Category Archives: News 2020

Rx burn South Fork Salmon River

Rx burn South Fork Salmon River planed

Update Oct 30: For your planning purposes and general knowledge. We are narrowing down our window for prescribed fire operations in Four Mile. Tentatively we are looking at burning Monday (11/2/20) or Tuesday (11/3/20) depending on weather. Ignitions will start in the afternoon and will last one day. I expect some residual smoke for a couple days. A system is expected to enter the burn area Wednesday which should bring cooler temps, high humidity’s and increased ventilation. Thank you for your interest and have a good weekend, Patrick

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning to conduct prescribed burning in the Four Mile project area this fall. The Four Mile project area is on both sides of the South Fork of the Salmon River between Poverty Flat Campground and Reed Ranch. The area that will be targeted for fire this fall is to the east of the South Fork Rd between Reed Ranch and Poverty Flat Campground. First priority burn block will be the area between Nasty and Four Mile creeks. Ignitions should take 1-3 days for each burn block, with smoke and fire most likely present in the project area until the next significant precipitation.

The decision to implement prescribed fire always includes assessing the risk and impacts to communities, firefighters and forest resources. This season additional consideration will be given to complexity associated with COVID19, cumulative smoke exposure in our communities from wildfire and the commitment of fire resources locally and nationally.

If you will be operating in the area or have any questions please contact Laurel Ingram, Fuels Tech or Patrick Schon, Fuels Specialist, so that we can collaborate on timing.

Patrick Schon
Email: patrick.schon@usda.gov
Laurel Ingram
Email: laurel.ingram@usda.gov

Map Link: FourMile Fall 2020 Notification
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Oct 25, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 25, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order until further notice.

Community Calendar:

April 17 – Boil water order issued
Aug 11 – Valley County Mask Order
Aug 12 – Firewood Permits at The Corner
Sept 8 – Hwy 55 work started
Oct 31 – Halloween at the YP Tavern 7pm
Fall 2020 – Rx burn South Fork Salmon River planed
Nov 1 – Daylight Savings Time ends
Nov 2 – 3-day a week mail starts
Nov 26 – Thanksgiving potluck Community Hall 2pm
Nov 30 – Firewood Season Ends
(details below)
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From Valley County

Valley County Mask-Up
A county-wide mask mandate was approved the CDH August 11th, and is now in effect for Valley County. (link)

Rebound – Idaho Governor’s phasing program
link:

COVID 19: Recommendations and Resources for Safe Business Practices
link: (lots of info for businesses)
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Local Events:

Yellow Pine Tavern Annual Halloween Party

20201031YPTavernMask-a

Join us for the “Most Original Covid Mask” Contest at the Tavern October 31 at 7pm. Our Annual Salmon Bake, End of Deer Season, Halloween Party Potluck. Alaskan Salmon provided by Tom Wood.
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Thanksgiving

Thursday, November 26th, 2pm. Yellow Pine Thanksgiving Potluck Dinner, at the Community Hall.
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Rx burn South Fork Salmon River planed

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning to conduct prescribed burning in the Four Mile project area this fall. The Four Mile project area is on both sides of the South Fork of the Salmon River between Poverty Flat Campground and Reed Ranch. The area that will be targeted for fire this fall is to the east of the South Fork Rd between Reed Ranch and Poverty Flat Campground. First priority burn block will be the area between Nasty and Four Mile creeks. Ignitions should take 1-3 days for each burn block, with smoke and fire most likely present in the project area until the next significant precipitation.

The decision to implement prescribed fire always includes assessing the risk and impacts to communities, firefighters and forest resources. This season additional consideration will be given to complexity associated with COVID19, cumulative smoke exposure in our communities from wildfire and the commitment of fire resources locally and nationally.

If you will be operating in the area or have any questions please contact Laurel Ingram, Fuels Tech or Patrick Schon, Fuels Specialist, so that we can collaborate on timing.

Map Link: FourMile Fall 2020 Notification
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Highway 55 Closure starts Monday, Sept 21st

Fall (September through November) and Spring (March through May)
– Daytime and nighttime work seven days a week
– Full road closures Monday through Thursday from 10:00am to 2:00pm
– One-way alternating traffic during all other time frames
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Village News:

Yellow Pine Precinct

Yellow Pine is a “vote by mail” precinct. You must be registered to vote in the Yellow Pine precinct to receive a mail in ballot.

The 2020 ballots have arrived. Make sure you follow instructions and SIGN the outer envelope. There were questions about return postage – the answer is the bar code sticker on the back of the outer envelope with your name is the postage. Ballots must be received by the Valley County Clerk no later than Nov 3rd.
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After Fire Action Meeting

On Tuesday, Oct 13, there was a meeting at the community hall to compile an “After Action Review” for the Buck Fire. (No report yet.)
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Help Support the Yellow Pine Volunteer Fire Department

Thank you for all your offers of help and support. Now you can help support the Yellow Pine Fire District by donating through our Go Fund Me account. Just click on the link to get started.

Even a small donation could help reach the fundraising goal. And if you can’t make a donation, it would be great if you could share the fundraiser to help spread the word.

Thanks for taking a look!

FAQ: YPAC is the charity that was set up to allow the Village to apply for grants. It was the only 501.c3 the Village has to allow GoFundMe to recognize an authorized EIN. So, funds will go to YPAC then they will cut a check to the fire district. YPAC is lead by Corey Phillips and Matt Huber is the Secretary.
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Boil Water Order issued April 17 still in effect.

No update for August or September.

Update July 5: the boil order is in effect due to extremely high use due to leaks.

Update June 12: The boil order is still on. We still are experiencing excessive water use because of leaks. Not sure when this will be lifted. We are applying for grants to repair the system.

Update June 2: The water plant is experiencing high water in Boulder Creek which brings more debris into the sand filter.

The high demand caused by leaks in the system plugs the sand filters prematurely. We will be on a boil order until further notice.
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Critters

Be Bear Aware

* Keep all household garbage secured in a garage or other enclosed area.
* Leftovers or discarded fish or meat bones give off a strong odor and should be stored in your freezer until you haul the garbage to the transfer station.
* Keep attractants like B-B-Q grills, bird seed or pet food stored where bears cannot find them.
* Bird feeders should be taken down May through October or placed well out of reach of bears.

Be Mountain Lion Aware

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
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Latest Road Reports

Link: to current road reports.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The 3-day a week mail delivery will start Nov 2nd. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report the bins were emptied Wednesday Oct 14th.

Road is good from YP to the dump.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020. This could last until leaks are repaired.

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance.

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020

Notice of Intent to File an Application with USDA, Rural Development

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an Application with USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG). Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG).

If any additional information is needed, please contact:
Willie Sullivan
Treasurer
ypwater @ gmail.com

Distributed to Yellow Pine Water Users Association customers via Yellow Pine Times on June 12, 2020.

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

Heat was installed in the Community Hall on April 30, 2020.

Addition for Community Hall bathrooms October 15, 2020.

Minutes from September 12 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from August 8, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from July 11, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from June 13, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

Burn Ban rescinded Oct 20, 2020

After Action Report meeting Oct 13, 2020 (no minutes yet.)

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30th at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

Make sure to clean and check chimney fitting before starting that first fall fire in your cabin. Cleaning brushes can be borrowed from the YPFD.

There was a YP Fire Commissioner meeting on June 27, 2020 at 10am at the Fire Station.
Link: 20200627 Fire Dept minutes June 27

YPFD COVID19 Policy

link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP

link: Covid-19 EMS (May 23)

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Bring It, Don’t Burn It”, you can take your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
(TBA) – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Open 11am-8pm Closed Tuesdays thru end of hunting season. Calling ahead works best. Groceries, Ice Cream, Beer and Soda. Our menu fluctuates but typically have Smoked Brisket, Tri Tip, Chicken, Burgers and Wings on hand.
Starting Aug 12th Firewood Permits at The Corner
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Open Daily 8am to 10pm. Outside Dining and Bar. Breakfast and Bar Food.
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open until November 3rd.
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Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300

The store is open now and will be thru October (closing November 3rd for the winter.) Hours are 9 am to 6 pm Tuesday through Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday.
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Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 19) yesterday’s rain showers totaled 0.06″, overnight low of 38 degrees, mostly cloudy sky this morning. Jays and a vocal pine squirrel visiting. Partly cloudy after lunch time. Gusty breezes and decreasing clouds mid-afternoon, high of 63 degrees. Pine squirrels hunting for the scarce pine cones. Clouds to the west at sunset were colorful. Partly cloudy and variable breezes at dusk. Blackbird on the power line. Cloudy before midnight.

Tuesday (Oct 20) 24 hour low temp of 41 degrees was from Monday morning, overcast sky this morning. Jays visiting. Gray overcast at lunch time. Boom at 219pm. Gray overcast and mild temperatures mid-afternoon, light breezes, high of 59 degrees. Brown truck speeding down the hill on main street. Mostly cloudy at dusk. Looked cloudy before midnight.

Wednesday (Oct 21) overnight low of 40 degrees, mostly cloudy sky and breezy this morning. Mail truck was a little late today, no problems reported. Mostly cloudy and breezy after lunch time. Cooler, mostly cloudy and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 54 degrees. Gusty late afternoon. Overcast at dusk, blustery and a short bit of rain and graupel. Overcast and breezy before midnight. Trace of snow fell during the night.

Thursday (Oct 22) overnight low of 26 degrees, trace of snow on the ground, partly clear sky this morning. Partly cloudy and breezy at lunch time. Steller Jays visiting. Cool, partly cloudy and chilly breezes mid-afternoon, high of 47 degrees. Clear sky at dusk and just above freezing. Clear and cold at midnight.

Friday (Oct 23) overnight low of 16 degrees, clear sky this morning, slight cold breeze and frosty. Sunny and breezy at lunch time. Cloudy, cool and gusty winds mid-afternoon, high of 48 degrees. Steller jays hanging out. Cloudy and calmer at dusk. Cloudy and calm before midnight. Rain early morning.

Saturday (Oct 24) 24 hour low of 17 degrees from Friday morning (stayed above freezing last night), rain early morning total = 0.03″, this morning clouds sitting halfway down the mountains and clearing above. Just before lunch a few flakes of snow falling (no accumulation,) mostly cloudy and breezy. Scattered sunshine after lunch. Mostly cloudy and chilly gusty breezes mid-afternoon, high of 47 degrees. Blustery, cold and dark overcast at dusk. Partly clear and breezy before midnight, Mars up.

Sunday (Oct 25) overnight low of 16 degrees, clear sky and cold breezes this morning. A little more traffic than usual. Clear and breezy at noon. Cool, clear and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 36 degrees. Blustery afternoon. Clear sky at dusk, below freezing and light breeze.
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RIP:

Ken Boatman

September 11, 1951 – October 17, 2020

20050102KenBoatman

Ken Boatman, of Yellow Pine, formerly of New Plymouth and Sandpoint, Idaho, passed away at 630pm Friday, October 17, 2020 after a very long illness.

Mr. Boatman moved to Yellow Pine in the early 1990’s and worked at the Stibnite Mine as a heavy equipment operator.

Ken was preceded in death by his father Lloyd and his canine companion Rocky. Survived by sister Connie and daughter Danelle and grandchildren.
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Idaho News:

1,073 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 9 new deaths

Oct 23, 2020 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 1,073 new COVID-19 cases and 9 new deaths on Friday.

That’s 21 cases less than the record reported cases on a single day of 1,094 last Friday, Oct. 16.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March to 57,673.

There are a total of 50,902 confirmed cases and 6,771 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state.

… 9 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 562.

full story:
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Idaho Friday, October 23


source: KTVB
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Some Idaho hospitals ‘reaching crisis stage’ as coronavirus cases surge, medical experts warn

The next two weeks will be crucial in determining the future status of hospital capacities throughout the Gem State, according to Dr. Steven Nemerson.

Katija Stjepovic (KTVB) October 22, 2020

As COVID-19 cases in North Idaho continue to surge, Panhandle Health District moved two counties under its jurisdiction to the highest risk category on Thursday.

Kootenai Health in Coeur d’ Alene is nearing its capacity for COVID-19 patients and may have to transfer some of them to out-of-state locations. Kootenai County’s positivity rate has surpassed 20%.

A similar situation is developing in South-Central Idaho, where doctors and health district officials are very concerned about the rising number of coronavirus cases and the resulting burden being placed on hospitals there.

continued:
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Valley County COVID-19 cases up 4, now stand at 144

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Oct 22, 2020

The total number of positive COVID-19 cases in Valley County reached 148 cases on Tuesday, up four cases from 144 a week ago, health officials said.

St. Luke’s McCall on Tuesday reported 115 total positive cases from testing done at the hospital, up two cases from 113 a week ago.

Cascade Medical Center reported 30 positive cases, or two more than the 28 cases reported last week.

In addition, the private testing cooperative Crush the Curve has found three confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Valley County with no change in the past week.

Nearly all of the positive cases reported by the hospitals were found following the start of the summer visitor season in mid-June.

Central District Health reported 99 of the positive cases were confirmed to be Valley County residents as of Tuesday, which is two more than the 97 cases reported a week ago.

The difference between the hospital figures and the health department figures are those who tested positive but did not declare Valley County as their residence.

One death from COVID-19 has been reported in Valley County since the pandemic reached Idaho in March. An 85-year-old McCall man died July 15 at St. Luke’s Boise hospital due to complications of COVID-19 infection.

continued:
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Found Safe

Report from Midas Gold Oct 19, 2020 via FB

This weekend, a gentleman got lost from his hunting party near Thunder Mountain. The news traveled to our team at Stibnite and we jumped into action, alongside many other first responders, to help with the search and provide backcountry communications support. Thankfully, the search and rescue helicopter saw a light late Saturday evening, which helped everyone hone our search Sunday and find the lost man!!!

We are so grateful to have wonderful search and rescue personnel in Idaho and that everyone is safe today.
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Valley County prepares for in-person voting Nov. 3

Voters will be required to wear masks, have temperatures taken

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 22, 2020

In-person voters in Valley County on Nov. 3 will be required to wear a mask and have their temperature taken, Valley County Clerk Doug Miller said.

Voters with elevated temperatures would not be allowed to enter the polling location, but would be able to do curbside voting outside instead, Miller said.

Voters will be required to maintain six feet from each other, poll booths will be sanitized after every voter and public areas will be sanitized every 15 minutes, among other safety precautions and sanitation procedures, Miller said.

… “We would respectfully ask that if a voter has requested an absentee ballot and has not received it that they contact our office immediately at 208-382-7103 for us to determine what the issue is and for us to make sure that the voter has the ability to cast a vote,” he said.

full story:
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WICAP seeks applications for winter home energy assistance

The Star-News Oct 22, 2020

The Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program will accept applications for the winter starting on Nov. 1.

The program offers assistance with heating and cooling energy costs, bill payment, energy crisis, weatherization and energy-related home repairs.

To apply for assistance, visit https://wicap.org and click on LIHEAP application or call 208-382-4577.

Information on the program is also available on the Western Idaho Community Action Partnership website.

source:
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McCall LOT taxes hold steady despite COVID-19

Collections show busiest tourist season ever

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Oct 22, 2020

McCall saw its busiest summer tourism season on record this year despite the COVID-19 pandemic, according to city tax collection reports.

The city’s two local-option taxes combined to bring in about $1.1 million in June, July and August, or about $26,000 more than the previous record highs set in 2019.

The taxes are a barometer for tourism in McCall because much of the money is generated through sales taxes on overnight lodging, like motels and short-term rentals.

continued:
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Donnelly man given jail time for shooting into home

Woman recounts terror of bullets smashing into house

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 22, 2020

A Donnelly man was sentenced on Monday to six months in jail and three years of probation for firing his rifle into a neighbor’s home on March 27 while a woman and her three children were inside.

Christopher Kaufman, 49 was arrested on five felony offenses when he fired more than a dozen rounds from a semi-automatic rifle into his neighbor’s home, which was occupied by the woman and her children ages 1, 3 and 6.

Kaufman later pleaded guilty to one count of shooting at an occupied dwelling and one count of injury to a child, both of which are felonies.

As part of his plea agreement, two additional counts of injury to a child and one count of malicious injury to property were dropped.

Fourth District Court Judge Jason Scott said his decision to primarily issue probation instead of jail time was a matter of luck that the shots fired did not hit anyone.

continued:
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Letter to Share:

Stibnite mine access on Johnson Creek would be a tragedy

To the Editor:

I can agree with the part of your editorial of Oct. 8 bemoaning the idea of the Midas Gold project at Stibnite building 20 miles of new haul road through an area of wilderness bordering on wilderness, and home of threatened species as well as summering grounds for all the ungulate species inhabiting and taking refuge there from the heavily peopled areas to the West (“Upgrade Johnson Creek Road for Stibnite mine,” The Star-News).

Its construction would be a tragedy. But even more problematic and tragic would be a route down the Johnson Creek Road from Landmark which borders Johnson Creek for most of its way, home to a struggling and slowly reviving population of Chinook salmon and one of the last best West Slope cutthroat populations in the Northwest.

Also claiming habitat here are bull trout, a signal of the purest waters available for fisheries habitats. The results of chemical or other spills along this route, as opposed to the Burntlog new construction route, are dramatically more damaging since the latter does not offer the companion road/stream embrace.

In addition to possible (and certain, given the reconstruction of the Johnson Creek Road route) damage to one of the most valuable fisheries in the Northwest, the Johnson Creek Road route would conflict with the heavy (and I do mean heavy) current use of that road for fishermen, campers, hikers, ATV/UTV motorcycle users, and homeowner motorists.

It has become the Valley County’s most used recreational access in its eastern sector. It is my understanding that Midas wishes for a gate at the Landmark entrance to its new proposed haul road which would eliminate all but mining traffic, leaving the recreational access northward toward Yellow Pine and Big Creek and the southward access toward Deadwood and Stanley free from heavy mining traffic.

While this does not resolve the conflicts and damages wrought on the Warm Lake Road, it does still allow those willing to face the heavy mining traffic there some less dangerous access to recreational areas after the completion of the haul road.

Before its completion, of course, the plans for all the alternatives in the EIS is to access the Stibnite area via Johnson Creek. A better plan would be to complete the haul road before accessing Stibnite via other routes.

If permanent access were decided to be along Johnson Creek, thence through Yellow Pine, as the editorial suggests, it would be the death knell for my business, a backcountry retreat for sportsmen offering wilderness quiet and access, as well as degradation of environment for nine year-round and part-time residents of the Johnson Creek corridor (several of whom would lose property in the “improvement” of the road to accommodate mining traffic).

In addition, a route through Yellow Pine would take private property on one or both sides of their through route, again, to accommodate large trucking traffic. I would doubt that traffic would be stopping for food or lodging there, they’d be highballing it through to meet time commitments. I could foresee the death of Yellow Pine, as well. Perhaps one or two would profit from land sales, but the town would become an oil spot on the road to Stibnite.

I won’t even venture to dream as to how the East Fork Road between Yellow Pine and Stibnite would be made usable for today’s modern mining/hauling equipment. A disaster waiting to happen.

It is inconceivable to me that the editorial writer encouraging the Johnson Creek access alternative has ever driven the Johnson Creek/Yellow Pine/East Fork route to Stibnite. As a long time resident of Johnson Creek and traveler on these roads, and as much as I loath the idea of the new Burntlog haul road, I see no alternative but the latter route.

Truly, our only alternative to chaos in the Valley County backcountry is to pray that entities more powerful than us are able to quash or significantly reduce the impact of the Midas Gold mining plan at Stibnite.

I recommend a reading/rereading of Mary Faurot Peterson’s letter to the editor last week (“Restoration of Stibnite area can be done without mining,” The Star-News, Oct 15, 2020). She’s a lady who knows and should be heard!

And I thought the McCall City Council’s letter to the Forest Service objecting to use of roads and route through their city to facilitate the Midas Gold plan was timely to my response to the Oct. 8 editorial.

I was going to suggest that if an alternative to the Burntlog Route was to be sought, it should be via the Lick Creek/East Fork road to Yellow Pine. Guess we know how that would fly with the Council and McCall residents.

We’re all NIMBY folks, but understand that Stibnite is in all our back yard and threatens not only our access to our recreational areas but to our very life style, tranquility of living and livelihoods, as well. Please, please wake up to the danger!

Diana Bryant, Wapiti Meadow Ranch

source: The Star-News Oct 22, 2020
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Mining News:

NM, Adams County weigh in on Midas Gold

More assistance sought for expected growth from Stibnite mine

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Oct 22, 2020

Midas Gold should give more consideration to assisting local communities with economic growth brought by its proposed Stibnite Gold Project, according to the New Meadows City Council.

The council recently submitted its comments on a draft environmental study of the proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine in a letter to the Payette National Forest.

The Payette, which is the lead permitting agency for the proposal, is accepting public comments on the draft study until Wednesday at 5 p.m.

The city did not endorse or oppose the project in its comment letter, but instead listed how the 12-year to 15-year life of mining operations could alter life in New Meadows.

… The letter also noted an existing housing shortage of about 70 units in New Meadows, which could “double if not triple” if the mine were to be permitted by the Payette.

“The region is already in a housing crunch,” the letter said. “We believe any project should assist the region in developing affordable housing.”

The city’s letter expressed cautious optimism that modern mining regulations and improved technology could help undo damage at Stibnite left by historic mining operations.

full story: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. • All rights reserved (used w/permission)
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Adams likes Stibnite project’s economic, environmental benefit

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Oct 22, 2020

Adams County commissioners support Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite Gold Project due to its anticipated economic and environmental benefits, a letter from the commissioners said.

The commissioners on Monday approved a comment letter to the Payette National Forest on its draft environmental study of the proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine.

The Payette, which is the lead permitting agency for the proposal, is accepting public comments on the draft study until Wednesday at 5 p.m.

The county supports Alternative 2 as outlined in the draft study, which is an updated plan submitted by Midas Gold that reduces traffic and harm to water quality compared to other project alternatives studied.

“Adams County approves of the extra measures proposed by Midas Gold to protect the environment and help restore habitats for local wildlife and fish populations,” the letter said.

In particular, the letter focused on the economic benefits that could trickle down from the mine into Adams County.

An average of about 600 direct jobs with Midas Gold during the three-year construction phase and 12 to 15-year life of mining would keep average annual payroll at nearly $50 million.

Many of those jobs could go to local residents and give younger generations a chance at well-paying jobs close to their hometowns and families, the letter said.

Those jobs, plus another 290 indirect local jobs expected to be supported by the mine, would decrease the local economy’s reliance on tourism and government jobs, the letter said.

“This project represents some encouraging news about the potential for economic growth and revitalization within Adams County,” the letter said.

The county’s letter commended Midas Gold for its “unique approach” to crafting its mining plan, which has emphasized community collaboration to maximize local benefits.

One example of this is the Stibnite Advisory Council, which is a panel of representatives from local communities who meet every other month with Midas Gold officials.

“Through the council, local community members have been able to learn more about the project, request additional information from Midas Gold, voice concerns, and have their questions answered,” the letter said.

The county also expressed confidence in modern mining regulations and financial bonding requirements to ensure environmental restoration work is completed as planned.

Adams County was required to review and comment on the draft environmental study of the mine as a condition of it signing a Community Agreement with Midas Gold in 2018.

The agreement was posed to all local communities that could be affected by the mine. Each signatory was granted a seat on the Stibnite Advisory Council.

Eight local communities signed the agreement, including the cities of Cascade, Donnelly, New Meadows, Council and Riggins, as well as Idaho and Adams counties and the community of Yellow Pine.

The City of McCall and Valley County declined to sign the agreement, citing potential conflicts of interests.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. • All rights reserved (used w/permission)
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Comments on Stibnite Gold Project due by Wednesday

The Star-News Oct 22, 2020

Public comments on the draft environmental study of Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite Gold Project are being accepted until 5 p.m. on Wednesday.

The entire draft study can be viewed by clicking on the “Analysis” tab on the Payette Forest’s project webpage at (link).

Comments can be submitted through the virtual public meeting room that is being used in lieu of in-person public meetings due to the COVID-19 pandemic. That can be found at (link).

Written comments can be mailed to the Payette Supervisor Linda Jackson at 500 Mission St., Building 2, McCall, Idaho 83638. Comments are not being accepted in person due to the pandemic.

Only “substantive” comments that raise questions about specific elements of the draft study or Midas Gold’s proposal will be taken into consideration in the Payette’s drafting of a final study.

Analysis of the alternatives in the draft study will be further refined and could change before a “preferred alternative” is defined in the final environmental study, which is tentatively expected by August 2021.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. • All rights reserved (used w/permission)
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Public Lands:

Prescribed fires to be set this fall on Payette National Forest

The Star-News Oct 22, 2020

Prescribed fires will be conducted this fall on the Council Ranger District, New Meadows Ranger District, McCall Ranger District and Krassel Ranger District.

The Payette conducts prescribed fires to reduce risk to homes from wildfires, protect healthy timber, improve wildlife habitat and improve the forest’s resilience to fire, pests and disease.

Here is a list of the planned fires:

Council Ranger District

• 15 landing piles in among the Middle Fork of the Weiser River, 9 miles southeast of Council.

New Meadows Ranger District

• 30 acres adjacent to west side of Lost Valley Reservoir.

• 170 acres of hand piles west of Hwy 95 near Evergreen Campground.

• 10 acres of hand piles in the Last Chance Campground.

• 4 landing piles between Meadows Valley and Goose Creek.

McCall Ranger District

• 410 acres of hand piles in the Bear Basin area.

• 8 landing piles near the Brundage Road.

Krassel Ranger District

• 1,300 acres along the east side of the South Fork of the Salmon River south of Reed Ranch Airstrip.

Trailheads and roads that lead into these areas will be posted with caution signs and maps of prescribed burn locations.

source:
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From rock slides to trails, ongoing earthquakes are changing the shape of the Sawtooths

Oct 20, 2020 by Nicole Blanchard Idaho Statesman

Six months after a major earthquake rattled Idaho, the rumbling has continued with a quake shaking near Stanley as recently as Monday morning. Since March 31, the earthquakes have intrigued scientists and, in some cases, reshaped the landscape of the Sawtooth mountains near their epicenter.

The initial magnitude-6.5 quake and its aftershocks caused multiple avalanches in the Sawtooths, but many of the effects were masked by snow. As the weather warmed — and as strong quakes continued — more ramifications came to light: the ‘liquefaction’ of a popular beach at Stanley Lake, toppled rock climbing destinations, structural damage to lava tubes at Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve and debris strewn over trails.

“The earthquakes and their effects on the Sawtooth skyline have been an interesting exclamation mark on an already surreal year,” said Ed Cannady, former backcountry manager for the Sawtooth National Recreation Area, in an email.

continued:
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Closure Order Terminated for the Woodhead Fire, Hazards Remain

October 20, 2020, Payette National Forest

McCall, Idaho –Forest Supervisor Linda Jackson has terminated the Woodhead Fire Closure Order, effective October 19th. With the change in weather patterns and associated precipitation in the fire area, fire behavior is minimal and is no longer a threat to containment objectives. Fire suppression resources continue to work in the area and some smoke may still be visible.

Forest users entering the burned area are reminded that there are still hazards in the area, including fire-weakened trees, smoldering fire, and heavy equipment operating in and around the fire area. A burned landscape presents several safety hazards that either did not exist prior to the fire, or have been exacerbated by the effects of the fire. Those travelling or recreating in the burned area are reminded to be very aware of your surroundings and follow warming signs and directions from agency personnel. Hazards include unstable terrain, displaced wildlife, hazard trees, burned stump holes and root chambers, and the possibility of flash flooding and debris flows during periods of heavy rain. Travelers should exercise caution and patience while traveling on narrow roads in and around the burned area.

The Woodhead Fire, northwest of Cambridge, Idaho, started on September 9, 2020, and has burned on lands managed by the Payette National Forest, the Bureau of Land Management, the Idaho Department of Lands, the Andrus Wildlife Management Area, and privately owned land. Suppression damage repair and burned area emergency response are in process.

Additional information about the termination of the closure order, traveling in the burned area, and rehab activities can be found at (InciWeb)
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Idaho parks outline plans for COVID-19 relief funds

Oct 19, 2020 Local News 8

The Idaho Parks and Recreation Department will receive $1.3 million in CARES Act funding. The department said Monday it will use the money to repair and improve park facilities, cover increased operational expenses, and acquire equipment to maintain high-use areas.

As of October 1, visitation at Idaho State Parks set an annual record of more than 6.5 million visitors, despite a 60-day closure early in the year. That surpassed the prior annual visitation record by 100,000 visitors and there are still more than two months in the year.

Parks and Recreation Board Chairman said the COVID-19 pandemic has created an increased burden on Idaho’s 30 state parks.

continued:
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Antifreeze toxicity in dogs and cats

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Oct 23, 2020 IME

Wintertime is approaching and we all want to make sure that our automobiles are functioning properly. This means changing our radiator fluids and adding new antifreeze. Antifreeze products can contain ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, methanol, or a combination of these agents. Most automotive antifreeze liquids contain ethylene glycol and pose the greatest hazard to pets; they are often dyed fluorescent green. Propylene glycol is generally recognized as safe, but can also be dyed a green or blue color. Methanol is present in the windshield washer fluids as well as gasoline antifreezes.

All three compounds can develop a serious metabolic condition known as acidosis after pets drink these fluids. They can depress the brain and cause drunken behavior, mental depression, and coma. Of the three compounds, ethylene glycol is of the most serious concern for pets. It is said to have a sweet taste that is attractive to dogs and cats. When it is metabolized by the body, crystals form that are deposited in the kidneys. These crystals can cause permanent kidney failure.

Signs can occur within one hour after ingestion. Anywhere from 12-36 hours after ingestion, kidney failure may develop with decreased urine production. The kidney damage is often irreversible and fatal.

continued:
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MCPAWS to host cat adoption Saturday at thrift store

The Star-News Oct 22, 2020

MCPAWS will host a no-cost cat adoption event on Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the MCPAWS Thrift Store in downtown McCall thanks to a Rachael Ray No-Kill Excellence Grant.

The McCall shelter has teamed up with partners in the Idaho Shelter Coalition for this statewide adoption event in their effort to make Idaho a no-kill state.

“The goal of the coalition is to end the unnecessary euthanasia of dogs and cats in Idaho by 2025,” said Amber Kostoff, executive director of MCPAWS and vice president of the Idaho Shelter Coalition.

The Idaho Shelter Coalition received the $30,000 grant to distribute to the organizations’ 20 members.

“We know we have a lot of work to do, and events like this represent just one strategy that the coalition has developed to accomplish this goal,” Kostoff said.

MCPAWS Thrift Store is located at 301 Lenora St.

source:
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Idaho Humane Society, Kuna PD and several citizens rescue horse at skatepark

by Ariana Pyper Saturday, October 24th 2020

Idaho Humane Society officers rescued a horse that fell into the Kuna Skate Park on Saturday.

A minor was out riding the horse when she got too close and fell into the bowl.

Officers say the horse appears to be in good health but the horse has a limp and her hock is bleeding.

“We are hoping she has a speedy recovery. Thank you to our Humane Officers who are called out around the clock and those who assisted in this case,” the Humane Society said.

continued: w/video
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Colville man shoots wolf to escape encounter

By RaeLynn Ricarte Statesman Examiner Tuesday, October 20, 2020

Colville, WA — A Colville man who found himself surrounded by wolves on Oct. 7 in the forest near Rocky Creek Road, just east of town, shot and killed a young male in the pack to escape.

“The man called us as soon as he managed to get back to a place where he had cell service, and the incident was investigated by the county’s wildlife conflict specialist, Jeff Flood, and the state Department of Fish and Game,” said Stevens County Sheriff Brad Manke. “Investigators went to the scene and found the dead wolf. From the evidence, they confirmed the man’s story and determined that he acted completely within the law because he was threatened.”

Manke said the identity of the man is being kept confidential to avoid making him a potential target for retaliation from wolf advocates. The incident occurred about 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 7, he said. According to Manke, the man had gone into the woods to check on his trail cameras. After walking through tall grass, he encountered multiple wolves in front of him. Manke said the man then began to slowly retreat, but looked behind to find other wolves flanking him.

continued:
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Letter to Share:

If you are not pheasant hunting you are missing the best.

from The Gamebird Foundation

Hi all you folks that like to hunt pheasants, or just go out and look at these beautiful birds. I am up several mornings and out in the afternoon, evenings. I have not seen as many pheasants in the last several years as I have seen this year. The areas where we are raising pheasants and releasing them are producing clutches of chicks from the birds we released last year. You need to get out and visit these areas.

I spend quite a bit of time around the Access Yes areas. Lots of pheasants, but very few hunters. Just came back from the Youth Access Area over on the Palouse River area. We see pheasants everywhere, but very few hunting. We visited with a young fellow, grinning from ear to ear. He harvested 2 roosters. His dad said that he missed more than he harvested. The farther said they were seeing roosters everywhere. They had just returned from elk hunting and his son wanted to go pheasant hunting. They checked and no one signed up to hunt so they went hunting. Dad said that the boy likes to hunt pheasants much more than elk and deer hunting. I had better sign of or I may fill the page. Give me a call or email if you want to know how to find these places.

“The Pheasant Guy”
Jim Hagedorn
208-883-3423
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Fish & Game News:

Four bull moose illegally shot at, three killed in Valley County over the weekend

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Monday, October 19, 2020

Conservation Officers seek help locating the individuals responsible for killing and leaving a trophy Shiras moose to waste near Tripod

An illegally killed bull moose was discovered recently in Idaho Fish and Game’s Southwest Region, and Fish and Game conservation officers are asking the public for information to bring the poacher to justice.

On Saturday, Oct. 17, a large bull moose was found dead and suspected of being poached west of Tripod Meadow, which is west of Smiths Ferry, in Unit 24. Conservation officers believe the animal was shot sometime between Oct. 10 and Oct. 17.

continued:
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Nonresident fee increase takes effect Dec. 1 and 2021 nonresident deer/elk tags will be available then

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, October 21, 2020

Nonresident deer and elk tags sold out in 2020 and demand is expected to be high

Most nonresident hunters, anglers and trappers will pay higher prices for licenses, tags and fees starting Dec. 1. Price increases will vary by item, but here are new prices for some of the most popular licenses and tags for adult nonresidents:

continued:
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Protect people, protect bats and avoid rabies

By Rita Dixon, Wildlife Natural Resource Program Coordinator
Thursday, October 22, 2020

Bats are beneficial, but often misunderstood wildlife

Idaho Fish and Game — in collaboration with the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Bat World Sanctuary, and Ravenswood Media — has released a short film (see below) called “Protect People, Protect Bats, Avoid Rabies!” Funded through a grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s White-Nose Syndrome Small Grants Program, and a Peekaboo Rescue Fund Grant from Bat World Sanctuary, the film promotes a One Health message by explaining the connection between human health, bat health, and the environment and how best to avoid a rabies exposure.

Late September through October brings our last wave of migrating bats through Idaho. This is a time of year when people are likely to come into contact with bats, which is why it’s important to understand how to avoid a rabies exposure. Although most of our bats are resident and make short-distance movements to their hibernation sites, two Idaho bat species, the Hoary Bat and Silver-haired Bat (both species of greatest conservation need), are long-distance migrants that make twice yearly journeys between their summer and winter grounds, traveling as far as over 900 miles and as far south as southern California and Arizona. These migratory tree bats undertake some of the longest seasonal movements of any bat species and can travel over 150 miles per night, making much needed stopovers for sanctuary or short-term rest. When not in flight, bats often enter daily torpor (controlled reductions in body temperature and metabolism), which reduces their energy costs.

continued:
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Wildlife Express Newsletter & Educational Activities

A new issue of Wildlife Express is out, and we’re expanding beyond the school year so that you can enjoy monthly wildlife features and activities all year long.

Have you ever had a quiet hike interrupted by an exploding bird? If so, you encountered a member of the grouse family. These birds don’t really explode, but their sudden getaway right at your feet will seem like a feathered explosion.

Take a closer look at Idaho’s forest grouse in the October edition of Wildlife Express.

link:
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Windows to Wildlife newsletter header

In this Fall 2020 issue:

* Studying the surprisingly elusive American white pelican
* Watchable Wildlife
* Idaho birding trails
* News from the Field
– * Great Basin Collared Lizard

link:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Elephant Smash Giant Pumpkins

Oregon Zoo Oct 23, 2020

They did the mash!

The elephant family stomped and snacked on over 1,200 lbs of pumpkins this morning during our Squishing of the Squash! Big thanks to growers Larry Nelson and Jim Paino for the gourd time!

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Cute co-pilot! Owl lands in helicopter fighting California wildfires

by KMPH Staff Wednesday, October 14th 2020


Co-pilot owl lands inside helicopter fighting Creek Fire in California (Photo Courtesy: Dan Alpiner / Sky Aviation)

Fresno County, Calif. (KMPH) — It’s odd to have an owl enter an aircraft. It’s unheard of to have it enter while it’s in-flight.

“It’s an unexplainable and magical miracle for it to stay with you for several water drops, then leave just as it arrived – safe and unannounced,” said helicopter pilot Dan Alpiner.

The pilot was flying water drops on the Creek Fire in California in a UH-1 Huey Helicopter.

The pilot said the bird just flew inside, sat on the co-pilot’s chair for a long time, long enough for several water drops and returns.

source:
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Seasonal Humor:

“Do not covid thy neighbors wife, wear a mask.”
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CovidHalloweenMask-a
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Oct 18, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 18, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order until further notice.

Community Calendar:

April 17 – Boil water order issued
May 15 – Firewood Season starts
Aug 11 – Valley County Mask Order
Aug 12 – Firewood Permits at The Corner
Sept 8 – Hwy 55 work starts
Oct 28 – Comment deadline Midas Gold
Oct 31 – Halloween at the YP Tavern 7pm
Fall 2020 – Rx burn South Fork Salmon River planed
Nov 26 – Thanksgiving potluck Community Hall 2pm
(details below)
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From Valley County

Valley County Mask-Up
A county-wide mask mandate was approved the CDH August 11th, and is now in effect for Valley County. (link)

We need Your Help to protect the place and the people we all Love.
link:

Valley County Covid-19 Response Page
link:

Valley County Emergency Operations Center
link:

Rebound – Idaho Governor’s phasing program
link:

COVID 19: Recommendations and Resources for Safe Business Practices
link: (lots of info for businesses)
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Local Events:

Yellow Pine Tavern Annual Halloween Party

Join us for the “Most Original Covid Mask” Contest at the Tavern October 31 at 7pm. Our Annual Salmon Bake, End of Deer Season, Halloween Party Potluck. Alaskan Salmon provided by Tom Wood.
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Thanksgiving

Thursday, November 26th, 2pm. Yellow Pine Thanksgiving Potluck Dinner, at the Community Hall.
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Rx Burn South Fork Salmon River planed

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning to conduct prescribed burning in the Four Mile project area this fall. The Four Mile project area is on both sides of the South Fork of the Salmon River between Poverty Flat Campground and Reed Ranch. The area that will be targeted for fire this fall is to the east of the South Fork Rd between Reed Ranch and Poverty Flat Campground. First priority burn block will be the area between Nasty and Four Mile creeks. Ignitions should take 1-3 days for each burn block, with smoke and fire most likely present in the project area until the next significant precipitation.

The decision to implement prescribed fire always includes assessing the risk and impacts to communities, firefighters and forest resources. This season additional consideration will be given to complexity associated with COVID19, cumulative smoke exposure in our communities from wildfire and the commitment of fire resources locally and nationally.

If you will be operating in the area or have any questions please contact Laurel Ingram, Fuels Tech or Patrick Schon, Fuels Specialist, so that we can collaborate on timing.

Map Link: FourMile Fall 2020 Notification
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Highway 55 Closure starts Monday, Sept 21st

Fall (September through November) and Spring (March through May)
– Daytime and nighttime work seven days a week
– Full road closures Monday through Thursday from 10:00am to 2:00pm
– One-way alternating traffic during all other time frames
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Village News:

Fall Fuel Delivery

The Diamond truck returned Wednesday morning (Oct 14) to deliver more winter fuel to Yellow Pine.
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Friday Food Boxes

Friday’s mail truck delivered food boxes to Yellow Pine. Milk, cheese, yogurt, lots of nice fruit, veggies and packets of ready to eat taco meat and chicken drum sticks.
— —

After Fire Action Meeting

On Tuesday, Oct 13, there was a meeting at the community hall to compile an “After Action Review” for the Buck Fire.
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Help Support the Yellow Pine Volunteer Fire Department

Thank you for all your offers of help and support. Now you can help support the Yellow Pine Fire District by donating through our Go Fund Me account. Just click on the link to get started.

