Category Archives: News 2022

May 15, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

May 15, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Note: If you are not receiving the YPTimes emails, check your spam folder.
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Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
Oct 27, 2021 – Transfer Station on Winter Schedule
Nov 1, 2021 – Winter Mail Delivery Starts
2022
May – Spring Rx burns
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit Season
May 15 thru Nov 30 – Firewood Season
May 28 – Memorial Potluck 2pm Community Hall
May 29 – YPFD Pancake Breakfast 830am Community Hall
May 29 – YPFD meeting at 2pm Community Hall
Jun 8-11 – Spring Free Dump Days
Jun 11 – VYPA Meeting 2pm Community Hall
Jul 2 – 4th of July golf tournament
Jul 3 – YPWUA Shareholders Meeting
Jul 9 – VYPA Meeting 2pm Community Hall
(details below)
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Local Events:

May 15, through Nov. 30, 2022 Firewood Season

Personal use fuelwood permits for the Boise National Forest will be available for sale at The Corner beginning May 15, through Nov. 30, 2022.
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Memorial Potluck Saturday May 28th

Memorial Potluck at the Community Hall. Burgers and Brats provided. Please bring a side dish if you would like.

Stay tuned for more details…


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YPFD Pancake Breakfast May 29

YPFD will have a Pancake Breakfast, “Come Meet Your Commissioner” May 29, 2022 at 8:30 AM at the Community Hall
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YPFD meeting May 29

There will be a Fire Commissioners Meeting May 29 at 2pm at the Community Hall.
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Krassel RD Prescribed Burns Spring 2022

The Krassel Ranger District plans to apply fire to approximately 2,500 acres within the Bald Hill project area (east of Yellow Pine); 2,000 acres in the Four Mile project area along the South Fork of the Salmon River near the Miners peak trail, and 70 acres around Krassel Work Center.
Ignitions may occur over 2-7 days in the months of March through May Flame, smoke and hazards may be present in the area until significant precipitation or season ending weather is received. If you have any questions or comments please contact Dave Hogen Krassel District Ranger at 208-634-0600

(Same map from last fall.)
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Spring Free Dump Days

June 8, 9, 10, and 11 for Valley County
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Golf Tournament July 2nd

The annual 4th of July golf tournament will be on Saturday, July 2nd at 10(ish). All proceeds will be used to improve the golf course (improving the greens, signs and tees. More information to follow. Contact Joel or Marj Fields with questions, sponsorships or donations at fieldsmarjie @ yahoo.com


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YPWUA Shareholders Meeting July 3rd

The yearly shareholders meeting will be Sunday July 3rd at 10am. There will be two positions up for elections.

There has been some question on who can vote and can run for office. You must be a shareholder with the Yellow Pine Water Users Association to be able to vote and run for office. If you have any questions about being a shareholder, please contact me.

Thank you – Steve Holloway
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Village News:

Mother’s Day Brunch

The Mother’s Day brunch was held at the Community Hall on Sunday May 8 at 12 noon. Food was provided. Donations appreciated. All donations will contribute to the village’s funds.

“Thank you to everyone who came to brunch! A big happy Mother’s Day to all of the wonderful mothers in our community!”

20220508MothersDay-aphoto courtesy HH

And Thank you to the folks who put on the brunch.
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Tuesday morning’s snow

20220510YellowPineWest-a

photo courtesy Eye-n-Sky

We had an inch and a half of snow on the ground Tuesday morning (May 10th) and another half an inch on Thursday morning (May 12th.)
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Yellow Pine Veterans’ Memorial

Spring cleanup time for our Yellow Pine Veterans’ Memorial. The elk had spent quite a bit of time visiting over the winter… now, if they’d just leave the flowers alone.

20220513VetsMemorial-aphoto courtesy CN
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State Burn permits required May 10th

Closed fire season begins May 10, which means Idahoans outside city limits will need a burn permit before burning any debris. The closed fire season lasts until Oct. 20.
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Watkins Pharmacy Update April 20th

Greetings! We will be painting the temp pharmacy in two weeks. There have to be some structural changes inside the space to ensure the pharmacy is secured and satisfy state regulations. In order to do that the new owner of the building, with his architect, have to have his building permit and plans approved by the city before we can modify anything under the permit. So we are probably looking at a date around June 1st at this point. Thank you for asking! Amber Watkins
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Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at wicap.org.
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Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
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Arnold Aviation News:

Customers New Deadline – Please email your shopping list by Sunday evening so they are ready to print early Monday morning.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
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Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Valley County Road & Bridge Announcements
Road Break-Up Limits in Effect Until further notice, break-up limits are now in effect:
* 7 tons per axle,
* 80,000 lbs maximum

Hwy 55 summer road closures reduced to 2 hours May 16, 2022
link:

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Closed to full sized vehicles at the junction with Profile Creek
from Perpetua “As Spring has arrived, snow and ice on the Stibnite road are beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Perpetua Resources crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Perpetua Resources crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
“We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road starting week of March 21st. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.” – Sam

Upper Johnson Creek road at Landmark, Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Elk Summit, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are closed to wheeled vehicles. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
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Critters

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be Elk Aware

Elk are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard. F&G confirms there is a pack of 6 wolves in our valley.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

Bears are out of hibernation and hungry.

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat had been hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started November 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report April 23: Bins emptied and transfer station cleaned by locals.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

Water Use

05/05/22 23427016 26439 24 1102 18 T 1114
05/06/22 23453555 26539 24 1106 18 F 100
05/07/22 23479603 26048 24 1085 18 S 491
05/08/22 23504902 25299 24 1054 18 S 749
05/09/22 23530420 25518 24 1063 18 M 219
05/10/22 23556919 26499 24 1104 18 T 981
05/11/22 23582736 25817 24 1076 18 W 682
05/12/22 23639804 27068 24 1128 19 T 1251
05/13/22 23636178 26374 24 1099 18 F 694
05/14/22 23663120 26942 24 1123 19 S 568
05/15/22 23689417 26297 24 1096 18 S 645

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

DRINKING WATER WARNING April 11, 2022
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 5-10-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

YPWUA 2022 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 3, 2022
YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 5, 2020 link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
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VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association:
Hailey Harris, Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Jen Aldrich, Secretary
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Ron Earl

April 6, 2022 Village Council meeting to fill vacant chairperson position (no minutes.)
Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.
2022 Meeting dates:
June 11
July 9
August 13
September 10

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Department

The Forest Service has requested a meeting with the Yellow Pine Fire Board on May 20, 2022 in Cascade at 1:30 PM. As a follow up to the POD’s (Potential Operational Delineations). The PODs process is more than drawing containers on a map; it is a cross-boundary, collaborative engagement that translates into operational strategies once fire is on the ground. PODS are fire management and planning units.

The Forest Service will set up a presentation to be given to the Village of Yellow Pine community at a later date.

Yellow Pine Fire Commissioners Meeting April 3, 2022

Officers In Attendance:
Bill McIntosh #3, Lorinne Munn #1, Tom Lanham #2, Tim Rogers Fire Chief, Ron Basabe Assistant Fire Chief, Ronda Rogers Secretary/Treasurer.
Others:  Sarah Lanham, Christy Harris Cecil Dallman, Tim and Jen Aldrich, Ginny Bartholomew, Leslie Jensen, Lynn Imel.

Meeting called to order at 2 PM; Visitors notified that there would be a comment period after the Commissioners Meeting.

Action Item: Approved of minutes from Prior meetings 2/24/2022 and 1/30/2022,    3/3 vote

Treasurer’s Report: 3/1/22 4 Battery For the Red Fire Truck $476.00, 3/3/22 Ed Staub Sons $39.72, 3/4/22 MTE letter $1.94, 3/18/22 MTE $95.16, 3/25/22 ICRMP 2nd payment $1245.00, 3/24/22 Conference & Membership $1700.00, Hotel $1328.00, 3/1/22 Deposit taxes $2008.97, 3/23/22 Deposit Taxes $174.29, Donation 500.00
Balance $23,131.73

Action Item: Commissioners approved all expenses, 3/3 vote

Discussion: Memorial Day Plans, Chairman Mclntosh would like to have brunch so the people of Yellow Pine could come and meet their Commissioner and talk to them about their concerns.

Discussion: Lorinne reported on the Commission Conference. Stronger Leadership For Resiliency and Challenging Times; by Silouan Green. Silouan was a very powerful speaker and talk about the Character of Leadership. The borad agreed that the Conference was very informational and important for them all to attend.

Discussion: Boise National Forest update; PODs overview. The PODs process is more than drawing containers on a map; it is a cross-boundary, collaborative engagement that translates into operational strategies once fire is on the ground. PODS are fire management and planning units.

Fire Chief’s Report:
The Red Truck has 4 new batteries and is back in working order.
Two fuel tanks have been found and can be purchased for $400.00 for both; just working on a place to put them.
Plans to have a website for the Fire Department to post all our activity, meetings, and trainings.
Training classes are in the planning stage; there will be 2 trainings per month in the summer months and 1 a month in the winter. There is also online training class also.
Cecil said we could make our own racks to dry our hoses after we use them. He is willing to help us build them.
Radios – need to locate all of the radios and have Alex Pellegrini condition them. Alex will be giving a training class on the radios and will be handing them back out.

Discussion: A safe at the firehouse – need a small safe at the firehouse to keep vehicle titles, other important documents.  Mike Amos said that he had one he would donate but his safe is too big. Chief Rogers will check on prices to purchase one.

Meeting Adjourned at 2:45 PM

Comment period started after the meeting.

Note: Minutes from the January 9th meeting have been submitted. See below for link to document.

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Meeting Minutes

Apr 3, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Feb 24, 2022 Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD New Commissioner’s Transition Meeting Link:
Nov 23, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Nov 8, 2021 – AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
Oct 31, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Oct 14, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Sep 27, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Sep 18, 2021 – Special meeting Link:
Sep 11, 2021 – YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
Jul 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Jun 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sep 30, 2020 – YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 11, 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Spring hours:
Wednesday thru Monday (closed Tuesdays) 8am-8pm
Fire wood permits Available May 15th
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Winter Hours at the Tavern until May 15th
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Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed for the winter.
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Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Availability for 2022
*Note can book Idaho Residents now for Archery or put on a waiting list for Non Residents, will find out final allocations by April 18th.
2 on 1 Archery August 29th to September 4th *Lodge hunt / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Archery September 6th to September 12th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Rifle September 24th to September 30th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Wolf.
Spring Bear Hunt June 3rd to June 9th Group of 2 to 3 hunters *Lodge Hunt / Black Bear and Wolf.
See our website for more details. Or give us a call 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 452-4361
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watkins can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

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Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (May 9) overnight low of 25 degrees. Yesterday’s snow and hail melted to 0.05″ water (may be under-catch due to breezes.) This morning it was 30 degrees at 930am, cracks in the overcast and patches of old snow and hail in the shade. A few finches, a hairy woodpecker and a male colombian ground squirrel visiting. Overcast and flaking snow at noon for a few minutes, then did it again an hour and a half later. Overcast, cool and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 46 degrees, about a 15-20 minuet graupel shower (little snow balls.) A few snowflakes falling at sunset, clouds sitting down on VanMeter Hill and light cold breezes. Overcast and light snowfall at sunset, cold breezes. Still snowing before midnight, about half an inch or more and socked in low. Still snowing after midnight, about an inch so far and below freezing.

Tuesday (May 10) overnight low of 26 degrees, yesterday’s snow measured 1 1/2″, melted to 0.11″ of water. This morning it was 32 degrees at 930am and partly cloudy with generous portions of blue sky and sunshine, new snow melting rapidly. Finches calling from the trees, 2 pine squirrels and a chipmunk visiting. Increasing clouds and new snow melted by lunch time. Overcast early afternoon and getting breezy. Mostly cloudy mid-afternoon (large dark cloud coming in from the west and patches of blue sky to the east) with lighter breezes, high of 50 degrees. Mostly cloudy just after sunset. Partly or mostly clear before midnight.

Wednesday (May 11) overnight low of 23 degrees. This morning it was 36 degrees at 930am, partly hazy, light breeze and heavy frost melting. Robins and finches calling, woodpecker drumming and vocal pine squirrel visiting. Mostly cloudy and warm at lunch time and light breezes. Mail truck made it in on time. Light sprinkles of rain for about half an hour mid-afternoon and low dark overcast. About half a dozen hummingbirds showed up with the rain. Patches of blue sky opened up about 20 minutes after the rain stopped and some sunshine, high of 55 degrees. Elk in the neighborhood at sunset. Mostly cloudy and breezy after sunset. Cloudy before midnight. Snow and possibly rain early morning.

Thursday (May 12) overnight low of 32 degrees. Early morning snow (and possibly rain) gave us 0.22″ of water in the gauge, there was still about half an inch of snow in the shade (possibly more?) and it was melting quickly. This morning it was 39 degrees at 930am and mostly cloudy with fog belts mid-mountain. Robins and a few finches calling. Colombian ground squirrels emerging from burrows. Dozens of finches and a few pine siskins along with 2 pine squirrels visiting. Hawk in the neighborhood chasing song birds. Mostly cloudy with cool breezes mid-afternoon, high of 52 degrees. Strong gust of wind hit around 7pm. Mostly cloudy and cool breezes after sunset. Cloudy before midnight with filtered moonlight. Rain after midnight.

Friday (May 13) overnight low of 32 degrees. Rain during the night and early morning added up to 0.18″ of water. This morning at 930am it was 42 degrees, partly clear sky and breezes gusting up at times. Lots of finches, several hummingbirds (including 1 black-chinned male,) and a mourning dove visiting. Partly cloudy and breezy after lunch time. Warm with chilly flag flapping breezes mid-afternoon and mostly cloudy, high of 53 degrees. After sunset it was mostly cloudy, calmer and robins calling. Cloudy before midnight. Raining by morning.

Saturday (May 14) overnight low of 38 degrees. Morning rain (so far) measured 0.04″. This morning it was 42 degrees at 930am, overcast with fog sitting on higher ridges and light rain containues to fall. Several finches, hummingbirds (a couple of male rufus and females and a black-chinned male,) a couple of male black-headed grosbeaks, a male evening grosbeak, a couple of male Lazuli Buntings, a small flock of brown-headed cowbirds, a few mourning doves and 2 arguing pine squirrels visiting, robins calling all over the neighborhood. Overcast and still raining at lunch time ending around 3pm. Hawk nailed a mourning dove, feathers scattered for several feet. Partly clear mid-afternoon. Jays calling from the trees. Clouded up and light rain for about half an hour late afternoon and breaks in the clouds, high of 57 degrees. Robins chirping. Warm and mostly cloudy with a few sprinkles after sunset. Some tree swallows have returned. Partly clear before midnight.

Sunday (May 15) overnight low of 31 degrees. Yesterday’s rain total = 0.14″. This morning it was 46 degrees at 930am and mostly clear. Tree swallows, jays, brown-headed cowbirds, black-headed and evening grosbeaks, hummingbirds, mourning dove, a pine squirrel, big fat ground squirrels and a chipmunk visiting. Mostly high thin haze at lunch time and warm. Gusty breezes early afternoon. Very warm by mid-afternoon, mostly hazy and breezy, high of 74 degrees! Dark overcast after sunset, slight breeze and feels a bit humid. Robins calling.
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Idaho News:

VCSAR Press Release

May 13, 2022

Beginning June 1st, 2022 there will be a Valley County Search and Rescue and EMS Team stationed in Yellow Pine. This Team will be comprised of a Nationally Registered Paramedic, a RN, EMT, and an EMR with others trained at different levels of basic Rescue Operations. Local volunteer team members have applied and been approved by the following agencies: VCSAR Board and membership, Valley County Sheriff’s Office, Cascade Rural Fire/EMS and in some cases, the State of Idaho Health and Welfare Division.

This Team will be a Part of Valley County Search and Rescue (VCSAR), it will also be associated with Cascade Rural Fire/EMS and will be providing responses to Search and Rescue, EMS, Technical Rescue, High and Low angle rope work, Extrication and limited SWIFT water rescue and other needed emergency services when available.

Jeff Forster is on the board with VCSAR and is the East Lieutenant. All Rescue apparatus and donated equipment from Yellow Pine Fire will be based at his home in Yellow Pine. There will not be an ambulance based out of Yellow Pine and no mechanism for transporting patients until a Paramedic ambulance arrives from Cascade. Should a patient need transport, response will continue to be coordinated with Life Flight and Ambulance through Cascade 911 Dispatch. Cascade’s Paramedic ambulance will continue in route to transport patients to the Yellow Pine’s Helispot should Life Flight be requested or to the hospital.

This Team will respond to 911 calls in Yellow Pine when available. Due to the limited number of qualified responders, their abilities and availability, we will not be able to guarantee a local response to calls for assistance 100% of the time. It’s important to dial 911 for any Emergency as soon as possible, allowing dispatch to notify the emergency responders to respond as soon as they receive the call for assistance. If a local team is not available in Yellow Pine to respond, the call will default to Cascade Rural Fire EMS to respond or Life Flight who are all dispatched through the 911 system if warranted.

Larry Scarborough
VCSAR Captain
208-860-8346
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Hwy 55 Update

Message from the Idaho Transportation Department (via the Valley County Sheriff’s Office FB page May 12, 2022)

Starting Monday, May 16, closures on SH-55 between Smiths Ferry and the Rainbow Bridge will shorten from 4-hour closures to 2-hour closures. The new schedule will be 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Monday – Thursday, and will continue through Thursday, May 26. Outside of those closures, there will still be one-way, alternating traffic with 15-minute delays.

Drivers should still anticipate longer delays once the road reopens at 12 p.m. to allow flaggers to clear queues on either side of the work zone. Once those lines are cleared, there should not be wait times longer that 15 minutes.

We appreciate your patience as we move through another spring season of construction work. To learn more about the spring construction schedule, visit (link).
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COVID-19 Updates: 373 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

May 13, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 373 new COVID-19 cases and 3 new deaths Friday. State-level case and hospital data are now being updated on the state dashboard on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, excluding holidays.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 447,913.

The state said 87 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 17,187, and 0 new case have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,934.

3 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,933.

full story: [Valley County 2,642 cases, 16 deaths.]
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Five new Valley County COVID-19 reported during week

By Tom Grote The Star-News May 12, 2022

Five new cases of COVID-19 were reported in Valley County last week by the county’s two hospitals.

The five new cases compared to nine new cases reported the previous week and the four new cases reported the prior week.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 2,702 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started in March 2020.

Thirteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health.

Clinics & Tests – McCall

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine offers the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines are offered for anyone age 5 and older.

Also available are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine boosters for ages 12 to 15 and to moderately or severely immunocompromised youths age 5 to 11.

Second booster doses are available for adults ages 50 years and older, people ages 12 years and older who are moderately or severely immunocompromised.

Patients should talk to their health care provider about their medical condition, and whether getting an additional primary shot is appropriate for them.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link) or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

Clinics & Tests – Cascade

Cascade Medical Center no longer offers the Pfizer vaccine. Those wishing to be given the Pfizer vaccine should contact St. Luke’s McCall or a local pharmacy.

The Cascade hospital offers a second booster shot of the Moderna vaccine to those over age 50 who received their first booster shot at least four months ago.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster. Call 208-382-4285 to schedule a time.

Take Home Tests

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital also provides free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

full story: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
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CMC bond promises more room for more services

$19 million proposal goes to voters Tuesday

(Note: This is the second of a two-week series on the $19 million bond issue proposed by Cascade Medical Center in Tuesday’s election.)

By Max Silverson The Star-News May 12, 2022

Leonard Isbell of Cascade recently met with cardiologist Dr. Steven Writer at the Cascade Medical Center, a visit that saved Isbell a trip to Boise.

Isbell, 70, previously visited Writer at the St. Alphonsus Heart Institute in Boise, but the doctor now makes monthly visits to Cascade to visit patients closer to home.

Writer typically sees about a dozen patients during each visit but would like to be able to make more visits to see more patients.

The hospital does not have the space to host more visits from Writer, or the other traveling clinics the center could provide, hospital CEO Tom Reinhardt said.

On Tuesday, voters in the hospital’s taxing district will be asked to approve a $19 million bond issue to help build a new hospital north of Cascade.

With more room, the hospital would provide clinics for dermatology, neurology, urology and specialized outpatient procedures, Reinhardt said.

The hospital currently provides primary care, family medicine, 24-hour emergency care, inpatient and rehabilitation services, mental health and physical therapy.

The hospital needs to be about twice its size to meet current demands, according to a study conducted by the consulting firm Wipfli. In addition, the population of Cascade and the surrounding area is expected to grow by as much as 14% in the next five years, the Wipfli study said.

The current hospital has two private rooms and four semi-private rooms that can fit two people each. The proposed facility would have six private rooms and two shared rooms.

The current clinic at the hospital has five examination rooms, while the proposed clinic would have 12 rooms.

Clinic visits have increased from 3,829 in 2016 to 5,333 in 2019, the Wipfli study said.

“We always find room for ER patients, but we rely on hospital rooms to host visiting specialists like Dr. Writer and that limits our ability to add specialists for visits,” Reinhardt said.

“That explains why we are now booking patients out farther to be seen for non-urgent issues,” he said.

The new hospital would add services like mammograms, colonoscopies, cataract surgeries and improved mental health services.

“We want people to be able to get what they need here locally, and not have to drive to Boise or even McCall, if they don’t have to,” Reinhardt said.

The board chose to expand only in areas that are in demand by residents of the area, he said.

“Our demographics are not maternity demographics, our community in Cascade and southern Donnelly, we are older,” he said.

About 43% of the City of Cascade population is over 60 years old, according to the 2020 US Census.

“When it comes to things like cataract surgeries and podiatry and colonoscopies, there’s absolutely enough volume in our end of the valley to support that,” Reinhardt said.

A study by Health Facilities Planning & Development estimated the Cascade hospital would see demand outpatient procedures like colonoscopies and cataract surgeries grow from 2,957 this year to 3,355 per year by 2030.

The current imaging department is 747 square feet, or about 25% smaller than it should be to meet current demand, according to the Wipfli study.

The number of total X-rays and other imaging services is estimated to grow by 690 scans per year over the 5,100 scans expected to be done this year, the Health Facilities study said.

The new hospital also would have a “safe room” for mental health patients where all items they could use to hurt themselves would be removed.

The facility would also include a decontamination room for patients exposed to fuel, pesticides, herbicides or other chemicals.

“Although infrequent, the standard of care is to include a decontamination room near the ER,” Reinhardt said.

The new building would see an expansion to the physical therapy department with six rooms and a large communal space.

Speech therapy and occupational therapy services would have their own rooms for the first time in the new building.

According to the Wipfli study, physical therapy appointments increased from 3,284 in 2016 to 3,825 in 2019.

The proposed hospital also would include space for a surgery suite that would not be finished.

“Depending on the end-cost of the project, there may be room in the bond to finish and equip the operating rooms,” Reinhardt said.

source: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
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Cascade hospital vote Tuesday will require 66.7% majority

The Star-News May 12, 2022

Cascade voters go to the polls Tuesday to decide on whether to fund a $19 million bond to build a new 32,000 square foot Cascade Medical Center.

Voters in the Cascade Medical Center Hospital District can cast their ballots at American Legion Post No. 60 at 105 West Mill Street in Cascade or the Donnelly Bible Church at 159 Gestrin Street in Donnelly from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. depending on their precinct.

Ballots can also be cast early at the Valley Count Clerk’s Office at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade until Friday.

… The cost of the proposed bond would be in addition to the district’s current property taxes, which cost taxpayers about $69 per $100,000 in taxable assessed value per year. The taxing district which owns the hospital extends from Smiths Ferry on the south to south of Donnelly on the north and from Tamarack and West Mountain to Yellow Pine.

full story:
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Absentee ballots must be returned by 8 p.m. on Election Day

By Nicole Camarda May 10, 2022 KIVI

Ada County Elections is reminding voters to get their absentee ballots in the mail by May 11 in order for them to be processed and received by the Ada County Elections Office next week.

Absentee ballots for the Primary Election on May 17 must be returned to Ada County Elections by 8 p.m. on Election Day.

continued: [Note: Deadline is 8pm May 17 for Valley County.]
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ATV stolen from construction site near Smith’s Ferry

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, May 10th 2022


Stolen ATV. (Courtesy Valley County Sheriff)

An ATV was stolen from the construction site on Highway 55 near Smiths Ferry.

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office on Tuesday says the vehicle was taken sometime after 9 p.m. on Monday night. It belongs to a local contractor.

Anyone with information is asked to call 208-382-5160.

source:
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Valley County to continue discussion on Roseberry Park development

Valley County Planning and Zoning public hearing drew about 118 people in opposition last week. Another meeting is set for Thursday evening.

Tristan Lewis May 11, 2022 KTVB

Opposition against the proposed Roseberry Park development in Valley County continues.

The Valley County Planning and Zoning Commission held a public hearing last Thursday which drew about 118 people in opposition to the proposed bid by California-based developer Roseberry Park, LLC.

The developer is looking to obtain a permit to build a mobile home community park west of Donnelly. It’s something they’re pitching as “necessary workforce housing.” If approved, it would bring 201 manufactured homes to the area on about 40 acres near the intersection of Roseberry and Norwood Road.

continued:
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Valley County denies Roseberry Park proposal

Council members stated concerns from public testimony, affordability, and property rights; among other concerns.

The Valley County Planning and Zoning Commission unanimously voted to deny the proposed bid by California-based developer Roseberry Park, LLC.

Valley County Planning and Zoning held the follow-up hearing after last week’s initial hearing received a greater public testimony turn out than previously expected.

continued:
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Wanted Georgia man, 11-year-old son found in Idaho’s Clearwater National Forest

Unprepared for the rugged backcountry and unable to start a fire in the wet conditions, the pair had resorted to eating snails and insects.

Katie Terhune May 13, 2022 KTVB

A missing Georgia boy and the father who took him on the run have been found after officials say they spent more than a week in Idaho’s rugged backcountry.

continued:
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Letters to Share:

Viewpoint: New Cascade hospital needed to serve all patients

By Dr. Ron Ellsworth and Tom Reinhardt

Cascade Medical Center is an independent, nonprofit hospital. It is locally owned and governed by citizens within our tax district. The appointed and elected members of the Board of Trustees are full-time residents, living within our community.

On May 17, Cascade Medical Center will ask the voters in our hospital district to support a $19 million bond to help us build a new facility so that we can keep pace with the growing demand for healthcare in our community.

The strong financial performance of the medical center will enable CMC to fund at least $15 million of the project ourselves between our savings, loans and grants, but we still need help from the citizens we serve to fund the $34 million project.

The need for a new facility (not just a remodel of the current facility) was determined to be necessary based upon several studies and site surveys. In 2020, Cascade Medical Center hired Wipfli to conduct a needs assessment to determine how we can best serve the needs of our community.

Those findings showed our facility is approximately 13,500 square-feet too small to meet contemporary standards, and that the current site does not provide adequate expansion room to build in the same location.

The results of this study were used to correctly size each department in the planned new facility. We invite you to read the full report and findings of this analysis on our website at (link).

Once the Wipfli findings were compiled, we asked a healthcare architect review their conclusions and provide consultation on a renovation versus a replacement project. Their recommendation, after reviewing all the data was to pursue a replacement facility.

Finally, Cascade Medical Center hired a consultant to study projected growth and volume of services needed in our hospital district. Both the opinion of the architect, as well as the summary of the service volume study, are available on our website at cmchd.org.

All of this due diligence has lead us to this point, the point where we need to replace our facility in order to continue serving all of our patients. To do that, we need to ask for your support as a taxpayer.

If the bond does not pass, the need for a new facility will not go away. Our options would be somewhat limited – try again to pass a bond in November or look to be absorbed into a larger health-care system.

Becoming part of a larger system means local control and autonomy will be lost, and the services we offer may be reduced rather than expanded.

We invite you to learn more and ask questions so you can make an informed decision when you vote on May 17h. Please visit our website for FAQs, to review studies and reports, and see a breakdown of the financials.

We also have two virtual public forums scheduled Thursday, May 12, where you can ask questions and get answers. The links to those forums are on the home page of our website.

It is a pleasure to serve this community and we hope to continue the tradition of independent hometown healthcare for generations to come.

(Dr. Ron Ellsworth is Medical Director of Cascade Medical Center. Tom Reinhardt is CEO of Cascade Medical Center.)
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Viewpoint: Cascade hospital bond cost small compared to going elsewhere

By Christine Murphy

I am writing to give you my perspective on Cascade Medical Center and the bond they are asking for. There are a few reasons why the bond is needed that I am going to describe.

I know that our money is becoming less valuable due to inflation, so the thought of having our taxes go up can be a turn-off. It is my understanding that the amount that taxes will increase is so minimal that almost anyone can make it work.

If we feel like we don’t have the money, then let’s make the decision to stop spending that $5 on non-essentials and put it in an envelope for paying the extra taxes instead. If we would save $5 a day it would be $1,825 that you would save in a year.

The next reason why I feel it is important to pass the bond is that with a bigger and up-to-date hospital we can have more of our appointments here in Cascade instead of having to go to McCall or Boise. I know of some who have to travel to Boise multiple times a week for doctor appointments and tests that could be handled here if we had the space to have specialists come to Cascade.

Some of them include MRI, ultrasound, EEG, echocardiogram, and many other tests. Some blood tests have to be sent out that depending on the results could mean life or death because of having to wait 24-plus hours instead of one to two hours for results. We would also be able to have the CAT scans in the same building, instead of being taken outside to get to the machine.

There was an event when a one-year-old child was diagnosed with RSV and the wonderful staff here had to choose between using medical transportation to move patients from Cascade to another facility at extreme costs or keeping him in Cascade with staff that was capable of treating him Like they are with almost 100% of non-trauma and trauma patients if we had the room and equipment to do so.

Knowing that they were qualified to care for the child they saved the family the cost of Life Flight to Boise. There was only one problem, the hospital was not large enough to have infant/children’s accommodations, including cribs, toys, oxygen cannulas/masks, oximeters, children’s menu, Pedialyte, sippy cups, or bottles.

Because of this, the child had to have an adult in the bed holding the child and the equipment to accommodate the child’s needs. Their kitchen was, and is, too small to do more than one meal at a time and if you have a special diet they can’t accommodate it.

We could also serve multiple people suffering from mental health issues at the same time, which would mean less expenses for treatment of self-harm and suicide attempts or completion.

I wonder when all the housing that is planned to be built is finished we will not be able to keep up with the demand. CMC has served our community of 900-1,000 people in the past because many people chose to go elsewhere for care. But now that we have a fantastic medical team and homes being built, we are having more patients moving their care from McCall and Boise to Cascade.

Part of the reasoning being, our doctors take the time to talk to you and treat you as important as you are and not like just another number/patients to get in and out so they can get more patients seen and make more money.

For example, last month a toddler was brought to the ER because the child’s G-tube came out and the family didn’t have an extra button on hand to replace it. The ER did not have a button because that is not a normal piece of medical equipment to have on hand.

The staff took the time to find a way to make the hole/port stay open that night until the family could make it to Boise to get a new button. Doctor Ellsworth then ordered a button to have on hand just in case. This is not the service you get at other locations!

I hope you can see that we as a community need to vote yes for the bond for Cascade Medical Center to build a new facility so we can meet the needs of our community. The extra taxes are pennies compared to the thousands of dollars it cost for us to be sent to other places for services, that could be handled if we just had the room to accommodate.

Please for the health and wellness of our community. Vote “yes.”

(Christine Murphy lives in Cascade.)

source: The Star-News May 12, 2022
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Scam Alert:

Don’t Buy Gift Cards to Pay Someone

From Valley County Sheriff’s Office May 10, 2022

We know we have said it before, but we are going to say it again. This is a scam. They are not traceable and you WILL LOSE YOUR MONEY! These people are super aggressive and extremely bossy. They will stay on the phone with you, tell you where to go, they look up local stores in your area and tell you where to go buy the gift cards, in fact the last one we had, stayed on the phone with the person the entire time they bought the cards. They are smart and manipulative, they do their homework and they are very hard to impossible to trace or track down. The last person lost out on $3,000. Please don’t judge people by their naivety, it happens, believe it or not, some people don’t have social media. The scammers are extremely convincing and prey on older people. Spread the word, tell your parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, etc… Share this post. Don’t buy a gift card for anyone unless you know who it is 100%.
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Public Lands:

Personal use fuelwood sales begin May 15, at local vendors

Exception: Fuelwood sales in the Visitor Center not available until end of June

Boise, Idaho, May 10, 2022 — Personal use fuelwood permits for the Boise National Forest will be available for sale beginning May 15, through Nov. 30, 2022. The Boise National Forest is offering multiple choices to purchase personal fuelwood permits. For information about fuelwood cutting on surrounding National Forests, please contact them directly.

The Mountain Home Ranger District office is open now and the Idaho City, Emmett, Lowman and Cascade Ranger District offices will be reopening May 16. The Visitor Center in Boise, Idaho, will not be selling fuelwood permits until the end of June.

1. Vendors in surrounding communities will be selling personal use fuelwood permits
2. Visitor Information Center, 1387 S. Vinnell Way, Boise, Idaho, (Not available for purchase until the end of June)
3. All mail-in applications will be processed at the Cascade Ranger District

1. Vendors -May 15, 2022: Fuelwood permits can be purchased at the following commercial vendor locations:

Caldwell: East Cleveland Beverage (208) 459-6442
Emmett: B & W Fuels (208) 365-2291
Horseshoe Bend: Ray’s Corner Market (208) 793-2391
Garden Valley: Garden Valley Chevron (208) 462-3869
Placerville: Donna’s Place (208) 392-9666
Idaho City: Idaho City Grocery (208) 392-4426
Idaho City: Seasons (208) 392-9777

2. Visitor Information Center – 208-373-4100 (Fuelwood permits will NOT be available for purchase until the end of June) Located at – 1387 S. Vinnell Way, Boise, Idaho; Monday thru Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

3. The Mail-in application process are for the continued safety of the public and our front-line employees. Mail-in application forms are available to print. Mail-in applications with check or money order payable to USDA (No Cash) to:
Cascade Ranger District / Attn: Fuelwood Program / P.O. Box 696 / Cascade, ID 83611.

For questions contact the Cascade Ranger District Office 208-382-7400; Monday – Friday: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
(Business Operations may be impacted by COVID-19 Restrictions and Closures, or Forest Fire Operations.)

For more information:

* Boise National Forest fuelwood webpage.
* Motor Vehicle Use Maps to ensure you are cutting in areas open to motor vehicle use.
* To see current forest closures, visit the interactive Forest Closure story map.

Cutting fuelwood within a closed area is prohibited.

* Ranger District offices.

– Mountain Home Ranger District 208-587-7961
– Idaho City Ranger District 208-392-6681
– Cascade Ranger District 208-382-7400
– Lowman Ranger District 208-259-3361
– Emmett Ranger District 208-365-7000

Fuelwood permit prices remain at $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum, and a 10-cord maximum per household. Please note, we cannot sell permits for only 2 cords. If you want all 10 cords, permits purchased will need to be 5 cords and 5 cords, or 4 cords and 6 cord, or all 10 cords at once. Pick up your 2022 fuelwood brochure with tags when you purchase the fuelwood permit

Permit holders are encouraged to cut fuelwood early in the year because fire restrictions may impact the cutting season later in the summer. Early season fuelwood cutters are asked to use caution to avoid wet muddy roads where travel may cause resource damage. Fuelwood cutting is not allowed within riparian areas (adjacent to creeks and rivers).

There is no cutting of Larch (Tamarack) after Nov. 1. Larch lose their needles every fall and appear to be dead, resulting in too many live trees being accidently cut. This new regulation is to prevent the cutting of live Larch trees after they have lost their needles in the fall.
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Fuelwood Season Starts May 15 on the Payette National Forest

McCall, Idaho, May 10, 2022 – Personal use fuelwood permits for the Payette National Forest will be available beginning May 15, through November 30, 2021. We will be selling permits with curbside service only at our Forest Service offices until offices are fully open to employees and the public. Permits are not sold at the Forest Supervisor’s Office in McCall.

