Category Archives: News 2021

July 25, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

July 25, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Because of our [water] situation lawn watering is discouraged. Odd/Even days watering. No watering after 2pm. If you are asked to turn your water off, it’s because the system is in danger of running out. Please be respectful. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in Effect

Remember there will be an internet and telephone out age Monday and Tuesday.

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order issued
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit season
May 15 – Firewood Season, permits at The Corner
May 25 – Johnson Creek road fully open
June 7 – Lick Creek road open
June 13 – Profile road open
July 16 – Stage 1 Fire Restrictions
July 19-29 – Lick Creek Road closure for bridge replacement
July 26-27 – Internet/Phone Outage
July 28 – Dust Abatement Calcium chloride
August 5-7 – Harmonica Festival
Aug 14 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
Sept 11 – YPFD Budget Meeting 10am at Fire Hall
Sept 11 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions July 16

Under the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions, the following acts are prohibited on state and federally managed or protected lands, roads, and trails:
* Building, maintaining, attending, or using a fire, campfire or stove fire except within a designated recreation site and in a permanent concrete or metal fire ring, or on private land, and only within an owner-provided structure.
* Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle, building, or designated recreation site or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials.
— — — —

July 26-27 – Internet/Phone Outage

MTE will be having a planned internet and phone outage Monday and Tuesday (July 26-27) for up to 8 hours per day to replace and upgrade equipment in our service area.
— — — —

Harmonica Festival August 5, 6, and 7

Link: to website
———

Village News:

July 24 – Pet Vax Clinic

Dr. Keith Ruble and crew from Cascade Vet Clinic came to Yellow Pine Saturday, July 24th, for the annual Pet Vax Clinic. Their first stop saw 5 cats and 10 well behaved dogs, who were examined, received their vaccinations, other medications as necessary including banana flavored wormer for the dogs; some even had their nails clipped. The crew headed up town for lunch and planned to see more pets in the afternoon.

20210724PetVaxClinicrrS
— — — —

Unplanned Internet and Phone Outages

Tuesday (July 20) Internet went out before 530pm for about an hour. Then Wednesday (July 21) Internet (and long distance) out around 945am for about 2 hours.

Short power outage at 1209am early Wednesday (July 21.)
— — — —

Mayor Chappy

April 19, 1945 – March 23, 2020

Thanks to the cemetery committee for placing Mayor Chappy’s headstone July 19, 2021 at the Yellow Pine Pioneer Cemetery.

20210719ChappyHeadstone1-a
photo courtesy MF
— — — —

Veterans’ Monument

With this heat, the flowers and shrubs at our Veterans’ Memorial dry out quickly. When Niebrand’s are in, they water them, but aren’t here all the time……if you go by, please check, and give them a drink with the hose that is there. Our veterans (and the Niebrand’s) thank you!
— — — —

Attention

Would the person who borrowed the measuring wheel please return it to the community hall? It will be needed for the festival.

Also – Will the person who left the twin bed outside the Community Hall please pick it up.The yard sale is over until next year. Thank you.
— — — —

Conserve (and Boil) Water

Please be conservative when watering lawns. We ask those that are here all week to not water lawns on the weekends so that more water is available for the weekend cabin owners. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!
— —

Tips on Water Recycling

Use a dishpan to catch the rinse water when doing dishes (and hand washing) and use it to water outdoor flowers.
— —

Scrap Metal

Sharing a message that Mike Amos will haul out a load of scrap metal. If you have scrap metal, contact Mike. He has an area by his place to stack it.
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Lick Creek Road will be closed at Zena Creek (about 4 miles east of the Ponderosa Campground) from July 19 – July 29 for a bridge replacement. Please plan ahead.

Johnson Creek, Profile Gap and Lick Creek roads are Open. These roads have not been bladed and are rough.

The Hwy 55 project Smith’s Ferry area: Starting June 1, crews will transition into their summer construction schedule. Drivers can anticipate single-lane, alternating traffic controlled by flaggers Monday – early Friday morning. From Friday morning – Sunday, and any major holidays, the road will be open to two lanes. This schedule will be in place until September. Project Website link:

The Hwy 55 project from Donnelly to McCall: One lane during the week and two lanes on weekends. Project is slated to last until September.
— — — —

Critters

Aggressive Deer and Elk

Be aware that mothers will attack dogs and chase people if they feel their babies are threatened. Keep dogs leashed in the forest during “baby season” for their own protection.

Ticks

* Know where to expect ticks. Many ticks live in grassy, brushy, or wooded areas. When possible, avoid wooded and brushy areas with tall grass and leaf litter. Walk in the center of trails, particularly in spring and summer when ticks feed.
* Wear appropriate clothing. When in tick habitats, wear light-colored, tightly woven long pants and long-sleeve shirt. Tuck your pant legs into socks or boots, and your shirt into your pants. This helps keep ticks on the outside of your clothing where you can spot them more easily.
* Use tick repellent when necessary, and carefully follow instructions on the label. Apply an EPA-registered repellent effective against ticks, such as those containing DEET to clothes and exposed skin, and permethrin to clothes and gear. Take care when applying repellent on children. EPA’s search tool can help you find the repellent that best suits your needs.
* Check clothing, gear, and pets after being areas with ticks. Ticks can hitch a ride into your home on clothing and pets, then attach to you or a family member later. Carefully examine coats, camping gear, and daypacks. Don’t forget your dog, see CDC’s where to check your pet for ticks.
* Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming can reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease and may be effective in reducing the risk of other tick-borne disease. Showering can wash off unattached ticks and it is a good opportunity to do a tick check.
* Check your body, your child and pets thoroughly for ticks. Carefully inspect areas in and around the hair, head, neck, ears, under arms, inside the belly button, around the waist, between the legs, and behind the knees. Ticks can be very small before they feed—look for what may appear like a new freckle or speck of dirt. Continue checking for two to three days after returning from areas with ticks.

Pine Martins & Raccoons

Watch your small pets. Reports of pine martins living in the dump and raccoons on the north side of the village.

Be Bear, Fox & Coyote Aware

* Do not feed them human food
* Secure your trash
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Be Mountain Lion Aware

Note: A report of a mountain lion still hanging around the upper end of the village early summer.

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report July 17: The dumpsters are about one quarter full, and it still clean out there. The road to the dump is fine.

Bins last emptied July 10th. Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water. No outside watering after 2pm, nor on holiday weekends and especially not during the festival.

July 25 Update:

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association Board asks that individuals refrain from using domestic water to dampen the road. The Water Corporation is doing its best to provide water for domestic use during the low water period but as the supply becomes more limited, it is incumbent upon each of us to be judicious with its use. Thank you for your cooperation in ensuring that all community members have an adequate supply of water.

The corporation has received the first $150k grant of the anticipated $450k. We are hoping to have some of the supply lines replaced by winter. Thanks to those who wrote letters of support. They were very beneficial in securing the grants. – Willie Sullivan

July 8, 2021 Update

DRINKING WATER WARNING
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059
BOIL WATER ADVISORY
Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST. Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 180 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake@drakediversified.com. .
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc. .
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 7-8-21.

YPWUA 2021 Shareholder Meeting July 4 at 10am

YPWUA 2021 Shareholder Meeting Minutes

Sunday July 4th 10am Community Hall

1. Financial Report – Willie
A. We have $52,000 balance
B. 9 people delinquent compared to 18 two years ago

2. Operations
A. Boil order status – continue to be on boil order and will be until more leaks are found and repaired

3. Grants
A. Details of grants We are been granted $450,000 in grants. YPWUA must contribute $12,500 as matching funds to receive grants
C. A vote was taken which was required by the shareholders to accept the terms of the grant. Nicki Harner made the motion, Ginney seconded the motion and the vote was approved by 100 percent of the shareholders that attended.
C. More future grants are going to be written. The approved $450,000 will only get some of the distribution lines replaced

4. Summer lawn watering
A. Because of our situation lawn watering is discouraged
B. Odd/Even days watering
C. No watering after 2 pm
D. If you are asked to turn your water off, it’s because the system is in danger of running out. Please be respectful.

5. Election of one board member
A. Dave Prouty is not running for another term
B. Candy Hardisy was nominated and accepted the available position on the board

6. Other Comments
A. Mike Fortin brought up that he was collecting spring water to water his lawn. That’s great, many in the community is coming up with ways to water lawns without using our community water.
B. Many thanked the water board for their work on getting grants. It has taken a while but is starting to pay off.
C. Meeting ended at 10:50 am.

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Water Board:

Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
— — — —

VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association
Meeting Minutes July 10, 2021

I. Call to order
Deb Filler called to order the regular meeting of the VYPA at 1400 at the Yellow Pine Community Hall.

II. Roll call
Council Members: Deb Filler, Ronda Rogers, Hailey Harris.
Attendees: Rhonda Egbert, Virginia Bartholomew, Ron Basabe, Christy Petersen, Joel Fields, Mary Fields, Belinda Provancher, Margaret Vranish, Bill McIntosh, Rob Rosenbaum, Theresa Rosenbaum.

III. Approval of minutes from last meeting
Deb Filler asked attendees if there were any outstanding questions/concerns with prior meeting minutes. All attendees agreed that there were no questions/concerns. Minutes approved.

IV. Open issues
a) Treasurer Report: Ronda Rogers discussed the breakdown of the General Ledger Report, all attendees were offered a copy. No questions/concerns. Marj Fields requesting a copy of financial breakdown for the cemetery committee. (Ronda Rogers to send that to Marj).
b) Community Hall Update: Council has cleaned out the Community Yard Sale items, waiting on grant outcomes, and Tim Rogers is still working on kitchen/bathroom renovations.
c) Cemetery: Ron Basabe gave an update-Tim & Ron will work together to get water source running; expired water permit is in process of being renewed, Ron will get the headstone for Chappy placed.
d) Infrastructure: OK Gravel started project on West Ellison
e) Harmonica Festival: Deb Filler gave a budget summary including the decline in funds due to ads, supplies, etc. Final Festival meeting to be held July 11, 2021 at 1400 at Deb Filler’s home.
f) Stibnite Project: University of Idaho partnership to monitor water levels starts this week.
g) Nominations: Hailey Harris appointed as interim Secretary in replacement of Rhonda Egbert until the position is up for election in 2022. Chairman: Deb Filler nominated by Virginia Bartholomew, seconded by Rhonda Egbert, no objections, motion to re-elect Deb Filler as Chairman approved unanimously. Member at Large: Rhonda Egbert nominated by Virginia Bartholomew, seconded by Christy Petersen, no objections, motion to elect Rhonda Egbert as Member at Large approved unanimously.
h) Dust Abatement: North American Dust Control has laid Earthbind; Calcium Chloride to be laid on July 28th. Deb Filler discussed the ultimate goal behind having Calcium Chloride on Yellow Pine Ave.
i) Perpetua Resources Update: Belinda Provancher explained that a comment period will be held for the Supplemental DEIS, Stibnite Lake will aim to keep water temperatures low (suggested by the tribes & conservation groups) by providing shrubbery and vegetation around the lake/along the stream. Within the first six months of 2023, a decision is likely to be made on mining permitting with hopes to start construction in the fall of 2023.
j) Fire Department: Ronda Rogers gave update-Elections for Commissioners for both District 2 & 3 will be held in November 2021.
V. New business
a) Fireworks: Explained by Deb Filler that both VYPA & YPFPD have no authority with the individuals that organize the fireworks show, but that VYPA can give donations if VYPA members vote for such. Concern around presence and location of fireworks was displayed by citizens of Yellow Pine. Rhonda Egbert to conduct research to further investigate requirements for future fireworks to ensure community unanimity. VYPA to inform Belinda Provancher of the outcome of said research and how the Village of Yellow Pine (citizens or otherwise) will handle this issue going forward.
b) Transfer Station: On July 10, 2021, at 1730, the community of Yellow Pine is encouraged (if able) to help clean up the transfer station. Explained by Deb Filler that Lake Shore Disposal had many breakdowns in their dump trucks, which resulted in an overflowing transfer station. Encouragement to maintain cleanliness of transfer station was expressed.

VI. Adjournment
Deb Filler adjourned the meeting at 1444.
Minutes submitted by: Hailey Harris

July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Hailey Harris, Secretary
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)

Festival
Want to join YPAC Corp in making a difference? We are raising money to benefit the Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival . Any donation will help.
Each year, during the first full weekend of August, the sleepy mountain village of Yellow Pine is transformed into the largest festival of it’s kind in the western hemisphere!
The festival is produced by volunteers and raises funds to support the village of Yellow Pine as well as the funds needed to hold next year’s festival.
As you all know, the 2020 festival had to be cancelled due to Covid-19. This placed a significant burden on Yellow Pine to come up with enough funding to hold the 2021 festival this August 5, 6, 7.
Souvenirs and events at the festival help raise funds. We also know there are many of you who support the festival, but are not able to attend. This fund raiser is to give you an opportunity to help us help Yellow Pine.
Thanks in advance for your tax-deductible contribution to this cause that means so much to us!
GoFundMe link:

Anyone interested in being a part of the Festival Planning/Working committee, please contact Deb Filler. Meetings will begin at the end of January. Even if you aren’t physically in YP, you can participate in the committee.
2021 Planning Notes updated July 11, 2021 (link)
Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival Policy and Procedure Link:
— — — —

YPFD News:

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful.
link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021.pdf

June 12, 2020 – 10am Fire siren test and YPFD meeting.
Link to minutes: 2021 June 12 YPFD meeting minutes.docx

There was a meeting Saturday, July 10th, 10 am at Fire Station (no minutes yet.)

Elections for Commissioners for both District 2 and 3 will be held in November 2021.

May 15, 2020 – there was a YPFD meeting 10am at the Fire Hall.
Link: to 20210515 YPFD MeetingNotes_Final.docx

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30, 2020 at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

2021 Meeting schedule for the YPFD. All meetings are at the YPFD Station
Sat. May 15 at 10am
Sat. June 12 at 10am
Sat. July 10 at 10am
Sat. September 11 at 10am Budget Meeting

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by a escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Phil Jensen, Acting – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Tim Rogers – Fire Chief
Secretary Ronda Rogers
Treasurer Nikki Saleen

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
Hours: 1pm-8pm, closed on Tuesdays
We offer smoked tri tip, brisket, and chicken sandwiches and also burgers and chicken wings.
Firewood Permits available May 15th.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Yellow Pine Tavern open daily:
Monday thru Thursday 8am to 9pm
Friday and Saturday 8am to 10pm
Sunday 8am to 8pm
Indoor Dining with limited seating and Outdoor Dining Available.
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer, Wine and Pop
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Opened June 12th for Summer
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
Store hours: 10am to 5pm Gas and Diesel available.
The store is now receiving inventory of Food items. The ATM is operational, and Debit/Credit cards are accepted. Currently there is fuel, ice, alcoholic beverages (non liquor) tobacco, non alc beverages, snacks, and Dairy items (ice cream, milk, butter, and yogurt). Fresh produce is soon to come. If there are needs for fuel or anything during off hours, Josh will be around on call to accommodate. For any particular store item requests, please call 208-633-3300 or Email
For room reservations, please call 208-633-3300 or Email for reservations
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation – (208) 382-4844

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (July 19) overnight low of 51 degrees. This morning cloudy above the smoke (Yellow AQ) and light sprinkles of rain started just before 9am and lasted about an hour and a half, enough to make things damp. Very quiet no birds calling. Cloudy, smoky and more normal temperature at lunch time, but a bit muggy. Overcast, humid, light breeze and light haze of smoke mid-afternoon, high of 79 degrees. Female hairy woodpecker and steller jay visiting. Sprinkles at 645pm, dark overcast, far off rumbles of thunder and a bit breezy. The lightning strike maps showed hits west of the South Fork towards McCall. Quit raining before 9pm, still a light haze of smoke and overcast. Robins chirping. Another shower around 930pm and cooling off. Cloudy and humid before midnight.

Tuesday (July 20) overnight low of 54 degrees, 24 hour rain total = 0.26″. This morning humid, mostly high clouds, light breeze and light haze of smoke. Quiet, no birds calling. Humid and mostly cloudy at lunch time. More normal temperatures early afternoon, humid, cloudy, light breeze and increasing haze of smoke, high of 85 degrees. Internet went out before 530pm for about an hour. Mostly cloudy early evening, light breeze and thicker smoke, poor air quality. Warm after sunset, light breeze, increasing smoke and appears to be some high clouds. Looked hazy before midnight, Mars rising over Golden Gate peak. Power blipped off and back on at 1209am. Looked hazy after midnight.

Wednesday (July 21) overnight low of 53 degrees. This morning it appears clear above smoky haze and poor air quality. A few birds calling. Internet (and long distance) out around 945am for about 2 hours. Smoky and warm at lunch time, looks like a few clouds – then getting a little gusty. Mail truck reported no problems on the drive in. Hot, smoky and breezy by early afternoon, high of 93 degrees. Loud gunfire to the west around 630pm. Cooling off just a tad by early evening, partly cloudy, thinner smoke and light breezes. Clear over haze of smoke and breezy after sunset. Large very orange moon rising over Antimony Ridge before 11pm.

Thursday (July 22) overnight low of 45 degrees. This morning it was mostly small clouds, light breeze, haze of smoke and poor air quality. Increased street traffic and dust. A few small ground birds and a juvenile steller jay visiting. Warm, increasing smoke and decreasing visibility at lunch time. Hot breezes blowing early afternoon, looks clear above the smoke, high of 91 degrees. Slightly thinner smoke, no clouds, and lighter breezes by early evening. Still warm after sunset. Probably clear with smoky haze before midnight.

Friday (July 23) overnight low estimated at 48 degrees (thermometer had an error.) This morning it looked clear above the haze of smoke and poor air quality. Early morning robin calling. Warm and haze of smoke at lunch time. Hot breezes early afternoon, clear sky and improved air quality, high of 92 degrees. Water pressure down. Still pretty warm early evening, light breezes, very light smoke and much better air quality. Pretty warm after sunset, clear sky and light breeze. Looked clear before midnight. Yucky smoke came in by early morning.

Saturday (July 24) overnight low of 44 degrees. This morning clear above moderate smoke, crappy air quality and light breeze. Morning air traffic (a couple of loud ones.) No birds around. Warm and smoky (and dusty) at lunch time, occasional light breeze. Hot, dry, dusty, smoky afternoon, high of 97 degrees. Still hot by early evening but thinner smoke and better air quality. A couple of swallows flying around. Smoke settling in after sunset, poor air quality. Still pretty warm (and smoky) after a red sunset. Looked hazy before midnight, Mars very red.

Sunday (July 25) overnight low of 48 degrees. This morning it appears clear above moderate smoke and very poor air quality. Very few birds around. Water pressure down. Hot and smoky after lunch time, poor air quality. Hot, dry, smoky afternoon with poor air quality, high of 96 degrees. Still hot early evening smoky and very light breezes.
—————

Idaho News:

Yellow Pine to host music & harmonica festival Aug. 5-7

The Star-News July 22, 2021

Yellow Pine will celebrate its 31st annual Music and Harmonica Festival Thursday through Saturday, Aug. 5-7, with live music, harmonica contest, Mustache Musical Parade and the Great Harmonica Run.

Live music will kick off on Thursday at 6 p.m., and the festival’s opening ceremonies will be Friday at noon.

The event will end with a Community Breakfast on Sunday from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.

The festival will include a Teen Hangout, scavenger hunt, Children’s Corner, demonstrations, jam sessions and booths.

West of Ustick, Guess When, The Kap Brothers and 37 other bands will take the stage during the event.

The Idaho Harmonica Workshop will be Wednesday and Thursday, Aug. 4-5, and conclude with a performance during the festival’s opening ceremonies. Cost is $99.

The Great Harmonica 6.5K Run will be Saturday beginning at 9 a.m. Sign-in will begin at 8 a.m. on the porch of The Corner.

Registration is $20 in advance and $25 at the race.

Cost is free to attend, park and camp at the festival. Donations are welcome, and all proceeds from the event will benefit the festival and the Village of Yellow Pine.

Visit (link) for more information, including directions, or to register.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — — — — — — — —

Lick Creek Road to stay closed through July 29 for bridge work

The Star-News July 22, 2021

Lick Creek Road east of McCall will stay closed through July 29 while Valley County crews replace the bridge at Zena Creek.

The road will be closed to all traffic during construction with no direct detour.

Access to Yellow Pine and areas of the backcountry can be gained by using the Warm Lake Road from Cascade and then either the South Fork Salmon River Road or Johnson Creek Road.

The original bridge was built in 1959 and was found to have extensive deterioration in the wood structure, Valley County Road and Bridge Superintendent Jeff McFadden said.

The wooden bridge was removed and a temporary steel bridge from the Payette National Forest was used to span the creek last fall, McFadden said.

The wooden bridge was 26 feet across. The new bridge will sit higher over the creek, spanning 40 feet and measuring 16 feet wide. The bridge is about 36 miles from McCall and about three miles from the South Fork Salmon River.

The bridge and pavement will cost about $68,000 to be paid by the Local Highway Technical Assistance Council, while construction work done by the county will cost about $40,000.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — — — — — — — —

COVID-19 numbers surge in Valley County

20 new positive cases reported in week

By Tom Grote for The Star-News July 22, 2021

Valley County’s two hospitals reported 20 new cases of COVID-19 in the past week.

St. Luke’s McCall reported eight new cases during the week ending Monday and Cascade Medical Center reported 12 new cases during the same period.

The latest numbers bring the total new cases since July 1 to 27. By comparison, 29 new cases were reported in all of June.

A total of 826 cases of COVID-19 have been reported by the two hospitals since the first case was detected in March 2020.

Four confirmed deaths and two suspected deaths related to COVID-19 among Valley County residents have been reported by Central District Health.

A total of 59% of eligible Valley County residents had received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine as of this week, the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare reported. That compares to 58.6% reported vaccinated last week. …

St. Luke’s McCall offers walk-in COVID-19 vaccines from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at St. Luke’s Clinics – Payette Lakes Family Medicine, 211 Forest Street, McCall.

Appointments also can be scheduled online through St. Luke’s myChart or calling 208-381-9500 or by calling 208-634-2225.

Cascade Medical Center offers a daily walk-in vaccination clinic Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.

full story:
— — — —

COVID-19 Updates: 325 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

July 21, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 325 new COVID-19 cases and 2 new deaths Wednesday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 197,781. …

The state said 737,995 people have received the vaccine, and 1,367,810 total doses have been administered. 683,866 people are fully vaccinated. …

The age group with the most cases is 18-29 with 49,212 cases. …

712 vaccine breakthrough cases have been reported.

2 new death was reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 2,179.

full story:  [Valley County 904 cases, 6 deaths.]
— — — —

Some quick COVID-19 facts:

* 99.5% of the deaths are among the unvaccinated

* The Delta variant now accounts for 83% cases in the US

* Unvaccinated who are infected with the Delta variant carry 1,000 times the amount of virus than people with the original variant (controlled study comparing 60 people infected with Delta variant to 60 people infected with the original virus).

* A vaccinated person who is exposed constantly to unvaccinated people, especially in crowded, indoor settings where no one is wearing masks, can become infected themselves.

Tom Reinhardt, CEO
Cascade Medical Center
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Health and Welfare working to step up testing for COVID-19 delta variant

As the more contagious delta variant emerges across the U.S., Health and Welfare is working to test more positive COVID samples for the variant

Joe Parris July 21, 2021 KTVB

Idaho Health and Welfare Director Dave Jeppesen said that COVID-19 metrics like daily case counts and COVID hospitalizations are now heading in the wrong direction.

“Unfortunately, I wish I had better news, the overall state COVID-19 numbers have taken a turn for the worse in the past few weeks,” Jeppesen said during a media briefing Tuesday. …

Idaho health experts explained that the process of sequencing positive COVID tests to find out if they are the delta strain is an intricate process. Frankly, they haven’t been able to test for it at a high frequency. But, that is set to change, soon.

“We’re happy to announce that through partnerships with other laboratories including, in particular, the VA Medical Center, which you may recall has been helping out with PCR testing all along, now has been assisting us with sequencing and so we have a bump this week where we have over 284 samples that we now have results on,” Hahn said.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Two people hospitalized after 3-vehicle crash on Highway 55

Traffic near Smiths Ferry was backed up for hours while emergency crews responded to help the injured. One driver was cited for inattentive driving.

KTVB Staff July 23, 2021

Idaho State Police say two people were flown to a Boise hospital after a three-vehicle crash on Highway 55 Thursday afternoon.

The crash happened just after 4 p.m. at mile marker 91 between Banks and Cascade.

Troopers say a southbound Toyota Camry collided with a northbound pickup and a second pickup that was traveling behind the first one.

continued:
—————-

Idaho History:

U of I researchers dig at Salmon River ranch of Polly Bemis

400 artifacts to give insight into life of Chinese immigrant

By Ralph Bartholdt for The Star-News July 22, 2021

About 400 artifacts linked to Chinese immigrant and Idaho pioneer Polly Bemis have been unearthed by University of Idaho archaeologists.

The first year of what researchers hope will be a multi-year excavation was completed in April at the Polly Bemis Ranch on the Salmon River 44 miles east of Riggins.

The team, directed by U of I Professor Mark Warner and led by doctoral student Renae Campbell, will clean, analyze and document the artifacts this fall for eventual display in the reconstructed cabin of Bemis (1853-1933).

Researchers found a small dump where Bemis likely disposed of her trash, including food cans and bottles that tell about the commercial products that made their way up to remote parts of the Salmon River.

Also discovered were personal items including a tobacco tin used by the pipe-smoking Bemis as well as fragments from a stoneware crock probably used to store food from the garden kept by Bemis and her husband, Charlie.

In addition to the excavation, researchers used metal detectors over a portion of the property surrounding the cabin, and dug several smaller probes where metal detectors showed there were possible artifacts.

Project Obstacles

It took U of I several years to gain access to the 25-acre property because the site is owned by a corporation. The property is also a designated national historic site in an area protected by the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act and is surrounded by Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness Area.

A statue of Bemis will be unveiled at noon on Aug. 10 on the front steps of the Idaho State Capitol in Boise. Gov. Brad Little and Sen. Jim Risch, R-Idaho, will declare Aug. 10 “Polly Bemis Day.” The statue will eventually be placed at the ranch.

Bemis, who was just over 4 feet tall, was smuggled to the United States and sold as a slave in California.

She was taken from San Francisco to Portland and eventually the Idaho Territory to the mining community of Warrens, now Warren, where she worked in a saloon.

She eventually gained her freedom from her Chinese owner, and the 1880 U.S. Census showed her living with saloon owner Charlie Bemis (1848-1922).

Polly Bemis took in laundry from miners and ran a boarding house. Charlie was almost killed during a gambling dispute in 1890 when he was shot in the cheek, but Polly nursed him back to health.

Polly Bemis was also a good fisherman and caught and sold fish from the Salmon River. Eventually she and Charlie moved to their ranch 17 miles north of Warren on the Salmon River where they had a mining claim.

They were among the first pioneers to live on the Salmon River. The story of Polly Bemis was the subject of a 1991 film, “A Thousand Pieces of Gold.”

(Ralph Bartholdt is Communications Manager of University Communications and Marketing for the University of Idaho.)

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
—————

Mining News:

Plans To Restart Mining In The Historic Stibnite District Raise Environmental Concerns

Boise State Public Radio News By Troy Oppie, Lindsey Schmidt July 22, 2021


Alexandra Etheridge U.S. Geological Survey

The U.S. Forest Service has asked Perpetua Resources — the company wanting to re-open and expand the Stibnite Mine east of McCall — for more information on the potential environmental impacts of its revised plan. That change means a decision on the mine won’t come until well into 2023. The site has a complex history and uncertain future here in Idaho.

Rocky Beginnings

Sixty-six miles along gravel roads northeast of Cascade sits the Stibnite Mining District. Miners first chased gold in the region’s rugged mountains in 1900. It was land that once belonged to the Nez Perce tribe.

“The Nez Perce tribe ceded millions of acres to the federal government,” said Shannon Wheeler, Vice-Chairman of the Nez Perce Tribal Executive Committee.

The Treaty of 1855 handed the U.S. government a lot of important tribal land, primarily for mining.

continued:
—————-

Public Lands:

Stage One Fire Restriction FAQs

Boise National Forest July 20, 2021 (via FB)

The Boise National Forest is currently under Stage One Fire Restrictions. Under Stage One Fire Restrictions – campfires are ONLY allowed at developed recreation sites.

But what is a developed recreation site and how it is different than a dispersed site?

A developed recreation site is an established area that has been improved and maintained by the Forest Service. These recreation sites will have approved metal fire rings, water, and other facilities provided. Usually these sites have an associated fee. Campfires are allowed only in the provided fire rings.

What is a dispersed recreation site and how it is different than a developed recreation site?

A dispersed recreation site is any site that is NOT an established developed recreation site that can be used for camping. These sites do not have an associated fee. These sites often have a rock fire ring. However, under Stage One Fire Restrictions campfires are NOT allowed in these rock rings. These rings are made by campers for there use and they are not safe to use under especially hot/dry conditions.
— — — — — — — — — —

BLM to extend closure of Skinny Dipper Hot Springs to protect public health and safety

Boise, Idaho – July 23, 2021 – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) announced today it will extend the existing closure of Skinny Dipper Hot Springs, located about five miles west of Garden Valley, for an additional five years to protect public health and safety and prevent additional damage to natural resources.

The existing closure was implemented in June 2016 after an environmental analysis concluded that unauthorized construction of pools and piping systems and resulting use posed a public health and safety hazard and damaged natural resources. Prior to the closure, the BLM received repeated complaints from local law enforcement, area landowners and public health officials related to unsafe and illegal activity at the site. Soon after the closure, a natural rockslide filled the pools, making them largely unusable.

The BLM released a proposal to extend the existing closure in May for public comment. The agency will soon be publishing a notice to extend the existing closure in the Federal Register, as required.

“We appreciate all the input received from our local partners and public land users, the majority of which supported the closure extension,” said Brent Ralston, BLM Four Rivers Field Manager. “Extending the closure addresses the potential for public health and safety concerns to arise again, allows us the time to finish rehabilitating the access trail, and provides relief to local and county emergency resources.”

Details regarding the closure extension are available at (link).

For more information, contact the BLM Four Rivers Field Office at 208-384-3300.
—————-

Fire Season:

InciWeb Fire info

link:
— — —

Air Quality McCall

link:
— — — —

National Fire Map

link: (zoomable)
— — — —

July 23, 2021 Afternoon Smoke

20210723SmokeMap-a
GOES-17 Satellite Map

(Our 1 day this week of good air quality.)
— — — — — — — — — —

Lightning sparks six fires on Payette, Frank Church wilderness

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 22, 2021

Lightning has ignited six wildfires in the Payette National Forest in the past week.

Four fires were within the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, while two smaller fires were within the South Fork of the Salmon River Drainage.

The Krassel Creek fire just east of the Krassel Work Center, and the Cougar Fire one mile northwest of Blackmare Peak were ignited on July 19 but were kept small by firefighters.

Of those fires within the wilderness, the Rush Fire was the largest, growing to over 1,500 acres as of Tuesday after initial firefighting efforts were not successful. The Rush Fire is located about 14 miles to the southwest of Taylor Ranch.

The Vinegar Fire, about two miles north of the Cabin Creek Administrative Site, was about 270 acres as of Tuesday. The Cabin Creek Airstrip has been closed and firefighters have been working to protect Forest Service structures at the site.

