Category Archives: News 2019

Winter Weather Advisory in effect from Dec 31, 5pm to Jan 1, 11pm

Winter Weather Advisory in effect from Dec 31, 5pm to Jan 1, 11pm

Link: Yellow Pine Forecast

Today Snow likely, mainly after 11am. Cloudy, with a high near 32. West northwest wind 5 to 7 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. Total daytime snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Tonight Snow. Low around 26. Northwest wind 7 to 9 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New snow accumulation of 2 to 4 inches possible.

New Year’s Day Snow showers. High near 34. West wind 6 to 10 mph, with gusts as high as 24 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 3 inches possible.

Wednesday Night Snow showers likely. Cloudy, with a low around 22. West wind around 8 mph, with gusts as high as 21 mph. Chance of precipitation is 70%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 2 inches possible.

Thursday Snow showers likely, mainly before 11am. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 29. West wind around 6 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Thursday Night A 40 percent chance of snow showers. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 18. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Winter Weather Advisory

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
306 AM MST Tue Dec 31 2019

West Central Mountains-Boise Mountains-
306 AM MST Tue Dec 31 2019

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 5 PM THIS
AFTERNOON TO 11 PM MST WEDNESDAY...

* WHAT...Snow expected. Total snow accumulations of 6 to 12
  inches. Local amounts up to 16 inches on the mountain peaks.
  Winds gusting as high as 35 mph above 6000 feet.

* WHERE...West Central Mountains and Boise Mountains zones,
  including the Highway 55 and 21 corridors, and the Long Valley.

* WHEN...From 5 PM this afternoon to 11 PM MST Wednesday.

* IMPACTS...Travel could be very difficult.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Slow down and use caution while traveling.

The latest road conditions can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.

A Winter Weather Advisory for snow means that periods of snow will
cause primarily travel difficulties. Be prepared for snow covered
roads and limited visibilities, and use caution while driving.

 

Dec 29, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Dec 29, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

New Year’s Eve ?
Dec 7 thru Feb 21 Yellow Pine Tavern Holiday Closure
(details below)
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Local Events:

New Year’s Eve ?
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Village News:

Dec 25 – Christmas dinner at the Community Hall

The community hall was warm and it didn’t start to cool off until everybody was done eating. We had a nice dinner with turkey, ham and prime rib. Hot cider, lots of pies, salads and side dishes. As usual way too much food. I think there probably were more than 25 people; there were two big, long tables full. Rhonda and Ronda and Deb decorated & had Christmas music. We enjoyed having having several “flat landers”: Ray Gillihan, Tom’s Lanham’s mother, Colleen, Deb’s sister, Vicky and her husband Jim, Marne and her friend. Dan Westfall was a nice surprise…. and he brought along a banana cream pie. We had a fun time and give our hostesses two thumbs up! Oh, and everyone went home with our annual Christmas “treats-in-a-bag”. (Bring your bag back to Nikki so it can be refilled next year.) – LI

20191225ComHall-a

20191225XmasDinner1-a
photos courtesy Marnie
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Cougar in Yellow Pine

There has been a small cougar hanging out in the village for almost 2 weeks. Tracks up at the post office and also around residences near main street. Keep an eye on your pets.

20191228CougarTracks-a
photo provided by Nicki
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Yellow Pine Tavern Holiday Closure

The Tavern will be closed from Saturday December 7th to Friday February 21st. UPS packages will be dropped off at Deb’s porch and she will also have gasoline for emergency situations. I will be available at my cell number for any questions or situations 208 739-7086
Thanks, Lorinne N. Munn
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report December 20 that the transfer station is clean and the bins are still fairly empty. Also the snow has improved the road, filling in the pot holes.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Boil Water Advisory Lifted November 22, 2019

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the Community Hall.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

The community hall committee’s goal is to have adequate heating installed in the main hall before the June VYPA meeting.

If folks have items for the community yard sale, please place them by the north wall in the community hall. If you see items you would like to purchase, you can pay Deb, Ronda, or Lynn. All funds support the community hall.

VYPA meetings for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
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YPFD News:

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Fire Chief – Jeff Forster

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

link: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Stop the Bleed Class: We will do another class this spring/summer [2020] depending on interest.

Training will resume in the spring.

-Fire Chief Jeff
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for Winter.
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

The Corner is closed for the winter, opening again next spring. I can be reached at matt @ ypcorner.com or at 970-379-5155. Thanks, have a great winter!
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Closed Dec 7 thru Feb 21.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Dec 23) overnight low of 26 degrees, low overcast (top of VanMeter socked in) and flaking snow – scant trace new and 2″ old snow on the ground. Red-breasted nuthatches, female hairy woodpecker visiting and possibly a female cassins finch, raven flying over the school “cronking.” Above freezing – steady snow, then rain/snow mix, back to all snow, then rain/snow mix then all rain ending by lunch time, the scant accumulation melting quickly, high of 37 degrees. Overcast and calm at sundown. Just above freezing and misting at dark, turned to snow when it dropped to 32 degrees later in the evening. Still snowing lightly at midnight. Looks like it snowed all night.

Tuesday (Dec 24) overnight low of 30 degrees, low overcast nearly to the floor and had just finished snowing by 10am, we received 1 1/8″ new snow and 3″ total snow on the ground. Nuthatches, chickadees and jays visiting. Light snow started before lunch time and ended early afternoon, about 1/4″ new accumulation, high of 35 degrees. Broken cloud cover mid-afternoon. Peaceful quiet day. Partly cloudy at dusk. Clear and sparkly stars before midnight.

Wednesday (Dec 25) overnight low of 4 degrees, partly cloudy – high thin streaks and cold, heavy frost, estimate 3″ snow on the ground. Steller jays, clark’s nutcracker, red-breasted nuthatches and a mountain chickadee visiting along with a fluffy looking pine squirrel. Some high haze and filtered sun after lunch time, high of 30 degrees. Mostly cloudy, below freezing and calm just before sundown. High thin clouds and haze at dusk, getting cold. A few bright stars out before midnight and cold. Cloudy at 2am. Clearing early morning and cold.

Thursday (Dec 26) overnight low of 5 degrees, mostly clear sky – a few clouds to the south and cold, estimate 3″ old snow on the ground. Nuthatches tapping seeds open. Strong sun melting frost by 11am and 13 degrees. Mostly cloudy before lunch time and still below freezing, high of 25 degrees. Just before sundown there were larger patches of open sky but mostly cloudy and cold. Cloudy and cold at dark. Light snow falling after midnight.

Friday (Dec 27) low of 6 degrees from Thurs morning, it was 22 degrees at 10am and overcast, light dusting of new snow and estimate 3″ old snow. Nuthatches and chickadees visiting. Cold and cloudy at lunch time, high of 28 degrees. Light traffic today. Spitting a few flakes of snow just before sundown (didn’t last long,) cloudy and cold. Low clouds and very light snow falling at dark. Snowed on and off most of the night and early morning.

Saturday (Dec 28) overnight low of 16 degrees, 1 1/8″ new snow and 4″ total snow on the ground, mostly cloudy and flaking snow all morning. A steller jay joined the nuthatches and chickadees at the feeders. Partly sunny at noon and icicles dripping, high of 34 degrees. Partly cloudy and light breeze early afternoon and above freezing for a bit. Sun went down behind the ridge by 330pm and almost clear. At dark it was calm and appeared to be partly cloudy. Short light snowfall at 920pm. Cloudy before midnight. Started snowing after 6am.

Sunday (Dec 29) overnight low of 15 degrees, 1/2″ new snow and 4″ total snow on the ground, overcast and fine light snow falling. Nuthatches, chickadees and hairy woodpecker visiting, raven flying and calling. Still snowing very lightly before lunch time, high of 31 degrees. Steady light snow all afternoon, calm and very low clouds. At sun set (around 330pm) the ridges were socked in and steady snowfall (about 1/4″ new.) Still snowing lightly at dark.
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RIP:

John H. Irwin
Jan. 1, 1931 – Dec.1, 2019

RIPJohnIrwinJohn H. Irwin, born Jan. 1, 1931 at Warren, died Sunday Dec.1, 2019 at his residence in Weiser at the age of 88.

John was born and raised on his parents ranch on the South Fork of the Salmon River, and was educated in Warren and at St. Gertrude’s in Cottonwood.

After his father’s untimely death when he was 16, he worked for the Forest Service building trails and lookouts. He then went on to join the Navy, serving four years during the Korean War.

While in the Navy he helped design the survival suits for the Navy pilots. He would always send money home to help his mother and 10 siblings.

John met his wife, Shirley Hix, in Prescott, Arizona where they were married. While raising a family of seven children he trained as a diesel mechanic.

John worked for Case/Drott for many years that included John and Shirley living in Costa Rica for five years while he was the Central American liaison for the company.

On his return to the states John retired from Case and worked as a foreman on the Petan Ranch in Nevada. While working on the ranch there was a wildland fire and he saved three wildland firefighters lives by driving into a wall of flames that surrounded them.

John received an award of valor and commendation from the BLM and the U.S. Congress.

John and Shirley built their retirement home at Secesh Meadows and lived there for more than 20 years. John was also instrumental in the start of the Secesh Fire Department.

He obtained fire equipment and trucks by writing grants. Through donations and grants the fire department building and land were established with his dedicated work.

He also made sure there was a phone installed by the fire station for emergencies to be used by everyone who needed it. He built the small enclosure for it. He also made the snow marker for Secesh Summit.

John also restored many gravesites on the South Fork of the Salmon River. He made sure the name of the deceased was on a headstone or marker.

He restored the Elk Creek Cemetery after fire destroyed the original markers and railing. Since he grew up in the area there were gravesites not known or marked, so he made sure they were marked and kept up.

John is survived by his children, James Irwin, Timothy Irwin, Catherine Farner, Deborah Jacoby, John Irwin, and Richard Irwin.

There are also 15 grandchildren and many great-grandchildren. He is also survived by brothers Robert Irwin and Dallas Irwin and sisters Colette Stradley and Ruth Clemens.

He is preceded in death by his wife of 65 years, Shirley Irwin, and a daughter, Laura Ann Robideau, also brothers Michael Irwin, Jerry Irwin, and Sisters Patricia Sasenberry, Rita Romine, Thecla Yeamans and Celine Seminole.

A family and friends gathering will be held early summer on the South Fork of the Salmon River at his favorite place.

source: The Star-News
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Idaho News:

Valley County roads get reprieve from Congress

Funding renewal to send $1M per year for 2 years

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Dec 26, 2019

Valley County road maintenance will get a boost of about $1 million each year for the next two years under funding passed last week by Congress.

The Secure Rural Schools and Self-Determination Act was reauthorized to provide funding to counties that have large amounts of federal land which generate no property taxes.

The new funding is likely to bring about $950,000 to the county road department in 2020 and 2021, Valley County Clerk Doug Miller said.

The funding also will provide $340,000 per year to the McCall-Donnelly School District and $65,500 to the Cascade School District, Miller said.

The legislation was first enacted in 2000, providing over $1 million in funding to county roads and was reauthorized several times since then.

The county received no funding in 2017 when Congress allowed the program to lapse.

The money for this year was already included in the current budget, Valley County Road Superintendent Jeff McFadden said.

“With this, it doesn’t really allow us to do any big projects, but it does help keep this place moving along with maintenance,” McFadden said.

Not receiving the funds would have been bad news for the road department, which saw a levy override vote in November fail to get the needed two-thirds majority. The levy would have added up to $4 million per year to the department’s budget.

County commissioners said they might seek to pass a similar levy in the future even with the renewed federal funding.

“We are still in discussion on the road levy,” Commission Chair Elt Hasbrouck said.

Commissioners have set a town hall meeting to discuss road department funding needs for Tuesday, Jan. 14, at 6 p.m. the American Legion Post 119 located beneath McCall City Hall in downtown McCall.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Payette Avalanche Center begins issuing regular forecasts

The Star-News Dec 26, 2019

The USFS Payette Avalanche Center has begun issuing forecasts on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays through the beginning of April at (link)

Forecasts may be issued on additional days if conditions warrant, a news release said.

Those interested can have the forecast emailed to them each morning or can call the center’s advisory hotline at 208-634-0409 to hear an audio recording of the forecast. The Friends of the Payette Avalanche Center will post conditions and events information on Facebook.

source:
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Valley rec director not guilty of extortion

Jury clears Larry Laxson of misdemeanor charge

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Dec 26, 2019

Valley County Recreation Director Larry Laxson was found not guilty of misdemeanor extortion following a jury trial last Thursday.

Laxson was accused of extorting a Nampa man by telling him his stranded pickup would not be retrieved unless he made a $500 donation to the McCall Area Snowmobile Club.

A five-woman, one-man jury issued the not-guilty verdict after deliberating about 90 minutes following testimony given at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade.

Laxson, 67, has been an employee of Valley County since 2012. He had been on administrative leave since June 27, but returned to work on Tuesday.

continued:
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Tamarack’s new chairlift to open Saturday, bus service starts

The high-speed, 4-person chairlift will whisk skiers up more than 1,600 feet in less than 6 minutes.

KTVB December 25, 2019

Donnelly, Idaho — Tamarack Resort announced that it will be opening the Wildwood Express chairlift on Saturday, Dec. 28.

Tamarack is expanding its mountain terrain and the lift will open access to more than 200 acres.

The Wildwood Express chairlift was originally installed in 2005. It was dismantled in late 2013 after Bank of America repossessed the lift.

continued:
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Heritiage Trust grant will repair ceiling at New Meadows depot

The Star-News Dec 26, 2019

The Adams County Historical Society has received a $2,550 grant from Idaho Heritage Trust for restoration of the second story hallway plaster ceiling in the historic Pacific and Idaho Northern Railway Depot in New Meadows.

The grant will be matched by an additional $2,550 from the historical society.

The 108-year-old plaster ceiling is failing and needs to be fixed before other restoration work can be done in other second story rooms. The work is scheduled to be done this winter.

This year 36 Idaho public organizations received matching grants from the Idaho Heritage Trust across Idaho, 16 of which were in communities with 5,000 or less residents.

source:
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Christmas heroes save local family from scary situation

Dec 23, 2019 By Natasha Williams KIVI

Idaho City, Idaho — It’s not unusual for Idaho families to make the trek up to Idaho City during Christmastime, and a lot can go wrong if you’re not prepared well enough.

What started as a Christmas adventure for a local mom and her four children became a disaster, but ended in a string of events they’ll never forget thanks to the help of four complete strangers.

Izabella Martinez and her children were happy to go hunting for their own tree, and as someone who grew up enjoying the Idaho outdoors, Martinez says she was prepared.

continued:
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Two elderly women in North Idaho die from flu complications

Megan Carroll December 23, 2019 KTVB

Two North Idaho women are the first in the state to die from flu-related complications this season.

The Department of Health and Welfare says both women were over the age of 70. Health leaders did not say whether the women received a flu shot.

During the four previous flu seasons in Idaho – from 2014 to 2019 – an average of 64 flu-related deaths occurred, with most of those occurring among people over 70 years of age.

continued:
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Mining News:

Midas Gold workers would live large at Stibnite

Lodge would include cafeteria, sports dome

(Note: This is the tenth part in a series detailing Midas Gold’s operating plan for its proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine. Next week: Traffic and Infrastructure)

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Dec 26, 2019

A lodge with a cafeteria, sports dome and a variety of other amenities would house Midas Gold employees at the company’s proposed gold mine near Yellow Pine.

Plans call for a 28,000 square foot hotel-style building called the Stibnite Lodge to house all Midas Gold employees and contractors through the expected 12-15-year life of the mine.

The Vancouver, B.C., company would pay about $70 million to build the facility, plus another $6 million per year to operate it, according to estimates.

The lodge would house employees in private individuals bedrooms. The total number of rooms planned was not available.

A housekeeping staff of about 28 to 32 employees would handle laundry and cleaning for employees, most of whom would work 14 consecutive 12-hour days before having 14 days off and away from site.

Two shifts of employees would live in the lodge at a time to enable the mine to operate 24 hours per day.

Every site employee would be required to stay in the lodge rather than commute three or more hours to the site each way daily.

Commuting could cause employee fatigue, increase the risk of traffic accidents and harm the environment due to increased traffic, according to Midas Gold.

Employees would be shuttled by bus to Stibnite from a Midas Gold logistics facility planned about seven miles up Warm Lake Road from Idaho 55.

All types of employees would be housed in the lodge along with other site visitors like company executives, consultants, government inspectors and regulators. Family and friends of employees would not be allowed on site.

The lodge would also feature a cafeteria capable of feeding about 300 people at once. No alcohol would be allowed or served in the lodge.

Other amenities included in the Stibnite Lodge would include internet access and a detached 20,000 square foot recreation dome.

The fabric dome would include sports fields for football, soccer and other sports, a gym with fitness equipment and a recreation area with activities like billiards, ping-pong and video games.

A separate outdoor area would provide additional sports fields for summer use and possibly cross-country ski trails in the winter, according to plans.

The lodge would be built about a mile away from mining operations in the Upper East Fork South Fork Salmon River valley, which would give workers a quiet place for off-shift employees to sleep.

Midas Gold would build a wastewater treatment plant to service the lodge, and trash would either be placed in a permitted on-site landfill or trucked off-site.

Materials to be recycled would be hauled to collection centers on outbound trucks following equipment and supply deliveries.

The lodge would be reduced in size and eventually be completely removed as mining winds down, according to the plan.

At its peak during World War II, Stibnite boasted a year-round community of about 750 people, 300 to 400 of which were employees of Bradley Mining Company, the site’s operator at the time.

The town featured a four-room school that had a ski team and a high school football team, plus other amenities like a bowling alley, a movie theater and Valley County’s first hospital.

The town was mostly abandoned in 1952 when Bradley shut down operations but several homes and other buildings from the community were trucked to Cascade and McCall and remain in use today.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Public Lands:

Winter Travel and Recreation Safety!

Payette National Forest, December 23, 2019

McCall, Idaho – December 23, 2019. The USFS Payette Avalanche Center (PAC) will begin issuing regular avalanche forecasts this Friday, December 20th. The PAC will be issuing forecasts on Monday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday through the beginning of April and they will be published at (link)

Forecasts may be issued on additional days if conditions warrant. Those interested can have the forecast emailed to them each morning or can call the PAC advisory hotline at 208-634-0409 to hear an audio recording of the forecast. As in past seasons, the Friends of the PAC will post conditions and events information on Facebook (@payetteavalanche). If you witness an avalanche or have a report on snowpack conditions, please submit your observations through the PAC website.

Looking to brush up on your avalanche awareness and rescue skills? The American Institute of Avalanche Research and Education (AIARE) training course calendar can be viewed online at (link). Courses are available for all levels both locally and regionally.