Even a small donation could help reach the fundraising goal. And if you can’t make a donation, it would be great if you could share the fundraiser to help spread the word.

Thanks for taking a look!

FAQ: YPAC is the charity that was set up to allow the Village to apply for grants. It was the only 501.c3 the Village has to allow GoFundMe to recognize an authorized EIN. So, funds will go to YPAC then they will cut a check to the fire district. YPAC is lead by Corey Phillips and Matt Huber is the Secretary.

If reading this makes you feel inspired to donate (especially the part about how we’re all over the age of 60…) – it will help us acquire more fire hose, hose fittings, needed pumps, and 2 replacement tires for our super old excess military water tender, plus other necessary items. Thank you for your consideration!!
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Midas

EIS draft copy for public reading is available in Yellow Pine Community Hall

A complete Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite mine has been placed in the Yellow Pine Community Hall so everyone can read and respond before 5 p.m. on Oct. 28 deadline for public comment. Read about your ares of concern, write a letter or submit your comments online before October 13th. Your comments really influence what happens in Stibnite.

-LI
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Boil Water Order issued April 17 still in effect.

No update for August or September.

Update July 5: the boil order is in effect due to extremely high use due to leaks.

Update June 12: The boil order is still on. We still are experiencing excessive water use because of leaks. Not sure when this will be lifted. We are applying for grants to repair the system.

Update June 2: The water plant is experiencing high water in Boulder Creek which brings more debris into the sand filter.

The high demand caused by leaks in the system plugs the sand filters prematurely. We will be on a boil order until further notice.
— — — —

Critters

Wasps – long legged wasps are around on warm afternoon. Watch for nests under eves and under propane tank lids.

West Nile has been found in Ada, Canyon and Gem county mosquitoes.

Be Bear Aware

* Keep all household garbage secured in a garage or other enclosed area.
* Leftovers or discarded fish or meat bones give off a strong odor and should be stored in your freezer until you haul the garbage to the transfer station.
* Keep attractants like B-B-Q grills, bird seed or pet food stored where bears cannot find them.
* Bird feeders should be taken down May through October or placed well out of reach of bears.

Be Mountain Lion Aware

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
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Latest Road Reports

Link: to current road reports.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Friday (Oct 9) Bins were full (including 2 mattresses) at the transfer station. Road is good from YP to the dump.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020. This could last until leaks are repaired.

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance.

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020

Notice of Intent to File an Application with USDA, Rural Development

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an Application with USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG). Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG).

If any additional information is needed, please contact:
Willie Sullivan
Treasurer
ypwater @ gmail.com

Distributed to Yellow Pine Water Users Association customers via Yellow Pine Times on June 12, 2020.

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

Work Continues on the community hall bathroom
20201015CommunityHall1-aOctober 15, 2020 (photo provided by DF)

Heat was installed in the community hall on April 30th.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes September 12, 2020

The regular meeting was called to order at 2:00 at the community hall by Deb Filler, Chairman.

Council Members Present: Deb Filler, Chairman; Matt Huber, Vice Chair; Ronda Rogers, Treasurer; Rhonda Egbert, Secretary.

Attendees: Virginia Bartholomew, Belinda Provancher, Jake Strohmeyer, Tom Reinhardt, Candy Sullivan, Teri Norrell, Ann Forster

Approval of minutes from August 2020 meeting as published.

Jake Strohmeyer from Boise National Forest gave updates on the Buck Fire.

Tom Reinhart CEO from Cascade Medical gave information on the telehealth programs available thru Cascade medical clinic. Call office to set up a zoom visit.

Treasurer’s report was given by Ronda, see attachments.

Cemetery: had nothing to report.

Community Hall Report: Grant money from Midas Gold has been received and storage shed has been ordered.

Community Hall Toilets: Working on options since Willie is unable to continue due to medical concerns.

Infrastructure Committee Report: Speeding continues to be an issue within town. Dogs and people are feeling unsafe due to vehicles speed. It was discussed to get better signage. Would like three signs on main road. Want to have fun with it. Belinda said s he would check into Midas helping with expenses of sandwich boards.

Festival Report: Refunds have been received. 2021 Festival Budget is replenished to $12,000. Thank you for the fundraising efforts that got us there.

Stibnite Advisory Council Update: Lynn Imel n/a.

Stibnite Foundation Update: Ronda went over grant apportions and how they work.

Reviewed Letters of Interest from Rhonda Rogers and Lynn Imel No other letters were submitted. Ginny made a motion that Ronda and Lynn serve another year. Tim Rogers seconded. Motion carried.

Update from Midas Gold: Belinda encouraged everyone to write a comment letter on the Draft EIS for the Stibnite Project.

Update from YPWA: representative not available, however, it was noted that past due payments are coming in.

Only one person, Deb Filler, expressed interest in being the 2021 Festival Chairman. Deb was appointed chairman.

[Don’t] forget to get your flu shot and write letters for Midas Gold after meeting.

Meeting adjourned at 2:45 by Deb Filler.

Minutes submitted by Rhonda Egbert Secretary

Minutes from September 12 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from August 8, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from July 11, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from June 13, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30th at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

Make sure to clean and check chimney fitting before starting that first fall fire in your cabin. Cleaning brushes can be borrowed from the YPFD.

There was a YP Fire Commissioner meeting on June 27, 2020 at 10am at the Fire Station.
Link: 20200627 Fire Dept minutes June 27

YPFD COVID19 Policy

link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP

link: Covid-19 EMS (May 23)

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Bring It, Don’t Burn It”, you can take your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
(TBA) – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Open 11am-8pm Closed Tuesdays thru end of hunting season. Calling ahead works best. Groceries, Ice Cream, Beer and Soda. Our menu fluctuates but typically have Smoked Brisket, Tri Tip, Chicken, Burgers and Wings on hand.
Starting Aug 12th Firewood Permits at The Corner
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Open Daily 8am to 10pm. Outside Dining and Bar. Breakfast and Bar Food.
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open until November 3rd.
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Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300

The store is open now and will be thru October (closing November 3rd for the winter.) Hours are 9 am to 6 pm Tuesday through Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday.
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Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins (208) 633-6677

Cabins are not available in 2020. RV Spaces $25/night; $150/week; $300/month. Tent spaces $10/night. Shower house is closed for 2020.
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 12) overnight low of 36 degrees, rain during the night = 0.22″, mostly cloudy and light breezes this morning. Dark clouds at lunch time. Rained a little early afternoon, then broken cloud cover. Raven calling. A few misty drops mid-afternoon, not enough to get wet, high of 55 degrees. Mostly cloudy and breezy at dusk. Partly clear before midnight, Mars high above Golden Gate. Warm front came in around 6am bringing clouds and raising temperatures. Started raining before 920am.

Tuesday (Oct 13) overnight low of 33 degrees, started raining before 920am plus yesterday’s light showers = 0.01″. Dark overcast sky, light rainfall and a little breezy this morning. Short sprinkle after lunch time, dark clouds and gusty breezes. Clark’s nutcrackers, jays and a few blackbirds visited. Dark overcast, chilly breezes and light rain splatters mid-afternoon, high of 50 degrees. Breezy showers all afternoon. At dusk it was overcast with light sprinkles and breezy. Cloudy and breezy before midnight.

Wednesday (Oct 14) overnight low of 32 degrees, mostly cloudy sky with open patches of blue this morning and good air quality, 24 hour rain total = 0.18″. Diamond Fuel & Feed truck delivering fuel this morning. Mail truck was a little late, but had a good trip in. Partly clear and breezy after lunch time. Steller jays visiting. Blustery, cool and mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, high of 54 degrees. Very light traffic. Calmer at dusk and mostly cloudy. Cloudy and calm before midnight.

Thursday (Oct 15) overnight low of 27 degrees, hard freeze but little frost, mostly cloudy-hazy sky this morning (almost looks like smoke.) Steller jays bopping around and scolding. Cool and partly cloudy after lunch time. Mostly hazy to partly clear mid-afternoon and very light breezes, high of 53 degrees. Shooting on the west side of the golf course after sundown. Cool and hazy at dusk, the whole sky was orange and cast a golden glow on every hing. Looked somewhat hazy before midnight, a few stars visible.

Friday (Oct 16) overnight low of 28 degrees, partly clear sky and no dew this morning. Sunrise getting later. Jays visiting. Partly hazy at lunch time. Mail truck came in on time. Mostly cloudy and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 65 degrees. Increased traffic. Mostly cloudy at dusk, ruby red clouds to the west. Looked cloudy before midnight. Rain early morning.

Saturday (Oct 17) overnight low of 36 degrees, rained probably around 6am = 0.05″, mostly cloudy sky this morning. Jays and a pine squirrel visiting. Helicopter flew over at 1145am. High hazy clouds at lunch time. Warmer, mostly hazy and gusty breezes mid-afternoon, high of 62 degrees. Sound of chainsaws in the distance, locals getting ready for winter. Lots of jays in the neighborhood. Thicker darker clouds at dusk and light breeze. Looked cloudy before midnight, no rain yet.

Sunday (Oct 18) overnight low of 42 degrees, trace of rain before sunrise, dark overcast sky. Short sprinkle of rain fell at 1010am, just enough to dampen roofs. Jays visiting. Dark clouds and sprinkles of rain after lunch time. Chilly and dark clouds but not raining mid-afternoon, high of 48 degrees. Light sprinkles and showers early evening. At dusk clouds starting to sit down on top of VanMeter Hill and still sprinkling. Air smells like vehicle exhaust.
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RIP:

Ken Boatman formerly of Yellow Pine passed away at 630pm Friday, October 17, 2020
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Letter to Share:

Common purpose, resolve, will help us get through the pandemic

By Gregory Irvine, MD

I have serious pandemic fatigue. We all do. We all desperately want our lives to return to what we had in January of this year.

SARS CoV2 is not experiencing the same fatigue. In fact, as has been shown everywhere on Earth, when we become fatigued and let our collective guards down, the virus takes the opportunity and comes roaring back with a vengeance.

Pandemics end when there is no longer an available reservoir of susceptible human bodies to infect so that the virus can use their cells to reproduce. This pandemic will end when that happens, either through “natural” herd immunity, which will exact a horrible toll on humanity, or through herd immunity created by a widely distributed vaccine against SARS CoV2.

There were no vaccines during the 1918 Spanish Influenza pandemic and approximately 50 million people perished from the influenza worldwide. We will likely have a vaccine and/or an antiviral therapeutic next year. In the meantime, we must do everything possible to reduce the spread of the virus in our communities.

We are all well aware of the measures that we can each take to do our part to reduce the spread of the Coronavirus: maintain physical distance, avoid crowds from outside our immediate household, perform frequent hand hygiene, strictly isolating when experiencing fever and/or respiratory symptoms, and properly wear a two-layer fabric or surgical mask when in public.

If these measures are strictly followed, as has been shown worldwide, viral transmission is significantly limited, and morbidity and death are substantially reduced.

The spread of SARS CoV2 has proven to be difficult to control because, unlike with other similar viral pandemics (SARS, MERS, H1N1, etc.), a significant number of infected individuals who are capable of spreading the virus are asymptomatic. Isolating only those who are sick is simply inadequate for preventing the spread of SARS CoV2. Therefore, all of us need to follow the well-known precautions.

The issue of universal masking needs to be specifically called out. Masks, when worn consistently and properly, work. Any opinion to the contrary is simply untrue. There has been a great deal of scientific validation of the utility of masks in reducing the spread of the Coronavirus, especially when correctly worn by both members of any interaction outside our family bubble.

Masks need to be two layers of tightly woven fabric and worn over the mouth and nose. No mask is perfect and viral particle can penetrate almost any permeable material, but we have learned that with SARS CoV2, viral load, the amount of virus that enters our respiratory tract correlates with the severity of illness.

Masks, worn by both individuals in an interaction, reduces viral load and thereby likely reduces the severity of COVID-19 when virus is transmitted. We, in Valley County, have been, for the most part, very consistent in the use of masks in public spaces. That has made an undoubted difference in our infection rates and must continue.

The issue of masks has, unfortunately, become far too political. These are issues of public health, not of politics. When it comes to issues of science, I am personally apolitical. My views are rooted in a constant search to understand the human body, the natural world and biology.

As this pandemic has descended on us in Valley County, there have been many heroes among us who have responded in a spirit of common purpose and resolve. These heroes are too numerous to mention here, but I would specifically call out Elt Hasbrouck, the Chairman of the Valley County commission. In Valley County’s response to the pandemic, Elt has exhibited leadership, wisdom, and a genuine concern for the health and safety of all of us in the county. The citizens of Valley owe him a debt of gratitude for all that he has done, often without calling attention to himself.

We must remind ourselves that the pandemic is not over yet, far from it. Nonetheless, with the precautions that we know work to reduce the spread of the virus, we can safely continue on with our livelihoods, our businesses, our schools, and our lives. Common purpose and resolve will get us through these challenges together. As I have said before, in this pandemic, we are truly our brothers’ keepers.

(Gregory Irvine, MD, is Chief of Staff of St. Luke’s McCall Medical Center.)

source: The Star-News Oct 15, 2020
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Idaho News:

Record 1,094 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths

Oct 16, 2020 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported a record 1,094 new COVID-19 cases and 6 new deaths on Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March to 51,704.

There are a total of 46,086 confirmed cases and 5,618 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state.

… 6 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 523.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Daily New Cases as of 10/15/2020

source: KTVB
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With Idaho stuck in Stage 4 again, Little urges personal responsibility to slow COVID-19

by Ruth Brown and Jacob Scholl Idaho Statesman Oct 15, 2020

Idaho has reached record-high numbers of new coronavirus cases this week, and Gov. Brad Little announced Thursday that the state must stay in Stage 4 of his reopening plan and urged people to behave responsibly to slow the spread.

Little continued to encourage Idahoans to wear masks and practice social distancing, rather than moving to implement stricter measures statewide.

He said the state’s rising coronavirus case count has a direct impact on Idaho’s health care facilities and workers. The more coronavirus patients hospitalized, the less access others will have for essential medical treatment.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

As schools reopen, children’s coronavirus case numbers double in two months

Idaho Education News Oct 17, 2020

Coronavirus case numbers for Idaho school-aged children have doubled in two months — exceeding even the state’s rapid increase in cases.

These numbers correlate with the start of the 2020-21 school year, and attempts to reopen K-12 schools to face-to-face instruction.

On Tuesday, the state reported 4,270 coronavirus cases involving 5- to 17-year-old children. No Idaho children have died from COVID-19, which has killed more than 500 Idahoans.

… Last week, the White House’s coronavirus task force said outbreaks in 10 Idaho counties could be tied to school reopenings, and the task force suggested shifting to online instruction.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County COVID-19 cases up one, now stand at 144

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Oct 15, 2020

The total number of positive COVID-19 cases in Valley County reached 144 cases on Tuesday, up one case from 143 a week ago, health officials said.

St. Luke’s McCall on Tuesday reported 113 total positive cases from testing done at the hospital, up one case from 112 a week ago.

Cascade Medical Center reported 28 positive cases, the same as reported last week.

In addition, the private testing cooperative Crush the Curve has found three confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Valley County with no change in the past week.

Nearly all of the positive cases reported by the hospitals were found following the start of the summer visitor season in mid-June.

Central District Health reported 97 of the positive cases were confirmed to be Valley County residents as of Tuesday, which is two more than the 95 cases reported a week ago.

The difference between the hospital figures and the health department figures are those who tested positive but did not declare Valley County as their residence.

Valley County schools this week remained in the “yellow” category designation by Central District Health. The health department switched the designation from “green” to “yellow” on Oct. 5 after a spike in confirmed cases.

The schools continue to operate under “yellow” precautions, which includes staggered classroom sessions and online learning.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Hospitals seek community help to “flatten the curve”

Oct 15, 2020 Local News 8

Fourteen regional hospitals have released a joint statement encouraging eastern Idahoans to “flatten the curve” of COVID-19.

As of this week, hospitals are experiencing the highest number of hospitalizations due to COVID-19 that have ever been seen since the pandemic began. They said it is placing a significant strain on hospital resources and especially health care workers.

The “flatten the curve” concept is explicitly aimed at helping hospitals handle the demand brought on by community spread of the virus.

continued:
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WICAP seeks applications for winter energy assistance

The Star-News Oct 15, 2020

The Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program will accept applications for the winter starting on Nov. 1.

The program offers assistance with heating and cooling energy costs, bill payment, energy crisis, weatherization and energy-related home repairs.

To apply for assistance, visit https://wicap.org and click on LIHEAP application or call 208-382-4577.

Information on the program is also available on the Western Idaho Community Action Partnership website.

source:
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Idaho 55 crew says their jobs are both art and science

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 15, 2020

Tim Shaub poured an unassuming pitcher of tiny pink pellets and placed what looked like a yellow sausage into a series of holes drilled in the bedrock along Idaho 55 between Smiths Ferry and the Rainbow Bridge.

A short time later, the rock shattered from a quick series of precise but powerful explosions that detonated the pellets, an explosive called ammonium nitrate fuel oil, and the sausage, which is an explosive similar to dynamite

Shaub is the safety manager for Ryno Works Inc., the drilling and blasting contractor based in McCall that was hired to conduct the controlled blasting on the Smiths Ferry project on Idaho 55.

The blast was only one of many that the company has detonated since the project began on Sept. 8.

The two-year project will widen and straighten about a mile of highway. In order to reshape the road, about 140,000 cubic yards of rock needs to be removed, much of it by blasting.

continued:
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Mining News:

McCall: More study needed on Stibnite trucks

Council worries about spills into North Fork

By Dew Dodson for The Star-News October 15, 2020

More analysis on how semi-trucks carrying hazardous materials to and from Stibnite could affect McCall is needed before approval of Midas Gold’s proposed mine, according to the McCall City Council.

The council unanimously approved submitting a letter to the Payette National Forest outlining what it sees as shortcomings of the agency’s draft environmental study of the mine as it relates to the city.

Public comments to the Payette on the proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine are due by Oct. 28 at 5 p.m.

Chief among the city’s worries are that one third of all mine traffic is projected to travel through McCall via Deinhard Lane and Boydstun Street during the 12 to 15-year life of operations.

But the draft study did not specifically study the effects of mine traffic in McCall, which would carry hazardous materials, like cyanide, antimony or sulfuric acid, near the North Fork of the Payette River, the letter said.

“Additionally, Big Payette Lake is the sole source of drinking water for the City of McCall and we cannot afford a hazardous material spill into the lake,” the letter said.

No mine traffic carrying explosives or toxic materials should be allowed to travel through McCall until the risks are analyzed by regulators and necessary safety improvements are identified, the city said.

The Payette should also bind Midas Gold to making road upgrades in McCall that are needed to handle mine traffic, the letter said.

Midas Gold has verbally agreed to pay to expand the intersections of Idaho 55 with Deinhard Lane and Boydstun Street, but is not required to do so by regulators.

Also, the city noted potential catastrophic consequences a toxic spill could have since it would take about four hours for a specialized clean-up team to respond from Boise.

“The Forest Service should require the applicant to provide HazMat response resources in McCall or another nearby location to allow for a timely response,” the letter said.

One possibility for that could be staging toxic spill response trailers in strategic locations, similar to safeguards Midas Gold has proposed along either primary mine access route it could use.

The letter also points to the importance of backcountry access to McCall’s economy and asks that the Payette work to preserve that access and backcountry recreation as much as possible.

That should include the Payette banning mine traffic from using Lick Creek Road through McCall, the city said.

The mine would not use Lick Creek Road for either primary access route under consideration, but some Midas Gold workers currently travel to Stibnite using the road, the letter said.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (Used with permission.)
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Comments on Stibnite Gold Project due by Oct. 28

By Dew Dodson for The Star-News October 15, 2020

Public comments on the draft environmental study of Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite Gold Project are being accepted until 5 p.m. on Oct. 28.

The entire draft study can be viewed by clicking on the “Analysis” tab on the Payette Forest’s project webpage at (link).

Comments can be submitted through the virtual public meeting room that is being used in lieu of in-person public meetings due to the COVID-19 pandemic. That can be found at (link).

Written comments can be mailed to the Payette Supervisor Linda Jackson at 500 Mission St., Building 2, McCall, Idaho 83638. Comments are not being accepted in person due to the pandemic.

Only “substantive” comments that raise questions about specific elements of the draft study or Midas Gold’s proposal will be taken into consideration into the Payette’s drafting of a final study.

Analysis of the alternatives in the draft study will be further refined and could change before a “preferred alternative” is defined in the final environmental study, which is tentatively expected by August 2021

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (Used with permission.)
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Letter to Share:

Restoration of Stibnite area can be done without mining

To the Editor:

In response to “‘No action’ at Stibnite would not solve problems” (The Star-News, Oct. 8, 2020).

The article implies that restoration cannot happen without mining, and that the Stibnite Gold Project is the only way to address degraded water quality and threats to endangered fish.

In my 20-plus years of working in the Stibnite area as a fisheries biologist and land manager, I can attest that restoration can, has been, and will be done without mining. After reading much of the draft EIS, I conclude with certainty that the Stibnite Gold proposed restoration and mining will have long-lasting impacts to water and fish.

In response to environmental impacts left by a century of mining, the Forest Service and others have already spent millions of dollars on restoration in the Stibnite area and the East Fork South Fork. Streams and riparian areas have been isolated from mine waste, salmon and trout habitats have been reconnected, unstable slopes have been secured, miles of unneeded sediment-producing roads have been improved or removed, and acres of bare mine area have been revegetated. The Nez Perce Tribe spends over $2 million a year on fish research, watershed restoration, and hatchery supplementation in the South Fork Salmon River.

Is there more restoration needed? Of course. Are there funding sources and capable, interested organizations that can accomplish restoration without mining? Yes.

Will decades of work and millions of dollars spent on restoration be negated by the Stibnite Gold Project? Undoubtedly.

Will the Stibnite Gold Project (mining plus restoration) result in further degradation to fish and water in the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, its tributaries, and downstream in the watershed, to endure long after reclamation is complete? Absolutely. It says so in the Draft EIS.

According to the Draft EIS:

• Up to seven miles habitat for bull trout, and four miles for salmon will be destroyed .

• About 100,000 fish are modeled to be injured/killed from stream removals and diversions.

• Some stream temperatures will increase to lethal levels for salmon and trout.

• Exceedences of arsenic and mercury are anticipated to extend indefinitely post-closure.

Does this sound like restoration to you? If not, please send your comments to the Forest Service now, before the Oct. 28 deadline!

Mary Faurot Petterson, McCall

source: The Star-News Oct 15, 2020
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Public Lands:

Prescribed Fire to Begin This Fall on the Payette National Forest

McCall, Idaho, October 13, 2020 – Prescribed fires will be conducted this fall on the Council Ranger District, New Meadows Ranger District, McCall Ranger District and Krassel Ranger District.

The Payette National Forest conducts prescribed fires to reduce community risk, protect timber values, improve wildlife habitat and improve stand resiliency. Prescribed fires are important to natural resources management.

Below is a list of where these prescribed fires will take place.

Council Ranger District

* 15 landing piles in among the Middle Fork of the Weiser River, 9 miles southeast of Council

New Meadows Ranger District

* 30 acres adjacent to west side of Lost Valley Reservoir

* 170 acre of hand piles west of Hwy 95 near Evergreen Campground

* 10 acres of hand piles in the Last Chance Campground

* 4 landing piles between Meadows Valley and Goose Creek

McCall Ranger District

* 410 acres of hand piles in the Bear Basin area

* 8 landing piles near the Brundage Road

Krassel Ranger District

* 1,300 acres along the east side of the South Fork of the Salmon River south of Reed Ranch Airstrip

Trailheads and roads that lead into these areas will be posted with caution signs and maps of prescribed burn locations. The public is encouraged to call their local ranger district with questions regarding prescribed burning.
— — — — — — — — — —

Payette forest crew restores lookout cabin in wilderness

Arctic Point site was built in 1938

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 15, 2020

Morgan Zedalis stood in front of the run-down cabin with her seven-person crew and realized their mission of restoring the structure would be no small feat.

Zedalis, archaeologist on the Payette National Forest, led a grueling backcountry journey this summer into the Arctic Point Fire Lookout deep in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

The Arctic Point site, built in 1936, consists of a small log cabin about 27 miles northeast of Big Creek.

The group from the Payette’s Heritage Program had to make the journey on foot with pack animals carrying supplies and only a few hand tools. All motors are banned from the wilderness.

continued:
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BAER Assessment underway for Woodhead Fire on the Payette National Forest

McCall, Idaho, October 13, 2020 – The Woodhead Fire has burned almost 100,000 acres to date, though the fire is not yet contained. The fire is located east of Council, Idaho including lands in the Payette National Forest. Starting September 28, a team of Forest Service specialists are conducting field assessments to determine the need for burned area emergency response (BAER) treatments. Specialists include hydrology, soils, engineering, botany, range, recreation, fisheries, archeology, and wildlife. BAER is a specific effort to reduce further damage due to the land being temporarily exposed in a fragile condition. Loss of vegetation exposes soil to erosion; water runoff may increase and cause flooding; sediment may move downstream and damage houses or fill reservoirs, putting habitat and community water supplies at risk. The BAER program is designed to address these situations through the key goals of protecting life, property, water quality, and deteriorated ecosystems.

Led by West Zone Hydrologist Melanie Vining, the Woodhead Fire BAER Team uses satellite imagery of the burned area to classify the landscape into low, moderate, and high soil burn severity. Ground-truthing the satellite imagery is ongoing, but generally the fire on the forest burned in a mosaic pattern with most of the burned area preliminarily classified as unburned, low severity, or moderate severity. The burned area is initially classified using the satellite imagery and adjustments in classification are being made based on ground surveys and updated imagery while the fire is not yet contained. Eventually these efforts will result in a final soil burn severity map which can be shared with adjacent landowners, other agencies, and the interested public.

The entire burned area is mapped, though the field work and treatments identified by the Forest Service BAER Team are limited to only the acres of burned area on the Payette National Forest. A BAER Plan summarizing the assessment results and describing the proposed treatments will be prepared and submitted for approval. Approved treatments will be implemented over the next 12 months using federal dollars on federal lands.

Areas of concern for watershed impacts are in places that experienced higher burn severity, namely in Crooked River, No Business Basin, and Brownlee Creek. To date, major federal infrastructure was not lost to the fire, though there is likely damage to trails, signage, fences, and similar minor infrastructure that might need replacement. The BAER assessment team will be looking at those impacts more closely over the coming days.

After the fire burn severity map is completed and the BAER treatment plan is approved additional information will be provided to the public. While the BAER program does not prescribe treatments on non-federal lands, the assessment and hydrologic risk analysis can be useful to adjacent and downstream landowners to inform their own range of possible treatments. The Woodhead BAER team continues to share information with County officials and other agencies who in turn coordinate with affected landowners.

Information about fire operations, maps, and closure information for the Woodhead fire is available at (link) InciWeb.
———————

Critter News:

Close encounter with a mountain lion

October 12, 2020 Local News 8

Provo, Utah (KIFI/KIDK) – A Utah man had a scary encounter while taking a hike in Slate Canyon outside of Provo Saturday.

Kyle Burgess shared the video on his Instagram.

Just a couple of minutes before that video, he came across two baby mountain lion cubs.

Seconds later mom came running out of the woods towards him, and he reacted correctly, according to Idaho Fish and Game, by not turning around and running away.

continued: w/video
— — — — — — — — — —

Elk almost drowns near Ketchum after getting caught in hammock

by Ryan L Morrison Thursday, October 15th 2020 CBS2


Elk almost drowns near Ketchum after getting caught in hammock. (Photos Courtesy of Blaine County Sheriff’s Office)

An elk was found almost drowning near Ketchum after getting caught in a hammock.

The Blaine County Sheriff’s Office said the bull elk got wrapped up in someone’s yard hammock last week near Broadway Run, south of Ketchum.

The elk was found almost drowning in the Big Wood River. Idaho Department of Fish and Game officers and BCSO deputies rescued the elk from the river.

continued:
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Fish and game says elk depredation “tools” are working, look toward relocating elk

By Natasha Williams Oct 14, 2020 KIVI

Elmore County, Idaho — Idaho Fish and Game biologists say they’ve been focusing hard this year on non-lethal methods of preventing elk depredation–and they’re starting to pay off.

“At the property where we’ve had a lot of issues in the past near Little Camas Reservoir, our technicians have been hazing since July 15, and the elk use in those agriculture fields has been extremely low,” said John Guthrie, a Regional Wildlife Biologist with Fish and Game.

This summer, they focused hard on four management “tools” in their toolbox:

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Fish and Game to trap, translocate elk responsible for repeated crop damage

Oct 15, 2020 Local News 8

In mid-October, Fish and Game will conduct a trapping and translocation project on private property to remove elk responsible for ongoing depredation issues in the Little Camas region of southern Idaho.

Elk in this area has a long history of expensive damage to crops on private property at night and then retreating to adjoining private property during the day.

Because all activity will be on private ground, there will not be any disruption to ongoing hunting seasons.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Fish and Game are testing deer samples for CWD

By Cole Sams October 14, 2020 Local News 8

Deer season may also help detect the spread of a virus.

The Idaho Fish and Game have set up stations for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) testing in the southeast region of the state. CWD is a contagious and always-fatal neurological disease that affects deer, elk, and moose.

“In Idaho we haven’t detected Chronic Wasting Disease but we are still monitoring our populations for the disease,” said Idaho Fish and Game Regional Communications Manager Jennifer Jackson.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Trumpeter releases help restore population

Oct 15, 2020 Local News 8


NPS

Eight young trumpeter swans were released at Alum Creek in Hayden Valley September 9 as part of an ongoing restoration project. The project was directed by Yellowstone National Park and included the Wyoming Wetlands Society and Ricketts Conservation Foundation.

The birds have undergone a decades-long decline. 60 birds and 17 territorial pairs were recorded in the early 1960’s, but that number fell to only four birds in 2009 and 2010.

Researchers said the decline may be due to any one of several reasons including nest success, the number of territorial pairs, and the number of cygnets (young birds) produced each year.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Power stocks Snake River with over 70,000 trout

By Lynsey Amundson Oct 15, 2020 KIVI

Are you looking for an outdoor family activity that you can safely do while socially distanced?

Idaho Power started the process of stocking more than 70,000 rainbow trout along the Snake River this week. Another 8,000 trout will head to American Falls in November.

Idaho Power tankers dropped off the trout at the Bell Rapids Sportsmans Area, Centennial Park in Twin Falls, and CJ Strike Reservoir, south of Mountain Home.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Mule deer buck left to waste near American Falls

By Jennifer Jackson, Regional Communications Manager
Wednesday, October 14, 2020

Idaho Department of Fish and Game is seeking information regarding the waste of a 4-point mule deer buck in Power County. On October 12, Senior Conservation Officer Morgan Scott received a call from Citizens Against Poaching about a mule deer buck left to waste in a ditch along Ferry Hollow Road approximately 5 miles southeast of American Falls.

Evidence at the scene indicates that the deer was standing above a ditch on private property and was shot from the road sometime on October 10 or October 11. The deer fell into the ditch and was left there to waste. Both sides of the road are bordered by private property.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Check out these F&G resources for a refresher on field dressing big game, upland birds

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Friday, October 16, 2020

No matter what kind of game you’re hunting, the hunt doesn’t end after the harvest. Properly field dressing your quarry is the crucial next step in getting delicious wild game meat from the field to your table.

Field dressing can sometimes seem like the most challenging part of the hunt, especially among those who have never hunted before.

To make it less intimidating, Fish and Game provides a number of resources for hunters who need a refresher about how to field dress wild game, including how-to videos for big game animals and upland game birds, as well as a virtual reality elk field dressing tutorial for people with an Oculus Rift VR headset. Check out the videos and link below.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Gray parrots separated at zoo after swearing a blue streak

by The Associated Press Wednesday, September 30th 2020


Steve Nichols/Lincolnshire Wildlife Park via AP

A British zoo has had to separate five foul-mouthed parrots who keepers say were encouraging each other to swear.

Billy, Eric, Tyson, Jade and Elsie joined Lincolnshire Wildlife Centre’s colony of 200 gray parrots in August, and soon revealed a penchant for blue language.

“We are quite used to parrots swearing, but we’ve never had five at the same time,” said the zoo’s chief executive, Steve Nichols. “Most parrots clam up outside, but for some reason these five relish it.”

continued:
————–

Seasonal Humor:

HuntingGuideTrees-a

Cookies for 2020

CovidCookies-a
——————–

Oct 11, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 11, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order until further notice.

Community Calendar:

April 17 – Boil water order issued
May 15 – Firewood Season starts
June 16 – Hard closure of South Fork Road (weekdays)
Aug 11 – Valley County Mask Order
Aug 12 – Firewood Permits at The Corner
Sept 8 – Hwy 55 work starts
Oct 13 – Buck Fire meeting 1-3pm Community Hall
Oct 14 – Diamond Fuel 2nd Delivery
Oct 28 – Comment deadline Midas Gold
Fall 2020 – Rx burn South Fork Salmon River planed
(details below)
———-

From Valley County

Valley County Mask-Up
A county-wide mask mandate was approved the CDH August 11th, and is now in effect for Valley County. (link)

We need Your Help to protect the place and the people we all Love.
link:

Valley County Covid-19 Response Page
link:

Valley County Emergency Operations Center
link:

Rebound – Idaho Governor’s phasing program
link:

COVID 19: Recommendations and Resources for Safe Business Practices
link: (lots of info for businesses)
——————-

Local Events:

Oct 13 Meeting

Tuesday, Oct. 13, 1-3pm, After Action Review (AAR) of the Buck Fire Event.

If you haven’t already provided your AAR input on the Fire Event, we will be at the Community Hall on Tuesday afternoon from 1-3 pm to answer the following questions:

What went as planned?
What didn’t go as planned?
What went really well?
What didn’t go so well?

The resulting document will be provided to Merrill Saleen as he was the Incident Commander for the Fire Event.
— — — —

Oct 14 Fuel Delivery

Wednesday, Oct 14th, Diamond will be returning with more fuel to deliver.
— — — —

Rx burn South Fork Salmon River planed

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning to conduct prescribed burning in the Four Mile project area this fall. The Four Mile project area is on both sides of the South Fork of the Salmon River between Poverty Flat Campground and Reed Ranch. The area that will be targeted for fire this fall is to the east of the South Fork Rd between Reed Ranch and Poverty Flat Campground. First priority burn block will be the area between Nasty and Four Mile creeks. Ignitions should take 1-3 days for each burn block, with smoke and fire most likely present in the project area until the next significant precipitation.

The decision to implement prescribed fire always includes assessing the risk and impacts to communities, firefighters and forest resources. This season additional consideration will be given to complexity associated with COVID19, cumulative smoke exposure in our communities from wildfire and the commitment of fire resources locally and nationally.

If you will be operating in the area or have any questions please contact Laurel Ingram, Fuels Tech or Patrick Schon, Fuels Specialist, so that we can collaborate on timing.

Map Link: FourMile Fall 2020 Notification
— — — —

Highway 55 Closure starts Monday, Sept 21st

Fall (September through November) and Spring (March through May)
– Daytime and nighttime work seven days a week
– Full road closures Monday through Thursday from 10:00am to 2:00pm
– One-way alternating traffic during all other time frames
———-

Village News:

Fancy Cookies

P1000632-2020YPFDCookie
These beautiful cookies were provided by L. Pelligrini
— — — —

Fall Fuel Delivery

The Diamond truck arrived Wednesday morning (Oct 7) to deliver winter fuel to Yellow Pine. They will return on Oct 14 with more fuel.
— — — —

Help Support the Yellow Pine Volunteer Fire Department

Thank you for all your offers of help and support. Now you can help support the Yellow Pine Fire District by donating through our Go Fund Me account. Just click on the link to get started.

Even a small donation could help reach the fundraising goal. And if you can’t make a donation, it would be great if you could share the fundraiser to help spread the word.

Thanks for taking a look!

FAQ: YPAC is the charity that was set up to allow the Village to apply for grants. It was the only 501.c3 the Village has to allow GoFundMe to recognize an authorized EIN. So, funds will go to YPAC then they will cut a check to the fire district. YPAC is lead by Corey Phillips and Matt Huber is the Secretary.

Note from YPFD:

Our sweet little village of Yellow Pine has been very busy – preparing to protect our town from the Buck fire. Forecasted VERY strong gusty winds, low humidities, and extremely low fuel moisture for this past Thursday & Friday had a high potential of pushing the fire straight at us. I think all our friends & family’s prayers pushed away those winds & brought in much needed rain! Thank you everyone!

Needless to say our little Fire District budget can’t keep up with our needs to replenish what we’ve used, and to acquire equipment & personal protective equipment for our future needs– now that we have to protect ourselves against new large fires (apparently Federal policy prohibits them from setting foot on private land – even though it’s their fire).

For example, we have fire protection areas (“divisions”) in town where we have 2 people protecting 30 houses. And 99% of us getting ready to fight this fire are over 60 years old!

If reading this makes you feel inspired to donate (especially the part about how we’re all over the age of 60…) – it will help us acquire more fire hose, hose fittings, needed pumps, and 2 replacement tires for our super old excess military water tender, plus other necessary items. Thank you for your consideration!!
— — — —

Midas

EIS draft copy for public reading is available in Yellow Pine Community Hall

A complete Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite mine has been placed in the Yellow Pine Community Hall so everyone can read and respond before 5 p.m. on Oct. 28 deadline for public comment. Read about your ares of concern, write a letter or submit your comments online before October 13th. Your comments really influence what happens in Stibnite.

-LI
— — — —

Boil Water Order issued April 17 still in effect.

No update for August or September.

Update July 5: the boil order is in effect due to extremely high use due to leaks.

Update June 12: The boil order is still on. We still are experiencing excessive water use because of leaks. Not sure when this will be lifted. We are applying for grants to repair the system.

Update June 2: The water plant is experiencing high water in Boulder Creek which brings more debris into the sand filter.

The high demand caused by leaks in the system plugs the sand filters prematurely. We will be on a boil order until further notice.
— — — —

Critters

Dark solid gray kitty wandering the lower part of the village – did someone lose a friend?

Wasps – long legged wasps are around on warm afternoon. Watch for nests under eves and under propane tank lids.

West Nile has been found in Ada, Canyon and Gem county mosquitoes.

Be Bear Aware

* Keep all household garbage secured in a garage or other enclosed area.
* Leftovers or discarded fish or meat bones give off a strong odor and should be stored in your freezer until you haul the garbage to the transfer station.
* Keep attractants like B-B-Q grills, bird seed or pet food stored where bears cannot find them.
* Bird feeders should be taken down May through October or placed well out of reach of bears.

Be Mountain Lion Aware

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
— — — —

Latest Road Reports

Link: to current road reports.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The 3-day a week mail starts Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Friday (Oct 9) Bins were full (including 2 mattresses) at the transfer station. Road is good from YP to the dump.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020. This could last until leaks are repaired.

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance.

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020

Notice of Intent to File an Application with USDA, Rural Development

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an Application with USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG). Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG).

If any additional information is needed, please contact:
Willie Sullivan
Treasurer
ypwater @ gmail.com

Distributed to Yellow Pine Water Users Association customers via Yellow Pine Times on June 12, 2020.

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
— — — —

VYPA News:

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

Minutes from September 12 VYPA meeting
link: (n/a yet)

Minutes from August 8, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Printable Letter of Interest to be a Community Representative
link:

Minutes from July 11, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from June 13, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

July 1 – Post Harmonica Meeting 2pm Community Hall
Note: at each meeting we simply add to info on the topic. That way, info from all meetings is included in a single document.
Link to notes:

Heat was installed in the community hall on April 30th.

