Category Archives: News 2020

Feb 16, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Feb 16, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Dec 7 thru Feb 21 Yellow Pine Tavern Holiday Closure
Feb 22 – Pie Contest 2pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern
May 2 – Firewise Meeting 2pm at the Fire Hall
(details below)
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Local Events:

Feb 22 – Pie Contest

2pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern, $1 per plate to taste the pies, money goes to the winners.
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May 2 Firewise Meeting

YPFD is participating in the “Wildfire Safety/National Community Preparedness Day”.

There will be an open house on May 2nd at 2pm at YPFD.

There will be presentations/pamphlets regarding what YPFD and the fire district has to offer on fire safety and mitigation for our community.
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Village News:

February Snow

February has brought a LOT of snow to Yellow Pine so far. From Feb 1st to Feb 16th: a total of 37.9″ of snow has fallen and since January 1st 76.5″ of snow has fallen, which is more than average for an entire winter.
P1000593-20200216SnowDepth
10am Feb 16, 2020
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Winter Closures

The Corner is closed for the winter, opening again next spring. I can be reached at matt @ ypcorner.com or at 970-379-5155. Thanks, have a great winter!
– Matt

The Tavern will be closed from Saturday December 7th to Friday February 21st. UPS packages will be dropped off at Deb’s porch and she will also have gasoline for emergency situations. I will be available at my cell number for any questions or situations 208 739-7086
Thanks, Lorinne N. Munn

The Yellow Pine Lodge is closed for the winter.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report the transfer station was plowed Wednesday (Feb 12) and Lakeshore came in and emptied the bins on Thursday (Feb 13.)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Water rates have been increased (see letter with water bill), the 2019 fee is $400. Payment is due by Feb 15, 2020, or you can pay half and the other half is due June 15, 2020.

Boil Water Advisory Lifted November 22, 2019

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the Community Hall.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

The community hall committee’s goal is to have adequate heating installed in the main hall before the June VYPA meeting.

If folks have items for the community yard sale, please place them by the north wall in the community hall. If you see items you would like to purchase, you can pay Deb, Ronda, or Lynn. All funds support the community hall.

VYPA meetings for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
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YPFD News:

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Fire Chief – Jeff Forster

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

We will do another class this spring/summer [2020] depending on interest. Training will resume in the spring. -Fire Chief Jeff
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Closed for the winter.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Will open Friday Feb 21.
Winter Hours Open every day 9am-2pm 4pm-8pm
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for Winter.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Feb 10) light snow early morning, trace by 10am and still snowing, snow depth varies from 30-32″ deep. Done snowing before 1030am and large patches of blue sky. Jays and hairy woodpecker calling, chickadees and nuthatches visiting. Cloudy, breezy and icicles dripping after lunch time, high of 35 degrees. Patches of blue sky and gusty breezes mid-afternoon, dropping below freezing before sunset. Sun headed behind the ridge at 440pm. Report of hungry elk from the upper side of the village across the river. Mostly clear at dusk, lighter breezes. Bright moon and stars before midnight.

Tuesday (Feb 11) overnight low of 2 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning, measured an average of 31″ of snow on the ground. Jays, chickadees and nuthatches visiting. Sunny and very blue sky at lunch time, high of 43 degrees. Sunny, chilly breezes and warm sunshine mid-afternoon. Mostly clear at dusk and calmer, a few clouds painted in golden colors. Clouds moved in and light snowfall late evening into the night, finishing with a trace of graupel.

Wednesday (Feb 12) 24 hour low of 7 degrees (from Tues morning) it probably hovered around 25 during the night, trace of snow/graupel on the board this morning, an average of 30″ total snow on the ground (several crusty layers), mostly cloudy and light breeze. Jays, nuthatches and chickadees visiting. Mostly cloudy and light breezes at lunch time, high of 39 degrees. Mail truck made it in a little early. Report of hungry elk in the lower SE part of the village. Partly cloudy and breezy mid-afternoon. Gun shots around 4pm. Partly hazy at dusk and calmer. High thin hazy clouds before midnight, stars shining. Bright waning moon after midnight and cold.

Thursday (Feb 13) overnight low of 3 degrees, almost clear sky this morning, measured an average of 30″ old crusty snow on the ground. Several jays, a clark’s nutcracker, a female hairy woodpecker, red-breasted nuthatches and a few mountain chickadees visiting. Bright sunshine and icicles dripping at lunch time, high of 48 degrees. Snowmobile traffic. Clear, warm and light chilly breezes late afternoon. Clear sky at dusk and calm. Breezy and cloudy before midnight. Breezy and light snow falling some time after midnight.

Friday (Feb 14) 24 hour low of 5 degrees (from Thurs morning) the low was probably around 25F, it was 27F at 10am, mostly cloudy and breezy, trace of new snow and an average of 30″ total snow on the ground. Several jays calling from the trees, a trio visiting along with a nutcracker and several red-breasted nuthatches. Mostly cloudy and a bit breezy at lunch time, followed by a short little snow flurry, high of 39 degrees. Later both a female and a male hairy woodpecker, a white breasted nuthatch and mountain chickadees visited. Another short snow flurry and breezy early afternoon. Partly cloudy and quite breezy by mid-afternoon. Cloudy and calmer after dark. Cloudy at midnight. Dusting of snow fell before 6am.

Saturday (Feb 15) overnight low of 21 degrees, 1/10″ new snow and measured 29″ total snow on the ground, overcast and fairly calm. Hairy woodpecker drumming on the power pole, lots of jays being vocal in the neighborhood, clark’s nutcracker, red-breasted nuthatches and a chickadee visiting. Cloudy at lunch time, high of 36 degrees. Snowmobile traffic. Cloudy and light breezes mid-afternoon. Stronger breezes and thicker clouds late afternoon. Snowing after dark and stacking up. Not snowing at midnight. More snow after 7am.

Sunday (Feb 16) 24 hour low of 26 degrees (30F at 10am) 2 1/2″ new snow and 31″ total snow on the ground, overcast and steady snowfall until 11am (trace then melted.) Clark’s nutcracker, male and female hairy woodpeckers, jays and red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Breaks in the clouds at lunch time and icicles dripping, high of 41 degrees. Mostly cloudy mid-afternoon and flag flapping breezy. Next round of snow started off with flakes, then snowing pretty hard by 445pm and windy, tapering off and done by 610pm (about 1″ new), then mostly clear and lighter breezes. Snowmobile traffic.
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Idaho News:

Wilkses offer to open roads

County would take over access roads in Kennally Creek, Gold Fork areas

By Max Silverson The Star-News Feb 13, 2020

20200213RoadsWilks
Graphic courtesy Wilks Ranch Brokers. Red lines shows roads on land owned by DF Development that are under discussion to be transferred to Valley County.

Representatives of DF Development on Monday offered to Valley County commissioners ownership of roads now owned by the company near Donnelly and Cascade.

The proposal would see the county take ownership of roads in the Kennally Creek and Gold Fork areas that provide access to state and federal land.

“The subject property, which we refer to as Gold Fork North, is over 11,000 acres and would provide the general public with some beautiful scenery and allow access to State and National Forest land,” Wilks Ranch Brokers Manager of Sales and leasing Jerry Conring wrote in an email to the county.

The new roads would have direct access off of Barker Lane and Gold Fork Road, Conring said.

Commissioners were receptive to the proposal, but also asked that the company consider making more DF Development owned roads into public roads.

Those requests include sections of Flat Creek Road, Lost Basin Road, West Fork Creek Road, Packer John Road, Sage Hen Road, Lost Basin Road, Corral Creek Road and Horsethief Road.

“I think it’s great they turned around and decided to deal with us instead of locking everybody out,” Commission Chair Elt Hasbrouck said.

Commissioners speculated that the transfer of roads may be in advance of DF Development selling parcels of land in the area at some time in the future.

Wilks Ranch Brokers has a property listed for sale on its website that roughly consists of the northern half of the roads proposed. The 5,722-acre property called Kennally Creek Ranch is listed for about $11.4 million.

The county would also be responsible for road maintenance if ownership were transferred.

The roads could be classified as high clearance or ATV trails, costing little in maintenance costs, but would still be accessible by the public, Hasbrouck said.

Commissioners and DF Development representatives did not make a decision on Monday, but made plans to look at the condition of each road once the snow melts.

DF Development is controlled by Farris and Dan Wilks of Cisco, Texas, who purchased 172,000 acres of private land in west-central Idaho in 2016.

The land was previously owned by Boise Cascade Corp and later Potlatch Corp., which managed the lands for timber harvest. The companies allowed the public to use the land for hunting, hiking, mountain biking, ATV use and other activities.

The new owners erected gates and “No Trespassing” signs across access roads into their land due to what the brothers said was instances of abuse.

The DF Development lands are concentrated around Smith Ferry, along the east side of Long Valley between Cascade and Lake Fork, and surrounding Meadows Valley.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Valley County to hear proposed rules on short-term rentals

By Max Silverson The Star-News Feb 13, 2020

Valley County commissioners will air a proposed ordinance governing short term rental in the county at a public hearing on Tuesday.

A public hearing will be one of three beginning at 1 p.m. Tuesday at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade.

Two other hearings will be on proposed regulations on accessory dwelling units and recreational vehicle campgrounds.

The rules would require every short-term rental to apply for an annual administrative permit and set standards on maximum occupancy, sewage disposal, garbage, setbacks, rules of operation, lighting, camp fires, quiet hours, and notification to adjacent property owners.

The purpose of the ordinance is to safeguard the public health, safety and general welfare in order to protect the integrity of residential neighborhoods, according to the draft ordinance.

Short term rental refers to any residence that is rented for 30 days or less. Current short-term rentals would not be exempted from obtaining a permit.

The proposal would require that the number of occupants could not exceed the limits of the septic system as approved by Central District Health. Portable toilets could not be used to increase the maximum occupancy.

continued:
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Valley DMV office to get new home in Cascade courthouse

By Max Silverson The Star-News Feb 13, 2020

The Division of Motor Vehicles office at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade is set to move to a new permanent location in the building’s ground floor after a water leak and mold outbreak forced a temporary move.

The DMV, which was forced to close between Jan. 21-24, will relocate to a large meeting room, kicking off an office shuffle among county departments.

The shuffle plans followed a discussion between Valley County Assessor June Fullmer and Valley County commissioners during commissioners’ weekly meeting on Monday.

Staff in the plat clerk’s office was also forced to relocate due to the mold and needed a permanent working space while the north wing of the building is renovated.

The DMV is set to begin moving into the new space as soon as possible, Fullmer said.

continued:
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Cascade hopes to get a total makeover for HGTV’s new ‘Hometown Takeover’ show

As for what parts of the city that need a makeover, Mayor Nissula says the library, city hall, sidewalks, and streetscaping could all use a little improvement.

KTVB February 11, 2020

Boise, Idaho — The City of Cascade is making the case that the small town deserves a large-scale makeover for a new HGTV show,

Mayor Judy Nissula told KTVB that the city submitted the video to the network on Friday.

The new show is called “Hometown Takeover” and is a spin-off one of HGTV’s current shows, “Hometown.” The hosts are choosing a second community of 40,000 or fewer and help them completely revamp their town.

continued:

video:

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Friend of avalanche center to host fundraiser Feb. 21

The Star-News Feb 13, 2020

The Friends of the Payette Avalanche Center will host a fundraiser party with live music on Friday, Feb. 21, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Banyan’s on the Green.

The event will also include a silent auction and raffle prizes. Live music will be performed by Jughandle Parade.

Cost is $10 at the door. All proceeds will benefit the Friends of the Payette Avalanche Center, which is a partner to the Payette Avalanche Center.

The Friends of the Payette Avalanche Center is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide a community-based forum to share avalanche information, to operate and maintain local beacon basic training facilities and to provide basic avalanche education to winter recreationists.

For more information on the Payette Avalanche Center or its Friends, visit (link). Banyans on the Green is located at 925 Fairway Dr.

source:
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US National Weather Service: Idaho, Northwest snow pack above average

by CBS 2 News Staff Sunday, February 16th 2020

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — Snow pack in much of Idaho, and in much of the northwest as well, is above average for the season, according to the US National Weather Service.

A map shows much of the Gem State with snow pack averages over 100 percent.

continued w/map:
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Letter to Share:

Response to Questions-Warm Lake Feeder Line Relocation

2/11/2020

Thank you for your comments on the upcoming Idaho Power Warm Lake Feeder Line Relocation Project. Here are some follow-up to several questions asked.

Disruption of service: Yes, there will be a short outage in service (approximately 4 hours) to transition power from the existing overhead line to the new underground line. IPC will coordinate this outage with the town of Yellow Pine so that the outage will not adversely affect residents and businesses.

Expense to Homeowners: There will be no increase in cost of services to local residents specific from this project.

Length of project and coordination with the Harmonica Festival: The duration of the total construction period is anticipated to be two months. IPC will coordinate with the community of Yellow Pine and schedule project activities so that they do not occur during Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, or interfere with community events/festivals since businesses rely on the revenue generated by these holidays/festivities.

Traffic control along Johnson Creek Road: Project activities will require set up and operation of equipment within and along Johnson Creek Road. As such, IPC will implement appropriate traffic control and/or road restrictions to ensure public safety during construction.. Traffic control may include flaggers and restriction of traffic to one lane, as well as limited road closures. IPC will coordinate project activities with the Valley County Road Department. Prior notice would be given for any extended delay or road blockage. The closures would only be for the time needed to perform the construction tasks requiring the road restrictions. The road restrictions would be managed according to the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices.

Terre Pearson-Ramirez
NZ NEPA Planner
Boise National Forest
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Public Lands:

Burntlog Route Geophysical Investigation – Scoping

2/10/2020

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the Burntlog Route Geophysical Investigation Project on lands managed by the Cascade Ranger District of the Boise National Forest as part of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review.

Project Description

The purpose of the Burntlog Route Geophysical Investigation is to collect crucial data at proposed rock quarries, bridge abutments, cut slopes, and soil nail/ mechanically stabilized earth wall locations. This project is needed to inform feasibility of developing a transportation route from the Stibnite mine site to Highway 55. The current proposal is to use the existing Burntlog road and develop a new alignment between Trapper Creek and Stibnite.

Analysis indicates that this action falls within the category of 36 CFR 220.6(e)(8) – Short-term (1 year or less) mineral, energy, or geophysical investigations and their incidental support activities that may require cross-country travel by vehicles and equipment, construction of less than 1 mile of low standard road, or use and minor repair of existing roads.

The Decision on this analysis will only authorize the geophysical investigation. The decision on the actual construction of the road is tied to the larger Stibnite analysis.

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the proposed action report (PAR) on the Project webpage: (link)

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback for the environmental assessment. Your comments will help us identify and address issues. Comments may be submitted in the following ways:

* Through the Project webpage (link above). Select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel. If uploading a file with comments, comments must be in the form of plain text (.txt), Word (.doc, .docx) or PDF (.pdf).
* Mail to the Cascade Ranger District, PO Box 696, Cascade, ID 83611.
* Hand deliver to the Cascade Ranger District 540 North Main Street, Cascade, ID 83611. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.
* By fax at 208-259-3366.

If submitting comments by mail or fax, be sure to include “Burntlog Route Geophysical Investigation” in the subject line.

Comments received will be included in the project record and may be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by March 2, 2020. For further information on the project, please contact Terre Pearson-Ramirez, Team Leader, at 208-382-7400.
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Two-Bit Road Decommissioning-Scoping

2/11/2020

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the Two-Bit Road Decommissioning Project on lands managed by the Cascade Ranger District of the Boise National Forest as part of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review.

Project Description

The Two-Bit Road Decommissioning project proposes to decommission approximately 18 miles of non-system routes in the Six-bit Creek and Curtis Creek subwatersheds. The purpose is to reduce sediment delivery to the South Fork Salmon River and several tributaries to improve spawning and rearing habitat for the threatened Chinook salmon, steelhead, and bull trout.