Fuelwood permits can be purchased in person at these vendor locations beginning Sunday, May 15:

* Weiser: Ridley’s Food and Drug (208) 549-1332
Open: Everyday 7 a.m. – 11 p.m.

* Weiser Farmer’s Supply Cooperative (208) 549-0654
Open: Everyday 5 a.m. – 10 p.m.

* Cambridge: Jay’s Sinclair (208) 257-5000
Open: Everyday 6 a.m. – 10 p.m.

* Council: Farmer’s Supply Co-op (208) 253-4266
Open: Everyday 6 a.m. – 10 p.m.

* McCall: Albertsons (208) 634-8166
Open: Everyday 6 a.m. – 11 p.m.

* New Meadows: C&M Lumber (208) 347-2194
Open: Monday – Saturday 8 a.m. – 6 p.m.

* Yellow Pine: The Corner (208) 634-3325
Open: Wednesday thru Monday (closed Tuesdays) 8am-8pm.

The prohibition of cutting Western larch (known locally as Tamarack) after November 1 remains in place. Larch lose their needles every fall and appear to be dead, resulting in too many live trees being accidently cut. This regulation is to prevent the cutting of live Larch trees after they have lost their needles in the fall. Regulations also prohibit the cutting of dead or living Whitebark pine trees due to decline in this tree species, and their critical importance to wildlife.

Fuelwood permit prices remain at $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum, and a 10-cord maximum per household. Please note we cannot sell permits for only 2 cords. If you want all ten cords, permits purchased will need to be 5 cords and 5 cords, or 4 cords and 6 cord, or all 10 cords at once.

The Payette National Forest has a free-use area located in the Big Creek area. A free-use permit is required for this area, and can be obtained by calling the McCall Ranger District office. Specifics of the free-use location and requirements will be explained to people seeking free-use permits. Free-use fuelwood counts as personal use toward the 10-cord maximum per household.

Cutting fuelwood within a closure area is prohibited. Check on the Alerts and Notices page of Forest websites for closure information.

Check this year’s fuelwood brochure and current Motor Vehicle Use Maps to make sure you are cutting in an area open to fuelwood gathering and pay special attention to closed areas and roads with restoration project areas.

Fuelwood permits are valid within the Boise, Payette and Sawtooth Forests. All motorized travel related to fuelwood gathering must be in full accordance with Forest Service travel regulations for the area as shown in the Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM), unless specifically exempted in the fuelwood permit. For information about fuelwood cutting on surrounding National forests, please contact them directly.

Permit holders are encouraged to cut fuelwood early in the year because fire restrictions may impact the cutting season later in the summer. Early season fuelwood cutters are asked to use caution to avoid wet muddy roads where travel may cause resource damage. Fuelwood cutting is not allowed within riparian areas (adjacent to creeks and rivers).

For additional information, contact the local Ranger District offices, or visit the Forest website and Payette National Forest Facebook page.

Weiser Ranger District, Monday through Friday, 8a.m. to 4:30p.m. 208-549-4200

Council Ranger District, Monday through Friday, 8a.m. to 4:30p.m. 208-253-0100

McCall Ranger District, Monday through Friday, 8a.m. to 4:30p.m. 208-634-0400

New Meadows Ranger District, Monday through Friday, 8a.m. to 4:30p.m. 208-347-0300
— — — — — — — — — —

Bureau of Land Management seeks input on fence improvements north of Emmett

Date: May 13, 2022
Contact: Mike Williamson mwilliamson@blm.gov 208-384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is seeking public comment on a proposed fencing modification plan for the Linson Creek grazing allotment located 20 miles northeast of Emmett.

An environmental assessment will analyze the proposed construction of a total of one mile of fencing to reduce recreation and livestock conflicts. The current layout of fences has led to instances of gates being left open and livestock wandering into sensitive streamside vegetation to feed.

The BLM will accept scoping comments through May 27, 2022.

“This scoping period will allow the public and other interested parties to identify potential issues for the BLM to consider,” said Four Rivers Assistant Field Manager Ammon Wilhelm. “Comments are most helpful if they provide specific actions, resources or issues that should be addressed.”

Maps and information about the project are available at: (link) (case sensitive).

Comments will be accepted through the following means:
* Email: BLM_ID_FourRiversOffice@blm.gov
* Fax: 208-384-3326
* Surface mail: Brent Ralston, Four Rivers Field Manager, 3948 Development Ave, Boise, ID 83705

Please note that before including their personal identifying information (address, email, phone number), commenters should be aware that their entire comment – including their personal identifying information – may be made publicly available at any time. While those commenting can ask in their comments to withhold this information from public review, the BLM cannot guarantee that they will be able to do so.

For more information, contact the BLM Four Rivers Field Office at 208-384-3300.
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Critter News:

BLM seeks comments on proposed wild horse management plan for southwest Idaho

May 11, 2022 Local News 8

As part of its mission to manage and protect wild horses and burros on public lands, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is seeking input from the public on a proposed 10-year management plan for wild horses within the Sands Basin, Hardtrigger and Black Mountain Herd Management Areas located along the Owyhee Foothills.

The BLM plans to prepare an environmental assessment for the plan analyzing a variety of wild horse gather and fertility control options to maintain wild horse populations at the appropriate management level within each herd management area as required by the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act. The action is needed to reduce impacts to rangeland health and wildlife habitat within the herd management area boundaries and to protect animal and herd health.

continued:
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Second illegally-stocked walleye caught in Lake Cascade in past four years

Walleyes are “incompatible” with the perch in Lake Cascade and its fisheries downstream, according to Idaho Fish & Game.

KTVB Staff May 10, 2022

Idaho Fish & Game confirmed the second illegally-stocked walleye was caught in Lake Cascade since 2018 on Saturday, May 7.

Off-duty Regional Fisheries Biologist, Mike Thomas, was fishing Lake Cascade with local angler, Chris Weber, when Weber landed the fish. According to Idaho Fish & Game (IDFG), the mature male walleye measured 20-inches in length and weighed nearly 3 pounds.

Back in 2018, an angler reported catching a 19-inch Walleye near Lake Cascade’s Crown Point. The walleye caught on May 7 was near the Boulder Creek arm of Lake Cascade.

“We know that the only way walleye could have gotten into Lake Cascade is through one or more individuals illegally transplanting them there,” Regional Fisheries Manager, Jordan Messner said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

New ‘citizen science’ opportunity hits Boise area: Bee Watch

By Geneva Zoltek May 10, 2022 KIVI

At 14 spots around the Treasure Valley, new installments invite you to take part in science.

Bee Watch, a brand new program to the City of Boise’s Parks and Recreation Department, encourages community scientists to help collect data on native bee species.

“There isn’t enough time and capacity in the scientific community to be everywhere all at once. And so by utilizing community scientists, we can maybe understand a larger breadth of bee diversity,” said Martha Brabeck, Parks & Rec Foothills Restoration Specialist.

continued:
—————-

Trivia:

A Group of Hummingbirds is called a charm, a glittering, a shimmer, a tune, a bouquet, or a hover.
————–

Fish and Game News:

F&G hosting “Fish Idaho Fest – McCall” on June 10

By Brian Pearson, Regional Communications Manager
Tuesday, May 10, 2022

The event will be a party bringing anglers, conservation groups and resource management agencies together

If you are interested in learning about and getting more involved with fisheries and aquatic resources management in the McCall area, and having some fun while you are at it, mark your calendars for June 10, 2022 and join Idaho Fish and Game and our various partners for “Fish Idaho Fest – McCall.”

Idaho Fish and Game is hosting the event from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Friday, June 10 at Broken Horn Brewery, 201 Mission St. in McCall. The event includes live music; fly casting and fly tying demonstrations; food trucks; booths from nonprofits and government agencies involved with fisheries and aquatic resources management; and more.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Spring Chinook Salmon Fishing Update 5/10/2022: Rapid River Run, Hells Canyon, and Clearwater River Fisheries

By Joe DuPont, Fisheries Regional Manager
Tuesday, May 10, 2022

Hi everybody.

It is time for my weekly spring Chinook Salmon update (May 10, 2022). So, let’s get right to it and discuss what we have learned since my last update.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Learn skills early western frontier people needed to survive at “Living History Rendezvous”

By Brian Pearson, Regional Communications Manager
Wednesday, May 11, 2022

This unique outdoor skills course provides students an opportunity to develop multiple primitive outdoor skills

Curious how the trappers, explorers and mountain men of Idaho lived in the early 1800s? Idaho Fish and Game, in partnership with Idaho Free Trappers, is hosting a “Living History Rendezvous” to teach people many of the skills that these early western frontier people and their families needed to survive.

The free, family-friendly event is scheduled for 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on May 21 and May 22 at Black’s Creek Public Shooting Range, 2420 E Kuna Mora Road in Kuna.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Spring Newsletter-Idaho Naturalist News

By Sara Focht, Wildlife Educator
Friday, May 13, 2022

The spring edition of the Idaho Naturalist News (seasonal newsletter of the Idaho Master Naturalist Program) is available. Read about the 2022 Rendezvous, the ice age floods of north Idaho, see great nature photography, and more!

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

A robot lives in this Antarctic penguin colony. It’s trying to save them

April 29, 2022 Local News 8

Thousands of emperor penguins cluster on the ice of Atka Bay in Antarctica, mostly unaware that an interloper lives among them.

Slightly shorter than the average adult emperor, the 3-foot-tall (1-meter-tall) autonomous robot sits silently within the colony, nondescript compared with humans who sometimes emerge from a nearby research station.

The birds occasionally notice ECHO, an unmanned and remote-controlled ground vehicle, because “they exhibit curiosity to everything that they don’t know,” said Dan Zitterbart, associate scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts.

But it’s a passing fascination for the emperors, who quickly move on from the static object. The penguins are unphased by the robot, which acts like a mobile antenna for an observatory monitoring about 300 of them each year.

continued: w/video
———-

Seasonal Humor:

MayWeather-a
— —

May

It’s May in the Idaho mountains.
And what can we expect?
There may be snow,
there may be sun,
or we may just be wet.
We may be wearing shorts and tees.
We may be wearing dungarees.
We may be in our overcoats.
We may stay in or be in boats.
We may be digging in our yards or staring at the blooms.
But no matter what it’s like we just can’t wait for June.

– shared by a local lady.
— — — — —

Rock Migration Season

RockMigrationSeason-a
————

May 8, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

May 8, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
Oct 27, 2021 – Transfer Station on Winter Schedule
Nov 1, 2021 – Winter Mail Delivery Starts
2022
Mar-May – Spring Rx burns
May 8 – Mother’s Day Brunch Community Hall
May 10 thru Oct 20 – Burn Permit Season
May 28 – Memorial Potluck 2pm Community Hall
May 29 – YPFD meeting at 2pm
Jun 8-11 – Spring Free Dump Days
Jun 11 – VYPA Meeting 2pm Community Hall
Jul 2 – 4th of July golf tournament
Jul 3 – YPWUA Shareholders Meeting
Jul 9 – VYPA Meeting 2pm Community Hall
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Mother’s Day Brunch May 8th

Mother’s Day brunch will be held at the Community Hall on Sunday May 8 at 12 noon. Food will be provided. Donations appreciated. All donations will contribute to the village’s funds.
— — — —

State Burn permits required by May 10

Closed fire season begins May 10, which means Idahoans outside city limits will need a burn permit before burning any debris. The closed fire season lasts until Oct. 20.
— — — —

Memorial Potluck Saturday May 28th

Memorial Potluck at the Community Hall. Burgers and Brats provided. Please bring a side dish if you would like.

Stay tuned for more details…


— — — —

Krassel RD Prescribed Burns Spring 2022

The Krassel Ranger District plans to apply fire to approximately 2,500 acres within the Bald Hill project area (east of Yellow Pine); 2,000 acres in the Four Mile project area along the South Fork of the Salmon River near the Miners peak trail, and 70 acres around Krassel Work Center.
Ignitions may occur over 2-7 days in the months of March through May Flame, smoke and hazards may be present in the area until significant precipitation or season ending weather is received. If you have any questions or comments please contact Dave Hogen Krassel District Ranger at 208-634-0600

(Same map from last fall.)
— — — —

Spring Free Dump Days

June 8, 9, 10, and 11 for Valley County
— — — —

Golf Tournament July 2nd

The annual 4th of July golf tournament will be on Saturday, July 2nd at 10(ish). All proceeds will be used to improve the golf course (improving the greens, signs and tees. More information to follow. Contact Joel or Marj Fields with questions, sponsorships or donations at fieldsmarjie @ yahoo.com


— — — —

YPWUA Shareholders Meeting July 3rd

The yearly shareholders meeting will be Sunday July 3rd at 10am. There will be two positions up for elections.

There has been some question on who can vote and can run for office. You must be a shareholder with the Yellow Pine Water Users Association to be able to vote and run for office. If you have any questions about being a shareholder, please contact me.

Thank you – Steve Holloway
———

Village News:

The Great Chicken Roundup

A good neighbor noticed loose chickens on main street early this week. She found an experienced assistant at the Tavern and using goodies donated by a bear hunter the great chicken roundup began. Most of the hens willingly went back in the gate, but a few stragglers resisted, so it took some expert wrangling to convince them to join their sisters in the pen.

ChickenHerding-a
— — — —

Tuesday Morning’s Snow

Woke up to half an inch of melting snow.
20220503YellowPine-West-a
Yellow Pine West – courtesy Eye-n-Sky
— — — —

Great Jab

A big Thank You to Cascade Medical center for sending in a vial of Moderna and especially to Jeff for his efforts to reach out and boost our elderly population on May 5th. Great “Jab” Jeff.
— — — —

Cinco de Mayo

A Cinco de Mayo party was held at the Community Hall at 3pm on May 5. The food was provided by the VYPA Council as an appreciation for our village community.
— — — —

Lattes at The Corner

After a long anticipated wait, lattes are live at the corner! Come on in for a delicious coffee.
20220506Lattes-a
courtesy The Corner
— — — —

Saturday Morning’s Snow

Rained Friday turning to snow Saturday morning.
20220507JohnsonCrNorth-a
Johnson Creek North courtesy Eye-n-Sky
— — — —

Sunday Morning’s Snow

Three and a quarter inches of snow fell during the night.
20220508YellowPineNorth-a
Yellow Pine North – courtesy Eye-n-sky
— — — —

Watkins Pharmacy Update April 20th

Greetings! We will be painting the temp pharmacy in two weeks. There have to be some structural changes inside the space to ensure the pharmacy is secured and satisfy state regulations. In order to do that the new owner of the building, with his architect, have to have his building permit and plans approved by the city before we can modify anything under the permit. So we are probably looking at a date around June 1st at this point. Thank you for asking! Amber Watkins
— — — —

Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at wicap.org.
— — — —

Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
— — — —

Arnold Aviation News:

Customers New Deadline – Please email your shopping list by Sunday evening so they are ready to print early Monday morning.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Valley County Road & Bridge Announcements
Road Break-Up Limits in Effect Until further notice, break-up limits are now in effect:
* 7 tons per axle,
* 80,000 lbs maximum

Hwy 55 summer road construction starts March 14, 2022
link:

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Closed to full sized vehicles at the junction with Profile Creek
from Perpetua “As Spring has arrived, snow and ice on the Stibnite road are beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Perpetua Resources crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Perpetua Resources crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
“We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road starting week of March 21st. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.” – Sam

Upper Johnson Creek road at Landmark, Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Elk Summit, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are closed to wheeled vehicles. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
— — — —

Critters

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be Elk Aware

Elk are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard. F&G confirms there is a pack of 6 wolves in our valley.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

Bears will be coming out of hibernation soon and hungry.

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat had been hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started November 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report April 23: Bins emptied and transfer station cleaned by locals.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

Water Use

Date Flow Used Hours gph gpm dow more less
05/01/22 23321007 26349 24 1098 18 S 130
05/02/22 23348164 27157 24 1132 19 M 808
05/03/22 23375252 27088 24 1129 19 T 69
05/04/22 23400577 25325 24 1055 18 W 1853
05/05/22 23427016 26439 24 1102 18 T 1114
05/06/22 23453555 26539 24 1106 18 F 100
05/07/22 23479603 26048 24 1085 18 S 491
05/08/22 23504902 25299 24 1054 18 S 749

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

DRINKING WATER WARNING April 11, 2022
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 4-11-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

YPWUA 2022 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 3, 2022
YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 5, 2020 link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
— — — —

VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association:
Hailey Harris, Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Jen Aldrich, Secretary
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Ron Earl

April 6, 2022 Village Council meeting to fill vacant chairperson position (no minutes.)
Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.
2022 Meeting dates:
June 11
July 9
August 13
September 10

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
— — — —

YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Commissioners Meeting April 3, 2022

Officers In Attendance:
Bill McIntosh #3, Lorinne Munn #1, Tom Lanham #2, Tim Rogers Fire Chief, Ron Basabe Assistant Fire Chief, Ronda Rogers Secretary/Treasurer.
Others: Sarah Lanham, Christy Harris Cecil Dallman, Tim and Jen Aldrich, Ginny Bartholomew, Leslie Jensen, Lynn Imel.

Meeting called to order at 2 PM; Visitors notified that there would be a comment period after the Commissioners Meeting.

Action Item: Approved of minutes from Prior meetings 2/24/2022 and 1/30/2022, 3/3 vote

Treasurer’s Report: 3/1/22 4 Battery For the Red Fire Truck $476.00, 3/3/22 Ed Staub Sons $39.72, 3/4/22 MTE letter $1.94, 3/18/22 MTE $95.16, 3/25/22 ICRMP 2nd payment $1245.00, 3/24/22 Conference & Membership $1700.00, Hotel $1328.00, 3/1/22 Deposit taxes $2008.97, 3/23/22 Deposit Taxes $174.29, Donation 500.00
Balance $23,131.73

Action Item: Commissioners approved all expenses, 3/3 vote

Discussion: Memorial Day Plans, Chairman McIntosh would like to have brunch so the people of Yellow Pine could come and meet their Commissioner and talk to them about their concerns.

Discussion: Lorinne reported on the Commission Conference. Stronger Leadership For Resiliency and Challenging Times; by Silouan Green. Silouan was a very powerful speaker and talk about the Character of Leadership. The broad agreed that the Conference was very informational and important for them all to attend.

Discussion: Boise National Forest update; PODs overview. The PODs process is more than drawing containers on a map; it is a cross-boundary, collaborative engagement that translates into operational strategies once fire is on the ground. PODS are fire management and planning units.

Fire Chief’s Report:
The Red Truck has 4 new batteries and is back in working order.
Two fuel tanks have been found and can be purchased for $400.00 for both; just working on a place to put them.
Plans to have a website for the Fire Department to post all our activity, meetings, and trainings.
Training classes are in the planning stage; there will be 2 trainings per month in the summer months and 1 a month in the winter. There is also online training class also.
Cecil said we could make our own racks to dry our hoses after we use them. He is willing to help us build them.
Radios – need to locate all of the radios and have Alex Pellegrini condition them. Alex will be giving a training class on the radios and will be handing them back out.

Discussion: A safe at the firehouse – need a small safe at the firehouse to keep vehicle titles, other important documents. Mike Amos said that he had one he would donate but his safe is too big. Chief Rogers will check on prices to purchase one.

Meeting Adjourned at 2:45 PM

Comment period started after the meeting.

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Meeting Minutes

Apr 3, 2022, Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Feb 24, 2022 Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting (no minutes yet.)
Nov 23, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Nov 8, 2021 AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
Oct 31, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Oct 14, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sep 27, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sep 18, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sep 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
Jul 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Jun 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sep 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 11, 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Winter hours:
Open Wednesday 11-6
Fridays 11-9
Saturdays 9-6
Sunday’s 10-6
Closed Monday, Tuesday and Thursday
Exceptions are by appointment and we’ll be open on Mondays of Holiday weekends. New Latte machine.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Winter Hours at the Tavern until May 15th
Open Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat: 9am-2pm 4pm-8pm
Open Sunday 9am-2pm
Closed Tues & Thurs
Call the Tavern 208 633-2233 or Cell 208 739-7086 for other arrangements
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed for the winter.
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Availability for 2022
*Note can book Idaho Residents now for Archery or put on a waiting list for Non Residents, will find out final allocations by April 18th.
2 on 1 Archery August 29th to September 4th *Lodge hunt / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Archery September 6th to September 12th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Rifle September 24th to September 30th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Wolf.
Spring Bear Hunt June 3rd to June 9th Group of 2 to 3 hunters *Lodge Hunt / Black Bear and Wolf.
See our website for more details. Or give us a call 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 452-4361
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watkins can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

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Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (May 2) overnight low of 29 degrees. This morning it was 44 degrees at 930am and mostly cloudy. A few tree swallows have returned, robins chirping, finches and jays calling from the trees. Report of 2 hummingbirds in the neighborhood. Gusty before lunch time. Dark clouds, warm and breezy by early afternoon. Gusty, overcast and a freckle of rain mid-afternoon, then temperature dropping. Couple of brief showers around 5pm. Dark overcast and calmer just before dusk with steady light rain. Still raining after midnight. Snowed early morning before 7am.

Tuesday (May 3) overnight low of 32 degrees. New snow measured 1/2″ and melting, rain+snow = 0.38″ of precipitation. This morning it was 37 degrees at 930am, mostly cloudy with a blue patch of sky overhead, new snow melting rapidly. Swallows must have left, robins calling, jays shrieking, pine squirrel chittering. Lots of finches visiting. Mostly cloudy at lunch time. Breezy by early afternoon. Warm and breezy mid-afternoon, mostly cloudy with dark bellies, high of 57 degrees. Just after sunset it was calmer, warm and mostly cloudy. Partly clear before midnight.

Wednesday (May 4) overnight low of 28 degrees. This morning it was 39 degrees at 930am, partly clear (high thin haze) and grass wet with melted frost. Tree swallows are back. Robins and finches calling, pine squirrel chittering. At lunch time thin high haze and filtered sunshine. Internet is slow mid-day. Mail truck was on time. Helicopter flew over at 229pm. Mostly clear with a few patches of thin haze mid-afternoon, light breezes and very warm, high of 71 degrees. Just after sunset it was nearly overcast with high haze and still fairly warm. Robins chirping at dusk. Frogs croaking after dark.

Thursday (May 5) overnight low of 37 degrees. This morning it was 49 degrees at 930am and overcast. Tree swallows and robins calling, dozens of finches, a pair of evening grosbeaks and a pine squirrel visiting. Getting breezy before 1030am. Thicker darker clouds and gusty breezes at lunch time. Warm and windy with dark clouds early afternoon, high of 67 degrees. Daffodils beginning to bloom. Blustery and started to sprinkle a little just after 3pm and dark clouds. Steady rain 6pm. Still raining just after sunset, dark overcast and the top of VanMeter in the clouds. Elk in the neighborhood. Still raining after midnight. Likely rained most of the night.

Friday (May 6) overnight low of 41 degrees. Rain total = 0.32″. This morning it was 44 degrees at 930am, clouds breaking up and patches of blue to the south, pockets of fog mid-mountain. Robins calling. Pine squirrel and a few finches visiting, swallows have departed again. Breezy before 1030am. Mostly cloudy and quite breezy at lunch time. Dark overcast, windy (estimate up to 20mph) and rain mid-afternoon on and off, high of 61 degrees. Rain and thunder around 630pm, ending before sunset. After sunset partly clear. About a dozen elk grazing their way up the street. Dark overcast at dusk. Rain after dark. Gusty rain after midnight. Turned to snow early morning, ground white by 7am.

Saturday (May 7) overnight low of 32 degrees. Half inch new snow plus rain = 0.54″ of precipitation. This morning it was 35 degrees at 930am, dark overcast, sprinkles and flakes of snow, new snow melting, fog belt across lower VanMeter. Robins calling (no swallows.) Dozens and dozens of pine siskins and finches along with a mourning dove and a noisy pine squirrel vising. Sprinkling before lunch time, low foggy clouds down on the ridges. Big fat flakes of snow falling with the rain mid-afternoon for about half an hour and cooling off, socked in nearly to the valley floor, high of 46 degrees. Socked in and raining again early evening, then rain/snow mix, then all snow for nearly an hour making the ground white by sunset. Low foggy clouds down to mid-mountain but not raining after sunset, and just above freezing. Snowing big flakes and stacking up before midnight. Looks like it snowed most of the night.

Sunday (May 8) overnight low of 29 degrees. Measured 3 1/4″ new snow, melted plus rain = 0.52″ of precipitation. This morning socked in low, snow squall 930am-945am and 31 degrees. Raven and flicker calling, a few finches and a pine squirrel visiting. At lunch time most of the new snow had melted, dark clouds to the south and patches of blue sky above the fog on VanMeter hill. Snowing for a little over half an hour after lunch time, no new accumulation. Snowing at an angle (breezy) early afternoon for a short while. Mid-afternoon patches of blue in a mostly cloudy sky and light breezes, high of 42 degrees. Big hail storm late afternoon, only lasted about 15 minutes but nearly an inch accumulation before melting. Partly clear an hour before sunset. Mostly cloudy after sunset and cooling off.
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Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 307 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

May 6, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 307 new COVID-19 cases and 0 new deaths Friday. State-level case and hospital data are now being updated on the state dashboard on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, excluding holidays.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 446,856.

The state said 9 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 17,161, and 0 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,933.

0 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,928.

full story: [Valley County 2,630 cases, 16 deaths.]
— — — —

New Valley County COVID-19 rise to nine during week

By Tom Grote The Star-News May 5, 2022

Nine new cases of COVID-19 were reported in Valley County last week by the county’s two hospitals.

The nine new cases compared to four new cases reported the previous week and just one new case in each of the prior three weeks.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 2,697 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started in March 2020.

Thirteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health.

Clinics & Tests – McCall

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine offers the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines are offered for anyone age 5 and older.

Also available are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine boosters for ages 12 to 15 and to moderately or severely immunocompromised youths age 5 to 11.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link) or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

Clinics & Tests – Cascade

Cascade Medical Center no longer offers the Pfizer vaccine. Those wishing to be given the Pfizer vaccine should contact St. Luke’s McCall or a local pharmacy.

The Cascade hospital offers a second booster shot of the Moderna vaccine to those over age 50 who received their first booster shot at least four months ago.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster. Call 208-382-4285 to schedule a time.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital also provides free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

full story: © Copyright 2009-2021 · Central Idaho Publishing Inc. · All rights reserved (used with permission.)
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CMC bond issue called cure for cramping

Current building too small, has problems, hospital officials say

(Note: This is the first of a two week series on the $19 million bond issue proposed by Cascade Medical Center in the May 17 election. Next Week: Services for the future.)

By Max Silverson The Star-News May 5, 2022

Every time a patient at the Cascade Medical Center needs a CT scan, they need to be taken outside through the ambulance bay to an annex that houses the machine, whether it’s a sunny day or below freezing with blowing snow.

CMC Chief Nursing Officer Teri Coombs recalled a patient in her 80s having to make the frigid trip outside this winter in a hospital gown as wind whipped falling snow through the bay.

Coombs said a nurse brought her to the door and began covering her in blankets as she protested, perplexed and uncomfortable, “why do we have to go outside?”

The outdoor trip is one of several shortcomings that would be solved if Cascade voters approve a $19 million bond to build a new Cascade Medical Center, hospitals officials said.

Voters go to the polls May 17 to cast ballots on whether to fund the bond to help build a new 32,000 square foot facility north of Cascade. The total cost to develop the facility is expected to be about $34 million.

The 50-year-old building is less than half the size that it should be for the number of patients that visit the hospital, CEO Tom Reinhardt said.

“Without a replacement hospital, we will be unable to accommodate the constantly growing demand for local health care at the standard of care expected of us by our patients, community, and staff,” Reinhardt said.

A study conducted by the consulting firm Wipfli found that the hospital should be more than 23,500 square feet to meet current standards, compared to the 13,500 square feet of the current facility on Lake Cascade Parkway.

The study said building an addition to the current facility would cost as much as $7 million but still not provide the space needed.

A new building would be required within 10 years even if the center was expanded, the Wipfli study said.

Remodeling the current building is impossible, Reinhardt said.

“There just isn’t enough physical room on the property to double or triple the size of the hospital,” he said.

Additionally, the center would have to close down entirely in order to rebuild, which is not an option, he said.

“This building would require such a massive renovation, and we don’t have other space that we can work in the meantime, so it’s just not feasible,” he said.

The hospital’s physical therapy department can only accommodate two or three patients at a time due to limited space.

“We have already opened up on Saturdays to add more time, but that is already being used up,” Reinhardt said.

Some physical therapy patients use the pool at the Cascade Aquatic and Recreation Center, but expanding services to the center isn’t practical, he said.

“Our PT staff provides inpatient therapy as well as outpatient, and driving back and forth between locations won’t work,” he said.

The building cannot accommodate additions like ceiling rails, bathrooms built to current standards or an in-wall oxygen supply.

Ceiling rails are standard in hospitals so that heavier patients can be safely supported when being transferred from beds to wheelchairs, Reinhardt said.

“On several occasions, patients had to be transported out for this reason alone,” he said.

Cascade has one inpatient room with in-wall oxygen. When patients in other rooms require oxygen, large, heavy tanks need to be brought in.

Each tank only lasts about three hours, said CMC emergency room RN Chad Kreider.

The oxygen system could be upgraded, but that would not solve the other problems with the building, Reinhardt said

Last year, the hospital expanded the bathroom connecting two patient rooms only to find that the flooring contained toxic asbestos. Removing the asbestos caused the project to take twice as long and run over budget, Reinhardt said.

“We don’t know how extensive asbestos is in the facility,” he said.

The heating and cooling systems are original from 1974 and are beginning to fail, Reinhardt said.

Replacement parts are not available and it is difficult to maintain a comfortable temperature for patients and staff, he said.

Like adding an oxygen system, a new heating system could be added if it was the only problem, Reinhardt said.

“But the big issue is that we don’t have enough space and a new heating system won’t fix that,” he said.

source: © Copyright 2009-2021 · Central Idaho Publishing Inc. · All rights reserved (used with permission.)
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Cascade hospital vote May 17 will require 66.7% majority

The Star-News May 5, 2022

Cascade voters go to the polls Tuesday, May 17 to decide on whether to fund a $19 million bond to build a new 32,000 square foot Cascade Medical Center.

Voters in the Cascade Medical Center Hospital District can cast their ballots at American Legion Post No. 60 at 105 West Mill Street in Cascade or the Donnelly Bible Church at 159 Gestrin Street in Donnelly from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. depending on their precinct.

Ballots can also be cast early at the Valley Count Clerk’s Office at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade until May 13.

Ballots were sent to Yellow Pine residents on April 25.

continued:
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Valley County residents oppose mobile home park proposal

Tristan Lewis May 5, 2022 KTVB

Valley County Planning and Zoning held a public hearing Thursday evening for a pitched affordable housing option, a proposed mobile home park near Donnelly.

A Californian developer, Roseberry LLC, wants a permit to build “Roseberry Park.” If approved, it would bring 201 manufactured homes to the area on about 40 acres near the intersection of Roseberry and Norwood Road. The developer said it would bring more necessary work force housing to the area.

Monthly rent for the units could range from $1,700 to $2,000. Rent increases would be capped at 4% for each owner. As part of their development agreement, the developer said it would not allow short term rentals. Owners must live there or rent out long term and all homes have to be new construction.

continued:
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State Burn permits required by May 10

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, May 3rd 2022

Closed fire season begins May 10, which means Idahoans outside city limits will need a burn permit before burning any debris.

The closed fire season lasts until Oct. 20.

“The burn permit system reduces the number of false alarms and allowing fire crews to respond only when truly needed. Having a burn permit on record means fire managers can also respond more quickly to fires that escape,” said Dustin Miller, Idaho Department of Lands director. “Obtaining a free burn permit can also potentially reduce the liability of the burner if their fire escapes.”

Central Idaho faces a significant risk of wildfires in 2022, so permits are particularly essential to preventing wildland firefighters from wasting resources.

continued:
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Idaho mountain snowpack levels get big boost in April

by Roland Steadham, Chief Meteorologist Monday, May 2nd 2022 CBS2

April has been amazing for the entire state as far as temperatures and precipitation were concerned. Our temperatures have been cooler than normal and we have seen enough snow in the mountains to bump our snowpack levels up.

At the end of March, our snowpack levels were averaging 65 percent of normal with no significant relief in sight. It was getting scary and water officials were often using the word “drought” to describe an almost certain bleak water year for Idaho. Then, all of a sudden, high pressure got out of the way and the storms started rolling in one after another. No one particular storm was earth-shattering, but it was a slow and steady pace that was winning the race.

So how did our snowpack levels jump to above 100 percent of normal in many snowpack basins in just one month? It’s not so much that we had a lot of precipitation, it was the cooler than normal temperatures that preserved our snow. So instead of a spring runoff, we held on to what snow we had. That, plus 5 inches of snow here and there certainly helped.

continued: w/map
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Rock slide reported in Idaho County; closures reported

by CBS2 News Staff Friday, May 6th 2022

A rock slide has been reported in Idaho County.

Deputies say the slide occurred on Big Salmon Road between French Creek and Fall Creek Friday afternoon.

Officials say one lane of travel is open at this time, but it may be closed to all traffic depending on the weather. Vehicles hauling jet boats will not be able to make it through the one-lane, the sheriff’s office says.

The Idaho County Sheriff’s Office and road department responded to the scene.

source: [Note: Idaho Co. Sheriff also reports rock fall on Hwy 95, use caution.]
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Public Lands:

Central Idaho faces ‘significant’ wildfire potential in July, August, officials say

by CBS2 News Staff Monday, May 2nd 2022

Central Idaho faces significant wildfire potential in July and August, the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise says.

This is largely because of droughts in the state. “Severe to extreme drought is ongoing across the southern two-thirds of the Great Basin, with severe drought across Idaho and western Wyoming,” the fire center said. “The drier and warmer weather expected in late May into June will likely allow the drought to persist or worsen over the next few months.”

“Parts of central and eastern Idaho into Wyoming will also see above-normal potential by July and August once the snow melts,” the fire center added.

continued: w/map
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Critter News:

Officials issue warning as elk calving season begins soon

May 5, 2022 Local News 8

Yellowstone National Park officials have issued a warning as elk calving season will begin soon.

Cow elk are much more aggressive towards people during the calving season and may charge or kick.

Officials say to stay alert. Look around corners before exiting buildings or walking around blind spots: cow elk may bed their calves near buildings and cars.

Keep at least 25 yards from elk at all times, and if an elk charges you, find shelter in your vehicle or behind a tall, sturdy barrier as quickly as possible.

source: [Note: cow elk can be very aggressive towards dogs too.]
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Spring chinook salmon season looks promising for Idaho anglers

By Steve Dent May 05, 2022 KIVI

So far more spring chinook salmon have made it to the Bonneville Dam than the ten-year average creating a promising outlook for the season in Idaho.

While the numbers are much lower than past decades, 51,480 fish have made it to first dam on the Columbia River and that is the most since 2016.

continued:
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Migratory Bird Day to be celebrated May 14 at Ponderosa park

The Star-News May 5, 2022

The Payette National Forest will celebrate World Migratory Bird Day with activities on Saturday, May 14, from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Ponderosa State Park Activity Center.

The event will also include an information booth and a Junior Park Rangers program.

At 11:30 a.m., a great horned owl from Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary near McCall will be shown by Snowdon Facility Manager Sierra Pederson.

The theme for this year’s event is “Dim the Lights for Birds at Night,” as night skies typically provide calmer air space and fewer predators for migrating birds, a news release said.