VYPA meeting schedule for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
— — — —

YPFD News:

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30th at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

Make sure to clean and check chimney fitting before starting that first fall fire in your cabin. Cleaning brushes can be borrowed from the YPFD.

There was a YP Fire Commissioner meeting on June 27, 2020 at 10am at the Fire Station.
Link: 20200627 Fire Dept minutes June 27

YPFD COVID19 Policy

link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP

link: Covid-19 EMS (May 23)

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Bring It, Don’t Burn It”, you can take your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
(TBA) – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Open 11am-8pm Closed Tuesdays thru end of hunting season. Calling ahead works best. Groceries, Ice Cream, Beer and Soda. Our menu fluctuates but typically have Smoked Brisket, Tri Tip, Chicken, Burgers and Wings on hand.
Starting Aug 12th Firewood Permits at The Corner
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Open Daily 8am to 10pm. Outside Dining and Bar. Breakfast and Bar Food.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open.
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300

The store is open now and will be thru October (closing November 3rd for the winter.) Hours are 9 am to 6 pm Tuesday through Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday.
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins (208) 633-6677

Cabins are not available in 2020. RV Spaces $25/night; $150/week; $300/month. Tent spaces $10/night. Shower house is closed for 2020.
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 5) overnight low of 32 degrees, clear sky, smoky haze and rather poor air quality (can smell the smoke.) Helicopter flew over at 11am. Clear with smoky haze at lunch time. Warm, clear and smoky mid-afternoon, high of 80 degrees. It looked clear at dusk, less smoke and better air quality. Looked clear before midnight, golden waning moon.

Tuesday (Oct 6) overnight low of 32 degrees, clear sky, haze of smoke (Buck Fire) fairly good air quality and roofs wet with dew. Pine squirrel calling from the trees. Mail truck made it in on time. Clear and smoky haze after lunch time. Warm and sunny mid-afternoon, haze of smoke and air quality not so good, high of 83 degrees. Hawk in the neighborhood. Clear sky and haze of smoke at dusk. Looked clear before midnight, waning moon rising over the ridge.

Wednesday (Oct 7) overnight low of 32 degrees, clear sky, haze of smoke (Buck Fire) and pretty good air quality, roofs wet with dew. Male finch visiting. Diamond truck came in to deliver fuel. Clear at lunch time, light haze of smoke. Mail truck made it in on time. Warm and mostly cloudy by mid-afternoon, fairly calm and light smoke, high of 81 degrees. Steller Jays visiting. Dusk is coming earlier, appears partly cloudy with a light haze of smoke. It appeared partly cloudy before midnight.

Thursday (Oct 8) overnight low of 31 degrees, dry (no frost) partly cloudy, moderate smoke (both out of state and local) and poor air quality. It looked mostly cloudy above the smoke at lunch time. Mild temperatures and smoky mid-afternoon, looks mostly cloudy and for a while gusty breezes, high of 76 degrees. Pine squirrel and steller jay visiting. At dusk it seemed there was thicker smoke and worse air quality, both above and along the river and probably mostly clear. Looked mostly clear before midnight, some stars shining thru the smoke.

Friday (Oct 9) overnight low of 30 degrees, dry (no frost) clear sky above moderate haze of smoke and very poor air quality. Thicker smoke and crappy air quality at lunch time. Male juvenile finch visiting. Warm, breezy and smoky mid-afternoon, poor air quality, high of 76 degrees. Shots fired west of the village near the golf course area, light street traffic. Dusk is coming earlier, cooling off sooner and smoky. Large dark-colored dog running loose. Smoky haze and crappy air quality before midnight.

Saturday (Oct 10) overnight low of 32 degrees, dry (no frost) mostly cloudy sky above moderate haze of smoke, very poor air quality and light breezes. Heard rocks rolling, hard to pinpoint direction, sounded like to the south west? Gusty breezes before noon. Juvenile male finch visiting again. Raining after lunch time. Puddles and standing water by early afternoon, smells like a wet campfire, and poor air quality. Steady rain, low clouds, chilly breezes and better air quality mid-afternoon, high of 62 degrees. Still raining lightly at dusk and feeling like fall. Raining pretty good for a while after dark than light steady rain again until around 10pm. Cloudy before midnight.

Sunday (Oct 11) overnight low of 35 degrees, 24 hour rain total = 0.67″. Overcast sky and snow on top of VanMeter Hill. Steller jay visiting. Broken cloud cover and bits of sunshine at lunch time. A few Clark’s nutcrackers in the neighborhood. Chilly breezes, cloudy and good air quality mid-afternoon, top of VanMeter Hill has snow and is a little foggy, high of 47 degrees. Quiet evening. Cloudy, cool and breezy before dusk, good air quality.
——————-

Idaho News:

Boise and Valley Counties moved to ‘yellow’ after increase in COVID-19 cases

by CBS2 News Staff Monday, October 5th 2020

Boise and Valley Counties were changed to category 2 (yellow) Monday by Central District Health after a reported increase in COVID-19 case counts.

CDH says the increase puts their calculated average case rate into the yellow level along with the rest of the schools under the district’s purview.

School categories are unchanged within Ada & Elmore County. You can find the weekly category reports on the CDH website.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

662 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

By Curtis Jackson October 9, 2020 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 662 new COVID-19 cases Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March to 47,088.

There are a total of 42,260 confirmed cases and 4,828 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state.

… 3 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 506.

full story:
— —

Idaho coronavirus latest: A record-breaking 821 new cases reported Friday

Oct 9, 2020 KTVB

… KTVB’s tracking shows 821 total cases versus the state’s 662 due to some health districts in Eastern Idaho updating their statistics with newer data after the state releases its own.

As of Oct 7, 2020

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Central District Health turns down state funding for coronavirus testing

Health district officials said they want the funding to go to healthcare providers who have the necessary infrastructure and staffing to test for the virus.

Joey Prechtl October 6, 2020 KTVB

Central District Health is rejecting nearly $400,000 to provide COVID-19 testing for teachers and school staff.

The health district is defending that decision and calling for the state funding to be freed up for local healthcare providers.

“We’d have to hire staff, we’d have to get capacity within our buildings,” CDH spokesperson Brandon Atkins said. “We have one clinic office in Boise; we’d have to find other spaces, locations and teams to go remotely.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County schools go back to ‘yellow’ COVID-19 rating

County cases up 12 in past week, now stand at 143

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Oct 8, 2020

Valley County schools on Monday were switched from “green” to “yellow” designation by Central District Health after a spike in COVID-19 cases in the county.

The total number of positive COVID-19 cases in Valley County reached 143 cases on Tuesday, up 12 cases from 131 a week ago, health officials said.

… St. Luke’s McCall on Tuesday reported 112 total positive cases from testing done at the hospital, up five cases from 107 a week ago.

Cascade Medical Center reported 28 positive cases, which is up seven from last week.

In addition, the private testing cooperative Crush the Curve has found three confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Valley County with no change in the past week.

Nearly all of the positive cases reported by the hospitals were found following the start of the summer visitor season in mid-June.

Central District Health reported 95 of the positive cases were confirmed to be Valley County residents as of Tuesday, which is nine more than the 86 cases reported a week ago.

The difference between the hospital figures and the health department figures are those who tested positive but did not declare Valley County as their residence.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

St. Luke’s McCall to host COVID-19 Virtual Town Hall Monday

The Star-News Oct 8, 2020

St. Luke’s McCall will host local experts from noon to 1 p.m. on Monday in a Virtual Town Hall to discuss the latest COVID-19 news in the community with the onset of fall and winter.

Local experts include St. Luke’s McCall Community Board Chair Dr. Doug Irvine, Central District Health, family medicine physician Dr. Jennifer Lewis, Project Manager Gina Pannell and St. Luke’s McCall Chief of Staff Dr. Greg Irvine.

McCall Chamber of Commerce Director Lindsey Harris will serve as moderator.

The town hall will be a panel discussion and will address questions submitted in advance. Send questions to lcrawford@slhs.org. For more information call 208-630-2223.

This is a Microsoft Teams event. Viewers can join through their device or call in by phone. Those connecting via a tablet or phone may need to download the free Teams app.

For information about joining the virtual town hall go to (link)

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

WICAP seeks applications for winter home energy assistance

The Star-News Oct 8, 2020

The Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program will accept applications for the winter starting on Nov. 1.

The program offers assistance with heating and cooling energy costs, bill payment, energy crisis, weatherization and energy-related home repairs.

To apply for assistance, visit (link)  and click on LIHEAP application or call 208-382-4577.

Information on the program is also available on the Western Idaho Community Action Partnership website.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Study: Combine local fire districts

One district would be more efficient for ambulance runs

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 8, 2020

All three fire protection districts in Valley County should be merged into one organization to provide fire and emergency medical services, a study of the county’s emergency services recommends.

The study recommended total or partial consolidation of the McCall Fire Protection District, Donnelly Rural Fire Protection District and Cascade Rural Fire Protection District.

It was conducted by the firm Emergency Services Consulting International, which has offices in Oregon, Virginia and Texas.

The study cost about $58,000, which was paid by the Valley County EMS District.

The findings of the study were presented to Valley County commissioners last week by the consulting firm’s project manager, Bill Boyd.

Boyd emphasized that consolidation was recommended not as a cost-saving measure, but in order to improve EMS services across the county as the population and number of visitors to the area increases.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Crash involving logging trailer near New Meadows kills one

By Meredith Spelbring Oct 07, 2020 KIVI

A crash involving a logging trailer on Highway 55 near New Meadows killed a 35-year-old Wilder man Wednesday.

Idaho State Police is investigating a crash on northbound Highway 55 near New Meadows involving a Kenworth semi pulling a logging trailer. Police say the semi crossed left of the center line and rolled over, partially blocking the southbound lane when it came to a rest. The driver, 35-year-old Cody Garrett of Wilder, died from his injuries at the scene of the crash, according to Idaho State Police.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

8-year-old hit by stray bullet in Garden Valley: ‘He won’t be the same’

The young victim was airlifted to Boise for treatment, but is now recovering at home.

Shirah Matsuzawa, KTVB Staff October 6, 2020

Garden Valley, Idaho — A boy is recovering after being shot by a stray bullet in Boise County Friday night.

According to the Boise County Sheriff’s Office, the shooting happened at 11 p.m. Friday at a home in Garden Valley. The bullet struck the 8-year-old in the hand and neck, the sheriff said.

The injured child, LJ, was airlifted to a hospital in Boise for treatment, and later released to recover at home. The boy’s wound is not believed to be life-threatening.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Several Idaho City high schoolers injured in crash: ‘Very lucky we didn’t lose students’

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, October 8th 2020

Idaho City, Idaho (CBS2) — Five students at Idaho City High School were injured Thursday following a vehicle crash.

The Boise County Sheriff’s Office says the students “sustained injuries but will recover in time.”

The sheriff’s office said not all the students were wearing seat belts.

“We are very lucky we didn’t lose any students today,” the sheriff said. “Please talk with your children and persuade, beg, plead, threaten, enforce, and have your kids wear their seat belts.”

source:
——————–

Letter to Share:

Houses must be built to withstand wildfire

By Stephen Pyne and Jack Cohen Writers on the Range Oct 7, 2020 IME

That the scene has become familiar makes it no less wrenching: A distraught couple searches through the ash, char, and melted metal of what was once their home. Only the concrete pad and the occasional fireplace remain.

What is also in that tableau—but hardly noticed—are trees. A few are killed and many are scorched, but most are alive and green. The house vaporized because it could not cope with fire; the forest survived because it could. And paradoxically, it was the house fire that killed the trees.

Those early-kindled houses then cast fire to neighbors. What began as a wildland fire amplified into an urban conflagration. It’s the sort of scene that was common in the American frontier over a century ago. Watching it burn through Paradise or Berry Creek, California, today is like watching smallpox or polio return.

Before-and-after photos of a devastated neighborhood reinforce the sense that a tsunami of fire rushed through and crushed the community. Images of soaring flame-fronts ahead of the town pair with post-burn moonscapes of ruin after the fire has passed. Our desire for a narrative fills in the storyline with a moving line of flame, telling us to attack the wildfire before it can breach the perimeter.

continued:
——————–

Fire Season:

Buck Fire Update Oct 5, 2020

Acres: interpreted from most recent IR flight = 19,353
2 crews
2 engines
1 Feller Buncher

Fire activity has increased in some areas of the fire. The most significant being in the Burntlog drainage where a small portion has crossed the Burntlog creek. The other area is near Johnson Creek to the South of Twin Bridges. 1 Crew and 1 engine are focusing their efforts in that Twin Bridges area to eliminate the threat of any fire crossing the creek, and another engine will be patrolling the Johnson creek corridor to watch for anything along the power lines. Weather is predicted to be dry and warm until Friday evening when some moisture is expected.

The feller buncher is still working on the old Thunder Mountain road removing hazardous snags within its reach along the road and saw teams are also working in the area removing fire affected trees that could potentially impact the road. Hazard tree work has been completed on the 447 road as well.

Buck Fire update 10/7/20

Most fire activity continues to be in the Burntlog drainage with higher than normal temperatures and lower relative humidities during the day. Moisture is still predicted this weekend, but firefighter resources will remain at Johnson Creek guard station to patrol and be ready to suppress any active fire that may occur along the powerline due to materials rolling down the steep hill. By Friday equipment and crews will be finished clearing out the 440 and 440A roads, but the closure will remain in place until enough moisture hits the fire for managers to lift the closure.
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Buck Fire Update Oct 9, 2020

19,631 acres

The Buck Fire continues to burn mostly in the Burntlog drainage and made it up the slope to the flats north of the 414 road. 1 crew and 2 engines will remain in the area through the weekend and reassess the needs for firefighter personnel to stay in the area after the fire receives moisture in the coming days.

2020108BuckFire-aBuck Fire map Oct 8th
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Buck Fire Update 10/10/20

Photos taken at the weather station on Ditch Creek road at 6,289 elevation. It has measured 0.48 inches of rain in the past 24 hours.

20201010BuckFireWeather-aDitch Creek – Buck Fire area

Valley County Fire Working Group via FB
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Fall Rx Burns Payette NF

Prescribed fires will be conducted this fall on the Council Ranger District, New Meadows Ranger District, McCall Ranger District and Krassel Ranger District.

In the Council Ranger District, prescribed fires will be conducted to remove landing piles along the Middle Fork of the Weiser River, nine miles southeast of Council.

In the New Meadows Ranger District, prescribed fires will occur to remove hand and landing piles west of Highway 95 near Evergreen Campground, in the Last Chance Campground and between Meadows Valley and Goose Creek. Additionally, prescribed fire will be applied to approximately 30 acres along the northwest side of Lost Valley Reservoir.

In the McCall Ranger District, prescribed fires will occur to remove hand and landing piles in the Bear Basin area and near Brundage Road.

Finally, on the Krassel Ranger District, prescribed fires will occur along the east side of the South Fork of the Salmon River south of Reed Ranch Airstrip.

The Payette National Forest conducts prescribed fires to reduce community risk, protect timber values, improve wildlife habitat and improve stand resiliency. Prescribed fires are important to natural resources management.

Trailheads and roads that lead into these areas will be posted with signs. For more information contact your local ranger district.
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Central Idaho Fire now 485 acres

by CBS2 News Staff Saturday, October 10th 2020


The Meridian Fire is burning 22 miles south of Clayton, Idaho. (Salmon-Challis National Forest)

A forest fire has grown to 485 acres in remote Central Idaho.

The Meridian Fire is located about 22 miles south of Clayton. The fire is in the Hunter Creek drainage area on the Lost River Ranger District.

Fire officials say fire behavior was moderate on Friday and the fire is burning in Douglas fir and grass.

continued:
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Wildfires in Idaho: ‘This was probably an average, maybe below-average fire season’

by Kristen McPeek Thursday, October 8th 2020 CBS2

Record amounts of acreage have burned in California and Oregon, but for fire season in Idaho, this hasn’t been the case.

“Overall I think people will say that this was probably an average, maybe below-average fire season for the state,” said Josh Harvey with Idaho Department of Lands. “Our fire at current numbers and the number of acres burned was slightly lower than usual and I think we’ll actually end up this season lower than usual.”

By combining factors like the number of unintentional acres burned, weather patterns and structure damage, forest managers can get an idea of how intense fire seasons are for jurisdictions.

continued:
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National Fire Prevention Week

Home fire safety and wildland fire prevention both depend on being mindful!

As the weather starts to cool down for the season, we all need to continue to be mindful of our surroundings while recreating on public lands. The week of October 4th is National Fire Prevention Week. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) set this year’s theme as Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen!TM According to the NFPA, cooking is the number one cause of home fires and home fire injuries. Unattended cooking is the leading cause of fires in the kitchen. While this week is mainly dedicated to home fire safety, the same safety precautions are relevant in the wildlands.

Did you know that escaped campfires or warming fires in some locations in Idaho are the leading cause of wildfires? These type of fire causes are no different then leaving your kitchen stove unattended. Everyone enjoys a campfire, but the devastating effects of an escaped unattended campfire could last for many years. Please take the proper steps to completely extinguish your campfire and any warming fires before leaving the area.

“As we begin our fall activities, our current weather patterns are showing warm temperatures this week with possible precipitation this coming weekend,” said BLM Idaho Associate State Director Peter J. Ditton. “Please keep current conditions in mind while you enjoy our wonderful public lands.”

The annual Fire Prevention Order put into place on May 10, 2020 will remain in effect for a couple more weeks until Oct. 20, 2020. BLM Idaho State Director John F. Ruhs issued the Fire Prevention Order to prohibit the possession or use of steel core/incendiary/tracer ammunition and exploding targets on public lands. In general, please be proactive and take precautionary measures while shooting by clearing all flammable materials and rocks away from the target area, and make sure to have fire safety equipment on hand (shovel, fire extinguisher and/or water). Studies have shown that sparks from steel core/steel jacketed fragments cause vegetation fires as much as lead core/copper jacketed and solid copper jacket fragments.

For more information pertaining to National Fire Prevention Week, please visit (link)

from Idaho Fire Info via FB
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Letter to Share:

Upgrade Johnson Creek Road for Stibnite mine

The Payette National Forest should require Midas Gold Corp. to improve Johnson Creek Road rather than punch a new road into the proposed Stibnite Gold Project. The move would add two years to the construction phase of the project but is best in the long run.

The Stibnite Gold Project has been the most discussed development in the recent history of Valley County. A lengthy and healthy debate has ensued over the Canadian company’s plans to extract gold and antimony from the historic mining area near Yellow Pine. Much of that debate has been spurred by Midas Gold itself, which has mounted an unprecedented years-long effort to educate the public about its plans and the historic mining waste that plagues the site today.

The bottom line is the mine cannot be rejected by regulators, as federal law guarantees mining can be done on public land. The job of the Payette forest is to dictate how mineral extraction can be done with the least harm to the environment.

There are many aspects of the project open for public comment by the Oct. 28 deadline such as water quality, local traffic, wildlife habitat and others. Alternative 2 clearly best manages the project’s overall effects at Stibnite with plans for long-term water treatment and stream diversions. But Alternative 2 misses the mark with its plan to upgrade and extend existing logging roads to ferry 33 semi-trucks of supplies to Stibnite daily by what is known as the Burntlog Route. Variations of the route are called for in Alternatives 1, 2 and 3.

However, the Payette forest suggests in Alternative 4 that Johnson Creek Road could be rebuilt as the primary access to Stibnite. Analysis shows more risk of rockslides, landslides and avalanches along the Johnson Creek Road route, which parallels Johnson Creek and would guide mine traffic through Yellow Pine. But, ultimately, the draft study of the Stibnite Mine Project rates the danger of crashes by fuel tankers or semi-trucks hauling toxic materials as “low” for either route.

What the Johnson Creek route would prevent is between 13 miles and 20 miles of new road that would be built through pristine forested areas a stone’s throw from the Frank Church – River of No Return Wilderness. It also would prevent unnecessary disturbance of wildlife habitat along the new route. Long after the mine is closed, an improved Johnson Creek Road would continue to serve the growing volume of recreational traffic venturing into the backcountry.

On the other hand, the Burntlog Route would serve no one as attempts would be made to remove the scar of the roadway and return the land to nature. Upgrading 40 miles of the Johnson Creek Road would extend the construction phase by about two years, but that is Midas Gold’s problem, not the problem of regulators. Extending the construction phase would boost the project’s benefit to local economies, not to mention the long-term economic boom Yellow Pine could enjoy by having mine traffic pass through the village.

Additional maintenance of potential rockfall and avalanche zones along Johnson Creek Road are the cost of admission if Midas wants a golden ticket to the Stibnite Mining District. But the building of a new access road in Alternative 2 would not be appropriate since Johnson Creek Road is already in existence. The Payette forest should recognize this fact and require improvement of the road in its decision on the Stibnite Gold Project.

source: The Star-News October 8, 2020
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Mining News:

‘No action’ at Stibnite would not solve problems

Water quality, fish at risk even without Midas Gold mine

(NOTE: This is the last in a series detailing the draft federal study of the Stibnite Gold Project.)

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Oct 8, 2020

Damage dealt by past mining operations would continue to plague water quality and threaten endangered fish, regardless of whether Midas Gold ever extracts an ounce of gold from Stibnite, according to the Payette National Forest.

No mining would occur under Alternative 5 in the Payette’s draft environmental study of the proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine.

The “no action” alternative is required by the federal permitting process to establish baseline site conditions prior to mining to help regulators weigh the consequences of the project.

But the Payette and other regulators cannot outright reject Midas Gold’s proposal under the General Mining Law of 1872. It may only impose conditions to limit harm to public resources.

At Stibnite, millions of tons of mining waste and disturbances from historic mining operations dating to the 1920s degrade water quality, which currently does not meet federal standards.

Yellow Pine Pit Lake

The most prominent scar from legacy mining is the Yellow Pine pit lake, or the former open pit mine that the Bradley Mining Company excavated from 1934 to 1952.

If no action is taken, the pit lake would continue to block upstream fish passage in the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, along with several other high-altitude streams ideal for fish.

The East Fork currently flows through the lake over a former pit high wall that is too steep for upstream fish passage.

The five-acre pit lake was originally 125 feet deep, but today is only about 35 feet deep due to sediment from upstream filling the lake, the draft study said.

Most of the 90 feet of sediment collected in the Yellow Pine pit lake stems from Blowout Creek, which flows into Meadow Creek before flowing into the East Fork upstream of the lake.

The creek was dammed in 1929 to form a reservoir to draw hydroelectric power for Bradley’s mining operations. The dam broke in 1965, flushing sediment downstream and forming Blowout Creek.

Fish Habitat

About 90% of the coarse sediment that enters the pit lake sinks and collects at the bottom, while 80% of the fine sediment that enters the pit lake passes downstream in the East Fork, the draft study said.

Coarse sediment provides ideal salmon spawning habitat, but fine sediment can fill and muck up existing salmon spawning grounds downstream of the pit lake.

About one foot of sediment is filling the pit lake per year, which means the lake could completely fill in about 40 years, threatening downstream salmon habitat with excessive sedimentation.

If mining were to occur, any alternative of Midas Gold’s plan would stabilize Blowout Creek, fill the Yellow Pine pit lake and re-establish the East Fork in a more natural configuration that allows fish passage.

However, water temperatures that would rise in the East Fork under all four mining alternatives would not occur under the “no action” alternative.

Increased water temperatures stress fish and can alter fish behavior, including feeding, migratory patterns and spawning. Severe stress could cause disease or death, the draft study said.

Meadow Creek

Despite being extensively affected by past mining, Meadow Creek currently boasts the best habitat for the chinook salmon and bull trout, both of which are federally-listed endangered species.

But the Yellow Pine pit lake makes it impossible for chinook salmon and bull trout to reach Meadow Creek without being captured and transferred upstream of the pit lake by humans.

The creek also loads arsenic and antimony into the East Fork due to 10.5 million tons of buried tailings and waste rock left from previous mining operations.

The creek is diverted around the waste in a rock-lined ditch, but contaminants still leach into groundwater, which recharges Meadow Creek and other streams at Stibnite, according to water studies.

The historic waste is “likely the main source” of arsenic and antimony concentrations at Stibnite that exceed federal standards, though natural mineralization of rock also contributes, the draft study said.

Contaminants would continue to enter streams and rivers via groundwater if the historic mining waste is not cleaned up, something Midas Gold would do under Alternatives 1, 2 and 4.

However, those alternatives would also block fish passage into upper Meadow Creek by storing 181 million tons of tailings and waste rock in a lined facility in the Meadow Creek Valley.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. • All rights reserved (used with permission)
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Comments on Stibnite Gold Project due by Oct. 28

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Oct 8, 2020

Public comments on the draft environmental study of Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite Gold Project are being accepted until 5 p.m. on Oct. 28.

The entire draft study can be viewed by clicking on the “Analysis” tab on the Payette Forest’s project webpage at (link)

Comments can be submitted through the virtual public meeting room that is being used in lieu of in-person public meetings due to the COVID-19 pandemic. That can be found at (link)

Written comments can be mailed to the Payette Supervisor Linda Jackson at 500 Mission St., Building 2, McCall, Idaho 83638. Comments are not being accepted in person due to the pandemic.

Only “substantive” comments that raise questions about specific elements of the draft study or Midas Gold’s proposal will be taken into consideration into the Payette’s drafting of a final study.

Analysis of the alternatives in the draft study will be further refined and could change before a “preferred alternative” is defined in the final environmental study, which is tentatively expected by August 2021.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. • All rights reserved (used with permission)
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Valley OKs Midas Gold logistics base

Limits put on Warm Lake Road site

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 8, 2020

Valley County commissioners on Monday approved a logistics facility for Midas Gold to be built on Warm Lake Road, but added measures intended to keep the rural area from becoming an industrial hub.

Commissioners also added rules on housing availability, traffic and county services.

The Valley County Planning and Zoning Commission first approved the 64,000 square foot facility on July 16.

That decision was appealed by the group Save the South Fork Salmon and a hearing was held before commissioners on Sept. 14.

Plans include four buildings and outdoor parking areas for about 300-vehicles on 25 acres of land on Warm Lake Road in Scott Valley, about eight miles east of Cascade.

It would be used as a staging area and parking facility for employees working at the proposed Stibnite Gold Project near Yellow Pine.

Employees, equipment and supplies would park at the facility and be shuttled to the proposed gold and antimony mine at Stibnite.

Save the South Fork Salmon claimed the P&Z’s approval was based on simply moving the process forward without due consideration and did not account for traffic increases.

Commissioners voted to deny the appeal and uphold the facility’s permit with additional conditions

One condition says no site preparations or construction other than logging or brush removal would be allowed until the mine project is approved by the Forest Service.

Commissioners also imposed a bond that would cover the cost of reclaiming the site if it was idle for two years.

Commissioners also added language to the permit noting approval does not constitute a permanent land use designation of the property. The facility should not be considered an industrial use if permits are sought for neighboring properties, the condition says.

Commissioner Dave Bingaman said he did not want to create a commercial area on Warm Lake Road at a time when the county is reconsidering its mixed-use planning and zoning.

“For the last few months, we’ve been struggling pretty hard with coming up with a better way of zoning in Valley County that would look at areas that we think are suitable for commercial development,” Bingaman said.

“And I’m just wondering if we look at this right now, are we opening the door for future similar use development in that area,” he said.

Commission Chair Elt Hasbrouck expressed similar worries, but said he has seen similar development for the past 20 years.

“I know really a lot of people are having a hard time wrapping their head around this, you know, that’s such a pristine area…but I felt the same way when they built Goslin, when they built Gold Dust, when they built all that stuff out in Clear Creek,” Hasbrouck said.

“When I was a kid, I didn’t want to see that, but that’s just progress in life, so I don’t have an issue with that,” he said.

Commissioner Sherry Maupin said that she preferred the Warm Lake site to what could be a 300-vehicle parking lot in Cascade located along Idaho 55, which is a designated state scenic byway.

“I don’t mind the site, but I do think that, with these mitigations in there, I feel a lot more comfortable,” Maupin said.

Midas Gold will be required to draft an agreement for affordable housing for workers at the logistics facility prior to building permits being issued.

An agreement will also be required regarding the facility’s effects on traffic and roads, police, emergency medical services, solid waste and administrative duties.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. • All rights reserved (used with permission)
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Public Lands:

Prescribed Fire Notification for Fall 2020 Krassel RD

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning to conduct prescribed burning in the Four Mile project area this fall. The Four Mile project area is on both sides of the South Fork of the Salmon River between Poverty Flat Campground and Reed Ranch. The area that will be targeted for fire this fall is to the east of the South Fork Rd between Reed Ranch and Poverty Flat Campground. First priority burn block will be the area between nasty and four mile creeks. Maps of the project area are attached for your reference. Timing will be dependent on weather; ignitions will most likely occur sometime in October, possibly November. Ignitions should take 1-3 days for each burn block (identified on the map in red), with smoke and fire most likely present in the project area until the next significant precipitation.

The decision to implement prescribed fire always includes assessing the risk and impacts to communities, firefighters and forest resources. This season additional consideration will be given to complexity associated with COVID19, cumulative smoke exposure in our communities from wildfire and the commitment of fire resources locally and nationally.

If you will be operating in the area or have any questions please contact Laurel Ingram, Fuels Tech or Patrick Schon, Fuels Specialist, so that we can collaborate on timing.

Patrick Schon
Email: patrick.schon@usda.gov

Laurel Ingram
Email: laurel.ingram@usda.gov

Messages can be left at the McCall Front Desk as well 208-634-0400

FourMile_Fall_20_UnitH-a

Map Link: FourMile_Fall 2020 Notification Sign.pdf
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Health advisory issued for Cascade Reservoir due to harmful algae bloom

A recent water sample shows cyanobacteria are present, and they can be harmful to pets and humans.

October 5, 2020 KTVB


Credit: CHD

Health officials are warning recreationists about using Cascade Reservoir due to the presence of a harmful algae bloom in the water.

The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality has been monitoring the reservoir and says a recent water sample shows that concentrations of a toxin-producing cyanobacteria are present. These type of bacteria can be harmful to humans and pets.

Central District Health and DEQ have issued a health advisory for reservoir users.

continued:
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Officials consider closing Kirkham Hot Springs due to overuse

Katija Stjepovic October 8, 2020 KTVB

As we soak up the last bit of warmer weather, people are flooding into Lowman to soak up the warm water at Kirkham Hot Springs.

But the surge in visitors is leaving an impact on the local community and the natural beauty of the hot springs, and now the Forest Service is considering closing the campground to cut down on overuse.

People come from all over to visit the popular hot springs, and the increased usage in recent months is apparent by the amount of trash left behind.

continued:
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Critter News:

MCPAWS sets up Gracie’s Fund to pay for veterinary expenses

The Star-News Oct 8, 2020

Gracie’s Fund is giving a paw up to pet owners who need help paying for medical expenses for their furry friends at MCPAWS Veterinary Hospital in Donnelly.

The fund is a pay-it-forward fund established in memory of Gracie, a dog who was rescued as a puppy and lived an active life with her owners until she died of cancer on Aug. 15.

Gracie fought her first battle with cancer at the age of 6, when she was diagnosed with abdominal lymphoma. After undergoing surgery and five months of chemotherapy, Gracie was cancer free.

She was able to maintain her active lifestyle until her cancer returned at age 11. She lived for 10 more months with help from the veterinarians at the Donnelly and MCPAWS Veterinary Hospital.

Gracie’s owners established the fund so that other animals would be able to receive necessary medical care, a news release said.

For more information or to donate to the fund, visit (link) and follow “MCPAWS Veterinary Hospital” under the “About” menu.

source:
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Pet talk – Dialysis in pets

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Oct 9, 2020 IME

Dialysis is a method of treating kidney disease. It is most used to treat reversible causes of acute kidney failure. Causes of acute kidney failure include infections, poisonings, and situations that cause poor blood flow to the kidneys. Kidney stones can cause the blockage of urine flow and are a quite common cause of kidney failure and cats, and some sort of dialysis may be needed to stabilize the cat in preparation for surgery to remove the blockage.

Peritoneal dialysis involves placing a catheter directly into the abdominal cavity. Fluid is delivered into the abdomen through the catheter. The fluid was then drained and discarded. This process is repeated multiple times to remove toxins from the abdominal cavity. Hemodialysis involves placing a double sided catheter in the large vein of the neck. This catheter allows blood to be withdrawn from one side and sent through the dialysis machine that clears out the toxins. The blood is returned to the body through the other side of the catheter. Hemodialysis is available at a limited number of veterinary hospitals.

continued:
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Grizzly bear illegally shot, killed in Fremont County

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, October 8th 2020

A collared adult male grizzly bear was illegally shot and killed near Coyote Meadows in Fremont County in September.

IDFG biologists came to get the bear’s collar when they received a mortality signal on Sept. 29.

They found the grizzly bear with a gunshot wound, recovered a rifle bullet from the side of the bear, and followed the trail of blood to a nearby clearing.

continued:
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Salmon officials search for mountain lion

October 9, 2020 Local News 8


IDF&G

Salmon District Fish and Game personnel say there has been no sign of a mountain lion, first spotted walking through yards on the Bar Hill about three weeks ago.

Regional Wildlife Manager Dennis Newman said officers put out multiple motion cameras and traps, but the animal vanished from public view about two weeks ago. He thinks the cat may have followed a stream bed out of town.

“Locating and capturing a very secretive animal is very challenging, especially amongst all the houses, pets, and chicken flocks in the area,” said Newman. “But we take these reports very seriously, and we will continue to utilize every tool we have until we capture it.”

continued:
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Federal agency denies protection for wolverines

October 9, 2020 Local News 8

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that wolverine populations are not as endangered now as much as they were in 2013.

As a result, the agency has determined the species does not meet the definition of threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act. The service has withdrawn its listing proposal. The species will continue to be managed by state wildlife agencies and tribes.

The wolverine is the largest member of the weasel family, which includes weasels, otters, ferrets, and martens and is primarily found in the higher elevations of Washington, Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming.

continued:
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Bull elk freed after catching antlers in barbed wire fence

Biologists and conservation officers responded and sedated the elk before disentangling his antlers from the wire and piece of fence post.

October 7, 2020 KTVB


Credit: IDFG

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game was able to successfully free a bull elk that had gotten caught in a fence in southeastern Idaho recently.

The rescue happened near the town of Bloomington in Bear Lake County.

According to Fish and Game, the elk apparently was using a barbed wire fence post to rake his antlers when he became tangled in a portion of the fence.

Biologists and conservation officers responded and sedated the elk before disentangling his antlers from the wire and piece of fence post. Once freed, the elk was able to return to the wild, officials say.

source: w/video
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Idaho hunters beware, shooting that moose could cost you a $1,000

by Ariana Pyper Tuesday, October 6th 2020 CBS2


Artificially simulated moose (Phil Stamer, IDFG)

Idaho hunters beware… illegally targeting elk, deer, and moose’s from the road could cost you $1,000.

Idaho Fish and Game say they use decoy animals in areas where there is a history of illegal hunting.

Artificially simulated animals are real-life copies of deer, elk, and other game species that look and act like a real animal. Conversation Officers use these decoys during hunting season to catch law-breaking hunters.

continued:
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Thousands of minks dead in COVID-19 outbreak on Utah farms

by Associated Press Tuesday, October 6th 2020

Thousands of minks at Utah fur farms have died because of the coronavirus in the past 10 days, forcing nine sites in three counties to quarantine, but the state veterinarian said people don’t appear to be at risk from the outbreak.

The COVID-19 infections likely were spread from workers at the mink ranches to the animals, with no sign so far that the animals are spreading it to humans, said Dr. Dean Taylor, the state veterinarian, who is investigating the outbreak.

“We genuinely don’t feel like there is much of a risk going from the mink to the people,” he said.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

F&G Commission approves limiting sales of nonresident disabled American veteran reduced-price deer and elk tags

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Thursday, October 8, 2020

Reduced-price deer and elk tags will go on sale Dec. 1, 2020 at 10 a.m. Mountain Time

Idaho Fish and Game Commission on Oct. 8 advanced new rules for 2021 Legislative approval including a limit on the number of reduced-price deer and elk tags available for nonresident disabled American veterans. The new limit is 500 nonresident DAV deer tags and 300 nonresident DAV elk tags for over-the-counter deer and elk hunts, which was previously approved by the Commission as a temporary rule and takes effect Dec. 1, 2020.

Because the number of nonresident DAV reduced-price tags will be limited for over-the-counter hunts, they are expected to sell out quickly and will go on sale Dec. 1, 2020 at 10 a.m. Mountain Time.

continued:
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Meridian fire prompts small area closure in Unit 50

By James Brower, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, October 8, 2020

Salmon-Challis National Forest has implemented an emergency area closure to protect Forest visitors from the current fire safety hazards associated with the Meridian Fire. This closure will remain in effect until October 20, 2020 or until rescinded, whichever occurs first.

Inciweb:

ROAD AND TRAIL CLOSURE:

FS Road 477 Hunter Creek Road
FS Trail 050 Hunter Creek Trail

For the most up to date fire information on the Meridian Fire and others across the state please [view] the Idaho Fire Map.

source:
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The right clothes can make you a more effective hunter

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Thursday, October 8, 2020

Staying warm and comfortable helps you stay out longer in any weather

Fall hunting takes place in all weather conditions and temperatures, so don’t overlook your hunting clothing because it may play a role in your comfort and success. It takes a little preparation and investment in the right clothing for the weather, but it will pay dividends when you’re more comfortable and able to stay out longer in all conditions.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

An angry elk gored a Colorado man finishing a round of golf over the weekend

October 6, 2020 Local News 8

A day catching up with friends and soaking in the scenery on a beautiful mountain golf course in Colorado this weekend ended with a golfer’s kidney sliced in half by an angry elk.

Zak Bornhoft, 41, and his three friends were two holes away from completing the Evergreen Golf Course, located outside of Denver, on Saturday. The 18-hole course overlooking the Evergreen Lake is known for having “spectacular views from every tee,” according to its Facebook page.

This was one reason, Bornhoft said, he wanted to play golf on this course.

But views of green tree tops and blue sparkling water weren’t the only thing the golfers would experience. They were met by dozens of elk roaming freely around the course.

continued:

Note: At the Yellow Pine Country Club, elk have the right of way.
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Seasonal Humor:

CovidMaskForYouToo-a

CovidMaskForYou-a
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Oct 4, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 4, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order until further notice.

Community Calendar:

April 17 – Boil water order issued
May 15 – Firewood Season starts
June 16 – Hard closure of South Fork Road (weekdays)
Aug 11 – Valley County Mask Order
Aug 12 – Firewood Permits at The Corner
Sept 8 – Hwy 55 work starts
Oct 7 – Diamond Fuel delivery
(details below)
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From Valley County

Valley County Mask-Up
A county-wide mask mandate was approved the CDH August 11th, and is now in effect for Valley County. (link)

We need Your Help to protect the place and the people we all Love.
link:

Valley County Covid-19 Response Page
link:

Valley County Emergency Operations Center
link:

Rebound – Idaho Governor’s phasing program
link:

COVID 19: Recommendations and Resources for Safe Business Practices
link: (lots of info for businesses)
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Local Events:

Highway 55 Closure starts Monday, Sept 21st

Fall (September through November) and Spring (March through May)
– Daytime and nighttime work seven days a week
– Full road closures Monday through Thursday from 10:00am to 2:00pm
– One-way alternating traffic during all other time frames
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Village News:

Fall Colors

Aspens, Larch and berry bushes are showing fall colors.

P1000621-20200929FallNeighbor’s “bi-polar” Mountain Maple tree (half is still green.) – rrS
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Help Support the Yellow Pine Volunteer Fire Department

Thank you for all your offers of help and support. Now you can help support the Yellow Pine Fire District by donating through our Go Fund Me account. Just click on the link to get started.

Even a small donation could help reach the fundraising goal. And if you can’t make a donation, it would be great if you could share the fundraiser to help spread the word.

Thanks for taking a look!

FAQ: YPAC is the charity that was set up to allow the Village to apply for grants. It was the only 501.c3 the Village has to allow GoFundMe to recognize an authorized EIN. So, funds will go to YPAC then they will cut a check to the fire district. YPAC is lead by Corey Phillips and Matt Huber is the Secretary.