Analysis indicates that this action falls within the category 36 CFR 220.6(e)(20) – Activities that restore, rehabilitate, or stabilize lands occupied by roads and trails, to a more natural condition that may include removing, replacing, or modifying drainage structures and ditches, reestablishing vegetation, reshaping natural contours and slopes, reestablishing drainage-ways, or other activities that would restore site productivity and reduce environmental impacts

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the proposed action report (PAR) on the Project webpage: (link).

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback for the environmental assessment. Your comments will help us identify and address issues. Comments may be submitted in the following ways:

* Through the Project webpage (link above). Select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel. If uploading a file with comments, comments must be in the form of plain text (.txt), Word (.doc, .docx) or PDF (.pdf).
* Mail to the Cascade Ranger District, PO Box 696, Cascade, ID 83611.
* Hand deliver to the Cascade Ranger District, 540 North Main Street, Cascade, ID 83611. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.
* By fax at 208-259-3366.

If submitting comments by mail or fax, be sure to include “Two-Bit Road Decommissioning” in the subject line.

Comments received will be included in the project record and may be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by March 2, 2020. For further information on the project, please contact Terre Pearson-Ramirez, Team Leader, at 208-382-7400.
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Tawnya Brummett selected as Forest Supervisor For Boise National Forest

2/12/2020

Boise Idaho, February 12, 2020 — Regional Forester Nora Rasure has selected Tawnya Brummett as the Forest Supervisor for the Boise National Forest. Tawnya has served for the last three years as the Boise National Forest’s Deputy Forest Supervisor. She replaces Cecilia Romero Seesholtz who retired December 2019.

“We are excited that Tawnya has accepted the position to lead Idaho’s Capital City Forest,” said Rasure. “Her diverse experience in range, wildlife, wildland fire and leadership will help the Boise National Forest continue to implement an ambitious forest management program.”

Brummett has 19 years in federal service most recently as acting Forest Supervisor for the Payette National Forest. Before serving as the Boise National Forest’s Deputy Forest Supervisor, she was the Deputy Forest Supervisor on the Tongass National Forest in southeast Alaska; District Ranger on the Lolo National Forest in Montana; Wildlife Biologist and Range Specialist on the Gila National Forest in NM; Wildlife Biologist on the Angelina-Sabine National Forest in East Texas; hotshot fire crewmember on the Gila National Forest.

“I am honored to step into this leadership role on the Boise National Forest,” said Brummett. “I look forward to strengthening existing partnerships as well as inviting new ideas and collaborative opportunities. I want our stakeholders to know that I remain committed to working with them to address concerns and implement strategies that improve the health of the forest while supporting our communities.”

Tawnya comes from a farming and ranching family in New Mexico, she, and her family are avid outdoor enthusiasts. During their off-time they enjoy multiple outdoor experiences on National Forest System lands including, boating, camping, hunting and hiking.

Brummett is a recognized leader in wildland fire, chairing a national complex fire leadership program for the last two years. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Wildlife Biology from Stephan F. Austin State University.
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Idaho Department of Transportation Maintenance Facility at Banks Special Use Permit Renewal -Scoping

2/11/2020

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the Idaho Department of Transportation Maintenance Facility at Banks Special Use Permit Renewal Project as part of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review.

Project Description

The Emmett Ranger District, in coordination with the Idaho Department of Transportation, is seeking to issue a new special use authorization for a new term to replace expired authorization EMT100131 which authorized the operation and maintenance of a building and storage area for the State of Idaho Department of Transportation—known as Banks Maintenance Shed No. 3114.

Analysis indicates that this action falls within the category 36 CFR 220.6(e)(15) issuance of a new special use authorization for a new term to replace an expired special use authorization. There are not changes to the authorized facilities or increases in the scope or intensity of the authorized activities and the holder is in full compliance with the terms and conditions of their expired authorization

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the proposed action report (PAR) on the Project webpage: (link)

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback for the environmental assessment. Your comments will help us identify and address issues. Comments may be submitted in the following ways:

* Through the Project webpage (link above). Select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel. If uploading a file with comments, comments must be in the form of plain text (.txt), Word (.doc, .docx) or PDF (.pdf).
* Mail or hand deliver to the Emmett Ranger District, 1857 Highway 16, Emmett, ID 83617. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.
* Fax 208-365-7637.

If submitting comments by mail or fax, be sure to include “IDT Maintenance Facility SUP” in the subject line.

Comments received will be included in the project record and may be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by March 2, 2020. For further information on the project, please contact Terre Pearson-Ramirez, Team Leader, at 208-382-7400.
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Cambridge Telephone Company Special Use Permit Renewal-Scoping

2/10/2020

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the Cambridge Telephone Company Special Use Permit Renewal Project as part of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review.

Project Description

The Lowman Ranger District in coordination with Cambridge Telephone Company is seeking to issue a new special use authorization for a new term to replace expired authorization LMN419306 which authorized the lease of land for the operation and maintenance of a microwave common carrier (MCC 803) on Jackson Peak.

Analysis indicates that this action falls within the category 36 CFR 220.6(e)(15) issuance of a new special use authorization for a new term to replace an expired special use authorization. There are not changes to the authorized facilities or increases in the scope or intensity of the authorized activities and the holder is in full compliance with the terms and conditions of their expired authorization

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the proposed action report (PAR) on the Project webpage: (link)

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback for the environmental assessment. Your comments will help us identify and address issues. Comments may be submitted in the following ways:

* Through the Project webpage (link above). Select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel. If uploading a file with comments, comments must be in the form of plain text (.txt), Word (.doc, .docx) or PDF (.pdf).
* Mail or hand deliver to the Lowman Ranger District, 7359 Highway 21, Lowman, ID 83637. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.
* By fax at 208-259-3366.

If submitting comments by mail or fax, be sure to include “Cambridge SUP” in the subject line.

Comments received will be included in the project record and may be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by March 2, 2020. For further information on the project, please contact Terre Pearson-Ramirez, Team Leader, at 208-382-7400.
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Lowman Fire Station Special Use Renewal Project -Scoping

2/10/2020

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the Lowman Fire Station Special Use Renewal Project as part of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review.

Project Description

The Lowman Ranger District in coordination with the Lowman Fire Department is seeking to issue a new special use authorization for a new term to replace expired authorization LMN433701 which authorized the Fire Station off mile marker 80 on Idaho State Highway-21.

Analysis indicates that this action falls within the category 36 CFR 220.6(e)(15) issuance of a new special use authorization for a new term to replace an expired special use authorization. There are not changes to the authorized facilities or increases in the scope or intensity of the authorized activities and the holder is in full compliance with the terms and conditions of their expired authorization

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the proposed action report (PAR) on the Project webpage: (link)

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback for the environmental assessment. Your comments will help us identify and address issues. Comments may be submitted in the following ways:

* Through the Project webpage (link above). Select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel. If uploading a file with comments, comments must be in the form of plain text (.txt), Word (.doc, .docx) or PDF (.pdf).
* Mail or hand deliver to the Lowman Ranger District, 7359 Highway 21, Lowman, ID 83637. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.
* By fax at 208-259-3366.

If submitting comments by mail or fax, be sure to include “Lowman Fire Station SUP” in the subject line.

Comments received will be included in the project record and may be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by March 2, 2020. For further information on the project, please contact Terre Pearson-Ramirez, Team Leader, at 208-382-7400.
— — — — — — — — — —

Lowman Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) Project

2/11/2020

The Forest Service is seeking public input (comments) for the Lowman Wildland Urban Interface Project on lands managed by the Lowman Ranger District of the Boise National Forest as part of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review.

Project Description

The Lowman WUI project would utilize prescribed fire, non-commercial thinning, and commercial thinning to reduce the risk of uncharacteristic wildfire to the wildland urban interface around the community of Lowman. The proposed project is an activity implementing a land management plan and is subject to the pre-decisional objection process at 36 CFR 218 Subparts A and B.

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the proposed action report (PAR) on the Project webpage: (link)

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback for the environmental assessment. Your comments will help us identify and address issues. Comments may be submitted in the following ways

* Through the Lowman WUI Project webpage (link above). Select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel. If uploading a file with comments, comments must be in the form of plain text (.txt), Word (.doc, .docx) or PDF (.pdf)
* Mail or hand deliver to the Lowman Ranger District, 7359 Highway 21, Lowman, ID 8363. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays
* By fax at 208-259-3366.

If submitting comments by mail or fax, be sure to include “Lowman WUI” in the subject line.

Comments received will be included in the project record and may be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

Comment Period & Pre-decisional Objection Process

The opportunity to comment ends 30 days following the date of publication of the legal notice in the Idaho World. Only those who submit timely and specific written comments (36 CFR §218.2) regarding the proposed project or activity during a public comment period established by the responsible official are eligible to file an objection (36 CFR §218.24(b)(6)). For issues to be raised in objections, they must be based on previously submitted specific written comments regarding the proposed project or activity and attributed to the objector. For objection eligibility, each individual or representative from each entity submitting timely and specific written comments must either sign the comment or verify identity upon request. The publication date of the legal notice in the newspaper of record is the exclusive means for calculating the time to submit written comments on a proposed project or activity. The time period for the opportunity to comment on a proposed project or activity to be documented with an environmental assessment shall not be extended. It is the responsibility of all individuals and organizations to ensure that their comments are received in a timely manner.

For further information on the project, please contact Ryan Shannahan, Team Leader, at 208-259-3361.
— — — — — — — — — —

Public informational meeting about Sage Hen Recreation Area

Boise National Forest 2/11/2020
Contact: Venetia Gempler (208) 373-4105

Emmett, Idaho, February 11, 2020 — The Emmett Ranger District of the Boise National Forest is hosting an informational meeting Feb. 20, 2020, to share proposed restoration activities in the Sage Hen Recreation Area.

“We are hosting this meeting before we begin the formal scoping process to provide an overview of the proposed project and restoration needs, “said Katie Wood, Emmett District Ranger. “The Sage Hen area is a favorite destination for many forest visitors and we want people to know they can participate and inform the development of the proposed action.”

For more information about the Sage Hen Integrated Restoration Project visit: (link). There the public can request more information and sign up to receive email updates.

The meeting details include:

* Date: Feb. 20, 2020
* Time: 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.
* Location: Emmett Ranger District Office, 1857 Highway 16, Suite A, Emmett ID
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Tips & Advice:

Cold Weather Safety Tips

Exposure to winter’s dry, cold air and chilly rain, sleet and snow can cause chapped paws and itchy, flaking skin, but these aren’t the only discomforts pets can suffer. Winter walks can become downright dangerous if chemicals from ice-melting agents are licked off of bare paws. To help prevent cold weather dangers from affecting your pet’s health, please heed the following advice from our experts:

* Repeatedly coming out of the cold into the dry heat of your home can cause itchy, flaking skin. Keep your home humidified and towel dry your pet as soon as he comes inside, paying special attention to his feet and in-between the toes. Remove any snow balls from between his foot pads.

* Never shave your dog down to the skin in winter, as a longer coat will provide more warmth. If your dog is long-haired, simply trim him to minimize the clinging ice balls, salt crystals and de-icing chemicals that can dry his skin, and don’t neglect the hair between his toes. If your dog is short-haired, consider getting him a coat or sweater with a high collar or turtleneck with coverage from the base of the tail to the belly. For many dogs, this is regulation winter wear.

* Bring a towel on long walks to clean off stinging, irritated paws. After each walk, wash and dry your pet’s feet and stomach to remove ice, salt and chemicals—and check for cracks in paw pads or redness between the toes.

* Bathe your pets as little as possible during cold spells. Washing too often can remove essential oils and increase the chance of developing dry, flaky skin. If your pooch must be bathed, ask your vet to recommend a moisturizing shampoo and/or rinse.

* Massaging petroleum jelly or other paw protectants into paw pads before going outside can help protect from salt and chemical agents. Booties provide even more coverage and can also prevent sand and salt from getting lodged between bare toes and causing irritation. Use pet-friendly ice melts whenever possible.

* Like coolant, antifreeze is a lethal poison for dogs and cats. Be sure to thoroughly clean up any spills from your vehicle, and consider using products that contain propylene glycol rather than ethylene glycol.

* Pets burn extra energy by trying to stay warm in wintertime. Feeding your pet a little bit more during the cold weather months can provide much-needed calories, and making sure she has plenty of water to drink will help keep her well-hydrated and her skin less dry.

* Make sure your companion animal has a warm place to sleep, off the floor and away from all drafts. A cozy dog or cat bed with a warm blanket or pillow is perfect.

* Remember, if it’s too cold for you, it’s probably too cold for your pet, so keep your animals inside. If left outdoors, pets can freeze, become disoriented, lost, stolen, injured or killed. In addition, don’t leave pets alone in a car during cold weather, as cars can act as refrigerators that hold in the cold and cause animals to freeze to death.

source:
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Critter News:

February Is Dental Procedure Month!

Save 15% on All Dental Procedures Through February 29.

We just want to show that we appreciate our clients very much.

Cascade Veterinary Clinic
Dr. Keith Ruble, DVM
935 S. Hwy 55 Cascade 382-4590
Large & Small Animal Medicine & Surgery

source: The Star-News
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MCPAWS to hold free cat microchipping clinic Feb. 20

The Star-News Feb 13, 2020

MCPAWS will host a free cat microchip clinic on Thursday, Feb. 20, from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter.

In 2019, MCPAWS saw an increase of the number of stray cats successfully returned to their humans due in part to the increased effort to microchip owned cats.

“Most stray cats are never reunited with their owners,” development director Kattie Kingsley said in a recent press release. “MCPAWS is working to address this issue by offering free cat microchips. All you have to do is bring your cat in a carrier to MCPAWS.”

Microchipped cats are reunited with their owners 38.5% of the time, compared to just 1.8% for those without chips.

A microchip is a small, electronic chip about the size of a grain of rice that is injected under the skin of an animal. No surgery or anesthesia is required.

The microchip contains a number that is linked to the owner’s information and can be read when a scanner is passed over the area.

Call 208-634-3647 for more information or to schedule a time outside the clinic hours to have a cat microchipped free of charge.

MCPAWS, which is located at 831 S. Third St., received a Maddie’s Fund grant to fund the microchip clinic.

source: The Star-News
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Pet Talk – Dogs are always swallowing foreign objects!

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Feb 14, 2020

A gastric foreign body is any item that is present in the stomach and not passing the small intestine or is vomited. Some gastric foreign bodies can cause severe vomiting or intestinal obstruction, and others, such as coins or metal toys, can poison the animal. Gastric foreign bodies occur when something is swallowed but cannot leave the stomach. They may include large pieces of bone, an item that the animal was playing with, rocks, socks, gloves and underwear. Some animals eat unusual items if they have nausea, and some eat unusual items as part of a behavioral problem. This consumption of unusual items is called PICA.

The most common clinical sign of a gastric foreign body is vomiting. Most animals also lose their appetite. If the foreign body is made of zinc, the animal may develop anemia. If it is made of a heavy metal such as lead, then poisoning may occur.

If the gastric foreign body is suspected, abdominal X-rays are commonly recommended.

continued:
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Council, Boise mushers dominate in 100-mile Idaho Sled Dog Challenge

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, February 11th 2020


Courtesy Photographer Melissa Shelby and the Idaho Sled Dog Challenge

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — Idaho mushers took first and third place in the 100-mile Idaho Sled Dog Challenge.

Winner Laurie Warren from Council finished the race Jan. 31 after 20 hours and 55 minutes on the trail.

Seppa Francis, a 15-year-old from Kuna, finished the junior race, a 37-mile event in which she was the only contender, with help from Kevin Daugherty, a musher from McCall vying in the 100-mile race.

continued:
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Community leaders discuss wildlife education

F&G initiative is in early planning phase

Emily Jone Feb 14, 2020 IME


Express photo by Roland Lane, The Wood River Valley has long had a problem with bears eating from residents’ trash cans, such as this female black bear and her cubs near Board Ranch, west of Ketchum, about five years ago.

