the Payette deemed the modified proposal worth announcing to the public.

Instead, both felt a public review of the modified plan should wait until a draft environmental study on the proposed mine is released, an action expected for late December.

“We did not issue a press release because…the release of the (study) is the official opportunity for public review and comment,” said Mckinsey Lyon, vice president of external affairs for Midas Gold Idaho.

The changes were made public during the July meeting of the Stibnite Advisory Council, a citizens group representing local governments that meets with Midas Gold officials monthly.

Publicly announcing the proposed changes would have been “premature” since they are not guaranteed to be included in the draft environmental study as presented by Midas Gold, Lyon said.

Payette Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris confirmed that the changes are now being considered as a viable alternative to the original proposal.

However, the Payette will likely propose changes to parts of the modified proposal, Harris said.

Prematurely releasing information about proposed alternatives to the project is not “part of the standard review process,” he said.

“We would be doing a disservice to the interested public if these drafts never make it to the (study),” he said.

The Stibnite Gold Project site is located 39 miles east of McCall and 14 miles from Yellow Pine.

continued: (used with permission) © Copyright 2009 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
— — —

Nez Perce Tribe sues Midas Gold over pollution at Stibnite

Tribe says company should clean up toxic discharges

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Aug 15, 2019

The Nez Perce Tribe has filed a lawsuit against Midas Gold Corp. claiming the company is illegally discharging pollutants like arsenic and cyanide into waterways near the company’s proposed mine near Yellow Pine.

The lawsuit accuses Midas Gold of violating the federal Clean Water Act by not removing contaminants on site.

A news release issued by Midas Gold called the lawsuit “unwarranted” and “misguided.”

The lawsuit was filed last week in U.S. District Court in Boise. A trial date has not been set.

The tribe hopes a federal judge will order Midas Gold to stop pollutants from entering waterways and pay fines for previous violations of water quality standards.

Sugar Creek, the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River, Meadow Creek and adjacent wetlands are all affected by the pollutants, according to the lawsuit.

… Water contamination that currently exists at Stibnite is the result of other past mining operations that were not subject to modern regulations, Midas Gold Idaho CEO Laurel Sayer said in a response from the company.

“While we agree the site needs immediate attention to clean up the damage of the past, make no mistake – the problems outlined in this lawsuit were not caused by Midas Gold,” Sayer said.

Midas Gold claims that it is not responsible for contaminants left by previous mining companies under the federal laws that regulate hazardous waste sites.

full story:

Note: if you want to read the full stories, subscribe to The Star-News. See link for more info:
— — — — — — — — — —

Caldwell Canyon mine project wins approval

Aug 15, 2019 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – A Record of Decision released by the Idaho Falls District Bureau of Land Management Thursday clears the path for the Caldwell Canyon Mine Project.

The open pit phosphate mine is located in Caribou County.

P4, a subsidiary of Bayer, would develop three phosphate leases on Schmidt Ridge, about 13 miles east-northeast of Soda Springs. The leases grant exclusive rights to the lease owner to develop phosphate minerals in accordance with an approved mine plan.

continued:
— — —

Open-pit phosphate mines approved in Idaho with safeguards

By Keith Ridler – 8/16/19 AP

Boise, Idaho — Federal officials have approved two open-pit phosphate mines in eastern Idaho that include environmental protections intended to prevent the type of pollution caused by past phosphate mining in the area.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management said Thursday it approved the Caldwell Canyon Mine project in Caribou County about 13 miles (21 kilometers) northeast of Soda Springs.

Bayer subsidiary P4 Production will develop the mines on three phosphate leases. Bayer acquired agricultural giant Monsanto, which previously mined the area, for $63 billion last year.

continued:
——————————–

Public Lands:

Public Scoping Period Open for the Rapid River Ecosystem Maintenance Burn Project – Closes September 16, 2019

New Meadows, ID, August 16, 2019 – The Payette National and Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests are seeking public comment on a prescribed burning project known as the Rapid River Ecosystem Maintenance Burn Project on the Payette and Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests in Idaho. The project area is located on both the New Meadows and Salmon River Ranger Districts. Interested parties should submit issues pertinent to this proposal in writing by September 16, 2019. Comments will help inform the environmental analysis and decision making process.

The purpose of the project is to restore wildlife habitat and improve ecosystem health in the Rapid River watershed and portions of Lost Creek, Boulder Creek, and Squaw Creek subwatersheds. While much of the project area has received prescribed burning treatments and/or experienced wildfire, there is a need for a more holistic, landscape scale approach to the existing conditions and desired conditions, including looking across National Forest boundary lines and private property.

Under the Wyden Authority, treatments on private property are possible and would be contingent upon approval from the private land owner and would also require entering into a formal agreement prior to implementation. Use of federal dollars on private property is made possible through the Wyden Authority.

The entire project area (including the Inventoried Roadless Area, and excluding the Pony Creek Research Natural Area) would be available to treatment over the next 25 years. Approximately 500 to 10,000 acres of fire would be applied annually. Prescribed burning operations would occur any time of year when conditions permit, typically in spring and fall.

A mosaic-like application of prescribed fire would re-introduce fire to approximately 75 percent of stands with historically high fire frequencies and lower severities, and 50 percent of stands with historically moderate to longer fire frequency and mixed to high severities.

Maintenance burning (burning after initial application of fire) would occur as necessary as often as every 5-15 years in fire regimes with historically frequent fire return intervals to maintain desired conditions. Approximately 500 to 10,000 acres of fire would be applied annually.

The New Meadows Ranger District and Salmon River Ranger District have made a preliminary assessment for the project proposal and have determined that it falls within a category of action that are excluded from documentation in an Environmental Assessment (EA) or an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). This assessment found that no extraordinary circumstances exist that would preclude the use of a categorical exclusion.

How to Comment

To be most helpful, please make your comments as specific as possible. Comments may pertain to the nature and scope of the environmental, social, and economic issues, and possible modifications to the proposed action. Your comments will help us refine the proposal and identify preliminary issues, interested and affected persons, and possible alternatives. Comments received in response to this request will become part of the project record and will be available for public inspection on the “Public Comment/Objection Reading Room” on the project web site:

Written, facsimile, hand-delivered, and electronic comments concerning this project will be accepted. Send written comments to Erin Phelps, New Meadows District Ranger, Payette National Forest, PO Box J, 3674 Highway 95, New Meadows, Idaho 83654. Comments may also be sent via facsimile to 208-347-0309. The office hours for those submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Oral comments may also be provided at the New Meadows Ranger District Office during normal business hours via telephone 208- 347-0300 or in person. Comments may also be submitted through the RREMB Project web page at

To submit comments using the web form select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s web page.
— — — — — — — — — —

BLM extends public comment deadline for Draft Resource Management Plan

Aug 14, 2019

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has extended the deadline for public comment on the Draft Four Rivers Field Office Resource Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement.

The deadline has been extended to Sept. 23, 2019, to allow additional time for public input.

Project information can be found on the BLM ePlanning page through the following link:

The BLM encourages the public to provide comments, particularly those concerning the adequacy and accuracy of the proposed alternatives, the analysis of the impacts of their respective management decisions, and any new information that would help the development of the plan. Comments can be submitted through the following means:

Website:
Email: Four_Rivers_RMP@blm.gov
Fax: 208-384-3326
Postal: Four Rivers Field Office
Attn: Brent Ralston
3948 Development Ave.
Boise, ID 83705

For more information contact Brent Ralston, Field Manager, at 208-384-3300.
— — — — — — — — — —

History: Birth of the “Air Tanker”

Payette NF Aug 12, 2019

The use of Aircraft on the Nethker Fire were critical to suppression operations. Here is the history of the birth of the “Air Tanker”.

The first “air drop” was made on the Mendenhall Fire, August 12, 1955, on the Mendocino National Forest. The first operational airtanker was developed in Willows, by the Willows Flying Service in 1955, at the request of the Fire Control Officer for the Mendocino National Forest. A Boeing Stearman 75 “Caydet” Agricultural Aircraft was modified with a 170 gallon tank at the Willows airport. This Aircraft, N75081, became the first registered free fall airtanker in the history of aviation.

In 1956, seven agricultural aircraft were modified and formed the first operational airtanker squadron in the United States. Piloted by local aviators, this squadron operated out of the Willows Airport fighting wildfires throughout California. Initially, plain water was used as the fire suppressant. However, it was soon discovered that most of the water evaporated before reaching the fire, so the practice was adopted of adding chemicals to the water to inhibit evaporation. Borate was one of the first chemicals used, hence the derivation of the term “borate bomber.”

In 1959, heavy airtankers, capable of carrying 2,000 gallons of fire retardant, were providing an effective tool in controlling wildfires. Today, the use of SEATs (Single Engine Airtankers) and Large Airtankers have become a staple for wildland fire suppression.

This Day in History is dedicated to the first Airtanker pilots: Vance Nolta, Floyd (Speed) Nolta, Harold Henderson, Dale Nolta, Ray Varney, Frank Prentice, L.H. McCurley, Warren Bullock; Fire Control Officer Joe Ely, and the first Air Attack Lee Sherwood. A commemorative plaque to the “Birth of the Airtanker Program” can be found at the Willows Airport.

source: Payette NF FB
————————-

Critter News:

Protecting yourself and your dogs from harmful algae found in some Idaho reservoirs

According to the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality, seven local reservoirs have tested positive for some form of cyanobacteria toxin this summer.

Misty Inglet August 15, 2019 KTVB

Ada County, Idaho — Recently, several dogs around the nation have died after being exposed to toxic algae in ponds or other waterways.

On Monday, three dogs in North Carolina died the same day because of the toxins.

Toxic algae is a form of cyanobacteria, which seven reservoirs in and around Southwest and Central Idaho have tested positive for.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Pet Talk – Tumors of the spleen in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Aug 16, 2019 IME

Tumors of the spleen are called hemangiosarcomas or hemangiomas. Eighty percent of all splenic tumors are malignant, or hemangiosarcomas. Twenty percent are hemangiomas, which are benign. Hemangiosarcomas are highly malignant tumors of the blood vessels in the spleen.

The spleen is an organ in the abdomen that stores red blood cells. It is also involved in producing cells that assist in our immune system. Growth of a mass on the spleen may go undetected until it becomes quite large or ruptures, which may result in life-threatening bleeding into the abdomen. Hemangiosarcomas have a high propensity to metastasize quickly to other organs such as the heart, lungs and liver. Dogs at risk include middle-age to older large-breed dogs, especially Labrador retrievers, golden retrievers, and German shepherd dogs, though all breeds are susceptible.

The reason this tumor develops is unknown. Hemangiosarcomas can develop in any tissue that contains blood vessels. The most common sites include the skin, spleen and heart.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

The evolution of puppy dog eyes

University of Portsmouth

Dogs have evolved new muscles around the eyes to better communicate with humans. New research comparing the anatomy and behavior of dogs and wolves suggests dogs’ facial anatomy has changed over thousands of years specifically to allow them to better communicate with humans.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

EPA reverses approval for poison traps used by ranchers

8/15/19 AP

Washington — The Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday reversed its preliminary decision allowing continued use of deadly sodium cyanide traps, blamed for injuring people and pets as well as their intended targets of coyotes and other predators.

EPA head Andrew Wheeler said in a statement he had decided the agency needed to do more analysis and consulting regarding the so-called M-44 traps, devices embedded in the ground that look like lawn sprinklers but spray cyanide when triggered by animals attracted by bait.

“I look forward to continuing this dialogue to ensure U.S. livestock remain well-protected from dangerous predators while simultaneously minimizing off-target impacts on both humans and non-predatory animals,” Wheeler said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Campers encouraged to be “Bear Aware”

Boise, Idaho, August 8, 2019 – August 12, 2019 – The Boise National Forest is reminding visitors to be extra cautious this summer when storing their food to avoid attracting black bears.

Bears possess an extremely keen sense of smell, and can find food from great distances. Once a bear finds food near humans, it is likely to come back. The result is a dangerous situation for both the bear and for people. Bears that repeatedly come into conflict with campers have to be trapped and euthanized.

Campers can protect themselves and others from unwelcome nighttime visitors by storing their food properly. In developed campgrounds, campers should store all food in their vehicle, trailer or camper with windows tightly closed. Stoves, cooking utensils, personal items such as toothpaste, and pet or livestock feed should be protected in the same manner. Garbage should be disposed of in the trash containers in campgrounds and never left out unattended. If a trash container is full, please pack your garbage out.

In the backcountry, food and garbage should be kept out of bears’ reach by hanging it in a tree, at least 100 yards from the sleeping area. Food bags should ideally be 10 feet above ground and 4 feet out from tree trunks. Food can also be stored in an approved bear-proof container. Backcountry campers should attempt to reduce or eliminate food odors on themselves, their clothes and near their sleeping area. Do not store food in tents.

For the safety of the public (and the bears) we urge Forest users to be “Bear Aware” and use common sense when camping in bear country. link:

For more information visit:
— — — — — — — — — —

Family attacked by wolf while they were asleep in tent

First time wolf attack reported in national park

By Leah Asmelash, CNN Aug 14, 2019 Local News 8

A New Jersey family was fast asleep in their tent on a camping trip when the unthinkable happened: They were attacked by a wolf.

“It was like something out of a horror movie,” mother Elisa Rispoli recounted on Facebook.

The family was in Banff National Park in Alberta when the incident occurred about 1 a.m. Friday, according to a report by the federal agency Parks Canada. Elisa wrote that her husband, Matthew, threw himself in front of her and their two boys while the wolf tore through the tent and clamped onto Matthew’s arms.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho roadkill study begins along wildlife migration route

by Associated Press Monday, August 12th 2019

Boise, Idaho (AP) – The U.S. Forest Service says $25,000 is being used for a federal-state project in eastern Idaho to identify road-killed animals in a major wildlife migration corridor to determine collision hotspots and potential locations for wildlife crossing structures.

The agency says 75% of historical migration routes for elk, bison, and pronghorn have been lost in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Freemont County in Idaho has many of the remaining migration routes but a high rate of wildlife-vehicle collisions.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise man, 70, becomes oldest horseman to win the Mongol Derby

A world away from home, Idaho’s Bob Long did the unthinkable.

Joe Parris August 14, 2019 KTVB

Boise, Idaho — A world away from home, Idaho’s Bob Long did the unthinkable.

“It’s nothing, you just ride 650 miles on a death march,” he explained with a laugh.

Early Wednesday morning, Long crossed over the finish line of the Mongol Derby, a 1,000-kilometer horse race that pits riders against each other and against Mongolia’s torrential rain, burning temperatures, and harsh terrain.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Bat found in Meridian backyard tests positive for rabies

KTVB August 15, 2019

Meridian, Idaho — A bat found in the backyard of a Meridian home has tested positive for rabies, according to Central District Health.

The discovery marks the sixth rabid bat found in Idaho this season, and the first so far in the Treasure Valley.

Health officials say no humans touched the sick bat, but a dog may have had contact with it. The dog was given a rabies booster shot as a precaution.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Sage grouse numbers continue to drop in Idaho

August 12, 2019 AP

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Idaho’s sage-grouse numbers have dropped 52% since the federal government decided not to list the birds as an endangered species in the fall of 2015.

It’s not yet clear whether the three-year decline is part of a cyclical pattern or indicative of a more serious issue, but the Idaho Statesman reports the trend could force state and federal wildlife and land managers to take a closer look at how sage grouse are faring in Idaho and other western states.

Under Idaho’s sage grouse management plan, wildlife managers must work to determine the cause of population declines and come up with an appropriate response any time numbers drop below a certain level. Idaho Fish and Game biologist Ann Moser says it looks populations are low enough in several parts of Idaho to trigger the plan.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services estimates that there are between 200,000 and 500,000 sage grouse, most of them in Idaho, Nevada, Wyoming, Montana, Oregon, Utah and Colorado.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Project aims to remove invasive trees, protect sage grouse habitat in Southwest Idaho

The spread of junipers in Owyhee County are having negative impact on sage grouse populations, officials say.

KTVB August 15, 2019

Owyhee County, Idaho — The sage grouse is one of Idaho’s most important species. The large chicken-like birds are an indicator species that provide essential information about the health of sagebrush landscapes across the West.

But in recent years, their numbers have dramatically declined – 52% since 2015. Currently, about 200,000 to 500,000 sage grouse remain in 11 western states.

Wildlife management officials are looking into the possible reasons for the three-year decline.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho officials reviewing Endangered Species Act changes

by Associated Press Wednesday, August 14th 2019

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Idaho officials say they’re looking into how the Trump administration’s move to weaken how it applies the Endangered Species Act could affect federally protected species in Idaho.

Idaho Office of Species Conservation Administrator Scott Pugrud tells the Idaho Press that his office is reviewing the regulatory changes announced Monday.

Idaho is home to six endangered and 13 threatened species.

The endangered species include sockeye salmon and Kootenai River white sturgeon. Threatened species include Canada lynx and grizzly bears.

source:
——————————

Fish & Game News:

Salmon River No Barrier to Wandering Wolverine

By Diane Evans Mack, Regional Wildlife Biologist
Wednesday, August 7, 2019

With all the trail cameras in the woods these days, it’s hard for even a rare animal to go unnoticed. And if you’re a wolverine sporting white feet instead of brown, you can bet you’ll get attention. A biologist with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game discovered a very distinctive-looking wolverine on a series of pictures from a remote camera put out last winter as part of a survey for fisher. This wolverine had 2 white paws and a white foreleg, markings not typically seen in west-central Idaho wolverines. Soon after, another biologist was going through pictures from a different part of the state and found the same wolverine!

Piecing the story together from the dates on the photographs, the wolverine, nicknamed ‘Whitefoot’, was along the Magruder Corridor in the Clearwater Region in mid January, then headed south, crossed the Main Salmon River, likely also crossed the South Fork Salmon River, and arrived north of McCall 15 days later.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Mule deer killed with pellet gun in Pocatello

By Jennifer Jackson, Regional Communications Manager
Friday, August 16, 2019

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is seeking information regarding the illegal killing of a mule deer doe in Pocatello.

At approximately 9:00 am on August 1, Idaho Fish and Game received a call about an injured deer in a south Pocatello neighborhood. The deer was reported to be lying in a backyard of a residence located on Fruitwood Lane off of Bannock Highway, motionless with labored breathing. The deer died before Fish and Game arrived at the scene.

After an examination of the carcass, Fish and Game determined the cause of death to be the result of a pellet piercing both lungs. The projectile removed from the lung tissue was the type fired from a pellet gun. The deer had otherwise been in good physical condition before its death.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Commission approves proposals for nonresident fees, wolf trapping and permits for stocked pheasants

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Monday, August 12, 2019

The legislative proposals and rule must be approved by the 2020 Legislature to become effective

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission on Monday, Aug. 12, approved two legislative proposals to advance for Governor’s Office review: a) increasing nonresident license and tag fees and b) establishing Commission authority to designate locations other than WMAs to stock pheasants and require an Upland Game Bird Permit to hunt them. The commission also adopted new rules that change gear requirements for wolf trapping. The legislative proposals and rule must be approved by the 2020 Legislature to become effective.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Hunters: nonresident/second elk tags are sold out for 2019

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Friday, August 16, 2019

Non resident deer tags still available, but are also expected to sell out

Nonresident hunters who plan to buy a deer tag, or resident hunters interested in buying a second tag, should do so quickly. Of the 15,500 nonresident deer tags available this year, less than 4,000 remained on Aug. 12.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

‘Bat Dog’ brings water to umpire at minor league baseball game

by Storyful Friday, April 26th 2019

Las Vegas, Nevada – The Las Vegas Aviators’ resident ‘bat dog’ proved on April 25 that he’s more than capable of carrying other large objects.

Footage shared on Finn the Bat Dog’s Twitter account shows the pooch bringing a cooler of water to one of the umpires during a game between the Aviators and the El Paso Chihuahuas. “Bringing the umpire some water. They work hard,” the tweet said.

Finn gathers bats left behind by the players during Las Vegas Aviators games at Las Vegas Park, and has become a beloved staple at the minor league games.

source w/videos:
———————–

Seasonal Humor:

SummerYellowJackets-a
———————-

Aug 11, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Aug 11, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: The boil order and water restrictions are still in effect.
Ad free website sponsored by Local Color Photography

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire Training
May 10 – Burn “permits” required
May 15 – Firewood Season opens
July 22 – Daytime closures on So. Fk road begin
Sept 14 – 10am YPFD meeting at the Fire Hall budget meeting
Sept 14 – Ride to Cinnabar
Sept 21 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall

(details below)
———-

Local Events:

2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine. link:
———-

Village News:

Fairly Slow Fest Weekend for YPFD Medical Team

Report: 6 minor patient contacts in town. One medical call, which was transported by ambulance to Reed Ranch for a rendezvous with Cascade Ambulance from the FS camp ground. Nice and slow for the medical team.
— — — —

Thunderstorms August 9th and 10th

Friday lightning and thunder at 1115pm, then thunderstorm hit with wind gusts and splatters of rain at 1125pm, storm lasted about an hour, total 0.02″ of rain. Strike map showed multiple hits on the Payette NF in all directions around YP.

Saturday we had sprinkles of rain on and off during the day, wind kicked up after lunch time then thunderstorm hit at 215pm with wind gusts, 1/4″-1/2″ hail and heavy rain for a bit, then showers for about half an hour. Strike map showed hits on South Frk, EFSF and Johnson Crk, some rather close to YP, received 0.13″ of rain from that storm.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
— — — —

Roads

South Fork
Starting July 22 the South Fork road will be closed Monday through Friday from 7am to 4pm on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends.
More info:
Map w/info for 7/29-8/2:

YP to Stibnite Road
Last update from Midas July 18: The road is still closed Monday through Thursday and open Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Good progress is being made, but it is likely that we still have a few weeks of work ahead.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

Note: August 10th was Dean’s last day of driving the mail truck for Arnold Aviation. Many thanks for your deliveries of mail, freight and groceries through all kinds of weather and hazardous road conditions.

June 1st started the 6-day a week mail delivery. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
— — — —

Wasp Season

Long legged wasps are out, invading sheds and seeking to come indoors. A few yellowjackets are around.

Have not had a report of ticks since the hot dry weather arrived.
— — — —

Reminder for people living in bear country:

* Garbage should be stored inside the house or in a secure garage or storage building.
* If garbage cannot be stored in a secure location, a bear-resistant container approved by the Interagency Bear Committee is recommended.
* Avoid using bird feeders from March through November. Birds do not need supplemental feeding this time of year.
* Pet food should not be left outside.
* BBQ grills or anything with a strong odor should not be left out at night.
* Protect gardens, beehives, and compost piles with electric fencing.
* Never intentionally feed bears. A food-conditioned bear may pose a threat to human safety and usually results in the removal of the bear.
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Update Aug 9:

We are currently trying to coordinate a date that works to shut the town water supply down to repair the leak. When that date is set, everyone will be notified.
– Steve Holloway

Update Aug 7:

Donations to the Water Department

We have received two donations to the water department totally $1,750.

First one came from Tom Keffer of the Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers. They donated $1,150. Tom and the Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers brought in the Highland Games to Yellow Pine. Last year they raised money for the Helipad. The Highland Games will be coming back to Yellow Pine next June 27th. Thank you Tom and the highland family.

The second one was from Keith and Delta Holloway. They raised $600 from the sales of corn dogs during this year’s Harmonica Festival. Thank you Mom and Dad for your continued support of Yellow Pine.
– Steve Holloway

Update July 25:

On July 19th a crew from Idaho rural water came in and found a substantial leak on the east side of the east fork bridge. We are currently looking for a good time to shut the water down to town to make the repairs. It will definitely be after harmonica but seeing we will be shutting down the town, we want to be prepared. We are still on a boil order due to the large capacity of water lost and low chlorine contact time. We still request that everyone conserves water by not watering lawns because we are borderline to running the town out of water.
– Steve H YPWUA

Update June 7:

1. The “boil order” is still in effect.
2. There is still large water leaks in the system. We continue to look.
3. A grant for $39,000 was approved for improvements to the system.
3. Work is currently being done on the new contact tank.
4. Please, no lawn watering until we find and repair the major leaks.
– Steve Holloway

The yearly Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th at 10am in the community hall. No meeting minutes yet.

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19.pdf

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx
— — — —

VYPA News:

Last meeting was August 10th 2pm at the Community Hall. No minutes yet.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes July 20, 2019
Link to: 20190720 Yellow Pine Village Association Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for June 8, 2019
link to: 20190608 Village of Yellow Pine Association

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 8th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th – 2pm at the Community Hall.
— — — —

YPFD News:

The foundation for the helispot
20190808FoundationHelispot-a

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

Link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Next Meeting Sept 14 at 10am YPFD meeting in the Fire Hall

Last meeting July 13 – no minutes yet.

YPFD June 16, 2019 Meeting minutes
link to: 20190615 YPFD Meeting Notes_Final

Meetings will be held at the fire station at 10am and everyone is welcome to attend. June 15th; July 13th; and Sept 14th (which will also be the budget meeting as well).

Every Sunday 11am – Training

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Training: Sunday Fire/EMS training has begun. Sundays at 11:00 AM unless otherwise posted. If Jeff F is in town the trainings will be held. All are welcome.

YP Helispot: We are working with Valley County Road Department and the Boise National Forest for the rock base for the road leading into the Helispot and the actual Helispot itself. We are also receiving rock for the Fire Hydrants, water tank foundations, etc. The rock will come from the Valdez pit and will be less expensive than having it trucked in from Cascade.

Stop the Bleed Course: This course was well attended in the Fall and Jeff F and Ann F will be presenting another course when the new instructor material comes out. There are “Stop The Bleed” kits at the Tavern in an emergency.

Siren Testing: The YPFD siren will be tested only once this year on the first of May at noon. 3 blasts of the siren is a test, more than 3 is an Emergency.

-JF
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Call for reservations
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Our hours will be 11-8 every day, except closed on Tuesdays. We are open for breakfast by request and always have good coffee starting at 6am.
The Corner has firewood permits in stock now. 4 cord minimum at $6.25 per cord. Please bring drivers license and cash is preferred, no CC.
The Corner Store is open with snacks, groceries, fresh produce, soda, ice and packaged beer. If you know you will be coming in over the summer and need special grocery orders, let me know and I will order it in for you while you are here, 2 deliveries a week. The best way to get a hold of me is to call or stop by and say hello.
Karaoke is back at The Corner! Choose your favorite songs from our online music library and entertain your friends up on stage through our professional sound system.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Summer Hours Daily 8am to Close
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
Website:
FB page:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Aug 5) overnight low of 52 degrees, clear sky and warming up fast this morning. A trickle of camps pulling out, the Westside road is really beat up and dusty. A few swallows and finches and one olive-sided flycatcher calling. Chipmunks and pine squirrels running about. Hot and a few clouds mid-day. Most of the campers have left, putting a big dust cloud over the neighborhood. HOT by mid-afternoon, big chunky clouds with dark bottoms and light breezes, high of 98 degrees. Very warm evening, high thin clouds, light breeze. For a minute is was quiet enough to hear the river. Cloudy at midnight.

Tuesday (Aug 6) overnight low of 57 degrees, partly cloudy, calm and warm this morning. Fairly quiet morning, not much air or street traffic. Olive-sided flycatcher, red-breasted nuthatch and a few finches calling. Lots of chipmunks running around. Overcast sky by lunch time. Porta potties removed. Cloud cover has moderated temperatures, warm but not too hot by mid-afternoon, light breezes, high of 88 degrees. Not many finches or pine siskins around, one calliope hummingbird, solitary jay and an occasional robin. Pine squirrels gathering cones, not many ground squirrels above ground recently. Overcast and warm evening. Broken cloud cover after sunset. One tree swallow flying around at dusk. Cloudy before midnight.