The Club Fire about three miles southwest of Root Ranch was less than 30 acres as of Tuesday with a 10-person firefighting crew on site.

The Copper Fire in the Monumental Creek drainage was put out by firefighters on Sunday.

Fire restrictions remain in place on the Payette forest in addition to all state and private land except within city limits.

Building, maintaining, attending or using a fire, campfire or stove fire is prohibited with exceptions that include using a liquid fuel stove, burning within a designated area approved by the Forest Service, using a Forest Service maintained metal or concrete campfire structure, or using a fully enclosed metal stove or grill.

Smoking is banned except in an enclosed vehicle or building, in an area at least three feet wide and cleared of flammable materials.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — —

Dixie Fire grows to 29,000 acres and spreading

Blaze stays on the north side of Salmon River

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 22, 2021

The lightning caused Dixie Fire about 51 miles northeast of McCall grew to about 29,300 acres as of Tuesday, mostly on the north of the fire and along the Salmon River.

Controlled burning conducted last week created a buffer between the community of Dixie and the fire, and firefighters continued to strengthen containment lines with similar burnouts as well bulldozer lines and retardant drops around the perimeter.

Containment lines near Dixie and Comstock have been holding the fire to the east of those communities, but the fire could grow to the south of Comstock and in the northeast portion of the fire, said Operations Section Chief Kendal Wilson.

continued:
— — — —

Lightning Starts Wilderness Fires on the Payette National Forest, More Thunderstorms Forecasted Today

Point Protection is Being Done on Wilderness Inholdings

McCall, ID, July 19, 2021 — Last week, lightning ignited four fires in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Payette National Forest. The Copper Fire, located in the Monumental Creek drainage, was suppressed and declared out on July 18th. The remaining three fires, the Rush Creek, Vinegar, and Club, escaped initial attack and are being managed by a local Type 3 Incident Management Team, with point protection in place. More lightning is anticipated for this afternoon, so fire crews are remaining vigilant.

The Rush Fire is located at the confluence of Rush Creek and Telephone Creek, approximately 14 miles to the southwest of Taylor Ranch. The fire was detected on July 16, 2021, and initial actions to suppress the fire were unsuccessful. As of midnight on July 18th, the fire had grown to just over 1,500 acres but had still not crossed the South Fork of Rush Creek.

The Vinegar Fire is located approximately 2 miles north of the Cabin Creek Administrative Site. As of early Monday morning it was almost 270 acres. Firefighters are on site with structure protection equipment and will have their protective measures in place by the end of shift today. Cabin Creek Airstrip has been closed to General Aviation and a Notice to Airman (NOTAM) is in place.

The Club Fire is located 3 miles southwest of Root Ranch. The fire is between 20 and 30 acres and has a 10-person crew on scene.

The nation is currently in planning level 5, meaning that unassigned resources are scarce. The Payette National Forest will be working with their neighboring forests to prioritize initial and extended attack resources. Please remember to recreate responsibly and abide by the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in place on the Payette. On average, human-caused wildfires make up 87 percent of all wildfire occurrences annually.

Forest Service News Release
Payette Fire Information: (208) 634-0820 payettefireinformation@gmail.com
— —

Rush Fire Update July 25

For the past several days, 11 members of the Alta Hotshot Crew have been preparing Taylor Ranch for the time when the Rush Creek Fire reaches it, a tactic called “point protection.” Because Taylor Ranch is a wilderness inholding managed by the University of Idaho, tools such as chainsaws are allowed within its boundaries. Protecting Taylor Ranch has involved cutting back flammable brush, digging handline, and setting up pumps, hoses, and sprinklers around buildings. For more information about the Rush Creek Fire, visit Inciweb at (link).

(via PNF FB)
— —

Trail Closures in Place as Warm, Dry Weather Returns

Thunderstorms Bring Precipitation to Wilderness Fires

McCall, ID, July 21, 2021— Trail closures have been put in place for the safety of the public and firefighters on the Rush Creek, Vinegar and Club Fires burning in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. Please see the attached maps and the descriptions below for details on the trail closures.

Thunderstorms brought precipitation to all three wilderness fires on Tuesday, slowing fire growth; however, recent rainfall will only moderate fire behavior temporarily. In the next few days, conditions are expected to continue to warm and dry, with fire danger remaining high.

Per Closure Order 0412-563, portions of Silver Creek Trail (NFST #010) and South Fork Rush Creek Trail (NFST #058) are closed until October 1, 2021. All of Coyote Spring/Spring Creek Trail (NFST #044), Rush Creek Trail (NFST #057), and Telephone Creek Trail (NFST #060) are closed until October 1, 2021. All trails are located within the Krassel Ranger District on the Payette National Forest, in Idaho and Valley Counties.

The portion of NFST #010, Silver Creek Trail, shown on Exhibit A (Club Fire), beginning at its junction with NFST #011, Frog Spring Ridge Trail, located in Section 11, Township 22 North, Range 11 East, and continuing for 6.8 miles to its junction with NFST #002, Cold Meadows Trail, in Section 19, Township 23 North, Range 12 East.

All of NFST #044, Coyote Spring / Spring Creek Trail, shown on Exhibit B (Vinegar Fire), which begins at its junction with NFST #196, Big Creek Trail, located in Section 25, Township 21 North, Range 12 East, and continues for 12.65 miles to its junction with NFST #168, Cottonwood Butte Trail, on the Forest Boundary in Section 2, Township 21 North, Range 13 East.

All of NFST #057, Rush Creek Trail, shown on Exhibit C (Rush Creek Fire), which begins at its junction with NFST #055, Big Creek Ridge Trail, located in Section 19, Township 20 North, Range 12 East, and continues for 8.5 miles to its junction with NFST #058, South Fork Rush Creek, and NFST #060, Telephone Creek Trail, in Section 3, Township 19 North, Range 12 East.

The portion of NFST #058, South Fork Rush Creek Trail, shown on Exhibit C (Rush Creek Fire), beginning at its junction with NFST #060 Telephone Creek Trail located in Section 3, Township 19 North, Range 12 East, and continuing for 7.6 miles to the Forest Boundary located at Section 8, Township 19 North, Range 13 East.

All of NFST #060, Telephone Creek Trail, shown on Exhibit C (Rush Creek Fire), which begins at its junction with NFST #061, Lookout Mtn. Ridge Trail, located in Section 12, Township 19 North, Range 11 East, and continuing 8.2 miles to its junction with NFST #057, Rush Creek Trail, and NFST #058, South Fork Rush Creek Trail, in Section 3, Township 19 North, Range 12 East.

The Closed Trails are all located within the Krassel Ranger District, Payette National Forest, Idaho and Valley Counties, Idaho, Boise Meridian.

InciWeb:

Link: to Maps at the bottom of the closure page:
— — — — — — — — — —

Latest on fires burning in Salmon-Challis National Forest

By Rachel Fabbi July 25, 2021 Local News 8

The National Forest Service has updated their progress in fighting three fires burning in the Salmon-Challis National Forest.

continued:
——————

Critter News:

Groups: Idaho wolf law will cause grizzly bear, lynx deaths

Keith Ridler (AP), Associated Press July 20, 2021

Environmental groups have notified Idaho Gov. Brad Little and other state officials of their intent to file a lawsuit over an expanded wolf-killing law they believe will result in the illegal killing of federally protected grizzly bear and lynx.

The Center for Biological Diversity, Western Watersheds Project and others on Monday gave a required 60-day notice of their intent to sue if Idaho officials don’t prohibit all hunting, trapping and snaring in grizzly bear and lynx habitat.

For lynx, the conditions could cover most of Idaho except for the southwestern portion of the state. For grizzly bears, the areas would include portions of northern, central and eastern Idaho. Wolves are found in roughly the northern two-thirds of the state.

continued: KTVB
— — — — — — — — — —

Messy Grand Teton camp draws bear; Idaho woman fined $5.8K

By Associated Press July 23, 2021

A judge has ordered an Idaho woman to pay over $5,800 for leaving trash out that attracted a grizzly bear to her campsite in Wyoming’s Grand Teton National Park.

Federal prosecutors say wildlife officials had to tranquilize the bear and move it elsewhere in the park in the hope that tasting human food won’t make it a recurring danger to people.

continued: (Local News 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Yearling moose relocated out of Twin Falls residential neighborhood

July 20, 2021 Local News 8


Idaho Fish and Game

A yearling moose on a walk-about was captured out of a Twin Falls neighborhood and relocated back into suitable moose habitat north of Carey, Idaho.

Residents of northeast Twin Falls had an unexpected visitor on Sunday, July 18, when they awoke to a yearling moose wandering throughout their neighborhood. Originally reported in the Kimberly area four days earlier, the moose slowly made its way into Twin Falls. While seeing a moose is an exciting event, having one in a residential neighborhood quickly raises issues of public safety, especially as residents take their morning walks, often with dogs.

The Twin Falls Police Department started receiving phone calls and reports of pictures of moose on doorbell cameras on Sunday morning near Jason’s Woodland Hills Park.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Van crashes into deer, catches fire on Idaho highway

The sheriff’s office said the crash created a fire that burned the van down and closed the highway. The deer was seen running away from the crash.

KTVB Staff July 21, 2021


Credit: Blaine County Sheriff’s Office

A Washington man is now in search of a new vehicle after his van was completely engulfed by a fire that was started by a collision with a deer.

According to the Blaine County Sheriff’s Office, the 59-year-old Bellevue man was driving northbound on Idaho Highway 75 in a red 1999 Volkswagen Eurovan.

At about 10:30 p.m. on Tuesday, near milepost 103, which is just north of the junction of Highway 75 and Highway 20, the Eurovan collided with a deer that was crossing the highway, the sheriff’s office said in a statement.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Rabid bat discovered in Blaine County

Blaine is at least the third Idaho county where rabies has been found in a bat this year. Health officials urge precautions to protect your family and your pets.

KTVB Staff July 20, 2021

A bat caught in Blaine County tested positive for rabies Tuesday.

That is the first bat this year to test positive for rabies in south-central Idaho, said Brianna Bodily, public information officer for the South-Central Public Health District.

However, rabid bats were found in June in Bonneville and Payette counties.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

2 charged with shooting, killing golden eagle in Ada County

Katie Terhune July 20, 2021 KTVB

Two men were are facing federal charges after investigators say they shot a golden eagle inside a conservation area earlier this year.

Wyatt Noe and Colten Ferdinand were formally charged Thursday with killing a golden eagle without permission and killing a migratory bird without permission. Both charges are misdemeanors.

According to agents with the U.S. Department of Fish and Wildlife, Noe and Ferdinand killed the eagle inside the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area south of Kuna on April 10. Officials stressed that the killing was not accidental, writing that the two men shot at the bird “knowingly or with wanton disregard for the consequences of their actions.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Mosquitoes found in Gem County test positive for West Nile virus

The mosquitoes were collected on July 21 and the virus was confirmed the next day in tests performed by the Idaho Bureau of Laboratories.

KTVB Staff July 23, 2021

West Nile virus has been found in a third Idaho county.

Jason Kinley, Director of the Gem County Mosquito Abatement District (GCMAD), says mosquitoes found in traps during routine surveillance have tested positive for virus.

continued:
—————–

Fish & Game News:

Bobcats abound in the Boise area and beyond

By Steven Ross, Conservation Officer Sr.
Wednesday, July 21, 2021

One of the greatest things about living in Idaho is the wide range of wildlife that can be seen at any time when you take a step outside your front door. As Idaho’s human population grows, the interface between the untamed and our urban communities also expands. Most of the time these interactions are quiet, memorable moments like seeing the mule deer walk by with her spotted fawns, or catching a glimpse of an osprey as it dives to snatch its next meal of fish. Sometimes we observe the more rare animals which can leave us with some concern, like a bobcat.


IDFG

Bobcats are common, but reclusive in nature. They don’t often come out in daylight hours as they are most active at night. The rocky canyons with mixed riparian and wooded areas nearby make Boise an ideal habitat for the bobcat. This wild cat varies in color from light brown to grey with black spots and stripes on its back and sides. The cat has rather large cheek tufts, with a white belly. The tail is a giveaway as it is “bobbed” short and is black tipped on the topside, white on the bottom. A full grown bobcat can weight up to 20 pounds, but most are smaller in size, and are usually around 16 to 20 inches tall at the back.

A bobcat sighting can be concerning at first with the thoughts of chance encounters with children and pets. However, a bobcat’s diet primarily consists of rodents, rabbits and small birds like quail. One should take care if they do have pets like small dogs, chickens, rabbits and ducks. To avoid any confrontations it is best to keep all pets inside from dusk to dawn and protect outside pets with enclosures that have a protective roof. Motion activated lights and noise devices have been used with good success to keep a variety of animals, including bobcats, out of yards.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Summer elk hunts require special preparation

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Thursday, July 22, 2021

Obtaining landowner permission, knowing the area, and planning for the heat are key

With some early season elk hunts starting Aug. 1, Idaho Fish and Game officials remind hunters that they can increase their chances of success and avoid possible problems by obtaining landowner permission, knowing the area they intend to hunt and take extra precautions to properly care for the game meat during summer weather.

“Always get permission, scout the area beforehand, and plan for the heat,” said Rick Ward, Deer and Elk Program Coordinator. “These are challenging hunts, but hunters who plan ahead and adjust to the conditions can do well.”

The majority of early season elk hunting opportunities are antlerless hunts that occur on or within 1 mile of private agricultural land. Early-season hunts across Idaho are a tool that wildlife managers use to address chronic depredation problems by providing additional opportunity to hunters. The goal is to reduce crop damage by harvesting or discouraging animals in specific areas or portions of units.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Goose refuses to be separated from mate undergoing surgery

by WJAR Staff Tuesday, July 20th 2021

A love story in Cape Cod, Massachusetts is giving animal lovers goosebumps.


Cape Wildlife Center/CNN Newsource)

Two geese couldn’t stand to be separated after an injury left one of them in need of medical care.

Staff at the Cape Wildlife Center in Barnstable noticed one of a pair of wild geese that live nearby limping and falling over after being hurt by a snapping turtle.

They discovered two fractures on his foot, requiring surgery.

“We heard sort of a faint tapping at the front door. We turned and were all pretty shocked to see his mate had walked up to the porch and was furiously trying to get into the clinic,” said Zak Mertz, executive director of the Cape Wildlife Center. “I kid you not, she stood there the entire time and actually watched the procedure going on. Was really watching him like a hawk. Or like a goose, I guess.”

Forty-five minutes later, with the surgery complete, they moved Arnold right in front of the door as they gave him oxygen. When Arnold fully woke up, his mate began grooming him.

full story w/video:
—————-

Seasonal Humor:

VetBill-a

CovidFirstShot-a
——————-

July 18, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

July 18, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Because of our [water] situation lawn watering is discouraged. Odd/Even days watering. No watering after 2pm. If you are asked to turn your water off, it’s because the system is in danger of running out. Please be respectful. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order issued
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit season
May 15 – Firewood Season, permits at The Corner
May 25 – Johnson Creek road fully open
June 7 – Lick Creek road open
June 13 – Profile road open
July 16 – Stage 1 Fire Restrictions
July 17 – ATV/UTV Escapade 10am
July 19-29 – Lick Creek Road closure for bridge replacement
July 21-22 – Mastercraft stove maintenance days
July 24 – Pet Vax Clinic
July 28 – Dust Abatement Calcium chloride
August 5-7 – Harmonica Festival
Aug 14 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
Sept 11 – YPFD Budget Meeting 10am at Fire Hall
Sept 11 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions July 16

Under the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions, the following acts are prohibited on state and federally managed or protected lands, roads, and trails:
* Building, maintaining, attending, or using a fire, campfire or stove fire except within a designated recreation site and in a permanent concrete or metal fire ring, or on private land, and only within an owner-provided structure.
* Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle, building, or designated recreation site or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials.
— — — —

ATV/UTV Escapade July 17

Saturday July 17, 2021: This out-and-back ride is rated as intermediate. Participants ride from Yellow Pine Community Hall to Logan Creek , then return to Big Creek Campground for lunch (provided) and history/stories. After lunch, participants will continue the ride to Pilot Peak. The timeframe of this event is estimated to be from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. Check-in starts at 9:00am; leave at 10:00am. You can register early at (link)
— — — —

Heating Maintenance Day July 21-22

Deb Filler is coordinating with Mastercraft of McCall to schedule a maintenance day in Yellow Pine for propane and pellet stoves. If you are interested, please contact Deb at 208 633-6945. Mastercraft will be here July 21 and 22 to do stove maintenance.
— — — —

July 24 – Pet Vax Clinic

Dr. Keith Ruble and crew from Cascade Vet Clinic will be coming to Yellow Pine Saturday, July 24th, to vaccinate our pets. If you want to get on the list, call Cascade Vet Clinic at (208) 382-4590 so they know to bring the proper charts, etc.
— — — —

Harmonica Festival August 5, 6, and 7

Link: to website
———

Village News:

General Store Update July 15th

The store has received their fuel delivery and now also offers diesel.
— — — —

Smoke in Yellow Pine

Yellow Pine, along with most of Idaho has had smoky skies and poor air quality this past week. Most of the smoke is coming from fires in California, Oregon and Washington, but some days we were getting smoke from the Dixie fire north of the main Salmon River. Our air quality was in the “Orange” range for several days, and this past weekend it has been “Yellow.”

Western Satellite Map for July 18, 2021
20210718SmokeMap-a
— — — —

Veterans’ Monument

With this heat, the flowers and shrubs at our Veterans’ Memorial dry out quickly. When Niebrand’s are in, they water them, but aren’t here all the time……if you go by, please check, and give them a drink with the hose that is there. Our veterans (and the Niebrand’s) thank you!
— — — —

Attention

Would the person who borrowed the measuring wheel please return it to the community hall? It will be needed for the festival.

Also – Will the person who left the twin bed outside the Community Hall please pick it up.The yard sale is over until next year. Thank you.
— — — —

Lick Creek Road

Lick Creek Road will be closed at Zena Creek TOMORROW (about 4 miles east of the Ponderosa Campground) from July 19 – July 29 for a bridge replacement. Please plan ahead!
— — — —

Conserve (and Boil) Water

Please be conservative when watering lawns. We ask those that are here all week to not water lawns on the weekends so that more water is available for the weekend cabin owners. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!
— —

Tips on Water Recycling

Use a dishpan to catch the rinse water when doing dishes (and hand washing) and use it to water outdoor flowers.
— —

DEQ awards $150,000 to the Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Inc. in Valley County

Boise, June 29, 2021 — The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) today announced the award of a $150,000 in drinking water construction assistance to the Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Inc. in Valley County, Idaho.

The funding will be used to replace the damaged transmission and distribution water mains and install three pressure-reducing valves.

The assistance from DEQ’s State Revolving Loan Fund, which is capitalized annually by grants from the US Environmental Protection Agency, provides this funding with no repayment obligation. The favorable loan terms represent a $205,146 savings to the community when compared to average costs for municipal general obligation debt issuances.

MaryAnna Peavey – Grants & Loans Bureau Chief
— — — —

Scrap Metal

Sharing a message that Mike Amos will haul out a load of scrap metal. If you have scrap metal, contact Mike. He has an area by his place to stack it.
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Lick Creek Road will be closed at Zena Creek (about 4 miles east of the Ponderosa Campground) from July 19 – July 29 for a bridge replacement. Please plan ahead.

Johnson Creek, Profile Gap and Lick Creek roads are Open. These roads have not been bladed and are rough.

The Hwy 55 project Smith’s Ferry area: Starting June 1, crews will transition into their summer construction schedule. Drivers can anticipate single-lane, alternating traffic controlled by flaggers Monday – early Friday morning. From Friday morning – Sunday, and any major holidays, the road will be open to two lanes. This schedule will be in place until September. Project Website link:

The Hwy 55 project from Donnelly to McCall: One lane during the week and two lanes on weekends. Project is slated to last until September.
— — — —

Critters

Aggressive Deer and Elk

Be aware that mothers will attack dogs and chase people if they feel their babies are threatened. Keep dogs leashed in the forest during “baby season” for their own protection.

Ticks

* Know where to expect ticks. Many ticks live in grassy, brushy, or wooded areas. When possible, avoid wooded and brushy areas with tall grass and leaf litter. Walk in the center of trails, particularly in spring and summer when ticks feed.
* Wear appropriate clothing. When in tick habitats, wear light-colored, tightly woven long pants and long-sleeve shirt. Tuck your pant legs into socks or boots, and your shirt into your pants. This helps keep ticks on the outside of your clothing where you can spot them more easily.
* Use tick repellent when necessary, and carefully follow instructions on the label. Apply an EPA-registered repellent effective against ticks, such as those containing DEET to clothes and exposed skin, and permethrin to clothes and gear. Take care when applying repellent on children. EPA’s search tool can help you find the repellent that best suits your needs.
* Check clothing, gear, and pets after being areas with ticks. Ticks can hitch a ride into your home on clothing and pets, then attach to you or a family member later. Carefully examine coats, camping gear, and daypacks. Don’t forget your dog, see CDC’s where to check your pet for ticks.
* Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming can reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease and may be effective in reducing the risk of other tick-borne disease. Showering can wash off unattached ticks and it is a good opportunity to do a tick check.
* Check your body, your child and pets thoroughly for ticks. Carefully inspect areas in and around the hair, head, neck, ears, under arms, inside the belly button, around the waist, between the legs, and behind the knees. Ticks can be very small before they feed—look for what may appear like a new freckle or speck of dirt. Continue checking for two to three days after returning from areas with ticks.

Pine Martins & Raccoons

Watch your small pets. Reports of pine martins living in the dump and raccoons on the north side of the village.

Be Bear, Fox & Coyote Aware

* Do not feed them human food
* Secure your trash
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Be Mountain Lion Aware

Note: A report of a mountain lion still hanging around the upper end of the village early summer.

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report July 17: The dumpsters are about one quarter full, and it still clean out there. The road to the dump is fine.

The bins were emptied May 22nd. Locals worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water. No outside watering after 2pm, nor on holiday weekends and especially not during the festival.

July 8, 2021 Update

DRINKING WATER WARNING
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059
BOIL WATER ADVISORY
Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST. Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 180 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake@drakediversified.com. .
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc. .
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 7-8-21.

YPWUA 2021 Shareholder Meeting July 4 at 10am

YPWUA 2021 Shareholder Meeting Minutes

Sunday July 4th 10 AM
Community Hall

1. Financial Report – Willie
A. We have $52,000 balance
B. 9 people delinquent compared to 18 two years ago

2. Operations
A. Boil order status – continue to be on boil order and will be until more leaks are found and repaired

3. Grants
A. Details of grants We are been granted $450,000 in grants. YPWUA must contribute $12,500 as matching funds to receive grants
C. A vote was taken which was required by the shareholders to accept the terms of the grant. Nicki Harner made the motion, Ginny seconded the motion and the vote was approved by 100 percent of the shareholders that attended.
C. More future grants are going to be written. The approved $450,000 will only get some of the distribution lines replaced

4. Summer lawn watering
A. Because of our situation lawn watering is discouraged
B. Odd/Even days watering
C. No watering after 2 pm
D. If you are asked to turn your water off, it’s because the system is in danger of running out. Please be respectful.

5. Election of one board member
A. Dave Prouty is not running for another term
B. Candy Hardisy was nominated and accepted the available position on the board

6. Other Comments
A. Mike Fortin brought up that he was collecting spring water to water his lawn. That’s great, many in the community is coming up with ways to water lawns without using our community water.
B. Many thanked the water board for their work on getting grants. It has taken a while but is starting to pay off.
C. Meeting ended at 10:50 am.

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Water Board:

Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty

Boil Your Water Before Using
Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020.
Link: to Notice
— — — —

VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association
Meeting Minutes July 10, 2021

I. Call to order
Deb Filler called to order the regular meeting of the VYPA at 1400 at the Yellow Pine Community Hall.

II. Roll call
Council Members: Deb Filler, Ronda Rogers, Hailey Harris.
Attendees: Rhonda Egbert, Virginia Bartholomew, Ron Basabe, Christy Petersen, Joel Fields, Mary Fields, Belinda Provancher, Margaret Vranish, Bill McIntosh, Rob Rosenbaum, Theresa Rosenbaum.

III. Approval of minutes from last meeting
Deb Filler asked attendees if there were any outstanding questions/concerns with prior meeting minutes. All attendees agreed that there were no questions/concerns. Minutes approved.

IV. Open issues
a) Treasurer Report: Ronda Rogers discussed the breakdown of the General Ledger Report, all attendees were offered a copy. No questions/concerns. Marj Fields requesting a copy of financial breakdown for the cemetery committee. (Ronda Rogers to send that to Marj).
b) Community Hall Update: Council has cleaned out the Community Yard Sale items, waiting on grant outcomes, and Tim Rogers is still working on kitchen/bathroom renovations.
c) Cemetery: Ron Basabe gave an update-Tim & Ron will work together to get water source running; expired water permit is in process of being renewed, Ron will get the headstone for Chappy placed.
d) Infrastructure: OK Gravel started project on West Ellison
e) Harmonica Festival: Deb Filler gave a budget summary including the decline in funds due to ads, supplies, etc. Final Festival meeting to be held July 11, 2021 at 1400 at Deb Filler’s home.
f) Stibnite Project: University of Idaho partnership to monitor water levels starts this week.
g) Nominations: Hailey Harris appointed as interim Secretary in replacement of Rhonda Egbert until the position is up for election in 2022. Chairman: Deb Filler nominated by Virginia Bartholomew, seconded by Rhonda Egbert, no objections, motion to re-elect Deb Filler as Chairman approved unanimously. Member at Large: Rhonda Egbert nominated by Virginia Bartholomew, seconded by Christy Petersen, no objections, motion to elect Rhonda Egbert as Member at Large approved unanimously.
h) Dust Abatement: North American Dust Control has laid Earthbind; Calcium Chloride to be laid on July 28th. Deb Filler discussed the ultimate goal behind having Calcium Chloride on Yellow Pine Ave.
i) Perpetua Resources Update: Belinda Provancher explained that a comment period will be held for the Supplemental DEIS, Stibnite Lake will aim to keep water temperatures low (suggested by the tribes & conservation groups) by providing shrubbery and vegetation around the lake/along the stream. Within the first six months of 2023, a decision is likely to be made on mining permitting with hopes to start construction in the fall of 2023.
j) Fire Department: Ronda Rogers gave update-Elections for Commissioners for both District 2 & 3 will be held in November 2021.
V. New business
a) Fireworks: Explained by Deb Filler that both VYPA & YPFPD have no authority with the individuals that organize the fireworks show, but that VYPA can give donations if VYPA members vote for such. Concern around presence and location of fireworks was displayed by citizens of Yellow Pine. Rhonda Egbert to conduct research to further investigate requirements for future fireworks to ensure community unanimity. VYPA to inform Belinda Provancher of the outcome of said research and how the Village of Yellow Pine (citizens or otherwise) will handle this issue going forward.
b) Transfer Station: On July 10, 2021, at 1730, the community of Yellow Pine is encouraged (if able) to help clean up the transfer station. Explained by Deb Filler that Lake Shore Disposal had many breakdowns in their dump trucks, which resulted in an overflowing transfer station. Encouragement to maintain cleanliness of transfer station was expressed.

VI. Adjournment
Deb Filler adjourned the meeting at 1444.
Minutes submitted by: Hailey Harris

Link: to July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes

June 12 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Hailey Harris, Secretary
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)

Festival
Want to join YPAC Corp in making a difference? We are raising money to benefit the Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival . Any donation will help.
Each year, during the first full weekend of August, the sleepy mountain village of Yellow Pine is transformed into the largest festival of it’s kind in the western hemisphere!
The festival is produced by volunteers and raises funds to support the village of Yellow Pine as well as the funds needed to hold next year’s festival.
As you all know, the 2020 festival had to be cancelled due to Covid-19. This placed a significant burden on Yellow Pine to come up with enough funding to hold the 2021 festival this August 5, 6, 7.
Souvenirs and events at the festival help raise funds. We also know there are many of you who support the festival, but are not able to attend. This fund raiser is to give you an opportunity to help us help Yellow Pine.
Thanks in advance for your tax-deductible contribution to this cause that means so much to us!
GoFundMe link:

Anyone interested in being a part of the Festival Planning/Working committee, please contact Deb Filler. Meetings will begin at the end of January. Even if you aren’t physically in YP, you can participate in the committee.
Next Festival Planning July 11, 2021 – Contact Deb for Zoom link and passcode.
2021 Planning Notes updated July 11, 2021 (link)
Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival Policy and Procedure Link:
— — — —

YPFD News:

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful.
link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021.pdf

June 12, 2020 – 10am Fire siren test and YPFD meeting.
Link to minutes: 2021 June 12 YPFD meeting minutes.docx

There was a meeting Saturday, July 10th, 10 am at Fire Station (no minutes yet.)

Elections for Commissioners for both District 2 and 3 will be held in November 2021.

May 15, 2020 – there was a YPFD meeting 10am at the Fire Hall.
Link: to 20210515 YPFD MeetingNotes_Final.docx

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30, 2020 at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

2021 Meeting schedule for the YPFD. All meetings are at the YPFD Station
Sat. May 15 at 10am
Sat. June 12 at 10am
Sat. July 10 at 10am
Sat. September 11 at 10am Budget Meeting

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by a escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Phil Jensen, Acting – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Tim Rogers – Fire Chief
Secretary Ronda Rogers
Treasurer Nikki Saleen

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
Hours: 1pm-8pm, closed on Tuesdays
We offer smoked tri tip, brisket, and chicken sandwiches and also burgers and chicken wings.
Firewood Permits available May 15th.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Yellow Pine Tavern open daily:
Monday thru Thursday 8am to 9pm
Friday and Saturday 8am to 10pm
Sunday 8am to 8pm
Indoor Dining with limited seating and Outdoor Dining Available.
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer, Wine and Pop
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Opened June 12th for Summer
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
Store hours: 10am to 5pm Gas and Diesel available.
The store is now receiving inventory of Food items. The ATM is operational, and Debit/Credit cards are accepted. Currently there is fuel, ice, alcoholic beverages (non liquor) tobacco, non alc beverages, snacks, and Dairy items (ice cream, milk, butter, and yogurt). Fresh produce is soon to come. If there are needs for fuel or anything during off hours, Josh will be around on call to accommodate. For any particular store item requests, please call 208-633-3300 or Email
For room reservations, please call 208-633-3300 or Email for reservations
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation – (208) 382-4844

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (July 12) overnight low of 47 degrees. This morning it appears clear above moderate smoke and orange air quality. A few tree swallows, a robin, a flicker and a jay in the area. Colombian ground squirrels are very numerous. Johnson Creek is running one third of normal flow. Smoky and warm at lunch time. A bit breezy early afternoon. Hot and smoky all afternoon, high of 97 degrees. Still in the 90s by early evening, appears clear above the smoke, poor air quality. Looked hazy before midnight.

Tuesday (July 13) overnight low of 52 degrees. This morning it is likely clear above the smoke, reduced visibility and orange air quality, light breeze. Loud aircraft buzzed over the village at 859am. Not many birds around, only a couple of swallows, and heard a woodpecker drumming. It is VERY dry. Warm and thicker smoke at lunch time. Hot afternoon, increasing smoke and very poor air quality, a bit breezy at times, high of 92 degrees. Warm and smoky by early evening, light breezes. Cooling off after sunset, light breezes and smoky. Looked hazy before midnight.

