Category Archives: News 2019

Nov 24, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Nov 24, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Boil water order lifted Nov 22
May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season
Nov 25 – deadline to order 2020 YP calendar
Nov 28 – Thanksgiving potluck 2pm at the Tavern
Dec 25 – Christmas dinner at the Community Hall 2pm
(details below)
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Local Events:

Nov 28 – Yellow Pine Thanksgiving Dinner

Thursday, November 28, 2019 at 2pm Potluck at the Yellow Pine Tavern – Turkey and bread stuffing provided by the Tavern. Also prime rib, pumpkin pie, and deviled eggs promised
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Dec 25 – Christmas dinner at the Community Hall 2pm

Potluck with turkey provided. We may have a Bingo game afterward.
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Village News:

Boil Water Advisory Lifted Nov 22

Good news! We have received a noticed that the boil order has been lifted. (More info under YPWUA News below.)
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South Fork Ice Flow

Folks need to be aware of dangerous road conditions about half way out the South Fork. Water has been running down the middle of the road this fall, eroding the pavement and freezing into a thick layer of ice right up to the edge along the river side. Folks have said that low clearance cars may have trouble with the deep rut and ice.

There have been 2 slide-offs and a few near wrecks reported this month.

photo courtesy Nancy Bellman – November 10th

Kelly Collins posted on FB around 1130pm Nov 17th in response to the photo above: I [saw] this pickup when it was upside down in the river. There is a thick stretch of ice right there, it kinda sneaks up on you. I also pulled two guys from Washington with a Dodge 1-ton with a cargo trailer out from that same spot about 4 days ago.
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Valley County Road Meeting Notes

by Teri Norell

On Nov. 18 I attended the road workshop in Cascade offered by our County Commissioners.

Doug Miller (county clerk) opened the workshop by presenting information on present monies available and projected financial revenue and expenses.

In general the road department has @ $6 million dollars as to date and expenses $3-4 million per year for just basic maintenance. $4.2 million dollars have been appropriated for this year. A large portion of these expenses are for snow removal. Revenue for road maintenance is primarily obtained from user fees (gas tax and vehicle registration) which is @ $2 million/ year. There is potential revenue from federal SRS funds.These funds rely on Congressionally approval. Last years funds from SRS was $1.7 million. As of this year no SRS monies have been allotted. Senator Risch and Representative Crapo are hoping to introduce legislation to obtain these monies in the near future, but no promises. Obviously road maintenance expenditures are greater then income.

While there are funds to cover this years snow removal /road maintenance, following years would run into deficits.

Jeff McFadden presented information on all that is involved with maintaining road system in Valley County. There are approximately 731 miles of roads. These roads are classified as to their importance ie: bus route, main corridor etc. Priority for maintenance is related to that classification.

Following Jeff’s presentation, the workshop was open to questions and comments. The discussions centered around how to increase funding, what roads would be cut from snow removal when funds run low / out and how to improve public awareness on road concerns and up coming meetings etc.

Some of the ideas presented for funding: get recently failed road levy back on the ballot possibly as early as this coming May. This time doing a better job of informing the public as to its importance. At this time Valley county does not receive revenue for road maintenance from property taxes. Change the state gas tax calculation so as to be more favorable for those counties that have a road systems that encompass a large portion of public lands. Grants are another area of income discussed. It was mentioned that a part time grant writer had just been hired.

Ideas for improving Public knowledge of road concerns, meetings etc. include: A pamphlet having relevant county contact information will be coming out with upcoming property tax bills, Face Book site (to be set up as I understood) and county web site etc.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Saturday (Nov 23) the dump is very full. Others have reported the road is developing some pot holes to dodge.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Boil Water Advisory Lifted November 22, 2019

With the sharp reduction in water demand due to the repair of the large pipeline leak and the successful cleaning of Filter #1, water production now exceeds demand. The flow restriction orifices are installed in each filter as is required, and both turbidity and chlorine residual values remain acceptable.

The combination of all of these factors has resulted in the restoration of sufficient treatment and as a result the Boil Advisory can now be lifted.

A few things to note:

1. As Boulder Creek water temperatures drop with winter conditions, chlorine dosing has to increase to maintain proper ratios. As usual, I will regularly provide a chlorine residual “target” value that corresponds with changes in water temperature. Maintaining the correct residual will be critical in order to avoid “Treatment Technique” violations with DEQ and the resulting required public notification.

2. Upon my last visit I observed the flow meter malfunctioning. It’s operation was intermittent and replacement of the meter should be considered.

3. A new Micro Switch for control of the chlorine dosing pump has been ordered and I plan to install it on the next regular visit.

4. Modification of the filter output piping and valving is planned for January. I will create and submit a drawing to DEQ for approval and once approved, the work can be completed. This modification will allow for “filter to waste” operation as is required after filter cleaning or maintenance. Currently no provision for filter to waste exists. Cost for fittings and valves is estimated at $350

5. Filter #2 should be cleaned and I’ve schedule that cleaning for mid January after filter to waste plumbing work is completed

6. Securement of the Boulder Creek “overflow culvert” needs to be completed. Please advise as to availability of the donated cable and clamps. Work needs to be completed before winter conditions set in so that the culvert is in place and secure for spring runoff.
– Warren Drake

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the Community Hall.
Link to: 20190707YPWUAminutes.rtf
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VYPA News:

Cemetery – Tim Rogers: Marge Fields is researching the history of the log cabin now located at the cemetery, but formerly was in the center of the Yellow Pine village. A plaque will be placed at the cabin. The previous information sign showing names and locations of deceased buried in the cemetery will be repaired this winter and placed next year.

Road & Ditch Committee has been created. Clayton Egbert, Chairman. Tim Rogers and Tom Lanham have volunteered. This group and will need more volunteers.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link to: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
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YPFD News:

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Fire Chief – Jeff Forster

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Stop the Bleed Class: We will do another class this spring/summer [2020] depending on interest.

Training update 11/18: Training will resume in the spring.

-Fire Chief Jeff
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for Winter.
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

The Corner is closed for the winter, opening again next spring. I can be reached at matt @ ypcorner.com or at 970-379-5155. Thanks, have a great winter!
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall hours open 8am to close
Full breakfast served starting at 8am with special arrangement for earlier breakfast as needed. 92 Octane non ethanol gas available, cubed ice, beer, pop and water sold by the 6 and 12 pack, snacks, ice cream and many supplies available. Burgers and Pizza, Beer and Wine on the evening menu. Football and other sports available on our TV. Wi Fi, Verizon phone service and information available.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Nov 18) overnight low of 27 degrees, mostly cloudy sky and light breeze this morning. First measurable precipitation in November on Sunday = 0.02″. Jays, nuthatches and nutcracker visiting, chickadee calling from the trees. Overcast by lunch time, light breezes. Not many birds around today. Thicker clouds, mild and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 51 degrees. Golfers out enjoying a nice day at the Yellow Pine Country Club. Overcast at dusk and calmer. A few stars out before midnight. Rain shower before 5am, more rain before 9am.

Tuesday (Nov 19) probably didn’t get below freezing last night, low dark clouds and steady rain this morning. A few jays and nuthatches visiting. Rain/snow mix, then back to rain at lunch time, stopped before 1pm then breaks in the clouds letting in a little sunshine. Partly clear/cloudy mid-afternoon, cool and a light chilly breeze, high of 43 degrees. Patches of new snow on the very top of Golden Gate, low cloud on VanMeter Hill hiding new snow up there. Almost full dark by 530pm now, looked partly clear. A few stars out before midnight.

Wednesday (Nov 20) overnight low of 27 degrees, mostly cloudy sky and bit of sunshine, light breeze and wet with dew and melting frost after sunrise. Jays and red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Almost overcast at lunch time, thicker darker clouds and rather chilly. Mail truck was nearly on time. Gusty breezes kicking up early afternoon. Partly clear to partly cloudy mid-afternoon, gusty chilly breezes, high of 45 degrees. Breezy at dusk and flat sky. High haze and a few stars out before midnight.

Thursday (Nov 21) overnight low of 16 degrees, almost clear sky this morning – a few little wispies and frosty. In addition to the jays and nuthatches a female cassins finch visited at lunch time. Strong sunshine at noon, but chilly. Clark’s nutcracker joined the jays and nuthatches at the feeders along with a resident pine squirrel. Partly cloudy (high wispies) and chilly breeze mid-afternoon, there is still frost on the ground in the shade, high of 41 degrees. Looked like some high haze at dusk. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Friday (Nov 22) overnight low of 16 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning – a handful of ‘popcorn’ clouds in the sky, slight chilly breeze and frosty. The female cassins finch is back along with half a dozen red-breasted nuthatches, noisy jays and nutcrackers. Sunny, clear and chilly at lunch time. A lone chipmunk visited. Clear and slight chilly breeze mid-afternoon, high of 45 degrees, sun is down behind the ridge by 345pm. The western sky was blushing pink at dusk, otherwise clear and calm. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Saturday (Nov 23) overnight low of 16 degrees, overcast sky and frosty this morning. A female cassins finch is still here (should have gone south by now), nuthatches, jays and nutcracker also visiting. Clearing off and sunny by lunch time, but cool. Mostly clear mid-afternoon, just a tiny cold breeze, high of 47 degrees. The frost on the ground on the north side has not melted in the last few days, it has built up and now looks like snow. Looked mostly clear at dusk. Dropped below freezing after dark.

Sunday (Nov 24) overnight low was just under freezing, a bit of frost and snow pellets on the ground, overcast and a very light breeze this morning. Jays, red-breasted nuthatches and clark’s nutcrackers visiting. Cloudy and cool at lunch time. Quiet day so far. Cracks in the clouds and cold light breeze mid-afternoon, high of 42 degrees. A few starlings have invaded. Big patches of clear sky late afternoon. Partly cloudy just before dark.
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RIP:

Jerome “Jerry” Schwarzhoff

Schwarzhoff, Jerome “Jerry”, 103, of Boise, died on November 21, 2019. A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, November 26, 2019 at Wright Community Congregational Church, 4821 W Franklin Rd, Boise, ID 83705.

Published in Idaho Statesman on Nov. 23, 2019
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Idaho News:

Valley, public ponder how to plow

Levy defeat puts winter of 2020-21 in doubt

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Nov 21, 2019

Valley County commissioners and the public on Monday swapped ideas on future funding and projects like snow plowing for the winter of 2020-21 in light of the defeat of the recent roads levy.

Monday’s workshop focused on changes that would affect services next winter, as the budget for the coming winter is already set.

County residents should not see a significant reduction in services this winter, Superintendent Jeff McFadden said at the meeting held at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade.

County voters on Nov. 5 failed to pass a property tax levy to fund county roads. The measure received 50.7% “yes” votes, but 66.7% was needed for passage.

Without the levy, the road department will have a deficit of about $4 million by 2023 if no other funding sources are found, Valley County Clerk Douglas Miller said.

The county looked at what roads could be cut from plow routes, which are classified as major and minor collectors, local roads and private roads, commission Chair Elt Hasbrouck said.

Private and local roads would be the last priority for plowing, Hasbrouck told about 60 people who attended the meeting.

“If we have to go a mile or a mile and a half to get to one residence versus a mile and a half to get to 20 residences then we’re going to have to prioritize which road we’re going to do, and I think that’s a pretty easy decision,” he said.

Roads serving year-round residents would be prioritized over second homes.

The county averages about 21 storms per year, with 10 days of snow cleanup needed on over 235 miles of road, McFadden said.

It costs about $1.58 per minute to operate a snowplow, and $2.25 per minute for a road grader. Every time it snows, eight to 18 pieces of equipment are out for up to 12 hours a day, McFadden said.

Straight stretches take less time and money to plow, where roads with intersections, curves and cul-de-sacs are more time consuming and expensive to plow, he said.

Not plowing seven roads would save about $20,000 per year, he said.

One member of the audience asked if a member of the public could plow a county road, to which McFadden said they could with an agreement with the county.

Other audience members said they were worried about emergency access to homes if they’re not plowed.

Others wanted to know how to alert second homeowners of the reduction in services and what happens if there is another month with heavy snowfall like this past February.

Hasbrouck said that there is no law requiring the county to plow any roads at all, but the county plows several roads specifically to maintain access for residents with medical needs.

Several funding sources were suggested by audience members, including toll booths, lobbying the state and federal legislatures for funding and using deferred property taxes.

Toll booths would need state approval and were unlikely, commissioners said.

The county cannot depend on state and federal funding, and deferred property taxes estimated at $1.1 million per year need to be saved for emergencies, they said.

“The past commissioners for the last hundred years have been running this road department without any property taxes and it’s finally come down to where we’re out of luck; now we’ve got to start paying our own bill,” Hasbrouck said.

Those attending and commissioners agreed the best way to move forward was to continue to educate the public on why a road tax is needed and try again to pass a similar levy.

Another road levy could be on the ballot in May 2020 or November 2020 but would require more effective public communication in order to pass, commissioners said.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Free Thanksgiving dinners set for McCall, Cascade, NM

The Star-News Nov 21, 2019

McCall
Quaker Hill Camp will host its 10th annual free community Thanksgiving Dinner with turkey and all the trimmings on Monday from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Reservations are helpful but are not required.

Cascade
The American Legion Auxiliary of Cascade will host its annual free Community Thanksgiving Dinner from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

New Meadows
A free Thanksgiving dinner will begin at 1 p.m. Thanksgiving Day at New Meadows United Methodist Church Education Building located at 201 N. Heigho St. in New Meadows.

full story:

Note: Thanksgiving pot-luck in Yellow Pine will be at 2pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern.
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CPR, First Aid classes to be offered Dec. 3-4 in Donnelly

The Star-News Nov 21, 2019

CPR/AED and First Aid classes will be held at the Donnelly Fire Station on Tuesday and Wednesday, Dec. 3-4, at 6 p.m.

The CPR/AED portion will be Tuesday, Dec. 3, and the First Aid portion on Wednesday, Dec. 4.

Cost is $25, and space is limited. For more information or to register, call 208-325-8619.

The Donnelly Fire Station is located at 244 W. Roseberry Road.

source:
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Police in McCall seek public’s help finding graffiti vandal

Several incidents have been reported to police in the past two weeks.

KTVB November 19, 2019

McCall, Idaho — Someone has been defacing public property in McCall.

The McCall Police Department posted three photos of the damage on their Facebook page and put out a call for help in finding the responsible parties.

The photos show two utility boxes and a Big Payette Lake sign that have been tagged with graffiti.

continued:
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Highway 55 back open after semi truck carrying logs overturns

The road reopened in both directions by 2:43pm Friday.

Nyla Gennaoui November 22, 2019 KTVB

Banks, Idaho — Highway 55 was blocked in both directions for several hours Friday after a semi-truck carrying logs overturned near a sharp bend in the road north of Horseshoe Bend.

The accident happened around 11:30am.

continued:
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Tips & Advice:

Reduce your risk of catching the cold and flu

Nov 20, 2019 KIVI Staff

Boise, Idaho — It’s official: cold and flu season is underway across the U.S. The CDC says flu season is getting an early start with 30 states already reporting cases.

Dr. Adam Saperston serves as Medical Director for Blue Cross of Idaho. He says there are ways to tell the difference between a cold and the flu. First, they’re caused by different viruses. Second, the flu makes people sicker through a higher fever, making someone feel more weak, and other symptoms. The flu can also continue to become worse, causing someone to develop pneumonia and can be fatal.

Dr. Saperston says the number one way to avoid catching the flu remains getting your flu vaccine.

continued:
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Scam Alert:

Police: Avoid scams, don’t take Facebook quizzes

Nov 18, 2019 By WTMJ Staff (KIVI TV)

Facebook quizzes help identity thieves learn personal information, increasing people’s risk of being scammed, according to Prevention.com.

Some quizzes ask questions that are similar to security questions when setting up an account, such as where you were born, the name of the street you lived on, your favorite pet and more. When you answer these questions on the quizzes, you could be giving scammers the answers to hack your accounts.

Additionally, some posts mean well, but prompt people to comment or post information. For example, the following post is likely intended to simply be a fun holiday game, but scammers can use the information you provide, combined with the information on your profile, to scam you.

continued: (h/t Valley County Sheriff’s office)
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Mining News:

Pressure cooker would squeeze gold, silver from Stibnite slurry

(Note: This is the fifth part in a series detailing Midas Gold Idaho’s operating plan for its proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine. Next week: Cyanide Leaching)

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Nov 21, 2019

Particles of gold and silver would be freed from other minerals like tender meat falls off the bone of a pressure-cooked pot roast, according to Midas Gold’s operating plan for the Stibnite Gold Project.

A massive pressure cooker for minerals, called an autoclave would be used to speed up the natural process of oxidation, or the weathering of rocks due to water, oxygen and pressure.

Most of the gold and silver at Stibnite is contained within the crystal structure of other minerals like pyrite.

Freeing the gold would require applying extreme pressure and heat to about 3,000 tons of ore per day in the autoclave, which would be about 16 feet wide and as long as a basketball court.

A slurry of gold and silver-bearing minerals generated during the flotation process would be pumped into the autoclave, where a chemical reaction would be induced by adding liquid oxygen into the chamber. The chemical reaction would result in the slurry being heated to about 430 degrees Fahrenheit and subjected to pressure equivalent to that of being about 1,000 feet beneath the ocean’s surface.

The force of water, pressure and heat bearing down on the slurry would cause gold-bearing pyrite minerals to break down and free gold in individual particles.

After an hour in the autoclave, a slurry of individual particles of gold, silver and pyrite would be cooled and neutralized using lime and ground limestone.

This process, called pressure oxidation, is the most commonly used modern method for freeing gold and silver from within ore, according to Midas Gold’s operating plan.

Pressure oxidation can take hundreds or even thousands of years in nature because without extreme forces, gold particles remain locked within other minerals until the surrounding material is slowly eroded away.

The autoclave would be housed in a steel building capable of containing 10% more than the capacity of the autoclave in case of a spill. The outer shell of the autoclave would be made from steel and lined with at least two layers of brick to help it withstand the extreme heat.

Bricks would be inspected and replaced as needed annually, according to Midas Gold. Building the oxidation circuit would cost Midas Gold about $70 million

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Sho-Ban Tribes win FMC lawsuit

November 18, 2019 Local News 8

The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has affirmed a district court judgment which affirmed a Shoshone Bannock Tribal Court of Appeals decision regarding a long-running dispute with the FMC Corporation.

In it, the court ruled FMC must pay an annual use permit fee for storage of hazardous waste on fee lands within the Shoshone Bannock Fort Hall Reservation. The requirement was laid out in a consent decree settling a prior suit brought against FMC by the Environmental Protection Agency.

The Circuit Court concluded the FMC’s storage of millions of tons of hazardous waste on the Reservation “threatens or has some direct effect on the political integrity, economic security, or the ‘health and welfare’ of the Tribes..”

continued:
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Public Lands:

USDA Forest Service Taylor Outfitting LLC. DBA McCall Angler Special Use Permit Reissuance Update

November 21, 2019

The Forest Service is seeking scoping comments for the proposed renewal of the special use authorization for Taylor Outfitting on the McCall and New Meadows Ranger Districts of the Payette National Forest. The enclosed scoping document provides more detailed information about the project. The scoping document is also available on the project’s webpage at (link)

The Forest Service is contacting interested individuals, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by December 19, 2019, and make your comments as specific as possible.

The project webpage provides you tools to engage this process as you wish. From “Get Connected” on the right hand side of the page, click on “Subscribe to Email Updates” if you wish to receive electronic communication about this project. Use the “Comment/Object on Project” link to access a simple webform to submit your comments on this project. The “Public Comment/Objection Reading Room” are the published comments received on this project.

Webform submission is preferred but written comments concerning this project will be accepted by mailing to the McCall Ranger District 102 West Lake Street McCall, ID 83638. Hand delivered comment letters may be delivered during regular business hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, excluding holidays. Electronic comments may be submitted electronically through the project web page listed above.

Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection and will be released in their entirety if requested pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act. Comments received in response to this request will also be available for public inspection on the “Public Comment Reading Room” on the project webpage.

For further information on this project, please contact acting Recreation Program Manager (detail), Emily Simpson at 208-634-0415, or emily.simpson@usda.gov

Sincerely,
Ann Hadlow
Acting McCall District Ranger
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Forest Supervisor signs decision memo for the Little Red Goose Forest Resilience Project on the Payette National Forest

McCall, Id., November 19, 2019 Payette National Forest

Tawnya Brummett, the Acting Forest Supervisor for the Payette National Forest, signed the decision memo today for the Little Red Goose Forest Resilience Project on the New Meadows Ranger District.

This project area is roughly 8,800 acres in the Little Salmon River subbasin in Upper Goose Creek, Sixmile Creek, and Lower Goose Creek between McCall and New Meadows, and is visible from Highway 55, Highway 95 and Brundage Ski Resort. The area has been heavily impacted by Douglas fir tussock moth as evidenced by the large areas of red needled trees this summer and fall.

According to a recent USDA Forest Health and Protection report, this area is also being impacted by the western spruce budworm, Balsam woolly adelgid, mistletoe, and root and butt rots which is compounding the effect on trees in the area.


Dwarf Mistletoe – William Jacobi, Colorado State University


Western spruce budworm larva – USDA Forest Service

This decision authorizes treatments on up to 3,000 acres identified within the larger 8,800-acre area, and includes commercial thinning, non-commercial thinning, commercial firewood removal, slash treatments (lop and scatter or pile burning), and broadcast prescribed burning. Hazard tree removal in Last Chance Campground as well as commercial treatments west of FSR 453 could begin as early as January 2020.

“[Little Red Goose] is an excellent example of how we can quickly respond to our changing forest conditions, and the importance of engaging with our communities and local officials to address insect and disease issues that have the potential to affect a much larger area,” says Brummett in her decision. “Much like wildfire, insects and disease do not recognize jurisdictional boundaries, and managing the National Forest to increase its resiliency to such disturbances is critical to being good stewards of the land and responsible neighbors.”

The project is categorically excluded from documentation in an EA or EIS because it fits within the Insect and Disease Infestation category authorized by the Healthy Forest Restoration Act, specifically section 603 (16 U.S.C6591b)(FSH1909.15, 32.3(3)). This project adheres to the specifications of that authority.

More information about the project can be found on the Little Red Goose project webpage at: (link) or you can contact Erin Phelps, New Meadows District Ranger at 208-347-0301.
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Lawsuit filed to stop big US Forest Service project in Idaho

Nov 20, 2019 Associated Press

Boise, Idaho — The U.S. Forest Service is ignoring a 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruling by restarting a giant forest project in Idaho, say environmental groups that have filed another lawsuit seeking to stop the project a second time.

The Alliance for the Wild Rockies and the other groups filed the lawsuit Monday in U.S. District Court in Idaho challenging the 125-square-mile (325-square-kilometer) project on the Payette National Forest.

The Forest Service and environmental groups agree the Lost Creek-Boulder Creek Landscape Restoration Project that includes logging, habitat restoration and recreational improvements is precisely the same as the one halted by the 9th Circuit Court’s ruling against the Forest Service in August 2018.

continued:
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Forest Service to review water diversions in Sawtooth Valley

by Associated Press Saturday, November 23rd 2019

Boise, Idaho (AP) — The U.S. Forest Service has agreed to complete environmental reviews of 20 water diversions in central Idaho that a conservation group says could be harming imperiled salmon.

A U.S. District Court judge on Thursday signed off on the agreement between the Forest Service and Idaho Conservation League involving the water diversions in the Sawtooth Valley.

continued:
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BLM to conduct fall, winter timber pile burning

Date: November 20, 2019
Contact: (Jared Jablonski) (jjablonski@blm.gov) (208-384-3210)

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Boise District will conduct three prescribed timber pile burns on projects within Boise, Valley and Adams Counties between Nov. 27 and Feb. 1, depending on weather, fuel and ground conditions. The main objective of these burns is to reduce 245 acres of slash accumulated during past timber treatments, reducing hazardous fuels and the potential for harmful fire behavior.

K-Round Pile Burning – The K-Round Prescribed Pile Burn is located in Valley County, approximately 17 miles northeast of Banks. Prescribed fire managers will be targeting 21 machine piles located on 145 acres of BLM land.

Mile Marker 73 Pile Burning – The Mile Marker 73 Prescribed Pile Burn is located in Boise County, approximately 9 miles northeast of Horseshoe Bend. Prescribed fire managers will be targeting six machine piles located on 28 acres of BLM land.

Fort Hall Pile Burning –The Fort Hall Prescribed Pile Burn is located in Adams County, approximately 1.5 miles east of Fruitvale. Prescribed fire managers will be targeting 15 machine piles located on 72 acres of BLM land.

Fire managers will be waiting for adequate moisture levels in project areas before initiating ignition operations in order to ensure minimal fire spread outside of designated piles. Once initiated, prescribed burning operations are expected to last up to one week in each area. Personnel and equipment will be in the project areas for the duration of the burning operations. Smoke from the burns has the potential to be visible from long distances due to location, fuel type and burning conditions.

For more information, contact the Boise District Fire Information Line at (208) 384-3378.
— — — — — — — — — —

BLM to conduct prescribed burning in southwest Idaho

Date: November 20, 2019
Contact: (Jared Jablonski) (jjablonski@blm.gov) (208-384-3210)

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will be conducting the Trout Springs Jackpot Prescribed Burn in Owyhee County between late November and January depending on weather, fuel and ground conditions. The Trout Springs Jackpot Prescribed Burn is located on Juniper Mountain, 36 miles southeast of Jordan Valley, Oregon. The planned prescribed fire will target 137 acres of downed juniper trees remaining from past cutting treatments.

The fire is part of a larger project intended to move pastures toward meeting rangeland health standards. Fire managers will be targeting weather and fuel conditions that minimize fire spread such as snow, high fuel moistures, and new grass growth. Containing the fire spread to individual tree debris zones reduces the risk of live vegetation mortality and allows for faster vegetation recovery.

Fire managers will perform ignitions over a multiday period, with subsequent mop-up and patrol of the prescribed fire occurring for several days. The public can expect to see smoke from the vicinity of Juniper Mountain during ignitions and for several days afterward.

This burn is a separate entry in the Trout Springs project and is adjacent to, not within, the 21-square-mile Trout Springs Prescribed Burn that took place in September 2019.

For more information, contact the BLM Boise District Fire Information Line at (208) 384-3378.
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Critter News:

Santa Paws to take photo with pets Dec. 7 at Barn Owl

The Star-News Nov 21, 2019

Santa Paws is coming to town to take pictures with local pets and their human friends on Saturday, Dec. 7, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Barn Owl Books and Gifts.

Pets must be secured in a carrier or on a leash. Furry friends may pose alone or with their family.

Cost is $5. Proceeds from the event will benefit the dogs and cats at MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter.

For more information, call 208-634-3647. Barn Owl Books and Gifts is located at 616 N. Third St., Suite 110, in McCall.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Pet owners should be aware of traps and snares in Idaho

by CBS 2 News Staff Wednesday, November 20th 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Pet owners should be aware of traps and snares in Idaho.

Idaho Fish and Game says most fur trapping seasons are open during late fall and winter, but some go year-round.

Owners should be careful letting pets run off-leash and unsupervised. They run the risk of having their pet’s toes pinched or worse – trapped by snares intended for large wildlife.

Know that one trap usually means there are more in the area. If you find one trap, avoid the rest of the area.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Forest Service opposes bear-baiting ban in Idaho, Wyoming

Keith Ridler Associated Press November 18, 2019

Boise, Idaho — Federal authorities say a lawsuit seeking to ban black bear hunting using bait in national forests in Idaho and Wyoming to protect grizzly bears should be dismissed.

The U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in documents filed Friday say the decision to allow using bait to attract bears should continue to be made by the states in which the national forests are located.

Western Watersheds Project, WildEarth Guardians and Wilderness Watch filed the lawsuit in June, contending the federal agencies are violating environmental laws because black bear hunters using bait have killed at least eight threatened grizzly bears since 1995 in national forests.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Another moose poached near Idaho City

The young bull was illegally killed and left to rot on the Cottonwood Creek/Thorn Creek divide.

KTVB November 19, 2019

Idaho City, Idaho — Idaho Department of Fish and Game officers are searching for answers after a bull moose was illegally killed and left to rot near Idaho City.

The remains of the young moose were found over the weekend on the Cottonwood Creek/Thorn Creek divide, although investigators believe it was shot sometime in early November.

The discovery marks the second moose poaching incident near Idaho City this month, and the eighth total in three years. The head of a young cow moose was found on Rocky Ridge Yurt Road earlier in November.

continued: [WARNING – sad photo]
— — — — — — — — — —

Study: Yellowstone bison mow, fertilize their own grass

“It’s almost like the bison become this giant fleet of lawnmowers moving back and forth across the landscape.”

Associated November 21, 2019

A study of grazing in Yellowstone National Park found that bison essentially mow and fertilize their own food, allowing them to graze in one area for two to three months during the spring and summer while other ungulates have to keep migrating to higher elevations to follow new plant growth.

Hundreds of bison grazing in an area stimulates the growth of nutritious grasses, in part because their waste acts as a fertilizer, according to research published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise Fire: Chicken coop fires rise with colder weather

by Haley Squiers Friday, November 22nd 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Just like house fires, Boise firefighters say they see an increase in chicken coop fires when it gets cold.

Backyard chicken owners want to keep their flock warm, but firefighters say that can be dangerous.

The issue is heat lamps falling where they’re not supposed to.

“It’s very easy for those heat lamps, they’re hot enough, they produce enough heat, that they could ignite that straw or hay and then burn down your chicken coop,” said Boise’s Deputy Chief Romeo Gervais.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Over 150 waterfowl dumped and left to waste along Highway 46

by CBS 2 News Staff Tuesday, November 19th 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Over 150 geese and ducks were dumped Friday along Highway 46 north of Gooding and left to rot.

Idaho Fish and Game officers are seeking information on the dumping of 154 snow and Canada geese and mallard ducks along Highway 46 on Nov. 15. All of the birds were left to rot, with no attempt to remove any meat.

“The birds were dumped prior to November 15th. This is an egregious situation of wasting waterfowl,” said Trevor Meadows, conservation officer. “If anyone witnessed a vehicle in the pull-off just north of the Camas and Gooding county line, please let us know a description of the vehicle or the occupants.”

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Traps, snares and pets can be a bad combination, and here’s how to avoid a problem

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, November 20, 2019

Pet owners should know the basic functions of traps so they can release their pets if they’re caught

Pet owners are reminded fur trapping seasons are open during late fall and winter, and pets running off leash unsupervised could risk having their toes pinched – or worse – by traps and snares intended for wildlife.

While traps and snares are rarely encountered by bird hunters or hikers, pets can be attracted to them and become trapped, and people who allow their dogs to roam should be prepared to act quickly if it occurs.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Releasing your Dog from a Trap

link to video:
— — — — — — — — — —

New wild turkey hunts slated to begin in Southwest Idaho

By Evin Oneale, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, November 21, 2019

December hunts are intended to relieve property owners from turkey damage

Four new wild turkey Landowner Permission hunts (LPH) are now on the books and slated to begin December 1 in areas with chronic turkey depredations. The hunts will give landowners, hunters and Fish and Game staff another tool to deal more effectively with private property damage caused by wild turkeys.

Approved by the Fish and Game Commission in August, these four new hunts are designed to alleviate depredation issues and increase social tolerance for wild turkey populations on private land.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Pardoning the Thanksgiving Turkey


President John F. Kennedy pardoned a turkey on November 19, 1963, stating “Let’s Keep him going.” John F. Kennedy Presidential Library/NARA

The official “pardoning” of White House turkeys is an interesting White House tradition that has captured the imagination of the public in recent years. It is often stated that to a turkey recorded in an 1865 dispatch by White House reporter Noah Brooks was the origin for the pardoning ceremony.

Reports of turkeys as gifts to American presidents can be traced to the 1870s, when began sending well fed birds to the White House. The First Families did not always feast upon Vose’s turkeys, but the yearly offering gained his farm widespread publicity and became a veritable institution at the White House. At Thanksgiving 1913, a turkey-come-lately from Kentucky shared a few minutes of fame with the fine-feathered Rhode Islander. Soon after, in December, Horace Vose died, thus ending an era.

By 1914, the opportunity to give a turkey to a President was open to everyone, and poultry gifts were frequently touched with patriotism, partisanship, and glee. In 1921, an American Legion post furnished bunting for the crate of a gobbler en route from Mississippi to Washington, while a Harding Girls Club in Chicago outfitted a turkey as a flying ace, complete with goggles. First Lady Grace Coolidge accepted a turkey from a Vermont Girl Scout in 1925. The turkey gifts had become established as a national symbol of good cheer.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

Thanksgiving Showdown – Farmer vs. Turkey


TurkeyStuffing-a
———————–

Nov 17, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Nov 17, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: The deadline to order calendars has been moved up to Nov 25th. If you have not ordered your 2020 Yellow Pine Calendar, send (rrSue) an email with “calendar” in the subject line and your mailing info.

The boil order and water restrictions are still in effect.

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season
Nov 23 – Xmas tree permits
Nov 25 – Deadline to order 2020 YP Calendar
Nov 28 – Thanksgiving potluck 2pm at the Tavern
Dec 25 – Christmas dinner at the Community Hall 2pm
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Xmas Tree Permits Nov 23

The Boise and Payette National Forest (NF) vendors will begin selling Christmas tree permits Saturday, Nov. 23. No local vendor this year.
— — — —

Nov 28 – Yellow Pine Thanksgiving

Thursday, November 28, 2019 at 2pm Potluck at the Yellow Pine Tavern – Turkey and bread stuffing provided by the Tavern. Also prime rib, pumpkin pie, and deviled eggs promised
— — — —

Dec 25 – Christmas dinner at the Community Hall 2pm

Potluck with turkey provided. We may have a Bingo game afterward.
———-

Village News:

Road Levy Failure will affect Yellow Pine Snowplowing

The Valley County Commissioners and Road Department are still working out the plan for Yellow Pine, they will have a report from the road department at the commissioner meeting on Monday, Nov 18th at 2pm, along with a public workshop.

Valley County Commissioner Elt Hasbrouck wrote on Wednesday Nov 13th, “The South Fork [road] will still be plowed but it may end up being a day or 2 later before we can get to it.” Elt also said, “I’m working on having Lakeshore place 2 bear proof containers on the southwest corner of the Johnson Creek intersection so that we won’t have to plow Johnson Creek.”

We will have info after the meeting to share next week.
— — — —

South Fork Slide Off

Sunday Nov 10 – report of a vehicle slide-off on the South Fork road. A pickup went off the road and crashed into the river around mile post 15. Nobody was hurt and our local SAR team was not dispatched.

The first tow truck called to the scene also slid off trying to pull the pickup out of the river. A second tow truck came and the rescue efforts blocked the road for some time and traffic was delayed. Some travelers came back to Yellow Pine as they didn’t want to take a chance on either the Johnson Creek or Lick Creek routes and waited here for word on the opening of the road late in the day.

20191110SoForkWreck-a
photo courtesy Nancy Bellman

Folks need to be aware of dangerous road conditions in that area of the South Fork. Reports that water has been running down the middle of the road, eroding the pavement and freezing into a thick layer of ice right up to the edge along the river side. Last report that low clearance cars may have trouble with the deep rut.

[h/t to locals that sent reports]
— — — —

Boil Water Order Still in Effect

Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the community hall.
Link to: 20190707YPWUAminutes.rtf

2019 YPWUA Yearly Meeting Sunday July 7th 10am Community Center

1. Financial Report – Willie
A. Current Account $27,510.17
B. Total revenue if everyone pays – $33,850.00
B. Budget Expenses – $32,010.00
C. Future rate increases – fall meeting a decision made on future rates
D. New Procedure Actions for Non-Payment – one water user stated that she was not going to pay her bill until her valve was repaired.
E. There are 55 shares held by 50 individuals, 112 services in Yellow Pine
F. It is requested that property owners that do not own a share, please buy one. $100 per share allows the property owner to vote on issues.

2. Operations Report – Steve
A. Current Operations We have obtained a grant to fix and get operational our new chlorine contact tank. We are currently using up to 50,000 gallons of water per day. We have spent many hours looking for leaks but have not found any major leak.
B. Chlorine levels through the boil order we will continue to keep the chlorine levels in an acceptable level.
C. Grant and work necessary
D. Boil Order Notification – Warren will be the one that orders and removes boil orders
E. Future Grants – we continue to investigate options for additional grants but nothing the works more than the grant to repair the chlorine contact tank.
F. Summer lawn watering – because of our boil order, we are requesting “no lawn watering the summer”.
G. Idaho rural water gave us a report that was given to the Water department several years ago.
H. Warren gave a very good explanation on our water system and what needs to happen to improve our system.

3. Election of Board Members
A. Dawn Brown and Stu Edwards, both are automatically nominated and without any other nominations, they will serve another 3 years on the board
B. Only shareholders can run for office and vote

Water Update Nov 11: The major leak has been repaired and has reduced our water usage to a level that our sand filters can keep up. We are still on a boil order until the sand filters can be cleaned and the turbidity levels settle. Warren will let us know when he feels comfortable with lifting the order.
– Steve H

Water Update Oct 23: October 22nd – The crew from Rocky Mountain Mechanical repaired the main water line leak up near the orchard.

Water Update Oct 15th: A major leak was found and a temporary fix was made until parts can be obtained. Once parts and people are available, that will be fixed. Fixing that leak doesn’t mean we will be off the boil order. The boil order was issued by the DEQ. They will not lift that order until the chlorine contact time meets the standard.
– Steve Holloway

Water Update Sept 21 (excerpted from VYPA 9/21 meeting notes):

Tests were conducted by Idaho Rural Water [July 19th] in an effort to locate the source of the major leak in the system. They will return October 3rd to continue the search for leaks. The line between Alpine Village and the Saleen property, which includes the bridge across the East Fork river is the line most suspected to be leaking. Cecil Dallman will stand by with a backhoe to dig in locations found. More digging work is needed at the tanks and pipes near the water facility. A second engineer is being consulted. Getting contractors to come to YP and replace seals is difficult. The previous grant money is tied to a timeline so some specified work must be done this fall.

The possibility for a large amount of grant money is very slim because we would have to take out a loan and use the borrowed money for the required matching money, and then there would be the loan payments. Money on hand must be used on required repairs to the contact tank. Because some water users do not have voting rights YPWUA does not qualify for some grants.

There are 56 shares available for purchase at $100/share. Each piece of land is entitled to own one share. Share holders are entitled to vote; water users that do not own a share may not vote, but do have access to water. The owners of the 56 lots are encouraged to purchase shares. Ownership of a share is shown on your annual water bill.

Anyone wanting to arrange a payment plan should contact Willie Sullivan.

– Steve Holloway/Willie Sullivan

May 1st: Leak in alley repaired

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19
— — — —

VYPA News:

Cemetery – Tim Rogers: Marge Fields is researching the history of the log cabin now located at the cemetery, but formerly was in the center of the Yellow Pine village. A plaque will be placed at the cabin. The previous information sign showing names and locations of deceased buried in the cemetery will be repaired this winter and placed next year.