Wednesday (Aug 7) overnight low of 55 degrees, partly cloudy sky this morning, warming up quickly. Olive-sided flycatcher and a few finches calling. A few morning airplanes buzzing one at a time. Warm and partly cloudy at lunch time. Mail truck made it in on time, this will be Dean’s last week. Hot, dark clouds and gusty breezes mid-afternoon, high of 97 degrees. Lots of chipmunks and ground squirrels running around. High thin clouds and starting to cool off by evening. Water pressure a bit low. Mostly cloudy at dusk, bright Saturn peeking through the cracks.

Thursday (Aug 8) overnight low 49 degrees, overcast and almost calm this morning. Giant cloud of dust boiling up from the crusher operation. A few finches, pine siskins and a red-breasted nuthatch visiting, lots of chipmunks. Water pressure is a bit low this morning. Two calliope hummingbirds and a red-breasted nuthatch visited. Gusty breezes after lunch and overcast. Steller Jay, a robin, 3 hummingbirds and pine squirrels visiting. Nice and cool mid-afternoon, overcast and almost calm, high of 78 degrees. Almost 20 minutes of sprinkles and dark clouds mid-evening. About a dozen tree swallows perched on the power line. A few little sprinkles after dark, cloudy and humid. Cloudy before midnight. May have rained a bit during the night.

Friday (Aug 9) overnight low of 56 degrees, partly clear (high thin clouds) and humid this morning. A raven calling to the east, a few swallows and finches calling. Lots of chipmunks running about. Light air traffic (loud one at 925am.) Finches and pine squirrels visiting. Chunky clouds with dark bottoms and light breezes before noon. Streets have dried out and dusty. Pretty warm by mid-afternoon, light breezes and mostly cloudy, high of 88 degrees. Red-breasted nuthatches and pine siskins visiting. Warm and mostly cloudy evening with light breezes. Cooling off slowly after sundown, a few swallows flying. Quiet at dusk, hazy half moon high in the sky. Thunder storm with wind and spatter of rain hit after 11pm and lasted about an hour, strike map shows multiple hits on the Payette NF. Internet connection spotty.

Saturday (Aug 10) overnight low of 49 degrees, mostly cloudy sky this morning. The thunderstorm last night dropped only 0.02″ of rain. Tree swallows flying and calling, red-breasted nuthatches and a few finches visiting. Internet connection spotty. Busy morning with air and street traffic. Dark clouds and getting breezy before lunch time. Gusty winds for a bit after lunch, sprinkles of rain on and off. Storm hit 215pm, 60 degrees, 1/4″-1/2″ hail, heavy rain, dark clouds, lightning and thunder, hail lasted 2 minutes, rain for about half an hour. Strike maps shows hits on Johnson Creek, South Fork and East Fork, some near the village. Landline phones out during the afternoon. Much cooler than normal mid-afternoon and mostly cloudy, high of 66 degrees. Rude Razors racing around the neighborhood. Pine siskins, finches, red-breasted nuthatches and a jay visited. Mostly clear and cool after sundown. Clear at dark, bright waxing moon and Saturn. Distant thunder around midnight, sprinkles on and off during the night.

Sunday (Aug 11) overnight low of 48 degrees, mostly cloudy with log foggy clouds sitting down on Golden Gate and VanMeter hill. Swallows and nuthatches calling, finches, pine siskins and a jay at the feeders. Internet connection has been spotty. Breaks in the clouds at noon, light breezes. Cool, cloudy and blustery mid-afternoon, sprinkles of rain on and off, high of 69 degrees. Hairy woodpecker calling, lots of chipmunks running about, one golden mantel and not many ground squirrels above ground today. Quiet afternoon, almost no traffic. Mostly cloudy evening before sunset and calmer. Doe visiting the neighborhood after sundown. Mostly cloudy at dusk and quiet.
————————

Letter to Share:

Commissioner Cruickshank’s July Newsletter

From the Desk of Commissioner Cruickshank,

Monday July 1st
Commissioner day today. Please see the minutes of our meeting posted on the Valley County website at Valley County Idaho Official Site under the commissioner section. The minutes once approved will be found there.

Tuesday July 2nd
I cleaned the restrooms at the Boulder Creek Trailhead this morning.
This afternoon I attended a meeting with Adams County to request help for Dispatch Services as Valley County is down too many staff to handle the calls on a long term basis.
I was able to attend a meeting with the Idaho Office of Emergency Management while in Adams County to discuss the spring disasters in our two counties.

Wednesday July 3rd
The Commissioners held another Board of Equalization meeting today in Cascade.

Saturday July 6th
I created the June Newsletter and sent out in the next two days.

Sunday July 7th
I cleaned the Restrooms at the Boulder Creek Trailhead this morning.

Monday July 8th
Commissioner meeting today. Please find the minutes once approved on the Valley County website.

Tuesday July 9th
I attended a portion of the Waterways Committee meeting.
I attended to some personnel issues at the Courthouse.
I reviewed Judge Applications to fill two positions in the 4th District.

Wednesday July 10th
I hand delivered my six choices to interview for Judges to the 4th District Trail Administrator’s office.
I flew to Clark County, Nevada to attend the National Association of Counties (NACo) Annual Conference.

Thursday July 11th
I attended a NACo Executive Board tour to learn more of behind the scenes of running a Casino in Clark County.
I attended the NACo Past President’s Dinner.

Friday July 12th
I attended the 1st Time Attendees Breakfast as an Ambassador to assist new people attending the conference.
I attended a NACo Transportation Committee meeting to discuss proposed resolutions on Transportation concerns.
I attended the NACo Audit and Finance Committee meetings.
I attended the NACo Executive Board Meeting.
I attended the NACo Policy Coordinating meeting.
I attended the NACo Annual Conference Opening Reception.

Saturday July 13th
My morning started with the NACo Rural Action Caucus meeting.
I attended the NACo Western Interstate Region Board Meeting.
I attended the NACo Board of Directors Forum.
I attended the NACo General Session and was honored to meet Chris Pilkerton, with the U.S. Small Business Administration prior to him speaking and David Kwong, Illusionist, New York Times crossword writer and television producer.
I attended the NACo 2nd Vice President Candidate Forum.
I attended the National Conference of Republican County Officials Reception.

Sunday July 14th
I attended the Non-Denominational Worship Service.
I attended the NACo Board of Directors and Resolutions Committee meeting.
I attended the NACo Achievement Awards Luncheon.
I attended the NACo Large Urban County and Rural Action Committee Reception.

Monday July 15th
I attended the NACo Annual Business Meeting and Election for NACo 2nd Vice President and the other officers moving up in their respective positions.
I started the NACo West Region meeting where we elected Joe Briggs from Cascade County, Montana to replace myself as the West Region Representative on the NACo Executive Board.
I helped Joe on the duties as a Regional Representative on where to be during the General Sessions as they are honored to meet the speakers backstage.
I attended the NACo General Session where I was honored to meet speaker Jennette Betancourt, ED.D. Senior Vice President, U.S. Social Impact, Sesame Street Workshop. I also was able to have a photo with Cookie Monster who made an appearance. I also was honored to meet Roy Spence, Co-Founder and CEO of The Purpose Institute who also spoke during this session.
I attended the NACo New Board of Directors Organizational Meeting where I now sit with the other NACo Board Members and not with the Executive Committee as I still represent the Idaho Association of Counties on the NACo Board.
I attended the NACo Closing Celebration Event.

Tuesday July 16th
I flew home from Clark County, Nevada. I will mention here that all my expenses to attend this NACo Conference were paid by the Idaho Association of Counties for me to represent Idaho and my County to learn more on how we can improve our county.

Wednesday July 17th
I spent quite a bit of time catching up on emails as I had terrible service to do emails while at the NACo Conference in my hotel room.

Thursday July 18th
I attended the Living With Fire Workshop in McCall to discuss how Valley County can prepare to not be another Paradise, California or at least work towards reducing the fire risk. About 40-50 people attended from around the region. Speakers came from the Western Wildland Cohesieve Strategy to assist in understanding the need to reduce the risk of wildfire.
I participated in a conference call to discuss the applications selected for the Judge Interviews on August 1st.

Friday July 19th
I attended the Idaho Association of Counties (IAC) District 3 meeting held in Canyon County.

Sunday July 21st
I cleaned and restocked the restrooms at the Boulder Creek Trailhead.

Monday July 22nd
Commissioner day today. Please find the minutes once approved on the website.

Tuesday July 23rd
I turned in my expense report to IAC for attending the NACo Annual Conference.
I sent Thank You’s to NACo staff.
I met with a landowner near Cascade to discuss winter recreation access.

Wednesday July 24th
I reviewed documents for next Monday’s Commissioner meeting.

Thursday July 25th
I met with Lakeshore representatives to discuss Solid Waste and Recycle operations.

Friday July 26th
I cleaned and restocked the Boulder Creek Trailhead restrooms.
I reviewed the minutes of a prior commissioner meeting and provided corrections.

Sunday July 28th
I cleaned and restocked the restrooms at Boulder Creek Trailhead.

Monday July 29th
Commissioner meeting today. Once the minutes are approved during an August meeting they will be posted on the website.

Well that wraps up another month of commissioner duties for me. Summer is hear and we are feeling the heat. Just remember last winter when you thought it was too cold and wanted more heat. It’s here.

Thanks for reading the newsletter.
Gordon
———————————-

Idaho News:

Huckleberries getting ripe in Idaho

Huckleberry Festival this weekend

Aug 07, 2019 By Steve Liebenthal KIVI TV

Donnelly, Idaho — As you drive around Idaho’s back roads this time of year, you might just notice foraging in the mountains. It is huckleberry season in Idaho, and people will spend hours harvesting the revered fruit.

“Huckleberries have an amazing flavor,” said Allison Hatzenbuhler “And you can make so much with them: huckleberry pancakes, huckleberry margaritas, huckleberry Jello shots, I make a huckleberry glaze that goes over chicken breasts when you grill them, barbecue sauce that is huckleberry based. There are so many things you can do with it, it’s amazing.”

But don’t plan on planting huckleberries in your garden. They only grow in the wild. If you want to know where to find a fruitful patch, you’ll probably have to spend some time driving and hiking through the mountains. And while we Idahoans are known for being friendly and helpful, getting someone to show you their favorite spots might not be as easy as you think.

The good news is, even if you are unable or unwilling to spend the time and effort to find huckleberries you can still enjoy their deliciously unique flavor. This Saturday Donnelly is hosting a celebration of everything huckleberry. The annual Huckleberry Festival is Donnelly’s day in the sun.

“Because Donnelly becomes Valley County’s feature of the weekend, whereas it’s normally McCall or Cascades” said Sherry Scheline. “So it becomes Donnelly’s weekend.”

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County rec director charged with extortion

Charges: Larry Laxson demanded $500 to aid snowmobiler

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Aug 8, 2019

Valley County Recreation Director Larry Laxson has been charged with extortion after he demanded $500 to aid someone whose vehicle was stuck on a snowmobile trail on New Year’s Eve 2018.

Laxson, 67, who has been an employee of Valley County since 2012, has pleaded not guilty to the charge, which is a misdemeanor.

He is scheduled to appear in Valley County Magistrate’s Court in Cascade on Aug. 19 for another hearing.

If convicted, Laxson could be sentenced to up to six months in jail and up to a $1,000 fine.

The charges stem from an incident on Dec. 31, 2018, according to the criminal complaint.

The complaint said a person named Dustin Steelsmith drove his vehicle onto one of the county’s groomed snowmobile trails and got the vehicle stuck.

continued:

see also:

Valley County Rec Director accused of extorting snowmobiler
KTVB:
— — — — — — — — — —

Former Valley dispatcher claims firing was retaliation

Jennifer Giambo said supervisor grabbed her by the face

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Aug 8, 2019

A lawsuit filed by a former Valley County Sheriff’s Office dispatcher claims she was assaulted and unjustly fired by her supervisor and that Sheriff Patti Bolen and former Chief Deputy Jason Speer did nothing about it.

The lawsuit was filed by Jennifer Giambo, who was a dispatcher at the sheriff’s office in Cascade between 2008 and Jan. 15 of this year.

Giambo is asking a jury to award her reinstatement, back pay and other compensation for what she said was retaliation, damage to her reputation and emotional damage.

The lawsuit was filed last month in Fourth District Court in Cascade. No trial date has been set.

continued:

see also:

Former dispatcher sues Valley County, alleging retaliation
KTVB:
— — — — — — — — — —

Mudslides close parts of Highway 95 in Idaho County

Clearing the highway is expected to be slow due to the size of the mudslide and amount of water on the roadway.

KTVB August 10, 2019

Idaho County, Idaho — The Idaho Transportation Department has closed Highway 95 from milepost 197 to 205, north of Riggins, due to mudslides that happened Friday night.

Officials say residents are being evacuated as needed.

continued:
— —

Note: Report from Riggins 8/9 “0.82” rain Heavy T/S, hail/rain, all accumulated in 35 minutes”

updated:

Highway 95 between Grangeville and New Meadows reopens one lane after closing down due to mudslides


KTVB
— — — — — — — — — —

Mudslide covers road in Ketchum, blocking both lanes

by CBS 2 News Staff Friday, August 9th 2019


Blaine County Sheriff’s Office

Ketchum, Idaho (CBS 2) — A mudslide has covered a road in Ketchum, Idaho blocking both lanes of travel.

The mudslide has made Warm Springs Rd impassable from west of the Hot Springs in Ketchum.

Crews are heading toward the slide and hope to clear the 3-5 feet of mud covering the road.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

3.2 earthquake reported near Challis

Aug 09, 2019 Local News 8

Challis, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – An earthquake shook the Challis area Friday morning.

A 3.2 magnitude earthquake was recorded at 10:02 a.m. local time, according to the USGS.

The epicenter of the quake was about 12 miles NNE of Challis.

If you felt it, report it HERE.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Lawsuit seeks to halt construction of central Idaho trail

August 9, 2019 AP

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Central Idaho ranch owners want construction of a proposed trail connecting the popular tourist destinations of Redfish Lake and Stanley stopped and further work to make it a smooth path for hikers and bikers prohibited.

Sawtooth Mountain Ranch owners David Boren and Lynn Arnone have been fighting construction of the trail with a federal lawsuit against the U.S. government and on Thursday filed new documents contending the proposed trail violates environmental laws.

The U.S. Forest Service has a conservation easement deed dating to 2005 that allows a trail 30 feet wide to cross about 1.5 miles of private property.

The lawsuit recognizes that an easement exits but contends it doesn’t allow the Forest Service to create an improved trail for recreationists.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Camper trailer’s flat tire sparks fire along Idaho 21

The family towing the camper was able to quickly disconnect it from their other vehicle, and are all OK.

KTVB August 7, 2019

Boise City, Idaho — Officials are warning everyone on the roads to be cautious after a flat tire sparked a fire along Idaho 21 Tuesday.

According to Boise County Emergency Management, the incident happened as a family was towing a camper trailer behind another vehicle. One of the trailer’s passenger-side tires went out, starting the fire, officials believe.

Metal rims scraping along the asphalt – along with dragging chains or other metal objects – can throw up sparks that catch quickly in dry grass and other fuels along the road.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

‘We’re off to a slow start’: Idaho fire season not yet as active as previous years

Even with 20 fires burning across the state, the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise said Idaho’s fire season is about a month behind a typical year.

Misty Inglet August 8, 2019 KTVB

Boise, Idaho — Idaho’s fire season is not yet as active as it has been in previous fire seasons.

According to the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, there are currently 20 fires burning across the Gem State. But so far, the 2019 fire season has been more calm than the last couple of years.

“So far, we’re off to a slow start I would say,” NIFC spokesperson Deb Schweizer said. “We’re about a month behind from a typical fire season and certainly what we were last year. That has a lot to do with a heavy snow pack year, a lot of snow, a lot of rain, and a very cool spring.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

BLM’S Rural Fire Readiness Program Helps Local Firefighters Across Eastern Idaho

August 8, 2019

Idaho Falls, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management Idaho Falls District has transferred surplus wildland fire engines and equipment to 34 fire programs— including two Rangeland Fire Protection Associations (RFPAs)—across eastern Idaho. The transfers are part of BLM’s effort to respond to rural wildland fires by giving excess equipment and supplies to local fire departments and RFPAs.

Under BLM’s new Rural Fire Readiness (RFR) program, local fire programs that meet certain requirements may receive at no cost wildland fire engines, pumps, hose, chainsaws, hand tools and other items the BLM no longer needs.

“We appreciate the assistance of our local fire departments and Rangeland Fire Protection Associations in wildland firefighting in eastern Idaho,” said Joel Gosswiller, BLM Fire Management Officer at Idaho Falls District. “The Rural Fire Readiness program allows us the opportunity to augment their response to wildland fires safely and effectively.”

Thirty-one of the 50 cooperators that Idaho Falls District works with have applied to the RFR program so far, receiving four engines, a hundred Nomex pants, 80 brush coats, three Port-a-Tanks, a half-dozen pumps, 150 tools, 29,000 feet of hose and some additional miscellaneous items.

continued:
—————————

Tips & Advice:

Protect Your Lungs from Wildfire Smoke or Ash

Wildfire smoke and ash can irritate your eyes, nose, throat, and lungs. They can make you cough or wheeze, and can make it hard to breathe. A respirator is a device (mask) that covers your nose and mouth, fits tightly to your face, and can filter out smoke or ash particles before you breathe them in. Respirators are not sized for children.

continued:
— — —

Protect Yourself from Ash

Protect yourself from harmful ash when you clean up after a wildfire. Cleanup work can expose you to ash and other products of the fire that may irritate your eyes, nose, or skin and cause coughing and other health effects. Ash inhaled deeply into lungs may cause asthma attacks and make it difficult to breathe.

Ash is made up of larger and tiny particles (dust, dirt, and soot). Ash deposited on surfaces both indoors and outdoors can be inhaled if it becomes airborne when you clean up. Ash from burned structures is generally more hazardous than forest ash.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Heat Safety Tips and Resources

Stay Hydrated

Drink Plenty of Fluids: Drink more fluids, regardless of how active you are. Don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.

* Warning: If your doctor limits the amount you drink or has you on water pills, ask how much you should drink while the weather is hot.
* Stay away from very sugary or alcoholic drinks—these actually cause you to lose more body fluid. Also avoid very cold drinks, because they can cause stomach cramps.

Replace Salt and Minerals: Heavy sweating removes salt and minerals from the body that need to be replaced. A sports drink can replace the salt and minerals you lose in sweat.

* If you are on a low-salt diet, have diabetes, high blood pressure, or other chronic conditions, talk with your doctor before drinking a sports beverage or taking salt tablets.

Keep Your Pets Hydrated: Provide plenty of fresh water for your pets, and leave the water in a shady area.
————————

Fire Season:

Aug 11 Report posted here:
— — — —

More Rain Predicted for Nethker Fire Area

Aug 11 Morning Update

Current Status: The Nethker Fire received about two-tenths of an inch of rain yesterday when storms moved through the area. Another round of storms is predicted for today with wind gusts up to 35 mph, but no hail.

The fire is 2,382 acres in size and containment is at 18 percent, due to additional fire growth. An infrared mapping flight – planned for overnight – did not take place due to weather.

Despite the rain and higher humidity, fuels under the forest canopy remain dry and may still burn today. There may be some torching as well but fire behavior should be moderate.

Crews have put 35 miles of hose line around the southern edge of the fire, in addition to putting in hand line to secure that part of the fire. Five hotshot crews will also be working today along the northwest edge of the fire to tie it in to the pre-existing burn scar from the 2000 Burgdorf Fire.

Firefighters are updating structure assessments in the Secesh area as a precaution. They will also be working in Ruby Meadows to find and extinguish hot spots.

Warren Wagon Road remains closed from Secesh Summit to Grouse Creek, except to those who have property in the area. The closure is staffed by incident personnel. Property owners may have to wait for a pilot car to escort them through the closure area.

The Burgdorf/French Creek Road remains closed from the Warren Wagon junction to Corduroy to all non-fire personnel.

Firefighters continue to work to secure the fire’s edge around Burgdorf and along the roadways in the area to restore safe travel routes for landowners and recreationists in the Burgdorf, Secesh and Warren areas.

An existing area closure for Forest Service land has been expanded. Popular areas affected by this closure include: Trail Lake, Summit Lake, Lake Rock, Josephine Lake, Frosty Meadow, Ruby Meadows to Loon Lake (Loon Lake remains open), Crystal Mountain, and Bear Pete Mountain. Chinook Campground is open with access only from Warren. The closure order and map can be found here:

A TFR (Temporary Flight Restriction) has been implemented over the fire area – which means recreational drones and private aircraft may not be operated over the fire. The TFR can be found here:

Today’s update and map are attached to this email in PDF for:
Aug 11 PIO Map.pdf
————————–

Letter to Share:

A Statement From Idaho County Commission Chairman Skip Brandt Addressing Nethker Fire Concerns;

(received Aug 9 via email – (h/t GC)

Take a look at a map of Idaho County and you will find the largest county in the State of Idaho. With over 8500 square miles and over 83% Federal Lands, Idaho County faces many challenges in providing necessary services with a limited tax base.

We are one of the last counties in the Nation to not tell people what they can do or not do on their own property. Combine these private property rights with the beauty found in remote Idaho County and it’s easy to see why some people opt to live in areas such as Burgdorf, Secesh and Warren. However, people who choose to live where there are no tax or subscription based fire protection districts and where it can be difficult to get insurance must realize that there are risks involved and that a key component of private property rights is personal responsibility.

There are a lot of misconceptions out there that property taxes are just thrown into some big pot and it is up to the County Commissioners to hand it out throughout the year as they see fit. It doesn’t work that way. The Board of County Commissioners approves a budget that sets the spending authority for the following year. The budget is published and a public hearing is held so the citizens know where ‘their’ tax dollars are going to be spent. All property taxes paid are designated to pay for specific services provided by the County. Fire protection is not a service that counties are required to provide. Recognizing this, many citizens in Idaho County who are concerned about protecting their property from the threat of fire have formed their own “fire districts”. These fire districts, governed by their own elected board, have taxing authority through the County tax collection system. Residents in a fire district pay an ‘additional’ tax for their fire district. In some other areas of the County, residents have formed subscription-based fire departments to cover the costs of fire protection in their own rural or remote areas. These residents have opted for their own neighbor-helping-neighbor solution to fire protection over paying an additional tax. This is the issue at hand with the Nethker Fire. We have property owners who haven’t formed either type of fire district to be proactive in protecting their private property and who are now are demanding that the County Commission obligate tax dollars to protect their structures either through direct contracting of fire protection services or through a cost-share agreement with the USFS.

Additionally, there is a misconception that if the Commission simply ‘declares a disaster’, the State and Federal Government will swoop in with all the resources. It simply isn’t that easy. There is a significant burden of proof that must be met in order to qualify for some disaster assistance via a declaration and simply wishing it does not make it happen. Further complicating the process in this specific situation is the fact that many residences in the Burgdorf/Secesh/Warren area are secondary recreational homes which do not qualify under a disaster declaration.

Forest fires devastate Idaho County almost every year courtesy of the Federal Government’s mismanagement of the National forest system. Because of this fact, THEY provided structure protections in the past. Now they don’t. They have passed the responsibility to local governments to pay for disasters that they bring to us.

In the end, there is no free money. If the Idaho County Board of Commissioners calls in support for the Nethker Fire, we are obligating ALL County residents to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars for fire protection that many of them are already paying for through organized districts in their own areas. As unfortunate as this event is for those living and recreating in the Burgdorf area, the Idaho County Commissioners have been hired by the citizens to be good stewards of their tax dollars-dollars that, in my opinion, cannot be spent providing fire protection that the affected citizens themselves can contract privately for.

Skip Brandt
Idaho County Commissioner
———————

Public Lands:

Work begins on rebuilding of Stolle Meadows Road near Warm Lake

The Star-News Aug 8, 2019

The Boise National Forest has started a road reconstruction project on the Stolle Meadows Road near Warm Lake that will see travel closed or restricted for the rest of the year.

Road work started on Monday to widen the road, construct shoulders, improve drainage, relocate utilities and resurface the road, a press release from the Boise National Forest said.

The Stolle Meadows Road is located about two miles east of the turnoff to Warm Lake on Warm Lake Road.

The road will be closed Monday through Friday from 8-11:30 a.m. and 1-5 p.m. with 20 minute delays outside of closure times.

Work will not be done on weekends. Camping along the closed section of road is also closed during construction.

The road is the only access road to Stolle Meadows off of Warm Lake Road after landslides damaged alternate routes in the winter of 2017.

The reconstruction project is designed to improve recreational access, and comfort as well as accommodate increased traffic in the future, the press release said.

The project is financed by emergency relief funding. Granite Excavation of Cascade has been contracted to work on the project.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Public should be aware of tree-damaging caterpillar within the Boise National Forest

Boise, Idaho, August 8, 2019 –The Boise National Forest continues to experience a widespread outbreak of Douglas-fir tussock moths/caterpillars across the forest with their prominence around the Sage Hen Reservoir area. Forest visitors are reminded not to touch or pick it up.

The moth’s tree-damaging caterpillar has long bristly hairs that may cause allergic-like reactions for some individuals. A rash called tussockosis can persist from a few hours to several weeks. Individuals do not have to come in contact with the caterpillar to be effected as the hairs may be airborne. For some individuals, reactions can worsen with exposure and can compromise airways.

The caterpillars feed from June to August and may be seen crawling along the forest floor, in campgrounds or on camping gear. They are searching for their favorite food source, Douglas-fir or grand fir needles. The caterpillars generally avoid Ponderosa pine, lodgepole pine and western larch.

Hungry caterpillars or caterpillars looking for sites to spin cocoons in highly populated areas will quickly crawl up legs or as you sit on the ground thinking that you are a vertical silhouette.

Defoliation is now visible and looks like reddish half-chewed needles and tends to be worse in the tops of trees. While the trees may look dead because the caterpillars feed on the needles, they may not be, and may recover the following year. They should not be cut for fuelwood.

This year is expected to be the last year of the outbreak and caterpillar populations should crash by the end of August. Natural enemies of the caterpillar including a virus and non-stinging parasitic wasps are beginning to kill the caterpillars. The native tussock moth population began to increase in 2016. Typically outbreaks last 3-4 years.

Options for control are somewhat limited over a large areas. Dense stands of trees are impacted more severely than more pend stands. Dry sites, ridges and dense stands tend to have more damage because trees have less water to recover from feeding damage. For more information:
— — — — — — — — — —

Dangerous trees at Bogus Basin to be removed, sold for firewood

by CBS 2 News Staff Friday, August 9th 2019


photo courtesy IDL

Bogus Basin, Idaho (CBS 2) — Dangerous trees at Bogus Basin will be removed this month for skiers and hikers who recreate up on the mountain.

The Idaho Department of Lands said Friday that logging crews will begin removing the diseased and infested trees that have douglas-fir dwarf mistletoe, which deprives trees of water and nutrients. In total, there’s about 1,050 acres that are in need of tree removal at Bogus Basin.

“These trees present a safety hazard as the large “brooms” may fall, especially under the weight of heavy snow,” the IDL said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

USFS Regional Intermountain News

Volume 3 Issue 5 August 9, 2019

In this issue:

Happy 75th Birthday Smokey Bear! August 9th.
USDA Releases Proposed Amendments to Greater Sage Grouse Land Management Plans
Forest News
Volunteer With Us!

link:
———————–

Mining News:

Q&A from Stibnite Advisory Council

Recently, the Stibnite Advisory Council developed a 27 page document of frequently asked questions and answers about the Stibnite Gold Project. This document will be linked to the Stibnite Advisory Council website which is under development. Q&A from this document will be featured here to better inform residents on the Project.

Q. Isn’t the Community Agreement Just a Bribe?

A. No. Such impact-benefit agreements are best practice in the industry. The Community Agreement is a long-term commitment on behalf of the company to promote transparency and collaboration with the community. It is important to know what the Community Agreement is asking and what is is not asking. We have agreed to three things:

* Participate in a regional conversation
* Become informed and share your point of view, and
* Assist in making decisions about how to distribute foundation funding.