Wednesday (July 14) overnight low of 49 degrees. This morning it is likely clear above moderate smoke and poor air quality. A few tree swallows and several ground squirrels. Warm and smoky at lunch time. Mail truck made it in on time. Light street traffic and very dusty. Hot smoky afternoon, high of 93 degrees. Still hot early evening, looks clear above the smoke and light breeze. Slow to cool down after sunset, smoky and crappy air quality. Looked hazy before midnight.

Thursday (July 15) overnight low of 50 degrees. This morning it is probably clear above moderate smoke and orange air quality. A couple of tree swallows and a jay calling. Light air traffic. Hot and smoky at lunch time, light breeze. Light street traffic and very dusty. Hot smoky afternoon, high of 96 degrees. Still pretty warm by early evening, light breeze and a couple of small passing clouds above the smoke. Slowly cooling off before dusk and smoky. Looked hazy before midnight.

Friday (July 16) overnight low of 49 degrees. This morning it is likely clear above moderate smoke, very poor air quality, and reduced visibility. A jay and a hairy woodpecker calling, ground squirrels and chipmunk running about. Warm, smoky and partly cloudy after lunch time. Hot, dry and smoky afternoon, poor air quality, a few clouds and gusty breezes, high of 95 degrees. Better air quality by early evening, still pretty warm but can see the sky – partly cloudy. Jays visiting after it started cooling off. Report of 1 chick about ready to fledge at the osprey nest.

Saturday (July 17) overnight low estimated at 49 degrees (gizmo showed 23F!) This morning clear sky visible above light haze of smoke. Not many birds around. Traffic kicking up dust. Helicopter at 139pm. Hot and gusty breezes early afternoon, smoke increasing a little bit. Hot, dry, smoky and dusty afternoon, high of 97 degrees. It was still in the low 90s by early evening, clear above a light haze of smoke and light breezes. The osprey chick has been taking practice flights from the nest to a nearby snag. A couple of jays stopped by. Still warm at dusk. Looked hazy before midnight.

Sunday (July 18) overnight low of 48 degrees. This morning clear sky above a haze of smoke. Very light air traffic. A couple of swallows swooping, no sign of any chicks fledging yet. Hot and smoky at lunch time. Hot and gusty breezes early afternoon, appears partly cloudy above increasing smoke. Very hot late afternoon and smoky, high of 100 degrees. Still above 90 degrees by early evening, it appears clear over the haze of smoke and slight breeze.
———————

Idaho News:

17 new Valley County COVID-19 cases reported since July 1

By Tom Grote for The Star-News July 15, 2021

Valley County’s two hospitals have reported 17 new cases of COVID-19 since July 1. The hospitals are on a pace to exceed the 29 new cases reported during June.

St. Luke’s McCall reported seven new cases between July 1 and Monday, while Cascade Medical Center reported 10 new cases during the same period.

A total of 806 cases of COVID-19 have been reported by the two hospitals since the first case was detected in March 2020.

Four confirmed deaths and two suspected deaths related to COVID-19 among Valley County residents have been reported by Central District Health.

A total of 58.6% of eligible Valley County residents had received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine as of this week, the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare reported. That is less than a 1% increase over the 57.8% reported vaccinated two weeks ago. …

St. Luke’s McCall offers walk-in COVID-19 vaccines from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at St. Luke’s Clinics – Payette Lakes Family Medicine, 211 Forest Street, McCall.

Appointments also can be scheduled online through St. Luke’s myChart or calling 208-381-9500 or by calling 208-634-2225.

Cascade Medical Center offers a daily walk-in vaccination clinic Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.

full story:
— — — —

COVID-19 Updates: 161 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 4 new deaths

July 16, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 161 new COVID-19 cases and 4 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 196,856. …

The state said 732,108 people have received the vaccine, and 1,357,663 total doses have been administered. 679,065 people are fully vaccinated. …

The age group with the most cases is 18-29 with 49,013 cases.

The state said 8 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 8,937, and zero new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 1,502. …

611 vaccine breakthrough cases have been reported.

4 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 2,173.

full story: [Valley County 894 casts, 6 deaths.]
— — — —

Southfork Lodge Lowman Idaho Temporarily CLOSED.

Owner Bill passed on Wednesday and wife Jeni-Lei was life flighted as a result of Covid. She is battling to recover. The CDC has closed us for a minimum two weeks for the safety of our workers and our guests. Your understanding during this difficult time is appreciated.

per: Southfork Lodge FB page

more info: Idaho Statesman
— — — — — — — — — —

Lick Creek Road to be closed starting Monday for bridge work

Lick Creek Road east of McCall will be closed Monday through July 29 while Valley County crews replace the bridge at Zena Creek.

The road will be closed to all traffic during construction with no direct detour.

Access to Yellow Pine and areas of the backcountry can be gained by using the Warm Lake Road from Cascade and then either the South Fork Salmon River Road or Johnson Creek Road.

The original bridge was built in 1959 and was found to have extensive deterioration in the wood structure, Valley County Road and Bridge Superintendent Jeff McFadden said.

The wooden bridge was removed and a temporary steel bridge from the Payette National Forest was used to span the creek last fall, McFadden said.

The wooden bridge was 26 feet across. The new bridge will sit higher over the creek, spanning 40 feet and measuring 16 feet wide. The bridge is about 36 miles from McCall and about three miles from the South Fork Salmon River.

The bridge and pavement will cost about $68,000 to be paid by the Local Highway Technical Assistance Council, while construction work done by the county will cost about $40,000.

source: The Star-News July 15, 2021
— — — — — — — — — —

Missing 9-year-old girl found safe

The girl was found safe shortly after the Valley County Sheriff’s Office reported her missing.

KTVB Staff July 18, 2021

Original story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Cascade to sell former police station at Aug. 14 auction

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 15, 2021

The building that formerly housed the Cascade Police Department will be sold at auction on Aug. 14, the Cascade City Council decided Monday.

The council set the minimum price at $360,000. Money raised from the sale would be set aside for future city projects like a new city hall and library building, Mayor Judith Nissula.

The building is located at 1480 E. Main Street (Idaho 55) across from the Cascade Airport.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

5 left homeless after McCall house fire

The residents of the home, who work at the Whitetail Club and Shore Lodge in McCall, lost all of their belongings in the blaze.

KTVB Staff July 15, 2021

Five McCall residents are searching for a place to live after their house caught fire Tuesday.

According to the fire department, electrical wiring beneath the front porch was determined to have sparked the blaze.

No one was hurt in the fire, and crews were able to keep it from spreading to neighboring houses, but the building was left charred and uninhabitable.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

McCall becomes another battleground for affordable housing

Developers are looking at what’s currently public land for new areas for housing. Conservation groups want to keep the land public and free from development.

Tristan Lewis July 15, 2021 KTVB

In the summertime, Payette Lake has the attention of many tourists but recently, the area also has grabbed the attention of developers who are seeing massive growth, with room for more.

Developers are looking at constructing more affordable housing on land that’s currently public. However, some residents and conservation groups are trying to keep that land out of the hands of developers.

McCall is joining a growing list of municipalities across the Gem State that are beginning to feel the weight of the housing crisis that began in the Treasure Valley. The small town’s growth increased during the last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic and more people moving there thanks to remote work, according to McCall’s community and economic development director.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Drought worsens around Idaho

The entire state is experiencing at least “moderate” drought.

Jeremy Stiles July 15, 2021 KTVB


Credit: National Integrated Drought Information System – drought.gov
U.S. Drought Monitor conditions for Idaho on July 15, 2021. A darker shade indicates a higher severity of drought.

The percentage of Idaho land area experiencing exceptional drought conditions has increased more than tenfold in the past week, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor.

The U.S. Drought Monitor uses five categories to describe drought conditions, ranging from D0 – “abnormally dry” – to D4, or “exceptional.”

All of Idaho is now experiencing at least a moderate drought, D1 on the scale. About 84% of the state is at D2 – “severe drought,” and about 33% is in D3 – “extreme drought.”

continued:
——————

Idaho History:

The search for those left behind

Chinese Cemetery still may have bodies not returned home

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 15, 2021

Circling the historic Chinese Cemetery in Warren, a specially trained dog located what could be the grave of a woman named Too Hay who was buried more than a century ago.

The search based on historical records and maps of the area was conducted earlier this month by a German shepherd named Cayvun, who was lead through the cemetery by his handler Florence Dickens of Rupert.

The Payette National Forest led the effort to locate the remains of any miners still buried in the cemetery, which was active between about 1870 to 1920.

The cemetery, located near the historic townsite of Warren, has 32 known temporary gravesites, Payette Archeology Technician Kelly Martin said.

Many bodies in the temporary gravesites were eventually sent to China funded by dues paid by Chinese workers to mining companies in the area.

But women who were not employed by the mines were also buried in the cemetery without the guarantee of posthumous repatriation.

“Continuing research and investigation into sites such as the Chinese Cemetery at Warren enables archaeologists to more accurately capture Idaho Chinese mining history and mining culture,” Martin said.

Payette archeologists think the cemetery could still contain unidentified remains, including the body of Too Hay, for whom there is a commemorative sign at the cemetery.

Hay died in 1880 at the age of 30, according to Forest Service records.

In addition to the 32 known temporary gravesites at the cemetery, Cayvun may have located additional previously unknown gravesites, Martin said.

Further research with ground penetrating radar may be necessary to confirm whether any human remains are still buried at the cemetery, she said.

Dickens was assisted in the search by Samantha Blatt, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Idaho State University; Jordan Ruska, Valley County Deputy Coroner; and Kathy Peterson, Adjunct Professor of Anthropology at the College of Western Idaho.

Prior to the search, Payette archeologists assisted a trail crew and Youth Conservation Corps crews in replacing the fence around the cemetery.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
——————

Public Lands:

Land Management Agencies to Implement Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in Boise and Payette Fire Restriction Areas

Campfires, Stove Use and Smoking Restricted

Boise, Idaho – July 13, 2021 – With the threat of wildfire danger increasing rapidly throughout Idaho, local land management agencies will implement Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in the Boise Fire Restriction Area and the Payette Fire Restriction Area beginning at 12:01 a.m. Friday, July 16, 2021.

These fire restrictions are being implemented by agencies managing state, private and public/federal lands in the area, including the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), United States Forest Service (USFS), Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association (SITPA), and the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL). Fire restrictions are intended to decrease the risk of any human caused wildfires in the designated areas.

The Boise and Payette Fire Restriction Areas include both the Boise and Payette National Forests, Idaho state endowment lands, Boise and Cottonwood BLM Field Offices, Bureau of Reclamation Project lands, and private lands in the restriction areas. Designated Wilderness areas are excluded from fire restrictions at this time but may be included in the future. For a detailed map of each fire restriction area, visit these links:

* Boise Fire Restriction Area includes the West Central, Treasure Valley and the Owyhee areas: (link)

* Payette Fire Restriction Area includes the Weiser River, Payette National Forest East and West, Little Salmon River and the Long Valley/Meadows Valley areas: (link)

Fire, fuels, and weather conditions as they relate to fire restrictions will continue to be monitored – based on these conditions, restrictions will be adjusted. The land management agencies would like to thank the public for their diligence in preventing unwanted human caused fires so far this season and ask for their continued support as fuels dry and hotter temperatures are expected to continue into this fall.

Under the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions, the following acts are prohibited on state and federally managed or protected lands, roads, and trails:

* Building, maintaining, attending, or using a fire, campfire or stove fire except within a designated recreation site and in a permanent concrete or metal fire ring, or on private land, and only within an owner-provided structure.
* Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle, building, or designated recreation site or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials.

The following are exemptions to the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions:

* Persons with a written permit that specifically authorizes the otherwise prohibited act.
* Persons using fire fueled solely by liquid petroleum or liquid petroleum gas (LPG) fuels. Such devices, including propane campfires, may be used only in an area cleared of flammable material.
* Persons conducting activities in those designated areas where the activity is specifically authorized by written posted notice.
* Any federal, state, or local officer or member of an organized rescue or firefighting force in the performance of an official duty.
* All land within a city boundary is exempted.
* Other exemptions unique to each agency.

Please visit (link) or contact the local land management offices for current information regarding fire restrictions and their potential end dates.
— — — — — — — — — —

USDA Forest Service South Fork Restoration and Access Management Plan Update

July 16, 2021

The Payette National Forest has concluded the environmental assessment process and has issued two Decision Notices for the South Fork Salmon River Restoration and Access Management Plan project. The decisions were signed on July 13, 2021.

The Decision Notices are posted on the project webpage as follows: (link). Hardcopy documents may be made available to interested parties upon request by calling 208-634-0601.

A project implementation plan is posted under the “Post-Decision” tab on the project webpage.

For additional information about this project please contact Krassel District Ranger, David Hogen at 208-634-0601 or via email at david.hogen@usda.gov.

Sincerely,
Linda L Jackson
Forest Supervisor
Payette National Forest
——————-

History:

Harry S. Truman in Idaho 1950

1950TrumanKeepIdahoGreen-a

Spreading the message – Keep Idaho Green, don’t be a Guberif!

courtesy Justin Smith, Idaho History Group
————————-

Fire Season:

Red Flag Warning from July 19, 3am to July 20, 11pm

link:
— — — — — — — — — —

Payette NF Fire July 17, 2021

As thunderstorm marched across eastern Idaho last night, the Payette National Forest is conducting initial attack on three wildfire north and south of Big Creek within the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

The Vinegar Fire is at 10 acres and located approximately 3 miles north of Root Ranch, a private inholding within the Wilderness.

The Club Fire is approximately 4 mile southwest of Root Ranch and is at 12 acres.

The Rush Fire is estimated at 15 acres and is located south of Big Creek, and approximately 3 mile south of the Cabin Creek area.

Smokejumpers and helitak firefighters and helicopters conducting bucket drops have been in initial attack on these wilderness fires throughout the day. Additional smokejumpers are being brought to McCall to assist with these fires and other fire starts that may occur.

These fires are burning in heavy dead and downed trees with Lodgepole regeneration – this makes access and moving around the fire perimeter difficult for firefighters.

In addition to these wildfires, firefighter responded to an abandoned campfire in Slaughter Gulch north of Lost Valley Reservoir today. The abandoned campfire was extinguished before it escaped and created a larger wildfire.

Forest visitors are reminded the Payette National Forest is in Stage 1 Fire Restrictions – under stage 1 restrictions campfires are allowed only in designated sites such as improved campgrounds. The abandoned campfire in Slaughter Gulch is not a designated site where campfires are not allowed.

source: PNF FB page
— — — — — — — — — —

Dixie-Jumbo Fires Nez Perce – Clearwater National Forests
InciWeb:

Dixie-Jumbo Fire Update- July, 18, 2021

Critical fire weather conditions are present across the fire with southwest winds at 10-15 mph, low relative humidity, and high temperatures. This will be the hottest, driest, and windiest day since the fire was discovered. Firefighters are expecting an increase in fire activity today with the change in weather.

The Dixie Fire

Dixie fire grew by 1,134 acres with most of the growth along the Salmon River and in the northeast corner. Heavy equipment task forces continue to work on a fuel break along Jack Mt road (FS Road 1190) above the northern perimeter of the fire. Mallard Ranch and the campground have structure protection in place and are being monitored. Along the eastern edge, crews are removing hazard trees on the 421 where the fire crossed the road between Vitta Point and White Water Ranch. To the south, the fire continues to spread along the Salmon River from Mallard Creek to just past Rhett Creek. Crews are continuing to do structure protection preparation along the river corridor. Within the communities of Dixie and Comstock, firefighters continue to hold and improve line, and do structure preparation on the west side of Dixie and down in the Comstock area.

The Jumbo fire grew by 62 acres. It will continue to be monitored daily and suppression tactics will be reassessed if conditions warrant.

Weather and Smoke

Today temperatures will be in the 90’s across the fire, with relative humidity around 15%. Winds are coming out of the southwest at 10-15 mph with gusts up to 20-25 mph on ridgetops. Hazy skies will persist as southwest winds bring smoke aloft from regional and local fires.

Evacuations and Closures

Evacuation orders continue to be in place in the communities around the fire perimeter including the Dixie/Comstock Area, Mallard and White Water Ranch. For evacuation information and updates, please call 208-983-1100.

The Payette National Forest has issued a closure order south of the Dixie fire for multiple trails on the Krassel Ranger District, including a portion of the Idaho Centennial Trail.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Mud Lick Fire Salmon-Challis National Forest
InciWeb:

Evacuations Now in Effect for Mudlick Fire
link: Local News 8

Mud Lick Fire now more than 12,000 acres, 0% contained
link: Local News 8

Haynes Fire burning in Salmon-Challis National Forest
link: Local News 8
— — — — — — — — — —

Snake River Complex Idaho Department of Lands

Location 20 miles south of Lewiston, ID
Size 103,907 Acres
InciWeb:
— — — — — — — — — —

Fire forces campers to evacuate in Sawtooth National Forest

The Cassia County Sheriff’s Office closed the road to Howell Canyon down and is now finding and evacuating campers.

KTVB Staff July 14, 2021

A wildfire is forcing evacuations at campsites in Cassia County, south of Burley.

The fire, which has been dubbed the Howell Fire, started Wednesday afternoon, four miles east of Pomerelle on the Minidoka Ranger District.

The Cassia County Sheriff’s Office closed the road to Howell Canyon down and is now finding and evacuating campers.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Anticipated thunderstorms, lightning could spark new wildfires in Idaho

by CBS2 News Staff & Ariana Pyper Sunday, July 18th 2021

A Red Flag Warning takes effect early tomorrow morning through Tuesday.

This means critical fire weather conditions are either occurring now or will occur shortly.

The Weather Service in Boise predicts thunderstorms will begin developing and will increase in the next 48 hours.

That means lightning, gusty winds, and brief heavy rainfall will be possible with the storms. There is a good chance these gusty winds and lightning could spark new wildfires.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

‘We are going to have a big fire season’: Gov. Brad Little declares emergency disaster declaration due to state wildfires

By Meredith Spelbring Jul 13, 2021 KIVI

Gov. Brad Little announced an emergency disaster declaration has been declared due to wildfires within Idaho.

The emergency order applies to all lands protected by the Idaho Department of Lands, which enables the Idaho National Guard to assist in fire suppression, said Idaho Department of Lands Director Dustin Miller.

“Fighting wildfires across the west requires a well-coordinated effort among federal, state, local and tribal entities,” Miller said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

‘Scary’: Fuel shortage could ground firefighting aircraft

July 13, 2021 Associated Press

Airport officials facing jet fuel shortages are concerned they’ll have to wave off planes and helicopters that drop fire retardants during what could be a ferocious wildfire season, potentially endangering surrounding communities.

U.S. officials say they’ve already had sporadic shortages at some tanker bases and fear multiple bases running out simultaneously during what is shaping up to be a ferocious wildfire season in the U.S. West.

Airport officials, aviation companies and jet fuel transport companies say jet fuel supply chains that atrophied during the coronavirus pandemic haven’t been able to rebuild fast enough to keep pace with the reopening of the U.S. economy.

source: KIVI
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Fires at NIFC
link:
— — — — — — — — — —

[Some of our smoke is coming from Oregon.]

Bootleg Fire in Oregon creating ‘fire clouds’ of dangerous smoke and ash

In a worst case, the clouds can spawn fire tornadoes and generate their own lightning.


Credit: AP
In this photo taken with a drone provided by the Bootleg Fire Incident Command, a pyrocumulus cloud, also known as a fire cloud, is seen over the Bootleg Fire in southern Oregon on Wednesday, July 14, 2021. Smoke and heat from a massive wildfire in southeastern Oregon are creating “fire clouds” over the blaze — dangerous columns of smoke and ash that can reach up to 30,000 feet and are visible for more than 100 miles away. Authorities have put these clouds at the top of the list of the extreme fire behavior they are seeing on the Bootleg Fire, the largest wildfire burning in the U.S. (Bootleg Fire Incident Command via AP)

more info: KTVB

Bootleg Fire
InceWeb:
————–

Critter News:

Dairy cows more susceptible to heat stress, expert says

By Ricardo Coronado Jul 15, 2021 KIVI

Marsing, Idaho — Nederend Farms is dedicated to keeping its cows comfortable, happy, and healthy. In total, the farm has about 8,000 Holstein cows, and amid higher than normal temperatures that have hit the Treasure Valley, the farm is making sure the heat doesn’t impact the cows.

“Cows don’t have any sweat glands. Think about wearing a leather jacket all the time in 100-degree heat. What we do is create an environment around them. We’ll soak the cows, we’ll cool the air with water,” said John Nederend, one of the owners of Nederend Farms.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

World Center for Birds of Prey welcomes new avian ambassador

By Katie Kloppenburg Jul 13, 2021 KIVI

The Peregrine Fund’s World Center for Birds of Prey introduced Tulio, a 52-day-old Ornate Hawk-eagle to its education flock. Visitors may see Tulio during one of his daily trips outside to become acclimated to his new home.


Monica Pittman

The World Center for Birds of Prey says Tulio arrived at the center at 27-days-old and has been cared for by the expert raptor care staff at the center. There is another Ornate Hawk-eagle at the center, Fancy, who has been a long-time resident but was recently requested to join a breeding program.

Fancy’s genes are underrepresented in the North American captive population of Ornate Hawk-eagles, making her valuable for breeding. Fancy moved into the program in Nevada and the center received Tulio in return.

continued:
——————

Fish & Game News:

Hunters, anglers and other recreationist’s guide to wildfire season

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Monday, July 12, 2021

Know before you go, be careful, and do your part to prevent wildfires

Wildfires can threaten public safety, destroy property, harm productive wildlife habitat, create nuisance smoke, and much more. It’s in everyone’s interest to prevent wildfires from occurring, and human-caused wildfires are unfortunately common during summer, but doing your part to prevent wildfires can make a difference to reduce them.

During wildfire season, which typically lasts from summer through the first significant rain or snow during fall, consider foregoing a campfire, or be extremely cautious and follow these tips, rules and guidelines:

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Fish and Game places Stage 1 fire restrictions on department-owned lands in the Southwest Region

By Bradley Lowe, Regional Habitat Manager
Friday, July 16, 2021

Drought conditions in southwestern Idaho have led to the implementation of Stage 1 fire restrictions on Fish and Game lands throughout the Southwest Region.

Southwestern Idaho is currently experiencing extreme fire conditions brought on by on-going impacts from several years of drought throughout the area. In response to these severe conditions, Fish and Game has implemented Stage 1 fire restrictions, effective July 16, 2021 on all Fish and Game owned lands within the following counties: Ada, Adams, Boise, Canyon, Elmore, Gem, Payette, Owyhee, Valley, and Washington.

The Wildlife Management Areas included in the fire restrictions include: Boise River, Cecil D. Andrus, C.J. Strike, Fort Boise, Montour, and Payette River. In addition to the Stage 1 fire restrictions, the roads on Cecil D. Andrus WMA will be closed to motorized travel until further notice with the exception of the USFS 085 road.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Summer heat will cause some trout mortality, but halting fishing won’t improve the situation

By Joe Kozfkay, State Fisheries Manager
Friday, July 16, 2021

Trout are resilient and even extreme weather rarely has a long-term impact on populations

Wild animals for the most part are well equipped to survive fluctuations in environmental conditions, and trout, Idaho’s favorite fish, are no different. Although they prefer cold water, trout are highly resilient, productive and adaptive. Because of this, short-term fishing regulation changes are unlikely to affect their numbers long-term, even during an extraordinary heatwave.

Recently, well-intended anglers and angling groups have requested Fish and Game restrict or close fishing during extreme heat because they feel restrictions will reduce fishing-related mortality and preserve more trout for next year when conditions will hopefully improve.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Really ’embarrassed’ raccoon recovered from Dalton, Ga. home

by WTVC Staff Wednesday, July 14th 2021

We all make mistakes. And unfortunately, sometimes that mistake winds up on Facebook.

A red-faced raccoon in Georgia would likely tell you he can relate, and all too well.

On its Facebook page Wednesday, the City of Dalton Fire Department says firefighters recovered a restive raccoon from a home on Monday night.

Their post reads,

You never know what the day is going to hold when you show up for your shift as a firefighter. Sure, there may be the occasional cat needing to be rescued from a tree, but a raccoon? That’s a new one. We were called out to help this guy find his way back out of a house in Dalton Monday night. As you can tell, he was pretty embarrassed about it, but it’s really nothing to be ashamed of. We all need a helping hand every now and then. After helping our new friend out of the jam, we were able to take him to safely release him back into the wild where he’ll hopefully be less adventurous in his search for snacks from now on.”

continued: CBS2 Idaho News
—————-

Seasonal Humor:

FishingFly-a

CovidBackToWork2-a
————

Red Flag Warning from July 19, 3am to July 20, 11pm

Red Flag Warning from July 19, 3am to July 20, 11pm

July 18 high in Yellow Pine 100F.

Yellow Pine Forecast

Monday A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms after noon. Some of the storms could produce gusty winds. Areas of smoke. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 84. Calm wind becoming south around 5 mph in the afternoon.
Monday Night A slight chance of thunderstorms. Some of the storms could produce gusty winds. Areas of smoke. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 63. East wind around 5 mph becoming calm after midnight. Chance of precipitation is 10%.
Tuesday A 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly after noon. Some of the storms could produce gusty winds and heavy rain. Areas of smoke. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 82. Calm wind becoming southwest around 6 mph in the afternoon.
Tuesday Night A slight chance of thunderstorms before midnight. Some of the storms could produce gusty winds. Areas of smoke. Partly cloudy, with a low around 61. West wind 5 to 8 mph becoming calm in the evening. Chance of precipitation is 10%.
Wednesday A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms after noon. Some of the storms could produce gusty winds. Areas of smoke. Mostly sunny, with a high near 87.

Red Flag Warning

URGENT - FIRE WEATHER MESSAGE...CORRECTED
National Weather Service Boise ID
223 PM MDT Sun Jul 18 2021

...HIGH HAINES OF 6 THROUGH THIS EVENING...
...SCATTERED THUNDERSTORM EXPECTED MONDAY AND TUESDAY...

.High haines of 6 will continue over Payette, Boise and Western
Sawtooth National Forests with high pressure over the area. Smoke
could limit instability to some degree but overall, High Haines
will to continue through this evening.

Thunderstorms are expected to develop early Monday morning in the
Idaho BLM districts and move north into the NF zones later in the
morning. Another shortwave later on Monday will develop
thunderstorms across all the BLM zones which will move into the NF
zones early Tuesday morning. More thunderstorms are expected to
develop Tuesday afternoon across much of the area. Although
thunderstorm coverage may not reach scattered coverage over the
course of the warning in all districts, the fuels are extremely
dry with ignitions possible with every CG strike. Lightning and
gusty outflow winds will be the primary threats though some storms
could produce brief periods of heavy rain.

Western Payette National Forest-Eastern Payette National Forest-
Northern Boise National Forest-
Southern Boise National Forest/Western Sawtooth National Forest-
223 PM MDT Sun Jul 18 2021

...RED FLAG WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 11 PM MDT THIS
EVENING FOR...HIGH HAINES FOR WESTERN PAYETTE NATIONAL
FOREST...EASTERN PAYETTE NATIONAL FOREST...NORTHERN BOISE NATIONAL
FOREST AND SOUTHERN BOISE NATIONAL FOREST/WESTERN SAWTOOTH
NATIONAL FOREST...WHICH ARE FIRE WEATHER ZONES 401... 402...403
AND 421...

...RED FLAG WARNING IN EFFECT FROM 3 AM MONDAY TO 11 PM MDT
TUESDAY FOR...LIGHTNING FOR WESTERN PAYETTE NATIONAL
FOREST...EASTERN PAYETTE NATIONAL FOREST...NORTHERN BOISE NATIONAL
FOREST AND SOUTHERN BOISE NATIONAL FOREST/WESTERN SAWTOOTH
NATIONAL FOREST...WHICH ARE FIRE WEATHER ZONES 401... 402...403
AND 421...

The National Weather Service in Boise has issued a Red Flag
Warning, which is in effect from 3 AM Monday to 11 PM MDT
Tuesday.

* THUNDERSTORMS...Isolated thunderstorms will develop early Monday
  morning and increase in coverage late Monday night into Tuesday.

* OUTFLOW WINDS...Gusts of 35 to 50 mph possible.

* HAINES...High Haines of 6 through this evening.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A Red Flag Warning means that critical fire weather conditions
are either occurring now, or will occur shortly.

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions July 16, 2021

Land Management Agencies to Implement Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in Boise and Payette Fire Restriction Areas

Campfires, Stove Use and Smoking Restricted

Boise, Idaho – July 13, 2021 – With the threat of wildfire danger increasing rapidly throughout Idaho, local land management agencies will implement Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in the Boise Fire Restriction Area and the Payette Fire Restriction Area beginning at 12:01 a.m. Friday, July 16, 2021.

These fire restrictions are being implemented by agencies managing state, private and public/federal lands in the area, including the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), United States Forest Service (USFS), Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association (SITPA), and the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL). Fire restrictions are intended to decrease the risk of any human caused wildfires in the designated areas.

The Boise and Payette Fire Restriction Areas include both the Boise and Payette National Forests, Idaho state endowment lands, Boise and Cottonwood BLM Field Offices, Bureau of Reclamation Project lands, and private lands in the restriction areas. Designated Wilderness areas are excluded from fire restrictions at this time but may be included in the future. For a detailed map of each fire restriction area, visit these links:

* Boise Fire Restriction Area includes the West Central, Treasure Valley and the Owyhee areas: (link)

* Payette Fire Restriction Area includes the Weiser River, Payette National Forest East and West, Little Salmon River and the Long Valley/Meadows Valley areas: (link)

Fire, fuels, and weather conditions as they relate to fire restrictions will continue to be monitored – based on these conditions, restrictions will be adjusted. The land management agencies would like to thank the public for their diligence in preventing unwanted human caused fires so far this season and ask for their continued support as fuels dry and hotter temperatures are expected to continue into this fall.

Under the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions, the following acts are prohibited on state and federally managed or protected lands, roads, and trails:

* Building, maintaining, attending, or using a fire, campfire or stove fire except within a designated recreation site and in a permanent concrete or metal fire ring, or on private land, and only within an owner-provided structure.
* Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle, building, or designated recreation site or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials.

The following are exemptions to the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions:

* Persons with a written permit that specifically authorizes the otherwise prohibited act.
* Persons using fire fueled solely by liquid petroleum or liquid petroleum gas (LPG) fuels. Such devices, including propane campfires, may be used only in an area cleared of flammable material.
* Persons conducting activities in those designated areas where the activity is specifically authorized by written posted notice.
* Any federal, state, or local officer or member of an organized rescue or firefighting force in the performance of an official duty.
* All land within a city boundary is exempted.
* Other exemptions unique to each agency.