The Payette National Forest Winter Travel Map has been updated for 2019 and print versions will be available at the start of the New Year. A digital version of the map can be downloaded to your phone via the free Avenza Maps app (link) for viewing in the field. The map can also be downloaded from the FS website here:

The Winter Travel Map shows allowable uses (i.e., motorized, non-motorized) during the winter season, as well as specific restrictions in areas such as Granite Mountain. Before heading out to enjoy your national forest, please take time to become familiar with the Winter Travel Map.

Enjoy visiting your National Forest this winter and please be safe while recreating. The McCall Ranger District is open M-F, 8:00am-4:30pm, and staff is available to answer your questions. You can also call the office at 208-634-0400 during business hours.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
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Letter to Share:

Cascade Veterinary Clinic

New Hours for both Clinics as of today 12/23/19! Cascade Vet Clinic Monday/Wed/Friday 9-5 lunch 12-1 Tuesday and Thursday 9-12 No doctor available. Garden Valley Clinic will be open on Tuesday and Thursday from 9-5 lunch 12-1 Monday/Wed/Friday they will be open from 9-12 no doctor available. Everyone have a safe and Happy Holidays!!
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Critter News:

‘It’s not going away’: Vets still seeing cases of dog heart problems linked to grain-free food

Exotic ingredients and boutique brands may also be linked to the health issues.

Dec. 27, 2019, By Linda Carroll NBC

Debbie Turner remembers the shock when a veterinary specialist said her beloved dog, Kanga Lu, had severe heart damage.

… The first question the specialist had asked Turner when she brought in Kanga — whose blood pressure had skyrocketed — was, “Do you feed her grain-free dog food?” The answer was yes.

Turner is one of a growing list of pet owners whose healthy-sounding dog food may have somehow led to a serious heart problem in their pets called dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM).

The Food and Drug Administration last year announced a possible link between the condition, which can cause heart failure, and grain-free pet foods, which replace grains with ingredients like peas, lentils or potatoes.

continued:
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Five mountain lion attacks reported in Wood River Valley

Dec 24, 2019 By Steve Bertel KIVI

Hailey, Idaho — Idaho Fish and Game officers received a report Monday about a mountain lion attack on a Labrador retriever on Saturday, December 21, north of Hailey.

The homeowners reported letting their dog out about 6:15 a.m. that morning then, shortly after, hearing loud noises in their backyard. They immediately checked and found a mountain lion attacking their dog in the unfenced backyard. Shortly after the homeowner confronted the lion, it let the dog go.

The dog received injuries in the attack, but survived and is back home with its owners.

continued:
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Man catches record-setting whitefish at Bear Lake, now owns three Idaho fishing records

Gaylon Newbold now holds the record for catching the heaviest and longest Bonneville Whitefish in Idaho.

KTVB December 23, 2019


by Gaylon Newbold

Boise, Idaho — Another Idaho fishing record has fallen, this time the record-breaking fish was caught at Bear Lake, along the Idaho-Utah border.

Gaylon Newbold now has his name etched in Idaho’s fishing records for a third time after he caught the largest Bonneville Whitefish in the state

Idaho Fish and Game said Newbold caught the whitefish 21-inch long fish on Dec. 10.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Safety tips when living in close proximity to mountain lions

By Terry Thompson, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, December 26, 2019

When people and their pets live in close proximity to mountain lions, everyone needs to be vigilant and aware of their surroundings.

Reports of mountain lions in the Wood River Valley continue to come in, almost daily, to Fish and Game. Most reports are about lions moving through neighborhoods or sightings of lions in yards. We also receive reports of cats recorded on security cameras. Since December 14, these reports have also included reports of five attacks on dogs, three fatal, in the Valley.

Understandably, residents and visitors are concerned.

continued:
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Ring in the New Year with a 2020 License

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Communications Manager
Monday, December 23, 2019

Before heading out in the New Year, Idaho hunters and anglers are reminded to pick up a 2020 license.

Nearly all of Idaho’s hunting and fishing licenses, tags, and permits are sold on a calendar year basis, and they expire December 31.

The only licenses or permit not sold on a calendar year basis are Idaho’s trapping license and Federal duck stamp. Both are valid from July 1 through the following June 30. This is because the seasons generally begin in the fall and end in the late winter.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Fun Critter Stuff:

‘Serious replies only:’ Dating ad seeks match for man’s grieving, newly single duck

by Associated Press Thursday, December 12th 2019

Jennifer Coolidge via AP

Blue Hill, Maine (AP) — There’s no Tinder for waterfowl, but that didn’t stop a Maine bird owner from trying to find a match for a mourning duckling.

One of Chris Morris’ ducks, Yellow Duck, lost its mate to a hungry bobcat a couple of weeks ago at Morris’ yard in Blue Hill. Morris, a 31-year-old special education teacher, drew up a singles ad for Yellow Duck and placed it on a community bulletin board at a local grocery store.

The ad declares: “Duck seeking duck. Lonesome runner duck seeks companion. Partner recently deceased.” It also includes an email address dedicated to the dating search and states, “serious replies only.”

The Bangor Daily News reports farm owner Sadie Greene might have just the duck to mend Yellow Duck’s broken heart. Greene and Morris are arranging a meeting for the ducks on Sunday.

Yellow Duck’s favorite food is slugs, and they might be on the menu for the big date, Morris said.

source:
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Seasonal Humor:

NewYearPondering-a
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Dec 22, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Dec 22, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Dec 7 thru Feb 21 Yellow Pine Tavern Holiday Closure
Dec 25 – Christmas dinner at the Community Hall 2pm
(details below)
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Local Events:

Dec 25 – Christmas dinner at the Community Hall 2pm

Christmas potluck will be at the community Hall on the 25th at 2pm. stay after dinner and play bingo!
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Village News:

Winter Solstice Sunrise

P1000563-20191221SolsticeSunrise
December 21, 2019 about 1045am. – rrS
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Community Hall has been Decked

On Friday December 20th A gathering of locals worked in the community hall decorating for Christmas dinner.
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Christmas Bags

Christmas bags will be available for ‘stuffing’ inside the community hall starting on the 10th.
-DF
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Yellow Pine Tavern Holiday Closure

The Tavern will be closed from Saturday December 7th to Friday February 21st. UPS packages will be dropped off at Deb’s porch and she will also have gasoline for emergency situations. I will be available at my cell number for any questions or situations 208 739-7086
Thanks, Lorinne N. Munn
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report December 20 that the transfer station is clean and the bins are still fairly empty. Also the snow has improved the road, filling in the pot holes.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Boil Water Advisory Lifted November 22, 2019

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the Community Hall.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

Christmas bags will be available for ‘stuffing’ inside the community hall starting on the 10th.

The community hall committee’s goal is to have adequate heating installed in the main hall before the June VYPA meeting.

If folks have items for the community yard sale, please place them by the north wall in the community hall. If you see items you would like to purchase, you can pay Deb, Ronda, or Lynn. All funds support the community hall.

VYPA meetings for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
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YPFD News:

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Fire Chief – Jeff Forster

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

link: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Stop the Bleed Class: We will do another class this spring/summer [2020] depending on interest.

Training will resume in the spring.

-Fire Chief Jeff
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for Winter.
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

The Corner is closed for the winter, opening again next spring. I can be reached at matt @ ypcorner.com or at 970-379-5155. Thanks, have a great winter!
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Closed Dec 7 thru Feb 21.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Dec 16) overnight low of 1 degree, clear sky this morning, trace of new snow from last evening and 3″ of snow on the ground. Mountain chickadees and red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Sunny and well below freezing at lunch time, high of 26 degrees. Female hairy woodpecker stopped by. Still way below freezing mid-afternoon, sunny clear sky. Temperatures dropped quickly after sundown into the teens under a clear sky. Single digits by 930pm. Stars out and cold before midnight.

Tuesday (Dec 17) overnight low of -1 degree, high thin overcast this morning, about 3″ old snow on the ground. Nuthatches and chickadees visiting. Thicker overcast by lunch time and chilly, high of 26 degrees. Clark’s nutcracker stopped by. Still below freezing and overcast mid-afternoon. Cloudy and chilly at dark, temperatures in the teens.

Wednesday (Dec 18) at 6am it was 9 degrees (probably the low for the night) overcast sky this morning and a little warmer. Mountain chickadees and red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Mostly cloudy at lunch time, high of 35 degrees. Mail truck (Elaine) was a little early today. Clouds breaking up early afternoon and bits of sunshine. Partly cloudy and below freezing by late afternoon. Appears to be mostly cloudy just before dark. Overcast before midnight. Snow falling early morning.

Thursday (Dec 19) warming up and snowing early this morning, at 10am it was 29 degrees, low overcast and half inch new snow (3″ on the ground.) Chickadees and nuthatches visiting. Thinner clouds and filtered sun (and a few flakes of snow) after lunch time, high of 37 degrees. A break from snow flakes, above freezing and dripping early afternoon. Breezy, overcast and flaking snow again mid-afternoon (just before sunset.) Breezy after dark and probably not snowing. Calmer before midnight. Rain early morning.

Friday (Dec 20) warmed up and rained early this morning, at 10am it was 34 degrees overcast and breezy, roofs dripping. A few nuthatches visiting, later a few mountain chickadees and a jay. Cloudy warm and melting snow dripping off roofs at lunch time, high of 44 degrees. Still above freezing by mid-afternoon, dark clouds and a little breezy. Cloudy and calmer at dark. Windy after midnight, flags flapping and overcast. Hard gusts of wind before sunrise.

Saturday (Dec 21) overnight low of 27 degrees, warmed up and windy this morning under overcast sky, about 3″ old snow still on the ground but roofs are mostly bare. Red-breasted nuthatches and mountain chickadees visiting. Overcast, warm and breezy at lunch time, high of 49 degrees. Really blustery early afternoon. Lighter breezes and overcast at sundown. Overcast, above freezing and almost calm at dark. Hit the freezing mark by 10pm and getting really slick on the streets and paths. Cloudy and calm before midnight.

Sunday (Dec 22) overnight low of 27 degrees, mostly high thin clouds this morning and almost calm, measured 2″ old crusty icy snow on the ground. Chickadees and nuthatches visiting. Mostly clear and a little breezy at lunch time, high of 48 degrees. Quiet day. Clear and breezy right after sundown. Cloudy and breezy at dark.
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RIP:

Milton Howard Gillihan

August 12, 1952 – December 4, 2019

RIPMiltonGillihan1

Milton Howard Gillihan, a former Yellow Pine resident, passed away on December 4, 2019, in Centralia, WA. He was born on August 12, 1952, in Boise, Idaho to John and Elsie Gillihan. Milton’s father was an Outfitter and Guide in the Frank Church Wilderness of Idaho. His family moved to Yellow Pine, Idaho in 1963. Milton attended school in there from 1963 to 1967, moved to Emmett to complete the last four years of school, and graduated from Emmett High School in 1970. Shortly after graduation, he married his High School sweetheart, Linda Walker, and they had three children – Russell, Lani and Marc. He and Linda eventually parted ways, and Milton moved to Washington state for a truck driving position. He married Jeanne Clark of Silver Creek, WA on July 30, 2005.

RIPMiltonGillihan2
Growing up, Milton spent summers helping his father in the hunting business. He learned to guide hunting and fishing parties in the Yellow Pine and Big Creek areas. They leased the Neal Ranch in Big Creek every summer, and it was Milton’s favorite place to be. His days were spent wrangling and riding horses, fishing, hiking and hunting. He loved being in the mountains and connecting with nature. During his lifetime Milton worked in Idaho, Washington, Nevada and California in various occupations including wilderness guide, sawmill & mining work, construction, and long haul & local truck driving.

Milton is survived by his wife Jeanne, his children Russell (Beth) Gillihan, Lanigan Vitaceae, and Marc (Jana) Gillihan. His siblings: Bob Gillihan (Cathy); George Gillihan (Veda); Ray Gillihan, Roy Gillihan (Renette), Anna May Wyman (Chuck); Kristy Scaraglino (Rick) and Pat Gillihan. He was preceded in death by his parents, John & Elsie Gillihan, his brothers Jack Gillihan and Harold Gillihan, and nephews Kevin and Kelly Gillihan. He was blessed with nine grandchildren and 31 nieces and nephews.

(courtesy Kristy Gillihan Scaraglino)
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Valley County Snowmobile News:

Valley County Board of County Commissioners Invites You to a Public Hearing

Public Hearing January 21, 2020 1:00 p.m.
Courthouse Building, 2nd Floor
219 North Main Street Cascade, ID

You are welcome to attend the public hearing and/or comment on this proposal. Our office would appreciate your comments in person or by mail, fax, email, or phone call. Written comments must be received at least seven days prior to the public hearing. You may also speak during the public hearing. If you do not submit a comment, we will assume you have no objections to the application.

Direct questions and comments to:

Cynda Herrick, AICP, CFM
Planning & Zoning Administrator
PO Box 1350
Cascade, ID 83611
208-382-7115
cherrick@co.valley.id.us

Ordinance Amendment “Snowmobiles”

This proposal would amend Valley County Code Title 5 Chapter 5 Snowmobiles and Chapter 7 Rights of Way

Changes include:

• Specific groomed snowmobile trails would be closed to Wheeled Vehicles during certain times of the year, including Warren Wagon RD, No Business RD, Anderson Creek RD, High Valley RD (USFS 626), Clear Creek Road, and “Green Gate RD”.
• Tracked vehicles may be permitted by the Valley County Parks & Recreation Director for home owners beyond groomed trail heads after consideration by the Board of County Commissioners.
• It shall be unlawful to leave wheeled vehicles or trailers parked in a place or manner which will impede snow removal equipment or impede the flow of orderly traffic, except in designated areas. Vehicles may be towed at owner’s expense.
• Overnight parking of wheeled vehicles and trailers, or between the hours of midnight and 6:00 a.m. is only allowed in designated areas. Vehicles may be towed at owner’s expense.
• If a wheeled vehicle gets stuck on a groomed trail or closed road, the operator is responsible for the removal of the vehicle to an open road and costs of the removal and repair of the groomed trail.
• A right of way permit shall be issued for any work done in the Valley County right-of-way, including road construction, utility installation, boring for utilities, snow removal, etc.

Draft ordinance can be read at: (link)

Visit the P&Z GIS map at: (link)
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Idaho News:

Idaho 55 blocked for an hour when snowplow hits car

The Star-News December 19, 2019

Idaho 55 west of McCall was blocked for about an hour last Thursday when a snowplow backed into a car, Idaho State Police reported.

The accident happened about 9 a.m. last Thursday about a mile west of the Brundage Mountain Resort turn-off, the ISP said.

An Idaho Transportation Department snowplow driven by Brad W. Steiner of New Meadows was working to clear the roadway around a stuck vehicle when it backed into a car driven by Robert R. Picken of Hayden. There were no injuries but Picken’s car had to be towed from the scene, the ISP said.

source:
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Historic Roseberry gets $7,000 grant for new general store roof

The Star-News December 19, 2019

A $7,000 grant to put a new roof on the general store at Historic Roseberry has been awarded by the Idaho Heritage Trust.

The grant to the Long Valley Preservation Society is dependent on the society raising $7,000 in matching funds, board member Dean Jones said.

“The roof is rusted, has holes in it, allows birds and bats inside,” Jones said. “Bat droppings as well as water are degrading the vintage, original wall paper upstairs.”

The Roseberry General Store was built in 1905 and was acquired by the society in 2015. It is one of nearly two dozen buildings owned and maintained by the society at the historic townsite located one mile east of Donnelly.

The general store is open May through September Fridays through Sundays and sells throwback candy such as horehound sticks, collectible tin toys, water and soft drinks.

The townsite is also the location of The Barn, a popular wedding and reunion venue, and the site of the Summer Music Festival at Roseberry each July.

The townsite also hosts an arts and crafts fair during the Independence Day holiday and the annual Ice Cream Social each Labor Day weekend.

The Long Valley Preservation Society was established in 1973 with the goal to collect, preserve, interpret and display Valley County history at the Roseberry complex.

Contact Jones at rattlesnake4873@gmail.com for information on making a donation toward the match for the Roseberry General Store roof. Go to (link)  for information on the townsite.

source:
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With new operator, Steamboat Gulch sled hill will open by Christmas

The area was shut down earlier this month after visitors damaged it by leaving trash, damaging trees and driving on the hill.

KTVB December 20, 2019

Idaho City, Idaho — A popular sledding spot near Idaho City will be open to the public after all, just weeks after officials said they were forced to shut it down.

A new operator has stepped up to manage and oversee Steamboat Gulch sled hill, meaning the area will reopen to sledders in time for Christmas.

continued:
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New Idaho law suspends uninsured drivers’ car registration after three months, goes into effect January 1

Joe Parris KTVB December 17, 2019

Boise, Idaho — In a few weeks we bring in the new year, 2020 – and some new laws go into effect in Idaho.

Starting Jan. 1, 2020, Idaho drivers who do not have insurance for three consecutive months could have their car registration suspended.

Vince Trimboli, a spokesman for the Idaho Transportation Department, says there are around 150,000 cars that don’t have insurance attached to them in Idaho.

continued:
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Seasonal Tips & Advice:

Dry Christmas trees cause house fires

By Emma Iannacone December 19, 2019 KDIK

About 160 Christmas trees catch fire every year, according to the National Fire Protection Association.

… Tree fires cause about $10 million in damage each year, according to the NFPA.

To avoid a tree fire, Farnsworth said to keep the tree watered daily and don’t set it up by heat sources.

“Heating devices, that’s one of the most common ones, to have heating devices near the Christmas trees,” Farnsworth said.

Double check your light set up for frays or breaks in the string. Don’t use outdoor specific lights on your tree because they can get too hot for the branches.

Keep candles away from the tree. Get rid of your tree after Christmas to avoid it drying out too much, but don’t leave it in the garage or up against the house.

full story:
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Christmas Tree Fire: Watered Tree vs. Dry Tree

According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), more than 200 home fires each year start with a Christmas tree. In this video, NIST fire researchers demonstrate what could happen if a fire starts in a watered Christmas tree vs. a dry Christmas tree.

[Turn Sound Down]

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Letter to Share:

Fact Check: Biological Assessment

Midas Gold Blog December 16, 2019

A recent article published by the AP around our project did not include all the facts on an aspect of the permitting process and only told one side of the narrative. We want to make sure Idahoans have the full story.

Here is what you need to know.

Midas Gold is working through the permitting process exactly as it was intended and following all of the rules outlined by federal agencies. We are committed to a permitting process based on objective scientific review that encourages a collaborative process that brings all stakeholders around the same table to share information and input to help guide the project.

The article discusses the process of preparing an environmental report called a Biological Assessment, which is part of Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act and an important part of the permitting process, and our role being designated as a “non-federal representative.”

continued:

link: briefing paper

link: Associated Press story
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Mining News:

Midas Gold plans to fill up the Glory Hole

Yellow Pine pit would go away under proposed plan

(Note: This is the ninth part in a series detailing Midas Gold’s operating plan for its proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine. Next week: Workforce Housing)

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News December 19, 2019

The existing pit lake seen from Stibnite Road would be drained and dug hundreds of feet deeper before the scar is removed from the land, according to Midas Gold’s operating plan for its gold mine near Yellow Pine.