Simple actions that people can take to help birds along their way include reducing the amount of light outside their home or business by using motion detectors and minimum wattage as well as directing light downward, the release said.

continued:
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Fish and Game News:

F&G Commission meeting May 18-19 in McCall

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Friday, May 6, 2022

Public hearing will be held the night of May 18

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission will hold its public hearing and business meeting at the Holiday Inn Express at 210 N. 3rd St. in McCall. A public hearing will begin on May 18 at 7 p.m. MDT at the same location.

Those wishing to speak to the Commission during the public hearing will have a three-minute time limit, with additional comments accepted in writing. People can address the commission on any topic pertaining to Fish and Game matters.

continued:
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Winter survival estimates for mule deer fawns, elk calves show slight increase from 2021

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Tuesday, May 3, 2022

F&G biologists use collars to track the young animals throughout winter and early spring

Statewide survival of collared mule deer fawns and elk calves was above average through April, which bodes well for hunters: Above-average survival grows herds and provides more young bucks for hunters in the fall. Fish and Game biologists will continue monitoring through May, but traditionally less than 5 percent of the mortalities occur after April.

“In years with milder winters, like the last two we’ve had, we tend to see the number of mortalities drop off in May,” said Toby Boudreau, Deer and Elk Program Coordinator. “We anticipate seeing some additional mortalities by the end of the month, however the statewide survival of mule deer fawns and elk calves is likely to end up being above average this year, barring any unusual events.”

continued:
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Great-horned owl in Custer County tests positive for avian influenza

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Tuesday, May 3, 2022

This is the first confirmed positive case in 2022 of avian influenza in Idaho wildlife

A great-horned owl in Custer County has tested positive for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza, and people are asked to report any dead or sick wild birds on Fish and Game’s Wildlife Health webpage.

The recent detection follows a trend seen in other parts of the country where sporadic deaths of migrating waterfowl and other birds provided the first indication that HPAI is present in an area.

continued:
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Weekly Salmon Fishing Update – May 4, 2022

By Chris Sullivan, Anadromous Fisheries Coordinator
Wednesday, May 4, 2022

Welcome to our weekly Chinook Salmon Fishing Update. Throughout the next several months we will provide updates on changes to seasons and rules and share data from dam counts, creel surveys, and hatchery returns to help anglers plan their salmon fishing trips.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Zeus, a Great Dane from Texas, is the world’s tallest dog

May 6, 2022 Local News 8 By Toyin Owoseje


Guinness World Records
Zeus eats 12 cups of dog food a day.

A Great Dane has been crowned the world’s tallest living dog by Guinness World Records.

Two-year old Zeus from Bedford, Texas stands at a whopping 1.046 meters (3 feet, 5.18 inches), making him the tallest dog in the world.

He officially received the paw-some plaudit on March 22, after his height was measured and confirmed by his vet.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

SpringFlower1-a

CovidLeaches-a
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May 1, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

May 1, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Yahoo subscribers need to look in their Spam folder for the emails.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
Oct 27, 2021 – Transfer Station on Winter Schedule
Nov 1, 2021 – Winter Mail Delivery Starts
2022
Mar-May – Spring Rx burns
May 5 – Cinco de Mayo party 3pm Community Hall
May 6 – Festival Planning meeting 5pm Community Hall
May 8 – Mother’s Day Brunch Community Hall
May 28 – Memorial Potluck 2pm Community Hall
May 29 – YPFD meeting at 2pm
Jun 8-11 – Spring Free Dump Days
Jun 11 – VYPA Meeting 2pm Community Hall
Jul 2 – 4th of July golf tournament
Jul 3 – YPWUA Shareholders Meeting
Jul 9 – VYPA Meeting 2pm Community Hall
(details below)
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Local Events:

Booster Shots

COVIDBOOSTERSHOTS-a
— — — —

Cinco de Mayo May 5th

A Cinco de Mayo party will be held at the Community Hall at 3pm on May 5. The food will be provided by the VYPA Council as an appreciation for our village community.
— — — —

Festival Planning meeting May 6th

We will be having a festival planning meeting with the festival coordinators on May 6th, 5pm, at the Community Hall.
— — — —

Mother’s Day Brunch May 8th

Mother’s Day brunch will be held at the Community Hall on Sunday May 8 at 12 noon. Food will be provided. Donations appreciated. All donations will contribute to the village’s funds.
— — — —

Memorial Potluck Saturday May 28th

Memorial Potluck at the Community Hall. Burgers and Brats provided. Please bring a side dish if you would like.

Stay tuned for more details…


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Krassel RD Prescribed Burns Spring 2022

The Krassel Ranger District plans to apply fire to approximately 2,500 acres within the Bald Hill project area (east of Yellow Pine); 2,000 acres in the Four Mile project area along the South Fork of the Salmon River near the Miners peak trail, and 70 acres around Krassel Work Center.
Ignitions may occur over 2-7 days in the months of March through May Flame, smoke and hazards may be present in the area until significant precipitation or season ending weather is received. If you have any questions or comments please contact Dave Hogen Krassel District Ranger at 208-634-0600

(Same map from last fall.)
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Spring Free Dump Days

June 8, 9, 10, and 11 for Valley County
— — — —

Golf Tournament July 2nd

The annual 4th of July golf tournament will be on Saturday, July 2nd at 10(ish). All proceeds will be used to improve the golf course (improving the greens, signs and tees. More information to follow. Contact Joel or Marj Fields with questions, sponsorships or donations at fieldsmarjie @ yahoo.com


— — — —

YPWUA Shareholders Meeting July 3rd

The yearly shareholders meeting will be Sunday July 3rd at 10am. There will be two positions up for elections.

There has been some question on who can vote and can run for office. You must be a shareholder with the Yellow Pine Water Users Association to be able to vote and run for office. If you have any questions about being a shareholder, please contact me.

Thank you – Steve Holloway
———

Village News:

Stormy Weather

The first half of the week we had wet weather (including a burst of hail Wednesday afternoon.) Thursday before dusk the clouds were sitting down on VanMeter Hill.

P1000741-20220428Clouds
— — — —

Friday Flyover

At noon we heard the loud rumble of low flying jets. Neighbor sent this information from the Idaho National Guard to share:

“Nearly 10 F/A-18Cs from Marine Corps Air Station Miramar will be operating out of the Boise Airport for approximately 14 days, starting today. These aircraft are not conducting training with the Idaho Air National Guard’s 124th Fighter Wing, but will be flying multiple sorties a day from the airport.”
— — — —

Watkins Pharmacy Update April 20th

Greetings! We will be painting the temp pharmacy in two weeks. There have to be some structural changes inside the space to ensure the pharmacy is secured and satisfy state regulations. In order to do that the new owner of the building, with his architect, have to have his building permit and plans approved by the city before we can modify anything under the permit. So we are probably looking at a date around June 1st at this point. Thank you for asking! Amber Watkins
— — — —

Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at wicap.org.
— — — —

Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
— — — —

Arnold Aviation News:

Customers New Deadline – Please email your shopping list by Sunday evening so they are ready to print early Monday morning.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Valley County Road & Bridge Announcements
Road Break-Up Limits in Effect Until further notice, break-up limits are now in effect:
* 7 tons per axle,
* 80,000 lbs maximum

Hwy 55 summer road construction starts March 14, 2022
link:

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Closed to full sized vehicles at the junction with Profile Creek
from Perpetua: “As Spring has arrived, snow and ice on the Stibnite road are beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Perpetua Resources crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Perpetua Resources crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
“We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road starting week of March 21st. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.” – Sam

Upper Johnson Creek road at Landmark, Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Elk Summit, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are closed to wheeled vehicles. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
— — — —

Critters

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be Elk Aware

Elk are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard. F&G confirms there is a pack of 6 wolves in our valley.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

Bears will be coming out of hibernation soon and hungry.

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat had been hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started November 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report April 23: Bins emptied and transfer station cleaned by locals.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

Water Use

04/21/22 23053853 26361 24 1098 18 T 192
04/22/22 23079391 25538 24 1064 18 F 823
04/23/22 23106130 26739 24 1114 19 S 1201
04/24/22 23133763 27633 24 1151 19 S 894
04/25/22 23160781 27018 24 1126 19 M 615
04/26/22 23187730 26949 24 1123 19 T 69
04/27/22 23214193 26463 24 1103 18 W 486
04/28/22 23241029 26836 24 1118 19 T 373
04/29/22 23268439 27410 24 1142 19 F 574
04/30/22 23294658 26219 24 1092 18 S 1191

May

Date Flow Used Hours gph gpm dow more less
05/01/22 23321007 26349 24 1098 18 S 130

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

DRINKING WATER WARNING April 11, 2022
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 4-11-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

YPWUA 2022 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 3, 2022
YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 5, 2020 link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
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VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association:
Hailey Harris, Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Jen Aldrich, Secretary
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Ron Earl

April 6, 2022 Village Council meeting to fill vacant chairperson position (no minutes.)
Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.
2022 Meeting dates:
June 11
July 9
August 13
September 10

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Meeting Minutes

Apr 3, 2022, Fire Commissioners Meeting (minutes forthcoming)
Feb 24, 2022 Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting (no minutes yet.)
Nov 23, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Nov 8, 2021 AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
Oct 31, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Oct 14, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sep 27, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sep 18, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sep 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
Jul 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Jun 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sep 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 11, 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Winter hours:
Open Wednesday 11-6
Fridays 11-9
Saturdays 9-6
Sunday’s 10-6
Closed Monday, Tuesday and Thursday
Exceptions are by appointment and we’ll be open on Mondays of Holiday weekends.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Winter Hours at the Tavern
Open Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat: 9am-2pm 4pm-8pm
Open Sunday 9am-2pm
Closed Tues & Thurs
Call the Tavern 208 633-2233 or Cell 208 739-7086 for other arrangements
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
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Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed for the winter.
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Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Availability for 2022
*Note can book Idaho Residents now for Archery or put on a waiting list for Non Residents, will find out final allocations by April 18th.
2 on 1 Archery August 29th to September 4th *Lodge hunt / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Archery September 6th to September 12th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Rifle September 24th to September 30th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Wolf.
Spring Bear Hunt June 3rd to June 9th Group of 2 to 3 hunters *Lodge Hunt / Black Bear and Wolf.
See our website for more details. Or give us a call 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 452-4361
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watkins can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
Please help support local journalism and subscribe.
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Apr 25) overnight low of 25 degrees, no new precipitation. This morning it was 36 degrees at 930am and high thin overcast. Robins, flicker, tree swallows and finches calling. A pair of quail and a mourning dove stopped by. Buds breaking open on lilacs. Small airplane circling at 1020am. Thicker clouds after lunch time and breezy. Warm, breezy and cloudy mid-afternoon, high of 63 degrees. Mostly cloudy just after sunset, warm and calmer. Robins chirping. A few stars out before midnight. Started raining before sunrise.

Tuesday (Apr 26) low of 36 degrees. This morning it was 40 degrees at 930am, low overcast (peaks and ridges foggy) and steady light rainfall, measured 0.07″ so far. Robins calling, downy woodpecker, finches, pine siskins, jays, brown-headed cowbirds and a pine squirrel visiting. Low overcast and steady light rain at lunch time. Stopped raining late afternoon and by early evening breaks in the clouds, high of 45 degrees. Rained for around 20 minutes before sunset. Mostly cloudy after sunset and light breeze, cloud of fog midway down VanMeter Hill. Cloudy before midnight.

Wednesday (Apr 27) overnight low of 33 degrees. Yesterday’s rain measured 0.22″. This morning it was 37 degrees at 930am, overcast and light breeze. Raven and robins calling, finches, mourning doves, cowbirds, jays, and pine squirrel visiting. Breaks in the clouds at lunch time. Mail truck was on time. Warm and mostly cloudy with filtered sun after lunch. Early afternoon rain/hail shower (less than 15 minutes) and breezy. Short little rain shower mid-afternoon, cooler and then partly clear with light breeze, high of 52 degrees. Partly clear after sunset and above freezing. Hazy to the east before midnight.

Thursday (Apr 28) overnight low of 27 degrees. Yesterday’s bit of rain and hail wet the bottom of the gauge = Trace. This morning it was 34 degrees at 930am, overcast and light breeze. Robins calling, jays, mourning dove, brown-headed cowbirds and finches visiting. Opinionated pine squirrel stopped by. Raining lightly mid-afternoon, overcast and light chilly breeze. Rain showers for a couple hours mid-afternoon, high of 50 degrees. Elk running all over the golf course just after sunset. Low dark clouds (top of VanMeter foggy) and breezy at dusk. A few tiny flakes of snow after 10pm, no accumulation. Dark and cloudy before midnight.

Friday (Apr 29) overnight low of 32 degrees. Yesterday’s rain measured 0.02″. This morning it was 38 degrees at 930am, overcast and light breezes. Robins calling, finches, jays, hairy and downy woodpeckers, mourning dove, yellow-headed blackbird, brown-headed cowbirds and a pine squirrel visiting. Breezy before lunch time and mostly cloudy. Low flying military jets went over at 1202pm. Breaks in the clouds early afternoon. Mostly cloudy with a couple patches of blue sky mid-afternoon, and light breezes, high of 51 degrees. Mostly clear after sunset and above freezing. Looked partly clear before midnight.

Saturday (Apr 30) overnight low of 27 degrees, no new precipitation. This morning it was 37 degrees at 930am and gray overcast starting to lower onto the ridges. Flicker drumming, robins chirping. Brown-headed cowbirds, jays, cassins finches, 5 mourning doves and a pine squirrel visiting. Sprinkles a little after lunch time. Overcast and a bit breezy mid-afternoon, high of 47 degrees. Overcast at dusk and a bit of a breeze. Dark and cloudy before midnight. Rain shower likely between 1am and 4am.

Sunday (May 1) low of 37 . The 24 hour rain total measured 0.02″. This morning it was 45 degrees at 930am, top of VanMeter foggy and a few breaks in the overcast. Robins calling, finches, pine siskins brown-headed cowbird, mourning dove, pine squirrel, golden mantled squirrel and chipmunk visiting. Mostly cloudy at lunch time. First hummingbird sighting – a male Rufus. Tiny first leaves breaking out of the buds on the lilac bush. Mostly cloudy, warm and a bit breezy mid-afternoon, high of 62 degrees. Report of buttercups blooming down by the river. Domestic daffodils are making flower buds. Elk on the golf course before sunset. Smoke along the river at sunset. Mostly clear and warm before dusk – one large dark cloud passing to the west, and light breezes. Robins calling from all over the neighborhood.
—————

RIP:

Violet Lorraine Kangas Earl

RIPVioletEarl-aMarch, 22. 1938 – April 15, 2022

Please join us as we celebrate the life of our beloved Mother, Violet Earl She was a woman of character who never missed an occasion to get together with friends or family. We plan to Celebrate her life on June 5th Starting at 2pm which will be held at the Ivy Wild Park in Boise. Food and drinks will be provided in exchange for memories and hugs. All will be taken care of.
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Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 219 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 4 new deaths

April 29, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 219 new COVID-19 cases and 4 new deaths Friday. State-level case and hospital data are now being updated on the state dashboard on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, excluding holidays.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 446,040.

The state said 7 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 17,135, and 0 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,930.

4 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,923.

full story: [Valley County 2,625 cases, 16 deaths.]
— — — —

New Valley County COVID-19 rise to four during week

By Tom Grote The Star-News April 28, 2022

Four new cases of COVID-19 were reported in Valley County last week by the county’s two hospitals.

The increase came after three straight weeks where the hospitals reported just one new case.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 2,688 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started in March 2020.

Thirteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health.

Clinics & Tests – McCall

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine offers the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines are offered for anyone age 5 and older.

Also available are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine boosters for ages 12 to 15 and to moderately or severely immunocompromised youths age 5 to 11.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at stlukesonline.org/mychart or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

Clinics & Tests – Cascade

Cascade Medical Center no longer offers the Pfizer vaccine. Those wishing to be given the Pfizer vaccine should contact St. Luke’s McCall or a local pharmacy.

The Cascade hospital offers a second booster shot of the Moderna vaccine to those over age 50 who received their first booster shot at least four months ago.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster. Call 208-382-4285 to schedule a time.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital also provides free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

full story: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — — — — — — — —

Cascade hospital plans forums on new hospital bond vote

Cascade Medical Center will continue public forums for the May 17 vote to authorize $19 million in bonds for a new hospital north of Cascade.

A forum will be held at 6 p.m. today at Donnelly Bible Church at 159 Gestrin St. in Donnelly.

Another forum is set for Thursday, May 5, at 3:30 p.m. at Cascade Schools at 209 N. School Street in Cascade.

Two virtual forums are set for May 12 at noon and 6 p.m. with links found at the hospital’s Facebook page.

The bond would fund about half of the proposed $34.2 million cost of building the new facility, which would be built on eight acres of land about a half-mile north of Cascade on the west side of Idaho 55.

The current hospital on Lake Cascade Parkway is 50 years old, too small and outdated, hospital officials have said.

The plans call for a surgery department, occupational and speech therapies, and expanded diagnostic imaging in addition to general modernization and expansion of existing services.

The hospital has 59 employees and took in patient revenue of about $5.2 million in the last budget year that ended Sept. 30.

Last year the clinic hosted 5,557 patient visits. The hospital treated 1,646 patients, mostly in the emergency room, took 1,907 diagnostic images, ran 4,335 lab tests and provided 4,063 physical therapy sessions.

source: The Star-News April 28, 2022
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County Internet

from Valley County Sheriff’s Department April 29, 2022 (via FB)

We would like to share an opportunity to assist with improving broadband (internet) service in Valley County at some point in the future.

Valley County is participating in a Regional task force called the West Central Mountains Fiber network. This is to create a regional approach to improving broadband speeds and capacity in the West Central Mountains. To create data that shows the current broadband speeds could you please test your computer speeds from your home address. This information will create a roadmap of where broadband infrastructure needs to occur and where broadband grant funding needs to be found. This will help us secure a part of the broadband dollars that have been identified by the State of Idaho for investment in rural community broadband projects.

Also please consider taking the broadband survey that identifies current costs and reliability of your service at (link)
(Note: It requires your email address!)

Speed Test (link)
— — — — — — — — — —

April 2022 Valley County Commissioners Newsletter

The lake is thawed and that has us looking forward to days on the water. Now is a great time to review our waterways ordinances and know the wake zones for Lake Cascade, Warm Lake, Horsethief Reservoir, and Payette Lake.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

No reopening date for Cascade Public Library

City library has been closed since Feb. 8 Watkins fire

By Drew Dodson The Star-News April 28, 2022

It is uncertain when the Cascade Public Library will reopen after fire damage, the library’s board of trustees was told last week.

The city-owned library at 105 N. Front St. has been closed since it sustained smoke and water damage from a Feb. 8 fire that burned down Watkins Pharmacy across the alley from the library.

Trustees were told in February that the library would not open until “at least April 18,” but that was before the extent of the damage was known, Cascade Mayor Judy Nissula said.

“We now have a better understanding of what needs to be accomplished and want to ensure that it is done correctly,” Nissula said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Emergency drought declaration issued for 34 Idaho counties

by CBS2 News Staff Friday, April 29th 2022

The Idaho Department of Water Resources on Friday declared an emergency drought declaration for 34 counties in Idaho.

The declaration is for all counties south of the Salmon River in central and southern Idaho.

“An emergency drought declaration provides a powerful tool for agricultural water users to cope with drought by allowing temporary water right changes for the remainder of the year,” the state says. “An emergency drought declaration may also help with eligibility requirements for federal drought assistance.”

continued:
————

Public Lands:

Payette, Boise forests to get $60M for fire projects

Logging, controlled burns to reduce wildfire risks

By Max Silverson The Star-News April 28, 2022

The Payette and Boise National Forests are set to receive almost $60 million in federal funding over the next three years from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to reduce the risks of catastrophic wildfires.

The funding will “amplify and accelerate” current projects, the Forest Service said.

Information on which projects would receive funding and when were not available as of Tuesday.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Bear Basin Trails Project Decision Released

McCall, Idaho, April 25, 2022 – The Payette National Forest, McCall Ranger District has released the decision for the Bear Basin Area Trails project. The purpose of the project is to develop a sustainable trail system to enhance recreation opportunities and to improve watershed conditions by incorporating existing routes as part of the Forest Service trail system, performing minor construction and reconstruction activities, and decommissioning other unsustainable unauthorized routes in the Bear Basin area.

Public comment on the project was sought beginning in November 2021. The Forest received over 50 comments on the project. “I am so impressed with how much the community is involved and engaged in the management of this area,” said McCall District Ranger Jenni Blake. “Scoping comments are an important part of our review process and truly helped shape the final decision for this project.”

As a result of scoping comments, the project was modified to reduce impacts to Great Gray Owl habitat along the edge of Bear Basin meadow. This modification includes rehabilitating the Rising Sun singletrack and adding the Rising Sun doubletrack as a National Forest System (NFS) trail. Additionally, one route proposed for decommissioning was dropped from the project due to public desire to add it to the NFS. Options for adding this route to the system will be considered in the future after identifying a more appropriate layout and design.

Several routes in the area have been constructed without authorization over the past several years. Constructing unauthorized trails is not only prohibited by the Code of Federal Regulations and subject to penalties but can have undesirable impacts to resources such as wildlife, archaeology, soil, botanical resources, and others.

“It is important for the public to remember that recreation is not the only resource the Forest Service manages for,” said Blake. “There are sensitive plants and wildlife species, archaeological resources, and soil and hydrology concerns within the Bear Basin area. Constructing trails without authorization bypasses the required environmental studies, is a violation of federal law, and can threaten these resources that need to be protected.”

In sum, the decision calls for 11.3 miles of previously approved trails to remain NFS trails, 5.7 miles to be added to the NFS, 2.1 miles of trail to be rehabilitated, and 0.7 mile to be dropped from the project and considered at a later date. All trails will be open to non-motorized uses, including hikers, horses, and bicyclists. E-bikes are considered motor vehicles on NFS lands and are thus not permitted on non-motorized trails. The decision memo and map, showing details of the decision, can be found at (link).

For more information about this decision and implementation, please contact Mike Beach, McCall & New Meadows Ranger Districts’ Recreation Program Manager, at 208-315-5263, or michael.beach@usda.gov.
— — — — — — — — — —

Lowman Ranger District is Hosting a Virtual Public Meeting for Kirkham Recreation Site Improvements

Forest Service officials are hosting a public meeting via TEAMS LIVE to present conceptual site plan options for the repair and upgrades at Kirkham Hot Springs.

Date: May 5, 2022
Time: 6:00-7:30 p.m.
Venue: TEAMS LIVE
Link to meeting

This is a pre-scoping meeting. The Forest Service will give a presentation on the conceptual site plan for the repair and upgrades for the Kirkham Recreation Site. Following the presentation the public is invited to ask questions and give feedback on the design.

Funding for deferred maintenance and facility upgrades at this site was received as part of the Great American Outdoors Act. Proposed redesign work may include reconfiguring the existing parking and managing roadside parking. The roads within the site would be resurfaced. Changes may be made to the bridge and gate.

Infrastructure such as picnic tables, shelters, signs, trails, and the viewing platform would be updated. Additional restrooms and changing rooms will be considered. Accessibility would be improved. Interpretation kiosks or panels would be developed. Restoration of vegetation in damaged areas would be undertaken.

Besides feedback on the design and improvements the Forest Service is hoping to generate interest in establishing a concessionaire to manage the site.

To follow this project as it develops visit the Project webpage at Forest Service (usda.gov) (project 61601) (link).
————-

Critter News:

Officials warn horse owners to take precautions against West Nile virus

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, April 26th 2022

The Canyon County Mosquito Abatement District is calling on horse owners to protect their horses from diseases such as West Nile virus.

“WNv is present annually in Southwest Idaho and it is important for residents to take steps to protect themselves and their horses from vector borne diseases,” said Jim Lunders, Director of the Canyon County Mosquito Abatement District.

Because horses have no innate protection from mosquito bites, they are particularly vulnerable to West Nile virus.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Migratory Bird Day to be celebrated May 14 at Ponderosa park

The Star-News April 28, 2022

The Payette National Forest will celebrate World Migratory Bird Day with activities on Saturday, May 14, from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Ponderosa State Park Activity Center.

The event will also include an information booth and a Junior Park Rangers program.

At 11:30 a.m. a great horned owl from Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary near McCall will be shown by Snowdon Facility Manager Sierra Pederson.

The theme for this year’s event is “Dim the Lights for Birds at Night,” as night skies typically provide calmer air space and fewer predators for migrating birds, a news release said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Fish and Game relocates sturgeon trapped in canal

Crews used a sling to lift the fish out of the water after it became stuck below Milner Dam.

KTVB Staff April 25, 2022

Rupert, Idaho — A seven-foot sturgeon was relocated after it became trapped below Milner Dam west of Twin Falls.

The monster fish – which spent the winter in the canal, according to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game – surprised a fisherman who had headed to the area hoping to reel in rainbow trout.

The angler contacted Fish and Game, who sent a team of fishery biologists and enforcement officers from the Magic Valley Region to see if they could get the sturgeon to roomier waters.

continued: w/photos
—————

Fish and Game News:

Spring Chinook Salmon Fishing Update 4/27/2022: Rapid River Run, Hells Canyon, and Clearwater River Fisheries

By Joe DuPont, Fisheries Regional Manager
Wednesday, April 27, 2022

Hi everybody.

It is time for my weekly spring Chinook Salmon update (April 27, 2022). From here on out I’m going to break my updates into two parts. The first part will discuss what the run is looking like including what we estimate the harvest share will be for each of the fisheries. The second part will discuss what we are seeing in each of our fisheries including where and how much harvest has occurred, how much harvest share is remaining in our fisheries, and changes to the seasons and limits that are likely to or will be occurring. With that understanding, let’s get right to it.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Hibernating bear family in crawl space is culprit behind family hearing ‘odd’ noises

by Melissa Eck The National Desk Tuesday, April 26th 2022

Some California residents found out what was causing rumbling and snoring noises in their home — a mother bear and her four cubs were hibernating in an unsecured crawl space. South Lake Tahoe, Calif. is about two and a half hours from Sacramento.

Non-profit bear organization, The BEAR League, said the black mother bear originally had three cubs. When they were nine months old, she adopted an orphan cub of the same age from their neighborhood.

When it was time for the bears to take winter hibernation rest, she found a house with an unsecured crawl space opening for the family to stay in. It was a home where people lived, who thought they heard “some odd rumbling, snoring-like noises but ignored it because it simply didn’t make sense.”

The BEAR League said the bear family awoke on Tuesday, April 19, and prepared to exit. “The people in the house could no longer deny there was probably a bear under the house,” the BEAR League said.

continued: CBS2 Idaho
—————-

Seasonal Humor:

BearHibernateRoll-a

CovidPlaguePainting-a
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Apr 24, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

Apr 24, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.
Some folks are not receiving the Yellow Pine Times email, please check your Spam folder.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
Oct 27, 2021 – Transfer Station on Winter Schedule
Nov 1, 2021 – Winter Mail Delivery Starts
2022
Apr 29 – Arbor Day
Mar-May – Spring Rx burns
May 5 – Cinco de Mayo party 3pm Community Hall
May 8 – Mother’s Day Brunch Community Hall
May 28 – Memorial Potluck 2pm Community Hall
Jul 2 – 4th of July golf tournament
Jul 3 – YPWUA Shareholders Meeting
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Cinco de Mayo May 5th

A Cinco de Mayo party will be held at the Community Hall at 3pm on May 5. The food will be provided by the VYPA Council as an appreciation for our village community.
— — — —

Mother’s Day Brunch May 8th

Mother’s Day brunch will be held at the Community Hall on Sunday May 8 at 12 noon. Food will be provided. Donations appreciated. All donations will contribute to the village’s funds.
— — — —

Memorial Potluck Saturday May 28th

Memorial Potluck at the Community Hall. Burgers and Brats provided. Please bring a side dish if you would like.

Stay tuned for more details…


— — — —

Krassel RD Prescribed Burns Spring 2022

The Krassel Ranger District plans to apply fire to approximately 2,500 acres within the Bald Hill project area (east of Yellow Pine); 2,000 acres in the Four Mile project area along the South Fork of the Salmon River near the Miners peak trail, and 70 acres around Krassel Work Center.
Ignitions may occur over 2-7 days in the months of March through May Flame, smoke and hazards may be present in the area until significant precipitation or season ending weather is received. If you have any questions or comments please contact Dave Hogen Krassel District Ranger at 208-634-0600

(Same map from last fall.)
— — — —

Golf Tournament July 2nd

The annual 4th of July golf tournament will be on Saturday, July 2nd at 10(ish). All proceeds will be used to improve the golf course (improving the greens, signs and tees. More information to follow. Contact Joel or Marj Fields with questions, sponsorships or donations at fieldsmarjie @ yahoo.com


— — — —

YPWUA Shareholders Meeting July 3rd

The yearly shareholders meeting will be Sunday July 3rd at 10am. There will be two positions up for elections.

There has been some question on who can vote and can run for office. You must be a shareholder with the Yellow Pine Water Users Association to be able to vote and run for office. If you have any questions about being a shareholder, please contact me.

Thank you – Steve Holloway
———

Village News:

Transfer Station Cleanup

20220423Dump2-a
photo courtesy Adam

About 10-12 locals thoroughly cleaned up the transfer station Saturday April 23rd. Thanks to Kat for organizing. The woody debris pile was also tidied up thanks to Cecil.
— — — —

Spring Buttercups

20220420Buttercup-a
April 20, 2022 photo courtesy LI

“Fawn lilies will be blooming soon.”
— — — —

April 19th

For those of you who remember Mayor Chappy, this would have been his 77th birthday. Rest in peace, Pard.
— — — —

Watkins Pharmacy Update April 20th

Greetings! We will be painting the temp pharmacy in two weeks. There have to be some structural changes inside the space to ensure the pharmacy is secured and satisfy state regulations. In order to do that the new owner of the building, with his architect, have to have his building permit and plans approved by the city before we can modify anything under the permit. So we are probably looking at a date around June 1st at this point. Thank you for asking! Amber Watkins
— — — —

Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at wicap.org.
— — — —

Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
— — — —

Arnold Aviation News:

Customers New Deadline – Please email your shopping list by Sunday evening so they are ready to print early Monday morning.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Valley County Road & Bridge Announcements
Road Break-Up Limits in Effect Until further notice, break-up limits are now in effect:
* 7 tons per axle,
* 80,000 lbs maximum

Hwy 55 summer road construction starts March 14, 2022
link:

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Closed to full sized vehicles at the junction with Profile Creek
from Perpetua “As Spring has arrived, snow and ice on the Stibnite road are beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Perpetua Resources crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Perpetua Resources crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
“We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road starting week of March 21st. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.” – Sam

Upper Johnson Creek road at Landmark, Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Elk Summit, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are closed to wheeled vehicles. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
— — — —

Critters

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be Elk Aware

Elk are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard. F&G confirms there is a pack of 6 wolves in our valley.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

Bears will be coming out of hibernation soon and hungry.

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat had been hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started November 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report April 23: Bins emptied and transfer station cleaned by locals.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

Water Use

04/14/22 22865324 28913 24 1205 20 T 2066
04/15/22 22895796 30472 24 1270 21 F 1559
04/16/22 22921411 25615 24 1067 18 S 4857
04/17/22 22948489 27078 24 1128 19 S 1463
04/18/22 22974460 25971 24 1082 18 M 1107
04/19/22 23000939 26479 24 1103 18 T 508
04/20/22 23027492 26553 24 1106 18 W 74
04/21/22 23053853 26361 24 1098 18 T 192
04/22/22 23079391 25538 24 1064 18 F 823
04/23/22 23106130 26739 24 1114 19 S 1201
04/24/22 23133763 27633 24 1151 19 S 894

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

DRINKING WATER WARNING April 11, 2022
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 4-11-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

YPWUA 2022 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 3, 2022
YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 5, 2020 link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
— — — —

VYPA News:

April 6, 2022 Village Council meeting to fill vacant chairperson position.

Village of Yellow Pine Association:
Hailey Harris, Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Jen Aldrich, Secretary
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Ron Earl

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.
2022 Meeting dates:
June 11
July 9
August 13
September 10

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
— — — —

YPFD News:

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Meeting Minutes

Apr 3, 2022, Fire Commissioners Meeting (minutes forthcoming)
Feb 24, 2022 Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting (no minutes yet.)
Nov 23, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Nov 8, 2021 AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
Oct 31, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Oct 14, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sep 27, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sep 18, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sep 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
Jul 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Jun 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sep 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 11, 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Winter hours:
Open Wednesday 11-6
Fridays 11-9
Saturdays 9-6
Sunday’s 10-6
Closed Monday, Tuesday and Thursday
Exceptions are by appointment and we’ll be open on Mondays of Holiday weekends.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Winter Hours at the Tavern
Open Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat: 9am-2pm 4pm-8pm
Open Sunday 9am-2pm
Closed Tues & Thurs
Call the Tavern 208 633-2233 or Cell 208 739-7086 for other arrangements
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed for the winter.
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Availability for 2022
*Note can book Idaho Residents now for Archery or put on a waiting list for Non Residents, will find out final allocations by April 18th.
2 on 1 Archery August 29th to September 4th *Lodge hunt / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Archery September 6th to September 12th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Rifle September 24th to September 30th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Wolf.
Spring Bear Hunt June 3rd to June 9th Group of 2 to 3 hunters *Lodge Hunt / Black Bear and Wolf.
See our website for more details. Or give us a call 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 452-4361
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watkins can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
Please help support local journalism and subscribe.
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Apr 18) 24 hour low of 27 degrees from Sunday morning. This morning it was 35 degrees at 930am, overcast and light breeze, measured 3″ old snow. Flickers calling and drumming, finches calling from the trees, pine siskins, white-crowned sparrow, nuthatches, a few juncos, pine squirrel, a few jays and a pair of quail visiting. Overcast and breezy at lunch time. Gusty winds started early afternoon. Warm mid-afternoon with gusty “snow-eater” breezes, high of 60 degrees. Most of the old snow melted, neighborhood streets are nearly bare. Calmer by early evening. Just after sunset it was overcast, slight breeze and 47 degrees. Cloudy before midnight. Trace of snow then rain before sunrise.

Tuesday (Apr 19) overnight low of 32 degrees. Early morning snow (trace) and rain measured 0.12″. Roofs dry by 930am, 34 degrees, overcast and foggy belts mid-mountain. Flickers calling, pine squirrel, chipmunk, mourning dove, nuthatches, female red-winged blackbird, hairy woodpecker and some finches visiting. Breaks in the clouds at lunch time and light breezes. Snowing lightly before 1pm, did not last very long and melted on contact. Cloudy mid-afternoon, breezy and occasional flakes of snow, high of 48 degrees. Overcast at sunset and light breeze. Socked in and snowing just before dark. Less than an inch before midnight, low clouds.

Wednesday (Apr 20) overnight low of 28 degrees. Measured 2″ new snow (SWE=0.08″) from last night. At 930am it was 36 degrees, mostly cloudy and new snow melting quickly. Heard a robin calling, flicker drumming, finches twittering from the trees, and downy woodpecker visiting. Mostly cloudy and breezy at lunch time. Mail truck was on time. Mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, breezy and warmer, nearly all of the new snow has melted, high of 51 degrees. No birds around, eerily quiet. Gusty afternoon. Just after sunset it was overcast and lighter breezes, still above freezing. Quiet, no birds calling. Cloudy and dry before midnight. Rained early morning.

Thursday (Apr 21) overnight low of 32 degrees. Early morning rain measured 0.29″. This morning it was 38 degrees at 930am, dark overcast (top of VanMeter foggy) light breeze and a few drops of rain. Flicker, finches and robin calling. Finches, pine siskins, a jay, a pair of quail, 3 mourning doves, a few dark-eyed juncos and a pine squirrel visiting. Overcast at lunch time. Overcast and a short light sprinkle of rain mid-afternoon. Cracks in the cloud cover by late afternoon, high of 48 degrees. Getting gusty at 545pm. Overcast and a few drops of rain after sunset, and lighter breezes. Dark and cloudy before midnight.