Please visit (link) or contact the local land management offices for current information regarding fire restrictions and their potential end dates.
——————-

July 11, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

July 11, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Because of our [water] situation lawn watering is discouraged. Odd/Even days watering. No watering after 2pm. If you are asked to turn your water off, it’s because the system is in danger of running out. Please be respectful. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order issued
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit season
May 15 – Firewood Season, permits at The Corner
May 25 – Johnson Creek road fully open
June 7 – Lick Creek road open
June 13 – Profile road open
July 10 – YPFD meeting 10am at Fire Hall
July 10 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
July 11 – 9am Fire training at Fire Hall
July 11 – Festival Planning Meeting on Zoom 2pm
July 12-14 – General Store closed
July 17 – ATV/UTV Escapade 10am
July 19-29 – Lick Creek Road closure for bridge replacement
July 21-22 – Mastercraft stove maintenance days
July 24 – Pet Vax Clinic
July 28 – Dust Abatement Calcium chloride
Aug 14 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
Sept 11 – YPFD Budget Meeting 10am at Fire Hall
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

ATV/UTV Escapade July 17

July 17, 2021: This out-and-back ride is rated as intermediate. Participants ride from Yellow Pine Community Hall to Logan Creek , then return to Big Creek Campground for lunch (provided) and history/stories. After lunch, participants will continue the ride to Pilot Peak. The timeframe of this event is estimated to be from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. Check-in starts at 9:00am; leave at 10:00am. You can register early at (link)
— — — —

Heating Maintenance Day July 21-22

Deb Filler is coordinating with Mastercraft of McCall to schedule a maintenance day in Yellow Pine for propane and pellet stoves. If you are interested, please contact Deb at 208 633-6945. Mastercraft will be here July 21 and 22 to do stove maintenance.
— — — —

July 24 – Pet Vax Clinic

Dr. Keith Ruble and crew from Cascade Vet Clinic will be coming to Yellow Pine Saturday, July 24th, to vaccinate our pets. If you want to get on the list, call Cascade Vet Clinic at (208) 382-4590 so they know to bring the proper charts, etc.
———

Village News:

General Store Update

We just ran out of fuel. With the large amount of traffic in the last few weeks, we sold out of both tanks. The store will be closed through Wednesday, July 14th.
— — — —

Transfer Station cleaned up July 10th

A huge thank you to Mike Amos, Tim, Ronda and Destinee Rogers, Clayton and Rhonda Egbert, Hailey, Ron, Clint and Nicki, Joel Fields for cleaning up the dump and surrounding area. Your help was so appreciated.

20210710DumpCleanup-a
courtesy GD
— — — —

Golf Tournament July 3rd

20210703GolfTourney-a
[h/t Ronda and Deb]
— — — —

July 4 fireworks

20210704Fireworks-a
courtesy of Yellow Pine Tavern
— — — —

Gonkulator

The Gonkulator made it to the 4th of July parade in Yellow Pine. Not only did it make the parade, it led it and stole the show.

Many people had a hand in bringing “Bertha” as Harley and Laura Goodwin called her, back to life. It was a fun project. And a testament to the ingenuity of Harley Goodwin.

I’d really appreciate people who have stories and photos of the Gonkulator, sending them to amos2500 @ yahoo.com to share with the next generation. And help keep the spirit of the Gonkulator alive.

Here’s “Bertha” in action. (Instagram)

Gonkulator leading the 4th of July parade.
(courtesy SA)


(photo courtesy Yellow Pine Tavern)
— — — —

Motorcycle Accident

July 6th the Cascade Ambulance transported a patient out of Yellow Pine to the Cascade Medical Center. Motorcycle accident in the Profile Summit area.
— — — —

Veterans’ Monument

With this heat, the flowers and shrubs at our Veterans’ Memorial dry out quickly. When Niebrand’s are in, they water them, but aren’t here all the time……if you go by, please check, and give them a drink with the hose that is there. Our veterans (and the Niebrand’s) thank you!
— — — —

Attention

Would the person who borrowed the measuring wheel please return it to the community hall? It will be needed for the festival.

Also – Will the person who left the twin bed outside the Community Hall please pick it up.The yard sale is over until next year. Thank you.
— — — —

Lick Creek Road

Lick Creek Road will be closed at Zena Creek (about 4 miles east of the Ponderosa Campground) from July 19 – July 29 for a bridge replacement. Please plan ahead!
— — — —

Conserve (and Boil) Water

Please be conservative when watering lawns. We ask those that are here all week to not water lawns on the weekends so that more water is available for the weekend cabin owners. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!
— —

Tips on Water Recycling

Use a dishpan to catch the rinse water when doing dishes (and hand washing) and use it to water outdoor flowers.
— —

DEQ awards $150,000 to the Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Inc. in Valley County

Boise, June 29, 2021 — The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) today announced the award of a $150,000 in drinking water construction assistance to the Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Inc. in Valley County, Idaho.

The funding will be used to replace the damaged transmission and distribution water mains and install three pressure-reducing valves.

The assistance from DEQ’s State Revolving Loan Fund, which is capitalized annually by grants from the US Environmental Protection Agency, provides this funding with no repayment obligation. The favorable loan terms represent a $205,146 savings to the community when compared to average costs for municipal general obligation debt issuances.

MaryAnna Peavey – Grants & Loans Bureau Chief
— — — —

Scrap Metal

Sharing a message that Mike Amos will haul out a load of scrap metal. If you have scrap metal, contact Mike. He has an area by his place to stack it.
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Lick Creek Road will be closed at Zena Creek (about 4 miles east of the Ponderosa Campground) from July 19 – July 29 for a bridge replacement. Please plan ahead.

South Fork Salmon River salmon fishing opens on June 26.

Johnson Creek, Profile Gap and Lick Creek roads are Open. These roads have not been bladed and are rough.

Monumental summit is rumored to be open.

Elk summit was still closed last weekend (June 14) but could be open soon. Travel at your own risk.

Deadwood summit is open from the Landmark side.

The Hwy 55 project Smith’s Ferry area: Starting June 1, crews will transition into their summer construction schedule. Drivers can anticipate single-lane, alternating traffic controlled by flaggers Monday – early Friday morning. From Friday morning – Sunday, and any major holidays, the road will be open to two lanes. This schedule will be in place until September. Project Website link:

The Hwy 55 project from Donnelly to McCall: One lane during the week and two lanes on weekends. Project is slated to last until September.
— — — —

Critters

Aggressive Deer and Elk

Be aware that mothers will attack dogs and chase people if they feel their babies are threatened. Keep dogs leashed in the forest during “baby season” for their own protection.

Ticks

* Know where to expect ticks. Many ticks live in grassy, brushy, or wooded areas. When possible, avoid wooded and brushy areas with tall grass and leaf litter. Walk in the center of trails, particularly in spring and summer when ticks feed.
* Wear appropriate clothing. When in tick habitats, wear light-colored, tightly woven long pants and long-sleeve shirt. Tuck your pant legs into socks or boots, and your shirt into your pants. This helps keep ticks on the outside of your clothing where you can spot them more easily.
* Use tick repellent when necessary, and carefully follow instructions on the label. Apply an EPA-registered repellent effective against ticks, such as those containing DEET to clothes and exposed skin, and permethrin to clothes and gear. Take care when applying repellent on children. EPA’s search tool can help you find the repellent that best suits your needs.
* Check clothing, gear, and pets after being areas with ticks. Ticks can hitch a ride into your home on clothing and pets, then attach to you or a family member later. Carefully examine coats, camping gear, and daypacks. Don’t forget your dog, see CDC’s where to check your pet for ticks.
* Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming can reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease and may be effective in reducing the risk of other tick-borne disease. Showering can wash off unattached ticks and it is a good opportunity to do a tick check.
* Check your body, your child and pets thoroughly for ticks. Carefully inspect areas in and around the hair, head, neck, ears, under arms, inside the belly button, around the waist, between the legs, and behind the knees. Ticks can be very small before they feed—look for what may appear like a new freckle or speck of dirt. Continue checking for two to three days after returning from areas with ticks.

Pine Martins & Raccoons

Watch your small pets. Reports of pine martins living in the dump and raccoons on the north side of the village.

Be Bear, Fox & Coyote Aware

* Do not feed them human food
* Secure your trash
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Be Mountain Lion Aware

Note: A report of a mountain lion still hanging around the upper end of the village.

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report July 10: The dumpsters have been emptied and the station cleaned up by locals.

The bins were emptied May 22nd. Locals worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water. No outside watering after 2pm, nor on holiday weekends and especially not during the festival.

July 8, 2021 Update

DRINKING WATER WARNING
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059
BOIL WATER ADVISORY
Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST. Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 180 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake@drakediversified.com. .
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc. .
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 7-8-21.

YPWUA 2021 Shareholder Meeting Minutes

Sunday July 4th 10am Community Hall

1. Financial Report – Willie
A. We have $52,000 balance
B. 9 people delinquent compared to 18 two years ago

2. Operations
A. Boil order status – continue to be on boil order and will be until more leaks are found and repaired

3. Grants
A. Details of grants We are been granted $450,000 in grants. YPWUA must contribute $12,500 as matching funds to receive grants
C. A vote was taken which was required by the shareholders to accept the terms of the grant. Nicki Harner made the motion, Ginny seconded the motion and the vote was approved by 100 percent of the shareholders that attended.
C. More future grants are going to be written. The approved $450,000 will only get some of the distribution lines replaced

4. Summer lawn watering
A. Because of our situation lawn watering is discouraged
B. Odd/Even days watering
C. No watering after 2 pm
D. If you are asked to turn your water off, it’s because the system is in danger of running out. Please be respectful.

5. Election of one board member
A. Dave Prouty is not running for another term
B. Candy Hardisy was nominated and accepted the available position on the board

6. Other Comments
A. Mike Fortin brought up that he was collecting spring water to water his lawn. That’s great, many in the community is coming up with ways to water lawns without using our community water.
B. Many thanked the water board for their work on getting grants. It has taken a while but is starting to pay off.
C. Meeting ended at 10:50 am.

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Water Board:

Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty

Boil Your Water Before Using
Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020.
Link: to Notice
— — — —

VYPA News:

Village Of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Agenda

July 10, 2021, 2pm; At The Community Hall

As requested by VYPA members, this meeting will be recorded and kept to a 1-hour timeframe.

Agenda Item – Presenter – Time – Comments
Call to Order Deb Filler 1 minute
Approval of Prior Meeting Minutes Deb Filler 2 minutes Please read the prior meeting minutes before the meeting to expedite approval
Treasurer’s Oral Report Ronda Rogers 2 minutes
Community Written Report Ronda Rogers 2 minutes Accomplishments since last meeting. Update on grant.
Cemetery Oral Report Ron Basabe 2 minutes Please include progress and expected completion date on sign.
Infrastructure Oral Report Tim Rogers 2 minutes Please include progress on Ellison St. repair.
Festival Oral Report Deb Filler 2 minutes Please include current budget information & planning status.
Stibnite Advisory Council Update Ronda Rogers 2 minutes
Stibnite Foundation Update Lynn Imel 2 minutes
Nominations Presented Ronda Rogers 2 minutes
Election of Council Officers Deb Filler 10 minutes Chairman and Member-At-Large

Old Business
Dust Abatement Deb Filler 1 minute Calcium Chloride application is July 28. Have payment in by July 27.
Perpetua Resources Update Belinda Provancher 2 minutes
YPFPD Update Tim Rogers 2 minutes
VYWUA Update If someone is available 2 minutes

New Business
Fireworks Discussion Ronda Rogers 5 minutes
Adjournment

June 12 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Secretary
Ron Noel, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)

Festival
Want to join YPAC Corp in making a difference? We are raising money to benefit the Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival . Any donation will help.
Each year, during the first full weekend of August, the sleepy mountain village of Yellow Pine is transformed into the largest festival of it’s kind in the western hemisphere!
The festival is produced by volunteers and raises funds to support the village of Yellow Pine as well as the funds needed to hold next year’s festival.
As you all know, the 2020 festival had to be cancelled due to Covid-19. This placed a significant burden on Yellow Pine to come up with enough funding to hold the 2021 festival this August 5, 6, 7.
Souvenirs and events at the festival help raise funds. We also know there are many of you who support the festival, but are not able to attend. This fund raiser is to give you an opportunity to help us help Yellow Pine.
Thanks in advance for your tax-deductible contribution to this cause that means so much to us!
GoFundMe link:

Anyone interested in being a part of the Festival Planning/Working committee, please contact Deb Filler. Meetings will begin at the end of January. Even if you aren’t physically in YP, you can participate in the committee.
Next Festival Planning July 11, 2021 – Contact Deb for Zoom link and passcode.
2021 Planning Notes updated June 6, 2021 (link)
Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival Policy and Procedure Link:
— — — —

YPFD News:

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful.
link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021.pdf

June 12, 2020 – 10am Fire siren test and YPFD meeting.
Link: to minutes: 2021 June 12 YPFD meeting minutes.docx

Yellow Pine Fire District Meeting, June 12, 2021:

In attendance:
Tim Rogers, Fire Chief; Merrill Saleen, Fire Commissioner 3#; Phil Jensen, Acting Fire Commissioner 2#; Ronda Rogers, Gary Niebrand, Nicki Harnar and Clint, Billy, Teresa and Darlene, Virginia Bartholomew, Cecil Dallman, Jeff and Ann Forster, Lorinne Munn, Joel Fields, Willy Sullivan, Tom Lanham, Sue Matlock, Nikki Saleen, Secretary/Treasurer.

Siren Test:
Siren went off at 10:03 AM

Update on Commissioner Elections this fall:
Will have elections this fall for District 2# and 3# if interested get a hold of Tim or Merrill for the paperwork, must have it back by September 2021

EMS and Search/Rescue cooperation with Cascade Rural & Valley County:
Cascade Search Rescue as well as the EMS unit from Cascade are willing to sponsor Jeff & Ann to provide these services for our area. Ranger UTV can be used for EMS and Rescue but not Search. Residents would access by calling 911. State must approve this plan. Question raised on why no Yellow Pine Ambulance. Answered that ambulance was returned to Cascade as there were no certified operators in our area. Question raised on equipment provided for search & rescue/EMS not being at firehouse. Answered that only “accountable property” needs to be inventoried. Additional discussion/ differing opinions about inventorying all fire district property. Inventories and stocking levels have not been completed for the Fire Station, engines, and for EMS/Rescue.

Insurance Rating results from The Idaho Surveying and Rating Bureau’s inspection:
Surveyed of Fire Protection: ended up with same rating as before ( 9 ) for everybody in the Village of Yellow pine’s Home Insurance. Discussion on what it takes to get a rating of 8 and how much that would reduce individual’s insurance rates. More research is needed.

Fire Season update and Community Fire wise:
Need to continue with fire prevention cleanup for the town – has been good work in past but need to continue. Learned a lot last year in terms of looking at where protection is needed within the Village site. Perimeter areas need focus, heavier timber where tree crowns each other. Village need to all work on there our property to cleanup. Need to contact property owners that don’t come in much to have their property cleaned up or get permission to do so.

Finalizing helistop work:
Need to have helistop finish for safety concern. It was suggested that we trade with the Forest Service as they have gravel at the Gravel pit.

Fire Chief’s Updates:
Looking at doing training once a month. Focus will be on becoming familiar and competent with using the engines.
Training will be on Sunday at 9 am
Would like to make sure everyone is trained to do basic first aid especially CPR. Tim will find someone to come in to help with that training.

Budget Update :
Ronda Rogers has agreed to do meeting notes
Expenditures by Category: May 2021 June 2021
MTE 46.73
Ridley’s-Fire Station Supplies (Cleaning, TP, etc.) 60.56
Cascade Hardware 12.70
Gem State Generators-generators maintenance 468.68
Grand Total Expenditures YTD 2021: $23,985.09
Donations – work in progress

Grant update:
Will not find out on Grant until Aug 2021

AAR & Response to Buck Fire:
The Fire Commissioners process a letter and supporting documentation that was submitted for review at the prior meeting. The Fire Commissioners have been contacted by Professional Forest Management to represent them regarding the concerns expressed in the letter and to consider a tort claim for costs incurred during the 2020 Buck Fire.

Appointment of replacement for District 1 Commissioner:
Multiple people were interested. In order to fairly assess the individuals, the Fire Commissioners Merrill Saleen and Phil Jensen, and Fire Chief Tim Rogers will do interviews with interested parties. Interviews will be scheduled for July 9, 2021. Contact Merrill Saleen for more information.

Next meeting Saturday, July 10th, 10 am at Fire Station
Next Training July 11th 9 am at Fire Station

Note: This meeting was recorded, contact Ronda Rogers if you wish to listen to it.

May 15, 2020 – there was a YPFD meeting 10am at the Fire Hall.
Link: to 20210515 YPFD MeetingNotes_Final.docx

Meeting schedule for the YPFD. All meetings are at the YPFD Station
Sat. May 15 at 10am
Sat. June 12 at 10am
Sat. July 10 at 10am
Sat. September 11 at 10am Budget Meeting

YP Fire District 2 (east of Yellow Pine Ave) up for election Nov 2nd for 4 year term (per Valley County.) Link:

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30, 2020 at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by a escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Phil Jensen, Acting – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Tim Rogers – Fire Chief
Secretary Ronda Rogers
Treasurer Nikki Saleen

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
Hours: 1pm-8pm, closed on Tuesdays
We offer smoked tri tip, brisket, and chicken sandwiches and also burgers and chicken wings.
Firewood Permits available May 15th.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Yellow Pine Tavern open daily:
Monday thru Thursday 8am to 9pm
Friday and Saturday 8am to 10pm
Sunday 8am to 8pm
Indoor Dining with limited seating and Outdoor Dining Available.
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer, Wine and Pop
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Opened June 12th for Summer
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
Store hours: 10am to 5pm – (Will be closed July 12-14)
The store is now receiving inventory of Food items. The ATM is operational, and Debit/Credit cards are accepted. Currently there is fuel, ice, alcoholic beverages (non liquor) tobacco, non alc beverages, snacks, and Dairy items (ice cream, milk, butter, and yogurt). Fresh produce is soon to come. If there are needs for fuel or anything during off hours, Josh will be around on call to accommodate. For any particular store item requests, please call 208-633-3300 or Email
For room reservations, please call 208-633-3300 or Email for reservations
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation – (208) 382-4844

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (July 5) overnight low of 60 degrees. This morning clear sky, light haze of smoke and light breeze. A few airplanes buzzed over. Not many birds around, only a couple of swallows, a robin, some hummingbirds and a jay. Hot and mostly clear with a very light breeze at lunch time – light haze of out of state smoke. Hot sunny afternoon, big chunky clouds building up, high of 95 degrees. Warm evening, mostly clear with a haze of smoke. Robins chirping before dusk and cooling off a little. Still warm after dark. Looked a bit hazy before midnight.

Tuesday (July 6) overnight low of 49 degrees. This morning clear sky, light haze of smoke and light breeze. A few tree swallows swooping, a couple of finches, some hummingbirds and a robin visiting. Colombian ground squirrels running amuck. Hot, light breezes and partly cloudy after lunch time. Very hot afternoon, increasing clouds, high of 100 degrees. Still in the 90s by early evening but dropping slowly, mostly clear and almost calm. At 714pm Ambulance with lights on headed south on Westside Ave. Cooling off at dusk, clear sky and haze of smoke. Mars rising over Golden Gate before midnight.

Wednesday (July 7) overnight low of 63 degrees. This morning very warm, mostly clear sky, slight breeze and light haze of smoke. Tree swallows and ground squirrels seem to be the only active critters. Mail truck made it in on time. Very hot at lunch time, partly cloudy and light breeze. Very hot afternoon, partly cloudy and light breezes, high of 98 degrees. Clear sky and definite haze of smoke by early evening, pleasant breezes and slightly cooler. Cooling off a little more before dusk, clear sky and high haze of smoke. Looked a bit hazy before midnight.

Thursday (July 8) overnight low of 47 degrees. This morning clear sky, haze of smoke and light breeze. Helicopter flew over at 9am. A few swallows, a couple of flickers and a few finches calling. Ground squirrels rushing around. Low 80s at lunch time, hazy to the south and light breeze. Hot afternoon, increasing smoke (and road dust), high of 94 degrees. By evening the smoke was starting to get thicker, more like a cloud of smoke. Smoke settling in before dusk, poor air quality. Quite hazy at midnight.

Friday (July 9) overnight low of 47 degrees. This morning it appeared clear above the smoke, the sunlight looked orange-ish and poor air quality. A few tree swallows, a couple of jays and a hairy woodpecker here. Looks like the colombian ground squirrels have a new batch of babies out of the nest. Pretty warm at lunch time, breezy, smoky and poor air quality. Street traffic kicking up dust. Hot afternoon, no clouds, smoke in the air and light breezes, high of 92 degrees. Still smoky by early evening, not quite as thick down at ground level but the air quality was still poor. Air smells like smoke after sunset, cooling off. Helicopter at 932pm. Eye burning smoke before midnight.

Saturday (July 10) overnight low of 47 degrees. This morning it is likely clear but the smoke makes it look overcast, dim orange sunlight and very poor air quality. Flicker and a jay calling, very few swallows around. Warm and smoky at lunch time. Hot, dry smoky afternoon, high of 99 degrees. Still smoky and above 90F early evening, at least we have a light breeze. Warm and smoky after sunset. A bit breezy and cooling off around midnight, smoky hazy sky.

Sunday (July 11) overnight low of 51 degrees. This morning the sky is covered with smoke but the satellite map shows it may be partly cloudy, very poor air quality. A few airplanes buzzed over, light traffic and dusty. A few swallows, a jay and possibly an evening grosbeak calling. Very smoky after lunch time, can barely see the ridges, very poor (orange) air quality and reduced visibility. Increasing street traffic. Hot, smoky and dusty afternoon. Better visibility by late afternoon, high of 96 degrees. Still in the 90’s early evening but can see enough of the sky to tell there are no clouds above the smoke.
——————-

RIP:

Kathy Hanggi passed on July 5, 2021

[h/t B]
— — — — — — — — — —

Ronald “Ron or Ronnie” Lawrence Smith

March 16, 1935 ~ June 10, 2021 (age 86)

Ronald (Ron or Ronnie) Lawrence Smith went to be with his Lord and Savior Jesus on June 10, 2021, after a brief bout of cancer. He was able to pass away at home with his family by his side. He was 86 years old.

Dad was born on March 16, 1935, in Boise to Lawrence and Reathel (Merritt) Smith and raised in Stibnite. Some of his best memories were made in this back country community. He was proud of the integral part Stibnite made in the World War II effort.

Thanks to a wonderful Christian mother, Dad accepted Jesus as his personal Savior at an early age. Although he “sowed some wild oats” in his late teens and early 20s, drinking and fight in bars around Yellow Pine, he got out of a few jail stays thanks to his dad being Valley County sheriff at the time.

At this time, he was working for Lafe and Emma Cox ranch out of Yellow Pine. He met Myrna Loy Emmerson in Cinnabar, where she worked in a store and as an assayer. They married soon after on March 20, 1958.

He was drafted into the Army and was stationed at Anchorage, Alaska, where he became a championship biathlon skier, beating out Olympians. He qualified to train for the Olympics in Denver but declined due to a wife and new baby at home!

Like Paul Bunyan, Dad was bigger than life to us kids. He started as a hooker in the logging industry and then was a faller for over 20 years, putting out both hips and knees walking the steep Idaho mountains with a chainsaw on his shoulder cutting timber and lots of right of way for roads.

He also did some hard-rock mining, a mercury mine in Oregon for three years and several gold mines in Idaho. He loved Idaho history and read every book he could find on the subject.

We were happy to be included on many camping trips with the heavy canvas tent and loved to hear his stories: “fun ones about Bigfoot or the factual ones from his Stibnite-Yellow Pine days.”

Our memories of dad included the smell of sweat, chainsaw oil and sawdust when he came home from work wearing a dirty T-shirt, suspenders, heavy duty black work pants with fiberglass patches that mom broke many needles sewing on.

He had an ice cream bucket for a lunch pail, which sometimes had baby owls or bunnies that had fallen from trees he cut (or found nearby) for us kids to care for. He wore moccasin slippers home replacing his work boots. We cherish these memories now.

Dad had no use for “tree huggers” or litterbugs! He lived in the outdoors and appreciated every day what God gave for use and beauty. He enjoyed exploring old prospector cabins, looking for old bottles etc.

He enjoyed working on his mining claim with his son Rocky up French Creek. He took up carving, whittling and made some fantastic artwork.

Although his ancestry traces to European royalty, his pride was in being an Idaho hillbilly. We appreciate dad’s Godly example; he very seldom drank or cussed.

He is survived by his wife of 63 years, Myrna, of Pollock, his brother Gary of Pollock, sister Patricia Willis of Boise, five kids: Ronya (Tim), Tanya (Jim), Donya (Thomas), Rocky (Cindy), Shona (Dan). 10 grandkids: Cara, Alyssa (Anthony), Emily (Spencer), Danny, Michael (Kristina), Janelle, Weston (Rebecca), Garrett, Joe, Ron and great-grandkids Troy and Sofia; sister-in-law Marlene Smith and numerous nieces and nephews.

He was preceded in death by his parents and older brothers Darrell and Jack.

Many thanks to St. Luke’s Hospice of McCall for fantastic care. Thanks for all the calls, prayers, and meals from family and friends.

Memorials can be made to Salmon River Community Church, where he was a long-time member, or Valley County Historical Society.

Services will be held this Fall, his favorite season.

Online condolences may be left at (link).

Arrangements in care of McCall Funeral Home.

source:
[h/t SMc]
————–

Idaho News:

Yellow Pine get $450K to repair damaged water system

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 8, 2021

About $450,000 in grants have been received for repairs and improvements to the water system of the remote community of Yellow Pine

A 6.5 magnitude earthquake in March 2020 damaged the Yellow Pine water system’s treatment system as well as underground water lines, said Kristina Gillespie-Jacques of the Lewiston based firm Mountain Waterworks, Inc.

Yellow Pine is located 40 air miles east of McCall. The water system has about 72 customers.

Yellow Pine Water Users Association received funding to replace damaged lines between the treatment plant and the East Fork South Fork Salmon River.

Funding will come from the Idaho Department of Commerce, from the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality and from the US Department of Agriculture Rural Development.

Yellow Pine water users have been advised since April 2020 by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality to boil water from the system to ensure it is safe to drink.

Repairs and improvements to the damaged lines was a critical first step in making the system functional again, Gillespie-Jacques said.

Engineering and design work began in June and construction is expected to completed in 2022, Gillespie-Jacques said.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. • All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — — — — — — — —

Lick Creek Road to be closed July 19-29 for bridge work

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 8, 2021

Lick Creek Road east of McCall will be closed July 19-29 while Valley County crews replace the bridge at Zena Creek.

The road will be closed to all traffic during construction with no direct detour.

Access to Yellow Pine and areas of the backcountry can be gained by using the Warm Lake Road from Cascade and then either the South Fork Salmon River Road or Johnson Creek Road.

The original bridge was built in 1959 and was found to have extensive deterioration in the wood structure, Valley County Road and Bridge Superintendent Jeff McFadden said.

The wooden bridge was removed and a temporary steel bridge from the Payette National Forest was used to span the creek last fall, McFadden said.

The wooden bridge was 26 feet across. The new bridge will sit higher over the creek, spanning 40 feet and measuring 16 feet wide. The bridge is about 36 miles from McCall and about three miles from the South Fork Salmon River.

The bridge and pavement will cost about $68,000 to be paid by the Local Highway Technical Assistance Council, while construction work done by the county will cost about $40,000.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. • All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — — — — — — — —

COVID-19 Updates: 135 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

July 9, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 135 new COVID-19 cases and 2 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 195,831.

There are a total of 156,727 confirmed cases and 39,104 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state. …

The state said 723,833 people have received the vaccine, and 1,342,090 total doses have been administered. 670,354 people are fully vaccinated. …

The age group with the most cases is 18-29 with 48,774 cases.

The state said 10 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 8,880, and zero new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 1,491. …

534 vaccine breakthrough cases have been reported.

2 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 2,165.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Group forms to preserve state-owned lands around McCall

by Associated Press Wednesday, July 7th 2021

A new conservation group has formed hoping to preserve state-owned lands around Payette Lake in west-central Idaho where a private company has proposed a huge land swap that would lead to developing much of that land with new homes.

The Idaho Statesman reports that United Payette announced its formation Tuesday.

It’s comprised of McCall-area residents, Brundage Mountain ski area, Payette Land Trust, Idaho Conservation League and others.

State officials are examining a new planning strategy for state-owned land in the area where soaring land values mean traditional uses such as timber harvest fail to provide the best financial return as required by the Idaho Constitution.

source: (CBS2)
— — — — — — — — — —

15 fires in the Boise area over July 4 weekend were caused by fireworks

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, July 7th 2021

Boise Fire said it responded to over a dozen firework-caused fires over the July 4 weekend.

In total, Boise Fire responded to two dozen fires in the Boise area – 15 of which were caused by fireworks. One fire was caused by a sky lantern, three were ruled as undetermined and two are still under investigation.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Weiser woman loses home after illegal fireworks start brush fire

by CBS2 News Staff Monday, July 5th 2021

A Weiser woman lost her home Sunday after illegal fireworks started a brush fire in the area.

The Weiser Area Rural Fire Department said it responded to the fire just before midnight along Weiser River Road.

“The fire was hard to fight due to a very long narrow driveway being the only access,” a department spokesperson said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Watch: Fireball captured plunging across Idaho sky

According to NASA, a meteor large enough to produce a visible fireball enters the Earth’s atmosphere only about once a year.

KTVB Staff July 6, 2021

Idaho residents got a pre-Independence Day show Saturday night when a meteor could be seen streaking across the sky.

The large glowing ball was visible in the Treasure Valley and other parts of the state at about 10:50 p.m. July 3. The meteor plunged through the air for five or six seconds, culminating in a flash that illuminated the dark sky.

According to the American Meteor Society, the meteor was also seen from Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

continued:


— — — — — — — — — —

Live grenade detonated in Garden Valley

KTVB Staff July 7, 2021

A team from the Mountain Air Force Base worked with the Boise County Sheriff’s Office on Wednesday to detonate a live grenade that was found in Garden Valley.

According to a Facebook post by the Boise County Sheriff’s Office, someone called in a possible explosive device inside a home in Garden Valley.

After examining it, law enforcement determined that it was a live hand grenade.

continued: w/video
— — — — — — — — — —

Highway 55 clear in both directions near Avimor after crash

by CBS2 News Staff Friday, July 9th 2021

Both directions of Highway 55 are back open and clear following a crash near Avimor.

The Ada County Sheriff’s Office says traffic is backing up in both directions with folks trying to get out of town for the weekend.

There’s no word yet on injuries.

source:
—————–

Mining News:

Stibnite mine decision pushed back to 2023

Payette says more study needed of Perpetua Resources proposal

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News July 8, 2021

A final decision will not happen until June 2023 on Perpetua Resources’ proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine, the Payette National Forest announced.

The project had been slated for final approval as soon as December, but will now be delayed by 18 months, according to the Payette, the lead permitting agency for the mine.

The delay was triggered by an updated mining plan Perpetua submitted last December, or four months after the Payette released a draft environmental analysis of the mine, said Brian Harris, a Payette spokesperson.

“The project has changed to the point that we need to fully inform the public and other interested parties about what the project is at this point,” Harris said.

The changes to the mining plan reduce the size of the project and go beyond previous plans to protect water quality in the Stibnite area after the mine is closed, according to Perpetua.

“The process has created a better project with better environmental outcomes,” said Mckinsey Lyon, a Perpetua spokesperson.

Changes the plan were in response to additional study by Perpetua and over 11,000 public comments on the Payette’s study, Lyon said.

A new study on the updated parts of Perpetua’s mining plan is expected to be released by March, 2022, after which public comment will be sought, Harris said.