A diverse group of Wood River Valley nonprofit leaders, city representatives and Forest Service and BLM employees met on Feb. 6 to discuss a grassroots effort to mitigate human-wildlife conflict.

The purpose of the well-attended “wildlife-friendly community” meeting, spearheaded by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, was to brainstorm how each jurisdiction could renew its commitment to wildlife preservation and education.

“With all the incidents that have occurred recently, from the killing of pets to the mountain lion killed [on Jan. 30], we can take real steps to reduce our conflicts with wildlife—animals never win in those situations,” said Hailey City Council President Kaz Thea, who attended the meeting, during a council meeting Monday. “We can increase our educational efforts.”

continued:
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Winter Wildlife Photos

photo gallery by Roland Lane IME

gallery link:
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Idaho, other western states to study big game range land

The grant was announced by the U.S. Department of the Interior on Friday.

Associated Press February 14, 2020

Boise, Idaho — Idaho has been awarded a grant to study how elk herds move through a northern Idaho migration corridor also used by grizzly bears and wolverines.

The grant was announced by the U.S. Department of the Interior on Friday.

It’s part of $3.2 million in funding for big game range land studies in 11 western states.

Idaho’s work will involve tagging 40 elk in the McArthur Lake area and using 119 trail cameras to map their movements.

source:
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Idaho visitors could see big hike in hunting, fishing fees

Most notably, the costs for elk and deer hunting are going up dramatically, which are the two most profitable areas for Idaho Fish and Game.

Keith Ridler (AP) February 11, 2020

Boise, Idaho — Legislation significantly increasing what it will cost nonresidents to hunt deer and elk in Idaho headed to the full Senate on Monday.

The Senate Resources and Environment Committee approved the measure that the Idaho Department of Fish and Game says resident hunters asked for so there will be less overcrowding in the field.

“Hunt satisfaction reported by many resident hunters has declined to the point where the (Idaho Fish and Game) Commission has made finding relief for this problem one of their highest priorities,” Paul Kline, a deputy director at the Department of Fish and Game, told lawmakers.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Group of elk hit by train in southeastern Idaho

Idaho Fish and Game say the elk were hit in rural Bear Lake County early Sunday morning.

Associated Press February 11, 2020

Dingle, Idaho — Idaho Fish and Game officials say a small group of elk were hit by a train in rural Bear Lake County over the weekend.

Conservation officers said 11 elk were killed in the collision near Dingle early Sunday morning. Two others were injured and had to be dispatched by wildlife managers. The salvageable meat was donated to members of the community, Fish and Wildlife officials said.

Such incidents are uncommon in southeastern Idaho, though this is the second incident in the area in a little over a year. In January 2019, about 30 elk were killed by a train traveling between Montpelier and Soda Springs.

Earlier this month, about 45 pronghorn were killed and another 19 were injured and had to be put down by wildlife managers in a train collision north of Hamer in eastern Idaho.

source:
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Nampa deploys decoys to scare off crows

Feb 12, 2020 KIVI

Nampa, Idaho — For several years now, the City of Nampa has been having problems with an influx of crows. Businesses and residents have complained about the mess left behind from the birds.

For the past two months, the city has been using plastic crow decoys, placing them in trees, to scare the crows away. According to city officials, it’s been working so far.

“The area downtown has not seen the impact that it had a couple of years ago,” said Amy Bowman, communications manager for the City of Nampa. “And so really, it’s been a great success.”

In the past, the city has tried scaring the crows away with shiny objects and even used infrared lasers. So far, the decoys seem to be working the best. There is no word on how long they will stay in place.

source:
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Fish & Game News:

Idaho Department of Fish and Game hosting public meetings on Chinook salmon seasons

Feb 12, 2020 KIVI


Copyright 2018 Scripps Media, Inc.

Boise, Idaho — This month, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game is asking for the public’s input on the upcoming Chinook salmon seasons.

During these meetings, pizza and refreshments will be provided, and biologists will discuss what we learned from last year’s Chinook Salmon season, what this year’s salmon return is projected to look like, and strategies we could use to manage this year’s Chinook run. As always, input from anglers is important to help ensure the Chinook Salmon run is managed in a manner that is most satisfying to all who participate in this amazing fishery.

In addition to this, biologists will also give presentations on topics we think anglers may be interested in, such as: “What have we been doing to control sea-lions?”, and “Where are all our fish dying?”, and “What is our ocean looking like?”. At the meetings in Nampa and Cascade, there will also be a special presentation on ‘Perch Management at Lake Cascade’.

continued:
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Remember Idaho’s nongame wildlife when completing your taxes

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Friday, February 14, 2020

Anyone working on this year’s tax forms might consider checking the box to donate to Idaho’s wildlife.

Taxpayers may check the square on their Idaho tax forms to donate any amount of their refund to the Nongame Wildlife Conservation Fund administered by Idaho Fish and Game.

This fund is used to pay for important work on species that are not hunted, fished or trapped – the “nongame” species of wildlife and plants that make up the vast majority of Idaho’s biological diversity. Other Fish and Game programs aimed at game animals and fish are funded through the sale of licenses and tags to hunters and anglers.

No general taxes go to either game or nongame programs.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Zoo animals enjoy treats on Valentine’s Day

ABC News

Gorillas enjoyed hearts made of biscuit and gelatin, while tortoises ate heart-shaped watermelon, as an Illinois zoo treated their animals to snacks to celebrate Valentine’s Day.

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2 bobcats try to flirt, end up yelling at each other instead

Colorado bobcats in love?

Allison Sylte February 14, 2020 KTVB

Boulder County, Colo. — This Valentine’s Day, humans across the world will attempt to flirt during a Hallmark holiday that honors the beauty of love.

Of course, there are some humans that aren’t so good at flirting, because honestly, it’s hard.

With that being said, be thankful that your flirting (likely) doesn’t sound anything like these two bobcats.

continued w/video:
——————-

Seasonal Humor:

V-DayMiner-a
———————

Winter Weather Advisory Feb 15, 11am to Feb 16, 11am

Link: Yellow Pine Forecast

Saturday Snow. High near 35. Southwest wind 5 to 7 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.

Saturday Night Snow. Low around 27. South southwest wind around 7 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New snow accumulation of 2 to 4 inches possible.

Sunday Snow before noon, then snow showers after noon. High near 36. Southwest wind 7 to 13 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 3 inches possible.

Sunday Night A 50 percent chance of snow showers. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 18. West southwest wind 5 to 9 mph. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Washington’s Birthday Snow showers likely, mainly after noon. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 31. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.

Winter Weather Advisory

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
128 PM MST Fri Feb 14 2020

...SNOW WILL IMPACT TRAVEL IN THE MOUNTAINS THIS WEEKEND...

.A winter storm will bring snow to the mountains Saturday
afternoon through Sunday. Significant snow accumulations are
expected across higher elevations in Baker County, Oregon and the
Central Mountains in Idaho.

West Central Mountains-Boise Mountains-Upper Weiser River-
128 PM MST Fri Feb 14 2020

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM 11 AM SATURDAY TO 11 AM
MST SUNDAY...

* WHAT...Snow expected. Total snow accumulations of 1 to 3 inches
  in the Upper Weiser Basin zone, with 3 to 6 inches over the
  mountains. Total snow accumulations of 4 to 8 inches in the West
  Central and Boise Mountains zones, with 8 to 14 inches over the
  mountains.

* WHERE...West Central Mountains, Boise Mountains and Upper
  Weiser River zones.

* WHEN...From 11 AM Saturday to 11 AM MST Sunday.

* IMPACTS...Travel could be very difficult.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Slow down and use caution while traveling.

The latest road conditions can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.

Feb 9, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Feb 9, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Dec 7 thru Feb 21 Yellow Pine Tavern Holiday Closure
Feb 22 – Pie Contest 2pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern
May 2 – Firewise Meeting 2pm at the Fire Hall
(details below)
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Local Events:

Feb 22 – Pie Contest

2pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern, $1 per plate to taste the pies, money goes to the winners.
— — — —

May 2 Firewise Meeting

YPFD is participating in the “Wildfire Safety/National Community Preparedness Day”.

There will be an open house on May 2nd at 2pm at YPFD.

There will be presentations/pamphlets regarding what YPFD and the fire district has to offer on fire safety and mitigation for our community.
———-

Village News:

Friday Power Outage

On Friday morning, Feb 7, the power went off at 557am, the outage lasted until 305pm. A report came in about trees down somewhere between Yellow Pine and Antimony Camp – probably the cause of the outage.
— — — —

February Snow

February has brought a LOT of snow to Yellow Pine so far. From Feb 1 to Feb 9: 35.3″ of snow has fallen and since January 1st 73.9″ of snow has fallen.

P1000589-20200206Snow15inches
Photo Thursday (Feb 6) after 15″ new snow fell (34″ on the ground.)
Friday morning (Feb 7) we had 11 1/2″ new snow (40″ on the ground.)
Saturday morning (Feb 8) we had only 1/2″ new snow (34″ on the ground.)
Sunday morning (Feb 9) another 2″ new snow (33″ on the ground.)

Winter snow so far = 90.1″
October 2019: 4.6″
November 2019: 1.7″
December 2019: 9.9″
January 2020: 38.6″
Feb 2020 (1-9): 35.3″

Report from Midas Gold (McKinsey Lyon) on Feb 7: “Stibnite received 24 inches in the last 24 hours.” FB report of slides on the road between YP and the mine. Photo below courtesy Midas.

— — — —

Biz Closures

The Corner is closed for the winter, opening again next spring. I can be reached at matt @ ypcorner.com or at 970-379-5155. Thanks, have a great winter!
– Matt

The Tavern will be closed from Saturday December 7th to Friday February 21st. UPS packages will be dropped off at Deb’s porch and she will also have gasoline for emergency situations. I will be available at my cell number for any questions or situations 208 739-7086
Thanks, Lorinne N. Munn

The Yellow Pine Lodge is closed for the winter.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report the transfer station was plowed on Thursday, Feb 7th.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Water rates have been increased (see letter with water bill), the 2019 fee is $400. Payment is due by Feb 15, 2020, or you can pay half and the other half is due June 15, 2020.

Boil Water Advisory Lifted November 22, 2019

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the Community Hall.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

The community hall committee’s goal is to have adequate heating installed in the main hall before the June VYPA meeting.

If folks have items for the community yard sale, please place them by the north wall in the community hall. If you see items you would like to purchase, you can pay Deb, Ronda, or Lynn. All funds support the community hall.

VYPA meetings for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
— — — —

YPFD News:

May 2 – Firewise Meeting 2pm at the Fire Hall

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Fire Chief – Jeff Forster

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

We will do another class this spring/summer [2020] depending on interest. Training will resume in the spring. -Fire Chief Jeff
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Closed for the winter.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Closed Dec 7 thru Feb 21.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for Winter.
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Feb 3) clear and cold, overnight low of 2 degrees, trace of new snow and measured 19″ total snow on the ground. Jays quite vocal, nuthatches and a nutcracker visiting. At 1pm the wind kicked up and whiteout from snow blown out of the trees for about 15 minutes, then again about an hour later for a short while, high of 30 degrees. Breezy cold and clear afternoon, a few tiny clouds arrived after sundown. Partly cloudy at dusk and slight breeze, temperatures dropping quickly into the teens. Cloudy before midnight, filtered moonlight and no stars.

Tuesday (Feb 4) 24 hour low of 2 degrees (yesterday morning) and 7 degrees at sunrise around 1015am, partly cloudy sky and almost calm, no new snow and 19″ total snow on the ground. Jays calling, red-breasted nuthatches and mountain chickadees visiting. Mostly sunny at lunch time, clouds moving in by early afternoon, high of 31 degrees. Solid overcast by sundown and cold light breezes. Overcast at dark, stinky air. Started snowing around 10pm and looks like it snowed all night.

Wednesday (Feb 5) 24 hour low of 7 degrees (yesterday morning) it was 21 degrees at 10am, low overcast (top of VanMeter in the clouds) and steady fine snow falling, 1 3/4″ new snow and 20″ total snow on the ground. Clark’s nutcracker, jays, red-breasted nuthatches and a chickadee visiting. Still snowing at noon, high of 27 degrees. Mail truck made it in on time, good trip. Low clouds and steady light snow early afternoon. Hairy woodpecker calling from a power pole, “squeak!” Light traffic. Still snowing steadily at sundown, low clouds and below freezing. Still snowing at dark, low clouds – almost foggy, about an inch of snow since 10am. Still snowing before midnight and stacking up. Snowed all night, buried by morning.

Thursday (Feb 6) 24 hour low of 21 degrees (yesterday morning), warmed up to 29 degrees by 10am (warmer than the high on Wednesday), measured 15″ new snow and 34″ total snow on the ground, low overcast and still snowing pretty good and accumulating. Clark’s nutcracker, jays and nuthatches visiting. Still snowing big flakes at lunch time and a couple inches since last measurement, high of 36 degrees. By mid-afternoon we had 5 1/2″ new snow fall since 10am, 37″ total on the ground, low overcast and still snowing but not quite so hard. Snow changed over to light rain at 330pm. Rain snow mix late afternoon, low foggy clouds. Fine light snow and misty rain drops at dark. Wet sloppy snow by 8pm and starting to stick. Snowing pretty good before midnight. Snowed all night. Power out at 557am and snowing. Turned to rain just before 10am.

Friday (Feb 7) (power out 557am) 24 hour low of 29 degrees (yesterday morning) low clouds nearly to the valley floor and misting rain by 10am, measured 11 1/2″ new snow and 40″ total snow on the ground. Jays, chickadees and both red and white-breasted nuthatches visiting. Low clouds, 35 degrees and misting lightly at lunch time. Steep roofs sliding their snow loads in loud whooshing avalanches, high of 36 degrees. Early afternoon clouds lifted enough to see Golden Gate for about an hour, then socked in low and light rain falling. Power on at 305pm. Very low clouds and misty rain all day, stopped before dark and just above freezing. Rain with a little snow mixed in late evening turning to all rain after midnight. Rain pounding down at 1245am and 330am. Graupel then snow early morning.

Saturday (Feb 8) overnight low of 30 degrees, measured 1/2″ of slush-graupel-snow and 34″ snow on the ground (old snow is settling and slumping in big “dimples”), overcast (top of VanMeter fogged in) light snowfall and light breeze. Jays, hairy woodpecker, chickadees and nuthatches visiting. A break in the snow after lunch with thinner clouds and filtered sun for a short time, then snowed on and off the rest of the afternoon, high of 37 degrees. Below freezing and not snowing at dark (about 1″ or more of new snow.) More snow before midnight and still snowing lightly. Full moon bright enough to be seen thru the clouds.

Sunday (Feb 9) overnight low of 15 degrees, measured 2″ of new snow and 33″ total snow on the ground, partly clear sky. Fresh fox tracks all over the place this morning. Jays, clark’s nutcracker, chickadees and nuthatches visiting. Partly cloudy at lunch time and strong sunshine, high of 38 degrees. Report of a red-winged blackbird in town. Mostly cloudy and breezy at sundown. Looked cloudy at dark, and had dropped below freezing with lighter breezes.
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Idaho News:

Next meeting on Valley [County] roads to be held Feb. 13 in Donnelly

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Feb 6, 2020

Valley County officials will hold a second town hall meeting to discuss the road and bridge department funding crisis next Thursday, Feb. 13 in Donnelly.

The meeting is scheduled to start at 6 p.m. Feb. 13 at the Donnelly Community Center at 169 Halferty Street.

Commissioners held a similar town hall meeting in McCall on Jan. 14. At least one more meeting will be held on the funding crisis in Cascade on a date still to be determined.

At the meeting, the county will again provide information and answer questions about road funding.

In November, a vote to add about $4 million in property tax funding failed at the ballot, leaving the county with a dwindling budget and little hope of undertaking any major road projects.

The county is still seeking options to fund roads, and also seeking comments from the public on what they would like to see from the road department, commissioner Sherry Maupin said.

County officials will present information about the current funding and possible future sources of funding.