The Yellow Pine pit, also known as the Glory Hole, has blocked salmon and trout from traveling further up the East Fork South Fork Salmon River since the pit was first excavated in 1938 by Bradley Mining Company.

Midas Gold plans to restore the river to its pre-1938 condition after extracting about 2.5 million ounces of gold, 4 million ounces of silver and 86 million pounds of antimony from the pit.

In order to do that, about 30 million gallons of water would be pumped out of the lake, while year-round pumps would prevent the pit from re-filling with groundwater.

The pit is now 125 feet deep but would be dug down to 640 feet below the surface during extraction operations, the operation plan said.

About 110 million tons of waste rock from the nearby West End pit would be used to fill the pit starting in year seven of mining.

By year 11, the pit would be completely filled and grading work to sculpt the river corridor back to its original configuration would begin.

The re-established river would consist of a main channel about 25 to 30 feet wide and five feet deep. Resting pools and small cascades would be built into it to mimic natural riverbeds and assist salmon and trout in swimming upstream.

Alongside the channel would be between 170 feet and 350 feet of floodplain with high-flow channels, which would provide additional wildlife habitat and room for the river to change courses naturally over time, according to the plan.

A liner would be needed to prevent the river from drying up while groundwater levels replenish in the former Yellow Pine pit, a process expected to take about two years.

The liner would be placed several feet beneath the ground to prevent erosion and would extend at least 100 feet out on each side of the main channel into the floodplain.

Native grasses, shrubs and trees planted in the restored river corridor would take several decades to fully mature and meet Midas Gold’s final vision for the restored East Fork corridor.

Until work to re-establish the East Fork is complete about 15 years after mining begins, it would flow through Midas Gold’s proposed fish passage tunnel to the west of the Yellow Pine pit.

The mile-long tunnel would remain open for about two years after the East Fork is re-established in case it is needed to divert high flows that could wash away newly planted vegetation.

Currently, the Yellow Pine pit lake is about 35 feet deep because about 90 feet of sediment from upriver has collected in it over the last 80 years.

Large, coarse sediment that is ideal for salmon spawning habitat sinks to the bottom of the lake, while finer sediment passes through and continues down the East Fork.

The finer sediment can fill and muck up existing salmon spawning grounds, which must be coarse gravel beds.

If the pit lake continues filling with sediment, eventually the sediment would spill downstream into the East Fork and overload existing salmon spawning grounds with sediment, according to Midas Gold.

Much of the fine sediment filling the lake stems from a 1965 dam failure that Midas Gold also proposes to clean up as part of its plan.

Exposed rock in the old pit walls beneath the surface of the water are also believed to be leaching arsenic and antimony into the water. Currently, water at Stibnite does not meet federal standards for drinking water or aquatic life.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Judge rejects Midas Gold request to dismiss lawsuit

Tribe says miners have not stopped water pollution at Stibnite

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News December 19, 2019

A federal judge on Monday denied Midas Gold’s request to dismiss a lawsuit filed by the Nez Perce Tribe against the company for discharging pollutants into waters at Stibnite.

The ruling handed down by U.S. District Judge Lynn Winmill in Boise means that the lawsuit will advance toward a trial, though no date has been set yet.

The tribe accuses Midas Gold of violating the Clean Water Act, a federal law regulating pollutant discharges into waterways, by not stopping existing sources of pollutants from entering waterways.

“As the tribe has repeatedly stated, Midas Gold’s failure to address unlawful pollution discharges at the site is harming the tribe and the people of Idaho,” Nez Perce Tribal Executive Committee Chairman Shannon Wheeler said in a statement following the hearing.

Sugar Creek, the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Meadow Creek and adjacent wetlands are all affected by the pollutants, according to the lawsuit.

Wheeler added that he is “troubled” by Midas Gold’s efforts to “evade ownership responsibility” of the proposed gold mine site near Yellow Pine by seeking a dismissal of the case.

But a Midas Gold spokesperson said the company cannot legally clean up contaminants left by previous mining companies under a federal law regulating hazardous waste sites that could endanger the environment and the public.

“A lawsuit will not clean up the site,” said Mckinsey Lyon, vice president of external affairs for Midas Gold.

“Midas Gold needs permission from regulators to do work on the ground to see true improvements in water quality at Stibnite,” Lyon said. “That process is underway and has been for quite a while.”

Winmill did not rule on a separate motion to suspend the lawsuit for 180 days while Midas Gold continues to work through the permitting process.

Midas Gold would be able to clean up existing pollutants just as the tribe seeks if the process is completed, Lyon said.

The tribe insists that the clean-up begin immediately to avoid further damage to aquatic ecosystems from the pollutants.

“The tribe remains committed to serving as the voice of these resources and to ensuring a full cleanup happens without further delay,” Wheeler said in the release.

Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite Gold Project lies on lands subject to a federal treaty from 1855 that protects the tribe’s rights to fishing, hunting, gathering and pasturing on the land.

In early June, the tribe filed documents notifying Midas Gold of its plans to sue if the company did not comply with federal water quality standards within 60 days. The lawsuit was then formally filed in August.

Midas Gold for nearly a decade has regularly submitted water sampling data to the Payette National Forest, the lead permitting agency on the mine, as part of its commitment to cleaning up Stibnite and improving water quality, Midas Gold officials said.

A recent sample taken from near the East Fork South Fork Salmon River showed arsenic levels 700 times higher than federal drinking water standards allow.

Last October, the Nez Perce Tribe, which is based in Lapwai, formally announced its opposition to the Vancouver, B.C., company’s proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Lawsuit puts forest gold exploration on hold

Dec 19, 2019 Local News 8

Boise, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK)-U.S. District Judge B. Lynn Winmill ruled Wednesday that the U.S. Forest Service failed to adequately consider the potential water quality impacts of an eastern Idaho mining permit.

Otis Gold plans to construct over 10 miles of temporary road, clear up to 140 drill pads, and drill up to 420 exploratory holes in a search for gold about 50 miles west of Yellowstone National Park in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. The project covers 20 square miles adjacent the popular Steel Creek Campground.

… The lawsuit was filed in November 2018, challenging an August 2018 decision to grant a five-year permit to Otis Gold Corp. of Canada for low grade gold in a wildlife migration corridor and farming region in the Centennial Mountains near Kilgore, Idaho.

full story:
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Union members from Idaho mine reject agreement with company

Dec 18, 2019 By Associated Press

Members of a union representing workers at an Idaho mine have rejected a tentative agreement that could have ended a two-and-half year strike.

The Spokesman-Review reported Monday that United Steelworkers Local 5114 and Hecla Mining Company announced a tentative agreement in November that required ratification by a majority of union members.

Union officials say a third party counted ballots Monday finding that the majority voted against the proposed contract. Officials say the union represents about 200 workers at the Lucky Friday Mine near Mullan, Idaho.

Hecla Mining was not immediately available for comment.

source:
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Public Lands:

USDA Forest Service South Fork Restoration and Access Management Plan Update

December 17, 2019

The US Forest Service has prepared a revised Environmental Assessment and Draft Decision Notice for the South Fork Restoration and Access Management Plan. The project includes numerous actions relating to watershed restoration, motorized and non-motorized access, and improvements of recreation facilities within the South Fork Salmon River (SFSR) watershed within a 329,000 acre project area. The selected alternative is a hybrid of the alternatives presented in the Environmental Assessment, hereafter referred to as the Selected Alternative. The selected alternative includes one project-level amendment limited to the scope and scale of this project related to the designation of existing routes as system roads for administrative purposes in the Krassel Work Center and Reed Ranch Airstrip area. It also includes the decision to issue a Federal Roads and Trails Act easement to Valley County for 30.3 miles of the South Fork Salmon River Road (Forest Road 474/674).

The project would be implemented on the Krassel and McCall Ranger Districts of the Payette National Forest and the Cascade Ranger District of the Boise National Forest. The Responsible Official is the Forest Supervisor, Payette National Forest. The proposed project is an activity implementing existing land management plans and is subject to pre-decisional objection process at 36 CFR 218 Subparts A and B.

The revised Environmental Assessment, Draft Decision Notice, and other project information are available for review at the project webpage at (link) and at the Krassel Ranger District 500 North Mission Street, Bldg 1, McCall, ID 83638. Hardcopy documents may be made available to interested parties upon request by calling 208-634-0600.

This project is subject to the objection process pursuant to 36 CFR 218 Subpart B. This project is not related to the Hazardous Fuels Reduction Act. The Intermountain Regional Forester is the reviewing officer. The objection filing period is expected to be December 19, 2019 through February 3, 2020.

Objections will be accepted only from those who have previously submitted specific written comments regarding the proposed project either during scoping or other designated opportunity for public comment in accordance with § 218.5(a). Issues raised in objections must be based on previously submitted timely, specific, written comments regarding the proposed project unless based on new information arising after designated opportunities. Individual members of organizations must have submitted their own comments to meet the requirements of eligibility as an individual. Objections received on behalf of an organization are considered as those of the organization only. If an objection is submitted on behalf of a number of individuals or organizations, each individual or organization listed must meet the eligibility requirement of having previously submitted comments on the project (§ 218.7). Names and addresses of objectors will become part of the public record.

Incorporation of documents by reference in the objection is permitted only as provided for at § 218.8(b). Minimum content requirements of an objection are identified in § 218.8(d) include: Objector’s name and address with a telephone number if available; with signature or other verification of authorship supplied upon request; identification of the lead objector when multiple names are listed, along with verification upon request; name of project, name and title of the responsible official, national forest/ranger district where project is located, and sufficient narrative description of those aspects of the proposed project objected to, specific issues related to the project, how environmental law, regulation, or policy would be violated, and suggested remedies which would resolve the objection. The objection must include a statement demonstrating the connection between prior specific written comments on this project and the content of the objection, unless the objection issue arose after the designated opportunities for comment.

Written objections, including any attachments, must be submitted within 45 days following the publication date of the legal notice in the newspaper of record. It is the responsibility of Objectors to ensure their objection is received in a timely manner (§ 218.9). The publication date in the Idaho Statesman, newspaper of record, is the exclusive means for calculating the time to file an objection to this project. Those wishing to object to this proposed project should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source. We anticipate the legal notice will be published on December 18, 2019 and the official comment period would open the following day.

The Reviewing Officer is the Regional Forester. Send objections to the project website using the link in the right corner to “comment/object to project” or send to Objection Reviewing Officer, Intermountain Region USFS, 324 25th Street, Ogden, Utah 84401; or fax to 801-625-5277; or by email to: objections-intermtn-regional-office@fs.fed.us. Reference the project name “SFRAMP” in the subject line. It is the responsibility of Objectors to ensure their objection is received in a timely manner (§ 218.9).

We appreciate your interest in the Payette National Forest and this project. If you have any questions regarding this project or objection period, please contact Anthony Botello, Krassel District Ranger at 208-634-0601.
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Idaho City District of the Boise National Forest Intends to Submit Grant Proposal to Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation

Idaho City, Idaho, December 20, 2019 — The Idaho City Ranger District of the Boise National Forest is applying for grant funding from the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation to help trail and developed campsite improvements and maintenance.

The different applications will request funding through the Department’s Off-Road Motor Vehicle (ORMV), and Recreational Vehicle (RV) programs.

* ORMV funds would provide necessary equipment and crew time to assist in the heavy trail maintenance and signing of approximately 16 miles of motorized trails # 289, 291 and 292.

* RV funds would be concentrated on improving Edna Creek Campground. The grant will fund the replacement of campground furniture and tent pads.

All grant proposals will improve visitor experiences. If received, implementation of the trails grant would begin in late summer and the RV grant would be implemented in the fall.

Comments or requests for more information should be submitted to Everardo Santillan, Idaho City Ranger District, and P.O. Box 129, Idaho City, ID or by calling 208-392-6681.
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More access to public land blocked

Crouch residents upset about gates

Dec 18, 2019 By Steve Liebenthal KIVI

Crouch, Idaho — Ryan McFarland is an Idaho native who has been wandering the mountains near Crouch his entire life. Nine years ago he bought a second home here, and this year he was disappointed to find a gate blocking a road that provides access to large parcels of state and federal public land.

“I called the Boise National Forest and asked them what was going on and why they allowed gates to go up over a Forest Service road,” said McFarland. “They told me it was not a Forest Service road.”

McFarland made that call based on a map the Forest Service published in 2018. In 2019 the Forest Service issued a new map with an interesting revision. On the new map this road doesn’t exist.

continued:
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Dogs and chocolate do not mix

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Dec 20, 2019 IME

In December, dogs are more than twice as likely to scarf down a toxic dose of chocolate than at any other time of the year. This is probably because their human companions have stocked up on candies, cocoa and baking chocolate for gifts and treats. The harmful substances in chocolate are theobromine and caffeine. Cocoa powder contains the highest amount of caffeine and theobromine, followed by unsweetened baker’s chocolate, sweet chocolate and milk chocolate. White chocolate contains negligible amounts of methylxanthines and caffeine.

The most common clinical signs of chocolate toxicity are restlessness, hyperactivity, vomiting, diarrhea, increased drinking and urination, and a rapid heart rate. Animals may begin pacing and are unable to sit still. They may pant and appear anxious. Hyperactivity may progress to tremors and seizures if large amounts of chocolate are ingested.

… For a dog, a deadly dose is about 100-200 milligrams per kilogram of body weight. That means that a 20-pound dog needs only 14 ounces of milk chocolate to kill it. About 3.5 ounces of semi-sweet or bittersweet chocolate could kill a 20-pound dog, and as little as one ounce of baker’s chocolate could end its life.

full story:
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USPS reports close calls between dogs, carriers

Dec 20, 2019 KIVI

Idaho — Southern Idaho Postal Carriers are reporting an increasing number of dog bites and close encounters with dogs as they deliver a growing number of packages to doors and porches this holiday season.

The injurious scenario is often the same; Postal carrier walks up to a house to deliver a package, customer opens the door, dog runs out the door and bites the carrier.

According to USPS District Manager Laura Hubrich, these dog attacks are preventable.

“If a carrier delivers a package or a certified letter to your front door, place your dog into a separate room and close the door before opening the front door,” said Hubrich. “Dogs have been known to burst through screen doors or plate-glass windows to get at strangers.”

continued:
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One dog killed, another injured in mountain lion attacks in Blaine County

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, December 17th 2019

Ketchum, Idaho (CBS2) — A dog was killed over the weekend by a mountain lion in Blaine County.

Another was injured in a separate and unrelated attack.

Idaho Fish and Game says a lion was in a fenced backyard in the small town of Gimlet on Sunday when the cougar killed the homeowner’s dog, a German shorthair. Conservation officers will try and trap and remove the mountain lion from the area.

continued:
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Cougar shot near Warm Springs Road

Lion involved in incident near Gimlet remains at large

Greg Moore Dec 20, 2019 IME

An Idaho Department of Fish and Game officer shot a mountain lion near Warm Springs Road on Wednesday morning after two residents reported that their dogs had been killed.

The attacks followed an attack by a cougar on a dog in southwest Ketchum on Saturday night, in which the dog survived but lost an eye, and a fatal attack on a dog Sunday night at a home near Gimlet Road south of Ketchum.

Fish and Game spokesman Terry Thompson said the department received a call Wednesday about 7 a.m. that a lion had just killed a dog that was behind a 6-foot solid fence in a yard on Bald Mountain Road. Thompson said the caller reported that another dog that had been in the yard had not been attacked. He said the caller said the lion had been seen jumping over the fence to leave the yard.

continued:
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2 Yellowstone wolf pups fatally hit by a vehicle

Mammoth Hot Springs, Wyo. (KIFI/KIDK) – Two wolves from the Junction Butte Pack were fatally hit around sunset on the road between Tower Junction and the Northeast Entrance on Nov. 19 Yellowstone National Park announced in a release Wednesday.

A necropsy confirmed the black male and female pups died from a vehicle strike.

Yellowstone law enforcement officers are investigating the incident.

continued:
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Zoo Boise welcomes Henry the maned wolf

KTVB December 18, 2019

Boise, Idaho — Zoo Boise is celebrating their newest addition to the zoo: a male maned wolf named Henry.

The 6-year-old wolf was selected as a mate for Zoo Boise’s female maned wolf, Jamie. Henry was brought to Zoo Boise from the Pueblo Zoo in Colorado through the Maned Wolf Species Survival Program.

The conservation program is aimed at maintaining a healthy population of endangered or threatened species.

Maned wolves are native to South America, and bark or roar rather than howling like a gray wolf. They are omnivores, eating fruit and vegetables along with small mammals and insects.

source:
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Annual land closure to begin in east Idaho to protect deer, elk and moose herds

by Ryan L Morrison Tuesday, December 17th 2019

… BLM closes the Egin-Hamer Area (in eastern Idaho) every year for the protection of wintering deer, elk and moose herds. The area’s temporary annual closure’s been in place for more than 20 years.

It designates nearly 500 square miles of land off-limits to human entry to allow herds to spend more time down on the desert outside of Rexburg – time during crucial portions of the late winter and early spring.

… “Occasionally, powered parachutes, helicopters and small planes have been sighted flying low over the closure area. While the air space over the seasonal closure is not restricted, pilots of all types are cautioned to not disturb wintering wildlife. If the machines are flying low enough to cause the wildlife to move away, then they are flying too low.”

full story:
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Wally the Moose tours Idaho to help with hunter education

by Ryan L Morrison Thursday, December 19th 2019


Wally the Moose tours Idaho to help with hunter education. (Courtesy IDFG)

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — Wally the Decoy Moose is touring Idaho to help Idaho Fish and Game educate hunters in certain areas.

A “whole bunch” of moose have been killed in the Idaho City-area lately, according to IDFG. At least seven in the last three years.

IDFG said all of these were mistaken identity cases and all seven cases were solved. Unfortunately, another moose died this fall, but the case is still open.

Eight dead moose in that short of time is unacceptable in a population that is already struggling. That’s where Wally comes in handy.

continued:
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Interior Department, states appeal sage grouse ruling

Idaho and Wyoming are appealing a ruling that halted a Trump administration plan.

Keith Ridler Associated Press December 18, 2019

Boise, Idaho — The Interior Department, Idaho and Wyoming are appealing a court ruling that halted a Trump administration plan to ease land-use restrictions in seven Western states that protect struggling sage grouse.

The notices filed Monday say the agency and states will seek a review by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals of an October ruling temporarily preventing the U.S. Bureau of Land Management from carrying out the plan.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Mountain lion attacks and kills two dogs in Warm Springs area of Ketchum

By Terry Thompson, Regional Communications Manager
Wednesday, December 18, 2019

Two dogs were killed in separate mountain lion attacks in the Warm Springs area of Ketchum.

Fish and Game officers in the Wood River Valley received two reports of separate fatal mountain lion attacks on dogs early Wednesday morning, Dec. 18. These were the third and fourth mountain lion attacks on dogs in the area over a period of five days, two of which took place over the prior weekend.