Friday (Apr 22) overnight low of 31 degrees. Yesterday’s sprinkles added up to 0.02″. This morning it was 37 degrees at 930am, overcast (top of VanMeter foggy) and light breeze. Robins are back! Hairy woodpecker, a few finches, a mourning dove and a pine squirrel visiting. Broken cloud cover and a bit breezy at lunch time. Gusty breezes early afternoon, strong at times. Partly clear and gusty breezes mid-afternoon, high of 51 degrees. Partly cloudy and lighter breezes early evening. Just after sunset a front came through, socked in to the north (VanMeter nearly obscured) blustery cold breezes and spitting snowflakes for about 15 minutes. Partly clear by 1030pm, two bright planets rising to the east.

Saturday (Apr 23) overnight low of 31 degrees. The flakes from last evening’s front did not accumulate, reporting “trace” and still have patches of old snow in the shade. This morning it was 37 degrees at 930am, mostly cloudy with a small patches of clear sky and dark clouds to the north. Several robins chirping, possibly a couple of tree swallows and some finches calling, mourning doves, chipmunk and pine squirrel visiting. At lunch time chunky dark clouds with higher white clouds above. Cool and breezy mid-afternoon, a few rain drops earlier drying out, low dark clouds to the south and patch of blue sky to the northeast, high of 49 degrees. Increased traffic on main street. Several loud gun shots near the neighborhood between 340pm and 4pm. Partly clear late afternoon. Rained pretty good for half an hour early evening. Mostly clear before midnight.

Sunday (Apr 24) overnight low of 24 degrees. Yesterday’s rain either missed the rain gauge or evaporated, only a few drops in the can. This morning it was 33 degrees at 930am, frost melting and clear sky. Swallows calling and swooping, robins chirping, raven calling, jays making a racket, and a few finches twittering. Pine squirrel, a few finches and a couple of pine siskins visiting. Sunny and blue sky at lunch time. Muffled booms at 1231pm, 1247pm and 1248pm. Warm sunny afternoon with light breezes and a few small clouds, high of 59 degrees. Could smell the grass growing! Sunset 740pm. Mostly hazy after sunset and sill warm.
—————–

Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 195 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 4 new deaths

April 22, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 195 new COVID-19 cases and 4 new deaths Friday. State-level case and hospital data are now being updated on the state dashboard on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, excluding holidays.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 445,545.

The state said 13 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 17,080, and 1 new case has been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,924.

4 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,922.

full story: [Valley County 2,155 cases, 16 deaths.}
— — — —

New Valley County COVID-19 cases stay at one for 3rd week

By Tom Grote The Star-News April 21, 2022

For the third week in a row, just one new case of COVID-19 was reported in Valley County last week by the county’s two hospitals.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 2,684 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started in March 2020.

Thirteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health.

Clinics & Tests – McCall

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine offers the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines are offered for anyone age 5 and older.

Also available are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine boosters for ages 12 to 15 and to moderately or severely immunocompromised youths age 5 to 11.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link) or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).
stlukesonline.org

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

Clinics & Tests – Cascade

Cascade Medical Center no longer offers the Pfizer vaccine, CEO Tom Reinhardt said.

“Pfizer requires us to purchase in large quantities and most just goes to waste,” Reinhardt said. “So until further notice, we’ll only carry the Moderna vaccine, which we can buy in smaller volumes.”

Those wishing to be given the Pfizer vaccine should contact St. Luke’s McCall or a local pharmacy, he said.

The Cascade hospital offers a second booster shot of the Moderna vaccine to those over age 50 who received their first booster shot at least four months ago.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster. Call 208-382-4285 to schedule a time.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital also provides free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

full story: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
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Cascade hospital plans forums on new hospital bond vote

The Star-News April 21, 2022

Cascade Medical Center will continue public forums for the May 17 vote to authorize $19 million in bonds for a new hospital north of Cascade.

A forum will be held at 6 p.m. next Thursday, April 28, at Donnelly Bible Church at 159 Gestrin St. in Donnelly.

Another forum is set for Thursday, May 5, at 3:30 p.m. at Cascade Schools at 209 N. School Street in Cascade.

Two virtual forums are set for May 12 at noon and 6 p.m. with details on how to participate to be announced.

The bond would fund about half of the proposed $34.2 million cost of building the new facility, which would be built on eight acres of land about a half-mile north of Cascade on the west side of Idaho 55.

The current hospital on Lake Cascade Parkway is 50 years old, too small and outdated, hospital officials have said.

The plans call for a surgery department, occupational and speech therapies, and expanded diagnostic imaging in addition to general modernization and expansion of existing services.

The hospital has 59 employees and took in patient revenue of about $5.2 million in the last budget year that ended Sept. 30.

Last year the clinic hosted 5,557 patient visits. The hospital treated 1,646 patients, mostly in the emergency room, took 1,907 diagnostic images, ran 4,335 lab tests and provided 4,063 physical therapy sessions.

source:
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Agencies in Cascade turn to voters for expansion needs as communities continue growth

The Cascade Medical Center and Cascade Rural Fire Protection District will both have funding measures on the May 17 ballot.

Tristan Lewis April 23, 2022 KTVB

Cascade, Idaho — With communities in Idaho continuing to grow and welcoming new people, it’s forcing first responders to plan ahead. In order to do so, two agencies in Cascade must get the public to approve measures in the upcoming election.

“We have great challenges,” Valley County Commissioner, Sherry Maupin said. “As people are joining us, their expectations are very high coming from other areas.”

Growth in Valley County has been happening for a number of years, but the community saw more residents flock to the area in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Maupin said it was due to people’s ability to work and learn remotely.

continued:
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Valley County employers offering housing for employees amid housing crisis

With the workforce in Valley County leaving the area because of lack of affordable housing, county leaders and employers are creating solutions.

Tristan Lewis April 21, 2022 KTVB

As the demand for affordable housing in the Gem State continues to be the top of mind for many Idahoans, employers in Valley County are creating housing opportunities for staff.

“We’ve had tremendous growth the last two years when COVID-19 happened,” said Valley County Commissioner Sherry Maupin. “We found that a lot of people that couldn’t leave the area came to us.”

Maupin said that even before the pandemic, many residents had second homes in Valley County. When people had the opportunity to work or learn remotely she said they took advantage of the opportunity and moved to cities like Cascade, Donnelly, and McCall.

continued: w/video
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When was that last oil change?

Valley County installs system to track equipment maintenance

By Max Silverson The Star-News April 21, 2022

As superintendent of the department, McFadden is leading the effort to automate the county’s inventory of parts and track maintenance and repairs on the county’s 120 vehicles.

The new digital system will replace the previous method of filling out work orders by hand on carbon triplicate paper.

It has been impossible under the current system to accurately track vehicle operating costs as well as routine and essential maintenance, McFadden said.

The new system will make road department expenses more accurate and help McFadden decide when some equipment should be sold, he said.

The software being installed by the county cost $9,000 with an additional $9,900 annual fee. It creates a profile and scannable code for every piece of equipment, from pickup trucks to road graders.

full story:
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Valley soil district to hold tree seedling sale starting Monday

The Star-News April 21, 2022

Valley Soil and Water Conservation District will kick off a tree seedling sale beginning Monday with Ponderosa pine and tamaracks that are adapted to the area.

The one-year-old seedlings were grown at Lucky Peak Nursery operated by the Forest Service near Boise.

Each tree is about eight inches long, including the root ball. Cost is $8 for a bundle of 10 plus planting directions.

Call John Lillehaug, board supervisor, at 208-630-4076 to order trees.

Proceeds will be used for conservation projects sponsored by the district, which since 1957 has provided technical, financial, and educational assistance to private landowners to help conserve soil, water, air, plants and animals.

source:
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Public Lands:

Idaho sees shortage of experienced wildland firefighters

by CBS2 News Staff Friday, April 22nd 2022

The Idaho Department of Lands is looking for experienced wildlands firefighters to lead engine crews.

There’s been a nationwide shortage of qualified wildland fire engine bosses, and it’s preventing officials from hiring more entry-level firefighters.

Without more engine bosses, fireguard stations in Centerville and High Valley won’t be able to remain open. That puts Idaho’s natural resources at risk and poses a threat to people who live in the area.

Idaho has recently implemented a $15 starting pay and hazard wages, as well as more overtime potential.

continued:
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Forest rangers remind campers of fire safety as camping season begins

By Seth Ratliff April 21, 2022 Local New 8

Saturday marks the beginning of an early camping season for several Idaho campsites, including the Egin Lake site in St. Anthony.

While National Forest campgrounds don’t open until memorial day, the Bureau of Land Management and forest rangers expect thousands of campers to visit this year.

Rangers have seen an increase in inexperienced campers after the pandemic.

As people rush to set up their tent poles, forest rangers want to remind all campers to practice responsible fire prevention in drought conditions.

full story:
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Payette National Forest Announces Recreation Event and Outfitter & Guide Special Use Permit Open Seasons

McCall, Idaho, April 19, 2022 – The Payette National Forest is implementing “Open Seasons” to receive recreation event and temporary outfitter and guide special use permit applications. Open seasons for all Ranger Districts are November 1 – February 15 for summer/fall activities, and August 1 – September 15 for winter/spring activities each year.

Recreation events are commercial activities requiring temporary special use authorizations for use of National Forest System (NFS) lands, including races, fishing contests, adventure games, and other similar events.

There are many types of outfitted and guided services provided on NFS lands. The new open season for applications will only apply to temporary outfitters and guides, which are issued for less than one year and typically to nonprofit organizations and educational groups.

The open seasons will not apply to noncommercial group use permits, such as weddings or family reunions, nor established, multi-year outfitter and guide permits.

The open seasons for applications will concentrate the review and approval of applications to specific time frames to provide for more efficient special use permit processing. Establishing these open seasons will improve the Forest’s capacity for excellent customer service to existing permit holders, and new permit applicants by reviewing applications in a predictable and collective manner to ensure protection of forest resources and policy compliance.

Applications for special use permits for recreation events, and temporary outfitters and guides will be processed at the close of an open season. Applications received prior to the open season dates will be held and reviewed after the closing of the open seasons.

Additional information and application forms are available at (link). Go to Visit Us (in the top bar), then Recreation Events and Commercial Permits (Learn More button).

For more information, please email Emily Simpson, Recreation Specialist at emily.simpson@usda.gov
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Forest urges visitors to use caution and prevent resource damage as they venture out this spring

April 20, 2022 Local News 8

With snow melting at lower elevations, the urge to get out on the forest creates the need for everyone to respect our natural resources through responsible outdoor behavior.

Winter is still alive and well at higher elevations.

Know the rules before you go. Soggy spring conditions on trails, roads and hillsides leave land and water resources in a vulnerable condition. Vehicle use on saturated trails, roads and hillside areas can easily damage the land causing permanent ruts, bog holes and erosion. Driving cross-country by motorized wheeled vehicles is prohibited on National Forest lands. This includes driving off-road to avoid a mudhole or snow drift which damages resources, creates ruts and is considered an unauthorized route. Ruts and bogs create additional maintenance needs that are costly to repair. Regardless of how many times you’ve visited the area in the past, you need to consider the current condition of the trails or roads you intend to use.

full story:
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Recent rain, snow showers could help Idaho’s summer recreation activities

by Marcos Guadarrama Wednesday, April 20th 2022 CBS2 Idaho

The Idaho Outfitters & Guides Association says the recent rain and snow showers are helping shape up a summer of fun outdoor recreation activities.

As CBS2 has reported recently, drought concerns have water experts worried. Aaron Lieberman with the Idaho Outfitters & Guides Association says recent rain and snowfall in the mountains look promising.

“These April storms have deposited a good amount of snow up in the mountains. That sort of changed and improved the outlook for white water rafting and jet boating for the coming summer season,” Lieberman said.

continued:
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Critter News:

Mountain lion spotted within Hailey city limits, house cats reported missing

KTVB Staff April 18, 2022

Hailey residents have been reporting a large mountain lion sighted within city limits, according to Idaho Fish and Game (IDFG).

Residents have also reported missing domestic cats. No incidents involving dogs or domestic livestock have been reported.

IDFG will deploy a trap in an effort to remove the mountain lion from city limits.

continued:
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Moose death blamed on Japanese yew

By Beaux White Eagle April 22, 2022 Bonner County Daily Bee

Sandpoint — The death of a young moose last month is being attributed to being poisoned after it ate the needles of a Japanese yew plant at the Idaho Club.

The moose was discovered March 20 by Idaho Club resident Maryhelen Hall, who found the animal deceased in her yard.

An Idaho Fish and Game officer collected the animal and conducted an investigation. After discovering moose droppings at a neighboring home, the officer determined the animal had died of yew poisoning from a Japanese yew.

continued:
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Dog bite hospitalizations doubled in 2020, IDHW says

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, April 21st 2022

The number of people hospitalized for dog bites more than doubled in 2020 from previous years, the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare says.

Dog bite injuries, especially among boys ages 5 to 17, are on the rise. “Most years, there are about 20 people hospitalized for dog bite injuries in Idaho. In 2020, that number more than doubled to 46,” IDHW says.

Dog bites have caused 165 fractures, 40 amputations and 10 detached earlobes and lips in Idaho over the last four years. These injuries have a risk of bacterial infection as well.

continued: w/tips
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Second sheep crossing over Highway 55 at Beacon Light set for Monday

By Meredith Spelbring Apr 22, 2022 KIVI

A second group of sheep will cross Highway 55 at Beacon Light Monday.

The sheep will cross between 9-9:30 a.m. April 25 and will move east from Eagle Bike Park area across the Boise Foothills then up to the Boise National Forest above Idaho City.

Officials ask people to stay off to the side of the road and keep a good distance from the sheep as they come through. Dogs should be on leash if you encounter sheep on the trail. For those biking on the trails during a sheep encounter, officials say to dismount the bike and walk through the sheep. If the sheep guard dog approaches, talk to them and keep the bike between you and the dog.

continued:
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Zoo Boise working to protect birds from Avian Flu

By Meredith Spelbring Apr 18, 2022 KIVI

Zoo Boise will put additional precautions into place to protect its birds from the avian flu, recently discovered in Idaho.

The zoo announced some outdoor bird exhibits will be covered and some birds will be brought indoors to reduce their risk for exposure to highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI).

continued:
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Fish and Game News:

Application period for moose, bighorn sheep and mountain goat controlled hunts closes April 30

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, April 21, 2022

Moose, sheep and goat drawing results will be online in early June

A reminder to big game hunters that Saturday, April 30 is the deadline to apply for any moose, bighorn sheep and mountain goat controlled hunts. Folks can apply for one of these three species in a year, and those who apply for a moose, sheep or goat hunt are ineligible for most deer, elk and pronghorn controlled hunt drawings.

Hunters can apply online or at any Fish and Game office, license vendor or by telephone by calling (800) 554-8685.

continued:
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Weekly Salmon Fishing Update – April 21, 2022

By Chris Sullivan, Anadromous Fisheries Coordinator
Thursday, April 21, 2022

Welcome to our weekly Chinook Salmon Fishing Update. Throughout the next several months we will provide updates on changes to seasons and rules and share data from dam counts, creel surveys, and hatchery returns to help anglers plan their salmon fishing trips.

This is the first update for the year and anglers can expect weekly salmon updates as we get further into the season. The next salmon update will be posted on May 4, 2022 or sooner if seasons or bag limits change.

This week we cover seasons and rules information for the upcoming fisheries and discuss the information located on the IDFG website. For more information, check out the links below.

continued:
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Windows to Wildlife

In the winter edition of Windows to Wildlife:

* Idaho’s Cool Carnivorous Plants
* A New Cassia Crossbill Project
* Spring Wildlife Viewing at Craig Mountain WMA
* White-faced Ibis – Spotlight Species of Greatest Conservation Need
* City Nature Challenge

link: (PDF File)
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

DNA results are in: Mystery animal rescued by Pennsylvania woman identified

by WJAC Staff Tuesday, February 15th 2022


DNA results are in: Mystery animal rescued by PA woman identified after escaping facility. (Photo: CNN Newsource via WPXI)

Following weeks of speculation, the “mystery animal” that was rescued from the cold by a Pennsylvania woman last month, before escaping back into the wild, has been identified.

Experts had already narrowed the creature’s species down to either a coyote or dog.

The canine had been rescued in Westmoreland County after a woman had found it on her property.

The animal was then taken to an animal rehabilitation center, Wildlife Works Inc., where it eventually escaped about a week later by destroying its cage and chewing its way back into the wild.

Monday, officials at Wildlife Works Inc. said their DNA sample came back 100% coyote.

full story: CBS2 Idaho
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Seasonal Humor:

FluVaccination-a

SpringBear-a
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Apr 17, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

Apr 17, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.

Note: If you are not receiving the Yellow Pine Times in your inbox, please check your spam folder.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
Oct 27, 2021 – Transfer Station on Winter Schedule
Nov 1, 2021 – Winter Mail Delivery Starts
2022
Apr 17 – Easter Potluck 2pm The Corner
Apr 29 – Arbor Day
Mar-May – Spring Rx burns
May 5 – Cinco de Mayo party 3pm Community Hall
May 8 – Mother’s Day Brunch Community Hall
May 28 – Memorial Potluck 2pm Community Hall
Jul 2 – 4th of July golf tournament
Jul 3 – YPWUA Shareholders Meeting
(details below)
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Local Events:

Easter Sunday Potluck April 17th at 2pm

Please join us for Easter Potluck at the Corner. Fried Chicken provided. Please bring your favorite Easter side dish if you would like.
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Cinco de Mayo May 5th

A Cinco de Mayo party will be held at the Community Hall at 3pm on May 5. The food will be provided by the VYPA Council as an appreciation for our village community.
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Mother’s Day Brunch May 8th

Mother’s Day brunch will be held at the Community Hall on Sunday May 8 at 12 noon. Food will be provided. Donations appreciated. All donations will contribute to the village’s funds.
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Memorial Potluck Saturday May 28th

Memorial Potluck at the Community Hall. Burgers and Brats provided. Please bring a side dish if you would like.

Stay tuned for more details…


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Krassel RD Prescribed Burns Spring 2022

The Krassel Ranger District plans to apply fire to approximately 2,500 acres within the Bald Hill project area (east of Yellow Pine); 2,000 acres in the Four Mile project area along the South Fork of the Salmon River near the Miners peak trail, and 70 acres around Krassel Work Center.
Ignitions may occur over 2-7 days in the months of March through May Flame, smoke and hazards may be present in the area until significant precipitation or season ending weather is received. If you have any questions or comments please contact Dave Hogen Krassel District Ranger at 208-634-0600

(Same map from last fall.)
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Golf Tournament July 2nd

The annual 4th of July golf tournament will be on Saturday, July 2nd at 10(ish). All proceeds will be used to improve the golf course (improving the greens, signs and tees. More information to follow. Contact Joel or Marj Fields with questions, sponsorships or donations at fieldsmarjie @ yahoo.com

2022JulyGolfTourney-a
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YPWUA Shareholders Meeting July 3rd

The yearly shareholders meeting will be Sunday July 3rd at 10am. There will be two positions up for elections.

There has been some question on who can vote and can run for office. You must be a shareholder with the Yellow Pine Water Users Association to be able to vote and run for office. If you have any questions about being a shareholder, please contact me.

Thank you – Steve Holloway
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Village News:

Snow!

A winter weather advisory was issued for Monday and Tuesday. It snowed all day Monday and all night. By Tuesday morning we had received 8 inches of new snow. The Big Creek SNOTEL site showed 12″ new snow. We received snow on Tuesday amounting to 1 1/4″ by Wednesday morning. Thursday morning’s total was 2″, and Friday morning tally was just 1/2″. Early morning snow on Saturday was 1/2″ by 930am and snowed until around 2pm adding a couple more inches. A blizzard Saturday evening added another 1/2″ of snow. Sunday morning we had 5″ on the ground.

20220412YellowPineWest-a
Yellow Pine West April 12, 2022 at 1030am courtesy Eye-n-Sky

20220412MainStreetSnow-a
Doug plowing main street April 13th – courtesy YP Tavern

20220413YellowPineNorth-a
Yellow Pine North (Elk) April 13, 2022 at 915am courtesy Eye-n-Sky
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Watkin’s Pharmacy update

March 24, 2022: Watkins Pharmacy has not yet finalized plans to open in a new, temporary location and a date for when a new location would open was not set, pharmacy owner Amber Watkins said.
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Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at wicap.org.
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Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
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Arnold Aviation News:

Customers New Deadline – Please email your shopping list by Sunday evening so they are ready to print early Monday morning.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
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Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Valley County Road & Bridge Announcements
Road Break-Up Limits in Effect Until further notice, break-up limits are now in effect:
* 7 tons per axle,
* 80,000 lbs maximum

Hwy 55 summer road construction starts March 14, 2022
link:

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Closed to full sized vehicles at the junction with Profile Creek
from Perpetua “As Spring has arrived, snow and ice on the Stibnite road are beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Perpetua Resources crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Perpetua Resources crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
“We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road starting week of March 21st. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.” – Sam

Upper Johnson Creek road at Landmark, Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Elk Summit, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are closed to wheeled vehicles. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
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Critters

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be Elk Aware

Elk are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard. F&G confirms there is a pack of 6 wolves in our valley.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

Bears will be coming out of hibernation soon and hungry.

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat had been hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started November 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report March 15th: Road from YP to the dump is very slushy. The bins are still fairly empty.

Road plowed March 31st.

Bins dumped March 5th. Please flatten your empty boxes!

Dump update October 27th: We are now in winter mode. When it gets fairly full we will call to have it dumped. Contact Cecil.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

Water Use

04/07/22 22671826 25412 24 1059 18 T 400
04/08/22 22699624 27798 24 1158 19 F 2386
04/09/22 22726981 27357 24 1140 19 S 441
04/10/22 22754548 27567 24 1149 19 S 210
04/11/22 22781702 27154 24 1131 19 M 413
04/12/22 22809564 27862 24 1161 19 T 708
04/13/22 22836411 26847 24 1119 19 W 1015
04/14/22 22865324 28913 24 1205 20 T 2066
04/15/22 22895796 30472 24 1270 21 F 1559
04/16/22 22921411 25615 24 1067 18 S 4857
04/17/22 22948489 27078 24 1128 19 S 1463

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

DRINKING WATER WARNING April 11, 2022
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 4-11-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

YPWUA 2022 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 3rd at 10am.
YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 5, 2020 link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
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VYPA News:

April 6, 2022 Village Council meeting to fill vacant chairperson position.

Village of Yellow Pine Association:
Hailey Harris, Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Jen Aldrich, Secretary
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Ron Earl

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.
2022 Meeting dates:
June 11
July 9
August 13
September 10

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Meeting Minutes

Apr 3, 2022, Fire Commissioners Meeting (minutes forthcoming)
Feb 24, 2022 Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting (no minutes yet.)
Nov 23, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Nov 8, 2021 AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
Oct 31, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Oct 14, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sep 27, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sep 18, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sep 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
Jul 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Jun 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sep 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 11, 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Winter hours:
Open Wednesday 11-6
Fridays 11-9
Saturdays 9-6
Sunday’s 10-6
Closed Monday, Tuesday and Thursday
Exceptions are by appointment and we’ll be open on Mondays of Holiday weekends.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Winter Hours at the Tavern
Open Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat: 9am-2pm 4pm-8pm
Open Sunday 9am-2pm
Closed Tues & Thurs
Call the Tavern 208 633-2233 or Cell 208 739-7086 for other arrangements
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
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Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed for the winter.
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Availability for 2022
*Note can book Idaho Residents now for Archery or put on a waiting list for Non Residents, will find out final allocations by April 18th.
2 on 1 Archery August 29th to September 4th *Lodge hunt / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Archery September 6th to September 12th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Rifle September 24th to September 30th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Wolf.
Spring Bear Hunt June 3rd to June 9th Group of 2 to 3 hunters *Lodge Hunt / Black Bear and Wolf.
See our website for more details. Or give us a call 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 452-4361
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watikns can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
Please help support local journalism and subscribe.
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Apr 11) overnight low of 23 degrees. Yesterday’s snow water equivalent (SWE) was 0.04″ – it was breezy so that may be an under-catch. This morning low overcast and snowing. Flicker calling, jays, juncos, finches, rufous sided spotted towhee, pine squirrel and downy woodpecker visiting. Steady snow at lunch time, over half inch so far, foggy and socked in nearly to the floor of the valley. Still snowing mid-afternoon. Measured 4 3/4″ of new snow at 4pm, still snowing, high of 35 degrees. Stopped snowing before 5pm, breaks in the clouds before 6pm. Back to low clouds by 7pm. Snowing before sunset and below freezing. Likely snowed all night.

Tuesday (Apr 12) overnight low of 23 degrees. Snowed most of the day yesterday and probably all night. By 930am it was 26 degrees, 8″ of new snow on the board (SWE=0.56″) overcast (top of VanMeter fogged in) and snowing lightly. Large flock of juncos visiting along with a rufous sided spotted towhee, a hairy woodpecker, a nuthatch, some finches and the usual gang of jays. Flicker calling in the distance. Flaking lightly all morning, then stopped by lunch time (no accumulation) and cracks in the clouds with scattered sunshine. Trees dropping “snow bombs” out in the forest. Socked in and snowing again early afternoon – lasted about 20 minutes, then a 15 minute break then flaking on and off and breezy, high of 35 degrees. A few snow flakes mid-afternoon, breezy and just below freezing. Socked in and snowing early evening. Below freezing, low clouds and steady snow before sunset, scant quarter inch so far. Stopped snowing after dark. Broken clouds after midnight. Accumulating snow early morning.

Wednesday (Apr 13) overnight low of 10 degrees. This morning measured 1 1/4″ new snow (SWE=0.10″) and 5 1/4″ on the ground. At 930am it was 19 degrees, thinning overcast and still snowing lightly. Large flock of juncos, some finches, downy woodpecker, pine squirrel and jays visiting. Elk up by main street. Broken clouds and haze at lunch time. Colombian ground squirrel poked its head up looked around and went back into its hole. Mail truck was later than usual. Breezy and cloudy early afternoon, high of 35 degrees. Clouds lowering, gusty winds and starting snowing lightly mid-afternoon. Low clouds and snowing early evening, put down a solid trace. Mostly cloudy and cold after sunset. Partly clear before midnight, bright moon.

Thursday (Apr 14) overnight low of 13 degrees. Snow started after 7am, by 930am we had 2″ new snow (SWE=0.07″) low foggy overcast, 20 degree and steady snow falling. Large flock of juncos, a few finches and jays visiting. Stopped snowing by lunch time (fat 1/2″), cracks in the overcast to the south letting in filtered sunshine, but dark low clouds to the north obscuring VanMeter Hill. Scattered sunshine early afternoon, snow melting. Light gray overcast mid-afternoon, above freezing and breezy. Snow on and off late afternoon, no accumulation and most of previous snow melted, high of 40 degrees. Low overcast and snowing before sunset, later about 45 minutes, a trace. Mostly cloudy before dusk. Snowing after dark – another trace. Partly cloudy before midnight and bright moon.

Friday (Apr 15) overnight low of 14 degrees. Yesterday’s snow had mostly melted, scant trace remaining. This morning it was 23 degrees at 930am, almost clear sky and light breeze, yesterday’s SWE=0.03″ and currently 4″ snow on the ground. Flickers calling and drumming, (female flicker stopped by) first pine siskins have arrived, finches, nuthatches, hairy woodpecker, a few juncos, jays and a pine squirrel visiting. Mostly cloudy after lunch time. A couple of snow flurries early afternoon. Mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, breezy and an occasional flake of snow, high of 36 degrees. Mostly cloudy after sunset and cold breezes. Hazy fat moon rising over Golden Gate at 1030pm. Morning snow started before 830am.

Saturday (Apr 16) overnight low of 23 degrees. Morning snow measured a scant 1/2″ by 930am (SWE=0.02″) and 4″ on the ground, it was 26 degrees, socked in down to the valley floor, light breeze and steady snowfall. Lots of juncos early with a few finches, then jays, nuthatches, pine squirrel, a couple of pine siskins and a hairy woodpecker visiting. Socked in and still snowing big flakes at lunch time. Stopped snowing early afternoon, estimate about 2″ new snow before melting some, clouds lifting above Golden Gate. Mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, warmer, windy and spitting rain drops and snowflakes for about half an hour. At 635pm blizzard – limited visibility, socked in down to the floor, gusty and snowing hard – lasted about half an hour then slacking off and clouds lifting, estimate 1/2″ new snow. Partly clear after sunset and cold brisk breezes. High clouds before midnight, fuzzy full moon.

Sunday (Apr 17) overnight low of 21 degrees. Yesterday’s snow total estimated 2 1/2″ as most of it melted (SWE=0.17″) and 5″ on the ground. It was 27 degrees at 930am, mostly cloudy and light breeze. Flickers calling, jays, juncos, nuthatches, pine squirrel and hairy woodpecker visiting. Partly clear after lunch time. Mostly cloudy mid-afternoon and chilly breezes, high of 45 degrees. Still above freezing right after sunset and high thin overcast.
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RIP:

Brian James Imel
December 2, 1958 – April 5, 2022

Brian James Imel, born December 2nd, 1958 in Prineville, OR to David Imel and Patricia Kent. He grew up in Boise, ID attending primary and middle school there. Brian was an adventurer who spent his summers in Central Idaho, primarily Yellow Pine, exploring every backroad, mine, mountaintop lake he could find (typically on a motorcycle behind his big brother).
Brian attended High school at Burns Union High School in Burns, OR. He was an accomplished football player and wrestler. Brian was a state runner up at the 1977 OSAA State Championships and a member of the 1977 OSAA State Championship Burns Union High Wrestling team. It was while attending Burns High School that he met the love of his life Tess Pepperling. On November 26, 1977 Brian and Tess were married in Hines, OR.
Brian and Tess moved to Boise, ID to attend College at Boise State University. Brian was an avid outdoorsman and now had a blossoming family to include on his adventures. He loved to take his family on adventures in the Idaho wilderness and had an unmatched zest for life. He was a vehement supporter of his children’s athletics, often playing the role of chauffer, coach, parent and mentor to other athletes all while working and attending Boise State University. Brian was a self-taught carpenter who started with residential construction and eventually started his own custom cabinetry business: Division 06 Cabinets. Brian became a master carpenter and worked to restore several old buildings in Downtown Boise.
Brian graduated from Boise State University in 1996 with a Bachelor of Science in Organic Chemistry and a Bachelor of Science with emphasis in Secondary Education. Brian’s opportunities as an Organic Chemist were abundant, however the beach was calling. Brian and Tess had always dreamed of living on the Oregon coast. They both accepted jobs in Eugene, OR and found a home on the beach in Florence, OR. Every day they commuted to work together, ate lunch together and enjoyed their beach home together. They were inseparable. Brian was an accomplished Chemist with Molecular Probes for 20 years. Upon retirement Brian and Tess took up their hand at farming and purchased the Imel estate in Scio, OR. Brian spent this time with his family working in his shop, gardening and running cattle. Brian passed away on April 5th, 2022 at the age of 63.
Brian was a man of great intelligence, compassion, and strength. He was a story teller and renaissance man. Brian was always ready for adventure, to jump in on a project or lend a hand to a friend in need. He was quick to make light of a bad situation and was the most loyal brother, son, husband, father and grandfather. Nothing mattered more to him than his family and we knew it because he showed us every day. He was known to break out in song and have a good laugh. The greatest father these authors could have imagined; he was our advisor, our inspiration, our hero and our rock. While the impact of his loss feels like an unfillable void, he inspired us to live life to its fullest, to work hard, take care of our families, and love each other unconditionally.
Brian was preceded in death by his Mother and Father. Brian is survived by his loving, dutiful wife Tess, his children and their spouses Andrew & Jodi Imel of Boise Idaho, Seth & Kari Bostick of Sandy Utah, Ryan & Keri Imel of Scio, OR. Ten grandchildren, that he mentored, encouraged and adored. They are: Ryan, Shealynn, Emma, Andrew, Olivia, Aaron, Abram, Brian (whom is his namesake), Amilia and Peter. Great grandchild: Holland. Brother Keith Imel of Juneau, AK, Sister Sally Imel of Vale, OR. Rest in peace Dad, you live in all of us. Your words, your wisdom, your love flows through all of us, now and forever.

Published: Idaho Statesman
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Violet L. Earl

Violet L. Earl, 84, of Emmett [and Yellow Pine], died Friday, April 15, 2022.

Funeral Home: Potter Funeral Chapel
Published in Idaho Press Tribune April 17, 2022
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Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 33 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

April 15, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 33 new COVID-19 cases and 2 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 445,040.

The state said 29 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 16,996, and 0 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,918.

2 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,913.

full story: [Valley County 2,606 cases, 16 deaths.]
— — — —

Latest hospital numbers as of 4/6 (Wednesday):

45 hospitalized with COVID-19
9 in ICU


source: KTVB April 13, 2022
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New Valley County COVID-19 cases stay at one for week

By Tom Grote The Star-News April 14, 2022

For the second week in a row, just one new case of COVID-19 was reported in Valley County last week by the county’s two hospitals.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 2,683 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started two years ago.

Thirteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health.

Cascade Medical Center no longer offers the Pfizer vaccine, CEO Tom Reinhardt said.

“Pfizer requires us to purchase in large quantities and most just goes to waste,” Reinhardt said. “So until further notice, we’ll only carry the Moderna vaccine, which we can buy in smaller volumes.”

Those wishing to be given the Pfizer vaccine should contact St. Luke’s McCall or a local pharmacy, he said.

Clinics and Tests

The Cascade hospital offers a second booster shot of the Moderna vaccine to those over age 50 who received their first booster shot at least four months ago.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster. Call 208-382-4285 to schedule a time.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital also provides free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine offers the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines are offered for anyone age 5 and older.

Also available are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine boosters for ages 12 to 15 and to moderately or severely immunocompromised youths age 5 to 11.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link) or call 208-381-9500.

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

full story: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — — — — — — —

Forums planned on proposed Cascade hospital bond election

Cascade Medical Center will hold four public forums on the May 17 vote to authorize $19 million in bonds for a new hospital north of Cascade.

The first forum is scheduled for Tuesday at 6 p.m. at American Legion Post No. 60 at 105 West Mill St. in Cascade.

A second forum will be held at 6 p.m. on Thursday, April, 28. at Donnelly Bible Church at 159 Gestrin St. in Donnelly.

The third forum is set for Thursday, May 5, at 3:30 p.m. at Cascade Schools at 209 N. School Street in Cascade.

A virtual forum is set for May 12 at 6 p.m. with details on how to participate to be announced.

The bond would fund about half of the proposed $34.2 million cost of building the new facility, which would be built on eight acres of land about a half-mile north of Cascade on the west side of Idaho 55.

The current hospital on Lake Cascade Parkway is 50 years old, too small and outdated, hospital officials have said.

The plans call for a surgery department, occupational and speech therapies, and expanded diagnostic imaging in addition to general modernization and expansion of existing services.

The hospital has 59 employees and took in patient revenue of about $5.2 million in the last budget year that ended Sept. 30.

Last year the clinic hosted 5,557 patient visits. The hospital treated 1,646 patients, mostly in the emergency room, took 1,907 diagnostic images, ran 4,335 lab tests and provided 4,063 physical therapy sessions.

source: The Star-News April 14, 2022
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Cascade fire district to ask for tax increase

November vote would provide funds for more first responders

By Max Silverson The Star-News April 14, 2022

The Cascade Rural Fire Protection District plans to ask voters in November to more than double property taxes to hire more first responders.

If approved, the levy would raise about $600,000 per year and fund three additional full-time paramedic/firefighters and three more EMT firefighters plus a deputy chief and secretary, Cascade Fire Chief Steve Hull said.