Officials plan to present information on the department’s funding for the past three years to show what work has been done and where the funds come from.

Future funding will also be presented, including specifics on what would happen to the department if property taxes are levied to support the department’s budget, and what would happen at current funding levels.

Specific projects and timelines for their implementation as well as cost estimates per mile of work will be available at the meeting.

An informal poll of preferred options for funding is planned.

The Secure Rural Schools and Self Determination Act of 2000 was recently reauthorized for two years. The federal funding should provide about $1 million per year, but exact figures are not yet known.

Even with the additional federal funding, the department is underfunded to meet basic needs into the future, officials have said.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Valley approves rules for singletrack trails along county roads

Study identifies 70 miles of new routes to connect towns

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Feb 6, 2020

Valley County commissioners on Monday approved guidelines to allow for singletrack trails to be developed along county roads.

The rules detail design standards for the pathways and a legal process for their approval.

The approval of the trails is designed to connect existing non-motorized trails in the county, which are well established near McCall, Cascade and Donnelly, but sparse in between those towns.

“We realized there were some challenges with connecting the bookends of several trail systems on the valley floor,” West Central Mountains Economic Development Council Executive Director Andrew Mentzer said.

Under the new rules, trails would be paid for and developed by organizations like Valley County Pathways, the Central Idaho Mountain Bike Association or a recreation district.

continued:
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Firewise Grant Program accepts applications until Feb. 28

The Star-News Feb 6, 2020

The Idaho Firewise Grant Program is accepting applications from fire departments and other community organizations seeking to increase wildland fire awareness through education.

The program has awarded more than $96,941 to fund projects throughout Idaho over the past six years.

A workshop to help groups complete their application will begin at 2 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 18, at the Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association. 555 Deinhard Lane, McCall.

For more information on the program, contact Stephanie Nelson at 208-630-4201 or http://facebook.com/VCFirewise.

For more information on Idaho Firewise grant requirements or to submit a grant proposal, visit http://idahofirewise.org/grants. The deadline for submitting proposals is Friday, Feb. 28.

source:
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Stretch of Highway 21 closed due to avalanche danger

The section of road known as Avalanche Alley is shut down multiple times each winter.

KTVB February 6, 2020

Boise, Idaho — A section of Idaho Highway 21 closed Thursday at 5 p.m. due to “high avalanche risk,” the Idaho Transportation Department announced.

In a tweet posted Thursday afternoon, the department said the planned closure affected the area between Grandjean Junction and Banner Summit.

The stretch of highway, known as Avalanche Alley, is shut down multiple times each winter due to the threat of avalanches.

continued: [Check the ITD page it may be open by now.]
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise’s Ronald McDonald House celebrates its grand opening for the public

Feb 01, 2020 By: Izaak Anderson KIVI

Boise, Idaho — Boise’s Ronald McDonald House celebrated its grand opening Saturday afternoon.

The project, which has been in development for roughly a year, offers families a place to stay while their children receive medical treatment at local hospitals.

In 2019, the Ronald McDonald House had to turn away 170 families in Boise due to a lack of space, but the new home will allow the organization to help three times as many families as their current facility.

continued:
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Original Idaho legislation showing 100 years of women’s suffrage

Feb 07, 2020 By Jessica Taylor KIVI

Boise — Sifting through the original documents that tell the story of Idaho’s piece in the ratification of the 19th amendment

“There’s something about knowing these pieces of paper are 100 years old, and at some point, somebody who received this file thought that they were important enough to hold on to,” said state historian HannaLore Hein.

Three-fourths of all states needed to approve of getting the amendment in action.

Idaho women essentially had the right to vote for 25 years, thanks to a state amendment passed. They wanted to stay on top of the suffrage conversation.

continued:
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Mining News:

Midas Gold mine study delayed until at least April

Payette forest says ‘additional review’ needed of application

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Feb 6, 2020

A draft environmental study of Midas Gold’s Stibnite Gold Project, expected to be released by the Payette National Forest last month, will now be delayed until after April 1.

Regulators decided that the draft study needed “additional review” before it is made available to the public, Payette Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said.

“We are continuing to refine the (draft study) to meet our collective goals of producing a quality product for public review,” Harris said.

It is unclear whether the delay will result in final approval of the project being pushed back from the current March 2021 timeline provided by the Forest Service, Harris said.

An updated timeline will be released on April 1 when the Payette issues its quarterly update on the proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine.

The delay means that the draft environmental study will not be released until more than a year after the original anticipated release date of March 2019.

Harris declined to discuss specifics of why extra time is needed, but said the internal review that led to the delay is part of the normal process of drafting an environmental study.

“This is just a standard review process,” he said. “It isn’t above and beyond anything we ordinarily do.”

The internal review was conducted by the six permitting agencies assisting the Payette in its review of the project, Harris said.

Those agencies include the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the Idaho Department of Lands, the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality, Valley County and the Idaho Governor’s Office of Energy and Mineral Resources.

A Midas Gold spokeperson said the company was disappointed by the latest delay.

“While we want these benefits realized as soon as possible, we also want the community to be able to review and comment on the best prepared document possible that leads to a defensible decision,” said Mckinsey Lyon, vice president of external affairs for Midas Gold Idaho.

“However, the delays yet again push out the environmental solutions being brought to the table, as well as the capital investment and employment,” Lyon said.

The delay in releasing the draft study marks the latest in several other delays over the last two years.

In the fall of 2018, the release of the study was delayed from last March to last May amid the Payette’s request for more information from Midas Gold.

The release date was then pushed back again until August 2019 to allow Midas Gold more time to submit additional water quality studies to regulatory agencies.

The Payette then moved the release to January 2020, the most recent planned release date, to allow it more time to develop project alternatives and weigh possible environmental consequences.

The draft study will weigh the environmental effects of the project as proposed and evaluate a range of alternatives to the project.

After the study is released, the Payette will hold a minimum 45-day public comment period on the draft.

Substantive comments will then be incorporated into the drafting of a final study, after which a decision on the project and which alternative, or combination of alternatives, will be made.

The final environmental study, most recently expected in November of this year, will also be subject to a minimum 45-day objection period.

Only those who submitted a valid comment to the Payette during the initial 2017 project review period or on the draft environmental study would be eligible to issue an objection.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Public Lands:

Growth hits Idaho’s state parks hard


North Beach Unit of Ponderosa State Park at north end of Payette Lake in Valley County.

Betsy Russell (Idaho Press) February 7, 2020

Boise, Idaho — Idaho’s state parks are so busy that they’re backing off on marketing, as popular campsites sell out long in advance and folks are turned away.

At Bear Lake in southeastern Idaho, the popular North Beach can handle about 600 cars, state Parks Director David Langhorst told the Legislature’s joint budget committee on Friday. “Once we get to that point, our rangers have to tell folks – imagine a ranger, in this business, saying to someone, mom and dad and the kids are in the back, and they just drove an hour or two – ‘Sorry, we don’t have room for you.’”

… Idaho’s most popular parks are being maxed out, he said. People can’t reserve campsites more than nine months in advance, and at that point, there’s a big rush over the internet. At places like Priest Lake or Ponderosa State Park in McCall, “I get letters from people who say they’ve been trying to get in for 15 years or more, and haven’t been able to get a campsite during the high season,” Langhorst said. “That’s the case in a lot of our parks, and growing.”

full story:
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Last Chance Road closed while hazardous trees are removed

The Star-News Feb 6, 2020

Last Chance Road located between McCall and New Meadows has been closed to motorized public access during the Duck Duck Goose Hazardous Tree Removal Project at Last Chance Campground.

While the road is typically left open for over-snow traffic, it is not usually plowed in the winter.

This year, the road has been plowed open for logging equipment access to the site, but motorized public use is not allowed for safety reasons.

The Duck Duck Goose Hazardous Tree Removal Project is a Good Neighbor Authority project in partnership with the Idaho Department of Lands.

It is a part of the larger Little Red Goose Forest Resilience Project in the Goose Creek and Sixmile drainages.

The two drainages have been hit hard in recent years by insect and disease infestation, and the Little Red Goose Project is focused on the removal of trees killed by insects and disease.

The road closure is expected to last through early April. Road closure signs have been posted.

source:
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New Meadows Ranger District Seeks Volunteer Campground Host for Last Chance Campground

New Meadows, Idaho, February 4, 2020 – The Payette National Forest is looking for volunteer campground hosts who are enthusiastic about public lands! We currently have a hosting opportunity available at Last Chance Campground near McCall, Idaho. A host campsite is provided, as well as propane and a reimbursement for incidentals and mileage. Minimum 2-month commitment (the campground is open May-Sept).

Volunteer campground hosts are front-line representatives of the U.S. Forest Service and vital to the success of public land management. Typical duties include informing visitors of recreational opportunities, answering questions from visitors, monitoring campground sites for fee compliance, recording daily occupancy levels, maintaining campground facilities, and more.

About Last Chance Campground: This campground is located 9 miles from McCall, Idaho, along Goose Creek. Its close location to McCall and New Meadows, as well as its proximity to Goose Lake and the Goose Creek trail, make this a popular campground. Twenty-three campsites are available to the public on a first-come, first-served basis.

For more information about this opportunity, please contact Mike Beach, Recreation Manager, at 208-634-0440. We hope you’ll consider joining our summer volunteer team on the Payette National Forest!

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
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Public Scoping Period Open for Sloans Point Forest Resilience Good Neighbor Authority Project – Public Meeting set for February 18, 2020

McCall, ID, February 06, 2020 – The Payette National Forest is seeking public comment on the Sloans Point Forest Resilience Good Neighbor Authority Project on the McCall Ranger District of the Payette National Forest. A public meeting is scheduled for February 18, 2020 from 5:00 to 7:00p.m. at the Forest Supervisors office (500 North Mission Street, McCall, Idaho 83638). Forest Service and Idaho Department of Lands personnel will be available to share information and answer questions.

The Forest proposes to manage forest structure and species composition to recover from insect and disease disturbances, and improve forest landscape resiliency. Activities would restore species composition, stand structure and size classes, and reduce undesirable species and stand densities while favoring the retention of larger diameter, seral trees throughout the project area. Visit the project webpage at: (link)

These proposed treatments would occur on up to 2,272 acres with activities including commercial thinning, non-commercial thinning, prescribed burning, riparian treatments, and transportation system work.

For this project, the Forest Service is partnering with the Idaho Department of Lands through the Good Neighbor Authority, which enables the Forest Service to achieve restoration and resilient landscape objectives through cooperative agreements. This cooperative effort will help improve forest health in the Sloans Point project area while simultaneously creating jobs and economic benefits.

A preliminary assessment of the project has determined it falls within a Categorical Exclusion as authorized by the Healthy Forest Restoration Act, specifically section 603 regarding insect and disease to reduce the extent of, or increase resilience. This project will adhere to the specifications of that authority. As a categorical exclusion, no additional designated public comment periods for this project would occur, so this “scoping” phase is the best opportunity for public input. The scoping period for comments will close March 2, 2020.

To assist the Forest Service in meeting its goals of reducing our carbon footprint and to achieve a sustainable operation, we are now using a web-based electronic comment system that allows all interested parties to receive project materials (scoping documents, updates, NEPA documents, and decisions) and submit comments through the project website.

To subscribe to receive email notifications about this project, go online to the project website listed above. On the project website, you will see a box titled “Get Connected” on the right-hand side of the page. Click on “Subscribe to Email Updates.” When you click on that item, you will be prompted to provide your e-mail address and select a password in the GovDelivery program. When you have logged in, you will be able to manage your account by subscribing to projects by Forest, District, project type, or project purpose. You will also be able to change your e-mail address and password. If you no longer wish to follow the projects, simply delete your subscription. Once you are subscribed, you will receive all project information via e-mail, unless you request hard copies. Only those who subscribe to the GovDelivery mailing list or submit comments will receive future correspondence on this project.

To submit comments using the web form, select “Comment/Object on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project website. The comment portal is only open during public comment periods, and submitted comments are available for public viewing in the Public Comment Reading Room.

Comments may also be submitted in hardcopy to Acting District Ranger Ann Hadlow at McCall District Office (102 West Lake Street, McCall, Idaho 83638) or hand delivered to the District Office during regular business hours of 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday–Friday, excluding holidays.

Comments received in response to this request will be released in their entirety if requested pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
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Idaho lawmakers kill legislation that would’ve allowed civil lawsuits for blocking access to public lands

The legislation was killed in the House Resources and Conservation Committee before it was introduced.

Joey Prechtl February 5, 2020 KTVB

Boise, Idaho — A Boise lawmaker wanted to introduce a bill that would’ve allowed penalties against people who block access to public lands. But Rep. John Gannon’s bill was shot down before it could be introduced on Wednesday.

The issue has made a lot headlines over the last few years as private land owners in Idaho have blocked roads on their property that is often the only access point to public recreation areas.

… [the] House Resources and Conservation Committee killed it because they said it infringed on private property rights and they’re working to keep big government out of people’s backyards.

full story:
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Critter News:

MCPAWS becomes the big dog in animal care

Animal shelter takes over vet clinics in Lake Fork, Donnelly

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Feb 6, 2020

MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter has acquired two local animal clinics as part of its quest to ensure shelter animals have adequate medical care.

MCPAWS has purchased Donnelly Veterinary Hospital in Donnelly and Long Valley Veterinary Clinic in Lake Fork.

The two clinics will be merged at the Donnelly clinic, which reopened Monday as MCPAWS Veterinary Hospital.

continued:
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Pet Talk – Why does my dog ‘scoot’?

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Feb 7, 2020 IME

The anal sacs are two small pouches under the skin near the anus at the 8:00 and 4:00 positions. These sacs hold the thick fatty liquid that is strongly scented and produced by the anal glands. This liquid is used by wolves and wildcat species to mark their territories. In the domestic dog and cat, the use of anal-gland secretions for territorial marking is much reduced or completely absent; however, the glands and their associated sacs are still present. Occasionally, the anal sacs become blocked or impacted or infected. Normal emptying of the anal sacs occurs with defecation. Dogs and cats also empty their anal sacs voluntarily, but they usually only do so if they are frightened.

Failure of the anal sacs to empty during defecation can occur when animals eat low-fiber diets that produce feces that are soft and do not stretch the anus. Infection of the anal sac duct, possibly from bacteria or fungal organisms living around the anus, can cause swelling of the dog and prevent the sacs from emptying. Sometimes the infection can cause the anal sac to abscess, which can cause a severe redness and inflammation and irritation to the anal area.

Any impaction or swelling of the anal sacs can cause anal discomfort in both dogs and cats. The most common clinical sign is scooting or dragging of the animal’s rear end on the floor while it is seated.

continued:
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Royer toughs it out to win Idaho Sled Dog Challenge

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Feb 6, 2020

Reflecting the lights at the finish line, the shimmering eyes of Jessie Royer’s 12 Alaskan huskies came into view, bouncing through the night as they happily trotted to a first-place finish at the Idaho Sled Dog Challenge at 2:19 a.m. on Saturday.

The team of Royer, of Seely Lake, Montana, crossed the finish line 2 days, 15 hours, 4 minutes and over 300 miles after the race began at the Little Ski Hill on Jan. 29.

About two dozen volunteers and spectators had gathered at the finish in the early morning to cheer the team’s arrival.

Royer’s team was joined shortly by Josie Thyr of Olney, Montana, and her 12 dogs, crossing the finish line only seven minutes later.

Both mushers went through the ritual of individually thanking each dog for their hard work with a thorough pat and friendly, “good dog.”

Warm weather and heavy snow made the sled dog race a grueling endeavor, with four of the six mushers in the 300-mile race dropping out.

continued:
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Dogs biting people, harassing wildlife draws ban in Tetons

by Associated Press Saturday, February 1st 2020

Jackson, Wyo. (AP) — The U.S. Forest Service is cracking down on people letting dogs run off leash along trails in Wyoming and Idaho, following a surge in reports of dogs harassing wildlife and biting people.

Officials say it’s not acceptable to treat Teton Canyon like a dog park.