Note from YPFD:

Our sweet little village of Yellow Pine has been very busy – preparing to protect our town from the Buck fire. Forecasted VERY strong gusty winds, low humidities, and extremely low fuel moisture for this past Thursday & Friday had a high potential of pushing the fire straight at us. I think all our friends & family’s prayers pushed away those winds & brought in much needed rain! Thank you everyone!

Needless to say our little Fire District budget can’t keep up with our needs to replenish what we’ve used, and to acquire equipment & personal protective equipment for our future needs– now that we have to protect ourselves against new large fires (apparently Federal policy prohibits them from setting foot on private land – even though it’s their fire).

For example, we have fire protection areas (“divisions”) in town where we have 2 people protecting 30 houses. And 99% of us getting ready to fight this fire are over 60 years old!

If reading this makes you feel inspired to donate (especially the part about how we’re all over the age of 60…) – it will help us acquire more fire hose, hose fittings, needed pumps, and 2 replacement tires for our super old excess military water tender, plus other necessary items. Thank you for your consideration!!
— — — —

Midas

EIS draft copy for public reading is available in Yellow Pine Community Hall

A complete Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite mine has been placed in the Yellow Pine Community Hall so everyone can read and respond before the October 13th deadline for public comment. Read about your ares of concern, write a letter or submit your comments online before October 13th. Your comments really influence what happens in Stibnite.

-LI
— — — —

Boil Water Order issued April 17 still in effect.

No update for August or September.

Update July 5: the boil order is in effect due to extremely high use due to leaks.

Update June 12: The boil order is still on. We still are experiencing excessive water use because of leaks. Not sure when this will be lifted. We are applying for grants to repair the system.

Update June 2: The water plant is experiencing high water in Boulder Creek which brings more debris into the sand filter.

The high demand caused by leaks in the system plugs the sand filters prematurely. We will be on a boil order until further notice.
— — — —

Critters

Wasps – long legged wasps are around on warm afternoon. Watch for nests under eves and under propane tank lids.

West Nile has been found in Ada, Canyon and Gem county mosquitoes.

Be Bear Aware

* Keep all household garbage secured in a garage or other enclosed area.
* Leftovers or discarded fish or meat bones give off a strong odor and should be stored in your freezer until you haul the garbage to the transfer station.
* Keep attractants like B-B-Q grills, bird seed or pet food stored where bears cannot find them.
* Bird feeders should be taken down May through October or placed well out of reach of bears.

Be Mountain Lion Aware

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
— — — —

Latest Road Reports

Link: to current road reports.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Sunday (Sept 27) Transfer station and area clean, bins nearly empty. Road is good from YP to the dump.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020. This could last until leaks are repaired.

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance.

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020

Notice of Intent to File an Application with USDA, Rural Development

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an Application with USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG). Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG).

If any additional information is needed, please contact:
Willie Sullivan
Treasurer
ypwater @ gmail.com

Distributed to Yellow Pine Water Users Association customers via Yellow Pine Times on June 12, 2020.

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
— — — —

VYPA News:

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

Minutes from September 12 VYPA meeting
link: (n/a yet)

Minutes from August 8, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Printable Letter of Interest to be a Community Representative
link:

Minutes from July 11, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from June 13, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

July 1 – Post Harmonica Meeting 2pm Community Hall
Note: at each meeting we simply add to info on the topic. That way, info from all meetings is included in a single document.
Link to notes:

Heat was installed in the community hall on April 30th.

VYPA meeting schedule for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
— — — —

YPFD News:

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30th at 10am at the fire station.

Make sure to clean and check chimney fitting before starting that first fall fire in your cabin. Cleaning brushes can be borrowed from the YPFD.

There was a YP Fire Commissioner meeting on June 27, 2020 at 10am at the Fire Station.
Link: 20200627 Fire Dept minutes June 27

YPFD COVID19 Policy

link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP

link: Covid-19 EMS (May 23)

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Bring It, Don’t Burn It”, you can take your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
(TBA) – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Open 11am-8pm Closed Tuesdays. Calling ahead works best but not a huge deal. Groceries, Ice Cream, Beer and Soda. Our menu fluctuates but typically have Smoked Brisket, Tri Tip, Chicken, Burgers and Wings on hand.
Starting Aug 12th Firewood Permits at The Corner
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Open Daily 8am to 10pm. Outside Dining and Bar. Breakfast and Bar Food.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open.
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300

The store is open now and will be open into October. Hours are 9 am to 6 pm Tuesday through Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday.
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins (208) 633-6677

Cabins are not available in 2020. RV Spaces $25/night; $150/week; $300/month. Tent spaces $10/night. Shower house is closed for 2020.
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Sept 28) overnight low of 28 degrees, clear sky, frosty and great air quality. The sun is coming up around 930am and started melting the frost and sending clouds of water vapor into the air as it melted the frost. Jays and a pine squirrel vocalizing. Clear and light breezes at lunch time. Crusher running today. Some high thin transparent haze across the sky mid-afternoon, light breezes and mild temperatures, high of 75 degrees and good air quality. It appeared to be clear at dusk, cooling off quickly and calm.

Tuesday (Sept 29) overnight low of 29 degrees, clear sky, frosty, good air quality and slight breeze. Strong sun melting frost and items steaming. Late morning air traffic over the village. Clear sky after lunch time and great air quality. Steller jays calling and flying around the neighborhood. Warm, clear and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 83 degrees. Clear and calm at dusk, good air quality. Clear before midnight, yellow almost full moon up over the ridge.

Wednesday (Sept 30) overnight low of 31 degrees, clear sky, frosty and good air quality. Clear sky at lunch time but some high thin haze to the south. Warm, sunny and clear mid-afternoon, light haze to the south and good air quality, high of 83 degrees. It appears clear at dusk, not much color to the sunset earlier. Looked clear before midnight, golden fat moon.

Thursday (Oct 1) overnight low of 31 degrees, clear sky, frosty, good air quality and slight haze of out of state smoke. Jays and a pine squirrel sounding off in the neighborhood. Sunny and mild at lunch time. Light street traffic. Mostly high thin wispy clouds mid-afternoon, warm and a slight breeze with good air quality, high of 84 degrees. More aspen leaves turning to gold. Hazy at dusk and cooling off. Fuzzy golden moon above the ridge before midnight.

Friday (Oct 2) the 24 hour low of 36 degrees was from Thurs. morning. This morning overcast and moderate smoke, bad air quality. Weird sounding low flying jet at 1043pm. Smoky and probably cloudy at lunch time. Warm, moderate smoke, breezy and probably mostly clear above the smoke mid-afternoon, high of 80 degrees. A female finch stopped by. At dusk, it appears clear above a haze of smoke, better air quality than this morning, although still rather poor. Looked clear before midnight, haze of smoke.

Saturday (Oct 3) overnight low of 33 degrees, clear sky this morning, light breezes, haze of smoke and poor air quality. Clear sky and haze of smoke after lunch time. Jays, nutcrackers and a pine squirrel calling. Warm, clear sky and light breezes mid-afternoon, light haze of smoke and slightly poor air quality, high of 82 degrees. Larch trees starting to turn yellow. Hairy woodpecker visited. Looked clear before midnight, haze of smoke coloring the moon.

Sunday (Oct 4) overnight low of 33 degrees, clear sky this morning, light haze of out of state smoke and rather poor air quality. Clear sky and haze of smoke after lunch time. Breezes kicking up after 3pm. Large flock of clark’s nutcrackers in the neighborhood. Warm, smoky w/poor air quality and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 81 degrees. Sarvisberry bushes turning yellow and lilac bushes starting to turn red. It appeared there were no clouds at dusk, a little thicker haze of smoke, calm and poor air quality.
————-

Idaho News:

Governor Little keeps Idaho in Stage 4 for another two weeks

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, October 1st 2020

Governor Brad Little held a press conference Thursday updating Idaho on COVID-19.

Little started by explaining the current State Emergency Order exists for two reasons. First, it gives Idaho access to state and federal resources. Second, it communicates to the public that we are in a state of emergency.

He also explained that local government bodies have the power to create mask orders whether a state emergency has been put in place or not.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Central District Health considers possible school rollback as coronavirus cases climb

“Our average daily case rate is going up,” said CDH spokesman Brandon Atkins.

Katija Stjepovic September 30, 2020 KTVB

With the new daily cases of the coronavirus climbing again, local health officials are particularly concerned about the impact on younger age groups, and how this could impact in-person learning.

Central District Health oversees four counties – Ada, Boise, Elmore and Valley. And in each of them they’re seeing a rise in COVID cases.

“We’ve seen a consistent trend where all our jurisdictions and all four of the counties are seeing an uptick in cases, and what that means is that our average daily case rate is going up,” said CDH public information specialist Brandon Atkins.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

464 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths

Oct 3, 2020 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 464 new COVID-19 cases and 6 new deaths on Saturday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March to 43,702.

There are a total of 39,494 confirmed cases and 4,208 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state.

… 6 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 480.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho as of 10/1/2020

— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County COVID-19 cases up 9, now stand at 131

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Oct 1, 2020

The total number of positive COVID-19 cases in Valley County reached 131 cases on Tuesday, up nine cases from 122 a week ago, health officials said.

St. Luke’s McCall reported 107 total positive cases from testing done at the hospital, up nine cases from 98 a week ago.

Cascade Medical Center reported 21 positive cases, which was no change from last week.

In addition, the private testing cooperative Crush the Curve has found three confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Valley County with no change in the past week.

Nearly all of the positive cases reported by the hospitals were found following the start of the summer visitor season in mid-June.

Central District Health reported 86 of the positive cases were confirmed to be Valley County residents as of Tuesday, which is five more than the 81 cases reported a week ago.

The difference between the hospital figures and the health department figures are those who tested positive but did not declare Valley County as their residence.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

WICAP seeks applications for winter home energy assistance

The Star-News Oct 1, 2020

The Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program is accepting applications for the winter season.

The program offers assistance with heating and cooling energy costs, bill payment, energy crisis, weatherization and energy-related home repairs.

To apply for assistance, visit (link) and click on LIHEAP application or call 208-382-4577.

Information on the program is also available on the Western Idaho Community Action Partnership website.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

New restaurants, safety policies coming to Tamarack Resort this winter

By Kristen Bolden Sep 30, 2020

Tamarack Resort is gearing up for its 2020-2021 winter season with several new changes in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Starting Friday, December 11, the Village at Tamarack will offer new dining opens with the addition of a food hall. Those options include:

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Highway 55 near Smiths Ferry back open after semi crash

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, October 1st 2020

Highway 55 is back open after both directions were blocked near Smiths Ferry.

Idaho State Police says the crash occurred in the construction zone.

The Idaho Transportation Department says the driver of a semi-truck took a turn too fast and rolled.

source:
— — — —

Driver killed in four-vehicle crash on Highway 55

by CBS2 News Staff Saturday, October 3rd 2020

A Cascade woman died after a four-vehicle crash on Highway 55 south of Cascade.

Idaho State Police says on Friday night, 87-year-old Beverly Elder was southbound on Highway 55. She attempted to turn left onto Thunder City Road.

Police say Elder failed to yield to oncoming traffic and collided head-on with a northbound driver. Elder’s Toyota Rav then struck two other cars.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Amendment to the Idaho Constitution to appear on November ballot

After passing the Idaho legislature back in March, House Joint Resolution 4 will appear on all Idaho ballots on election day.

Joe Parris September 29, 2020 KTVB

All Idahoans will see a question about a state constitutional amendment on their November ballot. It reads in-part: shall Section 4, Article III, of the Constitution of the State of Idaho be amended to require that the Legislature shall be apportioned to thirty-five legislative districts?”

Idaho currently has 35 legislative districts, but that number can be changed during reapportionment, the redistribution of U.S House of Representatives, after a census.

This could change Idaho’s representation in 2021.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

These are the most common reasons absentee ballots are rejected in Idaho, according to election experts

As some Idaho counties begin mailing out ballots, election officials explain a few common mistakes voters make.

Joe Parris September 30, 2020 KTVB

For weeks Idahoans have asked when they can expect to receive their absentee ballot for the November election.

Wednesday, some Idaho counties started to mail out ballots, including Ada County, which sent out a large batch.

“We are mailing out 115,000 of them today, it’s really the kickoff to the election that people are now voting and getting their ballots over the next few days,” Ada County Clerk Phil McGrane said, adding that his staff worked for weeks to assemble the ballots.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Extended deadline for tax returns is October 15

By Katie Kloppenburg Oct 02, 2020 KIVI

Time is running out to file your 2019 Idaho state income tax return. The Idaho State Tax Commission says taxpayers who qualified for an automatic extension to file must send in their return and full payment by October 15.

“We expect to receive about 45,000 individual income tax returns in October,” Tax Commission Chairman Tom Harris said. “That’s in addition to the 892,000 returns we’ve received so far this year.”

Idaho law allows you to avoid a penalty for filing a late return if you have an extension. But you’ll still owe 4% interest on any tax due that wasn’t paid by June 15, the original Idaho income tax due date.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho, 6 other states report highest census response rate

by Associated Press Thursday, October 1st 2020 CBS2

The U.S. Census Bureau has reported that Idaho is among six other states and Puerto Rico with the highest overall census response rate.

As of Tuesday, 99.9% of households in Idaho have been counted, The Lewiston Tribune reported. Among the responses, 69.1% responded online, by mail or over the phone and 30.8% waited until workers knocked on their doors.

The federal government conducts the census every 10 years as required by the Constitution as an official count of everyone living in the country. The official census day is April 1, but the count can take months to complete.

continued:
———————-

Letter to Share:

Courageous Kids Climbing

FIRST – Please mark your calendars that Courageous Kids Climbing will once again be hosting the “Autism in the Wild” training in McCall on Saturday, February 27, 2021 from 1:00 pm until 5:00 pm. This class is FREE and will provide guidance for first responders on how to respond to emergencies involving a child with autism. I am hoping to once again have a representative from the W.H.A.L.E. program attend this event. (If you are unfamiliar with this very valuable FREE program that will assist first responders when responding to incidents with small kids in car seats, I would encourage you to click on this link  and then click on the Car Seat Safety tab, then scroll down to W.H.A.L.E.)

SECOND – One of Courageous Kids Climbing’s very good friends and supporters has asked us for some help. He has 200 Teddy Bears that he needs to get rid of! These teddy bears are excellent tools to assist you, the first responder, in keeping a small child calm during an emergency. These are available on a first come, first served basis. Contact me with your agency name and how many teddy bears you would like and we’ll make arrangements to get them to you.

Jeff Riechmann
Event Coordinator
Courageous Kids Climbing
————————

Mining News:

Many Midas workers would commute

Study: Stibnite project would aid economy

(NOTE: This is the sixth in a series detailing the draft federal study of the Stibnite Gold Project. Next Week: No action)

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Oct 1, 2020

Between 50% and 80% of Midas Gold workers would not live in the area during construction and operation of the Stibnite Gold Project, according to the Payette National Forest’s draft study of the proposed mine.

Housing workers at Stibnite for rotating two-week shifts would spread the economic effects of the project locally, across Idaho and to other western states, the study said.

The draft study predicts many workers would commute from larger cities in Idaho with more affordable housing and job prospects for family members moving with them, while others would commute from other states.

But the economic benefits of high-paying Midas Gold jobs would only be felt in communities that employees live in.

Meanwhile, tax revenue generated by the project would primarily be federal taxes.

All project alternatives would have similar economic impacts, except Alternative 4, which would add two years to the construction phase to upgrade Johnson Creek Road and Stibnite Road as the primary mine access.

Construction & Operations

Midas Gold would employ an average of 600 people during the planned three-year construction phase and 12 to 15-year life of mining operations. Total combined payroll would be about $120 million per year.

About $36.1 million of that would go to residents of Adams and Valley counties, which would account for roughly 32% of the workforce, the draft study said.

Of the 200 local residents expected to be employed by Midas Gold, the Payette projects about half to relocate from elsewhere. The other 100 would be existing local residents.

The average annual salary of about $66,000 plus benefits would be nearly 85% higher than the average annual wage of $36,500 across Adams and Valley counties, per data from 2018.

About 250 non-local Idaho residents and 150 residents of other states would fill the remaining 400 jobs during construction and operations.

In addition to jobs with Midas Gold, the mine would support an average of another 290 local jobs such as mechanics, truck drivers, retail clerks and school staff.

Those jobs would have annual wages ranging from about $34,400 to about $51,400, the draft study said.

About 190 of those jobs would go to existing local residents. The other 100 jobs would be filled by new residents moving to the area.

Population Growth

About 200 total jobs during construction and operations would be filled by people moving to the area, but the population could grow by about 430 people, the draft study said.

That would include about 110 adult spouses and 125 children that would relocate to the area, based on state population demographics.

Most growth would occur in McCall and Cascade, followed by New Meadows and Council. Little growth is expected in smaller communities like Yellow Pine and Donnelly, the draft study said.

About half of the relocated families would work for Midas Gold, which would pay high enough wages for workers to rent, buy or build a home locally, the draft study said.

But the other half of relocated families would work a variety of mine support jobs with lower salaries, albeit generally higher than current local average wages.

That could increase competition for affordable housing, raise housing prices and contribute to greater scarcity of affordable housing, the draft study said.

Schools

Public schools would be the public service most vulnerable to projected growth from the Stibnite Gold Project, the Payette’s study said.

Of the 125 children estimated to relocate to Valley and Adams counties during construction and operations, about 80 would be old enough to attend public schools.

The students are expected to be spread between school districts in Cascade, McCall and New Meadows, but could burden schools if concentrated in one district.

Currently, the Meadows Valley School District and the Cascade School District each have capacity for at least 100 new students, according to school officials.

In the McCall-Donnelly School District, Donnelly Elementary School and Payette Lakes Middle School are currently at or above capacity, M-D Superintendent Jim Foudy said.

However, each school could add 100 more students if a bond issue for school expansion being considered by trustees is passed by district voters in 2021.

McCall-Donnelly High School is nearly at capacity, but Heartland High School and Barbara Morgan Elementary School have room for increased enrollment, Foudy said.

School districts would benefit from growth through property taxes and additional state funding, which is disbursed based on enrollment.

Other Public Services

Local police, fire and paramedic services are expected to be mostly unaffected by mining operations, the draft study said.

Increases in calls for service due to population growth would be offset by property taxes paid by new local residents.

However, government agencies could struggle to compete against Midas Gold for employees, the study said.

The mine would contribute about $952 million in taxes to government agencies throughout construction and operations, but the largest share would go to the federal government in income, payroll and corporate taxes.

Over the life of the mine, Valley County would see about $4.5 million in property taxes related to the mine, or about $300,000 per year, according to the Payette.

Boom and Bust

About 110 local Midas Gold jobs and 230 local jobs supported by the mine would be lost after 15 to 18 years of construction and mining ends, the draft study said.

The remaining 130 local jobs would be reduced to about 30 jobs after the five-year site closure phase transitions to the 15-year post-closure environmental monitoring phase.

The 30 jobs would still be a boost to existing conditions, but the exodus of 470 jobs in the local economy could raise unemployment and cause “economic stagnation,” the Payette study said.

The study notes long-term economic growth could be fostered if local tax revenues from construction and operations are “effectively re-invested in community services and infrastructure.”

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used w/permission)
— — — — — — — — — —

Comments on Stibnite Gold Project now due by Oct. 28

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Oct 1, 2020

Public comments on the draft environmental study of Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite Gold Project are being accepted until 5 p.m. on Oct. 28 following a 15-day extension by the Payette National Forest.

The entire draft study can be viewed by clicking on the “Analysis” tab on the Payette Forest’s project webpage at (link).

Comments can be submitted through the virtual public meeting room that is being used in lieu of in-person public meetings due to the COVID-19 pandemic. That can be found at (link).

Written comments can be mailed to the Payette Supervisor Linda Jackson at 500 Mission St., Building 2, McCall, Idaho 83638. Comments are not being accepted in person due to the pandemic.

Only “substantive” comments that raise questions about specific elements of the draft study or Midas Gold’s proposal will be taken into consideration into the Payette’s drafting of a final study.

Analysis of the alternatives in the draft study will be further refined and could change before a “preferred alternative” is defined in the final environmental study, which is tentatively expected by August 2021.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used w/permission)
— — — — — — — — — —

Payette extends Stibnite Gold Project comments to Oct. 28

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Oct 1, 2020

The Payette National Forest has granted a 15-day extension of the former 60-day public comment period on the draft environmental study of Midas Gold’s Stibnite Gold Project.

Public comments can now be submitted to the Payette Forest through Oct. 28 at 5 p.m., when the now 75-day comment period closes.

The extension does not affect the Payette’s timeline for a final study and draft decision on the project, which are still expected by next August, Payette Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said.

Local Payette officials decided on a 15-day extension after receiving a range of comments favoring longer extensions or no extension at all, Harris said.

Midas Gold Idaho President Laurel Sayer expressed support for the extension in a news release, but questioned whether the extension was necessary.

“With over 1,400 letters received to-date, it is clear many people throughout Idaho feel ready to provide the U.S. Forest Service with their thoughts on the Stibnite Gold Project,” Sayer said.

“However, given the amount of public disclosure on the project over many years, it is also time to move to the next stage of finalizing the EIS and selecting a preferred alternative,” she said.

The original comment period of 60 days was 15 days longer than the 45 days required by federal law.

All substantive comments on the draft study will be evaluated by the Payette, and some could even be incorporated into the final environmental study.

The final study will define a “preferred alternative” using parts of each of the four alternatives detailed in the draft study.

A minimum 45-day objection period will follow the release of the final study and draft record of decision, which are tentatively expected for August 2021.

However, only those who submitted substantive comments during the project scoping period in 2017 or on the draft environmental study may issue an objection.

Based on the current timeline, a final decision on the project is scheduled for December 2021, Harris said.

The draft environmental study was originally expected in March 2019, but has been pushed back several times over the last two years.

Since it first started work in 2009, Midas Gold has invested about $166 million into the Stibnite Gold Project, of which more than $100 million has been spent in Idaho, according to figures from the company.

The company’s probable mineral reserves include more than 4 million ounces of gold, or 125 tons, from the Stibnite deposits. The value of the gold is projected to bring in 94% of the mine’s revenue.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used w/permission)
————————-

Fire Season:

Buck Fire

Valley County Fire Working Group Oct 2, 2020

The fire has transitioned from the Nevada Type 3 team back to the Cascade Ranger District. The fire will be operated as a Type 4 organization which will consist of local resources and include; 2 crews and 2 engines. Repair work such as felling snags along the 447 and 440 roads is taking place at this time. The engines will continue to patrol and monitor any fire activity along the Johnson creek road. Along with the team transition, the incident command post will be moved to the Johnson Creek guard station today.

20201001BuckFirePhoto-aBuck Fire view from helicopter flight yesterday afternoon.
— —

Wet weather eases threat of Buck Fire to Yellow Pine

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 1, 2020

Wet weather has eased the danger from the Buck Fire which only a week ago threatened to burn into Yellow Pine.

Forest Service fire officials have said that the fire will continue to burn until significant precipitation is received, but is likely to see minimal growth until then.

As of Monday, the lightning-caused Buck Fire about seven miles south of Yellow Pine had burned about 19,500 acres and was listed as 33% contained.

“Conditions are looking good on the fire,” an update said, adding that firefighters had begun to remove pumps and hoses and repair fire lines.

But 136 people were still assigned to the fire, including two 20-person hand crews, one helicopter, two water tankers and 14 fire engines.

These firefighters will work on any hot spots they find, the Forest Service said.

Crews will remain in the Johnson Creek area to secure the western edge of the fire and protect structures in that area.

“You can expect to see some smoke on the fire until the snow flies. These are interior smokes and should not pose a threat,” the Forest Service advisory said.

An area closure is still in effect for the Buck Fire, but Johnson Creek Road remains open. The closure expires Oct. 31, unless rescinded sooner.

The roughly 14,500-acre Porphyry Fire burning in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness Area is also expected to see minimal growth.

As of Monday, 31 people were assigned to the fire, but the area closure had been rescinded.

“The Porphyry Fire will continue to be monitored by air and ground as needed,” a fire advisory said.

“Crews continue structure protection on four bridges and one structure along with mitigating some hazard trees around the Big Creek and Edwardsburg area,” the advisory said.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used w/permission)
— — — — — — — — — —

East Idaho fires burned less acres, more started by humans

By Emma Iannacone September 30, 2020 Local News 8

In a typical fire season, about 106 fires in east Idaho will burn about 80,000 acres.

“This year has been significantly lower,” said Sarah Wheeler with the US Forest Service and Eastern Idaho Interagency Fire Center.

This year, 120 fires have burned 18,000 acres, a significant decrease from previous years. Wheeler attributes this to a few things.

… This week alone, 7 fires were started because hunters didn’t put out their warming fires all the way, Wheeler said. Many other fires have been started by fireworks, chains dragging from towing boats and trailers, as well as exploding targets.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Minimal fire behavior allows fire crews to patrol and mop up Woodhead fireline

by Ariana Pyper Sunday, October 4th 2020 CBS2


Smoke from the large wildfires in California has settled over the fire area again. (Photo Courtesy of Bureau of Land Management Idaho Fire)

The Woodhead Fire burning outside of Cambridge has damaged over 95,000 acres and is 62 percent contained.

Fire officials say hot and dry weather conditions persist, but fire behavior is minimal. Fire crews are continuing to patrol and mop up the fireline.

Dukes Creek and Emerys Creek had an increase in fire activity, but helicopters were able to dump buckets of water on the fire area.

Officials say the fireline continues to hold on the northern and eastern perimeter of the Woodhead Fire. Crews and engines continue to patrol the line as needed and repair the area around Rush Creek Road.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wildfire near Twin Falls now 93 percent contained

by Ariana Pyper Saturday, October 3rd 2020 CBS2


Crews are monitoring for hot spots at the Badger Fire. (Photo Courtesy of Sawtooth National Forest)

The Badger Fire is burning outside of Twin Falls. It’s damaged over 90,000 acres since Sept. 12.

Fire crews continue to mop up hot spots of the fire and patrol containment lines. Road and campsite repairs continue throughout the burn area.

Officials say smoke from the west coast fires in California is settling into the area creating low air quality.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Fires Followed This Season:

Buck Fire
11 miles south of YP
InciWeb:

Porphyry Fire
20 miles north of YP
InciWeb:

Trap Fire
northwest of Stanley Hwy 21
InciWeb:

Grouse Fire
southeast of Featherville
InciWeb:

Woodhead Fire
Northwest of Cambridge
InciWeb:

All Previous Fire Updates posted here:
————————–

Public Lands:

SGP Comment Period 15 day Extension until Oct 28, 2020

Extension to the Opportunity to Comment on the Proposed Stibnite Gold Project including Project specific Plan Amendments associated with the Project

The Payette National Forest prepared a draft environmental impact statement (DEIS) for the Stibnite Gold Project and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a Notice of Availability (NOA) for the DEIS in the Federal Register on August 14, 2020. The opportunity to provide comments to establish eligibility to object under 36 CFR 218 usually ends 45 days following that date; however, the responsible official preemptively decided to extend the comment period by 15 days leading to a total of 60 days following publication of the NOA, due to the level of documentation associated with this project.

Based on requests received for an additional extension of the comment period the responsible official has granted a second 15 day extension for the DEIS comment period, leading to a total of a 75 day public comment period. The EPA will publish an amended NOA for the DEIS in the Federal Register on October 2, 2020. This legal notice serves as the public notification of the comment period extension for public comments on the DEIS as well as public comments on information for the proposed plan amendments, as required in the 2012 planning rule (36 CFR 219.13(b)(2) and 36 CFR 219.16(a)(2)).

The Stibnite Gold Project DEIS considers approval of a plan of operations for mining, either as submitted by Midas Gold Idaho, Inc. or as reasonably modified to protect National Forest System (NFS) resources. The proposed project is located on NFS lands that are open to mineral entry on the Payette National Forest (PNF), Krassel Ranger District, and Boise National Forest (BNF), Cascade Ranger District. Components of the proposed project include the following: three open mine pits; ore processing facilities; development rock storage facilities; a tailings storage facility; a water treatment facility; access and haul roads; electrical transmission lines; and various other support facilities. The potentially affected area for the proposed project includes approximately 3,500 acres on federal, state, and private lands located in Valley County, Idaho.

Some of the proposed mining operations would be inconsistent with applicable Forest Plan standards; therefore, project-specific amendments to the PNF and BNF Land and Resource Management Plans (LRMP) would be required. The Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare an EIS that was published on June 5, 2017 (82 FR 25759), indicated the possible need for plan amendments to address inconsistencies with Forest Plan standards, but the amendments that would be needed were not identified at that time. With completion of the DEIS, this legal notice serves as the public notification of information for the amendments, as required in the 2012 planning rule (36 CFR 219.13(b)(2) and 36 CFR 219.16(a)(2)). The proposed plan amendments are expected to be approved in the decision document approving the Stibnite Gold Project and only apply to the project (36 CFR 219.14 paragraphs (a) and (c)). The details of the proposed amendments and which substantive requirements of 36 CFR §§ 219.8 through 219.11 are likely to be directly related to the amendments can be found in Appendix A of the DEIS.

As indicated in the NOI, the Forest Supervisor of the PNF has been delegated authority for the decision related to the Stibnite Gold Project on both the PNF and the BNF; however, for the project-specific plan amendments, the Forest Supervisor of the PNF will be the responsible official for any needed amendments to the PNF LRMP, and the Forest Supervisor of the BNF will be the responsible official for any needed amendments to the BNF LRMP.

The decision to approve the proposed project will be subject to the objection process identified in 36 CFR part 218 Subparts A and B. Only those who submit timely and specific written comments, as defined in §218.2, regarding the proposed project and project-specific plan amendments during a public comment period established by the responsible official are eligible to file an objection per §218.5. It is the responsibility of all individuals and organizations to ensure that their comments are received in a timely manner. For objection eligibility, each individual or representative from each entity submitting timely and specific written comments must either sign the comments or verify identity upon request per §218.24(b)(8). As provided by 36 CFR 219.59(b), the administrative review process of 36 CFR 218 also applies to the project-specific plan amendments.

Information about the proposed project or activity, including the DEIS and associated plan amendments is available on the project webpage: (link)

How to Comment and Timeframe

The EPA published an NOA for the DEIS in the Federal Register on August 14, 2020 for a 60 day comment period. This notice grants an additional 15 day extension for the DEIS comment period, resulting in a 75 day public comment period.

Mailed or electronic comments will be accepted. Electronic submission of comments is encouraged. Mailed comments must be submitted to: Linda Jackson, Payette Forest Supervisor, 500 N. Mission Street, Building 2, McCall, Idaho 83638-3805. Please be advised that our offices are minimally staffed in response to Coronavirus (COVID-19) and the responsible official is not accepting hand-delivered comments at this time. Electronic comments must be submitted in a common digital format such as plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), Word (.doc, .docx) or PDF (.pdf) to the Comment Analysis and Response Application (CARA) system: (link) Comments must be submitted via mail or through the CARA system.

All comments, including names and addresses when provided, are placed in the record and are available for public inspection and copying. The public may inspect comments received online via the public reading room at: (link).

Due to current health precautions associated with COVID-19, the Forest Service is providing alternative measures for conducting public engagement. A Virtual Public Meeting Room using the open house format has been designed to conduct public engagement and solicit feedback on the Stibnite Gold Project DEIS at: (link) and will remain open through the public comment period. Instructions for entry to the Virtual Public Meeting Room will be included in the link.

Additional information regarding this project or activity can be obtained from: Brian Harris, Payette Forest Public Affairs Officer, 208-634-6945, brian.d.harris@usda.gov.
— — — — — — — — — —

USDA Forest Service South Fork Restoration and Access Management Plan Update

September 30, 2020

You are subscribed to South Fork Restoration and Access Management Plan for USDA Forest Service. This information has recently been updated, and is now available.

The US Forest Service has prepared a new Draft Decision Notice (hereafter referred to as No. 2) for two of the sixteen actions considered in the South Fork Restoration and Access Management Plan Environmental Assessment. The new selected alternative for these two actions (road decommissioning and new ATV trails in the Little Buckhorn Creek area), was considered under Alternative D in the Environmental Assessment.

The project would be implemented on the Krassel and McCall Ranger Districts of the Payette National Forest. The Responsible Official is the Forest Supervisor, Payette National Forest. The proposed project is an activity implementing existing land management plans and is subject to pre-decisional objection process at 36 CFR 218 Subparts A and B, which is this time period.

The new Draft Decision Notice No. 2, and other project information are available for review at the project webpage at (link). Hardcopy documents may be made available to interested parties upon request by calling 208-634-0400.

This project is subject to the objection process pursuant to 36 CFR 218 Subpart B. This project is not related to the Hazardous Fuels Reduction Act. The Intermountain Regional Forester is the reviewing officer. The objection filing period is expected to be October 1, 2020 through November 16, 2020.

Objections will be accepted only from those who have previously submitted specific written comments regarding the proposed project either during scoping or other designated opportunity for public comment in accordance with § 218.5(a). Issues raised in objections must be based on previously submitted timely, specific, written comments regarding the proposed project unless based on new information arising after designated opportunities. Individual members of organizations must have submitted their own comments to meet the requirements of eligibility as an individual. Objections received on behalf of an organization are considered as those of the organization only. If an objection is submitted on behalf of a number of individuals or organizations, each individual or organization listed must meet the eligibility requirement of having previously submitted comments on the project (218.7). Names and addresses of objectors will become part of the public record.

Incorporation of documents by reference in the objection is permitted only as provided for at 218.8(b). Minimum content requirements of an objection are identified in 218.8(d) include: Objector’s name and address with a telephone number if available; with signature or other verification of authorship supplied upon request; identification of the lead objector when multiple names are listed, along with verification upon request; name of project, name and title of the responsible official, national forest/ranger district where project is located, and sufficient narrative description of those aspects of the proposed project objected to, specific issues related to the project, how environmental law, regulation, or policy would be violated, and suggested remedies which would resolve the objection. The objection must include a statement demonstrating the connection between prior specific written comments on this project and the content of the objection, unless the objection issue arose after the designated opportunities for comment.

Written objections, including any attachments, must be submitted within 45 days following the publication date of the legal notice in the newspaper of record. It is the responsibility of Objectors to ensure their objection is received in a timely manner (218.9). The publication date in the Idaho Statesman, newspaper of record, is the exclusive means for calculating the time to file an objection to this project. Those wishing to object to this proposed project should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source.

The Reviewing Officer is the Regional Forester. Send objections to the project website using the link in the right corner to “comment/object to project” or send to Objection Reviewing Officer, Intermountain Region USFS, 324 25th Street, Ogden, Utah 84401; or fax to 801-625-5277; or by email to: objections-intermtn-regional-office@usda.gov. Reference the project name “SFRAMP” in the subject line. It is the responsibility of Objectors to ensure their objection is received in a timely manner (218.9).

The publication date in the Idaho Statesman, newspaper of record, is the exclusive means for calculating the time to file an objection to this project. Those wishing to object to this proposed project should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source. We anticipate the legal notice will be published on September 30, 2020, and the official comment period would open the following day.

We appreciate your interest in the Payette National Forest and this project. If you have any questions regarding this project or objection period, please contact Jennifer Blake, McCall District Ranger at 208-634-0400.

Thank you for your interest in this project.

Documents for review and a link to the webform for submission of public comments can be found at (link)
— — — — — — — — — —

USDA Forest Service Payette National Forest SOPA Update

Oct 1, 2020

You are subscribed to Payette National Forest SOPA for USDA Forest Service. This information has recently been updated, and is now available.

The October 1 2020 Quarterly Schedule of Proposed Activities has published and is available at: (link)

Also, the Biennial Monitoring Report for 2018-19 has been published and is available on the Forest website at: (link)

We appreciate your interest in the Payette National Forest.
— — — — — — — — — —

Edna Creek Road Open

10-3-2020 – Effective today, the Idaho City RD terminated the closure of NFS road 384

The Idaho City Ranger District of the Boise National Forest has removed the temporary closure of public entry along National Forest System road and area 384 (Edna Creek.) The purpose was for public safety while maintenance crews repaired sections of road. (0402-03-99)

This Order was in effect from September 8, 2020 and was terminated October 03, 2020 at 5:00 P.M.

Boise NF via FB
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise National Forest experienced substantial human impacts this summer

By Steve Dent Sep 30, 2020 KIVI

Lowman, Idaho — The Boise National Forest provides dispersed camping north of Lowman, where people can camp for free in the great outdoors.

However, human impacts remain after a busy summer with more people recreating during the pandemic.

“Every weekend has been like the 4th of July, and every weekday has been like a weekend,” said Boise National Forest ranger Brian Eversole. “We have seen a lot of impacts.”

Those impacts include cutting down trees, human feces, off-roading in areas that are off-limits and people building their own campsites.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho officials seek cleanup help amid rise in park visits

The volunteers will be able to pick how and where they help with a self-guided effort.

Associated Press September 28, 2020


KTVB

National park and forest officials in Idaho have reported an increase in trash and waste at public lands across the state since the coronavirus pandemic pushed more people outside.

The national parks and national forests around the United States are experiencing the same problem, including the Sawtooth National Recreation Area in central Idaho, east of Boise, The Times-News reported.

The National Forest Foundation, Sawtooth Society, Sawtooth Interpretive and Historical Association and Idaho Conservation League have asked for volunteers to help clean up the area between now and Oct. 4.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho county OKs public land ordinances amid legal warning

By Associated Press September 29, 2020

Commissioners in a rural Idaho county have approved three ordinances aimed at giving them authority over federal public lands despite warnings from state attorneys that the new rules are almost certainly unconstitutional.

The Washington County Commissioners approved the three ordinances Monday in a 2-1 vote, Boise State Public Radio reported.

Two ordinances purportedly give the county some authority over fire and road management on many federal public lands, which would mean road closures or prescribed burns would require approval from county commissioners and permit holders.

The third ordinance grants ranchers with federal grazing permits the ability to log or mine the federal land without seeking federal permission.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Big Hole inholding to be folded into the national forest

September 29, 2020 Local News 8


Conservation Fund / Val Keefer

Driggs, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK)-The U.S. Forest Service and the Conservation Fund have completed a deal to protect a 960-acre forest inholding. The partnership also includes the Teton Regional Land Trust, supportive landowners of the Beartooth Group, Teton County, Idaho Commissioners, Valley Advocates for Responsible Development, and Idaho’s Congressional delegation.

The Caribou-Targhee National Forest has made the Maytag-Teton Timbers property a top priority for several years. Surrounded by public lands, the inholding created navigational issues for forest users of the national forest.

The Forest Service acquisition helps consolidate the area within the northern end of the Big Hole Mountain Range. In addition, the deal will eliminate subdivision threats, reduce wildland-urban interface fire concerns, and protect critical wildlife habitat and watersheds.

continued:
——————–

Critter News:

Pet Talk – What is a Flail Chest?

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Oct 2, 2020 IME

A flail chest arises because of trauma and occurs when several contiguous ribs are broken in such a way that a segment of the chest wall moves in and out independent of the movement of the remaining normal rib cage. The fractured segment of ribs move paradoxically, meaning that it moves inward on inspiration and outward on expiration, which is opposite to normal chest cage movement. For this paradoxical movement to occur, a certain amount of damage to soft tissues, muscles and tendons must also be present. The degree of trauma responsible for multiple rib fractures usually results in damage to the underlying lung tissue.

Because of damage to the lungs, difficulty breathing, panting, poor oxygenation and open mouth breathing may occur. Paradoxical movement of a segment of the thorax is always seen. Pain is always present over the traumatized area, and the animal is often reluctant to move. Other clinical signs of trauma may also be present.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Elmore Sheriff warns locals of cougar spotting near Mountain Home

by Ryan L Morrison Tuesday, September 29th 2020 CBS2


Courtesy of Elmore County Sheriff’s Office

The Elmore County Sheriff’s Office is warning locals Monday of a cougar that was spotted near Mountain Home around Highway 51 and Hamilton Road.

The sheriff’s office says if you spot the animal, call 911; do not “take the matters into your own hands.” It is also important to keep watch for livestock, small animals, and children.