Road & Ditch Committee has been created. Clayton Egbert, Chairman. Tim Rogers and Tom Lanham have volunteered. This group and will need more volunteers.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link to: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
— — — —

YPFD News:

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway District 1
Dan Stiff, District 2
Merrill Saleen, District 3
Fire Chief: Jeff Forster

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Stop the Bleed Class: We will do another class this spring/summer [2020] depending on interest.

Training update 10/24: “FD training is done for the year except for anyone wanting a one-on-one orientation session with the fire station and fire engine operations/pumping. Those that are interested can call me and I’ll make it happen.” – Fire Chief Jeff

YP Helispot update 10/24: “The Helispot is on it’s final stages of completion. The sidewalk to the pad needs to be concreted but everything else is complete. The gate and signs are up and Valley County Dispatch has the GPS coordinates. (44.95968 -115.49531) It’s listed as Yellow Pine Helispot. The gate is unlocked and will remain that way. There is a snow shovel there if needed. I’m asking that NO VEHICLES go beyond the gate. We already had a muddy ATV’er ride all over the pad and over the new paint with muddy tires marking up the pad. We’re planning on a dedication ceremony on the Wednesday or Thursday prior to the 2020 Harmonica Festival. More on that next year.”

YP Helispot update 10/26: “The concrete walkway to the Helispot was completed today 10/26/2019. Thanks to all who worked in the cold, rain and snow to accomplish this needed project. The stretcher can be rolled smoothly to the helicopter making it safer for the the patient and medical personnel making it more comfortable for the patient and safer for everyone. Job well done.” JF – AF
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for Winter.
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

The Corner is closed for the winter, opening again next spring. I can be reached at matt @ ypcorner.com or at 970-379-5155. Thanks, have a great winter!
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall hours open 8am to close
Full breakfast served starting at 8am with special arrangement for earlier breakfast as needed. 92 Octane non ethanol gas available, cubed ice, beer, pop and water sold by the 6 and 12 pack, snacks, ice cream and many supplies available. Burgers and Pizza, Beer and Wine on the evening menu. Football and other sports available on our TV. Wi Fi, Verizon phone service and information available.
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Nov 11) overnight low of 20 degrees, almost clear sky this morning and frosty. A few summer birds showed up, pine siskin, goldfinch and evening grosbeaks; resident jays, nuthatches, hairy woodpecker plus the clark’s nutcracker. High thin haze by lunch time. Overcast by mid-afternoon, cooler and very light breezes, high of 51 degrees. It appeared to be mostly clear at dusk, temps dropping, river sounds up. A little haze before midnight giving the moon a small halo.

Tuesday (Nov 12) overnight low of 20 degrees, overcast sky and breezy this morning. Jays, nutcracker and red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Thicker clouds at lunch time. A couple of starlings in the neighborhood. Darker thicker clouds and calmer by mid-afternoon, high of 46 degrees. Overcast at dusk, river sounds up. Cloudy before midnight.

Wednesday (Nov 13) overnight low of 27 degrees, partly clear sky (high thin clouds) and almost calm this morning. Jays, red-breasted nuthatches and a couple of clark’s nutcrackers visiting. Partly cloudy and nice at lunch time. Mail truck made it in on time. Partly cloudy mid-afternoon and nearly calm, high of 56 degrees. It appeared to be partly cloudy to mostly clear at dusk. Mostly clear before midnight and very bright moon.

Thursday (Nov 14) overnight low of 21 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning. The sun came over the ridge just after 10am. Jays, nuthatches and nutcrackers visiting. Partly cloudy at lunch time and calm. Pine squirrel and chipmunk visiting early afternoon and partly cloudy. Mostly cloudy by mid-afternoon and more clouds moving in, high of 56 degrees. Pretty much overcast at dark. Pale moonlight behind high clouds before midnight.

Friday (Nov 15) probably did not get below freezing last night, no frost and mostly cloudy sky this morning. Jays and red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Gray overcast and light breeze at lunch time. Mountain chickadee stopped by, first sighting in a very long time. Quiet day. Overcast and cool light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 53 degrees. Overcast and calm at dusk. Cloudy at midnight.

Saturday (Nov 16) overnight low of 29 degrees, dewy but no frost and partly clear sky this morning. A mountain chickadee and pine siskin joined the regulars at the feeders. Partly cloudy and light breezes at lunch time. Female hairy woodpecker and a female cassins finch visiting. Mild and mostly clear mid-afternoon, high of 52 degrees. Dark-eyed junco visited late afternoon. The sun is down behind the hill before 430pm now. Mostly cloudy at dusk and calmer. Moon rise behind clouds.

Sunday (Nov 17) overnight low of 31 degrees, overcast sky and a few sprinkles this morning (first precipitation so far in the month of November.) Jays, nuthatches, nutcracker and hairy woodpecker visiting. Light sprinkle of rain at lunch time and dark clouds. Damp, overcast and cool mid-afternoon, high of 44 degrees. Pine squirrel visited. Sprinkling and overcast at dark.
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Idaho News:

Snowplow cuts on the table

Valley County seeks to save money after levy failure

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Nov 14, 2019

Valley County commissioners will hold a workshop on Monday to determine which county roads might no longer be plowed due to a lack of funding and the failure of the road levy vote on Nov. 5.

The workshop is scheduled for 2 p.m. Monday during the commissioners’ regular meeting at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade.

The session is not a public hearing, but the workshop will be open to the public.

During its meeting on Tuesday, commissioners instructed road superintendent Jeff McFadden to compile a list of roads that could be cut from the snowplowing routes as well as figures on how much the county would save by cutting those routes.

“It is important to have community involvement in setting priorities on which roads will be affected by the lack of funds for snowplowing and maintenance,” said Commissioner Sherry Maupin.

County roads are broken into the categories of major roads, minor roads, local collectors and private roads, McFadden said.

McFadden gave the example of Coho Lane, about one mile north of Donnelly, as one collector that could be plowed, but the subdivision it serves might not be plowed.

The county would consider plowing Coho Lane to where it meets the subdivision at Kokanee Lane and then turn around, he said.

The election on Nov. 5 saw voters reject a property tax that would have funded the county’s road department at about $4 million per year.

Without that revenue, commissioners have said the department would likely have to cut back on snowplowing and cease all road projects aside from basic maintenance.

The county may be forced to discontinue about half of its snowplowing routes depending on how severe the snowfall is over the winter, commissioners said.

Valley County Clerk Douglas Miller estimated that the county road department would be running a deficit by 2023 if no additional funding source can be found.

“It’s not a scare tactic, it’s just being honest with people that we can’t keep doing it this way,” Commission Chair Elt Hasbrouck said.

“We’re going to burn out our road department; those guys are going to quit because we’re working them too damn hard,” Hasbrouck said.

At Tuesday’s meeting, commissioners acknowledged more information needs to be presented on how road levy taxes would be spent.

“We have to inform the public a little bit more on what they are spending their tax dollars on, because right now, they don’t get it,” Maupin said.

“We’re asking them for their money and we have to show them how we’re going to spend it,” she said.

Commissioners plan to hold town hall meetings to discuss the budget for the road department and possible funding solutions.

“I believe we will hold meetings in Cascade, Donnelly and McCall as work sessions to listen to public input on the priorities they see,” Maupin said.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
— — — — — — — — — —

Nevermind!

Valley County to continue to accept plastic for recycling

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Nov 14, 2019

Valley County Commissioners on Tuesday reversed course from last week and decided not to stop accepting plastics at the county’s three recycling depots.

Commissioners voted last week to remove plastic recycling containers starting Dec. 2 because bins were too contaminated and resulted in the plastics being hauled to landfills.

The county will now accept all types of plastics at the McCall, Donnelly and Cascade depots and send them to a facility owned by the multinational firm Geocycle in Devil’s Slide, Utah, to be used in commercial concrete production.

Geocycle will accept plastic as long as it is free of garbage, metal and large pieces of PVC pipe, Scott Carnes, site manager for Lake Shore Disposal, told commissioners.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Contamination stalls New Meadows water line completion

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Nov 14, 2019

Bacteria contaminating newly installed water lines along U.S. 95 in downtown New Meadows will delay completion of the project until spring at the earliest, according to the Idaho Transportation Department.

Repeated failed water quality tests over the last two months have stymied Knife River Corporation of Boise, the general contractor for the project hired by the ITD, which is funding most of the $2.4 million project.

“It is not certain what will be required to achieve passing tests,” said Jennifer Gonzalez, a spokesperson for ITD.

“The contractor has been dousing the line with chlorine, has mechanically scrubbed it and has flushed it multiple times,” Gonzalez said.

The delays are costing the city more money than the $239,000 it expected to pay for the new water line, the only portion of the work funded by the city, New Meadows City Clerk Mac Qualls said.

City water customers will not have their service affected by the faulty water line. Instead, the old line that the new line was built to replace will continue to be used, Qualls said.

continued:
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‘I was really blessed to not be dead’: North Idaho man injured by stray bullet

On Oct. 30, the Boundary County resident was talking with a friend on his cellphone when a stray bullet ripped through a bay window in his home.

Taylor Viydo November 15, 2019 KTVB

Looking back at what happened at his home in late October, Carl Hunter realizes he was inches away from having his life be drastically different.

…A responding Boundary County Sheriff’s deputy later located a deformed rifle bullet near the bay window among shattered glass and blood.

Undersheriff Richard Stevens told KREM that the incident appears to be the aftermath of a hunting accident. The department said that based on the bullet’s deformities, the bullet likely struck a tree or the ground before crashing through Hunter’s window.

… Both Hunter and Stevens emphasized the importance of area shooters and hunters shooting responsibly and knowing what lies beyond their targets. Although Hunter’s home is located in a semi-rural area, both men noted the close proximity of other homes and a church in the area.

full story:
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New law requires Idaho drivers to provide proof of insurance to DMV or risk registration suspension

Nov 13, 2019 Local News 8

Vehicle owners will need to provide proof of insurance for two consecutive months or risk having their registration suspended beginning in 2020.

The law (Idaho Code Section 49-1234) was passed during the 2019 Idaho legislative session and goes into effect in January. It requires the Idaho Transportation Department’s Division of Motor Vehicles to determine monthly whether the owner of a vehicle has insurance. The law applies only to non-commercial vehicles and excludes trailers and off-highway vehicles.

A notification letter will be sent to affected vehicle owners to alert them of the law change.

Owners without insurance coverage for two consecutive months will receive a warning and be given 30 days to provide proof of insurance or obtain an exemption before their registration is suspended.

continued:
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Census Bureau in search of Idaho-based employees

Rachel Spacek, Idaho Press November 14, 2019

Boise, Idaho — Idaho is in need of roughly 9,000 employees to work for the U.S. Census Bureau as census takers.

Nationwide, the U.S. Census Bureau needs about 2.7 million workers, said Michael Hall, assistant regional census manager through the Los Angeles Regional Census Center. Hall met with the Idaho State Complete Count Committee Wednesday to discuss job recruitment and hard-to-count groups, according to the Idaho Press.

The Census Bureau will be recruiting employees through February. Hall said the Boise Census office hopes more than 13,000 people apply for census jobs but expects to hire only around 9,000.

“We try to hire local people who are familiar with their areas, to go in and work there,” Hall said.

continued:
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Mining News:

Chemical bubble bath would extract gold from Stibnite ore

Minerals from froth would move to next step of processing

(Note: This is the fourth part in a series detailing Midas Gold Idaho’s operating plan for its proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine. Next week: Oxidation)

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Nov 14, 2019

Billowing metallic bubbles laced with gold, silver and antimony would spill out of water tanks the size of small swimming pools as Midas Gold begins the process of separating precious metals from rock.

After crushing and grinding, finely ground ore the size of sand granules would be continuously fed into the flotation circuit at a rate of about 22,000 tons per day, according to Midas Gold’s proposed operating plan for the Stibnite area near Yellow Pine.

Flotation consists of a series of chemical reactions in large water tanks to isolate pyrite and stibnite, which are the two minerals that contain gold, silver and antimony.

The circuit would include about eight water tanks that would vary in size from 13-foot cubes with a capacity of 15,000 gallons to 26-foot cubes with a capacity of 100,000 gallons.

Once in the tanks, Midas Gold would add specific chemicals to the water to help either pyrite or stibnite rise to the surface while other minerals remain at the bottom, according to the company’s plan.

Like jets on a hot tub, the tanks would have air pumped into them and circulated to agitate the water and generate bubbles for stibnite and pyrite minerals to latch onto.

Another chemical would be added to promote stronger, frothy bubbles capable of supporting the added weight of minerals attached to them.

Bubbles at the surface of the tank would then spill over into a collection trough, where the precious metal-laden bubbles would be directed to another two stages of flotation to further isolate pyrite and stibnite from other rock.

For antimony, the process would take about 20 minutes from the time the ore enters the tanks to when it exits in concentrate form.

For gold and silver, it would take about an hour and a half because more care would be taken to isolate all pyrite minerals, which also require more effort to float than stibnite minerals.

The leftover slurry of rock at the bottom of tanks would be designated as tailings and neutralized before being pumped to the company’s planned 100-million-ton lined tailings storage area.

Not all gold and silver would be harvested from the tailings, so Midas Gold would monitor and occasionally reprocess the tailings slurry to extract lingering gold and silver.

Ore with two or more pounds of antimony per ton would go through the flotation process to remove antimony before going undergoing gold and silver flotation.

During antimony flotation, a chemical would be added to ensure pyrite minerals remain at the bottom of the tank while stibnite minerals are drawn to the surface.

At the end of the flotation circuit, metallic antimony-laden bubbles would be gathered in a liquid slurry form. Water would then be drained from the slurry to create a dry antimony powder.

The powder would only be about 60% antimony by weight. Traces of gold, silver, mercury and rock would make up the rest of the concentrate, which would be hauled away for further refining in one-ton to two-ton truckloads up to twice daily.

It would be uneconomic to extract antimony from ore containing two pounds or less per ton, so that ore would skip antimony flotation and go straight to gold and silver flotation tanks.

Concentrations of gold and silver collected from flotation bubbles would continue through the on-site ore processing facility, with the next step being oxidation, which would free gold and silver from the pyrite containing it.

Lime, which would be used to control acidity in the flotation tanks, would be the most used chemical in the flotation process at up to 187 tons per day.

Midas Gold plans to mine and process lime on site from a large limestone deposit in the existing West End pit.

Midas Gold would need to use about six to seven pounds of other chemicals in the flotation circuit per ton of ore processed, or about 70 tons per day at a cost of about $2.1 million per year.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Simplot proposing 5 open-pit phosphate mines in E. Idaho

by Keith Ridler Associated Press Monday, November 11th 2019

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Federal officials have released a final plan for five open-pit phosphate mines and reclamation work in eastern Idaho proposed by Idaho-based J.R. Simplot Company.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service released the jointly-prepared final environmental impact statement Friday for the Dairy Syncline Mine Project about 14 miles (23 miles) east of Soda Springs.

The five mines, disposal areas, tailing ponds and other mine workings would cover about 4.3 square miles (11 square kilometers).

The two federal agencies are taking comments before making decisions.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Boise forest plans thinning of trees in Clear Creek drainage

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Nov 14, 2019

The Boise National Forest is seeking comments on the 11,000-acre Lost Horse project in the Cascade Ranger District. The project is located about 21 miles east of Cascade in the Clear Creek drainage.

The goal of the project is to change the concentration and species of trees in the project area to reduce fire danger and improve animal habitats, a news release said.

Trees in the area are mostly densely populated fir species. An overgrowth of these trees has kept larger species like ponderosa pine from growing and crowded out animal habitats.

The densely packed fir stands have also been affected by a tussock moth outbreak, with several large patches of trees dying off, the release said.

Trees would be thinned throughout the project area and prescribed burns carried out to clear brush and smaller trees. About 5,900 acres would receive prescribed burns.

continued:
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Payette and Boise National Forests Begin Christmas Tree Permit Sales Nov. 23

McCall, ID, November 14, 2019 – The Payette and Boise National Forest vendors will begin selling Christmas tree permits Saturday, Nov. 23. On Monday, Nov. 25, permits will be available at Forest Service offices. All tree permits are valid to Dec. 25.

Each permit allows one tree to be cut, with a limit of three permits per family. For both Forests, the cost of a permit for one tree is $10, and the maximum height of a permitted tree is 12 feet. Permits are valid on both the Payette and Boise National Forest – one permit works for both Forests.

All purchasers are provided with information about where a Christmas tree may be harvested, restrictions and helpful tips. A Christmas Tree Permit is for personal use only, and use of permits for commercial purposes is prohibited. Permits are non-refundable and the purchaser must be at least 18 years in age.

In coordination with the “Every Kid in a Park” program, fourth-graders who are participating in the Every Kid in a Park program can receive a free Christmas tree Permit. The U.S. Forest Service is among several federal agencies that support the Every Kid in a Park initiative which is a nationwide call to action to build the next generation of outdoor enthusiasts. The initiative provides a free pass to all fourth-grade students who first go to (link) and complete the application/voucher process, print it and bring it to a Forest Service office.

To receive a free Christmas tree permit, the fourth-grader and a parent must go to a Forest Service office in person with the “voucher” they received from the online website at: (link)

Commercial vendors will not be issuing a free Christmas tree permit to participants of the Every Kid in a Park program, and free Christmas tree permits cannot be sent through the mail or electronically. Participation in the Every Kid in a Park program also offers benefits at National Parks and on other public lands and facilities across the United States.

Harvesting a Christmas tree is a fun adventure and often a traditional family event. Please review the Christmas tree brochure and map for optimal areas and be fully prepared for winter travel.

If an unusually heavy snowfall occurs in southwest Idaho, and forest roads become a safety concern for the public, some areas may be closed early to Christmas tree gathering. Forest roads are not plowed. Call ahead and check websites for road conditions before heading out. Please do not block private or county roadways at any time.

To provide for family safety, officials advise a few simple guidelines:

* Use the brochure with instructions provided.
* Practice winter survival and driving techniques.
* Bring the right tools, such as a saw and a shovel, so the tree can be cut to within 6” of the ground’s surface.
* Take along emergency equipment, plenty of food and water, and try to use a 4-wheel drive vehicle if you are planning to travel in snow country.
* Always inform neighbors and family friends of the route you intend to take, include a map of your destination, and the time that you plan to be gone.
* Be prepared for the possibility of a long hike or snowmobile ride while searching for the perfect tree.
* According to Idaho state law, any vehicle carrying a load that extends more than 4 feet past the tailgate, must display a red or florescent orange flag tied on the end of the load to caution other drivers.

Where to get a Christmas Tree Permit

Payette National Forest Offices (link)

All Payette National Forest offices are open Monday through Friday, 8am to 4:30pm Vendors and offices closed on Thanksgiving.

McCall Forest Supervisor’s Office
500 North Mission Street, McCall, ID
208-634-0700

Council Ranger District Office
2092 Highway 95, Council, ID
208-253-0100

New Meadows Ranger District Office
3674 Highway 95, New Meadows, ID
208-347-0300

Weiser Ranger District Office
851 E Ninth St., Weiser, ID
208-549-4200

McCall Ranger District Office
102 West Lake St., McCall, ID
208-634-0400

Payette National Forest Vendors

Weiser: Ridley’s Food and Drug (208) 549-1332
652 E First St., Weiser, ID
Open: Everyday 7am – 11pm

Cambridge: Jay’s Sinclair (208) 257-5000
Corner of Hwy 95 and Hwy 71, Cambridge, ID
Open: Everyday 7am – 8pm

Council: Farmer’s Supply Cooperative (208) 253-4266
2030 N. Highway 95, Council, ID
Open: Everyday 6am – 10pm

McCall: Albertsons (208) 634-8166
132 E. Lake Street, McCall, ID
Open: Everyday 6:30am -11pm

New Meadows: C & M Lumber (208) 347-3648
3625 Walker Ln, New Meadows, ID
Open: Mon – Sat 8am – 6pm
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Allergic bronchitis and cats

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Nov 15, 2019 IME

Feline allergic bronchitis is inflammation of the lower airways, especially the bronchi. The inflammation is often complicated by narrowing of the airways, which is called bronco constriction. This can greatly reduce the intake of oxygen. Allergic bronchitis has two forms. The acute form is associated with reversible inflammatory changes and is also referred to as feline asthma. The chronic form is associated with irreversible airway damage. It can eventually lead to emphysema, a debilitating disease that results from enlargement and dysfunction of the smallest airways and the lungs.

The acute form is usually triggered by a hyperactive immune response to environmental irritants. In most cases, the specific inciting cause is never identified. Most cats are young to middle-age when they’re first affected. The cat usually appears healthy and has no systemic signs of illness. Wheezing and coughing are common signs. If signs are mild and intermittent, the cat may be normal between episodes. Occasionally, episodes of breathing difficulty may progress to become severe and life-threatening. The cat may sit hunched over with the neck extended, trying to take in air.

A tentative diagnosis may be made from the history and physical examination findings. X-rays may or may not reveal changes compatible with allergic bronchitis, but help to rule out other causes of coughing.

continued:
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Off-leash dog fines could triple in Meridian if new ordinance passes

Nov 14, 2019 By Natasha Williams KIVI TV

Meridian, Idaho — Walking the dog without a leash in Meridian could soon be a very expensive proposition.

The Meridian City Council is thinking about more than tripling the fines for dog owners who let their pets off leash. Right now, the fines for having a dog loose is $25 for the first offense, $50 for the second, and $100 for the third.

If the council approves the plan, fees could jump to $100 for the first offense, $200 for the second, and $300 for the third.

Councilwoman Genesis Milam introduce the ordinance, saying in was in response to the enormous number of complaints she’s getting regarding people being chased or bitten by dogs. Meridian City Attorney, Bill Nary, says owners need to be more aware.

continued:
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Fish and Game warn of more wildlife on the roads

By Heatherann Wagner Nov 13, 2019 Local News 8

Idaho Fish and Game is reminding drivers to be aware in the roads. It’s the time of year when big game animals start to migrate. The most active times tend to be dawn and dusk. They ask that drivers slow down, buckle up, and scan the roads.

source:
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Bobcat spotted near Parkcenter Boulevard

by CBS 2 News Staff Friday, November 15th 2019


Bobcat near Parkcenter. (Courtesy photo)

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — A rather large kitty has been making the rounds in the Parkcenter Boulevard area.

A CBS2 viewer shared with us a photo taken last week of a bobcat hanging out, perhaps looking for its next meal.

Bobcats are not uncommon to Idaho and even the Treasure Valley, but it does appear they like the Boise River area. In 2016, another bobcat was spotted near the Greenbelt.

source:
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Northwest Montana grizzly deaths spur pushback

Nov 13, 2019 AP

The mortality rate of grizzly bears in northwestern Montana has prompted a group of bear researchers to challenge whether the grizzly should be removed from federal protection.

This month a grizzly bear was shot by a hunter east of Eureka and state wildlife managers killed another bear near Libby after it broke into a garage to eat a harvested elk.

The Missoulian reports the number of known grizzly deaths in the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem recovery zone this year has reached 48.

continued:
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Texas A&M is now home for Elliott the Elk

Elliott is planting his hooves at A&M’s Wildlife Center to be raised in captivity for veterinary students to study his species.

Gabriela Garcia November 15, 2019 KTVB

College Station, Texas — From football players to various alumni, Texas A&M has been home to a few big names.

Lately, there’s a pretty big star that’s living on campus, Elliott the Elk.

He has planted his hooves at A&M’s Winnie Carter Wildlife Center, coming from Idaho.

continued:
https://www.ktvb.com/article/life/animals/elliotttheelktamuvetschoolwildlifecenter/277-18a1e193-9d44-4954-af24-bceba7bb2dd9

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Nearly 300 wild horses captured in central Idaho

Associated Press November 12, 2019

Challis, Idaho — Nearly 300 wild horses have been captured in central Idaho as part of a plan by federal land managers to reduce the number of wild horses roaming the area to about 185.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management says that 295 wild horses were rounded up over seven days ending Monday in the Challis Herd Management Area near the town of Challis.

Aerial census flights are planned this week to determine the number of wild horses remaining in the area.

continued:
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Northwest Wyoming deer test positive for chronic wasting

Nov 11, 2019 AP

Cheyenne, Wyo. (AP) – Wildlife biologists have confirmed a disease deadly to deer, elk and moose in several deer in a new area of northwest Wyoming, near the Montana line.

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department says the deer came from the Clark area. Tests for chronic wasting disease came back positive for mule deer and white-tailed deer killed by hunters and for mule deer killed by vehicles.

The deer were killed in early November.

continued:
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Craft Fair Aids Trio of Nonprofits

November 12, 2019 By Mary Malone Bonner County Daily Bee


Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue

Sandpoint, [Idaho] — The third annual Ponderay Arts and Crafts Festival is coming up just in time for the holiday season.

With 42 vendors made up of local artists, crafters and others, there will be plenty of gift ideas for everyone at the festival.

“There is a lot of excellent stuff,” said Dory McIsaac from Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, the featured nonprofit for the event.

… McIsaac will be selling her handmade Mystic Farm candles, which come in a variety of scents. She has also been busy making antler art to sell this year, she said, such as wind chimes, candle holders, keychains and other items. There will be T-shirts and hats for sale to support the wildlife rescue as well.

continued:
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Largemouth bass earns angler new Idaho catch and release record at 25 inches, 9.7 lbs

by CBS 2 News Staff Thursday, November 14th 2019


25-inch, 9.7-pound bass earns angler new Idaho catch and release record. (Idaho Department of Fish)

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — A 25-inch, 9.7-pound bass just earned an angler the new Idaho catch and release record for largemouth bass.

J.J. Schillinger, of Post Falls, hooked this monster during the Panhandle Bass Anglers Fall Open tournament in October. He caught the bass in Cave Lake, one of a dozen chain lakes along the Coeur d’Alene River.

… J.J.’s new record bass beat the previous record of 23.75 inches set by Dale Stratton at Sawyers Pond near Emmett in May of 2017.

full story:
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Fish & Game News:

Oh deer! Peak season for hitting wildlife on the road is here

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Wednesday, November 13, 2019

Motorists are urged to slow down and be extra careful.

With big game animals on the move for mating and migration, wildlife-vehicle collisions tend to peak this time of year. Motorists are urged to slow down and be extra careful.

The deer mating season occurs in November, and they tend to be active all day and become inattentive at times. And with increased snow in the higher elevations, Idaho’s big game herds are migrating to lower elevation winter ranges, crossing many highways and roads.

“While you can’t predict when wildlife will cross the road, being extra alert, slowing down, and avoiding driving under low light conditions if possible is your best defense,” said Greg Painter, Idaho Fish and Game wildlife manager based in Salmon.

continued:
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Two moose illegally killed near Isabella Road east of Elk River on Nov. 2

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Communications Manager
Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Idaho Fish and Game officers are investigating an incident that occurred on Saturday, November 2 near Isabella Road east of Elk River, Idaho. Officers are asking for help locating a red Chevy pickup truck that was seen leaving the area where two moose were killed. The pickup was described as a 2007-2014 model red Chevrolet pickup with newer bedside wood racks approximately cab height. Witnesses reported seeing a black lab in the bed of the truck and said that the vehicle left the area traveling at a high rate of speed. Both moose were taken from the scene.

If anyone has information regarding this incident, call Sr. Conservation Officer, Brian Perkes at 208-969-1605 or contact the Citizens Against Poaching hotline at 1-800-632-5999. Callers can remain anonymous.

source:
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Three whitetailed deer found shot and left to waste near Keuterville/Ferdinand on Nov. 2

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Communications Manager
Tuesday, November 12, 2019

On Saturday, November 2, 2019 two deer were found shot and left to waste in agricultural fields in the Keuterville/Ferdinand area.

The first deer, a white tail doe, was found off Agnew Rd, near the intersection of Keuterville Rd. She had been gut shot and left to waste in a stubble field. She appears to have been shot late night on Friday, November 1 or early morning Saturday, November 2. The meat was salvaged and donated to a local family.

The second deer, a 4×4 white tail buck, was found off Rolling Hills Rd, about 3 miles outside Ferdinand. He was also gut shot and left to waste in a stubble field. He appears to have been shot in the same time frame as the doe.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Deer breaks into home, refuses to leave bathtub

by WSMH/WEYI Staff Friday, September 27th 2019


Picture from Fenton Police

Fenton, Mich (WSMH/WEYI) – Fenton Police responded to a bizarre breaking and entering on Wednesday, September 25th.

Police believe a deer may have been hit by a car and then crashed through the window of a home.

Once inside the home, police say the deer went into the bathtub and would not leave.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

FallFirewoodCutting-a

FallLongWinter-a
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Nov 10, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Nov 10, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: The boil order and water restrictions are still in effect.

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire/SAR Training
May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season
Nov 23 – Xmas tree permits
Nov 28 – Thanksgiving potluck 2pm at the Tavern
(details below)
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Local Events:

Xmas Tree Permits Nov 23

The Boise and Payette National Forest (NF) vendors will begin selling Christmas tree permits Saturday, Nov. 23.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Thanksgiving

Thursday, November 28, 2019 at 2pm Potluck at the Yellow Pine Tavern – Turkey and bread stuffing provided by the Tavern.
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Village News:

Nov 6th – Amerigas propane delivery

Dan Henrikson with Amerigas was in Yellow Pine all day Wednesday, November 6th, doing safety checks and topping off propane tanks for the winter.
DanHenricksonAmerigas-a
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Boil Water Order Still in Effect

Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
— — — —

Get Ready for Winter Heating

* Inspect and clean the chimney. Contact the YPFD to borrow chimney brushes.
* Inspect and clean wood stoves, make sure dampers work properly and check for leaks.
* Check your carbon monoxide and smoke detectors – install fresh batteries.
* Check your fire extinguisher and make sure it is handy. Manually rotate them around, tip upside down and lightly shake them, thus keeping the fire fighting agent loose, and check that the needle is still in the green. If you need a new one please call, your fire commissioner or Jeff F.
* If you have an oil-powered furnace, replace your filter and nozzle and check the tank level.
* Check your propane tank levels. Check to make sure snow falling from the roof cannot impact your pipes!
* Test the igniter switch. On an old system, you might have to relight the pilot. Newer systems have electronic igniters.
* Lubricate and clean the blower motor. First check the owner’s manual to see if your motor is the kind that needs lubricating. If it does, turn off the power, open the cover and clean the caps covering the bearings. Then remove the caps and lubricate the bearings.
* Inspect the blower belt for cracks. Turn off the power to the furnace at the main circuit breaker. Use a screwdriver to remove the steel cover of the air handler. The blower belt is the largest rubber belt that you see. Replace the belt if it is cracked.
* Inspect the exhaust flue outdoors to ensure it is free of obstructions such as branches or animal nests.
* Keep the area around your furnace unit free of debris and clutter.
* Change the air filters. Clean your air vents and ducts. Remove the vent covers with a screwdriver. Use the extension hose of your vacuum to remove the dust.
* Open all your air vents. Remove furniture, boxes and clutter that get in the way of air flowing from the vents.

Local Fuel Suppliers
Propane
Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Heating fuel
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
Furnace Service
Rocky Mountain Mechanical (208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Dump Report Nov 6th: The dumpsters were about half full and the road has pot holes.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Reminder for people living in bear country:

* Garbage should be stored inside the house or in a secure garage or storage building.
* If garbage cannot be stored in a secure location, a bear-resistant container approved by the Interagency Bear Committee is recommended.
* Avoid using bird feeders from March through November. Birds do not need supplemental feeding this time of year.
* Pet food should not be left outside.
* BBQ grills or anything with a strong odor should not be left out at night.
* Protect gardens, beehives, and compost piles with electric fencing.
* Never intentionally feed bears. A food-conditioned bear may pose a threat to human safety and usually results in the removal of the bear.
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the community hall. (No minutes yet)

Yellow Pine Water Use 2019


(link to larger size)
[h/t Dave P]

Water Update Oct 23:

October 22nd – The crew from Rocky Mountain Mechanical repaired the main water line leak up near the orchard.

Water Update Oct 15th:

A major leak was found and a temporary fix was made until parts can be obtained. Once parts and people are available, that will be fixed. Fixing that leak doesn’t mean we will be off the boil order. The boil order was issued by the DEQ. They will not lift that order until the chlorine contact time meets the standard.
– Steve Holloway

Water Update Sept 21 (excerpted from VYPA 9/21 meeting notes):

Tests were conducted by Idaho Rural Water [July 19th] in an effort to locate the source of the major leak in the system. They will return October 3rd to continue the search for leaks. The line between Alpine Village and the Saleen property, which includes the bridge across the East Fork river is the line most suspected to be leaking. Cecil Dallman will stand by with a backhoe to dig in locations found. More digging work is needed at the tanks and pipes near the water facility. A second engineer is being consulted. Getting contractors to come to YP and replace seals is difficult. The previous grant money is tied to a timeline so some specified work must be done this fall.

The possibility for a large amount of grant money is very slim because we would have to take out a loan and use the borrowed money for the required matching money, and then there would be the loan payments. Money on hand must be used on required repairs to the contact tank. Because some water users do not have voting rights YPWUA does not qualify for some grants.

There are 56 shares available for purchase at $100/share. Each piece of land is entitled to own one share. Share holders are entitled to vote; water users that do not own a share may not vote, but do have access to water. The owners of the 56 lots are encouraged to purchase shares. Ownership of a share is shown on your annual water bill.

Anyone wanting to arrange a payment plan should contact Willie Sullivan.

– Steve Holloway/Willie Sullivan

May 1st: Leak in alley repaired

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update
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VYPA News:

Cemetery – Tim Rogers: Marge Fields is researching the history of the log cabin now located at the cemetery, but formerly was in the center of the Yellow Pine village. A plaque will be placed at the cabin.

The previous information sign showing names and locations of deceased buried in the cemetery will be repaired this winter and placed next year.

Road & Ditch Committee has been created. Clayton Egbert, Chairman. Tim Rogers and Tom Lanham have volunteered. This group and will need more volunteers.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link to: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
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YPFD News:

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway District 1
Dan Stiff, District 2
Merrill Saleen, District 3
Fire Chief: Jeff Forster

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Stop the Bleed Class: We will do another class this spring/summer [2020] depending on interest.

Training update 10/24: “FD training is done for the year except for anyone wanting a one-on-one orientation session with the fire station and fire engine operations/pumping. Those that are interested can call me and I’ll make it happen.” – Fire Chief Jeff

YP Helispot update 10/24: “The Helispot is on it’s final stages of completion. The sidewalk to the pad needs to be concreted but everything else is complete. The gate and signs are up and Valley County Dispatch has the GPS coordinates. (44.95968 -115.49531) It’s listed as Yellow Pine Helispot. The gate is unlocked and will remain that way. There is a snow shovel there if needed. I’m asking that NO VEHICLES go beyond the gate. We already had a muddy ATV’er ride all over the pad and over the new paint with muddy tires marking up the pad. We’re planning on a dedication ceremony on the Wednesday or Thursday prior to the 2020 Harmonica Festival. More on that next year.”

YP Helispot update 10/26: “The concrete walkway to the Helispot was completed today 10/26/2019. Thanks to all who worked in the cold, rain and snow to accomplish this needed project. The stretcher can be rolled smoothly to the helicopter making it safer for the the patient and medical personnel making it more comfortable for the patient and safer for everyone. Job well done.” JF – AF

-Fire Chief Jeff
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Call for reservations. Open until the end of hunting season.
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

The Corner is closed for the winter, opening again next spring so that I can spend the winter with the family. I can be reached at matt @ ypcorner.com or at 970-379-5155. Thanks, have a great winter!
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall hours open 8am to close
Full breakfast served starting at 8am with special arrangement for earlier breakfast as needed. 92 Octane non ethanol gas available, cubed ice, beer, pop and water sold by the 6 and 12 pack, snacks, ice cream and many supplies available. Burgers and Pizza, Beer and Wine on the evening menu. Football and other sports available on our TV. Wi Fi, Verizon phone service and information available.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
FB page:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Nov 4) overnight low of 23 degrees, mostly high thin haze in the sky this morning. Clark’s nutcracker, steller jays and red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Partly hazy at lunch time. A little extra street traffic today. Partly hazy and mild mid-afternoon, high of 55 degrees. Colorful sunset, deep red to light pink. Stars out before midnight.

Tuesday (Nov 5) overnight low of 21 degrees, clear sky this morning, light frost melting in the sun, patches of old snow in the shade. Jays, clark’s nutcrackers and nuthatches visiting. Sunny and mild at lunch time. A couple of chipmunks and a pine squirrel stopped by. Clear and almost warm by mid-afternoon, high of 61 degrees. Fat waxing moon up above Antimony ridge at dusk. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Wednesday (Nov 6) overnight low of 20 degrees, almost clear sky this morning – one small patch of thin clouds – slight breeze and patchy old snow in the shade. Clark’s nutcracker, several jays, white and red-breasted nuthatches and a hairy woodpecker visiting, raven flying over the village calling. Heavy truck traffic on the back Stibnite road. Clear and warming up at lunch time. Amerigas was in inspecting and topping off propane tanks. Mail truck made it in on time. Clear and mild mid-afternoon, high of 57 degrees. Lots of jays bopping around. Looked clear at dusk and calm. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Thursday (Nov 7) overnight low of 19 degrees, almost clear sky – patch of haze to the south east, slight breeze this morning and patches of old snow in the shade. We have a bit of an inversion developing, the air quality is slightly poor and we had the same low temp as Stibnite. Jays, nutcrackers, nuthatches, a hairy woodpecker, chipmunks and a pine squirrel visiting. High haze at lunch time and fairly calm. Mild and thin overcast by mid-afternoon and calm, high of 54 degrees. It appeared to be only partly hazy at dusk, not much color in the west. A little haze before midnight.

Friday (Nov 8) overnight low of 20 degrees, clear sky and light frost. The slight inversion continues, it was a little warmer last night at Stibnite than in YP, and woodstove smoke hanging low. Nutcrackers, jays, red and white-breasted nuthatches and a hairy woodpecker visiting. Partly hazy at lunch time, filtered sunshine. Extra traffic on main street during the day. High thin overcast and calm mid-afternoon, high of 58 degrees. Scarlet colored sunset. Fuzzy moon up over the ridge after dark. Some stars out but mostly hazy at before midnight.

Saturday (Nov 9) overnight low of 23 degrees, mostly high thin clouds and light frost this morning. It was warmer at Stibnite again this morning than in YP. Jays, Clark’s nutcrackers, hairy woodpecker and red-breasted nuthatches visiting. High haze over most of the sky by lunch time. Hardly any traffic today. Low airplane circling over the village around 340pm. Mostly cloudy and calm mid-afternoon, high of 61 degrees. Mostly cloudy at dusk, quiet and calm. Cloudy before midnight.

Sunday (Nov 10) overnight low was probably above freezing, mostly cloudy and low 40s at sunrise, a tiny trace of old snow in the shade. Jays, nutcracker, a hairy woodpecker, a pine siskin, several red-breasted nuthatches and a chipmunk visiting. Mostly cloudy at lunch time. Getting breezy by mid-afternoon, mild temps and mostly cloudy, high of 57 degrees. A few more pine siskins, a male evening grosbeak and a pine squirrel joined the birds at the feeders. Partly cloudy and breezy at dusk. Big cloud to the east reflecting the light of the moon that was still below the horizon, and flag flapping breezes.
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Idaho News:

‘Our hands are tied:’ Services expected to be cut after roads levy fails in Valley County

Snowplowing and road maintenance will likely be slashed in half amid a major funding shortfall.