Teton Basin District Ranger Jay Pence says the forest service will more strictly enforce rules that say dogs must be leashed within 200 feet of trailheads and campgrounds.

The move comes after nearby Idaho communities such as the town of Driggs grew dramatically in recent years.

source:
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Mountain lion spotted in McCall neighborhood

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Feb 6, 2020

A mountain lion was seen roaming the backyard of a McCall home over the weekend, according to a report received by the McCall Police Department.

A family staying in a vacation rental on Broken Rein Road near Thompson Avenue reported the sighting through the police department’s website, Police Chief Justin Williams said. The exact date and time of the sighting was not reported.

Williams reported the sighting to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, which was monitoring the situation, said Regan Berkley, F&G regional wildlife manager in McCall.

Mountain lion sightings happen in the city of McCall “probably a couple times every winter,” Berkley said.

continued:
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Wild horse adoption a success

Feb 3, 2020 Local News 8

Challis, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – People from as far as Utah and Bonners Ferry, Idaho adopted 54 wild horses through the Bureau of Land Management’s Challis Field Office last weekend.

Several adoptors claimed up to four horses, qualifying for the Adoption Incentive Program. Under it, adopters are eligible to receive $500 within 60 days of the adoption date and an additional $500 within 60 days of each animal’s titling. That is usually about one year from the adoption date.

continued:
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Second group of elk ushered across highway near Sugar City

Feb 7, 2020 Local News 8


James Brower Idaho Fish and Game

Sugar City, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – A group of 150 elk moved out of Teton Canyon earlier this week and headed west towards Highway 20 near Sugar City, again causing concern for passing motorists.

Idaho State Police and the Idaho Transportation Department closed Highway 20 and diverted traffic for about 20 minutes Friday around 11 a.m. as Fish and Game staff gently encouraged this second group of elk to the west side of the highway where they desired to be.

A similar group of elk which moved out of the canyon in late-January.

continued:
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64 pronghorn killed after getting hit by train in eastern Idaho

by CBS2 News Staff Monday, February 3rd 2020

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — A train in eastern Idaho collided with 64 pronghorn on Monday morning — killing an estimated 45 on impact and severely injuring another 19 near the small community of Hamer.

Idaho Fish and Game said they were forced to put down the other 19.

Fish and Game officers were called to the area to salvage any edible meat and put down the injured animals. The meat will be distributed to needy families and food banks in the area.

“We have had these sad situations happen before during big snow events,” says Curtis Hendricks Wildlife Manager for the region. “These pronghorn are unable to cross the freeway fence as they migrate west and unfortunately they ended up on the tracks where the snow isn’t as deep.”

source:
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Pheasants Forever receives Cabela’s grant

Feb 3, 2020 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Upper Snake River Chapter of Pheasants Forever has been awarded a grant of $4,491 from Bass Pro Shops and Cabela’s Outdoor Fund.

The money will be used to support local conservation efforts, including enhanced wildlife habitat on more than 15.8 million acres across the United States and parts of Canada. Specifically, the donation will be used to improve the water delivery system at Deer Parks Wildlife Management Unit (WMA) and habitat restoration at the Mud Lake WMA.

Cabela’s and Bass Pro Shops generate donations from customers who agree to “round up” their purchases to support conservation efforts.

continued:
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Land Trust tracking trumpeter swans

Feb 6, 2020 Local News 8

Menan, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – There are currently some 5,000 trumpeter swans wintering with other waterfowl at the Deer Parks Wildlife Management Unit in Jefferson County. The birds are foraging on Idaho Fish and Game food plots that were planted for them.

The Deer Park units were established as mitigation for wildlife habitat lost by construction of the Palisades Dam and Reservoir. It is mostly intended for mule deer habitat, but also provides open-water winter habitat for waterfowl.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

To protect wildlife and public safety, give moose in town space

By Kiira Siitari, Regional Communications Manager
Monday, February 3, 2020


Kiira Siitari/IDFG

Refrain from approaching or feeding moose to keep you and your neighbors safe

During the winter, it is not surprising to see moose within city limits in the Idaho Panhandle and in other parts of the state. Moose move to lower elevations to avoid deep snowpack and take advantage of milder weather conditions. As the largest member of the deer family, moose sightings are part of what makes living in northern Idaho so spectacular.

Moose are not normally aggressive, but they are unpredictable. A docile-looking moose browsing on shrubs one minute can quickly charge or kick if it perceives a threat to itself or offspring. Mother cows with calves in particular require extra space and caution.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

A stray cat without ears has a new set of purple ones, thanks to an animal lover who crochets

Jan 19, 2020 Local News 8

A stray cat in Wisconsin had her ears removed due to chronic and painful infections. So a helpful woman crocheted her some new ones.

The cat, named Lady in a Fur Coat, was bought into the Dane County Humane Society in December and immediately began treatment for chronic ear infections and hematomas, spokesperson Marissa DeGroot told CNN.

To alleviate her suffering, veterinarians eventually decided to remove Lady’s outer ear flaps — which left her looking a little funny.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

SkiSnowplow-a

[Note: the cliff above looks a lot like the big piles of snow in Yellow Pine after cleaning up from recent storms.]
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Winter Weather Advisory Feb 4, 11pm to Feb 6, 11am

Winter Weather Advisory Feb 4, 11pm to Feb 6, 11am

Link: Yellow Pine Forecast

Tonight A 40 percent chance of snow, mainly after 11pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 13. West wind 3 to 5 mph. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Wednesday Snow. High near 32. West southwest wind 3 to 8 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New snow accumulation of 2 to 4 inches possible.

Wednesday Night Snow. Low around 27. West southwest wind around 8 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New snow accumulation of 2 to 4 inches possible.

Thursday Snow before 11am, then rain and snow. High near 40. West wind around 8 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New snow accumulation of around an inch possible.

Winter Weather Advisory

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
302 AM MST Tue Feb 4 2020

...WINTER WEATHER LATE TONIGHT THROUGH THURSDAY...

.Moisture from the Gulf of Alaska will bring snow to east-central
Oregon and west-central Idaho beginning late tonight through
Thursday. Mountains will see moderate to heavy snowfall
accumulations. Mountain valleys below 4000 feet MSL will see
light to moderate snow accumulations to start the event, with the
potential for brief freezing rain Wednesday afternoon as snow
levels rise.

West Central Mountains-
302 AM MST Tue Feb 4 2020

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM 11 PM THIS EVENING TO
11 AM MST THURSDAY...

* WHAT...Snow expected. Total snow accumulations of 4 to 8 inches,
  except 10 to 18 inches over the mountains above 7000 feet MSL.

* WHERE...West Central Idaho Mountains.

* WHEN...From 11 PM this evening to 11 AM MST Thursday.

* IMPACTS...Travel could be very difficult.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Slow down and use caution while traveling.

The latest road conditions can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.

Feb 2, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Feb 2, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Feb 3 – deadline to submit objections to South Fork Road Plan
Dec 7 thru Feb 21 Yellow Pine Tavern Holiday Closure
Feb 22 – Pie Contest 2pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern
(details below)
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Local Events:

Feb 22 – Pie Contest

2pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern, $1 per plate to taste the pies, money goes to the winners.
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Village News:

Friday Adventure

“Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds.” Or avalanches for that matter in our part of the country. We have been having a “January Thaw” after receiving nearly three times the 10 year average snowfall. Monday, January 27, Robert, our mail truck driver, was headed back to Cascade after bringing mail and supplies to Yellow Pine. Near the upper end of the South Fork road a snow slide had come down blocking the road with about 4 feet of snow. Robert got out and shoveled a path and powered his way on through, but about 25 yards ahead there was a second snow slide of about equal proportions across the road. Needless to say it was rather late by the time he got back to the airport in Cascade.
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Rock Migration Season

With the freeze thaw and lots of snow, big rocks are just waiting for a chance to “migrate” – they have waited millions of years for a chance to launch down the mountain. On Thursday, January 30, a big rock jumped onto the South Fork Road at mile marker 23.5, big enough that our local plow had to go push it off the road Friday.
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January Snow

Yellow Pine had a very snowy January, nearly 3 times the 10 year average monthly snowfall of 13″. By the end of the month we had received 38.6″ of snow. Melted snow water (and rain) totaled 3.34″. The average high temperature was 35F and the average low was 18F. The warmest day was 45F on Jan 19th and the coldest was -4F the morning of Jan 15th.

Today (Feb 2) Yellow Pine received 4 1/2″ new snow, there is 21″ total snow on the ground.

P1000582-20200202SnowTrees
Snow on trees before sunrise on Groundhog Day.
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Biz Closures

The Corner is closed for the winter, opening again next spring. I can be reached at matt @ ypcorner.com or at 970-379-5155. Thanks, have a great winter!
– Matt

The Tavern will be closed from Saturday December 7th to Friday February 21st. UPS packages will be dropped off at Deb’s porch and she will also have gasoline for emergency situations. I will be available at my cell number for any questions or situations 208 739-7086
Thanks, Lorinne N. Munn

The Yellow Pine Lodge is closed for the winter.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Friday (Jan 31) the transfer station was plowed today and the bins are about half full.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Water rates have been increased (see letter with water bill), the 2019 fee is $400. Payment is due by Feb 15, 2020, or you can pay half and the other half is due June 15, 2020.

Boil Water Advisory Lifted November 22, 2019

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the Community Hall.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

The community hall committee’s goal is to have adequate heating installed in the main hall before the June VYPA meeting.

If folks have items for the community yard sale, please place them by the north wall in the community hall. If you see items you would like to purchase, you can pay Deb, Ronda, or Lynn. All funds support the community hall.

VYPA meetings for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
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YPFD News:

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Fire Chief – Jeff Forster

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

We will do another class this spring/summer [2020] depending on interest. Training will resume in the spring. -Fire Chief Jeff
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Closed for the winter.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Closed Dec 7 thru Feb 21.
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for Winter.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Jan 27) overnight low of 27 degrees, 1″ new heavy snow and 16″ total snow on the ground, partly clear sky. Nuthatches and a jay visiting, chickadees calling from the trees. Partly sunny at lunch time, high of 41 degrees. Mostly clear mid-afternoon and chilly breezes. The sky looked clear just before dark and temperature dropping quickly. Cloudy and starting to snow just before 11pm. Light snow all night, heavier snow between 6am and 9am, clouds down to the valley floor.

Tuesday (Jan 28) overnight low of 24 degrees, 1 1/2″ new snow and 17″ total snow on the ground, overcast and snowing lightly this morning. Jays, nuthatches and chickadees visiting. Stopped snowing before lunch time, clouds lifting but leaving fog belts mid-mountain, high of 37 degrees. Still a bit of fog across the hills and breaks in the clouds mid-afternoon. Shower of graupel then snow late afternoon into the evening and low clouds. Rain/snow mix then snow again before midnight for half the night.

Wednesday (Jan 29) overnight low of 27 degrees, measured 1/2″ new snow and 17″ total snow on the ground, and mostly cloudy with high fog on the ridges. Jays, chickadees and nuthatches visiting. Mostly clear at lunch time, high of 38 degrees. Mail truck made it in on time. Overcast by early afternoon. Overcast at sundown and above freezing, more snow sliding off flatter roofs. Snowing mid-evening and most of the night.

Thursday (Jan 30) overnight low of 24 degrees, measured 1 1/2″ new snow and 18″ total snow on the ground, partly clear sky and light breeze. Raven flew over low enough to hear the whooshing of wings, Clark’s nutcracker and jays joined the chickadees and both red and white-breasted nuthatches at the feeders. Thin clouds and filtered sunshine at lunch time, high of 37 degrees. Mostly cloudy and above freezing at sundown. Mostly clear sky and crescent moon high in the sky at dark. Partly cloudy late evening and temperatures dropping into the teens. Lots of stars shining brightly before midnight. Clouds moved in and a skiff of snow fell before 6am.

Friday (Jan 31) overnight low of 14 degrees, skiff of new snow and 18″ total snow on the ground. This month we have had 38.6″ of snow fall, about 3 times the average January snowfall in the last 10 years. Lots of jays in the neighborhood visiting in pairs and trios, a couple of clark’s nutcrackers, a hairy woodpecker and the usual nuthatches and chickadees. Cloudy at lunch time, then breezy by early afternoon, high of 37 degrees. Snowmobile traffic and poor air quality. Overcast, damp and chilly at sundown. Mostly cloudy at dusk, crescent moon peeking thru thin clouds overhead. Cloudy before midnight.

Saturday (Feb 1) overnight low around 32 degrees (27F on the gizmo from Friday morning) no new precipitation, estimate 18″ of snow on the ground, cloudy, damp and breezy this morning. Jays, nuthatches and chickadees visiting. Cloudy, warm and gusty after lunch time, high of 50 degrees melting snow. Cloudy and gusty at sunset too – wind in the trees was quite loud at times. Still above freezing and gusty at dark, sounds like the river is up, and small breaks in the clouds to the south. Late evening 45 degrees, cloudy, breezy and wind gusts. Raining after midnight. Snowing pretty hard at 6am and done before 930am.

Sunday (Feb 2) overnight low of 25 degrees, 4 1/2″ new snow on top of slush, 21″ total snow on the ground, overcast and calm. Jays, nuthatches, chickadees and two clark’s nutcrackers visiting. Cloudy and snowing after lunch time for about 40 minutes (trace), high of 30 degrees. Cloudy and variable breezes just before sundown. Short snow flurry late afternoon (a light dusting) with low clouds. A small flock of starlings in the neighborhood and a report of a pileated woodpecker sighted today. Thinner higher clouds just before dark, fuzzy half moon high in the sky.
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Idaho News:

10 adults, 15 children hospitalized after carbon monoxide leak in Donnelly

The house where the carbon monoxide leak was detected was being used as a vacation rental property, according to the fire department.

KTVB January 27, 2020


photo credit Joey Precti KTVB

Donnelly, Idaho — More than two dozen people were taken to the hospital after a carbon monoxide leak in Donnelly.

Donnelly Assistant Fire Chief Franklin Yates told KTVB that emergency responders were called out to a home on Dawn Drive just before 6:30 a.m. Monday.

Four people were initially taken by ambulance to the emergency room at St. Luke’s McCall Medical. According to St. Luke’s spokeswoman Laura Crawford, doctors determined that those four people were suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning, and urged emergency responders to go back to the house and check for anyone else who might have been affected.

Twenty-one more people were then brought to the hospital, by ambulance or private car, according to St. Luke’s.

continued:
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25 sickened by carbon monoxide leak in Donnelly

Detector at rental home did not sound alarm

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Jan 30, 2020

A carbon monoxide leak in a vacation rental home near Donnelly early Monday sent 25 people from Washington state to the hospital, according officials.

It was the second case of carbon monoxide poisoning at the house, the last happening six years ago.

… Investigators were checking this week why carbon monoxide detectors installed in the home were not triggered, Bonilla said.

… All 25 people in the house were members of the same family from Puyallup, Washington, who had scheduled the home through Friday, said one of the guests, Yelena Boryshkevych.

… A December 2013 incident in the same house at 12924 Dawn Drive led to 14 guests being hospitalized for carbon monoxide exposure.

full story:
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Valley County aiming to regulate vacation rental homes

A public hearing on the proposed ordinance is scheduled for Feb. 18.

Joey Prechtl January 29, 2020 KTVB

Valley County, Idaho — More people looking for places to stay on a weekend getaway are finding short-term rentals online through businesses like Airbnb.

A near tragedy on Monday puts that issue in the spotlight in Valley County. County officials are working on new regulations for short-term rentals.

One of the things the ordinance will address is carbon monoxide detectors. This comes after a family of 25 was exposed to the deadly gas on Monday. Twenty-one of them are okay, but four had to be transported to Boise for specialized care.

Valley County Commissioner Sherry Maupin said the county has been working on the ordinance for the past six months. The primary focus of the ordinance is health and safety.

continued:
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Where there are wild things

Mountaintop snow sculpture earns first top prize for Brundage

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Jan 30, 2020

A snow sculpture of Max and his fanciful friends from the children’s picture book “Where the Wild Things Are” won the top prize at the 2020 McCall Winter Carnival.