ECSO has notified the Idaho Department of Fish and Game of the cougar.

continued: (w/tips for avoiding conflict with cougars)
— — — — — — — — — —

Pocatello City Council amends “Animal Services” ordinance

Oct 2, 2020 Local News 8

The Pocatello City Council has amended the “Animal Services” section of City Code to add a section that prohibits citizens from feeding or attracting wildlife except for certain birds and squirrels in city limits.

Under the ordinance, “it is unlawful for any person to intentionally and knowingly feed or attract wildlife (wild or habituated) except those birds and squirrels as allowed in 6.04.260.C by placing, depositing, distributing, storing, or scattering food, edible material, garbage, or other attractant, with the intent to lure, attract, entice, or feed wildlife.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Fish and Game kills thousands of invasive goldfish in Idaho pond

Biologists believe that someone deliberately dumped the fish in Heagle Pond in Hailey.

September 29, 2020 KTVB


Credit: IDFG

Hailey, Idaho — Most people would not think of goldfish as an invasive species, but biologists warn that they can threaten native fish populations in Idaho.

Earlier this spring, Idaho Fish and Game received reports of illegal dumping of goldfish in Heagle Pond in Hailey. Fisheries biologists returned to the pond this week to treat the water with rotenone, a natural plant-based substance that is toxic to fish. The rotenone will degrade naturally in the pond over the next few weeks.

In addition to thousands of goldfish, fathead minnows, koi and perch were killed by the rotenone treatment and collected from the pond.

continued:
— —

IDFG: Don’t dump live fish in Idaho waterways

By Natasha Williams Oct 01, 2020 KIVI

Idaho Fish and Game officials are reminding folks not to dump live fish into river systems after a situation where they had to kill thousands of goldfish in Hailey.

Fish and Game says sometime this year, someone likely released goldfish into Heagle Pond in Hailey. It’s a seemingly small action, but biologists say it can have severe consequences.

continued:
———————–

Fish & Game News:

Idaho Department of Lands provides guidelines for hunters using endowment lands

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Friday, October 2, 2020

Idaho Fish and Game pays for access to roughly 2.3 million acres of state endowment lands

Idaho Department of Lands reminds hunters that more than 96 percent of endowment land in Idaho is accessible by foot, watercraft or vehicle, with about 2.3 million acres available for hunting or other recreation.

In 2018 an agreement was made with Idaho Fish and Game to provide financial support for public access for hunting, fishing, and other wildlife-based recreation on endowment land. Fish and Game’s payments to IDL helps ensure those lands remain open, but responsible use by the public is critical and here’s how you can help:

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Hunt safe: Survival tips for big game hunters

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Thursday, October 1, 2020

Be prepared for those unexpected situations you might encounter while hunting in the fall

Every hunting season, hunters get lost in the woods, and while most escape no worse than tired, chilled and hungry, the hazards of being lost in Idaho’s woods shouldn’t be underestimated.

Hunters can take precautions and prepare for an unexpected situations in the woods.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

10 common hunting violations can easily be avoided

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Friday, October 2, 2020

Brushing up on the rules can help hunters avoid common blunders

With many of Idaho’s hunting seasons underway or about to begin, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game reminds hunters that they can avoid running afoul with the law this fall by simply reviewing the regulations.

“Accidents happen and simple mistakes are made every year that get hunters into trouble,” said David Silcock, Fish and Game regional conservation officer based in Salmon. “We see many violations that can be avoided if hunters just take the time to review and understand the regulations.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Kitten nicknamed ‘Baby Yoda’ rescued from California wildfire

by KRCR Staff Sunday, September 27th 2020


Photo: North Valley Animal Disaster Group

Oroville, Calif. (KRCR) – A kitten rescued from a wildfire in Butte County has been nicknamed “Baby Yoda” due to her resemblance to the much-loved character from the Disney Plus series “Mandalorian.”

Baby Yoda was rescued from the North Complex West Zone fire last weekend.

The North Valley Animal Disaster Group said firefighters found her in the middle of the road. The two or three-week-old kitten was covered in ash.

continued:
—————-

Seasonal Humor

2020Days-a
——————

Sept 27, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 27, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order until further notice.

Community Calendar:

April 17 – Boil water order issued
May 15 – Firewood Season starts
June 16 – Hard closure of South Fork Road (weekdays)
Aug 11 – Valley County Mask Order
Aug 12 – Firewood Permits at The Corner
Sept 8 – Hwy 55 work starts
Sept 27 – Fire Meeting 1pm at Fire hall
Sept 30 YPFD Budget meeting 10am at Fire Hall
(details below)
———-

From Valley County

Valley County Mask-Up
A county-wide mask mandate was approved the CDH August 11th, and is now in effect for Valley County. (link)

We need Your Help to protect the place and the people we all Love.
link:

Valley County Covid-19 Response Page
link:

Valley County Emergency Operations Center
link:

Rebound – Idaho Governor’s phasing program
link:

COVID 19: Recommendations and Resources for Safe Business Practices
link: (lots of info for businesses)
——————-

Local Events:

Highway 55 Closure starts Monday, Sept 21st

Fall (September through November) and Spring (March through May)
– Daytime and nighttime work seven days a week
– Full road closures Monday through Thursday from 10:00am to 2:00pm
– One-way alternating traffic during all other time frames
— — — —

Fire Meetings

Sunday, Sept 27, there will be a fire meeting at 1pm at fire hall with new IC of the Buck Fire.

YPFD has a budget meeting scheduled on September 30th at 10am at the fire station.
———-

Village News:

Sept 25th

Carol Arnold, the voice behind the radio at the Cascade airport and Arnold Aviation, will come home from the hospital and into hospice early next week. She has been suffering immensely with pain from sepsis that is antibiotic resistant. Please keep her and the extended family in your thoughts and prayers. Life for outfitters and guides in the Central Idaho wilderness, and along the Main and Middle Fork rivers, would have been much harder without her time and energy.
— — — —

Sept 22nd

20200922Tasha-a

Abandoned deaf old blind dog (Tasha) has been rescued and a new Furrever Home.
— — — —

Rain!

A series of storms Thursday thru Saturday gave us 0.65″ of rain. A report from the Bryant ranch area of 0.84″ from the latest storm, and Stibnite weather station recorded 0.81″ in 24 hours ending 9am Sept 26th.
— — — —

Sunday Morning

20200927Rainbow-aphoto courtesy DF
— — — —

Sept 24th Fire Abatement

Thursday, September 24, Fire crews assisted locals in cleaning up the burn pile at our transfer station. Please pile fire abatement slash NEATLY. Also fire crews abated the area around the dump.

20200924DumpCleanup-acredit DF
— — — —

YPFD News

Friday September 25th, members of the YP Fire Protection District received an orientation on our newly acquired engine. Cascade Fire District has graciously loaned our District a 4 wheel drive, brush/structure 1,100 gallon engine In addition to their orientation, the crew also practiced filling the truck from a pump in the river and deploying water.

20200923RedFireTruck1-a

20200925RedFireTruck2-a
— — — —

Fish Fry

Our Annual Fish Fry hosted by Stu Edwards was held at Alpine Village this year instead of at the Tavern. Fish provided by Stu also Chuck and Terry from Johnson Creek. With amazing potluck food as usual. It was felt there was more opportunity for distancing and being in the fresh air at Alpine. There was a good turnout of residents and a few friends.

Link: to FB photo gallery

— — — —

Power Outages

On Tuesday, Sept. 22nd at 945am the power was turned off (for approximately 3 hours and 15 minutes) and came back on at 1pm. This was for power line maintenance. There are some hazard trees near the power lines they want to take down and need to drop the lines in order to safely remove those trees.

Also Power outage September 24th from 1207pm to 303pm.

Note: They have not yet switched us over to the new underground lines yet, we will get advanced notice for that outage.

Card from Idaho Power to the Village of Yellow Pine

20200926IdPowerCard-acourtesy DF
— — — —

Help Support the Yellow Pine Volunteer Fire Department

Thank you for all your offers of help and support. Now you can help support the Yellow Pine Fire District by donating through our Go Fund Me account. Just click on the link to get started.

Even a small donation could help reach the fundraising goal. And if you can’t make a donation, it would be great if you could share the fundraiser to help spread the word.

Thanks for taking a look!

FAQ: YPAC is the charity that was set up to allow the Village to apply for grants. It was the only 501.c3 the Village has to allow GoFundMe to recognize an authorized EIN. So, funds will go to YPAC then they will cut a check to the fire district. YPAC is lead by Corey Phillips and Matt Huber is the Secretary.

Note from YPFD:

Our sweet little village of Yellow Pine has been very busy – preparing to protect our town from the Buck fire. Forecasted VERY strong gusty winds, low humidities, and extremely low fuel moisture for this past Thursday & Friday had a high potential of pushing the fire straight at us. I think all our friends & family’s prayers pushed away those winds & brought in much needed rain! Thank you everyone!

Needless to say our little Fire District budget can’t keep up with our needs to replenish what we’ve used, and to acquire equipment & personal protective equipment for our future needs– now that we have to protect ourselves against new large fires (apparently Federal policy prohibits them from setting foot on private land – even though it’s their fire).

For example, we have fire protection areas (“divisions”) in town where we have 2 people protecting 30 houses. And 99% of us getting ready to fight this fire are over 60 years old!

If reading this makes you feel inspired to donate (especially the part about how we’re all over the age of 60…) – it will help us acquire more fire hose, hose fittings, needed pumps, and 2 replacement tires for our super old excess military water tender, plus other necessary items. Thank you for your consideration!!
— — — —

EIS draft copy for public reading is available in Yellow Pine Community Hall

A complete Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite mine has been placed in the Yellow Pine Community Hall so everyone can read and respond before the October 13th deadline for public comment. Read about your ares of concern, write a letter or submit your comments online before October 13th. Your comments really influence what happens in Stibnite.

-LI
— — — —

Boil Water Order issued April 17 still in effect.

No update for August or September

Update July 5: the boil order is in effect due to extremely high use due to leaks.

Update June 12: The boil order is still on. We still are experiencing excessive water use because of leaks. Not sure when this will be lifted. We are applying for grants to repair the system.

Update June 2: The water plant is experiencing high water in Boulder Creek which brings more debris into the sand filter.

The high demand caused by leaks in the system plugs the sand filters prematurely. We will be on a boil order until further notice.
— — — —

2020 Census

The 2020 Census Impacts All Valley County Residents

Hurry and complete the census, the deadline has been moved up to September 30th – maybe.

It is recommended that we all fill out the census online.

If you spend 50% of your time in Valley County, you can consider it your home per the Census. Where you register with the Census is confidential and never linked to other governmental requirements such as property taxes or mailing address.

Link: to online census

You do not need an ID number. Go to the link. Click on “start questionnaire”. Then on the next page scroll down to “If you do not have a Census ID, click here” – when you click on that line it will start the census. (see below)

2020Census-a
— — — —

Critters

West Nile has been found in Ada, Canyon and Gem county mosquitoes.

Be Bear Aware

* Keep all household garbage secured in a garage or other enclosed area.
* Leftovers or discarded fish or meat bones give off a strong odor and should be stored in your freezer until you haul the garbage to the transfer station.
* Keep attractants like B-B-Q grills, bird seed or pet food stored where bears cannot find them.
* Bird feeders should be taken down May through October or placed well out of reach of bears.

Be Mountain Lion Aware

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
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Latest Road Reports

Link: to current road reports.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Dump report Sept 27th: Bins are nearly empty and the area around the transfer station is spick and span. The road between YP and the dump is ‘really nice.’

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020. This could last until leaks are repaired.

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance.

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020

Notice of Intent to File an Application with USDA, Rural Development

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an Application with USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG). Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG).

If any additional information is needed, please contact:
Willie Sullivan
Treasurer
ypwater @ gmail.com

Distributed to Yellow Pine Water Users Association customers via Yellow Pine Times on June 12, 2020.

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

Last VYPA meeting September 12 at 2pm

Minutes from August 8, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Printable Letter of Interest to be a Community Representative
link:

Minutes from July 11, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from June 13, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

July 1 – Post Harmonica Meeting 2pm Community Hall
Note: at each meeting we simply add to info on the topic. That way, info from all meetings is included in a single document.
Link to notes:

Heat was installed in the community hall on April 30th.

VYPA meeting schedule for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

YPFD has a budget meeting on September 30th at 10am at the fire station.

Make sure to clean and check chimney fitting before starting that first fall fire in your cabin. Cleaning brushes can be borrowed from the YPFD.

There was a YP Fire Commissioner meeting on June 27, 2020 at 10am at the Fire Station.
Link: 20200627 Fire Dept minutes June 27

YPFD COVID19 Policy

link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP

link: Covid-19 EMS (May 23)

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Bring It, Don’t Burn It”, you can take your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
(TBA) – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Open 11am-8pm Closed Tuesdays. Calling ahead works best but not a huge deal. Groceries, Ice Cream, Beer and Soda. Our menu fluctuates but typically have Smoked Brisket, Tri Tip, Chicken, Burgers and Wings on hand.
Starting Aug 12th Firewood Permits at The Corner
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Open Daily 8am to 10pm. Outside Dining and Bar. Breakfast and Bar Food.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open.
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300

The store is open now and will be open into October. Hours are 9 am to 6 pm Tuesday through Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday.
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Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins (208) 633-6677

Cabins are not available in 2020. RV Spaces $25/night; $150/week; $300/month. Tent spaces $10/night. Shower house is closed for 2020.
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Sept 21) overnight low of 35 degrees, clear sky this morning above haze of smoke to the east and south, light breezes and roofs wet with dew. Jays and nutcrackers calling. Light traffic. Warming up by lunch time, light haze of smoke, clear sky and light breezes. Warm and light breezes under clear sky mid-afternoon, light haze of smoke, high of 82 degrees. Quiet evening. Cooling off just before dusk, clear sky, slight breeze and light haze of smoke. Looks like smoke was getting a little thicker around midnight, some stars out and Mars very red.

Tuesday (Sept 22) overnight low of 37 degrees, the sky appeared to be clear or mostly clear above moderate haze of (out of state) smoke. Lights out at 945am for planned power outage. Mother mule deer and fat fawn (no spots) visited for quite a while. Power on 1pm. Looked mostly cloudy above the smoke after lunch time and light breezes. Mild temperatures mid-afternoon, mostly cloudy, haze of smoke and gusty breezes, high of 73 degrees. At dusk it appeared mostly clear above the smoke, temperature dropping quickly and almost calm. Haze of smoke obscuring fainter stars and Mars was yellow-orange before midnight.

Wednesday (Sept 23) overnight low of 40 degrees, it appears mostly clear above a moderate haze of (out of state) smoke this morning, poor air quality. A few aspen leaves are turning yellow. Gusty breezes at lunch time and smoky haze. Crusher running. Mail truck made it in on time. Grasshoppers are getting pretty big and numerous. Clark’s nutcrackers calling. Still breezy early afternoon, mostly high thin wispy clouds above the haze of smoke. Big blue dragonflies visiting. Blustery mid-afternoon, thicker clouds (overcast?) and temperatures dropping, high of 79 degrees. More traffic than usual for a weekday on main street. It appeared to be overcast at dusk, temperature dropping slowly and light haze of smoke. It looked cloudy before midnight.

Thursday (Sept 24) overnight low of 45 degrees, a few sprinkles on and off early = 0.01″, dark overcast, light breezes and a haze of smoke this morning, air quality not exactly good. Crusher running. Thinner clouds before lunch time. Power off at 1207pm. Light sprinkles early afternoon = 0.01″. Power on at 303pm. Cracks in the clouds mid-afternoon, high of 61 degrees. Overcast and calm late afternoon. Smell of smoke from neighborhood camp (garbage) fire. At dusk it looked overcast and felt calm, some smoke in the air. Mostly clear before midnight, air smells better.

Friday (Sept 25) overnight low of 31 degrees, sky is overcast and haze of smoke, poor air quality. Overcast, light breeze, little sprinkle of rain (not enough to get wet) and smoky at noon. Started raining lightly just before 2pm. Cool, cloudy and light rain continued mid-afternoon, high of 57 degrees. Misty sprinkles at dusk. Steady light rain at dark. Still raining lightly before midnight. Probably rained all night.

Saturday (Sept 26) it did not get below 37 degrees from Friday’s reset, low overcast (VanMeter socked in) and light rain this morning. As of 930am our 24 hour rain total = 0.60″. Stopped raining before 1030am (an additional 0.03″) and breaks in the clouds let in sunshine. Broken clouds and breezy after lunch time. YPFD volunteers gathering up fire hoses. Cool, cloudy and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 59 degrees. Flock of clark’s nutcrackers in the neighborhood and jays calling. The western larch, mountain ash and maples are turning gold. At dusk it was partly cloudy, fairly good air quality and calm. Appeared to be mostly cloudy before midnight.

Sunday (Sept 27) overnight low of 36 degrees, clear to the south, dark clouds to the north (VanMeter fogged in) and roofs wet with dew. Several clark’s nutcrackers and a vocal pine squirrel visiting. Mostly cloudy at lunch time. Breezy, cool and mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, high of 63 degrees. Clear and cool by early evening, light haze.
——————-

Idaho News:

523 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

Sept 25, 2020 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 523 new COVID-19 cases and 1 new death on Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March to 39,757.

There are a total of 36,232 confirmed cases and 3,525 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state.

… 1 new death was reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 458.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

2 Idaho hospitals say COVID-19 has them near ‘code black’

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, September 22nd 2020

The chief medical officers of two Idaho hospitals recently warned state public health officials that their facilities are close to being overwhelmed by patients infected with the coronavirus.

Dr. Daniel Snell of the Portneuf Medical Center and Dr. Ken Newhouse of Bingham Memorial Hospital told the Southeastern Idaho Public Health Board of Directors that the current rate of hospitalizations from COVID-19 is unsustainable.

“We are on a razor’s edge where with exponential growth and with continued people doing things in the community we could have a sudden uptick that could happen very, very quickly,” Newhouse said. “We could go into overload mode pretty quickly here.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Local doctors discuss flu vaccine, COVID-19

By Jessica Taylor Sep 22, 2020 KIVI

Doctors from across the state got together Tuesday morning to spread a message: get your flu shot.

They’re also reminding the community covid is still present and a threat. Currently, the risk of death from covid is around six times as great as influenza. A vaccine improves both your immunity as an individual and for our community.

“All age groups need to have a vaccination; it’s especially important for those in high-risk categories, children,” Dr. John Kaiser, Saltzer Health VP/Chief Medical Officer.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

White House Task Force report says Idaho in coronavirus ‘red zone’

Sept 22, 2020 Local News 8

The latest White House Coronavirus Task Force report obtained by ABC News shows Idaho is in the red zone for new confirmed cases.

With more than 101 new cases per 100,00 people, Idaho is 15th in the nation for new cases.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County COVID-19 cases up 3, now stand at 119

By Tom Grote for The Star-News September 24, 2020

The total number of positive COVID-19 cases in Valley County reached 122 cases on Tuesday, up three cases from 119 a week ago, health officials said.

St. Luke’s McCall reported 98 total positive cases from testing done at the hospital, up four cases from a week ago.

Cascade Medical Center reported 21 positive cases, down one from the 22 cases reported last week.

The change was due to the discovery that more than one positive test was attributed to the same person, CEO Tom Reinhardt said.

In addition, the private testing cooperative Crush the Curve has found three confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Valley County with no change in the past week.

Nearly all of the positive cases reported by the hospitals were found following the start of the summer visitor season in mid-June.

Central District Health reported 81 of the positive cases were confirmed to be Valley County residents as of Tuesday, which is one more than a week ago.

The difference between the hospital figures and the health department figures are those who tested positive but did not declare Valley County as their residence.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

McCall mask order expires, but countywide mandate remains

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News September 24, 2020

The City of McCall’s mandatory mask order expired last Saturday, but residents and visitors should not throw away their face coverings.

The city’s mask order to combat COVID-19 was passed on July 1 under an emergency powers ordinance adopted on March 20 by the McCall City Council.

But the emergency ordinance, and with it the mask order, expired on Saturday and cannot be extended under state law.

A mask order issued by Central District Health on Aug. 11 for all of Valley County, including McCall, remains in effect.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Maupin forms informal group on Valley County road funding

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 24, 2020

Valley County commissioner Sherry Maupin has established a working group to examine the road and bridge department’s functions and potential funding solutions.

Maupin said the group was an informational committee to educate the public on the county road department, she said.

“This really is just a working group to give us insight from the community into what they feel should be priorities and to inform about the road department procedures,” Maupin said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Voting by mail in Idaho: How to properly fill out absentee ballots and make sure your vote counts

A couple simple mistakes, like couples mixing their ballot envelopes, could disqualify a absentee ballot.

Devin Ramey September 24, 2020 KTVB

With less than six weeks away from Election Day and Idaho absentee ballots soon on their way to voters, here’s what you need to know about how to properly fill out your ballot and make sure your vote counts.

Because of the coronavirus pandemic, over 330,000 mail-in (or absentee) ballots have been requested in Idaho. Each absentee ballot has three parts – the ballot, a secret protective folder, then the mailing envelope.

The ballot and the secrecy folder are tied together – that’s how the ballots are counted and tracked. The ballot must be mailed with the folder it came with and if not, then the ballot is considered spoiled and won’t be counted. Each has a code that needs to match the other in order for that ballot to be counted. Once a ballot is mailed (and it doesn’t require extra postage) you can track it on the state’s Idaho Votes website.

continued:
—————–

More Idaho History:

Billy Murray – Ida-Ho ! (c.1907).

— — — — — — — — — —

What the 1918 flu pandemic can teach us about coronavirus

September 25, 2020 Local News 8

At this point in the coronavirus pandemic, with more than 32 million infected and more than 980,000 dead worldwide, describing this time as “unprecedented” may sound like nails on a chalkboard.

This pandemic, however, actually isn’t without precedent: The last time we dealt with a pandemic so mysterious, uncontained and far-reaching was in 1918, when influenza devastated populations around the globe.

The 1918 flu killed 50 million to 100 million people through 1919. There are eerie parallels between the 1918 flu and the 2020 coronavirus pandemic: a disease with a startling range of symptoms for which there is little treatment, human behavior as a hindrance to public health and cluster outbreaks that have become widespread, to name a few.

For 102 years, influenza scholars and infectious disease experts have attempted to educate the masses in hopes of preventing future pandemics. And yet, here we are.

continued:
— —

See also:

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic Series

link: to Idaho History Page with table of contents.
———————

Mining News:

Big rigs would travel to Stibnite

Improvements planned for intersections

(NOTE: This is the fifth in a series detailing the draft federal study of the proposed Stibnite Gold Project. Public comment is due by Oct. 13. Next Week: Local economy)

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News September 24, 2020

Limited passing lanes on Idaho 55 would cause semitrucks traveling to and from Stibnite to slow traffic despite making up a small portion of the highway’s overall traffic, according to the Payette National Forest.

However, improvements to three major intersection along Idaho 55 would help offset the effects of the expected 68 vehicles per day that would travel to and from Stibnite, the Payette’s draft environmental study of the project said.

Current average daily traffic at Warm Lake Road on Idaho 55 would increase from about 4,127 vehicles currently to about 4,192 vehicles during the 12 to 15-year life of mining operations.

Most of the daily traffic would be semitrucks delivering chemicals, fuels, food and a variety of other supplies to support the mine site.

Deliveries would be primarily Monday through Friday, but could occasionally occur on weekends. Mine traffic would only operate from 5 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Also, the Stibnite Logistics Facility would be located on Warm Lake Road, which is the beginning of the primary mine access under all alternatives.

The facility would serve as a hub for mine supplies and employee transportation to Stibnite.

During operations, about 600 employees would be shuttled from the facility to Stibnite for two-week work shifts.

It is unknown how commuting employees would affect existing traffic, but Midas Gold plans to encourage carpooling by operating pickup sites in McCall, Donnelly and Cascade, the draft study said.

Semitrucks

Of the 68 vehicles traveling to Stibnite daily, 49 would be large semitrucks, or about 1.2% of total traffic on Idaho 55.

About 32 semitrucks per day would pass through Cascade and Smiths Ferry, while about 17 semitrucks per day would pass through McCall.

Alternative 2 would reduce mine traffic to about 50 daily trips, including 22 semitruck trips through Cascade and Smiths Ferry and 11 through McCall, the draft study said.

Mining lime on site under Alternative 2 would eliminate about 2,900 lime deliveries per year and add about 133 propane deliveries to fuel the lime kiln. Lime is a key substance used in ore processing.

Intersection Improvements

Mine traffic would bypass downtown McCall using Deinhard Lane and Boydstun Street, the draft study said.

But the intersections of Deinhard Lane and Boydstun Street with Idaho 55 in McCall would both need upgrades to handle mine traffic, according to traffic studies.

Preliminary plans call for the intersection at Deinhard Lane to be widened by about 10 feet at the southwestern corner near the McCall Municipal Airport.

That would allow semitrucks on Deinhard Lane to turn right onto southbound Idaho 55 toward Stibnite without blocking other lanes of traffic.

The left turn lane onto Deinhard Lane from northbound Idaho 55 would be extended south to allow more room for semitrucks waiting to turn left at the stoplight.

At Boydstun Street, work would expand the intersection to accommodate the turning radius of semitrucks and install underground infrastructure for a future traffic signal, if necessary.

Combined, those improvements would route mine traffic around downtown McCall via Deinhard Lane and Boydstun Street.

Also, turn lanes and acceleration lanes would be added in both directions of Idaho 55 at Warm Lake Road to enable mine traffic to more easily merge into and out of the flow of other traffic.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission)
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct. 13 deadline noted for comments on Stibnite gold mine project

The Star-News September 24, 2020

Public comments on the draft environmental study of Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite Gold Project are being accepted by the Payette National Forest until 5 p.m. on Oct. 13.

The entire draft study can be viewed by clicking on the “Analysis” tab on the Payette Forest’s project webpage at (link).

Comments can be submitted through the virtual public meeting room that is being used in lieu of in-person public meetings due to the COVID-19 pandemic. That can be found at (link).

Written comments can be mailed to the Payette Supervisor Linda Jackson at 500 Mission St., Building 2, McCall, Idaho 83638. Comments are not being accepted in person due to the pandemic.

Only substantive comments that raise questions about specific elements of the draft study or Midas Gold’s proposal will be taken into consideration into the Payette’s drafting of a final study.

Analysis of the alternatives in the draft study will be further refined and could change before a “preferred alternative” is defined in the final environmental study, which is tentatively expected by August 2021.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission)
— — — — — — — — — —

Lawmakers ask for Midas Gold comment extension

House members say Stibnite processing being rushed

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News September 24, 2020

A 60-day extension of the public comment period on the draft environmental study of Midas Gold’s Stibnite Gold Project is being urged by five members of Congress.

A letter from U.S. Rep. Chellie Pingree, D-Maine, asks Forest Service Chief Vicki Christiansen to double the original 60-day public comment period that is set to end on Oct. 13.

“We have great concerns that the NEPA review of the Stibnite Gold Project in central Idaho is being conducted in a manner that limits, and in some cases excludes, the public’s meaningful and substantive participation,” the letter said.

Other House members signing Pingree’s letter were Reps. Nanette Barragán and Alan Lowenthal of California, Raúl Grijalva of Arizona and Deb Haaland of New Mexico, all Democrats.

The letter notes the Payette National Forest’s draft environmental study of the proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine includes more than 5,000 pages of dense project analysis.

“Though it took the Forest Service three years to prepare, the agency provided the public a mere 60-day comment period,” the letter said.

continued:
———————–

Public Lands:

Sage Hen Recreation Area reopens after logging operations are completed

Boise, Idaho, September 23, 2020 – The Emmett Ranger District of the Boise National Forest would like to thank the public for their patience as contractors removed numerous hazard trees from roads surrounding the Sage Hen Reservoir, including area campgrounds. The Area Closure will be lifted September 24, and it is open for forest visitors to enjoy.

“We want to thank the public for being patient while contractors remove hazardous trees from the six campgrounds and roadways,” said Katie Wood, Emmett Ranger District. “The area is going to look very different from before with more open spaces, fewer trees and less shade. Visitors will see large slash piles which will be burned when weather conditions are more favorable.”

Sage Hen and Antelope campgrounds (the two largest campgrounds with boat launches) will be open for the public to access with reduced services; maintained restrooms, no drinking water, and pack in pack out your trash. These two will remain open until the snow levels close them. This provides snowmobile access in the winter to the restrooms. The other 4 (Antelope annex, Hollywood, East side, and Cartwright ridge CG) will remain gated and closed until 2021.

The project originally expected to be completed in July was extended multiple times because of weather delays, the rockslide on Idaho State Highway 95 which impacted the haul route and additional disease effecting the timber stands.

The timber removed included dead or dying trees that succumbed to insect and disease, including tussock moth, beetles and fungus that softens the hardwood of certain tree species.

M. Joseph Schindel
Public Affairs
Boise National Forest
— —

Video:

Sagehen Campground, Boise National Forest, September Update Sep 18, 2020

— — — — — — — — — —

Payette forest works to protect goshawk from projects

Timber sales must avoid areas where birds are nesting

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 24, 2020

Sharyn Thompson and Jon Almack spend their work days trekking through the woods, playing recorded Northern goshawk “alarm” calls in an effort to provoke the rare birds to respond.

Once they hear the bird’s screeching reply, they track the raptor back to its nest to gather data on the number of birds in the nest, its size and location in the forest before marking it on a map that tracks the birds.

Thompson and Almack are biologists with the Payette National Forest working on the task of mapping and tracking the rare predatory birds. Goshawks are listed as a sensitive species, so the Payette factors their presence into several major forest operations in order to protect the birds.

Timber sales must avoid areas where goshawks are known to be nesting and cease operations if they come across a nest.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Die-off of pinyon pines spurs concern at Idaho state park

Sept 25, 2020 Local News 8

Almo, Idaho (AP) – The steward of the City of Rocks National Reserve in southern Idaho says more and more of the few pinyon pines that live in the reserve are dying, spurring investigations to try to find out why.

Wallace Keck, the superintendent of the City of Rocks National Reserve and Castle Rocks State Park, says he’s seeing groups of the green pinyon pines turning orange, then brown before losing their needles.

“We’re starting to see patches of kill zones,” Keck told The Times-News. “This is happening before our very eyes.”

continued:
———————

Fire Season:

Current Fire Updates posted here:
— — — — — — — — — —

Yellow Pine prepares for Buck Fire

Worries grew when fire spread quickly last week

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 24, 2020

Yellow Pine residents have been preparing for the worst, setting hose lines and thinning brush as the Buck Fire looms within seven miles of the village.

Concern peaked late last week, but there has been slow growth of the fire since Thursday and it has not moved towards the small village east of McCall since then, Cascade District Ranger Jake Strohmeyer said.

The Buck Fire, started by lightning on Aug. 26 had grown to about 19,300 acres as of Tuesday and was 33% contained.

“There is minimal activity on the north, east, and south ends of the fire,” an update from the Forest Service said on Tuesday. “The only activity was in the SW corner with backing into the Burnt Log Creek at a moderate pace.”

To the north, the fire had not reached Hanson Creek as of Tuesday. The creek is the designated “ready point” at which residents of Yellow Pine would be told to be ready to evacuate.

“The amount of fire movement in the next week will depend on any additional rain received and the wind,” Strohmeyer said.

“Given the current forecast we don’t expect much movement of the fire in the next week but we are prepared in the event that there is unexpected fire behavior,” he said.

Firefighters have been primarily focused on keeping the fire away from homes along Johnson Creek and preventing the spread towards Yellow Pine, he said.

On Monday crews began constructing a contingency line along the southeast edge of town and fire managers are developing a plan to use that line and Stibnite Road to prevent fire from getting into the town from the south, Strohmeyer said.

The fire burned close to Johnson Creek Road between Trapper Creek and Buck Creek, prompting the Forest Service to close the road last Thursday. The road was reopened on Sunday.

“Firefighters have been using the powerline corridor as a control feature and have so far been successful in keeping the fire from the road,” Strohmeyer said.

The strategy for the next few days is to continue to suppress the fire as it comes down near Johnson Creek Road and to use aircraft to drop retardant to slow its spread of fire to the north if it becomes active again, he said.

Crews and engines would be used to protect homes if the fire becomes more active, Strohmeyer added.

The fire will continue to burn until put out by rain or snow, he said.

“This isn’t a fire that we will be able to put out completely. Instead we are working to slow the spread of the fire and to use natural features and previously burned areas to check the fire from moving rapidly to the north until a season-ending weather event occurs,” Strohmeyer said.

As of Tuesday, 138 people, 14 engines, four crews and three helicopters were assigned to the fire.

Roads and trails near the fire remained closed. The closure extended from south of Yellow Pine to Landmark Summit, east of Johnson Creek Road and extends west to Chilcoot Peak.

Residents Take Action

Yellow Pine residents started working on efforts to protect the town from the blaze when the fire saw high winds, warmer temperatures and significant growth last week, said Merrill Saleen, who is a commissioner for the Yellow Pine Fire District.

“It’s a neighbor helping neighbor enterprise. Other friends and locals have also been enthusiastic in lending their support,” Saleen said, noting that memories of fires encroaching on the village in 2006-2008 are fresh in people’s minds.

Community support was ample, but some residents began to worry about a possible evacuation amid congested roads.

Village spokesperson Deb Filler released a statement on Friday requesting no additional volunteers.

“If an evacuation is ordered today, we want to limit any incoming traffic to both South Fork road and Lick Creek approach,” Filler said.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission)
— — — — — — — — — —

Fire in Frank Church wilderness grows to 14,500 acres

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 24, 2020

The Porphyry Fire about 20 miles north of Yellow Pine grew to about 14,500 acres as of Tuesday.

The fire growth would have been much larger if not for rainfall over the fire on Saturday, an update from the Payette National Forest said.

The fire, located in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, was started by lightning on Aug. 25.

More precipitation is expected in the coming week, but it will not be enough to put the fire out, the Payette said.

There were 23 people assigned to the fire as of Tuesday.

Firefighters plan to monitor the growth of the fire and protect structures at the Golden Hand and Wardenhoff mines if needed, the Payette said.

There are no current threats to structures, but Golden Hand Mine is in the current path of the fire, the Payette said.

The area around the fire remains closed. Boaters on the South Fork Salmon River are encouraged to move quickly through the section near the fire and hunters have been asked to avoid the area, the Payette said.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission)
— — — — — — — — — —

Brush fire in McCall causes alarm for nearby residents

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News September 24, 2020

A small brush fire last week near the corner of Colorado Street and First Street in McCall was quickly extinguished, but caused anxiety for nearby residents, McCall Fire and EMS said.

The agency responded at 6:35 p.m. on Sept. 16 with four firefighters and a pumper tender to douse less than an acre of flaming trees and grass with water, Fire Chief Garrett de Jong said.

The fire was knocked down in less than five minutes and crews cleared the scene at 7:51 p.m., de Jong said.

“We did have very minimal wind and it was in the evening, so we had all of the environmental factors working with us,” de Jong said.

The fire is believed to be human caused, though it is still under investigation, he said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Tanker pilot identified in fatal crash while fighting Emmett wildfire

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, September 22nd 2020

Emmett, Idaho (CBS2) — A tanker plane crashed Tuesday while fighting a bush fire near Emmett.

The pilot, Ricky Fulton, passed away following the crash.

The plane was owned by Aero S.E.A.T. Incorporated and was on an on-call contract with BLM Fire and Aviation at the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise. The FAA says Fulton was flying an AT-802.

continued:
— —

Pilot killed in Emmett fire remembered for decades of experience (and his love of kittens)

by CBS2 News Staff Friday, September 25th 2020


Ricky Fulton. (Photos courtesy Mary LaMoy, Spur Aviation, Twin Falls)

We’re beginning to learn more about the pilot who died earlier this week while helping fight a brush fire near Emmett.

The Vale Bureau of Land Management in Oregon shared a little bit more about Ricky Fulton.

From fighting fires to being a pilot and training instructor for the State Department and evening spraying herbicide on coca fields in Colombia, he had decades of experience in the air.

And that’s what he loved to do. He loved to fly.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Badger Fire evacuations lifted, now 84% contained

The fire remains at 89,632 acres.

September 27, 2020 KTVB

As of Sunday morning, the Badger Fire in southern Idaho is 84% contained. Its size is estimated at 89,632 acres.

Minimal fire activity was seen Saturday, even with winds in the area. Crews anticipate Sunday will see minimal activity as well due to the mellowing weather.

Officials said on Tuesday morning that firefighters will try to engage the fire to stop its spread south and west close to Pike Mountain and Magic Mountain Ski Resort. Fire crews will cool off hot pockets on the eastern side of the Badger Fire, while others mop up and patrol the other sides of the fire.

continued:
——————

Critter News:

Study finds killing of protected Idaho wildlife higher than previously known

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, September 24th 2020

A recent study has found the killing of protected Idaho wildlife is actually higher than people previously thought.

The study quantified a problem for several species of birds and snakes in two conservation areas in southwestern Idaho.

Between 2013 and 2019, illegal shooting was responsible for the death of 33 percent of long-billed curlews tracked by Boise State researchers and 59 percent of bird carcasses found and for which a cause of death was identified. One Idaho population of long-billed curlews affected by illegal shooting, on the ACEC, has declined by more than 90 percent in four decades.

“Only after years of repeated discoveries by the groups involved with this study were scientists able to collect enough data to quantify the extent of the illegal killings,” said Katzner.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Reptiles surrendered by Idaho Falls resident

September 24, 2020 Local News 8


IDF&G

Idaho Department of Fish and Game officers recently took possession of several exotic reptiles from an Idaho Falls area residence.

This is the second investigation of its type to occur this September following the seizure of several dozen venomous snakes from a Boise home earlier in the month.

The owner of the reptiles voluntarily surrendered eight specimens from his possession that were not properly permitted. The reptiles taken from the home included a seven-foot alligator, two caiman, two snapping turtles, two rubber boas and a Gila monster.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Bottom falls out of kokanee fishery

Population plummets

By Steve Liebenthal Sep 23, 2020 KIVI

Anderson Ranch Reservoir, Idaho — Alan Greenhalg has been fishing for kokanee for more than thirty years. Two years ago, he says it was hard to keep them off the hook, and they were big.

“We could limit on twenty five fish and be off the water by noon,” he said.

That may seem like a good thing, but to Alan it was a major red flag. When fish size goes up, population generally drops. Alan predicted that the bottom would fall out.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Invasive fish killed accidentally after being illegally dumped in Hailey area pond

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, September 24th 2020

Hailey, Idaho (CBS2) — Idaho Fish and Game biologists found thousands of fish that had been killed after a routine rotenone treatment in Heagle Park pond. According to IDFG, it seems the fish had been illegally dumped earlier this year.

Among the types found were goldfish, fathead minnows, koi, rainbow trout and perch. All of which are species not native to the Wood River Basin.

“The illegal introduction of invasive species into Idaho’s waters is an extremely concerning situation” said Mike Peterson, Regional Fisheries Manager. “What we found today is that the goldfish that were illegally introduced into Heagle Pond were successfully spawning, which could put the fisheries in the Big Wood River at risk.”

continued:
—————–

Letter to Share:

Idaho upland hunting news

Hi all, this is very important news from IFG to read [link below.] Most of what you will be able to digest is not in the hunting manual. Reading it could save you a ticket and it will show you where you can [find] released pheasants to hunt and the permit you need to hunt them here in north Idaho. Youth do not need the permit. Be sure and read!!!!! If you have questions you can call me at 209-883-3423.

“The Pheasant Guy”
Jim Hagedorn

F&G Commission expands access to pheasant hunting with new stocking locations. link:
———————–

Fish & Game News:

Ten tips for safe firearm handling while hunting

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Thursday, September 17, 2020

While firearm accidents are rare, human error or inattention is the leading cause

Some people have the mistaken impression that because firearms are used, hunting is a dangerous activity. While there is always the potential that a hunter will be involved in a firearm accident, statistics from the National Shooting Sports Foundation show that hunting with firearms is actually one of the safest recreational activities in the country.