Narrowed Down

The Payette also announced it had eliminated three alternatives analyzed in the draft study released last August.

That leaves the Payette with two options:

• Perpetua’s updated plan to study.

• An alternative that would route mine traffic through Yellow Pine using Johnson Creek Road.

Perpetua’s updated plan would build 13.5 miles of new roadway undisturbed Forest Service land, but would pose less risk of spills contaminating waterways, the Payette’s study said.

The eliminated alternatives included Perpetua’s original mining plan submitted in 2016 and an update submitted in June 2019, Both became outdated following Perpetua’s December 2020 update.

The other eliminated alternative would have moved a 100-ton tailings storage area to a different drainage at Stibnite. The Payette determined that plan high too high of risk for a spill.

Updated Plan

Perpetua’s updated plan would reduce the size of the proposed Hangar Flats pit, one of three open pit mines planned at Stibnite, from 140 acres to 66 acres, or by about 70%.

That would improve water quality and fish habitat by allowing the pit to be completely filled with rock after mining, eliminating a lake that would have formed years after mining ended, Perpetua said.

The Payette’s study said exposed rock in the pit walls would leach toxic metals in the lake water and could require permanent water treatment.

Re-filling the Hangar Flats Pit with 18 million tons of waste rock would eliminate the need to pile the rock on 168 acres in the mostly undisturbed Fiddle Creek Drainage.

The Fiddle waste rock site would have required permanent water treatment to remove toxic metals from water seeping through the waste rock, according to the Payette’s draft study.

Stibnite Lake

The updated plan calls for the existing Yellow Pine Pit Lake to be restored after gold ore is removed from the pit.

The lake marks where past mining operations have blocked upstream fish passage in the East Fork South Fork Salmon River for the last 80 years.

Previously, Midas Gold had planned to fill the pit and route the East Fork through a channel across the filled-in pit.

The new plan would put a liner in the bottom of the partially backfilled pit and let natural water refill it. The new lake would be renamed Stibnite Lake.

The East Fork would flow through Stibnite Lake and benefit downstream fish with colder water. Without the lake, downstream water temperatures would rise and could harm fish, according to Midas Gold.

Reduced Treatment

The updated plan would also reduce the amount of toxic arsenic left in the mine’s tailings, or the slurry left over after gold and silver is removed from rock.

That would allow water treatment at the site to end about 25 years after mining instead of being needed forever, according to Perpetua.

Project Changes at a Glance

• 10% reduction in rock mined – 44 million tons less

• 7% reduction in open pit disturbance – 37 acres less

• 70% reduction in Hangar Flats Pit – 74 acres less

• 168-acre waste rock storage area eliminated

• Stibnite Lake established from Yellow Pine pit lake

• Maximum water temperatures reduced

• More shade from wider, taller shoreline plants

• Cool water draining into East Fork from Stibnite Lake

• Elimination of Hangar Flats pit lake

• Permanent water treatment eliminated

• Tailings arsenic reduction

• Hangar Flats pit lake elimination

• Fiddle waste rock area elimination
— —

Vandal sprays paint on Perpetua Donnelly sign

A sign outside of Perpetua Resources’ Donnelly office on Idaho 55 was vandalized with spray paint last week.

White spray paint on both sides of the stone sign caused more than $1,000 in damage, according to Perpetua.

Anyone with information on the vandalism should contact the Valley County Sheriff’s Office at 208-382-5160.
— — —

Perpetua plans to extract gold, silver, antimony from Stibnite mine

Perpetua Resources proposes a gold and antimony mine at the Stibnite Mining District about 40 air miles east of McCall.

Perpetua, formally known as Midas Gold, hopes to extract about $6 billion in gold and other minerals from Stibnite, the site of historic mining operations dating to World War II.

However, Perpetua needs approval from 50 different local, state and federal agencies before mining can begin.

The Boise company’s proposal is currently being reviewed by the Payette National Forest, the lead permitting agency. Approval is expected in June 2023.

Approval of the project would trigger a three-year construction phase that Perpetua estimates would cost about $1.26 billion, followed by 12 to 15 years of mining.

Gold, silver and antimony would be extracted from three open pit mines totaling about 484 acres.

An on-site ore processing facility would then remove gold and silver from about 20,000 tons of rock per day in a contained cyanide circuit, according to Perpetua’s operating plan.

The mine is expected to net 100 million pounds of antimony and 4 million ounces of gold, which is expected to account for 94% of the mine’s estimated $6 billion in lifetime revenue.

Stibnite would become the only domestic source of antimony and would supply an estimated 30% of the annual demand for the mineral in the United States, according to Perpetua.

Antimony is used to make flame-proofing materials, paint, glass and ceramics.

Exploration of the Stibnite Mining District by Perpetua began with drilling in 2009.

Since then, the company has spent more than $200 million studying the mine site and collecting environmental data.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
——————-

Public Lands:

Boise National Forest – Great American Outdoors Act 2023 Project Feedback

July 7, 2021

Dear interested Boise National Forest recreation enthusiasts,

You are receiving this email because you’ve expressed interest in receiving updates about projects and plans taking place on the Boise National Forest. This letter addresses the Great American Outdoors Act (GAOA) and associated projects for 2021, 2022, and 2023. Please read to find out what projects have already been submitted, and most importantly, how you can provide feedback for 2023 projects.

The GAOA, which was signed into law in the summer of 2020, provides funding for the next five years to address maintenance backlog, or critical maintenance that has been postponed, across federal land management agencies.

Projects are selected based on criteria including: reducing deferred maintenance, promoting management of America’s forests, improving visitor experience, contributing to rural community economic development, improving visitor access, ensuring health and safety, leveraging external agencies and resources, connection to larger benefit, and strategy and/or theme.

On the Boise National Forest, our highest priority when implementing GAOA deferred maintenance projects are projects that provide the greatest benefits to the public, such as critical infrastructure in our most heavily used recreation areas.

2021 and 2022 Projects

Working with an accelerated timeline to submit GAOA projects in the midst of the pandemic, the Boise National Forest submitted several projects for first- and second-year funding consideration based on past feedback from a number of sources. Projects were evaluated by the Forest Service’s national headquarters and then were recommended to the Secretary of Agriculture.

The following projects were selected for 2021:

1. Edna Creek Campground Improvements including a redesign of the campground
2. Toilet Replacements at Buck Mountain, Penny Springs and Trout Creek Campgrounds
3. Trail Maintenance at Yellow Jacket, Ten Mile Ridge and Silver Creek Summit Trails
4. Trail Maintenance of the Central Idaho Wilderness Complex Priority Area
5. Scriver Creek Road Bridge Replacement
6. East Fork Burnt Log Creek Road Bridge Replacement
7. Boundary Creek -Dagger Falls Road Improvements
8. Water System Reconstruction at the Idaho City Compound
9. Water System Reconstruction at Third Fork Project Camp and Recreation Rental Cabin

Additionally, the following projects have been included in the President’s Budget for 2022 (not yet approved by Congress):

Developed recreation site improvements and reconstruction at the following locations:

* Sage Hen Recreation Area Reconstruction
* Kirkham Developed Recreation Site Improvements (multi-year project)

Trail Improvements:

* Four Trail Bridge Replacements on the Yellow Jacket, Ten Mile Ridge, Silver Creek Summit and Horse Haven Trails

2023 Projects

We have identified the need for improvements at the following locations on the Boise National Forest. If you have ideas for additional projects or would like to submit feedback on these identified projects, please submit your feedback as soon as possible, but not later than July 21, 2021, to: SM.FS.BoiseGAOA@usda.gov. Your feedback will help us better understand what your interests are and help us prioritize 2023 projects for submission.

Developed recreation site improvements and reconstruction at the following locations:

* Payette River Corridor Deferred Maintenance and Recreation Management
* Bull Trout Campground Reconstruction
* Little Roaring River and Power Plant Campgrounds Site Furniture Replacement
* Cascade District-wide Boat Dock Replacement and Ramp Improvements
* Shafer Butte Campground Water System Reconstruction and Site Improvements

Trail Improvements

* Lime Creek and South Fork Sand Creek Trail Bridge Replacements
* Roaring River Trail Deferred Maintenance

Road and Bridge Improvements

* Bridge 255-0.1 (Middle Fork Boise River)) Bridge Replacement

To learn about these Boise National Forest GAOA projects visit: (link)

Thank you for taking an interest in the Boise National Forest’s GAOA activities!
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise National Forest welcomes three new employees

Filling critical leadership vacancies across the forest

Boise, Idaho, July 6, 2021, — Boise National Forest employees are excited to welcome back two previous Forest employees and a former Type 1 Incident Management Team Public Information Officer into key leadership positions. These individuals spent some of their formative years working on, or with the Forest in hydrology, wildland fire or critical incident communications applying their skills and helping the Forest manage resources, wildland fire incidents or restoration activities.

“These individuals are familiar with the Forest and we are extremely fortunate to have these employees return to the Boise National Forest, “said Tawnya Brummett, Boise National Forest Supervisor. “We are very pleased they want apply their knowledge and leadership in working with our partners and in guiding the Boise National Forest’s future activities. “

Rich Zimmerlee joined the Forest March 1, 2021, as the Forest Fire Management Officer. Rich formerly worked for Bureau of Land Management, Wind River/ Bighorn Basin District as the Fire Management Officer in northwest Wyoming, where he served since 2016. Rich is no stranger to the Boise, as he was the Idaho City District Fire Management Officer from 2011-2016.

He began his career in California as a Mendocino Hotshot, then a Redding smokejumper. He transferred to the BLM where he was a Boise smokejumper at NIFC from 1997 to 2011. Rich has also served on incident management teams in Safety and Operation roles for more than 20 years. A proud graduate of the 2006 Technical Fire Management program, Rich brings a breadth and depth of experience to the Boise National Forest.

Rich is looking forward to being closer to his children and grandkids, who live in the Boise area, as well as hunting and recreating within the National Forest.

Traci Weaver joined the Boise National Forest as the new Lowman District Ranger. She comes from the Bighorn National Forest where she served as the District Ranger on the Powder River Ranger District.

Before her line officer experience, Traci was the Service First Fire Public Affairs Officer covering the BLM Washington/Oregon State Office and USFS Region 6 and Region 10 forests which includes Alaska.

Traci spent eight years with the National Park Service as a Fire Communications and Education Specialist based in Grand Teton National Park covering the parks in Wyoming, Montana, and northern Colorado. Traci has held a number
of different positions including newspaper writer, editor and photographer in Texas and Fire Prevention and Wildland-Urban Interface Specialist and lead Public Information Officer for the Texas Forest Service.

Traci has served as PIO on Area Command Team 4 and was elected the first chair of the National Public Information Officer Working Group. Traci has also served as the co-lead Public Information Officer for the Great Basin Incident Management Team 1 and most recently served as international media liaison in Australia during the devastating bushfires in 2020.

A native of Wyoming, Traci loves hiking, flyfishing, horseback riding, Nordic skiing, hunting, and spending time with her daughter. She is looking forward exploring the Lowman District as well as being a part of the Boise National Forest team.

TJ Clifford is joining the Forest as the Resource and Planning Staff Officer. TJ is an experienced manager with a demonstrated history of partnerships in land management agencies. He graduated from University of Arizona and started his career on the Lowman Ranger District as a Hydrologist. The Boise National Forest was fundamental in his growth in land management and initiated his path to management positions by supporting his graduation from the Executive Leadership Program in 2004.

TJ has 25 years of federal land management and comes from the BLM’s Bruneau Field Office where he served as their manager.

He started as a firefighter with the Forest Service (USFS) in Arizona and served in a variety of positions (from hydrologist to manager) for the USFS and the BLM in southwest Idaho, since 1995.

TJ has extensive experience with the Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) program and has held the position of a National Interagency BAER Team Leader for the past 20 years on more than 100 incidents. He has specialized training and extensive experience in leading emergency post-fire response teams to assess and design treatments to stabilize and rehabilitate landscapes to reduce threats to life, property, and natural and cultural resources.

TJ brings established partnerships and management experience back to the Forest Service. He is truly excited to be back with the Boise National Forest and hopes to add his experience to an already successful program and staff.

Venetia Gempler
Public Affairs Staff Officer
Boise National Forest
— — — — — — — — — —

New Meadows Landing Pile Disposal Project Scoping

The New Meadows Ranger District of the Payette National Forest is seeking comments on the New Meadows Landing Pile Disposal Project. I invite your review of the scoping document and to submit comments for the project’s interdisciplinary team and I to consider in project development. The scoping document provides details on the purpose of and need for action, project area location and management designations, and proposed action. Scoping comments would be most helpful if received by July 24, 2021.

We propose this project to dispose of slash landings created from the Moon River, 4th Rock, Cold Bear, and Restornation timber sales under the Lost Creek Boulder Creek Project between 2015-2020. As a result of a District Court decision in late 2020, the Lost Creek Boulder Creek Project’s Record of Decision was vacated, leaving the Forest unable to proceed with any action to remove the slash. These slash piles pose a fire hazard and a potential insect problem across the landscape. The primary concern is that bark beetles overwintered in the slash landing piles in the Restornation project area and could emerge and cause damage to nearby stands. By disposing of the remaining landing piles on the landscape, the potential insect and fire hazard would be removed.

A copy of the scoping document is available at the project webpage at (link). You may subscribe to project updates by clicking on “Subscribe to Email Updates” on the project webpage. For additional information, you may contact Erin Phelps, District Ranger, at 208-514-5809 or erin.phelps@usda.gov.

Thank you for your interest and participation in the New Meadows Landing Pile Disposal Project.

Sincerely,
Erin Phelps
New Meadows District Ranger
— — — — — — — — — —

New Meadows Reforestation Project Scoping

The New Meadows Ranger District of the Payette National Forest is seeking comments on the New Meadows Reforestation Project. I invite your review of the scoping document and to submit comments for the project’s interdisciplinary team and I to consider in project development. The scoping document provides details on the purpose of and need for action, project area location and management designations, and proposed action. Scoping comments would be most helpful if received by July 24, 2021.

The purpose and need of this project are to establish native desired tree species in regeneration treatment units in what was formerly the Lost Creek Boulder Creek project area in the 4th Rock, Cold Bear, and Restornation timber sales. This is needed because in late 2020, the Lost Creek Boulder Creek Project’s Record of Decision was vacated through a District Court decision, leaving the Forest unable to proceed with any actions authorized by that decision, including reforestation. Tree stocking on portions of this land do not meet minimum stocking requirements defined in the Payette National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan. Following treatment in these units, the residual canopy cover no longer meets the criteria of being a stocked stand per forest plan definitions. There is also a legal obligation to restock (either through natural regeneration or planting), or certify adequate stocking, in regeneration treatments within 5 years following harvest (National Forest Management Act, 1976). The objective of this project is to reestablish early seral, fire adapted species (western larch, ponderosa pine, and Douglas-fir) that are best suited to site conditions within the individual treatments.

A copy of the scoping document is available at the project webpage at (link). You may subscribe to project updates by clicking on “Subscribe to Email Updates” on the project webpage. For additional information, you may contact Erin Phelps, District Ranger, at 208-514-5809 or erin.phelps@usda.gov.

Thank you for you interest and participation in the New Meadows Reforestation Project.

Sincerely,
Erin Phelps
New Meadows District Ranger
————————-

Fire Season:

Wildfire reported between Horseshoe Bend and Placerville

The fire was reported in Boise County at about 7:45 p.m. Monday.

KTVB Staff July 6, 2021

A 25-acre wildfire has been reported in Boise County, between the communities of Horseshoe Bend and Placerville.

Crews responded to the wildfire Monday evening, which has been dubbed the Harris Fire. The fire is located near Flint Creek and Canyon Creek, west of Placerville.

The fire was reported at about 7:45 p.m. Monday.

continued: [No further update]
— — — — — — — — — —

Dixie Fire Satellite Image July 6th 1pm

20210706DixieFireSmoke-a
courtesy NOAA

Wildfire near Dixie burns 7,000 acres, some residents forced to evacuate

The wildfire is burning about 40 miles southeast of Grangeville and 15 miles south of Elk City near the community of Dixie.

KTVB Staff July 7, 2021


credit USFS

A large wildfire burning in north-central Idaho has grown to around 7,000 and has forced some people to flee from their homes.

Fire managers say the Dixie Fire continues to burn actively and spread in all directions. It nearly tripled in size since Tuesday. …

The Idaho County Sheriff’s Office has issued evacuation orders for the Dixie and Comstock area. For evacuation information and updates, please check the sheriff’s Facebook page.

full story:

Dixie Fire on InciWeb:
— —

Dixie wildfire grows to 11,000 acres

by NBC Montana Staff Thursday, July 8th 2021

Overnight infrared flight data shows that the Dixie Fire burning on the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest has grown to 11,086 acres, with another fire in the area also reaching 519 acres.

The fire prompted evacuations on Tuesday in the Dixie and Comstock areas.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Bonnie Fire near Lucky Peak grows to 150 acres

According to a spokesperson for the Bureau of Land Management, the fire started near Bonneville Point, which is found near Kuna Mora Road.

KTVB Staff July 9, 2021


KTVB

Fire crews from multiple agencies are responding to a wildfire that started near Bonneville Point, south of Lucky Peak Reservoir.

According to a spokesperson for the Bureau of Land Management, the fire started near Bonneville Point, which is found near Kuna Mora Road. The fire has since been dubbed the Bonnie Fire.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Several wildfires burning in North Idaho after lightning strikes

One is burning near the historic Cataldo Mission. The fight against another fire, near Kamiah, was hindered when someone flew a drone in the area.

KTVB Staff July 7, 2021

Lighting storms have led to several fires in North and North-Central Idaho, and the Idaho Dept. of Lands says interference from a drone forced a stoppage of the aerial attack against a fire near Kamiah, putting homes at risk.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Latest on Mud Lick fire burning in Salmon-Challis National Forest

By Rachel Fabbi July 11, 2021 Local News 8


KIFI

The Mud Lick fire is approximately two miles northwest of Blackbird Mine and nearing 2,500 acres. The lightning-caused fire is burning in grass, brush, dead/down timber, and trees in the 2000 Clear Creek Fire scar on the Salmon-Cobalt Ranger District.

The fire is burning in steep, inaccessible terrain with limited access for firefighters. A Type III Incident Commander is managing the fire. The fire was very active yesterday with uphill and wind-driven runs with the fire spotting across Deer Creek. In the late afternoon, due to safety concerns, crews disengaged from the fire. Air attack, heavy air tankers, Single Engine Air Tankers (SEATs), and Type I helicopters worked the fire throughout the day.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Governor mobilizes Idaho National Guard firefighters; fire restrictions coming soon

by CBS2 News Staff Friday, July 9th 2021

Idaho Gov. Brad Little is mobilizing Idaho National Guard firefighters and aircraft to assist in a statewide effort to fight several fires amid extreme drought and excessive heat.

“Wildfire is presenting an imminent threat to life, property, and the environment, and we need all hands on deck. I appreciate our firefighters and fire managers for working so hard under such challenging conditions, and I am grateful that our guardsmen are able to step in once again to support Idaho communities,” Little said. “I want to thank Idahoans for doing their part to prevent wildfires during a season where Idaho is particularly vulnerable to human-caused wildfires.”

It’s the first time the Idaho Department of Lands has requested the governor to issue an emergency declaration to make Guard resources available to fight wildfires.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Western Smoke Satellite Image July 10

20210710WesternSmoke-a

source: NOAA
——————

Critter News:

Simple precautions to help avoid bear problems at home and camp

By Katie Kloppenburg Jul 06, 2021 KIVI

Idaho Fish and Game says proper food and garbage storage is important to avoid conflicts with bears at your home or campsite. Most bear conflicts happen between July and September and are linked to careless handling of food and garbage.

With people heading outdoors, IDFG encourages them that most conflicts can be avoided by being mindful of food and garbage. The same precautions apply to homeowners in bear country.

“Minimize the chances of a bear conflict for yourself and those following you by securing your food and garbage, and anything else that a bear might find tasty,” said Dennis Newman, wildlife manager for Idaho Fish and Game’s Salmon Region. “Bears are very opportunistic and once they find a food reward, they will be back for more.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Meridian woman urges dog owners to be mindful of pet’s heat exposure after family bulldog has a heat-related seizure

“I was told by the vet that even though they’re in the pool and going inside and outside, it’s not enough. They’re still in the direct sun,” Delinda Shubin said.

Shirah Matsuzawa July 10, 2021

Most dog owners are aware of the dangerous and potentially fatal consequences of leaving an animal in a hot car, but one Caldwell woman is urging dog owners to pay more attention to their furry friends after her daughter almost lost her dog to the heat.

The dog was not inside a car, however; he was running around and splashing around in a pool outside.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Crews rescue dog stuck on Idaho cliff: ‘Don’t know how she got to where she was’

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, July 7th 2021


Wood River Fire and Rescue

An Idaho dog is thanking its lucky paws after it was rescued from a cliff in Blaine County over the July 4 weekend.

Wood River Fire and Rescue says Honey Bear the dog was reportedly trapped in the Della Mountain area near Croy Canyon.

Officials say eight “dog-loving rescuers” made their way to the site and suited up for an 800-foot descent to build an anchor. It took crews roughly five hours to rescue the pooch.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

McCall looks to ban feeding deer within the city

Deer have left their traditional migration patterns for the free food in McCall. Officials are now looking at an ordinance to ban feeding wild animals in the city.

Andrew Baertlein June 3, 2021

If you’ve been to McCall lately, you’ve seen a lot of wildlife. But some say there’s too much wildlife.

McCall code enforcement is proposing an ordinance that bans feeding wildlife in the city. It specifically addresses deer which have become a nuisance.

“There are multiple cities across the United States and in resort communities that do not allow feeding of wildlife in town,” McCall Police Chief Justin Williams said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Mosquitoes infected with West Nile virus found in traps in Payette County

The abatement program is increasing mosquito surveillance in these areas and continuing to locate and treat larvae infested waters.

KTVB Staff July 9, 2021

Payette County officials have confirmed that mosquitoes collected in two traps on July 8 have tested positive for the West Nile virus.

They were found in the Washoe area west of Payette and the Kiwanis Park area in Payette during routine surveillance by Payette County’s Mosquito Abatement Program, operated by Vector Disease Control International.

continued:
—————-

Fish & Game News:

Man injured by grizzly bear after encountering a female with a cub

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Friday, July 9, 2021

Forest Service has closed the area of the attack as a precaution

A man was attacked by a grizzly bear early Friday, July 9, in the Kilgore area near Island Park in Eastern Idaho after encountering a female with a cub. The man was injured in the attack, but able to return to the cabin he was staying in and call 911. His injuries were not life threatening, and he was treated at Madison Memorial Hospital in Rexburg.

The man was running on a trail near Stamp Meadows Road on Forest Service land around 6:30 a.m. when he encountered the female grizzly bear with a cub, and the female charged him. He laid down in an effort to protect himself, and the grizzly struck him several times before running off. The area has been closed as a precaution.

Idaho Fish and Game and the Fremont County Sheriff’s Office are continuing to investigate the incident.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Cow and calf moose relocated out of Hailey neighborhood to Silver Creek

By Terry Thompson, Regional Communications Manager
Friday, July 9, 2021 – 6:44 PM MDT


Idaho Fish and Game

A cow and calf moose, while enjoyable to see in a neighborhood, should not be encouraged to live in our communities.

Numerous reports of a cow moose with a very young calf in a Hailey neighborhood began to come into Fish and Game’s Magic Valley Regional office shortly before the July 4th holiday weekend. The cow moose had been seen for some time in the same area of Hailey, but the addition of the calf prompted concerns about the pair living in close proximity to families and pets. Cow moose are extremely protective of their young and can seriously injure or kill anything they view as a threat.

Wildlife biologists began to monitor the situation to assess if they could safely relocate the cow moose and her calf while maintaining public safety. A variety of factors contributed to the decision to relocate these particular moose. The moose were very close to where the City of Hailey would be putting on their July 4th fireworks show, which could bring a fireworks-stressed moose in close contact where local residents would be out walking in their neighborhoods at night. Second, the exceptionally dry conditions likely contributed to the cow and calf taking up residence in neighborhoods with their irrigated lawns and landscaping. And finally, numerous fences, the highway and the fenced airport separated the moose from safely getting to the Big Wood River, preventing them from accessing more suitable moose habitat.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Skunk with head in a McDonald’s cup saved by cop

by Joe Golder, Zenger News Monday, June 7th 2021

Video shows how a Canadian policeman managed to remove a McDonald’s cup from a skunk’s head without getting sprayed.

The video was filmed in Toronto by police who jokingly asked: “What do you get when a police officer and a skunk cross? Law and Odour!

continued:
————

Seasonal Humor:

BearTraffic-a

CovidBackToWork1-a
————–

Boil Water Update July 8, 2021

DRINKING WATER WARNING
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059
BOIL WATER ADVISORY
Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST. Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 180 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com.
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc. .
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 7-8-21.

July 4, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

July 4, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Please be conservative when watering lawns. We ask those that are here all week to not water lawns on the weekends so that more water is available for the weekend cabin owners. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order issued
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit season
May 15 – Firewood Season, permits at The Corner
May 25 – Johnson Creek road fully open
June 7 – Lick Creek road open
June 13 – Profile road open
July 2-5 – South Fork Salmon Season reopens
July 6 – Dust Abatement Earthbind
July 10 – YPFD meeting 10am at Fire Hall
July 10 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
July 11 – Festival Planning Meeting on Zoom 2pm
July 17 – ATV/UTV Escapade 10am
July 19-29 – Lick Creek Road closure for bridge replacement
July 21-22 – Mastercraft stove maintenance days
July 24 – Pet Vax Clinic
July 28 – Dust Abatement Calcium chloride
Aug 14 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
Sept 11 – YPFD Budget Meeting 10am at Fire Hall
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Dust Abatement July 6 and 28

Dust abatement for Earthbind customers will be July 6.
Calcium chloride application will occur on July 28.
Please make checks payable to North American Dust Control.
Deb Filler will be contacting you with the cost for your part.
— — — —

Community Meetings July 10th

YPFD meeting 10am at Fire Hall
VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
— — — —

ATV/UTV Escapade July 17

July 17, 2021: This out-and-back ride is rated as intermediate. Participants ride from Yellow Pine Community Hall to Logan Creek , then return to Big Creek Campground for lunch (provided) and history/stories. After lunch, participants will continue the ride to Pilot Peak. The timeframe of this event is estimated to be from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. Check-in starts at 9:00am; leave at 10:00am. You can register early at (link)
— — — —

Heating Maintenance Day July 21-22

Deb Filler is coordinating with Mastercraft of McCall to schedule a maintenance day in Yellow Pine for propane and pellet stoves. If you are interested, please contact Deb at 208 633-6945. Mastercraft will be here July 21 and 22 to do stove maintenance.
— — — —

July 24 – Pet Vax Clinic

Dr. Keith Ruble and crew from Cascade Vet Clinic will be coming to Yellow Pine Saturday, July 24th, to vaccinate our pets. If you want to get on the list, call Cascade Vet Clinic at (208) 382-4590 so they know to bring the proper charts, etc.
———

Village News:

Annual Golf Tournament July 3rd

The holiday weekend started off with a “bang” with Wally Cory firing his cannon to start the golf tournament. Proceeds support the Village of Yellow Pine
— — — —

Yellow Pine Parade July 3rd

Our Annual Yellow Pine 4th of July Parade was especially good this year with the addition of Harley Goodwin’s Gonkulator put back in service by Scott Amos. As Dave Imel would say we had dolls and dogs. Also horses, fire trucks, bikes, marchers and Christie returning as Miss Yellow Pine. Margaret was this year’s Grand Marshall.

20210703YPParade1-a

20210703YPParade2-a

Courtesy the Yellow Pine Tavern.
— — — —

The Corner July 2-3

The Corner had live music both Friday and Saturday evenings.
— — — —

Community Hall Yard Sale.

The yard sale ran June 15 thru July 4 at the Community Hall, This was a self-serve yard sale to support maintenance on the Community Hall.
— — — —

Veterans’ Monument

With this heat, the flowers and shrubs at our Veterans’ Memorial dry out quickly. When Niebrand’s are in, they water them, but aren’t here all the time……if you go by, please check, and give them a drink with the hose that is there. Our veterans (and the Niebrand’s) thank you!
— — — —

Attention

Would the person who borrowed the measuring wheel please return it to the community hall? It will be needed for the festival.
— — — —

Infrastructure

OK Gravel worked on the lower end of Ellison Street June 30th and July 1st.
— — — —

Lick Creek Road Closure July 19-29

Lick Creek Road will be closed at Zena Creek (about 4 miles east of the Ponderosa Campground) from July 19 – July 29 for a bridge replacement. Please plan ahead!
— — — —

Conserve (and Boil) Water

Please be conservative when watering lawns. We ask those that are here all week to not water lawns on the weekends so that more water is available for the weekend cabin owners. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!
— —

DEQ awards $150,000 to the Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Inc. in Valley County

Boise, June 29, 2021 — The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) today announced the award of a $150,000 in drinking water construction assistance to the Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Inc. in Valley County, Idaho.

The funding will be used to replace the damaged transmission and distribution water mains and install three pressure-reducing valves.

The assistance from DEQ’s State Revolving Loan Fund, which is capitalized annually by grants from the US Environmental Protection Agency, provides this funding with no repayment obligation. The favorable loan terms represent a $205,146 savings to the community when compared to average costs for municipal general obligation debt issuances.

MaryAnna Peavey – Grants & Loans Bureau Chief
— — — —

Scrap Metal

Sharing a message that Mike Amos will haul out a load of scrap metal. If you have scrap metal, contact Mike. He has an area by his place to stack it.
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Lick Creek Road will be closed at Zena Creek (about 4 miles east of the Ponderosa Campground) from July 19 – July 29 for a bridge replacement. Please plan ahead.

South Fork Salmon River salmon fishing reopens on July 2-5.

Johnson Creek, Profile Gap and Lick Creek roads are Open. These roads have not been bladed and are rough.

Monumental summit is rumored to be open.

Elk summit was still closed as of June 14) but could be open soon. Travel at your own risk.

Deadwood summit is open from the Landmark side.

The Hwy 55 project Smith’s Ferry area: Starting June 1, crews will transition into their summer construction schedule. Drivers can anticipate single-lane, alternating traffic controlled by flaggers Monday – early Friday morning. From Friday morning – Sunday, and any major holidays, the road will be open to two lanes. This schedule will be in place until September. Project Website link:

The Hwy 55 project from Donnelly to McCall starts soon. One lane during the week and two lanes on weekends. Project is slated to last until September.
— — — —

Critters

Aggressive Deer and Elk

Be aware that mothers will attack dogs and chase people if they feel their babies are threatened. Keep dogs leashed in the forest during “baby season” for their own protection.