District commissioners plan to place the measure on the Nov. 8 general election ballot. The proposal would require a 66.7% majority to pass.

The levy would cost taxpayers an additional $133 per $100,000 in taxable property value per year.

continued:
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No one hurt when car plunges into North Fork S. of Cascade

The Star-News April 14, 2022

Traffic on Idaho 55 was blocked for about an hour on Sunday after a SUV drove off the road and into the North Fork of the Payette River about 20 miles south of Cascade, Idaho State Police said.

There were no injuries to the two teenage boys from Middleton who were in the car, an ISP news release said.

It appears the driver lost control in slushy conditions about noon Sunday while driving the car northbound, the ISP said.

The car went down an embankment and landed in the river’s edge in shallow water, a spokesperson for the ISP said.

Both teens were able to get themselves out of the vehicle and only suffered minor injuries, a release said.

full story:
— — — — — — — — —

Idaho City closes schools due to weather

By KIVI Staff Apr 12, 2022

Classes in Idaho City will be canceled today, April 12th.

District officials confirmed the news this morning. They say schools are taking a snow day.

For more information, visit their website here.

source: w/link
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Avimor community growing across thousands of acres in the foothills

Morgan Romero April 13, 2022 KTVB

Approved by Ada County in the early 2000s, but stunted by the great recession in ’08, the booming master-planned community of Avimor is now moving full steam ahead.

Drive north on Highway 55 and you can’t miss it. So far, almost 700 homes, as well as mixed-use buildings, are nestled in the foothills community north of eagle.

Nine hundred homes were approved in Ada County and builders recently started in Boise County.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Controlled burns to be set near Cascade this spring

Two controlled burns will be set this spring near Cascade on the Boise National Forest.

The burns are scheduled to start this month and continue through June. A total of 4,200 acres are planned for burning in 11 areas on the Boise forest.

Here are the planned burns for the Cascade area:

* French Campbell: 68 acres about 10 miles west of Cascade along West Mountain Road lasting several days.

* Willow south: 294 acres about five miles southwest of Cascade lasting several days.

Information and signs will be posted on roads that lead to burn areas and remain in place through completion of the burns.

source: The Star-News April 14, 2022
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Bureau of Land Management and Idaho Army National Guard seek public input on expanded military training area in southwest Idaho

Date: April 14, 2022
Contact: Mike Williamson mwilliamson@blm.gov 208-384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Idaho Army National Guard are seeking public comments on a proposal to expand military training onto about 20 square miles of Federal and State land located west of Mountain Home and adjacent to the existing Orchard Combat Training Center.

The Simco Training Area Environmental Assessment analyzes possible impacts from proposed heavy maneuver training between March and November, construction and maintenance of 12.7 miles of dirt roadways, infrastructure development, and engineering practice areas. The proposal does not include live fire exercises.

The purpose of the proposal is to meet Department of Defense training requirements, ensure troop combat readiness, and offset loss of areas within the Orchard Combat Training Center where training is prohibited to protect native shrublands.

The BLM Four Rivers Field Office manages portions of the proposed expanded military training area that are located within the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area. The military has been using land in this vicinity for training since the 1940s. The proposed military training activities are within acceptable levels outlined in the BLM’s Resource Management Plan for the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area.

The BLM and the Idaho Army National Guard will each issue separate decisions based on the Environmental Assessment. The BLM will issue a decision on whether to authorize rights-of-way for the proposed expanded military training area. The Idaho Army National Guard will issue a decision on whether to expand military training onto proposed Federal and State land.

The purpose of the comment period is to obtain public input on the proposal, alternative courses of action, and environmental consequences. The BLM and Idaho Army National Guard will host a virtual public meeting on Zoom to provide information about the proposal on April 21 from 4:00-6:00 p.m. Mountain Daylight Time. Those interested in participating in the virtual public meeting must pre-register at (link) (case sensitive). Detailed information about the proposal is also available on that site.

The BLM and Idaho Army National Guard will accept public comments through May 16 via the following means:
Email: BLM_ID_FourRiversOffice@blm.gov
Fax: 208-384-3326
Surface mail: BLM Four Rivers Field Office, 3948 Development Ave., Boise, ID 83705

Those who provide comments are advised that before including their personal identifying information (address, email, phone number) they should be aware that the entire comment – including their personal identifying information – may be made publicly available at any time. While those commenting can ask in their comments to withhold this information from public review, the BLM cannot guarantee that they will be able to do so.

For more information, contact the BLM Four Rivers Field Office at 208-384-3300.
— — — — — — — — — —

Bureau of Land Management to deliver fire engine to local fire district

Date: April 15, 2022
Contact: Jared Jablonski jjablonski@blm.gov (208) 384-3210

Boise, Idaho — The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Boise District will transfer a surplus wildland fire engine to the New Plymouth Fire Protection District at 11:00 am on April 19. The media is invited to attend the engine transfer and meet with firefighting representatives from both the BLM and the Fire Protection District. Attendees will need to arrive by 10:45 a.m. to the Boise Interagency Dispatch Center, located at 3948 Development Avenue, Boise, Idaho, 83705.

The BLM is transferring the engine to the Fire Protection District at no cost through the Rural Fire Readiness Program, which is designed to enhance the capability of local fire districts, volunteer fire departments, and rangeland fire protection associations to respond to wildland fires safely and effectively. The BLM works hand in hand with these cooperators, as well as other federal and state agencies, to respond to wildfires on land under each other’s protection. These partnerships have always been important and are becoming more so as wildfire seasons become longer and large, severe wildfires become more frequent.

Please contact Jared Jablonski at (208) 384-3210 or email jjablonski@blm.gov for more information.
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Critter News:

Garden Valley and Cascade Veterinary Clinic

The phones in Garden Valley are working after almost 5 weeks. We apologize for all the inconveniences after the water damage in Garden Valley. We are doing our best to take care of everyone. Thank you for all your patience and understanding.

via FB April 15, 2022
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Bird flu confirmed in Idaho chicken flocks

Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza is highly contagious and often fatal to birds, although human infections are uncommon.

KTVB Staff April 15, 2022

The Idaho State Department of Agriculture confirmed Friday that multiple cases of avian flu have been found in two separate flocks of domestic Idaho chickens.

One of the chicken flocks is in Gooding County, and the other is in Caribou County, officials said. The groups of birds do not appear to have any overlap or connection.

Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza – more commonly known as bird flu or avian flu – is highly contagious and often fatal to birds.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Fish and Game puts down five wild elk at farm

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, April 12th 2022

Idaho Fish and Game put down five wild elk at a Garden Valley farm on April 12.

The elk had wandered into the facility through an open gate in early March. The owner held the elk there and notified the State Department of Agriculture.

IDFG visited and consulted with the state. “Out of an abundance of caution regarding the potential risk of transmitting disease to wild elk herds, Fish and Game determined the most appropriate course of action was to dispatch the wild elk in the pen rather than release them,” IDFG says.

IDFG says the elk will be tested for chronic wasting disease, and if their meat is safe, it will be donated to a local food bank.

source:
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Stray moose tries to crash egg hunt in Rexburg

April 16, 2022 Local News 8


Loose Moose no more

Idaho Fish and Game officials say they captured and transported a female cow moose Saturday morning.

She was spotted in Porter Park in Rexburg around 9, just before an Easter Egg hunt was scheduled to begin. We are told local Law enforcement helped escort the big lady away without further incident or injury.

Within hours the Department posted on its Facebook page that “She is currently headed to a much more suitable habitat far away from town.”

source:
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Fish and Game News:

Grizzly bear confirmed to have killed additional livestock near Naples in North Idaho on April 8

By T.J. Ross, Regional Communications Manager
Friday, April 8, 2022

Idaho Fish and Game staff have confirmed that a grizzly bear has killed two additional sheep and a goat on private land near Naples on April 8

continued:
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Annual F&G fur auction will be online again in 2022

By Brian Pearson, Regional Communications Manager
Monday, April 11, 2022

For the second straight year, Idaho Fish and Game’s annual fur auction will be held entirely online in 2022.

This year’s auction of furs, hides, antlers, and other items will be run through Prime Time Auctions (www.primetimeauctions.com). The online auction kicks off on April 18, and ends on April 25. While this unfortunately means potential buyers will not get to inspect items in person, they will be able to see photos of them on the Prime Time Auctions website.

Potential buyers will need provide a credit or debit card to register for the online auction, but have other options to pay for items they purchase. Here is more information.

continued:
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Salmon River Smolt Trap

By Scott Putnam, Fisheries Regional Biologist
Thursday, April 14, 2022

Story and Video by Devan Reid, Sr. Fisheries Technician

Located at Twin Bridges, near White Bird, Idaho, is the Smolt Monitoring Project’s Salmon River fish trap. The incline plane scoop trap is designed to catch smolting salmon and steelhead trout on their way to the Pacific Ocean. The fish are directed into the trap by river flow, guided up an incline belt, and forced across a perforation plate into the livewell. Fish are then netted and anesthetized in preparation for tagging.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Oregon Zoo

Tiny Dwarf Mongooses Open Eggs Filled With Treats


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Seasonal Humor:

Choceasterbunnies-a

SpringError2022

FebSnowDelivery-a
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Apr 10, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

Apr 10, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: several subscribers have written to say they are not getting the Yellow Pine Times email. Please check your spam folder. I cannot fix it from this end.

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
Oct 27, 2021 – Transfer Station on Winter Schedule
Nov 1, 2021 – Winter Mail Delivery Starts
2022
Apr 17 – Easter Potluck 2pm at The Corner
Mar-May – Spring Rx burns
May 28 – Memorial Potluck 2pm at Community Hall
Jul 2 – 4th of July golf tournament
Jul 3 – YPWUA Shareholders Meeting
(details below)
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Local Events:

Friday Night at The Corner

This week’s Friday special will be beef bulgogi rice bowl with pickled cucumber salad, kimchi and a sweet and sour eggplant.
As we start to get busy with the coming of summer, we will only be cooking a certain amount of specials, so if you know you will be here and would like to reserve a dinner please let us know to ensure you don’t miss out.
Hope to see you here!
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Easter Sunday Potluck April 17th at 2pm

Please join us for Easter Potluck at the Corner. Fried Chicken provided. Please bring your favorite Easter side dish if you would like.
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Memorial Potluck Saturday May 28th at 2pm

Memorial Potluck at the Community Hall. Burgers and Brats provided. Please bring a side dish if you would like.

Stay tuned for more details…


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Krassel RD Prescribed Burns Spring 2022

The Krassel Ranger District plans to apply fire to approximately 2,500 acres within the Bald Hill project area (east of Yellow Pine); 2,000 acres in the Four Mile project area along the South Fork of the Salmon River near the Miners peak trail, and 70 acres around Krassel Work Center.
Ignitions may occur over 2-7 days in the months of March through May Flame, smoke and hazards may be present in the area until significant precipitation or season ending weather is received. If you have any questions or comments please contact Dave Hogen Krassel District Ranger at 208-634-0600

(Same map from last fall.)
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Golf Tournament July 2nd

The annual 4th of July golf tournament will be on Saturday, July 2nd at 10(ish). All proceeds will be used to improve the golf course (improving the greens, signs and tees. More information to follow. Contact Joel or Marj Fields with questions, sponsorships or donations at fieldsmarjie @ yahoo.com
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YPWUA Shareholders Meeting July 3rd

The yearly shareholders meeting will be Sunday July 3rd at 10am. There will be two positions up for elections.

There has been some question on who can vote and can run for office. You must be a shareholder with the Yellow Pine Water Users Association to be able to vote and run for office. If you have any questions about being a shareholder, please contact me.

Thank you – Steve Holloway
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Village News:

Yellow Pine Volunteer Fire Department Trainings brings big crowd.

On Thursday April 7, 2022 the Yellow Pine Fire Department held training at the McIntosh property. Bill McIntosh had a big bonfire and over 25 people showed up. Fire Chief Rogers and Clint Limbaugh brought up the yellow fire truck and FastEddie and did a 2-hour training on both vehicles. Clint did a great job with hands on training about the hoses, laying them out, spraying the fire, and rolling them up the proper way, and about how the pump works. A bonfire and good food became a great reason for neighbors to get together and have a little fun in the backcountry.

Bill McIntosh, Fire Commissioner #3, Chairman
“Working together to protect our Village”

20220407FireTraining-aphoto courtesy YPFD
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Watkin’s Pharmacy update

March 24, 2022: Watkins Pharmacy has not yet finalized plans to open in a new, temporary location and a date for when a new location would open was not set, pharmacy owner Amber Watkins said.
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Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at wicap.org.
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Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
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Arnold Aviation News:

Customers New Deadline – Please email your shopping list by Sunday evening so they are ready to print early Monday morning.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
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Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Valley County Road & Bridge Announcements
Road Break-Up Limits in Effect Until further notice, break-up limits are now in effect:
* 7 tons per axle,
* 80,000 lbs maximum

Hwy 55 summer road construction starts March 14, 2022
link:

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Closed to full sized vehicles at the junction with Profile Creek
from Perpetua “As Spring has arrived, snow and ice on the Stibnite road are beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Perpetua Resources crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Perpetua Resources crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
“We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road starting week of March 21st. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.” – Sam

Upper Johnson Creek road at Landmark, Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Elk Summit, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are closed to wheeled vehicles. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
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Critters

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be Elk Aware

Elk are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard. F&G confirms there is a pack of 6 wolves in our valley.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

Bears will be coming out of hibernation soon and hungry.

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat had been hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started November 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report March 15th: Road from YP to the dump is very slushy. The bins are still fairly empty.

Road last plowed March 31st.

Bins dumped March 5th. Please flatten your empty boxes!

Dump update October 27th: We are now in winter mode. When it gets fairly full we will call to have it dumped. Contact Cecil.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

Water Use

Date Flow Used Hours gph gpm dow more less
04/01/22 22521406 24964 24 1040 17 F 2288
04/02/22 22545921 24515 24 1021 17 S 449
04/03/22 22571848 25927 24 1080 18 S 1412
04/04/22 22596418 24570 24 1024 17 M 1357
04/05/22 22621402 24984 24 1041 17 T 414
04/06/22 22646414 25012 24 1042 17 W 28
04/07/22 22671826 25412 24 1059 18 T 400
04/08/22 22699624 27798 24 1158 19 F 2386
04/09/22 22726981 27357 24 1140 19 S 441
04/10/22 22754548 27567 24 1149 19 S 210

Water update March 13th

Last Wednesday a few residents in Yellow Pine were experiencing low water pressure. A leak was confirmed that day we had a problem. Yesterday that leak was found and contained.

We want to thank everyone involved including those out looking for leak to the ones actually capping it.

Thanks to the community volunteers for keeping our water system flowing.

Steve Holloway

Water update March 8th

Hello Yellow Piners,

As required by DEQ until the water demand issue is resolved, the monthly Boil Water Notification is attached for distribution [See below]. Notification should be posted at public places, distributed via email, included in the Yellow Pine Times and social media posts, and sent to residents by any other means appropriate.

Best Regards,
Warren

Water Update Feb 26th

Hello Yellow Piners,

On Tuesday the 22nd of February I traveled to Yellow Pine, completed regular system checks, collected monthly and annual compliance samples, and cleaned Filter #1 to restore adequate flow.

Mike Amos again assisted by shuttling his 4-wheeler up to McIntosh’s place ahead of my arrival which made it easier to get pumps, hoses and equipment up to the plant. Winter water plant access needs to be improved and should be planned for going into next winter. Vehicle access to at least the filtration plant should be part of the plan.

Nicki’s reliable and consistent daily recording of data indicates that even after the recent leak repair completed in town, system demand exceeds 40K gallons per day which continues to exceed system capacity and therefore necessitates the continuation of the Boil Order.

Just for information’s sake, the filters have the following capacity. Please keep in mind that the system is designed to be able to run on one filter at a time while the other filter is offline for cleaning or maintenance.

Design filtration rate is .1 gpm/sq ft of filter surface area during warm weather and .05 gpm/sq ft of surface area when below 5 degrees C (41 degrees F)

Filter #1 is 215 sq ft
Warm Weather
215 x 0.1= 21.5 gpm
21.5 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 30,960 gallons per day
Cold Weather
215 x 0.05= 10.75 gpm
10.75 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 15,480 gallons per day

Filter #2 is 256 sq ft
Warm Weather
256 x 0.1= 25.6 gpm
25.6 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 36,864 gallons per day
Cold Weather
256 x 0.05= 12.8 gpm
12.8 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 18,432 gallons per day

Flow rates explained above are optimal and are only to be expected from clean filters. Flow rates diminish rapidly as the filter media becomes “plugged” with dirt and debris from Boulder Creek. High system demand equates to increased water volume through the filters which in turn causes filters to become dirty faster reducing flow accordingly.

Every time the filters are cleaned, a portion of the sand filter media is removed. Over time and after repeated cleanings, the level of sand in the filters becomes low and must be replenished. A plan for cleaning and replacement of the used sand or purchase and installation of new sand needs to be developed.

Additionally, there are a number of deferred maintenance items and miscellaneous equipment purchases that need to be considered in order to help assure continued and uninterrupted water supply to the community. A plan to address these issues needs to be developed as well.

I am available to answer questions or can attend a water board meeting to assist in discussion and planning as needed.

Best Regards,
Warren

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

DRINKING WATER WARNING March 8, 2022
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 3-8-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 at the Community Hall at 10am. Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting held July 5, 2020 at the Community Hall 2pm. link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
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VYPA News:

April 6, 2022 Village Council meeting to fill vacant chairperson position.

Village of Yellow Pine Association:
Hailey Harris, Chairman
Josh Jones, Vice Chairman
Jen Aldrich, Secretary
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Member at Large

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Ron Earl

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Meeting Minutes

Apr 3, 2022, Fire Commissioners Meeting (minutes forthcoming)
Feb 24, 2022 Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting (no minutes yet.)
Nov 23, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Nov 8, 2021 AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
Oct 31, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Oct 14, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sep 27, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sep 18, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sep 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
Jul 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Jun 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sep 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 11, 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Winter hours:
Open Wednesday 11-6
Fridays 11-9
Saturdays 9-6
Sunday’s 10-6
Closed Monday, Tuesday and Thursday
Exceptions are by appointment and we’ll be open on Mondays of Holiday weekends.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Winter Hours at the Tavern
Open Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat: 9am-2pm 4pm-8pm
Open Sunday 9am-2pm
Closed Tues & Thurs
Call the Tavern 208 633-2233 or Cell 208 739-7086 for other arrangements
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
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Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed for the winter.
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Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Availability for 2022
*Note can book Idaho Residents now for Archery or put on a waiting list for Non Residents, will find out final allocations by April 18th.
2 on 1 Archery August 29th to September 4th *Lodge hunt / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Archery September 6th to September 12th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Rifle September 24th to September 30th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Wolf.
Spring Bear Hunt June 3rd to June 9th Group of 2 to 3 hunters *Lodge Hunt / Black Bear and Wolf.
See our website for more details. Or give us a call 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 452-4361
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watikns can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

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Please help support local journalism and subscribe.
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Apr 4) 24 hour low of 27 degrees from Sunday morning. Started raining before sunrise this morning, low dark overcast and gusty. It was 35 degrees at 930am and so far 0.08″ of rain. Snow line just above us, snow on the ground at the air strip. Winter Weather advisory. Flicker, robins, finches and jays calling, male red-winged blackbird, male evening grosbeak and pine squirrel visiting. Cloudy and raining at lunch time, gusty breezes. Calmer and still raining with low overcast early afternoon. Cool, overcast and raining mid-afternoon. Gusty winds late afternoon and raining, high of 42 degrees. Low overcast, gusty and snowing after sunset (no accumulation.) Windy after dark. Snowed sometime after 1am.

Tuesday (Apr 5) overnight low of 25 degrees, yesterday’s rain and snow melted to 0.28″, there was 3/8″ new snow on the board this morning. At 930am it was 31 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy. Flicker, finches, red-winged black bird and robins calling. Jays, cassins finches, pine squirrel, rufous sided spotted towhee, nuthatches and juncos visiting. Short flurry of snow after lunch time, mostly cloudy and a bit breezy. Mostly cloudy mid-afternoon and breezy, high of 42 degrees. First reported sighting of a ground squirrel out of hibernation. Mostly clear after sunset, a hair below freezing and light breezes. Probably some haze before midnight.

Wednesday (Apr 6) overnight low of 15 degrees. This morning clear sky, 19 degrees at 930am, slight breeze and light frost. Hairy woodpecker drumming off in the distance, a couple of finches singing and jays visiting. Clear and sunny at lunch time. Mail truck was in on time, no problems reported. Flicker calling, finches, nuthatches, pine squirrel and jays visiting after it warmed up. Clear and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 52 degrees. Stars out before midnight.

Thursday (Apr 7) 24 hour low of 19 degrees from Wednesday morning. This morning it was 28 degrees at 930am, almost clear sky (a little band of haze to the east) and light frost melting in the sunshine. Old snow piles growing smaller in the shade. Robins and flicker calling. Pine squirrel, jays, nuthatches and finches visiting. Mostly high thin haze at lunch time. Warm, almost clear and a bit breezy mid-afternoon, high of 68 degrees. Sunset 739pm. Partly clear to mostly hazy after sunset and quite warm. Robins calling just before dark. Hazy sky before midnight.

Friday (Apr 8) 24 hour low of 27 degrees from Thursday morning. This morning it was 38 degrees at 930am, mostly hazy sky (milky blue) with filtered sun, rand roofs wet with either melting frost or heavy dew. Flickers calling and drumming, robins and finches chirping, jays being rowdy, 2 hairy woodpeckers chasing each other and nuthatches tapping open seeds. Mostly hazy at lunch time and light breezes. Cloudy and breezy early afternoon. Golden mantled, a colombian ground squirrel and a chipmunk showed up. Warm with gusty winds mid-afternoon and gray overcast, high of 72 degrees. Elk wandering around before sunset. Mostly cloudy, warm and light breeze before dusk. Windy and starting to snow after 930pm but didn’t last long. Broken clouds and breezy before midnight. Likely rained a bit before 330am.

Saturday (Apr 9) overnight low of 25 degrees. Reporting a trace of rain and snow based on observations, but rain gauge dry. This morning it was 34 degrees at 930am, partly cloudy, a bit breezy and old snow piles in the shade are smaller. Robins, jays, nuthatches, hairy woodpecker, pine squirrel, chipmunk and finches visiting. Mostly cloudy and a bit breezy at lunch time. Overcast and chilly gusty breezes mid-afternoon, high of 45 degrees. Raven in the neighborhood. Mostly cloudy and chilly breezes after sunset. Some stars out before midnight.

Sunday (Apr 10) overnight low of 22 degrees. Started snowing before 830am, by 930am it was 25 degrees, low overcast, breezy and ground white with snow (trace.) Woodpecker drumming in the distance, jays, finches, juncos, downy woodpecker, northern flicker, pine squirrel and nuthatches visiting. Socked in and snowing pretty good at lunch time. Stopped snowing before 1pm and melting. Snow mid-afternoon, lightly at first then “snowballs” (graupel) falling, cool and breezy, tapering off to flakes for a bit then quitting by late afternoon, high of 36 degrees. Another little snow flurry around sunset, leaving a scant trace, overcast and below freezing.
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Idaho News:

ID-55 Smiths Ferry Improvements

Full road closures on ID-55 near Smiths Ferry will begin on April 11, 2022. Drivers can expect the closures Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Outside of those hours, the road will be open to one-way alt traffic.

link: ITD
— — — —

More Highway 55 closures beginning next week

By Meredith Spelbring Apr 08, 2022 KIVI

Highway 55 near Smith’s Ferry will close down once again as Idaho Transportation Department crews continue work on the road beginning April 11.

The road will be fully closed Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. until the end of May. Highway 55 will be open outside of those hours to one-way alternating traffic with 15-minute delays.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

COVID-19 Updates: 53 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

April 8, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 53 new COVID-19 cases and 3 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 444,637.

The state said 104,208 people have received one dose of a two dose series, and 406,906 people have received an additional or booster dose. 2,330,513 total doses have been administered. 932,637 people are fully vaccinated.

The state said 24 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 16,851, and 4 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,910.

3 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,895.

full story: [Valley County 2603 cases, 16 deaths.]
— — — —

New Valley County COVID-19 cases down to one in past week

By Tom Grote The Star-News April 7, 2022

Just one new case of COVID-19 was reported in Valley County last week by the county’s two hospitals.

The one new reported case compared to the seven new cases reported the previous week and two new cases the prior week.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 2,682 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started two years ago.

Thirteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health.

Clinics & Tests

Cascade Medical Center is now offering a second booster shot of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine to those over age 50 who received their first booster shot at least four months ago.

The second boosters are available during the hospital’s vaccination clinic from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Call 208-382-4285 to schedule a time.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster.

The Pfizer vaccine for those ages 5 and older is available in Cascade on Wednesdays.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital also provides free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine offers the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines are offered for anyone age 5 and older.

Also available are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine boosters for ages 12 to 15 and to moderately or severely immunocompromised youths age 5 to 11.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link) or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

Full story: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County gets $30K grant to update road master plan

By Max Silverson The Star-News April 7, 2022

The Valley County Road and Bridge Department has received a $30,000 grant to redo the county’s outdated master plan, which was drafted in 2008.

The county uses the master plan to help decide what roads to repair and what type of work needs to be completed, Valley County Road Superintendent Jeff McFadden said.

“It is a living document that we work from,” McFadden said. “As we repave or pave roads, it changes the plan.”

Funds to update the plan came from the Local Rural Highway Investment Program, which was developed by the Idaho Transportation Board to assist small cities, counties and highway districts with improving roadways.

The plan includes an inventory of all roads and bridges in the county as well as records of previous work like new bridges and repaving projects.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County posts survey on how to spend federal funds

A survey to help Valley County commissioners decide what to do with $2.2 million in federal money from the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 has been posted on the county’s website.

The survey can be found at (link) by scrolling down to the “news” menu. The survey closes June 1.

The funds can be spent on any government purpose, commissioner Sherry Maupin said.

continued: The Star-News April 7, 2022
— — — — — — — — — —

Little appoints Allen to Valley County commission

By Max Silverson The Star-News April 7, 2022

Gov. Brad Little last week appointed Ed Allen to fill the vacant seat on the Valley County Board of County Commissioners.

Allen will serve the remainder of Dave Bingaman’s term, which expires at the end of the year.

Bingaman’s last day was Friday after he resigned to take a job in the county’s parks and recreation department.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Tamarack goes out in style with the pond skimming competition

By Steve Dent Apr 03, 2022 KIVI

Tamarack Resort will say goodbye to winter and close down the resort this weekend, but they couldn’t go out without putting on a classic ski industry tradition.

60 competitors attempted to make it across a pond and most of them made it showcasing the skill and talent of the skiers and snowboarders in the area.

Of course, there were crashes and the crowd enjoyed pelting competitors with snowballs at this wacky, but family-friendly event.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Tamarack Resort has several big changes and improvements on the horizon

By Steve Dent Apr 06, 2022 KIVI

In early March, the Boise National Forest approved Tamarack’s special use application for a possible expansion that would triple the amount of terrain for skiers and snowboarders.

Tamarack Resort has plans to build five new lifts, including a gondola that goes from the base to the summit on 2,099 acres of forest service land.

The plan would also feature a new year-round facility on top of Lone Tree Peak serviced by the gondola, expanded operations for hiking and biking, a new climbing route, a possible mountain coaster and projects that would protect the area from wildfires.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Riggins to host Salmon River Jet Boat Races April 15-17

The 38th annual Salmon River Jet Boat Races will be Friday through Sunday, April 15-17, with live and silent auctions, live music, barbecue, boat show, races and fireworks.

The event will kick off with the Live and Silent Auction at 4 p.m. on Friday at Riggins City Park, with the barbecue, live music and Show and Shine Boat Show beginning at 6 p.m.

The races will begin at 10 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday on the Main Salmon River – the River of No Return, with fireworks at dusk on Saturday at Riggins City Park.

continued: The Star-News April 7, 2022
———–

Mining News:

Perpetua Resources Launches Sustainability Roadmap

Boise, ID – Perpetua Resources Corp. (Nasdaq: PPTA / TSX: PPTA) (“Perpetua Resources” or “Perpetua” or the “Company”) launched its Sustainability Roadmap (“Roadmap”) today which outlines 13 goals to guide the Company as it advances the Stibnite Gold Project (“Project”) towards development. The Roadmap provides additional transparency and accountability measures for stakeholders, including community members and employees to track how Perpetua’s Environment, Social, and Governance (“ESG”) commitments will be integrated as the Project advances. Each goal within the Roadmap is informed by the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (“UNSDGs”) to align Perpetua’s path with global objectives to promote a more sustainable future.

“Our actions over the last decade demonstrate our deep commitment to building a company where responsible redevelopment of the historical Stibnite Mining District can bring environmental, social and economic benefits” said Laurel Sayer, President and CEO of Perpetua Resources. “Launching Perpetua’s Sustainability Roadmap provides an additional level of transparency for all of our stakeholders as we advance the Stibnite Gold Project.”

Perpetua Resources and the Stibnite Gold Project are uniquely positioned to demonstrate an industry-leading sustainability approach. The Project is designed to restore an abandoned mine area through reprocessing and safely storing millions of tons of legacy mine tailings, restoring river habitat and fish migration access, and improving wetlands. The Project can also support the clean energy transition as the only domestically mined source of the critical mineral antimony, which is an essential component in Ambri’s long-duration storage batteries. Additionally, the Perpetua team has prioritized gender diversity with over 40% female employees and over 65% female senior leadership, led by CEO Laurel Sayer.

continued:
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Fire News:

Southwest Idaho spring prescribed fire burning planned

Boise, Idaho, April 8, 2022 — Southwest Idaho interagency fire managers anticipate favorable spring weather conditions for planned low-intensity prescribed fires. Prescribed fires are designed to reduce hazardous vegetation (fuels), large wildfire potential to communities, and improve wildlife habitat.

Weather and conditions permitting, prescribed burns are scheduled to start in April and continue through June. Approximately 4,200 acres are planned for ignition in 11 project areas within the Boise National Forest.

Public and firefighter safety is always the top priority in all public land fire operations. Fire managers develop burn plans that account for safety, specific fuel and weather prescriptions and smoke management. All prescribed burns are closely evaluated and are only approved when favorable conditions are present.

Prescribed burns may affect people sensitive to smoke and may impact access to burn areas and travel routes. Fire officials strongly advise forest visitors and homeowners to prepare and plan activities around the proposed dates and locations of burns and to use extreme caution near prescribed fire areas. Please be aware of firefighters and equipment in the area and on roadways, comply with posted notices and drive slowly in areas with decreased visibility.

Information and signs will be posted on roads that access burn areas in advance of ignitions and remain in place through burn completion.

Visit the interactive map with the latest planned areas of prescribed fire treatments. (link). Zoom into your areas of interest to get the latest information. The Idaho Department of Lands and Boise, Payette, and Sawtooth National Forests’ planned prescribed fire treatments will be featured.

Planned Boise National Forest spring prescribed burns include:

Mountain Home Ranger District

* Lower Feather (752 acres): located approximately 3 miles north of Featherville, Idaho, in the Feather River and Lincoln Creek drainages north of National Forest System (NFS) road 156. This is a landscape burn that may require multiple days of hand ignition.

Idaho City Ranger District

* Alder (250 acres): located 3 miles north of Placerville, Idaho. This a landscape burn (ground fire) using hand ignition to reduce fuel in the wildland urban interface.
* Boise Basin Experimental Forest (300 acres): located 2 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho. This a landscape burn (ground fire) using hand ignition to reduce fuel in the wildland urban interface.
* Buckskin (300 acres): located approximately 3 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho.
* Little Ophir (300 acres): located 4 miles west of Pioneerville, Idaho. A landscape burn using hand ignition that will reduce fuel in the wildland urban interface area.
* Mores South-Granite Creek (250 acres): located 3 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho. This is a landscape burn (ground fire) using hand ignition to reduce fuel in the wildland urban interface.

Cascade Ranger District

* French Campbell (68 acres): located approximately 10 miles west of Cascade, Idaho, along NFS road 422 (West Mtn. Road). This is a landscape burn using hand ignition to reduce fuels accumulation within the wildland urban interface. Ignition is scheduled for multiple days.
* Willow South GNA (294 acres): located approximately 5 miles southwest of Cascade, Idaho, along NFS roads 404 & 404G. This is a under burn using hand ignition to reduce activity (logging slash) accumulations. Ignitions will take multiples days to complete and is highly visible from Cascade, Idaho.

Lowman Ranger District

* West Lowman (566 acres): located approximately 2 miles northeast of Lowman, Idaho, between Clear and Miller creek drainages.

Emmett Ranger District

* Pinney Slope Rx (960 acres): Is approximately 6 miles north of Crouch, Idaho, in the Pinney Creek drainage. NFS road 693 in Scriver Creek is south and west of the project area.
* Williams Creek Rx (130 acres): Is located west of Highway 55, between Banks and Smiths Ferry, Idaho. The project area is to the south and east of High Valley and located entirely on NFS lands in Valley County.

Venetia Gempler
Public Affairs Officer
Boise National Forest
— — — — — — — — — —

Wildfire outlook, hazard pay impact IDL firefighter recruitment

By Anna Azallion Apr 04, 2022 KIVI

The Idaho Department of Lands has already had to respond to a wildfire this year in Mid-March. The fire was in Banks, Idaho and burned 6 acres, causing concern for the future. The department sees this as a cause for concern because of how early the fire was, but also because of the way it burned.

“It’s two months ahead for a fire of that size and of that active behavior. So we are a little concerned that that might be a harbinger for things to come,” said Casper Urbanek, the Southwest Fire Warden.

This isn’t impacting how department approached seasonal wildland firefighter recruitment this year, which is wrapping up in April. There are starting to be discussions about what these changes in fire season will mean for the department, though.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Public Scoping Period Opens for the Railroad Saddle Project

Payette National Forest Request Scoping Comments

New Meadows, ID, April 8, 2022 – The Payette National Forest invites scoping comments on the Railroad Saddle Project. Comments will help inform project development during the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process and would be most helpful if received by May 9, 2022. Comments can be submitted through the project webpage at (link) by clicking on “Comment/Object on Project”.

The 25,000-acre project area is on the New Meadows Ranger District of the Payette National Forest, west and northwest of New Meadows, Idaho within Adams County. The project aims to move forest stands toward vegetative desired conditions; move subwatersheds toward desired conditions for soil, water, riparian, and aquatic resources; and provide forest products to contribute to the economic sustainability of local communities. Vegetation management, including commercial timber harvest, non-commercial thinning, and prescribed fire, road management, and culvert improvements and removal are proposed to meet project objectives.

The project is currently anticipated to complete National Environmental Policy Act review as an environmental assessment (EA), pending input from the public and resource specialists about anticipated environmental effects. As an EA, this scoping period is one of two public comment opportunities before a decision on the project would be made by the Forest Service.

Additional information on the project is available in the scoping document on the project webpage, or the project’s interactive story map at (link). For additional information, you may also contact Dana Harris, District Ranger, at 208-514-5809 or dana.harris@usda.gov; or, Rita Bennett, District Environmental Coordinator, at 208-271-6296 or rita.l.bennett@usda.gov
— — — — — — — — — —

Joe’s Creek Timber Sale

Boise National Forest April 7, 2022 (via FB)

The Joe’s Creek Timber Sale on the Emmett Ranger District of the Boise National Forest will be starting logging operations Monday, April 11, 2022.

This sale is located north of Sage Hen Reservoir near the NFS 622A and 622I roads. Visitors should be cautious when traveling forest roads in the area and expect to encounter logging traffic.

“Public safety is our first priority, and we want to inform visitors so they can plan accordingly,” said John Wallace, Emmett District Ranger. “This timber sale was designed to remove dead and dying trees that have succumbed to the recent tussock moth outbreak and to reduce hazardous fuels in the area.”