KTVB November 6, 2019

Cascade, Idaho — Snow plowing and road maintenance in Valley County will likely be slashed by half after voters declined to raise their own property taxes to help officials grapple with a federal funding shortfall.

Fifty-one percent of those who turned out at the polls backed the Valley County roads override levy, but it fell far short of the two-thirds majority needed to pass. A total of 1,194 people backed the levy, while 1,159 opposed it.

The levy’s failure leaves the county staring down a looming funding crisis.

According to county commissioners, the federal government used to give Valley County $3 million a year for road maintenance, but are no longer providing funding for rural roads. The Idaho Transportation Department will continue to maintain and plow Idaho 55, but the county roads department is facing a major shortfall.

continued:
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Cascade voters reject local option tax

The measure failed 123 to 111.

KTVB November 6, 2019

Cascade, Idaho — Cascade residents voted down a proposed 1 percent local sales tax officials say would have brought in money to the city.

The tax would have applied to purchases under $1,000, with some exceptions, and would have been in place for two years. The measure failed 123 to 111.

The funds raised through the new tax would have gone towards streets, sidewalks, paths and crosswalks, as well as the maintenance and development of city parks.

source:
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Cascade Legion post to hold Veterans Day observances

The Star-News Nov 7, 2019

American Legion Post 60 will honor Veterans Day on Monday with observances at Legion Hall at 11 a.m. and at the Cascade School gym at 12:45 p.m.

The Post 60 veterans will also perform a flag retirement ceremony at 1:30 p.m. at the American Legion Hall, 105 E. Mill St. in Cascade.

source:
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Valley County to stop accepting plastics at recycling stations

Plastics have been taken to landfills for the past year

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Nov 7, 2019

Valley County commissioners on Monday voted to stop collecting plastic recycling at all three of the county’s recycling depots effective Dec. 2.

Commissioners put into motion plans to consolidate all the county’s recycling at a single, manned site in Lake Fork but no decision has been made if plastics will be accepted at the new location.

Plastic recycling bins will be removed from recycling stations in McCall, Donnelly and Cascade on Dec. 2.

For the past year, plastic has been accepted at the recycling stations but has been taken to landfills in Council and Payette after recycling companies said the plastics were too contaminated with other materials to accept.

“Right now, we can’t control the contamination factor,” Commissioner Dave Bingaman said.

continued:
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Valley County recycling

There have been changes made to the types of materials accepted for recycling in Valley County.

Lori Hunter, P&Z Technician
Valley County Planning & Zoning Dept.

Recycling Guidelines November 2019

* There is no garbage collection at the recycling locations.

* Do not leave garbage, “Free” items or other non-recyclable items.

* Do not place bags containing recyclables in the bins. Remove the items from the bags.

Items Accepted for Recycle

– Cardboard – Flattened/broken down cardboard only. No plastics, Styrofoam or other packing materials.

– Mixed Paper – Includes printer paper, newspaper and packing paper. We cannot accept neon paper or shredded paper.

– Aluminum Cans – Only aluminum cans are accepted in the aluminum bins. Do not place other forms of aluminum or tin in the aluminum bins. Remove the cans from bags.

– Tin – Clean tin cans only in tin compartment. No aluminum. No bags.

* Valley County will temporarily cease collecting all plastic at the 3 recycling collections centers in Cascade, Donnelly, and McCall beginning December 2, 2019. A reevaluation of the ability to accept plastic will take place in the spring of 2020.

* Contaminated bins will be disposed of as garbage. Please be aware of these guidelines and what you are placing in the bins to prevent this from happening. Your cooperation is appreciated and will contribute to the continuation of the recycling program in Valley County.
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St. Alphonsus ski and mountain trauma conference helps first responders in Sun Valley

Nov 08, 2019 By Steve Dent KIVI TV

Sun Valley, Idaho — The 14th annual St. Alphonsus ski and mountain trauma conference was back in Sun Valley this week to help first responders prepare for difficult rescues.

First responders, military personnel, ski patrollers and people interested in learning how to save lives in the back country came from all over the country for this conference.

The training features both seminar style learning, but also hands-on training that forces people to work as a team in order to help a patient in a number of different scenarios.

continued:

Note: Yellow Pine EMS members affiliated with Cascade EMS once again attended the annual Ski and Mountain Trauma Conference.

20191110SunValleyEMS-a
(photo courtesy Ann F)
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Scam Alert:

Veterans Day scams to watch for this year

Nov 04, 2019 KIVI TV

Boise, Idaho — With Veterans Day just around the corner, many people will look for ways to honor those who served but, unfortunately, that can open the door for scammers.

Better Business Bureau has reported seeing Veterans Day schemes involving people posing as a phony charity, often with a legitimate name. People receive a call from someone soliciting donations. The caller may claim to represent a veteran’s organization and request cash, settle for credit card information, or try to get you to buy a prepaid card or send a wire transfer.

If you receive a call, email or find an advertisement soliciting donations, take your time to research. Verify contact information and that the charity is legitimate, keeping in mind bad guys will make their phony charities sound similar to real ones. In some cases, they may just impersonate the real deal so it’s worth verifying with the real charity before donating.

continued w/more info:
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Mining News:

Gold, antimony ore would go through the mill – literally

Rocks would be crushed, ground before processing

(Note: This is the third part in a series detailing Midas Gold Idaho’s operating plan for its proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine. Next week: Flotation)

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Nov 7, 2019

Blasted chunks of ore slightly larger than semi-truck tires would be whittled down to particles the size of sand granules before gold could be extracted by Midas Gold.

Crushing and grinding ore down into individual particles would allow precious metals to be separated from rock containing them, according to the proposed operating plan for the Stibnite Gold Project.

The process would begin with as much as 25,000 tons of ore per day from the company’s three open pit mines passing through a jaw crusher, which is a series of steel mechanical jaws that function like a human mouth.

One jaw would remain fixed, while the other would swing back and forth, crushing ore until it is about the size of a volleyball.

The jaw crusher would operate about 18 hours each day to allow for routine maintenance, including the replacement of steel jaw liners that would prevent the actual jaws from wearing out.

Most of the crusher, which is about the size of an RV tipped vertically, would be located inside the ore processing building. Only the mouth of the jaws where ore is fed into would be outside of the building.

Misters and a dust collection system would reduce dust emissions from the jaw crusher, according to Midas Gold’s operating plan.

Once small enough to pass through an opening at the bottom of the jaw crusher, ore would then be funneled into a SAG mill via conveyor belts for the first phase of grinding.

The SAG mill, which stands for semi-autogenous grinding mill, would be a large, enclosed cylindrical tube that functions like a clothes washer and would be 30 feet wide and 16 feet long.

Ore would tumble in the mill for up to eight minutes, breaking the rocks apart with the assistance of steel grinding balls about five inches in diameter and weighing seven to 14 pounds.

After being ground down to about the size of a coarse grain of salt, the ore would then move onto the ball mill, the final phase of crushing and grinding.

Like the SAG mill, the ball mill would tumble the ore with steel balls to further reduce the size of the grains or ore

But the steel balls in the ball mill would be only about 3 inches in diameter and would weigh between one and three pounds, which enables them to generate finer ore than the SAG mill.

Ore would spend up to 15 minutes tumbling in the ball mill, which would be about 26-feet-wide and 44-feet-long, or nearly the size of a double-wide trailer.

If the ore is not broken down to suitable size, it would be re-routed back to the appropriate mill for another round of grinding before advancing to the part of the plant where precious metals are extracted.

Like the jaw crusher, the SAG mill and ball mill would include replaceable heavy-duty liners that would protect the steel interior from being damaged during grinding.

The amount of ore cycled through the grinding mills per day would vary depending on the ore’s durability. At capacity, they could process about 1,225 tons per hour, or 29,400 tons per day.

Midas Gold expects to operate the grinding mills for about 22 hours per day throughout the 12-year to 15-year life of the mine.

Both grinding mills would be contained within the 18,000-square-foot grinding building, which would be one of several buildings making up the ore processing facility.

Buying and building the infrastructure for the jaw crusher, SAG mill and ball mill would cost Midas Gold about $140 million, plus another $35,000 per day in electricity to operate it.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Public Lands:

Lost Creek-Boulder Creek Landscape Restoration Project Record of Decision signed

Forest Supervisor signs record of decision for the Lost Creek-Boulder Creek Landscape Restoration Project on the Payette National Forest

On Nov 1, 2019 – Tawnya Brummett, the Acting Forest Supervisor for the Payette National Forest, signed the record of decision today for the Lost Creek-Boulder Creek Landscape Restoration Project on the New Meadows Ranger District.

This record of decision follows the 9th District Court of Appeals’ ruling to vacate the original 2014 decision in a lawsuit brought by entities that opposed the project.

Subsequent to the court order, the Forest Service re-examined the 2014 final environmental impact statement (FEIS) and determined that the effects analysis and alternatives were sound, but additional clarification was warranted in the form of an errata to the final environmental impact statement. The FEIS and errata, along with a draft record of decision, were made available to the public in June 2019.

The selected alternative includes vegetation management, watershed restoration treatments, road management, and recreation management activities. Implementation of the decision can begin immediately.

The project files are posted on the Payette National Forest project web site at: (link)

For additional information, please contact Erin Phelps, New Meadows District Ranger at 208-347-0301.
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Lawsuit planned after giant forest project OK’d in Idaho

by Keith Ridler Associated Press Tuesday, November 5th 2019

Boise, Idaho (AP) – A giant forest project in Idaho rejected by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals is on again, and an environmental group says it violates the court’s orders and will stop it with another lawsuit.

The U.S. Forest Service on Friday approved the 125-square-mile (325-square-kilometer) project on the Payette National Forest, with work expected to start this week.

The Forest Service and the Alliance for the Wild Rockies agree the project is precisely the same as the one halted by the 9th Circuit Court’s ruling against the Forest Service in August 2018.

But the Forest Service says changes in wording in an environmental review remove problems that caused the court to stop the project, and the Forest Service’s new approval decision Friday allows work to begin immediately.

source:
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Lost Horse Project – Scoping/Comment Period

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the proposed Lost Horse Project on the Cascade Ranger District in Valley County as part of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review.

Project Description

The project would implement a variety of vegetation management activities (mechanical thinning, noncommercial thinning, prescribed burning, machine piling, and aspen and meadow enhancement), along with associated road management activities (temporary road construction and road decommissioning). The objective is to restore species composition and stand structure, while reducing undesirable tree densities and favoring the retention of the larger diameter, more fire-resistant trees to benefit wildlife habitat and water quality throughout the project area. The proposed project is an activity implementing a land management plan and is subject to the pre-decisional objection process at 36 CFR 218 Subparts A and B.

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the proposed action report (PAR) on the Project webpage:

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback for the environmental assessment. Your comments will help us identify and address issues. Comments may be submitted in the following ways:

* Through the Lost Horse Project webpage (link above). Select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel. If uploading a file with comments, comments must be in the form of plain text (.txt), Word (.doc, .docx) or PDF (.pdf).
* Mail to Cascade Ranger District, PO Box 696, Cascade, ID 83611.
* Hand deliver to Boise National Forest, Cascade District, 540 North Main Street, Cascade, ID 83611. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.
* By fax at 208-382-7480.

If submitting comments by mail or fax, be sure to include “Lost Horse” in the subject line.

Comments received will be included in the project record and may be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

Comment Period & Pre-decisional Objection Process

The opportunity to comment ends 30 days following the date of publication of the legal notice in the Idaho Statesman. Only those who submit timely and specific written comments (36 CFR §218.2) regarding the proposed project or activity during a public comment period established by the responsible official are eligible to file an objection (36 CFR §218.24(b)(6)). For issues to be raised in objections, they must be based on previously submitted specific written comments regarding the proposed project or activity and attributed to the objector. For objection eligibility, each individual or representative from each entity submitting timely and specific written comments must either sign the comment or verify identity upon request. The publication date of the legal notice in the newspaper of record is the exclusive means for calculating the time to submit written comments on a proposed project or activity. The time period for the opportunity to comment on a proposed project or activity to be documented with an environmental assessment shall not be extended. It is the responsibility of all individuals and organizations to ensure that their comments are received in a timely manner.

For further information on the project, please contact Jim Bishop, Team Leader, at 208-382-7400.
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Idaho’s Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness displayed on new U.S. quarter

by CBS 2 News Staff Wednesday, November 6th 2019


Courtesy the United States Mint Connecting America through Coins website

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Idaho’s Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness is now on one of the new U.S. quarters.

This quarter is a part of the U.S. Mint’s 2019 America the Beautiful Quarters Program.

This coin is the fifth in 2019 and 50th overall in the program, and it shows a piloted drift boat on the rushing river surrounded by trees and rocks found in the wilderness.

continued:
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Lung tumors in cats and dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Nov 8, 2019 IME

Lung tumors that arise from lung tissue are called primary tumors. If lung tumors have spread to the lungs from a tumor arising in another organ, they are called secondary tumors. Most tumors of the lungs are secondary. Lung tumors can occur as single or multiple masses, and they can involve one or several lobes. Older animals are most commonly affected. Most tumors are malignant, and carcinoma is the most common type. Benign tumors are rare. It is possible that passive cigarette smoke and genetic factors influence the development of lung tumors.

About 25 percent of dogs with lung tumors have no clinical signs. Coughing and panting, with or without some degree of respiratory distress, are common. Exercise intolerance may be observed. Dogs with advanced disease will have a decreased appetite and weight loss.

Lung masses may be found incidentally when X-rays of the chest are taken for some other reason. Routine chest X-rays usually reveal masses in the chest if they are of a significant size. If a lung tumor is suspected, three views of the chest are often necessary to identify and confirm the locations of the masses.

continued:
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What can you learn from a flying beaver?

Land managers improve habitat by mimicking beavers

Nov 06, 2019 By Steve Liebenthal KIVI TV

Bruneau, Idaho — Chris Black knows a lot about ranching. And he knows a little bit about wildlife habitat. That’s why he has been wanting to attract beavers to his ranch in Bruneau.

“I’ve wanted to get beaver in here for years,” said Black.

The idea of using beavers to improve habitat for other animals is nothing new. Seventy years ago, Fish and Game came up with a very creative way to put beavers in the Idaho wilderness where over-trapping had decimated their population, resulting in habitat degradation.

continued w/video:
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[Re-posting from Aug 24, 2014 Yellow Pine Times]

When Beavers Flew

Forest Service transplanted beavers in 1948 with parachute drops

By Kyla Sawyer for The Star-News August 21, 2014

Beavers that cut trees and build dams where they are not wanted are considered a nuisance. But in 1948, they were given airplane rides.

1948beaver-aPhoto courtesy of Idaho Department of Fish & Game archives & Payette National Forest
Photo caption: A brave beaver arrives safely in its new home on the Idaho National Forest in a photo taken around 1948.

Rather than kill the nuisance beavers, the post-World War II Forest Service decided to transplant them into the Chamberlain Basin area of what is now the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness northeast of McCall.

It was thought the beavers could benefit the back country by building dams to create wetlands. And, it was decided to drop them by parachute.

“This is stuff you can’t make up,” Payette National Forest Archaeologist Erik Whiteman said. “Sometimes we hear these anecdotal stories and think honestly, ‘that’s crazy’ and then find out its true.”

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game worked with the Forest Service to transplant about 76 captured beavers.

The problem was, no one had ever dropped a beaver by parachute. So testing was done on various designs of wooden boxes intended to open when they hit the ground.

One beaver, nicknamed “Geronimo,” became the test beaver for the drop boxes.

“Geronimo was dropped again and again on the field,” F&G officer Elmo W. Heter wrote in his article, “Transplanting Beavers by Airplane and Parachute” in The Journal of Wildlife Management in April 1950.

“Each time he (Geronimo) scrambled out of the box someone was on hand to pick him up,” Heter wrote.

“Poor fellow! He finally became resigned and as soon as we approached him would crawl back into his box ready to go aloft,” he wrote.

Geronimo was rewarded by being on board the first plane into the wilderness along with three young female beavers.

“His colony was later reported as very well established,” Heter wrote.

Surplus Parachutes

Heter didn’t say exactly how he and his colleagues came up with the idea to use parachutes and boxes to transplant the beavers.

Using war surplus parachutes from what was then called the Idaho Forest Service, the beavers were placed in 30-inch long boxes that were 16-inches wide and 12-inches deep.

Holes were drilled in the boxes for air and sling ropes that kept the box shut when airborne, but safely opened once it rested on the ground.

However the right release mechanism for the boxes took some additional research, Heter wrote.

“The first box tried had ends made of woven willow,” he wrote. “It was thought that, since willows were a beaver’s natural food, the animal would gnaw his way to freedom.”

This method was discarded when it was discovered that beavers might chew their way out of these boxes while still airborne, Heter wrote.

Instead a tension-banded box was used that cinched tight from its own weight in the air, but snapped open to let the beavers out once the box reached the ground.

Thanks to Geronimo’s efforts, conservation officers found that 500 to 800 feet was the ideal beaver-dropping altitude.

The estimated cost was about $30 to transplant four beavers. That included $2 for two boxes, $16 for two cargo parachutes and $12 flying time for one plane.

Ranchers, Forest Service employees and packers helped to collect the parachutes, Heter wrote.
— —

Parachuting beavers featured in ‘Fur For the Future,’ 1950s-era film

Note: Very old film and poor quality in places
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho photographer wins first place in National Wildlife contest

by Ryan L Morrison Friday, November 8th 2019


Kirk Geisler’s first-place “Birds” photo in National Wildlife contest

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — An Idaho photographer won first place with this photo in the National Wildlife’s 2019 photography contest.

Kirk Geisler said he was hiking in the Camas Wildlife Refuge when he took this picture three or four years back.

Geisler told me he’d been up there to shoot white-tailed deer. When he got up there, all of these short-eared owls were flying everywhere, so he abandoned his original plan.

continued:
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Young angler breaks Idaho state record with 36.5-inch rainbow trout

The 8-year-old caught the giant-sized Gerrard rainbow trout while fishing in Lake Pend Oreille last month.

KTVB November 4, 2019

Boise, Idaho — An 8-year-old Idaho girl has quite the fish story to tell.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game confirmed that Sophie Egizi set a new state record by catching a 36.5-inch Gerrard rainbow trout last month.

She wrangled up the monster fish while trolling flies on Lake Pend Oreille in early October.

continued:
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Kelt program aims to rehabilitate repeat steelhead spawners

by Associated Press Saturday, November 9th 2019


(CBS 2 News Stock Photo)

Illia, Washington (AP) — The Nez Perce Tribe and Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission released 37 wild steelhead into the Snake River below Lower Granite Dam this week in hopes of boosting the number of spawning steelhead.

The Lewiston Tribune reports the fish, known as kelts, were previously captured at the dam as they tried to return to the ocean after spawning in their natal streams. They were held for one or two years at the Dworshak National Fish Hatchery to allow them to regain strength, and they were released Tuesday, ready to spawn once again.

Steelhead are unique among anadromous fish – fish that migrate from the sea to reproduce – in that they don’t necessarily die after spawning. Still, it’s rare for female steelhead to make it as far as the Lower Granite Dam to spawn an second time.

source:
————————

Tips & Advice:

Wildlife Vehicle Collisions

Wildlife-vehicle collisions tend to peak this time of year as big game animals are on the move and cross many of Idaho’s highways and roads. Take the following precautions to reduce your chances of an animal collision:

* Big-game animals are especially active at dawn, dusk and at night. Motorists should drive extra cautious during these times.

* Slow down. Driving more slowly increases reaction time and reduces the chance of a collision.

* Always wear your seat belt. This won’t prevent a collision, but it can save your life depending upon the severity of the accident.

* Scan ahead and watch for movement, especially near the fog line and side of the road. When driving at night, watch for shining eyes in headlights.

* If you see one animal cross the road, slow down immediately and look for more to follow.

* Pay extra attention in areas posted with wildlife crossing signs. They are there for good reason.

* Using high beams can help you spot wildlife, but be considerate of other drivers when using them.

* Don’t Tailgate. Always keep a safe distance between you and the car in front of you to avoid any unnecessary accidents. If that driver brakes suddenly for an animal in the road, you won’t be able to react in enough time.

* Don’t swerve and risk losing control of your vehicle. Try to brake as much as possible and stay on the roadway. The most serious crashes occur when drivers lose control of their vehicles trying to avoid an animal. It is usually safer to strike the animal than another object such as a tree or another vehicle.

source: Idaho Fish & Game Facebook page
————————

Fish & Game News:

Moose’s head found near Idaho City, Idaho Fish and Game investigating

The head of a young cow moose was found a short distance from Highway 21.

KTVB November 6, 2019

Boise, Idaho — The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is asking for the public’s help in solving what appears to be a moose poaching case.

Fish and Game posted on its Facebook page Tuesday that a conservation officer found only the head of a young cow moose on Rocky Ridge Yurt Road. That’s north of Idaho City just a short distance from Highway 21.

There is no moose hunting season in this area. The officer believes it was either a case of mistaken identity, perhaps the hunter thought it was a cow elk, or this is poaching.

Fish and Game needs the public’s help to solve this case.

Anyone with information is urged to call the Citizens Against Poaching hotline at (1-800-632-5999) or the Fish and Game regional office in Nampa at (208-465-8465).

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Mature bull elk shot and left on private property in Swan Valley

By James Brower, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, November 7, 2019

Officers seeking information from the public to solve the case

Fish and Game Officers are seeking information pertaining to a bull elk that was shot and left on private property in the Swan Valley area. The mature bull elk was shot on the evening of November 6 along the Pine Creek Bench in Unit 67. Currently, only antlerless elk hunts are going on in the area.

Anyone with information is asked to call the Citizen’s Against Poaching hotline at 1-800-632-5999. Callers may remain anonymous and a reward is being offered for information that leads to a citation in this case.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Antlers removed from whitetail buck left to waste near Salmon

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Tuesday, November 5, 2019

Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) is offering a reward for information

Fish and Game is investigating a buck white-tailed deer that was shot and left to waste near Kenney Creek, south of Salmon.

The buck was discovered October 20th on private property, and officers believe it was likely shot from the Lemhi Backroad. The antlers were removed and no meat was taken.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Cyclist Meets Family of Skunks

posted Aug 24, 2016

While biking along the roads of Pointe-Taillon National Park, this cyclist came across a family of skunks. All of them rushed towards him and sniffed him before running back into the wild. [Sound on!]

—————————

Seasonal Humor:

DogSkunk-a

FallShedding-a
————————

Nov 3. 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Nov 3. 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: The boil order and water restrictions are still in effect.

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire/SAR Training
May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season
Nov 6 – Amerigas propane delivery
Nov 23 – Xmas tree permits
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Nov 6th – Amerigas propane delivery

Amerigas will be coming in November 6th to get everyone topped off for winter. If you are a “will call customer” you will need to order online or call us or you will not get fuel.

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
— — — —

Xmas Tree Permits Nov 23

The Boise and Payette National Forest (NF) vendors will begin selling Christmas tree permits Saturday, Nov. 23.
———-

Village News:

Monument Flag Pole

On Saturday Nov 2nd it was noted that the State flag pole by the Veterans Monument next to the Community Hall was leaning about 15 degrees to the south, broken at the base. A local took it down so it wouldn’t fall on someone. It was accidentally hit and the responsible party will work with the Veterans’ Monument committee on putting it back up – this time it will be placed outside of the road right-of-way.
— — — —

Rx Burn Nov 1-2

The Krassel Ranger District conducted a prescribed burn November 1-2 in the Bald Hill project area north of the East Fork Rd, east of Quartz Creek to Profile Rd. Crews focused on the lower elevations and smaller blacklining operations to prep units for next year.
— — — —

Halloween-End Of Hunting Season Party Nov 2nd

The Halloween-End Of Hunting Season Party was held at the Yellow Pine Tavern Nov 2nd at 8pm, Chili Dogs were provided by the Tavern.

Halloween at the Tavern thanks to our cooks for the great food! Another great get together, late enough to include our hunters who have been out working so hard.

20191102HalloweenTavern-a

link to FB photo gallery:
— — — —

Fall Back Nov 3rd

Daylight savings time ended today at 2am November 3rd this year. Don’t forget to change the batteries in your smoke alarms and CO2 detectors.
— — — —

Boil Water Order Still in Effect

Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
— — — —

Get Ready for Winter Heating

* Inspect and clean the chimney. Contact the YPFD to borrow chimney brushes.
* Inspect and clean wood stoves, make sure dampers work properly and check for leaks.
* Check your carbon monoxide and smoke detectors – install fresh batteries.
* Check your fire extinguisher and make sure it is handy. Manually rotate them around, tip upside down and lightly shake them, thus keeping the fire fighting agent loose, and check that the needle is still in the green. If you need a new one please call, your fire commissioner or Jeff F.
* If you have an oil-powered furnace, replace your filter and nozzle and check the tank level.
* Check your propane tank levels (early morning when it is cool in case there is a wasp nest!) Check to make sure snow falling from the roof cannot impact your pipes!
* Test the igniter switch. On an old system, you might have to relight the pilot. Newer systems have electronic igniters.
* Lubricate and clean the blower motor. First check the owner’s manual to see if your motor is the kind that needs lubricating. If it does, turn off the power, open the cover and clean the caps covering the bearings. Then remove the caps and lubricate the bearings.
* Inspect the blower belt for cracks. Turn off the power to the furnace at the main circuit breaker. Use a screwdriver to remove the steel cover of the air handler. The blower belt is the largest rubber belt that you see. Replace the belt if it is cracked.
* Inspect the exhaust flue outdoors to ensure it is free of obstructions such as branches or animal nests.
* Keep the area around your furnace unit free of debris and clutter.
* Change the air filters. Clean your air vents and ducts. Remove the vent covers with a screwdriver. Use the extension hose of your vacuum to remove the dust.
* Open all your air vents. Remove furniture, boxes and clutter that get in the way of air flowing from the vents.

Local Fuel Suppliers
Propane
Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Heating fuel
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
Furnace Service
Rocky Mountain Mechanical (208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Oct 22nd “Bring It – Don’t Burn It” Pile Burned

Tim Dulhanty, Fuels Technician for the Cascade Ranger District, Boise National Forest reports they burned our woody debris pile at the Transfer station Oct 22nd at 2pm. He said it went well, “it was pretty clean, the signs really helped this year, thanks.” -TD

“Kudos to all that brought their woody debris to the transfer station. Cecil really worked the pile with his backhoe, he spent a lot of his time and energy to keep the pile looking good and free of non-burnables. Thanks to all the community members for helping to keep the pile as woody debris only and not furniture, building supplies, insulation, etc.” – JF

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Reminder for people living in bear country:

* Garbage should be stored inside the house or in a secure garage or storage building.
* If garbage cannot be stored in a secure location, a bear-resistant container approved by the Interagency Bear Committee is recommended.
* Avoid using bird feeders from March through November. Birds do not need supplemental feeding this time of year.
* Pet food should not be left outside.
* BBQ grills or anything with a strong odor should not be left out at night.
* Protect gardens, beehives, and compost piles with electric fencing.
* Never intentionally feed bears. A food-conditioned bear may pose a threat to human safety and usually results in the removal of the bear.
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the community hall. (No minutes yet)

Yellow Pine Water Use 2019


(click HERE for larger size)
[h/t Dave P]

Water Update Oct 23:

Thank you for all involved for getting the leak fixed [village water main]. For those in the hole on the first go round replacing the section of pipe. Getting correct parts for the fix. To lining up plumbers that were already in town on another project for someone else, to turning water off and on, and filling in the big hole.
– Nik

October 22nd – The crew from Rocky Mountain Mechanical repaired the main water line leak up near the orchard.

Water Update Oct 15th:

A major leak was found and a temporary fix was made until parts can be obtained. Once parts and people are available, that will be fixed. Fixing that leak doesn’t mean we will be off the boil order. The boil order was issued by the DEQ. They will not lift that order until the chlorine contact time meets the standard.
– Steve Holloway

Water Update (posted to FB Oct 4th 930pm)

Today (10/4) YPWUA worked on the section of pipe that had a number of leaks. Unfortunately we were unable to complete the repairs due to having a couple of incorrect parts. We will order the parts as soon as possible and complete the repairs. We had to do some creative Engineering today but cut 10 leaks to 2 small ones. Thank you to Jeff Forster and Dayle Bennett for working in the muck and water for two days without complaint, to Cecil Dallman for excellent excavation work, to Dave McClintock for parts and advice, to Layne Bennett, Ginny Bartholomew and Ann Forster for their support. Thanks to the community for your patience.
– Willie Sullivan

Water Update (posted to FB Oct 3rd 9pm):

YPWUA found the leaks today (above the orchard) and will be repairing them tomorrow. The water will be off from 10am till repairs and testing completed.
– Willie Sullivan

Water Update Sept 21 (excerpted from VYPA 9/21 meeting notes):

Tests were conducted by Idaho Rural Water [July 19th] in an effort to locate the source of the major leak in the system. They will return October 3rd to continue the search for leaks. The line between Alpine Village and the Saleen property, which includes the bridge across the East Fork river is the line most suspected to be leaking. Cecil Dallman will stand by with a backhoe to dig in locations found. More digging work is needed at the tanks and pipes near the water facility. A second engineer is being consulted. Getting contractors to come to YP and replace seals is difficult. The previous grant money is tied to a timeline so some specified work must be done this fall.

The possibility for a large amount of grant money is very slim because we would have to take out a loan and use the borrowed money for the required matching money, and then there would be the loan payments. Money on hand must be used on required repairs to the contact tank. Because some water users do not have voting rights YPWUA does not qualify for some grants.

There are 56 shares available for purchase at $100/share. Each piece of land is entitled to own one share. Share holders are entitled to vote; water users that do not own a share may not vote, but do have access to water. The owners of the 56 lots are encouraged to purchase shares. Ownership of a share is shown on your annual water bill.

Anyone wanting to arrange a payment plan should contact Willie Sullivan.

– Steve Holloway/Willie Sullivan

Water Update Sept 8:

Still looking for the leak. Water restrictions and boil order still in effect.

Water Update June 7:

The “boil order” is still in effect. There [are] still large water leaks in the system. We continue to look. Work is currently being done on the new contact tank. Please, no lawn watering until we find and repair the major leaks.
– Steve Holloway

May 1st: Leak in alley repaired

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update
— — — —

VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link to: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for August 10, 2019
link to: 20190810 VYPA Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for July 20, 2019
link to: 20190720 Yellow Pine Village Association Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for June 8, 2019
link to: 20190608 Village of Yellow Pine Association
— — — —

YPFD News:

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway District 1
Dan Stiff, District 2
Merrill Saleen, District 3

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Meeting minutes for Sept 14, 2019
link to: 2019-09-14 YPFD Meeting_final

Meeting minutes for July 13, 2019
link to: 20190713 YPFD Meeting Notes_final

Meeting minutes for June 16, 2019
link to: 20190615 YPFD Meeting Notes_Final

Training update 10/24: “FD training is done for the year except for anyone wanting a one-on-one orientation session with the fire station and fire engine operations/pumping. Those that are interested can call me and I’ll make it happen.” – Fire Chief Jeff

YP Helispot update 10/24: “The Helispot is on it’s final stages of completion. The sidewalk to the pad needs to be concreted but everything else is complete. The gate and signs are up and Valley County Dispatch has the GPS coordinates. (44.95968 -115.49531) It’s listed as Yellow Pine Helispot. The gate is unlocked and will remain that way. There is a snow shovel there if needed. I’m asking that NO VEHICLES go beyond the gate. We already had a muddy ATV’er ride all over the pad and over the new paint with muddy tires marking up the pad. We’re planning on a dedication ceremony on the Wednesday or Thursday prior to the 2020 Harmonica Festival. More on that next year.”

YP Helispot update 10/26: “The concrete walkway to the Helispot was completed today 10/26/2019. Thanks to all who worked in the cold, rain and snow to accomplish this needed project. The stretcher can be rolled smoothly to the helicopter making it safer for the the patient and medical personnel making it more comfortable for the patient and safer for everyone. Job well done.” JF – AF

-Fire Chief Jeff
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Call for reservations. Open until the end of hunting season.
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

The Corner will be closed for the winter (starting the first week of November), opening again next spring so that I can spend the winter with the family. I can be reached at matt @ ypcorner.com or at 970-379-5155. Thanks, have a great winter!
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall hours open 8am to close
Full breakfast served starting at 8am with special arrangement for earlier breakfast as needed. 92 Octane non ethanol gas available, cubed ice, beer, pop and water sold by the 6 and 12 pack, snacks, ice cream and many supplies available. Burgers and Pizza, Beer and Wine on the evening menu. Football and other sports available on our TV. Wi Fi, Verizon phone service and information available.
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
FB page:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 28) overnight low of 17 degrees, overcast sky this morning. A flock of goldfinches in winter plumage visiting along with the usual jays, nuthatches and nutcrackers. Mostly cloudy after lunch time, thin spots and a few patches of blue sky, chilly breezes. Rather cold mid-afternoon, overcast and breezy, high of 37 degrees. Cold, cloudy and breezy at sunset. Starting to snow at dusk, clouds down to the valley floor, the ground was white by dark. Gusty breezes and had quit snowing before 1030pm. Decreasing clouds after midnight.

Tuesday (Oct 29) overnight low of 5 degrees, 1″ new snow on the board, mostly clear sky (hazy to the east and south.) Jays, nutcrackers, nuthatches, woodpecker and winter goldfinches visiting. Almost clear (a little high haze) cold and breezy at lunch time, wind chill. By mid-afternoon it was still below freezing, sunny and cold breezes, the snow is evaporating – not melting, high of 30 degrees. Thin rosy haze to the west just before dusk, lighter cold breeze. Clear and breezy before midnight.

Wednesday (Oct 30) overnight low of 0 degrees, clear sky and light breeze this morning, patchy old snow on the ground. Lots of birds this morning, white and red-breasted nuthatches, nutcracker, jays, hairy woodpecker, a starling and several winter goldfinches. Mail truck made it in on time. Above freezing by mid-afternoon, clear sky and very light breezes, high of 40 degrees. Almost clear and calm at dusk, orange haze to the west. Clear and calm before midnight, then mostly cloudy and light breeze after midnight and temps in the teens.

Thursday (Oct 31) overnight low around 17 degrees, overcast and calm this morning, patches of old snow on the ground. Winter goldfinches, jays, juncos, nutcracker, nuthatches and starlings visiting. Cloudy, cool and calm at lunch time, sucker hole early afternoon and brief spot of sunshine. Cool calm and mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, high of 40 degrees. Quiet day. Partly clear late afternoon and mostly clear after sunset. Bright thin crescent moon setting at dusk. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Friday (Nov 1) overnight low of 10 degrees, clear sky this morning. Hairy woodpecker, jays, nuthatches, starlings and a fluffed up pine squirrel visiting this morning, and a raven calling. Clear and light breezes after lunch time. A couple of dark-eyed juncos and a chipmunk visited early afternoon. Getting a little thin haze to the southwest mid-afternoon, light breezes and warmer, high of 48 degrees. Partly cloudy (thin clouds to the west) after sunset, below freezing. Partly hazy and smoky after dark (Bald Hill Rx burn). Some stars and hazy/smoky after midnight.

Saturday (Nov 2) overnight low of 15 degrees, almost clear sky this morning, light haze of smoke to the northeast from the Bald Hill Rx burn. Raven flying over the village and calling. Increasing clouds after lunch time. Jays, nuthatches and a pine siskin visiting. Mostly cloudy (high thin) by mid-afternoon, warmer and very light breezes, high of 53 degrees. Colorful sunset, mostly hazy sky and calm.

Sunday (Nov 3) overnight low of 20 degrees, mostly thin clouds this morning. White and red-breasted nuthatches, jays and a chipmunk visiting this morning, raven flying over the village and calling. Air quality a bit poor. Mostly cloudy and fairly calm at lunch time. Clarks nutcracker and a hairy woodpecker stopped by. Mostly cloudy – thicker and darker – and fairly calm mid-afternoon, high of 52 degrees. Very colorful sunset, deep red to the west. Mostly cloudy at dusk, crescent moon peeking out.
———————

Idaho News:

Valley tax levy would start the long road back

First priority would be to catch up on maintenance

(Note: This is the second of a two-part review of the proposed Valley County road levy that will be on Tuesday’s ballot. Part 1 appeared last week.)

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 31, 2019

Valley County Road Superintendent Jeff McFadden stood next to a dangerously rusted out dump truck that can only be used as a snowplow because the frame can’t safely support the weight of sand or gravel.

The truck, along with many other pieces of aged equipment, would be replaced if voters approve a new property tax levy on Tuesday.

Polls will be open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday at Idaho First Bank in McCall, the American Legion Hall in Cascade and the Donnelly Bible Church in Donnelly. The vote requires a 66.6% “yes” vote to pass.

If the levy is approved, the county would be able to not only replace sketchy old machinery, but also start basic road maintenance that has long been pushed back, McFadden said.

“We would get back into the maintenance of our infrastructure,” he said. “This would include chip sealing, crack sealing, striping, regraveling, repaving, and crushing gravel and culvert replacements.”

For years the county’s road and bridge budget relied heavily on federal funding, but since 2000 those funds dropped from about $3 million per year to zero dollars next year if the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act is not reauthorized by Congress.

The new levy that would tax property at $84 for every $100,000 of assessed value, generating about $4 million per year for the department. Currently, no property taxes are used to fund the department.

If passed, the county plans to spend that money on all roads that are needing repairs and several much-needed equipment upgrades, McFadden said.

“For the first few years of the levy, we will be concentrating on ‘catching up’ with past due maintenance,” he said.

“Some roads that are beyond repair doesn’t mean that they are on our priority list,” he said. “We also have to concentrate on newer asphalt also for chip sealing and making sure we get the longevity out of it.”

A list of priority projects was not available, but county officials said improvements would be done on the most highly traveled roads first and continue for years to come.

“We do have a transportation plan that we have to follow for the list of roads,” McFadden said. “I recently had a study completed on all of the asphalt roads to help me decide what needs to be done to them and help prioritize them.”

“We are playing catch up right now and will be for some time to come so there is no lack of projects, it is more a matter of prioritizing them,” commissioner Dave Bingaman said.

County commissioners said that the public would play a role in the project schedule.

“If the levy passes we will begin hosting workshops with our road department and the general public to gauge what should be done first,” commissioner Elt Hasbrouck said.

“My goal is to make these decisions based on public input and our road supervisor requests,” Hasbrouck said.

Before any roadwork could be done, the county would upgrade equipment, purchase material and hire more employees with levy funding.

“We have some older equipment that we are starting to expend too much money into just to keep it on the road,” he said. “When they get to this point, it is time to swap them out for newer machines. For the last few years, we have not had a choice but to try to keep up with repairs.”

The county plans to hire about 10 new employees to staff the department, and purchase the materials necessary to perform maintenance on all county roads, Hasbrouck said.

The new levy would apply to all property in Valley County, including inside McCall, Cascade and Donnelly, but could only be spent on county roads.