Ticks

* Know where to expect ticks. Many ticks live in grassy, brushy, or wooded areas. When possible, avoid wooded and brushy areas with tall grass and leaf litter. Walk in the center of trails, particularly in spring and summer when ticks feed.
* Wear appropriate clothing. When in tick habitats, wear light-colored, tightly woven long pants and long-sleeve shirt. Tuck your pant legs into socks or boots, and your shirt into your pants. This helps keep ticks on the outside of your clothing where you can spot them more easily.
* Use tick repellent when necessary, and carefully follow instructions on the label. Apply an EPA-registered repellent effective against ticks, such as those containing DEET to clothes and exposed skin, and permethrin to clothes and gear. Take care when applying repellent on children. EPA’s search tool can help you find the repellent that best suits your needs.
* Check clothing, gear, and pets after being areas with ticks. Ticks can hitch a ride into your home on clothing and pets, then attach to you or a family member later. Carefully examine coats, camping gear, and daypacks. Don’t forget your dog, see CDC’s where to check your pet for ticks.
* Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming can reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease and may be effective in reducing the risk of other tick-borne disease. Showering can wash off unattached ticks and it is a good opportunity to do a tick check.
* Check your body, your child and pets thoroughly for ticks. Carefully inspect areas in and around the hair, head, neck, ears, under arms, inside the belly button, around the waist, between the legs, and behind the knees. Ticks can be very small before they feed—look for what may appear like a new freckle or speck of dirt. Continue checking for two to three days after returning from areas with ticks.

Pine Martins & Raccoons

Watch your small pets. Reports of pine martins living in the dump and raccoons on the north side of the village.

Be Bear, Fox & Coyote Aware

* Do not feed them human food
* Secure your trash
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Be Mountain Lion Aware

Note: A report of a mountain lion still hanging around the upper end of the village.
20210627Cougar-a
photo taken near the end of June, courtesy N

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report July 2: “The bins are full to overflowing.”

The bins were emptied May 22nd. Locals worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water. No outside watering after 2pm.

June Water Usage:
Date…flow meter reading…gallons used…hours between readings

06/01/21 10284494 38390 23.5
06/02/21 10338714 54220 25.0
06/03/21 10375837 37123 23.0
06/04/21 10415252 39415 24.0
06/05/21 10454904 39652 24.5
06/06/21 10490008 35104 23.5
06/07/21 10529956 39948 24.5
06/08/21 10569400 39444 23.5
06/09/21 10610644 41244 24.0
06/10/21 10645211 34567 24.0
06/11/21 10677145 31934 24.0
06/12/21 10711198 34053 24.5
06/13/21 10744206 33008 24.0
06/14/21 10790927 46721 23.5
06/15/21 10833587 42660 24.0
06/16/21 10875154 41567 24.0
06/17/21 10917632 42478 24.0
06/18/21 10964659 47027 24.0
06/19/21 11020928 56269 26.5
06/20/21 11078032 57104 22.5
06/21/21 11134824 56792 23.0
06/22/21 11191717 56893 24.0
06/23/21 11242297 50580 24.0
06/24/21 11280008 37711 24.0
06/25/21 11364991 84983 37.0
06/26/21 11386784 21793 11.5
06/27/21 11436088 49304 24.0
06/28/21 11483655 47567 23.5
06/29/21 11544768 61113 24.0
06/30/21 11609436 64668 24.0

YPWUA 2021 Shareholder Meeting July 4 at 10am

Sunday July 4th 10am Community Hall

Agenda

1. Financial Report – Willie
A. Willie stepping down as treasurer

2. Operations – Warren
A. Boil order status
B. Leaks

3. Grants – IMPORTANT VOTE BY SHAREHOLDERS TO OBTAIN GRANTS
A. Details of grants
B. Requirements to receive grants
C. More future grants

4. Summer lawn watering
A. Because of our situation lawn watering is discouraged
B. Odd/Even days watering
C. No watering after 2 pm

5. Election of one board member
A. Dave Prouty is not running for another term

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Your Water Before Using
Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020.
Link: to Notice
— — — —

VYPA News:

June 12 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Secretary
Ron Noel, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)

Festival
Want to join YPAC Corp in making a difference? We are raising money to benefit the Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival . Any donation will help.
Each year, during the first full weekend of August, the sleepy mountain village of Yellow Pine is transformed into the largest festival of it’s kind in the western hemisphere!
The festival is produced by volunteers and raises funds to support the village of Yellow Pine as well as the funds needed to hold next year’s festival.
As you all know, the 2020 festival had to be cancelled due to Covid-19. This placed a significant burden on Yellow Pine to come up with enough funding to hold the 2021 festival this August 5, 6, 7.
Souvenirs and events at the festival help raise funds. We also know there are many of you who support the festival, but are not able to attend. This fund raiser is to give you an opportunity to help us help Yellow Pine.
Thanks in advance for your tax-deductible contribution to this cause that means so much to us!
GoFundMe link:

Anyone interested in being a part of the Festival Planning/Working committee, please contact Deb Filler. Meetings will begin at the end of January. Even if you aren’t physically in YP, you can participate in the committee.
Next Festival Planning July 11, 2021 – Contact Deb for Zoom link and passcode.
2021 Planning Notes updated June 6, 2021 (link)
Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival Policy and Procedure Link:
— — — —

YPFD News:

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful.
link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021.pdf

June 12, 2020 – 10am Fire siren test and YPFD meeting (no minutes yet.)

May 15, 2020 – there was a YPFD meeting 10am at the Fire Hall.
Link: to 20210515 YPFD MeetingNotes_Final.docx

Meeting schedule for the YPFD. All meetings are at the YPFD Station
Sat. May 15 at 10am
Sat. June 12 at 10am
Sat. July 10 at 10am
Sat. September 11 at 10am Budget Meeting

YP Fire District 2 (east of Yellow Pine Ave) up for election Nov 2nd for 4 year term (per Valley County.) Link:

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30, 2020 at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by a escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Tim Rogers – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
Hours: 1pm-8pm, closed on Tuesdays
We offer smoked tri tip, brisket, and chicken sandwiches and also burgers and chicken wings.
Firewood Permits available May 15th.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Yellow Pine Tavern open daily:
Monday thru Thursday 8am to 9pm
Friday and Saturday 8am to 10pm
Sunday 8am to 8pm
Indoor Dining with limited seating and Outdoor Dining Available.
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer, Wine and Pop
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Opened June 12th for Summer
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
Store hours: 10am to 5pm
The store is now receiving inventory of Food items. The ATM is operational, and Debit/Credit cards are accepted. Currently there is fuel, ice, alcoholic beverages (non liquor) tobacco, non alc beverages, snacks, and Dairy items (ice cream, milk, butter, and yogurt). Fresh produce is soon to come. If there are needs for fuel or anything during off hours, Josh will be around on call to accommodate. For any particular store item requests, please call 208-633-3300 or Email
For room reservations, please call 208-633-3300 or Email for reservations
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation – (208) 382-4844

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (June 28) overnight low of 53 degrees. This morning clear sky and warming up quickly. Light air traffic. The tree swallows are taking chicken down feathers to their nests (may have babies hatching,) several Jays bopping around, a couple of robins and a few finches visiting. Very hot and sunny at lunch time. no breeze to speak of. Tiger swallowtail butterfly looking for flowers. Extremely hot afternoon, high of 100 degrees. Rock rake possibly cleaning residential streets. Still in the high 90’s by early evening, clear and slight breeze. Flicker calling. Cooling down a little after sunset. Stars out before midnight.

Tuesday (June 29) overnight low of 51 degrees. This morning clear sky, light breeze and dry. Tree swallows swooping, robins hopping, jays calling and a few finches visiting. Ground squirrels and a chipmunk running about. Looks like a water truck has wet residential streets. Helicopter flew over at 1014am. Very hot at lunch time. Extremely hot early afternoon, a few scattered clouds and light breezes, high of 103 degrees. Still plenty hot (high 90s) early evening, mostly clear and light breezes. Cooling off to mid 80s after sunset. Stars out before midnight.

Wednesday (June 30) overnight low of 56 degrees. This morning clear sky. Swallows, robins, jays, cassins finches and a pine siskin visiting. Light air traffic. Golden mantled and colombian ground squirrels running around. Heavy equipment up on the main road. A few clouds before lunch time and quite warm. Mail truck was later than usual, but no problems reported. Hot and mostly cloudy by early afternoon, high of 99 degrees. Dry thunderstorm started around 4pm and cooling off. Big drops of rain, much cooler, breezy and thunder late afternoon. (Rain lasted about half an hour.) Several hummingbirds showed up. Nice and cool before dusk, but rather humid. At least partly clear before midnight – Mars rising.

Thursday (July 1) overnight low of 51 degrees. This morning almost clear sky – a few tiny clouds to the southwest. Measured 0.04″ of rain from yesterday’s storm. A few swallows, robins, jays and finches calling. Heavy equipment on lower Ellison street (and an unhappy dog howling.) Sunny and warming up before lunch time. Golden mantled and several colombian ground squirrels running about. Dark overcast after lunch time. Some thunder mid-afternoon and breezy but no rain. Cooling off by late afternoon, gray overcast and light breeze, high of 84 degrees. Several hummingbirds visiting. Warming up again early evening, partly clear (mostly high thin haze) and variable breezes. Cooling off nicely before dusk, hazy sky and light breeze. Looked partly clear before midnight.

Friday (July 2) overnight low of 50 degrees. This morning mostly cloudy. Light air and street traffic. Swallows, robins, jays, a few finches and hummingbirds visiting. Golden mantled and colombian ground squirrels running about. Mostly clear and hot at lunch time. Very hot afternoon, partly cloudy to mostly clear and light breezes, high of 97 degrees. Increasing street traffic. Still over 90F by early evening. Plenty warm after sunset. Increasing street traffic. Haze of smoke (and dust) in the air before dusk. Late evening 4 wheeler traffic. Looked hazy before midnight.

Saturday (July 3) overnight low of 52 degrees. This morning almost clear sky (light haze) and slight breeze. Early air traffic and increasing street traffic. Tree swallows, robins, a few finches and jays visiting. Golden mantled and colombian ground squirrels running around. Cannon shot at 1022am to start the golf tourney. Hot after lunch time, increasing haze (and dust), partly cloudy and light breezes. Lots of people enjoying the golf tournament. Parade at 4pm. Very hot afternoon, high of 98 degrees. Still in the 90s by early evening, thin haze of smoke and partly cloudy. Cooling off after sunset, clear sky with haze of smoke. Looked hazy before midnight.

Sunday (July 4) overnight low of 59 degrees. This morning almost clear sky (a few tiny clouds, light haze of smoke) and slight breeze. Swallows, a few robins and finches calling. Hot and mostly cloudy at lunch time. Hot afternoon, light haze of smoke and becoming mostly cloudy, high of 97 degrees. Still hot early evening, mostly clear (light haze of smoke) and light breeze. The YPFD water tanker sprinkling local streets before sunset.
—————-

Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 83 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 4 new deaths

July 2, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 83 new COVID-19 cases and 4 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 195,172.

There are a total of 156,211 confirmed cases and 38,961 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state. …

The state said 720,293 people have received the vaccine, and 1,335,050 total doses have been administered. 666,099 people are fully vaccinated. …

The state said 9 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 8,835, and 1 new case HAS been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 1,486. …

477 vaccine breakthrough cases have been reported.

4 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 2,158.

full story: [Valley County 877 cases, 6 deaths.]
— — — — —

Valley County hospitals report 16 new COVID-19 cases

By Tom Grote for The Star-News July 1, 2021

Valley County hospitals reported 16 new cases of COVID-19 during the past week.

St. Luke’s McCall reported nine new cases in the last week for a total of 15 new cases in June. Cascade Medical Center reported seven new cases last week for a total of 10 during June.

A total of 785 cases of COVID-19 have been reported by the two hospitals since the first case was detected in March 2020.

Four confirmed deaths and two suspected deaths related to COVID-19 among Valley County residents have been reported by Central District Health.

A total of 57.8% eligible Valley County residents had received at least one dose of the COVID-19 as of this week, the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare reported. That compares to 55.5% vaccinated as of the beginning of June. …

St. Luke’s McCall offers walk-in COVID-19 vaccines from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at St. Luke’s Clinics – Payette Lakes Family Medicine, 211 Forest Street, McCall.

Appointments also can be scheduled online through St. Luke’s myChart or calling 208-381-9500 or by calling 208-634-2225.

Cascade Medical Center offers a daily walk-in vaccination clinic Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County buys house in Cascade for employees

Home would be temporary housing for new employees

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 1, 2021

Valley County has purchased a three-bedroom home in Cascade for employee housing.

Valley County Commissioners approved the purchase of 205 N. Idaho Street in Cascade for $280,000.

The intent is for new employees to be able to rent the home until they can find more permanent housing.

Current county employees who lose their housing could also rent the home until they find secure housing, Valley County Human Resources Director Pat Duncan said.

“We are unable to hire employees and have lost some due to losing their homes so this needs to happen this year,” Commissioner Sherry Maupin said.

The county has lost four employees when they were asked to leave the property they were renting because the landlord either sold the home or was going to do something else with the property, Duncan said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

McCall woman dies in crash down embankment

KTVB Staff June 30, 2021

A McCall woman was killed Tuesday night when her car plunged off an embankment along Idaho 55.

The wreck happened at 10:42 p.m. north of Smiths Ferry in Valley County.

According to Idaho State Police, 73-year-old Janet Rockwell of McCall was headed north on Idaho 55 when she went off the highway on a curve. Her BMW veered off the right shoulder and down an embankment before coming to a stop.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Cascade man hurt in two-car crash on ID55 near Smiths Ferry

The Star-News July 1, 2021

Idaho 55 was reduced to one lane near Smiths Ferry on Monday afternoon following a head-on car collision that left a Cascade man seriously injured, the Idaho State Police reported.

Ronald Neil, 74, of Cascade was driving north when his truck crossed the center line at about 1:49 p.m., striking a truck driven by Murriel Baptiste, 79, of Garden Valley, an ISP report said.

Neil was taken by air ambulance to St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, where he remained on Tuesday in “serious condition,” a hospital spokesperson said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Mudslide causing delays on Highway 95 north of Riggins

by CBS2 News Staff Friday, July 2nd 2021

Crews are clearing debris as they monitor a mudslide north of Riggins, which briefly closed an area of Highway 95 Thursday night.

One lane is now open with alternating traffic between milepost 196 and milepost 204.

Idaho Transportation Department crews are also monitoring the adjacent slope.

Drivers can expect delays when traveling through the area.

source:
—————-

Public Lands:

Rafting guides manage to move strainer tree along Payette River

by CBS2 News Staff Friday, July 2nd 2021

A tree that fell across the Payette River near the Banks-Lowman Road has been cleared for rafters.

The Boise County Sheriff’s Office says the tree fell Thursday night and was blocking the entire width of the river. It fell just east of Highway 55.

“It is very difficult to see the down tree as it is around a bend in the river at the bottom of some difficult rapids,” the sheriff said earlier Thursday. “This is a potentially deadly situation for anyone who floats down the river at that section.”

But that danger has been mitigated.

continued:
——————

Fire Season:

Fire Update, Payette National Forest, July 2, 2021, 6pm

Initial Attack Underway on Wildfires from Recent Thunderstorms

McCall, Idaho, July 2, 2021 – The Payette National Forest is currently conducting initial attack on four small wildfires today, finishing containment on three additional wildfires reported yesterday, and assisting the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest with a small fire in the Hell Canyon Recreation Area near Black Lake.

These wildfires are lightning ignited and are a result of thunderstorms on the Forest over the past few days. There is strong potential for additional wildfire is be reported throughout the remainder of today and into the 4th of July weekend.

Forest visitors are reminded that firework use is illegal on National Forest System Lands always; every day; and, on every National Forest across the Nation. The Forest has put out three human caused wildfires and several abandoned campfires so far this fire season. While spending time out in the forest this weekend, please recreate responsibly to ensure the safety of yourself, your family, and local communities. Recent hot weather has increased the potential for wildfire starts across the Forest.

Fire managers emphasize the importance of smart and responsible recreation during these periods of increased fire danger. With new wildfire starts, especially near populated areas, Fire Managers will be faced with very difficult decisions on where to focus firefighting efforts and how to prioritize incident response.

Please help prevent human caused wildfires by using extreme caution with any activity that can cause a spark.

Council Ranger District

Moonlight Fire: Approximately three miles northwest of the Huckleberry Campground. 1/10th of an acre. McCall Smokejumpers responded. Containment expected tomorrow 7/3.

McCall Ranger District

Kennally Creek Fire: Approximately 3 mile east of Jug Handle Mountain. 1/10th of acre. Krassel Helitak responded. Contained.

Fogg Fire: Approximately 4 miles east of Jug Handle Mountain. 1/10th of an acre. Krassel Helitak responded. Contained.

Union Fire: Approximately 1 mile southeast of the Marshall Mountain Mining District. 1/10 of an acre. McCall Smokejumpers responded. Expected containment 7/3.

New Meadows Ranger District

Exchange Fire: Approximately 9 miles northwest of New Meadows. Half acre. Sawtooth Hotshots and Engine 421 responded. Expected containment 7/3.

Elk Creek Fire: Approximately 2 miles east of Pinehurst. 1/10th of an acre. Price Valley rappelers responded. Expected containment 7/3.

Denny Creek Fire: Near highway 96, approximately 1.5 miles south of Pollock. 1/10th of an acre. Snow Slide Fire Module responded. Expected containment 7/3.

Wallowa-Whitman National Forest: Black Lake Fire. Four McCall smokejumpers responded to assist.

No wildfire related area closures are in effect at this time.

The Payette National Forest has a public wildfire information hotline for fire information – 208-634-0820. Visit Inciweb for information on large wildfires at (link), and follow the Payette National Forest on Twitter at @PayetteForest, and on Facebook at U.S. Forest Service – Payette National Forest.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Tribal Liaison
Payette National Forest
— — — — — — — — — —

Lightning sparks 40-50 acre fire near Riggins

Firefighters were forced to pull away from the fire due to ongoing thunderstorm activity.

Kaitlin Riordan July 1, 2021 KTVB

A 40 to 50-acre fire is burning 14 miles northeast of Riggins, Idaho near the Florence Township, according to Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests officials.

It’s being called the Sand Creek fire and it was started by lightning Wednesday afternoon. According to a press release from the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests Public Affairs Specialist Jim Wimer, firefighters were forced to pull away from the fire due to ongoing thunderstorm activity. Lightning, hail and erratic winds during the storms made conditions unsafe for firefighters, Wimer said.

A total of 85 personnel are assigned to the fire including aviation resources, hand crews, engines, smokejumpers and heavy equipment.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Two brush fires reported along Highway 16 near Firebird Raceway

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, June 29th 2021

Firefighters have managed to gain the upper hand on two fires reported along Highway 16.

The Bureau of Land Management says the fires burned along the highway near Firebird Raceway.

“Crews are mopping up hotspots and hope to have both fires contained in the next few hours and controlled later this evening,” BLM said.

The highway was closed between Beacon Light and the Gem County line but it has since been re-opened as the fire is burning away from the road.

No structures were lost.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Smoke from California wildfires may reach Idaho this week

KTVB Staff June 30, 2021

The smoke from wildfires in California may spread to parts of Idaho, according to the National Weather Service.

The US National Weather Service Boise posted on Facebook a gif of the HRRR smoke model showing smoke from wildfires north of Redding, CA drifting into eastern Oregon and parts of Idaho.

The forecast model currently only goes to 6 a.m. on July 2 and does not show much smoke reaching the Treasure Valley but a large volume of smoke is anticipated to stretch from La Grande, Ore. to Missoula, MT.

continued: w/video
——————-

Critter News:

Bear spotted at popular campground near Lucky Peak

Officials are reminding everyone to make sure their food and trash is secured, especially when camping overnight.


Credit: Boise Co. Sheriff’s Office

Authorities are urging people to stay safe after a bear came into a popular recreation and camping area near the Lucky Peak Reservoir.

The Boise County Sheriff’s Office said the young bear was seen in the Deer Flat Campground on Wednesday. Photos captured of the animal show it roaming close to a dock, picnic tables, and coolers.

Officials say the area has been shut down, and park rangers have been called in to trap and relocate the bear to “a more bear-friendly environment” farther away from people.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Excessive heatwaves impact on Idaho’s wildlife

By Lynsey Amundson Jun 30, 2021 KIVI

From people to pets and wildlife, we’re all trying to find relief from the current heatwave. But just like us, wildlife can experience heat stress too.

“Wildlife has much of the same problems. They are going to alter their behavior, so they are not moving around during the hottest part of the day so they are going to try and seek areas where they can stay as cool as possible,” Bob Collier, University of Idaho’s Department Head of Animals, Veterinary, and Food Sciences said.

If wildlife isn’t able to find ways to stay cool, it can negatively impact their well-being.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Sockeye salmon facing hot water will be trapped, trucked

July 2, 2021 Associated Press


BLM

Sockeye salmon at risk from high water temperatures will be captured at an eastern Washington dam to save as many of the endangered fish headed for Idaho as possible.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game says workers will start trapping the salmon Tuesday at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River and truck them to hatcheries to be artificially spawned or to Redfish Lake in central Idaho for release.

Fish and Game officials tell The Lewiston Tribune that water temperatures in the Snake and Salmon rivers have been as high as 76 degrees.

That can be lethal for salmon.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Around 300 animals rescued from home in Weiser; chickens looking for new home

By Nicole Camarda Jun 30, 2021 KIVI

Nearly 300 animals were rescued from a small rental home in Weiser by the Washington County Sheriff’s Department and the Idaho Humane Society. A team of veterinarians and staff from the Idaho Humane Society were at the rescue site to evaluate the health of the animals.

The approximately 900 square foot home had over 100 chickens inside the home along with around 15 cats and even more chickens outside in kennels. …

The Idaho Humane Society has already started adopting out the chickens but they need the community’s help in finding these birds new homes.

full story:
—————-

Fish & Game News:

F&G seeks information regarding the shooting of a mountain lion in Swan Valley

By James Brower, Regional Communications Manager
Wednesday, June 30, 2021

A reward is being offered for information that leads to a citation

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is seeking information regarding the shooting of an adult female mountain lion found on the Snake River Road near Deer Creek in Swan Valley.

On the evening of June 25, a member of the public spotted the lion as it struggled to cross the road and immediately reported the injured animal to Fish and Game. The lion was quickly dispatched and further inspection of the animal revealed multiple gunshot wounds that appeared to have been inflicted several days prior.

If anyone has any information that may be useful in solving this case, please call the Upper Snake Regional Office 208-525-7290, the Citizens Against Poaching hotline 1-800-632-5999 or fill out an online form at (link). Callers can remain anonymous and a reward is available for information that leads to a citation in the case.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

How to camp safely in bear country and avoid unwanted encounters

By Terry Thompson, Regional Communications Manager
Friday, July 2, 2021

Bears and campers can be a bad mix that usually leads to a dead bear

Summer is upon us, leading many to escape to the mountains to relax and camp. Before you head to the hills, Fish and Game wildlife biologists remind everyone to be mindful of wildlife, especially bears, when camping over the Fourth of July holiday and beyond.

Food storage when camping is especially important. Bears are quick learners and have an excellent sense of smell. When food is improperly stored, it can attract bears that can easily get to the food. When this happens, it never turns out favorably for the bear.

Unfortunately, a bear conditioned to food accidentally supplied by people leaves Fish and Game officials with no other choice but put the bear down to ensure public safety.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Low flows, high temperatures impact fisheries and hatchery operations statewide

By Cassie Sundquist, Fisheries Production Manager
Friday, July 2, 2021

The combination of low snowpack, lack of spring precipitation, and hot summer air temperatures are reducing stream flows and reservoir elevations, and increasing water temperatures across Idaho. These conditions have forced Fish and Game staff to modify normal operations in order to save fish and meet program goals.

The most recent example involves sockeye salmon. In late June, Fish and Game determined that a passage emergency exists for Snake River sockeye. This resulted in a decision to haul trapped sockeye from Lower Granite Dam to Eagle Fish Hatchery, which is home to Fish and Game’s captive rearing program for the species. Transporting trapped Sockeye Salmon from Lower Granite Dam to Eagle Fish Hatchery will begin July 6.

Under normal circumstances, these fish would complete an incredible, 900-mile journey from the Pacific Ocean to the Sawtooth Basin at the Sawtooth Hatchery near Stanley — a journey that is valuable to Idaho’s sockeye recovery efforts.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Incredibly rare dual-sex butterfly found at Pingree Butterfly Haven

By Emma Iannacone June 30, 2021 KTVB

A Pingree couple with a passion for butterflies came upon a one in a million find: a butterfly with both sex chromosomes.

This Tiger Swallowtail butterfly made it’s uniqueness known when it opened its wings for the first time and displayed its remarkably different wings: one yellow for his male characteristics, and one dark and blue, for her female characteristics.

“When its wings were closed, it looked normal. When its wings opened, I’m like Wow! That’s when we contacted our friend and said what is this?” said Randy Reed, who owns and operates the Butterfly Haven in Pingree with his wife Karen. The couple raises thousands of butterflies in a greenhouse-turned-sanctuary, where they found the incredibly rare butterfly.

continued: w/video
—————

Seasonal Humor:

GolfBeerCart-a

ChickenHOT-a
———————–

No Illegal Fireworks

Valley County June 25, 2021

NoFireworksSummer in Valley County has officially arrived and with it, the need for a reminder about fireworks safety and fire prevention. While fire danger is always of concern in the summer months, this year we are seeing increasing drought conditions, unseasonably hot weather, and a large influx of new visitors and forest users to our area who may not be well versed in fire prevention measures.

We urge you to use caution as you celebrate the Fourth of July holiday and keep these things in mind:

• Possessing or lighting any firework on U.S. Forest Service, Idaho Department of Lands, and Bureau of Land Management lands is illegal.
• Idaho allows “safe and sane” fireworks to be purchased and ignited on private land.
• Only light one firework at a time and maintain a safe distance after lighting.
• Keep a bucket of water on hand to douse used fireworks.
• Only light fireworks in clear, open areas away from structures and people.
• Lighting any aerial firework is illegal and a misdemeanor offense in Idaho, even on private property.
• That one bears repeating…lighting any aerial firework is illegal in the state of Idaho, even on private property.

If you plan to recreate on public lands, please keep the following tips in mind to help prevent forest fire:

• Never leave a campfire unattended.
• Completely extinguish campfires using water or stirring with dirt or sand. If it is too hot to touch, it is too hot to leave.
• Prevent sparks by making sure vehicles are not dragging tow chains or loose tail pipes.
• Ensure off-road vehicles have spark arrestors.

Help us protect Valley County from fire.

June 27, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

June 27, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Please be conservative when watering lawns. We ask those that are here all week to not water lawns on the weekends so that more water is available for the weekend cabin owners. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order issued
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit season
May 15 – Firewood Season, permits at The Corner
May 25 – Johnson Creek road fully open
June 7 – Lick Creek road open
June 13 – Profile road open
June 15 thru July 4 – Community Hall Yard Sale
June 26 – South Fork Salmon Season starts
June 26 – Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers Highland Games
July 2-4 Yard Sale Silver Dollar Cafe
July 2-3 Live Music at The Corner
July 3 – Annual Golf Tournament
July 3 – Independence Day Parade 4pm
July 4 – YPWUA 2021 Shareholder Meeting 10am
July 10 – YPFD meeting 10am at Fire Hall
July 10 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
July 11 – Festival Planning Meeting on Zoom 2pm
July 17 – ATV/UTV Escapade 10am
July 19-29 – Lick Creek Road closure for bridge replacement
July 21-22 – Mastercraft stove maintenance days
Aug 14 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
Sept 11 – YPFD Budget Meeting 10am at Fire Hall
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Community Hall Yard Sale – Going on now.

June 15 thru July 4, 2021. At the Community Hall, This self-serve yard sale supports maintenance on the Community Hall. Shop at your leisure; decide what the items are worth to you; and pay one of the volunteers. Easy-peasy

Received a report complimenting on how well things were laid out at the hall.
— — — —

Dust Abatement

The infrastructure committee has determined to use Calcium Chloride this year (same stuff used on the E. Fork.) It is slightly less expensive than the Earthbind. If you are interested in dust abatement this year please let Deb Filler know. She can give you the cost information. If you would prefer the Earthbind (the stuff that was used last year) let Deb know that. If you choose Earthbind, North American Dust Control will bill you directly.

Dust abatement will occur once Landmark is open. (No date set yet as of June 18th, will be coordinated with the EFSF county dust abatement.)
— — — —

Yard Sale July 2-4

I am having a huge yard sale between the store and the Silver Dollar July 2nd, 3rd and 4th. Items include restaurant equipment, antiques, tools, building supplies, furniture, electrical wire, stainless steel cable, diesel heaters and much, much more. -S Holloway
— — — —

The Corner July 2-3

Live music at The Corner both Friday and Saturday evenings, starting at 5 p.m.
— — — —

Annual Golf Tournament, July 3rd

Check in at the golf course at 10am. Bring a team or we’ll set one up for you. $20 registration requested. Fun Prizes.

Proceeds support the Village of Yellow Pine
— — — —

Independence Day Parade July 3 4pm

Join us to watch or participate in the annual Yellow Pine Independence Day Parade. All family-friendly entrants are welcome. If you want to participate, meet at the fire house at 315pm.
— — — —


— — — —

YPWUA 2021 Shareholder Meeting July 4 at 10am

Sunday July 4th 10am Community Hall

1. Financial Report – Willie
A. Willie stepping down as treasurer

2. Operations – Warren
A. Boil order status
B. Leaks

3. Grants – IMPORTANT VOTE BY SHAREHOLDERS TO OBTAIN GRANTS
A. Details of grants
B. Requirements to receive grants
C. More future grants

4. Summer lawn watering
A. Because of our situation lawn watering is discouraged
B. Odd/Even days watering
C. No watering after 2 pm

5. Election of one board member
A. Dave Prouty is not running for another term
— — — —

ATV/UTV Escapade July 17

July 17, 2021: This out-and-back ride is rated as intermediate. Participants ride from Yellow Pine Community Hall to Logan Creek , then return to Big Creek Campground for lunch (provided) and history/stories. After lunch, participants will continue the ride to Pilot Peak. The timeframe of this event is estimated to be from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. Check-in starts at 9:00am; leave at 10:00am. You can register early at (link)
— — — —

Heating Maintenance Day July 21-22

Deb Filler is coordinating with Mastercraft of McCall to schedule a maintenance day in Yellow Pine for propane and pellet stoves. If you are interested, please contact Deb at 208 633-6945. Mastercraft will be here July 21 and 22 to do stove maintenance.
———-

Village News:

The Highland Games Yellow Pine

BaldMtnKnuckleDraggers-aOn June 26th the Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers competed in Yellow Pine.

Link: to more info about the Highland Games and the Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers

Thank you to Steve Holloway for donating Alpine Village Lodge for the Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers so they could have their competition here in Yellow Pine.

This is the crew from Highland games.
20210626HighlandGames-a
courtesy Ann F.

Stone Throw

20210626HighlandGames1-a

Hammer Throw

20210626HighlandGames2-a

Caber Toss

20210626HighlandGames3-a

Weight Over Bar

20210626HighlandGames4-a

Photos courtesy of Deb F.
— — — —

Power Outage and Thunderstorm

Tuesday evening Yellow Pine had a power outage 833pm-115am due to high winds damaging infrastructure down in the valley. Power was out from Kuna to Donnelly. We also experienced an intense thunderstorm with lightning striking Golden Gate Hill. About 10 minutes of intense rain, followed by light sprinkles adding up to 0.23″ total.

Link: to short time-lapse video courtesy John B.