Safety signs will be in place notifying people of logging operations, log haul, and the CB channel trucks will be using. Log haul will occur Monday – Friday with one log truck load per day permitted to haul on Saturdays before noon from April 11-May 21, 2022.
— — — — — — — — — —

Bureau of Land Management seeks input on habitat improvement plan for threatened plant

Date: April 8, 2022
Contact: Mike Williamson mwilliamson@blm.gov 208-384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is seeking public comment on a proposed habitat improvement plan for the Slickspot peppergrass plant on lands within the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area located south of Boise. The BLM plans to prepare an environmental assessment to analyze implementation of site-specific projects to improve habitat for the plant and its insect pollinators.

Slickspot peppergrass (Lepidium papilliferum) is a native plant found in the low-elevation sagebrush habitat in southwestern Idaho. The plant was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 2016, due to loss and degradation of its habitat.

The BLM will accept feedback on the proposed plan through April 30, 2022.

“This scoping period will allow the public, organizations, and other interested parties to identify potential issues for the BLM to consider in the development of the environmental assessment,” said BLM’s Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area Acting Manager Charlotte Alexander. “Comments are most helpful if they provide specific actions, resources or issues that should be addressed.”

Maps and information about the project are available at: (link) (case sensitive).

Comments will be accepted through the following means:

* Email: BLM_ID_FourRiversOffice@blm.gov
* Fax: 208-384-3326
* Surface mail: Brent Ralston, Four Rivers Field Manager, 3948 Development Ave, Boise, ID 83705

Please note that before including their personal identifying information (address, email, phone number), commenters should be aware that their entire comment – including their personal identifying information – may be made publicly available at any time. While those commenting can ask in their comments to withhold this information from public review, the BLM cannot guarantee that they will be able to do so.

For more information, contact the BLM Four Rivers Field Office at 208-384-3300.

Attachment: Picture of Slickspot peppergrass (Lepidium papilliferum)

—————

Critter News:

Idaho Fish and Game: 50 reports of dead or injured deer this winter in McCall

by CBS2 News Staff Monday, April 4th 2022

Idaho Fish and Game says a deer heard in the McCall area continues to grow.

And with that, it’s receiving more and more reports of dead and injured deer (about 50 reports this past winter). So what should you do if you happen upon a dead or injured animal?

Injured or dead wildlife that are causing a hazard on a highway or other main road generally are a high priority. Fish and Game works with state or local road departments to move these off to the side of road. Fish and Game may be able to assist with dead wildlife found in yards, driveways, golf courses or parks, but often cannot get to these quickly because of other, higher priority calls.

“We recommend that people call us to report dead animals, but then remove the animals themselves,” said Regan Berkley, regional wildlife manager.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Bannock County Sheriff, Humane Society urge dog owners to remain safe on trails

April 8, 2022 Local News 8

The Bannock County Sheriff’s Office, in cooperation with the Bannock Humane Society, is reminding the public to remain vigilant as the weather warms up and more people use area trails for dog-walking.

There have been no further reports of hotdogs laced with ibuprofen on area trails in recent weeks; however, there have been reports of similar instances in Jackson Hole, Boise and Montana.

“We can’t be sure that the person or people leaving these hotdogs won’t do it again, so we’re encouraging trail users to not let their guard down this spring,” said Sgt. Jon Everson with the Bannock County Sheriff’s Office.

If a dog ingests ibuprofen, it can cause kidney failure or even death. According to the Bannock Humane Society, symptoms of ibuprofen toxicity in a dog may include not eating, vomiting, black tarry stools, abdominal pain, weakness, lethargy, increased thirst and increased urination.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Sheep scheduled to cross Highway 55 April 11

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, April 7th 2022

A flock of sheep is scheduled to cross Highway 55 on Monday from 9 to 9:30 a.m.

This crossing happens manually. The sheep will go through at the Beacon Light Road junction. They’ll then head across the Boise Foothills to graze in higher pastures.

“If you encounter the sheep while on a hike or ride on the trails, please make sure you leash your dog(s) and yield the right of way. Cyclists are asked to slow down and get off their bike when passing the flock,” Ridge to Rivers says.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Bird flu found in western Wyoming

By Conner Nuckols April 5, 2022 Local News 8

A strain of bird flu has made its way into western Wyoming.

The Wyoming Livestock Board identified a case of avian influenza in a flock of mixed non-commercial birds in Park County. Livestock board officials say all of the birds on the premises will be depopulated to prevent the spread of the disease.

Avian influenza is a highly contagious disease that can infect chickens, turkeys, and other birds; Causing severe illness and sometimes sudden death in infected birds.

Anyone in western Wyoming, eastern Idaho, or southern Montana who deals with poultry is asked to monitor the health of their birds and report any signs of the virus to their local officials.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Chicks may be cute but can spread ugly disease

April 6, 2022 KIFI

As the time of year arrives when the “cheep, cheep” sound of cute chicks becomes more common, the Wyoming Department of Health (WDH) is reminding people baby birds can sometimes carry harmful germs even though they look clean and healthy.

“There’s no denying that poultry chicks are cute and appealing. They’re soft too. That’s why many people want to photograph, touch, hold or even snuggle with them. Unfortunately, these charming chicks can also have germs on their bodies and in their droppings,” WDH surveillance epidemiologist Matthew Peterson said.

Baby poultry are recognized as a common source of Salmonella, which can cause diarrhea, fever, stomach cramps and other severe symptoms in humans. Some people have an increased risk for severe symptoms: young children, the elderly, pregnant women and people with weakened immune systems.

continued: Local News 8
———-

Fish and Game News:

2022 Big Game Seasons and Rules now available

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, April 6, 2022

Printed booklets will be available at license vendors and Fish and Game regional offices later in April

Idaho Fish and Game has updated its fall hunting season in response to two disease oubreaks and new legislation that effected some seasons and rules. You can see the 2022 Idaho Big Game Seasons and Rules online, and the printed booklets will be at license and tag vendors and Fish and Game regional offices later in April.

Here’s a cheat sheet of what’s been changed.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Grizzly bear suspected to have killed livestock in North Idaho on April 5

By T.J. Ross, Regional Communications Manager
Wednesday, April 6, 2022

Idaho Fish and Game officers suspect a grizzly bear attacked and killed a llama and a sheep on private land in the Panhandle Region on the evening of April 5

Idaho Fish and Game received information on April 6 about a llama and a sheep that had been killed overnight by a suspected grizzly bear. The incident occurred on private land near the town of Naples in Boundary County. The landowner reported seeing a reddish-brown bear the evening of the incident, but he was unable to identify whether it was a grizzly or black bear at the time of the sighting.

After arriving on the scene on April 6, Fish and Game officers and Wildlife Services staff quickly located grizzly bear tracks.


Center for Wildlife Information – Grizzly bear and black bear identification

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Dead jackrabbit found southwest of the Boise Airport confirmed to have rabbit hemorrhagic disease

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Tuesday, April 5, 2022

Disease was first detected in the same area of Southwest Idaho last year, and can infect domestic rabbits

On March 24, Idaho Fish and Game and Idaho State Department of Agriculture confirmed that a black-tailed jackrabbit tested positive for Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease (RHD), a fatal and highly contagious disease that affects animals in the rabbit family, which includes domestic and wild rabbits, hares and pikas. RHD does not infect humans or nonrabbit species.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Labs remain the favorite dog breed in the US, poodles pop in popularity

by Jennifer Peltz Associated Press Tuesday, March 15th 2022


In this March 28, 2018 file photo, Labrador retrievers Soave, 2, left, and Hola, 10-months, pose for photographs as Harbor, 8-weeks, takes a nap during a news conference at the American Kennel Club headquarters in New York. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

Labrador retrievers are still tugging hardest on U.S. dog lovers’ heartstrings, but poodles just strutted back into the American Kennel Club’s top five most popular dog breeds for the first time in nearly a quarter-century.

The club’s annual popularity rankings come out Tuesday, drawn from more than 800,000 purebred puppies and older pooches that joined the nation’s oldest canine registry last year.

With 197 recognized breeds, the list ranges from such familiar furry faces as Labs — No. 1 for an unprecedented 31 straight years — to the newly added Biewer terrier (making a strong debut at #82) and unusual pups like the hairless Xoloitzcuintli (#119).

For dog fans, there’s plenty to dig into (like a dachshund, #10) and point out (like a pointer, #120). So we’ve rounded up (like a border collie, #31) some highlights:

continued: (CBS2 Idaho)
————

Seasonal Humor:

EasterDogs-a

BirdFlu-a
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Apr 3, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

Apr 3, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
Oct 27, 2021 – Transfer Station on Winter Schedule
Nov 1, 2021 – Winter Mail Delivery Starts
Apr 3 – YPFD meeting at 2pm
Apr 5 – Forrest Gump
Apr 17 – Easter Potluck 2pm at The Corner
Mar-May – Spring Rx burns
May 28 – Memorial Potluck 2pm at Community Hall

(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Tuesday Movie Nights

Come join us for Movie Night at the Community Hall every Tuesday at 4:30 p.m. Snacks, drinks, and comfy clothes welcome.
— — — —

Easter Sunday Potluck April 17th at 2pm

Please join us for Easter Potluck at the Corner. Fried Chicken provided. Please bring your favorite Easter side dish if you would like.
— — — —

Memorial Potluck Saturday May 28th at 2pm

Memorial Potluck at the Community Hall. Burgers and Brats provided. Please bring a side dish if you would like.

Stay tuned for more details…

20220528MemorialDayPoster-a
— — — —

Krassel RD Prescribed Burns Spring 2022

The Krassel Ranger District plans to apply fire to approximately 2,500 acres within the Bald Hill project area (east of Yellow Pine); 2,000 acres in the Four Mile project area along the South Fork of the Salmon River near the Miners peak trail, and 70 acres around Krassel Work Center.
Ignitions may occur over 2-7 days in the months of March through May Flame, smoke and hazards may be present in the area until significant precipitation or season ending weather is received. If you have any questions or comments please contact Dave Hogen Krassel District Ranger at 208-634-0600

(Same map from last fall.)
———

Village News:

Saturday’s Snow

20220402YellowPineWest-acourtesy Eye-n-Sky

Snowed pretty good Saturday morning then melted.
— — — —

Watkin’s Pharmacy update

March 24, 2022: Watkins Pharmacy has not yet finalized plans to open in a new, temporary location and a date for when a new location would open was not set, pharmacy owner Amber Watkins said.
— — — —

Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at wicap.org.
— — — —

Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
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Arnold Aviation News:

Customers New Deadline – Please email your shopping list by Sunday evening so they are ready to print early Monday morning.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
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Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Hwy 55 summer road construction starts March 14, 2022
link:

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.

Upper Johnson Creek road at Landmark, Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Elk Summit, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are closed to wheeled vehicles. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
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Critters

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be Elk Aware

Elk are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard. F&G confirms there is a pack of 6 wolves in our valley.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

Bears will be coming out of hibernation soon and hungry.

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat had been hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started November 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report March 15th: Road from YP to the dump is very slushy. The bins are still fairly empty.

Road plowed March 31st.

Bins dumped March 5th. Please flatten your empty boxes!

Dump update October 27th: We are now in winter mode. When it gets fairly full we will call to have it dumped. Contact Cecil.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

Water Use

03/25/22 22269634 38254 24 1594 27 F 374
03/26/22 22303637 34003 24 1417 24 S 4251
03/27/22 22335585 31948 24 1331 22 S 2055
03/28/22 22407477 71892 24 2996 50 M 39944
03/29/22 22438270 30793 24 1283 21 T 41099
03/30/22 22469190 30920 24 1288 21 W 127
03/31/22 22496442 27252 24 1136 19 T 3668
Date Flow Used Hours gph gpm dow more less
04/01/22 22521406 24964 24 1040 17 F 2288
04/02/22 22545921 24515 24 1021 17 S 449
04/03/22 22571848 25927 24 1080 18 S 1412

Water update March 13th

Last Wednesday a few residents in Yellow Pine were experiencing low water pressure. A leak was confirmed that day we had a problem. Yesterday that leak was found and contained.

We want to thank everyone involved including those out looking for leak to the ones actually capping it.

Thanks to the community volunteers for keeping our water system flowing.

Steve Holloway

Water update March 8th

Hello Yellow Piners,

As required by DEQ until the water demand issue is resolved, the monthly Boil Water Notification is attached for distribution [See below]. Notification should be posted at public places, distributed via email, included in the Yellow Pine Times and social media posts, and sent to residents by any other means appropriate.

Best Regards,
Warren

Water Update Feb 26th

Hello Yellow Piners,

On Tuesday the 22nd of February I traveled to Yellow Pine, completed regular system checks, collected monthly and annual compliance samples, and cleaned Filter #1 to restore adequate flow.

Mike Amos again assisted by shuttling his 4-wheeler up to McIntosh’s place ahead of my arrival which made it easier to get pumps, hoses and equipment up to the plant. Winter water plant access needs to be improved and should be planned for going into next winter. Vehicle access to at least the filtration plant should be part of the plan.

Nicki’s reliable and consistent daily recording of data indicates that even after the recent leak repair completed in town, system demand exceeds 40K gallons per day which continues to exceed system capacity and therefore necessitates the continuation of the Boil Order.

Just for information’s sake, the filters have the following capacity. Please keep in mind that the system is designed to be able to run on one filter at a time while the other filter is offline for cleaning or maintenance.

Design filtration rate is .1 gpm/sq ft of filter surface area during warm weather and .05 gpm/sq ft of surface area when below 5 degrees C (41 degrees F)

Filter #1 is 215 sq ft
Warm Weather
215 x 0.1= 21.5 gpm
21.5 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 30,960 gallons per day
Cold Weather
215 x 0.05= 10.75 gpm
10.75 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 15,480 gallons per day

Filter #2 is 256 sq ft
Warm Weather
256 x 0.1= 25.6 gpm
25.6 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 36,864 gallons per day
Cold Weather
256 x 0.05= 12.8 gpm
12.8 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 18,432 gallons per day

Flow rates explained above are optimal and are only to be expected from clean filters. Flow rates diminish rapidly as the filter media becomes “plugged” with dirt and debris from Boulder Creek. High system demand equates to increased water volume through the filters which in turn causes filters to become dirty faster reducing flow accordingly.

Every time the filters are cleaned, a portion of the sand filter media is removed. Over time and after repeated cleanings, the level of sand in the filters becomes low and must be replenished. A plan for cleaning and replacement of the used sand or purchase and installation of new sand needs to be developed.

Additionally, there are a number of deferred maintenance items and miscellaneous equipment purchases that need to be considered in order to help assure continued and uninterrupted water supply to the community. A plan to address these issues needs to be developed as well.

I am available to answer questions or can attend a water board meeting to assist in discussion and planning as needed.

Best Regards,
Warren

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

DRINKING WATER WARNING March 8, 2022
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 3-8-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 at the Community Hall at 10am. Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting held July 5, 2020 at the Community Hall 2pm. link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
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VYPA News:

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Chairman – vacant
Vice Chairman – Josh Jones
Treasurer – Ronda Rogers
Secretary – Hailey Harris
Member-at-large – Rhonda Egbert

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Ron Earl

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

YPFD Meeting April 3, 2022, 2pm at Yellow Pine Community Hall, 210 Yellow Pine Ave., Yellow Pine, Idaho 83677
Agenda Item Presenter Time Comments
Call to Order Bill McIntosh
Approval of Meeting Minutes from 1/30/22
Report: Budget Ronda Rogers
Discussion: Commissioner Memorial Day Bill McIntosh
Commission conference update information Lorinne Munn Tom Lanham
Boise National Forest
Fire Chief Report Tim Rogers Ron Basabe
Discussion: safe at the firehouse Ronda Rogers
Adjournment Bill McIntosh
Public Comment: The Chairperson of the board will call for any comments from the public on any subject whether or not it is on the agenda for any items the public may wish to bring forward and discuss. Please limit the comments to two (2) minutes. The District Board does not take any action or make any decisions during public comment.
MEETING CONDUCT: Meeting attendees are expected to: Uphold the professional purposes of meetings by respecting the rights, privacy, safety, and dignity of all persons; exercise professionalism, consideration, and respect in their speech and actions; refrain from harassing speech and other harassing behavior. Failure to conduct oneself in accordance with these expectations may result in removal of the offending person or adjournment of the meeting.

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Meeting Minutes

Feb 24, 2022 Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting (no minutes yet.)
November 23, 2021 Special meeting Link:
November 8, 2021 AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
October 31, 2021 Special meeting Link:
October 14, 2021 Special meeting Link:
September 27, 2021 Special meeting Link:
September 18, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sept 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
July 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
June 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sept 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 11, 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Winter hours:
Open Wednesday 11-6
Fridays 11-9
Saturdays 9-6
Sunday’s 10-6
Closed Monday, Tuesday and Thursday
Exceptions are by appointment and we’ll be open on Mondays of Holiday weekends.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Winter Hours at the Tavern
Open Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat: 9am-2pm 4pm-8pm
Open Sunday 9am-2pm
Closed Tues & Thurs
Call the Tavern 208 633-2233 or Cell 208 739-7086 for other arrangements
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
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Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed for the winter.
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Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Availability for 2022
*Note can book Idaho Residents now for Archery or put on a waiting list for Non Residents, will find out final allocations by April 18th.
2 on 1 Archery August 29th to September 4th *Lodge hunt / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Archery September 6th to September 12th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Rifle September 24th to September 30th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Wolf.
Spring Bear Hunt June 3rd to June 9th Group of 2 to 3 hunters *Lodge Hunt / Black Bear and Wolf.
See our website for more details. Or give us a call 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 452-4361
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watikns can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
Please help support local journalism and subscribe.
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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This is Dusty White. I was a vendor for many years for the Harmonica Festival many years ago: “The Lill Red Wagon + More”. I was born and raised in Idaho and as a child spent many summers with my parents and family in and around Yellow Pine and the Stibnite areas. My grandmother lived at Roosevelt as a child. I have just published my first book of my life, “Walking With An Open Heart” (link)
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Mar 28) overnight low of 31 degrees. This morning it was 43 degrees at 1030am and light overcast. Mostly bare ground except where piled from plowing and a few inches in shaded areas. Tree swallows singing and swooping, a robin chirping, finches twittering, nuthatches tapping open seeds and jays making a racket. Gray overcast and breezy after lunch time. Raven calling. Low clouds sitting down on VanMeter and Antimony Ridge, and rain for about an hour late afternoon, variable breezes, and a high of 54 degrees. Report of a pair of quail in the neighborhood. Swallows left when it started raining. Flicker calling. Low clouds almost halfway down VanMeter at dusk, light breezes and not raining. Looked cloudy before midnight. Rain showers during the night.

Tuesday (Mar 29) overnight low of 35 degrees, 24 hour rain total = 0.13″. This morning it was 41 degrees at 1030am, broken overcast with fog belts mid-mountain and a little bit of mist. About 90% bare ground, old snow in the shade. Robins and pine squirrel calling, nuthatches, finches and jays visiting. Mostly cloudy at lunch time. Gusty winds early afternoon and mostly cloudy. Mostly (dark) clouds and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 55 degrees. Partly clear and light breeze after sunset. Robins calling at dusk. Stars out before midnight.

Wednesday (Mar 30) overnight low of 24 degrees. This morning it was 37 degrees at 1030am, mostly hazy sky, light breezes and frost melting quickly. Snow piles linger in the shade. Pine squirrel, jays and finches visiting, a couple of swallows and robins calling. Mostly high thin haze and light cool breeze at lunch time. Mail truck was on time, he had to cut 1 tree on the SF road. Gray “chunky” overcast mid-afternoon and light breeze, high of 56 degrees. Lumpy gray overcast and light breeze after sunset. Looked cloudy before midnight.

Thursday (Mar 31) overnight low of 25 degrees. This morning it was 39 degrees at 1030am, mostly cloudy and light breeze. Flicker calling and drumming and robins chirping. Jays, finches, 2 male quail and pine squirrel visiting. Mostly cloudy at lunch time and a bit breezy. Partly cloudy mid-afternoon and a bit breezy, high of 49 degrees. Mostly clear and breezy after sunset. Some clouds or haze before midnight.

Friday (Apr 1) overnight low of 19 degrees. This morning it was 25 degrees at 930am, frosty, mostly clear and cold breeze. Piles of snow remain in the shade. Flicker, robins, finches and jays calling. Mostly hazy at lunch time. Warm with mostly thin haze and filtered sunlight mid-afternoon and light breezes, high of 56 degrees. Raven calling, nuthatches and pine squirrel visiting. Mostly clear and nearly calm after sunset. Cloudy/hazy after dark.

Saturday (Apr 2) 24 hour low of 25 degrees. This morning it was 31 degrees at 930am, dark overcast, roofs damp with melted frost, dark overcast and light breeze. Old snow lingers in the shade. Raven and flicker calling, robins, nuthatches, finches, downy and hairy woodpeckers, juncos and jays visiting. Started snowing at 1015am, nearly 1/4″ by 1115am, and done by lunch time. Melted by 1pm, then another little snow flurry around 130pm. Breezy with thinner clouds early afternoon and filtered sun. Mostly cloudy mid-afternoon and breezy, high of 50 degrees. Partly cloudy after sunset and chilly light breezes. Some stars out before midnight.

Sunday (Apr 3) overnight low of 20 degrees, yesterday’s snow melted to 0.03″ of water. This morning it was 27 degrees at 930am, mostly clear sky, light breeze and frost melting. A few swallows have returned, woodpecker drumming in the distance, finches singing, robins calling, nuthatches and jays visiting. Mostly hazy and breezy after lunch time. Light gray overcast mid-afternoon and blustery, high of 57 degrees. Mostly cloudy after sunset and light breezes.
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Idaho News:

Cascade Medical Center puts $19 million bonds in May election

“Assuring access to current and added health services locally, in our hometown, is an outcome worthy of additional investment,” said Trustee Zemlicka.

KTVB Staff March 29, 2022


Credit: Cascade Medical Center

Cascade Medical Center Hospital District (CMCHD) announced it will have a $19 million general obligation bond in the May 2022 election to help fund a new medical center.

Residents in the hospital’s taxing district will be asked to consider the $19 million bond over the next 30 years.

If the full bond is used, property owners will pay $68 for each $100,00 in taxable property value. So a home assessed at $279,000 would pay $105 per year.

continued:
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COVID-19 Updates: 208 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

April 1, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 208 new COVID-19 cases and 3 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 444,210.

The age group with the most cases is 18-29 with 102,786 cases.

The state said 8 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 16,761, and 0 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,895.

3 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,876.

full story: [Valley County 2603 cases, 16 deaths.]
— — — —

Seven new Valley County COVID-19 cases reported in past week

By Tom Grote The Star-News March 31, 2022

Seven new cases of COVID-19 were reported in Valley County last week, according to the county’s two hospitals.

The seven new reported cases are higher than the two new cases reported the previous week but below the 13 new cases the prior week.

All the new cases were reported by St. Luke’s McCall. Cascade Medical Center reported no new cases for the second week in a row.

The two hospitals have reported 2,681 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started two years ago.

Thirteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health.

Clinics & Tests

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine offers the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines are offered for anyone age 5 and older.

Also available are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine boosters for ages 12 to 15 and to moderately or severely immunocompromised youths age 5 to 11.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link)  or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital also provides free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

Cascade Medical Center offers a walk-in vaccination clinic from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster.

The Pfizer vaccine for those ages 5 and older is available in Cascade on Wednesdays.

full story: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County Commissioner Newsletter

March 2022

link:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County posts survey on how to spend federal funds

The Star-News March 31, 2022

A survey to help Valley County commissioners decide what to do with $2.2 million in federal money from the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 is now up on the county’s website.

The survey can be found on the county’s website at (link) by scrolling down to the “news” menu.

The funds can be spent on any government purpose, commissioner Sherry Maupin said.

Commissioners have drafted a list of top priorities including housing, broadband internet, new facilities for the road and bridge department and recreational amenities like bathrooms and trailhead parking lot improvements.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Road Break-Up Limits in Effect

March 21, 2022

Until further notice, break-up limits are now in effect:

* 7,000 lbs per axle,
* 80,000 lbs maximum

source: Valley County
— — — — — — — — — —

The Boise County Way!

03/29/2022, 1900 hours (7pm), Dispatch received a 911 call regarding a single vehicle rollover on highway 55, just north of Banks. The vehicle was over the embankment and sideways on a small tree that was the only thing keeping the car and occupant from going in the river. Lucky for this occupant, Some employees from InterWest Final-Mile logistics were passing by in their work trucks and quickly jumped into action. The three employees hooked a tow strap to the vehicle and pulled the strap by hand to free the occupant to safety in case the tree gave way.

Boise County is a ways off the normally traveled path and a long way from quick help sometimes. In many cases we have to rely on the kindness of strangers passing by to help in emergency situations as professional/volunteer help is a long ways off.

We greatly appreciate these brave employees who risked their safety to save someone in need.

Please stop by our office or ask one of our deputies for your very well deserved Junior Deputy Stickers.

Thank you!
Boise County Sheriff’s Office (via Facebook)
— — — — — — — — — —

Flying over the backcountry snowpack, things are looking dry

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, March 29th 2022

Chief meteorologist Roland Steadham took a flight over the Idaho backcountry snowpack and found things were a lot drier than usual.

There’s usually a lot more snow than he saw while flying. That’s why our numbers are getting so low. And with the continued dry spell that we’re anticipating for the next week, we’re not going to be getting any more snow.

Areas that should have snow on the ground are bone dry.

The snowpack is at 68t percent of normal in the Boise Basin. Another area that contributes to our watershed, the Big Wood and Little Wood basins, are at 73 to 78 percent. The Payette Basin is 71 percent, while the Weiser Basin is 67 percent.

source:
— — — —

Below average snowpack will mean no high water season for kayakers and rafters

By Steve Dent Mar 31, 2022 KIVI

Banks, Idaho — The warm weather this past week melted snow, causing river levels in Idaho to rise. On any given day you can see kayakers and rafters taking on the rivers in the Payette River system.

But at the end of March the snow water equivalent for the Payette River Basin sits at 67% of normal, the Boise River Basin is at 64% while the Salmon River basin sits at 78%.

Those numbers have dropped this past week by about 10% after that warm stretch, but it has also given paddlers a chance to get on the river earlier than normal. But the whitewater won’t last this year.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Two-year anniversary: 6.5-magnitude earthquake rattled Idaho

KTVB Staff March 31, 2022

Two years ago, a 6.5 magnitude earthquake rattled Idaho.

It was the strongest earthquake in almost 40 years and the second-largest ever recorded in Idaho.

According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the epicenter was 45 miles west of Challis and about 73 miles north of Meridian.

continued: w/video
——————-

Letter to Share:

Cascade hospital bond makes sense to preserve local services

Last week, The Star-News printed a headline story about Cascade Medical Center’s proposed replacement hospital. The article explained that the hospital will be able to fund about half of the project on its own, but will need the public’s help with the other half in the form of a general obligation bond.

If passed by voters in May, this bond would result in property owners paying an additional $68 annually per each $100,000 in taxable assessed property value. While no one likes the idea of more taxes, this one makes sense.

Cascade Medical Center is a completely independent hospital governed entirely by a local and elected board. One hundred percent of the tax dollars paid to support the hospital and its new building will stay local.

CMC is dedicated to serving our local residents, and adding services to help us avoid trips to Boise. Saving just one trip to Boise per year may be all it takes to offset the added cost to us homeowners.

On a personal note, Jo Ann and I were here when our current hospital was built in 1974-75, and when the clinic was added later. We have used all the services that are offered, including General Medicine, Physical Therapy, Lab, X-ray, CT Scan, Emergency Dept., Life Flight.

We would place our medical services second to none, with a staff that is second to none. However, we have out-grown our present facility, and need to move forward to meet the needs of our growing community and area.

Bill and Jo Ann Wheeler, Cascade

source: The Star-News Thursday, March 31, 2022
————–

Scam Alert:

Skimming

from the FBI

Skimming occurs when devices illegally installed on ATMs, point-of-sale (POS) terminals, or fuel pumps capture data or record cardholders’ PINs. Criminals use the data to create fake debit or credit cards and then steal from victims’ accounts. It is estimated that skimming costs financial institutions and consumers more than $1 billion each year.

Fuel Pump Skimming

* Fuel pump skimmers are usually attached in the internal wiring of the machine and aren’t visible to the customer.

* The skimming devices store data to be downloaded or wirelessly transferred later.

continued:
— —

Texas Woman’s Video Of Busting Credit Card Skimmer Goes Viral

Mar 28, 2022

[h/t SG]
————

Fire News:

Wildfire season is almost here: How to protect your home

by Mickaela Elich Monday, March 28th 2022 CBS2

As hot temperatures and dry conditions are on their way, so are wildfires.

“We’re going to be rolling into fire season here very soon, and it’s more like these fire seasons are starting earlier and they’re going longer,” said Jerry McAdams, Boise Fire Department Wildfire mitigation specialist captain.

It’s not just overgrown forests that are affected by fires, but also your homes.

continued:
—————-

Public Lands:

Volunteers needed to plant sagebrush in fire-damaged habitat

KTVB Staff March 30, 2022

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is calling for volunteers to help restore wildlife habitat in the Magic Valley that was badly damaged in a 2020 wildfire.

The Badger Fire scorched thousands of acres south of Twin Falls in an area that is critical both as winter range for big game and habitat for sage grouse. The flames burned so hot they destroyed not only sagebrush plants, but even their seeds underneath the soil.

Fish and Game hopes to plant 15,000 sagebrush seedlings in the Antelope Valley area south of Hansen, but they need help from volunteers.

continued:
————–

Critter News:

Helping remove dead wildlife is part of living in a rural town

As the local deer herd has grown, so has the number of dead and injured deer in town. The McCall Idaho Department of Fish and Game office has received over 50 calls reporting dead or injured deer this winter.

“We are a small office, and have staff in the field during much of the winter conducting wildlife surveys,” says Regional Wildlife Manager Regan Berkley. “We prioritize calls that come in, and often do not have staff available to help remove dead wildlife.”

Injured or dead wildlife that are causing a hazard on a highway or other main road generally are a high priority. IDFG works with state or local road departments to move these off to the side of road. Poaching reports, efforts to assess injured wildlife, or accomplishing time-sensitive data collection are also high-priority tasks.

continued: (City of McCall)
— — — — — — — — — —

F&G says protect trash cans from bears waking from sleep

The Star-News March 31, 2022

Hungry bears are emerging from hibernation and are looking for trash cans to raid, the McCall office of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game said.

“Last year, our first reports of bears getting into trash cans came in on March 31,” Regional Wildlife Manager Regan Berkley said.

Bears emerge hungry in the spring, and are drawn to town by smells of food and trash, Berkley said.

“They’ll often knock over trash cans a few times, hoping to find something to eat,” she said.

continued:
—————

Fish and Game News:

Moose, bighorn sheep and mountain goat controlled hunt application period is now open

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Friday, April 1, 2022

A person is allowed to apply for one of these three species in a year, and those who apply for a moose, sheep or goat hunt are ineligible for most deer, elk and pronghorn controlled hunt drawings.

The application period for moose, bighorn sheep and mountain goat controlled hunts is now open and runs through April 30. Hunters can apply online or at any Fish and Game office, license vendor or by telephone by calling (800) 554-8685.

Hunters are reminded that Fish and Game no longer accepts mail-in applications, and that moose, bighorn sheep and mountain goat controlled hunt tags are excluded from designation by any parent or grandparent to their minor child or grandchild.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Dogs, Sleds And Snowmen


—————

Seasonal Humor:

SpringAngryBirds-a

CovidQuackCures-a

Note: see today’s history post for 1918 Patent Medicines
———–

Mar 27, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

Mar 27, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
Oct 27, 2021 – Transfer Station on Winter Schedule
Nov 1, 2021 – Winter Mail Delivery Starts
Mar 25 – SF Rx Burn
Mar 29 – City Slickers
Apr 3 – YPFD meeting at 2pm
Apr 5 – Forrest Gump
Mar-May – Spring Rx burns

(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Tuesday Movie Nights

Come join us for Movie Night at the Community Hall every Tuesday at 4:30 p.m. Snacks, drinks, and comfy clothes welcome.

March 29: City Slickers
April 5: Forrest Gump
— — — —

PNF Rx Burn March 25th South Fork Salmon River

We are planning to start burning this Friday through the weekend in the four mile project area. Ignitions will primarily take place from noon to 4pm along the Miners Peak trail. Small scale hand ignition no more than 50 acres. Aerial ignitions are planned for mid-April.
Patrick Schon – Payette Forest Fire Management Specialist
— —

Krassel RD Prescribed Burns Spring 2022

The Krassel Ranger District plans to apply fire to approximately 2,500 acres within the Bald Hill project area (east of Yellow Pine); 2,000 acres in the Four Mile project area along the South Fork of the Salmon River near the Miners peak trail, and 70 acres around Krassel Work Center.
Ignitions may occur over 2-7 days in the months of March through May Flame, smoke and hazards may be present in the area until significant precipitation or season ending weather is received. If you have any questions or comments please contact Dave Hogen Krassel District Ranger at 208-634-0600

(Same map from last fall.)
———

Village News:

March 27 Johnson Creek Airstrip Snow

20220327JohnsonCrNorth-aJohnson Creek North webcam courtesy Eye-n-Sky
— — — —

Match 23 Satellite Map

Clear sky and Idaho snow
20220623IdahoSnow-acourtesy NOAA
— — — —

Watkin’s Pharmacy update

March 24, 2022: Watkins Pharmacy has not yet finalized plans to open in a new, temporary location and a date for when a new location would open was not set, pharmacy owner Amber Watkins said.
— — — —

Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at wicap.org.
— — — —

Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
— — — —

Arnold Aviation News:

Customers New Deadline – Please email your shopping list by Sunday evening so they are ready to print early Monday morning.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
— — — —

Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Hwy 55 summer road construction starts March 14, 2022
link:

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.

Upper Johnson Creek road at Landmark, Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Elk Summit, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are closed to wheeled vehicles. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
— — — —

Critters

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be Elk Aware

Elk are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard. F&G confirms there is a pack of 6 wolves in our valley.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

Bears will be coming out of hibernation soon and hungry.

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat had been hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started November 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report March 15th: Road from YP to the dump is very slushy. The bins are still fairly empty.

Road plowed March 16th.

Bins dumped March 5th. Please flatten your empty boxes!

Dump update October 27th: We are now in winter mode. When it gets fairly full we will call to have it dumped. Contact Cecil.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

Water Use

03/17/22 21962329 38224 24 1593 27 T 701
03/18/22 22000682 38353 24 1598 27 F 129
03/19/22 22038502 37820 24 1576 26 S 533
03/20/22 22077208 38706 24 1613 27 S 886
03/21/22 22115518 38310 24 1596 27 M 396
03/22/22 22153904 38386 24 1599 27 T 76
03/23/22 22193500 39596 24 1650 28 W 1210
03/24/22 22231380 37880 24 1578 26 T 1716
03/25/22 22269634 38254 24 1594 27 F 374
03/26/22 22303637 34003 24 1417 24 S 4251
03/27/22 22335585 31948 24 1331 22 S 2055

Water update March 13th

Last Wednesday a few residents in Yellow Pine were experiencing low water pressure. A leak was confirmed that day we had a problem. Yesterday that leak was found and contained.

We want to thank everyone involved including those out looking for leak to the ones actually capping it.

Thanks to the community volunteers for keeping our water system flowing.

Steve Holloway

Water update March 8th

Hello Yellow Piners,

As required by DEQ until the water demand issue is resolved, the monthly Boil Water Notification is attached for distribution [See below]. Notification should be posted at public places, distributed via email, included in the Yellow Pine Times and social media posts, and sent to residents by any other means appropriate.