The sculpture is located at the top of Brundage Mountain Resort, where wild things live, so the setting was appropriate for the sculpture to celebrate the Winter Carnival theme of “It’s a Kid’s World.”

It was the first top prize for the resort and its builders, who are members of the National Ski Patrol.

continued:

Photo LM Tribune

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Ice sculpture in McCall vandalized during the winter carnival

Jan 30, 2020 By Steve Dent KIVI

McCall, Idaho — Businesses in McCall spend countless hours and dollars preparing for their annual winter carnival, they build some really extravagant ice sculptures.

Rudy’s Kitchen won second place for the best sculpture after putting together an ice castle that was a big hit on opening weekend.

“We have about 300 man hours into it and we start ten days before the carnival,” said John Schulz who spearheaded the effort of building the castle.

However, on Sunday night people punched and kicked holes in the castle wall and the owner of Ruby’s Kitchen told us there were urine stains on the wall and dog poop left on the ground near the sculpture.

continued:
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Boise State and USC hockey teams help local special needs non-profit score goals in McCall

Courageous Kids Climbing took to the ice with Boise State and the USC hockey teams during the McCall Winter Carnival.

Mark Johnson January 27, 2020 KTVB

Boise, Idaho — It was quite the scene over the weekend in McCall at the Manchester Ice Rink when players from both the Boise State and University of Southern California hockey teams spent an hour with kids from a local organization based in McCall called Courageous Kids Climbing.

The non-profit provides opportunities for kids of all ages with special needs to experience rock climbing and so much more.

“Hey mom!” beamed a youngster while being pushed in a chair along the ice by a Trojan hockey player.

It was hard to tell who was enjoying this day more. The kids or the players who embraced a moment they won’t soon forget.

continued:
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Cascade annexes land under River District project

Review of development agreement for 443-unit project remains

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Jan 30, 2020

The Cascade City Council on Monday voted to annex 121 acres on which the 443-unit River District development would be located.

The annexation will not take effect until the city and developer sign a development agreement, which had not been completed as of Monday.

The five-hour hearing was marked by acrimonious exchanges between representatives of the city and the developer accusing each other of incompetence, poor communication and abuses of the public process.

The River District is proposed east of Idaho 55 and south of the North Fork of the Payette River on the southern end of Cascade. The developers are Phil and Josh Davis of Cascade.

continued:
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Cascade DMV offices moved after mold found from boiler leak

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Jan 30, 2020

The Department of Motor Vehicles office at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade was closed for three days last week after mold caused by a boiler leak was found in the walls.

DMV services were shut down on Jan. 21 and moved from the office’s location in the north end of the courthouse to the Valley County Clerk’s office at the south end of the building. The DMV reopened on Friday in its temporary location.

The leak also forced the closure of the plat clerks’ office. The employees were relocated to temporary offices in the Valley County Assessor’s Office, which oversees the DMV and the plat clerks.

The entire first floor on the north end of the courthouse will be closed until the mold can be cleaned up and repairs made, Valley County Clerk Doug Miller said.

continued:
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Idaho 55 reopens between Boise and Horseshoe Bend after rollover

Drivers should look out for dense fog and ice in the area, according to Idaho State Police.

January 29, 2020 KTVB

Horseshoe Bend, Idaho — Idaho 55 is back open after an early-morning rollover between Boise and Horseshoe Bend Wednesday.

The crash happened before 6 a.m. near mile marker 59, just south of Horseshoe Bend.

Only one vehicle was involved in the crash, according to Idaho State Police, and no one was hurt.

Both southbound lanes and one northbound lane were shut down for about an hour as emergency crews worked.

Drivers should slow down and be aware of dense fog and ice in the area, according to Idaho State Police.

source:
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Scam Alert:

Idaho Attorney General warns of “FedEx” scam

Jan 27, 2020 By Steve Bertel KIVI

Boise, Idaho — Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden is asking Idahoans to be on the lookout for a text-based scam connected to the worldwide shipping company FedEx.

Potential victims receive a text, purportedly from FedEx, with a tracking code and a request to “set delivery preferences.” Officials say the text includes a link that, when clicked, takes the user to an Amazon listing with a customer satisfaction survey that promises a reward. If fully executed, the scam ends with customers inadvertently signing up for expensive services they’ll be billed for later.

The ploy highlights an increase in text-related scams.

continued:
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Mining News:

US lawmakers want answers about Idaho gold mine process

By Keith Ridler January 27, 2020 Associated Press

Boise, Idaho (AP) — Lawmakers who oversee appropriations for the U.S. Forest Service on Monday sent a letter requesting the agency revoke its decision allowing a Canadian company to write a key environmental report on proposed open-pit gold mines in central Idaho.

Democratic U.S. Rep. Betty McCollum of Minnesota chairs the House Appropriations Subcommittee. She, the vice-chair of the committee and four other House Democrats want all records leading to the Forest Service giving British Columbia-based Midas Gold authority to write the document.

The Associated Press in December reported that internal documents obtained by conservation group Earthworks showed that the Forest Service in February 2018 decided to deny Midas Gold’s request to participate as what is called a non-federal representative in writing the assessment.

The Forest Service said they didn’t want Midas Gold helping to write the document because the massive project would likely harm protected fish.

… “The letter is inaccurate and misleading,” said Laurel Sayer, CEO of Midas Gold Idaho. “Midas Gold’s non-federal representative status is not new or unusual and ultimately has already and will continue to increase collaboration.”

full story:
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Letter to Share:

From: Valley County Board of County Commissioners

December 10, 2019

Re: FRTA Easement, South Fork Salmon River Rd.

Dear [Boise & Payette NF] Supervisors,

The Valley County Board of Commissioners voted Dec. 9, 2019 to withdraw the FRTA request on the South Fork Salmon River Road from the Warm Lake Highway in the Boise National Forest north to the Lick Creek Road in the Payette National Forest. Based on budgeting and other concerns continuing with the request at this time would be a burden that Valley County cannot afford to take on.

It is the intent of Valley County to continue winter maintenance to maintain access to the community of Yellow Pine per the Cooperative Forest Road Agreement (17-RO·11040216·31 Boise National Forest) and (17-RO-11041200-15 Payette National Forest) that is currently in place.

Elt Hasbrouck, Chairman
Valley County Board of Commissioners

source:
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Public Lands:

Note: Comment period closes Feb 3, 2020

Opportunity to Object to the South Fork Salmon River Restoration and Access Management Plan

A new draft Decision Notice and revised Environmental Assessment for the South Fork Salmon River Restoration and Access Management Plan are now available. These documents were prepared by the Payette National Forest following a public scoping period in June 2017 and a public comment period in April 2019.

The project includes numerous actions relating to watershed restoration, motorized and nonmotorized access, and improvements of recreation facilities within the South Fork Salmon River (SFSR) watershed within a 329,000 acre project area. The selected alternative is a hybrid of the alternatives presented in the Environmental Assessment, hereafter referred to as the Selected Alternative. The selected alternative includes one project-level amendment limited to the scope and scale of this project related to the designation of existing routes as system roads for administrative purposes in the Krassel Work Center and Reed Ranch Airstrip area. It also includes the decision to issue a Federal Roads and Trails Act easement to Valley County for 30.3 miles of the South Fork Salmon River Road (Forest Road 474/674).

The project would be implemented on the Krassel and McCall Ranger Districts of the Payette National Forest and the Cascade Ranger District of the Boise National Forest. The Responsible Official is the Forest Supervisor, Payette National Forest.

The revised Environmental Assessment, Draft Decision Notice, and other project information are available for review at the project webpage at (link) and at the Krassel Ranger District 500 North Mission Street, Bldg 1, McCall, ID 83638. Hardcopy documents may be made available to interested parties upon re- quest by calling 208-634-0600.

The draft Decision Notice and revised EA are subject to the objection process pursuant to 36 CFR 218 subparts A and B.

Eligibility to File Objections

Objections will be accepted only from those who have previously submitted specific written comments regarding the proposed project either during scoping or other designated opportunity for public comment in accordance with 36 CFR § 218.5(a). Issues raised in objections must be based on previously submitted timely, specific, written comments regarding the proposed project unless based on new information arising after designated opportunities.

Individual members of organizations must have submitted their own comments to meet the requirements of eligibility as an individual. Objections received on behalf of an organization are considered as those of the organization only. If an objection is submitted on behalf of a number of individuals or organizations, each individual or organization listed must meet the eligibility requirement of having previously submitted comments on the project (36 CFR § 218.7). Names and addresses of objectors will become part of the public record.

Contents of an Objection

Incorporation of documents by reference in the objection is permitted only as provided for at 36 CFR § 218.8(b). Minimum content requirements of an objection are identified in 36 CFR § 218.8(d) include:

• Objector’s name and address with a telephone number if available; with signature or other verification of authorship supplied upon request;
• Identification of the lead objector when multiple names are listed, along with verification upon request;
• Name of project, name and title of the responsible official, national forest/ranger district where project is located, and
• Sufficient narrative description of those aspects of the proposed project objected to, specific issues related to the project, how environmental law, regulation, or policy would be violated, and suggested remedies which would resolve the objection.
• Statement demonstrating the connection between prior specific written comments on this project and the content of the objection, unless the objection issue arose after the designated opportunities for comment.

Filing an Objection

Written objections, including any attachments, must be submitted within 45 days following the publication date of this legal notice in the newspaper of record. It is the responsibility of Objectors to ensure their objection is received in a timely manner (36 CFR § 218.9). The publication date in the Idaho Statesman, newspaper of record, is the exclusive means for calculating the time to file an objection to this project. Those wishing to object to this proposed project should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source. The legal notice is expected to be published on December 18, 2019 and the official comment period would open the following day. The objection filing period is expected to be December 19, 2019 through February 3, 2020.

The Reviewing Officer is the Intermountain Regional Forester. Submit objections through the project website using the link in the right corner to “comment/object to project” or send to Objection Reviewing Officer, Intermountain Region USFS, 324 25th Street, Ogden, Utah 84401; or fax to 801-625-5277; or by email to: objections-intermtn-regional-office@fs.fed.us.

source:

link: Project page
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USDA Forest Service Sloans Point Forest Resilience Project Update

The Payette National Forest is seeking public comments for the proposed Sloans Point Project on the McCall Ranger District. The scoping document provides detailed information about the project and is available on the project’s webpage at (link).

To assist the Forest Service in meeting its goals of reducing our carbon footprint and to achieve a sustainable operation, we are now using a web-based electronic comment system that allows all interested parties to receive project materials (scoping documents, updates, NEPA documents, and decisions) and submit comments by e-mail.

To subscribe to receive email notifications about this project, go online to the project website listed above. On the project website, you will see a box titled “Get Connected” on the right-hand side of the page. Click on “Subscribe to Email Updates.” When you click on that item, you will be prompted to provide your e-mail address and select a password in the GovDelivery program. When you have logged in, you will be able to manage your account by subscribing to projects by Forest, District, project type, or project purpose. You will also be able to change your e-mail address and password. If you no longer wish to follow the projects, simply delete your subscription. Once you are subscribed, you will receive all project information via e-mail, unless you request hard copies. Only those who subscribe to the GovDelivery mailing list or submit comments will receive future correspondence on this project.

To submit comments using the web form, select “Comment/Object on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project website. The comment portal is only open during public comment periods, and submitted comments are available for public viewing in the Public Comment Reading Room.

Comments may also be submitted in hardcopy to Acting District Ranger Ann Hadlow at McCall District Office 102 West Lake Street, McCall, Idaho 83638 or hand delivered to the District Office during regular business hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday–Friday, excluding holidays.

To be most helpful, please submit your comments by March 2, 2020, and make your comments as specific as possible. Comments received in response to this request will be released in their entirety if requested pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act.

We anticipate the potential use of the Section 603 of the Healthy Forests Restoration Act (HFRA; 16 U.S.C.6591b) categorical exclusion (CE) for this project. If a CE is used, an additional period where written comments are solicited for the project would not occur, though some aspects of the proposed activities could change before a decision would be signed based on comments received during scoping, collaboration with the Payette Forest Coalition, tribal consultation, and additional field work and analysis conducted by resource specialists.

For further information on this project, please contact myself at 208-634-0400 or ann.hadlow@usda.gov.

Thank you for your interest in your National Forest!

Sincerely,
Ann Hadlow
Acting McCall District Ranger
— — — — — — — — — —

New Idaho program could boost timber revenue on state lands

by Keith Ridler Associated Press Friday, January 31st 2020

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Idaho’s state lands manager on Friday asked a legislative committee to approve $500,000 for a pilot program that would allow specific types of timber to be separated and sold when harvested from state land.

Currently, all trees cut from a particular parcel are included in auctions.

Breaking the sales into specific types of trees could result in more competition and higher bids, bringing more money for a particular timber sale, officials said.

continued:
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USFS Regional Intermountain News

Volume 4 Issue 2 February 2020

In this issue:

* Fire Hire
* USDA Forest Service surpasses goals and breaks records in 2019
* Discover the Forest
* Forest News
* Boots in the Forest
* Volunteer With Us!

link: Archived Newsletters
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Critter News:

McCall school children cheer on mushers at the start of the Idaho Sled Dog Challenge

Jan 30, 2020 By Steve Dent KIVI

McCall, Idaho — The Idaho Sled Dog Challenge is part of the Rocky Mountain Triple Crown and people came out to the Little Ski Hill in McCall to cheer on the teams as they began a 300-mile journey.

This year marked the third year in a row this event featuring mushers and their dogs is happening during the winter carnival.

There was a buzz at the start of this race and it was hard to tell who was more excited the school kids or the dogs.

“It’s a toss up on which one is more motivated,” said assistant race director Dave Looney. “But when those kids show up and they start cheering and chanting the mushers have to be amped.”

continued:
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Pet Talk – Gallbladder disease in dogs and cats

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Jan 31, 2020 IME

The gallbladder is a small pouch or sac that contains bile produced by the liver. The gallbladder stores bile until it is released into the small intestine, where it helps in the digestion of fat.

In people, the most common disease of the gallbladder is gallstones. In dogs, inflammation of the gallbladder can occur, but the formation of hard stones is uncommon. The gallbladder can also become infected by bacteria, and some cancers can develop in the gallbladder. The most common problem in dogs is a condition called biliary mucocele. This condition is when the bile becomes thickened and is retained in the gallbladder, causing it to be enlarged.

The causes of most gallbladder disease, particularly biliary mucocele, is not well-defined in the dog. Most dogs with gallbladder disease have some sort of underlying metabolic or hormonal problem. Both low thyroid and high cholesterol diseases are associated with an increased risk of developing a biliary mucocele.

continued:
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Max number of wolf tags for Idaho hunters and trappers increases to 15

by Ryan L Morrison Wednesday, January 29th 2020

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — The Idaho Department of Fish and Game Commission voted to increase the maximum number of wolf tags Jan. 23 for individuals.

The maximum number of wolf tags available for one person to purchase is now 15 hunting tags and 15 trapping tags for the 2020-2021 season.

The changes to the allowable tag numbers for wolves applies statewide, simplifying the wolf hunting and trapping seasons and rules.

This change is more than likely due to the new wolf estimates that came out recently in Idaho.

continued:
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Wolf debate heats up

Biologist says laws should be science based

Jan 29, 2020 By Steve Liebenthal KIVI

Boise, Idaho — Carter Niemeyer has literally written the book on wolf reintroduction. In fact he’s currently writing his third. Niemeyer is a wildlife biologist, a hunter, and a self proclaimed wolf advocate. He was directly involved in the trapping and release of 35 wolves in Idaho more than twenty years ago.

Niemeyer believes recent increases in the number of wolves hunters and trappers can kill in Idaho are motivated by politics rather than science.