There are no requirements for support and funding is not tied to support. It is good business for us to work with communities to anticipate and address points of conflict before they arise. While Midas Gold fully intends to operate the Stibnite Gold Project, regardless of what happens to anyone who works for Midas Gold, the Community Agreement ensures our commitments today remain for the future.

Q. Are the Funds in the Stibnite Gold Foundation Intended to Mitigate Project Impacts?

A. No. The foundation will be a charitable organization focused on helping the communities of the West Central Mountains, Council and Riggins. Project impact, like road improvements or environmental mitigation, will be paid for by Midas Gold as a part of the permitting process.

Our Yellow Pine representative on the Stibnite Advisory Council, Lynn Imel, urges those with questions regarding the project to contact her at yellowpine @ stibniteadvisorycouncil.com in order for her to present them during the monthly Advisory Council meetings.
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho tribe sues mining company over continued pollution

The Nez Perce Tribe contends the company is illegally allowing arsenic, cyanide and mercury to pollute an area in central Idaho.

Keith Ridler Associated Press August 9, 2019

Boise, Idaho — The Nez Perce Tribe is suing a Canadian mining company contending the company is illegally allowing arsenic, cyanide and mercury to pollute a central Idaho area that the tribe has hunting and fishing rights to from an 1855 treaty with the United States.

The tribe filed the lawsuit Thursday in U.S. District Court seeking to force British Columbia-based Midas Gold and three Idaho-based subsidiaries to stop discharging pollutants.

Midas Gold has never mined in the area about 40 miles east of McCall but in the last decade has acquired mining claims and developed a plan it says will ultimately clean up the mess left by a century of mining by other companies.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has spent $4 million since the 1990s trying to clean up the area that includes streams with federally protected salmon.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Mining region struggles as it faces loss of biggest employer

By Nicholas K. Geranios – 8/10/19 AP

Metaline Falls, Wash. — Times are tough in a rural county in northeast Washington state because one of the region’s biggest employers is shutting down.

The Pend Oreille Mine, just north of Metaline Falls, closed on July 31, at a cost of about 200 family wage jobs in an area of less than 1,000 residents.

… The owners of the Pend Oreille Mine said the closure was prompted by slumping demand for zinc and the prohibitive cost of exploring for new deposits. The Galena and Lucky Friday mines in nearby northern Idaho are the only active large mining operations left in the Inland Northwest, a region that was originally built by a robust mining industry.

full story:
——————————

Letter to Share:

Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc. Fundraising

Aug 6, 2019

This is the part of re-habbing that I absolutely hate…I HATE IT. I hate asking for donations. But, none of this could be done without money, and I’m not independently wealthy (dang it). Running some numbers this morning: At the stage the fawns are now, they are costing me approximately $650.00+ this month alone for “bottle fuel”…that does not include the cost of the bottles, racks and nipples (which they are extremely hard on!), the gas to shop for their “fuel”, diaper wipes, dish soap and bleach, power bills for hot water and lights so we can see what we are doing…well, you get it. Mystic Farm – like most rescue facilities – operates on pennies and a prayer (and our own check books and credit cards) and receive no salary for our time. If you can find it in your heart to help, it would be SO appreciated. Like I said, I HATE THIS PART OF RESCUE… But, the fawns are so appreciative for any little bit of help. And…we are a non-profit 501 (c) 3 – all donations are tax deductible! THANK YOU!

Donate Via:
* PayPal: mysticfarmrescue@yahoo.com
* Donate Button on Website: http://www.mystic-farm.com
* Donate Button on FB Page: http://www.facebook.com/mysticfarmwildliferescue
* Via Snail Mail: 710 Sanctuary Hills Sagle, ID 83860


Thank you from the bottom of their hearts
—————————

Critter News:

Mangy Deer in Cascade

Cascade Veterinary Clinic Aug 8 (Facebook)

Dr Merik Metos treated wild deer with mange in Cascade – She had some very concerned people that wanted help to treat these deer’s. So she told them what to do and as you can see it worked. The first picture is what they looked like before treatment the second picture is them growing there hair back and looking pretty darn good. Thank you Dr Merik Metos for all your knowledge and helping out the locals.

20190808DeerMange1-a

20190808DeerMange2-a

“Sarcoptic mange is a zoonotic disease – domestic mammals and humans can also contract the disease: depending on the type of mange and the species of the host, some infections may be self-limiting. Direct contact with infected animals and having a compromised immune system increases your risk of contracting it.”
– Dr Merik Metos
— — — — — — — — — —

Cats know their names, they just ignore us

by Ida Domingo Friday, August 9th 2019 (WSET)

Have you ever wondered if your cat is ignoring you or just doesn’t know its name?

Well, researchers from japan wanted to find out so they experimented to see how cats would react to their names, in the cat’s home and with their owner out of view.

Researchers played audio recordings of the cat’s owner and strangers saying nouns similar to the cat’s name and then finally the cat’s name, according to CNN.

They say most of the cats reacted when their names were spoken moving their heads or perking up their ears.

Which leads researchers to believe cats are able to distinguish their name from other random sounds but they choose to ignore our calls to come hang out.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Pet Talk – Herbal poisoning in pets

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Aug 9, 2019 IME

There are five main herbal poisonings that we see in pets. We will discuss each one individually.

No. 1 is ephedrine and pseudoephedrine.
No. 2 is an herb called guarana.
No. 3 is St. John’s wort.
No. 4 is echinacea.
No. 5 is valerian.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Feds give initial OK to predator-killing sodium cyanide

An eastern Idaho family filed a lawsuit against the U.S. government after a cyanide trap injured a boy and killed his dog two years ago.

Keith Ridler Associated Press August 7, 2019

Boise, Idaho — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has taken an initial step to reauthorize a predator-killing poison that injured a boy in Idaho and killed his dog.

The federal agency on Tuesday announced an interim decision involving sodium cyanide that’s used in M-44s, devices embedded in the ground that look like lawn sprinklers but spray cyanide when triggered by animals attracted by bait.

Environmental groups, which have filed lawsuits aimed at banning the devices, blasted the move toward reauthorizing the devices.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Study says cougars kill more elk than wolves in Idaho

Aug 07, 2019 By Associated Press

A study by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game has found that more elk are being killed by cougars than by wolves in Idaho.

The Spokesman-Review in a story on Sunday reports that the study found that wolves accounted for 32% of adult female elk deaths and 28% of elk calf deaths.

The study found that cougars accounted for 35% of adult female elk deaths and 45% of elk calf deaths.

The study published earlier this year in the Journal of Wildlife Management examined 15 years of data.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Bear attacks 13-year-old boy at campground near Moab

Aug 9, 2019 AP

Moab, Utah (AP) – Wildlife officials say they are still looking for the bear that attacked a 13-year-old boy at a campground in eastern Utah.

The state’s Division of Wildlife Resources said the teenager was sleeping at a campground along the Colorado River Friday morning when a bear approached him and bit his ear and cheek.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Grand Teton visitor bitten by bat

Aug 9, 2019 Local News 8

Moose, Wyo. (KIFI/KIDK) – Grand Teton National Park reports a park visitor was bitten by a bat that tested positive for rabies.

The visitor was part of an organized group near Jenny Lake. The bat fell from a tree onto the visitor’s shoulder. As the visitor tried to brush it off, the bat bit the person’s hand. The bat was captured in a plastic bag and park rangers were called to help.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Mosquitoes in Ada, Adams and Washington counties test positive for West Nile virus

The virus has shown up in samples from nine different Southwest Idaho counties this summer.

KTVB August 7, 2019

Boise, Idaho — Mosquitoes recently trapped in Ada, Washington and Adams counties have tested positive for West Nile virus, health officials announced on Wednesday.

The Ada County Mosquito Abatement District confirmed that one pool of mosquitoes tested positive for the virus. The infected mosquitoes were trapped along the Boise River in Star near the intersection of South Short Road and West State Street.

Abatement workers are now spraying the area in an effort to avoid human infections.

continued:
———————–

Fish & Game News:

Bighorn sheep lottery tag raised over $109,000 for sheep research and management

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Monday, August 5, 2019

Idaho Wild Sheep Foundation donates 100 percent of 2019 lottery proceeds to F&G

For the Arizona hunter whose ticket was pulled for the 28th Annual Bighorn Sheep Tag Lottery, it represents the hunt of a lifetime. For the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, it means more than $109,000 in funding will benefit wild sheep conservation in Idaho.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

First sockeye of 2019 arrives at Stanley

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Friday, August 2, 2019

Run likely to be lowest in more than a decade

The first sockeye of 2019 returned to the Redfish Lake Creek trap near Stanley on Aug. 2. The first sockeye arrived on July 26 last year, and July 27 in 2017.

The fish is among the 53 sockeye that have so far crossed Lower Granite Dam near Lewiston (through Aug. 1), which is the last dam the fish cross before reaching Idaho.

The 2019 sockeye run through Lower Granite so far is below last year’s total of 276 fish, as well as the 2017 total of 228 fish, which was the the lowest return in a decade. It is likely that the returns in 2019 will be lower.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

F&G seeks angler input on proposed Clearwater fall Chinook season

By Martin Koenig, Natural Resource Program Coordinator
Monday, August 5, 2019

Proposal would expand fall Chinook fishing farther upstream on the Clearwater

Fish and Game fisheries managers are considering expanding fall Chinook salmon fishing in the Clearwater River, and they’re gathering public comments about the proposal. Deadline to comment is Aug. 18 at 6 p.m. MDT.

There have been discussions on how to provide this fishery without negatively impacting the experience of catch-and-release steelhead anglers fishing at the same time (September through October 14).

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Firefighter uses YouTube duck calls to rescue ducklings

by Associated Press Friday, June 21st 2019


Firefighters rescue ducklings using a YouTube duck call to draw them to safety. (Photo via: South Metro Fire Rescue / Littleton, Colorado.)

Littleton, Colo. (AP) — A flock of ducklings is safe in suburban Denver after a firefighter used a recording of duck calls to coax some of them from a storm drain.

A video from South Metro Fire Rescue shows how a firefighter was able to scoop out four of the birds in the water at the bottom of the drain on Thursday. Four others, though, were hiding in an adjacent pipe.

The firefighter held up his cellphone to an opening in the pipe and played a YouTube video of duck calls. The ducklings walked toward the sound.

The fire district says the ducklings were reunited with their mother, who was nearby.

source w/video:
————————–

Seasonal Humor:

SummerWaterRestrictions-a
—————————-

Aug 4, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Aug 4, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: The boil water order and water restrictions are still in effect.
Ad free website sponsored by Local Color Photography

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire Training
May 10 – Burn “permits” required
May 15 – Firewood Season opens
July 22 – Daytime closures on So. Fk road begin
Aug 10 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall
Sept 14 – 10am YPFD meeting at the Fire Hall budget meeting
Sept 14 – Ride to Cinnabar
Sept 21 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall

(details below)
———-

Local Events:

2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine. link:
———-

Village News:

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
— — — —

Roads

South Fork
Starting July 22 the South Fork road will be closed Monday through Friday from 7am to 4pm on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends.
More info:
Map w/info for 7/29-8/2:

YP to Stibnite Road
Last update from Midas July 18: The road is still closed Monday through Thursday and open Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Good progress is being made, but it is likely that we still have a few weeks of work ahead.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

June 1st started the 6-day a week mail delivery. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
— — — —

Wasp Season

Long legged wasps are out, invading sheds and seeking to come indoors.

Have not had a report of ticks since the hot dry weather arrived.
— — — —

Reminder for people living in bear country:

* Garbage should be stored inside the house or in a secure garage or storage building.
* If garbage cannot be stored in a secure location, a bear-resistant container approved by the Interagency Bear Committee is recommended.
* Avoid using bird feeders from March through November. Birds do not need supplemental feeding this time of year.
* Pet food should not be left outside.
* BBQ grills or anything with a strong odor should not be left out at night.
* Protect gardens, beehives, and compost piles with electric fencing.
* Never intentionally feed bears. A food-conditioned bear may pose a threat to human safety and usually results in the removal of the bear.
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Water Update July 25:

On July 19th a crew from Idaho rural water came in and found a substantial leak on the east side of the east fork bridge. We are currently looking for a good time to shut the water down to town to make the repairs. It will definitely be after harmonica but seeing we will be shutting down the town, we want to be prepared. We are still on a boil order due to the large capacity of water lost and low chlorine contact time. We still request that everyone conserves water by not watering lawns because we are borderline to running the town out of water.
– Steve H YPWUA

Water Update June 7:

1. The “boil order” is still in effect.
2. There is still large water leaks in the system. We continue to look.
3. A grant for $39,000 was approved for improvements to the system.
3. Work is currently being done on the new contact tank.
4. Please, no lawn watering until we find and repair the major leaks.
– Steve Holloway

The yearly Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th at 10am in the community hall. (no minutes yet)

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19.pdf

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx
— — — —

VYPA News:

Next meeting August 10th 2pm at the Community Hall

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes July 20, 2019
Link to: 20190720 Yellow Pine Village Association Minutes.docx

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for June 8, 2019
link to: 20190608 Village of Yellow Pine Association.rtf

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 8th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th – 2pm at the Community Hall.

Yellow Pine Harmonica Meetings 2019:

July 27, 2019 Saturday 2pm at the Community Hall
— — — —

YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

Link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation.doc

Next Meeting Sept 14 at 10am YPFD meeting in the Fire Hall

Last meeting July 13 – minutes forthcoming.

YPFD June 16, 2019 Meeting minutes
link to: 20190615 YPFD Meeting Notes_Final.docx

Meetings will be held at the fire station at 10am and everyone is welcome to attend. June 15th; July 13th; and Sept 14th (which will also be the budget meeting as well).

Every Sunday 11am – Training

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Training: Sunday Fire/EMS training has begun. Sundays at 11:00 AM unless otherwise posted. If Jeff F is in town the trainings will be held. All are welcome.

YP Helispot: We are working with Valley County Road Department and the Boise National Forest for the rock base for the road leading into the Helispot and the actual Helispot itself. We are also receiving rock for the Fire Hydrants, water tank foundations, etc. The rock will come from the Valdez pit and will be less expensive than having it trucked in from Cascade.

Stop the Bleed Course: This course was well attended in the Fall and Jeff F and Ann F will be presenting another course when the new instructor material comes out. There are “Stop The Bleed” kits at the Tavern in an emergency.

Siren Testing: The YPFD siren will be tested only once this year on the first of May at noon. 3 blasts of the siren is a test, more than 3 is an Emergency.

-JF
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Call for reservations
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Our hours will be 11-8 every day, except closed on Tuesdays. We are open for breakfast by request and always have good coffee starting at 6am.
The Corner has firewood permits in stock now. 4 cord minimum at $6.25 per cord. Please bring drivers license and cash is preferred, no CC.
The Corner Store will also be open with snacks, groceries, fresh produce, soda, ice and packaged beer. If you know you will be coming in over the summer and need special grocery orders, let me know and I will order it in for you while you are here, 2 deliveries a week. The best way to get a hold of me is to call or stop by and say hello.
Karaoke is back at The Corner! Choose your favorite songs from our online music library and entertain your friends up on stage through our professional sound system.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Summer Hours Daily 8am to Close
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
Website:
Link to FB page:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
Link to website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (July 29) overnight low of 45 degrees, mostly cloudy sky and light breeze this morning. Plume of dust rising from gravel site. A few finches and several tree swallows calling. Pine squirrels harvesting (and chewing up) cones. Increasing traffic and dust on the west side. The number of camps on the north end of the golf course is growing. Mostly cloudy and breezy mid-day. Rumble of thunder after lunch time, maps show a strike south of the Johnson Creek airstrip (Porcupine Fire.) Mostly cloudy and “Virga” (rain evaporating before it reaches the ground), hot and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 88 degrees. Chipmunks, pine and ground squirrels active. Two calliope hummingbirds and a red-breasted nuthatch visited. Steady street traffic kicking up dust on the west side. Backfiring airplane went over at 352pm. Mostly clear (dusty smoky haze) later in the afternoon and a little breezy. Cooling off slowly after sundown, mostly clear (hazy) warm evening.

Tuesday (July 30) overnight low of 54 degrees, sprinkles of rain early morning, thunderclap at 801am (map showed hits south of the Thunder Mtn. “cherry stem”.) Partly clear and muggy this morning. Traffic and airplanes started early, huge plume of dust rising from crusher operation at gravel pit on the hill. Partly cloudy, warm and light breezes mid-day. Light but constant traffic, porta potties set out. Thunder, dark clouds and hot mid-afternoon, high of 90 degrees, map shows strikes east of the South Fork river and also west of Missouri Ridge. Some strong breezes on and off this afternoon. More campers pulling in and dusty air. Mostly cloudy and warm before sunset, a bit humid. Campers continue to pull in kicking up dust out in the forest too. Mostly clear before dusk and calm, skeeters are hungry.

Wednesday (July 31) overnight low of 46 degrees, high haze turning the sky milky blue (smoke?) Early airplanes and street traffic (dusty) yelling over by hole #1. A few swallows and finches calling this morning, red-breasted nuthatch visiting. Some clouds starting to build up to the south mid-day and pretty warm. Constant traffic and dust all day, poor air quality. Hot, dry, partly cloudy and windy mid-afternoon, high of 96 degrees. Mostly clear, warm and dusty evening. Constant buzz of traffic. Hazy sky and some stars out before midnight.

Thursday (Aug 1) overnight low of 49 degrees, partly cloudy sky this morning, dusty air. No swallows this morning, a lone olive-sided flycatcher calling from the trees. Road barricades went up this morning, but folks just drag them out of the way. Campers piling in right around the porta potties in the residential area. Partly cloudy and warm mid-day. A few finches and chipmunks visiting, not as many ground squirrels out. Hot by mid-afternoon, partly cloudy and light breezes, high of 95 degrees. A few finches and a pine siskin showed up. Pine squirrels very active, chipmunks scurrying about and a few columbian ground squirrels above ground. Hot and dusty late afternoon, light breeze and a few chunky clouds. Clear and warm at nightfall. Bar traffic, potty doors slamming and generators running after midnight.

Friday (Aug 2) overnight low of 53 degrees, a tiny trace of rain fell around 6am, partly cloudy sky this morning. A few finches, lots of chipmunks, a couple of young pine squirrels and several ground squirrels visiting. Off leash dogs roaming the neighborhood, increasing traffic and dust. Pretty warm by mid-day, mostly cloudy and light breezes. Finches and a red-breasted nuthatch visiting. More campers piling in, big clouds of dust. Mostly dry thunder storm early afternoon, not enough rain to settle the dust. Mostly sunny and hot mid-afternoon, light breezes, high of 95 degrees. Impressive thunderstorm at 420pm, strike map showed Bald Hill hit, 25 minutes of hard rain with large hail at the end, done by 445pm. Storm settled the dust quite well. Power blipped off/on at 6pm. Constant traffic. Underage kids drinking in the school yard. Mostly cloudy and breezy at dusk. Bar traffic at 2am, yelling, generators and loud music up until 3am.

Saturday (Aug 3) overnight low of 49 degrees, clear sky this morning. Early air and street traffic, dogs barking, potty doors slamming and people yelling. A couple of tree swallows still around, a few finches and a robin. Lots of chipmunks running about. Shooting started 1039am – several shots fired, sounds like it is coming from the west side of the golf course. A few campers leaving. Calliope hummingbird, red-breasted nuthatch and pine squirrels visiting mid-day, a few small clouds and breezy, not as many ground squirrels today. More campers pulled out early afternoon, streets are drying out and getting dusty from traffic. Plenty hot by mid-afternoon, partly cloudy and very light breezes, high of 93 degrees. Helicopter high to the south – might be looking at the fire near Johnson Creek. A couple more camps pulled out late afternoon. Warm evening, clear sky after sundown and slowly cooling off. Two swallows perched on the power line. Quiet after midnight until the bar traffic wah-hooed down into the neighborhood after 2am. Yelling, dogs barking and potty doors slamming at least until after 3am.

Sunday (Aug 4) overnight low of 46 degrees, clear sky this morning, light haze of dust and smoke. Early morning air and road traffic, slamming potty doors and barking dogs. A few finches visiting. Campers slowly pulling out. Road barricades taken down at noon. Increased traffic and dust after lunch. Mostly cloudy and hot mid-afternoon, light breezes, high of 95 degrees. Exodus of campers continues leaving a lingering cloud of dust over the neighborhood. Lots of chipmunks and a few ground squirrels running about. Pretty warm evening, mostly cloudy and slight breeze. Flock of swallows flying high. A few campers remain on the golf course.
————————–

Idaho News:

South Fork Road work cancels 4 Summit Challenge

Event has drawn up to 400 riders in past years

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Aug 1, 2019

Organizers of the 4 Summit Challenge canceled the event scheduled for last Saturday due to road construction on the South Fork Salmon River Road by the Payette National Forest.

“If we had done the old route up Warm Lake Road to Landmark Summit, then it would have provided limited paved emergency access to Yellow Pine,” organizer Mary Tracey of Cascade said.

“In the end, we decided to cancel it this year in the hopes that we can offer a nicely paved South Fork Road for our 10th anniversary ride next year.” Tracey said.

The 4 Summit Challenge is an event centered around conquering a personal challenge, with no emphasis on racing against others or the clock.

In previous rides, participants doing the full ride start from downtown Cascade, turn on to Warm Lake Road and the left at the South Fork road 45 miles over two summits, returning via the same route.

… The closures will be in place Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. with no closures over the weekend. Construction on the road is expected to end in the summer of 2020. No road work will be done over the winter.

Yellow Pine will remain accessible via the Johnson Creek Road and Lick Creek Road during the closures.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise hikers found safe after spending 4 nights in the forest

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Aug 1, 2019

Two Boise hikers and their dog are safe after spending four nights lost on backwoods trails near Blackmare Lake east of Donnelly, according to Valley County Search and Rescue.

The hikers were reported missing, triggering a search involving 20 search and rescue members and two airplanes, Search and Rescue Capt. Larry Mangum said.

The two and their dog Lucy set out last Friday for Stump Lake, about 13 miles east of Donnelly with the intention of returning Sunday evening at the latest.

“They told their wives what their hiking plan was, but got turned around on the trails and went the wrong direction,” Mangum said.

The hikers later sent a text to family members on Saturday saying that they would abandon Stump Lake and head for Blackmare Lake because there were too many bugs, Mangum said.

Relatives contacted Search and Rescue when the pair failed to return on time.

Searchers found the hikers’ car at the Kennelly Creek Campground and sent teams to Blackmare Summit, Blackmare Lake, Stump Lake and the surrounding area, Mangum said.

Two airplanes were mobilized to join the search. A co-worker of one of the hikers also hired a plane to fly over the area.

Also called in was Two Bear Air, a private search and rescue company based in Whitefish, Montana, to fly over the area with infrared sensors hoping to spot the lost hikers, Mangum said.

Neither airplane was able to spot the two hikers or the dog.

The two lost hikers made their way inadvertently to the Cougar Trail on the South Fork Road, just south of the Krassel Work Station. They were found by a Forest Service trail crew working in the area on Tuesday Morning, shortly after 9 a.m., Mangum said.

“They didn’t panic and they did all the right things, they just got confused on the trail markings and got turned around going the wrong direction,” he said.

“Both were in very good shape when they came out, the only thing that suffered was the dog and her paws,” Mangum said.

source:

Note: Yellow Pine S&R also responded to the incident.
— — — — — — — — — —

Work progresses on U.S. 95 rebuild through NM

The Star-News Aug 1, 2019

Work on the northbound lanes will begin this week following the completion of the paving work on the southbound lanes as construction continues on U.S. 95 in New Meadows.

Final paving of both south and northbound lanes is scheduled to occur in late August, the Idaho Transportation Department said.

The City of New Meadows and ITD will replace the city’s water main as well as replacing the old road base and pavement on U.S. 95 between South End Road and Idaho 55.

The project, which began in June, will also include construction of new curbs, gutters and sidewalks.

During the project, homes and businesses may experience disruption of water service. Those affected will be notified in advance.

For more information about city water service, contact New Meadows City Hall at 208-347-2171.

Construction work will be from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 7 a.m. to noon on Fridays on U.S. 95. All lanes will be open on the weekends.

There is no on-street parking in the work zone, and business access will remain open.

For more information on the project, visit:

source:
————————

Scam Alerts:

Four credit card skimmers found at ATMs across Boise

Police say that thieves are now placing the skimmers in ATMs, where people will least expect the devices.

KTVB July 29, 2019

Boise, Idaho — Boise Police are asking people to check their bank statements after four credit card skimmers were found at local bank ATMs across Boise.

Police did not state where exactly the skimmers were found.

“The financial institutions are technically victims as well, so we will not be naming them,” Haley Williams, a spokesperson with Boise Police, said.

She also said the banks where the skimmers were found will be reaching out to their customers about it.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Better Business Bureau reports rise in scams involving utility companies

Customers duped by Idaho Power scams

Jul 29, 2019 KIVI TV

Boise, Ida. — With temperatures heating up across the Treasure Valley, utility scammers are also on the rise. Many are impersonating water, electric, and gas company representatives, frequently threatening residents and business owners with deactivation of service if they don’t pay up immediately.

Scammers are starting to take advantage of customers here in Idaho. One Ada County woman says she recently lost $897 to a scammer. She reported to the BBB Scam Tracker that she received a message from a caller claiming to be Idaho Power , saying her services would be shut off in 30 minutes. When she called back, she reached what sounded like the real Idaho Power answering message.

When she was finally able to reach someone on the phone, they listed addresses for two of her properties and said her nearly $900 bill was overdue. Since it was close to 5 p.m., the scammer told her Idaho Power was about to close and she needed to pay immediately. The caller told the woman to go to Walgreens and buy Money Pac cards, then to call the technician who was waiting to turn the power off and give him the card numbers.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idahoans lost $6.85 million to online scams in 2018

Idaho ranked as the #22 state in victims per capita and the #35 state in loss amount.

KTVB August 1, 2019

Boise, Idaho — Idahoans lost near $7 million to online scams last year.

That’s according to CenturyLinkQuote, which pored over FBI statistics and the 2018 Annual Report by the Internet Crime Complaint Center to identify the most at-risk states for internet scams.

continued:
————————–

Mining News:

Midas Gold submits changes to Stibnite gold mine plans

Revisions designed to meet comments by Payette, public

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Aug 1, 2019

Midas Gold Idaho has submitted a new plan to the Payette National Forest with several significant changes to the company’s proposed Stibnite Gold Project near Yellow Pine.

The changes are designed to reduce the size of the project, better preserve water quality, cut costs and accommodate public access at the proposed gold and antimony mine, Midas Gold officials said.

The changes were made in response to public comments and as well as analysis by the Payette and a contractor hired to review the project.

The changes were filed by the Vancouver, B.C., company with the Payette in May, but neither Midas Gold or the Payette issued a statement announcing the revised plan.

The changes were made public during the most recent meeting of the Stibnite Advisory Council, the citizens group composed of representatives of various local governments.

The submission of the modified plan should not delay the expected release of a draft study of the Stibnite Gold Project by the end of the year, Payette Public Affairs Officers Brian Harris told The Star-News.

The original plan of operations was submitted in September 2016. That plan, the revised plan and other alternatives proposed by the Payette will all be incorporated into the draft environmental study, Harris said.

Here is a brief review of the changes made by Midas Gold. More detailed explanations will be presented in The Star-News in future issues.

Rock Storage

One major change proposed is to eliminate the West End Development Rock Storage Facility, which would have dumped about 25 million tons of waste rock not containing gold or antimony onto a new massive pile.

Instead the rock would be used to backfill two open pit mines proposed as part of the project.

About 20 million tons of rock would be put into the proposed Hangar Flats pit, making its final depth about 140 feet. Previously the Hangar Flats pit would have been 600 feet deep under the 2016 proposal.

Another 5 million tons of rock would be used to completely backfill the existing Midnight pit, which would result in lower water temperatures by eliminating the formation of a lake, according to the revisions.