Best Regards,
Warren

Water Update Feb 26th

Hello Yellow Piners,

On Tuesday the 22nd of February I traveled to Yellow Pine, completed regular system checks, collected monthly and annual compliance samples, and cleaned Filter #1 to restore adequate flow.

Mike Amos again assisted by shuttling his 4-wheeler up to McIntosh’s place ahead of my arrival which made it easier to get pumps, hoses and equipment up to the plant. Winter water plant access needs to be improved and should be planned for going into next winter. Vehicle access to at least the filtration plant should be part of the plan.

Nicki’s reliable and consistent daily recording of data indicates that even after the recent leak repair completed in town, system demand exceeds 40K gallons per day which continues to exceed system capacity and therefore necessitates the continuation of the Boil Order.

Just for information’s sake, the filters have the following capacity. Please keep in mind that the system is designed to be able to run on one filter at a time while the other filter is offline for cleaning or maintenance.

Design filtration rate is .1 gpm/sq ft of filter surface area during warm weather and .05 gpm/sq ft of surface area when below 5 degrees C (41 degrees F)

Filter #1 is 215 sq ft
Warm Weather
215 x 0.1= 21.5 gpm
21.5 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 30,960 gallons per day
Cold Weather
215 x 0.05= 10.75 gpm
10.75 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 15,480 gallons per day

Filter #2 is 256 sq ft
Warm Weather
256 x 0.1= 25.6 gpm
25.6 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 36,864 gallons per day
Cold Weather
256 x 0.05= 12.8 gpm
12.8 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 18,432 gallons per day

Flow rates explained above are optimal and are only to be expected from clean filters. Flow rates diminish rapidly as the filter media becomes “plugged” with dirt and debris from Boulder Creek. High system demand equates to increased water volume through the filters which in turn causes filters to become dirty faster reducing flow accordingly.

Every time the filters are cleaned, a portion of the sand filter media is removed. Over time and after repeated cleanings, the level of sand in the filters becomes low and must be replenished. A plan for cleaning and replacement of the used sand or purchase and installation of new sand needs to be developed.

Additionally, there are a number of deferred maintenance items and miscellaneous equipment purchases that need to be considered in order to help assure continued and uninterrupted water supply to the community. A plan to address these issues needs to be developed as well.

I am available to answer questions or can attend a water board meeting to assist in discussion and planning as needed.

Best Regards,
Warren

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

DRINKING WATER WARNING March 8, 2022
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 3-8-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 at the Community Hall at 10am. Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting held July 5, 2020 at the Community Hall 2pm. link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
— — — —

VYPA News:

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Chairman – vacant
Vice Chairman – Josh Jones
Treasurer – Ronda Rogers
Secretary – Hailey Harris
Member-at-large – Rhonda Egbert

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Ron Earl

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
— — — —

YPFD News:

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Apr 3 – YPFD meeting at 2pm

Meeting Minutes

Feb 24, 2022 Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting (no minutes yet.)
November 23, 2021 Special meeting Link:
November 8, 2021 AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
October 31, 2021 Special meeting Link:
October 14, 2021 Special meeting Link:
September 27, 2021 Special meeting Link:
September 18, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sept 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
July 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
June 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sept 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 11, 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Winter hours:
Open Wednesday 11-6
Fridays 11-9
Saturdays 9-6
Sunday’s 10-6
Closed Monday, Tuesday and Thursday
Exceptions are by appointment and we’ll be open on Mondays of Holiday weekends.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Winter Hours at the Tavern
Open Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat: 9am-2pm 4pm-8pm
Open Sunday 9am-2pm
Closed Tues & Thurs
Call the Tavern 208 633-2233 or Cell 208 739-7086 for other arrangements
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed for the winter.
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Availability for 2022
*Note can book Idaho Residents now for Archery or put on a waiting list for Non Residents, will find out final allocations by April 18th.
2 on 1 Archery August 29th to September 4th *Lodge hunt / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Archery September 6th to September 12th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Rifle September 24th to September 30th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Wolf.
Spring Bear Hunt June 3rd to June 9th Group of 2 to 3 hunters *Lodge Hunt / Black Bear and Wolf.
See our website for more details. Or give us a call 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 452-4361
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watikns can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
Please help support local journalism and subscribe.
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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This is Dusty White. I was a vendor for many years for the Harmonica Festival many years ago: “The Lill Red Wagon + More”. I was born and raised in Idaho and as a child spent many summers with my parents and family in and around Yellow Pine and the Stibnite areas. My grandmother lived at Roosevelt as a child. I have just published my first book of my life, “Walking With An Open Heart” (link)
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Mar 21) overnight low of 19 degrees. This morning it was 27 degrees by 1030am, high thin hazy overcast with filtered sun and light breeze. More open ground under trees and near buildings, but on the flat the undisturbed snow ranges 8-11″ deep. Several jays, nuthatches, a hairy woodpecker and the local pine squirrel visiting. Thin overcast and breezy at lunch time. Partly sunny mid-afternoon, warmer and breezy. Local streets have more bare (muddy) patches, high of 47 degrees. Mostly cloudy and calm at dusk and nearly 10 degrees above freezing. Looked cloudy before midnight.

Tuesday (Mar 22) 24 hour low of 27 degrees from Monday morning. This morning gray overcast, light breeze and 38 degrees at 1030am. More open ground but 6-11″ snow remains down on the flat by the school. Jays, nuthatches, hairy and downy woodpeckers visiting. Partly clear and breezy at lunch time. Warm, partly clear to mostly cloudy and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 57 degrees. The warm breezes melted quite a bit of snow this afternoon. First robin calling after sunset. Warm, partly cloudy and calm at dusk. Some stars out before midnight.

Wednesday (Mar 23) overnight low of 25 degrees. This morning it was 37 degrees at 1030am, clear very blue sky and frost melting. Measured 5-9″ snow, about 25% bare ground. Jays and robin calling. Clear, strong sunshine and warm at lunch time. Mail truck was a tad early. Very warm and mostly hazy mid-afternoon with a slight breeze, high of 66 degrees. Two intersecting contrails made an “X” over Golden Gate peak. Flock of Cassins Finches showed up late afternoon. A lot more snow has melted today. A bit hazy at dusk and warm. Some haze before midnight.

Thursday (Mar 24) overnight low of 27 degrees. This morning it was 40 degrees at 1030am with mostly clear sky. About 50% of the ground is bare down here on the flat, remaining snow between 4-8″ deep, South facing hills are getting bare. Jays, finches, nuthatches and pine squirrel visiting, also a flicker calling. A few clouds at lunch time and warm. Mostly clear mid-afternoon, light breeze and quite warm for this time of year, high of 63 degrees. Lots of snow melting today. Mostly cloudy at dusk, calmer and warm. About a dozen elk wandering through the neighborhood. Some stars out before midnight.

Friday (Mar 25) overnight low of 28 degrees. This morning it was 39 degrees at 1030am with an overcast sky. About 60% bare ground, snow is still over 6″ deep in the shade. Finches, jays, hairy woodpecker and nuthatches visiting. Overcast at lunch time. Very warm and overcast mid-afternoon, light breezes, high of 65 degrees. Warm and mostly hazy at dusk, light breezes. Robins calling. Looked hazy/cloudy after midnight.

Saturday (Mar 26) overnight low of 29 degrees. This morning it was 44 degrees at 1030am with mostly high thin haze and filtered sunshine. About 75% bare ground now. Robins and pine squirrel calling, jays, cassins finches, red-breasted nuthatches and downy woodpecker visiting. Hazy overcast and a bit breezy after lunch time. Warm and a bit breezy mid-afternoon, light gray overcast, high of 65 degrees. Mostly cloudy, warm and light breezes at dusk. Robins chirping. Clouds or haze before midnight.

Sunday (Mar 27) overnight low of 29 degrees. This morning it was 44 degrees at 1030am with mostly hazy sky and light breeze. About 80% bare ground, large patches of snow remain in the shade. Finches and robins calling, jays and rufous sided spotted towhee visiting. First swallows of spring! Cloudy with filtered sun at lunch time. Quite warm mid-afternoon and gray overcast, high of 67 degrees. Lots of melting. Three pine squirrels chasing each other around. Wind gusts late afternoon for a short while. At dusk it was quite warm, calm and mostly cloudy. Robins calling.
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Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 70 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

March 25, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 70 new COVID-19 cases and 3 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 443,549.

The state said 104,832 people have received one dose of a two dose series, and 402,860 people have received an additional or booster dose. 2,310,548 total doses have been administered. 929,667 people are fully vaccinated.

The state said 25 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 16,637, and 4 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,872.

3 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,867.

full story: [Valley County 2600 cases, 16 deaths.]
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Latest hospital numbers as of 3/23 (Wednesday)

93 hospitalized with COVID-19
13 in ICU

source: KTVB (more info)
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New Valley County COVID-19 cases drop to two in past week

By Tom Grote The Star-News March 24, 2022

Two new cases of COVID-19 were reported in Valley County last week, according to the county’s two hospitals.

The three new reported cases are down from the 13 new cases reported the previous week and three cases the prior week.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 2,674 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started two years ago.

Thirteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health.

Clinics & Tests

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine is now offering the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older. Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines continue to be offered for anyone age 5 and older.

Also available are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine boosters for ages 12 to 15 and to moderately or severely immunocompromised youths age 5 to 11.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link)  or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital is also providing free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

Cascade Medical Center offers a walk-in vaccination clinic from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster.

The Pfizer vaccine for those ages 5 and older is available in Cascade on Wednesdays.

full story: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (Used w/permission.)
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Watkins Pharmacy Update

Watkins Pharmacy has not yet finalized plans to open in a new, temporary location and a date for when a new location would open was not set, pharmacy owner Amber Watkins said.

source: The Star-News March 24, 2022
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Cascade hospital seeks $19 million for new building

May 17 vote would replace current 50-year-old facility

By Max Silverson The Star-News March 24, 2022

2002CMCSitePlan-aGraphic shows a preliminary design for a proposed new Cascade Medical Center that would be built about one-half mile north of Cascade on the west side of Idaho 55. Image courtesy BWBR

Cascade Medical Center will ask voters to approve up to $19 million in new property taxes to help fund the construction of a new hospital in the May 17 election.

The bond would be paid for over 30 years and cost $68 per $100,000 in assessed taxable property value per year. A two-thirds majority, or 66.7%, is required for passage.

The bond would fund about half of the expected cost of the new hospital.

The rest of the cost is expected to funded with $2 million the hospital has saved for the project as well as loans, grants and fundraising by the Cascade Medical Center Foundation, CEO Tom Reinhardt said.

“We hope not to need all $19 million and intend to actually use less,” Reinhardt said.

The district plans to build the new 32,000 square foot health-care facility on about eight acres of land about a half-mile north of Cascade on the west side of Idaho 55.

For more information, visit (link).

full story:
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Valley to ask public how to spend federal funds

$2.2 million received from 2021 stimulus bill

By Max Silverson The Star-News March 24, 2022

Valley County commissioners will ask the public what to do with $2.2 million in federal money from the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021.

Commissioners plan to conduct an online survey about how to spend the funds and hold community meetings specifically addressing the topic.

The survey is not yet available and public meetings have not yet been scheduled.

continued:
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Tamarack Resort plans expansion, revitalization

Morgan Romero March 23, 2022 KTVB

In Idaho’s west-central mountains, a resort with a checkered past is not just bouncing back – it’s on the verge of booming.

The Boise National Forest accepted Tamarack Resort’s special use application for its proposal to expand its footprint and develop the area, the first step in a long public process.

The owners are hoping to grow year-round recreation as it continues to pump millions of dollars into revitalizing and reviving the resort.

continued:
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New ownership at Brundage continues Judd DeBoer’s legacy with a new ten-year plan

By Steve Dent Mar 23, 2022 KIVI

This is part one of a two-part series on Brundage Mountain, but before we take an in-depth look at Brundage’s new ten-year plan we wanted to understand the history behind the changes on the horizon for Brundage.

Brundage opened in 1961 after Warren Brown and Norwegian ski champion Corey Engen were able to convince Jack Simplot to invest in the mountain.

After the DeBoer family, a direct descendant of Warren Brown bought out Simplot, long-time owner Judd DeBoer had a vision for the future of Brundage.

continued:
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Taking a closer look at Brundage’s 10-year development plan

By Steve Dent Mar 24, 2022 KIVI

Brundage Mountain will break ground on a new base lodge this summer kicking off its new 10-year plan.

continued:
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Gov. Brad Little signs bill into law to help rural EMS with funding

By Jake Garcia Mar 23, 2022 KIVI

Gov. Brad Little signed HB561 into law Monday, helping to free up money in the state’s Emergency Medical Services Fund III.

The existing fund only allowed for vehicle and equipment purchases, but the new law opens up what the money can be used for. This law allows funding to be used for training, licensing, communication technology, dispatch services and other costs that does not include personnel salaries.

Around 65% of EMS providers in Idaho are volunteer-based. Some of those providers are in a small taxing district they can’t get an increase in property taxes before voters, in Idaho a small portion of property taxes help fund EMS, but some of those percentages have not changed in decades. This law allows for those districts to have access to state funds to help.

Idaho Law does not guarantee Emergency Medical Services as it is not an Essential Government Service. Only eleven states have laws that deem EMS as “essential. ”

full story:
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Census Data: Idaho is 6th youngest state

March 23, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho remains one of the youngest states in the nation while the state’s population growth and home pricing increases top national rates, according to the recently released results from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2016-2020 American Community Survey.

The release includes new tables on the civilian-employed population (age 16 and older), along with data on computer and internet use.

Some of the statistically significant changes for Idaho include:

continued:
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Fire News:

PNF Rx Burn March 25th South Fork Salmon River

We are planning to start burning this Friday through the weekend in the four mile project area. Ignitions will primarily take place from noon to 4pm along the Miners Peak trail. Small scale hand ignition no more than 50 acres. Aerial ignitions are planned for mid-April.

Patrick Schon – Payette Forest Fire Management Specialist
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BLM to conduct prescribed burning along fencelines in Southwest Idaho

March 22, 2022
Jared Jablonski 208-384-3210

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management will be conducting prescribed burns throughout southwest Idaho to reduce unsafe accumulations of tumbleweeds along fencelines from late March through April, depending on weather, vegetation, and ground conditions.

Burnings will include approximately six miles of fenceline south of Boise within the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area and about 15 miles along the Owyhee Front between Marsing and Wilson Creek.

“Most of the area’s fires are human caused and begin along roadways,” said Lance Okeson, Boise District Assistant Fire Management Officer Fuels. “Burning these large volumes of tumbleweeds under controlled conditions will reduce both a hazardous fuel source and possible obstruction of the roadways themselves.”

During the prescribed burns, the public can expect to see smoke from a distance, fire vehicles on roadways, and possible short-term travel delays on secondary roads. For public and firefighter safety, traffic flaggers from the Idaho Transportation Department may be used.

For more information contact the BLM Boise District Fire Information at 208-384-3210.
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Hazard pay for Idaho wildland firefighters could help with recruiting efforts

House Bill 588 passed the house and senate. It would pay wildland firefighters 25% above their hourly wage while working at an active fire.

Andrew Baertlein March 22, 2022 KTVB

Boise, Idaho — They can’t clock a regular 9 to 5 timecard – Monday through Friday – and expect the week to be over.

Wildland firefighting isn’t like other jobs.

“I’ve put in 52-hour shifts before,” Idaho Department of Lands (IDL) Fire Management Bureau Chief Josh Harvey said. “I’m not gonna say you’re on call all the time, but when the phone rings, the expectation is you’re gonna answer it and you’re gonna respond.”

Recruiting people to answer those calls is getting harder, according to Harvey. Partly because Idaho wildland firefighters currently make $12.55 per hour.

continued:
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Volunteers plant shrubs to help rehabilitate land burned by wildfires

by Deni Hawkins Friday, March 25th 2022 CBS2


Volunteers plant native plants along a hillside near Lucky Peak where the Lucky Fire burned in 2019. This is part of a larger effort to rehabilitate lands burned by wildfires in southwest Idaho. (CBS2 Photo)

Idaho Fish and Game is working to rehabilitate land in southwest Idaho that’s been burned by wildfires in recent years, and they’re asking for volunteers to help!

One local group spent part of their weekend planting about 3,000 bitterbrush plants on and around the Lucky Fire burn scar out near Lucky Peak. That fire burned about 150 acres in brush and steep terrain back in 2019.

Idaho Fish and Game is hosting two additional planting days in April: one on April 9, and the other on April 23. IDFG will provide volunteers with any needed tools and equipment.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Clear Creek Forest Health Project: Opportunity to Comment on the EA-FONSI

March 23, 2022

The Mountain Home Ranger District of the Boise National Forest has published the Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact (EA-FONSI) for the Clear Creek Forest Health (CCFH) Project. This project meets the requirements as part of the insect and disease treatment program in accordance with Title VI, Section 602, of the Healthy Forests Restoration Act (HFRA), as amended by the Agricultural Improvement Acts of 2014 and 2018 (2014 and 2018 Farm Bills). The EA-FONSI can be found on the project webpage at (link).

We welcome your comments on the content of the EA-FONSI. We are particularly interested in comments that address one or more of the following: new information that would affect the analysis, or information or evidence of flawed or incomplete analysis. Specific comments are the most useful. Only those who submit timely and specific written comments regarding the proposed project during an instance where the responsible official seeks written comments are eligible to file an objection. HFRA EAs must provide an opportunity for public comment and this opportunity to comment satisfies this requirement. To have standing to object your written comments must be submitted to our electronic web form, post-marked by the Postal Service, or otherwise submitted (for example, by express delivery service) by 11:59 p.m. in the time zone of the receiving office on Monday, April 25, 2022.

Comments received in response to this solicitation, including names and addresses of those who comment, will be considered part of the public record for this project and will be available for public inspection. The following options are available for submitting comments.

How to Comment

Written and electronic comments concerning this project will be accepted. Comments can be submitted as follows:

Electronic Web Form:
Comments may be submitted on the project website at (link). To submit comments using the web form select “Comment/Object on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s webpage.

Mailed to:
Boise National Forest, Mountain Home RD
Attn: Brian Lawatch
3080 Industrial Way Mountain Home, ID 83647
(Specify comments are for the “Clear Creek Forest Health Project”)

Additional information about this project may be obtained from Brian Lawatch, Environmental Protection Specialist, at brian.lawatch@usda.gov, or Josh Newman at joshua.newman@usda.gov.
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Valley County applies to set aside 1,218 acres of state land

Lease would prevent development, allow recreational uses

By Drew Dodson The Star-News March 24, 2022

2022EndowmentLand-aMap shows the locations, in blue and in red, of the state endowment lands being sought by Valley County to lease for public use. Star-News illustration by Tomi Grote

An application to conserve 1,218 acres of state land on both sides of Payette Lake has been submitted to the Idaho Department of Lands by Valley County.

About 1,051 acres are along Warren Wagon Road near McCall, while 167 acres are along Eastside Drive south of Lucks Point.

If approved by the state land board, the lease would prevent development on the lands, but still allow public access for camping, hiking, berry picking and other recreational activities.

continued:
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District Rangers Named to the Council/Weiser and New Meadows Ranger Districts

McCall, Idaho, March 23, 2022 – Payette National Forest Supervisor, Linda Jackson is pleased to announce that Jeff Jones has been selected as the Council/Weiser District Ranger and Dana Harris has been selected as the New Meadows District Ranger. Jones replaced Ronda Bishop who moved to a position at Forest Supervisor’s Office as the Administrative & Planner Staff Officer. Harris replaced Erin Phelps who accepted a promotion to the Washington Office as the National Branch Chief of Fire Operations Risk Management.

“I want to thank Erin and Ronda for their dedicated service and valued work in moving the Forest forward with forest restoration,” said Linda Jackson, Forest Supervisor. “I am so pleased to announce that Jeff and Dana have joined the Forest in these key leadership roles. Both are bringing knowledge and career experiences that will play a vital role in our Forest management.”

Incoming Ranger Dana Harris (New Meadows Ranger District) was raised in Idaho and attended Idaho State University where she received a Bachelor of Arts in English Writing. She then completed coursework at Oregon State University in Forestry and Fire Management.

Dana began her federal career on the Caribou-Targhee National Forest in 2001 working in range management and fuels management. She moved into fire dispatch at East Idaho Interagency Fire Center and then served as the center manager for three years at the Texas Interagency Coordination Center. In 2019 she moved back to the Intermountain Region in Ogden, Utah as a fire management planning specialist.

“I am excited to join the Payette National Forest and be back in my home state,” said Harris. “I grew up recreating in Idaho forests – cutting firewood, camping, fishing, hiking, and picking huckleberries. I look forward to learning the landscape of the New Meadows district and supporting the forest restoration work already being implemented here as well as additional restoration work across the District.”

Incoming Ranger Jeff Jones (Council/Weiser Ranger Districts) also has a long history in Idaho, having attended elementary and Junior high in Idaho prior to his family relocating to Washington state. Jeff has been on the Payette since October of 2018 as the Timber Management Assistant/Forest Service Representative for the Council/Weiser Ranger Districts before accepting this new position as District Ranger.

He began his Forest Service career in 1987 on the Wenatchee National Forest working in Timber Management and worked on all but one National Forest in the state of Washington. While most of his career has been in timber management, he also spent ten years in Fire & Aviation management on the Colville National Forest along with supporting Recreation Management when available.

“As a teenager in Idaho, I had the opportunity to spend time in the Payette and Boise National Forests camping, motorcycling, hiking, fishing and hunting,” said Jones. “I have always wanted to return to Idaho and specifically to further my career by joining the Payette National Forest. Over the past 3 years of working here we have accomplished a great deal of forest restoration work and I look forward to continuing this effort in my new role.”

Payette National Forest
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Winter restrictions remain in effect on forest land

March 23, 2022 Local News 8


USFS

As we prepare to change out our snow boots for tennis shoes and skis to mountain bikes, the Teton Basin Ranger District wants to remind individuals to educate themselves on closures to ensure the backcountry stays open, accessible, inclusive and protected.

“Rules are in place to keep people and natural resources safe, and make sure everyone has an enjoyable experience on their public lands, including wildlife,” Teton Basin District Ranger Jay Pence said. “Please do not recreate or horn hunt on south facing slopes until after April 15. Human intrusion stresses wintering wildlife and can have negative effects on their winter survival.”

continued:
[“Know before you go” – check road conditions for the Payette and Boise NFs – many higher elevation roads still have several feet of snow.]
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Boise Co. Search and Rescue frees man stranded on snow-covered road

When visiting the mountains, “it is important to let people know where you are going,” the sheriff’s office said after the rescue of an “extremely lucky” man.

KTVB Staff March 22, 2022


Credit: Boise County Sheriff’s Office

It’s March, but Idaho’s mountain roads still have a lot of snow on them and can be hazardous, the Boise County Sheriff’s Office reminds drivers after crews rescued an “extremely lucky” man on St. Patrick’s Day.

The sheriff’s office received a 911 call at about 12:30 p.m. on March 17 from a man who had gotten stuck southwest of Boise Peak on Boise Ridge Road, which is a Forest Service road. The man said he was driving up the road when his pickup became stuck in the snow. A deputy on duty activated a call for Boise County Search and Rescue members. After loading a trailer with a UTV and rescue and medical equipment, and a briefing meeting on the situation, the deputy and BCSAR 2313 headed out toward the stranded man within an hour of getting the call.

The deputy and Search and Rescue team determined the stranded driver’s location by a cell-phone ping off a cell tower when he called 911. They drove almost 7 miles on a snow-covered road before locating the stranded man, who was not injured. The rescuers drove the man off the mountain and back to Boise on the UTV. His truck was left behind.

continued:
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BLM extends review period on proposed land purchase near Boise

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has extended the public review period on the Harris Acquisition Environmental Assessment which analyzes a proposed purchase of a 275-acre private land parcel, located 5 miles east of downtown Boise, that has been directly offered to the BLM by the owner.

The purchase would help maintain open space in the Boise Foothills, preserve intact big game winter range and enhance protection of wildlife habitat and recreation access. Purchasing funds would come from the Land and Water Conservation Fund. “Healthy public lands are important for many reasons. As places of solitude and beauty, they provide invaluable opportunities for recreation, conservation, and wildlife habitat,” said acting Boise District Manager Tanya Thrift.

This review period allows the public, agencies, and other interested parties to review the Environmental Assessment and provide comments. Comments will now be accepted through April 21 and are most helpful if they provide pertinent information about the impacts of the proposed action and alternatives.

Maps and information about the project are available at: (link) (case sensitive).

Comments will be accepted through the following means:
* Email: BLM_ID_FourRiversOffice@blm.gov
* Fax: (208) 384-3326
* Surface mail: Brent Ralston, Four Rivers Field Manager, 3948 Development Ave, Boise, ID 83705

Please note that before including their personal identifying information (address, email, phone number), commenters should be aware that their entire comment – including their personal identifying information – may be made publicly available at any time. While those commenting can ask in their comments to withhold this information from public review, the BLM cannot guarantee that they will be able to do so.

For more information, contact the BLM Four Rivers Field Office at 208-384-3300.
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Critter News:

Dog killed by wolves in eastern Oregon

KTVB Staff March 21, 2022

The Baker County Sheriff’s Office is urging residents to remain vigilant after a dog was attacked by wolves in eastern Oregon’s Halfway Valley last week.

The dog’s owner did not see the attack, officials said, but noticed something was wrong with his dog. An examination revealed multiple severe punctures and swelling on the pet’s neck.

The owner called a veterinarian, but the dog had to be put down due to the severity of the wounds.

continued:
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Fish and Game News:

As bears emerge from hibernation, people need to be ‘bear aware’

By James Brower, Regional Communications Manager
Friday, March 25, 2022

Being outdoors means you may be among bears, so be prepared and take precautions

This information is courtesy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service:

As grizzly bears begin to emerge from their dens this spring in search of food, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reminds the public to remain vigilant and encourages people to take proactive actions to avoid bear conflicts. Male grizzly bears tend to emerge from their dens in March and April, and females with cubs typically appear in April and May. Knowing how to be Bear Aware can reduce your chance of encountering a grizzly bear.

continued:
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F&G Commission approves changes to 2022 deer and elk hunting seasons

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, March 24, 2022

The season changes are in response to disease outbreaks that occurred in 2021

Idaho Fish and Game Commission modified fall deer and elk hunts during its March commission meeting in Boise in response to the detection of chronic wasting disease and an outbreak of Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease in 2021. Commissioners also mandated CWD testing for deer, elk and moose taken in Units 14 and 15.

Chronic wasting disease was detected for the first time ever in Idaho in deer and elk in Unit 14, and Fish and Game staff developed a plan to keep the percentage of animals infected with the CWD low (less than 5 percent), and slow the geographic spread of it. Fish ad Game Director Ed Schriever described changes as a “measured response” to managing CWD.

continued:
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McCall area ice conditions – final update

By Mike Thomas, Regional Fisheries Biologist
Friday, March 25, 2022

On Wednesday, March 23, I checked surface and ice conditions at Lake Cascade, Horsethief Reservoir, and Payette Lake. Unfortunately, recent warm temperatures have significantly reduced ice thickness around the edges of Cascade and Payette Lakes – making them both unsafe for ice fishing. On Lake Cascade, I visited each public access area from Blue Heron to Poison Creek and observed only a very thin layer of ice along the shoreline. On Payette Lake, I visited the Mile High Marina boat ramp area and observed similar conditions. With continuing warm weather in the forecast, it looks like ice fishing season is wrapping up in Valley County. However, Horsethief Reservoir is still accessible. I measured 8 inches of ice below 8.5 inches of white ice (compact slush) with little to no snow on the surface. This measurement was taken roughly 30 feet out from the King’s Point boat ramp.

Ice conditions and thickness can vary greatly in a given area. Drill holes and check for yourself – use caution and don’t go alone. Ice can be very thin along cracks as ice sheets expand and contract, as well as near any current from rivers or creeks entering the lake. Be careful out there and watch out for each other!

continued:

Note: North Shore Lodge reports the ice is breaking up on Warm Lake.
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F&G Commission sets Chinook season to open April 23 for the Clearwater, Snake and Salmon rivers

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Thursday, March 24, 2022


Photo by Roger Phillips/Idaho Fish and Game

Forecast for Chinook could be best return since 2015

Idaho Fish and Game Commission approved spring Chinook fishing seasons for the Snake, Clearwater and Salmon River drainages, which will open April 23.

* Fishing for Chinook will be open daily in the Lower Salmon River, Little Salmon River, Snake River in the mainstem Clearwater River, Middle Fork of the Clearwater River and South Fork of the Clearwater River.

* Fishing for Chinook will be open four days per week in the North Fork Clearwater River, Thursday through Sunday.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Lion and wolf evacuated from Ukraine with no tranquilizers or vet

Stephen McGrath and Eldar Emric (Associated Press) [KTVB] March 23, 2022


Credit: AP

Simba the lion and a wolf named Akyla have been evacuated from a zoo in war-torn Ukraine and brought to safety in Romania in what an animal rights group involved in the operation says was a four-day mission “full of dangers” further hampered by border entry bureaucracy.

The adult male lion and the gray wolf, who were fully awake during the dangerous journey due to lack of tranquilizers in Ukraine, arrived Monday at a zoo in Radauti, from a zoo in Zaporizhzhia in southeast Ukraine.

Now at a safe distance from the conflict and after spending four days in cages in the back of a van, the two animals were recovering from the journey in their new enclosure Wednesday, regaining their strength as they lounged in the shade.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

Snowflakes-s

CovidFeedStore-a
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Mar 20, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

Mar 20, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
Oct 27, 2021 – Transfer Station on Winter Schedule
Nov 1, 2021 – Winter Mail Delivery Starts
Mar 20 – Spring Equinox 933am MDT
Mar 22 – Seven Brides for Seven Brothers
Mar 29 – City Slickers
Apr 3 – YPFD meeting at 2pm
Apr 5 – Forrest Gump
Mar-May – Spring Rx burns

(details below)
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Local Events:

Tuesday Movie Nights

Come join us for Movie Night at the Community Hall every Tuesday at 4:30 p.m. Snacks, drinks, and comfy clothes welcome.

March 22: Seven Brides for Seven Brothers
March 29: City Slickers
April 5: Forrest Gump
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Krassel RD Prescribed Burns Spring 2022

The Krassel Ranger District plans to apply fire to approximately 2,500 acres within the Bald Hill project area (east of Yellow Pine); 2,000 acres in the Four Mile project area along the South Fork of the Salmon River near the Miners peak trail, and 70 acres around Krassel Work Center.
Ignitions may occur over 2-7 days in the months of March through May Flame, smoke and hazards may be present in the area until significant precipitation or season ending weather is received. If you have any questions or comments please contact Dave Hogen Krassel District Ranger at 208-634-0600

(Same map from last fall.)
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Village News:

March 17th Potluck at The Corner

St Patty day potluck at The Corner. The Corner provided the corned beef and cabbage and others brought in a potluck dish to share.
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Buckhorn Outfitters

Just a neat picture caught on one of our game cams.

20220318BuckHornEagles-acourtesy Buckhorn Outfitters
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Watkin’s Pharmacy update

As of March 16th they have not yet found a place for a temporary pharmacy.
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Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at wicap.org.
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Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
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Arnold Aviation News:

Customers New Deadline – Please email your shopping list by Sunday evening so they are ready to print early Monday morning.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
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Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Hwy 55 summer road construction starts March 14, 2022
link:

South Fork Road: As of March 15th the road maintenance reverts back to the Forest Service. Contact PNF Ben Drier 208-634-0770 cell 208-315-7584 or Will Perry 208-634-0767 cell 208-630-3954 for issues with the SF road.

Upper Johnson Creek road at Landmark, Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Elk Summit, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are closed to wheeled vehicles. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
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Critters

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be Elk Aware

Elk are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Bear Aware

Bears will be coming out of hibernation soon and hungry.

* Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
* Take down bird feeders in the spring.
* Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat had been hanging around the upper part of the village this winter. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started November 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report March 15th: Road from YP to the dump is very slushy. The bins are still fairly empty.

Road plowed March 14th.

Bins dumped March 5th. Please flatten your empty boxes!

Dump update October 27th: We are now in winter mode. When it gets fairly full we will call to have it dumped. Contact Cecil.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

Water Use

03/09/22 21511822 68525 24 2855 48 W 29243
03/10/22 21591890 80068 24 3336 56 T 11543
03/11/22 21674045 82155 24 3423 57 F 2087
03/12/22 21755277 81232 24 3385 56 S 923
03/13/22 21807935 52658 23 2289 38 S 28574
03/14/22 21826624 18689 24 779 13 M 33969
03/15/22 21886582 59958 24 2498 42 T 41269
03/16/22 21924105 37523 24 1563 26 W 22435
03/17/22 21962329 38224 24 1593 27 T 701
03/18/22 22000682 38353 24 1598 27 F 129
03/19/22 22038502 37820 24 1576 26 S 533
03/20/22 22077208 38706 24 1613 27 S 886

Water update March 13th

Last Wednesday a few residents in Yellow Pine were experiencing low water pressure. A leak was confirmed that day we had a problem. Yesterday that leak was found and contained.

We want to thank everyone involved including those out looking for leak to the ones actually capping it.

Thanks to the community volunteers for keeping our water system flowing.

Steve Holloway

Water update March 8th

Hello Yellow Piners,

As required by DEQ until the water demand issue is resolved, the monthly Boil Water Notification is attached for distribution [See below]. Notification should be posted at public places, distributed via email, included in the Yellow Pine Times and social media posts, and sent to residents by any other means appropriate.

Best Regards,
Warren

Water Update Feb 26th

Hello Yellow Piners,

On Tuesday the 22nd of February I traveled to Yellow Pine, completed regular system checks, collected monthly and annual compliance samples, and cleaned Filter #1 to restore adequate flow.

Mike Amos again assisted by shuttling his 4-wheeler up to McIntosh’s’ place ahead of my arrival which made it easier to get pumps, hoses and equipment up to the plant. Winter water plant access needs to be improved and should be planned for going into next winter. Vehicle access to at least the filtration plant should be part of the plan.

Nicki’s reliable and consistent daily recording of data indicates that even after the recent leak repair completed in town, system demand exceeds 40K gallons per day which continues to exceed system capacity and therefore necessitates the continuation of the Boil Order.

Just for information’s sake, the filters have the following capacity. Please keep in mind that the system is designed to be able to run on one filter at a time while the other filter is offline for cleaning or maintenance.

Design filtration rate is .1 gpm/sq ft of filter surface area during warm weather and .05 gpm/sq ft of surface area when below 5 degrees C (41 degrees F)

Filter #1 is 215 sq ft
Warm Weather
215 x 0.1= 21.5 gpm
21.5 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 30,960 gallons per day
Cold Weather
215 x 0.05= 10.75 gpm
10.75 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 15,480 gallons per day

Filter #2 is 256 sq ft
Warm Weather
256 x 0.1= 25.6 gpm
25.6 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 36,864 gallons per day
Cold Weather
256 x 0.05= 12.8 gpm
12.8 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 18,432 gallons per day

Flow rates explained above are optimal and are only to be expected from clean filters. Flow rates diminish rapidly as the filter media becomes “plugged” with dirt and debris from Boulder Creek. High system demand equates to increased water volume through the filters which in turn causes filters to become dirty faster reducing flow accordingly.

Every time the filters are cleaned, a portion of the sand filter media is removed. Over time and after repeated cleanings, the level of sand in the filters becomes low and must be replenished. A plan for cleaning and replacement of the used sand or purchase and installation of new sand needs to be developed.

Additionally, there are a number of deferred maintenance items and miscellaneous equipment purchases that need to be considered in order to help assure continued and uninterrupted water supply to the community. A plan to address these issues needs to be developed as well.

I am available to answer questions or can attend a water board meeting to assist in discussion and planning as needed.