Upon investigation, officers found that a mountain lion attacked a dog in its fenced backyard where it received significant injuries from the attack. The dog survived, but had to be euthanized by a local veterinarian.

Shortly after the first report, Fish and Game officers were notified of a second dog that had been killed as a result of a mountain lion attack within blocks of the first incident.

continued:
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Here’s where Idaho’s ducks come from

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Monday, December 16, 2019

Study identifies origins of dabbling ducks harvested in Pacific Flyway states

When temperatures fall in December and January, duck hunting in Idaho — particularly in the southwest part of the state — often heats up with the arrival of “northern birds.” But exactly where in the north are these birds coming from? Generally speaking, the likeliest answer for Idaho hunters is Alberta.

In a 2017 study, researchers at the University of Minnesota and the California Department of Water Resources shed some additional light on where dabbling ducks harvested in the Pacific Flyway originated. Using abundance, banding and harvest data from throughout the Pacific Flyway, as well as other important source areas in the neighboring Central Flyway, researchers were able to estimate where ducks came from and where they were harvested over the course of about 50 years, from 1966 to 2013.

continued:
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F&G Commission expands 2020 spring steelhead fishing season starting Jan. 1

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Wednesday, December 18, 2019

Fishing will reopen on the Clearwater and lower Snake rivers

Meeting by conference call on Wednesday, Dec. 18, the Idaho Fish and Game Commission reopened steelhead fishing in the Clearwater River and lower Snake River downstream of Couse Creek Boat Ramp, beginning on Jan. 1. Daily bag limit in those sections is limited to one adipose-clipped steelhead per day, none over 28 inches in length.

Anglers should note that the North Fork Clearwater River will be closed to steelhead fishing during the 2020 spring season. The South Fork of the Clearwater River will also reopen on Jan. 1, and all other season dates remain the same as what is printed 2019-21 Idaho Fishing Seasons and Rules brochure.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Video: Police dog hoards holiday toys

by Gary Detman Friday, December 20th 2019

Franklin, Mass. (CBS12) — Police officers in Massachusetts discovered that the case of the missing holiday toys turned out to be an inside job.

The department collected a classroom full of toys for the Santa Foundation.

Some of them mysteriously vanished.

But the mystery unraveled after officers spotted Ben Franklin, the department’s therapy dog, walking out of the classroom with a baby doll in its mouth.

continued w/video:
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Decorating the Christmas tree was a real hoot for this Georgia family

by Leandra Bernstein Thursday, December 19th 2019


Katie McBride Newman

Newnan, GA. (Sinclair Broadcast Group) — An unusual-looking ornament caught the attention of a family in Georgia when they realized there was a live owl living in their Christmas tree.

Katie McBride Newman posted to Facebook that she and her two children, India and Jack, found a live owl “roosting” in their Christmas tree.

… The family isn’t sure how long the creature was living in their Christmas tree. They bought the tree from a store two days after Thanksgiving, according to CNN. They discovered the owl almost two weeks later Dec. 12.

full story w/more photos:
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Seasonal Humor:

XmasEveMouse-a
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Winter Weather Advisory from Dec 19, 5am to Dec 20, 5am

Winter Weather Advisory from Dec 19, 5am to Dec 20, 5am

Yellow Pine Forecast

Tonight A 20 percent chance of snow after 11pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 21. South southwest wind 5 to 7 mph.

Thursday Snow. High near 35. South wind around 7 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.

Thursday Night Snow before 11pm, then rain and snow. Low around 34. South wind around 7 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.

Friday Rain likely before 11am. Cloudy, with a high near 43. South southwest wind around 7 mph. Chance of precipitation is 70%.

Friday Night Mostly cloudy, with a low around 32.

Winter Weather Advisory

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
342 AM MST Wed Dec 18 2019

...SNOW THURSDAY AND THURSDAY NIGHT...

.A Pacific warm front will spread snow across eastern Oregon
Thursday and Thursday night. Snow will begin early Thursday
morning in eastern Oregon and by sunrise Thursday in western
Idaho. Snow will accumulate on the roads Thursday morning but
above-freezing temperatures Thursday afternoon will turn roads
slushy or wet below 4000 feet. The Upper Treasure Valley including
Boise will receive up to one inch of snow which may cause slick
roads during the Thursday morning commuting period.

West Central Mountains-Upper Weiser River-
342 AM MST Wed Dec 18 2019

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 5 AM THURSDAY
TO 5 AM MST FRIDAY...

* WHAT...Snow expected. Total snow accumulations of 3 to 6 inches
  with 8 to 12 inches above 6000 feet.

* WHERE...West Central Mountains and Upper Weiser River zones.

* WHEN...From 5 AM Thursday to 5 AM MST Friday.

* IMPACTS...Plan on slippery road conditions.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Slow down and use caution while traveling.

The latest road conditions can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.

Dec 15, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Dec 15, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Dec 7 thru Feb 21 Yellow Pine Tavern Holiday Closure
Dec 25 – Christmas dinner at the Community Hall 2pm
(details below)
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Local Events:

Dec 25 – Christmas dinner at the Community Hall 2pm

Christmas potluck will be at the community Hall on the 25th at 2pm. stay after dinner and play bingo!
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Village News:

Yellow Pine Tavern Holiday Closure

The Tavern will be closed from Saturday December 7th to Friday February 21st. UPS packages will be dropped off at Deb’s porch and she will also have gasoline for emergency situations. I will be available at my cell number for any questions or situations 208 739-7086
Thanks, Lorinne N. Munn
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Christmas Bags

Christmas bags will be available for ‘stuffing’ inside the community hall starting on the 10th.
-DF
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South Fork Ice Flow

Folks need to be aware of dangerous road conditions about half way out the South Fork. Water has been running down the middle of the road this fall, eroding the pavement and freezing into a thick layer of ice right up to the edge along the river side. Folks have said that low clearance cars may have trouble with the deep rut and ice.

There have been 2 slide-offs and a few near wrecks reported this month.

photo courtesy Nancy Bellman – November 10th

Kelly Collins posted on FB around 1130pm Nov 17th in response to the photo above: I [saw] this pickup when it was upside down in the river. There is a thick stretch of ice right there, it kinda sneaks up on you. I also pulled two guys from Washington with a Dodge 1-ton with a cargo trailer out from that same spot about 4 days ago.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

All 4 bins at the transfer station were emptied on Friday, December 13th.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Boil Water Advisory Lifted November 22, 2019

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the Community Hall.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

Christmas bags will be available for ‘stuffing’ inside the community hall starting on the 10th.

The community hall committee’s goal is to have adequate heating installed in the main hall before the June VYPA meeting.

If folks have items for the community yard sale, please place them by the north wall in the community hall. If you see items you would like to purchase, you can pay Deb, Ronda, or Lynn. All funds support the community hall.

VYPA meetings for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
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YPFD News:

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Fire Chief – Jeff Forster

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

link: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Stop the Bleed Class: We will do another class this spring/summer [2020] depending on interest.

Training will resume in the spring.

-Fire Chief Jeff
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for Winter.
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

The Corner is closed for the winter, opening again next spring. I can be reached at matt @ ypcorner.com or at 970-379-5155. Thanks, have a great winter!
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Closed Dec 7 thru Feb 21.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Dec 9) overnight low of 17 degrees, clear sky this morning, about 1/2″ old snow on the ground. Mtn. chickadee and a white-breasted nuthatch joined the red-breasted nuthatches at the feeder this morning, raven flying and calling, clark’s nutcracker stopped by. Bright sun at lunch time. Steller jay made a short visit. Overcast and below freezing by late afternoon, high of 36 degrees. Elk sighting by the crossroads. Fuzzy moon up over the ridge lighting up the cloud cover and below freezing at dark. Partly clear before midnight.

Tuesday (Dec 10) overnight low of 11 degrees, mostly cloudy (high streaks), about 1/2″ old snow remains this morning. Mtn. chickadee and red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Mostly clear and sunny at lunch time. Clark’s nutcracker stopped by. High thin clouds building up by mid-afternoon, high of 38 degrees. Fuzzy large moon in a hazy sky rising way north of Golden Gate peak after full dark. Hazy sky before midnight.

Wednesday (Dec 11) light snow fell this morning before daylight, the low of 15 on the gizmo was from yesterday morning, overcast and occasional flakes of snow at 10am and 27 degrees. Several red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Sounds of a chainsaw out on the golf course this morning. Mail truck was about 20 minutes late, no problems coming in. Clark’s nutcracker stopped by. Overcast, below freezing and still lightly flaking after lunch time. Overcast and not snowing late afternoon, high of 35 degrees. Snowing after dark and probably snowed most of the night.

Thursday (Dec 12) overnight low probably just below freezing, 2″ of new wet heavy snow (2.5″ total on the ground) and weird banks of fog rolling over the village – repeatedly. A few red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Shooting started around 1130am. Mostly cloudy mid-day and dripping. Clark’s nutcracker stopped by. Mostly cloudy and snow melting mid-afternoon, high of 40 degrees. At dark clouds sitting down on the ridges and misting rain. Rain changed to light snow after dropping below freezing, light dusting by 830pm. Still snowing before midnight and probably snowed most of the night.

Friday (Dec 13) overnight low of 28 degrees, 1″ new snow and 3″ total snow, snowfall ended a little after 10am. Chickadees and a jay calling from the forest, red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Cloudy and calm at lunch time. Mail truck made it in on time. Overcast and flaking snow for a short while mid-afternoon, high of 35 degrees. Cloudy just before full dark and not snowing. The moon wasn’t up yet before midnight, lighting up the bulky clouds. Light dusting of snow fell during the night.

Saturday (Dec 14) overnight low of 19 degrees, mostly cloudy, trace of new snow and 3″ old snow (with 2 crusty layers.) Jays, red-breasted nuthatches and chickadees visiting, raven calling and flying over. Overcast after lunch time. Breaks in the clouds and a bit of sunshine early afternoon and a few drips off the roof. Mostly cloudy mid-afternoon and a high of 33 degrees. Late afternoon snow storm for about 20 minutes, clouds down nearly to the valley floor. Next round of snow started just before dark, less than 1/2″. Breaks in the clouds before midnight, mostly clear after midnight.

Sunday (Dec 15) overnight low of 7 degrees, mostly cloudy and short light snow flurry this morning, 3/8″ new snow and about 3″ total snow. Chickadee, nuthatches, jays and a female hairy woodpecker visiting. Broken clouds and open patches of blue sky at lunch time. Quiet day. Nearly overcast at sunset and a small patch of broken clouds to the south, high of 27 degrees. Low clouds and snowing at dusk.
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Letter to Share:

Cascade Vet Clinic News

Cascade Veterinary Clinic would like to thank Dr. Merik Metos for her time with us this year; December 17th will be her last day. Her help was imperative to allowing Dr. Keith to recover from his back surgery. We cannot thank her enough for all her hard work and for being so wonderful to the clients, their pets, the staff and the community. We will miss you but wish you the best of luck in your new employment. Visit often and God bless.

– Cascade Veterinary Clinic December 11, 2019
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Idaho News:

Dec. 20 deadline noted for Valley, Adams property taxes

The Star-News Dec 12, 2019

The deadline for the first half of the year’s property taxes for Valley and Adams counties will be Friday, Dec. 20.

Payments will be accepted through 5 p.m. Dec. 20 at the county courthouses in Cascade and Council. The treasurer offices in both counties are staffed Monday through Friday, including the lunch hour.

Late charges begin on Saturday, Dec. 21, and interest begins on Jan. 1, so mailed payments must be postmarked by Dec. 20.

Valley County property owners can also pay their taxes with credit cards at (link)

For more information, contact the treasurer’s office at 208-382-7110 or treasurer@co.valley.id.us.

Online credit card payments are available in Adams County at (link). For questions, call 208-253-4263 extension 6 or write to christy.roach@co.adams.id.us.

Payments also can be left in the payment drop box just outside the main courthouse entrance in Council.

source:
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Valley County property tax collections to rise $1.6 million

$33.3 million in total taxes to be paid for 2020

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Dec 12, 2019

About $33.3 million in property taxes will be collected to operate Valley County governments in 2020, an increase of about $1.6 million from this year, the Valley County Clerk’s Office said.

Valley County has 22 taxing districts and three irrigation districts, most of which have already started their 2020 budget year.

The McCall-Donnelly School District has requested the most money, at about $8 million, about $39,000 more than last year.

Valley County had the next largest balance to be levied with about $7.2 million, followed by the City of McCall at about $6.3 million.

Taxes for Valley County government will increase by a total of $298,000 next year and the City of McCall’s dollar amount will increase by $276,000.

Valley County Emergency Medical Services and the Donnelly Rural Fire District had the next largest increases with the total balance to be levied increasing by about $196,000 and $164,000 respectively.

Taxes for the McCall Fire Protection District increased by about $81,000.

The increase for the emergency services and fire districts includes the value of new construction, the maximum increase of 3% per year allowed under state law and about $100,000 in taxing authority set aside from previous years.

The Cascade School District also had an increase of $150,000 per year in its property tax collections. The increase was from the district’s $650,000, two-year supplemental levy that was approved by voters in March.

The McCall Memorial Hospital District will levy about $406,385 less in the next year for a total of about $729,000.

The smallest amount of property taxes requested next year is $18,177 for the Yellow Pine Fire District.

continued:
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Brundage, Tamarack to begin full-time operations on Friday

KTVB December 11, 2019


Snowmaking at Tamarack Resort. KTVB

Boise, Idaho — Brundage Mountain and Tamarack Resort announced that they will be open on a full-time basis starting this Friday.

Nearly a foot of new snow has fallen at Brundage in the past week and another storm bringing more snow is expected in the mountains Wednesday evening through Friday morning.

Most of the mountain’s primary runs will be groomed from top to bottom.

continued:
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Popular Idaho City sledding hill closed

The Steamboat Gulch sled hill was shut down after visitors left trash behind, shot at trees and damaged the area by driving onto it.

KTVB December 10, 2019

Idaho City, Idaho — The Idaho Department of Lands has shut down a popular sledding spot near Idaho City after visitors repeatedly threw trash on the ground and damaged the area.

The Steamboat Gulch sled hill, located off of Idaho 21, used to be operated by the Mores Creek Recreational Foundation, which had a permit from the IDL to oversee the site. But the foundation ran out of money last year, and was unable to continue operating the hill.

The sledding hill was allowed to remain open without an official operator last winter, according to the Department of Lands. But visitors to the sledding hill did not hold up their end of the bargain: With no oversight of the area, the sledding area was damaged by people who left garbage behind, drove vehicles on the hill, and fired guns at the trees.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Western governors form council to target invasive species

By Keith Ridler – 12/10/19 AP

Boise, Idaho — States need to work together to stop the spread of invasive species, Western governors say.

The Western Governors’ Association on Friday launched the Western Invasive Species Council and named representatives from 13 states and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

Invasive species are costing the U.S. $120 billion every year, the governors said, and pose a significant threat to range lands in the West and water systems infrastructure such as hydroelectric dams. Those threats include feral swine, invasive annual grasses such as fire-prone cheatgrass, and aquatic quagga and zebra mussels.

continued:
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Mining News:

East Fork fish would take a ride through Stibnite tunnel

Mile-long diversion would allow excavation of Yellow Pine pit

(Note: This is the eighth part in a series detailing Midas Gold’s operating plan for its proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine. Next week: Yellow Pine Pit)

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Dec 12, 2019

Salmon and trout would swim through a mile-long tunnel and into the upper reaches of the East Fork South Fork Salmon River for the first time since Franklin Delano Roosevelt was president under Midas Gold’s operating plan for its proposed gold mine near Yellow Pine.

Before mining begins, the company would re-route the river to the west of the Yellow Pine Pit beneath up to 450 feet of earth through a mile-long tunnel that would be 15 feet wide and 15 feet tall.

About 80,000 tons of rock would be blasted and removed from the tunnel using front-end loaders and haul trucks.

Large bolts would then be used to help secure the ground above the tunnel, while shotcrete would be sprayed throughout the interior of the tunnel to coat the rock and prevent collapses.

Midas Gold estimates the tunnel would take at least 16 months to build and would cost at least $24 million, plus more than $100,000 per year in routine maintenance.

That maintenance would include solidifying the tunnel with more shotcrete and rock bolts, cleaning debris and sediment screens and maintaining fish monitoring technology.

The tunnel would have a five-foot-tall partition dividing it into two sides, the larger of which would be about nine feet wide and would function as a maintenance road through the tunnel.

The road would also act as an overflow corridor for Midas Gold to redirect water during high flows, which would keep flows in the fish passageway amenable for upstream travel by fish.

The smaller fish passage side of the tunnel would be five feet wide and would contain about 2.5 feet of water during base flows.

A series of concrete weirs, or small dams that allow water to cascade over them, would create water depths and velocities that are ideal for fish passage over a wide range of river flows.

The passageway would also be designed to include natural pools that fish could use to rest when fatigued from swimming against the current.

The weirs would be staggered by either 22 feet or 66 feet, depending on the slope of the fish passageway, which would range in slope from 1.5% to 4.5% due to the bedrock above the tunnel.

In natural streams, salmon and some trout can only swim up slopes of about 6%, but artificial fish passageways provide deep enough water for them to scale much steeper slopes, according to the Midas Gold operating plan.

Screens staged at the upstream entrance of the tunnel would prevent most sediment and debris from entering the tunnel and altering flows which could prevent fish passage.

Lighting would also be installed throughout the tunnel to minimize sudden light changes at each entrance which could disorient fish and deter them from using the tunnel.

Video cameras would be installed at both ends of the tunnel to monitor fish passage and enable Midas Gold to tweak conditions in the tunnel as needed.

The tunnel is expected to provide access to at least six miles of streams beyond the current blockage, plus another 25 miles of smaller streams accessible to juvenile fish.

Chinook salmon, bull trout and steelhead salmon would be able to swim up the tunnel, with juveniles of each species able to descend safely, according to water studies.

If fish do not use the tunnel as expected, Midas Gold would trap salmon and trout to manually transport them to and from each end of the tunnel.

Once mining operations end after about 12 to 15 years, the East Fork would be re-established in its natural configuration prior to 1938 to allow fish passage.

The tunnel would be capped at both ends and covered with rock to match the surrounding area.

The interior of the tunnel would remain hollow, but the prevalence of granite above the tunnel would make any collapses unlikely, according to Midas Gold.

Fish passage has been blocked since 1938 when Bradley Mining Company first excavated the Yellow Pine pit, which can be seen from Stibnite Road when entering the site. East Fork cascades into the Yellow Pine Pit lake over at a 25% grade that prevents fish from swimming any further up the river.