Protective Liner

Another change would add a protective liner cover to waste rock storage to improve water quality by reducing leaks.

The new plans also call for design changes to several surface water diversions that would result in improved water quality and lower water temperatures.

“Water temperature is important to long-term fish population restoration and a priority for the company,” said Dale Kerner, permitting manager for Midas Gold Idaho.

During operations, run-off water and streams around waste rock storage and tailings facilities would be diverted into underground pipes during low flows to prevent water from warming.

After mining is completed, the diversions would be re-established across the surface of the storage areas to create permanent waterways, Kerner said.

Meadow Creek

A temporary rerouting of Meadow Creek around the Hangar Flats pit lake proposed in Midas Gold’s original plan would instead be permanent under the proposed changes.

Simulations showed a risk of increased water temperatures in the original proposal, Kerner said.

A liner proposed for a portion of Meadow Creek would also be extended to prevent the stream from being absorbed into groundwater while the Hangar Flat pit lake fills with water after mining.

Public Access

Another proposed change would allow public access through the mine using the Stibnite Road during operations.

The road would not be plowed during the winter and could be subject to daily or even weekly closures for blasting and other dangerous mine activities, according to modified plans.

“People want to get up here with their campers,” Kerner said. “They do it now, they want to do it 10 years from now.”

Limestone Mine

Under the modified proposal, Midas Gold would use limestone discovered in an existing open pit on site to produce lime, an important substance use for neutralization in extracting gold and silver from rock.

That would involve building an estimated $29 million lime kiln, which would produce lime about 50% cheaper than having it delivered daily by trucks.

Producing lime on site would eliminate about 2,917 truck deliveries annually, but it would add about 133 propane deliveries each year to fuel the kiln, according to the company.

Overall, emissions would slightly increase as a result of on-site lime generation, the modified plans said.

Maintenance Facility

Another proposed change would relocate an off-site maintenance facility originally planned for Landmark to about four miles east up the Burnt Log Route, which is proposed as the primary mine traffic access to Stibnite.

Moving the building would preserve the historical character of the Landmark Ranger Station, which was built in about 1930.

Burnt Log Route

The modified plan would also modify the Burnt Log Route to reduce steepness and impacts to wetlands along a 5.8-mile section of the road near the Riordan Creek drainage.

The changed route would edge closer to the Frank Church – River of No Return Wilderness, but would remain at least 100 feet from the boundary and outside of the Frank’s watershed, Kerner said.

“Refining it the way we did, it was a no-brainer,” he said. “It just made sense.”

A minor change proposed in the modified plan would reroute some power lines that must be upgraded to operate the mine.

source:

Link to: 2019 Midas Gold Plan Revision.pdf
— — — — — — — — — —

Bemetals Commences Resource Expansion and Confirmation Drilling Program at the High-Grade South Mountain Zinc-Silver Project in Idaho

Thursday, August 1, 2019

Vancouver, Canada – BeMetals Corp. is pleased to announce the commencement of BeMetals’ initial core drilling program at the high-grade South Mountain Zinc-Silver Project (“South Mountain” or the “Project” or “Property”) in southwestern Idaho, U.S.A. This summer’s drilling campaign is designed to test potential extensions and confirm the grade distribution of the mineral resource outlined in the independent technical report titled, “National Instrument 43-101 Technical Report Updated Mineral Resource Estimate for the South Mountain Project Owyhee County, Idaho, USA.”, with an effective date of April 1, 2019, and available on the Company’s website at http://www.bemetalscorp.com and on SEDAR at http://www.sedar.com.

continued: [h/t Sandy]
—————————-

Tips & Advice:

Protect Your Lungs from Wildfire Smoke or Ash

Wildfire smoke and ash can irritate your eyes, nose, throat, and lungs. They can make you cough or wheeze, and can make it hard to breathe. A respirator is a device (mask) that covers your nose and mouth, fits tightly to your face, and can filter out smoke or ash particles before you breathe them in. Respirators are not sized for children.

continued:
— — —

Protect Yourself from Ash

Protect yourself from harmful ash when you clean up after a wildfire. Cleanup work can expose you to ash and other products of the fire that may irritate your eyes, nose, or skin and cause coughing and other health effects. Ash inhaled deeply into lungs may cause asthma attacks and make it difficult to breathe.

Ash is made up of larger and tiny particles (dust, dirt, and soot). Ash deposited on surfaces both indoors and outdoors can be inhaled if it becomes airborne when you clean up. Ash from burned structures is generally more hazardous than forest ash.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Heat Safety Tips and Resources

Stay Hydrated

Drink Plenty of Fluids: Drink more fluids, regardless of how active you are. Don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.

* Warning: If your doctor limits the amount you drink or has you on water pills, ask how much you should drink while the weather is hot.
* Stay away from very sugary or alcoholic drinks—these actually cause you to lose more body fluid. Also avoid very cold drinks, because they can cause stomach cramps.

Replace Salt and Minerals: Heavy sweating removes salt and minerals from the body that need to be replaced. A sports drink can replace the salt and minerals you lose in sweat.

* If you are on a low-salt diet, have diabetes, high blood pressure, or other chronic conditions, talk with your doctor before drinking a sports beverage or taking salt tablets.

Keep Your Pets Hydrated: Provide plenty of fresh water for your pets, and leave the water in a shady area.
————————

Fire Season:

Porcupine Fire
Boise National Forest
Porcupine Fire: One fire prevention patrol and 1 helicopter are assigned to the Porcupine Fire. The Porcupine Fire is burning in timber and brush and it is currently about 0.25 acres. Yellow Pine residents and forest visitors attending the Harmonica Festival may see fire crews and aircraft in the area but it should not affect weekend festivities.
Note: Porcupine Creek is a tributary to Johnson Creek at Ice Hole.
PorcupineCreekMap-a

Nethker Fire
Payette National Forest
Evacuations of campgrounds, closing of Burgdorf Hot Springs and Burgdorf-French Creek Road is closed to through traffic. Wildfire started at 2:20pm near Burgdorf – cause is unknown at this time. 150+ acres and actively growing. Air tankers, helicopters and ground based firefighters are actively suppressing the fire.
20190804NethkerFireafromMcCall-a
Nethker Fire as seen from McCall. 4:41pm, Sunday, August 4. 150+ acres.
InciWeb:

There is a fire outside Burgdorf Hot Springs. First reported 2:20, 25 acres. By 4:41 they are reporting 150+ acres. It’s on Netheker Creek. That’s about 5 miles from Secesh. Smokejumpers and DC10 are on it.
20190804NethkerCreekfromBurgdorfHotSprings
Nethker Creek from Burgdorf Hot Springs.
Update: The fire is holding at this time and is not expected to reach Warren Wagon Road tonight. Air tankers and helicopters working in support of ground based firefighters continue to work the fire. A Type 2 Incident Management Team has been ordered to manage the fire.
Update, 8:45p.m. August 4, 2019: The fire continues to hold west of Warren Wagon Road. Firefighters will work through the night to cut fire line, and prepare for a potential burnout operation in the morning. A fie update will be posted in the morning.
Nethker Fire Actively burning Southwest of Burgdorf
Nethker-Fire-August-4-2019-a
Nethker-Fire-08042019-a
Nethker Fire: The Nethker fire was detected today a 2:20p.m. It is actively burning approximately 3 miles southwest of Burgdorf. The fire is estimated at 150 acres. Ten airtankers, 5 helicopters, 8 crews and 9 engines are assigned to the fire. The fire is holding to the west of Warren Wagon Road at this time and the road remains open. Firefighters will continue to engage the fire throughout the night. Jeanette Campground and dispersed camp sites were evacuated from the area – Burgdorf residents evacuated as well. The cause of the fire is undetermined at this time, but lightning is suspected. An area closure will be effect for this fire area. A Type 2 Incident Management Team has been ordered to manage the fire. (Inciweb link).
To date, the Payette National Forest has had 25 wildfires which is in keeping with the Forest having an average fire season or 65 to 70 wildfires – four wildfires have been reported since Friday. The three wildfires in the Profile Gap area were declared out and in patrol status today. The Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association (SITPA) has responded to 16 wildfires so far this season. The largest wildfire prior to the Nethker Fire was held to 2.5 acres.
Fire Restrictions: No Fire Restrictions are in effect at this time.

Shady Fire
Salmon-Challis National Forest
Two (2) miles east of Seafoam Guard Station in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Middle Fork Ranger District.
Size 3,931 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Thursday October 31st, 2019
InciWeb:

Canyon Fire
Boise National Forest
14 miles west of Stanley, Idaho
Canyon Fire 100 percent containment on August 2, 2019
Size 326 Acres
InciWeb:

Vader Fire
Salmon-Challis National Forest
14 miles northwest of Stanley, south of Highway 21 on the Middle Fork Ranger District.
Percent of Perimeter Contained 100%
Size 443 Acres
InciWeb:

Idaho Fire Info
link:

NIFC
link:

2 Idaho News
To keep you updated, safe and in the know, this page will provide the very latest news and updates throughout the summer.
link:
— — — — — — — — — —

Lightning starts fires on the Boise National Forest

UPDATE: August 2, 2019 – The Boise National Forest has detected three lightning caused fires about 3 p.m. Two fires are east of Lowman, Idaho, in Eight Mile Creek and the third in southwest of Yellow Pine, Idaho, in Porcupine Creek. Crews are working to suppress the fires and establish hand line along the perimeter to prevent further growth.

Nine Fire/Eight Fire: Three hand crews, 1 fire engine, 1 helicopter, 1 air attack and 4 air tankers are assigned to the Nine Fire which is located in the vicinity of the Eight Fire. Retardant has been dropped around the Nine Fire and has slowed its spread. It is burning in timber and brush and it is currently about 3-5 acres.

Porcupine Fire: One fire prevention patrol and 1 helicopter are assigned to the Porcupine Fire. The Porcupine Fire is burning in timber and brush and it is currently about 0.25 acres. Yellow Pine residents and forest visitors attending the Harmonica Festival may see fire crews and aircraft in the area but it should not affect weekend festivities.

STRUCTURES THREATENED: No structures are threatened.

CAUSE: Lightning.

CLOSURES: None at this time.

SMOKE: Smoke from the wildfires may affect the overall air quality of this area. For information visit: http://airquality.deq.idaho.gov/

RESTRICTIONS: Currently there are no fire restrictions in effect.

Forest official ask the public to be extremely careful with all flammable materials and t ensure campfires are completely out and cold to the touch. With increasing weekend temperatures, fuels are drying out quickly and the potential for wildfire ignitions is high.
— — —

Fires ignited within Boise National Forest

Boise, Idaho, July 30, 2019 — Fire crews are responding to several new wildfires reported across the Boise National Forest as a result of thunderstorms late yesterday.

The higher concentration of ignitions were within the Lowman and Idaho City Ranger Districts. Aerial detection flights will be flown today and tomorrow in search for new holdover fires.

The fires are all currently small, less than one acre in size and some moisture was reported. The largest of the fires is the Taylor Fire within the Idaho City Ranger District and approximately 5 acres in size. The majority of fires have been staffed with a combination of helicopters, hotshots, fire crews and engines. Staffing is on-going today and containment is anticipated on many of the starts within the next few shifts.

Lingering monsoonal moisture is predicted across southern Idaho this morning. Instability will remain over the eastern portions of the Boise and Payette National Forests bringing another possible round of thunderstorms to the area today. Today’s air mass is more moist than yesterday, therefore potentially better chance of wetting rains with the thunderstorms.

There are no structures threatened at this time and there are not fire restrictions currently in effect. Forest officials ask the public to be extremely careful with all flammable materials. With the increase in temperatures and decrease in humidity, fuels are drying out quickly and the potential for wildfire ignitions rises daily.

photo of Taylor fire on FB:
— — — — — — — — — —

Lightning zaps Salmon-Challis Forest

Jul 30, 2019 Local News 8


Jenny Fire

Salmon, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Lightning has caused at least 11 new fires on the Salmon-Challis National Forest in the past week.

The three-acre “Jenny” fire was reported Sunday about 38 miles southwest of Salmon in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. The fire is in rugged back country. For now, a helicopter is dropping water on the fire to cool the fire’s edge and slow the spread of fire.

continued:
— — — —

Central Idaho Dispatch Zone moves to very high fire danger

by CBS 2 News Staff Wednesday, July 31st 2019


(USFS – Salmon-Challis)

Salmon, Idaho (CBS 2) — Weather and fuel conditions have made the Central Idaho Dispatch Zone move to Very High Fire Danger.

In this type of danger, fires will start from most of the usual causes.

Fires can spread quickly and grow intensely shortly after starting.

“Small fires can quickly become large fires and exhibit extreme fire intensity, such as long-distance spotting and fire whirls,” said the U.S. Forest Service – Salmon-Challis. “These fires can be difficult to control and will often become much larger and longer-lasting fires.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Firefighters respond to fires near Lucky Peak Reservoir

Boise National Forest
Contact: Venetia Gempler
Phone: (208) 373-4105

UPDATE: August 1, 2019 — Engines and crews with Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Forest Service (FS) are responding to several new fire starts near Lucky Peak Reservoir. The fires were reported Thursday morning just after 1 a.m. The 104 acre Lucky Fire is the largest fire, under Forest Service protection and burning on State Lands. (Acres updated 8-1 / 11:30 a.m.)

Lucky Fire crews are working to secure hand line, dozer line and hose line along the perimeter to prevent further growth. The fire grew quickly in the early morning hours, however all spread has been slowed and stopped with the suppression efforts. The containment and control of the fire will be determined as further progress is made.

The Shores Fire ignited in the same vicinity and time was contained at 0.10 acres.

A third fire, the MM13 Fire, was contained at 20 acres and BLM crews are now assisting with the Lucky Fire.

STRUCTURES THREATENED: No structures are threatened.

CAUSE: The cause of the fires are under investigation.

WEATHER: Crews say the wind and steep terrain made this fire difficult to battle in the early hours of the morning. Possible thunderstorms have been predicted through the weekend.

RESOURCES: Resources responding to all the fires include multiagency helicopters, crews, engines and water tenders.

CLOSURES: Middle Fork of the Boise River (road #268) is currently shut down as crews work.

SMOKE: Smoke from the Lucky Fire was reported Thursday morning. For information on smoke impacts to air quality, visit http://airquality.deq.idaho.gov/

RESTRICTIONS: Currently there are no fire restrictions in effect. Please be careful to ensure campfires are completely out and cold to the touch. We can all make a difference in reducing human-caused fires.
— —

Idaho 21 reopened amid Lucky Fire mop-up

“Drivers are asked to remain alert and cautious,” the sheriff’s office tweeted.

KTVB August 2, 2019

Boise, Idaho — Idaho 21 has reopened to traffic as crews continue working on the Lucky Fire Friday.

The Ada County Sheriff’s Office said Friday that deputies were blocking the highway as mop-up crews worked alongside the road.

By 12:35 p.m. Friday, however, the sheriff’s office said the highway would be reopened.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Fire burning near Craters of the Moon burns 2,500 acres

by CBS 2 News Staff Thursday, August 1st 2019

Carey, Idaho (CBS 2) — The Spud Fire, burning in central Idaho near Craters of the Moon National Monument, has grown to 2,500 acres as of late Thursday.

The fire is located about 12 miles east of Carey, and is still actively burning.

BLM crews are facing rocky terrain and windy conditions as they work to get the fire under control. The fire is burning in grass and also brush that’s growing out of the lava rock in the area.

Eight Bureau of Land Management Fire Department fire engines, 1 Sawtooth National Forest engine, a dozer, water tender, and multiple aircraft are responding.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Human-caused fire prevention: How you can help Idaho stop wildfires

By KBOI July 30, 2019

Due to such an unseasonably hot and dry summer, the state of Idaho has experienced a dramatic uptick in the number of wildfires in 2019.

While some of these fires have been the result of Mother Nature’s fury, others have sparked at the hands of everyday human beings doing what they perceive as everyday activities. In fact, people are the number one cause of wildfires in Idaho, further solidifying the evidence that you can make a difference.

In order to cut down on the number of wildfires for the second half of this year, please be aware of these fire-starting tendencies so that you can prevent the next potential disaster:

continued:
————————-

Public Lands:

South Fork Salmon River Road Rehabiliation Project Newsletter July 29 through August 2, 2019

USDA Forest Service Region 4 Payette

There are two closure points for this week. Monday, July 29 at Mile Post 11 south of Poverty Flat Campground, and Tuesday, July 30 through Friday, August 2 between Mile Posts 25 and 26 south of the Krassel work station. Closures run from 7a.m. to 4p.m. No closures over the weekends.

Please see the attached newsletter for closure points in effect for Monday, July 29 through August 2, 2019.

link:

Note: The South Fork road is closed Monday through Friday from 7am to 4pm on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends.
— — — — — — — — — —

Stolle Meadows Roadway Reconstruction Project begins August 5

Cascade, Idaho, August 2, 2019 — National Forest System (NFS) road 427 (Stolle Meadows road) Reconstruction Project will begin Aug. 5, 2019, at 8 a.m., and run through the 2019 field season. The purpose of the project is to widen the roadway, construct road shoulders, install additional surface drainage culverts, relocate utilities and provide aggregate and asphalt surfacing.

Beginning Aug. 5, 2019, NFS 427 road will be closed from the Warm Lake Highway to the NFS road 489, see attached map. In addition:

* The 427 road will be restricted between the junctions of NFS roads 489 and 474.
* The restriction will close this segment Monday – Friday from 8 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
* Travelers should also anticipate 20 minute delays outside the closure timeframes
* Work will not be done over the weekends.
* While travel restrictions are limited, dispersed camping along this restricted segment will be closed for the duration of the project.

While travel restrictions are limited, dispersed camping along this restricted segment will be closed for the duration of the project.

The Boise National Forest is producing and distributing a bimonthly newsletter to update permitted residences, travelers, and recreational users about the project’s status. The first newsletter is included with this release and the next one will be available Aug. 19. To receive updates, subscribe to the newsletter by singing up at:
Reconstruction Update: National Forest System road 427.

During the winter of 2017, excessive snowpack and rainfall induced several hillslope failures on a segment of NFS road 474. The landslides left NFS road 427 as the only route or link from the Warm Lake Highway to Stolle Meadows and provides access to permitted recreation residences, developed and dispersed recreation areas, special use permittees, and the Stolle Meadows Guard Station. The reconstruction project is designed to not only improve recreational access and user comfort but also accommodate future traffic growth.

The project is being financed by emergency relief funding. The work is being completed by a local contractor, Granite Excavation Inc. from Cascade, Idaho.

map link: 0402-04-82 NFS Roads 427 and 489.1 construction closure MAP.pdf
— — — — — — — — — —

Leadership Changes on the Payette National Forest

August 1, 2019 Payette National Forest

McCall, Id., August 1, 2019 – Forest Supervisor Keith Lannom is leaving the Payette National Forest, Tawnya Brummett will detail into the Forest Supervisor position, the Forest have been authorized to hire a permanent Deputy Forest Supervisor, and Krassel District Ranger Anthony Botello will go on a temporary assignment to the Custer Gallatin National Forest.

Lannom is headed to the Forest Service’s Northern Region in Missoula, Montana as one of two Deputy Regional Foresters. He has served on Payette National Forest as the Forest Supervisor since July of 2011. While he and his family will miss friends and colleagues, he looks forward to the new challenges in Montana, northern Idaho and North and South Dakota. “I am grateful to have had the opportunity to work with the employees of the Forest as they are excellent stewards of our public lands,” said Lannom. “We have accomplished much needed forest restoration work through partnership with the Payette Forest Coalition. The family and I will miss recreating in the mountains and rivers of the Payette and the friends we have made here.” He reports to his new position on August 5, 2019.

Filling in behind Lannom is Tawnya Brummett who is the Deputy Forest Supervisor on the Boise National Forest. She will serve as the Acting Forest Supervisor for the Payette National Forest until the position is filled on a permanent basis. Brummett’s experience prior to the Boise National Forest includes serving as a District Ranger on the Lolo National Forest; Wildlife Biologist and Range Specialist on the Gila National Forest; Wildlife Biologist on the Angelina-Sabine National Forest; and as a hotshot crewmember on the Gila National Forest. Brummett holds a degree in Wildlife Biology from Stephan F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, Texas. “I am excited to engage with members of the public and partners of the Payette National Forest,” said Brummett. “We love the central Idaho Mountains and look forward to exploring more outdoor opportunities.”

With the Forest being authorized to fill a fulltime Deputy Forest Supervisor, Belle Craig will serve as the Acting Deputy Forest Supervisor until the position is filled on a permanent basis. Craig is currently the Regional Director for Information Management in the Intermountain Region (Ogden, Utah), and had previous leadership assignments to include: Acting Planning Director; Acting Deputy Forest Supervisor on the Bridger-Teton National Forest; and Washington Office Assistant Director at the National Geospatial and Technology Application Center in Salt Lake City. Craig is a professional land surveyor and holds a degree in Geology from Fort Lewis College in Durango, Colorado. She is an avid hiker, enjoys camping and golf. “I look forward to working with our employees and engaging with our stakeholders,” said Craig. “The Payette National Forest is a true gem of the Gem State.”

Krassel District Ranger Anthony Botello will temporarily depart the Payette National Forest as he will serve as the Acting Deputy Forest Supervisor on the Custer Gallatin National Forest in Bozeman, Montana. Botello will return the Payette once his assignment has ended. On a temporary assignment, Acting District Ranger Brian Anderson will fill in behind Botello. Anderson is currently the Deputy Area Ranger for the Sawtooth National Recreation Area in Stanley, Idaho. Prior to this, he worked as a Hydrologist for the Boise National Forest from 2011 to 2017. Anderson has experience working as a youth conservation corps leader, trail crew member, wilderness ranger, hydrologic technician, and firefighter, including 4 field seasons in wilderness and trails on the Krassel Ranger District from 2001-2005. He has a bachelor’s degree in Environmental Science from the University of Idaho and a master’s degree in Hydrologic Science from Boise State University.
— — — — — — — — — —

Two big timber salvage sales planned north of Boise

By Idaho Press Staff Jul 29, 2019


Idaho Department of Lands

Boise — The Idaho Department of Lands is planning two major timber salvage sales in the Smiths Ferry-Banks-Crouch area totaling nearly 2,000 acres, due to a big Douglas fir-tussock moth infestation that’s killed most of the trees in the area.

“The dead and dying trees pose a significant fire danger, especially to those who live or recreate near the affected area,” IDL said in a news release Monday. “There is also the danger of the dead and dying trees falling, creating further risk for the recreating public.”

The insect-killed trees still have economic value if they’re cut soon, the department said. “However, that value will rapidly decrease if bark beetles and wood borers infest the dead trees, or if the wood dries and cracks due to delayed salvage harvests.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Lost Horse Public Meeting

July 30, 2019

The Cascade Ranger District will host a Public Field Trip to view the Lost Horse Project on Tuesday, August 6th. The field trip will begin at the Cascade Ranger District at 10:00 a.m. Participants will carpool to three different locations within the project area and will return to the Ranger Station at approximately 3:00 p.m. Participants should pack a lunch, water, and appropriate clothing.

Please RSVP to Jim Bishop, Project Leader at james.bishop@usda.gov

Map link:
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise Basin Experimental Forest Project – Decision Notice Signed

July 30, 2019

Dear Interested Party,

The Boise National Forest has signed the Decision Notice for the Boise Basin Experimental Forest (BBEF) Project on the Idaho City Ranger District.

A copy of the Environmental Assessment, Finding of No Significant Impact and Decision Notice for the BBEF Project can be found on the project webpage at https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49262 (see Analysis and Decision tabs).

If you would like further information about the project, please contact Brian Lawatch, Project Team Leader at 208-590-3345, or Brant Petersen, District Ranger at 208-392-3701.
— — — — — — — — — —

Temporary area closure of Sage Hen Gravel Pit

Boise, Idaho, July 29, 2019 — The Emmett Ranger District is temporarily closing the Sage Hen Gravel Pit to provide for public safety due to hazards associated with rock crushing operations. The Pit is located along National Forest System road 626 (Sage Hen Road) approximately 1 mile east of the Forest boundary.

The temporary closure is in effect beginning August 4, 2019 and will remain in effect through November 15, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. Please refer to the order and the map for specific information at the link provided below.

Forest visitors should drive with caution while traveling in the area, they may encounter heavy equipment using roadways.

For all current area and road closures within the Boise National Forest visit:

If you need further information, you may call the Emmett Ranger District at 208-365-7000.

0402-06-42 Sage Hen Gravel Pit Area Closure MAP
—————————

Critter News:

Snowdon to host Beers for Bear Cubs Aug. 8 at SRB

The Star-News Aug 1, 2019

Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary will host the 4th annual Beers for Bear Cubs next Thursday, Aug. 8, from 3 to 6 p.m. at the Salmon River Brewery.

Those who buy a collectible beer glass will get their first beer free. The event will also include an owl ambassador from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. and tickets for a carved bear by McCall artist John Schulz.

The winner of the carved bear will be drawn during Snowdon’s open house on Sept. 28.

Proceeds will benefit injured and orphaned bear cubs and other wildlife through the Snowdon sanctuary and its programs.

The 35-acre Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary is located near McCall and has a number of animal pens and enclosures as well as a clinic to care for injured animals.

The Salmon River Brewery is located at 411 Railroad Ave. in McCall.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho campers should be ‘bear aware’

by CBS 2 News Staff Wednesday, July 31st 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Bears have been spotted by campers from the Sawtooth National Forest to the Salmon-Challis National Forest.

The U.S. Forest Service wants to encourage campers to be, “bear aware.”

The Sawtooth National Forest is reminding visitors to be extra vigilant this summer when storing their food to avoid attracting black bears.

“Bears possess an extremely keen sense of smell and can find food from great distances,” according to the Sawtooth NFS. “Once a bear finds food near humans, it is likely to come back. The result is a dangerous situation for both the bear and for people.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Pet Talk – Older dogs and their inability to control their stools

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Aug 2, 2019 IME

Fecal incontinence occurs when a loss of control of the lower bowel and rectum allows feces or stool to be passed at inappropriate times or places. Fecal incontinence may be neurogenic in origin associated with the failure of nervous sensation. In these cases, the animal does not realize that it is defecating and does not assume a normal posture for defecation. In contrast, urge incontinence may occur with uncontrolled strong urges to defecate. In these cases, the animal acutely needs to defecate and is aware of that need.

Diseases of the nerves in the lower spine, and of the rectum and anus can all result in fecal incontinence. Masses or tumors in the wall of the rectum or in the pelvic canal can also lead to excessive straining. Urge incontinence can result from inflammation to the lower colon, which is called colitis. Some older animals develop incontinence from a decline in mental status, or senility, which leads them to become less attentive to many aspects of daily life.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Education International

Newsletter Aug 1, 2019

Biological deserts in Siberia and northern Canada
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise man spots Bobcat in north Boise near park

The animal was spotted around 8:15 Tuesday evening

Jul 30, 2019 By Karen Lehr KIVI TV

Boise, Idaho — A Boise man snapped some photos of what appears to be a large bobcat roaming a field near a playground in north Boise.

Ryan Chisum says he spotted the large cat around 8:15 Tuesday evening in close proximity to Stewart Gulch Park just past Quail Hollow Golf Course on 36th Street in north Boise.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Ducks Unlimited plans Sportsman’s Party Aug. 17 at Northfork

The Star-News Aug 1, 2019

McCall Ducks Unlimited will host a Sportsman’s Party with games, raffles, a silent auction and food on Saturday, Aug. 17, at 5:30 p.m. at Northfork Lodge.

Tickets include a barbecue dinner, bottomless beer and a $35 Ducks Unlimited membership. Items for raffle include 15 guns. Cost is $45 per person and $25 for youth ages 16 and under. The sportsman’s package, which includes a $100 raffle pack, is $120 for a single and $140 for a couple.

Those who purchase a sportsman’s package by Tuesday, Aug. 13, will be entered into an early bird gun drawing.