In each of the past few years, about 450,000 people hunted in Idaho. Even with that many people in the field, there are typically very few, if any, hunting accidents involving firearms in Idaho.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Know Idaho’s trespassing laws before you go hunting or fishing

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Friday, September 25, 2020

You need permission to be on private lands, and written permission is recommended

Hunters, anglers and other sportsmen and women should be aware of Idaho trespass laws before they head into the field. Trespass laws changed in 2018, and here are some basic things to remember:

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

F&G asks deer hunters to provide harvested animals for chronic wasting disease testing

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Friday, September 25, 2020

The disease has never been detected in Idaho, but surveillance continues, and hunters can help

Idaho Fish and Game is asking hunters to help provide samples from deer so they can be tested for chronic wasting disease, particularly deer taken in hunting units bordering, or near, the states of Montana, Utah and Wyoming, all of which have CWD in their big game herds.

The disease has never been detected in Idaho, but animals with CWD have been found within miles of Idaho’s border. CWD is a contagious and fatal disease that affects mule deer, white-tailed deer, elk, caribou and moose.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Giant rat wins animal hero award for sniffing out landmines

by Danica Kirka Associated Press Friday, September 25th 2020


In this undated photo issued by the PDSA, People’s Dispensary for Sick Animals, Cambodian landmine detection rat, Magawa is photographed wearing his PDSA Gold Medal, the animal equivalent of the George Cross, in Siem, Cambodia. (PDSA via AP)

A rat has for the first time won a British charity’s top civilian award for animal bravery, receiving the honor for searching out unexploded landmines in Cambodia.

Magawa, a giant African pouched rat, was awarded the PDSA’s Gold Medal for his “lifesaving bravery and devotion” after discovering 39 landmines and 28 items of unexploded ordinance in the past seven years, according to the charity.

First known as the People’s Dispensary for Sick Animals, PDSA started as a free veterinary clinic in 1917 and has honored heroic animals since 1943.

continued:

——————-

Seasonal Humor

CovidMuzzles-a
——————-

Sept 20, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 20, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order until further notice.

Community Calendar:

April 17 – Boil water order issued
May 15 – Firewood Season starts
June 16 – Hard closure of South Fork Road (weekdays)
Aug 11 – Valley County Mask Order
Aug 12 – Firewood Permits at The Corner
Sept 8 – Hwy 55 work starts
Sept 22 – Planned Power outage 945am-245pm
(details below)
———-

From Valley County

Valley County Mask-Up
A county-wide mask mandate was approved the CDH August 11th, and is now in effect for Valley County. (link)

We need Your Help to protect the place and the people we all Love.
link:

Valley County Covid-19 Response Page
link:

Valley County Emergency Operations Center
link:

Rebound – Idaho Governor’s phasing program
link:

COVID 19: Recommendations and Resources for Safe Business Practices
link: (lots of info for businesses)
——————-

Local Events:

Highway 55 Closure starts Monday, Sept 21st

Fall (September through November) and Spring (March through May)
– Daytime and nighttime work seven days a week
– Full road closures Monday through Thursday from 10:00am to 2:00pm
– One-way alternating traffic during all other time frames
— — — —

Idaho Power Planned Outage Sept 22

On Tuesday, Sept. 22nd at 945am the power will be turned off for approximately 5 hours (until around 245pm) for power line maintenance. There are some hazard trees near the power lines they want to take down and need to drop the lines in order to safely remove those trees. You will received an automated phone message about 5 days before this planned outage.

They have not yet switched us over to the new underground lines yet, we will get advanced notice for that outage.
———-

Village News:

Help Support the Yellow Pine Volunteer Fire Department

Thank you for all your offers of help and support. Now you can help support the Yellow Pine Fire District by donating through our Go Fund Me account. Just click on the link to get started.

Even a small donation could help reach the fundraising goal. And if you can’t make a donation, it would be great if you could share the fundraiser to help spread the word.

Thanks for taking a look!

FAQ: YPAC is the charity that was set up to allow the town to apply for grants. It was the only 501.c3 the town has to allow GoFundMe to recognize an authorized EIN. So, funds will go to YPAC then they will cut a check to the fire district.
— — — —

This Week with Photos:

Sept 13 Last Sunday Buck Fire

Pic taken from Johnson creek road 14 miles from Yellow pine at 10:14 pm. Sunday night Sept 13th.


photo courtesy Ray Lutz

Sept 16 11 miles from Yellow Pine taken at 5:30 pm Wednesday

20200916BuckFireLutz-aphoto courtesy Ray Lutz

Sept 15 Buck Fire Meeting

A fire meeting was held Tuesday, Sept 15, for 6pm at the Community Hall to discuss the Buck and Porphyry Fires.

20200915BuckFireMeeting-acourtesy Valley County Fire Working Group

Yellow Pine residents got an update from the Buck Fire and Porphyry Fire IC’s yesterday evening. The teams and Ranger District were glad to get all the questions answered. Thank you for attending and participating in the community meeting.

Link to recorded meeting on Sept 15th at the community hall with Buck Fire Incident Command Team (about 2 hours long.)

Sept 16 Meetings

Local Fire Planning Meeting Wednesday Sept 16 at 6pm at the Fire Hall.

Sept 17 – Johnson Creek road closed (except for residents.)

Sept 17 Fire Meeting this morning

“08:00 @ YPFD: Reviewed critical fire elements. Sections and assignments for volunteers were reviewed. Reviewed safety protocols. Communications links verified. Patrols around Yellow Pine will be active today. Discussed possibility of plume dominated fire and wind funneling.” – DF

YP Fire District Meeting was held at 6pm, Thursday Sept 17th.

“Yellow Pine Community is pulling together and gone into full action mode. Led by Commissioner Merle Saleen and his co pilot Nikki, assisted by Commissioners Sue Holloway and Phil Jensen with advisors Jeff and Ann Forster. You couldn’t ask for a better team, even Terry Leatherman with many years of fire fighting experience behind him just showed up today. We have a good foundation of folks trained many years by Jeff and now have many capable residents getting familiar with our fire equipment built up by Dave McClintock and Jeff. It doesn’t get any better than that.” – YP Tavern

The smoke was thick Thursday

20200917YPFD1-a

20200917YPFD2-a

20200917YPSmoke-acourtesy Yellow Pine Tavern

Photo Gallery on FB:

YPFD Volunteers
20200917YPFD3-acourtesy DF

September 18 Prepping

“A long day in Yellow Pine. At the Morning meeting things did not look good with the weather prediction. The day was spent preparing to evacuate between preparing to defend the town. The weather stayed cool and very unusual no wind to speak of in advance of the rain that started to fall around 6PM. Not much rain is predicted but it all helps us get a good night’s sleep tonight.” – YP Tavern

20200918Tanker-a

20200918Smoke1-a

20200918Smoke2-aphotos courtesy Yellow Pine Tavern

Photo Gallery on FB:

Sept 18 YP received 0.09″ rain.

Sept 19 YP received 0.17″ rain.

Sept 20 Johnson Creek road open!
— — — —

Flu Shots

Thanks to Cascade Medical Center for Supplying flu vaccines for the Village of Yellow Pine and for the CEO – Tom Reinhardt for bringing them in and for giving a presentation at the Village Meeting on Saturday. Vaccinations were given to 13 people.
— —

Boil Water Order issued April 17 still in effect.

No update for August.

Update July 5: the boil order is in effect due to extremely high use due to leaks.

Update June 12: The boil order is still on. We still are experiencing excessive water use because of leaks. Not sure when this will be lifted. We are applying for grants to repair the system.

Update June 2: The water plant is experiencing high water in Boulder Creek which brings more debris into the sand filter.

The high demand caused by leaks in the system plugs the sand filters prematurely. We will be on a boil order until further notice.
— — — —

2020 Census

The 2020 Census Impacts All Valley County Residents

Hurry and complete the census, the deadline has been moved up to September 30th.

It is recommended that we all fill out the census online.

If you spend 50% of your time in Valley County, you can consider it your home per the Census. Where you register with the Census is confidential and never linked to other governmental requirements such as property taxes or mailing address.

Link: to online census

You do not need an ID number. Go to the link. Click on “start questionnaire”. Then on the next page scroll down to “If you do not have a Census ID, click here” – when you click on that line it will start the census. (see below)

2020Census-a
— — — —

Critters

West Nile has been found in Ada, Canyon and Gem county mosquitoes.

Be Bear Aware

* Keep all household garbage secured in a garage or other enclosed area.
* Leftovers or discarded fish or meat bones give off a strong odor and should be stored in your freezer until you haul the garbage to the transfer station.
* Keep attractants like B-B-Q grills, bird seed or pet food stored where bears cannot find them.
* Bird feeders should be taken down May through October or placed well out of reach of bears.

Be Mountain Lion Aware

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Sept 18 report: Dumpsters about half full. Watch the right door, hard to close.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020. This could last until leaks are repaired.

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance.

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020

Notice of Intent to File an Application with USDA, Rural Development

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an Application with USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG). Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG).

If any additional information is needed, please contact:
Willie Sullivan
Treasurer
ypwater @ gmail.com

Distributed to Yellow Pine Water Users Association customers via Yellow Pine Times on June 12, 2020.

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
— — — —

VYPA News:

Next VYPA meeting September 12 at 2pm

Minutes from August 8, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Printable Letter of Interest to be a Community Representative
link:

Minutes from July 11, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from June 13, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

July 1 – Post Harmonica Meeting 2pm Community Hall
Note: at each meeting we simply add to info on the topic. That way, info from all meetings is included in a single document.
Link to notes:

Heat was installed in the community hall on April 30th.

VYPA meeting schedule for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.
— — — —

YPFD News:

There was a YP Fire Commissioner meeting on June 27, 2020 at 10am at the Fire Station.
Link: 20200627 Fire Dept minutes June 27

YPFD COVID19 Policy

link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP

link: Covid-19 EMS (May 23)

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Bring It, Don’t Burn It”, you can take your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
(TBA) – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Open 11am-8pm Closed Tuesdays. Calling ahead works best but not a huge deal. Groceries, Ice Cream, Beer and Soda. Our menu fluctuates but typically have Smoked Brisket, Tri Tip, Chicken, Burgers and Wings on hand.
Starting Aug 12th Firewood Permits at The Corner
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Open Daily 8am to 10pm. Outside Dining and Bar. Breakfast and Bar Food.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open.
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300

The store is open now and will be open into October. Hours are 9 am to 6 pm Tuesday through Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday.
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins (208) 633-6677

Cabins are not available in 2020. RV Spaces $25/night; $150/week; $300/month. Tent spaces $10/night. Shower house is closed for 2020.
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Sept 14) overnight low of 40 degrees, smoky this morning can barely see the ridges and bad air quality. Large hawk (female coopers?) in the neighborhood. Smoky haze at lunch time. Warm, smoky and bad air quality mid-afternoon, there may be some clouds above the smoke? Warm and smoky mid-afternoon, poor air quality, high of 87 degrees. Quiet day. Still warm by mid-evening, slightly thinner smoke – dirty smudge to the east, poor air quality and perhaps a few clouds above the smoke. Smoke settling in at dusk, very poor air quality and cooling off slowly. Thicker smoke before midnight obscuring the stars.

Tuesday (Sept 15) overnight low of 39 degrees, socked in down to the valley floor with smoke, very hazardous air quality. Hawk in the neighborhood again this morning terrorizing little critters. Really smoky at lunch time. Warm with light breezes mid-afternoon and sky covered in smoke, we can barely see the peaks and ridges, high of 86 degrees. Increased traffic and dust. Warm and smoky mid-evening, seems the air quality is worsening somewhat, sky covered in smoke like it was overcast, can see the hills and peaks thru the smoke, getting darker before sunset. Smoke settling in thicker at dusk, cooling off and worse air quality. Thick smoke by midnight, terrible air quality.

Wednesday (Sept 16) overnight low of 38 degrees, socked in with smoke down to the valley floor, low visibility and very hazardous air quality. Clark’s nutcracker and a nuthatch calling. Still socked in at lunch time and Haz AQ. Flicker calling and drumming in the distance. Warm and socked in with smoke mid-afternoon and very bad air quality, high of 81 degrees. Increased traffic. Before dusk the smoke had thinned a little, enough to see the outlines of the ridges thru the haze, air quality is still pretty bad. Smoke settling in after dark, pretty yucky before midnight.

Thursday (Sept 17) overnight low of 39 degrees, socked in with smoke down to the valley floor, very hazardous air quality and low visibility. YPFD meeting at 8am. At lunch time the smoke was even thicker, visibility reduced to approx. 150 yards, very hazardous air quality. Warm and still socked in with smoke mid-afternoon, hazardous air quality and calm, high of 85 degrees. The inversion lifted a little by mid-evening, can see the outline of ridges thru the smoke, very poor air quality, warm and light breeze. Thinner smoke before midnight, a few stars to the north and Mars was a ruby red spot above the eastern ridge. More smoke settled in during the night.

Friday (Sept 18) overnight low of 41 degrees, socked in with smoke down to the valley floor (again) visibility less than 1/4 miles, very hazardous air quality. Sounds of chainsaws around the village and spotter traffic. At lunch time thick smoke, low visibility, light chilly breeze. YPFD volunteers placing resources and laying out hoses in key areas around the village. Cool and very smoky mid-afternoon, apparently it is cloudy above the smoke, high of 61 degrees. The inversion lifted early evening, can see the hills. Steady rain for an hour or so late evening, temperature dropping and very light breezes. Possible shower after dark and calm. Smoke and fog settling in by midnight. No rain during the night.

Saturday (Sept 19) yesterday’s rain total = 0.09″, overnight low of 44 degrees, partly clear to mostly cloudy (can see the sky!) lighter haze of smoke, and rather poor air quality (vehicle exhaust + extra traffic.) Steller’s jays making their presence known in the neighborhood. Mostly cloudy and light breezes after lunch time. Thunderstorm with short shower early afternoon, strikes all over the BNF and PNF, cloudy and better air quality. Good shower of rain for about an hour mid-afternoon, lightning strikes in the area, high of 64 degrees. Break in the rain for about half an hour, then a another hour of rain late afternoon, clearing a bit afterwards and sun peeking thru. Partly clear before dusk. Pine squirrel and clark’s nutcracker calling. It looked cloudy before midnight, light haze.

Sunday (Sept 20) yesterday’s rain total = 0.17″, overnight low of 35 degrees, this morning clear sky above ground fog (sun evaporating moisture from the trees, etc.) and light haze of smoke and much better air quality (can smell smoke though.) Hearing birds calling, robins, jays, clark’s nutcracker and red-breasted nuthatches. Mostly cloudy and light breeze after lunch time, fairly good air quality. Light breezes, mostly cloudy and perfect fall temperature mid-afternoon, high of 69 degrees. Clear sky and better air quality before dusk. Light traffic.
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Press Release:

Yellow Pine Idaho Fire Update & Village Status

September 18, 2020

The Village requests no outside visitors or additional volunteers during the next 24 hours.

The Village is currently connected with USFS with regular updates on the Buck fire.

High-risk fire behavior could pose a threat to the Village today, expected to be alleviated tomorrow

Yellow Pine, Idaho —— The Buck fire conditions are favorable for large fire growth and extreme fire behavior.

“We are requesting no additional volunteers at this time,” Deb Filler, Village Spokeswoman. “If an evacuation is ordered today, we want to limit any incoming traffic to both South Fork road and Lick Creek approach. We will be updating via social media channels throughout the day today”.

The Buck fire is currently over 19,139 acres with only 6% containment and active growth overnight. It has the potential today to make an approach in the direction of the Village of Yellow Pine. Fire crews are actively managing the fire outside of Village with both ground and air support.

The Yellow Pine Fire District, the volunteer fire department for the town, is the only asset assigned to protect the town. To have assistance from the USFS and County assets the Village would have to pay 50% of the costs, which is not fiscally possible. The 100% volunteer team consists of a handful of residents, most of whom are seniors, and retired seasoned forest fire leaders to help prepare and protect the 110+ residence in the Village and mitigate as much of the risk as possible.

The Village is thankful for the outpouring of support and offers of assistance. Donations will be directed to a fundraising campaign launching shortly.

For Additional Information or Press inquiries, please contact: Deb Filler, Village of Yellow Pine Spokeswoman: villageofyellowpine @ gmail.com

[Note: We had rain a little rain Friday and more on Saturday, conditions have improved since this press release was issued.]
————————

Idaho News:

Gov. Little keeps Idaho in Stage 4 for another two weeks

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, September 18th 2020

Governor Little hosted a press conference Friday to discuss the Idaho Rebounds plan.

Gov. Little has again decided to keep the state in Stage 4 for another two weeks. Under Stage 4, all Idaho businesses are open while protocols are followed to minimize transmission risk.

“In nearly all the statewide metrics categories we are seeing encouraging trends. However, our COVID hospitalizations statewide remain too high again to move out of Stage 4,” Little said. “As temperatures start dropping, more transmissible moments will occur in the coming months. A primary reason we are able to achieve this remarkable economic position is because of our personal actions to slow the spread of coronavirus in our communities. I urge Idahoans, please do not let your guard down.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

470 new Idaho COVID-19 cases Friday, 4 new deaths

Sept 18, 2020 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 470 new COVID-19 cases and 4 new deaths on Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March to 36,959.

There are a total of 33,901 confirmed cases and 3,058 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state.

… 4 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 438.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley Up One Case

By Tom Grote for The Star-News September 17, 2020

The total number of positive COVID-19 cases in Valley County reached 119 cases on Tuesday, up just one case from 118 a week ago, health officials said.

St. Luke’s McCall reported 94 total positive cases from testing done at the hospital, the same as a week ago.

Cascade Medical Center reported 22 positive cases, up one from the 21 cases reported last week.

In addition, the private testing cooperative Crush the Curve has found three confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Valley County with no change in the past week.

Nearly all of the positive cases reported by the hospitals were found following the start of the summer visitor season in mid-June.

Central District Health reported 80 of the positive cases were confirmed to be Valley County residents as of Tuesday, which is no change from a week ago.

The difference between the hospital figures and the health department figures are those who tested positive but did not declare Valley County as their residence.

One death from COVID-19 has been reported in Valley County since the pandemic reached Idaho in March. An 85-year-old McCall man died July 15 at St. Luke’s Boise hospital due to complications of COVID-19 infection.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Speer declares as write-in candidate for Valley sheriff

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 17, 2020

Former Valley County Sheriff’s Office Chief Deputy Jason Speer has declared himself as a write-in candidate for Valley County Sheriff.

Speer, 45, placed second among five candidates in the May primary election for the Republican nomination for sheriff.

Current Sheriff Patti Bolen received 49% of the vote while Speer received 33%.

He filed his declaration with the Valley County Clerk’s Office so that any write-ins of his name on the Nov. 3 general election ballot will be counted.

continued:
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Burn Ban Includes Valley County

This ban is not for fire danger but for air quality. This includes ALL types of outdoor burning to include camp fires.

From DEQ:

Due to continued smoke impacts from regional wildfire activity, IDEQ has issued a Red Air Quality Advisory for Southwest Idaho. Moderate to heavy smoke impacts are expected to continue throughout the area. Smoke impacts may be higher in the morning and evening hours. Hourly air quality values may range from the moderate (yellow) to very unhealthy (purple).

Due to the continued degradation in air quality and potential health impacts, IDEQ has also issued an Air Quality Forecast & Caution for the area. During a Stage 1 Forecast & Caution (Air Quality), ALL OUTDOOR OPEN BURNING ACTIVITIES ARE PROHIBITED per IDAPA 58.01.01.561.01. Specifically “there shall be no new ignition of open burning of any kind”. This includes, but is not limited to:

* Solid waste (e.g., rubbish, tree leaves, yard trimmings, and gardening waste) if no scheduled house-to-house solid waste collection service is available and the burning is conducted on the property where the waste was generated

* Tree leaves, yard trimmings, or gardening waste if allowed by local ordinance or rule and conducted on the property where the waste was generated

* Fires for the preparation of food or recreational purposes, such as campfires and barbecues

* Ceremonial fires

* Small fires set for hand-warming purposes

* Weed control along fence lines, canal banks, and ditch banks

* Crop residue disposal (agricultural burning activities)
— — — — — — — — — —

ID-55 to close on weekdays for blasting, cleanup near Smiths Ferry

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, September 17th 2020

Idaho Highway 55 is closing between Smiths Ferry & Rainbow Bridge starting Mon, Sept. 21.

The Idaho Transportation Department says the closures will last Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. for blasting and cleanup.

The closures will last through November. ITD will use U.S. Highway 95 as an alternate route.

source:

ITD Link:
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Letter to Share:

Valley County should change its zoning

The Star-News September 17, 2020

Valley County should change the way it regulates land use in order to increase certainty among current property owners about what can be built next to them while still preserving flexibility to ensure land is developed to its highest and best use.

When most people think of zoning, they think of a map with areas designated with different colors for residential, commercial and industrial. At a glance, zoning maps provide property owners and developers with what a local government has decided are the most appropriate uses for those properties. Valley County, however, has performance-based zoning, which approaches each property as a blank canvas. Developers can propose anything they want on a given property, regardless of location or neighboring uses. All they have to do is pass a compatibility test, a series of questions about whether the proposed use would be beneficial to the community as well as compatible with surrounding properties.

The scoring on the test is subjective, with nine vaguely worded questions such as “Is the proposed use generally compatible with the overall land use in the local vicinity” for which a plus or minus value is applied. The total score is supposed to guide the Valley County Planning and Zoning Commission and Valley County commissioners how to vote. The process causes turmoil and angst among adjacent property owners because they have no idea if they will receive a notice for a proposed apartment complex, a factory or a go-cart track to be built next door.

Elsewhere, performance-based zoning is commonly used to clear the way for easier development of parcels such as abandoned factories in order to remove blight and create jobs. That might work for some parcels in Valley County, but the vast majority of applications are in areas where no incentive to develop exists.

Valley County should adopt traditional zoning, which is more suited to areas experiencing growth because neighbors are not blind-sided by proposals. Of course, traditional zoning has its own problems, mainly the many restrictions and requirements within a zone that can make a proposed development impossible to justify financially. But there is a solution for this, known as a planned-unit development, first used locally by Spring Mountain Ranch in McCall more than 25 years ago. In return for relaxation of density requirements to allow for multiple types of homes, the developers agreed to build the nine-hole Cedar course to add to the 18-hole McCall Golf Course, plus other amenities. Both the public and the developer were the winners.

Performance-based zoning has its place, but not in Valley County. Traditional zoning is the best way to channel growth and prevent heart-stopping notices from being received in the mail.

source:
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Mining News:

Midas staging area gets poor reviews; decision to be Oct. 5

Opponents call Warm Lake Road facility permit premature

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 17, 2020

The process to approve a proposed staging area for Midas Gold’s Stibnite Gold Project on Warm Lake Road was called arbitrary on Monday.

The comments were heard during a public hearing before Valley County commissioners on an appeal of the Valley County Planning and Zoning Commission’s approval of the proposal on July 16.

Commissioners did not make a decision on the appeal and will take the matter up again on Oct. 5.

The appeal was filed by the group Save the South Fork Salmon. The group claimed the P&Z’s approval was based on simply moving the process forward without due consideration.

The facility would include four buildings and outdoor parking areas on 25 acres of land on Warm Lake Road in Scott Valley, about eight miles east of Cascade.

The four buildings would have about 64,000 square feet of floor space.

It would be used as a staging area and 300-space parking facility for employees working at the mine. Employees, equipment and supplies would park at the facility and be shuttled to the proposed gold and antimony mine at Stibnite near Yellow Pine.

McCall attorney Julia Thrower, recounted P&Z commissioners saying that approving the application would move it further along so that Midas can continue with its development plan.

“This is not an appropriate factor to base a decision on and it’s arbitrary,” Thrower said.

The group also objected to the application’s effects on traffic, the location of an industrial facility in a rural area in contradiction to the county’s comprehensive plan, effects on affordable housing and the transportation of hazardous materials.

Thrower also argued that approving the facility while the approval by the Forest Service was still underway would be inappropriate and premature.

She requested commissioners halt consideration of the application until a decision is made by the Forest Service on the project.

Midas Gold attorney Deborah Nelson of Boise said that the application’s timing was appropriate and separate from Forest Service permitting. If the mine is not approved, then there will be no logistics facility, Nelson said.

The commissioners received 29 letters in support of the appeal, while 14 letters were submitted in favor of the proposed staging area.

At the hearing, seven people spoke in favor of the appeal while five spoke in support of the staging proposal.

One of those in favor of the appeal was Ed Allen, who was the lone P&Z commissioner to vote against the original application. Allen has since resigned from the commission.

“A work facility of this magnitude will leave a huge imprint in Valley County,” Allen said.

“Scott Valley is a pristine gateway to a huge portion of Idaho’s Central Mountains,” he said. “Backcountry resources are going to become even more valuable as the years pass and our choice of development will matter.”

Cascade resident Sam Stoddard agreed that the location was not suitable.

“I can’t for the life of me see the advantage of that particular location,” Stoddard said.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission)
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New road would provide Stibnite access

Johnson Creek also proposed as primary access

(NOTE: This is the fourth in a series detailing the draft federal study of the proposed Stibnite Gold Project. Public comment is due by Oct. 13. Next week: Local traffic and infrastructure)

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News September 17, 2020

20200917midasMap-a
(click image for larger size)

A new road would be cut through the Payette National Forest between Landmark and Stibnite to provide access to the proposed Stibnite Gold Project under a draft study of the project.

Three of the four alternatives included in the draft study would see Forest Service Road 447, also known as Burntlog Road, improved and extended to serve as the primary road to Stibnite.

The fourth alternative would see mining traffic travel over the existing Johnson Creek Road, which would be improved.

The route is proposed because parts of the Burntlog Route would run parallel to the Frank Church – River of No Return Wilderness.

That could harm the wilderness area’s character and threaten the habitat of endangered species like the lynx, the draft study said.

Also, much of the Burntlog Route would be built in designated roadless areas, which are valued by the Payette for the lack of wildlife habitat disturbance.

Burntlog Route

The Burntlog Route would begin at Landmark, which is located about 35 miles east of Cascade on Warm Lake Road.

Alternative 1 would extend the existing Burnt Log Road by 15 miles and upgrade about 3.3 miles of existing roads at Stibnite. The route would cross 71 streams.

Under Alternative 2, new roadway construction would be reduced to 13.5 miles and two stream crossings would be eliminated by rerouting a 5.3-mile segment of the road.

However, that would move more of the roadway closer to the Frank Church wilderness, compared to Alternatives 1 and 3.

Alternative 3 would require 19.6 miles of new roadway to be built, the most under any of the alternatives, the draft study said.

Each alternative would include widening about 20 miles of the existing Burnt Log Road, straightening tight corners and reducing slopes to 10% or less.

Yellow Pine Route

Alternative 4 would route mine traffic to Stibnite over Johnson Creek Road and Stibnite Road.

Using the Johnson Creek route would place mine traffic along Johnson Creek and the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, both of which are home to endangered fish. It would also direct mine traffic through Yellow Pine.

Using the route would require extensive upgrades to over 40 miles of the two roads, which would delay mining by about two years, the draft study said.

Work would include blasting slopes to expand existing single-lane roads, leveling steep sections where possible and paving steep sections of existing dirt roads.

But the route’s steep terrain would require wider roads, more cut slopes and more switchbacks than the Burntlog Route, all while including several miles of roadway adjacent to Johnson Creek and the East Fork.

Hazards along the route include 16 landslide paths, 19 rockfall areas and 12 avalanche paths, compared with six landslide paths, 20 rockfall areas and zero avalanche paths on the Burntlog Route.

Mine traffic and public traffic would also share Johnson Creek Road and Stibnite Road under Alternative 4, which would increase the risk of accidents and spills, the draft study said.

However, the overall risk of Stibnite supply trucks spilling hazardous materials into nearby waterways is considered “low” by the Payette’s draft environmental study.

Public Access

Reaching recreational areas beyond Stibnite, like Thunder Mountain and Monumental Summit, would require detouring around the mine during operations under Alternatives 1 and 3.

That would extend the current 13-mile trip from Yellow Pine about 61 miles by detouring down Johnson Creek Road to the Burntlog Route, the draft study said.

Alternatives 2 and 4 would allow public access through the mine site during operations, though it would be closed for the winter and during dangerous mining operations, like blasting.

(Note: Subscribers to The Star-News can view previous stories in this series as well as other previous stories on Midas Gold by logging on at (link)
https://mccallstarnews.com
and following the “Midas Archive” link.)

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission)
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct. 13 deadline noted for comments on Stibnite gold mine project

The Star-News September 17, 2020

Public comments on the draft environmental study of Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite Gold Project are being accepted by the Payette National Forest until 5 p.m. on Oct. 13.

The entire draft study can be viewed by clicking on the “Analysis” tab on the Payette Forest’s project webpage at (link)
https://https://fs.usda.gov/project/?project=50516

Comments can be submitted through the virtual public meeting room that is being used in lieu of in-person public meetings due to the COVID-19 pandemic. That can be found at (link)
https://stibnite.consultation.ai

Written comments can be mailed to the Payette Supervisor Linda Jackson at 500 Mission St., Building 2, McCall, Idaho 83638. Comments are not being accepted in person due to the pandemic.

Only substantive comments that raise questions about specific elements of the draft study or Midas Gold’s proposal will be taken into consideration into the Payette’s drafting of a final study.

Analysis of the alternatives in the draft study will be further refined and could change before a “preferred alternative” is defined in the final environmental study, which is tentatively expected by August 2021.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission)
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Public Lands:

Boise County camping areas trashed, forcing locals to clean up after visitors

Littering and poor camping behavior is not a new problem, but the Grimes Creek area of Boise County is seeing far worse etiquette than in years past.

Joe Parris September 15, 2020 KTVB

Boise County, Idaho — As Idahoans try to escape from pandemic stress, many head to the Gem State’s beautiful outdoor recreation sights.

In popular camping areas, specifically in Boise County, the summer has been a real challenge. Visitors are simply trashing campsites, showing no regard or respect for the area, according to Emergency Manager for Boise County Bob Showalter.

“It’s been getting progressively worse every year, but this year it really seems bad,” Showalter said.

Visitors have not treated their sites with respect this summer, which lead to the temporary closure for a part of Grimes Creek.

continued:
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Fire Season:

Current Fire Updates posted here:
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Deafness in dogs and cats

By Dr. Alani Delis Sept 18, 2020 IME

Deafness can be divided into several classes based on the specific problem: conductive, sensorineural, central-mediated, or presbycusis.

Conductive hearing loss results from the failure of sound energy to be translated into mechanical energy by the ear structures. This may be caused by chronic ear infections, ear wax impaction, foreign bodies (like grass awn or foxtails), cancer, or trauma. This type of hearing loss can occur at any age, depending on the underlying cause.

Sensorineural hearing loss is caused by loss of electrical energy transfer from the cochlea (the inner ear). This is caused by a genetic defect seen in animals with white coat color with blue eyes in both dogs and cats. It also affects numerous purebred dogs, such as the Dalmation, Australian blue heeler, English setter, Argentine dogo, bull terrier, Australian shepherd, Jack Russel terrier, and Cavalier King Charles spaniel.

continued:
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Hunters with bear spray survive attack in Island Park

Sept 18, 2020 Local News 8

Island Park, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Idaho Department of Fish and Game report an archery hunter was attacked by a bear while pursuing elk Friday morning in a remote area of the Caribou-Targhee National Forest south of Two Top Mountain in Island Park.

The victim and his hunting companion encountered the bear from a close distance while in thick brush.

Though not confirmed by Fish and Game, the hunters described the bear as a grizzly.

Both hunters carried bear spray and were able to successfully deploy it during the attack.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

World Center for Birds of Prey reopens, no Fall Flights this year

By Jessica Taylor Sep 18, 2020

Though the World Center for Birds of Prey has been closed to the public since March, the staff has been hard at work taking care of endangered birds–most recently adding 26 California Condors to the center, escaping the dangerous smoke and flames.

Now, it’s open back up to the public.

“It’s been since the middle of March that we’ve been closed, and I know a lot of the staff and even the birds thrive on interaction with people, so to have people here again is a really heartwarming thing,” said director Tate Mason.

continued:
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Record number of natural spawning salmon return to Pettit Lake

Twenty-six fish released into the lake on Wednesday

Tony Evans Sept 18, 2020 IME

Despite many challenges that lie ahead, the Snake River sockeye recovery program got a boost on Wednesday when 26 naturally spawned salmon returned to their birthplace at Pettit Lake after a four-year journey.

That is far more than have returned in over 20 years.

Many millions of dollars have been spent since 1995 to recover this endangered species, including the use of fish hatcheries to artificially spawn thousands of sockeye and release them into Redfish and Pettit Lakes in the Sawtooth Basin. Some fish are tagged with electronic devices so they can be tracked during migration.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

ATV Users: Know Where You Can Travel Before You Go

By Evin Oneale, Regional Communications Manager
Wednesday, September 16, 2020

A common complaint heard every hunting season by Idaho Fish and Game (IDFG) officers and biologists involves the violation of motorized vehicle restrictions. Few things are more frustrating for hunters than to rise well before sunup, hike to a favorite hunting spot – in a motorized restricted area – and just as the sun peeks over the horizon, hear a motorized vehicle approaching.

With 2020 hunting seasons in full swing, it is important for hunters to know where they can and cannot operate a motorized vehicle on US Forest Service (USFS) lands. To assist with this, the USFS publishes free motor vehicle use maps in various media formats.

continued:
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Porphyry Fire Could Impact Middle Fork Zone Elk Hunters

By Evin Oneale, Regional Communications Manager
Friday, September 11, 2020

It’s hard to pronounce and could prove to be a headache for Middle Fork Zone elk hunters. The Porphyry wildfire, burning north of Yellow Pine in portions of Game Management Units 20A and 26, has led to closures on portions of the Payette National Forest.

While the road from Yellow Pine to Big Creek and beyond remains open, a large area north of the Elk Creek Road (west of Big Creek) is now closed, limiting access to unit 20A.

Holders of Middle Fork Zone elk tags can play the waiting game, but do have the option of exchanging their tags for another available elk tag. The exchange must occur prior to the season opener on September 15th.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Portions of Andrus WMA Now Closed due to Wildfire

By Evin Oneale, Regional Communications Manager
Tuesday, September 15, 2020

Effective immediately, that portion of Andrus Wildlife Management Area (WMA) north and east of Highway 71 is closed to all public entry due to wildfire and public safety concerns.

The Woodhead Fire – which started on September 7th – has grown to more than 68,000 acres and burned across more than 5,000 acres of Andrus WMA. Fire crews continue to battle the blaze and access to the fire from Andrus WMA property is vital to the effort.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Bald eagle shows air superiority, sends $950 drone into lake

by The Associated Press Thursday, August 13th 2020


Scott Mason/The Winchester Star via AP

Escanaba, Mich. (AP) — A bald eagle launched an aerial assault on a drone operated by the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy — known as EGLE — ripping off a propeller and sending the aircraft into Lake Michigan.

The attack happened July 21, when the drone was mapping shoreline erosion near Escanaba in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula to document and help communities cope with high water levels, the department said in a statement.

Environmental quality analyst and drone pilot Hunter King said he had completed about seven minutes of the mapping flight when satellite reception became spotty.

King pressed a button to return the $950 drone to him and was viewing his video screen when the drone began to twirl.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

CovidWorkHome2-a
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Press Release September 18, 2020

Yellow Pine Idaho Fire Update & Village Status

The Village requests no outside visitors or additional volunteers during the next 24 hours.

The Village is currently connected with USFS with regular updates on the Buck fire.

High-risk fire behavior could pose a threat to the Village today, expected to be alleviated tomorrow

Yellow Pine, Idaho — — The Buck fire conditions are favorable for large fire growth and extreme fire behavior.

“We are requesting no additional volunteers at this time,” Deb Filler, Village Spokeswoman. “If an evacuation is ordered today, we want to limit any incoming traffic to both South Fork road and Lick Creek approach. We will be updating via social media channels throughout the day today”.

The Buck fire is currently over 19,139 acres with only 6% containment and active growth overnight. It has the potential today to make an approach in the direction of the Village of Yellow Pine. Fire crews are actively managing the fire outside of Village with both ground and air support.

The Yellow Pine Fire District, the volunteer fire department for the town, is the only asset assigned to protect the town. To have assistance from the USFS and County assets the Village would have to pay 50% of the costs, which is not fiscally possible. The 100% volunteer team consists of a handful of residents, most of whom are seniors, and retired seasoned forest fire leaders to help prepare and protect the 110+ residence in the Village and mitigate as much of the risk as possible.

The Village is thankful for the outpouring of support and offers of assistance. Donations will be directed to a fundraising campaign launching shortly.

For Additional Information or Press inquiries, please contact: Deb Filler, Village of Yellow Pine Spokeswoman: villageofyellowpine @ gmail.com [take out spaces.]


Sept 13, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 13, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order until further notice.

Community Calendar:

April 17 – Boil water order issued
May 15 – Firewood Season starts
June 16 – Hard closure of South Fork Road (weekdays)
Aug 11 – Valley County Mask Order
Aug 12 – Firewood Permits at The Corner
Sept 8 – Hwy 55 work starts
Sept 22 – Planned Power outage 945am-245pm
(details below)
———-

From Valley County

Valley County Mask-Up
A county-wide mask mandate was approved the CDH August 11th, and is now in effect for Valley County. (link)

We need Your Help to protect the place and the people we all Love.
link:

Valley County Covid-19 Response Page
link:

Valley County Emergency Operations Center
link:

Rebound – Idaho Governor’s phasing program
link:

COVID 19: Recommendations and Resources for Safe Business Practices
link: (lots of info for businesses)
——————-

Local Events:

Highway 55 Work starts Tuesday, Sept 8, 2020

Fall (September through November) and Spring (March through May)
– Daytime and nighttime work seven days a week
– Full road closures Monday through Thursday from 10:00am to 2:00pm
– One-way alternating traffic during all other time frames
———-

Village News:

Monday Storm

Monday, Sept 7th a storm blew thru the area. Reports of trees down From Wapiti Meadow to Big Creek. Looks like a few went down on the Yellow Pine Country Club. At least we got some rain out of it, 0.05″ total.

Other areas had stronger damaging winds and power outages. According to the Star-News a tree took the power line down across Hwy 55 up by New Meadows, resulting in power outages.
— — — —

M 4.4 Aftershock Felt in Yellow Pine Tuesday

At 224pm Tuesday, Sept 8th we felt a jolt and heard a rumble. Folks up Johnson Creek felt it too.

Link: to USGS event

Also a M 3.9 was felt by folks on Johnson Creek at 223pm.

Link: to USGS event
— — — —

Life Flight Tuesday

On Sept 8th Life Flight landed at the helipad at 6pm and shut down, took off at 651pm.
— — — —

Fire Reported Wednesday between Amos Road and the EFSF River

A report that a fire was discovered west of the village of Yellow Pine along the west side of the river north of the East Fork bridge (human caused?) Wednesday evening, September 9th. It was successfully contained and extinguished by Ronnie Earl, Matt Huber, and Tim Rogers. The forest service was notified by Matt (that was the helicopter hovering west of town) and they came to check it out. There were no injuries and minimal damage to the forest.

First hand account: “The fire was west of the river between Scott’s driveway and the river, likely a cigarette butt not a campfire. The fire was smoldering when Paula called and by the time we made it there it was actively burning into dead and down trees and partially torching a few trees. We used the old BLM heavy to knock it down then cut line around it, tying into rocks and the river. We mopped up multiple hot spots this morning [Sept 10] and the Krassel Rappel crew cold-trailed the entire fire today with no hot spots found. The fire was about 1/10 of an acre. A really good catch and thanks are owed to Paula for calling it in, a few more minutes and we likely would have lost it and easily spotted across to the golf course.” – MH

20200909YPFire1-a

20200909YPFire2-a

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Fire reports are posted at the website as they come in here:
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Idaho Power

September 9th: the contractor was busy taking down the last of the power poles from Antimony Camp to Yellow Pine and was picking up miscellaneous insulators and cables from the power lines. – LI

On Tuesday, Sept. 22nd at 945am the power will be turned off for approximately 5 hours (until around 245pm) for power line maintenance. There are some hazard trees near the power lines they want to take down and need to drop the lines in order to safely remove those trees. You will received an automated phone message about 5 days before this planned outage.