Midas Gold based its proposed fish passage tunnel on simulations, studies and a review of more than a dozen other fish passage tunnels currently in use around the world.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
— — — — — — — — — —

Documents: Mining company writing own environmental report

by Keith Ridler Associated Press Friday, December 13th 2019


This Sept. 19, 2018 photo shows the last standing building above the Yellow Pine Pit open-pit gold mine in the Stibnite Mining District in central Idaho, where a company hopes to start mining again. Documents show the Trump administration intervening in a U.S. Forest Service decision so that a Canadian company could write a key environmental report on its proposed open-pit gold mines in central Idaho. (Riley Bunch/Idaho Press-Tribune via AP

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Documents show the U.S. Forest Service allowing a Canadian company to write a key environmental report on its proposed open-pit gold mines in central Idaho after the Trump administration became involved.

The documents obtained by conservation group Earthworks show British Columbia-based Midas Gold’s lobbying efforts after initial rebuffs from the Forest Service.

The report, called a biological assessment, would typically be written by the Forest Service or an independent contractor. Its purpose is to examine the potential effect the open-pit mines would have on salmon, steelhead and bull trout protected under the Endangered Species Act.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Cascade Ranger District of the Boise National Forest intends to submit grant proposal to Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation

Cascade, Idaho, December 12, 2019 — The Cascade Ranger District of the Boise National Forest is applying for grant funding from the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation to help with buoy replacements at the very popular Warm Lake.

The application will request funding through the Department’s Waterways Improvement Fund, (WIF). WIF funds will be used to install a replacement buoy line on two small sections of the southern end of Warm Lake. The buoy line separates the lake to give small motorized and non-motorized lake users a section of the lake with “no to minimum wake zone.” The buoy line also protects vegetation in the shallow southern end of the lake.

This grant proposal will improve recreationists experience, protect vegetation and minimize public health and safety hazards. If received, implementation will begin fall of 2020.

Comments or requests for more information should be submitted to Will Smith, Cascade Ranger District, P.O. Box 696 Cascade, ID 83611, or by calling 208-382-7400.
— — — — — — — — — —

Illegal dumping, trash litters Indian Creek Reservoir near Boise

by Trevor Fay Wednesday, December 11th 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — Trash is being found in some of Idaho’s most beautiful areas. And Wednesday, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) called for action.

One access site is Indian Creek Reservoir by the Boise Stage Stop.

Everything from dresser drawers and Styrofoam to bottles are dumped there. And it’s more than just an eyesore, it’s illegal.

There’s not much out there but Mother Nature herself, and that’s how the IDFG wants to keep it. But people have been bringing a very unwanted addition to the place: garbage.

continued:
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Tips & Advice:

Prevent Hypothermia & Frostbite

Hypothermia (abnormally low body temperature) and frostbite are both dangerous conditions that can happen when a person is exposed to extremely cold temperatures. Stay safe this winter by learning more about hypothermia and frostbite, including who is most at risk, signs and symptoms, and what to do if someone develops hypothermia or frostbite.

continued:
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Are poinsettias poisonous?

Dec 11, 2019 IME

Christmas trees, Santa Claus, menorahs, and glittering lighting displays are just a few of the many prominent symbols of the holiday season. And while mistletoe might garner more attention and inspire more displays of affection, poinsettias are another prominent sign that the holiday season has arrived.

Thanks to its bright red and green colors, the poinsettia is perhaps the ideal holiday plant. But as much as it suits holiday decor and seems tailor-made for that special time of year between Thanksgiving and the first of January, the poinsettia has a reputation that few plants would want.

First discovered in Mexico and brought to the United States by Dr. Joel Poinsett, the poinsettia has long been rumored to be poisonous. However, the National Capital Poison Center notes that poinsettias are not deadly. In fact, the NCPC notes that the rumor that poinsettias are deadly may have been around for more than a century, tracing its origins all the way back to a child who was found dead lying next to a poinsettia plant. The plant was blamed for the child’s death, and even though that blame was misplaced, the stigma stuck. WebMD notes that others trace the false rumors surrounding poinsettias to 1919, when parents blamed the death of their daughter, who they thought had eaten poinsettia leaves, on this ubiquitous holiday plant.

Even today, when researchers have long since proven that poinsettias are not deadly, many people still believe they can be fatal if consumed.

continued:
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Critter News:

Idaho Humane Society reminding families to think before adopting a pet for Christmas

Dec 11, 2019 By KIVI Staff

Boise, Idaho — Adding a furry friend to your family this Christmas may seem like the perfect present, but the Idaho Humane Society is asking everyone to think twice before surprising loved ones.

Bringing an adoptable pet home for the holidays can be a good idea, but you want to make sure the recipient is ready for everything a new pet entails. From time to feeding to grooming and more, pets can be a lot for one person or even an entire family. IHS says they see an uptick in returns in January after pets are adopted during the holiday season. Remember, it’s a lifetime commitment when you adopt a pet.

As the temperatures drop, IHS is also reminding pet owners to check their pet’s paws as snow melt can damage their paw pads. Animals with shorter hair will likely need a sweater before they go outside. It’s also recommended to bring your animals inside if it’s very cold or make sure they have a well-insulated area to stay out of the wind if they’re outside. Make sure outside animals also have access to fresh water that isn’t frozen over.

continued:
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Pet Talk – Uterine infections in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Dec 13, 2019 IME

Uterine infections are very common in dogs that have not had an ovariohysterectomy, often called a “spay.” Pyometra is a term used to describe a pus-filled uterus. The severity of this disease is influenced by whether the cervix is open and draining pus, or closed. Most affected dogs are 6 years or older and still have both her ovaries and uterus. The hormone progesterone normally causes the lining of the uterus to produce a fluid-like secretion. When the uterus is idle for a long time, such as between the periods of heat, this fluid may accumulate in the lining of the uterus and become thickened. If inflammation and bacterial contamination occur, commonly the secretions become infected. If the cervix is closed and the infected material cannot drain to the outside, the uterus may become very distended and infection may spread to other parts of the body, causing the animal to be seriously ill.

continued:
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Washington agency to look at other wolf management tools

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has told Gov. Jay Inslee it will try “previously unused tools” to protect cattle and avoid shooting wolves.

Associated Press December 9, 2019

Salem, Oregon — The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has told Gov. Jay Inslee it will try “previously unused tools” to protect cattle and avoid shooting wolves in the Kettle River Range, though it did not specify any new tactics.

The department responded to Inslee’s complaint that recurrent culling of wolves in the northeast Washington mountain range is unacceptable, Capital Press reported.

The department, which describes the region as “saturated” with wolf packs, has defended killing as a last resort when non-lethal measures failed to keep cattle losses from mounting.

continued:
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Colorado initiative would OK reintroducing the gray wolf

By Associated Press December 10, 2019

Denver (AP) – Wildlife activists want Colorado voters to decide next year if the endangered gray wolf should be reintroduced in the state decades after it was hunted to near-extinction.

Backers of a ballot initiative delivered thousands of voter signatures on Tuesday to the secretary of state’s office in hopes of getting their proposal on the 2020 ballot.

Officials have 30 days to determine if enough signatures are valid to qualify the initiative.

continued:
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Confiscated bear cub recovering at Snowdon

“Chewy” likely to be released next spring

Dec 11, 2019 By Steve Liebenthal KIVI

McCall, Idaho — A few miles outside of McCall, up the icy Lick Creek Road, is a sanctuary where four black bear cubs are waiting for spring, including one you may recognize. Two months ago, Charles Erickson found him lying in the snow, nearly lifeless.

“It barely could move because it was starved half to death,” Erickson told us in October. “I noticed that its gums where pure white and its tongue was pure white, so it was obviously dehydrated.”

So Erickson took the bear to Boise, where he gave it cat food, water and even bottle fed it. And he and his kids also gave the sickly cub a name.

continued:
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US wildlife officials agree to grizzly bear review

by Matthew Brown Associated Press Monday, December 9th 2019

U.S. officials will review whether grizzly bears have enough protections across the Lower 48 states after advocates sued the government in a bid to restore the fearsome animals to more areas, according to court documents filed Monday.

The review must be completed by March 31, 2021, under a settlement approved by U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen.

Grizzly bears are protected as a threatened species outside Alaska. An estimated 1,900 bears live in portions of Wyoming, Montana, Idaho and Washington state.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Deer Poached in Boise’s Baggley Park

By Evin Oneale, Regional Communications Manager
Friday, December 13, 2019

Fish and Game is asking for the public’s help in solving an apparent mule deer poaching case in Boise’s Baggley Park.

Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) is offering a reward for information in the case and callers can remain anonymous. Contact CAP at 1-800-632-5999 twenty four hours a day.

Fish and Game conservation officer Joey Ishida responded to a report of the apparent poaching and found a large pool of blood next to the tennis courts in East Boise’s Baggley Park, just off Parkcenter Boulevard. A drag trail led northeast out of the park and terminated in a cul-de-sac at the end of South Crosscreek Lane. Based on this evidence, Ishida believes that the deer was poached between 1:00am and 3:00am Tuesday morning, dragged across the park to the cul-de-sac and loaded into a vehicle.

continued:
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Hunters invited to comment on proposed moose management plan

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Thursday, December 12, 2019

Deadline to comment is Jan. 12

Hunters and other interested members of the public have until Jan. 12 to offer their input on Fish and Game’s newly proposed Moose Management Plan for 2020-25. The Moose Management Plan is a six-year document that guides the department in protecting and managing moose populations in Idaho, as well as developing season setting recommendations.

The draft plan and a comment form are available on Fish and Game’s Moose Management Plan page. The final draft, which will factor in public comments, will be presented to the Fish and Game Commission for its consideration at its March 19-20, 2020 meeting in Boise.

continued:
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Male mountain lion seasons close in five southeast Idaho units

By Jennifer Jackson, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, December 12, 2019

The take season for male mountain lions has closed in Game Management Units 66A, 75, 76, 77, and 78 in southeast Idaho effective December 9, 2019. Please note the following in relation to mountain lion hunting in these same five units:

continued:
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F&G asks for public’s help to combat illegal dumping at access sites

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Monday, December 9, 2019


(IDFG)

Dumping is illegal and costs hunters’ and anglers’ money to clean up

Littering is a serious problem on many Idaho Fish and Game properties, and Fish and Game staff has noticed an uptick in people dumping trash at access sites around the state. The department is asking people to report anyone who is dumping or damaging access sites by calling any local law enforcement agency as soon as possible. Write down a vehicle license plate number, physical description of the violator and their vehicle, and note the location, day and time of the activity.

These access sites are maintained for public use and paid for with funding from hunters and anglers, so not only are the sites degraded, it costs money that could be better spent on other things.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Fun Critter Stuff:

After hitting a dog with his car, a Canadian man drove it to safety. Turns out it was a coyote

By Ryan Prior, CNN December 3, 2019

Eli Boroditsky was driving to his night shift last week on a narrow rural road in Manitoba, Canada, when his car hit what he thought was a dog streaking across the dark road.

After he clipped the animal, it flew into the ditch on the shoulder. He parked and used a small flashlight to get a look.

“I thought it was a German shepherd or a husky,” he told CNN news partner CBC. “I didn’t think it was a wild animal.”

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

WinterCrazyNot-a
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Seasonal Trivia:

How Dr. Seuss Stole Christmas

The making of the classic Grinch holiday cartoon.

Brian Jay Jones The Saturday Evening Post

In early 1964, Theodor “Dr. Seuss” Geisel received a note from an old friend who wanted to discuss adapting a Dr. Seuss book into an animated cartoon. It wasn’t the first time such an entreaty had been made. “Everybody wanted to make a series,” said Geisel, but he was skeptical: most television producers, he said, wanted to “bat ’em out fast and use up my whole life’s work in a year.” But this plea was different from the others. It came from someone Ted Geisel knew and respected — someone he’d worked with during World War II, and who knew exactly what he was doing. “Maybe you don’t think I can draw your character,” said the note, under which was a nearly perfect rendering of the Cat in the Hat to prove otherwise. And underneath that was the author’s crabbed signature: Chuck Jones.

Jones, then 51, had recently been let go from Warner Bros. after more than 30 years of turning out one iconic cartoon for the studio after another. Now he was in charge of MGM Animation, where he was revamping the shopworn Tom and Jerry series. Knowing Geisel as he did — and well aware of his penchant for perfection — Jones knew it was going to be a tough sell and decided to take on the task in person. “Unsurprisingly, Dr. Seuss was not eager to have more of his books made into film,” Jones said later. Jones drove from Los Angeles to Ted’s home in La Jolla, and as he came up the winding road, Ted was standing at the end of their long driveway to greet him. Jones, who hadn’t seen Geisel since 1946, thought his old friend looked “not very different. He didn’t change a lot.”

continued:

[h/t Sandy McRae]
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Winter Weather Advisory Dec 11, 8pm to December 12, 11am

Winter Weather Advisory Dec 11, 8pm to December 12, 11am

Yellow Pine Forecast

Tonight Isolated snow showers after 11pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 25. Light west southwest wind. Chance of precipitation is 20%.

Wednesday A 40 percent chance of snow showers, mainly before 11am. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 38. Light west southwest wind. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Wednesday Night Snow, mainly after 11pm. Low around 32. Calm wind becoming south around 6 mph after midnight. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Thursday Rain and snow, becoming all rain after 11am. High near 41. South southwest wind around 6 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.

Thursday Night Rain and snow likely, becoming all snow after 11pm. Cloudy, with a low around 29. Southwest wind around 6 mph. Chance of precipitation is 70%. New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.

Friday Snow showers likely. Cloudy, with a high near 36. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New snow accumulation of around an inch possible.

Friday Night A 50 percent chance of snow showers. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 20. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Winter Weather Advisory

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
236 PM MST Tue Dec 10 2019

...SNOW IN THE MOUNTAINS ON THURSDAY...

.A moist Pacific storm will bring snow to the mountains of west-
central Idaho on Thursday. Snow levels will start around 4500 feet
Thursday morning, rising to around 5500 feet Thursday afternoon.
Rising snow levels and temperatures will limit further
accumulation in mountain valleys Thursday afternoon while sites
above 5500 feet will see accumulating snow into Thursday night.

West Central Mountains-Boise Mountains-
236 PM MST Tue Dec 10 2019

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM 8 PM WEDNESDAY TO 11 AM
MST THURSDAY...

* WHAT...Snow expected. Total snow accumulations of 3 to 5 inches
  in mountain valleys above 4500 feet with up to 7 inches over the
  mountains. Snow will continue into Thursday night with little
  additional accumulation below 5500 feet.

* WHERE...West Central Mountains and Boise Mountains zones.

* WHEN...From 8 PM Wednesday to 11 AM MST Thursday.

* IMPACTS...Plan on slippery road conditions.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Slow down and use caution while traveling.

The latest road conditions can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.

Dec 8, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Dec 8, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Dec 7 thru Feb 21 Yellow Pine Tavern Holiday Closure
Dec 25 – Christmas dinner at the Community Hall 2pm
(details below)
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Local Events:

Dec 25 – Christmas dinner at the Community Hall 2pm

Christmas potluck will be at the community Hall on the 25th at 2pm. stay after dinner and play bingo!
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Village News:

Yellow Pine Tavern Holiday Closure

The Tavern will be closed from Saturday December 7th to Friday February 21st. UPS packages will be dropped off at Deb’s porch and she will also have gasoline for emergency situations. I will be available at my cell number for any questions or situations 208 739-7086
Thanks, Lorinne N. Munn
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Christmas Bags

Christmas bags will be available for ‘stuffing’ inside the community hall starting on the 10th.
-DF
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South Fork Ice Flow

Folks need to be aware of dangerous road conditions about half way out the South Fork. Water has been running down the middle of the road this fall, eroding the pavement and freezing into a thick layer of ice right up to the edge along the river side. Folks have said that low clearance cars may have trouble with the deep rut and ice.

There have been 2 slide-offs and a few near wrecks reported in November and a small crash recently on the upper end.

photo courtesy Nancy Bellman – November 10th

Kelly Collins posted on FB around 1130pm Nov 17th in response to the photo above: I [saw] this pickup when it was upside down in the river. There is a thick stretch of ice right there, it kinda sneaks up on you. I also pulled two guys from Washington with a Dodge 1-ton with a cargo trailer out from that same spot about 4 days ago.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Boil Water Advisory Lifted November 22, 2019

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the Community Hall.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

Christmas bags will be available for ‘stuffing’ inside the community hall starting on the 10th.

The community hall committee’s goal is to have adequate heating installed in the main hall before the June VYPA meeting.

If folks have items for the community yard sale, please place them by the north wall in the community hall. If you see items you would like to purchase, you can pay Deb, Ronda, or Lynn. All funds support the community hall.

VYPA meetings for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
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YPFD News:

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Fire Chief – Jeff Forster

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

link: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Stop the Bleed Class: We will do another class this spring/summer [2020] depending on interest.

Training will resume in the spring.

-Fire Chief Jeff
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for Winter.
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

The Corner is closed for the winter, opening again next spring. I can be reached at matt @ ypcorner.com or at 970-379-5155. Thanks, have a great winter!
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Closed Dec 7 thru Feb 21.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Dec 2) overnight low around 26 degrees, warmed up to 31 by sunrise this morning, overcast sky and 3″ of snow on the ground. Jays, nuthatches and a nutcracker visiting. First snowmobile traffic of the season, otherwise very quiet. Overcast and dripping at lunch time. Both male and female hairy woodpeckers visited after lunch. Warmed up enough to melt a little snow and drip off the roof by mid-afternoon, broken cloud cover, and high of 37 degrees. Cloudy and calm at dark. Cloudy before midnight.

Tuesday (Dec 3) overnight low of 29 degrees, cloudy sky and calm this morning. A few red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Cloudy and calm at lunch time. Not many birds visiting today. Cloudy, calm and dripping mid-afternoon, high of 38 degrees. Some clearing spots in the cloud cover at dusk. Looked cloudy before midnight.

Wednesday (Dec 4) overnight low of 27 degrees, cloudy and light breeze. Snow depth between 1-2″ this morning. Not many birds around, clark’s nutcracker and red-breasted nuthatches. Broken cloud cover at lunch time. Mail truck made it in on time. Quiet day. Partly clear to mostly cloudy late afternoon, high of 41 degrees. Appeared to be mostly clear at dusk, half full waxing moon above Antimony Ridge. High thin clouds moving in before midnight.

Thursday (Dec 5) overnight low of 15 degrees, almost clear sky this morning, very little frost, measured 1″ old snow. Red-breasted nuthatches, steller jays, clark’s nutcrackers and a female hairy woodpecker visiting (male hairy came later). Mostly sunny at lunch time, roofs dripping. Sun behind the ridge before 335pm. Quiet day. Mostly cloudy late afternoon and calm, high of 39 degrees. Some high haze at dusk – fuzzy moon over Golden Gate hill. Partly clear before midnight.