Constituents from the cities will benefit by being able to continue access to back country roads for their recreational needs, Hasbrouck said.

“Even though this levy will be very expensive for me personally, I feel strongly that it will be cheaper than if I have to take care of the county road myself,” Hasbrouck said.

Bingaman said there are no other funding solutions available to the road department.

“We don’t have a choice, we either pass the levy or suffer the consequences of a grossly underfunded road program,” he said.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County lists tools to set priorities if new levy passes

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 31, 2019

The Valley County Road Department will use a combination of long-term planning documents and a recent survey of paved county roads to help determine which roadways would be worked on first if a new road levy is passed on Tuesday.

The county is seeking approval for a permanent levy that would raise about $4 million in property taxes each year.

The Valley County Master Transportation Plan, which has been in use since March 2008, operates as a guide for roadway use, planning, improvement and analysis.

A recently completed pavement condition survey classified all paved roads in the county into a maintenance schedule and assign a score to each.

The highest category roads would need annual crack sealing, pothole patching and drainage maintenance.

Secondary scores would require drainage maintenance, and chip sealing every four to five years.

Lower rated roads would need surface treatments, surface recycling and overlays of asphalt.

The worst rated roads would require complete reconstruction from sub-base to asphalt surface.

Valley County maintains 245 miles of paved road and 486 miles of gravel road, with snow removal carried out on 407 total miles of road. There are 76 bridges that the county maintains and 3,443 culverts.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
— — — — — — — — — —

Wednesday meeting to review Phase 2 of Warren Wagon project

The Star-News Oct 31, 2019

An informational open house on the proposed rebuilding of 2.2-mile section of Warren Wagon Road north of Eastside Drive will be hosted by Federal Highway Administration on Wednesday.

The open house will be from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. and from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the Payette National Forest Building at 500 N. Mission St. in McCall.

The work would rebuild the road from Eastside Drive to just south of the Fisher Creek Bridge with frost-resistant asphalt and would replace culverts and install sections of guardrail.

One lane of the roadway would remain open with flaggers throughout construction, which would start next spring and be complete next fall, said Doug Hecox, a spokesperson for the highway administration.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Fugitive takes hostage, kills himself at [Cascade] Idaho motel

by CBS 2 News Staff Monday, October 28th 2019

Cascade, Idaho (CBS 2) — A fugitive took a hostage before killing himself Monday at an Idaho motel.

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office responded to the Alpine Lodge for reports of a fugitive from Washington State.

Sean Duggan, the suspect, briefly opened the door and showed officers a weapon before barricading himself.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Crews respond to Cascade house fire

The homeowners and their dogs escaped unharmed, but several cats inside the house did not make it out.

KTVB October 28, 2019

Cascade, Idaho — A home in Cascade is expected to be a total loss after a fire broke out early Monday morning.

The fire happened just after midnight on Idaho Street.

continued:
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Rural Idaho fire departments learn equipment is uninsured

by Associated Press Wednesday, October 30th 2019

Grangeville, Idaho (AP) – Several rural volunteer fire departments in north-central Idaho are in danger of losing much of their equipment after officials learned it was uninsured.

The Lewiston Tribune reports Idaho County officials previously believed the fire trucks and other equipment loaned to fire departments by the Idaho Department of Lands and the U.S. Forest Service were covered under the county’s insurance policy.

They recently learned that’s not the case, and now county commissioners, state employees and local fire department representatives are trying to figure out how to fix the problem.

continued:
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Wood stove ashes cause large house fire in northern Idaho

by Ryan L Morrison Thursday, October 31st 2019

Coeur d’Alene, Idaho (CBS 2) — Ashes from a wooden stove caused a large house fire in northern Idaho Thursday.

The Coeur d’Alene Fire Department said the ashes were improperly discarded from a wood stove which caused the house to go up in flames.

There was one person inside at the time, but she made it out safely.

The house had working smoke detectors which helped her get out. The family’s dog did not survive.

continued:
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Tips & Advice:

Follow 4 health tips during flu season

By Dr. Greg Frank Nov 1, 2019 IME

You know the signs. The thunderous cough. The pounding headache. The full-body fatigue.

It’s the flu. Last fall and winter, influenza sickened roughly 40 million Americans and killed 60,000, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

This year’s flu season is nearly upon us. Here are four tips to stay healthy.

continued:
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Mining News:

Midas Gold will move mountains to get at gold

Blasting, giant haulers will provide ore for processing

(Note: This is the second part in a series detailing Midas Gold Idaho’s operating plan for its proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine. Next week: Crushing and Grinding)

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Oct 31, 2019

Midas Gold plans a fleet of 200-ton haul trucks to carry about 500,000 loads of ore over the life of the project in order to extract the gold and antimony suspected to be under the ground at Stibnite in Valley County.

20191031midas-aPhoto courtesy Midas Gold
Photo shows a hauler similar to the 200-ton haulers that Midas Gold plans to use to take ore from pits to the processing plant at the Stibnite Gold Project near Yellow Pine.

The trucks would need to haul about 110 loads of ore per day, or about 22,000 standard pickup truck loads, in order to process the company’s estimated average of 22,000 tons of ore per day, according to the company’s proposal.

Ore and waste rock would be hauled from the three proposed open pit mines that make up the Stibnite Gold Project.

The 200-ton haul trucks are too big to be legally driven on public roads, so they would be delivered in several pieces and assembled on site, said Mckinsey Lyon, vice president of external affairs for Midas Gold.

The Yellow Pine pit, known currently as a pit lake seen from Stibnite Road, would be mined first for about seven years.

Midas Gold would then ramp up excavation of the Hangar Flats pit in about the sixth year of operations before depleting it after about four years of mining.

The West End pit, which is an open pit left from a 1990s mining company, would mostly be mined for about five years beginning during the eighth year of operations.

The West End pit also would be mined throughout the project to extract limestone, which would be used to control acidity during the ore processing.

Mining the pits would begin by using up to five large drilling rigs to drill holes between 23 feet and 45 feet deep in patterns.

The patterns would be based on more than 100,000 ground core samples taken from Stibnite and studied to map out ore zones and waste rock zones.

Each drill hole would then be filled with an explosive mixture of ammonium nitrate and fuel oil before being plugged and detonated remotely to blast the rock apart while keeping it in place.

Blast holes in ore zones would be closer together to shatter solid rock containing precious metals as much as possible to allow for easier processing, Lyon said.

“It is more economical to break the ore into small rocks using explosives during the blasting than the mechanical effort of breaking rocks into smaller particles,” she said.

Blasts would be generally limited to afternoon hours to reduce disturbances to wildlife and on-site employees, according to Midas Gold’s proposed operating plan.

After a safety inspection, the blast zone would be studied by geologists to further refine ore zones and waste rock zones. Ore and waste rock would then be hauled to either the ore processing facility or one of three waste rock storage areas.

Up to 400,000 tons of ore could be stored at a short-term stockpile next to the ore processing facility, Lyon said.

The blasting process would be continuously repeated starting at the edges of each pit and stair-stepping down about 40 feet from one mine bench to the next until the pits reach their average final depth of 550 feet.

The benches would increase the stability of the pit walls and allow for haul roads to be built between them so heavy machinery and haul trucks could easily access the bottom of the pit, Lyon said.

Roads from each pit to the ore processing facility and waste rock storage areas would be built by a fleet of 40-ton haul trucks and excavators.

The 87-foot-wide roads would spiral down into each pit on roads built on top of cut rock left between mining benches. Other haul roads on site would be built on top of historic mining roads.

Mining would take place 24 hours a day all year long, which would require Midas Gold to use a fleet of about 10 portable 25-foot-tall LED lights attached to a generator.

The lights would be used only as needed, include shields to reduce skyward light pollution and be strategically placed to prevent over-lighting work zones, Lyon said.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Public Lands:

Forest Supervisor signs record of decision for the Lost Creek-Boulder Creek Landscape Restoration Project on the Payette National Forest

McCall, Id., Nov 1, 2019 – Tawnya Brummett, the Acting Forest Supervisor for the Payette National Forest, signed the record of decision today for the Lost Creek-Boulder Creek Landscape Restoration Project on the New Meadows Ranger District.

“This is a big milestone for the Payette, and it took a lot of work and support from many people to get here,” said Brummett. “The Lost Creek-Boulder Creek project is about more than just one resource; it’s about getting our landscapes back to a more resilient place, protecting threatened species, restoring watersheds, improving recreation access and experience, and supporting our local communities.”

This record of decision follows the 9th District Court of Appeals’ ruling to vacate the original 2014 decision in a lawsuit brought by entities that opposed the project.

Subsequent to the court order, the Forest Service re-examined the 2014 final environmental impact statement (FEIS) and determined that the effects analysis and alternatives were sound, but additional clarification was warranted in the form of an errata to the final environmental impact statement. The FEIS and errata, along with a draft record of decision, were made available to the public in June 2019.

The selected alternative includes vegetation management, watershed restoration treatments, road management, and recreation management activities. Implementation of the decision can begin immediately.

The project files are posted on the Payette National Forest project web site at:  (link). For additional information, please contact Erin Phelps, New Meadows District Ranger at 208-347-0301.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
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Boise and Payette National Forests begin Christmas tree permit sales Nov. 23

Boise, Idaho November 1, 2019 –The Boise and Payette National Forest (NF) vendors will begin selling Christmas tree permits Saturday, Nov. 23. On Monday, Nov. 25, permits will be available at Boise and Payette NF District Offices and the Interagency Visitor’s Information Center located at 1387 South Vinnell Way in Boise, 83709. All tree permits are valid to Dec. 25.

Each permit allows one tree to be cut, with a limit of three permits per family. For both Forests, the cost of a permit for one tree is $10. The maximum height of a permitted tree is 12 feet. Permits are valid on both the Payette and Boise NFs.

Forest offices will provide information about where a Christmas tree may be harvested, restrictions and helpful tips. A Christmas tree permit is for personal use only and the use of permits for commercial use is prohibited. Permits are not refundable for any reason. Purchaser must be at least 18 years in age.

In coordination with the “Every Kid Outdoors” program, fourth-graders who are participating in the program can receive a free Christmas tree Permit. The U.S. Forest Service is among several federal agencies that support the Every Kid Outdoors initiative which is a nationwide call to action to build the next generation of outdoor enthusiasts. The initiative provides a free pass to all fourth-grade students by going to:  (link). Complete the voucher, print it and bring it to the Forest Service office.

To receive a free Christmas tree permit, the fourth-grader and a parent must go to a Forest Service office in person with the “voucher” they received from the online website at: (link)

Commercial vendors will not be issuing a free Christmas tree permit to participants of the Every Kid Outdoors program, and free Christmas tree permits cannot be sent through the mail or electronically.

Participation in the Every Kid Outdoors program also offers benefits at National Parks and on other public lands and facilities across the United States.

“Harvesting a Christmas tree is a fun adventure and often a traditional family event,” said Ruth Rieper, Boise NF Tree Coordinator. “Please review the Christmas tree brochure and map for optimal areas.”

If an unusually heavy snowfall occurs in southwest Idaho, and forest roads become a safety concern for the public, some areas may be closed early to Christmas tree gathering. Forest roads are not plowed. Call ahead and check websites for road conditions before heading out. Please do not block private or county roadways at any time. For further information call the Boise NF at: 208-373-4007 and check out our website for updates and closures at: (link)

To provide for family safety, officials advise a few simple guidelines:

* Use the brochure with instructions provided.
* Practice winter survival and driving techniques.
* Bring the right tools, such as a saw and a shovel, so the tree can be cut to within 6” of the ground’s surface.
* Take along emergency equipment, plenty of food and water, and try to use a 4-wheel drive vehicle if you are planning to travel in snow country.
* Always inform neighbors and family friends of the route you intend to take, include a map of your destination, and the time that you plan to be gone.
* Be prepared for the possibility of a long hike or snowmobile ride while searching for the perfect tree.
* According to Idaho state law, any vehicle carrying a load that extends more than 4 feet past the tailgate, must display a red or florescent orange flag tied on the end of the load to caution other drivers.

Boise National Forest Offices (link)

Interagency Visitor Information Center 208-373-4007
Sells permits for the Payette and Boise National Forests
1387 South Vinnell Way
(BLM State Office – West of Walmart on Overland Road, Boise)
Hours: M-F 7:45-4:30pm (Vendors and offices are closed Thanksgiving Day)

The Idaho City Ranger District 208-392-6681
3833 Highway 21
Idaho City, ID
Hours: M-F 8am – 4:30p.m
Idaho City may or may not be open on weekends. Please call ahead.

Lowman Ranger District 208-259-3361
7359 Highway 21
Lowman, ID 83637
Hours: M-F 8am – 4:30pm

Emmett Ranger District 208-365-7000
1857 Highway 16, Suite A
Emmett, ID 83617
Hours: M-F 7:30am – 4:30pm

Cascade Ranger District 208-382-7400
540 North Main Street
Cascade, ID 83611
Hours: M-F 8am – 4:30pm

Mountain Home Ranger District 208-587-7961
3080 Industrial Way
Mountain Home, ID 83647
Hours: M-F 8am – 4:30pm

Boise National Forest Vendors

Idaho City Grocery (208) 392-4426
3868 Highway 21
Idaho City, ID 83631 Open: Everyday, 7:30am – 9pm
Mon-Thursday, – Open: 8am – 8pm Fri-Sun, 8am -9pm

Tom’s Service/Sinclair (208) 392-4900
243 State Highway 21
Idaho City, ID 83631
Open: Everyday, 5am -11pm

Seasons (208) 392-9777
200 Main Street
Idaho City, ID 83631
Open: Everyday, 8am-10pm

Donna’s Place (208) 392-9666
110 E Granite Street
Placerville, ID 83666
Open: Everyday, 10am – 6pm

East Cleveland Beverage (208) 459-6442
2518 E Cleveland
Caldwell, ID 83605
Open: Everyday, 6am – 10pm

B & W Fuels (208) 365-2291
1900 N. Washington
Emmett, ID 83617
Open: Sun – Thursday, 6am – 9pm; Fri-Sat, 6am -10pm

D & B Supply (208) 963-7035
111 State Highway 16
Emmett, ID 83617
Open: Mon – Sat, 8am – 8pm; Sunday 9am – 6pm

Valley View Chevron (208) 793-4321
459 State Highway 55
Horseshoe Bend, ID 83629
Open: Everyday, 5:30am – 10pm

Ray’s Corner Market (208) 793-2391
445 State Highway 55
Horseshoe Bend, ID 83629
Open: Sun-Sat, 6am – 10pm

Garden Valley Chevron (208) 462-3869
P.O. Box 447
Garden Valley, ID 83622
Beginning Nov.21 – open: Everyday – 7am – 9pm

Payette National Forest Offices (link)

All Payette National Forest offices are open Monday through Friday, 8am to 4:30pm For more information contact any of the District Offices. (Vendors and offices closed on Thanksgiving)

Council Ranger District Office
2092 Highway 95, Council, ID
208-253-0100

New Meadows Ranger District Office
3674 Highway 95, New Meadows, ID
208-347-0300

Weiser Ranger District Office
851 E Ninth St., Weiser, ID
208-549-4200

McCall Ranger District Office
102 West Lake St., McCall, ID
208-634-0400

Payette NF Supervisor’s Office
500 N. Mission St., Bldg. 2
208-634-0700

Payette National Forest Vendors

Weiser: Ridley’s Food and Drug (208) 549-1332
1401 E 6th St., Weiser, ID
Open: Everyday 7am – 11pm

Weiser Farmer’s Supply Cooperative (208) 549-0654
622 E Commercial St., Weiser, ID
Open: Everyday 5am – 10pm

Cambridge: Jay’s Sinclair (208) 257-5000
Corner of Hwy 95 and Hwy 71, Cambridge, ID
Open: Everyday 7am – 8pm

Council: Farmer’s Supply Co-op (208) 253-4266
2030 N. Highway 95, Council, ID
Open: Everyday 6am – 10pm

McCall: Albertsons (208) 634-8166
132 E. Lake Street, McCall, ID
Open: Everyday 6:30am -11pm

New Meadows: C & M Lumber (208) 347-3648
3625 Walker Ln, New Meadows, ID
Open: Mon – Sat 8am – 6pm
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Pines in peril

Local agencies – and the Clark’s nutcracker—help boost Idaho’s threatened whitebark pine

by Emily Jones Nov 1, 2019 IME


photo by Emily Jones

When Meriwether Lewis and William Clark first stumbled across the Clark’s nutcracker in 1805 along Idaho’s Salmon River, they didn’t quite know what to make of the bird.

“I saw to-day [a] bird of the woodpecker kind which fed on pine burrs, its bill and tail white the wings black,” William Clark wrote in his journal.

Lewis, the more eloquent journalist between the two, took more accurate notes—perhaps the bird should have been named “Lewis’s nutcracker”—as evidenced by his observations:

“[It] Had a loud, squawling note something like the mewing of a cat. The beak of this bird is 1-1 1/2 inches long, is proportionately large, black. … The head and neck are also proportionately large … this bird feeds on the seed of the pine and also on insects. It resides in the Rocky Mountains at all seasons of the year, and in many parts is the only bird to be found.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

USDA Forest Service Payette National Forest SOPA Update October-December 2019

link:
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Critter News:

Pet talk

by Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Nov 1, 2019 IME

When the facial nerve does not work, dogs have an inability to blink, their lips droop, and there is decreased tear production on the affected side.

Twelve pairs of nerves, one on each side of the head, originate at the base of the brain and are responsible for certain neurological functions of the head and face. These paired nerves are called the cranial nerves and they are numbered 1 through 12. The 7th cranial nerve is the facial nerve, and it controls the muscles involved in facial expression, blinking and tear production. The cause of this condition is unknown. Although some cases of facial nerve paralysis have an identifiable origin, such as diseases of the ear, tumors and metabolic disorders, usually the cause of this disease is not well-defined.

Typically, a sudden weakness or paralysis occurs on one side of the face. If nerves on both sides of the head are affected, weakness is seen on both sides of the face. This weakness causes the ears and lips to droop. Animals may drop food or drool from the affected side of their mouth. Sensation, or feeling, of the face is normal.

continued:
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Does Catnip Really Make Cats ‘High’?

By Mindy Weisberger – Live Science Nov 3, 2019

They may look blissful and euphoric, but what’s really happening?

Offer a pinch of catnip or a catnip-filled toy to your pet feline, and her response might be dramatic … and silly. She may roll on her back, dart wildly around, drool, lick the catnip and rub it on her face and body, or flop over and lie there purring.

Her actions seem goofy and comical, and somewhat resemble the uncoordinated and gleeful behavior of someone who’s had a little too much to drink or is pleasantly under the influence of recreational drugs.

But is that what’s happening here? Does catnip make cats high?

continued:
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Fish & Game advises feeding deer can be dangerous

The Star-News Oct 31, 2019

The the Idaho Department of Fish and Game is advising that people stop feeding deer.

Feeding deer makes them not only more likely to be hit by cars, but is also bad for their health.

Every year the department responds to dozens of reports of deer that are injured or killed by cars, with more animal deaths during the winter, Regional Wildlife Manager Regan Berkley said.

The food that people feed to the deer can also kill, Berkley said. The animal’s digestive system is equipped to digest small bits of low-quality food during winter.

Feeding them large quantities of high-quality food can actually lead to death in some cases, Berkley said.

Deer will return to places they have been fed. As more deer congregate in town, predators like mountain lions follow, she said.

Deer are the primary prey for mountain lions and sightings of the dangerous animals have been reported in town every winter.

Under stressful circumstances, deer sometimes respond with aggression, Berkley said.

“Does with young fawns have stomped dogs and chased people, and bucks in breeding season have behaved aggressively, and even injured people,” she said.

Contact the Idaho Department of Fish and Game in McCall at 208-634-8137.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Nampa rethinks strategy to displace high crow populations

Last year, city officials and volunteers tried multiple strategies to disrupt the birds, such as infrared lasers, decoys and deterrent sprays, but saw mixed results.

Erin Bamer, Idaho Press October 31, 2019


A murder of crows perches on the upper branches of a tree and telephone lines in the Fred Meyer parking lot in Nampa on Tuesday, Oct. 29. The city has tried over the years to find good strategy for driving away the birds, which come to the city in the thousands each year when the weather turns colder. Jake King/Idaho Press

Nampa, Idaho — Last year, between 3,000 and 5,000 crows flocked to densely populated areas of Nampa. According to city officials, the birds have returned.

Darrin Johnson, Nampa Parks and Recreation director and head of the city’s crow displacement strategies, said the city is scaling back efforts to reduce the crows through city resources.

This year, the focus is on helping people learn how to get rid of the birds themselves, according to the Idaho Press.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

IDFG offering reward for two poaching cases in Garden Valley/Lowman area

by CBS 2 News Staff Tuesday, October 29th 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is asking the public for information regarding two suspected poaching cases in the Garden Valley/Lowman area.

Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) is offering a reward for information in both cases and callers can remain anonymous.

Sometime during the evening of Oct. 20, a spike elk was shot and left to waste on the Terrace Lakes Golf Course near Crouch.

The following evening around 5:00pm, a mule deer doe was shot and left to waste in the Rock Creek drainage near Lowman, Idaho.

continued:
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Partially harvested cow elk left behind

Abandoned meat left near Georgetown

By Matthew Cooper Nov 01, 2019 Local News 8

Georgetown, ID [Bear Lake County] – Body parts from two cow elk are wasted in the backcountry.

A passing by sportsman found cuts of meat abandoned about one mile north of Georgetown on Red Canyon Road. Idaho Fish & Game is now looking for those responsible. Senior Conservation officer Raleigh Scott said, “this area is known for sportsmen who take great pride in caring for meat, so to see waste at this level is troubling.”

If you have any information about this, call Officer Scott at (207) 270-9923.

source:
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Anglers: don’t overlook catching whitefish in Idaho’s rivers and streams

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Thursday, October 31, 2019


Bart Gamett

Whitefish are plentiful and fun to catch, and fishing is good in late fall and winter

Anglers may be overlooking one of Idaho’s abundant and fun-to-catch stream fish – mountain whitefish – and late fall and winter are some of the best times to catch them.

Before talking about catching whitefish, let’s clear up a few misconceptions. Whitefish are not a so-called “trash fish,” they’re a native Idaho gamefish found in many rivers and streams, as well as some lakes. Some anglers might mistake them for suckers because of their slightly down-turned mouths, but whitefish are in the Salmonid family along with salmon, trout, char and grayling.

continued:
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Monitoring the entire Journey of Wild Chinook Salmon

By Josh Poole, Regional Fishery Biologist
Friday, November 1, 2019


IDFG/ Photo by Josh Poole

In recent blog articles, you’ve learned about new fish detection systems being installed on rivers in Idaho and how managers use these systems to gain a snapshot of tagged fish in a particular place (read those blogs here and here). With more of these systems in place, managers can track and monitor the journey of anadromous fish, like the Chinook Salmon, with finer detail. This can even allow a single fish to be monitored from the time it was tagged, across the hundreds of miles to the ocean, through each of the 8 dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers, and back as an adult. You will see one such journey below.

Fisheries biologists monitor this remarkable journey every year using a variety of tools. One important tool is a rotary screw trap (photo below). The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) uses rotary screw traps to capture and tag wild juvenile Chinook Salmon and steelhead at over 15 locations throughout the state. By tagging juveniles captured at screw traps with PIT tags (passive integrated transponder tags) managers can track their movement on the way out to the ocean, and as they return as adults.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Fun Critter Stuff:

All-white creature identified as rare albino porcupine

by The Associated Press Thursday, July 18th 2019

In this Tuesday, July 16, 2019, photo taken provided by the Seashore Trolley Museum, a rare albino porcupine waddles around near the Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, Maine. The museum asked for help identifying the strange animal after it appeared on the grounds this week. (Fred Hessler/Seashore Trolley Museum via AP)

Kennebunkport, Maine (AP) — A curious visitor to a Maine train museum that resembled a white throw pillow or perhaps a lost toupee turned out to be a rare albino porcupine.

The young rodent turned up Tuesday at Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, perplexing the staff, who sought help identifying it via social media. The consensus was it’s an albino porcupine.

continued w/more photos:
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Halloween Trivia:

7 things you didn’t know about the history of Halloween candy

by Emily Faber FABER, Sinclair Broadcast Group Thursday, October 31st 2019

In childhood, the beloved Halloween tradition of trick-or-treating is typically accepted without a second thought. Why wouldn’t we go door-to-door asking our neighbors for candy? When free sweets are involved, you simply don’t ask questions. Growing up surrounded by Halloween stores occupying every vacant strip mall, supermarket aisles filled with bags of miniature Hershey bars and pumpkin-shaped Reese’s, and jack-o’-lanterns illuminating entire neighborhoods, it can be difficult to imagine a time before Halloween was celebrated in such a massive way.

But while it is estimated that Americans will spend $2.6 billion on candy this October, that wasn’t always the case. Take a moment to dive into the history of Halloween candy, and you might discover that today’s sugar-fueled celebrations took their now-familiar shape much more recently than you would have guessed.

continued:

Note: see this week’s recipes for Soul Cakes

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Seasonal Humor:

Halloween at Stibnite in 1950

1950HalloweenStibnite-a

HalloweenVeganWitches-a
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Oct 27, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 27, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: The boil order and water restrictions are still in effect.

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire/SAR Training
May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season
Oct 31 – Halloween
Nov 1 – 3-day a week mail service begins
Nov 2 – 8pm Halloween-End Of Hunting Season Party
Nov 3 – 2am Daylight saving time ends
Nov 6 – Amerigas propane delivery
(details below)
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Local Events:

Salmon Feed

There was a salmon feed at the Yellow Pine Tavern last Monday evening, October 21st.
— — — —

Halloween-End Of Hunting Season Party Nov 2nd

Halloween-End Of Hunting Season Party at the Yellow Pine Tavern Nov 2nd, 8pm.

Chili Dogs Provided by the Tavern, bring snacks if you wish. Costume Contest or come as you are.
— — — —

Fall Back Nov 3rd

Daylight savings time ends at 2am November 3rd this year. Don’t forget to change the batteries in your smoke alarms and CO2 detectors.
— — — —

Nov 6th – Amerigas propane delivery

Amerigas will be coming in November 6th to get everyone topped off for winter. If you are a “will call customer” you will need to order online or call us or you will not get fuel.

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
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Village News:

Plumbers visit Yellow Pine

P1000542-20191022Plumbers
Rocky Mountain Mechanical Plumbing Crew Keaton Hess and Levi Kurta

It is often difficult to find professionals willing to come all the way to Yellow Pine to work on projects in the hinterlands. Fortunately we found a company out of Emmett that will schedule time for Yellow Pine to work on both furnaces and plumbing. Rocky Mountain Mechanical (208) 365-PIPE (7473)

Their plumbing crew traveled from a job in Cascade to Yellow Pine Monday evening, Oct 21st, found accommodations at the Yellow Pine Lodge and dinner at the Yellow Pine Tavern. On Tuesday morning, bright and early, they went to work on a couple of projects for locals. Fortunately the rain let up in time for working outside in the trenches. After finishing up 2 jobs in the School Subdivision, they headed up to the orchard (in a borrowed UTV to get up the steep hill) and worked on fixing the leak in the main water line for the village, parts for which locals had made a quick trip to town and back.

It took coordination and planning from several people to get this all accomplished – as they say, “it takes a village.” Thanks to all involved.

P1000540-20191022Plumbers
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Last Fall Heating Fuel Delivery

Chris Gurney of Diamond Fuel and Feed came to Yellow Pine early Friday morning, Oct 25th, to top off fuel tanks for winter heating.
P1000547-20191025ChrisGDiamond
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Boil Water Order Still in Effect

Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
— — — —

Get Ready for Winter Heating

* Inspect and clean the chimney. Contact the YPFD to borrow chimney brushes.
* Inspect and clean wood stoves, make sure dampers work properly and check for leaks.
* Check your carbon monoxide and smoke detectors – install fresh batteries.
* Check your fire extinguisher and make sure it is handy. Manually rotate them around, tip upside down and lightly shake them, thus keeping the fire fighting agent loose, and check that the needle is still in the green. If you need a new one please call, your fire commissioner or Jeff F.
* If you have an oil-powered furnace, replace your filter and nozzle and check the tank level.
* Check your propane tank levels (early morning when it is cool in case there is a wasp nest!) Check to make sure snow falling from the roof cannot impact your pipes!
* Test the igniter switch. On an old system, you might have to relight the pilot. Newer systems have electronic igniters.
* Lubricate and clean the blower motor. First check the owner’s manual to see if your motor is the kind that needs lubricating. If it does, turn off the power, open the cover and clean the caps covering the bearings. Then remove the caps and lubricate the bearings.
* Inspect the blower belt for cracks. Turn off the power to the furnace at the main circuit breaker. Use a screwdriver to remove the steel cover of the air handler. The blower belt is the largest rubber belt that you see. Replace the belt if it is cracked.
* Inspect the exhaust flue outdoors to ensure it is free of obstructions such as branches or animal nests.
* Keep the area around your furnace unit free of debris and clutter.
* Change the air filters. Clean your air vents and ducts. Remove the vent covers with a screwdriver. Use the extension hose of your vacuum to remove the dust.
* Open all your air vents. Remove furniture, boxes and clutter that get in the way of air flowing from the vents.

Local Fuel Suppliers
Propane
Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Heating fuel
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
Furnace Service
Rocky Mountain Mechanical (208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Oct 22nd “Bring It – Don’t Burn It” Pile Burned

Tim Dulhanty, Fuels Technician for the Cascade Ranger District, Boise National Forest reports they burned our woody debris pile at the Transfer station Oct 22nd at 2pm. He said it went well, “it was pretty clean, the signs really helped this year, thanks.” -TD

“Kudos to all that brought their woody debris to the transfer station. Cecil really worked the pile with his backhoe, he spent a lot of his time and energy to keep the pile looking good and free of non-burnables. Thanks to all the community members for helping to keep the pile as woody debris only and not furniture, building supplies, insulation, etc.” – JF

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery will start Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
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Reminder for people living in bear country:

* Garbage should be stored inside the house or in a secure garage or storage building.
* If garbage cannot be stored in a secure location, a bear-resistant container approved by the Interagency Bear Committee is recommended.
* Avoid using bird feeders from March through November. Birds do not need supplemental feeding this time of year.
* Pet food should not be left outside.
* BBQ grills or anything with a strong odor should not be left out at night.
* Protect gardens, beehives, and compost piles with electric fencing.
* Never intentionally feed bears. A food-conditioned bear may pose a threat to human safety and usually results in the removal of the bear.
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Yellow Pine Water Use 2019

2019VillageWaterUse-a
(click image for larger size)
[h/t Dave P]

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the community hall. (No minutes yet)

Water Update Oct 23:

Thank you for all involved for getting the leak fixed [village water main]. For those in the hole on the first go round replacing the section of pipe. Getting correct parts for the fix. To lining up plumbers that were already in town on another project for someone else, to turning water off and on, and filling in the big hole.
– Nik

October 22nd – The crew from Rocky Mountain Mechanical repaired the main water line leak up near the orchard.

Water Update Oct 15th:

A major leak was found and a temporary fix was made until parts can be obtained. Once parts and people are available, that will be fixed. Fixing that leak doesn’t mean we will be off the boil order. The boil order was issued by the DEQ. They will not lift that order until the chlorine contact time meets the standard.
– Steve Holloway

Water Update (posted to FB Oct 4th 930pm)

Today (10/4) YPWUA worked on the section of pipe that had a number of leaks. Unfortunately we were unable to complete the repairs due to having a couple of incorrect parts. We will order the parts as soon as possible and complete the repairs. We had to do some creative Engineering today but cut 10 leaks to 2 small ones. Thank you to Jeff Forster and Dayle Bennett for working in the muck and water for two days without complaint, to Cecil Dallman for excellent excavation work, to Dave McClintock for parts and advice, to Layne Bennett, Ginny Bartholomew and Ann Forster for their support. Thanks to the community for your patience.
– Willie Sullivan

Water Update (posted to FB Oct 3rd 9pm):

YPWUA found the leaks today (above the orchard) and will be repairing them tomorrow. The water will be off from 10am till repairs and testing completed.

– Willie Sullivan

Water Update Sept 21 (excerpted from VYPA 9/21 meeting notes):

Tests were conducted by Idaho Rural Water [July 19th] in an effort to locate the source of the major leak in the system. They will return October 3rd to continue the search for leaks. The line between Alpine Village and the Saleen property, which includes the bridge across the East Fork river is the line most suspected to be leaking. Cecil Dallman will stand by with a backhoe to dig in locations found. More digging work is needed at the tanks and pipes near the water facility. A second engineer is being consulted. Getting contractors to come to YP and replace seals is difficult. The previous grant money is tied to a timeline so some specified work must be done this fall.

The possibility for a large amount of grant money is very slim because we would have to take out a loan and use the borrowed money for the required matching money, and then there would be the loan payments. Money on hand must be used on required repairs to the contact tank. Because some water users do not have voting rights YPWUA does not qualify for some grants.

There are 56 shares available for purchase at $100/share. Each piece of land is entitled to own one share. Share holders are entitled to vote; water users that do not own a share may not vote, but do have access to water. The owners of the 56 lots are encouraged to purchase shares. Ownership of a share is shown on your annual water bill.

Anyone wanting to arrange a payment plan should contact Willie Sullivan.

– Steve Holloway/Willie Sullivan

Water Update Sept 8:

Still looking for the leak. Water restrictions and boil order still in effect.

Water Update June 7:

The “boil order” is still in effect.
There [are] still large water leaks in the system. We continue to look.
Work is currently being done on the new contact tank.
Please, no lawn watering until we find and repair the major leaks.
– Steve Holloway

May 1st: Leak in alley repaired

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update
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VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link to: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for August 10, 2019
link to: 20190810 VYPA Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for July 20, 2019
link to: 20190720 Yellow Pine Village Association Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for June 8, 2019
link to: 20190608 Village of Yellow Pine Association
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YPFD News:

District 1 Fire Commissioner

Per the Postings on the opening for Yellow Pine District 1 Fire Commissioner, Sue Holloway came forward to volunteer her time to represent YP Fire District 1. The Fire Commissioners have unanimously agreed to accept Sue as a Fire Commissioner representing the residents of District One, (The center of Yellow Pine Ave. West). This position will run for 4 years.

We look forward to having Sue as a Fire Commissioner. Sue brings a community commitment not only as a resident but also as a business owner. Thank You Sue for stepping up for the challenge.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway District 1
Dan Stiff, District 2
Merrill Saleen, District 3

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Meeting minutes for Sept 14, 2019
link to: 2019-09-14 YPFD Meeting_final

Meeting minutes for July 13, 2019
link to: 20190713 YPFD Meeting Notes_final

Meeting minutes for June 16, 2019
link to: 20190615 YPFD Meeting Notes_Final

Training update 10/24: “FD training is done for the year except for anyone wanting a one-on-one orientation session with the fire station and fire engine operations/pumping. Those that are interested can call me and I’ll make it happen.” – Fire Chief Jeff

YP Helispot update 10/24: “The Helispot is on it’s final stages of completion. The sidewalk to the pad needs to be concreted but everything else is complete. The gate and signs are up and Valley County Dispatch has the GPS coordinates. (44.95968 -115.49531) It’s listed as Yellow Pine Helispot. The gate is unlocked and will remain that way. There is a snow shovel there if needed. I’m asking that NO VEHICLES go beyond the gate. We already had a muddy ATV’er ride all over the pad and over the new paint with muddy tires marking up the pad. We’re planning on a dedication ceremony on the Wednesday or Thursday prior to the 2020 Harmonica Festival. More on that next year.”

YP Helispot update 10/26: “The concrete walkway to the Helispot was completed today 10/26/2019. Thanks to all who worked in the cold, rain and snow to accomplish this needed project. The stretcher can be rolled smoothly to the helicopter making it safer for the the patient and medical personnel making it more comfortable for the patient and safer for everyone. Job well done.” JF – AF
20191026HelispotSidewalk2-a

-Fire Chief Jeff
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Call for reservations. Open until the end of hunting season.
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

Our fall hours are open by request for the winter. Please call 208-633-3325, 970-379-5155 or email at matt@ypcorner.com
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall hours open 8am to close
Full breakfast served starting at 8am with special arrangement for earlier breakfast as needed. 92 Octane non ethanol gas available, cubed ice, beer, pop and water sold by the 6 and 12 pack, snacks, ice cream and many supplies available. Burgers and Pizza, Beer and Wine on the evening menu. Football and other sports available on our TV. Wi Fi, Verizon phone service and information available.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
FB page:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 21) overnight low of 31 degrees, overcast sky this morning, patchy old snow in the open, about an inch or more remains in the shade. Clark’s nutcracker, nuthatches, a lone pine siskin, jays and lots of juncos visiting this morning. Old snow melting and dripping off the roof at lunch time. Pine squirrels visiting. A little warmer and overcast mid-afternoon, high of 44 degrees. Starling and a robin showed up late afternoon. Misting a little before sundown, steady light rain after dark. More rain before sunrise.

Tuesday (Oct 22) probably stayed above freezing overnight, 37F at 930am, overcast and raining lightly. Jays, juncos, nuthatches and nutcrackers visiting. Ray Arnold driving mail truck today. Rain tapered off and ended a little after lunch time. Breaks in the clouds, warmer and light breeze mid-afternoon, high of 57 degrees. Water shut off this afternoon while plumbers repair leaks in the main water line (Rocky Mountain Mechanical out of Emmett.) Broken cloud cover at sunset. A few stars out before midnight, more stars out after midnight.

Wednesday (Oct 23) overnight low of 26 degrees, partly cloudy sky this morning and frosty. Red-breasted nuthatches and several jays visiting, chipmunks still running about. Heavy truck traffic on the back Stibnite road. Water pressure extra high on this end of the village. More clouds and gusty breezes just before 1pm. Chilly breezes and smaller clouds mid-afternoon, high of 50 degrees. Mostly clear and light chilly breeze at sunset.

Thursday (Oct 24) overnight low of 21 degrees, light frost and mostly cloudy sky this morning. White and red-breasted nuthatches, nutcracker, jays and hairy woodpecker visiting. Less clouds by lunch time. Clear mid-afternoon and mild, high of 54 degrees. Very light traffic. High water pressure at the bottom of the water system. Clear at sunset, golden glow at dusk. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Friday (Oct 25) overnight low of 26 degrees, clear sky and frosty this morning. Jays, nutcracker, hairy woodpecker and nuthatches visiting before sunrise. Diamond Fuel (and Feed) made their last fall delivery to top off tanks. Sunny and mild mid-day. Very light traffic for a Friday. Mostly cloudy (high wispies), warm and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 67 degrees. Sun went down before 630pm. Mostly clear at dusk. Cloudy before midnight. Light skiff of snow fell before sunrise.

Saturday (Oct 26) tiny skiff of snow on the ground this morning, overnight low probably right at freezing (low of 26 from Fri morning) partly clear sky. Nutcrackers, nuthatches, jays, hairy woodpecker and a goldfinch in winter plumage visiting. Mostly cloudy and occasional flake of snow right after sunrise. Sounds of heavy equipment and back-up beepers. A few flakes of snow swirling around for a short time at noon. Pine siskins and goldfinches visited with the other birds this afternoon. Snow flurries, low clouds and gusty breezes on and off in the afternoon, high of 41 degrees, then temperature dropping below freezing. Partly cloudy at dusk and cold breezes. Blustery after midnight and partly clear.