“I’m not gonna judge the Idaho Department of Fish and Game,”said Niemeyer. “I’m a wildlife biologist and I know many of the biologists who work for the agency, and I’m guessing they don’t like what’s going on, but if the legislature dictates to them that they have to do something, they’re professionals, and they will respond to that. To me the biggest problem is having legislators dictate wildlife management policy. I just think that is dead wrong.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Skier bitten by coyote in Yellowstone National Park

The coyote, which officials suspect was starving, is being tested for rabies.

January 29, 2020 KTVB

Yellowstone National Park, Wyo. — Yellowstone National Park is urging people to use caution around wild animals after a woman was attacked and bitten by a coyote this week.

The incident happened Tuesday morning while the 43-year-old woman was cross-country skiing on the Grand Loop Road near the South Rim Drive.

The skier suffered puncture wounds and lacerations to her head and her arm. she was taken to the Canyon Visitor Education Center, where rangers provided first-aid before transporting her to a medical facility for more treatment.

Park staff were able to identify and kill the coyote that had bitten the skier. The animal is being necropsied and tested for rabies.

continued:
— — — —

Coyote that bit skier tested negative for rabies

Jan 30, 2020 Local News 8

Mammoth Hot Springs, Wyo. (KIFI/KIDK) – Update: Yellowstone National Park officials report the coyote has tested negative for rabies.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Mountain lion euthanized after being spotted in Hailey neighborhood, near schools

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, January 30th 2020

Hailey, Idaho (CBS2) — A mountain lion is dead after Idaho Fish and Game were notified of its presence in the Woodside subdivision in Hailey on Thursday.

According to Regional Supervisor Craig White, “we became aware of the mountain lion from a Facebook video that was posted earlier today. Knowing that there was a lion in close proximity to local schools, especially as schools were releasing students this afternoon was very concerning to us.”

After tracking it through many neighborhood yards, officers attempted to haze the lion using a rubber buck shot, the animal was not deterred.

continued:

Video: Cougar spotted in Woodside, Hailey, ID. Attempts to make it over the airport fence to get the riverside of the valley, instead changes its mind and runs back into the neighborhood.

— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho officials rescue large bull elk from hay tarp

by Ryan L Morrison Friday, January 31st 2020


Courtesy Brett Panting & Iver Hull IDFG

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — Wildlife biologists from the Idaho Department of Fish and Game rushed to the rescue Thursday after a large bull elk had got caught in a hay tarp.

Out in Monteview a local landowner called IDFG to report the animal after discovering the tangled elk on his property. Clark County Sheriff’s Office also called in a report.

Wildlife biologists were able to sneak up on the elk and tranquilize it to prevent injury.

“The tarp covered the elk’s eyes and he could barely see,” said wildlife biologist Brett Panting. “I am glad we were able to get to him before he injured himself.”

continued: (see video below in Fish & Game News)
———————–

Fish & Game News:

F&G proposes changes in wolf hunting/trapping for 2020

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Tuesday, January 28, 2020

Deadline to comment on the proposals is Feb. 10.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is proposing seven extensions of the 2020 wolf hunting seasons and two proposed changes to open more areas to wolf trapping and extend trapping seasons. Public can see the proposals and comment at Fish and Game’s public comment webpage. Deadline to comment is Feb. 10.

Fish and Game biologists recently published a new statewide wolf population estimate based on an improved model incorporating remote camera surveys and other monitoring efforts. The estimate indicates Idaho’s wolf population remains robust through fluctuations of births and mortality over the year — an estimated peak of 1,541 wolves in summer 2019 after the annual birth cycle.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

F&G commission increases number of wolf tags hunters and trappers can purchase

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Tuesday, January 28, 2020

Up to 15 hunting tags and 15 trapping tags can now be purchased by individual in a year

During their meeting in Boise on Jan. 23, the Idaho Fish and Game Commission voted to increase the maximum number of wolf tags an individual can purchase to 15 hunting tags and 15 trapping tags for the 2020-21 season.

The changes to the allowable tag numbers for wolves applies statewide, simplifying the wolf hunting and trapping seasons and rules.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Video: F&G staff rescue bull elk entangled in hay tarp

By James Brower, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, January 30, 2020

Hay tarp entangles mature bull elk in Monteview

Wildlife biologists from Idaho Fish and Game rushed to the rescue of a bull elk that had become entangled in a hay tarp in the Monteview area Thursday morning.

continued:

video:

— — — — — — — — — —

F&G wants your help to curb illegal carcass disposal

By James Brower, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, January 30, 2020

Carcass disposal remains an issue around the state

Wildlife Management Areas, such as Market Lake in Eastern Idaho, continue to have problems with the illegal dumping of animal carcasses along roads and in public parking areas.

“Illegal dumping has been an ongoing issue,” says Brett Gullett, Market Lake Biologist. “Carcass dumping can, and often does, ruin the experience of other visitors to the Wildlife Management Area.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Teton Raptor Center helps rescue bald eagle

January 29, 2020 Local News 8

Wilson, Wyo. (KIFI/KIDK) – The Teton Raptor Center in Wilson says a 30-year-old bald eagle is recovering after crashing into a home window Tuesday.

Reed Moulton told us he was lying in his bed in Hoback, Wyoming Tuesday morning when the eagle came crashing through his double-paned window. He said he contacted Wyoming Game and Fish which, in turn, called the Teton Raptor Center.

According to the Center, the eagle survived the crash. The USGS leg bands reveal the eagle has been living in the area for 30 years. It is currently recuperating in the Center’s oxygen tank with minor cuts and scrapes, head trauma and severe bruising, but no obvious broken bones.

full story:
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Trivia:

For the 1st time in over 900 years, Sunday is an extra rare Palindrome Day

by Don Parker WJLA Staff Sunday, February 2nd 2020

Today (Feb. 2, 2020) some are thinking it’s Super Bowl Sunday and some are focusing on Groundhog Day. But to others, it’s Palindrome Day!

For the first time in more than 900 years, the full 8-digit date is a palindrome: 02022020. And it works whether you list it as month, day, year or day, month, year.

The last one was 11/11/1111.

And it will be 101 years before the next one: December 12, 2121. After that, the next one won’t be until the next millennium: March 3, 3030.

source:
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Winter Precipitation Types

Snow is small white ice crystals formed when supercooled cloud droplets freeze. Snow crystals can have different shapes usually dictated by the temperature at which they form.

Snow pellets, also called graupel, are white, opaque ice particles round or conical in shape. They form when supercooled water collects on ice crystals or snowflakes. They typically bounce when they fall on a hard surface and often break apart.

Snow grains are very small, white opaque particles of ice, more flattened and elongated than snow pellets. Snow grains can be thought of as the solid equivalent of drizzle, or as I like to call it, “snizzle”.

Ice pellets, or sleet, are small balls of ice. They form from the freezing of raindrops or the refreezing of melting snowflakes when falling through a below-freezing layer of air near the earth’s surface.

Freezing rain occurs when rain occurs and the surface temperatures is below freezing. The raindrops become supercooled as they fall through the layer of cold air near the surface and freeze upon impact with surfaces below freezing.

source: CoCoRaHS
——————–

Seasonal Humor:

DogSledFlat-a

DogSledSpare-a
——————-

Winter Weather Advisory January 27, 11pm to Jan 28, 5pm

Winter Weather Advisory January 27, 11pm to Jan 28, 5pm

Link: Yellow Pine Forecast

This Afternoon A 20 percent chance of snow. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 37. West southwest wind around 6 mph.

Tonight A 40 percent chance of snow. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 26. South southwest wind around 6 mph. New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.

Tuesday Snow before 11am, then rain and snow. High near 39. South southwest wind 5 to 7 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 2 inches possible.

Tuesday Night Snow likely, mainly before 11pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 22. Southwest wind around 5 mph becoming calm in the evening. Chance of precipitation is 70%. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Wednesday Partly sunny, with a high near 37. Calm wind.

Winter Weather Advisory

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
951 AM MST Mon Jan 27 2020

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY FOR SNOW FOR THE WEST CENTRAL IDAHO
MOUNTAINS FROM 11 PM TONIGHT UNTIL 5 PM TUESDAY...

.A winter storm will move in rapidly tonight and bring mountain
snow and valley rain tomorrow. Snowfall totals are expected to be
sufficient to warrant an advisory for the West Central Idaho
Mountain zone, with 4-6 inches expected in McCall and 6-9 inches
at higher elevations.

West Central Mountains-
951 AM MST Mon Jan 27 2020

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM 11 PM THIS EVENING TO
5 PM MST TUESDAY...

* WHAT...Snow expected. Total snow accumulations of up to 6
  inches, except up to 9 inches over the higher mountains.

* WHERE...West Central Mountains zone.

* WHEN...From 11 PM this evening to 5 PM MST Tuesday. The heaviest
  snowfall will be from 5 am to 11 am Tuesday.

* IMPACTS...Plan on slippery road conditions.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Slow down and use caution while traveling.

The latest road conditions can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.

Jan 26, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Jan 26, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Jan 28 – comments due on power line relocation
Dec 7 thru Feb 21 Yellow Pine Tavern Holiday Closure
Feb 22 – Pie Contest 2pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Feb 22 – Pie Contest

2pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern, $1 per plate to taste the pies, money goes to the winners.
———-

Village News:

Ski Race Jan 18

Two intrepid skiers (Deb and Ronda) entered the cross country ski race, but after half a lap around the airstrip, the race was called due to the snow conditions (2 feet deep!) A great time was had by all.
— — — —

Chili Contest Results from Jan 18

20200118ChiliContest-a

The chili contest was fun and about thirteen gathered and sat around to talk.

Winners
Sarah 1st
Kat 2nd
Cecil 3rd
20200118-ChiliContestWinners-a
(photos courtesy Ray L)
— — — —

IPC Warm lake Feeder Line Relocation [Yellow Pine]

“Please submit your scoping comments by January 28, 2020”

(received Jan 13, 2020) Boise National Forest

Project Description

Idaho Power Company (IPC) has identified a need relocate a segment of line that is currently west of Johnson Creek. This segment of line is only accessible by a deteriorated light-duty bridge that cannot handle the weight of the large equipment required to maintain the line, thus creating a safety issue. Also, the segment of line where it crosses back over to the east side of Johnson Creek and continues into the community of Yellow Pine is at risk to rock slides and there has been repeated rock slide related outages and emergency repairs over the last several years. The proposed underground alignment would improve access, reduce customer outages, improve service and reliability, and ensure the electrical energy source to Yellow Pine residences is maintained.

Proposed Action:

IPC proposes to reroute approximately 2.49 miles of a portion of the existing overhead Warm Lake (WMLK 011) 7.2-kilovolt (kV) distribution line with approximately 2.74 miles of single-phase underground line.

The proposed underground line would be along the easterly ROW (66 feet) of Johnson Creek Road and the associated vaults and sectors would be located outside of the existing road prism and would not interfere with the free flow of traffic, disrupt communication services, or impair the full use and safety of the road.

The proposed project would involve plowing/trenching conduit, installing conductor, excavating and installing vaults/sectors, installing two new single poles (where the line transitions from overhead to underground), and backfilling the trench.

Once the underground distribution line is installed, the overhead line would be removed and the ROW for the portion of the overhead line would be relinquished. All project related disturbance would be repaired as soon as weather, ground, and scheduling conditions permit.

Approximately 0.27 miles of the existing overhead line (including four single-pole wood pole) would remain to continue to provide service to a private mining claim on the west side of Johnson Creek.

Project Location:

The proposed project is in Township 18 North, Range 08 East, Section 04, and Township 19 North, Range 08 East, Sections 28, 29, 32, & 33, Boise Meridian, Valley County, Idaho.

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. Your comments will help us identify and address issues. Comments may be submitted in the following ways:

* Through the project webpage (link). Select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel. If uploading a file with comments, comments must be in the form of plain text (.txt), Word (.doc, .docx) or PDF (.pdf).
* Mail to Cascade Ranger District, PO Box 696, Cascade, ID 83611.
* Hand deliver to Boise National Forest, Cascade District, 540 North Main Street, Cascade, ID 83611. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.
* By fax at 208-382-7480. If submitting comments by mail or fax, be sure to include “WMLK-11” in the subject line.

Comments received will be included in the project record and may be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by January 28, 2020. For further information on the project, please contact Terre Pearson-Ramirez, Team Leader, at 208-382-7400.
— — — —

January Snow

As of Sunday morning (Jan 26) Yellow Pine has 15 1/2″ of snow on the ground. We received 34″ of snowfall so far in January, average depth 15″. Average high 35 degrees, average low 18 degrees. Total water (rain + melted snow) = 2.57″. The warmer weather and rain this week has been absorbed by the snow pack, which is saturated and quite heavy. A report of a couple of avalanches on the upper South Fork closed the road for a while Friday night until the local plow driver could get out and clear a path on Saturday. Travel takes concentration this time of year.
— — — —

Biz Closures

The Corner is closed for the winter, opening again next spring. I can be reached at matt @ ypcorner.com or at 970-379-5155. Thanks, have a great winter!
– Matt

The Tavern will be closed from Saturday December 7th to Friday February 21st. UPS packages will be dropped off at Deb’s porch and she will also have gasoline for emergency situations. I will be available at my cell number for any questions or situations 208 739-7086
Thanks, Lorinne N. Munn

The Yellow Pine Lodge is closed for the winter.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Saturday (Jan 25) the transfer station was plowed this week and the bins are about half full.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Water rates have been increased, the 2019 fee is $400. Payment is due by Feb 15, 2020, or you can pay half and the other half is due June 15, 2020.

Boil Water Advisory Lifted November 22, 2019

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the Community Hall.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
— — — —

VYPA News:

The community hall committee’s goal is to have adequate heating installed in the main hall before the June VYPA meeting.

If folks have items for the community yard sale, please place them by the north wall in the community hall. If you see items you would like to purchase, you can pay Deb, Ronda, or Lynn. All funds support the community hall.

VYPA meetings for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
— — — —

YPFD News:

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Fire Chief – Jeff Forster

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

We will do another class this spring/summer [2020] depending on interest. Training will resume in the spring. -Fire Chief Jeff
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Closed for the winter.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Closed Dec 7 thru Feb 21.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for Winter.
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Jan 20) overnight low of 16 degrees, overcast sky, no new precipitation and measured 17″ of snow on the ground. A few nuthatches visited, a jay calling across the street. Overcast at lunch time and light breezes, high of 40 degrees. Chickadees stopped by. Overcast at sundown and fairly calm. No rain yet and overcast just before dark. Cloudy before midnight. Looks like it rained a little during the night, roofs starting to dry by morning.

Tuesday (Jan 21) 24 hour low of 23 degrees from Monday morning, at 10am it was 32 degrees and dark overcast, measured 17″ snow on the ground. Steeper roofs have slid and moderate pitches have long snow curls oozing off roofs. Red-breasted nuthatches, hairy woodpecker and mountain chickadees visiting. At lunch time a thinner place in the clouds and filtered sun for a short while, high of 39 degrees. Gusty breezes and a few drops of rain mid-afternoon. Breezy and light sprinkles with low foggy clouds at dusk. Still sprinkling early evening, temperature right at freezing and slick paths. Mid-evening it was snowing hard and stacking up, then back to rain again by late evening. Breaks in the clouds and stars out around 1030pm. Cloudy after midnight.

Wednesday (Jan 22) overnight low of 18 degrees, measured 1/4″ of frozen slush and 16 1/2″ total snow on the ground. Crusty slush improved traction on paths. Hairy woodpecker, red-breasted nuthatches, mountain chickadees, jays and a clark’s nutcracker visiting. Mail truck made it in a little early today. At lunch time it was still below freezing and overcast. A few breaks in the clouds early afternoon, then back to overcast sky before sundown, high of 36 degrees. Broken cloud cover, light breeze and just above freezing at dark. Cloudy night. Light snow falling before sunrise.