Friday (Dec 6) overnight low of 15 degrees, mostly high thin haze, frosty and chilly light breezes, measured 1″ old crusty frozen snow. Nuthatches, chickadee, nutcracker and jays visiting. Thinner haze after sunrise. Overcast after lunch. Both male and female hairy woodpeckers visited. Quiet day. Cloudy and chilly light breeze late afternoon, feels like the humidity is up, high of 39 degrees. Appeared cloudy at dark. Fuzzy moon rising over the tip of Golden Gate Hill mid-evening. Partly clear before midnight, patches of stars.

Saturday (Dec 7) overnight low was below freezing (reading of 19F was from yesterday morning) overcast – top of VanMeter socked in, steady rain then rain/snow mix by sunrise. A few nuthatches braving the storm. Snow, then snow/rain mix, then rain until after lunch time. Clark’s nutcracker and male hairy woodpecker stopped by. The ground is frozen so the rain is freezing and getting slick by mid-afternoon, high of 38 degrees. Almost full dark by 530pm and cloudy. Started raining some time after dark, getting very slick on the paths. Probably rained all night.

Sunday (Dec 8) overnight low of 32 degrees, low clouds and socked in, light rain/snow mix falling, 1″ of old snow on the board, ground is frozen and paths are icy. Raven calling to the south, red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Rain and rain/snow mix ended a little after lunch time. Broken clouds and bits of sun early afternoon, wispy fog draped low on the mountains. Late afternoon broken cloud cover and calm, high of 37 degrees. Mostly cloudy at dark, light breeze and bright fat moon above the saddle north of Golden Gate peak.
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RIP:

Budd Lynn Kehne

April 17, 1923 ~ November 25, 2019 (age 96)

RIPBuddKehne-a

Tribute

Budd Lynn Kehne, 96, of Eagle, died Monday, November 25, 2019 at home of natural causes.

Budd Kehne was born April 17, 1923 to Gustave and Laura Kehne in St. Paul, Minnesota. He attended schools in St. Paul and graduated from Murray High School in 1941, later graduating from Dunwoody College of Technology with a degree in electronics.

Budd and Peggy Handford were married and had three children, Craig Handford, Rolf Michael and Karen Lynn.

One year and one day after Pearl Harbor, Budd enlisted in the army and served as a radio operator in the Philippines and New Guinea. Budd related that as luck would have it, he just happened to be on the beach to observe MacArthur’s return to the Philippines.

After the war Budd had a number of jobs which included selling Kirby Vacuum Cleaners door to door, as well as radiator enclosures.

Later, Budd was a district salesman for Gould National Battery Company. Many of his battery accounts were farm and ranch stores and Budd decided that he would like to be in that business, but in the west and near mountains. As a young boy, Budd made a trip to Idaho with his grandmother and he always remembered the mountains and wanted to return.

When asked, “Just what do you know about farming or ranching?” Budd would reply, “Well, I know that on a tractor, the big wheels go on the back and the little wheels go on the front.”

And thus, having much to learn, Budd and his young family moved to Caldwell and in 1959 the first D&B opened its doors for business. Budd and his partner would eventually have four stores before they retired.

Budd enjoyed travel, archaeology, history and especially the back country – Yellow Pine and the Owyhees. Kona, Hawaii was also a special place for Budd and his family.

Budd also loved flying and was a private pilot for many years. His love of flying may have been sparked when, as a toddler his father made an airplane, complete with propeller, out of an orange crate. Budd spent many happy hours “flying” in his imagination on the front porch.

Budd was a member of El Korah Shrine for fifty years, an Elk in Caldwell for 59 years, a Mason and a longtime member of the Owyhee County Historical Society.

Budd and Jerralyn were married in 1993 and were inseparable for twenty-six years. His parents; his wife Peggy; his two brothers, Pete and Myron; and his son Craig predeceased Budd.

Budd is survived by his wife, Jerralyn; two children, Rolf (Kate) Kehne of Boise and Karen (Gregg) Landrey of Marsing; two Granddaughters, Sarah Kehne and Maggie Landrey. He is also survived by a beloved sister-in-law, Janet Kehne; nieces and nephews and their families; and cousins with whom he shared his youth and adventures.

Budd’s family would like to express their gratitude to St. Luke’s Heart Failure Clinic, Heart and Home Hospice and many others for their compassionate care. Heartfelt thanks to you all!

A celebration of Budd’s life will be held at 11:00 a.m. Wednesday, December 18, 2019 at Dakan Funeral Chapel, 504 S. Kimball Ave., Caldwell. A reception will follow at the C.V. Peckham Community Center, located adjacent to the chapel. Please send your memories and condolences to Budd’s family at (link)

The family suggests that memorials be made to Shriner’s Hospitals for Children, or St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

source: Dakan Funeral Chapel
[h/t B]
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Idaho News:

Tamarack Resort begins shuttle bus from the Treasure Valley

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, December 5th 2019

Donnelly, Idaho (CBS2) — Tamarack Ski Resort is beginning a round-trip bus shuttle for eager skiers and borders this season.

The mountain announced on Thursday that for $20, skiers can be transported from Eagle Promenade (near State Street and Highway 55) to Tamarack Village.

The 56-passenger bus will operate every Saturday from Dec. 28 through Feb. 29. The bus features reclining seats, an on-board restroom, wi-fi and storage space for gear. The bus will leave at 7 a.m. and will return by 7 p.m.

source:
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Idaho Post Offices prepare for holiday cards and packages

Dec 04, 2019 KIVI

Idaho — Only Santa will be busier. The busiest mailing and delivery weeks of the year are here and Idaho Post Offices are prepared for the avalanche of holiday cards and packages.

“We prepare all year for the holidays. It’s our season, and we’re ready to deliver for our customers,” said USPS District Manager Laura Hubrich, who shared some of the preparations Idaho Post Offices have made to deliver the holidays.

… Domestic Shipping Deadlines

· Dec. 14 – USPS Retail Ground
· Dec. 20 – First-Class Mail and packages
· Dec. 21 – Priority Mail
· Dec. 23 – Priority Mail Express

full story:
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Winter flu season is here early, could be intense

Douglas Jones, TEGNA December 8, 2019

Citing health officials, the Associated Press is reporting that the winter flu season in the U.S. is starting at its earliest point in over 15 years. Officials say there is a chance this flu season could peak much earlier than usual. According to health experts, the last flu season that started this early was from 2003-2004, and it was bad.

CDC official Scott Epperson told the AP, “It really depends on what viruses are circulating. There’s not a predictable trend as far as if it’s early it’s going to be more severe, or later, less severe.”

Officials are saying that the type of virus that is causing most of the illnesses right now is a surprise version that doesn’t usually have this sort of intensity until much later in the season.

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Idaho becomes least regulated state in the U.S.

Idaho has eliminated more than 1,800 pages of administrative code since Gov. Little took office.

Joey Prechtl December 5, 2019 KTVB

Boise, Idaho — Idaho is now the least regulated state in the entire country, passing South Dakota.

Idaho Gov. Brad Little said on Wednesday when he took office there were 736 chapters of regulations and 82,000 pages.

The cuts reduced or eliminated 75% of those chapters and reduced the page number by over 1,800. Little said that some of the cuts were silly rules that didn’t make sense anymore.

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Tips & Advice:

Wellness Wednesday: avoiding common winter injuries

Dec 04, 2019 By KIVI Staff

Boise, Idaho — Winter is just around the corner, bringing plenty of holiday cheer–and a higher risk of injuries–with it.

Some of the most common winter injuries include slipping on ice. Up to 40,000 cases of people injured from slipping on ice are reported each year. Another common injury comes from shoveling snow with up to 11,000 cases per year. Skiing, snowboarding and other winter sports activities also lead to 50,000 to 80,000 injury cases each year. Children and seniors are most likely to be injured during the season, but people of all ages can be hurt in winter, especially athletes.

Injuries that lead to a deformity in an extremity or severe pain, numbness or tingling down your back and legs are all signs you need to get to an emergency room. Other common things that send you to the ER: symptoms of frostbite like tingling or numbness or waxy or grayish-yellow colored skin. A person who has frostbite may not know it until someone else points it out because the frozen parts of their body are numb.

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Mining News:

Washing, baking would free gold, silver at Stibnite Mine

25-pound bricks would be shipped out for refining

(Note: This is the seventh part in a series detailing Midas Gold’s operating plan for its proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine. Next week: Fish Passage Tunnel)

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Dec 5, 2019

20191205midas-aPhoto courtesy Midas Gold. Photo shows an electrical furnace similar to one proposed by Midas Gold at the Stibnite Gold Project where molten gold and silver mixture is poured into molds to be cooled into bars called dore.

Molten gold and silver would be poured like chocolate fondue into brick-sized casts that would each weigh about 25 pounds upon cooling, according to Midas Gold’s operating plan for its proposed Stibnite Gold Project near Yellow Pine.

The final step of ore processing would involve stripping gold and silver particles off of grains of pure carbon and melting them down into large bars called doré.

That process would begin by washing gold and silver-loaded carbon from the cyanide leaching circuit with water and nitric acid in sealed tanks before stripping it from the carbon in pressurized tanks at about 190 degrees with a weak cyanide solution.

Gold and silver freed from the carbon would exit the tanks in a sludge about as thick as melted ice cream.

Unloaded carbon would then be recycled by burning off lingering impurities in a 1,300-degree kiln, which would free up pores for the carbon to once again absorb gold and silver particles in the vat leaching circuit.

The gold and silver-laden sludge would be pumped into 4,000-gallon tanks outfitted with steel wool for a process called electrowinning.

Electrical currents would zap the tanks, prompting gold and silver particles to isolate from the sludge and stick to the steel wool.

Various types of acid would then be poured over the steel wool, consuming it and leaving behind only a metallic golden sludge.

Before being melted down, the sludge would have flux, or minerals like quartz, mixed in with it to help the gold and silver separate more easily from impurities when molten.

The sludge would be heated to about 2,000 degrees, or the melting point of gold and silver, for about one to two hours in an induction furnace about the size of a five-gallon bucket.

Like oil and vinegar salad dressings, doré bars would be layered based on the density of metals within. Each bar would be about the size of a brick and weigh as much as three gallons of milk.

The bottom 70% of each bar would be mostly gold, with another 20% above it consisting of mostly silver. The remaining 10% at the top would contain other metals likes steel and copper.

Once cooled, the doré bars would be prepared for shipment to refining companies, marking the end of a roughly 24-hour journey through the on-site ore processing circuit.

About 11,000 tons of ore would need to be processed to form one doré bar, which would earn Midas Gold about $345,000 for the gold, plus another $2,500 for the silver.

Over the life of the Stibnite Gold Project, Midas Gold expects to generate about 16,000 doré bars worth a total of $5.4 billion, most of which would be paid out by the refining companies.

Doré bars would be shipped in small amounts several times per week. Private security companies would use armored trucks, helicopters, planes or other methods to transport the bars.

The bars would be shipped to refineries in either the United States, Canada or overseas based on a bidding process.

Antimony concentrate would be shipped out in powder form in heavy duty two-ton sacks.

Antimony would be sent to Mexico or overseas for roasting, but then could return to the United States for final refining and the production of materials like battery metal and flame retardant.

Correction: A story last week in The Star-News incorrectly stated that the solution in Midas Gold’s proposed vat leaching circuits would contain 0.3% cyanide. The solution would actually contain about 0.03% cyanide, or 300 parts per million.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Public Lands:

USDA Forest Service Big Creek Hazardous Fuel Reduction Update

The Forest Service, Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is accepting comments on an Environmental Assessment for the Big Creek Hazardous Fuels Reduction project. The proposed fuels treatments are in direct proximity to the Edwardsburg-Big Creek communities, private lands, USFS Administrative sites and along Forest Roads (FR) 50340 (Warren-Profile Gap), FS Road 50343 (Logan Creek), Government Creek FS Road 50344 and FS Road 50371 (Big Creek-Smith Creek) and associated spur roads. These treatments are designed to reduce the risk of effects to private homes, structures, other private property, and National Forest resources, from wildland fires and would increase the effectiveness of fire suppression efforts, as well as improve ingress/egress of public and emergency responders.

The environmental assessment as well as other project information is provided on the project’s webpage at (link) and at the Krassel District Office at 500 North Mission, Building 2, McCall, Idaho 83638. Hardcopy documents may be made available to interested parties upon request by calling 208-634-0602. A public meeting during the comment period is being considered in the Big Creek/Edwardsburg area, additional details will be announced on the project website.

The project webpage provides you tools to engage this process as you wish. From “Get Connected” on the right-hand side of the page, click on “Subscribe to Email Updates” if you wish to receive electronic communication about this project. Use the “Comment/Object on project” link to access a simple webform to submit your comments on this project. The “Public Comment/Objection Reading Room” are the published comments received on this project.

The opportunity to comment ends 30 days following the date of publication of the legal notice in the McCall Star-News, the official newspaper for record for Krassel District Ranger decision. Only those who submit timely and specific written comments §218.2 regarding the proposed project or activity during a public comment period established by the responsible official are eligible to file an objection §218.24(b)(6). For issues to be raised in objections, they must be based on previously submitted specific written comments regarding the proposed project or activity and attributed to the objector. The publication date of the legal notice in the newspaper of record is the exclusive means for calculating the time to submit written comments on a proposed project or activity. The time period for the opportunity to comment on a proposed project or activity to be documented with an environmental assessment shall not be extended. It is the responsibility of all individuals and organizations to ensure that their comments are received in a timely manner.

Webform submission through the project webpage is preferred but written comments concerning this project will be accepted. Comments for the project may be mailed to 500 North Mission Street, Building 2, McCall, ID 83638. Hand delivered comment letters may be delivered during regular business hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, excluding holidays. For objection eligibility, each individual or representative from each entity submitting timely and specific written comments regarding the proposed project or activity must either sign the comments or verify identity upon request §218.24(b)(8).

We appreciate your interest in the Payette National Forest and this project. If you have any questions regarding this project or comment period, please contact Patrick Schon at 208-634-0623.

Sincerely,
Anthony B. Botello
Krassel District Ranger
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Payette OKs logging near McCall to rid forest of tussock moths

The Star-News Dec 5, 2019

The Payette National Forest has approved a 3,000-acre project designed to battle an infestation of tussock moths in the New Meadows Ranger District.

The Little Red Goose Forest Resiliency Project is located inside 8,000 acres in Upper Goose Creek, Sixmile Creek and Lower Goose Creek between New Meadows and McCall.

The project includes logging, firewood removal, slash pile burning and other controlled fire burns, a news release from the Payette said. Work on the project could begin as early as January.

Moths, in combination with other blights, threaten the health of trees in the area with a high risk that additional trees could be killed if no actions were taken, New Meadows District Ranger Erin Phelps said.

The Little Red Goose project area is within the larger Granite Meadows project, which is an 80,000-acre Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration project that will have additional restoration work completed in the future.

More information about the project can be found on the Little Red Goose project webpage at: (link) or by contacting Erin Phelps at 208-347-0301.

source:
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Payette National Forest Welcomes New Forest Supervisor

McCall, ID, December 3, 2019 – U.S. Forest Service Regional Forester Nora Rasure has announced the selection of Linda Jackson as the new Forest Supervisor of the Payette National Forest. Jackson replaces Keith Lannom, who accepted a position in the Northern Rockies Region in Missoula as a Deputy Regional Forester in August.

In welcoming Linda to the Payette, Rasure said, “We are excited to welcome Linda to our team as her vast experience and knowledge will serve the Forest and community well.” Jackson reports to the Payette on January 19, 2020.

Jackson comes to the Payette from her previous position as Forest Supervisor on the Ottawa National Forest in northwestern Michigan. She has also served as a District Ranger in Arizona, Utah and Nevada, the Acting Forest Supervisor of the Alleghany National Forest, and the Acting Deputy Forest Supervisor of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest. Jackson began her Forest Service career in Utah in 1993 working in public affairs and National Environmental Policy Act compliance.

“I am excited to be coming to the Payette and for being given the opportunity to serve as the Forest Supervisor,” said Jackson. “I look forward to getting to know and working with the employees, the local communities, and valued partners of the Forest.”

Jackson received bachelor degrees in natural science and geology from Lewis and Clark College and Portland State University in Portland, Oregon. She worked for several years as a coal mining geologist in Oregon and Wyoming.

She was born and raised in Portland, Oregon. Linda and her husband Mike Leonard have five children and three grandsons. Linda has a son in Kamiah, and a daughter in northern California; and her husband, a former Forest Service employee, has daughters in Spokane and Portland, and a son in Flagstaff. Both of their sons also work for the Forest Service.

In the interim prior to Jackson reporting to the Payette, Tawnya Brummett and Belle Craig will continue to serve in leadership roles on the Forest, and Jenni Blake who is assigned to the McCall Ranger District will assist as the Acting Deputy Forest Supervisor.
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Emmett Ranger District of the Boise National Forest Intends to Submit Grant Proposal to Idaho Department Of Parks and Recreation

Emmett, Idaho, December 6, 2019– The Emmett Ranger District of the Boise National Forest is applying for grant funding from the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation to help with trailhead improvements.

The application will request funding through the Department’s Off-Road Motor Vehicle (ORMV) fund. ORMV funds will improve visitor experience by installing kiosks, maps, and site signs at Joe’s Creek and West Mountain South trailheads near Sage Hen Reservoir.

This will also help sustain the capital investment of the trailheads. If received, implementation of the grant would begin in the fall of 2020.

Comments or requests for more information should be submitted to Kate Hermanns, Emmett Ranger District, 1857 Highway 16, Emmett, ID 83617, or by calling 208-365-7000.
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BLM resource advisory council to meet in January

Date: December 6, 2019
Contact: Caleb Ashby, cashby@blm.gov, 208-384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) announced today it will hold a meeting of the Boise District Resource Advisory Council (RAC). The public is welcome to attend the meeting, which will occur on Jan. 9, 2020, at 3948 S. Development Ave., Boise, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Resource Advisory Councils provide advice and recommendations to the BLM on issues regarding public land and natural resources the agency manages. The Bureau of Land Management maintains 38 chartered advisory committees located in the West. Each citizen-based council consists of 10 to 15 members from diverse interests in local communities, and they assist in the development of committee recommendations that address public land and natural resource management issues.

Planned agenda items will include discussions of Four Rivers, Bruneau and Owyhee Field Office grazing, recreation and fuels projects. The meeting will also include a discussion about forming a subcommittee dedicated to recreational shooting issues on public lands and a presentation by Idaho Department of Fish and Game on Sage-grouse population status in southwest Idaho.

“The RAC’s feedback helps us make more informed decisions, resulting in better projects on the ground,” said BLM Boise District Manager Lara Douglas. “The members represent diverse public interests and provide important input for managing our public lands.”

A 30-minute comment period, during which the public may address the RAC, will begin at noon. Depending on the number of people wishing to comment and time available, the amount of time for individual oral comments may be limited. For more information about the upcoming RAC meeting, please contact Caleb Ashby at (208) 384-3393 or cashby@blm.gov
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Conjunctivitis in dogs and cats, also called ‘pinkeye’

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Dec 6, 2019 IME

Conjunctivitis is inflammation of the tissues lining or covering the eyelids and eyeballs. Numerous factors can lead to conjunctivitis, including infection by bacteria or viruses, irritants and trauma. Certain forms of conjunctivitis may develop with allergies. Conjunctivitis often occurs in eyes that have insufficient tear production, which is called “dry eye.” It can occur in association with many systemic or generalized illnesses, such as upper respiratory tract infections and generalized viral or bacterial infections. Tumors of ocular tissue can also cause conjunctivitis.