They have not yet switched us over to the new underground lines yet, we will get advanced notice for that outage.
— — — —

Flu Shots Saturday

Tom Reinhardt from Cascade Medical Center came to YP to talk about Telehealth and brought Flu vaccines with him. Ann Forster was kind enough to administer the “jabs” to locals after the VYPA meeting.
— — — —

Johnson Creek Road Saturday

On Saturday, Sept 12, a report that Johnson Creek road was closed for a spell. The report indicated that a semi coming down the hill had overheated brakes and it caught the tires on fire, blocking the entire road. The driver was OK and self-rescued. A report from Cascade Ranger Jake Strohmeyer: “The truck and lowboy were moved up to the first wide spot. I drove through there at around 4pm today.”
— — — —

Sunday Smoke

Sunday morning, Sept 13, we had really thick smoke, socked in down to the valley floor, low visibility and very hazardous air quality.

From the YP Webcam at 945am.
20200913YellowPine-NW-a
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Boil Water Order issued April 17 still in effect.

No update for August.

Update July 5: the boil order is in effect due to extremely high use due to leaks.

Update June 12: The boil order is still on. We still are experiencing excessive water use because of leaks. Not sure when this will be lifted. We are applying for grants to repair the system.

Update June 2: The water plant is experiencing high water in Boulder Creek which brings more debris into the sand filter.

The high demand caused by leaks in the system plugs the sand filters prematurely. We will be on a boil order until further notice.
— — — —

2020 Census

The 2020 Census Impacts All Valley County Residents

Hurry and complete the census, the deadline has been moved up to September 30th.

It is recommended that we all fill out the census online.

If you spend 50% of your time in Valley County, you can consider it your home per the Census. Where you register with the Census is confidential and never linked to other governmental requirements such as property taxes or mailing address.

Link: to online census

You do not need an ID number. Go to the link. Click on “start questionnaire”. Then on the next page scroll down to “If you do not have a Census ID, click here” – when you click on that line it will start the census. (see below)

2020Census-a
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Critters

West Nile has been found in Ada, Canyon and Gem county mosquitoes.

Be Bear Aware

* Keep all household garbage secured in a garage or other enclosed area.
* Leftovers or discarded fish or meat bones give off a strong odor and should be stored in your freezer until you haul the garbage to the transfer station.
* Keep attractants like B-B-Q grills, bird seed or pet food stored where bears cannot find them.
* Bird feeders should be taken down May through October or placed well out of reach of bears.

Be Mountain Lion Aware

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020. This could last until leaks are repaired.

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance.

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020

Notice of Intent to File an Application with USDA, Rural Development

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an Application with USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG). Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG).

If any additional information is needed, please contact:
Willie Sullivan
Treasurer
ypwater @ gmail.com

Distributed to Yellow Pine Water Users Association customers via Yellow Pine Times on June 12, 2020.

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

Next VYPA meeting September 12 at 2pm

Minutes from August 8, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Printable Letter of Interest to be a Community Representative
link:

Minutes from July 11, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from June 13, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

July 1 – Post Harmonica Meeting 2pm Community Hall
Note: at each meeting we simply add to info on the topic. That way, info from all meetings is included in a single document.
Link to notes:

Heat was installed in the community hall on April 30th.

VYPA meeting schedule for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.
— — — —

YPFD News:

There was a YP Fire Commissioner meeting on June 27, 2020 at 10am at the Fire Station.
Link: 20200627 Fire Dept minutes June 27

YPFD COVID19 Policy

link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP

link: Covid-19 EMS (May 23)

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Bring It, Don’t Burn It”, you can take your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
(TBA) – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Open 11am-8pm Closed Tuesdays. Calling ahead works best but not a huge deal. Groceries, Ice Cream, Beer and Soda. Our menu fluctuates but typically have Smoked Brisket, Tri Tip, Chicken, Burgers and Wings on hand.
Starting Aug 12th Firewood Permits at The Corner
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Open Daily 8am to 10pm. Outside Dining and Bar. Breakfast and Bar Food.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open.
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300

The store is open now and will be open into October. Hours are 9 am to 6 pm Tuesday through Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday.
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins (208) 633-6677

Cabins are not available in 2020. RV Spaces $25/night; $150/week; $300/month. Tent spaces $10/night. Shower house is closed for 2020.
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Sept 7) overnight low of 42 degrees, clear sky above yucky smoke (bad air quality) and light breezes. Low flying loud airplanes and street traffic this morning. Jays and nutcrackers calling. Mostly cloudy and breezy at lunch time. Wind gusting up early afternoon. Better air quality by mid-afternoon, gusty breezes and mostly (dark) clouds with mild temperatures, high of 77 degrees. Pine siskin and a few finches visiting. Windy afternoon, temperature dropping and a 40 minute rain shower late afternoon. Still windy early evening, much better air quality, chilly and short light rain shower. Quiet evening. Cool, breezy and mostly cloudy at dusk. Some stars out before midnight. Gusty breezes after midnight and partly clear.

Tuesday (Sept 8) overnight low of 32 degrees, yesterday’s rain total = 0.05″, clear sky and great air quality with chilly breezes this morning. Sounds like the crusher is running up on the hill, lots of clanging and backup beepers. A few finches visiting and nutcrackers calling from the trees. Smoky haze building up to the south east and breezy after lunch time. Aftershock jolted at 224pm. Cool and light breezes mid-afternoon, clear sky with haze of smoke to the west, high of 67 degrees. Life Flight landed at the helipad at 6pm and shut down, took off at 651pm. Cool, light breeze and getting smoky mid-evening. A little thicker smoke settling in at dusk, no clouds, cool and calm. Hazy before midnight.

Wednesday (Sept 9) overnight low of 28 degrees, “clear” sky, haze of smoke, crappy air quality this morning. Smoky haze, light breezes, cool and no clouds at noon. Mail truck was on time. Warmer, better air quality, clear sky and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 82 degrees. Quiet evening. Early evening a lot of smoke along the EFSF river – fire between Amos Road and the river, VanMeter hill barely visible and a big smoke plume to the south. Poor air quality and pleasant temperature mid-evening. Around 715pm a low helicopter circled over the village a few times and left. Smoky haze at dusk and poor air quality. Thicker smoke after midnight.

Thursday (Sept 10) overnight low of 34 degrees, no clouds and thick smoke obscuring the mountains, hazardous air quality. A few early airplanes and the crusher is running. Extremely smoky at lunch time, can’t see the hills. Thinner smoke early afternoon, can see the ridges thru the haze, large smoke cloud building to the south. By mid to late afternoon the air quality had improved to ‘poor’ – lighter haze of smoke, warm and slight breeze, high of 87 degrees. To the south up Johnson Creek the “notch” has a big cloud of smoke. Clark’s nutcracker calling from the trees. A little better air quality mid-evening, haze of smoke in the air and big cloud of smoke to the south up Johnson Creek, light breezes and warm. At dusk it appeared to be clear above a haze of smoke, rather poor air quality and calm. A few bright stars peeking thru the haze before midnight.

Friday (Sept 11) overnight low of 35 degrees, light breeze no clouds and thick smoke to the south and east, blue sky to the north and hazardous air quality. Crusher up on the hill running. Totally smoked in before lunch time, low visibility and hazardous air quality. Quiet day, only one airplane during the heat of the early afternoon. Gusty breezes and lighter smoke, a little better air by mid-afternoon and improved visibility, high of 88 degrees. By mid-evening better air quality, light haze of smoke, warm and light breezes. Jays and nutcrackers calling. Cooling off, light haze of smoke and clear sky at dusk. Smoky before midnight, a few anemic looking stars.

Saturday (Sept 12) overnight low of 35 degrees, no clouds, thick smoke to the south and thinner to the north – hazardous air quality and light breeze. Jays and nutcrackers calling. Totally smoked in by lunch time, very bad air quality and low visibility. Light weekend traffic. Village meeting day. Warm, smoky and light breeze mid-afternoon, visibility somewhat better, high of 89 degrees. Nuthatches calling from the trees closer to the river. Still warm mid-evening, increasing to moderate smoke and light breezes. Smoke settling in at dusk, poor air quality. Bat flitting about and pine squirrel scolding. Thicker smoke before midnight.

Sunday (Sept 13) overnight low of 38 degrees, probably no clouds, very thick smoke this morning – socked in down to the valley floor, low visibility and the sun looked like an orange blob to the east, very hazardous air quality. At lunch time the smoke was thicker, very limited visibility and the sun is not casting any shadows. Cooler without the warmth of the sun mid-afternoon, high of 84 degrees, and slightly thinner smoke – can barely see the outline of Gold Gate but VanMeter, Antimony and Johnson Creek ridges are invisible, very bad air quality. Warm and thinner smoke mid-evening and calm, can see the ridges thru the haze, air quality is still bad. The smoke plume from the Buck Fire has traveled north – you can see it stretching behind Golden Gate ridge north towards Vibika creek. Clark’s nutcrackers calling from the trees.

Sept 13 Smoke 945am

——————–

Idaho News:

333 new Idaho COVID-19 cases Friday, 5 new deaths

Sept 11, 2020 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 333 new COVID-19 cases and 5 new deaths on Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March to 34,950.

There are a total of 32,228 confirmed cases and 2,722 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state.

… 5 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 412.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County changed to ‘green” by health department

Schools wary about changing to all in-person classes

By Tom Grote for The Star-News September 10, 2020

Valley County’s COVID-19 health status was changed from “yellow” to “green” on Tuesday by Central District Health.

But the superintendents of the county’s two school districts said they are in no hurry to change to full-time in-person schooling for all students.

Valley County recorded less than five new cases during the two weeks up to Aug. 30, which allowed the status to be changed, health district Public Information Officer Christine Myron said.

The change in status does not mean the countywide mandatory mask order imposed Aug. 11 by the health district board will be lifted, Myron said.

… Total Cases Now 118

The total number of positive COVID-19 cases in Valley County reached 118 cases on Tuesday, up just one case from 117 a week ago, health officials said.

St. Luke’s McCall reported 94 total positive cases from testing done at the hospital, the same as a week ago.

Cascade Medical Center reported 21 positive cases, up one from the 20 cases reported last week.

In addition, the private testing cooperative Crush the Curve has found three confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Valley County with no change in the past week.

Nearly all of the positive cases reported by the hospitals were found following the start of the summer visitor season in mid-June.

Central District Health reported 80 of the positive cases were confirmed to be Valley County residents as of Tuesday, up two cases from 78 cases reported a week ago.

The difference between the hospital figures and the health department figures are those who tested positive but did not declare Valley County as their residence.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

M-D trustees require face masks inside schools at all times

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 10, 2020

Wearing face masks will be mandatory for all students, staff and visitors inside every school in the McCall-Donnelly School District, the M-D board of trustee decided last week.

“This action item provides consistency and clarity,” M-D Superintendent Jim Foudy said of the action taken at a special meeting last Thursday. “Our goal is to keep our students, staff and community safe amidst this pandemic,”

Trustees voted unanimously to amend the district’s pandemic operation plan, which previously aligned with guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, that lists face coverings as “optional” or “expected.”

“I know it’s not easy sometimes for people to take this stance but I think it’s an important stance to take,” trustee Heidi Galyardt said.

“I think we need to be showing kids what we feel is good health and being good to each other by wearing a mask,” Galyardt said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Tamarack Resort extends summer season

by CBS2 News Staff Friday, September 11th 2020

Donnelly, Idaho (CBS2) — There’s still plenty of time to head up to the mountains.

On Friday, Tamarack Resort said it’s extending its summer season beyond this weekend. The resort says its bike bark and chair lifts will operate two additional weekends (Sept. 19-20 and 26-27) from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.

The resort’s zip line will also take reservations through Halloween.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Windstorm topples trees, cuts power Monday night

The Star-News September 10, 2020

A windstorm toppled a tree across Idaho 55 and power lines on Monday night at about 8:08 p.m. about three miles east of New Meadows, Meadows Valley Fire & EMS said

Crews worked to clear the tree from the roadway about an hour after it fell across the roadway, the fire department said.

Power was restored by 12:17 a.m. Tuesday morning to about 87 residences in the Old Meadows area, an Idaho Power spokesperson said.

The McCall Police Department and Donnelly Fire and EMS also reported downed trees in McCall and Donnelly, but road closures and damage was minimal.

Monday’s windstorm had average winds of about 20 miles per hour, with gusts up to nearly 40 miles per hour, according to the National Weather Service’s McCall weather station.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Hwy 55 – Correction

The Star-News September 10, 2020

A story in The Star-News last week incorrectly said four-hour closures of Idaho 55 north of Smith Ferry would begin on Tuesday to allow for blasting as part of an improvement project.

Blasting and full road closures are expected to begin later this month. When they occur, the closures will be between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays.

However, one-lane, alternating traffic with up to 15-minute delays should be expected at all times until a winter pause in work in mid-November.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

4.4 magnitude earthquake hits northeast of Lowman

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, September 8th 2020

A 4.4 magnitude earthquake has been reported in the Lowman area.

The United States Geological Survey reports the quake hit about 23 miles northeast of the small mountain town at about 2:24 p.m. Tuesday.

Central Idaho has been rattling for months now after a record-setting 6.5 magnitude quake hit near Stanley back on March 31. The big one was felt all over Idaho and throughout the region.

Also on Tuesday, the Associated Press reported that the stability of some caves at the Craters of the Moon National Monument are being threatened thanks to all the seismic activity.

source:
— —

6 earthquakes hit near Stanley

The USGS reports that the largest earthquake struck about 20 miles away from Lowman at about 2:30 p.m.

September 8, 2020 KTVB


Credit: USGS

Multiple earthquakes ranging from 2.7-magnitude to 4.4-magnitude hit near Stanley on Tuesday afternoon.

continued:
——————–

Letter to Share:

Write-in Candidate for Valley County’s District 1 Commissioner Seat

On September 2nd, Joshua Hurley of Smiths Ferry, announced his candidacy as a write-in candidate for Valley County’s District 1 Commissioner seat. Josh Hurley will be challenging the incumbent, Elt Hasbrouck in an uphill write-in campaign.

“From what I know of write-in campaigns, it is very rare to actually win. But, with this latest extension of big government into the homes, schools and churches of my fellow Valley County residents, spearheaded by Elt Hasbrouck, I felt compelled to do something. I can’t stand by. So, I’m putting myself out there in a small community and I’m going to work very hard to win.” Mr. Hurley said.

Mr. Hurley is 34 years old, a native-born Idahoan, and a self-described small government conservative. “Valley County is big and diverse. We have locally elected city councils, school boards, and other cooperative groups that work together for their communities. We need to empower these at the lowest possible level to meet the needs of their local communities as they see fit. We need to use the resources of the County to be visionary and to get ahead of some of these challenging issues like public lands, youth advocacy, roads, and housing.”

Mr. Hurley touts his years working for the state government in Corrections, as an Idaho State Police Trooper for almost 7 years, and in the public schools as his experience that makes him qualified for the job. “You know, I’ve run my own business in an actual brick and mortar space. I’ve started several online businesses over the years. I know the struggle of the private sector in these times. But, I’ve also worked in state government for almost 9 years. This gives me a great balance to be able to understand the law, how it applies, and how we can use it to shape Valley County’s future and to let Idahoans be free in their pursuit of life, liberty, and happiness.”

more info:
———————–

Mining News:

Valley County Notice of Public Hearing

Appeal of C.U.P. 20-12 Stibnite Gold Project Logistics Facility

Monday, September 14th at 2pm at the Valley County Courthouse

Social distancing will be required, requiring telephonic testimony and/or limited access. Please call for further information.

Written comments must be received by mail, fax, or email no later than 5:00 p.m., September 8, 2020.

To listen to the hearing, please go to (link) and click on link labeled “Watch Commissioner Meetings Live” Instructions will be provided.

To comment telephonically or in-person, call 208-382-7102 prior to 5:00 p.m. September 11, 2020 -OR- email dmiller@co.valley.id.us until testimony is opened.

(via FB)
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct. 13 deadline noted for comments on Stibnite gold mine project

The Star-News Sept 10, 2020

Public comments on the draft environmental study of Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite Gold Project are being accepted by the Payette National Forest until 5 p.m. on Oct. 13.

The entire draft study can be viewed by clicking on the “Analysis” tab on the Payette Forest’s project webpage at (link).

Comments can be submitted through the virtual public meeting room that is being used in lieu of in-person public meetings due to the COVID-19 pandemic. That can be found at (link).

Written comments can be mailed to the Payette Supervisor Linda Jackson at 500 Mission St., Building 2, McCall, Idaho 83638. Comments are not being accepted in person due to the pandemic.

Only “substantive” comments that raise questions about specific elements of the draft study or Midas Gold’s proposal will be taken into consideration into the Payette’s drafting of a final study.

Analysis of the alternatives in the draft study will be further refined and could change before a “preferred alternative” is defined in the final environmental study, which is tentatively expected by August 2021.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. • All rights reserved
— — — — — — — — — —

Stibnite project could hurt salmon, bull trout

Water temps would rise under all alternatives

(NOTE: This is the third in a series detailing the draft federal study of the proposed Stibnite Gold Project. Public Comment is due by Oct. 13. Next Week: Mine Access)

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Sept 10, 2020

Rising water temperatures in the East Fork South Fork Salmon River due to Midas Gold’s Stibnite Gold Project would pose the greatest threat to endangered fish species, according to the Payette National Forest.

The chinook salmon and bull trout could both be harmed by water temperature increases under all project alternatives weighed in the Payette’s draft environmental study of the proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine.

However, additional measures to reduce water temperature increases have been submitted by Midas Gold for evaluation in the final environmental study expected by next August.

The East Fork downstream of Stibnite would be about 8 degrees Fahrenheit warmer under each of the four alternatives, with varying temperature changes in mine site creeks and streams that flow into the East Fork.

That would put maximum average water temperatures in the summer in the lower East Fork at about 67 degrees, or below the state standard of 70 degrees for chinook salmon.

State standards set 55 degrees as the maximum average summer water temperature for bull trout, though most of the waterways at Stibnite do not currently meet that standard.

Bull trout and chinook salmon are both protected under the Endangered Species Act, which flags about 27 total miles of Stibnite waterways as important habitat for the fish.

Increased water temperatures stress fish and could ultimately alter fish behavior, feeding, migratory patterns and spawning, and could even result in disease or death, the draft study said.

Water temperatures are expected to gradually improve over time after mining as new plants shade rehabbed waterways and streamflow is not sapped into recovering groundwater.

Alternative 2 would raise water temperatures the least due to changes to the original plan that would redirect water to reduce streamflow losses observed during water studies of Alternative 1.

Alternative 3 would increase East Fork water temperatures more than other alternatives due to the relocation of the tailings storage area.

The draft study ranks Alternative 4 as the worst for fish habitat due to increased risk of spills into Johnson Creek, which the primary mine access would follow under the alternative.

East Fork Tunnel

Currently, about 25 miles of bull trout habitat and 6.5 miles of chinook salmon habitat are blocked where the East Fork flows through the Yellow Pine Pit, which currently is a lake.

Upstream fish passage has been blocked at the pit since mining operations in the 1930s, but would be restored via a mile-long tunnel, under Alternatives 1, 2 and 3.

The tunnel would be used to re-route the East Fork around the Yellow Pine Pit to allow Midas Gold to pump water out of the pit to extract an estimated 2.5 million ounces of gold, 4 million ounces of silver and 86 million pounds of antimony.

Alternative 4 would still see the tunnel built to divert the river, but it would not be designed for fish passage due to uncertain benefits and consequences, the draft study said.

All alternatives would see the tunnel closed after mining, with the restored East Fork channel accommodating fish passage.

Lake Habitat

The existing Yellow Pine Pit lake serves as habitat for up to 48 juvenile chinook salmon and up to 104 bull trout, according to population surveys in the draft study.

But the pit lake, which the East Fork flows through, would not remain under any of the alternatives to the project, erasing the site’s most prominent scar from past mining operations.

Currently, the pit lake traps coarse sediment that provides quality salmon spawning habitat while passing fine sediment that ruins spawning habitat further down the East Fork.

Over the last 80 years, the pit lake’s depth has been reduced to 35 feet due to about 90 feet of sediment that has collected from upstream.

The restored river channel would provide fish habitat after mining operations, while a pit lake along Meadow Creek would form from the Hangar Flats Pit, one of three open pit mines proposed at Stibnite.

Meadow Creek would be connected to the Hangar Flats pit lake under Alternatives 1, 3 and 4 to replace the lake habitat lost by eliminating the existing Yellow Pine pit lake.

However, water studies showed warm water temperatures in the lake could impede fish movement and warm downstream water.

Alternative 2 would permanently divert Meadow Creek around the eventual pit lake to minimize warming of downstream water.

Tailings and Waste Rock

Lined storage areas designed to prevent lingering metals from escaping waste rock and tailings would permanently block upstream fish habitat in upper Meadow Creek, under Alternatives 1, 2 and 4.

The creek would be diverted around the storage areas during operations, then be re-established in lined channels on top of the piles once mining ends.

But gradients of 20% or more in the streams flowing down the 400-foot tailings dam would permanently block upstream fish passage to about 5.7 miles of fish habitat, the draft study said.

That would include 3.4 miles of critical habitat for chinook salmon and 2.9 miles of critical habitat for bull trout.

Under Alternative 3, 100 million tons of tailings and 81 million tons of waste rock would be relocated to the upper East Fork valley.

Similar to the other alternatives, steep gradients would permanently block upstream fish passage into the East Fork.

That would eliminate about 4.3 miles of critical habitat for chinook salmon and 7.4 miles of critical habitat for bull trout.

However, the habitat in Meadow Creek lost under Alternatives 1, 2, and 4 would remain under Alternative 3.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. • All rights reserved
——————-

Public Lands:

Outdoors group helps Payette build fences to reduce erosion

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 10, 2020

The Idaho chapter of the Backcountry Hunters and Anglers organization partnered with the Payette National Forest last month on a project to reduce erosion and improve wildlife habitat near No Business Lookout.

The nonprofit group helped construct a dozen barricades to block off unauthorized routes near the No Business Lookout and Five Corners intersection about 15 miles east of Council.

“The barriers are made of native materials and are designed to withstand the snow loads at these high elevation sites for several years at a time,” Payette Public Information Intern Cody Allred said.

Damage has been done to the area for years by people leaving authorized roads and trails in their vehicles, she said.

The group installed signs at each barricade and plans to do more work in the fall to complement the barricades and rehabilitate the area over the long term.

“The hope is that, with additional treatment to help vegetation establish and reduce erosion, the unauthorized trails where barriers were placed will recover by the time the barriers deteriorate,” Allred said.

By reducing soil erosion and fostering native vegetation, the project should benefit wildlife and provide a higher quality experience for hunters traveling on foot, she said.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. • All rights reserved
— — — — — — — — — —

Tour of forest projects near Cascade set for Wednesday

The Star-News September 10, 2020

A tour of about 6,000 acres of the Boise National Forest near Cascade scheduled for rehabilitation will be held on Wednesday.

The tour of the Skunk Creek and Fawn Tussock projects will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Wednesday.

Those who wish to attend should arrive at 9 a.m. Wednesday at the Cascade Ranger District office at 540 N. Main St. in Cascade and provide their own lunch, water, transportation, COVID-19 protective gear and a hardhat.

The Skunk Creek project is about 12 miles southeast of Cascade while the Fawn Tussock project is about seven miles southwest of Cascade. Each project covers about 3,000 acres.

The areas have been infested with insect and diseases, including Douglas fir tussock moth, dwarf mistletoe, western spruce budworm and Douglas-fir beetle.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreak over the last few years has killed a large number of trees in the area, a Boise Forest news release said.

The forest plans to use prescribed burning and logging to reduce fuels and improve forest resistance to insects and disease.

Current roads in the area will be improved while temporary roads built to allow access to the area will be removed. The project is scheduled to start next June.

For questions, call Jim Bishop at 208-382-7442.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

How an increase in people camping during the pandemic is impacting Idaho’s forests

By Lynsey Amundson Sep 10, 2020 KIVI

Camping is a great way to get out of town and see the beauty of Idaho, all while staying safe during the pandemic, but the increase in campers is starting to impact forest lands.

“Down in the Lost Valley area, it’s experiencing five times the amount of people than what they usually do,” said Payette National Forest Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris. “That’s one we know for sure, but it applies to almost every place around the forest.”

The increase in people is also leading to an increase in trash left in and around campsites.

“It’s a lot of first-time campers that are unaware of camping etiquette,” said Harris.

continued:
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Fire News:

Amos Road Fire

A report that a fire was discovered west of the village of Yellow Pine along the west side of the river north of the East Fork bridge (human caused?) Wednesday evening, September 9th. It was successfully contained and extinguished by volunteers from Yellow Pine. The forest service sent a crew to mop up and cold trail the next morning. More info in Village News.
— — — —

Buck Fire
11 miles south of YP
InciWeb:
— — — —

Porphyry Fire
20 miles north of YP
InciWeb:
— — — —

Grouse Fire
Southeast of Featherville
InciWeb:
— — — —

Woodhead Fire
Northwest of Cambridge
InciWeb:
— — — —

Fire reports posted here:
— — — — — — — — — —

Other Fire News:

Emergency fire shelters can save lives but raise questions

By Rebecca Boone – 9/9/20 AP

After flames trapped 14 firefighters in California and they had to use last-resort fire shelters to survive, questions are emerging about how well the emergency devices work and how often crews are forced to use them during wildfires.

“They are for an extreme emergency, never to be considered as an alternative to safe firefighting,” National Interagency Fire Center spokeswoman Carrie Bilbao said Wednesday. “They’re to be used as a last resort if there’s no planned escape out or safety zones become inadequate.”

Still, the shelters have saved more than 300 firefighters since they began being used in the 1960s and became required in firefighting equipment in the late 1970s, Bilbao said.

They look like oversized silver sleeping bags, weigh about 4.5 pounds (2 kilograms) and are made of an aluminum foil-woven silica outer shell designed to withstand direct flames and 2,000 degrees (1,090 Celsius) of heat for about a minute. The shelters don’t stand up well to direct flames or longer periods of heat exposure.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

‘Evacuate now:’ Wildfires grow in Oregon

Associated Press Friday, September 11th 2020

story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Maps of wildfires burning in Oregon, California and Idaho

Use the interactive maps to see where dozens of wildfires are burning on the West Coast.

Sept 11, 2020 KTVB


Pink fire retardant covers a car at an area destroyed by the Almeda Fire, Friday, Sept. 11, 2020, in Talent, Ore. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Over 2 million acres of land in California and nearly 900,000 acres in Oregon have burned in the last several weeks as wildfires across the West Coast continue to rage. With dozens of fires burning across the west, use the interactive maps below to see where the wildfires are and how large each one is.

As of Friday, 38 fires have started in Oregon, which has killed five people so far.

In Idaho, the Woodhead Fire has burned about 40,000 acres and is only 14% contained, according to official estimates.

continued:
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Scam Alert:

BBB seeing rise in pet scams during the pandemic

By Katie Kloppenburg Sep 11, 2020 KIVI

Right now, with more people staying home, there has been a major increase in animal adoptions. But beware if you are searching online for that perfect pet.

The Better Business Bureau Scam Tracker has received more than 2,100 reports of pet scams in the last few months. That is up 700 for the same period this time last year.

BBB says scammers have been using fake websites using photos of real pets. But unfortunately, those pets are not available for adoption. So if you do turn to the internet to find a new furry family member, remember these tips.

continued:
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Letter to Share:

IDFG News Release: 2020 Upland game bird permit required to hunt pheasants at Clearwater region release sites

Folks we need to send this to everyone on your email that might hunt pheasants. These rules pertain to those that hunt on Access Yes Areas and WMA’s in Idaho. Youth do not need a permit and the mentor, if not hunting pheasants do not need a permit. But if they carry a scatter gun they will need one. If you click on all the different sights you will get the whole story. Please read the whole story. We want to get the right information out to the folks. If you see anything I missed, please add to it.

“The Pheasant Guy”
Jim Hagedorn
208-883-3423

A 2020 upland game permit is required to hunt pheasants at Clearwater region release sites this fall

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Communications Manager
Wednesday, September 2, 2020

Idaho Department of Fish & Game (IDFG) will release over 1,300 pheasants this fall at four locations throughout the Clearwater region. In addition to a hunting license, an upland game bird permit is required to hunt stocked pheasants at these regional locations. Permits are not required to hunt pheasants or any other upland game birds outside these stocked locations. The cost of the permit is $23.75 (price locked), $28.75 (non-price locked) and $51.75 (non-resident) and will be valid for six birds—multiple permits may be purchased during the season. The daily bag limit is two roosters at release sites.

continued:
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Roundworms in dogs and puppies

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Sep 11, 2020 IME

There are two species of roundworms affecting dogs and puppies. These worms can be seen if they are passed in the stool, but normally are diagnosed by looking at the stool under the microscope for the eggs of roundworms. The major species of roundworms infecting dogs is Toxocara canis. It is the most common roundworm of the domestic dog, but it is not able to infect cats. Its presence can go completely without symptoms, although more likely it is going to create some degree of diarrhea and possibly vomiting or general unthriftiness in its canine host.

An animal can become infected by consuming worm eggs from soil in the environment. An animal can also be infected by nursing from an infected mother. Another way of transmission is by consuming a prey animal that is carrying developing worms, usually rodents. During embryonic development, when an infected mother dog is pregnant, immature worms can be passed to the fetus in her uterus. Most puppies are infected this way.

continued:
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Two sightings of a mountain lion in Idaho City

by CBS2 News Staff Sunday, September 13th 2020

Boise County Emergency Management posted on social media a mountain lion was sighted twice near Idaho City. The first sighting was Thursday at 12 a.m. at the Sheriff’s office. The second sighting was around 12:30 a.m. near MM 36 on Highway 21.

Mountain lions are normally nocturnal and hunt from dusk to dawn. Boise County Emergency Management recommends keeping your pets inside at night.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Mother bear attacks bow hunters in North Idaho

The two men were able to escape after using bear spray against the female grizzly.

September 10, 2020 KTVB

Sandpoint, Idaho — A pair of hunters survived a grizzly attack after they accidentally surprised a mother bear with her cubs Wednesday morning.

The attack happened north of Sandpoint in the Apache Ridge area of the Upper Pack River drainage.

The archery hunters say they did not realize the grizzly and her cubs were nearby until they came upon her suddenly. The men used bear spray to fend off the attack, but one of the hunters was injured by the bear.

continued:
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2 grizzly bears killed after conflicts near Yellowstone

The Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks responded to 15 reports of two bears getting into garbage, approaching houses and entering campgrounds.

Associated Press September 7, 2020

Wildlife officials in Montana have said two grizzly bears were killed this week after entering an occupied tent and recreational vehicle storage compartment near Yellowstone National Park.

The Bozeman Daily Chronicle reported Friday that the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks responded to 15 reports of two bears getting into garbage, approaching houses and entering campgrounds.

Department officials said the bears were previously removed from residential areas last year but resurfaced last month.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

When Should I Take Down My Hummingbird Feeder?

by Deborah Tukua Farmer’s Almanac

Fall migration is underway for the hummingbird. Most North American hummingbird species migrate to Central America or Mexico for the winter; they travel nearly 4,000 miles—a long journey for such a tiny creature. But if you keep your feeders up, will it interfere with their migration? Will they stick around rather than take the trip nature intended?

Birds & Blooms expert Rob Ripma explains that hummingbirds migrate according to their internal, circannual rhythms and leaving the feeder up will not deter them from migrating. In fact, sugar-water feeders are important refueling stations for them along the way. Following these tips will allow you to help them on their journey south.

As hummingbirds prepare for migration, they need to feed more frequently to gain weight and store fat needed for the journey south. An increase intake of flower nectar and sugar-water from feeders will provide a weight increase of 25% to as much as 50% to help provide fuel for the migration.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

World Center for Birds of Prey takes in 26 Californian Condors fleeing Oregon wildfires

The Oregon Zoo had to relocate 44 condors from their breeding facility in Clackamas County after being placed under an evacuation order due to wildfires.

September 12, 2020 KTVB

Late Monday night, the Peregrine Fund’s World Center for Birds of Prey in Boise took in 26 Californian Condors that had to be relocated due to the wildfires that are raging in Oregon.

The center began preparing for the possibility of the 44 condors from the Oregon Zoo’s breeding facility in Clackamas County on Thursday, according to a spokesperson for the Birds of Prey. Oregon Zoo crews delivered the condors, which includes 13 adults, 6 younger birds ready for release, and 7 hatch-year birds, late Monday night.

“The center’s condor propagation experts will be providing around-the-clock care to the older birds and will carefully finish rearing the two nestlings that hatched in Oregon this spring but had not yet fledged their nests when evacuation became necessary,” an official said in a statement.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Lake Pend Orielle sets new Idaho record with 31-inch bull trout

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, September 10th 2020


Photo by Ed O’Hara courtesy of IDFG)

An angler just set a new Idaho record after catching a 31-inch bull trout in Lake Pend Oreille.

Ed O’Hara of Hayden set the latest catch-and-release state record for bull trout in Idaho with this monster. O’Hara caught it over the weekend of Aug. 29.

After a quick measurement and photograph, the record fish was released.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Angler sets Idaho record with 42-inch flathead catfish out of Snake River

by CBS2 News Staff Friday, September 11th 2020


Angler sets Idaho record with 42-inch flathead catfish out of Snake River. (Photo by Jared Holt Courtesy of IDFG)

Owyhee County, Idaho (CBS2) — A Homedale angler set the new Idaho state record after catching a 42-inch flathead catfish out of the Snake River.

Jared Holt was fishing the Snake River in Owyhee County on Sept. 6 when he landed the 42-inch long monster catfish. His new record beats the previous flathead catfish record held by Scott Turner set in 2018 by an impressive 3.5 inches!

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Nearly 3 dozen venomous snakes seized from Boise home

“We were more than a bit surprised by what we discovered,” said conservation officer Charlie Justus.

September 9, 2020 KTVB

Boise, Idaho — The Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Boise Police Department officers seized nearly three dozen venomous snakes from a Boise home after lengthy investigation.

Some were Great Basin rattlesnakes, a species native to Idaho, but many others were exotic species from Southeast Asia, Africa and Central and South America.

Officers made the discovery after serving a search warrant in Boise on Sept. 5.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Two Owyhee County residents diagnosed with Idaho’s first West Nile virus cases of 2020

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, September 9th 2020

Idaho’s first two West Nile virus cases of 2020 were diagnosed Wednesday in Owyhee County residents.

Both people are over the age of 50. One was diagnosed with West Nile fever and the other was identified through blood donor screening.

… So far this year, WNV activity has been detected in six southwest counties.

full story:
———————

Fish & Game News:

Porphyry Fire Could Impact Middle Fork Zone Elk Hunters

By Evin Oneale, Regional Communications Manager
Friday, September 11, 2020

It’s hard to pronounce and could prove to be a headache for Middle Fork Zone elk hunters. The Porphyry wildfire, burning north of Yellow Pine in portions of Game Management Units 20A and 26, has led to closures on portions of the Payette National Forest.

While the road from Yellow Pine to Big Creek and beyond remains open, a large area north of the Elk Creek Road (west of Big Creek) is now closed, limiting access to unit 20A.

Holders of Middle Fork Zone elk tags can play the waiting game, but do have the option of exchanging their tags for another available elk tag. The exchange must occur prior to the season opener on September 15th.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Fire affecting your hunting area? Here’s what you need to know

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Friday, September 11, 2020

Hunters and anyone else heading into the backcountry are advised to check with Forest Service ranger district offices or county sheriffs’ offices in their hunt area before heading out. Fire updates can be found online at: (link).

Additional fire information is available on Fish and Game’s Fire Information webpage, and the Fish and Game Hunt Planner Map Center at: (link). To display fire information on the hunt planner map, click “Turn Layers On/Off,” select “Wildfires & Closure Related Layers,” and check the boxes next to “Active Fire Report” and “Fire Emergency Closure Areas.”

Fish and Game generally doesn’t close hunts or change seasons in response to fire restrictions. Most fires do not affect an entire controlled hunt unit or elk zone for the entire duration of the hunt, so hunters have the option of hunting a different portion of the hunt area that is not affected by fires or after the fire is out.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Bird hunters encouraged to donate their wings

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Friday, September 11, 2020

Wings provide information used to better understand population trends and improves management

With many upland game bird seasons open or opening soon, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game is asking hunters to donate a fully feathered wing for each bird they harvest.

Because juvenile and adult birds molt their wing feathers differently, biologists can use this information to estimate chick production that year. For sage grouse, biologists can even tell if an adult female successfully produced chicks that year. In addition, the percentage of juveniles and adults wings collected can provide information on production rates. All of this information can help determine the status of various game bird populations and helps Fish and Game improve management.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Two fawns rescued by police officers after falling into swimming pool

by Kendra Mann, Sinclair Broadcast Group Tuesday, September 8th 2020

Pharma, Ohio (SBG) — Police officers in Ohio made a “deering” rescue!

Officers say they were called to the scene for two fawns that had fallen into a swimming pool and were fighting for their lives on Aug. 30.

The homeowner told officials she had attempted for over an hour to rescue them herself before making the desperate call.

The rescue was caught on police cam and shared by the department on Facebook. The officers are seen in the video gently roping the fawns and releasing them back into the wild. Officers say the fawns let out a “cheer” at their release.

“The deer were tired, but happy, as you can hear them let out a “cheer” of appreciation after being rescued!” the City of Parma Police Department posted on Facebook.

source:
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Seasonal Humor:

CovidCommonSense-a

SquirrelCheerleaders-a
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Sept 6, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 6, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order until further notice.

Community Calendar:

April 17 – Boil water order issued
May 15 – Firewood Season starts
June 16 – Hard closure of South Fork Road (weekdays)
Aug 11 – Valley County Mask Order
Aug 12 – Firewood Permits at The Corner
Sept 8 – Hwy 55 work starts
Sept 12 – Midas Gold 12pm–4pm Community Hall
Sept 12 – VYPA meeting at 2pm Community Hall
Sept 12 – Flu shots after 3pm Community Hall
(details below)
———-

From Valley County

Valley County Mask-Up
A county-wide mask mandate was approved the CDH August 11th, and is now in effect for Valley County. (link)

We need Your Help to protect the place and the people we all Love.
link:

Valley County Covid-19 Response Page
link:

Valley County Emergency Operations Center
link:

Rebound – Idaho Governor’s phasing program
link:

COVID 19: Recommendations and Resources for Safe Business Practices
link: (lots of info for businesses)
——————-

Local Events:

Highway 55 Work starts Tuesday, Sept 8, 2020
Fall (September through November) and Spring (March through May)
– Daytime and nighttime work seven days a week
– Full road closures Monday through Thursday from 10:00am to 2:00pm
– One-way alternating traffic during all other time frames
— — — —

Sept 12 – Flu shots after 3pm Community Hall

Flu shots will be available after the September 12th Village meeting (~3pm). Insurance usually pays 100% of the cost. If you don’t have insurance, the cost is $25, make the checks out to Cascade Medical Center.
— — — —

Assistance with Support Letters

I wanted to let you know that I will be in YP @ the community center on 9/12 from 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm to assist community members with their letters of support for the Stibnite Project.

Belinda Provancher
Community Relations Manager
Midas Gold
———-

Village News:

Golf Tournament Saturday, Sept 5th

First place mixed – the Steve & Ronda
First place women’s – Brenda & Dez
First place men’s – team Midas
Second-place mixed – the Magills
Second-place men’s – Slim & Earl
Third place men’s – Dave & Jay
Youth – Sam

20200905GolfTourney-a
photo courtesy DF

Fourteen golfers signed up to brave the smoke and have a go at the Yellow Pine Country Club’s unfair fairways. A cannon shot started the golf tourney at 1105am. Around 12pm gun shots were heard nearby (while folks were still golfing.) Gusty breezes, thick smoke and a high of 97 degrees didn’t seem to hamper the festivities.
— — — —

Holiday Weekend “Overdose” of Fun

Johnson Creek Airstrip “alcohol overdose” – photo furnished by pilots with a sense of humor (courtesy T&R)

20200905AirstripAA-a
— — — —

Smoky Weekend

Friday, Saturday and Sunday, September 4-6th, the smoke was pretty thick in Yellow Pine, almost obscuring views of the surrounding mountains.