For more information or to purchase tickets, visit http://ducks.org/idaho or call 208-761-1145 or 404-630-8150.

Ducks Unlimited is a private, nonprofit waterfowl and wetlands conservation organization. The group works through a series of partnerships with private individuals, land-owners, agencies and scientific communities.

The works of Ducks Unlimited include waterfowl habitation as well as improving wet-lands, which aids the overall health of the environmental by recharging and purifying groundwater, moderating floods and reducing soil erosion.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho male sage-grouse counts decline 25% in one year

by CBS 2 News Staff Wednesday, July 31st 2019


(Idaho Fish and Game)

Idaho Fish and Game are seeking public comment on proposed sage-grouse hunting season after a 25 percent decline in males since 2018.

Population counts are down which could mean more restrictive seasons according to Idaho Fish and Game.

… Statewide, sage-grouse lek counts indicate a 25-percent decline in males at leks in spring 2019, compared to 2018.

full story:
— — —

USDA Releases Proposed Amendments to Greater Sage Grouse Land Management Plans

(Washington – August 1, 2019) – U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue today announced the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Forest Service proposed changes to how the agency manages greater sage grouse in Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah after hearing concerns from states and land users. The changes strive to improve the clarity, efficiency, and implementation of the current sage grouse plans.

“The Forest Service continues to promote our multiple use mission while ensuring conservation of greater sage grouse habitat,” Secretary Perdue said. “We are sharing the stewardship of the lands with western state governors – their extensive participation throughout this process was the key to landscape-scale conservation that aligns our policies and practices across local, state, and federal jurisdictions.”

The Forest Service published the final environmental impact statement in the Federal Register, and the objection period will last 60 days from the date of the publication of the notice of availability. After considering objections, the Forest Service intends to continue the planning process by issuing a final decision document regarding the revised plan amendments in the fall of 2019.

Background:

Greater sage grouse populations have been impacted by a variety of threats including the loss of habitat from wildfire and the spread of invasive weeds like cheat grass. In 2015, the USDA’s Forest Service, along with the Department of Interior’s Bureau of Land Management, amended land management plans in an attempt to address threats and improve habitat conservation for greater sage grouse.

Stakeholders have since raised concerns that the 2015 plans would impact economic growth and did not align with conservation plans laid out by the states. To address these concerns, USDA engaged in an historic collaboration effort to build partnerships between state and local governments, ranchers, universities, non-profit groups, and businesses in order to better align changes to the 2015 plans with stakeholder knowledge.

USDA applied lessons-learned and concerns voiced by a diverse set of stakeholders, including grazers and other land users, in the 2019 proposed changes. The 2019 plans have been adapted to take into account site-specific conditions to ensure ranchers, permittees, and industry can adapt to their local conditions rather than be forced to conform to a one-size-fits-all, national approach.

Key Changes:

* The 2019 plans allow for greater flexibility and local control of conservation and management actions related to sage grouse, ensuring that we can both conserve the habitat and enable grazers to maintain their livelihood. USDA has revised grazing guidelines to shift from rigid, prescriptive standards to common sense, locally-driven strategies.
* The 2019 plans align state and federal conservation standards, so ranchers and other land users have one set of standards instead of dealing with multiple, complex layers of restrictions. The new changes also align mitigation options with state-based systems so mitigation strategies on how to ensure no net-loss of habitat are locally supported, not a one-size-fits-all standard.
* The 2019 plans maintain the goal of preventing any net-loss to critical sage grouse habitat, but no longer require the unreasonable standard that every action increase conservation. This enables local stakeholders to determine what strategies to implement where and how while still conserving sage grouse habitat.
— — — — — — — — — —

Volunteers track songbirds along Boise River to study migration, breeding

Jul 31, 2019 By Jessica Taylor KIVI TV

Boise — Just off Highway 21 by the Boise River, volunteers are tracking migration patterns, breeding, and life cycles of different bird species.

“Usually they take off by themselves, you just hold your hand out, and they fly,” said 11-year-old volunteer Evan Sweet.

Dozens of songbirds are being banded, like yellow warblers and red-winged blackbirds, but the real star of the show is 14-year-old Arlo Thomas.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho fisheries managers forecast poor steelhead return

Jul 29, 2019 Associated Press

Lewiston, Idaho — Steelhead anglers hoping for strong returns this year on the Snake River likely will be disappointed, according to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

State biologists are forecasting another poor return to the Snake River and its tributaries, especially for the larger B-run fish, the Lewiston Tribune reported .

They are also forecasting few B-run steelhead for the Clearwater River.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Tussock moth caterpillars kill trees, cause rash

Caterpillars and eggs can cause allergic reaction

Jul 31, 2019 By Steve Liebenthal KIVI TV

Payette National Forest — Before you head into the forest, beware: There is an outbreak of bugs that could put you in danger of an allergic reaction, especially if you are looking for huckleberries. Touching them could result in an annoying rash, and in extreme cases, respiratory distress.

We talked to some huckleberry pickers who were aware of the tussock moth outbreak, but did not expect to find them in the patch where they were picking.

… The caterpillars and the moths they become can make humans uncomfortable, but they can also wreak havoc on timber. That’s why the Department of Lands is selling the trees on roughly two thousand acres near Smiths Ferry.

full story w/video report:
— — — — — — — — — —

West Nile Virus infected mosquitoes found in Payette County

by CBS 2 News Staff Wednesday, July 31st 2019

Payette, Idaho (CBS 2) — West Nile Virus has made its way into the Payette County area.

On Wednesday, the Payette County Mosquito Abatement Program said traps collected on Tuesday in the Jewel Wetlands area north of Payette, Blacks Bridge near New Plymouth and Falk Bride near the eastern edge of the county have tested positive for the virus.

Crews will increase mosquito surveillance in the area and will treat larvae infested waters as well as aerial spraying.

source:
— — —

West Nile Virus discovered near Boise River in Canyon County

by CBS 2 News Staff Friday, August 2nd 2019

Caldwell, Idaho (CBS 2) — West Nile is continuing to put a strangle on the western end of the Treasure Valley.

On Friday, the Canyon County Mosquito Abatement District says mosquitoes collected in a trap near Sand Road and Highway 95 near the Boise River have tested positive for the virus.

To reduce the numbers, authorities fogged the area Thursday night and will repeat the treatment Friday night.

This is the fifth trap over the past six weeks in this area that has tested positive for West Nile Virus.

source:
————————

Fish & Game News:

Second Super Hunt entry deadline is Aug.10

Tuesday, July 30, 2019

Last Chance for Second Super Hunt Drawing

Saturday, Aug. 10 is the deadline to enter to win the hunt of a lifetime in the second Super Hunt drawing of 2019. Tags for two elk, two deer, two pronghorn hunts, and one moose hunt will be drawn, as well as a “Super Hunt Comb” that will entitle the winner to hunt for all four species – elk, deer, pronghorn, and moose.

Super Hunt entries are $6 each and Super Hunt Combo entries are $20 each. No hunting license is required for residents or nonresidents to enter a Super Hunt, and there is no limit on the number of times a person can apply. Hunters may enter the drawings at any Fish and Game office, license vendors, by phone at (800)-554-8685, or online at idfg.idaho.gov

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

F&G seeks public comment on proposed sage-grouse hunting season

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, July 31, 2019

Population counts are down which could mean more restrictive seasons

Idaho Fish and Game officials are asking hunters and other interested parties to review and comment on a proposed sage-grouse hunting season for 2019. Deadline to comment is Aug. 19.

Statewide, sage-grouse lek counts indicate a 25-percent decline in males at leks in spring 2019, compared to 2018. Data indicates that most sage grouse populations can be hunted at the “Restrictive” level, as defined in the 2006 Conservation Plan for the greater sage grouse in Idaho. However, Fish and Game data also calls for caution in some areas north of the Snake River and in part of Owyhee County.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

F&G commission approves proposed rules to be forwarded to the legislature

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Monday, July 29, 2019

During a meeting in Salmon on July 25, the Idaho Fish and Game Commission voted to adopt four proposed rules and received an update about the progress of negotiated rulemaking regarding changing gear requirements on snares for gray wolf trapping.

The commission adopted the following proposed rules, which will now be published in the Idaho Administrative Bulletin for an additional period of public comment, and will have to be approved by the Legislature during its next session to become final rules.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Officer trying to rescue kitten finds a bobcat instead

by Associated Press Tuesday, July 30th 2019


(Matt Callahan/Stratham Police Department via AP)

Stratham, N.H. (AP) — A New Hampshire police officer says the kitten he was trying to pick up in a parking lot turned out to be a bobcat, which then jumped onto the roof of a Burger King.

Stratham Officer Matt Callahan tells Seacoastonline.com he was on patrol Saturday and saw the “kitten” run under a car. It eventually climbed a tree near the restaurant.

Once Callahan realized he was dealing with a young bobcat, he called state Fish and Game officers.

continued w/more photos:
—————————–

Seasonal Humor:

FestTouristTrap-a
————————

Harmonica Festival – Boil Water Advisory

Harmonica Festival – Boil Water Advisory

Hello Yellow Pine,

In anticipation of the Harmonica Festival, I thought it appropriate to make sure everyone was on the same page regarding the Boil Water Advisory. Since its unfortunately still in place, efforts must be made to assure that everyone who might drink water from the system is advised of the circumstances. Posting notifications at places where the public will be using water is necessary and required by DEQ rule. A copy of the original notification is attached if needed.
– Warren Drake

link to notice:
————————

July 28, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

July 28, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: The boil water order and water restrictions are still in effect.

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire Training
May 10 – Burn “permits” required
May 15 – Firewood Season opens
July 22 – Daytime closures on So. Fk road begin
Aug 10 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall
Sept 14 – 10am YPFD meeting at the Fire Hall budget meeting
Sept 14 – Ride to Cinnabar
Sept 21 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall

(details below)
———-

Local Events:

2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine. link:
———-

Village News:

“If it’s yellow let it mellow; if it’s brown flush it down.”

Tips for conserving water during fest weekend

Remember we are under a boil water order until further notice. Pass the word to visitors.

No outside watering, this means no car washes or spraying off decks either. No filling of visitors camper’s water tanks!

Avoid doing laundry, running a dishwasher or showering. Do not leave the water running while brushing teeth or washing dishes.

If we all conserve as much as possible, we can avoid running the village out of water.
— — — —

Power Outage

Idaho Power planned a maintenance outage on Thursday, July 25th, the power was off from 805am to 1230pm.
— — — —

Progress at the Heli-Pad

20190725_HeliPad1-a

Volunteers working hard on the helicopter landing pad

20190727_HeliPad5-a

Building a cement landing pad for Life Flight.
— — — —

Wally and Roberta Cory

Wally and Roberta celebrated their 60th Wedding Anniversary at the YP Tavern

20190721WallyRobertaAnniversary-a

link to Tavern’s FB photo gallery:
— — — —

Wilbur Wiles Remembered

There was large turnout for the celebration of life for Wilbur Wiles at the Big Creek Lodge on July 27th. Lunch catered by The Corner.

20190727BCWilburWilesRIP-a
photo courtesy Scott A
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Sunday (July 28) the dumpsters are about 3/4 full (they were 1/2 full on Friday.) The road to the dump has been dust abated.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
— — — —

Roads

South Fork
Starting July 22 the South Fork road will be closed Monday through Friday from 7am to 4pm on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends.
More info:
Map w/info:

YP to Stibnite Road
Update from Midas July 18: The road is still closed Monday through Thursday and open Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Good progress is being made, but it is likely that we still have a few weeks of work ahead.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

June 1st started the 6-day a week mail delivery. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
— — — —

Wasp Season

Long legged wasps are out, invading sheds and seeking to come indoors.

Have not had a report of ticks since the hot dry weather arrived.
— — — —

Reminder for people living in bear country:

* Garbage should be stored inside the house or in a secure garage or storage building.
* If garbage cannot be stored in a secure location, a bear-resistant container approved by the Interagency Bear Committee is recommended.
* Avoid using bird feeders from March through November. Birds do not need supplemental feeding this time of year.
* Pet food should not be left outside.
* BBQ grills or anything with a strong odor should not be left out at night.
* Protect gardens, beehives, and compost piles with electric fencing.
* Never intentionally feed bears. A food-conditioned bear may pose a threat to human safety and usually results in the removal of the bear.
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Water Update July 25:

On July 19th a crew from Idaho rural water came in and found a substantial leak on the east side of the east fork bridge. We are currently looking for a good time to shut the water down to town to make the repairs. It will definitely be after harmonica but seeing we will be shutting down the town, we want to be prepared. We are still on a boil order due to the large capacity of water lost and low chlorine contact time. We still request that everyone conserves water by not watering lawns because we are borderline to running the town out of water.
– Steve H YPWUA

Water Update June 7:

1. The “boil order” is still in effect.
2. There is still large water leaks in the system. We continue to look.
3. A grant for $39,000 was approved for improvements to the system.
3. Work is currently being done on the new contact tank.
4. Please, no lawn watering until we find and repair the major leaks.
– Steve Holloway

The yearly Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th at 10am in the community hall.

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19.pdf

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx
— — — —

VYPA News:

Next meeting August 10th 2pm at the Community Hall

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes July 20, 2019
link to: 20190720 Yellow Pine Village Association Minutes.docx

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for June 8, 2019
link to: 20190608 Village of Yellow Pine Association.rtf

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 8th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th – 2pm at the Community Hall.

Yellow Pine Harmonica Meetings 2019:

July 27, 2019 Saturday 2pm at the Community Hall
— — — —

YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

Link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation.doc

Next Meeting Sept 14 at 10am YPFD meeting in the Fire Hall

Last meeting July 13 – minutes forthcoming.

YPFD June 16, 2019 Meeting minutes
link to: 20190615 YPFD Meeting Notes_Final

Meetings will be held at the fire station at 10am and everyone is welcome to attend. June 15th; July 13th; and Sept 14th (which will also be the budget meeting as well).

Every Sunday 11am – Training

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Training: Sunday Fire/EMS training has begun. Sundays at 11:00 AM unless otherwise posted. If Jeff F is in town the trainings will be held. All are welcome.

YP Helispot: We are working with Valley County Road Department and the Boise National Forest for the rock base for the road leading into the Helispot and the actual Helispot itself. We are also receiving rock for the Fire Hydrants, water tank foundations, etc. The rock will come from the Valdez pit and will be less expensive than having it trucked in from Cascade.

Stop the Bleed Course: This course was well attended in the Fall and Jeff F and Ann F will be presenting another course when the new instructor material comes out. There are “Stop The Bleed” kits at the Tavern in an emergency.

Siren Testing: The YPFD siren will be tested only once this year on the first of May at noon. 3 blasts of the siren is a test, more than 3 is an Emergency.

-JF
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Call for reservations
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Our hours will be 11-8 every day, except closed on Tuesdays. We are open for breakfast by request and always have good coffee starting at 6am.
The Corner has firewood permits in stock now. 4 cord minimum at $6.25 per cord. Please bring drivers license and cash is preferred, no CC.
The Corner Store will also be open with snacks, groceries, fresh produce, soda, ice and packaged beer. If you know you will be coming in over the summer and need special grocery orders, let me know and I will order it in for you while you are here, 2 deliveries a week. The best way to get a hold of me is to call or stop by and say hello.
Karaoke is back at The Corner! Choose your favorite songs from our online music library and entertain your friends up on stage through our professional sound system.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Summer Hours Daily 8am to Close
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
Website:
Link to FB page:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
Link to website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (July 22) stayed warm overnight, the low of 51F was recorded Sunday morning, mostly cloudy sky this morning and humid. Morning air and street traffic (noisy and dusty.) A few swallows calling. Dark clouds and a few drops of rain just before noon, not enough to wet anything. Decreasing clouds after lunch and warming up. Hot and mostly clear mid-afternoon, high of 95 degrees. Extra traffic thru the neighborhood most of the afternoon and very dusty. Still hot this evening before sunset, smoky/dusty haze in the air. Starting to cool off a little after sun down, mostly clear. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Tuesday (July 23) overnight low of 54 degrees, warming up quickly and mostly clear sky this morning. Finches and pine siskins visiting, tree swallows swooping and calling. Sounds like they are working on the crusher above the village. Lots of young columbian ground squirrels running about. Cloudy before lunch time, and not too hot yet. Dark clouds, occasional drop of rain and moderate temperatures mid-afternoon, high of 84 degrees. Cloudy and normal temperatures late afternoon. About a 30 minute light rain shower early evening, settled the dust and good air quality. Quiet evening. Overcast sky at dusk. Cloudy before midnight.

Wednesday (July 24) overnight low of 53 degrees, warming up quickly under clear sky and strong sunshine this morning. Finches, pine siskins and swallows calling. Lots of clanging and banging up on the hill at the gravel site, hazy air. Partly cloudy and warm mid-day, light breeze. Light traffic this afternoon. Clear sky and warm mid-afternoon, light breezes, high of 86 degrees. OHVs traveling at excessive speed down the hill on main street. Warm evening, breeze died down and skeeters out in droves.

Thursday (July 25) overnight low of 40 degrees, clear sky this morning. Planned power outage started at 805am. Tree swallows, an olive-sided fly catcher, finches and pine skiskins calling. Noisy morning: air and road traffic, generators and crusher. Clear and light breeze mid-day. Power on at 1230pm. Water pressure a bit low. Large low jet flew over at 149pm. Traffic and dust early afternoon, heavy equipment working. Clear, hot and light breeze mid-afternoon, high of 91 degrees. High wispy clouds over most of the sky by evening, warm and slight breeze. Lots of skeeters. Cooling off after dark.

Friday (July 26) overnight low of 43 degrees, mostly high thin wispy clouds and a nice breeze this morning. Northern flicker, swallows, finches and pine siskins calling, calliope hummingbird visiting. Extra traffic and dust in the neighborhood. Overcast before lunch time, clouds keeping temperatures down. Olive-sided flycatcher sounding off from the forest, ground squirrels not as active in the heat. Partly clear and hot mid-afternoon, high of 93 degrees. Warm evening, nearly calm and lots of skeeters out at sunset. Mostly cloudy at dusk, rose colored clouds to the west.

Saturday (July 27) overnight low of 51 degrees, clear sky and warming up fast this morning. A few noisy airplanes turning over the village, light morning traffic and haze of dust in the air. Mostly cloudy and breezy after lunch. Water pressure down a bit. Hot and mostly clear mid-afternoon and gusty breezes, high of 90 degrees. Haze of smoke to the west, reduced air quality. Breezy evening. Clear, warm and lighter breezes after sunset, skeeters coming out. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Sunday (July 28) overnight low of 46 degrees, clear sky this morning. A few noisy airplanes turning over the village, increased road traffic and dust. Swallows, finches and pine siskins calling. Ground squirrels active. Pretty warm mid day, dusty air. Hot by mid-afternoon, a few small clouds and light breezes, high of 91 degrees. Clear, warm and a bit of haze in the air before sunset. Seems like there are fewer swallows and song birds around, but plenty of columbian ground squirrels. Folks are starting to camp on the golf course.
————————–

RIP:

John F. Lance
died February 15, 2019
Ashes to be scattered in Yellow Pine August 4, 2019
— — — — — — — — — —

Ron “The Sugar Mountain Strangler” Erickson
June 22, 1948 – July 13, 2019
Memorial video link:
———————–

Idaho News:

Brake Dancing

Lick Creek Rd. homeowners thrilled with new radar speed signs

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News July 25, 2019

Blake Hanks is thankful speed limit radar signs were installed earlier this month on Lick Creek Road by the City of McCall, but he also had a backup plan in place to deter speeding cars.

“Until we got the signs, I was going to sit out here in a chair and use a hair dryer as a radar gun,” said Hanks, who has lived on Lick Creek Road for seven years.

One of the new signs was placed near Davis Avenue to face eastbound cars and another was placed near Spring Mountain Boulevard to face westbound cars.

So far, the two signs have made a drastic difference along the long, straight stretch of road with a speed limit of 25 miles per hour, Hanks said.

“To us that live here, I think you’d call it night and day,” said Hanks, 68. “It’s not that ‘pick up and race down the street’ anymore.”

Hanks began campaigning for the signs to be installed on the street last summer amid worries that speeding traffic would kill one of the many pedestrians and cyclists that frequent the road.

… Other residents along Lick Creek Road have also noticed fewer speeding cars since the signs were installed.

“Before, they used to drive like 50 miles an hour down this street,” said David Beckman, 65, a Lick Creek Road resident of 18 years. “I’ve been looking forward to (the signs) for a long time.”

Beckman still sees speeding cars pass by, but not as fast or as frequently. Beckman knows how dangerous speeding can be after having two dogs hit and seeing multiple deer killed by speeding cars on the road.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Warren Wagon rebuild on track for October completion

$9.9 million project will rehab 5.5 miles of road

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News July 25, 2019

Work on a two-year, $9.9 million reconstruction of Warren Wagon Road remains on schedule to wrap up by the end of the October.

Daily road closures from 8 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday will likely remain in place until work is complete, said Cody Brown, a spokesperson for M.A. DeAtley Construction of Clarkston, Washington, the general contractor for the federally-funded project.

Barricade locations change daily throughout the 5.5-mile project zone, which begins 2.2 miles north of West Lake Street (Idaho 55) and extends to the intersection of Warren Wagon Road and Eastside Drive.

Motorists will continue to be forced to detour around Payette Lake via Eastside Drive, which the Valley County Road Department has performed extra maintenance on this year to account for increased traffic.

Since work resumed on May 7, crews have focused on widening some sections of roadway, installing new drainage culverts and stabilizing land below the roadway to prep for paving work, Brown said.

Base layer paving is expected to begin on Aug. 12 moving from north to south and is expected to take about two weeks, before final paving work begins moving south to north, he said.

Final paving is expected to be complete around Sept. 20. Crews will then transition to striping the new roadway and installing guard rails and new signs, Brown said.

Once complete, Warren Wagon Road will have new pavement, guard rails along some sections and shoulders between three and four feet wide on either side to accommodate bicyclists.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Semi rolls on Highway 55 near McCall, traffic clear

by CBS 2 News Staff Friday, July 26th 2019

McCall, Idaho (CBS 2) — A semi rolled onto its side on H-55 mp 140, near McCall and was blocking northbound traffic according to Valley County dispatch.

The incident was reported at 1:06 p.m. Friday.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Housing survey needs wide response

The Star-News July 25, 2019

A survey designed to gauge how local employees view housing in Valley and Adams counties deserves a few minutes of everyone’s time.

The 21-question survey, posted by the West Central Mountains Economic Development Council, aims to capture how secure employees feel with their current and future housing and whether the type, size, price and location of housing meets their needs. The target audience for the survey is people who live and work locally, but it is also open to business owners and employers. Breaking down responses by industry and income level will help surveyors identify housing needs specific to different segments of the workforce.

The survey will provide a thorough, regional accounting of perspectives from real people. Local government can use the data to tweak their housing policies, but the real value will be to private developers to tell them what kinds of housing projects people would want to live in and how much they would be willing to pay.

But the survey is only valid if enough people take it to be a true representation of the community. So open up that browser and go to (link):
——————————-

Letter to Share:

Americans Deserve Real Data Privacy

By U.S. Senator Mike Crapo July 15, 2019

Over the last decade, we have experienced a digital revolution that sees people using the Internet to manage more of their daily lives. Mobile applications, social media and search engines have become everyday tools, but their usage is accompanied by a shocking amount of hidden data collection without individuals’ knowledge or consent. A report from Cracked Labs on corporate surveillance notes “the behaviors, movements, social relationships, interests, weaknesses and most private moments of billions are now constantly recorded, evaluated and analyzed in real-time . . .” We need to balance maintaining America’s lead on the digital front while protecting our individual liberties and personal privacy.

Companies are collecting, processing, analyzing and sharing considerable data on individuals for all kinds of purposes. Data brokers play a central role in gathering vast amounts of personal information—many times without ever interacting with individuals—from a wide range of public and private sources, which is then sold or shared with others. The previously mentioned report broadly outlines examples of the information data brokers collect on individuals: “The profiles . . . include not only information about education, occupation, children, religion, ethnicity, political views, activities, interests and media usage, but also about someone’s online behaviors such as web searches. Data brokers also calculate scores that predict an individual’s possible future behavior, with regard to, for example, someone’s economic stability or plans to have a baby or to change jobs.” Companies will argue that this data is needed in order to provide customized, free services, but consumers will just as rightly argue that they were never fully informed of such data collection, nor consented to it.

continued:
—————————–

Scam Alerts:

‘Jury Duty’ Scam

Valley County Sheriff’s Office July 23, 2019

We have received several phone calls over the last hour asking if we have certain individuals working for the Sheriff’s Office. Several citizens in Valley County have gotten phone calls from “so-called” employees claiming that they have missed jury duty or some type of legal action against them is imminent. This is a scam, please do not give out any of your personal information or verify any personal data.
— — — — — — — — — —

Have you been hit with a Social Security scam call? Feds say it’s a growing problem

The Federal Trade Commission says complaints increased tenfold from 2017 to 2018.

Morgan Romero July 19, 2019 KTVB

Here’s a scenario that might sound familiar: a number that looks a lot like yours is calling, or maybe your caller ID says it’s the government ringing you.

So, you pick it up and on the other end, a recording says your Social Security number or benefits are suspended.

If that does sound familiar, you should know it’s the latest version of a government impostor scam – a common form of fraud in which scammers act as government officials and try to get you to give up personal and financial information or money.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Prime day is past, but scams are just starting

Jul 22, 2019 By Natasha Williams KIVI TV

Amazon Prime Day is officially behind us, but experts say around 175 million items are now in the mail from all those orders!

With the onslaught of deliveries comes an onslaught of scams. Officials say the bad guys will pose as the post office, UPS, or Fed Ex, saying there’s a problem with your delivery. They’ll send you a text, an email, or will call you as a way to get your personal information.

continued:
—————————-

Tips & Advice:

Prepare for Fire Season

If you live in an area where the wildfire risk is high, take steps now to prepare for fire season. Being prepared for fire season is especially important for the health of children, older adults, and people with heart or lung disease.

continued (pdf):
— —

Evacuation Levels: What They Mean

Level 1 (Be Ready): You should be aware that a danger, such as a wildfire, exists near you. Officials recommend that you prepare to be evacuated. This includes packing essential items, water food and needed medications.

Level 2 (Get Set): There is a high risk of danger to you and your property and officials say you should be ready to evacuate at a moment’s notice.

Level 3 (Go Now): Officials say you should evacuate immediately. The danger to you and your property is imminent.

More detailed information about these levels can be found at this U.S. Forest Service page here.
— — — — — — — — — —

Heat Safety Tips and Resources

Warning Signs and Symptoms of Heat-Related Illness

link (image):
———————-

Fire Season:

Shady Fire
Salmon-Challis National Forest
Two (2) miles east of Seafoam Guard Station in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Middle Fork Ranger District.
InciWeb:

Canyon Fire
Boise National Forest
14 miles west of Stanley, Idaho
InciWeb:

Vader Fire
Salmon-Challis National Forest
14 miles northwest of Stanley, south of Highway 21 on the Middle Fork Ranger District.
InciWeb:

2 Idaho News
To keep you updated, safe and in the know, this page will provide the very latest news and updates throughout the summer. link:

NIFC:

Idaho Fires: 6 Acres: 126,611 New: 0 Contained: 1
Canyon Boise National Forest BLM 324 80 14 miles west of Stanley 208-373-4105
Lookout Point Twin Falls District BLM 9,432 50 16 miles northwest of Murphy
Shady Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 2,500 0 21 miles north of Stanley 208-756-7853
Sheep Idaho National Laboratory DOE 113,612 95 10 miles south of Mud Lake
Vader Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 443 88 12 miles west of Stanley 208-756-7853
Waterfall Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 300 0 37 miles west of Salmon
Marys Boise District BLM 182 100 15 miles northeast of Riddle

— — — — — — — — — —

Employees evacuated as 6,500-acre wildfire burns on Idaho National Lab site

The blaze, dubbed the Sheep Fire, started Monday with a lightning strike.