Redness of the conjunctiva is a common sign. Ocular discharge often develops and may be watery or purulent. Swelling of the conjunctiva may occur in some cases. With widespread or severe conjunctivitis, inflammation of the eyelids or of the cornea may also occur. Most eyes with mild conjunctivitis are not painful. Eyes with conjunctivitis associated with trauma, chemical burns, corneal ulcerations or foreign bodies may be painful, and this is indicated by squinting and pawing at the eye.

Conjunctivitis must be differentiated from other causes of a red eye, including glaucoma, corneal ulceration and uveitis, which is inflammation inside the eye. A thorough eye exam with a tear test, fluorescein staining for a corneal ulcer and glaucoma testing are always performed to rule out some of those other conditions.

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Yellowstone wolf oddities

by Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online! October 20, 2019

Yellowstone National Park has released its wolf project annual report for 2018, reporting that there were at least 80 wolves in 9 packs (7 breeding pairs) living primarily in the park at the end of December 2018.

For all the details, download the report at the link below.

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Attracting song birds to your back yard

Annual sale makes getting started less expensive

Dec 04, 2019 By Steve Liebenthal KIVI

Boise, Idaho — Alan Crockett has been attracting song birds to his back yard for decades. He says creating an oasis for multiple species is pretty simple.

To get song birds you like to have some habitat, meaning a bunch of trees around, or shrubbery, some water, and then food,” said Crockett. “And they’ll be there.”

On any given day, he can glance out his window and see a variety of birds taking advantage of his back yard set up. But the readily available food also attracts unwanted guests.

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Sockeye are endangered. Here’s what Idaho Fish and Game is doing to save them.

by Bryan Levin Thursday, December 5th 2019

Eagle, Idaho (CBS2) — There’s a brewery named after them.

One of the most picturesque places in Idaho is also named after them.

We’re talking about a fish for goodness’ sake.

“Sockeye are really an iconic species in Idaho,” said Idaho Fish and Game biologist John Powell. “Redfish Lake is named after sockeye who would return and spawn on the beaches.”

But the sockeye needs help. And Fish and Game has a team dedicated to doing just that.

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Outfitters discuss solutions to declining steelhead fishing in Idaho

by Associated Press Wednesday, December 4th 2019

Lewiston, Idaho (AP) – Steelhead outfitters and guides at an Idaho forum talked about solutions to the declining fish population that is hurting their businesses.

Those who work the Clearwater River met at an Idaho Outfitters and Guides Association forum Tuesday near Lewiston to explore their potential role in reversing fish numbers that have been shrinking over the past four years, The Lewiston Tribune reported.

“The goal was ultimately to reengage the conversation about how the outfitting and guiding industry in Idaho can have agency in determining the future of salmon and steelhead that businesses in rural communities rely on, and to reaffirm our motivation to meaningfully do that,” association director Aaron Lieberman said.

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Fish & Game News:

Time to shop for 2020 hunting and fishing license deals

By Emily Palmer, Marketing Analyst
Monday, December 2, 2019

You can save a few bucks on licenses, and they make good gifts

With Black Friday, Cyber Monday and holiday shopping deals going on, here are some Idaho Fish and Game “hacks” you may not be aware of that can save you money and increase your opportunities.

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Cow elk found left to waste and domestic cow shot near Leadore

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Monday, December 2, 2019

Anyone with information is encouraged to call Citizens Against Poaching 1-800-632-5999

Idaho Department of Fish and Game is asking the public’s help regarding a cow elk that was shot and left to waste on private property west of Leadore in hunt unit 29. A domestic cow was also found shot in the area, which was later euthanized due to its injuries.

While evidence was collected at both scenes, Fish and Game Conservation Officer Chad Wippermann hopes to learn more from an eyewitness or others who have knowledge of these crimes.

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Public’s Help Sought in Elk Poaching Case

By Evin Oneale, Regional Communications Manager
Monday, December 2, 2019

Fish and Game is asking the public for information regarding the recent poaching of two elk in hunt unit 40, just off the Mud Flat Road near Pole Creek in Owyhee County. The cow/calf pair was shot on or about November 22, and no meat was taken from either carcass. The cow elk was radio collared as part of a monitoring study conducted by Idaho Fish and Game.

Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) is offering a reward for information in the case and callers can remain anonymous. Contact CAP at 1-800-632-5999 twenty four hours a day.

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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Fun Critter Stuff:

On Thanksgiving, elk with love of apples gets tangled up in North Carolina man’s hammock

By Frank Miles Fox News


In this Nov. 28, 2019, photo provided by Jim Beaver, an elk stands stuck with a hammock in Beaver’s yard in Maggie Valley, N.C. on Thanksgiving. (Jim Beaver via AP)

An elk in western North Carolina caused quite the commotion on Thanksgiving.

Jim Beaver says he gets visitors often, mainly elks who eat apples in his yard and play with his red hammock.

“They can be really quiet; we often will be sitting on the porch and look up and see 4-6 of them having quietly wandered in the yard to eat apples,” Beaver told WLOS-TV.

This time, a visitor came and couldn’t quite leave.

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Seasonal Humor:

for the Snowbirds…

Wearrivedherefourmonthsago-a
caption: “We arrived here four months ago… intending to stay just overnight… but…”

by Clyde Lamb, July 22, 1950 Saturday Evening Post
[h/t Sandy McRae]
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Dec 1, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Dec 1, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Dec 7 thru Feb 21 Yellow Pine Tavern Holiday Closure
Dec 25 – Christmas dinner at the Community Hall 2pm
(details below)
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Local Events:

Dec 25 – Christmas dinner at the Community Hall 2pm

Potluck with turkey provided. We may have a Bingo game afterward.
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Village News:

Lost Dog

Don Waller (down on the South Fork near the McClain ranch) is missing his dog Able. Someone saw a dog that appeared lost fitting Abel’s description near Warren about a week ago but the dog wouldn’t get in with them. If you see Able, give Don a call (208) 636-2020.

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Yellow Pine Thanksgiving Dinner

Thanksgiving at the Tavern. A special treat this year Prime Rib provided by Cory and Annie. As well as our Turkey provided by the Tavern. Pies and side dishes by our usual great Yellow Pine cooks.

20191128TavernThanksgiving-a
linkto FB photo gallery:
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Boil Water Advisory Lifted Nov 22

Good news! We have received a noticed that the boil order has been lifted. (More info under YPWUA News below.)
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South Fork Ice Flow

Folks need to be aware of dangerous road conditions about half way out the South Fork. Water has been running down the middle of the road this fall, eroding the pavement and freezing into a thick layer of ice right up to the edge along the river side. Folks have said that low clearance cars may have trouble with the deep rut and ice.

There have been 2 slide-offs and a few near wrecks reported this month.

photo courtesy Nancy Bellman – November 10th

Kelly Collins posted on FB around 1130pm Nov 17th in response to the photo above: I [saw] this pickup when it was upside down in the river. There is a thick stretch of ice right there, it kinda sneaks up on you. I also pulled two guys from Washington with a Dodge 1-ton with a cargo trailer out from that same spot about 4 days ago.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Saturday (Nov 23) the dump is very full. Others have reported the road is developing some pot holes to dodge.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Boil Water Advisory Lifted November 22, 2019

With the sharp reduction in water demand due to the repair of the large pipeline leak and the successful cleaning of Filter #1, water production now exceeds demand. The flow restriction orifices are installed in each filter as is required, and both turbidity and chlorine residual values remain acceptable.

The combination of all of these factors has resulted in the restoration of sufficient treatment and as a result the Boil Advisory can now be lifted.

A few things to note:

1. As Boulder Creek water temperatures drop with winter conditions, chlorine dosing has to increase to maintain proper ratios. As usual, I will regularly provide a chlorine residual “target” value that corresponds with changes in water temperature. Maintaining the correct residual will be critical in order to avoid “Treatment Technique” violations with DEQ and the resulting required public notification.

2. Upon my last visit I observed the flow meter malfunctioning. It’s operation was intermittent and replacement of the meter should be considered.

3. A new Micro Switch for control of the chlorine dosing pump has been ordered and I plan to install it on the next regular visit.

4. Modification of the filter output piping and valving is planned for January. I will create and submit a drawing to DEQ for approval and once approved, the work can be completed. This modification will allow for “filter to waste” operation as is required after filter cleaning or maintenance. Currently no provision for filter to waste exists. Cost for fittings and valves is estimated at $350

5. Filter #2 should be cleaned and I’ve schedule that cleaning for mid January after filter to waste plumbing work is completed

6. Securement of the Boulder Creek “overflow culvert” needs to be completed. Please advise as to availability of the donated cable and clamps. Work needs to be completed before winter conditions set in so that the culvert is in place and secure for spring runoff.
– Warren Drake

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the Community Hall.
Linkto: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

Cemetery – Tim Rogers: Marge Fields is researching the history of the log cabin now located at the cemetery, but formerly was in the center of the Yellow Pine village. A plaque will be placed at the cabin. The previous information sign showing names and locations of deceased buried in the cemetery will be repaired this winter and placed next year.

Road & Ditch Committee has been created. Clayton Egbert, Chairman. Tim Rogers and Tom Lanham have volunteered. This group and will need more volunteers.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link to: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
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YPFD News:

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Fire Chief – Jeff Forster

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Stop the Bleed Class: We will do another class this spring/summer [2020] depending on interest.

Training will resume in the spring.

-Fire Chief Jeff
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for Winter.
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

The Corner is closed for the winter, opening again next spring. I can be reached at matt @ ypcorner.com or at 970-379-5155. Thanks, have a great winter!
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Holiday Closure Dec 7 thru Feb 21
Hours open 8am to close
Full breakfast served starting at 8am with special arrangement for earlier breakfast as needed. 92 Octane non ethanol gas available, cubed ice, beer, pop and water sold by the 6 and 12 pack, snacks, ice cream and many supplies available. Burgers and Pizza, Beer and Wine on the evening menu. Football and other sports available on our TV. Wi Fi, Verizon phone service and information available.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!
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Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:
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Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Nov 25) overnight low of 20 degrees, mostly cloudy sky and light frost this morning. Raven calling to the south west, chickadee calling from the forest, jays, nuthatches, hairy woodpecker and clark’s nutcrackers visiting. Quiet morning. Overcast and a few flakes of snow falling at noon. Light snow and cold gusty breezes on and off in the afternoon, mostly cloudy, high of 34 degrees. At dark it was mostly cloudy and calmer. Cloudy before midnight. Light dusting of snow fell before sunrise.

Tuesday (Nov 26) overnight low of 17 degrees, light dusting of snow on the ground and overcast sky this morning. Raven flying over the village and calling, lots of red-breasted nuthatches and a few jays visiting. Breaks in the clouds after lunch time. Quiet cold day. Mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, high of 30 degrees. Cold and cloudy at dusk. Cloudy before midnight. Gusty breezes after midnight. Skiff of snow fell early morning.

Wednesday (Nov 27) overnight low of 20 degrees, light dusting of snow on the ground and overcast sky again this morning. Jays, nutcrackers, nuthatches and a female cassins finch visiting. Patches of blue sky between the clouds at lunch time. Mail truck (Ray) was a bit late today, he said Cascade got more snow than Landmark. Mostly cloudy with cold gusty breezes mid-afternoon, high of 36 degrees. Below freezing by dark, hazy flat sky. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Thursday (Nov 28) Happy Thanksgiving. Overnight low of 14 degrees, clear sky and a little frost this morning. The wild birds are enjoying a “feast” of seeds, corn and suet, a little mountain chickadee showed up to join in with the flock of red-breasted nuthatches. Thin high haze to the south at lunch time and weak sunshine. Made it above freezing by mid-afternoon and partly cloudy, high of 34 degrees. Sun down behind the ridge just before 4pm today. Partly cloudy at dusk. Lots of stars out before midnight. Snow fell early morning.

Friday (Nov 29) overnight low of 12 degrees, overcast and snowing this morning, an inch by 10am and still snowing. Mostly red-breasted nuthatches and a solitary jay visiting. Light snow fall and thinner clouds at lunch time, but mountains still socked in. Snow stopped and clouds lifted early afternoon. Chilly, overcast and light cold breezes mid-afternoon, high of 29 degrees. Overcast at dusk. Lightly snowing after dark, still snowing lightly at midnight.

Saturday (Nov 30) overnight low around 20 degrees, mostly cloudy with growing clear patches this morning, 3/4″ new snow and 1.5″ total snow on the board. This has been the driest Nov in 10 years of record keeping, and the 2nd driest month of 2019 (July had a hair less, August a hair more.) Mountain chickadee, female hairy woodpecker, red-breasted nuthatches, jays and clark’s nutcracker visiting. Breaks in the clouds and filtered sunshine at lunch time. Partly cloudy mid-afternoon and cold breezes, high of 33 degrees. Sun behind the ridge by 340pm. Appeared to be mostly clear at dark, thin crescent moon low to the southwest. Lots of stars out before midnight. Increasing clouds during the night.

Sunday (Dec 1) overnight low of 7 degrees, socked in and steady snow this morning before sunrise, then clouds lifting and lighter snow at sunrise, and light breeze. Nuthatches, jays and nutcrackers visiting, raven flying and calling. Break in the snow until noon, then steady snow and socked in down to the valley floor. Still snowing mid-afternoon, high of 28 degrees, measured 1 7/8″ new snow since this morning, 3″ total on the board. Still snowing at dark.
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RIP:

Budd Kehne

Budd L. Kehne, 96, of Eagle (and Yellow Pine), died Monday, November 25, 2019. Survived by wife Jerralyn (Jeri). Funeral Home: Dakan Funeral Chapel, Caldwell
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Idaho News:

Officials warn of hazardous driving conditions in Boise County after car crash blocks parts of Highway 55

Boise County is currently under a winter weather advisory.

KTVB December 1, 2019

Boise City, Idaho — A multi-vehicle crash is blocking northbound lanes of Highway 55 in Boise County and officials are warning drivers of hazardous road conditions throughout the county due to winter weather.

According to Boise County Emergency Management, the crash happened at mile marker 57.5 and traffic is being diverted around the crash.

Officials did not state exactly how many cars were involved in the crash or if anyone was seriously injured.

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Boise man dies in snowy Idaho 55 crash

KTVB November 26, 2019

Donnelly, Idaho — One man is dead after police say he lost control on a snow-covered highway north of Donnelly Monday evening.

The wreck happened just before 8 p.m. on Idaho 55.

According to Idaho State Police, 27-year-old Kenneth Fourtner of Boise was headed north when he tried to pass a vehicle in front of him.

continued:
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Valley County recycling

Lori Hunter, Valley County Planning & Zoning Dept. Nov 26, 2019

The Valley County recycling guidelines have been updated, with additions! This version has been updated after receiving input from Commissioner Bingaman, Lakeshore Disposal, and the buyer of our recycled materials.

Please note – no plastic bags in recycling bins.

Recycling Guidelines

Updated November 2019

• There is no garbage collection at the recycling locations.
• Do not leave garbage, “Free” items or other non-recyclable items.
• Do not place bags containing recyclables in the bins. Remove the items from the bags. Currently Ridley’s, Albertsons and McPaws accept grocery bags.

Items Accepted for Recycle

– Corrugated Cardboard – Flattened/broken down corrugated cardboard. No wax coated boxes, egg cartons, chipboard or paperboard(These go to Mixed Paper).
– Mixed Paper – Includes printer paper, magazines, newspaper and packing paper. Also includes junk mail, neon paper and chipboard (such as cereal boxes.) No shredded paper and no food-contaminated items.
– Plastic – Includes #1 – #7 plastics mixed together. No plastic films such as garbage bags or grocery bags. Also no buckets, PVC pipe or other similar large items will be accepted. Containers need to be rinsed and free of food and chemical residue.
– Aluminum Cans – Only aluminum cans are accepted in the aluminum bins. No other forms of aluminum are accepted. Remove the cans from bags.
– Tin – Clean steel cans only in tin compartment. EMPTY aerosol cans are acceptable. No aluminum, scrap metal or bags.

• Contaminated bins may be disposed of as garbage. Please be aware of these guidelines and what you are placing in the bins to prevent this from happening. Your cooperation is appreciated and will contribute to the continuation of the recycling program in Valley County.
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Cascade, McCall DMV offices to be closed for training

The Star-News November 27, 2019

The Division of Motor Vehicle office in Cascade will be closed for Idaho State Tax Commission training next Thursday, Dec. 5, from 9:45 a.m. until 12:45 p.m.

The DMV office in McCall will be closed on Wednesday, Dec. 11, from 9:45 a.m. until 12:45 p.m. for the same training.

The Department of Motor Vehicles is located at 219 N. Main St. in Cascade and at 475 E. Deinhard Lane, Suite 106, in McCall. Normal office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Cascade and 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in McCall.

source:
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Childhood friend 3D prints prosthetic arm for McCall man

A University of Idaho student made a prosthetic arm using a 3D printer for a childhood friend after he lost half of his left arm in a car accident.

Joey Prechtl November 29, 2019 KTVB

Boise, Idaho — Losing a limb can be a traumatizing event, a person must re-learn how to live life with something they may have thought they’d never lose.

Alex Montes from McCall lost his left arm in a car accident in 2018. He was driving on Highway 55 from McCall to Boise, when he fell asleep at the wheel. Montes said he had his arm hanging out the window and the car flipped over onto it, causing him to lose it.

Montes told KTVB he didn’t get a prosthetic arm because he doesn’t have health insurance, and he couldn’t afford the out of pocket cost for one. He said a basic prosthetic would run him around $10,000.

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Tamarack opening beginner area this weekend for skiers and boarders

by CBS2 News Staff Friday, November 29th 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — Tamarack Resort is opening the beginner area Friday, Saturday, and Sunday for skiers and snowboarders.

The lift started turning Friday with several hundred people coming out to get some early season turns.

It has been snowing softly all day with one inch accumulating since early Friday morning.

continued:
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Mining News:

Midas: Cyanide leaching would be contained

Closed system would extract gold, silver, from slurry

(Note: This is the sixth part in a series detailing Midas Gold Idaho’s operating plan for its proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine. Next week: Gold and Silver Recovery)

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News November 27, 2019

Gold and silver particles would be dissolved by cyanide in large tanks of water, leaving only rock as if it were coffee grounds leftover after brewing a hot pot of coffee, according to Midas Gold’s operating plan for its proposed mine near Yellow Pine.

After being freed from within rock during oxidation, gold and silver particles mixed with rock would be pumped into the vat leaching circuit at a continuous rate of about 3,000 tons per day.