Sunday (Oct 27) overnight low of 22 degrees, clear sky, breezy and frosty this morning. Several goldfinches in winter plumage along with the jays, nutcracker, nuthatches and starlings visiting. Sunny, breezy and cool at lunch time. Clear, breezy and cool mid-afternoon, high of 36 degrees. Rosy haze to the west at dusk, below freezing, clear and lighter breezes.
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RIP:

Karen Westfall

1-19-1956 to 10-21-2019

Karen Westfall passed away peacefully at home on Monday October 21, 2019.

Karen, beloved wife of Dan, was the grand daughter of Yellow Pine pioneers Faye and Iva Kissinger.

Karen Louise Westfall, 63, of Middleton, died Monday, October 21, 2019. Funeral Home: All Valley Cremation

Published in Idaho Press Tribune on Oct. 22, 2019
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Letter to Share:

Levy would provide sustainable revenue for Valley County roads

As a former Valley County road superintendent and commissioner, I have witnessed the reduction in revenue for our county road maintenance.

Historically the needed revenue has come from timber harvest dollars from national forests and fuel taxes for over 100 years. I personally made many trips to Washington D.C. to advocate for the Secure Rural Schools dollars to assist in funding the lost timber dollars, however each year Congress reduced the amount counties received.

Today, Valley County, when the funding is approved, there is not enough to provide basic services when added to the fuel tax revenue. With the reduction of timber harvest dollars the revenue is not sufficient to maintain the roads let alone the allow equipment upgrades, paying decent wages and purchasing needed materials.

On Nov. 5, the voters in Valley County will be asked if they want the county roads maintained sufficiently or allowed to continue to degrade. The maximum cost to the property owner will be $84 per $100,000 of the property market value to provide sustainable revenue so Valley County can provide the needed service to maintain the county roads.

In the event the road levy does not pass then snow removal will be limited to less than we have seen in the past, no major road projects would happen on a consistent basis, paved roads may have to return to gravel and staffing will be smaller than it is today. Additionally if the roads are not maintained to a graded and drained, standard the fuel tax dollars may be lost as they must be in a good condition to qualify per state standards.

Some question why Valley County maintains the roads into the national forest, and I would like to point out the funding collected from adding these miles to the fuel tax formula is what is used to fund this maintenance along with partnerships with the Forest Service and Nez Perce Tribe. If we don’t maintain these access routes. then there will be limited to no maintenance and Valley County loses $500,000 in revenue.

No one likes to have higher taxes, however I don’t believe anyone wants to pay higher costs for their own maintenance let alone higher cost of repairs on their vehicles due to rough roads.

We need to remember the Valley County commissioners do not have to impose the full levy if they determine not all the funding is needed to fund the road department.

So the decision, by state statue, is for the voters to decide whether to have decent county road maintenance or lose it all, which will place the burden on individuals or home owner associations to provide their own maintenance.

Gordon Cruickshank, McCall

source: The Star-News
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Idaho News:

Levy vote will set future of Valley County roads

(Note: This is the first of a two-part review of the proposed Valley County road levy that will be on the Nov. 5 ballot. Part 2 will appear next week.)

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 24, 2019

Jeff McFadden scanned Spring Valley Road west of Donnelly, obviously deteriorated with crumbling edges, patches and potholes.

“This road is my nemesis,” said McFadden, who is Valley County road superintendent, noting the thousands of dollars that have been spent patching the road.

Spring Valley Road is one of several roads that could fall into greater disrepair if voters fail to pass a new, permanent property tax levy on Nov. 5.

“Some of these roads have more patch material on them than original asphalt,” McFadden said.

As it stands now, Valley County has no funds to properly maintain the road system. If the tax doesn’t pass, Spring Valley Road may end up being converted to a gravel road after all, along with several others.

Without the levy, Valley County will also have to eliminate up to half of its general road maintenance, bridge maintenance, culvert maintenance, backcountry road maintenance, and staff,” according to voter information put out by the county.

Historically, the road and bridge department received about $3 million per year from receipts from timber harvested on federal land within the county.

In 2000, the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act was passed by Congress to provide direct federal funding to counties and schools located near national forests.

Currently, no local tax dollars fund the road department. The remainder of the budget is from highway user funds.

The department received only about $75,000 in SRS funds in 2017, and about $1 million in 2018 and this year. However, the act has not been reauthorized for 2020.

Without the property-tax levy, county commissioners warn the road department’s annual budget will drop to around $2 million and lead to significant reductions in the services it provides.

Passing the levy, on the other hand, would boost the department’s annual budget to about $6 million.

The county is about 20 years and $50 million behind on road work due to years of funding shortage, McFadden said.

“Gravel roads are a problem right now because we do not have the funds to crush gravel for resurfacing,” he said.

Routine maintenance is barely keeping up in the summer months, and vital county equipment needs to be replaced.

“We have four water trucks and we could barely keep two of them running this summer because of the age and fatigue that these trucks take,” McFadden said.

Various other county vehicles need to be replaced, with several dump trucks now too rusted to haul anything heavier than snow safely, he said.

“A road network of our size should actually require $18 million annually,” Valley County Commissioner Dave Bingaman said.

“If the levy doesn’t pass, we’ll be forced to take what they’d call in the medical world a triage approach, where we try to help the most catastrophically hurt, write off the those who cannot be saved, and then work forward to help those with minor injuries,” Bingaman said.

That approach could include the halting of maintenance of roads that provide access to the backcountry, McFadden said.

Those roads could include Gold Fork Road, Lick Creek Road, High Valley Road and roads to Deadwood Reservoir and Yellow Pine, he said,

Snowplowing services would also see an unprecedented reduction without levy funding.

“If our road department’s budget gets cut in half, we may be forced to discontinue up to half of the snowplowing services Valley County provides,” Commissioner Elt Hasbrouck said.

“Priority would be given to main connectors like bus routes, emergency services, and main roads, but we may not have the staff and equipment to service some residential roads,” Hasbrouck said.

Snow removal may fall to individual homeowners or homeowners associations, he said.

The Nov. 5 levy would tax property at $84 for every $100,000 of assessed value, generating about $4 million in annual revenue for the department.

“A homeowner whose property in Valley County is worth $300,000 is going to pay around $250 more per year to help maintain a consistent, reliable road network,” Valley County Clerk Doug Miller.

“If a subdivision has to take on snowplowing because the county has to cut services, $250 extra per year in property taxes is relatively inexpensive,” Miller said.

“Taking this on independently, the homeowners would likely be looking at double, triple, or maybe even four or five times that amount depending on the amount of roadway needing to be cleared,” he said

Valley County maintains 245 miles of paved road and 486 miles of gravel road, with snow removal carried out on 407 total miles of road. There are 76 bridges that the county maintains and 3,443 culverts.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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See what’s on your ballot for the November 2019 election

Tyson Miller October 23, 2019 KTVB

VALLEY COUNTY

Cascade
Mayor
Judith Nissula
City Council (Vote for two)
Ronald Brown
Rachel Huckaby
City Council (Vote for one)
William McFarlane
Denise Tangen
Cascade City Ordinance Proposal
Local Option Tax
1% tax on all sales, with exceptions
Ballot Question:

Shall the City of Cascade adopt proposed Ordinance No. 700?

Ordinance No. 700 provides for the imposition, implementation, and collection of non-property taxes (commonly referred to as a local option tax) for a period of two (2) years from its effective date. If approved, the tax will be assessed at the rate of one percent (1%) on all sales subject to taxation (sales tax) under Chapter 36 of Title 63, Idaho Code.

Single item purchase of $1,000 or more is exempt.

The Local Option Tax revenue will be used for the following purposes:

a) Streets, sidewalks, pedestrian crosswalks, pathways, and other public rights-of-way

b) Public parks maintenance, development, and beautification

Donnelly
Mayor
Susan Dorris
City Council (Vote for two)
Leslie D. Minshall
Chelsea Bergquist

McCall
City Council (Vote for two)
Michael Maciaszek
Colby Nielsen
Jordan Ockunzzi

Valley County Road Department
Funding Request
Permanent Override Tax Levy
Ballot Question:

Shall the Valley County Board of Commissioners be authorized and empowered to increase its budget for a permanent override tax levy at a rate of 0.084% multiplied by the current market value for assessment purposes of property in 2019 pursuant to Idaho Code 63-802(h) for the purpose of defraying road department personnel costs, conducting road maintenance, and for new road construction on all taxable property within the district beginning with the fiscal year commencing on October 1, 2021?

excerpted from:
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Winter storm Saturday causes slide-off, power outages

The Star-News Oct 24, 2019

Stormy winter conditions on Saturday resulted in numerous cars sliding off the road and a brief closure on Idaho 55, the Valley County Sheriff’s Office reported.

There were no injuries from accidents during the storm, and the only closure on the highway, between Smiths Ferry Drive and Round Valley Road last about 15 minutes, the sheriff’s office said.

Snow weighing down branches and rubbing against power lines in McCall caused outages on Reedy Lane and Warren Wagon Road, according to McCall Fire and EMS.

One car slid off the road and another crashed into a pole in McCall due to the snow, although neither accident resulted in injuries, McCall Police Chief Justin Williams said.

Landmark east of Cascade received one to two feet of snow, according to the Yellow Pine Times online news service.

“There is probably at least that much at Profile Gap and Lick Creek summits – and even more on Monumental and Elk summits,” The Yellow Pine Times reported.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Barricades come down on Warren Wagon Road

Two-year $9.9M project nears completion

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Oct 24, 2019

There will be no more road closures stemming from a two-year, $9.9 million reconstruction of Warren Wagon Road that is expected to be complete by Nov. 1.

The barricades came down on Wednesday after about five consecutive months of daily closures Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Crews are now working to install new road signs and raise old manholes to the level of the roadway, said Cody Brown, a spokesperson for M.A. DeAtley Construction of Clarkston, Washington, the general contractor for the federally-funded project.

Flaggers are still posted along the road as crews complete that work, but any delays would be 15 minutes at most, Brown said.

Work in the 5.5-mile project zone, which begins 2.2 miles north of Idaho 55 and extends to Eastside Drive, started in July 2018.

continued:
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Valley courthouse to limit access to one door

New security measure to start Nov. 4

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 24, 2019

Public access to the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade will be limited to only the south door on Main Street starting on Monday, Nov. 4.

A security guard will be posted at the entrance and there are plans to install a metal detector, Valley County Clerk Doug Miller said.

The change in access to the building is being made to increase security for the public and the county’s employees, Miller said.

The public will be required to use the south entrance exclusively, with doors in the north end of the building reserved as emergency exits only.

continued:
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Idaho lawmakers considering property tax changes

Oct 21, 2019 By Associated Press

Boise, Idaho AP – Lawmakers are examining property tax options amid complaints that taxes are going up with rising property values, while also hearing concerns from cities and counties that they’re operating on tight budgets.

The Property Tax Working Group took no action Monday following a day of presentations that also included university and state financial experts.

Ultimately, the group aims to make recommendations and perhaps offer legislation to the full Legislature in January.

continued:
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Over 6,000 pounds of frozen meat sold at Walmart recalled

Recall due to possible salmonella contamination

By Scottie Andrew, CNN Oct 21, 2019 Local News 8

More than 6,400 pounds of a Walmart brand’s frozen meat have been recalled for possible salmonella contamination.

George’s Prepared Foods, the company that produces Walmart’s Great Value frozen, fully cooked meat, said that the products were meant to be disposed of after a small group of them tested positive for salmonella but were accidentally shipped nationwide.

continued:
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Mining News:

Midas Gold estimates $6 billion in precious metals lay under Stibnite

(Note: This is the first part in a series detailing Midas Gold Idaho’s operating plan for its proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine. Next week: Digging and Hauling)

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Oct 24, 2019

Beginning at the surface of the Stibnite Mining District and extending down more than 1,000 feet lies an estimated $6 billion in gold, silver and antimony, according to estimates by Midas Gold.

About 4.5 million ounces of gold, 1.5 million ounces of silver and 68 million pounds of antimony would be harvested from three open pit mines proposed by the company.

The bulk of the project’s value stems from gold, which is currently priced at about $1,500 per ounce and would generate nearly $6.2 billion for Midas Gold.

However, Midas Gold would need to spend at least around $1.1 billion in infrastructure and equipment and about $2.7 billion in operating costs to recover the precious metals, according to company figures.

Since 2009, Midas Gold has spent about $182 million studying mineral deposits at Stibnite, conducting environmental studies and collecting data to confirm that the project is economically viable, said Mckinsey Lyon, vice president of external affairs for Midas Gold.

Within the 521-acre footprint of its three proposed open pit mines lie 390 boreholes from 10 years of Midas Gold drilling into the ground to extract cylindrical samples of the Earth from as far as 1,602 feet below the surface.

Historic exploration data from previous mining companies have also been incorporated into Midas Gold’s data, enabling the company to study more than 100,000 samples from the project site, Lyon said.

Studies have shown that gold is scattered relatively evenly throughout the first 1,000 feet of ground in tiny granular particles embedded among solid rock, she said.

High-grade deposits of gold have been taken by previous mining operations across the last century, leaving behind the scattered gold that was too risky or too costly to mine.

The capacity of modern haul trucks, gold processing mills and other equipment have increased greatly to allow the processing of more rock at lower costs, Lyon said.

“It’s all economies of scale,” she said. “Back in the 1950s, trucks had a 10 to 20 ton capacity. By the 1980s, they were 40 to 50 ton trucks. Now trucks carry 150 to 300 tons.”

Most of the gold particles lie within the Yellow Pine and West End pits, two of three open pit mines proposed by the company.

The Yellow Pine pit and West End pits have been previously mined. The Yellow Pine pit is probably best known because of the large lake that has filled it and is visible from Stibnite Road.

The Yellow Pine pit contains the highest grade ore and would produce about two grams of gold for each ton of rock excavated, or an ounce of gold per 17 tons of rock, according to Midas Gold.

“To put this in perspective, this would be the fourth-highest grade open pit deposit in the United States,” Lyon said.

Antimony also would come from the Yellow Pine pit and a new pit called Hangar Flats.

Another 10,000 pounds of antimony is expected to come from historic tailings that Midas Gold plans to reprocess as part of the Stibnite Gold Project.

Antimony is used in fire retardants for electronics and is considered a “critical” mineral by the United States government, but generally is not profitable enough to mine on its own.

“In this case, the presence of gold makes getting to the antimony feasible,” Lyon said.

The 68 million pounds of antimony at Stibnite would generate about $169 million for Midas Gold, or about 3% of the project’s estimated $6 billion in precious metals.

More than half of the project’s estimated silver reserves are within the Yellow Pine pit, which is currently a lake.

At current prices, Midas Gold would generate nearly $26 million from the estimated 1.5 million ounces of silver to be mined. Silver is mostly used for jewelry, electronics and batteries.

Harvesting all of the company’s estimated mineral reserves within the projected 12-year to 15-year life of the mine would require Midas Gold to process between 20,000 and 25,000 tons of ore per day.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
—————————

Public Lands:

Cascade Ranger District Pile burning

Oct 21, 2019

The Cascade Ranger District on the Boise National Forest is planning to complete some of our pile burning tomorrow the 22nd of October, we hope to burn the debris pile at Crawford Work Center and the debris pile at the Yellow Pine transfer site. If you have any questions or concerns feel free to contact me, Tim Dulhanty at 208-382-7445.

Tim Dulhanty
Fuels Technician
Boise National Forest, Cascade Ranger District
— — — — — — — — — —

Logging starts on dying trees hit by moth outbreak in Idaho forests

by Ryan L Morrison Tuesday, October 22nd 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Logging has started on the dead and dying trees hit by the tussock moth outbreak in Idaho forests.

The Idaho Department of Lands sold nearly 2,000 acres of dead and dying timber as part of two salvage sales.

The tree harvest reduces fire risk, addresses safety concerns to the recreating public, and clears the way to plant trees that are less preferred by tussock moth.

The salvage sales also generate money to help fund public schools in Idaho and other beneficiaries to endowment lands.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Decision Signed for Ola Summit Project

Forest Supervisor Cecilia Seesholtz has signed the decision for the Ola Summit Project located on the Emmett Ranger District of the Boise National Forest. A copy of the Decision Memo can be found on the Ola Summit project webpage (see the Decision tab). Thank you for your interest in this project. If you have any questions, please direct them to Katie Wood, Emmett District Ranger, at 208-365-7000.

Sincerely, Tera Little, Forest Planner
— — — — — — — — — —

Decision Signed for Tripod Project

Oct 25, 2019

Forest Supervisor Cecilia Seesholtz has signed the decision for the Tripod Project located on the Emmett Ranger District of the Boise National Forest. A copy of the Decision Memo can be found on the Tripod project webpage (see the Decision tab). Thank you for your interest in this project. If you have any questions, please direct them to Katie Wood, Emmett District Ranger, at 208-365-7000.

Sincerely, Tera Little, Forest Planner
— — — — — — — — — —

Study finds US public land workers facing assaults, threats

By Matthew Brown – 10/21/19 AP

Federal employees overseeing U.S. public lands were assaulted or threatened at least 360 times over a five-year period marked by heightened tensions with anti-government groups and dwindling ranks of law enforcement officers, a congressional watchdog agency said Monday.

The Government Accountability Office in a new report highlights anti-government tensions that at times have boiled over, including a six-week armed occupation of a federal wildlife refuge in Oregon in 2016 and other standoffs with armed protesters in Montana and Nevada.

The clashes have been rooted in a deep distrust of government on the part of the protesters, who view the federal bureaucracy as unlawfully impeding people from using public land for grazing, mining and other economic purposes.

continued:
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Letter to Share:

Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.

Oct 22, 2019

Happy Fall From Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.

Things are winding down here on the farm. Fawns are all released and we are now in the “clean up and fundraising stage”… Please click on the link in the information below and Vote to Nominate Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.! If we make the nomination cut, there will then be the final vote in November.

Also, Mystic Farm will once again be a part of the Ponderay Arts and Crafts Festival on November 23rd. I’ve been busy making the wonderful, handmade, Mystic Farm candles, creating “antler art”, and so many other goodies to have available at the event.

Remember, Mystic Farm operates 100% on donations and volunteers. We depend on you for support (like voting in the Findlay Post Falls Charity below) and purchasing goodies. Thanks…and the fawns thank you!

Mystic Farm Needs Your Help! Please go to this link:
Scroll down to the “Nominate” section and VOTE for Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc. to be nominated to be in the running for the November Charity of the Month! DO IT NOW! We are getting in way late, so only a few days left in this month to be nominated for NEXT month. If we are one of the top three (we can do this!) we are entered into the November running to win $2000! Please Share… We Can Do This! Do it for the fawns.
-Dory
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Critter News:

PNF Seeking Winter Boarding for Pack Stock

The Payette National Forest is looking for a location to contract a stock boarding facility or pasture for the Forest Service pack stock during the winter months and shoulder seasons on either side of the field season. The time period would be annually from approximately late October to early May, starting in 2020.

The preferred location would be lower elevation, experience mild winters, and be within 100 miles of McCall. The facility shall make available adequate feed and provide for the safety, security, and health and well-being for the pack stock. The pack stock herd consists of 18 mules and horses. The Forest Service would prefer to enter into a 5 year contract with the option of renewal.

Please contact the Krassel Ranger District at 208-634-0600 with interest or for more information.

(via Facebook Oct 22, 2019)
— — — — — — — — — —

Fish and Game confiscates captured bear cub

Managers assessing next move

Oct 21, 2019 By Steve Liebenthal KIVI TV

Boise, Idaho — A Boise man who thought he was rescuing a dying bear cub from the wild says he was blind-sided when Fish and Game officers confiscated it.

Charles Erickson says he found the bear during a hunting trip.

He says the cub appeared to be sick and dying, so he captured it and brought it to his home in Boise where he and his family kept it warm and bottle fed it.

Erickson says he contacted two bear rehabilitation centers hoping they could nurse the bear back to health, but before he was able to make that happen, Fish and Game officers contacted him and took the bear.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

A Day In The Sun

Oct 25, 2019 IME


Courtesy photo by Nicholas Coletti

A cow and calf moose take a drink in a Wood River Valley wetlands on Sunday. People and animals alike enjoyed a sunny, blue-skies day after a snowstorm passed through the region on Saturday.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Challis wild horse “gather’ to start November 5

Oct 25, 2019 Local News 8

Challis, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) plans a helicopter-assisted method to gather 365 wild horses from the Challis Herd Management Area beginning Nov. 5. It’s expected to last 5 to 9 days.

The “gather” is aimed at reducing the overpopulation of wild horses by approximately 244 horses. Any mares released back to the range will be treated with fertility control. Once complete, approximately 185 wild horses will remain in the management area.

BLM managers says the herd size reduction will balance it to what the 168,700 acre area can support. The reduction will protect habitat for wildlife species like sage grouse, pronghorn antelope, mule deer and elk. BLM says its objective is between 185 to 253 horses. Right now there are about 429 horses in and directly outside the management area.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

F&G finalizes agreements to allow public access on corporate timberlands in North Idaho

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, October 23, 2019

Corporate timberland agreements are part of F&G’s programs that provides millions of acres for public access

With final agreements now signed, hunters, anglers, trappers and other recreationists have access to 336,630 more acres of private timberland through an agreement between the landowners and Fish and Game.

You can see locations of the parcels on Fish and Game’s Map Center.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Two mule deer bucks left to waste south of Idaho Falls

By James Brower, Regional Communications Manager
Monday, October 21, 2019

F&G seeks information from the public in deer case

Fish and Game is investigating two mule deer bucks that were wasted and dumped south of Idaho Falls. They were discovered on Thursday Oct. 17 south of the Sand Creek Golf Course on Henry Creek Road.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Mule deer doe & fawn wasted near North Tom Beall Road near Lapwai

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Communications Manager
Tuesday, October 22, 2019

On Thursday October 17, 2019 a mule deer doe and fawn were found wasted near North Tom Beall Road east of Lapwai, ID. Investigation by Idaho Fish and Game conservation officers showed both deer had been shot and no meat taken from either animal. It is believed that both deer were killed at separate locations and dumped where they were discovered.

Anyone with any information about this incident is encouraged to call IDFG Sr. Conservation Officer Tony Imthurn at (208) 716-8099 or call the Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) hotline 1-800-632-5999. Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Only antlers and ivories taken from bull elk shot and wasted near McKown Road north of Potlatch

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Communications Manager
Tuesday, October 22, 2019

On Thursday October 17, a bull elk was found wasted in a wheat field near McKown Road north of Potlatch, ID. The elk had been shot one time with only the antlers and ivories removed from the animal. All of the meat was left to waste from the elk. It is believed the elk was killed sometime between Sunday October 13, 2019 and Wednesday October 16.

“Someone has information regarding who killed this elk and we would be very interested in talking to them and solving this case” says Moscow Sr. Conservation Officer Tony Imthurn.

Anyone with any information about this incident is encouraged to call IDFG Sr. Conservation Officer Tony Imthurn at (208) 716-8099 or call the Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) hotline 1-800-632-5999. Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Tiny tags and antennas help track juvenile Chinook in Lemhi and Salmon rivers

By Brent Beller, Fisheries Technician
Friday, October 25, 2019

Tracking the lives of thousands of tiny salmon is no easy task. But knowing where they prefer to live and how far they move and survive is invaluable for fish managers


Radio tag (at bottom) compared to passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Rare yellow cardinal spotted in Florida

Expert says it’s ‘one in a million’ sighting

By Elizabeth Wolfe and Saeed Ahmed, CNN Oct 16, 2019 Local News 8

An extremely rare yellow northern cardinal was spotted in Port St. Lucie, Florida, exciting bird enthusiasts and drawing in anyone who can appreciate a good bird photo.

While there is no precise number for how many yellow cardinals are spotted a year, Geoff Hill, a professor and a self-described “curator of birds” at Auburn University, estimates the chances of seeing a yellow cardinal are “one in a million.”

continued:
——————————

Tips & Advice:

Remember to clear your devices before disposing them

Personal information may be stored on printers

Oct 21, 2019 KIVI TV

Boise, Idaho — Sending and receiving information digitally is the norm in society today, but forgetting to clear your personal information from devices before disposing them could leave you susceptible to hackers.

Better Business Bureau reports printers are commonly forgotten about when it comes to clearing personal information. Printer hard drives can store some of the most sensitive data, including birth certificates, income tax forms, and bank statements. Keeping that information secure is essential.

Personal home printers generally have smaller storage space, but it’s important to wipe it clean before selling or getting rid of it. Make sure to check for any external storage like SD card readers. You can also unplug your printer for 60 seconds or more to purge temporary memory. Long-term memory is typically erased after more jobs are completed. You should also check your printer manual on steps to perform a factory reset.

continued:
———————-

Winter Trivia:

Winter Precipitation Types

Snow is small white ice crystals formed when supercooled cloud droplets freeze. Snow crystals can have different shapes usually dictated by the temperature at which they form.

Snow pellets, also called graupel, are white, opaque ice particles round or conical in shape. They form when supercooled water collects on ice crystals or snowflakes. They typically bounce when they fall on a hard surface and often break apart.

Snow grains are very small, white opaque particles of ice, more flattened and elongated than snow pellets. Snow grains can be thought of as the solid equivalent of drizzle, or as I like to call it, “snizzle”.

Ice pellets, or sleet, are small balls of ice. They form from the freezing of raindrops or the refreezing of melting snowflakes when falling through a below-freezing layer of air near the earth’s surface.

Freezing rain occurs when rain occurs and the surface temperatures is below freezing. The raindrops become supercooled as they fall through the layer of cold air near the surface and freeze upon impact with surfaces below freezing.

source: CoCoRaHS
———————-

Seasonal Humor:

FallingRockSign-a

FallWeather-a
————————

Oct 20, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 20, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: A report there was over a foot of snow on the road above 6500 feet Sunday afternoon, see road reports for photo.
The boil order and water restrictions are still in effect.

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire/SAR Training
May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season
Oct 31 – Halloween
Nov 1 – 3-day a week mail service begins
Nov 2 – 8pm Halloween-End Of Hunting Season Party
Nov 3 – 2am Daylight saving time ends
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Halloween Party Nov 2nd

Halloween-End Of Hunting Season Party at the Yellow Pine Tavern Nov 2nd, 8pm.

Chili Dogs Provided by the Tavern bring snacks if you wish. Costume Contest or come as you are.
———-

Village News:

Snow in the High Country Oct 20th

P1000538-20191020VanMeterSnow
(Low clouds hiding the top of Van Meter Hill this morning 10-20-2019)

It snowed pretty good Saturday night here in Yellow Pine, measured 2″ of snow on the board this morning. About half of it melted by late this afternoon.

Heads up to Travelers and Hunters: Received a report this afternoon of 1 to 2 Feet of snow on the road above 6500 feet at Landmark. There is probably at least that much at Profile Gap and Lick Creek summits – and even more on Monumental and Elk summits.


(photo and report courtesy Scott A)
Report Sunday afternoon (Oct 20) of 14″ to 2 feet of snow at Landmark.
— — — —

Boil Water Order Still in Effect

Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
— — — —

Fuel Delivered Oct 15

After a delay due to last week’s snow storm, Diamond Fuel (and Feed) came up to deliver fuel to Yellow Pine on Tuesday, Oct 15th. They will return next week with another load.
— — — —

Get Ready for Winter Heating

* Inspect and clean the chimney. Contact the YPFD to borrow chimney brushes.
* Inspect and clean wood stoves, make sure dampers work properly and check for leaks.
* Check your carbon monoxide and smoke detectors – install fresh batteries.
* Check your fire extinguisher and make sure it is handy. Manually rotate them around, tip upside down and lightly shake them, thus keeping the fire fighting agent loose, and check that the needle is still in the green. If you need a new one please call, your fire commissioner or Jeff F.
* If you have an oil-powered furnace, replace your filter and nozzle and check the tank level.
* Check your propane tank levels (early morning when it is cool in case there is a wasp nest!) Check to make sure snow falling from the roof cannot impact your pipes!
* Test the igniter switch. On an old system, you might have to relight the pilot. Newer systems have electronic igniters.
* Lubricate and clean the blower motor. First check the owner’s manual to see if your motor is the kind that needs lubricating. If it does, turn off the power, open the cover and clean the caps covering the bearings. Then remove the caps and lubricate the bearings.
* Inspect the blower belt for cracks. Turn off the power to the furnace at the main circuit breaker. Use a screwdriver to remove the steel cover of the air handler. The blower belt is the largest rubber belt that you see. Replace the belt if it is cracked.
* Inspect the exhaust flue outdoors to ensure it is free of obstructions such as branches or animal nests.
* Keep the area around your furnace unit free of debris and clutter.
* Change the air filters. Clean your air vents and ducts. Remove the vent covers with a screwdriver. Use the extension hose of your vacuum to remove the dust.
* Open all your air vents. Remove furniture, boxes and clutter that get in the way of air flowing from the vents.

Local Fuel Suppliers
Propane
Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Heating fuel
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
Furnace Service
Rocky Mountain Mechanical (208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery will start Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
— — — —

Reminder for people living in bear country:

* Garbage should be stored inside the house or in a secure garage or storage building.
* If garbage cannot be stored in a secure location, a bear-resistant container approved by the Interagency Bear Committee is recommended.
* Avoid using bird feeders from March through November. Birds do not need supplemental feeding this time of year.
* Pet food should not be left outside.
* BBQ grills or anything with a strong odor should not be left out at night.
* Protect gardens, beehives, and compost piles with electric fencing.
* Never intentionally feed bears. A food-conditioned bear may pose a threat to human safety and usually results in the removal of the bear.
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the community hall. (No minutes yet)

Water Update Oct 15th:

A major leak was found and a temporary fix was made until parts can be obtained. Once parts and people are available, that will be fixed. Fixing that leak doesn’t mean we will be off the boil order. The boil order was issued by the DEQ. They will not lift that order until the chlorine contact time meets the standard.
– Steve Holloway

Water Update (posted to FB Oct 4th 930pm)

Today (10/4) YPWUA worked on the section of pipe that had a number of leaks. Unfortunately we were unable to complete the repairs due to having a couple of incorrect parts. We will order the parts as soon as possible and complete the repairs. We had to do some creative Engineering today but cut 10 leaks to 2 small ones. Thank you to Jeff Forster and Dayle Bennett for working in the muck and water for two days without complaint, to Cecil Dallman for excellent excavation work, to Dave McClintock for parts and advice, to Layne Bennett, Ginny Bartholomew and Ann Forster for their support. Thanks to the community for your patience.
– Willie Sullivan

Water Update (posted to FB Oct 3rd 9pm):

YPWUA found the leaks today (above the orchard) and will be repairing them tomorrow. The water will be off from 10am till repairs and testing completed.

– Willie Sullivan

Water Update Sept 21 (excerpted from VYPA 9/21 meeting notes):

Tests were conducted by Idaho Rural Water [July 19th] in an effort to locate the source of the major leak in the system. They will return October 3rd to continue the search for leaks. The line between Alpine Village and the Saleen property, which includes the bridge across the East Fork river is the line most suspected to be leaking. Cecil Dallman will stand by with a backhoe to dig in locations found. More digging work is needed at the tanks and pipes near the water facility. A second engineer is being consulted. Getting contractors to come to YP and replace seals is difficult. The previous grant money is tied to a timeline so some specified work must be done this fall.

The possibility for a large amount of grant money is very slim because we would have to take out a loan and use the borrowed money for the required matching money, and then there would be the loan payments. Money on hand must be used on required repairs to the contact tank. Because some water users do not have voting rights YPWUA does not qualify for some grants.

There are 56 shares available for purchase at $100/share. Each piece of land is entitled to own one share. Share holders are entitled to vote; water users that do not own a share may not vote, but do have access to water. The owners of the 56 lots are encouraged to purchase shares. Ownership of a share is shown on your annual water bill.

Anyone wanting to arrange a payment plan should contact Willie Sullivan.

– Steve Holloway/Willie Sullivan

Water Update Sept 8:

Still looking for the leak. Water restrictions and boil order still in effect.

Water Update June 7:

1. The “boil order” is still in effect.
2. There is still large water leaks in the system. We continue to look.
3. A grant for $39,000 was approved for improvements to the system.
3. Work is currently being done on the new contact tank.
4. Please, no lawn watering until we find and repair the major leaks.
– Steve Holloway

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update
— — — —

VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link to: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for August 10, 2019
link to: 20190810 VYPA Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for July 20, 2019
link to: 20190720 Yellow Pine Village Association Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for June 8, 2019
link to: 20190608 Village of Yellow Pine Association
— — — —

YPFD News:

District 1 Fire Commissioner

Per the Postings on the opening for Yellow Pine District 1 Fire Commissioner, Sue Holloway came forward to volunteer her time to represent YP Fire District 1. The Fire Commissioners have unanimously agreed to accept Sue as a Fire Commissioner representing the residents of District One, (The center of Yellow Pine Ave. West). This position will run for 4 years.

We look forward to having Sue as a Fire Commissioner. Sue brings a community commitment not only as a resident but also as a business owner. Thank You Sue for stepping up for the challenge.

YP Fire Commissioners.
Sue Holloway District 1
Dan Stiff, District 2
Merrill Saleen, District 3

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Meeting minutes for Sept 14, 2019
link to: 2019-09-14 YPFD Meeting_final

Meeting minutes for July 13, 2019
link to: 20190713 YPFD Meeting Notes_final

Meeting minutes for June 16, 2019
link to: 20190615 YPFD Meeting Notes_Final

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Training: Sunday Fire/EMS training at 11am unless otherwise posted. All are welcome.

YP Helispot: We are working with Valley County Road Department and the Boise National Forest for the rock base for the road leading into the Helispot and the actual Helispot itself. We are also receiving rock for the Fire Hydrants, water tank foundations, etc. The rock will come from the Valdez pit and will be less expensive than having it trucked in from Cascade.

link to Cooking safety in the home:

link to Smoke Alarm Info:

-JF
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Call for reservations. Open until the end of hunting season.
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Our fall hours are open by request for the winter. Please call 208-633-3325, 970-379-5155 or email at matt@ypcorner.com
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall hours open 8am to close
Full breakfast served starting at 8am with special arrangement for earlier breakfast as needed. 92 Octane non ethanol gas available, cubed ice, beer, pop and water sold by the 6 and 12 pack, snacks, ice cream and many supplies available. Burgers and Pizza, Beer and Wine on the evening menu. Football and other sports available on our TV. Wi Fi, Verizon phone service and information available.
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
FB page:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 14) overnight low of 26 degrees, a few small clouds and some haze before sunrise. Evening grosbeaks and pine siskins are still around, resident jays, hairy woodpecker, white and red-breasted nuthatches along with our winter visitors dark-eyed juncos and clark’s nutcrackers. Almost clear sky mid-day and mild breezes. Partly hazy to the southwest mid-afternoon and mild breezes, high of 62 degrees. Quiet enough at times to hear the river. Partly cloudy (high and thin) at sunset and nearly calm. Gun shot out in the forest at 726pm (dark.) Bright moon before midnight with a rainbow halo around it.

Tuesday (Oct 15) overnight low of 25 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning. White and red-breasted nuthatches, clarks nutcracker, hairy woodpecker, pine siskins, jays and juncos visiting. An eastern blue jay showed up! Diamond fuel truck arrived before noon, ran out and will have to come back. Sunny and mild mid-day. Cowbirds showed up, eastern blue jay departed. Increasing high thin clouds. Partly clear and warm mid-afternoon, light breezes, high of 70 degrees. Nearly overcast by late afternoon. Fuzzy moon rise (hazy sky). Partly clear after midnight.

Wednesday (Oct 16) overnight low around 29 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning. Clark’s nutcracker, hairy woodpecker, nuthatches, juncos and jays visiting. Also several chipmunks and a pine squirrel. Sunny and warm mid-day, a few clouds. Warm, mostly cloudy and quite breezy mid-afternoon, high of 71 degrees. At dusk it was still a little breezy and flat looking sky. Thin hazy clouds before midnight, fuzzy moon.

Thursday (Oct 17) it was 49 degrees this morning before sunrise, no frost, dark clouds covering the sky and gusty breezes. An evening grosbeak, a hairy woodpecker and a pine siskin visited along with the usual nuthatches, jays and nutcracker. The temperature rose to 50F before falling with the rain mid-day. Dark clouds and light sprinkles mid-afternoon and calmer, high of 50 degrees. Rain ended late afternoon, then breaks in the clouds and chilly at dusk. Bright waning moon peeking out between clouds before midnight, then cloudy after 2am.

Friday (Oct 18) overnight low of 32 degrees, breaks in the cloud cover and almost calm. A few drops on and off before sunrise. Nuthatches, hairy woodpecker, an evening grosbeak, 4 nutcrackers and a 6-pack of jays visiting. Mostly cloudy w/sucker holes leaking sunshine at lunch time, then snow flurries early afternoon (no accumulation.) Little short sprinkle of rain late afternoon and mostly cloudy, high of 46 degrees. Chilly and mostly cloudy at sunset. Partly clear before midnight, bright moon and a few stars.

Saturday (Oct 19) overnight low of 25 degrees, low clouds – socked in nearly to the valley floor, breezy and snowing this morning. About 1/4″ of snow by 11am, then rain/snow mix and melting a little for a short while, then big flakes falling before noon. Jays, nuthatches, nutcrackers and hairy woodpecker visiting. By early afternoon we had 1/2″ of snow on the board, and starting to melt, high of 36 degrees. Short snow flurries and/or misty rain showers late afternoon and evening and calmer. Van Meter Hill socked in at sunset and misting. Snowing after dark. Additional 1″ new snow by midnight and snowing pretty good.

Sunday (Oct 20) overnight low of 31 degrees, breaks in the overcast – top of Van Meter socked in. Measured 2″ heavy wet snow on the board, snow (and rain) melted to 0.49″ of water. Jays, juncos, nuthatches, nutcrackers and hairy woodpecker visiting, no ‘summer’ birds around. Sucker hole let in some sunshine before noon and snow starting to melt. Chilly and overcast mid-afternoon, snow continues to melt, high of 41 degrees. Light snow falling before dusk, patches of open ground. Doesn’t appear to be snowing at 815pm.
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Idaho News:

Maupin named to Valley commission to replace Cruickshank

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Oct 17, 2019

Sherry Maupin was named last week by Gov. Brad Little to serve on the Valley County commission for the last year of the term of former commissioner Gordon Cruickshank.

Maupin, 59, of McCall, was sworn in during the commissioners’ regular meeting on Tuesday at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade.

She joins Dave Bingaman and Elt Hasbrouck on the three-person panel.

Maupin told The Star-News that she plans to seek a full-term in the November 2020 county election.

“I look forward to working with the other commissioners and the county team to envision a bright and prosperous future for our region,” Maupin said in a statement.

Maupin was one of three candidates interviewed on Sept. 19 by the Valley County Republican Central Committee, which was tasked with interviewing and ranking eligible replacements for Cruickshank, a Republican.

continued:
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Valley County revises application process for tax exemption

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 17, 2019

Valley County commissioners have approved substantial changes to a property tax exemption ordinance intended to bring new businesses to the county.