Thursday (Jan 23) 24 hour low of 23 degrees from Wed morning, overcast and fine light snow falling this morning, 1/4″ new snow and 16″ total snow on the ground. Clark’s nutcracker, jays, hairy woodpecker, mountain chickadees, a while-breasted and the usual bunch of red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Overcast and snow melting, dripping at lunch time, high of 37 degrees. Misted a little rain mid-afternoon. Above freezing and overcast just before sundown. Top of VanMeter hill fogged in since morning, cloudy at dark. Cloudy before midnight. Rain early morning, probably after 6am. Do not think it got below freezing during the night.

Friday (Jan 24) 24 hour low of 30 degrees from Thurs morning, overcast and raining lightly before sunrise, measured 15 1/2″ total snow on the ground, steep roofs are bare and flatter roofs are sliding. Raven calling and flying over the village, red-breasted nuthatches and chickadees visiting. Cloudy and drippy at lunch time, high of 41 degrees. Above freezing and melting snow early afternoon. Still above freezing at sundown. Patches of clear sky and above freezing at dark. Cloudy before midnight. Snowing before sunrise.

Saturday (Jan 25) overnight low of 27 degrees, low clouds – ridges fogged in, steady light snow falling (about 1/8″ by 10am) measured 15″ total snow on the ground. Woodpecker drumming, jays, chickadees and nuthatches visiting. Short light snow flurry after lunch, high of 38 degrees. Cloudy afternoon and above freezing. More bare roofs in the neighborhood, less steep ones are shedding some of their snow loads too. Overcast, humid and above freezing at dark. Some stars out before midnight. Snowing before 7am.

Sunday (Jan 26) overnight low of 25 degrees, measured 1/2″ new snow and 15 1/2″ total snow on the ground, low overcast (top of Van Meter in the clouds) and still snowing (good snowball snow.) Nuthatches and chickadees visiting. Stopped snowing just before lunch, above freezing and roofs dripping, low foggy overcast, high of 37 degrees. Rain/snow mix then all snow mid-afternoon, low foggy clouds to the valley floor. Slushfest. Still snowing at dark (3/4″ measured) and right at freezing. Slushy wet heavy snow.
———————

Idaho News:

Valley delays decision on new snowmobile rules

Problems found with Anderson Creek, car ban date

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Jan 23, 2020

Valley County commissioners on Tuesday said questions remain about proposed new rules for use of snowmobile trails and parking lots in the county.

No date was set for the commissions to take up the topic again.

Chief among the questions was a proposal to ban wheeled vehicles during the winter on Anderson Creek Road on the west side of Lake Cascade.

The owner of land along the road told commissioners that he is developing a subdivision along Anderson Creek Road and the ban would hinder access.

Commissioners told the owner, Ed Priddy of Eagle, that they wanted to find a solution and made plans to hold a meeting between Priddy and representatives from snowmobile groups. The Valley County Snowmobile Advisory Committee also was told to begin drafting rules for parking in the Francis Wallace Parking Lot on Warren Wagon Road north of McCall.

At the public hearing, three people spoke in favor of the ordinance and six people spoke against the rules as drafted.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley Search & Rescue nominated for Idaho’s Brightest Star

The Star-News Jan 23, 2020

Valley County Search and Rescue was among 17 nominees in the Non-Profit/Civic Organization category in the 2020 Idaho’s Brightest Star Awards program.

The Idaho’s Brightest Star Awards program celebrates outstanding dedication and accomplishments of Idaho’s volunteers. Honorees are nominated by fellow Idahoans for their civic contributions and volunteer spirit.

The 2020 awards ceremony was held last week at Boise State University’s Student Union Building.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Event Guide: McCall Winter Carnival 2020

Thousands of people will converge on the small Idaho mountain community for the annual event. Here’s a guide to all the activities happening at this year’s carnival.

KTVB January 22, 2020

McCall, Idaho — The popular McCall Winter Carnival returns for its 55th year. Festivities will bring plenty of fun and excitement for all the kids and family. This year’s carnival runs from Friday, Jan. 24 to Sunday, Feb. 2.

The carnival attracts thousands of people across the globe to enjoy live events, fireworks over Payette Lake and the famous snow and ice sculptures.

This year’s theme is “It’s a kids world!”

Visitors will be able to enjoy snow sculpture viewings, live music and events each day.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Historical group seeks images of McCall from 1940 to 1980

The Star-News Jan 23, 2020

The McCall Historic Preservation Commission is seeking photos, home movies and other historical accounts of McCall and the surrounding areas taken from the 1940s through the 1980s.

The commission will use the media to create a video documenting McCall’s transition from a town centered on industry to one centered on recreation and tourism.

The organization is also seeking candidates to provide oral histories in interviews that will be featured in the video.

The new production will be a follow-up to the 2018 History of McCall video, which describes the early years of McCall. To view the 2018 production, visit (link)

Historic videos and images can be uploaded online at (link)

For more information or to email the media, contact the Historic Preservation Commission at McCallTransitions@gmail.com

source:
— — —

The History of McCall Idaho

(34 minute video) City of McCall A journey through the history of McCall Idaho. Sponsored by the Historical Preservation Commission. Copyright 2017

— — — — — — — — — —

Warm, rainy weather causes rockfalls along Highway 95, seriously damaging one car

If you’re driving on Highway 95 near Riggins, make sure to use extra caution and look out for rockfalls.

January 24, 2020 KTVB

Boise, Idaho — Thanks to warm and rainy weather throughout Idaho, the Idaho Transportation Department is urging drivers to use extra caution and look out for rockfalls when driving on Highway 95 near Riggins.

On Friday, a rock fell onto Highway 95 south of Riggins and a car crashed into it, folding up the car’s front-end like paper. Officials at the Idaho Transportation Department said no one seriously injured in the crash.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Firewise Grant Program accepts applications through Feb. 28

The Star-News Jan 23, 2020

The Idaho Firewise Grant Program is accepting applications from fire departments and other community organizations seeking to increase wildland fire awareness through education.

The program has awarded more than $96,941 to fund projects throughout Idaho over the past six years.

For more information on the program, contact Stephanie Nelson at 208-630-4201 or (link).

For more information on Idaho Firewise grant requirements or to submit a grant proposal, visit (link) The deadline for submitting proposals is Friday, Feb. 28.

source:
———————–

Mining News:

Stibnite Gold Project opponents form nonprofit corporation

The Star-News Jan 23, 2020

A citizens group that is opposed to the Stibnite Gold Project proposed by Midas Gold Corp. has incorporated as a nonprofit conservation organization.

Save the South Fork Salmon is dedicated to protecting the natural, cultural, and economic values of the South Fork of the Salmon River watershed and the people and economies that depend on it,” said Fred Coriell of McCall, the group’s president and a member of its board of directors.

“We decided that incorporating as a non-profit conservation organization would be the best way to maximize our effectiveness,” Coriell said. “As a corporation, we will have far better access to technical and legal expertise.”

Prior to incorporation, members and supporters worked as a loosely organized community of volunteers.

Its most visible recent project was a protest rally in October in downtown McCall that drew about 300 people.

… For more information, go to (link).

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Bemetals Further Extends Down Plunge DMEA Zone Mineralization at the High-Grade, Polymetallic, South Mountain Project in Idaho, U.S.A.

Jan 20, 2020

Vancouver, Canada – BeMetals Corp. (“BeMetals” or the “Company”) (TSXV: BMET and OTCQB: BMTLF) is pleased to announce the remaining analytical results from its Phase 1 underground drilling campaign, including holes SM19-016, SM19-017 and SM19-018 from the Company’s high-grade South Mountain Base and Precious Metal Project (“South Mountain” or the “Project”) in southwestern Idaho, U.S.A. Most importantly, drill hole SM19-016 has further increased the down plunge extent of the DMEA zone by approximately 75 metres and the zone remains open at depth (See Figures 1 & 2). The Company has also recently agreed upon revised terms with Copper Cross Zambia Limited at the Pangeni Copper Exploration Project in Zambia, to extend the due date for money-in-the-ground exploration investment until the end of 2020. This allows for a full field season of exploration activities this year. (See Pangeni section of this news release for more details).

From this batch of recent analytical results, hole SM19-016 has identified multiple zones of dominant gold and silver mineralization in the projected extension of the polymetallic DMEA zone (See Figure 1 & Table 2). The geological logging and interpretation of SM19-016 suggests this drill hole intersected the margins of the DMEA zone based on an increase in the observed ratio of skarn to massive sulphide styles of mineralization. Future drilling will test areas in close proximity to SM19-016 where more massive sulphide mineralization is likely to be discovered.

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Public Lands:

Last Chance Road Closed for Good Neighbor Authority Project

New Meadows, ID, January 24, 2020 – Last Chance Road (FS Road 453) on the New Meadows Ranger District is closed to motorized public access for the implementation of the Duck Duck Goose Hazardous Tree Removal Project at Last Chance Campground.

While the road is typically left open for over-snow traffic, it is not usually plowed in the winter. This year, the road has been plowed open for logging equipment access to the site, and motorized public use of the roadway is not allowed due to concerns for public and contractor safety.

The Duck Duck Goose Hazardous Tree Removal Project is a Good Neighbor Authority project in partnership with the Idaho Department of Lands, and a part of the larger Little Red Goose Forest Resilience Project in the Goose Creek and Sixmile drainages. These drainages have been hit hard in recent years by insect and disease infestation, and the Little Red Goose Project is focused on the removal of insect and disease killed trees to promote forest health and resiliency in the project area.

The road closure is expected to last through early April 2020, or the end of tree removal operations. Road closure signs have been posted to inform members of the public of this closure.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
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Critter News:

Search and rescue teams rely on canines

By Heatherann Wagner January 23, 2020 Local News 8

Teton County, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK)- It’s the time of year when we hear more and more about avalanche safety. The Teton County Search and Rescue team helps respond to our local mountains when needed. Dogs are often used with teams to quickly locate people.

Jason O’Neill- Director of the group says, “For the search work in general, whether it’s avalanche or area search the K-9s really effective for time. Especially in avalanche they can be really fast compared to and keep team members at safe distances while the K-9’s go in and work. So you can instead of having a 10 person pro blind walking across the avalanche site, you can have a single dog work that site. And they’re fast, they can find people in a couple of minutes.” The dogs go through years of training that continues through the dogs lives.

For volunteers, they meet and train at a facility in Driggs that houses their equipment. The group O’Neill is in charge of is around 30 people from all walks of life. The biggest requirement is having ability and skill in the mountains.

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Lawmaker proposes wolf-free zones in southern Idaho

by Keith Ridler Associated Press Thursday, January 23rd 2020

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Some areas in Idaho would be declared wolf-free zones, and other areas where the animals have killed livestock would have increased wolf-killing opportunities under legislation proposed Wednesday.

The Senate Resources and Environment Committee voted to clear the way for a hearing on the measure put forward by Republican Sen. Bert Brackett, a rancher in the area designated for wolf-free zones.

“Wolf numbers have continued to increase, livestock depredation remains unacceptably high,” he said. “More needs to be done. Ranchers’ livelihood is being threatened by wolves.”

Federal officials say there were 175 wolf attacks on livestock in Idaho in fiscal year 2019, which ended on June 30.

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Idaho wolf population is estimated at 1,000 animals

by Keith Ridler Associated Press Thursday, January 23rd 2020


In this Feb. 2, 2010, file photo, a wolf track, imprinted in the snow, was left near the carcass of an elk in Avery, Idaho. (Kathy Plonka/The Spokesman-Review via AP, File)

Boise, Idaho (AP) – The director of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game on Thursday said there are an estimated 1,000 wolves in Idaho.

Ed Schriever told the House Resources and Conservation Committee that the estimate made public for the first time is the first wolf population estimate in Idaho since 2015.

“We will be making that estimate every year, and we will know from this point forward if the population is going up, as some people speculate, if it’s been level, or if it’s decreasing,” Shriever told lawmakers.

Shriever said the wolf population peaked early in the summer of 2019 at about 1,500 following the birth of pups. He said subtracting hunting and trapping kills along with other deaths puts the population now closer to 1,000.

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Nampa man fined, banned for guiding illegal Alaska hunts

by Associated Press Thursday, January 23rd 2020

Anchorage, Alaska (AP) – An Idaho man who illegally guided bear and moose hunts in Alaska was fined $20,000 and ordered never to hunt in the state again.

U.S. District Court Judge Sharon Gleason on Wednesday also ordered Paul Silvis, 52, of Nampa, to serve six months of home confinement, to be followed by five years of supervised release, federal prosecutors announced Wednesday.

Silvis in October pleaded guilty to two felony violations of the Lacey Act, the law that bans illegal wildlife trafficking, U.S. Attorney Bryan Schroder said in the announcement.

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Fighting rams stop traffic on Idaho highway

The two male bighorn sheep were caught butting heads on a road near Riggins over the weekend.

KTVB January 20, 2020

Lisa and Fred Taylor were on a winding road near Riggins over the weekend when they came upon two bighorn sheep.

The rams were engaged in a battle, putting on quite a display of headbutting alongside the roadway.

Shortly, after bashing heads, one of the rams turns toward the vehicle and gives a look of disgust at the people watching, then returns to the fight.

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Fish and Game works to reduce Magic Valley elk population

Jan 22, 2020 By Steve Liebenthal KIVI

Twin Falls, Idaho — These elk, grazing just north of Mountain Home are part of a population that Fish and Game managers say has grown too large.

“We’re talking almost three thousand elk above our top-end objective,” said State Wildlife Manager Jon Rachel.

So why is that a problem? Depredation. The growing population has created problems, mostly for farmers.

And when deer, pronghorn antelope or elk damage crops, hunters and anglers pay the price. In 1990, the Idaho Legislature mandated that Fish and Game compensate farmers for damage, and two summers ago, that compensation went through the roof.

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Ice fishing tourney Feb. 1 to raise funds for firefighters group

The Star-News Jan 23, 2020

The second annual “Deep Freeze for Firefighters” ice fishing fundraiser tournament with prizes, raffles and an auction will be Saturday, Feb. 1, beginning at 7:30 a.m. at Lake Cascade.

Prizes will be awarded for largest trout as well as first, second and third place winners for total weight of three best perches.

Check-in and registration will be from 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. at Cascade Reservoir’s Poison Creek Campground boat ramp. Parking is $5 for those who do not have the Idaho Parks Pass.

Weigh-in will be at 3 p.m. at Perch 55, 256 N. Main St. in downtown Donnelly. The raffles and benefit auction will follow the weigh-in.

The entry fee is $25. Proceeds will benefit the Wildland Firefighter Foundation, whose mission is to help families of wildland firefighters who were killed or injured in the line of duty.

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Fish & Game News:

Camera surveys provide new statewide wolf population estimate

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Friday, January 24, 2020


Idaho Fish and Game

Game cameras took 11 million photos to help researchers count wolves

Idaho Fish and Game has a new estimate of the statewide wolf population through its new survey method using game cameras and mathematical modeling, which will be repeated annually and fine-tuned during the next few years.

At the Fish and Game Commission meeting on Jan. 23 in Boise, staff reported there were an estimated 1,541 wolves in the state during summer 2019. The estimate represents the peak population shortly after pups were born.

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F&G collaring mule deer bucks to get a better look at long-term survival

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Tuesday, January 21, 2020


Roger Phillips/Idaho Fish and Game

Wildlife managers want to know how bucks are faring during hunting season

Fish and Game researchers want to learn more about mule deer buck survival during hunting seasons, including how the season structure, and hunter access and habitat types affect buck survival. Biologists are using specially designed GPS collars and ear tags to help answer those questions, and collars are being placed on mule deer during winter that will remain on bucks through the upcoming hunting season.

Researchers hope that understanding buck survival will help biologists better manage deer hunting and avoid over-harvesting bucks, as well as meeting hunters’ desires for the age class of bucks and types of hunting seasons.

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More F&G News Releases

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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Man v. Moose as Alaska resident gets trapped in shed

NY Daily News Jan 18, 2020

Things came to a head right in front of the shed.

Anchorage resident Curtis Phelps tried to take out the trash, but a moose tried to take him out. Phelps ducked into the shed for cover.

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Seasonal Humor:

WinterDogPoop-a
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