The circuit would consist of a series of seven steel tanks filled with a diluted mixture of sodium cyanide and water being circulated through each tank.

The cylindrical tanks would average about 50 feet in diameter and 30 feet tall with a capacity of about 440,000 gallons.

Slurry would be pumped into the first tank in the series and begin working its way to the final tank. Each tank would be connected by screens that allow particles to pass through.

As the slurry moves through the circuit, sodium cyanide would dissolve gold and silver from the slurry and into the water solution in the tanks. The solution would contain about 0.3% cyanide.

Tanks toward the end of the circuit would be stocked with granular activated carbon, which attracts and absorbs dissolved gold and silver particles.

The carbon would regularly be transferred up the tank gradient to remove dissolved gold and silver lingering in tanks at the beginning of the circuit.

Once the fully-loaded carbon reaches the first tank, it would be removed from the circuit for the next step of the process, gold and silver recovery. The removed carbon would then be replaced with new carbon in the last tank, or most down-gradient tank, in the circuit.

Slurry would spend about 12 hours in the leach circuit until all the gold and silver particles are dissolved and removed through carbon absorption.

Rock slurry would be left behind in the tanks just like coffee grounds in a filter. It would then be neutralized, thickened and pumped to the on-site, lined tailings storage facility.

The leaching circuit would use about 10 tons of sodium cyanide per day, or about 50,000 tons over the expected 12-year to 15-year life of the mine.

Cyanide would be shipped to Stibnite in briquette form in double-walled and sealed tanker trucks to reduce the risk of a spill in an accident.

Large concrete walls capable of holding 10% more than the contents of the largest of the seven tanks would be built around the circuit in case of a spill.

A digital monitoring system would also make sure that the circuit remains at safe operating conditions, according to the Midas Gold operating plan.

Cyanide History

Cyanide has commonly been used to extract gold from rock since the late 1800s, including during previous mining operations at Stibnite.

However, the closed circuit, vat cyanide leaching proposed by Midas Gold is different than open heap leaching techniques used at Stibnite as recently as then 1980s and 1990s by Hecla Mining Company and Canadian Superior Mining.

Heap leaching involves piling hundreds of thousands of tons of ore onto a liner and then initiating a cyanide drip system to percolate through the heap and dissolve gold and silver particles.

A collection basin at the bottom of the heap would collect the cyanide solution for processing to remove the gold and silver.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Public Lands:

Payette, Boise forests now selling Christmas tree permits

The Star-News November 27, 2019

Christmas tree permits for the Boise and Payette national forests are now on sale at vendor locations and at Forest Service offices.

Cost is $10 per tree. Each permit will allow one tree to be cut, with a limit of three per family. Maximum height for a tree is 12 feet.

Forest offices will provide information on where a Christmas tree may be harvested, restrictions and helpful tips.

Fourth-graders can also pick up a free Christmas tree permit as part of the “Every Kid Outdoors” program by completing a voucher online and bringing it into a Forest Service office.

Fourth-graders cannot receive their free permits from commercial vendors, electronically or through the mail. The voucher is available at (link).

Those heading out to cut trees are encouraged to check road conditions before leaving, as Forest Service roads are not plowed.

Tree cutters are also encouraged to bring the proper tools, such as a saw, a shovel and a red or orange flag. Trees should be cut to within 6 inches of the ground.

Vehicles carrying a load that extends more than 4 feet past the tailgate must display a red or orange flag tied to the end of the load as a warning to other drivers.

Christmas tree permits will be available at the following locations:

• McCall Ranger District Office, 102 W. Lake St., McCall.
• Payette National Forest Supervisor’s Office, 500 N. Mission St., McCall.
• Cascade Ranger District, 540 N. Main St., Cascade.
• New Meadows Ranger District Office, 3674 U.S. 95, Cascade.
• Albertsons, 132 E. Lake St., McCall.
• C&M Lumber, 3625 Walker Lane, New Meadows.

source:
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Little Red Goose Forest Resilience Project – Decision Memo signed

McCall, Id., November 19, 2019 – Tawnya Brummett, the Acting Forest Supervisor for the Payette National Forest, signed the decision memo today for the Little Red Goose Forest Resilience Project on the New Meadows Ranger District.

This project area is roughly 8,800 acres in the Little Salmon River subbasin in Upper Goose Creek, Sixmile Creek, and Lower Goose Creek between McCall and New Meadows, and is visible from Highway 55, Highway 95 and Brundage Ski Resort. The area has been heavily impacted by Douglas fir tussock moth as evidenced by the large areas of red needled trees this summer and fall.

According to a recent USDA Forest Health and Protection report, this area is also being impacted by the western spruce budworm, Balsam woolly adelgid, mistletoe, and root and butt rots which is compounding the effect on trees in the area.

This decision authorizes treatments on up to 3,000 acres identified within the larger 8,800-acre area, and includes commercial thinning, non-commercial thinning, commercial firewood removal, slash treatments (lop and scatter or pile burning), and broadcast prescribed burning. Hazard tree removal in Last Chance Campground as well as commercial treatments west of FSR 453 could begin as early as January 2020.

“[Little Red Goose] is an excellent example of how we can quickly respond to our changing forest conditions, and the importance of engaging with our communities and local officials to address insect and disease issues that have the potential to affect a much larger area,” says Brummett in her decision. “Much like wildfire, insects and disease do not recognize jurisdictional boundaries, and managing the National Forest to increase its resiliency to such disturbances is critical to being good stewards of the land and responsible neighbors.”

The project is categorically excluded from documentation in an EA or EIS because it fits within the Insect and Disease Infestation category authorized by the Healthy Forest Restoration Act, specifically section 603 (16 U.S.C6591b)(FSH1909.15, 32.3(3)). This project adheres to the specifications of that authority.

More information about the project can be found on the Little Red Goose project webpage at: (link) or you can contact Erin Phelps, New Meadows District Ranger at 208-347-0301.
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Winter logging operations may affect some snowmobile routes within the Emmett Ranger District

Crouch, Idaho, November 26, 2019 — This winter, some Emmett Ranger District snowmobile routes within Boise County may be affected by logging activities in an effort to respond to the recent tussock moth outbreak.

The West Scriver timber sale is ongoing, adjacent to National Forest System roads 693 and 696. The Boise National Forest has authorized winter logging along these routes through January 15, 2020 to remove dead and dying trees.

Logging activities are operating Monday through Friday. Visitors should proceed with caution since they may encounter heavy logging truck traffic. Signs are posted where active logging operations are occurring. “We want to provide as much notice as possible,” said Katie Wood, Emmett District Ranger. “There is a chance that harvest dates or timber operations may change and if so, we will get the word out so forest visitors can plan accordingly.”

The Emmett Ranger District has experienced numerous tussock moth outbreaks over the last few years. Options for control are somewhat limited over large areas. Dry sites, ridges and dense stands tend to have more damage because trees have less water to recover from feeding damage.

Multiple efforts are being planned in future years to improve the health and resilience of the forest including timber harvests, prescribed burns and tree plantings.
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E-Bikes welcome on ‘motorized use’ Forest Service trails, roads

Ogden, Utah, Nov. 20, 2019 – Electric bicycles, known commonly as e-bikes, have grown in popularity for both recreational use and hunting on public lands and are currently welcome on roads and trails where motorized vehicle travel is authorized throughout the Intermountain Region’s 12 national forests and Curlew National Grassland.

The USDA Forest Service considers e-bikes as motorized vehicles and therefore does not allow their use on non-motorized National Forest System roads and trails.

The Forest Service encourages e-bike riders to consult their local National Forest or Grassland’s motor vehicle use map to ensure they’re riding on an approved motorized-use roads or trails and to exercise caution when traveling among other motor vehicles.

The mission of the Forest Service is to sustain the health, diversity and productivity of the nation’s forests and grasslands to meet the needs of present and future generations. The agency manages 193 million acres of public land, provides assistance to state and private landowners, and maintains the largest forestry research organization in the world.

The Forest Service Intermountain Region includes 12 national forests in Idaho, Utah, Nevada, Wyoming with small portions in California and Colorado and 47,790 acres of National Grassland In Idaho. These public lands provide timber for people, forage for cattle and wildlife, habitat for fish, plants and animals, and some of the best recreational opportunities in the country.
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Letter to Share:

Community to Thank for Wildlife Rescue’s Success

November 26, 2019 Bonner County Daily Bee

It has been another successful year at Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue and we have the community to thank. None of this could be done without your help.

Mystic Farm is a non-profit, 501(c)3. We operate 100% on donations, grants, and volunteers. You are the backbone of the rescue. Because of you, there are many happy, healthy, and thriving fawns living their second chance at life in the wild. Thank you to the following: Safeway for the supplemental produce, Mountain Sky for the continued printing donations, The Bonner County Daily Bee for getting the word out regarding “don’t be a fawn napper,” Blue Sky for their community calendar, Community Assistance League for supporting us with a grant to help with predator control fencing improvement, Winter Ridge for the “Bags for Change” program, Dr. Marvalee Higgins at Fry Creek Veterinarian Clinic, Officers Josh, Matt and Rob at Idaho Department of Fish and Game, all the great “fawn warrior” volunteers who hauled produce and donated apples, those volunteers that were there with a second set of hands when needed (too many to mention), Sandpoint Furniture for selling the fabulous handmade Mystic Farm candles, all who purchased Mystic Farm candles and swag, those whom have generously donated cash and in-kind so we can keep the rescue up and running, and to everyone reading this that may have given us a word of support or a wave and thumbs up when you see the Mystic Farm truck driving by. We are truly blessed with this community.

Thank you — and the fawns thank you.
Dory Mcisaac
Sagle
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Critter News:

9 Thanksgiving foods that will make your dog sick

If you care about your dog’s health, think twice before feeding them off of your Thanksgiving plate.

Suzanne Nuyen November 25, 2019

It can be tempting to feed your dog a little bit off of your Thanksgiving plate, especially if you have a pet that’s prone to begging for food at the table. If you’re going to give your dog a Thanksgiving treat, make sure you’re not feeding them anything that will send them to the hospital. These popular Thanksgiving foods are a no-no for your pets.

Turkey skin and bones

Dogs love gnawing on bones, but if they swallow one it might cause problems. Poultry bones can splinter off in the esophagus or intestines and require surgery to remove. The fattier turkey skin can cause gastrointestinal distress and even life threatening inflammation in the pancreas.

Turkey twine
Corn on the cob
Garlic and Onions
Grapes/Raisins
Gravy and trimmings
Bread dough
Chocolate

full story:
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Wolf News Roundup

11/23/2019 By Cat Urbigkit Pinedale Online

Western Wyoming’s wolf hunting season opened Sept. 1st. Six of the trophy wolf hunt areas have had their quotas reached, so those areas are now closed. Of the total quota of 35 wolves available for legal harvest in the state’s wolf trophy zone, 25 wolves have been killed by hunters as of Nov. 21. An additional 22 wolves have been killed so far this year in the remainder of Wyoming, where wolves are classified as predators.

In the early 1990s, biologists attempted a reintroduction of endangered red wolves to Great Smoky Mountains National Park. It was a failed program that was quickly ended once the endangered red wolves failed to raise pups. Although the reintroduced wolves reproduced, all of the estimated 40 pups died of parvo.

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Sockeye salmon run falters, but Idaho officials optimistic

Nov 26, 2019 By Associated Press


Idaho Department of Fish and Game

Boise, Idaho — Fisheries managers are optimistic a program to save imperiled Snake River sockeye salmon is heading in the right direction despite few of the ocean-going fish making it back to central Idaho this year.

Of the 730,000 young sockeye released in Idaho 2017, only 17 survived the 900-mile (1,400-kilometer) journey to the Pacific Ocean and then back again to arrive as adults in the Sawtooth Basin near Stanley.

But John Powell of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game said late last week that fish raised to adults in hatcheries will keep the population going. Biologists also released 610 adults into central Idaho lakes this fall to spawn naturally.

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Idaho utility will dismiss lawsuit against EPA over dams

by Keith Ridler Associated Press November 29th 2019

Boise, Idaho (AP) – An Idaho utility will voluntarily dismiss its lawsuit against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency involving relicensing of the company’s hydroelectric project where federally protected fall chinook salmon reproduce.

Idaho Power in documents filed earlier this week in U.S. District Court says the EPA in response to the lawsuit has approved allowing warmer water temperatures in the Snake River below the Hells Canyon Complex on the Idaho-Oregon border.

The National Marines Fisheries Service says the change is not likely to jeopardize salmon or their critical habitat.

Idaho Power says allowing warmer water below the dams could reduce the cost of electricity and save customers up to $100 million over 50 years.

The company says the Hells Canyon Complex generates about 70% of its hydroelectric power supplied to customers.

source:
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Fish & Game News:

2020 nonresident deer and elk tags go on sale Dec. 1

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Monday, November 25, 2019

Nonresident hunters can buy 2020 hunting license and deer and elk tags starting Dec. 1, except Sawtooth Zone elk tags, which go on sale May 11.

Pioneer Zone elk B tags and Big Desert Zone elk B tags will also be available to nonresident hunters on Dec. 1, which were not available at that time last year.

Nonresident deer and elk tags have sold out in recent years and were gone by mid September in 2019, and if trends continue, they will likely sell out in 2020. Nonresidents are encouraged to buy licenses and tags early to ensure they have the opportunity to hunt in Idaho.

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MK Nature Center hosting 13th annual bird seed sale

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Tuesday, November 26, 2019

Stop by on Dec. 6-7 to stock up on food for your favorite backyard birds

The MK Nature Center will host its 13th annual bird seed sale on December 6 and 7. Come and stock up on food for your favorite backyard birds, and help support the Nature Center in the process.

High quality bird seed, including black-oil sunflower, dove and quail mix, nyger thistle, and other varieties are provided through partnership with Wild Birds Unlimited of Boise. Wild Birds Unlimited is a long-time supporter of this event, helping make sure that the bird seed sale is one of the nature center’s most successful and popular fundraisers. Proceeds from this event benefit educational programs at the MK Nature Center.

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Sorry anglers, no steelhead for the Boise River this year

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Tuesday, November 26, 2019


Roger Phillips/Idaho Fish and Game

Low returns mean all steelhead trapped in Hells Canyon will be needed for hatcheries

Low steelhead returns mean no steelhead will be released into the Boise River for the first time in more than 20 years. It’s an annual event that many anglers look forward to all year, but there aren’t enough fish available at the trap in Hells Canyon to do it.

“We have been holding out hope that we would have enough steelhead to stock into the Boise River this week, but as trapping at Oxbow has progressed this fall, we have determined that we are not going to have enough surplus fish above broodstock needs to make it happen,” Anadromous Fisheries Manager Chris Sullivan said.

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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Viral Bellingham cat ‘Cinderblock’ is on a mission to lose weight

by Dyer Oxley KOMO News Tuesday, October 29th 2019

Bellingham, Wash. — Exercise is rarely fun, as Cinderblock the Cat can attest. But no pain, no gain.

“I think what has drawn a lot of attention to her is people’s personal weight loss and body issues that we all have,” said Jason Collins, a vet tech with Bellingham’s Northshore Veterinary Hospital. “Having a feline that we can relate to and seeing her go through things is heartwarming.”

Cinderblock the Cat hails from Bellingham, but has recently become a bit of an online sensation with videos of her exercise going viral. Losing weight entails significant playtime, walking on a special underwater treadmill, and sticking to a low calorie diet.

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When eating is more important than breathing

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Seasonal Humor:

FallDogCold-a
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Winter Weather Advisory Dec 1, 11am to Dec 2, 11am

Yellow Pine Forecast

Today Snow likely after 11am. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 34. South southwest wind 6 to 9 mph. Chance of precipitation is 70%. Total daytime snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.

Tonight Rain and snow, becoming all snow after 11pm. Low around 28. Southwest wind 3 to 6 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Monday A chance of snow before 11am, then a slight chance of rain and snow. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 38. Southwest wind around 6 mph. Chance of precipitation is 30%. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Monday Night A 20 percent chance of snow after 11pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 27. Southwest wind around 6 mph.

Winter Weather Advisory

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
355 AM MST Sun Dec 1 2019

...WINTER STORM TODAY THROUGH MONDAY MORNING...

A Pacific storm will spread snow across eastern Oregon and
western Idaho today, tonight, and Monday morning. Heavy snow is
expected in northern Harney and Malheur Counties, the Lower
Treasure Valley, Owyhee Mountains, and the Boise Mountains.
Southern areas will have less snow and it may mix with or change
to rain there overnight or Monday morning.

West Central Mountains-Boise Mountains-Western Magic Valley-
355 AM MST Sun Dec 1 2019

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM 11 AM THIS MORNING TO
11 AM MST MONDAY...

* WHAT...Snow expected. Total snow accumulations of 2 to 4 inches,
  except up to 8 inches over the mountains.

* WHERE...West Central Mountains, Boise Mountains and Western
  Magic Valley zones.

* WHEN...From 11 AM this morning to 11 AM MST Monday.

* IMPACTS...Plan on slippery road conditions.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS...Gusty northeast winds near Jerome will
  cause areas of blowing and drifting snow and reduced
  visibility.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Slow down and use caution while traveling.

The latest road conditions can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.

 

Winter Weather Advisory Nov 26, 11pm to Nov 27, 5pm

YP Weather forecast link:

Tonight A 30 percent chance of snow after 11pm. Cloudy, with a low around 20. East southeast wind 5 to 9 mph. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Wednesday Snow. High near 32. East wind 7 to 9 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Wednesday Night A 30 percent chance of snow showers before 11pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 14. East wind 3 to 6 mph. Little or no snow accumulation expected.

Thanksgiving Day A 40 percent chance of snow showers, mainly after 11am. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 32. East wind 3 to 5 mph. Little or no snow accumulation expected.

Thursday Night A 30 percent chance of snow showers. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 13. Little or no snow accumulation expected.

Winter Weather Advisory

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
201 PM MST Tue Nov 26 2019

...HOLIDAY TRAVEL TO BE IMPACTED BY STRONG WINTER STORM TONIGHT
THROUGH WEDNESDAY...

.A powerful winter storm will impact Oregon and Idaho beginning
this evening. Conditions will deteriorate tonight as snowfall
intensifies, and impacts much of the area. Additionally, this
system will produce areas of strong winds, especially across
southwest Idaho. The combination of snow and wind will impact
travelers through Wednesday afternoon.

West Central Mountains-
201 PM MST Tue Nov 26 2019

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM 11 PM THIS EVENING TO
5 PM MST WEDNESDAY...

* WHAT...Snow expected. Total snow accumulations of 2 to 4 inches,
  except 4 to 10 inches over the mountains. Winds gusting 15 to 25
  mph with local blowing and drifting snow.

* WHERE...West Central Mountains zone.

* WHEN...From 11 PM this evening to 5 PM MST Wednesday.

* IMPACTS...Plan on slippery road conditions.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Slow down and use caution while traveling.

The latest road conditions can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.