— — — —

Veterans’ Monument

With this heat, the flowers and shrubs at our Veterans’ Memorial dry out quickly. When Niebrand’s are in, they water them, but aren’t here all the time……if you go by, please check, and give them a drink with the hose that is there. Our veterans (and the Niebrand’s) thank you!
— — — —

Attention

Would the person who borrowed the measuring wheel please return it to the community hall? It will be needed for the festival.
— — — —

Lick Creek Road

Lick Creek Road will be closed at Zena Creek (about 4 miles east of the Ponderosa Campground) from July 19 – July 29 for a bridge replacement. Please plan ahead!
— — — —

Conserve (and Boil) Water

Please be conservative when watering lawns. We ask those that are here all week to not water lawns on the weekends so that more water is available for the weekend cabin owners. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!
— — — —

Scrap Metal

Sharing a message that Mike Amos will haul out a load of scrap metal. If you have scrap metal, contact Mike. He has an area by his place to stack it.
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Lick Creek Road will be closed at Zena Creek (about 4 miles east of the Ponderosa Campground) from July 19 – July 29 for a bridge replacement. Please plan ahead.

South Fork Salmon River salmon fishing opens on June 26.

Johnson Creek, Profile Gap and Lick Creek roads are Open. These roads have not been bladed and are rough.

Monumental summit is rumored to be open.

Elk summit was still closed last weekend (June 14) but could be open soon. Travel at your own risk.

Deadwood summit is open from the Landmark side.

The Hwy 55 project Smith’s Ferry area: Starting June 1, crews will transition into their summer construction schedule. Drivers can anticipate single-lane, alternating traffic controlled by flaggers Monday – early Friday morning. From Friday morning – Sunday, and any major holidays, the road will be open to two lanes. This schedule will be in place until September. Project Website link:

The Hwy 55 project from Donnelly to McCall starts soon. One lane during the week and two lanes on weekends. Project is slated to last until September.
— — — —

Critters

Aggressive Deer and Elk

Be aware that mothers will attack dogs and chase people if they feel their babies are threatened. Keep dogs leashed in the forest during “baby season” for their own protection.

Ticks

* Know where to expect ticks. Many ticks live in grassy, brushy, or wooded areas. When possible, avoid wooded and brushy areas with tall grass and leaf litter. Walk in the center of trails, particularly in spring and summer when ticks feed.
* Wear appropriate clothing. When in tick habitats, wear light-colored, tightly woven long pants and long-sleeve shirt. Tuck your pant legs into socks or boots, and your shirt into your pants. This helps keep ticks on the outside of your clothing where you can spot them more easily.
* Use tick repellent when necessary, and carefully follow instructions on the label. Apply an EPA-registered repellent effective against ticks, such as those containing DEET to clothes and exposed skin, and permethrin to clothes and gear. Take care when applying repellent on children. EPA’s search tool can help you find the repellent that best suits your needs.
* Check clothing, gear, and pets after being areas with ticks. Ticks can hitch a ride into your home on clothing and pets, then attach to you or a family member later. Carefully examine coats, camping gear, and daypacks. Don’t forget your dog, see CDC’s where to check your pet for ticks.
* Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming can reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease and may be effective in reducing the risk of other tick-borne disease. Showering can wash off unattached ticks and it is a good opportunity to do a tick check.
* Check your body, your child and pets thoroughly for ticks. Carefully inspect areas in and around the hair, head, neck, ears, under arms, inside the belly button, around the waist, between the legs, and behind the knees. Ticks can be very small before they feed—look for what may appear like a new freckle or speck of dirt. Continue checking for two to three days after returning from areas with ticks.

Pine Martins & Raccoons

Watch your small pets. Reports of pine martins living in the dump and raccoons on the north side of the village.

Be Bear, Fox & Coyote Aware

* Do not feed them human food
* Secure your trash
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Be Mountain Lion Aware

Note: A report of a mountain lion near the upper end of the village early this spring.

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report June 13th: “The bins were half full.”

The bins were emptied May 22nd. Locals worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water. Turn off your trickles.

Update May 14, 2021: Kerry and Dion from Idaho Rural Water were onsite yesterday along with Nicki and me for leak detection in the “downtown” Yellow Pine grid.

Utilizing their leak detection equipment, and Nicki’s knowledge of the distribution system, Kerry and Dion successfully located a number of leaks including a large leak at a fire hydrant. The fire hydrant was turned off and Tim, the fire chief, was notified that the hydrant is not operational.

Many small leaks were identified and marked, but of particular concern is the waterline that runs under the alley behind the hotel and all the way down to the community center. Numerous active leaks were located in that section. So many leaks exist along the alley that the best course of action is probably replacing the entire run of pipe.

Nicki followed up after the guys left and using her tablet and GPS program, accurately recorded the location of all the leaks identified. Now that a record of the leak locations exists, prioritization of the leaks and a plan to repair them can be developed.

Kerry and Dion were very thorough and helpful, and the work they completed will be beneficial to reducing demand on the system as a whole. Based on today’s daily system data, reported this morning by Nicki, it appears that daily demand was reduced by approximately 10,000 gallons as a result of yesterday’s work.

Regards, Warren Drake, Drake Diversified LLC

Update May 13, 2021: Cecil, Tom and Ron fixed a leaking valve which resulted in saving 5000 gallons of water!

Update May 6, 2021: The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an application with the USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility planning grant. If any additional information is needed please contact: Willie Sullivan, Treasurer Ypwater @ gmail.com

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Your Water Before Using
Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020.
Link: to Notice
— — — —

VYPA News:

June 12 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall (no minutes yet)
Minutes link:

Village Of Yellow Pine Association June 12,2021

In attendance: Deb Filler Chairmen, Ronda Rogers Treasurer, Rhonda Egbert Secretary

Joel Fields, Marj Fields, Willie Sullivan, Lynn Imel, Virginia Bartholomew

Meeting called to order at 2pm, June12,2021 by Deb Filler.

Prior Meeting minutes approved.

Treasurer’s report by Ronda Rogers:
Account Fund Balance
General Fund $8311.94
Festival $14712.50
Cemetery $4350.36
Infrastructure $7191.98
Community Hall $4198.23
Total $38765.01

Community – Ronda Rogers reported the storage shed was delivered and being used for Harmonica Festival and other event storage. Grant completed.

Cemetery – Tim Rogers has resigned, Ron Basabe has agreed to take his position. Flags were present for Memorial Day weekend. Marj noted that the cemetery needs mowing and trimming. Information will be passed on.

Infrastructure – Ronda Rogers reporting. Repairs on Ellison waiting for OK Gravel to have time to fit in their schedule.

Valley county is making progress on the Abstein bridge.

Cleaning ditches will be addressed in the fall.

Festival Planning – Deb Filler reporting. Plans are progressing successfully. Next planning meeting is July 11 at 2 pm.

Stibnite Advisory Council – Lynn Imel said the council formed a sub-group to provide water testing at the mine. This is to reassure surrounding communities and prevent distrust. Information on results will be provided in the fall.

Stibnite Foundation – Ronda Rogers reported: We have three grants up for consideration with the foundation. Fire department, Community Hall repairs, Digital sign for advertising. Selection takes place in August.

Nominations Ad-Hoc Committee for open positions for council to fill in July. Chairman and Member- at- large terms are up for election. Ronda Rogers agreed to recruit potential candidates.

Old Business – update on 2020 Shed Grant, Deb Filler said final report has been submitted.

New Business – Dust Abatement – no date set yet. Waiting for Valley County to set time for E. Fork Rd. Choice of Earthbind or Calcium Chloride to choose from. Cost within cents of each other. Willie noted that if you used Earthbind before, the Calcium Chloride may not adhere to the old Earthbind, unless completely gone. The road must be wet down before applying Calcium Chloride. The water truck will be used to wet the road for those wanting Calcium Chloride.

Deb Filler said the yard sale runs June 15-July 4. In community hall, serve yourself, pay a council member what it is worth to you. Exercise equipment in community hall has not been used in years, should it stay for use? now that we have heat, or removed by owners or donated to yard sale? Ginny said she would ask Cecil and Deb would call other owners. Note: follow-up, all exercise equipment has been donated to yard sale.

Willie Sullivan reported the Yellow Pine Water Users Association is making progress on the grants for repairs to the water system. Their will be a YPWUA meeting on July 4 to vote on a grant to be submitted.

Sally Imel requested information on the downed, stacked fence by the ditch, near the yurt. Note: follow up- Shelly had an accident last winter and stacked the logs.

Adjournment 3:08 by Deb Filler.
Submitted by VYPA Secretary, Rhonda Egbert

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Secretary
Ron Noel, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)

Festival
Want to join YPAC Corp in making a difference? We are raising money to benefit the Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival . Any donation will help.
Each year, during the first full weekend of August, the sleepy mountain village of Yellow Pine is transformed into the largest festival of it’s kind in the western hemisphere!
The festival is produced by volunteers and raises funds to support the village of Yellow Pine as well as the funds needed to hold next year’s festival.
As you all know, the 2020 festival had to be cancelled due to Covid-19. This placed a significant burden on Yellow Pine to come up with enough funding to hold the 2021 festival this August 5, 6, 7.
Souvenirs and events at the festival help raise funds. We also know there are many of you who support the festival, but are not able to attend. This fund raiser is to give you an opportunity to help us help Yellow Pine.
Thanks in advance for your tax-deductible contribution to this cause that means so much to us!
GoFundMe link:

Anyone interested in being a part of the Festival Planning/Working committee, please contact Deb Filler. Meetings will begin at the end of January. Even if you aren’t physically in YP, you can participate in the committee.
Next Festival Planning July 11, 2021 – Contact Deb for Zoom link and passcode.
2021 Planning Notes updated June 6, 2021 (link)
Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival Policy and Procedure Link:
— — — —

YPFD News:

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful.
link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021.pdf

June 12, 2020 – 10am Fire siren test and YPFD meeting (no minutes yet.)

May 15, 2020 – there was a YPFD meeting 10am at the Fire Hall.
Link: to 20210515 YPFD MeetingNotes_Final.docx

The Fire Station recently had a propane heater installed. The heater will be a great addition to the fire station. It will be more efficient at keeping the station above freezing during the winter, especially since we keep water in the engines so they are ready to roll if an emergency occurs. It will also make it more pleasant to hold meetings at the fire station. Big thanks to Fire Chief Tim Rogers for coordinating this.

Meeting schedule for the YPFD. All meetings are at the YPFD Station
Sat. May 15 at 10am
Sat. June 12 at 10am
Sat. July 10 at 10am
Sat. September 11 at 10am Budget Meeting

YP Fire District 2 (east of Yellow Pine Ave) up for election Nov 2nd for 4 year term (per Valley County.) Link:

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30, 2020 at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by a escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Tim Rogers – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
Hours: 1pm-8pm, closed on Tuesdays
We offer smoked tri tip, brisket, and chicken sandwiches and also burgers and chicken wings.
Firewood Permits available May 15th.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Yellow Pine Tavern open daily:
Monday thru Thursday 8am to 9pm
Friday and Saturday 8am to 10pm
Sunday 8am to 8pm
Indoor Dining with limited seating and Outdoor Dining Available.
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer, Wine and Pop
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Opened June 12th for Summer
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
Store hours: 10am to 5pm
The store is now receiving inventory of Food items. The ATM is operational, and Debit/Credit cards are accepted. Currently there is fuel, ice, alcoholic beverages (non liquor) tobacco, non alc beverages, snacks, and Dairy items (ice cream, milk, butter, and yogurt). Fresh produce is soon to come. If there are needs for fuel or anything during off hours, Josh will be around on call to accommodate. For any particular store item requests, please call 208-633-3300 or Email
For room reservations, please call 208-633-3300 or Email for reservations
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation – (208) 382-4844

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (June 21) overnight low of 44 degrees, clear sky this morning and light breeze. Light morning air traffic. Swallows, robins, finches and a flicker calling. Golden mantled and colombian ground squirrels running about. Clear and warm before lunch time. A few hummingbirds visiting. Hot sunny afternoon, high of 91 degrees. Still pretty hot by early evening, clear and slight breeze. Two female hairy woodpeckers stopped by after sunset, (they look like they have been around burned trees.) Cooling off at dusk, clear sky and slight breeze. Still a little bit light out at 1045pm on our longest day, Mars rising above Golden Gate before midnight.

Tuesday (June 22) overnight low of 49 degrees, partly cloudy (high thin hazy clouds) and slight breeze this morning. Early air traffic. Tree swallows, robins and a flicker calling, a few finches visiting. Warm and partly cloudy at lunch time. Large machinery up on main street near the Community Hall clanking away. Hot, muggy and mostly cloudy early afternoon. Hot, partly clear and light breezes late afternoon, high of 94 degrees. Clear sky, hot and light breezes early evening, haze of dust(?) in the sky. Getting breezy at sunset. Dark clouds to the south before dusk, visible lightning and mutters of thunder. Power out 833pm. Intense thunder and lighting with gusty breezes after dark and rain until after midnight. Lightning striking Golden Gate hill, loud thunder. Power back on around 115am.

Wednesday (June 23) overnight low of 55 degrees, measured 0.23″ of rain from last night’s storm. This morning mostly cloudy, (clouds sitting down on top of VanMeter and Johnson Creek ridge) humid and light breeze. Light (and some loud) air traffic. Swallows, robins and finches calling, hummingbird visiting, golden mantled and colombian ground squirrels running around. Power out at 1052am for about a minute. Mostly clear, nice temperature and light breeze before lunch time. Mail truck was a little late, but no problems. Partly cloudy and very warm after lunch time. Not quite as hot late afternoon, high of 86 degrees, partly cloudy and light breezes. Still partly cloudy and light breezes but starting to cool off before dusk. Partly cloudy before midnight.

Thursday (June 24) overnight low of 48 degrees, partly clear sky and light breeze this morning. Moderate air and street traffic. Swallows, robins and finches calling. Partly clear/cloudy, and pretty warm and a little breezy at lunch time. A pine squirrel, a golden mantled and a few colombian ground squirrels running about. Hot early afternoon, light breezes and partly cloudy, high of 88 degrees. Mostly cloudy, cooler and nearly calm late afternoon. Warm, partly cloudy and light breeze before sunset. Increased street traffic. Cooling off a little and clear sky before dusk. Looked clear after midnight and bright full moon.

Friday (June 25) overnight low of 46 degrees, partly cloudy sky this morning. Air and street traffic. Swallows, robins and a few finches calling. Mostly cloudy, pleasant temperatures and light breeze at lunch time. Mostly cloudy (big clouds w/dark bellies) and breezy late afternoon, high of 87 degrees. Mostly clear and slight breeze before sunset. Cooling off nicely before dusk. Very bright big moon up after midnight.

Saturday (June 26) overnight low of 48 degrees, clear sky this morning. An early loud airplane, otherwise light air traffic. Several swallows, lots of jays, a couple of robins and a few finches calling. Clear sky, pleasant temperatures and light breeze at lunch time. Getting a bit warm, clear and light breezes early afternoon. Jays calling from the trees. Hot and sunny mid-afternoon, high of 90 degrees. Still hot, clear and light breeze early evening. Golfers out enjoying the Yellow Pine Country Club. Cooling off after dark. Looked clear before midnight.

Sunday (June 27) overnight low of 50 degrees, clear sky and nearly calm this morning. Light (and sometimes loud) air traffic. A few swallows, several jays and a couple of finches visiting. Hot and sunny at lunch time, light breeze. Pine squirrel, golden mantled and colombian squirrels running about, and a flicker calling. Hot sunny afternoon, clear sky and light breezes, high of 95 degrees. Cooling off a little before sunset.
—————–

Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 81 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

June 25, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 81 new COVID-19 cases and 2 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 194,690.

There are a total of 155,853 confirmed cases and 38,837 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state. …

The state said 713,134 people have received the vaccine, and 1,315,924 total doses have been administered. 652,762 people are fully vaccinated.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says Idaho has the eighth lowest adult partial COVID-19 vaccination rate in the U.S. …

The age group with the most cases is 18-29 with 48,522 cases.

The state said 8 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 8,787, and 3 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 1,478. …

445 vaccine breakthrough cases have been reported.

2 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 2,145.

full story: [Valley County 870 cases, 6 deaths.]
— — — — — — — — — —

Monday deadline noted to pay Adams, Valley property taxes

The Star-News June 24, 2021

Monday at 5 p.m. is the deadline for property owners in Adams and Valley counties to pay the second half of their yearly property taxes.

Late charges and interest will begin on Tuesday, with interest retroactive from Jan. 1, so mailed payments should be correctly stamped by date.

The treasurers’ offices in both counties are open during the lunch hour Mondays through Fridays.

Valley County accepts credit card payments at (link) or by calling 208-382-7110.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

One person hospitalized after chain-reaction crash near Horseshoe Bend

Idaho State Police say four vehicles were involved and one of them crashed into a building.

KTVB Staff June 21, 2021

One person was taken to the hospital after a chain-reaction crash Monday morning on Highway 55 near the south end of Horseshoe Bend.

Idaho State Police responded around 9 a.m. to a collision that involved four vehicles and a building.

Troopers say the driver of a commercial truck hauling lumber was northbound on the highway and appears to have lost control. He rear-ended a pickup truck that went off the road and into a building. Police say the driver of the pickup was taken to a nearby hospital with what appeared to be non-life-threatening injuries.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Two injured when plane crashes near Warren

Local residents praised for efforts to rescue victims

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News June 24, 2021

Two men were injured on Monday when the airplane they were flying crashed near Warren, according to the Idaho County Sheriff’s Office.

A Cessna 182 single engine airplane carrying John McClelland, 58, and Rick McCarthy, 62, both of San Diego, crashed about 2 p.m. Monday in the Mayflower Creek drainage about three miles northeast of Warren.

McClelland and McCarthy suffered burns and other non-life-threatening injuries, according to Warren Fire and Rescue, a community backcountry rescue and fire protection group.

Both men were transported to the University of Utah Hospital’s Intermountain Burn Center following their rescue Monday night, according to Dale Points of Caldwell, who is McClelland’s uncle. …

Points made several phone calls to Warren locals and local McCall pilot Mike Dorris, who immediately flew his airplane up to the area to help search for the wreckage.

Meanwhile, volunteers from Warren Fire were alerted by Idaho County dispatch to a emergency airplane beacon that had been activated, said Kelly Martin of Warren Fire.

Volunteers Robert Carver and Danny Rosselli set out on a dirt bike and an ATV to search for the wreckage, which was located at about 3:30 p.m. Martin said. …

The crash sparked a small wildfire that was contained by 6 p.m. Tuesday by firefighters from the Payette National Forest, Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Missing mushroom hunter found safe

The 76-year-old man was reported missing after foraging for mushrooms near Fish Creek Campground.

MacKenzie Belley June 22, 2021 KTVB

The Idaho County Sheriff’s Office found missing 76-year-old man who was last seen foraging for mushrooms Saturday.

John “Mack” McBoyle was found at 3 p.m. on Tuesday. He was found in the area of Service Flats, which is approximately five miles west of where McBoyle’s vehicle was parked. He was last seen was last seen in the area of forest road 2000, near Fish Creek Campground.

McBoyle was found in fair condition, but disoriented.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

One dead, another airlifted after tree falls during storm in Boise National Forest

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, June 23rd 2021

One female camper died and another was airlifted after a tree fell on them during Tuesday night’s storm.

The Gem County Sheriff’s Office says two female campers were at the Antelope Campground at Sage Hen Reservoir when the storm hit. Both took refuge in a vehicle to avoid the storm.

The storm caused severe damage in the area, including toppling several trees. GCSO says the upper portion of a fallen tree hit the vehicle.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Power asks customers to conserve energy during evening hours

Air conditioners are expected to be working overtime as the heat wave ramps up in Idaho over the next week.

Temperatures are expected to climb into the triple digits in southwest Idaho on Sunday and could remain above 100 degrees for another week.

The hot weather is just one of the factors ramping up electrical use in the region.

Idaho Power is preparing for increased demand and is asking its customers to conserve energy during the evening hours.

continued:
—————–

Idaho History:

Cherry Festival began with dances for money

Jun 5, 2013 Idaho Press


The most entertaining entertainment of the Cherry Festival is the cherry pie eating contest. Second from the left in this 1953 photo is Gary Harris, second heat winner and by far the fastest cherry pie eater in Gem County. Gary’s pie disappeared in about half the time of that of his closest rival. First heat winners were in order were Gene Chambers, Butch Averett and Jim Victor. Messenger Index file photo

From a humble beginning in the early 1930s, the Emmett Cherry Festival has gained national attention, now at attracting thousands of visitors to the valley around the cherry harvest season.

The celebration originated with a dance by Shorty Britton and due to its success, the next year was taken over by the American Legion. A small cherry exhibit was added and the event called the Cherry Pickers Dance. Repeating the event the following the year the American Legion added a carnival spirit with concessions.

That year, in 1932, it became the “Cherry Festival,” a name that has come to mean more and more each year and annually jams the town with vacationists and fun seekers.

continued:
————–

Public Lands:


— — — — — — — — — —

Segment of Edna Creek road temporarily closed July 7 -Sept. 2

Contact: Venetia Gempler, Public Affairs Officer 208-373-4105

Edna Creek Campground will also be affected and temporarily closed

Idaho City, Idaho, June 22, 2021 – The Boise National Forest is temporarily closing National Forest Systems (NFS) Road 384, commonly referred to as the Edna Creek road from July 7—Sept.2 to replace three large culverts and perform much needed road maintenance and resurfacing. Edna Creek campground lies within the affected area and for public safety is also closed. The Idaho City Ranger District was awarded a Federal highways administration grant to improve the road system and update infrastructure that has exceeded its life span.

“This is a continuation of the work we began last year to update our most traveled road on the district, and create additional fish habitat for bull trout,” said Brant Petersen, Idaho City District Ranger. “We scheduled the work to begin after the Fourth of July holiday to lessen the impact for visitors. Going forward, users should plan for this temporary closure and access the forest by the alternate route.”

The full road closure starts Wednesday, July 7, 2021, at 7 a.m. and lasts through Friday, Sept. 2, 2021, at 5 p.m. During this time there will be no access to trails or the campground.

A detour around the closure will be via NFS road 327 “Granite Creek” road to access the North Fork of the Boise River, and the town of Atlanta (see attached map). Several kiosks and signage will be placed out on the ground at major intersections to inform users of the temporary closure.

This is the second phase of the infrastructure improvement project. “The reconstruction work will result in real improvement that travelers will appreciate for years to come,” said Petersen. We were fortunate to be awarded this funding and while the road closed for a period of time is an inconvenience, the project will lead to a better travel experience in the future and improved fish habitat.

The Beaver/Edna sub-watershed is within a key bull trout recovery area. Habitat connectivity is a crucial factor in ensuring long-term sustainability of fish populations which are an essential aspect of an overall healthy forest ecosystem. Project efforts will improve drainage, reduce erosion and reduce direct sediment delivery to bull trout habitat, while improving driving conditions for all forest users.

Once the closure is in place it will be posted at: Boise National Forest Alerts and Notices and the Boise National Forest Closure Story map.

Venetia Gempler
Public Affairs Staff Officer
Boise National Forest
— — — — — — — — — —

Visitors dump trash Salmon-Challis National forest lands

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, June 22nd 2021

Officials and general park enthusiasts were not happy Tuesday after a picture surfaced of a large pile of trash left in one of Idaho’s national forests.

The large pile of trash was found on lands in the Salmon-Challis National Forest. The forest service took to Facebook to express their concern and advice after the pile was found.

“Dispose of Waste Properly! Visitors – PLEASE be mindful of even the smallest effects you may have on the land and on the experiences of those around you,” the post reads.

continued:
————–

Fire Season:

Firefighters prepare for busy season

Dry conditions called worst in 15 years

By Max Silverson for The Star-News June 24, 2021

Firefighters on the Payette National Forest have already put out several small fires started by lightning and could be looking at a busy season ahead, Payette officials said.

April and May were the driest for those months in the past 15 years, said Fire Staff Officer for the Payette National Forest Sean Johnson, who oversees firefighting and aviation operations on the Payette.

The forest is drier and the potential for large fire growth is almost a month sooner than normal, Johnson said.

For the rest of the month, the region is predicted to have record breaking high temperatures, high winds and excessive heat warnings, Johnson said.

“And everything that we’ve been hearing is to expect that same kind of weather pattern through the entire fire season, which could go clear out until November this year,” he said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — —

Forest officials warn of ‘very high’ fire danger in central Idaho

The Central Idaho Dispatch Zone is urging the public to be extremely careful when out in the forest this summer.

KTVB Staff June 24, 2021

The Forest Service is urging the public to be extremely careful when camping, hiking or taking a motorized trip on public lands.

Hot weather and dry fuel conditions in Idaho’s backcountry has prompted the Central Idaho Dispatch Zone to move the fire danger to “very high.” …

When the fire danger gets this high it means that fires can start easily and spread rapidly. There is a good chance that small fires can quickly become large ones and exhibit extreme fire intensity right after ignition. These fires can be difficult to control and will often become much larger and longer-lasting fires.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Fritzer Fire near Salmon National Forest about 20% contained

Officials say the Fritzer Fire is burning in steep, mountainous terrain. It’s being fueled by grass and timber in an old burn scar.

KTVB Staff June 26, 2021


Credit: inciweb

A wildfire is burning in high, steep mountainous terrain in the Salmon National Forest about 20 miles west of Salmon, Idaho.

Forest Service officials say the Fritzer Fire was sparked by lightning on Tuesday. As of Saturday morning, the fire is burning 137 acres and is 20% contained.

It is being fueled by grass and timber, mostly Ponderosa Pine, and is burning the fire scar of the 2000 Clear Creek Fire.

continued:
— —

more info:

Fritzer Fire

Inciweb:
— — — — — — — — — —

Blaine County bans fireworks to prevent wildfires

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, June 22nd 2021

Blaine County announced Tuesday that it has banned the use of fireworks to prevent human-caused wildfires.

The Board of Commissioners unanimously voted to ban fireworks and the use of exploding targets in unincorporated Blaine County.

“Please do your part in helping to prevent human-caused wildfires by following these new bans and avoiding the use of fireworks and exploding targets during this dry summer,” a spokesperson said.

News of Blaine County’s ban followed the city of Hailey, whose city council also voted to ban the use of fireworks due to drought conditions.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Fremont County prohibits firework use, bans open burning

June 23, 2021 Local News 8

Fremont County has reached high fire danger, and as a result, a ban on open burning has been issued.

All open burning, including burn barrels and fireworks, are prohibited. Campfires in approved fire pits, charcoal grills and gas grills are allowed.

This order does not apply to federal lands.

continued:
—————

Critter News:


— — — — — — — — — —

Donnelly Rural Fire welcomes newest crew member

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, June 23rd 2021

The Donnelly Rural Fire Protection District welcomed its newest crew member Wednesday.

This sweet pup was provided by Coleen Goodwin with Council House Golden’s.

“We have big plans for this Sweet sweet girl!!” a spokesperson said. “You all will be seeing a lot more of her! Stay tuned!!!”

source:
— — — — — — — — —

IDFG looking for information about pronghorn killing near Emmett

By Katie Kloppenburg Jun 21, 2021 KIVI

Idaho Fish and Game (IDFG) is asking for information about a buck antelope that was shot and left near the Emmett dump early on June 6. IDFG says it likely happened before sunrise.

Conservation officers are looking for any information that might help solve the case. A reward is available for anyone who provides information that leads to an arrest or a citation.

You can report information online anonymously or by calling the Citizens Against Poaching hotline at 800-632-5999.

source:
— — — — — — — — —

Cold water released from N. Idaho dam to help salmon

June 24, 2021 Associated Press


Roger Phillips, IDFG

Authorities have started releasing cold water from a northern Idaho dam to keep Snake River water temperatures cool to help migrating salmon and steelhead.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers started increasing releases of the 43-degree water at Dworshak Dam on Tuesday ahead of an expected heat wave.

The Lewiston Tribune reports the agency will up the flows to 12,400 cubic feet per second.

continued: (Local News 8)
— — — — — — — — —

Mosquitoes trapped in Canyon County test positive for West Nile Virus

The infected mosquitoes were caught June 23 south of Melba. That area has been treated for both larval and adult stage mosquitoes in response.

KTVB Staff June 25, 2021

Mosquitoes collected from traps in Canyon County have tested positive for West Nile Virus, the first confirmation of the illness in the Treasure Valley so far this year.

The infected mosquitoes were caught June 23 south of Melba. That area has been treated for both larval and adult stage mosquitoes in response.

West Nile cases in insects are common during the summer months. So far, the Canyon County Mosquito Abatement District has tested 94 pools for West Nile Virus.

continued:
——————-

Fish & Game News:

Chinook fishing on South Fork Salmon River opens Saturday, June 26

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Tuesday, June 22, 2021

Season opens for two days, then is scheduled to reopen on July 2 if enough fish are available

Chinook fishing on the South Fork of the Salmon River opens Saturday, June 26 and closes at the end of fishing hours on Sunday, June 27. If harvest objectives are not met on the opening weekend, it will then reopen four days per week, Friday through Monday, until the season is closed by the Director of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

continued:
— —

see also:

South Fork Salmon River – Chinook Update 6/24/21

By Jordan Messner, Fisheries Regional Manager
Thursday, June 24, 2021

link:
— — — — — — — — —

Aggressive food-conditioned black bear charges Ketchum resident within city limits

By Terry Thompson, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, June 24, 2021

An aggressive food-conditioned black bear continues to get food rewards from residential garbage carts in Ketchum.

A Ketchum woman had a face-to-face encounter with an aggressive black bear early Wednesday morning, June 23 when a late night walk through her neighborhood took a serious turn when she faced a food-conditioned bear in the area of lower Warm Springs in Ketchum. The neighborhood streets were lined with garbage carts prior to pick-up the next day, which attracts black bears into area neighborhoods looking for an easy high-calorie meal. While the direct encounter was alarming, no physical contact was made and the woman did not suffer any physical injury.

continued:
— — — — — — — — —

Backcountry camper kills moose in self-defense north of Sandpoint

By Kara Campbell, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, June 24, 2021

An aggressive bull moose charged a camper at the Harrison Lake backcountry camping area north of Sandpoint on June 22, 2021. The moose died after being shot by the camper in self-defense.

On Tuesday, June 22, 2021, Fish and Game received a report of an aggressive bull moose that charged a camper at a Harrison Lake backcountry campsite north of Sandpoint. The moose tore apart the campsite and charged at the camper and his dog. The camper hid behind a tree, but the moose did not stop charging. The camper then discharged a firearm at the moose in self-defense from close range. Fish and Game responded to the incident and located the deceased moose. The Forest Service has closed the Harrison Lake trailhead to hikers in order to prevent possible conflicts between hikers and any bears that may feed on the carcass.

continued:
— — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Cats on Roombas: Compilation


—————-

Seasonal Humor:

moosecop-a

CovidJabsCats-a
——————-

June 20, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

June 20, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Please be conservative when watering lawns. We ask those that are here all week to not water lawns on the weekends so that more water is available for the weekend cabin owners. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!

Happy Father’s Day and Summer Solstice.

Community Calendar:

April 17, 2020 – Boil water order issued
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit season
May 15 – Firewood Season, permits at The Corner
May 25 – Johnson Creek road fully open
June 7 – Lick Creek road open
June 13 – Profile road open
June 15 thru July 4 – Community Hall Yard Sale
June 26 – South Fork Salmon Season starts
June 26 – Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers Highland Games
July 2-4 Yard Sale Silver Dollar Cafe
July 2-3 Live Music at The Corner
July 3 – Annual Golf Tournament
July 3 – Independence Day Parade 4pm
July 4 – YPWUA 2021 Shareholder Meeting 10am
July 10 – YPFD meeting 10am at Fire Hall
July 10 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
July 11 – Festival Planning Meeting on Zoom 2pm
July 17 – ATV/UTV Escapade 10am
July 21-22 Mastercraft stove maintenance
Aug 14 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall
Sept 11 – YPFD Budget Meeting 10am at Fire Hall
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Community Hall Yard Sale – Going on now.