KTVB July 23, 2019

Idaho Falls, Idaho — Crews are working to contain a wildfire burning on the Idaho National Laboratory site near Idaho Falls.

The blaze, dubbed the Sheep Fire, started Monday evening with a lightning strike, according to the Bureau of Land Management. The area where it is burning is south of Highway 33 and north of Highway 20.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Shady Fire grows to 2,681 acres 16 days after starting

by CBS 2 News Staff Friday, July 26th 2019

Shady Fire activity increased Thursday, growing to 2,681 acres after starting in the Salmon-Challis Forest 16 days ago on July 10.

The fire was active in the bottom of the Shady Creek drainage burning to the north. The fire is established in Shady and Casto Creeks, in an unnamed drainage east of Casto Creek, and in unnamed drainage north of Silver Creek and west of Shady Creek.

continued w/video:
— — — — — — — — — —

Highway 75 near Shoshone closed due to brush fire

by CBS 2 News Staff Tuesday, July 23rd 2019

Shoshone, Idaho (CBS 2) — A fast-moving brush fire near Shoshone has forced fire crews to shut down a stretch of Highway 75.

The Bureau of Land Management says Highway 75 has been closed north of Shoshone for fire suppression operations. The closure is between Highway 26 and 520 North Road about three miles north of town.

The BLM says the Lava fire has burned more than 500 acres about three miles north of Shoshone, and is growing quickly from west to east.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Lightning strikes spark six fires in Malheur County

An overnight thunderstorm in eastern Oregon set a half-dozen new wildfire starts.

KTVB July 23, 2019

Malheur County, Ore. — An overnight thunderstorm in eastern Oregon set a half-dozen new wildfire starts.

Vale Bureau of Land Management said Tuesday morning that crews were either already fighting or en route to at least six fires in Malheur County. All were sparked by lightning strikes: “the number one cause of wildfires on the BLM Vale District,” according to officials.

continued:
————————-

Public Lands:

South Fork Salmon River Road Rehabilitation Project Update

USDA Forest Service Region 4 Payette

The road closure will be in place Monday through Friday from 7:00 a.m. to 4:00 pm daily, with no closures over the weekends.

July 22-26 Newsletter.pdf

link (pdf):
— — — — — — — — — —

Outbreak of tree damaging caterpillar peaking in the Sage Hen area

Boise, Idaho, July 25, 2019 –The Boise National Forest is experiencing another outbreak of Douglas-fir tussock moths/caterpillars in and around Sage Hen Reservoir, a popular recreation area located 5 miles west of Smiths Ferry and forest visitors are reminded not to touch or pick it up.

The moth’s tree-damaging caterpillar has long bristly hairs that may cause allergic-like reactions for some individuals. A rash called tussockosis can persist from a few hours to several weeks. Individuals do not have to come in contact with the caterpillar to be effected as the hairs may be airborne. Reactions can worsen with exposure and can compromise airways for some individuals.

Tussock moth population began to increase in 2016 following with outbreaks typically lasting 3-4 years and subside when natural enemies such as a virus specific to the caterpillars and non-stinging parasitic wasps that kill the caterpillars. This year is expected to be the last year of the outbreak and caterpillar populations should crash by the end of August.

Defoliation is now visible and looks like reddish half-chewed needles and tends to be worse in the tops of trees. While the trees may look dead because the caterpillars feed on the needles, they are not, and should not be cut for fuelwood. If trees have any green needles, please do not cut.

Options for control are somewhat limited over a large areas. Dense stands of trees are impacted more severely than more open stands. Dry sites, ridges and dense stands tend to have more damage because trees have less water to recover from feeding damage. For more information:
— — — — — — — — — —

Decision signed for West Side Divide – Cottonwood Project

Dear Interested Party:

Forest Supervisor Cecilia Seesholtz has signed the decision for the Cottonwood Project located on the Emmett Ranger District of the Boise National Forest. A copy of the Decision Memo can be found on the Cottonwood project webpage (see the Decision tab).

Thank you for your interest in this project. If you have any questions, please direct them to Deb Lozinski, Project Leader, at 208-365-7019.

Sincerely, Tera Little (208-373-4157)
—————————-

Mining News:

Canada mine waste prompts calls for better water protection

7/22/19 AP

Towns, tribes and politicians in U.S. states bordering British Columbia are seeking better oversight and stricter regulations to protect them from hazardous pollution that flow downstream from coal mines in the Canadian province.

Leaders in Libby, Troy and Eureka, towns along the Kootenai River, wrote in separate letters to Montana Gov. Steve Bullock saying their livelihoods depend on the region’s rivers and lakes. But those waterways that support diverse wildlife and recreational interests are being compromised by contaminants from British Columbia coal mines, they said.

They and tribal leaders in Montana and Idaho want state and federal officials to fund better long-term water quality monitoring and to adopt a strict water quality standard for selenium.

continued:
————————-

Critter News:

Pet Talk – When A Pet doesn’t have Testes

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt July 26, 2019

“Crypt” is a Latin word for hidden. “Orchid” is the Latin word for testicle. “Crypt orchid” is a failure of one or both testes to descend into the scrotum; descent usually occurs within six to eight weeks after birth but may take as long as six months. The undescended testicle may be located within the inguinal canal, called the groin, or in the abdominal cavity. Cryptorchidism usually involves only one testicle and is more likely to affect the right side. A testicle that is not in the proper location is termed an ectopic testis. This is a congenital anomaly that has a reported incidence of approximately 5 percent in dogs and 2 percent in cats. The anomaly is thought to be a trait that can be inherited. Small-breed dogs are more likely to have this problem.

There are usually no signs directly related to the retained testicle. Retained testicles are prone to tumor formation because of the increased temperature inside the abdomen compared to the temperature in the scrotal sac. Dogs with the retained testicle are 14 times more likely to develop a testicular tumor.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Humane Society in need of cat food, blankets

The shelter is also in need of blankets for dogs.

KTVB July 25, 2019

Boise, Idaho — The Idaho Humane Society says they’re running low on small bags of dry cat food for their pet food pantry.

That pantry is used by those facing economic hardships, other animal non-profits and Meals on Wheels, which, in addition to delivering human food, also delivers pet food to homebound seniors.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Cat calls BFD for own ‘rescue’ at the Idaho Humane Society

by Ryan L Morrison Friday, July 26th 2019

Cats and firefighters have always had a special bond and that was put to the test today after a cat pulled a fire alarm at the Idaho Humane Society.

“We hadn’t scheduled a drill, so we were all scratching our heads wondering what was happening,” said the IHS. “There was a faint smell of smoke hovering in the air, but we couldn’t be sure that it wasn’t smoke floating in from wildfires burning outside of the Treasure Valley.”

Firefighters arrived on scene and cleared the facility. CBS 2 reached out to the IHS about whether or not there was a fire, though we haven’t heard back.

The staff eventually discovered that the alarm had been triggered in a unique place: the cat holding room.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise City Council member proposes change to city animal code

Jul 22, 2019 By Anna Silver KIVI TV

Boise city council member, TJ Thomson considers himself an animal lover. He is asking his fellow council members to join him in supporting a proposed change to the City of Boise’s animal code that he says is outdated.

“I’m no different than anyone else. Our city has consistently been shown one of the top dog loving cities in all of America,”said Thomson.

He says the Humane Society has to rely on Idaho code. He wants to change the definition of animal cruelty to include common sense practices which currently aren’t in the code.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wolf pack kills calves in southeast Washington

by Brian Morrin Saturday, July 27th 2019 Idaho News 2

Washington wildlife officials say wolves have killed two calves in southeast Washington in the past two and a half weeks.

Data from a collared wolf shows the wolves are part of the Grouse Flats Wolf Pack.

Washington Fish and Game policy says the department will consider killing two wolves after four attacks on livestock in ten months, or three attacks in thirty days.

Washington Fish and Game officers have never killed a wolf in the southeast part of the state.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Moose on the loose in Nampa caught, relocated to mountains

“Well that’s not the typical cow call we handle here in Nampa,” the department posted on Twitter.

KTVB July 23, 2019

Nampa, Idaho — A young female moose is on a journey to a new home – this time, one a little farther from the City of Nampa’s neighborhoods and cul-de-sacs.

The moose caused a stir early Tuesday morning, when a resident spotted her in town and dialed police.

… Nampa officers were eventually able to corral the large creature in someone’s backyard, and called in the Idaho Department of Fish and Game to tranquilize her.

continued w/video and more photos:
— — — — — — — — — —

Rabid bat found near Red Fish Lake

Jul 25, 2019 Local News 8

Custer County, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – A rabid bat has been identified in Custer County near Red Fish Lake.

This is the first rabid bat located in Public Health District 7 so far this season and the third in the state.

While most bats are harmless and do not carry rabies, they are the only animal in Idaho that is a natural reservoir for the virus. Rabies is a fatal viral illness in humans and other animals.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Empty Nester: Osprey nest on crane at McCall home site found to be not used

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 25, 2019

The appearance of an osprey nest on a construction crane on Payette Lake this summer caused a flurry of calls to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

However, the nest was found to be empty and there were no delays to the home being built at 305 W. Lake St.

Several weeks ago, ospreys began constructing a stick nest on the horizontal arm of the crane, Fish and Game Regional Wildlife Biologist Diane Evans Mack said.

The crane had been sitting idle for about two weeks, which allowed the birds time to construct the nest, Evans Mack said.

Ospreys and their active nests are protected under the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Beekeepers scramble after truck hauling beehives goes off road

by CBS 2 News Staff Tuesday, July 23rd 2019

Dubois, Idaho (CBS 2) — Beekeepers scrambled to gather up bees after a truck carrying beehives went off the road.

The truck carrying the hives was forced off the road when a grain hauler, trying to pass another car, went back into the other lane.

Beekeepers were able to contain the bees and get them back on their journey according to Idaho State Police.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

“Mormon crickets” invade Franklin County

By Max Cohan Jul 23, 2019 Local News 8

Dayton, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Over the past several weeks, “Mormon crickets” have been causing quite the stir in parts of southern Idaho.

Millions of shield-backed katydids have made their way down from the mountains of the Bannock Range and invaded towns in Franklin County.

continued:
———————-

Fish & Game News:

Newly deployed game cameras will improve statewide wolf population estimates

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Monday, July 22, 2019

New survey methods will help produce the first estimate of total wolf numbers since 2015

How many wolves are on the landscape in Idaho? That’s an often-asked question that Idaho Fish and Game is aiming to answer using game cameras during a new statewide population monitoring program.

In recent months, Fish and Game staff have deployed over 800 game cameras in a high-density grid throughout the state, which will take millions of pictures. When Fish and Game staff collect the cameras at the end of September, researchers will download and analyze the photos and apply statistical modeling to estimate the population.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Hunters must buy controlled hunt tags by Aug. 1, or tags will be forfeited

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Monday, July 22, 2019

It’s the hunters’ responsibility to check if they drew and buy the controlled hunt tags no later than Aug. 1

Big game hunters who were successful in drawing controlled hunt tags for deer, elk, pronghorn, and black bear have until midnight Mountain Daylight Time Aug. 1 to buy their tags.

Tags may be purchased at any Fish and Game office, license vendor, by telephone at (800-554-8685), or online. Controlled hunt tags not purchased by Aug. 1, excluding unlimited tags, will be forfeited and combined with controlled hunt tags no one applied for and made available in a second drawing.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Artificial beaver dams rebuild Boise streams

by Axel Quartarone Wednesday, July 24th 2019 Idaho News 2

Idaho Fish and Game have implemented a project on the Boise River Wildlife Management Area in order to restore stream bed and riparian zones near Lucky Peak reservoir that were damaged during the 2016 Mile Marker 14 fire. The project uses beaver dam analogs which is an artificial beaver dam that uses wooden posts and surrounding vegetation to help stream bed health through increasing wet zone areas.

This means the stream bed is widened by slowing flow and spreading it across a greater area. The goal of the project is to help increase riparian zones and provide more resources for local wildlife to thrive. Idaho Fish and Game has also implemented this strategy on streams in the Owyhees mountains.

link to video:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

German firefighters rescue squirrel stuck in manhole cover

by Associated Press Friday, June 21st 2019


In this Thursday, June 20, 2019 photo provided by the fire department a squirrel is stuck in a gully cover in Dortmund, Germany. (Feuerwehr Dortmund/dpa via AP)

Berlin (AP) — Firefighters, police and a veterinary clinic combined forces to rescue a red squirrel that had gotten its tiny head stuck in a manhole cover in the western German city of Dortmund.

Dortmund’s fire department said Friday they responded Thursday morning to a call about the rodent in peril on a street next to a downtown park.

When rescuers arrived, they spotted the tufted-eared squirrel’s head poking out of a hole in the cover. Initial attempts to free the animal were unsuccessful, so the entire manhole cover was removed and taken to a nearby veterinary clinic, while police were called in to guard the open sewer.

Vets used anesthetic to calm the squirrel and then freed the animal. It was treated for superficial neck wounds and is expected to soon be released back into the wild.

source:
———————

Seasonal Humor:

AshesSpread-a


———————–

July 21, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

July 21, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: The boil water order and water restrictions are still in effect.
July 22 – Daytime closures on So. Fk road begin
July 25 – 8am – noon planned power outage
———————-

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire Training
May 10 – Burn “permits” required
May 15 – Firewood Season opens
July 22 – Daytime closures on So. Fk road begin
July 25 – 8am – noon planned power outage
July 27 – Festival meeting Saturday 2pm at the Community Hall
July 27 – 12pm Memorial and potluck for Wilbur Wiles in Big Creek
Aug 10 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall
Sept 14 – 10am YPFD meeting at the Fire Hall budget meeting
Sept 14 – Ride to Cinnabar
Sept 21 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall

(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Celebration of Life – Wilbur Wiles July 27

Celebration at Big Creek lodge July 27th at noon. Lunch catered by The Corner.
— — — —

2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine. link:
———-

Village News:

Power Outages

Idaho Power will have a maintenance power outage on Thursday, July 25th from 8am – noon.

The power went off at 417pm July 14, back on at 917am July 15 – off a total of 17 hours. Then power went off again at 243pm July 15 until 617pm – a total of 3 hours and 31 minutes. Wednesday (July 17) power blipped off and on some time before 250pm.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
— — — —

Roads

Johnson Creek
July 24th dust abatement will be applied to Johnson Creek from Wapiti Meadow Ranch to Yellow Pine.

South Fork
Starting Monday, July 22, the South Fork road will be closed Monday through Friday from 7am to 4pm on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends.
More info:
Map w/info:

YP to Stibnite Road
Update from Midas July 18: The road is still closed Monday through Thursday and open Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Good progress is being made, but it is likely that we still have a few weeks of work ahead.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

June 1st started the 6-day a week mail delivery. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
— — — —

Wasp Season

Long legged wasps are out, invading sheds and seeing to come indoors.

Have not had a report of ticks since the hot dry weather arrived.
— — — —

Reminder for people living in bear country:

* Garbage should be stored inside the house or in a secure garage or storage building.
* If garbage cannot be stored in a secure location, a bear-resistant container approved by the Interagency Bear Committee is recommended.
* Avoid using bird feeders from March through November. Birds do not need supplemental feeding this time of year.
* Pet food should not be left outside.
* BBQ grills or anything with a strong odor should not be left out at night.
* Protect gardens, beehives, and compost piles with electric fencing.
* Never intentionally feed bears. A food-conditioned bear may pose a threat to human safety and usually results in the removal of the bear.
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Water Update July 5:

The Boil Order is still in effect.

Idaho Rural Water water will be in on the 19th to look for leaks. Water usage in town is in excess of 57,000 gallons per day. Some have been reminded of the No Lawn Watering request. If we get too much above the 60,000 gallons per day, the town is running the risk of draining the tanks and being out of water.

The yearly Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th at 10 am in the community hall. (no minutes yet)

Water Update June 7:

1. The “boil order” is still in effect.
2. There is still large water leaks in the system. We continue to look.
3. A grant for $39,000 was approved for improvements to the system.
3. Work is currently being done on the new contact tank.
4. Please, no lawn watering until we find and repair the major leaks.
– Steve Holloway

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19.pdf

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx
— — — —

VYPA News:

Next meeting August 10th 2pm at the Community Hall

Last meeting was July 20, 2019 – minutes forthcoming.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for June 8, 2019

link to: 20190608 Village of Yellow Pine Association Minutes

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 8th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th – 2pm at the Community Hall.

Last Yellow Pine Harmonica Meetings July 27, 2019 Saturday 2pm at the Community Hall
— — — —

YPFD News:

Next Meeting Sept 14 at 10am YPFD meeting in the Fire Hall

Last meeting July 13 – minutes forthcoming.

YPFD June 16, 2019 Meeting minutes

link to: 20190615 YPFD Meeting Notes_Final.docx

Meetings will be held at the fire station at 10am and everyone is welcome to attend. June 15th; July 13th; and Sept 14th (which will also be the budget meeting as well).

Every Sunday 11am – Training

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Training: Sunday Fire/EMS training has begun. Sundays at 11:00 AM unless otherwise posted. If Jeff F is in town the trainings will be held. All are welcome.

Safety Message: The best place to be during an avalanche, rock fall or a tree fall due to the wind is not there, please use extreme caution and common sense when conditions exist for these scenarios.

“If you are an Adventurist, please do not go out alone in steep areas. The spring thaw is an extremely dangerous time for Avalanches. The freezing and thawing create layers that break away from each other with the slightest disturbance. Scree fields are especially dangerous this time of year because of hidden ice that makes them even more unstable. Please be careful out there.”

YP Helispot: We are working with Valley County Road Department and the Boise National Forest for the rock base for the road leading into the Helispot and the actual Helispot itself. We are also receiving rock for the Fire Hydrants, water tank foundations, etc. The rock will come from the Valdez pit and will be less expensive than having it trucked in from Cascade.

Stop the Bleed Course: This course was well attended in the Fall and Jeff F and Ann F will be presenting another course when the new instructor material comes out. There are “Stop The Bleed” kits at the Tavern in an emergency.

Siren Testing: The YPFD siren will be tested only once this year on the first of May at noon. 3 blasts of the siren is a test, more than 3 is an Emergency.

-JF
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Call for reservations
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Our hours will be 11-8 every day, except closed on Tuesdays. We are open for breakfast by request and always have good coffee starting at 6am.
The Corner has firewood permits in stock now. 4 cord minimum at $6.25 per cord. Please bring drivers license and cash is preferred, no CC.
The Corner Store will also be open with snacks, groceries, fresh produce, soda, ice and packaged beer. If you know you will be coming in over the summer and need special grocery orders, let me know and I will order it in for you while you are here, 2 deliveries a week. The best way to get a hold of me is to call or stop by and say hello.
Karaoke is back at The Corner! Choose your favorite songs from our online music library and entertain your friends up on stage through our professional sound system.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Summer Hours Daily 8am to Close
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
Website:
Link to FB page:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
Link to website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (July 15) overnight low of 53 degrees, partly cloudy sky this morning. Early air traffic. Hummingbirds visiting. Power on at 917am (was off for a total of 17 hours.) Mother hairy woodpecker brought her baby, feeding it bits of suet. Increasing traffic before lunch time. Dark clouds and a rumble of thunder early afternoon. Power off again at 243pm (it had been on for 5 hours and 26 minutes today.) Cloudy and warm mid-afternoon, high of 84 degrees. Power back on at 614pm (off a total of 3 hours and 31 minutes this time.) Mostly cloudy this evening, warm, a bit muggy and slight breeze. A couple dozen juvenile tree swallows perched on the power line calling to the adults flying above. Lightning, thunder, gusty wind and rain at dusk, storm lasted about 20 minutes. Bright almost full moon before midnight.

Tuesday (July 16) overnight low of 48 degrees, low overcast this morning – top of VanMeter socked in. Tree swallows swooping and calling, mother hairy woodpecker w/juvenile and a few finches and pine siskins visiting. Gun shot on the golf course at 1154am. Breaks in the clouds mid-day, partly sunny and mild breezes. Quiet afternoon, very little traffic. Mostly cloudy, mild temperatures and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 81 degrees. Juvenile swallows flying around with the adults. Mostly clear and cooling off after sunset. Young swallows were going in and out of the old nest boxes or perching on top of them, then at dusk they were on the power line. Two does wandering down the side of the road at dusk, looking sleek (no fawns.) Mostly clear at dusk.

Wednesday (July 17) overnight low of 43 degrees, thin overcast sky this morning. Finches, pine siskins, tree swallows and a northern flicker calling. Pine and ground squirrels active. Mostly cloudy and mild temperatures mid-day. Light traffic. Power blipped off and on some time before 250pm. Mostly cloudy and a bit breezy mid-afternoon, high of 83 degrees. Northern flicker calling from various trees in the neighborhood. It was cooling off under mostly cloudy skies early this evening and breezy. Traffic kicking up dust in the neighborhood. After sundown it was partly clear and light breezes.

Thursday (July 18) overnight low of 51 degrees, mostly cloudy this morning. Heavy air traffic early, extra loud planes at 842am, and 920am. Increased traffic and dust in the neighborhood. A hummingbird, some finches and pine siskins visiting. Mostly cloudy mid-day and a little breezy. Young tree swallows landing on the birdhouses and begging for food. Mostly clear, breezy and mild temperatures mid-afternoon, high of 80 degrees. Lots of afternoon traffic (and dust.) Doe with spotted fawn in the neighborhood. YP Ambulance went by early evening, then Life flight landed at the new heli-pad at 730pm, took off at 750pm. Mostly clear and cooling off after sundown.

Friday (July 19) overnight low of 42 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning. Young pine squirrel sounding off from the edge of the forest, young swallows practicing flying, finches and pine siskins visiting. Light breezes, clear and mild temps mid-day, high of 79 degrees. Dusty air from increased traffic this afternoon and evening (loud dirt bike on main street.) Brown-headed cowbirds visiting early afternoon. Lots of juvenile ground squirrels out, appear to be gathering dried grasses for winter. Clear evening, light cool breeze. Red-breasted nuthatch and mama woodpecker with her baby visited after sunset. Clear and cool at dusk.

Saturday (July 20) overnight low of 37 degrees, clear sky this morning. It has been very dry this month, the forest floor is “crunchy”. Cassins finches, little pine siskins and a couple of cowbirds visiting, young pine squirrels calling, tree swallows swooping around catching bugs. Clear and mild mid-day. Calliope hummingbird stopped by. Warming up by mid-afternoon, clear and light breezes, high of 82 degrees. A few cowbirds visiting, later the mama hairy woodpecker and fledgling. Smoky sky to the south and haze of dust in the air this afternoon. Clear at dusk and cooling off. Saturn rising over the ridge to the south east just after dark.

Sunday (July 21) overnight low of 39 degrees, clear sky this morning. Quiet enough to hear the river before the traffic started. Lots of juvenile swallows perched on the power lines calling and adults flying around. Finches, pine siskins, steller jays and pine squirrel visiting. Clear and warm mid-day. Almost constant traffic all afternoon and dusty air. Mid-afternoon it was clear, hot, dry and light breeze, high of 93 degrees. Calliope hummingbird and red-breasted nuthatch visited. Warm mostly clear evening.
—————————

RIP:

Bud Tracy

Buddy Bruce Tracy, 77, of Reno, Nevada, formerly of Yellow Pine, passed away May 18, 2019 in Reno. A Memorial Graveside Service will be held at 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, July 24, 2019 at the Emmett Cemetery.

Published in Idaho Press Tribune on July 21, 2019
— — — — — — — — — —

Don Caward

December 23, 1940 ~ July 10, 2019

Donald Caward 78, of Cambridge, ID (formerly of Yellow Pine) passed away July 10, 2019. Cremation under the direction of Cremation Society of Idaho.

Published in Idaho Press Tribune on July 18, 2019
– — — — — — — — — —

Correction:

John Lance’s ashes will be scattered in Yellow Pine on Aug. 4, not Aug. 3.
——————————

Idaho News:

South Fork Salmon River Road to have closures for roadway rehabilitation project

by CBS 2 News Staff Thursday, July 18th 2019

McCall, Idaho (CBS 2) — The South Fork of the Salmon River Road rehabilitation project will begin July 22, 2019, and run through the 2020 field season, with a winter shutdown on the Boise and Payette National Forests.

The roadway is paved and in need of repairs to include the replacement of broken asphalt, surface drainage issues, and subgrade stability problems.

Beginning July 22, 2019, a point road closure will be in place Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Adams dispatchers step up to aid Valley County

911 staffers to take shifts in Cascade

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 18, 2019

Five of the six Adams County 911 dispatchers have said they are willing to help fill in at the critically understaffed Valley County Sheriff’s Office Dispatch, Valley County commissioners were told Monday.

Sheriff Patti Bolen also told commissioners that two dispatchers from elsewhere in Idaho, including one from Idaho County, have offered assistance if needed.

The added help means that Valley County will be able to maintain adequate 911 dispatch staff to keep the service running until permanent staff can be hired.

Dispatchers from Adams County will be paid their regular wage plus $2 per hour and travel expenses to make the 67-mile drive to the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade to fill shifts.

The assisting dispatchers will be hired as part time Valley County employees, she said.

Bolen and commissioners hope a long-term solution can be found to replace the stopgap measure of paying outside dispatchers. The proposed 2019-2020 county budget could see a 6% increase in 911 dispatcher pay, commissioners said.

A pay increase may help attract applicants, but the cost of housing in the area is an continuing concern, Bolen said.

“This is the third time since I’ve been sheriff, since 2005, that we’ve been in this position with dispatch,” Bolen said. “This is pretty critical.”

The starting wage for dispatchers in Valley County is $16.77 per hour, while starting dispatchers in Adams County earn $14.97 per hour.

The sheriff’s office is in the process of reviewing three applications for dispatchers. The department needs eight dispatchers to be fully staffed and will be down to one part time and three full time employees at the end of the month, Bolen said.

Valley County dispatch handles calls for the Valley County Sheriff’s Office, McCall Police Department, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Forest Service, Valley County Search and Rescue, and fire districts in McCall, Donnelly, Cascade and Yellow Pine.

In 2018, Valley County dispatch received about 35,000 calls, generating about 11,000 calls for service.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Hazards to watch out for on rivers in Idaho

Jul 15, 2019 By Steve Dent KIVI TV

Boise — This summer has already proven deadly on Idaho’s most popular rivers for recreating, with deaths reported on the Boise, Payette and Snake Rivers.

One recent drowning on the Payette River system involved a 27-year-old man who died after his raft went through Big Falls on the South Fork of the Payette Canyon section.

“The population in Boise is going up, kayaking popularity is getting bigger, and I think people underestimate the river,” said Kyle Little of Idaho River Sports.

Every river in Idaho has hazards; some are more dangerous than others, but all should be taken seriously.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

VA Health offers new urgent care benefit for veterans

Jul 18, 2019 By Madeline White KIVI TV

Calling all veterans enrolled in VA Healthcare: getting your urgent care visit covered may have just gotten a whole lot easier.

“We don’t want any veterans not to get the care that they earned the right to get… When you’re sick, you’re sick, and you need to be seen timely,” said Stacie Burtis, Chief, Health Administration Service, Boise VA Medical Center.

… Visit missionact.VA.gov to learn more.

full story:
————————

Scam Alert:

Beware of scam calls from “Medicare Assistance”. Medicare will not cold call you or ask for personal info.
— — — — — — — — — —

BBB explains recent fraud alert on genetic testing scam

Jul 15, 2019 KIVI TV

Genetic testing is rising in popularity. With a few swabs of the cheek, we are learning more than ever about our health and potential risks, but the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has issued a fraud alert on a new genetic testing scam.

“Scammers are popping up across the country, offering Medicare beneficiaries cheek swabs for genetic testing through telemarketing calls, booths at public events, health fairs, and door-to-door visits. They claim this is at no-cost to them and attempt to obtain their Medicare information for identity theft or fraudulent billing purposes,” said Better Business Bureau’s Rebecca Barr.