Saturday Smoke Sept 5 at 3pm

Sunday Smoke Sept 6 at 1230pm

— — — —

Fire Traffic

Heads up folks, a report there is quite a bit of fire traffic on upper Johnson Creek road. The Buck Fire camp is at Landmark. Crews are working along Johnson Creek road reducing fuels.

Buck Fire photo taken on Johnson creek Aug 30th at 8 pm. 18 miles from Yellow Pine. – courtesy Ray Lutz
20200830BuckFireLutz-a— — — —

Boil Water Order issued April 17 still in effect.

Update July 5: the boil order is in effect due to extremely high use due to leaks.

Update June 12: The boil order is still on. We still are experiencing excessive water use because of leaks. Not sure when this will be lifted. We are applying for grants to repair the system.

Update June 2: The water plant is experiencing high water in Boulder Creek which brings more debris into the sand filter.

The high demand caused by leaks in the system plugs the sand filters prematurely. We will be on a boil order until further notice.
— — — —

2020 Census

The 2020 Census Impacts All Valley County Residents

Hurry and complete the census, the deadline has been moved up to September 30th.

It is recommended that we all fill out the census online.

If you spend 50% of your time in Valley County, you can consider it your home per the Census. Where you register with the Census is confidential and never linked to other governmental requirements such as property taxes or mailing address.

Link: to online census

You do not need an ID number. Go to the link. Click on “start questionnaire”. Then on the next page scroll down to “If you do not have a Census ID, click here” – when you click on that line it will start the census. (see below)

2020Census-a
— — — —

Critters

West Nile has been found in Ada, Canyon and Gem county mosquitoes.

Be Bear Aware

* Keep all household garbage secured in a garage or other enclosed area.
* Leftovers or discarded fish or meat bones give off a strong odor and should be stored in your freezer until you haul the garbage to the transfer station.
* Keep attractants like B-B-Q grills, bird seed or pet food stored where bears cannot find them.
* Bird feeders should be taken down May through October or placed well out of reach of bears.

Be Mountain Lion Aware

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020. This could last until leaks are repaired.

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance.

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020

Notice of Intent to File an Application with USDA, Rural Development

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an Application with USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG). Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG).

If any additional information is needed, please contact:
Willie Sullivan
Treasurer
ypwater @ gmail.com

Distributed to Yellow Pine Water Users Association customers via Yellow Pine Times on June 12, 2020.

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
— — — —

VYPA News:

Next VYPA meeting September 12 at 2pm

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Agenda
September 12, 2020 2pm; at the Community Hall
As requested by VYPA members, this meeting will be recorded and kept to a 1-hour timeframe.
Midas Gold Letter Writing Event: Noon to 4pm with break for VYPA meeting.
Agenda Item Presenter Time Comments
Call to Order Deb Filler 1 minute
Approval of Prior Meeting Minutes Deb Filler 2 minutes Please read the August 2020 minutes before the meeting to expedite approval
Telehealth Tom Reinhardt, CEO Cascade Medical Center 15 minutes
Treasurer’s Report Rhonda Egbert 2 minutes
Cemetery Written Oral Tim Rogers 2 minutes Please include progress since July and expected future projects.
Community Hall Oral Report Ronda Rogers 2 minutes Please include update on YPAC grant.
Community Hall Toilets 2 minutes Please include progress and expected completion date.
Infrastructure Oral Report Clayton Egbert 2 minutes Please include progress on Ellison St. repair.
Festival Written Report Deb Filler 1 minutes
Stibnite Advisory Council Update Lynn Imel 2 minutes
Stibnite Foundation Update Ronda Rogers 2 minutes
Review Letters of Interest and Vote for next Community Representatives Deb Filler 5 minutes
OLD BUSINESS
Update from Midas Gold Belinda Provancher (if available) 5 minutes
Update from YPWA Steve Holloway (if available) 3 minutes
NEW BUSINESS
Announcement of 2021 Festival Chairman Matt Huber 1 minute
Adjournment Continue Midas Gold Letter Writing Event
Flu Shots available after the meeting. Bring insurance info or $25 if self-pay.

Minutes from August 8, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Printable Letter of Interest to be a Community Representative
link:

Minutes from July 11, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from June 13, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

July 1 – Post Harmonica Meeting 2pm Community Hall
Note: at each meeting we simply add to info on the topic. That way, info from all meetings is included in a single document.
Link to notes:

Heat was installed in the community hall on April 30th.

VYPA meeting schedule for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.
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YPFD News:

There was a YP Fire Commissioner meeting on June 27, 2020 at 10am at the Fire Station.
Link: 20200627 Fire Dept minutes June 27

YPFD COVID19 Policy

link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP

link: Covid-19 EMS (May 23)

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Bring It, Don’t Burn It”, you can take your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
(TBA) – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Open 11am-8pm Closed Tuesdays. Calling ahead works best but not a huge deal. Groceries, Ice Cream, Beer and Soda. Our menu fluctuates but typically have Smoked Brisket, Tri Tip, Chicken, Burgers and Wings on hand.
Starting Aug 12th Firewood Permits at The Corner
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Open Daily 8am to 10pm. Outside Dining and Bar. Breakfast and Bar Food.
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open.
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Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300

The store is open now and will be open into October. Hours are 9 am to 6 pm Tuesday through Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday.
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Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins (208) 633-6677

Cabins are not available in 2020. RV Spaces $25/night; $150/week; $300/month. Tent spaces $10/night. Shower house is closed for 2020.
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Aug 31) overnight low of 45 degrees, overcast sky and the smoke is back giving us poor air quality. Rained enough to make things damp, dark clouds and breezy after lunch time. Better air quality, chilly and dark overcast mid-afternoon, high of 55 degrees. Clark’s nutcrackers calling from the trees. Cool and dark overcast mid-evening, better air quality. A few narrow cracks in the cloud cover at dusk. Looked mostly clear by midnight.

Tuesday (Sept 1) overnight low of 34 degrees, clear sky, light breeze and light haze of smoke this morning. Clark’s nutcrackers calling. Clear and gusty breezy after lunch time, warming up. Young golden mantle squirrel visited. By mid-afternoon it was warm, lighter breezes and almost clear sky, good air quality, high of 84 degrees. Some rowdy sounding traffic brapping up through the village early evening. Mostly clear, slight breeze, warm and pretty good air quality mid-evening. Clear sky at dusk, cooling off slowly, calm and good air quality. Looked like a bit of haze to the east before midnight.

Wednesday (Sept 2) 24 hour low of 39 degrees from Tuesday morning, clear sky, dew on roofs, light breeze and local smoke – poor air quality. Steller jays visiting, clark’s nutcrackers calling from trees. Warm and mostly clear at lunch time, increased smoke and poor air quality. A couple of finches visiting. Gusty breezes, hot and smoky haze early afternoon, high of 89 degrees. A few hummingbirds still around. Increasing traffic, people, kids and dogs on main street. Warm, clear, light breeze and lighter haze of smoke early evening. It appeared to be clear at dusk, a bit hazy around the edges and smoke settling in, nearly calm. Moon glow behind Golden Gate hill and a few stars out before midnight.

Thursday (Sept 3) overnight low of 42 degrees, clear sky, light breeze and smoky – poor air quality. Clark’s nutcrackers calling from the trees and a jay visiting. Hot, smoky, clear sky and light breeze at lunch time. Increasing traffic and dust. Hot, light breeze, cloudless sky and smoky haze mid-afternoon, high of 92 degrees. Clear and warm mid-evening, lighter smoke and a little better air quality. Light evening traffic. Light smoke at dusk, clear, calm and cooling off. Looked clear before midnight.

Friday (Sept 4) overnight low of 42 degrees, quite smoky this morning to the south east – crappy air quality, no clouds in the sky and some dew on the roofs. Several airplanes buzzed over this morning. Jays, nutcrackers and a few finches visiting. Hot, smoky and breezy at lunch time. Dragonflies zooming around and seeing more grasshoppers. Hot, smoky and light breezes at lunch time. Increasing street traffic. Hot, visible smoke from Buck fire – poor air quality and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 98 degrees. More weekend visitors rolling in. Still pretty hot mid-evening, no clouds, haze of smoke and poor air quality. Pine squirrel scolding from a tree. At dusk it had cooled off 20 degrees in 2 hours, no clouds, but a dirty brown smudge in the sky to the east, haze of smoke in the air. Fat waning moon came up over the ridge before midnight. Thick smoke settled in during the night.

Saturday (Sept 5) overnight low of 45 degrees, very smoky this morning (both local and out of state) hazardous air quality, dry and mostly clear sky. Heavy street and air traffic. Pine squirrel and clark’s nutcrackers calling. Cannon fired for golf tourney at 1105am. Shots fired around 12 noon (during golfing.) Hot and very smoky after lunch time, obscuring the mountains. Early afternoon breezes, hot and less smoke, high of 97 degrees. Smoke getting thicker by early evening and calmer. Loud gunshots around 630pm. Warm and very smoky at dusk, orange hue in the western sky. Murky looking before midnight.

Sunday (Sept 6) overnight low of 43 degrees, heavy smoke and hazardous air quality this morning, satellite map shows no clouds above the smoke (can’t see the sky.) Morning street traffic kicking up dust. A jay and a few finches stopped by. Shooting started just after 1130am and lasted well over an hour. Very smoky at lunch time, Golden Gate barely visible. More shots fired after 1pm. Quite a bit of air traffic early afternoon. Shooting started again before 230pm, this time it lasted under an hour. Hot, slight breeze and thinner smoke mid-afternoon, high of 92 degrees. Clear, thinner smoke and better air quality (still poor) by mid-evening and breezy.
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Idaho News:

Idaho to remain in Idaho Rebounds Stage 4; governor encourages flu shots

September 3, 2020 Local News 8 Associated Press

Governor Little announced Thursday Idaho will remain in Stage 4 for at least another two weeks.

Little said hospitalizations of those infected remain too high, but other areas, such as the positivity rate, are improving.

You can watch the press conference below.

continued:
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281 new Idaho COVID-19 cases Saturday, 2 new deaths

Sept 5, 2020 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 281 new COVID-19 cases and 2 new deaths on Saturday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March to 33,477.

There are a total of 30,999 confirmed cases and 2,478 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state.

… 2 new deaths were reported leaving the total recorded deaths at 384.

full story:
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Valley County COVID-19 cases climb to 117 since June

By Tom Grote for The Star-News September 3, 2020

The number of positive COVID-19 cases in Valley County reached 117 cases on Tuesday, up five cases from 112 a week ago, health officials said.

St. Luke’s McCall reported 94 total positive cases from testing done at the hospital since March, up four cases from 90 a week ago.

Cascade Medical Center reported 20 positive cases, the same number of cases reported the last two weeks.

In addition, the private testing cooperative Crush the Curve has found three confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Valley County, up from two reported a week ago, spokesperson Camille Blaylock said.

Nearly all of the positive cases reported by the hospitals were found following the start of the summer visitor season in mid-June.

Central District Health reported 78 of the positive cases were confirmed to be Valley County residents as of Tuesday, up three cases from 75 cases reported a week ago.

The difference between the hospital figures and the health department figures are those who tested positive but did not declare Valley County as their residence.

Valley County remained in the “yellow’ category as of Tuesday as designated by Central District Health.

The “yellow” category means there is widespread transmission of COVID-19 in the county with the potential for rapid increase in suspected cases.

Valley County has been under a mandatory order for people to wear masks in public spaces since Aug. 11, when the order was issued by the board of Central District Health.

Indoor public spaces include retail businesses, government offices, schools, and medical facilities.

Outdoor public spaces include parks, trails, streets, sidewalks and lines for entry into businesses when a distance of at least six feet cannot be maintained from any non-household member.

Adams County had 24 total confirmed cases among county residents as of Tuesday, which was no change from a week ago, according to Southwest District Health.

One death from COVID-19 has been reported locally since the pandemic reached Idaho in March. An 85-year-old McCall man died July 15 at St. Luke’s Boise hospital due to complications of COVID-19 infection.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. • All rights reserved
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McCall council extends mask order to Sept. 18

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News September 3, 2020

An order mandating masks to combat COVID-19 in the City of McCall was extended to Sept. 18 by the McCall City Council last Thursday.

McCall Mayor Bob Giles and council members Melanie Holmes, Mike Maciaszek and Colby Nielsen voted to extend the order, while council member Thom Sowers was opposed.

“When does it end?” Sowers said of mask mandates during Thursday’s meeting. “I don’t feel like we need to continue these draconian measures under the guise of safety.”

Violators of the mask order in McCall City Limits could be cited under the city’s order or under a countywide mask order by the Central District Health, city officials said.

The county mask order is punishable by a misdemeanor offense carrying up to six months in jail and a $300 fine, while the city mask order results is only a $100 citation with no criminal charge.

For more information on the mask order, visit (link)

continued:
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M-D schools to start classes Tuesday

Students to alternate days in class, at home

By Max Silverson The Star-News September 3, 2020

Classes in the McCall-Donnelly School District will begin on Tuesday with students alternating days in class and at home in an effort to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

About half of the district’s 1,400 students will attend in-person classes Tuesdays and Thursdays while the other half will attend in-person classes Mondays and Wednesday.

In-school classes on Fridays will alternate between the two groups. Students will be given assignments to be completed on their own when not attending in-person classes.

Those attending sessions will be divided by last names starting with A to L and M to Z.

continued:
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COVID-19 case confirmed at Cascade schools

No changes planned to mix of in-person, online learning

By Max Silverson The Star-News September 3, 2020

A case of COVID-19 was discovered at Cascade school last Friday, just two days after the first day of the school year.

“We were informed this afternoon that an individual within our school community has tested positive for COVID-19,” Superintendent Jeff Blaser said in a letter to parents sent on Friday.

“Health officials have worked with us and no classroom exposures took place and your student is not considered to be at any significant risk,” Blaser said.

The person who tested positive was not allowed back in the building, and about 260 students were back in session on Monday.

continued:
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Central District Health gets $1 million grant to fight opioid abuse in Valley County

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, September 1st 2020

McCall, Idaho (CBS2) — Local health officials will have $1 million at their disposal to help with the fight against opioid abuse in Valley County.

The Central District Health Department said Tuesday that the three-year federal Rural Communities Opioid Response Program Implementation Project Grant was awarded by the Health Resources and Services Administration.

Health officials will use the funds through education, outreach, and an expansion of services.

continued:
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Notice of Public Hearing for Valley County P&Z

Thursday, September 10, 2020 at 6pm at the Valley County Courthouse

Agenda to Include:

* C.U.P. 20-13 Ted’s RV Site (tabled from August 13th)
* C.U.P. 20-21 Coleman’s RV Site
* C.U.P. 20-22 Chapy’s Sawmill and Woodworks

For more information on these agenda items, please visit (link)
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Boat stuck on a sandbar in Lake Cascade causes a nightmare for owner

By Steve Dent Sep 05, 2020 KIVI

The water levels in Lake Cascade continue to drop, but as it does as hazards emerge for boaters.

A week ago, Chance Welton was cruising in his new boat when he hit a sandbar, he couldn’t see the sandbar because it was underwater.

Chance bought his new boat this summer, he called it a lifelong dream after growing up in Idaho, his father regularly took him out on the water.

continued:
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Idaho 55 closures coming this fall for major road project

Starting next week, the highway will be reduced to alternating lanes, with a total closure from Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

September 2, 2020 KTVB


Credit ITD

Smiths Ferry, Idaho — The Idaho Transportation Department will begin work to straighten curves and widen the shoulders along a section of Idaho 55 next week, a project that will result in a series of total closures of the highway.

The safety-enhancement project between Smiths Ferry and Round Valley is set to begin Sept. 8.

Idaho 55 will be fully blocked in that area every Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. this fall as crews work on blasting and rock removal.

continued:
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Tips & Advice:

Ambulance Behind Me!!

What to do?

I’ve been driving the ambulance for quite awhile now and have been on many calls. Usually when responding we’re “running code”. That’s lights and sirens. If an ambulance, fire truck or law enforcement is coming up behind you, DON’T PANIC! Find a safe place to slow down and then pull over. NEVER stop on a corner! (People do it.) If you can’t see what’s coming around the corner, neither can the emergency vehicle. Keep driving until you know the emergency vehicle can pass you safely. I promise, you won’t get in trouble if you don’t immediately stop. I’ve seen people pull off the road when it wasn’t safe and almost wreck. Extra precautions need to be taken if you’re in a motor-home or pulling a trailer. If an emergency vehicle is coming at you, you still need to slow down and safely pull over to the side of the road. If the emergency vehicle needs to go around a vehicle, they need as much room as they can get. Be safe and take care Boise County and Friends!

Boise County Emergency Management Sept 2, 2020
(via FB)
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Mining News:

Oct. 13 deadline noted for comments on Stibnite gold mine project

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News September 3, 2020

Public comments on the draft environmental study of Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite Gold Project are being accepted by the Payette National Forest until 5 p.m. on Oct. 13.

The entire draft study can be viewed by clicking on the “Analysis” tab on the Payette Forest’s project webpage at (link)

Comments can be submitted through the virtual public meeting room that is being used in lieu of in-person public meetings due to the COVID-19 pandemic. That can be found at (link)

Written comments can be mailed to the Payette Supervisor Linda Jackson at 500 Mission St., Building 2, McCall, Idaho 83638. Comments are not being accepted in person due to the pandemic.

Only “substantive” comments that raise questions about specific elements of the draft study or Midas Gold’s proposal will be taken into consideration into the Payette’s drafting of a final study.

Analysis of the alternatives in the draft study will be further refined and could change before a “preferred alternative” is defined in the final environmental study, which is tentatively expected by August 2021.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. • All rights reserved
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Study: Stibnite water would get cleaner

Midas Gold review outlines various methods of treatment

(NOTE: This is the second in a series detailing the draft federal study of the proposed Stibnite Gold Project. Public Comment is due by Oct. 13. Next Week: Fish Habitat)

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News September 3, 2020

Treating all water that flows through Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite mine would keep or improve water quality in the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, according to the Payette National Forest.

Elevated arsenic concentrations in nearby waterways would remain under three of four project alternatives shown in the Payette’s draft environmental study of the proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine.

Alternative 2 is the only of the four alternatives that would decontaminate all water in a treatment plant and lower existing arsenic levels in the East Fork, which now exceed federal water quality standards.

Despite the reduction compared to existing arsenic levels, concentrations in the East Fork would remain above federal standards after mining, under Alternative 2.

Elements of each alternative in the draft study could be incorporated into a final plan for the project to be defined in a final environmental study by next August.

The study looked at any water that would flow across ore, mine pit walls, tailings, waste rock or other mine features that could leach contaminants like arsenic, antimony or mercury.

At Stibnite, that water would include millions of gallons of water that would need to be constantly pumped out of the three open pit mines to allow for mineral extraction.

Under Alternatives 1, 3 and 4, the water would not be treated prior to being discharged, potentially elevating contaminant concentrations in waterways, studies said.

That water would be discharged to the East Fork or into two basins in Meadow Creek.

Meadow Creek

Among the most affected waterways at Stibnite would be Meadow Creek, which is one of many creeks and streams within the project zone that flow into the East Fork.

Flows in the stream would be drastically affected under Alternatives 1, 3 and 4, with studies predicting the stream to temporarily dry up as groundwater levels recover and fill the nearby Hangar Flats Pit with water.

The Hangar Flats Pit is the name of a 600-foot deep hole Midas Gold plans to excavate to reach ore containing gold and antimony.

The pit would be filled with water and left as a lake after mining operations are completed.

Alternative 2 would keep more water in Meadow Creek by extending a liner originally proposed for the creek about 1,050 feet downstream and further away from the Hangar Flats Pit.

Also, high spring flows in Meadow Creek and nearby Blowout Creek would be diverted into the Hangar Flats Pit lake following mining operations, under Alternative 2.

That would speed filling of the pit lake from seven years to about 3.5 years, which would reduce the risk of stream loss by fostering faster groundwater recovery.

Alternative 2 is the only alternative that would permanently route Meadow Creek around the eventual Hangar Flats Pit lake, which the creek would flow through under other alternatives.

Studies showed routing the creek through the lake could harm downstream water quality with contaminants and increased temperatures.

Antimony and arsenic concentrations in Meadow Creek and the East Fork would be increased if historic mine waste in Meadow Valley is not cleaned up, the draft study said.

Alternative 3, which would move the tailings storage area from Meadow Valley, is the only project alternative that would not see the 10.5 tons of historic mine waste cleaned up.

Waste Rock

Other elements of Alternative 2 would benefit water quality compared to the other three alternatives, including the disposal of waste rock.

Alternative 2 would see liners installed under dirt, rocks, shrubs and trees established on top of waste rock storage piles, which Alternative 2 would reduce from four to three.

That run-off water would then be captured and treated prior to being discharged, greatly reducing arsenic concentrations in nearby waterways compared to other alternatives.

Alternative 2 also would eliminate the planned West End storage area. The waste rock originally planned for that area would be put into the Hangar Flats pit. The resulting lake would be 140 feet rather than 600 feet deep under other alternatives.

Placing waste rock underwater prevents the rock from generating acid through oxidation by reducing its exposure to oxygen, though rock at Stibnite is low risk for acid generation, the draft study said.

Under the other alternatives, the West End waste rock storage, if allowed to be built, would leach arsenic into nearby West End Creek, which flows into the East Fork.

Reducing the depth of the pit lake would also allow for groundwater levels in the area to recover more quickly.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. • All rights reserved
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NYC firm now owns 44% of Midas Gold

Move reduces Barrick Gold’s share to 11%

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News September 3, 2020

A New York City investment firm has replaced Toronto-based Barrick Gold as the largest single shareholder in Midas Gold Corp.

Paulson & Co. now holds nearly 200 million shares, or 44% of all shares, of the Vancouver, B.C., parent company of Midas Gold Idaho, which is seeking to operate a gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine.

Earlier this year and in 2016, the firm purchased $60 million in notes that gave Midas Gold money to continue funding permitting activities.

The deal allowed Paulson to later convert the notes to shares of Midas Gold stock for the price at the time when the notes were purchased.

The current price per share of Midas Gold is about $1.30, or about 333% more than it was when Paulson purchased the convertible notes at roughly 30 cents per share.

Midas Gold would have been required to repay the $60 million if Paulson chose not to convert the notes, said Mckinsey Lyon, vice president of external affairs for Midas Gold Idaho.

“Paulson and Co.’s decision to convert the notes to equity removes this repayment risk and means their return on the project will be solely tied to our long-term success,” Lyon said.

Converting the notes into shares reduced Barrick Gold’s ownership in the stake from 19.9% prior to the conversion to about 11%, according to figures from Midas Gold.

Institutional investors hold about 15% of the remaining Midas Gold stock and individual investors hold about 26%.

Currently, Midas Gold has about $35 million in operating funds, with about $2 million per month being spent on permitting and related matters, according to financial statements.

In March, Paulson bought $35 million in convertible notes to prevent Midas Gold from running out of money for permitting.

The investment boosted the company’s operating funds from about $9 million to about $43 million, or enough to carry it through the end of 2021.

Other investments in Midas Gold by Paulson include a purchase last June of 9.66 million common shares for $4.3 million and $25 million in convertible notes in 2016.

Meanwhile, Barrick Gold’s current 11% ownership stake in Midas Gold stems from the 2018 purchase of 46.55 million shares, as well as another 7.27 million shares it bought last year.

The Toronto-based mining company was founded in 1983 and has mining operations employing over 11,000 people in 15 countries. In 2019, it harvested 5.5 million ounces of gold and 432 million pounds of copper.

Final approval on the Stibnite Gold Project could come by next August, according to the Payette National Forest, the lead permitting agency on the proposed mine.

Midas Gold’s probable mineral reserves include more than 4 million ounces of gold, or 125 tons, from the Stibnite deposits.

The value of the gold is projected to bring in 94% of the mine’s estimated $6 billion in total revenue over the 12 to 15-year life of the mine.

The reserves also are predicted to contain 100 million pounds of antimony, which is used to make flame-proofing materials, paints, ceramic enamels, glass and pottery.

The value of antimony is only expected to produce 5% of total mine revenue, but the Stibnite Gold Project would become the only source of mined antimony in the United States.

Estimated reserves also include about 1.5 million ounces of silver, though the value of silver is expected to make up less than 1% of the total value of all metals extracted.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. • All rights reserved
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Public Lands:

Citizens group forms to protect McCall area endowment lands

The Star-News September 3, 2020

A citizens group has formed to “conserve and protect” state endowment lands in the McCall area.

The Payette Endowment Lands Alliance originally formed to place a full-page ad signed by more than 650 people that appeared in The Star News on July 20.

The ad opposed a proposal by Trident Holdings of Boise to trade 28,000 acres of state endowment land for timber land in northern Idaho.

Trident Holdings withdrew its proposal to the Idaho Department of Lands in July, but the state land board ordered a long-term management plan for state lands around McCall. That plan is expected to be finished by the end of the year.

“We felt it was important to organize and give citizens an effective voice in advocating for protection of these lands,” said Deb Fereday of McCall, one of the organizers of the Payette Endowment Lands Alliance.

“The idea of privatizing these lands led us to organize this group,” Fereday said. “We realized how vulnerable these lands are, both ecologically and politically.”

continued:
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Partnership forms – addressing recreation overuse at Grimes Creek

Local residents, Boise County, Volunteer Fire Departments and Emergency Managers are partnering with the Idaho City Ranger District to address the heavy recreation use along Grimes Creek. The heavy use is creating sanitation issues and ecological damage.

The heavily used area is popular because it is close to Boise and has numerous open spaces for dispersed camping. Every weekend, the seven-mile strip of land adjacent to Grimes creek is packed with campers and off-road enthusiasts, many are not recreating responsibly.

Boise County Sheriffs and deputies spend a lot of time in Grimes Creek responding to many serious incidents. “Grimes Creek has the heaviest recreation impact in all of Boise County. Unlawful and disruptive activities tax law enforcement and emergency resources, including wildfire response,” Said Scott Turner, Boise County Sheriff. “We need to address the destructive behavior and resource damage before it is too late.”

“People are leaving campfires burning,” said Bob Showalter, Boise County Emergency Manager. “We have homes in the area and do not want a wildfire starting because of someone’s neglect.”

Area Residents are fed up with the destructive behavior and want visitors to be more considerate and lawful with their use. Negative visitor impacts include extensive littering, off road vehicles (UTVS/ATVs) creating illegal trails and exceeding posted speed limits; damaging natural resources and increasing potential for accidents.

“With the help of our partners, and the community, we are developing short- and long-term solutions,” said Brant Petersen, Idaho City District Ranger. “We want to continue to provide a safe area that people can enjoy improve the sanitation issues while restoring riparian areas along the Creek.”

The first step in the short term plan is to mandate a temporary emergency closure in damaged areas to address sanitation issues, remove litter, and repair resource damage to the creek and riparian areas. “We want to provide recreation opportunities that are safe and enjoyable for everyone and reduces the negative impacts to local residents,” said Petersen.

What can you do to help? Dispose of all garbage, by packing it out of dispersed recreation areas. Leaving bags of garbage at area toilets or outside of trash cans endangers wildlife and fellow recreationists.

(via FB 9-2-2020 Boise NF)

Video:

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Sections of Grimes Creek to close temporarily for clean up and repair

By Katie Kloppenburg Sep 03, 2020 KIVI


Photo by: Boise County Sheriff’s Office

A group of people and organizations are teaming up to address recreation overuse along Grimes Creek, creating sanitation issues and ecological damage.

Residents, Boise County and Volunteer Fire Departments and Emergency Managers are partnering with the Idaho City Ranger District to address the issue. The Grimes Creek area is popular as it is closed to Boise and has lots of open space for camping.

“Grimes Creek has the heaviest recreation impact in all of Boise County. Unlawful and disruptive activities tax law enforcement and emergency resources, including wildfire response,” said Scott Turner, Boise County Sheriff. “We need to address the destructive behavior and resource damage before it is too late.”

continued:
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Access to Celebration Park temporarily redirected during construction

Date: September 2. 2020
Contact: Mike Williamson mwilliamson@blm.gov 208-384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has begun construction to enhance access to Celebration Park and the Halverson Lakes trailhead, located 5 miles south of Melba along the Snake River, that will temporarily hamper vehicle access to the visitor center and trailhead from its eastern entrance off Victory Lane. The BLM is encouraging visitors to access the park and trailhead from its western entrance off Sinker Road.

Enhancements to the road will improve public safety and increase accessibility to surrounding BLM public lands by accommodating low-clearance vehicles, buses and trailers. There will also be a newly designated parking area.

“Celebration Park is managed by Canyon County and was established as Idaho’s only archeological park in 1989,” said Amanda Hoffman, Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area Manager. “The park provides amazing educational and recreational opportunities, and we’re happy to be able to improve the public’s access to this important area.”

Construction is expected to be completed by Sept.18, 2020.

For more information, contact the Boise District Office at 208-384-3300.
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Fire Season:

September 6 at 6pm smoke map

The three central Idaho smoke plumes are the Buck Fire, Porphyry fire (middle) and Shissler fire (north of Salmon river.)
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Buck Fire Sept 6, 2020

from Valley County Fire Working Group

With the Red Flag warning in effect yesterday the Buck Fire grew over 2,000 acres and is now at 4,441 acres. The fire growth was to the North and North East primarily into the old burn scars North of the old Thunder Mountain Road.

The Buck Fire burned actively yesterday afternoon primarily on the North Eastern edge. Today is expected to be another active day with hot temperatures, low relative humidities, and some gusty winds. Please continue to watch out for fire traffic traveling on FR 413.

FB link:
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Payette National Forest

McCall, ID, September 4, 2020 – A return to seasonable temperatures has brought an increase in fire behavior on the sole remaining fire after the prior weeks’ lightning busts. The Porphyry Fire has grown to 1300 acres as of a 4pm reconnaissance flight today. Started by lightning on August 25th, the fire is expected to remain active through the weekend as an unstable air mass enters the region bringing gusty winds and Red Flag Warnings.

Fire Updates:

Porphyry:

McCall Ranger District, Porphyry Creek drainage, 2 miles SW of the bridge – 1300 acres, no safe access at this time for ground personnel. The fire is burning actively under dry and windy conditions. The fire has moved over the ridgeline and has the potential to impact Porphyry trail, trail #003 near Mosquito Ridge, the Rattlesnake trail and the South Fork trail. The public is asked to stay cognizant of the fire and remain clear of the area, however no closures are in effect at this time. Check for updates. (link)

Copeland:

The Copeland fire is located 5 miles east of McCall near Shaw/Twin Lakes on SITPA protected Idaho Department of Lands land bordering the Payette National Forest. The fire is 91 acres and 100% contained. Personnel continue to mop-up interior heat on the Copeland Fire. There are no closures in effect, the Boulder Lake Road is open. The Copeland Fire was started by nocturnal lightning on August 19, 2020.

FB link:

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Shissler Fire

9/5/2020 Shissler Fire Update

Yesterday’s weather brought increased fire activity to the Shissler fire near Elk City compared to the past several days, with fire size now at approximately 2,800 acres. The majority of fire activity yesterday was seen in the Meadow Creek drainage, but increased activity was noted in the Butter Creek drainage and old fire scars on the north end of the fire. The fire also continues to progress up-slope towards the 505 Trail System and established fire lines. Fire crews are continuing to improve and hold the fire lines established along the 505 Trail System.

For those recreating in the Elk City area for the holiday weekend, please be advised that roads, trails, and camping areas near the Shissler fire remain closed for public safety and to accommodate traffic by fire management personnel. See “Closures” tab for more information.

Current as of 9/5/2020, 10:49:52 AM
Incident Type Wildfire
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Monday August 17th, 2020 approx. 09:00 PM
Location Southeast of Elk City, Idaho two miles south of Red River Hot Springs
Coordinates 45.76 latitude, -115.193 longitude
Size 2,800 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 21%
Fuels Involved Timber

August 31, 2020 Public Map

InciWeb:
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Wild Mountain Fire Update: 9/6/2020 9am

Contact: EIIFC Fire Information, 208-497-5934

The Wild Mountain Fire started just after midnight on Forest Service lands near the Gibson Jack trailhead. The fire proceeded to back downhill towards homes along the Gibson Jack road. Residents in the area of Gibson Jack and Wildhorse subdivision have been asked to evacuate. Evacuations are expected to be lifted at 9 a.m. No structures have been lost and a bull dozer has completed containment lines around the 19 acre fire, which has slowed the fire’s progress. Engines are now securing the dozer line with a hose lay to get water around the whole fire. Air resources will arrive with the light of day and a 20-person handcrew has been ordered.

A Pocatello Valley FD engine was high centered on difficult terrain while fighting the fire. Firefighters got out of the engine and made their way to safety. No firefighters were injured. The engine was burned over.

Start Date: September 6, 2020 just after midnight

Location and Jurisdiction: approx. 4 miles south of Pocatello, ID near the Gibson Jack trailhead. Started on the Caribou-Targhee Nation Forest and burned onto private lands.

Cause: Under investigation
Fire Size: mapped at 19 acres
Percent Contained: 25% contained, containment estimated for 9/6/2020 at 6 p.m.

Fire Behavior: Forward progression has been slowed with dozer line around the fire. Juniper and brush is still burning within containment lines.

Fuels and Terrain: Grass, brush and juniper in difficult terrain.

Fire Crews/Resources: 25 engines and 1 dozer. A handcrew and air resources have been ordered. The Gateway Interagency Fire Front (GIFF) was activated to respond (BLM, Caribou-Targhee NF, Pocatello FD, North Bannock County FD, Pocatello Valley FD, Chubbuck FD and Inkom FD).

Structures Threatened: Structures threatened in the Gibson Jack area. No structures lost.

Evacuations: Evacuations are in place for Gibson-Jack and Wildhorse subdivision residents. Bannock County Sheriff is handling evacuations. Expect to be lifted 9/6/2020 at 9 a.m.

Closures: The Gibson Jack road and trailhead are closed.
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Critter News:

MCPAWS starts scholarship fund for WSU vet students

The Star-News September 3, 2020

A new MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter Scholarship in honor of former animal care coordinator Jeff Motychak will benefit fourth-year veterinary students at Washington State University who plan to practice animal shelter medicine.

The scholarship was established by longtime MCPAWS supporter and volunteer Randy Zuniga to honor Motychak, who worked with shelter veterinarians to provide quality care for animals during his years at MCPAWS.

The annual scholarship will be used for fourth-year students at Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine. Preference will be given to those who desire to work in smaller, rural animal shelters.

Checks may be mailed to Washington State University Foundation, P.O. Box 647, Pullman, WA 99164.

For more information, contact Kay Glaser at development@vetmed.wsu.edu or 509-335-9516.

source:
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Leave livestock guardian dogs alone

By Katie Kloppenburg Aug 31, 2020 KIVI


Photo by Steve Stuebner

The Idaho Rangeland Resources Commission and U.S. Forest Service officials say there have been several incidents lately where people have picked up expensive livestock guardian dogs thinking they are lost or have been abandoned. The dogs, which are often white Great Pyrenees dogs, should be left alone to protect sheep herds, according to officials.

Sheep ranchers and Forest Service officials say this is an emerging problem that is increasing across southern Idaho. Guard dogs are there to protect livestock from predators like coyotes, mountain lions, black bears and wolves.

“I realize that everybody has their own best intentions, but you shouldn’t be taking a guard dog out of its environment, bringing it home, causing undue stress, and exposing it to unnecessary domestication,” says Cory Peavey, a Blaine County sheep rancher, who has had his dogs hauled away to an animal shelter by mistake.

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US wildlife officials aim to remove wolf protections in 2020

by John Flesher Associated Press Monday, August 31st 2020

The Trump administration plans to lift endangered species protections for gray wolves across most of the nation by the end of the year, the director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Monday.

“We’re working hard to have this done by the end of the year and I’d say it’s very imminent,” Aurelia Skipwith told The Associated Press in a phone interview Monday.

The administration also is pushing ahead with a rollback of protections for migratory birds despite a recent setback in federal court, she said.

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New group aims to decrease wildlife conflicts in Blaine County

By Natasha Williams Aug 31, 2020 KIVI

Blaine County, Idaho — Fish and Game says they’re getting more calls about bears getting into trash cans in the Wood River Valley, but mountain lions have also become more of an issue.

A new group called the Wood River Valley Wildlife Smart Communities Coalition is working toward some solutions. The coalition is made up of representatives from Fish and Game, the Idaho Conservation League, the national forest, and local cities including Ketchum, Hailey, and Sun Valley.

The goal is to reduce wildlife conflicts like bears getting into trash.

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Hunters should have plenty of opportunities this season with growing populations of deer and an already thriving elk population

By Lynsey Amundson Aug 31, 2020 KIVI

“This year should be good for both deer and elk, particularly noteworthy for mule deer. We saw a good over the winter fawn survival this past winter, which translates into more opportunity in the fall, especially for general season hunts,” said Idaho Fish and Game Deer and Elk Program Coordinator, Rick Ward.

State-wide, 63 percent of the mule deer fawns survived because of the mild winter this past year, which is well above average, he said.

High over the winter fawn survival paired with good fawn production translates into a growing population.

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Five more mosquito samples test positive for West Nile in Canyon County

By Katie Kloppenburg Sep 02, 2020 KIVI

Nampa, Idaho — The Canyon County Mosquito Abatement District said five more mosquito samples tested positive for West Nile virus last week in the north part of Nampa. As the Labor Day weekend gets closer, residents of Canyon County should protect themselves from mosquitoes and the West Nile virus.

The abatement district sets eight gravid traps and 120 dry ice baited EVS traps in Canyon County to watch for adult mosquito populations and the presence of “vector-borne diseases.” So far this year, the abatement district has test 1,474 pools for West Nile virus, 18 of which tested positive.

Canyon County Mosquito Abatement District staff has increased surveillance and control measures in response to the increased public health threat, according to a news release.

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Fish & Game News:

Traps, snares and pets can be a bad combination, and here’s how to avoid a problem

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Wednesday, September 2, 2020

Fish and Game provides resources that show pet owners how to spot and avoid trap sets, and how to release their pet if it becomes trapped

With some wolf trapping seasons in Idaho opening on Sept. 10, and many more trapping seasons opening in October, upland game bird hunters and other people recreating with off-leash pets are reminded to avoid traps and be prepared to act quickly in the event their hunting or hiking companion becomes trapped.

Most traps and snares are simple in design and easy to operate if you know what to do. Some of the larger foothold and body-gripping traps can be challenging because they require more effort to open, but the principles are the same.

Idaho Fish and Game provides information on how to spot and avoid traps, and what to do if a pet gets caught. Both videos and brochure are available online.

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Aggressive cow moose with calf reported in the Adams Gulch area north of Ketchum

By Terry Thompson, Regional Communications Manager
Friday, September 4, 2020

An aggressive cow moose bluff charged a family out hiking in the Adams Gulch area north of Ketchum on September 4, 2020. Hikers are encouraged to be alert when hiking area trails.

On Friday, September 4, 2020 Fish and Game received a report of an aggressive cow moose that bluff charged a family in the Adams Gulch area north of Ketchum on Friday, September 4. A family of three with a baby in a stroller and two leashed dogs was hiking along the creek when a cow moose charged the family. An adult male put himself between the charging moose, yelling and raising his arms, which stopped the charge, just short of the family.

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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

‘Screaming’ bison stops traffic in Yellowstone National Park

A Boise mom and her three children were stopped as the male bison made his way down the highway Tuesday afternoon.

August 14, 2020 KTVB
… Heather Parker, a mom of three from Boise, made the trip to Lamar Valley, Wyoming earlier this week with her children. While driving, they were stopped along the highway by a male bison with a lot to say.

It is mating season for bison, meaning they’re pretty aggressive this time of year. So if you’re headed to the park anytime soon, be very careful and don’t get too close.

full story:
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Seasonal Humor:

CovidDinos-a
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