June 15 thru July 4, 2021. At the Community Hall, This self-serve yard sale supports maintenance on the Community Hall. Shop at your leisure; decide what the items are worth to you; and pay one of the volunteers. Easy-peasy

Received a report complimenting on how well things were laid out at the hall.
— — — —

Dust Abatement

The infrastructure committee has determined to use Calcium Chloride this year (same stuff used on the E. Fork.) It is slightly less expensive than the Earthbind. If you are interested in dust abatement this year please let Deb Filler know. She can give you the cost information. If you would prefer the Earthbind (the stuff that was used last year) let Deb know that. If you choose Earthbind, North American Dust Control will bill you directly.

Dust abatement will occur once Landmark is open. (No date set yet as of June 18th, will be coordinated with the EFSF county dust abatement.)
— — — —

The Highland Games are back in Yellow Pine

All day, June 26th. Watch the Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers compete.
— — — —

Yard Sale July 2-4

I am having a huge yard sale between the store and the Silver Dollar July 2nd, 3rd and 4th. Items include restaurant equipment, antiques, tools, building supplies, furniture, electrical wire, stainless steel cable, diesel heaters and much, much more. -S Holloway
— — — —

The Corner July 2-3

Live music at The Corner both Friday and Saturday evenings, starting at 5 p.m.
— — — —

Annual Golf Tournament, July 3rd

Check in at the golf course at 10am. Bring a team or we’ll set one up for you. $20 registration requested. Fun Prizes.

Proceeds support the Village of Yellow Pine
— — — —

Independence Day Parade July 3 4pm

Join us to watch or participate in the annual Yellow Pine Independence Day Parade. All family-friendly entrants are welcome. If you want to participate, meet at the fire house at 315pm.
— — — —

YPWUA 2021 Shareholder Meeting July 4 at 10am

Sunday July 4th 10am Community Hall

1. Financial Report – Willie
A. Willie stepping down as treasurer

2. Operations – Warren
A. Boil order status
B. Leaks

3. Grants – IMPORTANT VOTE BY SHAREHOLDERS TO OBTAIN GRANTS
A. Details of grants
B. Requirements to receive grants
C. More future grants

4. Summer lawn watering
A. Because of our situation lawn watering is discouraged
B. Odd/Even days watering
C. No watering after 2 pm

5. Election of one board member
A. Dave Prouty is not running for another term
— — — —

ATV/UTV Escapade July 17

July 17, 2021: This out-and-back ride is rated as intermediate. Participants ride from Yellow Pine Community Hall to Logan Creek , then return to Big Creek Campground for lunch (provided) and history/stories. After lunch, participants will continue the ride to Pilot Peak. The timeframe of this event is estimated to be from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. Check-in starts at 9:00am; leave at 10:00am. You can register early at (link)
— — — —

Heating Maintenance Day July 21-22

Deb Filler is coordinating with Mastercraft of McCall to schedule a maintenance day in Yellow Pine for propane and pellet stoves. If you are interested, please contact Deb at 208 633-6945. Mastercraft will be here July 21 and 22 to do stove maintenance.
———-

Village News:

Attention

Would the person who borrowed the measuring wheel please return it to the community hall? It will be needed for the festival.
— — — —

Yellow Pine County Club Question

[We] are looking for the names of the golf course holes and distances. We don’t have the name for hole #12, and hope someone might remember or have a record of it somewhere? We can measure the few holes that we guessed at the distances.

1. Humble Pie – 102
2. Double Trouble – 45 paced ?
3. Bitch & Moan – 47 paced ?
4. Deception Alley – 70
5. No Chance! – 80
6. Easy Opportunity – 74
7. So Easy – Sure! – 54 paced ?
8. Timber Alley! – 97
9. Lucky Lady! – 60
10. Branch Buffet – 70
11. Birdie Bargain – 51
12. No name – 60
13. Split decision? – 52
14. Gambler’s Choice! – 80
15. Cream Puff – 73
16. Rock Garden! – 50
17. Unfair Fairway – 82
18. Duffer’s Delight – 47

Contact: Ann F at email: aforsterrn @ aol.com (remove spaces)
— — — —

Abstein Bridge June 14-15

The drillers were in June 14 and 15 to drill test holes on both ends of the bridge. The drill rig blocked the bridge for about 2 hours the first day and 3 hours the second day, although 4-wheelers could get through if necessary.

A report that the crew was very nice and ‘left no trace.’
— — — —

Another Wind Storm

On Tuesday afternoon, June 15th, it was quite windy in Yellow Pine, estimate wind gusts of at least 30mph or higher. The South Fork weather station at Tea Pot Dome registered a maximum gust of 42mph and the station at Stibnite registered a maximum gust of 33mph.

No reports of trees down locally, but on Wednesday the mail truck driver reported trees had come down on Johnson Creek road – but had been cut out by the time he came through. No report on the South Fork route. Be aware there might be trees down on other back country roads.
— — — —

Internet Outage

On Friday morning, June 18th around 1030am Yellow Pine internet went down for about an hour. MTE said it was part of a larger outage. It apparently affected the MTE webcam at the Johnson Creek airstrip as it seems to be “stuck.”
— — — —

Johnson Creek Fly-in

The weekend of June 18-20 was busy at the Johnson Creek Airstrip.

20210618JCairport-a
(courtesy MTE webcam)
— — — —

Conserve (and Boil) Water

Please be conservative when watering lawns. We ask those that are here all week to not water lawns on the weekends so that more water is available for the weekend cabin owners. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!
— — — —

Scrap Metal

Sharing a message that Mike Amos will haul out a load of scrap metal. If you have scrap metal, contact Mike. He has an area by his place to stack it.
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

South Fork Salmon River salmon fishing opens on June 26.

Johnson Creek, Profile Gap and Lick Creek roads are Open. These roads have not been bladed and are rough.

Elk summit was still closed last weekend (June 14) but could be open soon.

Monumental summit is rumored to be open.

Deadwood summit is open from the Landmark side.

The Hwy 55 project Smith’s Ferry area: Starting June 1, crews will transition into their summer construction schedule. Drivers can anticipate single-lane, alternating traffic controlled by flaggers Monday – early Friday morning. From Friday morning – Sunday, and any major holidays, the road will be open to two lanes. This schedule will be in place until September. Project Website link:

The Hwy 55 project from Donnelly to McCall starts soon. One lane during the week and two lanes on weekends. Project is slated to last until September.
— — — —

Critters

Aggressive Deer and Elk

Be aware that mothers will attack dogs and chase people if they feel their babies are threatened. Keep dogs leashed in the forest during “baby season” for their own protection.

Ticks

* Know where to expect ticks. Many ticks live in grassy, brushy, or wooded areas. When possible, avoid wooded and brushy areas with tall grass and leaf litter. Walk in the center of trails, particularly in spring and summer when ticks feed.
* Wear appropriate clothing. When in tick habitats, wear light-colored, tightly woven long pants and long-sleeve shirt. Tuck your pant legs into socks or boots, and your shirt into your pants. This helps keep ticks on the outside of your clothing where you can spot them more easily.
* Use tick repellent when necessary, and carefully follow instructions on the label. Apply an EPA-registered repellent effective against ticks, such as those containing DEET to clothes and exposed skin, and permethrin to clothes and gear. Take care when applying repellent on children. EPA’s search tool can help you find the repellent that best suits your needs.
* Check clothing, gear, and pets after being areas with ticks. Ticks can hitch a ride into your home on clothing and pets, then attach to you or a family member later. Carefully examine coats, camping gear, and daypacks. Don’t forget your dog, see CDC’s where to check your pet for ticks.
* Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming can reduce your risk of getting Lyme disease and may be effective in reducing the risk of other tick-borne disease. Showering can wash off unattached ticks and it is a good opportunity to do a tick check.
* Check your body, your child and pets thoroughly for ticks. Carefully inspect areas in and around the hair, head, neck, ears, under arms, inside the belly button, around the waist, between the legs, and behind the knees. Ticks can be very small before they feed—look for what may appear like a new freckle or speck of dirt. Continue checking for two to three days after returning from areas with ticks.

Pine Martins & Raccoons

Watch your small pets. Reports of pine martins living in the dump and raccoons on the north side of the village.

Be Bear, Fox & Coyote Aware

* Do not feed them human food
* Secure your trash
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Be Mountain Lion Aware

Note: A report of a mountain lion near the upper end of the village in early spring.

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report June 13th: “The bins were half full.”

The bins were emptied May 22nd. Locals worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water. Turn off your trickles.

Update May 14, 2021: Kerry and Dion from Idaho Rural Water were onsite yesterday along with Nicki and me for leak detection in the “downtown” Yellow Pine grid.

Utilizing their leak detection equipment, and Nicki’s knowledge of the distribution system, Kerry and Dion successfully located a number of leaks including a large leak at a fire hydrant. The fire hydrant was turned off and Tim, the fire chief, was notified that the hydrant is not operational.

Many small leaks were identified and marked, but of particular concern is the waterline that runs under the alley behind the hotel and all the way down to the community center. Numerous active leaks were located in that section. So many leaks exist along the alley that the best course of action is probably replacing the entire run of pipe.

Nicki followed up after the guys left and using her tablet and GPS program, accurately recorded the location of all the leaks identified. Now that a record of the leak locations exists, prioritization of the leaks and a plan to repair them can be developed.

Kerry and Dion were very thorough and helpful, and the work they completed will be beneficial to reducing demand on the system as a whole. Based on today’s daily system data, reported this morning by Nicki, it appears that daily demand was reduced by approximately 10,000 gallons as a result of yesterday’s work.

Regards, Warren Drake, Drake Diversified LLC

Update May 13, 2021: Cecil, Tom and Ron fixed a leaking valve which resulted in saving 5000 gallons of water!

Update May 6, 2021: The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an application with the USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility planning grant. If any additional information is needed please contact: Willie Sullivan, Treasurer Ypwater @ gmail.com

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Your Water Before Using
Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020.
Link: to Notice
— — — —

VYPA News:

June 12 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at Community Hall (no minutes yet)
Agenda link to: 2021 June VYPA Agenda.docx

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Secretary
Ron Noel, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)

Festival
Want to join YPAC Corp in making a difference? We are raising money to benefit the Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival . Any donation will help.
Each year, during the first full weekend of August, the sleepy mountain village of Yellow Pine is transformed into the largest festival of it’s kind in the western hemisphere!
The festival is produced by volunteers and raises funds to support the village of Yellow Pine as well as the funds needed to hold next year’s festival.
As you all know, the 2020 festival had to be cancelled due to Covid-19. This placed a significant burden on Yellow Pine to come up with enough funding to hold the 2021 festival this August 5, 6, 7.
Souvenirs and events at the festival help raise funds. We also know there are many of you who support the festival, but are not able to attend. This fund raiser is to give you an opportunity to help us help Yellow Pine.
Thanks in advance for your tax-deductible contribution to this cause that means so much to us!
GoFundMe link:

Anyone interested in being a part of the Festival Planning/Working committee, please contact Deb Filler. Meetings will begin at the end of January. Even if you aren’t physically in YP, you can participate in the committee.
Next Festival Planning July 11, 2021 – Contact Deb for Zoom link and passcode.
2021 Planning Notes updated June 6, 2021 (link)
Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival Policy and Procedure Link:
— — — —

YPFD News:

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful.
link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021.pdf

June 12, 2020 – 10am Fire siren test and YPFD meeting (no minutes yet.)

May 15, 2020 – there was a YPFD meeting 10am at the Fire Hall.
Link: to 20210515 YPFD MeetingNotes_Final.docx

The Fire Station recently had a propane heater installed. The heater will be a great addition to the fire station. It will be more efficient at keeping the station above freezing during the winter, especially since we keep water in the engines so they are ready to roll if an emergency occurs. It will also make it more pleasant to hold meetings at the fire station. Big thanks to Fire Chief Tim Rogers for coordinating this.

Meeting schedule for the YPFD. All meetings are at the YPFD Station
Sat. May 15 at 10am
Sat. June 12 at 10am
Sat. July 10 at 10am
Sat. September 11 at 10am Budget Meeting

YP Fire District 2 (east of Yellow Pine Ave) up for election Nov 2nd for 4 year term (per Valley County.) Link:

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30, 2020 at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

Also if you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by a escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Tim Rogers – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
Hours: 1pm-8pm, closed on Tuesdays
We offer smoked tri tip, brisket, and chicken sandwiches and also burgers and chicken wings.
Firewood Permits available May 15th.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Yellow Pine Tavern open daily:
Monday thru Thursday 8am to 9pm
Friday and Saturday 8am to 10pm
Sunday 8am to 8pm
Indoor Dining with limited seating and Outdoor Dining Available.
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer, Wine and Pop
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Opened June 12th for Summer
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
The store is now receiving inventory of Food items. The ATM is operational, and Debit/Credit cards are accepted. Currently there is fuel, ice, alcoholic beverages (non liquor) tobacco, non alc beverages, snacks, and Dairy items (ice cream, milk, butter, and yogurt). Fresh produce is soon to come. Times may be in flux as we adjust to trends, but more or less the summer hours are going to be from 10-5pm, Monday – Saturday, and Sunday 10-3pm. If there are needs for fuel or anything during off hours, Josh will be around on call to accommodate. For any particular store item requests, please call 208-633-3300 or Email
For room reservations, please call 208-633-3300 or Email for reservations
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation – (208) 382-4844

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (June 14) overnight low of 48 degrees, this morning clear sky, warm and light breeze. Johnson Creek is running 800CFS below median. Some early air traffic. Woodpecker drumming on the power pole, a few swallows, finches and jays calling, ground squirrels running around. Sunny and hot at lunch time. Sunny, light breeze and hot early afternoon. Quite hot late afternoon, mostly clear and light breeze, high of 93 degrees. Starting to cool down some before dusk and mostly clear sky.

Tuesday (June 15) overnight low of 49 degrees, this morning partly cloudy and hazy sky. A few tree swallows, finches and robins calling, a couple of jays flying around, ground squirrels scampering about. Nice breezes before lunch time and warming up. Gusty breezes at noon. Windy by 2pm, estimate gusts of 30+mph. A hummingbird and a couple of evening grosbeaks stopped by. Cooling off late afternoon, breezes gusting up once in a while and partly cloudy, high of 82 degrees. Pleasant temperatures after sunset, calmer and mostly clear. Getting breezy again at dusk.

Wednesday (June 16) overnight low of 45 degrees, this morning clear sky and light breeze. Loud air traffic. Tree swallows taking feathers to nests, robins, a few finches and jays calling. Mail truck was a bit late, but no problems reported (fallen trees had been cut out on Johnson Creek route.) Clear, warm and light breezes after lunch time. Warm sunny afternoon with light breezes, high of 84 degrees. Colombian and golden mantled squirrels running about, a few finches visiting. Clear, warm and light breeze early evening. Very pleasant after sunset, clear sky and fairly calm. Stars out before midnight.

Thursday (June 17) overnight low of 40 degrees, this morning clear sky and light breeze. Light air and street traffic. Tree swallows taking feathers to nests, robins, a few finches and jays calling. Sunny, warm and light breeze at lunch time. Sunny and hot with stronger breezes mid-afternoon, high of 87 degrees. Clear and almost calm early evening, still pretty warm. Breezes kicking up at sunset. Cooling off, calmer and clear at dusk. Stars out before midnight Mars is rising just above Golden Gate peak.

Friday (June 18) overnight low of 40 degrees, this morning clear sky and light breeze. Light (and loud) early air traffic. Not as many tree swallows nesting here this year, a few robins and finches calling. Internet down around 1030am to a little after 1130am. Clear, warm and light breezes at lunch time. Getting hot, light breezes and almost clear early afternoon. Hot and clear late afternoon, high of 91 degrees. Waxing moon in the sky. Light early evening air traffic. Cooling off nicely before dusk. Stars out before midnight.

Saturday (June 19) overnight low of 44 degrees, this morning clear sky and light breeze. Quite a few (loud) airplanes flying over the village. Johnson Creek is running less than 1/3 of normal flow. More swallows around and gathering nesting materials, a robin and a few finches calling. Warming up pretty good by lunch time. Hot and sunny afternoon, estimated high of 87 degrees (gizmo on the fritz.) Still pretty warm early evening, clear and breezy. Warm, clear and calm before dusk. Stars out before midnight.

Sunday (June 20) overnight low of 44 degrees, this morning partly clear sky (mostly small clouds) and light breezes. Constant air traffic since daylight, some low and loud. Robins and swallows calling, finches visiting. Pine squirrel stopped by, ground squirrels running about. Warm, partly cloudy and breezy at lunch time. Hummingbirds visiting. Hot afternoon, breezy and a few clouds, high of 86 degrees. Still warm and almost clear by early evening and breezy.
——————

RIP:

Darrell Merlin Hathaway

Hathaway, Darrell, 66, of Meridian, passed away Monday, June 14, 2021 at his home with his family by his side.

Arrangements are under the care of Accent Funeral Home and Cremation, Meridian.
— — —

The world is short one more honorable man today.

Darrell Hathaway, or “Dary”, for short, passed away in Meridian this morning of natural causes.

He was a fixture of Yellow Pine for many years. Attending school before his family moved to Atlanta. His mom, Georgia Alred, passed away last December. His sister just a few years ago. Dary worked at Quartz Creek mines for Fay Kissinger before joining the Navy. And returned to work at Thunder Mountain and at Stibnite Mines after his tour of duty in Vietnam.

For the last 10 years, Dary had worked as a caregiver in Garden Valley, living with a wheelchair bound fellow disabled Vietnam veteran, to assist him with daily chores.

Not everyone who knew Dary would call him “friend”. But everyone who knew him knew that he was someone they could count on in their time of need.

Scott A.
—————–

Independence Weekend:

4th of July Preview

The Star-News June 17, 2021

Below are brief descriptions of some of the local events scheduled for the 4th of July holiday. …

Yellow Pine to offer music, golf tourney, parade, fireworks

The tiny community of Yellow Pine east of McCall will host a full slate of Independence Day events, including live music, a golf tournament, parade, and fireworks.

Live music will be featured at The Corner both Friday and Saturday evenings, starting at 5 p.m.

The Annual Golf Tournament begins Saturday, July 3, at 10 a.m. at the Yellow Pine “golf course.” A donation of $20 per person is requested and includes a ticket for a beverage. Additional beverages will be available for purchase.

Prizes will be awarded for first, second and third place for teams. Proceeds will help support the Village of Yellow Pine.

The annual Independence Day Parade will begin at 4 p.m. on Saturday, July 3. To participate, meet at the fire house at 3 p.m. All family-friendly entries are free and welcome.

full story:
—————–

Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 87 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

June 17, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 87 new COVID-19 cases and zero new deaths Thursday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 194,006.

There are a total of 155,288 confirmed cases and 38,718 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state. …

The state said 702,880 people have received the vaccine, and 1,292,452 total doses have been administered. 637,197 people are fully vaccinated. …

The age group with the most cases is 18-29 with 48,359 cases.

The state said 11 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 8,729, and 3 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 1,471. …

409 vaccine breakthrough cases have been reported.

Zero new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 2,122.

full story: [Valley Co 854 Cases, 6 deaths.]
— — — — — — — — — —

Vax Rate at 56.6%

The Star-News June 17, 2021

The total of eligible Valley County residents who had received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine topped 56% this week, the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare reported.

A total of 56.6% of Valley County residents age 12 and older had received the vaccine as of Monday, up from 54.7% two weeks ago, or a total of 5,668 out of 10,017 eligible residents, the H&W said.

A total of 765 positive cases have been reported in Valley County since the pandemic entered the county in the spring of 2020.

St. Luke’s McCall reported four new cases since June 1.

Cascade Medical Center reported two new cases on Tuesday, the first positive cases report by the hospital since March 17, CEO Tom Reinhardt said.

“Just when we think we’re in the clear, the virus reminds us that it is always ready to attack and that our work isn’t done to protect the community,” Reinhardt said.

continued:
— — — —

St. Luke’s mobile COVID-19 vaccine unit to visit area next week

By Tom Grote for The Star-News June 17, 2021

The St. Luke’s mobile COVID-19 vaccine unit will offer free walk-up COVID vaccinations in McCall, New Meadows and Riggins next week.

The retrofitted RV will make the following stops:

• McCall: Tuesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., The Terrace/Ponderosa Center, next to Hotel McCall across from Legacy Park

• Riggins: Wednesday, 8 a.m. to noon, St. Luke’s Clinic – Salmon River Family Medicine, 214 Main Street

• New Meadows: Wednesday, 2:30 to 6 p.m., St. Luke’s Clinic – Meadows Valley Family Medicine, 320 Virginia St.

• McCall: Thursday, June 24, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to 4 p.m., Marketplace at McCall (Ridley’s/Rite Aid), corner of Deinhard Lane and North 3rd Street.

Anyone age 12 or older can receive a vaccine regardless of whether or not they live or work in Idaho.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

At-home COVID-19 tests now available for free in Idaho

By Meredith Spelbring Jun 15, 2021 KIVI

At-home COVID-19 tests are now available to all Idahoans.

The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare announced Tuesday Idaho residents can get a free, at-home test by calling 211. No personal information will be request aside from a name and mailing address, according to the department.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Work starts Monday on Idaho 55 from McCall to Donnelly

Winter weather, traffic broke up surface laid in 2010

By Tom Grote for The Star-News June 17, 2021

Eleven miles of Idaho 55 between Donnelly and McCall will get new pavement under a project to start on Monday by the Idaho Department of Transportation.

The $3.25 million project is scheduled to be finished in August, ITD Public Information Officer Jake Melder said.

The entire width of the highway will be repaved, but areas of the road that have broken up due to weather and traffic will get special attention, Melder said.

“For sections of damaged pavement, we will repair the base, and place a fresh layer of asphalt on top to provide a smooth riding surface,” Melder said.

Also targeted for repair is a culvert crossing just south of McCall that has had trouble with heaving during the winter, he said.

continued:

Link: to ITD project
— — — — — — — — — —

Dane Jackson wins the North Fork Championship, Sage Donnelly is the queen of NFC IX

By Steve Dent Jun 20, 2021 KIVI

Crouch, Idaho — Dane Jackson once again had the fastest lap in the North Fork Championship, Dane successfully defended his title as the king of the North Fork and the win marked his third in the last four years.

Jackson also won the boater cross and had the fastest qualifying lap becoming the first racer to ever win the triple crown at this extreme whitewater kayaking event.

Sage Donnelly competing in her first NFC coming from a slalom background earned the title of queen of the North Fork, Natalie Anderson finished second and Darby McAdams rounded out the podium for the ladies.

continued: w/videos
————–

Public Lands:

The South Fork of the Salmon watershed showcases the remote wilderness we have in Idaho

By Steve Dent Jun 20, 2021 KIVI

Yellow Pine, Idaho — The South Fork of the Salmon River didn’t make the list of America’s most endangered rivers in 2021, but it did make that list all three years prior. …

One of the things we haven’t been able to do is showcase the South Fork of the Salmon watershed so my brother Scott and I embarked on a three-day, two-night self-support kayaking expedition that took us 58 miles through this remote wilderness finishing up after the confluence of the Main Salmon.

The South Fork of the Salmon has long been a favorite trip for experienced kayakers who paddle this whitewater rollercoaster at over six feet when it becomes a full-on class five trip, we did it at 4.5 feet.

full story: w/videos
— — — — — — — — — —

Out-of-state fees to rise at Ponderosa, other state parks

Camping fees for out-of-state visitors will increase to double that of residents at five of the busiest state parks, including Ponderosa State Park, to comply with a new Idaho law.

Out-of-state campers will pay $48 a night for a basic campsite and $64 a night for a site with full hookups at Ponderosa, Farragut, Henrys Lake, Priest Lake and Round Lake state parks. Residents will pay $24 and $32, respectively, for the fees.

The changes were implemented to comply with House Bill 93, which also specifies in-creases to entry fees for non-residents at five of the state’s busiest parks.

Non-resident daily entry fees increased to $14 at Bear Lake, Farragut, Hells Gate, Priest Lake and Round Lake. Cost for Idaho residents is $7.

continued: The Star-News June 17, 2021
— — — — — — — — — —

Bureau of Reclamation to increase flows, could mean shorter rafting season on Payette

by CBS2 News Staff Monday, June 14th 2021

The Bureau of Reclamation says it has started to increase flows at Cascade and Deadwood dams to help with irrigation and salmon migration.

Runoff volume in the Payette River basin is running at about 58 percent of normal.

“Flows are anticipated to support recreational floating on the North Fork and South Fork Payette rivers,” the Bureau of Reclamation said. “However, dry conditions will likely result in lower river stages and shorter rafting season this summer.”

source:
——————–

Fire Season:

How you can prepare for the above-normal expected fire season

By Anna Azallion Jun 15, 2021 KIVI

The National Interagency Fire Center is predicting an above-normal fire season in Idaho, and there are things you should do to prepare for it now.

The warmer and drier conditions in Idaho are one of the reasons for this above-normal fire potential. High temperatures, like those expected this week, are unusual for this time of year, and the state of Idaho is experiencing different levels of drought. …

“The Bureau of Land Management Boise District’s ten-year average points to vehicle-related fires as our number one cause over the last ten years each fire season, and that can be from UTVs, motorcycles, vehicles on the highway, trailers,” said Jared Jablonski, a BLM fire information officer.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise National Forest says employees put out over 400 abandoned campfires in 2020

by CBS2 News Staff Sunday, June 20th 2021

The Boise National Forest is asking for help in reducing human-caused wildfires in Idaho.

Forest officials said a campfire is “out” only when it is cool to the touch.

Boise National Forest Fire Prevention employees located and extinguished over 400 abandoned campfires in 2020.


The photos provided show a campfire that still holds heat.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

IDL firefighters have responded to 99 wildfires in Idaho so far

By Katie Kloppenburg Jun 17, 2021 KIVI

Firefighters with the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL) have already responded to 99 wildfires on state and private lands protected by the IDL. So far this year, the fires have burned 433 acres on these lands.

IDL firefighters and Clearwater-Potlatch Timber Protective Association and Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association crews have held 90 fires to less than 10 acres. Many of the fires were contained at less than an acre, according to IDL.

“It’s early in the fire season, and we’ve already seen three times as many acres burned this year over the 20-year average,” said Josh Harvey, IDL’s Fire Bureau Chief. “Unfortunately, 95% of these fires were human-caused and could have been prevented. We are ready to suppress fires, but we need the public to help us by not starting wildfires.”

continued:
—————

Critter News:

Idaho camper shoots family dog, mistaking it for wolf

June 16, 2021 AP

A family has said their pet dog is recovering after she was shot twice last weekend by a camper in Idaho who mistook her for a wolf.

The pet is actually an Alaskan malamute.

The Idaho Statesman reported Rob Kolb and his daughter started their backpacking trip on Friday in central Idaho with their dog named Suki.

The next morning, they woke up to multiple gunshots.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho dog recovering after being shot multiple times

Katie Terhune June 18, 2021 KTVB

A dog is expected to make a full recovery after he was found with multiple gunshot wounds in Gooding County earlier this month.

Dave Wright, the rescue coordinator at Friends Furever Animal Rescue in Twin Falls, said the black retriever he calls Garth had been shot with a shotgun, a pellet gun, and a .22, leaving him riddled with ammunition and near death.

Garth was found after a resident of Gooding County called dispatch to report what they believed was a dog hit by a car at about 7:15 p.m. on June 5. Wright, whose organization works closely with law enforcement, drove out to the scene along with Gooding County Sheriff’s deputies to search.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

2 conflicts with deer and dogs reported in Pocatello’s Johnny Creek

June 17, 2021 Local News 8

For the second time in a week, a deer-dog altercation in the Johnny Creek area has been reported to the Idaho Fish and Game office in Pocatello.

In both incidents, homeowners reported encounters between mule deer does and pet dogs that have resulted in the pets requiring veterinary attention.

Deer will act defensively when approached by dogs and people, especially if there are fawns in the picture. In one of the incidents, a fawn was actually seen in the vicinity of the doe before the confrontation with the dog took place.

continued: w/tips to protect dogs
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Humane Society getting ‘alarming number’ of calls for pets locked in hot cars

by Ryan L Morrison Tuesday, June 15th 2021 CBS2

The Idaho Humane Society said Tuesday it’s responding to an “alarming number” of calls for pets locked in hot cars.

IHS says officers responded to 29 calls in May, primarily centering around Memorial Day weekend.

In just the first two weeks of June, IHS has received 31 calls, 24 of which were in the city of Boise.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Gallery: Sheep take over mountain road near Tamarack Resort

June 14, 2021 CBS2

link: to slide-show
— — — — — — — — — —

‘Fish salvage’ issued for Magic Valley reservoir due to drought conditions

The order was issued due to irrigation water being shut off following drought conditions at the Big Wood River.

KTVB Staff June 14, 2021

Idaho Fish and Game (F&G) announced Monday that a ‘fish salvage’ for the Richfield Canal and the Big Wood River below Magic Dam is in effect. The order was issued due to irrigation water being shut off following drought conditions.

The Big Wood Canal Company notified F&G that the gates to the Magic Dam would close on June 10, causing flow reductions into the Big Wood River below the dam and Richfield Canal.

The gates were closed early due to ongoing regional drought conditions in the Big Wood River Basin. In a normal year, there is enough water to keep the gates open until the first weeks of October.

continued:
—————

Fish & Game News:

Chinook Salmon Seasons and Rules

South Fork Salmon River

Current Season Status: Scheduled to Open
River Code: 21
Stream Name: South Fork Salmon River
Lower Boundary Description: Bridge on Forest Service Road 48 (Lick Cr-East Fork South Fork Road) where it crosses mainstem South Fork Salmon River
Upper Boundary Description: Posted boundary approximately 100 yards downstream from the Idaho Fish and Game South Fork Salmon River weir and trap.
Season Date Range: Saturday, June 26, 2021 – 5:30 AM MDT
Daily Limit: 4 salmon per day, only 1 may be an adult
Possession Limit: 12 salmon, no more than 3 may be adults
Legal Harvest: Adults Jacks

Notes: Open Saturday June, 26 and Sunday June 27, then four (4) days per week; Friday through Monday until the season is closed

Special Note: Fishing with bait for Chinook Salmon is allowed on the South Fork Salmon River

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

F&G Commission amends wolf hunting and trapping seasons to align with new state law

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Thursday, June 17, 2021

New seasons take effect July 1

During a conference call on Thursday, June 17, Idaho Fish and Game Commissioners amended current wolf trapping and hunting seasons in response to recent legislative direction.

The amended seasons take effect on July 1, consistent with the effective date of Senate Bill 1211. Changes will not be reflected in the current printed 2021 Big Game Seasons and Rules brochure, but an updated brochure with the changes will be available on Fish and Game’s website by July 1.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wildlife Express Newsletter

Summer 2021

link: (PDF file)
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Backyard Squirrel Maze 1.0 – Ninja Warrior Course


————–

Seasonal Humor:

SquirrelCheeks-a

CovidCoffeeMasks-a
————–