The new ordinance institutes a scoring system to evaluate proposals and changed rules to make them more specific to Valley County.

The ordinance gives up to five years of tax relief to qualifying, non-retail businesses investing over $500,000 in a new facility in the county.

The previous version was first adopted in 2018 following adoption of enabling legislation by the Idaho Legislature in 2017.

The new version of the ordinance was drafted by officials from the Valley County Assessor’s Office, the county planning and zoning department and Valley County Emergency Manager Juan Bonilla, who is also Donnelly Fire & EMS chief.

The goal of the new ordinance is to encourage businesses to come to Valley County, something the previous version did not, Valley County Assessor June Fullmer said.

continued:
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The Star-News to host election forums in Cascade, McCall

The Star-News Oct 17, 2019

The Star-News will host public forums in Cascade and McCall this month for candidates and issues that will appear on the Nov. 5 general election ballot.

The Cascade forum will begin at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 24, at American Legion Hall, 105 E. Mill St.

Topics will include the election for Cascade City Council, a proposal for a local-option sales tax in Cascade, and a proposal by Valley County to raise property taxes for county roads.

The McCall forum will begin at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 28, at a new location, the Holiday Inn Express and Suites, 210 N 3rd St.

Candidates for McCall City Council have been invited and a proposal by Valley County to raise property taxes for county roads will be presented.

The forums will be moderated by The Star-News Co-Publisher Tom Grote. The format will consist of opening statements or presentations followed by the asking of written questions submitted from the audience.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Winds blow off portions of Horseshoe Bend High School roof

Oct 19, 2019 by KIVI Staff

Horseshoe Bend, Idaho — Emergency roof repair crews are on their way to Horseshoe Bend High School after strong winds blew off portions of the school’s roof.

Boise County dispatch says some debris hit a transformer and other pieces landed on Highway 55.

Crews were able to clear debris off the road, and the highway remains open. Banks-Lowman Road, however, is closed due to downed power lines.

Storms that moved through southern and central Idaho Saturday afternoon downing trees and prompting at least 50 power outages.

source:
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Banks-Lowman Road back open to traffic after downed power lines prompted closure

Oct 19, 2019 By KIVI Staff

Garden Valley, Idaho — Banks-Lowman Road is back open to traffic after downed power lines prompted closures.

Crews worked to clear the area Saturday afternoon and opened the highway to traffic around 2:10 p.m.

Idaho Power is aware of 50 power outages in the Treasure Valley as of 2:10 p.m. as a result of strong, gusty winds associated with a line of passing thunderstorms early Saturday afternoon.

continued:
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Wilder cemetery damaged

Oct 19, 2019 By Anna Silver KIVI TV

Wilder, Idaho — Saturday’s storms hit one of the most sacred places in one Treasure Valley town, leaving behind extensive damage. Larry Cooper, the Wilder Cemetery Sexton, says he was devastated.

“I take this very seriously, and I took this over two years ago, and I love my cemetery, and I love my people out here and have close relationships with them, and this hurts a lot.”

He estimates 18 trees fell, and numerous headstones were damaged.

continued:
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City of Hailey lifts boil water advisory, drinking water clean

by CBS 2 News Staff Saturday, October 19th 2019


City of Hailey

Hailey, Idaho (CBS 2) — Hailey’s drinking water is safe to drink after officials lift the boil water advisory, Saturday morning.

The City Water Department followed Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) regulations, taking several samples of water from the repaired water pressure zone, with at least a 24-hour gap between samples.

Previously, Hailey officials had been warning residents not to drink water until they boil it.

continued:
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Wendell residents need to boil water after power outage shuts down well

KTVB October 19, 2019

[Wendell], Idaho — The town of Wendell is now under a boil water order after Saturday’s storm knocked out power to one of their water wells.

Cindy Woodard, the supervisor of public works in Wendell, told KTVB that one well has lost power, forcing the town to boil its water to make sure it’s safe to use.

Woodard also asks area residents to reduce their water usage, as the town’s wastewater stations could overflow without enough power to them. She said there is a plan set if the waste stations do overflow.

continued:
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Western governors want nuclear testing compensation expanded

By Keith Ridler – 10/15/19 AP

Boise, Idaho — Atmospheric nuclear weapons testing exposed more states and more people to radiation fallout and resulting cancers and other diseases than the federal government currently recognizes, Western governors said.

The Western Governors’ Association on Friday sent letters to the U.S. Senate and U.S. House urging passage of proposed changes to a law involving “downwinders.”

The U.S. between 1945 and 1992 conducted more than 1,000 nuclear weapons tests, nearly 200 in the atmosphere. Most were conducted in Western states or islands in the Pacific Ocean.

The changes to the 1990 Radiation Exposure Compensation Act would add all of Nevada, Arizona and Utah, and include for the first time downwinders in Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico and the island territory of Guam.

continued:
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Mining News:

Our Phased Approach to Restoration

Midas Gold Blog

The Stibnite Mining District has a long history of mining, spanning more than a century. For most of the time the site was in operation, regulatory and environmental laws were limited and expectations around reclamation were very different than they are today. That, combined with the critical mining for the war effort at Stibnite, has resulted in a legacy of environmental damage.

Today, the United States has some of the strictest mining and environmental laws and regulations in the world. There is heavy oversight of the mining industry and stringent requirements that every company must meet if they want their projects to move forward. These regulations help to protect the environment and require modern mining companies to approach projects differently than their predecessors.

Reclaiming the environment is a must for mining companies. However, when we were designing the Stibnite Gold Project, we wanted to take care for the environment a step further. From the outset, our philosophy has been to use responsible mining as a tool to repair the damage left behind and restore the site, not just reclaim it to the standards required by law.

continued:
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Hundreds protest proposed Midas Gold project

Speakers fear mine would harm salmon, rivers

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 17, 2019

Gary Dorr asked a crowd of about 300 people in downtown McCall on Saturday to get angry and alarmed about what he said was a threat to native salmon and treaty rights by the proposed Stibnite Gold Project near Yellow Pine.

Dorr, a member of the Nez Perce Tribe and Nimiipuu Protecting the Environment, was one of several speakers at a protest rally called the Gathering of Peoples to Protect our Sacred Water and Fish, at Art Roberts Park in McCall.

The event was organized by the tribe and the Save the South Fork group. Participating organizations include Earth Works, Nimiipuu Protecting the Environment, Idaho Conservation League, Idaho Rivers United and Better Neighborhoods.

Participants in the event rallied against the building the proposed gold and antimony mine by Midas Gold on the grounds that the project would be disastrous to the South Fork of the Salmon River watershed.

Before the event, protestors gathered at three locations in downtown McCall, walking in large groups toward the park to symbolize the confluence of people coming together and the journey that native fish undertake. Some participants also arrived via boat, paddling from Brown Park.

Protestors carried signs reading, “Save Our Salmon,” “Too Precious to Risk,” “Water is More Important Than Gold,” “Sacred Waters,” and “Sacred Fish,” among others.

Dorr outlined how the development of the mine would violate the Nez Perce Treaty of 1855.

“The U.S. constitution states that treaties are the supreme law of the land,” he said. “You can’t make any laws that are against what’s in the treaty.”

He also chastised Midas Gold, saying the company is misrepresenting its business and the project.

Midas Gold Idaho is a subsidiary of a Canadian company and beholden to both Midas Gold Corp. and Barrick Gold Corp., another Canadian company which owns 20% of Midas Gold.

He mocked the company’s advertising to portray the company as environmentally friendly.

“They think you’re stupid . . . they think we believe their grade school media campaign,” he said to hoots and cheers from the audience.

Idaho Rivers United Executive Director Nic Nelson said the mine is the greatest threat to Chinook salmon and steelhead beyond the dams on the lower Snake River.

“Idaho is the most important spawning habitat for Chinook salmon anywhere in the world,” Nelson said.

“We are vitally important to the perpetuation of this species globally; not even Alaska can offer what Idaho has with our high elevation and spawning habitat,” he said.

Retired Forest Service fish biologist Mary Faurot-Peterson told a story of three fishes, the Chinook salmon, steelhead and bull trout, all of which she said would be threatened by the Stibnite Gold Project.

“I worked in the 90s to help enforce the promises of Stibnite miners to adhere to their operation and restoration plans,” Faurot-Peterson said.

“I saw firsthand how easy it was for the mining company to walk away, leaving the taxpayers in charge of cleaning up destroyed fish habitat and other environmental messes,” she said.

John Robison, Public Lands Director for the Idaho Conservation League, said that the Forest Service plan does not account for a disastrous accident and assumes that mining operations go according to plan.

“We need to start questioning the underlying assumption that mining is the highest and best use of our public lands and rivers,” Robison said.

“Right now it is ranked as more important than drinking water, or salmon or our quality of life,” he said.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Public Lands:

Campground improvements at Horsethief Reservoir opened to public

By Nicole Blanchard for The Star-News Oct 17, 2019

The Kings Point campground at Horsethief Reservoir east of Cascade has reopened after being shuttered for the summer for renovations.

The campground now boasts regraded campsites, new asphalt pads for recreational vehicles, new compacted sand tent pads with fire rings, and regraded and blacktopped boat ramps and fishing areas, according to Scott Gill, a member of the Y Camp advisory board.

“It rivals any state park,” Gill said. “It rivals any national site at Redfish Lake.”

Though they’re on Idaho Department of Fish and Game property, the campsites surrounding Horsethief Reservoir have been managed by the Treasure Valley Family YMCA, whose Y Camp: Horsethief Reservoir site is nearby.

The YMCA and IDFG struck the deal in 2017 in an attempt to cut down on Fish and Game expenditures at the site and improve the area surrounding the Y Camp, which at times was blighted by rowdy campers and inadequate bathroom facilities.

“There was no fee (to camp there) and people were abusing the use of the public campgrounds,” Gill said. “There were a significant number of calls to the Valley County Sheriff’s Office.”

continued:
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Lowman Ranger District of the Boise National Forest Intend to Submit Grant Proposal to Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation

Lowman, Idaho, October 17, 2019 — The Lowman Ranger District of the Boise National Forest is applying for grant funding from the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation to help with trail improvements and maintenance.

The application will request funding through the Departments Off-Road Motor Vehicle (ORMV)

* MBR/ ORMV funds would be used to maintain trails on the North Zone of the Boise National Forest. These trails receive heavy summer usage from motor bike enthusiasts. This grant proposes to address culvert placements, signage, brushing and heavy tread maintenance needs.

All grant proposals will improve the visitor experience and mitigate public health and safety hazards. This will also help sustain the capital investment of the trail treads. If received, implementation of the projects would begin in late summer of 2020.

Comments or requests for more information should be submitted to Charles A Jarvis, Lowman Ranger District, 7539 Highway 21, Lowman, ID 83631, or by calling 208-259-3361.

Contact: Lowman Ranger District
Charles A. Jarvis
208-259-3361
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Proposed wildfire fuel breaks plan released for 3 states

Oct 14, 2019 AP

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Authorities have released plans to stop devastating wildfires in southwestern Idaho, southeastern Oregon and northern Nevada with one option creating 1,500 miles of fuel breaks up to 400 feet wide along existing roads.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management on Friday released a draft environmental impact statement for the Tri-State Fuel Breaks Project and is taking public comments through the end of November.

The BLM says creating fuel breaks by clearing vegetation will help firefighters stop wildfires and protect key habitat for sage grouse and other wildlife on land also used by ranchers and outdoor enthusiasts.

continued:
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Critter News:

Animal rescuer saves dog stranded on steep cliff in Idaho

Associated Press October 16, 2019

Boise, Idaho — Nobody knows how long the skinny white dog was trapped on the side of a steep, rocky cliff in rural Idaho, but when Dave Wright heard about the pup’s plight he knew he had to get the animal down.

Wright, the founder of Friends Furever Animal Rescue, told the Idaho Statesman he saw a Facebook post about the dog’s precarious position on Sunday. He got the coordinates, did some research and with the help of rock climber Richard Jensen scaled the cliff face to rescue the dog.

The trio made it down safely, and the dog — covered in fleas, with some bruises and sores — was whisked away for vaccinations and treatment. Wright says the Great Pyrenees, now named “Clifford,” is sweet and gets along with both dogs and cats. Wright is trying to find his owner, but if that fails he says the rescue group will work to find him a new home.

source:
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Pet Talk – Intestinal obstructions in dogs and cats

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Oct 18, 2019 IME

For the intestinal tract to work properly, fluid and food material must be able to pass through its entire length. When the passage of material is obstructed, nutrients cannot be absorbed, fluids are lost from the body and the animal can rapidly become severely ill. Obstructions may be partial or complete, with the latter being more serious.

The most common causes of foreign body are a toy or piece of string or fabric. Sometimes an indigestible food item such as a bone or rock has been swallowed by the animal. This type of obstruction tends to be more common in younger animals. There are other diseases of the intestines that can lead to obstructions, including tumors and telescoping of the bowel into itself.

The main signs of an intestinal obstruction are vomiting and loss of appetite. Fever is also common, from complicating bacterial infections. Abdominal pain is usually present, but not always.

continued:
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Fish and Game doubts bear rehab prospects

Facility claims they have been successful

Greg Moore Oct 18, 2019 IME

The killing of an orphaned black bear cub by an Idaho Department of Fish and Game officer in Hailey last week raised questions about the viability of rehabilitation of bear cubs.

At least three organizations in Idaho are licensed to rehabilitate black bears. Idaho Black Bear Rehab in Garden City deals solely with black bears and Snowden Wildlife Sanctuary near McCall and Earthfire Institute in Driggs take in a variety of wildlife, including black bears.

However, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game is reluctant to send bears there.

continued:
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6 grizzly bears killed in single week in northwest Montana

Early snowstorms in northwest Montana have contributed to the deaths of five grizzly bears in one week on the Rocky Mountain Front.

Associated Press October 14, 2019

Missoula, Mont. — Early snowstorms in northwest Montana have contributed to the deaths of five grizzly bears in one week on the Rocky Mountain Front.

The Missoulian reports that a sixth grizzly was put down east of Rogers Pass for killing cattle, pushing the one-week death toll to six and the unofficial annual mortality count to 38 in the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem.

continued:
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Idaho’s too friendly elk is heading to the Lone Star state

by CBS 2 News Staff Thursday, October 17th 2019


Bob Shindelar

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — A bull elk that was illegally removed from the Idaho woods in early 2018 and grew to show no fear of humans has found a new home.

Texas A&M University.

Idaho Fish and Game says the 400-pound elk, which roamed the streets of Sweet, was for the most part, raised in captivity its entire life. The elk was captured and released in Bear Valley with the hope that it would integrate with wild elk herds in the area. Instead, the animal sought out humans, resulting in its recapture.

continued:
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Grand Teton to hunt, relocate non-native mountain goats

Oct 16, 2019 AP

Jackson, Wyo. (AP) – Grand Teton National Park officials have announced plans to begin removing non-native mountain goats from the park by lethal and non-lethal means.

The Jackson Hole News & Guide reported Tuesday the final plan from park officials includes hunting, capturing and relocating the goats.

Park officials say the goats migrated from the Snake River Range into the range of native bighorn sheep and could spread diseases that could kill off the native herd.

continued:
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World Center for Birds of Prey offers up-close encounters with raptors

The Fall Flights demonstration south of Boise is your best opportunity to get up-close to a hawk, falcon or owl as they soar inches from your head.

KTVB October 16, 2019

Boise, Idaho — The World Center for Birds of Prey south of Boise is one of the premiere conservation facilities in the world for raptors.

… “When you come to see Fall Flights, you get the opportunity to have birds fly up close,” said Birds of Prey spokesperson Erin Katzner. “Some of our hawks are complete acrobats, and they love to be daredevils. They’ll fly very close to the audience, and it’s not uncommon for one to brush you with its wing feathers as it goes by.

… The Fall Flights program takes place at 3 p.m. every Friday, Saturday and Sunday through Nov. 3, weather permitting. The shows last about 30 minutes.

full story w/cool video:
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Fish & Game News:

Sweet, Idaho Elk Headed for the Lone Star State

By Evin Oneale, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, October 17, 2019


Evin Oneale, IDFG

A human-habituated bull elk from the Sweet, Idaho area has found a “forever” home in Texas.

After six weeks at a Fish and Game facility, the elk left Idaho early Thursday morning, ultimately bound for Texas A&M University where it will become part of the school’s wildlife management and veterinarian programs.

The elk will join a number of native and exotic wildlife species which roam the university’s animal paddock including white-tailed deer, fallow deer, zebra, addax antelope and ostrich. “Of the alternatives available, A&M was the best place for this elk to land,” Fish and Game wildlife veterinarian Dr. Mark Drew noted. “He will be well cared for and enjoy a good life at this world-class facility.”

continued:
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Hunters: If your tag isn’t properly notched, it’s invalid

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, October 16, 2019

This applies to all permits that require you to notch the month and date

Reminder for hunters, after you harvest your animal, you must validate your tag by completely removing the correct day and month – just like in the picture – and attaching it to the largest portion of the carcass.

source:
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It’s time to hunt pheasants in the Magic Valley

By Terry Thompson, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, October 17, 2019


IDFG

Pheasant hunting will open in the Magic Valley Region on Saturday October 19th.

The much awaited season opener for ring-necked pheasants opens across the Magic Valley this Saturday, October 19th and will continue until December 31, 2019. Regional wildlife biologists are expecting this year’s season to be very similar to last year, in terms of the number of birds available to hunters. Pheasant populations in Zone 3, which includes the Magic Valley, have struggled since the mid-1980s because of changes in farming practices and the resultant loss of habitat. The 10-year average, from 2009 – 2018 for pheasant populations across Zone 3 have continued to trend downward.

The daily bag limit for pheasants is 3 roosters per day, with a possession limit of 9. There is no season on hen (female) pheasants.

continued:
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Oct. 14: Upper Salmon River Steelhead fishing report

By Brent Beller, Fisheries Technician
Thursday, October 17, 2019


M. Koenig IDFG

Steelhead were caught over the past week on the upper Salmon River. Angler effort increased but remained light overall. The majority of bank angler effort was observed downstream of North Fork while boat anglers were spread out throughout the area.

Anglers interviewed between the Middle Fork and North Fork in location code 15 averaged 86 hours per steelhead caught, and no steelhead were harvested. Anglers interviewed in the other upper Salmon River location codes did not report catching a steelhead. Check the Harvest Report for more details.

River conditions remained good throughout the week. Water temperatures were in the mid-40’s and the clarity was clear. Currently, the Salmon River is flowing at 1,320 cfs through the town of Salmon, which is 103 percent of average for today’s date.

continued:
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Windows to Wildlife Newsletter

Idaho Fish & Game

link:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Rare zebra with ‘polka dots’ spotted in Kenyan wildlife reserve

by Ida Domingo, WSET Staff Friday, September 20th 2019

Kenya (WSET) — A zebra with a dark coat and white polka dots has been spotted in Kenya’s Masai Mara National Reserve.

According to the New York Post, its the first of its kind for the park.

The Maasai Mara National Reserve also took to their Facebook page to share the picture of the polka dot foal. They wrote, “The dotted zebra foal which has been spotted in the Maasai Mara Game Reserve causing excitement among tourists.”

continued w/photos and video:
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Seasonal Humor:

FallBugsDying-a

“To tell the truth – we get a little nervous along this stretch ourselves.”
MountainTrailRide-a
by Frank Owen September 16, 1950 Saturday Evening Post [h/t Sandy]
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Oct 13, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 13, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: The boil order and water restrictions are still in effect.

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire/SAR Training
May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season
Oct ? – Diamond Fuel delivery delayed
Oct 17 – 10am pre-2020 Harmonica Meeting at the YP Tavern
Oct 31 – (Thursday) Halloween
Nov 3 – 2am Daylight saving time ends
(details below)
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Local Events:

Fuel Delivery Oct ?

Due to the snow storm Oct 9th, Diamond Fuel (and Feed) had to delay the fuel delivery to Yellow Pine, will reschedule this week. [I will send an email to residents – rrS]

Please check your tanks and give them a call (208) 382-4430.
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Village News:

Snow in the High County

P1000535-20191010Snow
Photo of Van Meter Hill Oct 10th. – rrS
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Get Ready for Winter Heating

* Inspect and clean the chimney. Contact the YPFD to borrow chimney brushes.
* Inspect and clean wood stoves, make sure dampers work properly and check for leaks.
* Check your carbon monoxide and smoke detectors – install fresh batteries.
* Check your fire extinguisher and make sure it is handy. Manually rotate them around, tip upside down and lightly shake them, thus keeping the fire fighting agent loose, and check that the needle is still in the green. If you need a new one please call, your fire commissioner or Jeff F.
* If you have an oil-powered furnace, replace your filter and nozzle and check the tank level.
* Check your propane tank levels (early morning when it is cool in case there is a wasp nest!) Check to make sure snow falling from the roof cannot impact your pipes!
* Test the igniter switch. On an old system, you might have to relight the pilot. Newer systems have electronic igniters.
* Lubricate and clean the blower motor. First check the owner’s manual to see if your motor is the kind that needs lubricating. If it does, turn off the power, open the cover and clean the caps covering the bearings. Then remove the caps and lubricate the bearings.
* Inspect the blower belt for cracks. Turn off the power to the furnace at the main circuit breaker. Use a screwdriver to remove the steel cover of the air handler. The blower belt is the largest rubber belt that you see. Replace the belt if it is cracked.
* Inspect the exhaust flue outdoors to ensure it is free of obstructions such as branches or animal nests.
* Keep the area around your furnace unit free of debris and clutter.
* Change the air filters. Clean your air vents and ducts. Remove the vent covers with a screwdriver. Use the extension hose of your vacuum to remove the dust.
* Open all your air vents. Remove furniture, boxes and clutter that get in the way of air flowing from the vents.

Local Fuel Suppliers
Propane
Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Heating fuel
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
Furnace Service
Rocky Mountain Mechanical (208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Oct 5: The bins were empty Friday afternoon. Road to the dump is getting ‘pot-holey’.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Roads

Work on the South Fork Salmon River road was completed last week, road is fully open.

Work on the Stibnite slide between Yellow Pine and the mine has been completed.

Work on the culvert on Profile Creek road has been completed.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
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Reminder for people living in bear country:

* Garbage should be stored inside the house or in a secure garage or storage building.
* If garbage cannot be stored in a secure location, a bear-resistant container approved by the Interagency Bear Committee is recommended.
* Avoid using bird feeders from March through November. Birds do not need supplemental feeding this time of year.
* Pet food should not be left outside.
* BBQ grills or anything with a strong odor should not be left out at night.
* Protect gardens, beehives, and compost piles with electric fencing.
* Never intentionally feed bears. A food-conditioned bear may pose a threat to human safety and usually results in the removal of the bear.
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

No current update on water line repairs. Water Restrictions and Boil Order still in effect.

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the community hall. (No minutes yet)

Water Update (posted to FB Oct 4th 930pm)

Today (10/4) YPWUA worked on the section of pipe that had a number of leaks. Unfortunately we were unable to complete the repairs due to having a couple of incorrect parts. We will order the parts as soon as possible and complete the repairs. We had to do some creative Engineering today but cut 10 leaks to 2 small ones. Thank you to Jeff Forster and Dayle Bennett for working in the muck and water for two days without complaint, to Cecil Dallman for excellent excavation work, to Dave McClintock for parts and advice, to Layne Bennett, Ginny Bartholomew and Ann Forster for their support. Thanks to the community for your patience.
– Willie Sullivan

Water Update (posted to FB Oct 3rd 9pm):

YPWUA found the leaks today (above the orchard) and will be repairing them tomorrow. The water will be off from 10am till repairs and testing completed.

– Willie Sullivan

Water Update Sept 21 (excerpted from VYPA 9/21 meeting notes):

Tests were conducted by Idaho Rural Water [July 19th] in an effort to locate the source of the major leak in the system. They will return October 3rd to continue the search for leaks. The line between Alpine Village and the Saleen property, which includes the bridge across the East Fork river is the line most suspected to be leaking. Cecil Dallman will stand by with a backhoe to dig in locations found. More digging work is needed at the tanks and pipes near the water facility. A second engineer is being consulted. Getting contractors to come to YP and replace seals is difficult. The previous grant money is tied to a timeline so some specified work must be done this fall.

The possibility for a large amount of grant money is very slim because we would have to take out a loan and use the borrowed money for the required matching money, and then there would be the loan payments. Money on hand must be used on required repairs to the contact tank. Because some water users do not have voting rights YPWUA does not qualify for some grants.

There are 56 shares available for purchase at $100/share. Each piece of land is entitled to own one share. Share holders are entitled to vote; water users that do not own a share may not vote, but do have access to water. The owners of the 56 lots are encouraged to purchase shares. Ownership of a share is shown on your annual water bill.

Anyone wanting to arrange a payment plan should contact Willie Sullivan.

– Steve Holloway/Willie Sullivan

Water Update Sept 8:

Still looking for the leak. Water restrictions and boil order still in effect.

Water Update June 7:

1. The “boil order” is still in effect.
2. There is still large water leaks in the system. We continue to look.
3. A grant for $39,000 was approved for improvements to the system.
3. Work is currently being done on the new contact tank.
4. Please, no lawn watering until we find and repair the major leaks.
– Steve Holloway

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update
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VYPA News:

October 17 pre-2020 Harmonica Meeting

There will be a pre-2020 Harmonica Meeting on Thursday October 17th at 10am at the Yellow Pine Tavern. Lorinne and Deb will be there and Dawn on the phone to pre plan for our next festival. For all of you folks willing to help let us know your thoughts and plans. If you can’t attend please let us know by email or phone what your ideas are.
Thanks for all your support,
– Lorinne N. Munn

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link to: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for August 10, 2019
link to: 20190810 VYPA Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for July 20, 2019
link to: 20190720 Yellow Pine Village Association Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for June 8, 2019
link to: 20190608 Village of Yellow Pine Association
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YPFD News:

The YPFD District One Fire Commissioner position is currently available. (The Middle of Yellow Pine Ave. West)

The YPFD District One Commissioner is open for any full or part time resident who owns property west of the middle of YP Avenue and would like to be involved as a Fire Commissioner representative for a 4 year term.

If you are interested or would like further information please contact Jeff Forster (j4star1911@gmail.com or 633-1010).

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Meeting minutes for Sept 14, 2019
link to: 2019-09-14 YPFD Meeting_final

Meeting minutes for July 13, 2019
link to: 20190713 YPFD Meeting Notes_final

Meeting minutes for June 16, 2019
link to: 20190615 YPFD Meeting Notes_Final

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Training: Sunday Fire/EMS training at 11am unless otherwise posted. All are welcome.

YP Helispot: We are working with Valley County Road Department and the Boise National Forest for the rock base for the road leading into the Helispot and the actual Helispot itself. We are also receiving rock for the Fire Hydrants, water tank foundations, etc. The rock will come from the Valdez pit and will be less expensive than having it trucked in from Cascade.

link to Cooking safety in the home:

link to Smoke Alarm Info:

-JF
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Call for reservations. Open until the end of hunting season.
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

Our fall hours are open by request for the winter. Please call 208-633-3325, 970-379-5155 or email at matt@ypcorner.com
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall hours open 8am to close
Full breakfast served starting at 8am with special arrangement for earlier breakfast as needed. 92 Octane non ethanol gas available, cubed ice, beer, pop and water sold by the 6 and 12 pack, snacks, ice cream and many supplies available. Burgers and Pizza, Beer and Wine on the evening menu. Football and other sports available on our TV. Wi Fi, Verizon phone service and information available.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
FB page:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 7) overnight low around 26 degrees, clear sky and frosty this morning. Lots of evening grosbeaks, a few pine siskins, juncos, jays and nuthatches. Chipmunks and a pine squirrel enjoying the sunshine after sunrise. Hawk or falcon (didn’t see) chasing song birds in the neighborhood. Crusher running, minimal dust. Clarks nutcracker, hairy woodpecker and cassins finches added to today’s bird list. Clear sunny and light breezes at lunch time. Warmer, clear and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 68 degrees. Our water is a tad murky this afternoon, cleared up by late evening. A few high thin clouds turning pink at sunset. Bright fat waxing moon and lots of stars before midnight.

Tuesday (Oct 8) overnight low was above freezing, no frost, dark overcast and light breeze this morning. Crusher making a lot of noise, but not much dust. Jays, nuthatches and hairy woodpecker visiting. Breaks in the clouds (sucker holes) and stronger breezes mid-day. Clarks nutcracker and a couple of pine siskins were additional visitors. Mostly cloudy, breezy and mild mid-afternoon, high of 60 degrees. Late afternoon rain showers, raining pretty good at dusk, top of Golden Gate fogged in. Snowed after midnight.

Wednesday (Oct 9) overnight low of 28 degrees, 3/4″ new snow on the board, 0.50″ rain and melted snow in the gauge, patchy snow on the ground and sharp variable breezes under mostly cloudy sky. Light snow falling this morning. Nuthatches, jays, nutcracker and hairy woodpecker visiting. Crusher whirring and whining. Dark-eyed juncos, white and red-breasted nuthatches showed up after lunch. Light snow falling and low clouds mid-day. Mail truck was just a little late, said there was 6″ of snow on Warm Lake Summit. Cold (just above freezing) overcast, light steady snowfall and stronger breezes mid-afternoon, high of 36 degrees. Snowed lightly until dark, no accumulation. Cloudy at midnight. Clearing early morning.

Thursday (Oct 10) the low this morning was 18 degrees, almost clear sky – a couple of clouds hovering over VanMeter. Patches of snow in the shade and the hills are white. Lots of juncos, a few pine siskins and jays, evening grosbeak and a red-winged blackbird visited along with the usual hairy woodpecker and nuthatches. Smell of diesel exhaust in the air. Clear, sunny and rather cold at noon. Red-winged blackbird, 2 grosbeaks and a white breasted nuthatch sighted after lunch. Cool, almost clear and slight breeze mid-day, patches of snow remain in the shade, high of 44 degrees. Rosy haze at sunset and cooling off quickly. Bright moon up before midnight in a clear sky.

Friday (Oct 11) it was 21 degrees before sunrise this morning, some high hazy cloud turning pink and heavy frost. Dark-eyed juncos galore, small flock of little pine siskins, busy nuthatches tapping open seeds and raucous jays sounding off. Clear sky before lunch time. Clarks nutcracker, an evening grosbeak and a hairy woodpecker visiting. Clear, light breeze and almost warm mid-afternoon, high of 56 degrees. Clear sky and calm at dusk. Bright moon and stars out before midnight. Late night traffic.

Saturday (Oct 12) overnight low of 20 degrees under clear skies, heavy frost this morning started melting after sunrise. Lots of dark-eyed juncos around, pine siskins, evening grosbeaks, nuthatches, jays, clarks nutcracker and a hairy woodpecker visiting. Light weekend traffic. Sunny and mild mid-day, light breezes. Sunny and warmer mid-afternoon, high of 63 degrees. Some haze to the south west after sunset. Hazy moon before midnight.

Sunday (Oct 13) it was 26 degrees this morning before sunrise and mostly cloudy sky. Mostly clear by 1030am. Evening grosbeaks, nuthatches, pine siskins, jays, juncos, a clarks nutcracker and a hairy woodpecker visiting. By lunch time high haze building up again. Loud airplane buzzed the village around 1215pm. Overcast with high thin haze and fairly warm mid-afternoon with light breezes, high of 64 degrees. Light weekend traffic. Mostly cloudy at dusk and almost calm. Smell of burning garbage in the air.
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Idaho News:

Missing Donnelly man found dead after crash into Cascade Lake

by CBS 2 News Staff Tuesday, October 8th 2019

Donnelly, Idaho (CBS 2) — A 65-year-old Donnelly man who was reported missing on Friday has been found dead.

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office says Brian Randall Ekman was found dead inside a UTV that had rolled into Cascade Lake south of the Boulder Creek boat launch.

Ekman’s UTV was in about 10 feet of water.

It appears as if Ekman got his ride stuck in the sand on a steep embankment when it rolled and went into the water, deputies say. Ekman’s dog, Cheech, which was also reported missing was not found and there were no dog tracks in the sand.

“The Valley County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank all partner agencies that assisted in looking for Ekman and we extend our deepest condolences to the surviving family and friends of Ekman,” the sheriff’s office said.

source:
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Father of NFL Star helps save hunter near Idaho’s Salmon River

by Ryan L Morrison Monday, October 7th 2019

Riggins, Idaho (CBS 2) — The father of Dallas Cowboys star and former Boise State Broncos linebacker Leighton Vander Esch helped save an elk hunter trapped in the mountains near Idaho’s Salmon River.

62-year-old Michigan hunter Jeff Harison was hunting in the mountains between Patrick Butte and the Salmon River on Saturday night, Sept. 28.

Harrison was packing out a harvested bull elk on a mule with guides from Hells Canyon Outfitters when it started to run and Harrison was thrown from the animal.

continued:
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Missing hunters found

Oct 11, 2019 Local News 8

Leadore, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Search and Rescue teams in three counties are looking for what they believe is a party of four missing hunters.

Update: The mother of one of the missing hunters report they have been found.

continued:
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Governor Little appoints Sherry Maupin as Valley County Commissioner

Press release Oct 11, 2019

Boise, Idaho – Governor Brad Little announced today his appointment of Sherry Maupin as Valley County Commissioner.

“Sherry’s interest and expertise in issues important to Valley County make her an ideal fit for this important role,” Governor Little said. “She possesses the leadership skills and knowledge expected of a county commissioner.”

Maupin worked 27 years in banking with First Interstate Bank and most recently as a Vice President at Idaho First Bank. She spent 11 years as a real estate agent in the Treasure Valley and West Central Mountains. She is the president of the West Central Mountains Economic Development Council and president of the Board of the Ponderosa Center.

Governor Little appointed Maupin following the retirement of District 2 Commissioner Gordon Cruickshank. Maupin will serve the remainder of Cruickshank’s term, set to end December 2020.

[h/t Gordon C]
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Valley County revises application process for tax exemption

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 10, 2019

Valley County commissioners have approved substantial changes to a property tax exemption ordinance intended to bring new businesses to the county.

The new ordinance institutes a scoring system to evaluate proposals and changed rules to make them more specific to Valley County.

The ordinance gives up to five years of tax relief to qualifying, non-retail businesses investing over $500,000 in a new facility in the county.

The previous version was first adopted in 2018 following adoption of enabling legislation by the Idaho Legislature in 2017.

The new version of the ordinance was drafted by officials from the Valley County Assessor’s Office, the county planning and zoning department and Valley County Emergency Manager Juan Bonilla, who is also Donnelly Fire & EMS chief.

The goal of the new ordinance is to encourage businesses to come to Valley County, something the previous version did not, Valley County Assessor June Fullmer said.

continued:
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The Star-News to host election forums in Cascade, McCall

The Star-News Oct 10, 2019

The Star-News will host public forums in Cascade and McCall this month for candidates and issues that will appear on the Nov. 5 general election ballot.

The Cascade forum will begin at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 24, at American Legion Hall, 105 E. Mill St.

Topics will include the election for Cascade City Council, a proposal for a local-option sales tax in Cascade, and a proposal by Valley County to raise property taxes for county roads.

The McCall forum will begin at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 28, at a new location, the Holiday Inn Express and Suites, 210 N 3rd St.

Candidates for McCall City Council have been invited and a proposal by Valley County to raise property taxes for county roads will be presented.

The forums will be moderated by The Star-News Co-Publisher Tom Grote. The format will consist of opening statements or presentations followed by the asking of written questions submitted from the audience.

source:
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McCall food bank to offer free flu shots Oct. 23, Nov. 13

The Star-News Oct 10, 2019

Free flu vaccinations for adults do not have health insurance will be available from 4 to 6 p.m. on Oct. 23 and Nov. 13 at the Heartland Hunger Resource Center, 556 Deinhard Lane. No appointment is necessary.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends all persons age six months and older be vaccinated annually against influenza.

Young children, pregnant women, people over age 65, and those with chronic health conditions are at highest risk of flu complications, the agency said.

This free clinic is sponsored by the Community Medical Fund and St. Luke’s McCall.

For more information call, 208-630-2379.

source:
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Beachgoers found human remains along the Salmon River in Idaho County

Nearly an entire adult skeleton was excavated, according to officials.

Nyla Gennaoui October 11, 2019 KTVB

Idaho County, Idaho — Beachgoers found human skeletal remains ten miles downriver from the White Bird on the Salmon River on Sept. 16, according to the Idaho County Sheriff’s Office.

Pieces of bones were discovered “under the high water mark, at a back eddy and nearly entirely under sand and silt,” according to police.

continued:
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Emmett’s old sawmill to be turned into mixed-use racetrack and event center

Developers hope to have the raceway open in 2021.

Joey Prechtl October 9, 2019 KTVB

Gem County, Idaho — A one of a kind race track and event center will soon be coming to Gem County.

John Wood, who is a developer, told KTVB he is trying to transform the old Emmett Saw Mill, but while still preserving the history.

The goal is to try and revitalize the city. The old mill closed in 2011, and it’s sat empty ever since then. The plan is to now transform the mill and fill the air with the sounds one hears at a racetrack.

continued:
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Crews put out wind-driven brush fire south of Kuna

Multiple agencies responded to the scene as the flames spread quickly.

KTVB October 8, 2019

Kuna, Idaho — Fire crews from multiple agencies responded to the scene of a wind-driven brush fire just south of Kuna Tuesday night.

The fire was reported at 8:19 p.m. near Kuna Mora Road and burned southeast in the area of Kuna Butte toward Swan Falls Road.

Initially reported by crews at the scene as a “very large fire,” it is believed the fire burned between 30 and 50 acres, according to Kuna Fire Chief Phil Roberts.

continued:
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Hwy 75 back open in eastern Idaho despite Big Wood Fire

by CBS 2 News Staff Thursday, October 10th 2019

Timmerman Hill, Eastern Idaho (CBS 2) — Highway 75 is back open Thursday in eastern Idaho, after the Big Wood Fire shut it down for a little over an hour.

The fire is south of Timmerman Hill according to the BLM Fire Department. It’s about 20 acres, but the fire’s growth has slowed.

Officials have closed the highway because of smoke and fire equipment being put near the roadway.

Bellevue, Carey, Sun Valley, Wood River, Sawtooth National Forest and #BLMTFDFire crews are all on the scene.

source:
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Possible record-low October temperatures across Idaho could hurt local crops

The Idaho Farm Bureau Federation says onions, dry beans, sweet corn and potatoes could all be affected by the current cold spell.

Misty Inglet October 9, 2019 KVB

Boise, Idaho — Less than two weeks into October and already parts of Idaho are dealing with snow and very low temperatures.

According to the National Weather Service, Central Idaho and the Northern Panhandle got some light snowfall on Wednesday, while Eastern Idaho saw anywhere from a light dusting to several inches. Other regions across the state could see record-low temperatures.

continued:
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Mining News:

Ask Midas: Four True Things You Should Know About the Stibnite Gold Project

Midas Gold Blog

Midas Gold has been exploring the Stibnite Mining District, a site that has been mined off and on since the 1920s, for the last 10 years. We published our first plans for the site in 2012. Through continued work, studies and consulting with communities and other stakeholders, we refined our plans in an updated study in 2014, again when we filed our Plan of Restoration and Operations (“PRO”) with regulators in 2016 and in our modified PRO in 2019. Each iteration of these plans looks to improve upon our initial concepts, reduce the project footprint and enhance environmental outcomes. Despite all of this work, and sharing this information with the community, myths and misleading information about the Stibnite Gold Project persist.