Barr says this scam is happening in Idaho.

continued:
———————

Mining News:

State officials update Idaho’s 50-year-old mining laws

The rules take effect immediately and come ahead of an Aug. 1 deadline set by the Legislature earlier this year.

Keith Ridler Associated Press July 16, 2019

Boise, Idaho — State officials have approved a rewrite of Idaho’s 50-year-old mining law.

Republican Gov. Brad Little and other members of the Idaho Land Board voted Tuesday to adopt rules intended to give mining companies the financial leeway to mine but also avoid leaving Idaho taxpayers paying for cleanup costs if a mining company goes bankrupt.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Former Idaho governor seeks investigation of mining company

by Associated Press Monday, July 15th 2019

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Former Idaho Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter has asked the Trump administration to investigate possible Chinese involvement in a mining company that could compete in Idaho with a Canadian-based company that tapped Otter to serve on its board of directors.

The Idaho Statesman reports in a story on Friday that Otter in a July 9 letter to U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin says he’s concerned cobalt mined in Idaho will be shipped to China.

Otter, a Republican, left office in January after serving 12 years as governor. In February he joined the board of Toronto-based First Cobalt Corp.

continued:
———————-

Tips & Advice:

Heat Safety Tips and Resources

During a Heat Wave

How to Respond to Excessive Heat Events

* Slow down: reduce, eliminate or reschedule strenuous activities until the coolest time of the day. Children, seniors and anyone with health problems should stay in the coolest available place, not necessarily indoors.
* Dress for summer. Wear lightweight, loose fitting, light-colored clothing to reflect heat and sunlight.
* Eat light, cool, easy-to-digest foods such as fruit or salads. If you pack food, put it in a cooler or carry an ice pack. Don’t leave it sitting in the sun. Meats and dairy products can spoil quickly in hot weather.
* Drink plenty of water (not very cold), non-alcoholic and decaffeinated fluids, even if you don’t feel thirsty. If you on a fluid restrictive diet or have a problem with fluid retention, consult a physician before increasing consumption of fluids.
* Use air conditioners or spend time in air-conditioned locations such as malls and libraries.
* Use portable electric fans to exhaust hot air from rooms or draw in cooler air.
* Do not direct the flow of portable electric fans toward yourself when room temperature is hotter than 90°F. The dry blowing air will dehydrate you faster, endangering your health.
* Minimize direct exposure to the sun. Sunburn reduces your body’s ability to dissipate heat.
* Take a cool bath or shower.
* Do not take salt tablets unless specified by a physician.
* Check on older, sick, or frail people who may need help responding to the heat. Each year, dozens of children and untold numbers of pets left in parked vehicles die from hyperthermia. Keep your children, disabled adults, and pets safe during tumultuous heat waves.
* Don’t leave valuable electronic equipment, such as cell phones and gps units, sitting in hot cars.
* Make sure rooms are well vented if you are using volatile chemicals.
—————————-

Fire Season:

Idaho Fire Info

link:
— — — — — — — — — —

NIFC

July 19, 2019

Nationally, 99 large fires have burned more than 1.7 million acres in 10 states. Large fire activity continues in Alaska where 70 large fires are burning. Many fires in Alaska were active yesterday and burned thousands of acres. Large fire activity picked up in Arizona where four new ones were reported. Firefighters contained five large fires yesterday.

link:
— — — — — — — — — —

Vader Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest
14 miles northwest of Stanley, south of Highway 21 on the Middle Fork Ranger District.
InciWeb:
— —

Forest fire near Stanley burns over 200 acres, shuts down parts of Highway 21

by CBS 2 News Staff Saturday, July 20th 2019

Stanley, Idaho (CBS 2) — Many people were stranded on the side of the road Friday night after a forest fire caused fire crews to close off portions of Highway 21, near Stanley.

A spokeswoman from the US Forest Service in Salmon, Idaho stated the Vader Fire was reported Friday afternoon and is located about 14 miles northwest of Stanley, south of Highway 21 on the Middle Fork Ranger District.

The fire is estimated at 231 acres, as of Saturday morning.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Canyon Fire

Boise National Forest
14 miles west of Stanley, Idaho
InciWeb:
— —

Firefighters Continue to Gain on the Canyon Fire

Lowman, Idaho, July 21, 2019 — After yesterday’s effective burn operation along Idaho State Highway (SH) 21, firefighters are continuing to secure the east side, and monitor the area for hot spots. Today, crews are conducting burn operations on the northern perimeter of the fire. The fire is 303 acres and 18 percent contained. Crews are hopeful for larger containment gains this weekend with favorable wind conditions and weather outlook. The fire is expected to remain active within the perimeter for several days as flames move through unburned fuel pockets.

Both lanes of SH 21 between milepost 101- 103 will be open to traffic. Forest Officials are asking drivers to please slowdown in that area as fire traffic will continue to be on the road.

Smoke from the Canyon Fire and other nearby fires may affect the overall air quality of this area. For information on smoke impacts to air quality, visit link.

The Canyon Fire is located southeast of Bull Trout Campground and 14 miles west of Stanley, Idaho, within the Lowman Ranger District. It was reported at approximately 5 p.m., July 14, 2019. Currently, there are 202 personnel on scene.

Fire danger in Central Idaho is high due to high temperatures and drying fuel conditions. Forest Officials encourages the public to be careful with anything that could start a fire and to ensure campfires are completely out and cold to the touch. We can all make a difference in reducing human-caused fires.
— — — — — — — — — —

Lightning adds five new fires to Idaho forest, nine total in Salmon-Challis

by CBS 2 News Staff Monday, July 15th 2019

Idaho (CBS 2) — The Salmon-Challis National Forest has detected five new lightning fires over the weekend moving the total up to nine fires that are currently being monitored.

… The Waterfall Fire is located on the east side of the Middle Fork Salmon River, about one mile southeast of the confluence of the Middle Fork Salmon River and Big Creek in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, in steep, inaccessible terrain. The fire is inactive at this time. The fire has had no significant fire activity in the last four days. Logs and brush in the interior of the fire have burned and the exterior edges of the fire are inactive. Very little smoke, if any, is apparent on the fire; the Middle Fork Peak lookout will continue to monitor the fire area for smoke.

… The Central Idaho Dispatch Zone is at HIGH Fire Danger. There are no fire restrictions at this time. While the SalmonChallis National Forest looks green, fire danger is a concern.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Shady Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Two (2) miles east of Seafoam Guard Station in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Middle Fork Ranger District.
InciWeb:
— —

Thousands of acres burning in Payette County wildland fire

Jul 14, 2019 By Natasha Williams KIVI TV

Fire crews are working to fight two fires in Payette County.

Dispatchers received a call about a fire in the area of Little Willow Road and Dry Creek Road around 11:45 Sunday morning.

Crews say the smaller of the two fires is located off Dry Creek Road and is about 100 acres, but the percent of containment is unknown.

The larger of the two fires is on the west side of Little Willow Road and is estimated to be 5,000 acres and growing. Fire officials have not yet been able to contain the larger fire.

There are nine fire departments and air support working to fight both fires.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise District BLM Fire Update

July 15, 2019 Jared Jablonski 208-384-3378

Four of the seven wildfires ignited over the past few days have been controlled and fire crews have made substantial progress on the remaining three. This will be the last news release for these fires unless significant activity occurs.

Canmay Fire
Location: approximately eight miles north of Mountain Home, Id near the intersection of Canyon Creek and Mayfield roads
Size: mapped at 1,010 acres
Containment: 7/13 at 11:59 p.m.
Control: estimated 7/15 at 6 p.m.
Resources: two Boise BLM engines
Fire behavior: smoldering
Structures threatened: none
Cause: lightning

Heart Fire
Location: approximately fifteen miles southeast of Weiser, Id near Heart Gulch
Size: mapped at 1529 acres
Containment: estimated 7/15 at 8 p.m.
Control: estimated 7/16 at 8 p.m.
Resources: three Boise BLM engines, two Vale BLM engines, two Boise BLM dozers, SRV-1 hand crew, SRV-9 hand crew, Payette Engine 421 and FS Engine 413
Fire behavior: smoldering
Structures threatened: none
Cause: lightning

Alkie Fire
Location: approximately 20 miles southeast of Weiser, Id near Dry Creek
Size: mapped at 86 acres
Containment: 7/15 at 12 noon
Control: estimated 7/15 at 8 p.m.
Resources: two Boise BLM engines
Fire behavior: smoldering
Structures threatened: none
Cause: lightning
———————-

Public Lands:

South Fork Salmon River Road to have Closures for Roadway Rehabilitation Project Beginning July 22

McCall, ID, July 18, 2019 – The South Fork of the Salmon River Road rehabilitation project will begin July 22, 2019 and run through the 2020 field season, with a winter shutdown on the Boise and Payette National Forests. The roadway is paved and in need of repairs to include the replacement of broken asphalt, surface drainage issues, and subgrade stability problems.

Beginning July 22, 2019, a point road closure will be in place Monday through Friday from 7:00a.m. to 4:00 pm on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends. Access to all sites along the river will remain open, but the route to reach those sites will be determined by the point closure location. The first point closure location will be just south of Reed Ranch beginning July 22nd.

The Payette National Forest will produce and distribute a weekly newsletter to help travelers determine the location of the point closure, and which route to use to reach desired sites along the river. Additionally, a webpage has been developed to convey this same information. Self-subscribe to the newsletter by singing up at (link), and visit the project web site at (link)

Things to know about the point closure site:

· The point closure location will dictate if the Warm Lake route, or the Lick Creek route to the South Fork of the Salmon River is to be taken to access sites along the river.

· The closure sites will change on a weekly basis, and will not always be adjacent to the last closure site. Refer to the current weekly newsletter or the project website to determine the closure point and access for each week.

· Use the existing mile post markers to become familiar with the road. These mile post markers will be used to note where the current point closure is located.

The South Fork Salmon River Road was paved in 1993 as a single track road in order to assist in the prevention of sediment getting into the river and creating problems for ESA Listed Summer Chinook Salmon. Minor road work, and periodically, major road reconstruction following a road damaging event, has been conducted since 1993, but this is the first full rehabilitation project that will take place on the road.

To learn more about the history of the South Fork of the Salmon River, and stewardship efforts visit this link:

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
p: 208-634-0784
c: 208-634-6945
brian.d.harris@usda.gov
————————

Critter News:

Pet talk – Chewing Disorders In Dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt July 19, 2019

There is a common chewing disorder in dogs involving the muscles that are used in chewing. These muscles are called the muscles of mastication, and the disease is called masticatory myositis. The muscles of the head that are used for chewing are inflamed and attacked by the immune system. The main muscles involved are the temporalis muscles, which are in the forehead region above and beside the eyes, and the masseter muscles, which are in the cheek area. The inflammation is usually of sudden onset and causes severe pain.

Masticatory myositis is in immune-mediated disease. The dog’s own immune system attacks various components of the muscles. This group of muscles has unique origin in the embryo and is different from other skeletal muscles.

Acute myositis usually causes symmetrical swelling and pain of the muscles. If the muscles become terribly swollen, one or both eyes may bulge. The dog will always be in severe pain and reluctant to open the mouth. Fever, lethargy, decreased appetite and enlargement of nearby lymph nodes may also occur. Signs may last two to three weeks.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Camera catches grizzly bear foraging with cubs in Idaho wilderness

KTVB July 18, 2019

Cameras operated by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game caught a grizzly bear and her two cubs foraging in the Island Park area of eastern Idaho.

The female adult bear can be seen investigating a scent in a small tree, while her young cubs attempt to help.

Fish and Game officials – curious if the bear had cubs – say they placed a scent on top of the tree, hoping to draw her out of her den.

The area where the camera is located is on Forest Service lands far from any human interaction, according to IDFG, and researchers had to hike several miles to get there.

video:

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Mountain lion relocated from public park

July 19, 2019 Local News 8


On July 18, a young male mountain lion ran up a tree in a public park in Banida , Idaho, after being spooked out of some cover on an adjacent property by a landowner and his dog. The healthy mountain lion was tranquilized and transported to a remote location in southeast Idaho where it was released.

Banida, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Idaho Department of Fish and Game personnel removed a mountain lion from a public park in the small community of Banida in Franklin County Thursday.

At approximately 12:30 p.m., Fish and Game conservation officers responded to a report of a mountain lion in a tree in a 3-acre park in Banida.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

CDC: Backyard chickens, pig ear dog treats still making people sick

Two people have died, hundreds ill

By Theresa Waldrop Jul 19, 2019 Local News 8

Two people have died and hundreds more have become ill in an ongoing outbreak of salmonella linked to backyard chickens, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday.

The news came as the CDC also said a salmonella outbreak traced to pig ear dog treats continues to sicken people in multiple states.

Since the illnesses related to backyard poultry began January 1, more than 768 people in 48 states have become ill, the CDC said. That number includes 489 who were diagnosed since June 13, the agency said in a release. One death was reported in Ohio, and one in Texas.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Gem County mosquitoes test positive for West Nile Virus

by CBS 2 News Staff Monday, July 15th 2019

Gem County, Idaho (CBS 2 News Staff) — Mosquitoes trapped in Gem County have tested positive for the West Nile virus. The mosquitoes carrying the virus in Gem County were trapped outside of the Gem County Mosquito Abatement District near the Payette County border.

This area is not located inside a mosquito abatement district.

Residents are encouraged to take extra precautions to avoid being bitten. Precautions include draining any standing water on your property and wearing repellent when outdoors.

continued:
————————–

Fish & Game News:

Escape the summer heat by fishing in the mountains

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, July 17, 2019

https://idfg.idaho.gov/files/mountain-lake-fishingq345jpeg
Roger Phillips/Idaho Fish and Game

There are thousands of mountain lakes in Idaho that offer cool temperatures and great fishing

Distant mountain peaks loom in the summer heat and stand like a cool oasis for anglers. Hidden in the bowls, basins and valleys are many lakes brimming with trout and waiting for intrepid anglers.

Idaho has many mountain ranges, nearly all of which have lakes that contain fish. Idaho Fish and Game has long been committed to keeping those lakes stocked with fish by a variety of methods, including aircraft, horseback and backpack.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Check out summer birding in Idaho’s sagebrush country

By Hilary Turner, Road Ecology Wildlife Technician
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

https://idfg.idaho.gov/files/sage-thrasher-robert-l-kothenbeuteljpg
sage thrasher Robert L Kothenbeutel

Sagebrush country is home to a variety of songbirds and other birds

Southern Idaho is a wonderful place to spend the summer as a birder. With diverse habitats there is no shortage of places to explore the avifauna. A few of my favorite places to watch birds during the summer are in the sagebrush steppe, juniper foothills, and Snake River riparian corridors.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Deer spotted with ‘rare batch of triplets’ – one of them is albino

by Brandon Bailey Monday, July 1st 2019


Photo Credit: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

Miles City, MT — Tracy Baker spotted a truly rare sight recently when she captured a mother deer with triplets in Montana.

A deer having triplets is rare by itself, but one of the triplets was albino.

“Only two fawns are visible in the picture, but in the span of a few minutes, the doe had a third fawn, making for a rare batch of triplets,” said Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks – Region 7 on Facebook.

continued:
—————————

Seasonal Humor:

SummerCampingGhosts-a
———————–

July 14, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

July 14, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: Heads up Johnson Creek travelers – watch for heavy truck traffic – OK Gravel will be hauling in parts for the crusher this week on Johnson Creek road, Monday July 15 thru Friday July 19th. Also dust abatement will be applied on Johnson Creek road on Wednesday July 24 from Wapiti Meadow Ranch to Yellow Pine.
Ads have been removed from the website – apologies for the offensive ads that WordPress placed without my consent! The first year of ad free content sponsored by Local Color Photography.

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire Training
May 10 – Burn “permits” required
May 15 – Firewood Season opens
July 20 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall
July 27 – Festival meeting Saturday 2pm at the Community Hall
July 27 – Memorial and potluck for Wilbur Wiles (Big Creek/Edwardsburg)
Aug 10 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall
Sept 14 – 10am YPFD meeting at the Fire Hall budget meeting
Sept 14 – Ride to Cinnabar
Sept 21 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall

(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Celebration of Life – Wilbur Wiles July 27

Potluck celebration of life at his cabin July 27th.
— — — —

2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine. link:
———-

Village News:

Power Outage

The power went off at 417pm July 14 and came back on at 917am July 15 – a total of 17 hours. Outage cause unknown, but it had been windy on and off.
— — — —

July 13 Live Music

Willie and the Singlewides played at The Corner Saturday night.
— — — —

4th of July Parade photos

Grand Marshal Lorinne Munn
20190704GrandMarshalLorinneMunn-a

Miss Yellow Pine Christy Petersen
20190704MissYPChristyPetersen-a

photos by Marc Auth
50+ photos posted to a gallery on Facebook.
— — — —

July 6 Yellow Pine golf tournament raises $1,500 for improvements

Golfers turned out for breakfast and a tournament at the Yellow Pine fundraiser last Saturday.

Attendees raised around $1,500 for road repair, the Community Hall and the upkeep of the village museum. A total of 64 golfers signed up for the tournament.

source of info: The Star-News
— — — —

Dust Abatement July 11

Tanker truck was applying dust abatement in Yellow Pine around 11am on Thursday July 11th. Not everyone could afford the application, so please drive slow in the neighborhoods to keep the dust down.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Saturday (June 29): The dumpsters were not quite half full. Road to dump “not bad”.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
— — — —

Roads

South Fork road will have day time closures during the week and open on weekends during road repairs. Will have more info later this week.

Heads up Johnson Creek travelers! Watch for heavy truck traffic starting July 15th thru July 19th, OK Gravel will be hauling in a crusher via Johnson Creek road. Then on July 24th dust abatement will be applied to Johnson Creek from Wapiti Meadow Ranch to Yellow Pine.

Folks in ATVs made it over Elk summit this weekend, not advisable for vehicle traffic quite yet. (See photo in the July 14th road report.)

Stibnite Road will be open to the public on weekends. Monumental Summit is also open, but only on weekends due to the Stibnite Slide work.

Update from Midas July 9, 2019: construction will continue at least through the end of next week so the Monday through Thursday closure would still be in place.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

June 1st started the 6-day a week mail delivery. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
— — — —

Reminder for people living in bear country:

* Garbage should be stored inside the house or in a secure garage or storage building.
* If garbage cannot be stored in a secure location, a bear-resistant container approved by the Interagency Bear Committee is recommended.
* Avoid using bird feeders from March through November. Birds do not need supplemental feeding this time of year.
* Pet food should not be left outside.
* BBQ grills or anything with a strong odor should not be left out at night.
* Protect gardens, beehives, and compost piles with electric fencing.
* Never intentionally feed bears. A food-conditioned bear may pose a threat to human safety and usually results in the removal of the bear.
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Water Update July 5:

Idaho Rural Water water will be in on the 19th to look for leaks. Water usage in town is in excess of 57,000 gallons per day. Some have been reminded of the No Lawn Watering request. If we get too much above the 60,000 gallons per day, the town is running the risk of draining the tanks and being out of water.

The Boil Order is still in effect.

The annual Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th at 10 am in the community hall.

Water Update June 7:

1. The “boil order” is still in effect.
2. There is still large water leaks in the system. We continue to look.
3. A grant for $39,000 was approved for improvements to the system. (See story in Idaho News)
3. Work is currently being done on the new contact tank.
4. Please, no lawn watering until we find and repair the major leaks.
– Steve Holloway

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19.pdf

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx
— — — —

VYPA News:

Next meeting July 20th, 2pm at the Community Hall

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for June 8, 2019

link to: 20190608 Village of Yellow Pine Association.rtf

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 8th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th – 2pm at the Community Hall.

Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.

Yellow Pine Harmonica Meetings 2019:

July 27, 2019 Saturday 2pm at the Community Hall
— — — —

YPFD News:

Next Meeting Sept 14 at 10am YPFD meeting in the Fire Hall

YPFD June 16, 2019 Meeting minutes posted (July minutes coming soon)

link to: 20190615 YPFD Meeting Notes_Final.docx

Meetings will be held at the fire station at 10am and everyone is welcome to attend. June 15th; July 13th; and Sept 14th (which will also be the budget meeting as well).

Every Sunday 11am – Training

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Training: Sunday Fire/EMS training has begun. Sundays at 11:00 AM unless otherwise posted. If Jeff F is in town the trainings will be held. All are welcome.

Safety Message: The best place to be during an avalanche, rock fall or a tree fall due to the wind is not there, please use extreme caution and common sense when conditions exist for these scenarios.

“If you are an Adventurist, please do not go out alone in steep areas. The spring thaw is an extremely dangerous time for Avalanches. The freezing and thawing create layers that break away from each other with the slightest disturbance. Scree fields are especially dangerous this time of year because of hidden ice that makes them even more unstable. Please be careful out there.”

YP Helispot: We are working with Valley County Road Department and the Boise National Forest for the rock base for the road leading into the Helispot and the actual Helispot itself. We are also receiving rock for the Fire Hydrants, water tank foundations, etc. The rock will come from the Valdez pit and will be less expensive than having it trucked in from Cascade.

Stop the Bleed Course: This course was well attended in the Fall and Jeff F and Ann F will be presenting another course when the new instructor material comes out. There are “Stop The Bleed” kits at the Tavern in an emergency.

Siren Testing: The YPFD siren will be tested only once this year on the first of May at noon. 3 blasts of the siren is a test, more than 3 is an Emergency.

-JF
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Call for reservations
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Our hours will be 11-8 every day, except closed on Tuesdays. We are open for breakfast by request and always have good coffee starting at 6am.
The Corner has firewood permits in stock now. 4 cord minimum at $6.25 per cord. Please call to make sure I’m around before Memorial Day, bring drivers license and cash is preferred, no CC.
The Corner Store will also be open with snacks, groceries, fresh produce, soda, ice and packaged beer. If you know you will be coming in over the summer and need special grocery orders, let me know and I will order it in for you while you are here, 2 deliveries a week. The best way to get a hold of me is to call or stop by and say hello.
Karaoke is back at The Corner! Choose your favorite songs from our online music library and entertain your friends up on stage through our professional sound system.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Summer Hours Daily 8am to Close
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
Website:
Link to FB page:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
208-315-3554 cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
Link to website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 – Wild Bird Seed 50LB Bag for $25.58
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (July 8) overnight low of 41 degrees, high thin overcast sky this morning. A few early loud airplanes. Finches, pine siskins, swallows, hummingbirds and ground squirrels active. Gusty breezes kicking up, wonky sounding airplane at 1234pm. Darker clouds and breezy early afternoon, about a 20 minute rain shower followed by thunder on and off the rest of the afternoon, high of 72 degrees. A couple of lightning strikes south of the airstrip, a few more at the confluence of EFSF and So Fk, most of the strikes were in the Thunder Mtn area. Young swallows practicing with their wings in the nest box. Windy by early evening, thunder and about 25 minute rain shower. Breaks in the clouds before sunset and calmer. Mostly cloudy at dusk, with a clear spot overhead framing a fat waxing crescent moon.

Tuesday (July 9) overnight low of 39 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning, some haze building up to the south. Finches and swallows calling. At 1204pm a large helicopter came from the direction of the airstrip and turned west. A few clouds mid-day, getting rather warm. Mostly clear mid-afternoon, warm and light breezes, high of 83 degrees. Finches, pine siskins, jays and hummingbirds visiting, pine and ground squirrels active. Quiet evening after a busy afternoon. Mostly cloudy by early evening, slight breeze.

Wednesday (July 10) overnight low of 50 degrees, overcast and calm this morning. Early air traffic. Finches, robins, jays and swallows calling. Cloudy and a bit muggy mid-day. Light traffic (streets are dusty!) Hot and muggy mid-afternoon, overcast and very light breezes, high of 89 degrees. Finches and pine siskins visiting, ground and pine squirrels very active. Wind gusts late afternoon, hot and mostly cloudy. Warm evening, mostly cloudy and calmer. Cooling off and robins calling at dusk. A couple stars out and filtered moonlight before midnight.

Thursday (July 11) overnight low of 46 degrees, clear sky this morning. Light air traffic (couple of loud ones right over the village.) Finches, robins and swallows calling. Chainsaw going out on the golf course. Dust abatement tanker truck spraying streets around 11am. Mostly clear and hot mid-day. Tree swallow babies are practicing with their wings inside the next box. Some fatter clouds building up mid-afternoon, hot and light breeze, high of 92 degrees. Still pretty warm mid-evening, big chunky clouds and an occasional wind gust. Increasing traffic. Almost clear after sundown, very slow to cool off. Clear after dark, rainbow ring around the bright half moon. Mostly cloudy before midnight.

Friday (July 12) overnight low of 48 degrees, clear sky this morning. Light air traffic (some very loud going right over the village.) Tree swallows active and vocal, pine siskins, finches and 2 female hairy woodpeckers visiting. Increasing traffic. A few clouds and pretty warm mid-day. Calliope hummingbirds visiting. The young swallows are crowding the door hole of the bird house, their wing feathers are getting longer, later in the day 3 of them left the nest. Pretty hot mid-afternoon, about half clear/cloudy and not much of a breeze, high of 94 degrees. Hot (90 degrees) before sunset and mostly clear. After dark a fat waxing moon and bright planet paired to the south east.

Saturday (July 13) overnight low of 50 degrees, partly cloudy sky this morning. Increased air traffic. Calliope hummingbirds visiting. Two swallow chicks still in the nest. Increasing street traffic. Mostly cloudy, hot and windy mid-day, high of 93 degrees. Water pressure a bit low this afternoon. Lighter breezes and partly cloudy early evening but still plenty hot. Mostly clear at dusk, a little cooler and very light breezes. Mostly cloudy at dark, bright waxing moon peeking between clouds. Wind and rain after 1am. Early morning loud thunderstorm and rain.

Sunday (July 14) overnight low of 57 degrees, partly cloudy sky this morning. Lots of airplanes early this morning (wonky sounding engine just after 830am.) Early morning thunderstorm and rain settled the dust. Hummingbirds visiting, swallows circling. Warming up fast and starting to dry out late morning. Clouds building up early afternoon, warm and light breezes. Last swallow chick has left the nest. Hot by mid-afternoon, high of 88 degrees. Power out at 417pm. Mostly clear by evening. A western tanager visited, young tree swallows perched on power lines calling to the adults flying around. Clouds getting thicker at dusk. Juvenile pine squirrels visiting. Quiet except for the sounds of generators up in the village. Windy after midnight, couple of short sprinkles of rain (not enough to settle the dust.) Power still out, recording says it is affecting 150 customers, cause unknown.
——————————

RIP:

Ron “The Sugar Mountain Strangler” Erickson

June 22, 1948 – July 13, 2019

RIPErickson-a
Picture of Ron when he lived in Yellow Pine.

RIPRonErickson7-13-2019
Ron Erickson 2018

It is with a sad heart that I report that Ron Erickson came to the end of his road at 11pm, July 13th. He was not in pain. He was not afraid. He died peacefully with his daughter Valerie, his grandson Adam, and me, his sister [Connie], at his bedside. Ron had some significant physical ailments that limited his mobility and ability to do every day tasks. He never complained about it or blamed anyone for his difficulties. He never asked for help because he was as independent as he was stubborn. He never lost his sense of humor.

He said a few days ago his life was a good long road and he was grateful for the life he lived and the people in it. To his family, friends, and military family, know that he loved you. And he knew he was loved by you all. He was so happy to get to talk to several of his army buds this week. It was important for him to hear your voices one more time and for him to tell you how much he cared for you.

Ron said to me this week he wished he could go back to Yellow Pine one more time. It was the best time of his life when he lived there. He will get his wish. Ron will be cremated and his ashes scattered in the mountains of Yellow Pine, Idaho. No date has been set yet but I will let you know.