Here are four areas of our current mining proposal that I believe people need more information.

continued:
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BeMetals Reports Batch of High-Grade Zinc and Precious Metal Underground Drilling Results at Polymetallic South Mountain Project in Idaho

October 8, 2019 Accesswire


Project Location Map

Vancouver, BC – BeMetals Corp. is pleased to announce the first batch of borehole analytical drill results from its underground drill program at the Company’s high-grade South Mountain Zinc-Silver Project (“South Mountain” or the “Project”) in southwestern Idaho, U.S.A. This batch of recently received results represents sampling of boreholes; SM19-003, SM19-005 and SM19-006 (See Figures 1 & 2). The drilling program is ongoing with further mineralized zones from other boreholes under geological logging, sampling and laboratory analysis. Further batches of borehole analytical results will be released as they become available.

… John Wilton, President, CEO and Director of BeMetals stated, “We are pleased with this first batch of underground borehole results. They support the significant high-grade nature of the deposit, and again show the robust grades in both silver and gold associated with the base metal mineralization. Notably these results relate to boreholes drilled both above (SM19-006) and below (SM19-003/005) the Sonneman level adit in an extensive area of mineralization known as the DMEA zone (See Figure 2). This illustrates the up and down plunge potential to extend the mineralized bodies that form the deposit with further drilling to expand the high-grade resource base during future work plans.

The contacts of the massive sulphide bodies generally provide a clear visual boundary to the high-grade mineralization into either marble or skarn units. This could provide an important effective marker to guide any future mining of the deposit and limit dilution of the high-grade material.

full story: [h/t Sandy McRae]
— — — — — — — — — —

Kilgore gold project goes to court

Oct 7, 2019 Local News 8

Boise, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Idaho Conservation League (ICL) and Greater Yellowstone Coalition (GYC) are asking a federal court to stop the Kilgore Gold Project. A federal judge in Boise is scheduled to hear arguments in the case on Tuesday.

A Canadian mining company, Otis Gold, has a drilling permit for an area that includes prime wildlife habitat in the Centennial Mountains. The ICL contends the project would disrupt a major wildlife corridor and could harm grizzly bears, Yellowstone Cutthroat trout, Columbia spotted frogs, and whitebark pines.

… The Otis Gold project is located on the Caribou-Targhee National Forest near Kilgore, about 60 miles north of Idaho Falls. It covers nearly 20 miles of federal and state public lands and would include construction of 10 miles of new roads and nearly 150 drill stations, according to the Conservation League.

full story:
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Public Lands:

Idaho has enough money to buy 130,000 acres of timberland

Oct 11, 2019 By Associated Press

Boise, Idaho — If Idaho spent the remaining $150 million of the estimated $240 million it’s getting from the sale of residential and commercial real estate, it could buy another 130,000 acres (53,000 hectares) of timberland, Gov. Brad Little was told Thursday.

Little and Attorney General Lawrence Wasden, both Republicans, and a financial expert took in that information and more as part of a subcommittee examining financial options for the Idaho Land Board.

Spending money to buy more land is fraught with political risks because private entities have complained about unfair competition from the state.

continued:
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Stakeholders celebrate the ten year anniversary of the Owyhee Initiative

Oct 10, 2019 By Steve Dent KIVI TV

Marsing, Idaho — In 2001 a group of diverse stakeholders came together to form a group to discuss the issues in Owyhee County and figure out the best way to manage those lands for future use.

It’s a success story with a centerpiece of collaboration and cooperation between groups that don’t always get along.

Ranchers, environmentalists, recreationalists and government entities all worked together to get federal legislation passed.

continued:
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Critter News:

Rescue helps abandoned pets near Lake Lowell: ‘They definitely don’t fare well there’

by Alexis Goree Monday, October 7th 2019


Lake Lowell has become a dumping ground for all kinds of pets, especially cats. (CBS2 Staff Photo)

Nampa, Idaho (CBS2) — Rabbits, chickens, ducks but especially cats at Lake Lowell Animal Rescue have been left to fend for themselves. Dumped near Lake Lowell to fall victim to predators.

“Most of the animals that we find are either sick or injured. A lot of them are hungry.”

… “Domestic animals aren’t really set up to live by the lake and the woods by themselves. So sometimes we do have to trap them or we find them injured so they need to be spayed and neutered, they have to go to the vet,” Blackmer said.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Pet Talk – Chemotherapy and you pet

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Oct 11, 2019 IME

The use of chemotherapy depends on several factors, including the type and location of the tumor, the condition of the patient and whether the tumor has spread to other organs, as well as personal decisions such as financial constraints. Chemotherapy may be used alone or with surgery or radiation therapy, depending on the tumor type and its location. Positive responses to chemotherapy range from partial remission and slowing progression of the disease to complete remission. Most cancers are not completely cured by chemotherapy and many recur at some time in the future.

Chemotherapy works by damaging rapidly growing cells. Rapidly dividing cancer cells are typically more sensitive to chemotherapy than normally dividing healthy cells. The effective use of chemotherapy is a balance between killing cancer cells and minimizing side effects that arise from killing healthy cells in the patient.

continued:
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Study: Owning a dog helps you live longer, lowers risk of heart attack, stroke

by Stefanie Dyga WSBT Tuesday, October 8th 2019

Dogs are the perfect furry friends to cuddle up with at the end of the day, but new research suggests your pet can actually help you live a longer, healthier life.

According to a study published in a journal of the American Heart Association, owning a canine was associated with a 24% reduced risk of all-cause mortality and a 31% lower risk of death by heart attack or stroke, compared to non-owners.

They study also says dog ownership was associated with a 33% lower risk of death for heart attack survivors living by themselves and 27% reduced risk of death for stroke survivors living by themselves, compared to people who did not own a pup.

continued:
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Bear cub takes over Hailey, Idaho

by CBS 2 News Staff Wednesday, October 9th 2019


Courtesy BCSO

Hailey, Idaho (CBS 2) — The Blaine County Sheriff’s Office received multiple reports of bear sightings around Hailey Wednesday.

After three hours of searching, deputies eventually found this cute little bear cub. They were able to capture the baby bear on a road in the east side of Hailey before anything happened.

“Baby bears may be cute but they are also dangerous,” BCSO said. “Just another way we serve and protect our community.”

source:
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Search for livestock-killing cougar begins in north Idaho

Oct 9, 2019 AP

Federal and state wildlife officials have started a search in northern Idaho for a cougar that killed multiple livestock.

The Spokesman-Review reported Tuesday that Idaho Fish and Game and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are working to locate the cougar and trap it.

Officials say the cougar was sighted northeast of Sandpoint and recently killed three alpacas, a miniature horse and a deer.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Hunters: Buy deer tags early to avoid the last minute rush

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Tuesday, October 8, 2019

General any-weapon deer season opens Oct. 10 in most areas

Deer hunters have a lot to look forward to this season, but standing in a long line waiting to buy a tag should not be one of them. Fish and Game is anticipating high volumes of sales immediately before the opening day on Oct. 10. By buying tags early, hunters can avoid the last-minute rush.

Hunters have numerous buying options for hunting licenses and tags, but hunters who buy online or by phone should remember to allow seven to 10 business days for their tags to arrive. The license will be immediately available as a PDF.

continued:
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Calling all archers: Please fill out your hunter reports if you’re done for the season

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Monday, October 7, 2019

Hunter reports provide first-hand information that is critical to wildlife management and season setting

Idaho Fish and Game needs help from all big game hunters to fill out their hunter reports whether or not they harvested. With many archery seasons winding down, hunters who are done can fill out their reports online or by calling (877) 268-9365. The phone option is available 24 hours per day and seven days per week. Please have your hunting tag number when calling.

If you plan to keep hunting, good luck and please remember everyone who bought big game tags needs to report so wildlife managers can get accurate and vital information for managing big game herds.

continued:
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Windows to Wildlife

10/7/2019

In the fall edition of Windows to Wildlife:

* Birding the Fall Migration: Experiencing the best Southeast Idaho offers
* Spotlight Species of Greatest Conservation Need: Mountain Goat
* Fall Wildlife Events
* Leave the Leaves

link:
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Birders can flock to southeast Idaho to see fall migrations

By Hilary Turner, Road Ecology Wildlife Technician
Tuesday, October 8, 2019

From raptors to warblers to shorebirds, the area provides diverse habitat for a variety of birds

As a birder, there is almost nowhere I would rather be than southeastern Idaho in the fall. In the later summer, migrant birds begin their southward journeys, stopping over along the way to rest and refuel.

continued:
https://idfg.idaho.gov/press/birders-can-flock-southeast-idaho-see-fall-migrations
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The upside-down world of bats

By Sara Cassinelli, Website Content Specialist
Friday, October 4, 2019

Did you know Idaho has 14 different species of bats? Bats play an essential role in our environment and are one of the most endangered land mammals in the United States. Learn how you can help bats and what to do if you see one outside or around your home in our October 2019 edition of Wildlife Express.

Be sure to mark your calendar for Bat Week, October 24-31. Visit http://batweek.org/ for more information.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Deputies rescue cub from dumpster as mama bear watches

Sound of crying bear had neighbors distressed

Rob Malcolm Aug 30, 2019 Local News 8

North Lake Tahoe, California – Sheriff’s deputies had to get creative as they devised a plan to free a bear cub trapped in a dumpster, KOVR reported.

They filmed the entire rescue and had to work cautiously as the mother bear was watching closely with siblings nearby.

continued w/video:
— — — — — — — — — —

Pa. baker goes viral after making life-sized deer wedding cake

by WJAC Staff Thursday, October 10th 2019


Shady Maple Farm Market

East Earl, Pa. (WJAC) — Deer-ly beloved…

A wedding cake in Lancaster County is getting attention across Pennsylvania.

… The couple brought in a pair of plastic antlers and asked Shady Maple to make a wedding cake that fit the antlers.

The company says everything but the antlers were made from scratch.

full story w/more photos:
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Seasonal Humor:

FallCold-a
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Oct 6, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 6, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: The boil order and water restrictions are still in effect.

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire/SAR Training
May 10 to Oct 10 – Burn “permits” required
May 15 – Firewood Season opens
Oct 9 – Diamond Fuel delivery
Oct 17 – 10am pre-2020 Harmonica Meeting at the YP Tavern
(details below)
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Local Events:

Saturday Night at the Yellow Pine Tavern

Dave Nudo played at the Yellow Pine Tavern on Saturday October 5th at 8pm. Always a good time!
— — — — —

Fuel Delivery Oct 9

Diamond Fuel (and Feed) will be delivering fuel to Yellow Pine on Oct 9th. Please check your tanks and give them a call (208) 382-4430.
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Village News:

Helispot Update Sept 29th

20190929Helispot2-a
photo courtesy Ann F

Progress on the helispot continues despite the weather.
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Water Leak Photos and Video Oct 4, 2019

20191004WaterLeak1-a
courtesy Jeff F

Orchard water leak (Doe Street) 10 good sized leaks uncovered. Temporally fixed, waiting for parts to be delivered for permanent fix.

Link to video of leaking pipe on FB (courtesy Ann):
(See YPWUA News for info)
— — — —

Get Ready for Winter Heating

* Inspect and clean the chimney. Contact the YPFD to borrow chimney brushes.
* Inspect and clean wood stoves, make sure dampers work properly and check for leaks.
* Check your carbon monoxide and smoke detectors – install fresh batteries.
* Check your fire extinguisher and make sure it is handy. Manually rotate them around, tip upside down and lightly shake them, thus keeping the fire fighting agent loose, and check that the needle is still in the green. If you need a new one please call, your fire commissioner or Jeff F.
* If you have an oil-powered furnace, replace your filter and nozzle and check the tank level.
* Check your propane tank levels (early morning when it is cool in case there is a wasp nest!) Check to make sure snow falling from the roof cannot impact your pipes!
* Test the igniter switch. On an old system, you might have to relight the pilot. Newer systems have electronic igniters.
* Lubricate and clean the blower motor. First check the owner’s manual to see if your motor is the kind that needs lubricating. If it does, turn off the power, open the cover and clean the caps covering the bearings. Then remove the caps and lubricate the bearings.
* Inspect the blower belt for cracks. Turn off the power to the furnace at the main circuit breaker. Use a screwdriver to remove the steel cover of the air handler. The blower belt is the largest rubber belt that you see. Replace the belt if it is cracked.
* Inspect the exhaust flue outdoors to ensure it is free of obstructions such as branches or animal nests.
* Keep the area around your furnace unit free of debris and clutter.
* Change the air filters. Clean your air vents and ducts. Remove the vent covers with a screwdriver. Use the extension hose of your vacuum to remove the dust.
* Open all your air vents. Remove furniture, boxes and clutter that get in the way of air flowing from the vents.

Local Fuel Suppliers
Propane
Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Heating fuel
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
Furnace Service
Rocky Mountain Mechanical (208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Oct 5: The bins were empty Friday afternoon. Road to the dump is getting ‘pot-holey’.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Roads

Work on the South Fork Salmon River road was completed last week, road is fully open.

Work on the Stibnite slide between Yellow Pine and the mine has been completed.

Work on the culvert on Profile Creek road has been completed.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
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Reminder for people living in bear country:

* Garbage should be stored inside the house or in a secure garage or storage building.
* If garbage cannot be stored in a secure location, a bear-resistant container approved by the Interagency Bear Committee is recommended.
* Avoid using bird feeders from March through November. Birds do not need supplemental feeding this time of year.
* Pet food should not be left outside.
* BBQ grills or anything with a strong odor should not be left out at night.
* Protect gardens, beehives, and compost piles with electric fencing.
* Never intentionally feed bears. A food-conditioned bear may pose a threat to human safety and usually results in the removal of the bear.
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

The yearly Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the community hall. (No minutes yet)

Water Update (posted to FB Oct 4th 930pm)

Today (10/4) YPWUA worked on the section of pipe that had a number of leaks. Unfortunately we were unable to complete the repairs due to having a couple of incorrect parts. We will order the parts as soon as possible and complete the repairs. We had to do some creative Engineering today but cut 10 leaks to 2 small ones. Thank you to Jeff Forster and Dayle Bennett for working in the muck and water for two days without complaint, to Cecil Dallman for excellent excavation work, to Dave McClintock for parts and advice, to Layne Bennett, Ginny Bartholomew and Ann Forster for their support. Thanks to the community for your patience.

– Willie Sullivan

Water Update (posted to FB Oct 3rd 9pm):

YPWUA found the leaks today (above the orchard) and will be repairing them tomorrow. The water will be off from 10am till repairs and testing completed.

– Willie Sullivan

Water Update Sept 21 (excerpted from VYPA 9/21 meeting notes):

Tests were conducted by Idaho Rural Water [July 19th] in an effort to locate the source of the major leak in the system. They will return October 3rd to continue the search for leaks. The line between Alpine Village and the Saleen property, which includes the bridge across the East Fork river is the line most suspected to be leaking. Cecil Dallman will stand by with a backhoe to dig in locations found. More digging work is needed at the tanks and pipes near the water facility. A second engineer is being consulted. Getting contractors to come to YP and replace seals is difficult. The previous grant money is tied to a timeline so some specified work must be done this fall.

The possibility for a large amount of grant money is very slim because we would have to take out a loan and use the borrowed money for the required matching money, and then there would be the loan payments. Money on hand must be used on required repairs to the contact tank. Because some water users do not have voting rights YPWUA does not qualify for some grants.

There are 56 shares available for purchase at $100/share. Each piece of land is entitled to own one share. Share holders are entitled to vote; water users that do not own a share may not vote, but do have access to water. The owners of the 56 lots are encouraged to purchase shares. Ownership of a share is shown on your annual water bill.

Anyone wanting to arrange a payment plan should contact Willie Sullivan.

– Steve Holloway/Willie Sullivan

Water Update Sept 8:

Still looking for the leak. Water restrictions and boil order still in effect.

Water Update June 7:

1. The “boil order” is still in effect.
2. There is still large water leaks in the system. We continue to look.
3. A grant for $39,000 was approved for improvements to the system.
3. Work is currently being done on the new contact tank.
4. Please, no lawn watering until we find and repair the major leaks.
– Steve Holloway

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update
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VYPA News:

October 17 pre-2020 Harmonica Meeting

There will be a pre-2020 Harmonica Meeting on Thursday October 17th at 10am at the Yellow Pine Tavern. Lorinne and Deb will be there and Dawn on the phone to pre plan for our next festival. For all of you folks willing to help let us know your thoughts and plans. If you can’t attend please let us know by email or phone what your ideas are.
Thanks for all your support,
– Lorinne N. Munn

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link to: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for August 10, 2019
link to: 20190810 VYPA Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for July 20, 2019
link to: 20190720 Yellow Pine Village Association Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for June 8, 2019
link to: 20190608 Village of Yellow Pine Association

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 8th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th – 2pm at the Community Hall.
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YPFD News:

The YPFD District One Fire Commissioner position is currently available. (The Middle of Yellow Pine Ave. West)

The YPFD District One Commissioner is open for any full or part time resident who owns property west of the middle of YP Avenue and would like to be involved as a Fire Commissioner representative for a 4 year term.

If you are interested or would like further information please contact Jeff Forster (j4star1911 @ gmail.com or 633-1010).

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Meeting minutes for Sept 14, 2019
link to: 2019-09-14 YPFD Meeting_final

Meeting minutes for July 13, 2019
link to: 20190713 YPFD Meeting Notes_final

Meeting minutes for June 16, 2019
link to: 20190615 YPFD Meeting Notes_Final

May 10th to Oct 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Training: Sunday Fire/EMS training at 11am unless otherwise posted. All are welcome.

YP Helispot: We are working with Valley County Road Department and the Boise National Forest for the rock base for the road leading into the Helispot and the actual Helispot itself. We are also receiving rock for the Fire Hydrants, water tank foundations, etc. The rock will come from the Valdez pit and will be less expensive than having it trucked in from Cascade.

link to Cooking safety in the home:

link to Smoke Alarm Info:
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Call for reservations. Open until the end of hunting season.
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Our fall hours are open by request for the winter. Please call 208-633-3325, 970-379-5155 or email at matt @ ypcorner.com
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall hours open 8am to close
Full breakfast served starting at 8am with special arrangement for earlier breakfast as needed. 92 Octane non ethanol gas available, cubed ice, beer, pop and water sold by the 6 and 12 pack, snacks, ice cream and many supplies available. Burgers and Pizza, Beer and Wine on the evening menu. Football and other sports available on our TV. Wi Fi, Verizon phone service and information available.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
FB page:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Sep 30) overnight low of 22 degrees, first hard freeze! Clear sky and frosty this morning, a few patches of snow lingering in the shade. Large flock of dark-eyed juncos, a couple of female grosbeaks and nuthatches visiting. Crusher running, not so much dust today. Mostly cloudy by lunch time. Cool, light breeze and cloudy mid-afternoon, high of 47 degrees. Mostly cloudy and chilly light breeze at sunset. Lightly misting at dusk and getting rather cold. A few stars out before midnight. Started snowing before 6am.

Tuesday (Oct 1) overnight low around 32 degrees (low of 23 from 9am 9/30), overcast – top of VanMeter socked in, snowing lightly and patches of snow on the ground (less than 1/4″.) Then the clouds sat down to the valley floor and moderate snowfall for less than an hour, probably another 1/4″ accumulated before melting. Crusher running – not much dust (but a lot of noise.) Breaks in the clouds after lunch time and light cold breezes. Flocks of dark-eyed juncos and cassins finches, a couple of jays, several red-breasted nuthatches, a female northern flicker and a hairy woodpecker visiting. Mid-afternoon broken cloud cover and light chilly breezes, high of 48 degrees. Late afternoon low clouds almost to the base of VanMeter and half melted snowflakes fell for nearly an hour – no accumulation. Light drizzle after dark. Breezy after midnight.

Wednesday (Oct 2) overnight low of 31 degrees, mostly cloudy – ridges socked in and light breeze. Red-breasted nuthatches, hairy woodpecker and jays visiting, flicker calling from somewhere. Crusher running, no visible dust. Juncos, finches, pine siskins and evening grosbeaks visiting. Mail truck made it in on time. Partly cloudy at noon, chilly breezes. Male red-winged blackbirds visiting. Very nice mid-afternoon, mostly sunny and light breezes, high of 53 degrees. A few clouds at sunset, almost calm. Pine squirrel yelling from the trees. Mostly clear at dusk. Some stars out before midnight.

Thursday (Oct 3) overnight low of 26 degrees, mostly high haze covering the sky and frosty. Crusher wailing like a banshee. Nuthatches, a few finches and pine siskins visiting early. Evening grosbeaks, jays and a clarks nutcracker stopped by for lunch. Mostly cloudy and light breezes mid-day. Overcast, warmer and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 57 degrees. A few breaks in the clouds before sunset. Mostly cloudy at dusk. Dark by 740pm. Stars out at 11pm. Cloudy at 2am. Snowing 7am-745am.

Friday (Oct 4) overnight low of 29 degrees, overcast and the snow that fell earlier melting. Lots of clanging and banging up at the crusher. Red-breasted nuthatches, cassins finches, evening grosbeaks, steller jays, dark-eyed juncos, a female hairy woodpecker and a clarks nutcracker visiting (chipmunks and a pine squirrel too.) Rain/snow mix drizzle on and off all morning. Red-winged blackbirds and a white-breasted nuthatch visited after lunch. Low water pressure noted, was shut off upstream for repairs. Overcast mid-afternoon, clouds sitting down on VanMeter, high of 42 degrees. Partly clear at sunset, bright crescent moon to the south. Some stars out before midnight, then cloudy.

Saturday (Oct 5) overnight low of 28 degrees, overcast sky this morning. Clarks nutcracker, red-breasted nuthatches, a few evening grosbeaks, finches and pine siskins, a couple of jays and a hairy woodpecker visiting, (also chipmunks and a pine squirrel.) Day off for the crusher. Dark overcast mid-day. Dark-eyed juncos and red-winged blackbirds showed up after lunch. Extra street traffic. Breaks in the clouds early afternoon and a little breezy. Mostly cloudy late afternoon, cool light breezes, high of 53 degrees. Big breaks in the clouds before sunset. Mostly cloudy at dusk. Extra traffic after dark. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Sunday (Oct 6) overnight low of 24 degrees, clear sky and frosty this morning. Clarks nutcracker, 3 jays, a bunch of pine siskins, evening grosbeaks, white and red-breasted nuthatches, female hairy woodpecker and a red-winged blackbird visiting. Sunny and clear (bit of haze) mid-day. Extra street traffic. Clear, mild and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 62 degrees. Juncos visiting. Clear sky, red sunset.
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Letters to Share:

Midas Gold Drilling Program

I wanted to let you know that this week Midas Gold will be starting a small drilling program studying the hydrogeology and hydrology of specific areas of the historic Stibnite Mining District. The program is expected to take 3 weeks and will result in a small increase in traffic to and from Stibnite, starting on October 2nd, to bring the necessary equipment to and from site.

Let me know if you have any questions.

Cheers,
Shelley Bennett
Public Relations Manager
M: 208.860.0985
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Commissioner Cruickshank’s Final Newsletter

From the Desk of Commissioner Cruickshank, Oct 1 2019

Sunday Sept 1st
I created the August newsletter and sent it out.

Tuesday September 3rd
I received a call from a Consultant working on potential uses for the Kokanee Cove area of Ponderosa Park in the future.
I returned a call to a fellow commissioner in Clearwater County requesting some information on the duties of a NACo Board Member.

Wednesday September 4th
I participated in a National Forest Counties and Schools Coalition Conference Call to discuss the Fly-In next week to advocate for Secure Rural Schools Funding in the short term and permanent funding for the future.
I reviewed the minutes of the August 26th commissioner meeting.
I returned a call from a fellow commissioner in Bingham County to discuss the duties of a NACo Board Member.

Thursday September 5th
I emailed my Clerk and Fellow Commissioners on not being able to attend Monday’s Commissioner meeting due to a
Memorial Service for a family member.

Monday September 9th
Commissioner day today which I missed to attend the Memorial Service. The minutes once approved can be found on the Valley County Website at Valley County Idaho Official Site then click on the commissioners section where you will find the minutes.

Tuesday September 10th
I met with the Consultant working on the Kokanee Cove project for the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation.
I reviewed the wording on the proposed Road Department Levy for this fall’s Ballot.

Thursday September 12th
I met with an attorney doing investigation on a potential lawsuit against Valley County.
I toured the Anderson Creek area to look at alternatives for Winter Access routes.
I stopped by the Road Department to discuss winter access in various areas.
I left a message with the Cascade Ranger on the Boise National Forest to inquire about a Forest Roads and Trails Act easement for potential Winter Access routes for recreation. The call was returned later this evening saying they would consider this possibility.

Friday September 13th
I reviewed contracts that will be decided on Monday’s agenda and reviewed and replied to various emails.

Monday September 16th
Commissioner day today. Please see the minutes once approved on the Valley County Website.

Tuesday September 17th
I replied to questions from the Star News reporter on the proposed Road Levy.
I reviewed the Packer John Tower Lease for our 911 Repeater for south Valley County Communications.
I created a draft letter to request the Forest Roads and Trails Act easement request to the Boise National Forest, Cascade Ranger District for the commissioners to approve on the next commissioner meeting.
I received a call from an Irrigation District looking for surplus bridge material to replace a failing bridge on their canal system.

Wednesday September 18th
I met with a Land owner and their Consultant on the Anderson Creek property to discuss their needs and future Winter Access for recreation in that area.
I reviewed a document to help explain why Valley County is requesting a Road Levy to fund the Road Department in the future.
I returned a call to a Clerk in Nez Perce County who will be traveling to Washington D.C. next week and wanted to insure she had the correct information on Secure Rural Schools and Payment in Lieu of Taxes for when she meets with our Idaho Congressional Delegation. The information is correct.

Thursday September 19th
I participated in the National Association of Counties (NACo) West Region Conference Call where it is now hosted by a commissioner from Cascade County, Montana who was elected this summer when I finished my term for NACo.
I reviewed the minutes of September 16th.

Friday September 20th
I participated in the NACo Western Interstate Region Board of Directors Conference call to discuss current legislative issues and the upcoming Fall Board meeting held in October.
I reviewed the minutes of September 16th.
I returned a call to a citizen asking about the process used by the McCall Impact Area Planning and Zoning and how to voice his concerns.

Monday September 23rd
Commissioner meeting today. The minutes will be on the Valley County Website once approved.

Tuesday September 24th
I sent a list of committees to an applicant who is interested in my position as a commissioner.

Wednesday September 25th
I sent information on Wave Enhanced Technology (WET) to the commissioner interested in my position.

Thursday September 26th
I met with a retired Idaho Association of Counties staff person in McCall who was up visiting and playing golf to reminisce about the prior days.

Monday September 30th
My FINAL DAY as a Valley County Commissioner was spent in a Commissioner Meeting. The Clerk hosted a Luncheon to recognize my retirement. [link to V. Co. Website for minutes.]

I want to thank everyone for reading my newsletters as I attempted to provide a snapshot of what a commissioner does to serve the citizens and to do their best in all aspects of the job it entails.

I am sure the future will bring more changes and that the commissioner in charge will do their best as well for Valley County.

From the bottom of my heart THANK YOU for allowing me to serve the great citizens of Valley County to the best of my abilities.

Gordon
— — —

Gordon Cruickshank at his retirement gathering.

20190930CruickshankRetirement-a
(photo courtesy LI)
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Idaho News:

Valley County Sheriff: Missing man, dog last seen in Donnelly

by CBS 2 News Staff Sunday, October 6th 2019


Valley County Sheriff’s Office

Valley County, Idaho (CBS 2) — A man and his dog are missing with their last known location being the Wagon Wheel area of Donnelly, Friday.

It was around 4 p.m. that Valley County Sheriff’s Office say that Brian Elkman and his dog, Cheech, were last heard from.

They add that Elkman is known to travel the areas of Paddy Flat, Gold Fork and West Mountain areas.

Cheech is described as a 14-year-old yellow lab with tumors on his body.

Elkman’s car is a 2018 Polaris General with a rack and a red gas can attached to it.

If you have any information related to Elkman’s whereabouts, Valley County SO say you should call them at 208-382-5160.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County commissioners approve new regulations in effort to make home propane systems safer

The McCall Fire District said over the last 10 years, it has responded to 136 propane-related emergencies and it hopes these new regulations can change that.

Misty Inglet September 30, 2019 KTVB

Cascade, Idaho — After nearly 140 propane-related emergencies over the last ten years, Valley County is taking steps to prevent propane leaks and the resulting disasters.

On Monday, Valley County commissioners approved an ordinance that would better specify, as well as tighten, restrictions on propane tanks outside the home.

The driving force behind the propane ordinance originally started with McCall Fire Chief Garret De Jong, who pushed for better regulations for home propane systems after a propane leak caused a home explosion in March, killing one man and severely injuring a teenage girl.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Frontier Communications sale set to be final in 2020

Wash. firm to acquire operations in Idaho, 3 other states

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Oct 3, 2019

The sale of Idaho operations of Frontier Communications, including those in Valley County and Meadows Valley, is expected to be completed by July of next year, a spokesperson for the buyers said.

“The first half of 2020” is the goal for closing the sale of Frontier operations in Idaho, Washington, Oregon, and Montana to WaveDivision Capital of Kirkland, Washington, for $1.3 billion, WaveDivision spokesperson John Raffetto.

Frontier’s operations in the four states serve more than 350,000 residential and commercial customers and account for $619 million of revenue per year, an announcement of the sale said. Numbers for Valley County and Meadows Valley were not available.

Details on how local service will change under WaveDivision Capital will not be available until the sale is completed, Raffetto said.

Until then, all current Frontier services will continue without disruption, all offices will remain open, and all contracts and rates will continue to be honored, the announcement said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

McCall OKs plan to provide internet service

Council members question cost estimates

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Oct 3, 2019

Faster internet speeds in McCall could be achieved by building a city-owned network of fiber-optic wires, the McCall City Council was told last week

The city would treat the internet as a utility like water to keep up with an increasing cultural demand for quality internet, McCall Information Systems Manager Chris Curtin told council member during a work session last Friday.

… The need for a city-owned internet system stems from the shortcomings of existing internet providers, the largest of which are Frontier Communications and Sparklight, formerly CableOne, Curtin’s report said.

… Residents interested in the city’s proposal should go to [link to McCall Rapid]

full story:
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CPR, First Aid classes set for Donnelly Oct. 16-17

The Star-News Oct 3, 2019

CPR/AED and First Aid classes will be offered on Wednesday and Thursday, Oct. 16-17, at 6 p.m. at the Donnelly Fire Station.

The CPR/AED portion will be held Wednesday, Oct. 16, and the First Aid portion will be held Thursday, Oct. 17.

Cost is $25, and space is limited. To register, call 208-325-8619.

The Donnelly Fire Station is located at 244 W. Roseberry Road.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Open government seminar to be held Oct. 10 in McCall

The Star-News Oct 3, 2019

Idaho’s open meeting and public records laws will be the topic of a seminar to be held in McCall next Thursday, Oct. 10.

The seminar, led by Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden, will be held from 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Oct. 10 in the lower level meeting room at Idaho First Bank, 475 E. Deinhard Ln.

The session is a chance to learn what is covered by the laws and how to comply in a fun and accessible format.

Presenters in addition to Wasden will include Deputy Idaho Attorney General Brian Kane and Betsy Russell, president of Idahoans for Openness in Government. The event is hosted by The Star-News.

The session is being staged for the benefit of elected officials and local government employees, but members of the public should find interest in the topic, The Star-News Publisher Tom Grote said.

… More information plus an online “User’s Guide” to Idaho’s open government laws are available at [link]

full story:
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Horseshoe Bend Flight Park reopens to honor former owner who died in July

Joey Prechtl October 4, 2019 KTVB

Horseshoe Bend, Idaho — Months after a tragic accident, the Horseshoe Bend Flight Park is back open, and in a big way, with a paragliding accuracy contest. The contest is the first of its kind in the country, and it’s also the first time the park is back open after an accident that killed one of the park’s co-owners.

Justin Boer was flying when he crashed at the park in July. He died at the scene. He co-founded the flight park with his friend, Scott Edwards.

continued:
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Mining News:

Oct. 12 gathering to protest threat of gold mine to South Fork river

The Star-News Oct 3, 2019

A rally called “A Gathering of Peoples for the Protection of the South Fork and the Salmon” will be held on Saturday, Oct 12, at 11:30 a.m. at Art Roberts Park in downtown McCall.

The rally is sponsored by Save the South Fork and the Nez Perce Tribe and will include representatives from Nimiipuu Protecting the Environment, Earthworks and the Idaho Conservation League.

A “tributary walk” from several locations in town to the park will begin the event. There will be an invocation by the tribe followed by speakers and music.

The tribe will have a booth with information on fisheries, climate change and its website, Dig for the Truth.org.

The rally will also discuss what organizers said is the threat to the South Fork of the Salmon River, its tributaries and fisheries from the mine proposed near Yellow Pine by Midas Gold.

The mine could also have significant effects on Valley County’ roads, population, schools, medical services, labor force, water and sewer facilities, carbon emissions, housing costs and availability, and traffic, the rally organizers said,

source:
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Idaho lawsuit against suction-dredge miner can proceed

The Idaho Conservation League sued in 2018 contending Shannon Poe was violating the federal Clean Water Act.

Keith Ridler Associated Press October 1, 2019

Boise, Idaho — A U.S. District Court judge in Idaho has rejected a California man’s request to dismiss an environmental group’s lawsuit against him concerning suction dredging for gold in Idaho rivers without required federal permits.

Chief U.S. Magistrate Judge Ronald E. Bush ruled Monday that the Idaho Conservation League has standing to bring the citizen enforcement lawsuit against Shannon Poe of Concord, California.

Bush wrote that Poe in multiple years admitted in online posts to dredging Idaho rivers while recognizing the need to obtain permits and his defiance to do so.

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Public Lands:

USFS Regional Intermountain News

Volume 3 Issue 6 October 2019

In this issue:

* Paiute Cutthroat Trout Reintroduced to Native Habitat in High Sierra Wildernes
* USDA Forest Service proposes changes to address land management challenges
* Wyoming Public Lands Day Stewardship Events on the Bridger-Teton National Forest
* Discover your Forest
* Forest News
* Boots in the Forest
* Volunteer With Us!

Link:
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Critter News:

Cascade Veterinary Clinic

Dr. Ruble and the great folks at the Cascade clinic have brought their traveling clinic to Yellow Pine every summer for over 10 years. This year Dr. Merik Metos has joined the team.

The Cascade Veterinary Clinic is always in need of donated (used) towels, blankets and sheets. Please consider “paying it forward”.

Cascade Veterinary Clinic
935 Main Street
Cascade, ID 83611
Phone: (208) 382-4590
Fax: (208) 382-5728

Business Hours
Monday: 9am – 5pm (Lunch 12pm – 1pm)
Tuesday: 9am – 12pm (no doctor available)
Wednesday: 9am – 5pm (Lunch 12pm – 1pm)
Thursday: 9am – 5pm (Lunch 12pm – 1pm)
Friday: 9am – 5pm (Lunch 12pm – 1pm)
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed
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Pet Talk – Atrial fibrillation in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Oct 4, 2019 IME

Atrial fibrillation is an abnormal heart rhythm caused by rapid irregular contractions of the upper chambers of the heart, called the atria. Because the heart is beating faster and more irregularly than normal, it does not fill or pump blood properly. Failure to pump blood normally can result in fluid accumulation in the lungs, chest or abdomen, and can lead to weakness and heart failure.

The most common cause of AF is advanced heart disease, with enlargement of one or both atria. AF can occur spontaneously for unknown reasons in giant-breed dogs such as the great Dane and Irish wolfhound. Clinical signs of AF include weakness and inability to exercise. Fainting episodes may occur. Breathing may be faster and labored, and coughing may be noted. An electrocardiogram (ECG) is needed to confirm the presence of AF. Additional tests, such as chest X-rays and a heart ultrasound, are then done to search for any underlying cause. Any fluid removed from the chest or abdomen may be sent for analysis.

Treatment is initially directed at any underlying heart disease or heart failure and may include drugs to increase contractility or decrease fluid retention.

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Wood River Wolf Project has successful season

Project’s goal is to save sheep and wolves through nonlethal deterrents

Greg Moore Oct 4, 2019 IME

As herders bring their sheep down from the hills for the season, the Wood River Wolf Project is reporting a mostly successful summer keeping the domestic animals and wolves apart.

Project steering committee member Larry Schoen said herders reported only one incident of wolf depredation this season, when seven or eight sheep were killed this spring in the Dip Creek drainage, on the east side of state Highway 75 just north of Ketchum.

“There was a much-elevated wolf presence over the past couple of years, so with only one depredation early in the season, that’s a pretty good outcome,” Schoen said.

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New wolfpack in western Oregon boasts 4 new pups

Associated Press October 5, 2019

Salem, Ore. — A newly established pack of wolves in Oregon has something to howl about. At least four pups have been born to the pack in the western part of the state, where they are still listed as endangered.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced Friday that a photo from a trail camera confirmed the pups’ existence. Their fur gray with cream-colored streaks, three of them were photographed walking on an unpaved road with a larger wolf, with the fourth pup on the other side of the road and further back.

The existence of the pack was officially confirmed only early this year, and then numbered three wolves.

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BLM approves wild horse roundup in southcentral Idaho

Oct 01, 2019 Associated Press

Boise, Idaho — Federal officials plan to roundup nearly all the wild horses in a south-central Idaho wild horse area, so the population can be brought down and maintained at about fifty horses.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management said Tuesday that it has approved an environmental analysis that includes using fertility control on 25 female horses that would be released back into the wild.

The agency estimates the population at the Saylor Creek Herd Management Area — about fifteen miles south of Glenns Ferry — will be about 170 horses by next summer.

continued:
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US announces caribou protections for Idaho, Washington

Oct 03, 2019 By Associated Press

Boise, Idaho — U.S. officials on Wednesday announced protections for woodland caribou and their habitat in parts of Idaho and Washington.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service designated the southern mountain population of woodland caribou as endangered and confirmed 47 square miles (122 square kilometers) in Idaho and Washington as critical habitat requiring special protection.

The agency’s decision came after environmentalist groups sued to seek the critical habitat designation that requires federal agencies to consult with Fish and Wildlife before approving activities like logging or road building.

continued:
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Chronic wasting disease reaches Wyoming Range

Oct 03, 2019 By Associated Press

Jackson, Wyo. (AP) — Chronic wasting disease has been found in a western Wyoming mule deer herd prized by hunters.

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department says the disease was confirmed early this week in a mule deer buck that was shot by a hunter Sept. 16 west of Bondurant in the Wyoming Range.

The Jackson Hole News & Guide reports that although the area where the buck was killed is technically in the Wyoming Range, the herd that uses that portion of the Bridger-Teton National Forest is known as the Sublette Herd.