Thank you for your prayers and support during the past few weeks.
— — — — — — — — — —

Celebration for John Lance in Yellow Pine

John F. Lance, 78, of McCall, died February 15, 2019. Plans to scatter John’s ashes August 3rd in Yellow Pine.
————————

Idaho News:

Valley Dispatch calls 911

Understaffed center asks Adams County dispatchers to fill in

By Max Silverson and Drew Dodson for The Star-News July 11, 2019

Valley County will pay Adams County 911 dispatchers to drive from Council to Cascade to work in the understaffed Valley County dispatch center, Valley County commissioners said Monday.

Adams County dispatchers will be given the option to work extra shifts at Valley County dispatch for an extra $2 per hour on top of their normal wages, plus mileage expenses for the 67-mile drive.

It was not known on Monday if any of the six Adams County dispatchers will be interested in the extra shifts.

The drive from Council to Cascade typically takes about 90 minutes not counting delays for road construction.

Valley County dispatch needs eight full-time employees to be fully staffed, but is down to four full-time and one part-time employee, Valley County Sheriff’s Patti Bolen said.

One of the full-time employees will be leaving at the end of the month, Bolen said.

Valley County and Adams County officials met in Council last week to discuss the staffing crisis.

During the meeting, Bolen suggested the idea of Adams County taking over dispatch for both counties.

Adams County Sheriff Ryan Zollman said that Adams County could not handle the added call volume on a regular basis.

“I think it’s too much to take on full consolidated (dispatch) to move everything here; that’s a risk I don’t want to go into,” Zollman said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Nampa man dies after wreck near Donnelly

The 28-year-old driver was airlifted to Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise.

KTVB July 8, 2019

Donnelly, Idaho — A Nampa man died from his injuries after crashing his pickup into a tree in Valley County Monday morning.

The wreck happened just before 6 a.m. on West Mountain Road west of Donnelly.

According to Idaho State Police, 28-year-old Homero Delosreyes Jr. was driving south in a GMC Sierra when he veered off the road. The pickup plummeted down an embankment and hit a tree.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

One dead in rafting accident on South Fork of the Payette River

The Boise County Sheriff’s Office said three people in a raft went into the water. One of them died.

KTVB July 11, 2019

Boise County, Idaho — One person is dead after a raft trip turned tragic on the South Fork of the Payette River Thursday afternoon.

Sergeant David Anthony with the Boise County Sheriff’s Office said that someone called 911 at about 2:30 p.m. to report that rafters had gone into the river at Big Falls Rapid — about ten miles east of Garden Valley on a section known for Class III and Class IV rapids.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley committee to take another stab at lake rules

Drew Dodson for The Star-News July 11, 2019

The Valley County Waterways Advisory Committee on Tuesday began the work to draft boating rules on Payette Lake and Lake Cascade that will pass muster where a previous version it drafted did not.

The task was returned to the committee in April after Valley County commissioners decided not to adopt the previous proposed rules following public opposition.

The committee hopes to approve a new ordinance at its August meeting, which would then send the rules to the commissioners for consideration and public comment.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County approves property-tax break for EnergySEAL

Drew Dodson for The Star-News July 11, 2019

A waiver from property taxes for a new building housing EnergySEAL near McCall was approved by Valley County commissioners on Monday.

The exemption provides tax relief to non-retail businesses that invest $500,000 or more in a plant or facility in the county.

The ordinance under which EnergySEAL applied for the tax relief was adopted a year ago and is intended to encourage business development in the county by offering five years of tax relief.

EnergySEAL will receive a 90 percent reduction the first year, an 80 percent reduction for the second year, 60 percent for the third year, 40 percent for the fourth year, and 20 percent for the fifth year, before being taxed at the full rate for each subsequent year.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Tamarack Resort plans to finish construction by winter, unveils condos for sale

Visitors to the resort are greeted by scaffolding, dirt, and equipment, but by this winter there will be retail shops, restaurants, and 129 fully furnished condos.

Shirah Matsuzawa July 13, 2019 KTVB

Donnelly, Idaho — Tamarack Resort’s Village Project has been in the works for over a decade now, but the president of the ski resort says construction on the massive project will be completed in time for the 2019 ski season.

About 90 people are trying to turn the unfinished Village from barren building and dirt into a ski resort that will compete with some of the best resorts from around the country.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

New Meadows depot to open Packer John exhibit Wednesday

The Star-News July 11, 2019

The Pacific & Idaho Northern Railway Depot in New Meadows will open its free exhibit on Wednesday.

The exhibit will be open every Wednesday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. through Labor Day weekend.

The exhibit features Packer John Welch, his famous cabin, and details about the life and needs of a packer.

Visitors will learn what kind of items a packer would commonly pack, maps showing the Boise Trail, information about important political meetings held at the cabin, and the journey to save the cabin.

Also on display will be a Packer John’s Cabin model created in 2013 by Meadows Valley School seventh and eighth grade shop class students along with an explanation of how the students built the model.

The exhibit was created to give additional information about the Packer John site and to compliment the newly installed interpretive signs installed at the Packer John’s Cabin Park this spring by the Meadows Valley School fifth-grade class and volunteers.

For more information, visit http://historicpindepot.com

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Closures announced for US Highway 95 between Council and New Meadows

Jul 12, 2019 By Steve Bertel KIVI TV

U.S. Highway 95 between Council and New Meadows will close overnight from 10 p.m. Sunday, July 14 to 6 a.m. Monday, July 15 as construction continues on the Weiser River Bridge.

Several overnight-only closures will be scheduled throughout the summer to accommodate bridge construction.

During those closures, a detour route will be available for vehicles, according to the Idaho Transportation Department.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More than half of Idaho’s job service offices to close

Associated Press July 9, 2019

Boise, Idaho — The Idaho Department of Labor plans to eliminate more than half of its job service offices in the state, officials said.

Fourteen of the 25 offices will close by September, the Idaho Press reported Monday.

In the last 10 years, the department saw a 47% drop in federal funding for services at local offices, department director Jani Revier said.

… Offices in Blackfoot, Bonners Ferry, Emmett, Grangeville, Hailey, Kellogg, McCall, Meridian, Mountain Home, Payette, Rexburg, St. Maries and Soda Springs will also close.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

National Weather Service looking for more weather spotters

By Max Cohan Jul 08, 2019 Local News 8

The National Weather Service is hosting training for storm spotters in Southeastern Idaho. There are already more than 500 in the area, but the service is super dependent on them and looking for more.

Part of the SKYWARN program that includes more than 350,000 volunteers nationwide, the only thing people need to help report storms is the willingness to participate and the ability to communicate.

Groups like the National Weather Service use radar to track storm systems every day, but they also use spotters to show them the things that radar doesn’t.

continued:
————————

Mining News:

Nez Perce: Stibnite mine plan just ‘glittery promises’

Video doubts Midas Gold’s plans to clean up toxic waste

Drew Dodson for The Star-News July 11, 2019

The Nez Perce Tribe has released a video saying Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite Gold Project as “polished and glittery promises based on pure speculation, not hard science.”

The video details the tribe’s opposition to the project and a 2013 study of 27 active gold mines that found all experienced at least one accidental spill or release of toxic material.

The study also found that 20 of those mines had toxic waste from tailings, or spent ore, seeping through liners in tailings storage facilities. The tribe is worried the same could happen to Midas Gold’s proposed 413-acre facility that would hold about 100 million tons of spent ore.

“As we all know, liners leak and over time they’ll rip and they’ll tear,” said Emmit Taylor, director of the Nez Perce Tribal Fisheries Watershed Division.

“Who knows what kind of environmental disaster we’d be setting up for our kids, our grandkids, generations and generations down the line,” Taylor said in the video.

Midas Gold should be evaluated on its proposed design and track record of more than seven years of exploration activities at Stibnite without a reportable spill, Midas Gold Vice President of External Affairs Mckinsey Lyon said.

continued:

video link:

———————-

Fire Season:

Wildfire workshop for landowners to be held July 18 in McCall

The Star-News July 11, 2019

The National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy Team will host a wildfire workshop for Valley County landowners on Thursday, July 18, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the McCall-Donnelly High School commons.

The event, “Can McCall Become Another Paradise,” continues the conservation that began with last year’s workshop.

Topics will include lessons learned from 2018 fires, risk assessment for Valley County, progress since last year and an optional field trip to a recent hazard fuel removal project.

The event is free, and lunch will be provided. Space is limited.

For more information, contact Stephanie Nelson of Valley County Firewise at 208-630-4201 or VCFirewise@gmail.com

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Firefighters begin suppression and mop up operations on Corner Prescribed Fire north of Placerville

Idaho City, Idaho, July 10, 2019 — The Forest Service has started suppression and mop up operations on the Corner Prescribed Fire, approximately 2 miles north of Placerville along National Forest System (NFS) road 615.

Warmer weather is drying fuels and has caused an increase in fire activity within the burn. Yesterday, firefighters began constructing interior handlines to stop the fire spread inside the unit and began mopping up hotspots to remove the remaining heat inside the unit.

Fire managers anticipate most of the fire activity will be contained by the end of the week. While all fire activity is within established control lines and meeting resource objectives, the decision to suppress the fire’s activity is precautionary; to prevent the risk of escape or undesired effects as summer progresses.

Currently, there are no closures in place. The public is asked to be mindful of fire traffic along NFS roads 615 and 395 south of Alder Summit.

The prescribed burn took place June 5 and 6, 2019 and remains approximately 150 acres. The burn was conducted to meet the Forest’s objectives of improving forest vegetation and wildlife habitat while also reducing the threat of a wildfire impacting the communities of Placerville and Garden Valley.

For more information, contact the Idaho City Ranger District: (208) 392-6681.
— — — — — — — — — —

Salmon-Challis monitoring two lightning fires

Jul 09, 2019 Local News 8


Waterfall Fire July 8, 2019

Salmon, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Salmon-Challis National Forest is keeping a close eye on two lightning caused fires.

The “Trapper” fire was reported early Monday afternoon, about one mile east of Highway 93 in the Trapper Gulch area on the North Fork Ranger District. The fire is about .10 acre in a stand of lodgepole, spruce, and fir. Four firefighters are staffing that fire.

Fire crews are also monitoring the 200-acre “Waterfall” fire. It was spotted at around 8:30 a.m. Sunday on the east side of the Middle Fork of the Salmon River, about a mile southeast of the confluence of the Middle Fork and Big Creek on the North Fork Ranger District in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

The Waterfall fire is in monitor status and being allowed to play its ecological role.

source:
— — —

The Waterfall Fire, reported on July 7, located on the east side of the Middle Fork Salmon River, approximately one (1) mile southeast of the confluence of the Middle Fork Salmon River and Big Creek on the North Fork Ranger District in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, in steep, inaccessible terrain. The fire continues to show little activity and is holding at approximately 300 acres along the Middle Fork Trail and on and below the ridge between Bobtail Creek and the Fox Creek Draw. The Middle Fork Trail, the Waterfall Creek Trail, and campsites along the Middle Fork Salmon River remain open. The fire is currently in monitor status and is being allowed to play, as nearly as possible, its natural ecological role in the environment while providing for firefighter and public safety. The Forest will provide updates and information as significant changes occur.

posted July 11, 2019 to Salmon-Challis NF FB
— — —

Shady Fire

InciWeb link:
— — — — — — — — — —

Lightning ignites regional fires

July 11, 2019 Local News 8


Shady fire

Salmon, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Lightning ignited several small fires in southeast Idaho this week.

On Salmon-Challis National Forest, the “Shady” fire was reported Wednesday night about 2 miles east of Seafoam Guard Station in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Middle Fork Ranger District. Two engines and a wildland fire module will be assigned to the fire today. Because of snags, heavy fuel, and fire behavior, no action was possible Wednesday night.

Fire crews were dispatched to three small fires on the Caribou-Targhee National Forest.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise District BLM Fire – Evening Update 7/14/2019

Boise BLM crews continue to fight multiple lightning sparked wildfires across the district, including two new lighting fires, the Heart and Alkie fires, in the Weiser area. Boise BLM crews also responded to a suspected human caused fire, the Pen fire, above the Diversion Dam outside of Boise. The cause of the Penn fire is still under investigation.

Canmay Fire
Location: approximately eight miles north of Mountain Home, Id near the intersection of Canyon Creek and Mayfield roads
Size: mapped at 1,010 acres
Containment: 7/13 at 11:59 p.m.
Control: estimated 7/15 at 6 p.m.
Resources: four Boise BLM engines, one Boise BLM dozer and one Boise BLM water tender
Fire behavior: smoldering
Structures threatened: none
Cause: lightning

Heart Fire
Location: approximately fifteen miles southeast of Weiser, Id near Heart Gulch
Size: estimated at 1500 acres
Containment: to be determined
Control: to be determined
Resources: two Boise BLM engines, two Vale BLM engines, two Boise BLM dozers, SEAT planes, rural fire department resources include Payette County, Gem County Two, Weiser, Sand Hollow, Ontario, Middleton, Parma, New Plymouth and the Black Canyon Rural Fire Protection Association.
Fire behavior: running
Structures threatened: none
Cause: lightning

Alkie Fire
Location: approximately 20 miles southeast of Weiser, Id near Dry Creek
Size: estimated at 86 acres
Containment: to be determined
Control: to be determined
Resources: three Boise BLM engines
Fire behavior: creeping
Structures threatened: none
Cause: lightning

Pen Fire
Location: approximately four miles southeast of Boise, Id above the Diversion Dam
Size: mapped at 17.5 acres
Containment: 7/14 at 2:27 p.m.
Control: 7/14 at 9 p.m.
Cause: under investigation

Lock Fire
Location: approximately five miles northwest of Mountain Home, Id near Lockman Butte
Size: mapped at 165.8 acres
Containment: 7/14 at 12:28 a.m.
Control: 7/14 at 6:04 p.m.
Cause: lightning

Lydle Fire
Location: approximately ten miles southeast of Boise, Id near Bonneville Point
Size: mapped at 32 acres
Containment: 7/14 at 3:03 a.m.
Control: estimated 7/15 at 12 noon
Resources: one Boise BLM engine, SRV-19 hand crew and one BLM water tender
Fire behavior: smoldering
Structures threatened: none
Cause: lightning

Bonneville Fire
Location: approximately 11 miles southeast of Boise, Id near Blacks Creek Road
Size: mapped at 7.7 acres
Contained 7/13 at 3:03 a.m.
Control: estimated 7/15 at 12 noon
Resources: one Boise BLM engine
Fire behavior: smoldering
Structures threatened: none
Cause: lightning

For More Information,
Jared Jablonski, Fire Information and Prevention Officer, jjablonski@blm.gov 208 384-3378
Idaho Wildfires visit http://www.IdahoFireInfo.com
— — — — — — — — — —

National Interagency Fire Center uses drones to help fight wildfires, keep firefighters safe

Jul 08, 2019 By McKenna King KIVI TV

Boise — The 2019 fire season has been a mild one for much of the U.S., so far at least. But that doesn’t stop the National Interagency Fire Center from working on new tactics.

Just within the last few years, the National Interagency Fire Center has just started using drones to not only help fight wildfires, but to also scan wildfire areas to keep firefighters safe.

“Instead of putting a firefighter on the fire line, we can put a drone up there to scout an active fire line,” said Jessica Gardetto, Spokesperson for NIFC.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

National Interagency Fire Center implements GPS trackers for fire vehicles

Jul 10, 2019 By McKenna King KIVI TV

Boise — The National Interagency Fire Center is rolling out a new tracking system to help them keep tabs on wildland firefighters.

It’s called the location based services program and it’s being implemented in all Bureau of Land Management fire vehicles by the end of fiscal year 2020. It hasn’t made its way to Idaho quite yet, but it’s being used in many of our neighboring states.

“All of these GPS tracking units are going to be in all of our fire vehicles,” said Jessica Gardetto, Spokesperson for NIFC.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

‘Doing nothing is not an option’: BLM hopes to slow down wildfires across the West with more fuel breaks

The Bureau of Land Management held the first of 12 public hearings in Boise on Tuesday.

Shirah Matsuzawa July 9, 2019 KTVB

Boise, Idaho — The Bureau of Land Management is hoping to slow down wildfires with a proposal that would place more fuel breaks across a large portion of the western United States, known as the Great Basin.

The Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for fuel breaks will analyze a system of up to 11,000 miles of strategically-placed fuel breaks to control wildfires within a 223 million-acre area. That area includes portions of Idaho, Oregon, Washington, California, Nevada and Utah.

On Tuesday, BLM-Idaho held a public hearing at the Red Lion Boise Hotel on Fairview.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

National Interagency Fire Center

National Preparedness Level 2

July 11, 2019

Nationally, two new large fires were reported and one contained. The majority of the fire activity continues in Alaska. A total of 56 large fires have burned nearly 895,000 acres.

Idaho Fires: 5 Acres: 2,822 New: 3 Contained: 2
* Heart Boise District BLM 500 0 15 miles southeast of Weiser
* Pioneer Twin Falls District BLM 422 80 3 miles west of Bliss
Ridgeline Twin Falls District BLM 600 98 5 miles northeast of Albion
Shady Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 375 0 21 miles north of Stanley
Waterfall Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 300 0 37 miles west of Salmon
Canmay Boise District BLM 1,010 100
* Smith Twin Falls District BLM 1,350 100

link:
— — — — — — — — — —

USFS Regional Intermountain Wildfire

Regional Intermountain Newsletter Special Issue July 10, 2019

Slow Start to Fire Season in the Intermountain Region
August 9, 2019- Celebrate Smokey’s 75th
Intermountain Region Wildfire Activity Map
(and more)

link:
————————

Public Lands:

Forest Service wants public’s help to extinguish campfires

Boise, Idaho, July 12, 2019, — Fire managers want to urge forest visitors to completely extinguish campfires before they pack up and leave the woods. With higher temperatures, fuel conditions are expected to dry out, increasing the risk of wildfire ignitions. Over the 4th of July holiday, Boise National Forest employees discovered multiple abandoned campfires.

“We are at that turning point where temperatures are rising and forest vegetation is drying out; add unattended campfires to the equation and the risk of a human-caused wildfire increases significantly,” said Steve Baran, Assistant Forest Fire Management Officer. “We are asking the public to help us by ensuring their campfire is out and cold to the touch whenever they leave camp. Otherwise, someone should stay at the site if the campfire is burning or holding heat.”

While fire season has been a slow start in Southwest Idaho, Boise National Forest fire crews have already suppressed a number of lightning caused fires.

Last year within the Boise National Forest, firefighters responded to 18 human-caused wildfires which burned more than 6,000 acres compared to the 13 lightning caused fires which burned about 152 acres.
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise National Forest-Schedule of Proposed Actions (SOPA)

July 10, 2019

The Boise National Forest’s published “Schedule of Proposed Actions” (SOPA) report for July 1, 2019 through September 31, 2019 is now available on the Boise National Forest Schedule of Proposed Actions webpage. The Forest Service produces the published SOPA report every three months to keep the public informed about projects that the Forest is currently working on or planning to analyze in the near future. Link:

The SOPA has been standardized across all National Forests from a national database to track key project planning information. The SOPA reports for the all National Forests are available at http://www.fs.fed.us/sopa. The Forest Service automatically posts the SOPA four times a year in January, April, July, and October.

If you have questions about a specific project, please contact the project leader listed in the SOPA. If you have general questions about the SOPA, please feel free to contact me.

Sincerely,
Terre Pearson-Ramirez
North Zone NEPA Planner
Boise National Forest
1249 South Vinnell Way, Suite 200
Boise, ID 83709
Phone: 208-382-7457
Email: terre.pearsonramirez@usda.gov
— — — — — — — — — —

Lawsuit seeks to stop juniper-removal project in Eastern Idaho

Groups say it would allow for invasive species

Jul 09, 2019 Associated Press

Boise, Ida. — Environmental groups say a U.S. Forest Service plan to improve wildlife habitat in eastern Idaho will do the opposite and takes an illegal shortcut around environmental laws.

Alliance for the Wild Rockies and two other groups filed a lawsuit in federal court last week seeking to halt the Rowley Canyon Wildlife Enhancement Project in Bannock County. The Forest Service in June approved the project that would remove more than half of the juniper trees on about 1,300 acres (525 hectares) and remove shrubs on another 400 acres (160 hectares).

continued:
—————————-

Critter News:

‘It’s almost like being in a microwave’: Animal control warns people not to leave pets in hot cars

KTVB went on a ride along with animal control as they responded to calls about dogs left in hot cars on Wednesday.

Shirah Matsuzawa July 10, 2019 KTVB

Boise, Idaho — Every year, dozens of dogs across the nation die because their owner left them in a hot car. It’s a problem that also happens in Idaho during the summer months.

According to the Idaho Office of Emergency Management, even if the temperature outside is only 70 degrees, the inside of your car may be as much as 20 degrees hotter. That can be deadly for anyone, let alone your pet.

… “Dogs have fur coats, they can’t cool down, they only cool down by panting and they’re continually breathing in the hot air and so they panic and pace and they start scratching the windows trying to get out,” Freutel said. “So, it can go from good to bad really quick.”

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Humane Society’s Look Before You Lock campaign begins today

IHS partnered with Boise Police, St. Luke’s

Jul 11, 2019 By Katie Kloppenburg KIVI TV

Boise, Idaho — The Idaho Humane Society has partnered with Boise Police and St. Luke’s for the Look Before You Lock Campaign aimed at preventing death and injury from animals and children being left in vehicles in hot temperatures.

As part of the Idaho Humane Society’s Humane Education initiative, they will spend today teaching children about how quickly temperatures rise in vehicles. Children attending the camp will be baking dog treats on the dashboards of cars and taking internal car temperatures from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The humane society will show how quickly the dog treats will be cooked simply by leaving the dough in vehicles parked both in the sun and in the shade.

The Boise Police Department will have a police officer and a K9 on scene over the course of the day.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Summer weather brings higher risk for ‘foxtails’

By Brady Halbleib Jul 11, 2019 Local News 8

Pocatello, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Summer is here, and the heat is drying out the wild grass. As hikers hit the trails with their dogs, they need to be aware of dangerous foxtails.

… Foxtails are among several types of grass that have barbed-like seeds. Like an arrowhead, they only move in one direction when they penetrate the skin of a dog. They’re not only extremely painful but in some cases, they can be deadly.

During the summer, veterinarians remove foxtails daily and say they are a lot more common than most people think.

“They can get up their noses, they can get in their mouth, they can work through soft tissue and penetrate their lungs, they can get into their abdominal cavity. They can be dangerous,” said Dr. Kelly Knight, a veterinarian for Alpine Animal Hospital.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Dog owners beware: Popular sweetener may be deadly, FDA warns

Dogs have been known to die of xylitol poisoning in as little as one hour. Here’s what you need to know.

Travis Pittman July 11, 2019 KTVB

The Food and Drug Administration has posted an updated warning to dog owners about the dangers of letting their pets consume a sweetener that is popular in items like sugarless chewing gum: xylitol.

It comes after a report of a Bay Area dog ending up in a veterinary hospital after being given skinny vanilla ice cream with xylitol in it. The dog survived, but many others in recent years have died after consuming foods with xylitol. Some of those deaths have occurred in as little as one hour.

Here’s why it’s not dangerous for humans but is for dogs: The FDA says xylitol does not stimulate the release of insulin from the human pancreas, but it can lead to a “potent” release of insulin in dogs because it is absorbed into the bloodstream more quickly. That can lead to hypoglycemia.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Water Intoxication: Too Much of a Good Thing

By Dr. Becker

Responsible dog owners understand the importance of making sure their canine companion always has fresh, clean water to drink. But what a surprising number of pet owners don’t realize is that it’s actually possible for a dog to ingest too much water.

Water intoxication, which results in life threatening hyponatremia (excessively low sodium levels), is a relatively rare but frequently fatal condition in dogs. At highest risk are dogs that enjoying playing in the water for long stretches. But believe it or not, even a lawn sprinkler or hose can pose a hazard for pets that love to snap at or “catch” spraying water.

Hyponatremia occurs when more water enters the body than it can process. The presence of so much water dilutes bodily fluids, creating a potentially dangerous shift in electrolyte balance. The excess water depletes sodium levels in extracellular fluid (fluid outside of cells). Sodium maintains blood pressure and nerve and muscle function.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wyoming warns livestock owners to watch for spreading virus

July 11, 2019 AP

Wyoming is warning livestock owners in the state to be on the lookout for an animal virus spreading in other states.

The Wyoming Tribune Eagle reports the Vesicular Stomatitis Indiana serotype has recently been found in horses in Texas, New Mexico and Colorado.

Wyoming State Veterinarian Jim Logan has implemented a 72-hour health certificate requirement on susceptible livestock.

The requirement is effective immediately and covers animals imported from any county where VSV has been diagnosed in the previous 30 days.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

West Nile virus confirmed in Canyon County

Jul 11, 2019 By Jessica Taylor KIVI TV

Canyon County — Neighbors in the north end of Canyon County near Market Road noticed mosquitoes near their property and put in a service request with the mosquito abatement district. It wasn’t long before inspection teams found positive West Nile.

“Our larvacide crews did find the area, just a small 10×10 area in a field that had some tire tracks in it that the water collected in and that’s where it was found,” said district director of Canyon County Mosquito Abatement District Ed Burnett.

West Nile is only carried by a few species of mosquitoes, so when crews find those breeds, they know they pose a risk. These samples sent to the bureau of laboratories in Boise confirmed the mosquitoes were positive for West Nile.

continued:
—————————–

Fish & Game News:

Midway through the run, very few sockeye are returning to Idaho

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Monday, July 8, 2019

Typically, about half the run crosses Lower Granite Dam by mid July

Fish and Game biologists expected few sockeye to return to Idaho this year, and midway through the run, the number of fish crossing the dams is lower than expected, but the exact number of Idaho fish returning is difficult to determine because few of the fish have electronic PIT tags that help biologists monitor the run.

“With most of the returning Snake River sockeye currently making their way through the Columbia River to Idaho, over the next couple of weeks, we should get a better idea of whether our Snake River sockeye salmon were affected by the same processes that led to the downgrade in the Columbia River-wide sockeye forecast at the end of June,” John Powell, Fish and Game fisheries research biologist.

“Through July 8, we have observed a single PIT tagged fish pass Bonneville Dam,” Powell said. “With only one PIT tag, we are unable to make a precise estimate of the number of Snake River sockeye salmon that are currently in the Columbia River.”


IDFG – pit tags used in sockeye salmon research at the Eagle Island Hatchery August 29, 2013

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Four remnant South Hills bighorn sheep removed to prevent disease spread

By Terry Thompson, Regional Communications Manager
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Fish and Game officials lethally removed the sheep from the Big Cottonwood Wildlife Management Area

Idaho Fish and Game officials lethally removed four bighorn sheep from the Big Cottonwood Wildlife Management Area. The two ewes and two young rams are believed to be the last remaining sheep from the South Hills population in Game Management Unit 54. They were euthanized to prevent spreading disease into nearby herds.

Fish and Game policy is to maintain separation between bighorn sheep and domestic sheep and goats. Domestic sheep and goats carry respiratory pathogens that are lethal to bighorn sheep. These pathogens cause all-age die-offs due to bacterial pneumonia and persistent low lamb recruitment or survival, sometimes lasting for decades after the initial die-off.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Fish and Game gets girls ready for hunting season

New course offered to general public

By Emma Iannacone Jul 09, 2019 Local News 8

Pocatello, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Idaho Fish and Game is teaching its annual Ladies and Girls Hunter Education Class at the southeast region’s office in Pocatello.

Tessa Atwood, the instructor, says the course is designed to help girls of all ages overcome an intimidating classroom setting.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Funny Kids and Critter Stuff:

Family’s fish photo goes viral

by Elizabeth Tyree, WSET Staff Tuesday, July 9th 2019


Photo Courtesy: Marika Daniels

Brookings, S.D. (WSET) — They say every photo tells a story and that’s definitely true for one family whose photo of their catch of the day went viral.

… She said she wanted to take a photo of her kids and their new rubber fish they got at the museum.

It wasn’t until after she took the photo that she realized what her youngest, 18-month-old Landon, had done.

full story:
———————–

Seasonal Humor:


————————-