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Lost sheep roaming the streets of Middleton

It is unknown who these sheep belong to or how they escaped.

Nyla Gennaoui October 4, 2019 KTVB

Middleton, Idaho — Middleton Police officers are trying to capture sheep running around the city on Oct. 4.

The sheep were first spotted near Highway 44 and then again in Park Place subdivision in Middleton.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

People can comment on proposed Fish and Game rule regarding wolf trapping

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Friday, October 4, 2019

People can comment on proposed Fish and Game rule changes for legal methods of take for trapping wolves. Under the proposed changes, diverters for wolf snares would no longer be required, but all wolf snares would need both a break-away device and a cable stop incorporated within the loop of the snare. Current rules require either a break-away device or a cable stop in addition to diverters.

The proposed rule change would allow the Fish and Game Commission to require diverters on a local basis (rather than statewide), based on levels of non-target catch of animals whose capture may be avoided by diverter use.

continued:
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Hunt safe: Survival tips for big game hunters

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, October 2, 2019

Be prepared for those unexpected situations you might encounter while hunting in the fall

Every hunting season, hunters get lost in the woods, and while most escape no worse than tired, chilled and hungry, the hazards of being lost in Idaho’s woods shouldn’t be underestimated.

Hunters can take precautions and prepare for an unexpected stay in the woods.

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Dress for the weather and you’ll be more comfortable during your hunt

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Friday, October 4, 2019

Wear the right hunting clothing so you can stay in the woods and make your hunting time count

Hunting takes place in all weather and conditions, so don’t overlook your hunting clothing because it may determine how long you’re able to stay outdoors, and how comfortable you are when you’re out there. It takes a little preparation and investment in the right clothing for the weather, but it will pay dividends.

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Idaho F&G on hunting safely: ‘Don’t trust modern electronics’

by Ryan L Morrison Tuesday, October 1st 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — “Don’t trust modern electronics for your sole source of navigation,” said Roger Phillips, an Idaho Fish and Game (IDFG) public information supervisor. “Cell phones die, all batteries die, all electronic things fail at some point in their lives, you don’t want them to fail while you’re out there.”

Phillips said to always trust the ole’ map and compass – or even just the compass. Get your bearings, and know where you’re heading.

But the first thing people need to remember is the weather warns Phillips. It’s unpredictable and dressing for the right climate is imperative.

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Think twice before taking a roadside shot

Oct 3, 2019 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – That buck or bull standing next to the road might be a tempting target, but it might not be what you think it is, and it could be a very costly mistake.

Idaho Fish and Game conservation officers deploy “artificial simulated animals” during hunting season to catch law-breaking hunters. Commonly called ASAs, they are life-like copies of deer, elk and other game species that look and act like the real thing.

“Officers watch the animal and respond if someone violates the law,” said Fish and Game Chief of Enforcement Greg Wooten. “This tool is extremely important in our effort to curtail illegal activity that is otherwise undetectable.”

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Conservation Officers seek assistance regarding bull elk shot and left to waste near Orofino

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Communications Manager
Wednesday, October 2, 2019

A local landowner reported hearing a shot off of Harmony Heights Loop Road near Orofino, ID on Tuesday, October 1 around 9 p.m. The landowner discovered a wounded bull elk in the field early the next morning. There currently is no open hunting season for elk in that area. A county deputy came to dispatch the elk and Idaho Department of Fish & Game (IDFG) Conservation Officers determined that the elk was shot with a rifle in the spine.

Anyone with any information about the incident is encouraged to call IDFG Sr. Conservation Officer John McLain at (208) 827-1488 or call the Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) hotline 1-800-632-5999. Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward.

source:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Squirrels listen in on bird chatter to decide if they’re safe, study says

They take cues to determine if predator is nearby

By AJ Willingham, CNN Sep 05, 2019 Local News 8

Squirrels are capricious little creatures. And aside from taunting the neighborhood dogs and using your gutters as water slides, it appears they also eavesdrop on bird chatter to gauge their safety.

A new study published in the journal PLOS One concludes grey squirrels use the sounds of nearby birds to infer the absence of predators.

Researchers from Oberlin College played several recordings for squirrels in their natural habitat, including the ambient chatter of birds around a feeder and the sound of a red-tailed hawk; a predator.

Understandably, the squirrels went on alert after hearing the hawk sound, displaying what the study calls “vigilance behavior.” This could include freezing, looking around more often or standing up.

However, the researchers found squirrels who heard bird chatter some time after the hawk sound “expressed significantly lower and more rapidly declining levels of vigilance behavior than those exposed to ambient noise.”

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Seasonal Humor:

FallBirdTab-a
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Sept 29, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 29, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: The boil order and water restrictions are still in effect.

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire/SAR Training
May 10 to Oct 10 – Burn “permits” required
May 15 – Firewood Season opens
July 22 – Daytime closures on So. Fk road begin
Oct 5 – 8pm Dave Nudo playing at the YP Tavern
Oct 9 – Diamond Fuel delivery

(details below)
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Local Events:

Saturday October 5th YP Tavern

Coming back to the Tavern for the 4th year Dave Nudo. Catch him Saturday October 5th at 8pm. Always a good time!
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Fuel Delivery Oct 9

Diamond Fuel (and Feed) will be delivering fuel to Yellow Pine on Oct 9th. Please check your tanks and give them a call (208) 382-4430.
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Village News:

Smoke Sep 25 from Rx burn

20190925smoke-a
photo courtesy Eye n the Sky Yellow Pine cam

Prescribed Burning in Bald Hill and Four Mile Projects September 25 and 26
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Fish Fry at the Yellow Pine Tavern Sept 28

20190928FishFry-a
photo courtesy YP Tavern

There was a good turnout for our annual fish fry. About 50 people showed up in spite of the rain. We estimate this is our 15th year for this event. Thanks to Stu for his donation of the fish, Jeff, Willie and Steve for frying the fish, Ann for the set up and take down, Nicki for bar tending, Sue for the cleanup and all of the folks who brought desserts and other dishes.

– Yellow Pine Tavern

link to FB photo gallery:
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Get Ready for Winter Heating

* Inspect and clean the chimney. Contact the YPFD to borrow chimney brushes.
* Inspect and clean wood stoves, make sure dampers work properly and check for leaks.
* Check your carbon monoxide and smoke detectors – install fresh batteries.
* Check your fire extinguisher and make sure it is handy. Manually rotate them around, tip upside down and lightly shake them, thus keeping the fire fighting agent loose, and check that the needle is still in the green. If you need a new one please call, your fire commissioner or Jeff F.
* If you have an oil-powered furnace, replace your filter and nozzle and check the tank level.
* Check your propane tank levels (early morning when it is cool in case there is a wasp nest!)
* Test the igniter switch. On an old system, you might have to relight the pilot. Newer systems have electronic igniters.
* Lubricate and clean the blower motor. First check the owner’s manual to see if your motor is the kind that needs lubricating. If it does, turn off the power, open the cover and clean the caps covering the bearings. Then remove the caps and lubricate the bearings.
* Inspect the blower belt for cracks. Turn off the power to the furnace at the main circuit breaker. Use a screwdriver to remove the steel cover of the air handler. The blower belt is the largest rubber belt that you see. Replace the belt if it is cracked.
* Inspect the exhaust flue outdoors to ensure it is free of obstructions such as branches or animal nests.
* Keep the area around your furnace unit free of debris and clutter.
* Change the air filters. Clean your air vents and ducts. Remove the vent covers with a screwdriver. Use the extension hose of your vacuum to remove the dust.
* Open all your air vents. Remove furniture, boxes and clutter that get in the way of air flowing from the vents.

Local Fuel Suppliers
Propane
Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Heating fuel
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
Furnace Service
Rocky Mountain Mechanical (208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Sept 19th: Road to the dump is good. The bins were empty Thursday afternoon.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Roads

Snow in the high country

Photo of snow Profile Gap Saturday Sep 28th (courtesy Scott A)

Photo of snow Warm Lake summit Saturday Sep 28th (courtesy Dave P)
20190928WarmLakeSummitSnow-a

Photo of snow at Stibnite Sunday Sep 29th (courtesy Midas Gold)
20190929SnowStibnite-a

South Fork Road: Note: It is possible they may be done with the paving, if so, then the road closures will end for the season. Waiting on confirmation from the FS.
More info:

YP to Stibnite Road
Update from Valley Co. Road Dept Sept 25: Work is complete on the Stibnite road. I believe the contractor is still going to blade the road from Yellow Pine to Stibnite.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
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Reminder for people living in bear country:

* Garbage should be stored inside the house or in a secure garage or storage building.
* If garbage cannot be stored in a secure location, a bear-resistant container approved by the Interagency Bear Committee is recommended.
* Avoid using bird feeders from March through November. Birds do not need supplemental feeding this time of year.
* Pet food should not be left outside.
* BBQ grills or anything with a strong odor should not be left out at night.
* Protect gardens, beehives, and compost piles with electric fencing.
* Never intentionally feed bears. A food-conditioned bear may pose a threat to human safety and usually results in the removal of the bear.
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

The yearly Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the community hall. (No minutes yet)

Water Update Sept 21 (excerpted from VYPA 9/21 meeting notes):

Tests were conducted by Idaho Rural Water [July 19th] in an effort to locate the source of the major leak in the system. They will return October 3rd to continue the search for leaks. The line between Alpine Village and the Saleen property, which includes the bridge across the East Fork river is the line most suspected to be leaking. Cecil Dallman will stand by with a backhoe to dig in locations found. More digging work is needed at the tanks and pipes near the water facility. A second engineer is being consulted. Getting contractors to come to YP and replace seals is difficult. The previous grant money is tied to a timeline so some specified work must be done this fall.

The possibility for a large amount of grant money is very slim because we would have to take out a loan and use the borrowed money for the required matching money, and then there would be the loan payments. Money on hand must be used on required repairs to the contact tank. Because some water users do not have voting rights YPWUA does not qualify for some grants.

There are 56 shares available for purchase at $100/share. Each piece of land is entitled to own one share. Share holders are entitled to vote; water users that do not own a share may not vote, but do have access to water. The owners of the 56 lots are encouraged to purchase shares. Ownership of a share is shown on your annual water bill.

Anyone wanting to arrange a payment plan should contact Willie Sullivan.

– Steve Holloway/Willie Sullivan

Water Update Sept 8:

Still looking for the leak. Water restrictions and boil order still in effect.

Water Update June 7:

1. The “boil order” is still in effect.
2. There is still large water leaks in the system. We continue to look.
3. A grant for $39,000 was approved for improvements to the system.
3. Work is currently being done on the new contact tank.
4. Please, no lawn watering until we find and repair the major leaks.
– Steve Holloway

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update
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VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link to: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for August 10, 2019
link to: 20190810 VYPA Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for July 20, 2019
link to: 20190720 Yellow Pine Village Association Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for June 8, 2019
link to: 20190608 Village of Yellow Pine Association

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019
June 8th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th – 2pm at the Community Hall.
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YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Meeting minutes for Sept 14, 2019
link to: 2019-09-14 YPFD Meeting_final

Meeting minutes for July 13, 2019
link to: 20190713 YPFD Meeting Notes_final

Meeting minutes for June 16, 2019
link to: 20190615 YPFD Meeting Notes_Final

May 10th to Oct 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Training: Sunday Fire/EMS training at 11am unless otherwise posted. All are welcome.

YP Helispot: We are working with Valley County Road Department and the Boise National Forest for the rock base for the road leading into the Helispot and the actual Helispot itself. We are also receiving rock for the Fire Hydrants, water tank foundations, etc. The rock will come from the Valdez pit and will be less expensive than having it trucked in from Cascade.

link to Cooking safety in the home:

link to Smoke Alarm Info:

-JF
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Call for reservations
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

Our hours will be 11-8 every day, except closed on Tuesdays. We are open for breakfast by request and always have good coffee starting at 6am.
The Corner has firewood permits in stock now. 4 cord minimum at $6.25 per cord. Please bring drivers license and cash is preferred, no CC.
The Corner Store will also be open with snacks, groceries, fresh produce, soda, ice and packaged beer. If you know you will be coming in over the summer and need special grocery orders, let me know and I will order it in for you while you are here, 2 deliveries a week. The best way to get a hold of me is to call or stop by and say hello.
Karaoke is back at The Corner! Choose your favorite songs from our online music library and entertain your friends up on stage through our professional sound system.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall hours open 8AM to close
Full breakfast served starting at 8am with special arrangement for earlier breakfast as needed. 92 Octane non ethanol gas available, cubed ice, beer, pop and water sold by the 6 and 12 pack, snacks, ice cream and many supplies available. Burgers and Pizza, Beer and Wine on the evening menu. Football and other sports available on our TV. Wi Fi, Verizon phone service and information available.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
FB page:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Sep 23) our 24 hour low of 34 degrees was from Sunday morning, it was 39 degrees at sunrise, almost clear sky this morning – one cloud peeking over VanMeter to the north. Red-breasted nuthatches, jays, a pine skiskin and a couple of finches (and chipmunks) visiting. Partly cloudy before lunch time. Partly cloudy and mild breezes mid-afternoon, high of 71 degrees. Partly clear at sunset and just a slight breeze. Fall Equinox: sunrise just after 9am and sunset before 730pm. Absence of mosquitoes noted. Cloudy before midnight.

Tuesday (Sep 24) overnight low of 39 degrees, mostly dark clouds and nearly calm this morning. Crusher is running, small haze of dust. Herd of low loud airplanes flew over around 940am. Red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Bigger breaks in the clouds before lunch time and breezy. Warm, mostly clear and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 74 degrees. Female hairy woodpecker visiting. Mostly cloudy after sunset. Smell of burning garbage in the air. Cloudy before midnight.

Wednesday (Sep 25) overnight low of 36 degrees, mostly clear sky (high haze) and heavy dew. Crusher making high pitched whine, small haze of dust. Red-breasted nuthatches and steller jays visiting. A few clouds and breezy mid-day. Mail truck made it in on time. Small flock of finches flying around. Heavy smoke coming in from the west (Rx burn) mid-afternoon, breezy and no clouds in the sky, high of 71 degrees. By sunset the sun was a scarlet jewel in the west and the sky was orange, thick smoke almost obscured the hills. At dusk it was very smoky, unable to see the sky. A few hazy stars before midnight.

Thursday (Sep 26) overnight low of 33 degrees, mostly cloudy sky, dewy, light breeze and smoky air this morning. Noisy crusher running putting up small cloud of dust, traffic kicking up street dust as well. Red-breasted nuthatches visiting, raven flying and calling. A few noisy airplanes. Overcast and light breezes at lunch time, better air quality. Several chipmunks, a few finches and a pine squirrel visiting. A little extra traffic early afternoon. Dark overcast and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 72 degrees. Started raining late afternoon, still raining lightly after sunset and cloudy.

Friday (Sep 27) overnight low of 36 degrees, mostly cloudy – peaks and ridges socked in. Nuthatches, hairy woodpecker and jays visiting. Clouds lifting and thinning by lunch time, light breeze. Light traffic, no dust. Partly cloudy and slight breeze mid-afternoon, high of 66 degrees. Power off/on at 540pm. Smoke settling in before sunset. Doe and 2 fat fawns munching around the neighborhood. At dusk it was mostly cloudy and smell of smoke in the air. Partly clear in the middle of the night.

Saturday (Sep 28) overnight low of 33 degrees, mostly cloudy and chilly light breeze this morning. Lots of nice tree color in the neighborhood. Evening grosbeaks are back! Hairy woodpecker, several nuthatches and a few jays also visiting. Pine squirrels and chipmunks are busy. Gusty breezes and rain shower right after lunch time. Extra traffic. Cool, cloudy and steady rain mid-afternoon, high of 46 degrees. Rained until late afternoon. Low foggy clouds just before sunset. Light misty sprinkle at dusk, very low clouds. Drizzles on and off until after midnight.

Sunday (Sep 29) overnight low of 34 degrees, low overcast and socked in this morning. Snow line looks below 6000 feet. Heard one grosbeak tweet, red-breasted nuthatches and jays busy at the feeders, dark-eyed juncos sheltering in the lilac bushes. Higher darker cloud cover at lunch time, high of 44 degrees. Flock of grosbeaks visiting and small flock of juncos out back. Gusty breezes and “grauple” (little snowballs) falling 3pm – enough to cover the ground in 15 minutes before melting, then large quarter sized flakes for about 10 minutes, then lighter snowfall which ended around 350pm. Breaks in the cloud cover before sunset. Partly clear at dusk and still above freezing.
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Photo to Share:

Wilbur’s grave marker, Idaho Veterans Cemetery, Boise, Idaho

RIPWilburWilesHeadstone-a

courtesy Sandy McRae
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Idaho News:

Proposed [Valley County] law would protect propane tanks from leaks

Snow slide blamed for March blast that killed McCall man

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Sep 26, 2019

An ordinance aimed at preventing propane explosions like one that killed a McCall man and critically injured his granddaughter in March will be heard by Valley County commissioners on Monday.

A public hearing on the ordinance will be held at 2 p.m. in the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade.

The ordinance would require all propane systems in Valley County to be built with protective equipment that helps prevent leaks stemming from falling snow cracking outdoor propane pipes.

“The intent of the whole thing is to just build propane systems that are safe and maintenance-free for secondary homeowners and the like,” McCall Fire & EMS Chief Garrett de Jong said.

The ordinance, which was drafted by the McCall, Donnelly and Cascade fire districts and propane providers, is also expected to go before city councils in McCall, Donnelly and Cascade this fall, de Jong said.

The current draft would require second stage regulators to be placed on the gable end of roofs or a location approved by the local fire districts.

Second-stage regulators are installed along the edge of homes and manage propane flows to appliances.

The placement would help reduce the risk of snow shedding from roofs and damaging the regulators, de Jong said.

Snow shields would also be required over all regulators and piping to protect them from breaks caused by snow sliding or being shoveled off roofs and the pressure of built-up snow on the ground.

Instead of a solid metal regulator pipe, a flexible pipe would be required to allow the pipe to move under the weight of snow or other forces instead of shearing off.

Under the new ordinance, all new propane systems would be inspected and approved by the local fire district with jurisdiction over the property.

The new rules would apply only to new construction, while existing installations would not be required to be upgraded until a propane tank is replaced, according to the ordinance.

However, if the ordinance is adopted, de Jong anticipates many local propane providers would refuse to fill tanks without the safety equipment.

continued:
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Free woody debris collection to be held Oct. 4-16 at four sites

The Star-News Sep 26, 2019

Valley County residents can bring their woody debris to one of four free collection sites from Friday, Oct. 4, through Wednesday, Oct. 16, during the “Bring It, Don’t Burn It” event.

No construction waste or plastic bags will be accepted. Branches, needles, leaves and other organic materials will be accepted at the following collection sites:

• McCall Fire Station, 201 Deinhard Lane.

• Donnelly Fire Station, 244 W. Roseberry Road.

• Cascade Fire Station, 109 E. Pine St.

• Valley County Transfer Station, Spink Lane off Farm-to-Market Road in Donnelly.

The Valley County Transfer Station will accept debris until Saturday, Oct. 19.

source:

Note: The Yellow Pine woody debris pile is at the Transfer Station, please follow the rules listed in Village News.
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McCall Police crack down on city-wide TP’ing spree

by Ryan L Morrison Thursday, September 26th 2019


McCall Police Department

McCall, Idaho (CBS 2) — The McCall Police Department (MPD) is cracking down on a city-wide TP’ing spree as of Thursday.

What sounds like harmless pranks between students in the community, have now become an issue in what local authorities are calling a “city-wide free for all.”

“Businesses, streets, and entire blocks including, homes without kids, have all become the targets of both TP, eggs, and select produce items,” according to MPD.

continued:
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CPR, First Aid classes set for Donnelly on Oct. 16-17

The Star-News Sep 26, 2019

CPR/AED and First Aid classes will be offered on Wednesday and Thursday, Oct. 16-17, at 6 p.m. at the Donnelly Fire Station.

The CPR/AED portion will be held Wednesday, Oct. 16, and the First Aid portion will be held Thursday, Oct. 17.

Cost is $25, and space is limited. To register, call 208-325-8619.

The Donnelly Fire Station is located at 244 W. Roseberry Road.

source:
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GOP interviews two to replace Cruickshank

Governor will appoint new member to Valley commission

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Sep 26, 2019

Two candidates for Valley County commissioner were interviewed by the Valley County Republican Central Committee last week.

The interviews at the Valley County Courthouse were with candidates to replace current commissioner Gordon Cruickshank, who plans to step down next week.

Sherry Maupin of McCall and Furel Dummar of Lake Fork were interviewed for Cruickshank’s seat, which must be filled by another Republican under state law.

The committee will meet again on Wednesday in a closed session to rank the two candidates and make a recommendation to Gov. Brad Little, who must appoint a new commissioner within 15 days.

continued:
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ITD holds community meeting to discuss Banks Lowman Road intersection

by Haley Squiers Friday, September 27th 2019

Chances are, if you’re headed to Idaho’s backcountry during the summer, you’ve likely run into the long lines along the Payette River.

Highway 55’s intersection with Banks Lowman Road is often packed with cars, boats, campers, kayakers and rafters.

Idaho Transportation Officials are hoping to ease some of that congestion.

“They’re solutions, but it’s just trying to find the right one, that benefits everyone,” said Idaho Transportation Department employee, Caleb Lakey.

continued:
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Little ‘dubious’ about proposal to tap counties to pay for Medicaid expansion

Little told the counties group that there are still many unknowns, including how many people will sign up for Idaho’s expanded Medicaid program.

Betsy Z. Russell, Idaho Press September 24, 2019

Boise, Idaho — Idaho Gov. Brad Little said Monday that he’s “dubious” about a legislative proposal to make counties kick in up to $10 million to help fund Medicaid expansion next year.

“Our budget request will basically harvest the savings that we have in corrections, that we have in Health and Welfare, we have in the other areas, to fund the state’s 10% of that Medicaid match,” Little told more than 200 county officials gathered in Boise for the annual conference of the Idaho Association of Counties. “That’s going to be embedded into my budget, and that’s what we’re going to need to do.”

Medicaid expansion already is funded for its first six months, from Jan. 1 to July 1, 2020, at no cost to the state general fund, through a combination of savings and $10 million from the state’s Millennium Fund, a tobacco settlement fund. The discussion now is about how to fund the state’s 10% share — the federal government will pay 90% of the cost — for the fiscal year that starts July 1, 2020. That’ll be an estimated $41.9 million.

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Mining News:

Judge says Idaho mining company violates federal water rules

U.S. District Judge Mikel Williams in 2012 ordered Atlanta Gold to pay $2 million for repeated violations of the Clean Water Act.

Associated Press September 22, 2019

Boise, Idaho — An Idaho mining company has not complied with court orders and continues to violate clean water rules, according to a ruling by a federal judge.

U.S. Chief Magistrate Judge Ronald Bush of Boise in an order Thursday determined that Atlanta Gold had not achieved substantial compliance at its Montezuma Creek site above Atlanta in Elmore County, the Idaho Statesman reported.

Montezuma Creek is a tributary of the Middle Fork of the Boise River, a source of drinking, irrigation and recreational water for Boise and other Treasure Valley communities.

continued:
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Pollution found in US river downstream of Canada mines

By Matthew Brown – 9/23/19 AP

Billings, Mont. — U.S. government scientists found high levels of pollution that can be toxic to fish, aquatic insects and the birds that feed on them in a river that flows into Montana and Idaho from a coal mining region of Canada, officials said Monday.

Elevated levels of selenium were found in fish and fish eggs from the Kootenai River downstream of Lake Koocanusa.

The lake straddles the Canada border in northwestern Montana and southern British Columbia, and feeds into the Kootenai before the water flows downstream to Idaho.

continued:
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Public Lands:

IDL reminds Idaho hunters about fire season and public land

by CBS 2 News Staff Wednesday, September 25th 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Hunting season has started in Idaho has started, however, fire season is still going.

The Idaho Department of Lands wants to remind hunters that fire season will go through the end of October and that people cause most fires.

“Most wildfires today are not naturally occurring,” according to IDL. “People – not lightning – were responsible for more than half the fires this year, accounting for 98% of the acres burned on lands protected by the Idaho Department of Lands.”

If campfires are allowed where you plan to hunt, make sure your campfire is cool to the touch before leaving it so you do not unintentionally start a wildfire.

continued:
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Idaho agencies say state land agreement is a good deal

Sep 26, 2019 AP

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Idaho officials at two state agencies say an agreement a little over a year ago formalizing public access to state-owned lands has been a good deal for the agencies as well as a benefit to hunters, anglers and recreationists.

The Idaho Department of Lands and Idaho Department of Fish and Game said Thursday both sides are benefiting from the 2018 agreement.

Fish and Game is paying the Lands Department $580,000 annually, with about a fourth of that in law enforcement.

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Comments sought on 3,000-acre project to combat tussock moths

The Star-News Sep 26, 2019

A proposed 3,000-acre project designed to battle an infestation of tussock moths in trees is proposed for the New Meadows Ranger District of the Payette National Forest.

The Little Red Goose Forest Resiliency Project is located inside 8,000-acres in Upper Goose Creek, Sixmile Creek and Lower Goose Creek between New Meadows and McCall.

The Forest Service will also host a public meeting on the Little Red Goose project on Wednesday, Oct. 9, at 6:30 p.m. Details on the meeting, including location, will be posted on the project webpage.

Moths, in combination with other blights, are threatening the health of trees in the area with a high risk that additional trees could be killed if no actions are taken, New Meadows District Ranger Erin Phelps said.

The project includes logging, firewood removal, slash pile burning and other controlled fire burns, the project proposal said.

“We recognized a need to focus our efforts and do what we can to give the area a chance to bounce back from the high stressors related to insects and disease,” Phelps said.

The Little Red Goose project area is within the larger Granite Meadows project, which is an approximately 80,000-acre Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration project that will have additional restoration work completed in the future.

“Adequately responding to this insect issue is important enough that we need to move quickly and efficiently,” Phelps said. Comments are requested through Monday, Oct. 21 on the project webpage.

source:
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Local citizen rewarded for helping with illegal dumping case on BLM land

Sep 27, 2019 By Steve Dent KIVI TV

Boise, Idaho — Illegal dumping on public lands continues to be a problem in Idaho, but recently a local citizen was rewarded $500 for helping authorities solve a case.

The Boise BLM District stretches for four million acres, but there are only four rangers patrolling the district.

“The public is truly our eyes and ears out there, without them we can’t get timely reports or have successful investigations,” said Ranger Jay Brown with the Bureau of Land Management.

continued:
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Tips and Advice:

Be bear aware

* Camping in Bear Country
* Do not feed bears or other wildlife.
* Visit or call the local Forest Service office to learn about special requirements or guidelines for properly storing food while camping in the area.
* Keep a clean camp site.
* Do not store food or any scented items in a tent, including clothing with food residues.
* Do not leave food unattended at a campsite or in your vehicle.
* Use bear-resistant food lockers and dumpsters where provided or bring your own.
* Clean utensils and food prep area thoroughly after cooking.
* Do not store garbage at camp site. Use a designated dumpster.
* At an undeveloped camping location, cook and store food away from sleeping area.

Remember: You are responsible for your own safety and for the safety of those around you.

source:
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Critter News:

MCPAWS to move Oktoberfest to The Activity Barn Oct. 5

The Star-News Sep 26, 2019

MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter will celebrate fall with its family friendly Oktoberfest on Saturday, Oct. 5, from noon to 6 p.m. at a new location at The Activity Barn near McCall.

The event will include horse-drawn hayrides, a costume contest, live music by Bottom Line Band and Bob Kasnik, craft vendors, dancing, local brews, traditional Oktoberfest games and a raffle.

Cost is $10 per person and includes one free beer ticket and an Oktoberfest koozie.

Raffle tickets are $5 each and will be available at the event. Prizes include a fat-tire mountain bike and a mini fridge filled with beer.

Proceeds from the registration and raffle will benefit the cats and dogs at MCPAWS.

There will be a free shuttle running from 11:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. from the McCall Post Office, 495 Deinhard Lane.

The Activity Barn is located at 141 Moonridge Dr. For more information, visit

source:
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FDA cautions against feeding your dog this food

Sample shows salmonella

By Madeline Holcombe, CNN Sep 29, 2019 Local News 8

The United States Food and Drug Administration is warning pet owners to stay away from Performance Dog frozen raw pet food produced on or after July 22, 2019, after a sample tested positive for Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes.

Two samples of raw pet food — one of Performance Dog and the other of a beef variety — were taken by the FDA as a part of a routine inspection in the Bravo Packing, Inc. manufacturing facility in Carneys Point, New Jersey, the statement said.

The beef pet food tested positive for Salmonella and the Performance Dog tested positive for Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes.

continued:
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Animal shelter says housing woes mean more pets surrendered

Sep 26, 2019 AP

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Idaho’s increasing cost of living is putting pressure on people and their pets.

Idaho Humane Society officials say they’re seeing an increase in the number of people surrendering their pets because of housing issues.

Kristine Schellhaas with the Idaho Humane Society tells KBOI television in Boise some owners can’t afford pet insurance or the higher rental rates they must pay with pets. So far this year the shelter has taken in more than 1,500 owner-surrendered cats and dogs.

continued:
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Washington authorizes killing of some wolves in Grouse Flats pack

Sep 24, 2019 AP

Spokane, Wash. (AP) – The state of Washington has authorized the killing of some wolves in the Grouse Flats pack in an effort to stop the pack from preying on cattle.

Kelly Susewind, director of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, on Tuesday authorized the incremental killing of members of the pack located in southeastern Washington.

The agency says the Grouse Flats pack has been involved in two cattle depredations in the past 30 days, and four in the past 10 months.

continued:
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Man who shot wolf in Grand Teton given conditional license

Sep 23, 2019 AP

Jackson, Wyo. (AP) – A big game hunting guide who illegally killed a wolf in a Wyoming national park has been granted a probationary license.

The Jackson Hole News & Guide reported the Wyoming State Board of Outfitters and Professional Guides granted Brian Taylor a one-year, conditional outfitters license last month.

The board voted to approve the penalty proposed by a three-person investigative committee after members who participated in the investigation recused themselves.

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9/15/19: Wyoming Wolf Hunt

(By Cat Urbigkit) With the Sept. 1 opening of the wolf hunting season in many of western Wyoming’s trophy wolf hunt areas, here is an update of harvests as of Sept. 13… (Click this link for the complete story.)
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9/3/19: Wolf News Roundup, 9/3/19

(By Cat Urbigkit) Back in the 1960s, Alaska wildlife officials decided that Coronation Island with its high density of deer should have a wolf population, so four wolves were transplanted. What came next is a story of the wolves causing the decline of the deer population, and when the wolf population declined and was eventually eliminated, the deer population once again increased. The Capital Press reports that wolves killed a record number of livestock in Idaho in the last fiscal year, with 175 confirmed depredations – a 25 percent increase from the year prior. Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife officials have cancelled a series of wolf recovery planning open houses because of the volatility of public discourse… (Click on this link for the complete story.)
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8/22/19: WA removes OPT wolf pack

(By Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife) On the morning of Aug. 16, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) lethally removed the four known remaining members of the OPT wolf pack. A series of WDFW investigations had shown the pack responsible for 29 depredation incidents on federal grazing lands in the Kettle River range of Ferry County. In April 2019, the department reported 27 wolf packs in Washington….. (Click on this link for the complete story.)
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8/15/19: Wolf News Roundup: 8/15/19

(By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online!) A wolf attacked a man who was sleeping in tent (one of four family members in the tent) at a busy campground in Canada’s Banff National Park. The injured man was hospitalized with serious injuries, and nearby campers helped to scare away the wolf. A new paper in the Journal of Wildlife Management examines the effects on wolf pack size and winter conditions on elk mortality, as well as the influence of mountain lion predation on elk. The Duluth News-Tribune has an article about the wolves of Voyageurs National Park, including details about the life of wolves in this unique environment – from prey encounters to social interactions….. (Click on this link for the complete story.)
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Male grizzly captured near Cody and moved

Sep 23, 2019 Local News 8

Jackson, Wyo. (KIFI/KIDK) – Wyoming Game and Fish personnel captured and relocated an adult male grizzly bear Saturday, September 21.

It was captured on private lands northwest of Cody, Wyoming for livestock depredation on private lands. The bear was relocated to Blackrock Creek drainage, about 20 miles east of Moran Junction.

Carnivore biologists said the relocation will minimize conflicts with humans.

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Another hunter attacked by grizzly in Montana

Sep 25, 2019 AP

Billings, Mont. (AP) – For the fourth time in just over a week a hunter has been attacked by a grizzly bear in the Gravelly Mountains in southwestern Montana.

Fish, Wildlife and Parks spokesman Morgan Jacobsen tells The Billings Gazette the victim of Tuesday’s attack was being treated in Sheridan.

continued:
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Montana wardens can’t located injured bear after mauling

Sep 26, 2019 AP

Bozeman, Mont. (AP) – Montana wildlife officials have been unable to locate a grizzly bear that mauled an Ohio hunter in southwestern Montana.

Fish, Wildlife and Parks wardens began investigating Tuesday, shortly after the attack was reported in the Gravelly Mountains.

FWP spokesman Morgan Jacobsen said Thursday the hunter reported he was walking through blown-down timber when he was attacked by a bear at close range. The hunter said he fired several shots at the bear until it left.

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Humans can get tuberculosis from deer, the CDC says

Disease carried in dead animal’s organs

By Scottie Andrew, CNN Sep 29, 2019 Local News 8

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found another unusual way animals can get humans sick. Luckily, this one doesn’t involve kisses from your pet.

After two decades of hunting, a 77-year-old Michigan man came down in 2017 with a case of tuberculosis. The carrier, according to a new CDC report, was an infected deer.

The unnamed patient had hunted deer in the same area where two other hunters were infected more than 15 years earlier.

In his case, he likely inhaled infectious pathogens of bovine tuberculosis, a mycobacterium that can sicken humans, while removing a dead deer’s infected organs, the CDC said.

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Letter to Share:

Calling All Youth Bird Hunters!

The Game Bird Foundation and Idaho Fish and Game invite youth hunters 17 and under to the Palouse River Upland Game Area starting October 5, 2019 for special youth-only pheasant hunting. The Game Bird Foundation and IDFG will be releasing banded pheasants each week throughout the season on this special Access Yes property to make hunting even more exciting. Report any banded birds you bag to the IDFG to have your name entered to win a prize!

Youth hunters must be accompanied by an adult mentor and registration is required to hunt. You can register online at (link) or call the IDFG Lewiston office at 208-799-5010 to register over the phone. Good luck hunters!! We can’t wait to see photos of your hunt!

– The Game Bird Foundation (via FB 9/29/2019)
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Fish & Game News:

Idaho Fish and Game proposes new out of state hunting management plan

Sep 22, 2019 By Steve Dent KIVI TV

Boise, Idaho — Idaho hunters have spoken up and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game listened to concerns about non-Idaho residents overcrowding the hunting landscape in the Gem State.

Idaho has already sold out their out-of-state tags for deer and elk in the controlled hunt, but Idaho is one of five western states that allows a general big game hunt for both in-state and out-of-state hunters.

Wyoming and Montana recently put and end to their out of state general hunt and now Idaho Fish and Game has a proposal in the works that would help them manage where non-residents hunt.

continued:
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Idaho F&G: Know the trespassing laws when hunting and fishing

by Ryan L Morrison Monday, September 23rd 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) wants Idaho fishers and hunters to remember one thing: you need permission to be on private lands.

Last year Idaho’s trespassing laws changed to include permission to hunt and fish on private property.

“No person shall enter or remain on private land to shoot any weapon or hunt, fish, trap or retrieve game without written permission or other lawful permission,” – IDFG website.

continued:
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Someone poached a moose in central Idaho and left it to waste

by CBS 2 News Staff Tuesday, September 24th 2019

Mackay, Idaho (CBS 2) — A moose was poached in central Idaho near the small town of Mackay.

It was left to waste about 70 yards away from a nearby campground.

The antlers and a small amount of meat had been removed with the majority of the edible meat left to waste. Idaho Fish and Game says the moose was found near the Park Creek Campground.

continued:
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Idaho F&G uses decoys to catch roadside poachers

by Ryan L Morrison Thursday, September 26th 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — The Idaho Fish and Game (IDFG) is warning people to not shoot at animals from the road.

“That buck or bull standing next to the road might be a tempting target, but it might not be what you think it is, and it could be a very costly mistake,” said IDFG.

IDFG uses ASAs, or artificial simulated animals, in places well known for trespassing, spotlighting and road hunting to catch law-breaking hunters.

continued:
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Fish and Game Property Vandalized – Public’s Help Sought

By Evin Oneale, Regional Communications Manager
Tuesday, September 24, 2019


Payette County Sheriff’s Office

Fish and Game is asking the public for information regarding the recent vandalism of an access gate at the Birding Island North segment of the Payette River Wildlife Management Area (WMA). The segment is located about three miles north of New Plymouth, Idaho.

Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) is offering a reward for information in the case and callers can remain anonymous. Contact CAP at 1-800-632-5999 twenty four hours a day.

Deputies from the Payette County Sheriff’s Office discovered the badly damaged gate on Sunday, September 22nd and relayed their discovery to Fish and Game district conservation officer Mark Sands.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Deer in McCall finds itself tangled in Christmas lights

by CBS 2 News Staff Wednesday, September 25th 2019

McCall, Idaho (CBS 2) — Well, file this under “Something You Don’t See Every Day.”

A deer has been roaming around Payette Lake with Christmas lights stuck in its antlers. Idaho Fish and Game told CBS 2 that it started receiving reports of the jolly ol’ deer Sept. 19 in the Warren Wagon Road area west of Payette Lake.

“It looks like it’s healthy,” Fish and Game said. “The deer is fine — other than the lights.”

So what’s the plan?

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Seasonal Humor:

Fall1stSnowflake-a
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Prescribed Burning Bald Hill and Four Mile Projects Sept 25-26

Prescribed Burning in Bald Hill and Four Mile Projects September 25 and 26

(email Sept 23, 2019 640pm)

We are planning on burning on Wednesday and Thursday of this week, September 25 and 26. Ignitions will take place in both Bald Hill and Four Mile project areas.

Areas targeted in Bald Hill will be Units A and B, near the confluence of the East Fork and South Fork Salmon River in Williams, Dutch Oven, Telephone and Deadman Creek drainages.

Areas targeted in the Four Mile Project Area will be units D, E, F on the west side of the South Fork Salmon river between Poverty Flat Campground and Reed Ranch, including Holdover and Martin Creek drainages.

Smoke and fire should be expected in these areas until the next significant precipitation, as of now predicted for this weekend.

Maps are attached, Bald Hill A and B (in red) are on the west side of the project area, Four Mile D,E,F are the 3 outlined in red in the middle of the project.

Any questions please call or email myself at 208-634-0622, laurel.ingram@usda.gov or Patrick Schon at 208-634-0623, patrick.schon@usda.gov

Thanks,
Laurel Ingram
Fuels Technician
Payette National Forest
Krassel Ranger District

Maps:

link to: Bald Hill Fall 2019 Notifications.pdf

link to: FourMile_Notification Fall 2019.pdf
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