Best Regards,
Warren

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

DRINKING WATER WARNING March 8, 2022
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 3-8-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 at the Community Hall at 10am. Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting held July 5, 2020 at the Community Hall 2pm. link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
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VYPA News:

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Chairman – vacant
Vice Chairman – Josh Jones
Treasurer – Ronda Rogers
Secretary – Hailey Harris
Member-at-large – Rhonda Egbert

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Ron Earl

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Notice Of Cancellation And Reschedule Of Meeting Of The YPFPD Board Of Commissioners
Yellow Pine Fire Protection District (YPFPD), Valley County, Idaho
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the meeting on 3/27/2022 of the Board of Fire Commissioners of the above named Fire District will be Canceled and be Rescheduled for the 3th day of April 2022, at 2:00 pm at Yellow Pine Community Hall, 210 Yellow Pine Ave., Yellow Pine, Idaho 83677
Dated this 6th day of March 2022
Lorinne Munn, District 1 Fire Commissioner
Tom Lanham, District 2 Fire Commissioner
Bill McIntosh, District 3 Fire Commissioner

Meeting Minutes

Feb 24, 2022 Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting (no minutes yet.)
November 23, 2021 Special meeting Link:
November 8, 2021 AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
October 31, 2021 Special meeting Link:
October 14, 2021 Special meeting Link:
September 27, 2021 Special meeting Link:
September 18, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sept 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
July 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
June 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sept 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 11, 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Winter hours:
Open Wednesday 11-6
Fridays 11-9
Saturdays 9-6
Sunday’s 10-6
Closed Monday, Tuesday and Thursday
Exceptions are by appointment and we’ll be open on Mondays of Holiday weekends.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Winter Hours at the Tavern
Open Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat: 9am-2pm 4pm-8pm
Open Sunday 9am-2pm
Closed Tues & Thurs
Call the Tavern 208 633-2233 or Cell 208 739-7086 for other arrangements
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
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Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed for the winter.
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Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Availability for 2022
*Note can book Idaho Residents now for Archery or put on a waiting list for Non Residents, will find out final allocations by April 18th.
2 on 1 Archery August 29th to September 4th *Lodge hunt / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Archery September 6th to September 12th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Black Bear, Wolf.
2 on 1 Rifle September 24th to September 30th *Fritzer Camp / Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Wolf.
Spring Bear Hunt June 3rd to June 9th Group of 2 to 3 hunters *Lodge Hunt / Black Bear and Wolf.
See our website for more details. Or give us a call 208-633-3614
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 452-4361
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watikns can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
Please help support local journalism and subscribe.
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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This is Dusty White. I was a vendor for many years for the Harmonica Festival many years ago: “The Lill Red Wagon + More”. I was born and raised in Idaho and as a child spent many summers with my parents and family in and around Yellow Pine and the Stibnite areas. My grandmother lived at Roosevelt as a child. I have just published my first book of my life, “Walking With An Open Heart” (link)
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Mar 14) overnight low of 26 degrees. Yesterday’s snow and rain showers only amounted to a trace in the gauge. This morning it was 40 degrees at 1030am, mostly cloudy and breezy, average snow depth now 16″. Blackbirds calling. Rufous sided spotted towhee, hairy woodpecker, pine squirrel, jays and juncos visiting. Gray overcast and breezy at lunch time. Gray overcast, warm and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 45 degrees. Overcast and breezy at dusk, way above freezing. Gusty breezes, broken cloud cover and filtered moonlight before midnight. Rain early morning.

Tuesday (Mar 15) overnight low of 34 degrees, rain likely started around 7am. This morning it was 35 degrees at 1030am, low overcast and steady rain. Measured 0.15″ of rain in the gauge so far and down to an average of 14″ old snow on the ground. Jays, towhee, hairy woodpecker, red-winged blackbird and pine squirrel visiting. Overcast and sprinkling at lunch time. Break in the rain early afternoon. Gusty breezes and 20-30 minute rain shower mid-afternoon, high of 44 degrees. Rain/snow mix started at dusk (not sure how long it lasted), low foggy overcast, breezy and above freezing. Low clouds and a bit foggy around 930pm. Higher overcast before midnight. Trace of snow fell early morning.

Wednesday (March 16) overnight low of 30 degrees, trace of new snow. This morning it was 33 degrees at 1030am, low overcast, light breeze and flaking snow. Rain and (melted) snow = 0.14″ and an average of 13″ on the ground. Fresh fox tracks. Jays, hairy woodpecker, red-breasted nuthatch and pine squirrel visiting. Patches of blue sky at lunch time. Mail truck was a little early. A few flakes of snow after lunch time. Low foggy clouds, breezy and snowing sideways before 130pm (lasted less than 30 minutes.) Clouds lifted and patch of blue sky over VanMeter Hill by early afternoon. Melt water is starting to soak in where the ground receives sunshine. Partly sunny, warm and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 43 degrees. Calmer and partly cloudy at dusk, fat moon rising north of GG. Looked clear before midnight, big bright moon.

Thursday (March 17) overnight low of 13 degrees. Yesterday’s breezy snowfall missed the collection gauge and melted. This morning it was 22 degrees at 1030am, clear sky, light breeze and frosty. Snow depth ranges from 11-15″ – average 13″. Downy and hairy woodpeckers, pine squirrel, nuthatch and jays visiting. Mostly sunny with a little high thin haze at lunch time. High thin overcast mid-afternoon, warm and a bit breezy, high of 49 degrees. Overcast at dusk, above freezing and calmer. Thin overcast and fuzzy moon before midnight. Tiny trace of graupel (snow balls) fell during the night.

Friday (March 18) 24 hour low of 22 degrees from Thursday morning. Tiny trace of graupel melting, this morning it was 38 degrees at 1030am and broken cloud cover. Snow depth ranges from 10-14 inches, tree wells growing larger. Mystery bird singing sweetly this morning, jays, nuthatch and hairy woodpecker visiting. Mostly cloudy at lunch time (smaller clouds.) Blustery “snow-eater” breezes, warm and mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, high of 50 degrees. High flat overcast at dusk, calmer and warm. Full “worm” moon rising in hazy sky at 1025pm. Thinner haze after midnight, bright moonlight.

Saturday (March 19) overnight low of 27 degrees. This morning clear to the north and hazy sky to the south, breezy and 41 degrees at 1030am. Snow depth on the open flat ranges from 10-13 inches. Larger open spots under the trees and near buildings, more open patches on local streets. Pine squirrel, jays, hairy woodpecker and nuthatches visiting. Mostly cloudy and breezy at lunch time. Warm and blustery mid-afternoon, light gray overcast with a big dark cloud in the middle of the sky, high of 54 degrees. Short early evening rain shower and a little mist on and off. Still above freezing at dusk, dark overcast and calm. Rain after dark, turned to snow before morning.

Sunday (March 20) overnight low of 27 degrees, rain from last evening plus trace of snow early morning = 0.12″ precipitation. This morning it was 31 degrees at 1030am, mostly cloudy and light breezes. Undisturbed snow on the flat ranges from 8-12″ deep. Pine squirrel, jays, nuthatches and hairy woodpecker visiting. Mostly cloudy and breezy at lunch time. Cool, partly sunny and lighter breezes mid-afternoon, high of 39 degrees. Mostly clear at dusk, just a hair below freezing and light cold breezes.
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Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 563 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

March 18, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 563 new COVID-19 cases and 0 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 441,938.

The state reports data for the most recent 2-week period are incomplete. Due to the recent surge in cases from Jan. 10 to Feb. 5, approximately 400 outstanding positive laboratory results are pending local public health district review and follow-up.

The state said 44 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 16,423 and 7 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,824.

0 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,834.

full story: [Valley County 2,597 cases, 16 deaths.]
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Latest hospital numbers as of 3/16 (Wednesday)

98 hospitalized with COVID-19
18 in ICU

more info: KTVB March 16, 2022
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13 new Valley County COVID-19 cases reported in week

By Tom Grote The Star-News March 17, 2022

Thirteen new cases of COVID-19 were reported in Valley County last week, according to the county’s two hospitals.

The 13 new cases reported is up from the three new cases reported the previous week and after being down from 12 cases the prior week.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 2,672 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started two years ago.

Thirteen confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health.

Clinics & Tests

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine is now offering the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older. Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines continue to be offered for anyone age 5 and older.

Also available are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine boosters for ages 12 to 15 and to moderately or severely immunocompromised youths age 5 to 11.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link) or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital is also providing free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

Cascade Medical Center offers a walk-in vaccination clinic from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster.

The Pfizer vaccine for those ages 5 and older is available in Cascade on Wednesdays.

full story: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used w/permission.)
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Idaho continues to test wastewater for COVID-19

By Nicole Camarda Mar 16, 2022 KIVI

Idaho is entering a new phase in the COVID-19 pandemic, one that looks a little more normal. Testing positivity rates are low, but public health officials say the pandemic is not over and COVID-19 is here to stay for the foreseeable future.

One way states and cities are testing for early signs of COVID-19 activity is through wastewater samples.

Two of the five regional laboratories are up and running in the state and collecting samples from communities in Idaho.

continued:
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Idaho City water back on after broken water main

by CBS2 News Staff Monday, March 14th 2022

The water is back on in Idaho City.

Earlier Monday, a broken water main has caused officials to shut off water to the entire city until it can be repaired.

It’s unclear what led to the broken line.

source:
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Idaho needs more active weather to build up snowpack

By Geneva Zoltek Mar 19, 2022 KIVI

Right on schedule as spring ski season officially starts at Bogus Basin, active weather brought 4 fresh inches of spring conditions last Tuesday.

Above 5,000 ft. the snow was lighter, but below that elevation the precipitation came down more as of rain/snow mix.

But what was this system’s ultimate impact on regional snowpack? Well it helped, but not by much.

full story:
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Mining News:

Stibnite Advisory Council 2021 Progress Report

In late 2018, eight communities from across the West Central Mountains came together to sign a Community Agreement with Perpetua Resources (then Midas Gold). A key component of the Community Agreement was the creation of the Stibnite Advisory Council. This report highlights the work of the Stibnite Advisory Council since the Community Agreement was signed.

The Stibnite Advisory Council is made up of a representative appointed annually from Adams County, Cascade, Council, Donnelly, Idaho County, New Meadows, Riggins, Yellow Pine, Perpetua Resources Idaho and Perpetua Resources Corp. The Council meets monthly and serves as the communities’ principal forum for communication regarding the Stibnite Gold Project with management of Perpetua Resources, now and throughout the life of the Project. Representatives are tasked with the responsibility of working through shared issues with Perpetua Resources, providing key information back to the communities they serve and overseeing the implementation of the Community Agreement.

continued:
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Lawsuit filed over eastern Idaho gold mine

KTVB Staff March 16, 2022

Local conservation groups filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Forest Service over the agency’s approval to expand mining in the Centennial Mountains.

Canadian mining company Excellon Resources plans to build a gold mine in a 16,700-acre area of national forest north of Kilgore.

The Idaho Conservation League and the Greater Yellowstone Coalition are opposed to the mining company’s five-year plan. They say Excellon will extract the gold with a cyanide heap leach mining technique, which could pose a risk to the nearby waterways that supply drinking water for the Eastern Snake Plain aquifer.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Payette seeks comments on 30,000 acre forest project

The Payette National Forest is seeking comments on the 30,000-acre Cold July Forest Restoration Project.

The project is located on the New Meadows Ranger District about five miles west of New Meadows. Comments are due April 23.

The project seeks to increase resistance to disease and insects as well as thin trees to reduce the threat of intense wildfires and improve forest habitat for the northern Idaho Ground squirrel and white-headed woodpecker.

Work within the project includes logging, thinning, prescribed burns and other brush reduction projects as well as tree planting.

Details of the project are available (link).

For additional information, contact Jeffery Kincaid, Acting District Ranger, at 865-924-2476 or jeffery.kincaid@usda.gov, or Rita Bennett, District Environmental Coordinator, at 208-271-6296 or rita.l.bennett@usda.gov.

source: The Star-News March 17, 2022
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Seedlings available for reforestation and habitat improvement

Boise, Idaho, March 17, 2022 — Landowners who need trees and shrubs to create windbreaks, improve wildlife habitat, and enhance forests on their property are encouraged to come to the Boise National Forest Lucky Peak Nursery’s annual surplus seedling sale.

The surplus seedling sale will begin Saturday, April 2, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Seedlings will not be available on Sunday. The seedling sale will continue through the end of April, Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., as supplies last. The price is $30.00 for 50 seedlings.

The minimum quantity that can be purchased is 50 seedlings of each species. Each customer will be able to purchase a maximum of 500 seedlings. First come-first served, no presales.

All sales Saturday, April 2, will be drive up. CASH or CHECK only.

This year’s available species are Douglas-fir, Engelmann spruce, ponderosa pine, Antelope bitterbrush and Wyoming big sagebrush. Seedlings will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. Sagebrush is highly desirable for improving big game habitat in the Foothills. In forested areas, ponderosa pine is typically found on drier sites.

The seedlings are best suited for landowners with property in rural areas. They are not intended for homeowners in urban areas to plant in their backyards. Landowners who purchase the one-year-old trees can expect the majority of them to grow and thrive if planted correctly. Written planting instructions and technical assistance will be available.

Each year, the Lucky Peak Nursery produces over three million one and two-year old trees and shrubs. These seedlings are used for public land reforestation activities in the intermountain west disturbed by wildfire, timber sales, or other events. When the Nursery has produced more seedlings than is customers need, that surplus becomes available to rural landowners for conservation plantings.

The Lucky peak Nursery is located 16 miles northeast of Boise on Highway 21. For more information about the annual seedling sale, call (208) 343-1977.
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Sawtooth National Forest receives more than $1.6 million for Badger Fire recovery

KTVB Staff March 17, 2022


Credit: Sawtooth National Forest

The Sawtooth National Forest announced Thursday it will receive $1,659,000 in disaster relief funding to support recovery from the Badger Fire.

The Badger Fire started on Sept. 12, 2020 and was declared 100% contained on Oct. 15, 2020 and out Jan. 4, 2021, according to the National Wildfire Coordinating Group (NWCG). The final acreage of the fire was 90,190.

Through the Extending Government Funding and Delivering Emergency Assistance Act of 2021, the Sawtooth Nation Forest requested the disaster relief funding for projects to restore infrastructure and for ecological recovery.

continued:
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Critter News:

Garden Valley and Cascade Veterinary Clinic.

This [last] weekend the Garden Valley Clinic had a busted water pipe inside the clinic and we have complete water damage. The Garden Valley Clinic will be closed for at least 10 days while we repair the damage. Please be patient with our staff members as we are having to reschedule everyone. Sorry for any inconvenience to our Clients.

source: Cascade Vet Clinic FB March 14, 2022
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Valley County 4-H to host livestock field day March 26

Valley County 4-H will host a Horse and Large Livestock Field Day on Saturday, March 26, from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Donnelly Elementary School.

4-H members from Valley and Adams counties can learn about the different species of large animals as well as some tips on showmanship.

Registration is required via Zsuites or by calling the Extension office at 208-382-7190.

The event will be held in the gym at Donnelly Elementary, located at 327 W. Roseberry Road.

source: The Star-News March 17, 2022
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F&G: Protect trash cans from bears waking from hibernation

Hungry bears are emerging from hibernation and are looking for trash cans to raid, the McCall office of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game said.

“Last year, our first reports of bears getting into trash cans came in on March 31,” Regional Wildlife Manager Regan Berkley said.

Bears emerge hungry in the spring, and are drawn to town by smells of food and trash, Berkley said.

“They’ll often knock over trash cans a few times, hoping to find something to eat,” she said.

McCall City Code requires that all waste be stored in a properly secured and latched bear-proof container unless personally attended.

“Many of the refuse violations we see in town can be traced back to overfilled and unlatched containers, which make an easy target for hungry animals,” City of McCall Code Enforcement Officer Krystal Giessen said.

Bears should not be rewarded for this behavior, Berkley said.

“If they find even one trash can, cooler, or freezer with food, they’re likely to stick around and keep trying,” she said.

Berkley advises the following to help prevent bear problems this spring and summer:

• Use bear resistant trash containers properly: don’t overfill them, and don’t tamper with latches.
• Keep trash cans inside a garage or shed until the morning of pick-up.
• Businesses should not prop open bin lids.
• Take down bird feeders in the spring.
• Do not store coolers, freezers or refrigerators outside where bears can reach them.

Bears that have become too accustomed to human food sources cannot responsibly be relocated, Berkley said.

The bears can become dangerous, and in some cases IDFG needs to trap and lethally remove them. For questions, call 208-634-8137.

source: The Star-News March 17, 2022
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Flock of red-winged blackbirds shot near Aberdeen

March 15, 2022 Local News 8

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is seeking information regarding the illegal killing of 17 male and four female red-winged blackbirds near Aberdeen in Power County. …

It is both against state and federal laws to kill protected non-game birds with four exceptions: European starlings, Eurasian-collared doves, house sparrows, and rock pigeons. These species are nonnative and can be taken outside city limits year-round with a hunting license. …

A reward is available for information that leads to an arrest. Callers can remain anonymous.

full story:
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Fish and Game News:

Winter survival for mule deer fawns and elk calves tracking slightly above average

By Brian Pearson, Regional Communications Manager
Monday, March 14, 2022

84 percent of fawns and 92 percent of calves with tracking collars have survived through February

Statewide winter survival for mule deer fawns and elk calves fitted with tracking collars was average to slightly above average through the end of February.

“From a statewide perspective, winter survival is tracking very close to what we saw in past two years,” said Toby Boudreau, deer and elk program coordinator for Fish and Game. “If we continue on that trajectory, that’s good news because we ended up with above-average winter survival in both 2019-20 and 2020-21. And every mild winter we can stack together is another step in the right direction for our mule deer herds.”

continued:
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F&G Commission special meeting March 23-24 in Boise

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Monday, March 14, 2022

People can address the commission on any topic pertaining to Fish and Game matters

The Commission will hold the public hearing and business meeting at the Fish and Game Headquarters Office at 600 S. Walnut St. in Boise. A public hearing will begin on March 23 at 7 p.m. MDT in the Sawtooth Room. Those wishing to speak to the Commission during the public hearing will have a three-minute time limit, with additional comments accepted in writing. People can address the commission on any topic pertaining to Fish and Game matters.

The business meeting will resume at 8 a.m. MDT March 24 at the same location. Public comments are not accepted during the business meeting, but it is open to the public, and available via Zoom.

continued:
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Lake Cascade and Payette Lake ice conditions – March 17, 2022

By Mike Thomas, Regional Fisheries Biologist
Thursday, March 17, 2022

On Thursday, March 17 we checked surface and ice conditions on Cascade and Payette Lakes. Recent warm temperatures have compacted the ice layer into a uniform layer of clear ice. We did not observe very much, if any, snow on top of the ice which can make travel (on foot and motorized) more difficult. Please be careful out there. While conditions remain safe for ice fishing at both lakes, we urge anglers to use caution if accessing Cascade Lake at Van Wyck and Payette Lake at Mile High due to deteriorating edge conditions (see pictures below). Remember, on Payette Lake we do not recommend any motorized forms of travel, as ice thickness can vary widely. If you are planning on taking a snowmobile out on Lake Cascade, we highly recommend using “scratchers” or air-cooled machines to avoid overheating.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Audubon Zoo Animals Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day


————

Seasonal Humor:

StPatrickDrivingSnakes-a
[h/t SMc]

StPaddyIrishCreamFarm-a
[h/t TM]


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Mar 13, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times

Mar 13, 2022 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17, 2020 – Boil water order in effect
Oct 27, 2021 – Transfer Station on Winter Schedule
Nov 1, 2021 – Winter Mail Delivery Starts
Mar 15 – Free Guy
Mar 17 – St. Patrick’s Day Potluck at The Corner
Mar 22 – Seven Brides for Seven Brothers
Mar 29 – City Slickers
Apr 3 – YPFD meeting at 2pm
Apr 5 – Forrest Gump
Mar-May – Spring Rx burns

(details below)
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Local Events:

Tuesday Movie Nights

Come join us for Movie Night at the Community Hall every Tuesday at 4:30 p.m. Snacks, drinks, and comfy clothes welcome.

March 15: Free Guy
March 22: Seven Brides for Seven Brothers
March 29: City Slickers
April 5: Forrest Gump
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March 13th Spring Ahead

Daylight Saving Time begins. Don’t forget to check the battery in your smoke alarms.
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March 17th Potluck at The Corner

St Patty day potluck at The Corner. We will provide the corned beef and cabbage and others can bring in a potluck dish to share. We will start around 5pm on Thursday 3/17.
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Krassel RD Prescribed Burns Spring 2022

The Krassel Ranger District plans to apply fire to approximately 2,500 acres within the Bald Hill project area (east of Yellow Pine); 2,000 acres in the Four Mile project area along the South Fork of the Salmon River near the Miners peak trail, and 70 acres around Krassel Work Center.
Ignitions may occur over 2-7 days in the months of March through May Flame, smoke and hazards may be present in the area until significant precipitation or season ending weather is received. If you have any questions or comments please contact Dave Hogen Krassel District Ranger at 208-634-0600

(Same map from last fall.)
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Village News:

Yellow Pine at Dusk Sunday March 13, 2022

20220313YellowPineWest-acourtesy eye-n-sky.net webcam
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Attention Yellow Pine Water Users

You may now apply to WICAP for help with your water bill under the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). You may apply for help with your past-due, as well as your current bill.

Application may be made in person at the WICAP office in Cascade, 110 W. Pine St. You may also apply by phone at 208 454-0675, or on-line at wicap.org.
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Notice – Deadline

In order to have your item posted in that week’s paper you must email it in by Noon on Sunday.

A reminder – if your group or business want an event, photo, minutes, news or advertising posted in the Yellow Pine Times, please write what you want posted in text form (for copy/paste) and send it by email. Remember to include the “who, what, when, where and why.” Images or groups of images must be under 10 megs per email.
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Arnold Aviation News:

Customers New Deadline – Please email your shopping list by Sunday evening so they are ready to print early Monday morning.

Attention Mail Route Customers – FedEx Ground has changed their policy, and they will no longer pay for Mail Plane or Truck freight. If you can avoid it, we strongly encourage you to use UPS or USPS to receive packages. If you do order a FedEx Ground package, you will be billed for: Air Freight @ $0.45/lb, or Mail Truck Freight @ $0.05/lb. We are truly sorry this is the case, and are working very hard to make sure you still receive your orders. – Arnold Aviation
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Road News

Link: to current road reports.

Hwy 55 summer road construction starts March 14, 2022

Upper Johnson Creek road at Landmark, Profile Gap, Lick Creek, Elk Summit, Thunder Mountain and Deadwood roads are closed to wheeled vehicles. These roads are not maintained. Travel at your own risk.
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Critters

20190429Dump2-bBe Tick Aware
Ticks are out early this year, 1st report Feb 11th.

* After being outdoors check for ticks. Remove any that are attached.
* Tumble any clothing in a hot dryer for 10 minutes. That should kill any ticks left in the clothing.
* When hiking outside where there are ticks, wear long clothing. Tuck the ends of pants into socks.
* Use a bug repellent to shoes, socks and exposed skin.

Be Elk Aware

Elk are hanging around the village, please watch for them on local streets. There have been a couple of near misses reported.

Be Wolf Wary

Report Saturday, Feb 12, wolves howling around the upper end of the village, and two were in a residential yard.

* Always keep children nearby and in sight.
* Keep pets leashed and under control.

Be Coyote Aware

* Remove or secure attractants, such as pet food, trash or dog feces.
* If you have a potential living food source for coyotes, such as chickens, secure their coops with wire mesh fences at least five feet high.
* Don’t leave your dog outside unsupervised.
* If possible, ensure your property boundaries are secure by keeping fences in good repair and letting your dogs out for bathroom breaks only in fenced areas, particularly at night. The American Kennel Club recommends solid fences of at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, and says that “coyote rollers” can provide additional deterrence.
* If your property is not fenced, turn on outside lights and make noise before letting your dog outside, and consider taking your dog out on a lead for nighttime bathroom breaks.
* Clear away brushy areas around your property that coyotes may see as safe denning or hiding spots.

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Photo taken Jan 18, 2021 by AP

Be Cougar Aware

A big cat has been hanging around the upper part of the village recently. Watch your small pets and do not leave food outside.

photo courtesy NH
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started November 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 58 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Bins dumped March 5th. Please flatten your empty boxes!

Road plowed March 3rd.

Report Jan 7th: Bins were emptied about a week and a half ago. Road plowed Jan 5th.

Dump update October 27th: We are now in winter mode. When it gets fairly full we will call to have it dumped. Contact Cecil.

Locals have worked hard to clean up the area, please be respectful.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176

Dump Tips

Do you know where your trash goes after it leaves Yellow Pine?

90 tons per week of Valley Co.’s solid waste comes to the Adams Co. landfill. (Valley Co. has a contract with Adams Co.) When Valley Co.’s weekly trash exceeds 90 tons, the rest is then taken to Payette. The more garbage, the more cost in transferring it further away.

Tips to reduce trash:

1. When purchasing groceries refuse plastic bags as they reek havoc at the Adams Co.’s landfill, causing problems with equipment.

2. Garbage: recyclables, compost, trash

If each household would have containers for these three categories this is the place to start.

– B. Dixon
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

Water Use

Date Flow Used Hours gph gpm dow more less
03/01/22 21168946 38939 24 1622 27 T 1585
03/02/22 21208004 39058 24 1627 27 W 119
03/03/22 21246840 38836 24 1618 27 T 222
03/04/22 21286828 39988 24 1666 28 F 1152
03/05/22 21325525 38697 24 1612 27 S 1291
03/06/22 21365611 40086 24 1670 28 S 1389
03/07/22 21404015 38404 24 1600 27 M 1682
03/08/22 21443297 39282 24 1637 27 T 878
03/09/22 21511822 68525 24 2855 48 W 29243
03/10/22 21591890 80068 24 3336 56 T 11543
03/11/22 21674045 82155 24 3423 57 F 2087
03/12/22 21755277 81232 24 3385 56 S 923
03/13/22 21807935 52658 23 2289 38 S 28574

Water update March 13th

Last Wednesday a few residents in Yellow Pine were experiencing low water pressure. A leak was confirmed that day we had a problem. Yesterday that leak was found and contained.

We want to thank everyone involved including those out looking for leak to the ones actually capping it.

Thanks to the community volunteers for keeping our water system flowing.

Steve Holloway

Water update March 8th

Hello Yellow Piners,

As required by DEQ until the water demand issue is resolved, the monthly Boil Water Notification is attached for distribution [See below]. Notification should be posted at public places, distributed via email, included in the Yellow Pine Times and social media posts, and sent to residents by any other means appropriate.

Best Regards,
Warren

Water Update Feb 26th

Hello Yellow Piners,

On Tuesday the 22nd of February I traveled to Yellow Pine, completed regular system checks, collected monthly and annual compliance samples, and cleaned Filter #1 to restore adequate flow.

Mike Amos again assisted by shuttling his 4-wheeler up to Mcintoshes’ place ahead of my arrival which made it easier to get pumps, hoses and equipment up to the plant. Winter water plant access needs to be improved and should be planned for going into next winter. Vehicle access to at least the filtration plant should be part of the plan.

Nicki’s reliable and consistent daily recording of data indicates that even after the recent leak repair completed in town, system demand exceeds 40K gallons per day which continues to exceed system capacity and therefore necessitates the continuation of the Boil Order.

Just for information’s sake, the filters have the following capacity. Please keep in mind that the system is designed to be able to run on one filter at a time while the other filter is offline for cleaning or maintenance.

Design filtration rate is .1 gpm/sq ft of filter surface area during warm weather and .05 gpm/sq ft of surface area when below 5 degrees C (41 degrees F)

Filter #1 is 215 sq ft
Warm Weather
215 x 0.1= 21.5 gpm
21.5 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 30,960 gallons per day
Cold Weather
215 x 0.05= 10.75 gpm
10.75 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 15,480 gallons per day

Filter #2 is 256 sq ft
Warm Weather
256 x 0.1= 25.6 gpm
25.6 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 36,864 gallons per day
Cold Weather
256 x 0.05= 12.8 gpm
12.8 gpm x 1440 minutes per day = 18,432 gallons per day

Flow rates explained above are optimal and are only to be expected from clean filters. Flow rates diminish rapidly as the filter media becomes “plugged” with dirt and debris from Boulder Creek. High system demand equates to increased water volume through the filters which in turn causes filters to become dirty faster reducing flow accordingly.

Every time the filters are cleaned, a portion of the sand filter media is removed. Over time and after repeated cleanings, the level of sand in the filters becomes low and must be replenished. A plan for cleaning and replacement of the used sand or purchase and installation of new sand needs to be developed.

Additionally, there are a number of deferred maintenance items and miscellaneous equipment purchases that need to be considered in order to help assure continued and uninterrupted water supply to the community. A plan to address these issues needs to be developed as well.

I am available to answer questions or can attend a water board meeting to assist in discussion and planning as needed.

Best Regards,
Warren

Water Update Jan 19th

Hello Yellow Piners,

After the news went out about high water use, the demand went down about 10,000 gallons per day by the following five days. That seems to indicate that the message was heard and action was taken.

Mike Amos was a huge help when I came in on Sunday 1/16/2022 to clean filter #2. He provided a four-wheeler and shuttled it up close to Nicki’s place for me which was extremely helpful. I loaded it up with tools and pumps etc., and hauled it all up to the plant. Filter #2 was then cleaned and flow has been restored to an acceptable level. Please keep in mind that daily demand still exceeds the design capacity of the system by approximately 30%.

I also took the necessary DEQ compliance samples and took care of regular maintenance issues while there. Aside from the high demand, everything else seems to be normal.

Regards, Warren Drake

We are still under a Boil Order. Please conserve water.

DRINKING WATER WARNING March 8, 2022
Yellow Pine Water Users PWS 4430059 BOIL WATER ADVISORY Due to insufficient treatment
We routinely monitor the conditions in the drinking water distribution system. On 4-19-2020 we experienced a period of insufficient treatment due to extreme water demand which exceeded the capacity of the treatment system. A drop in water pressure is a signal of the existence of conditions that could allow contamination to enter the distribution system through backflow, by backpressure, or back-siphonage. As a result, there is an increased chance that the drinking water may contain disease-causing organisms.
What should I do?
* DO NOT DRINK THE WATER WITHOUT BOILING IT FIRST.
Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
* Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.
* The symptoms above are caused by many types of organisms. If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you may want to seek medical advice. People at increased risk should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.
What is being done?
Efforts are under way to curtail water use. Once water use is diminished, the water treatment system will again be operational and the boil water order can be lifted
We will inform you when you no longer need to boil your water. We anticipate resolving the problem within 365 days.
For more information, please contact Warren at 208-573-6261 or wdrake @ drakediversified.com
Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.
This notice is being sent to you by Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc.
PWS ID #: 4430059. Date distributed: 3-8-22.

Water Conservation Tipsyellowmellow

1. Turn OFF the tap when you brush your teeth
Pretty much everyone runs the tap whilst brushing their teeth, when in fact you only need water at the beginning and the end (to wet the brush and rinse it).

2. Try and conserve water when using the toilet
We’ve heard a simple saying for this “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown flush it down”.
Also don’t use the toilet as a bin, every time you throw a small bit of trash and flush the toilet 5 gallons is gone.

3. Shorten your shower and turn it off when you can
You can also turn the shower off in between, wet yourself, lather up then turn the water off. When you’re ready turn it on and rinse off.

4. If you have any dripping taps – FIX THEM.
A single dripping tap can waste 4 gallons of water a day (or more) or 1450 gallons of water a year.

YPWUA 2021 Annual Shareholder Meeting July 4, 2021 at the Community Hall at 10am. Link: to 20210704 YPWUA minutes
YPWUA 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting held July 5, 2020 at the Community Hall 2pm. link: to 20200705 YPWUA minutes

Water Board:
Steve Holloway
Willie Sullivan
Dawn Brown
Stu Edwards
Candy Hardisty
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VYPA News:

Sept 11, 2021 – VYPA Meeting minutes link:
Aug 14, 2021 VYPA Meeting Canceled (lack of quorum.)
July 10, 2021 VYPA meeting minutes link:
June 12, 2021 VYPA Meeting Minutes link:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Chairman – vacant
Vice Chairman – Josh Jones
Treasurer – Ronda Rogers
Secretary – Hailey Harris
Member-at-large – Rhonda Egbert

Cemetery Committee:
Ron Basabe
Marj Fields
Ron Earl

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)
YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
— — — —

YPFD News:

If you have an emergency, please call 911

Notice Of Cancellation And Reschedule Of Meeting Of The YPFPD Board Of Commissioners
Yellow Pine Fire Protection District (YPFPD), Valley County, Idaho
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the meeting on 3/27/2022 of the Board of Fire Commissioners of the above named Fire District will be Canceled and be Rescheduled for the 3th day of April 2022, at 2:00 pm at Yellow Pine Community Hall, 210 Yellow Pine Ave., Yellow Pine, Idaho 83677
Dated this 6th day of March 2022
Lorinne Munn, District 1 Fire Commissioner
Tom Lanham, District 2 Fire Commissioner
Bill McIntosh, District 3 Fire Commissioner

Meeting Minutes

Feb 24, 2022 Fire Commissioners Special Meeting Link:
Jan 30, 2022 Fire Commissioners Meeting Link:
Jan 10, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting Link:
Jan 9, 2022 YPFD Special Meeting (no minutes yet.)
November 23, 2021 Special meeting Link:
November 8, 2021 AAR Report (Hopeless) Link:
October 31, 2021 Special meeting Link:
October 14, 2021 Special meeting Link:
September 27, 2021 Special meeting Link:
September 18, 2021 Special meeting Link:
Sept 11, 2021 YPFD Budget meeting Link:
Aug 28, 2021 – YPFD Meeting to discuss election (no notes taken.)
July 10, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
June 12, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
May 15, 2021 – YPFD Meeting Minutes. Link:
Sept 30, 2020 YPFD budget meeting. (No minutes yet.)

If you are burning any piles of forest litter and debris – please have a connected and charged garden hose that can reach your piles. If your hose cannot reach where you are burning, follow the good advice of having a shovel, axe, and water bucket at the scene. Rake away from anything that could ignite. Stop burning if winds become an issue. Make sure your fire is out before you leave the area. Nothing like getting surprised by an escaped fire in the middle of the night!

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice
The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Valley County Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
A wildfire evacuation checklist that property owners in the Yellow Pine area might find useful. link: Valley County Evacuation Checklist – 2021

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid-19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS

Fire Chief: Tim Rogers 208-633-2005
Assistant Fire Chief: Ron Basabe 208-633-9001
YP Fire Commissioners:
Lorinne Munn – District 1
Tom Lanham – District 2
Bill McIntosh – District 3
Secretary/Treasurer – Ronda Rogers

2022 Meeting Schedule:
January 30, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
March 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm (rescheduled)
April 3, 2022 at 2pm
May 29, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
September 11, 2022, Sunday at 2pm Budget Meeting
November 27, 2022, Sunday at 2pm
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325 Facebook Page
Winter hours:
Open Wednesday 11-6
Fridays 11-9
Saturdays 9-6
Sunday’s 10-6
Closed Monday, Tuesday and Thursday
Exceptions are by appointment and we’ll be open on Mondays of Holiday weekends.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233 Facebook Page
Winter Hours at the Tavern
Open Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat: 9am-2pm 4pm-8pm
Open Sunday 9am-2pm
Closed Tues & Thurs
Call the Tavern 208 633-2233 or Cell 208 739-7086 for other arrangements
Full Breakfast Menu. Burgers, Pizza, Fajitas, Beer Wine and Pop
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Yellow Pine General Store and Motel (208) 633-3300
Website Facebook page
The Yellow Pine General Store will be observing new Winter Hours. We will be officially open on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday 11am-4pm. Josh or Christy are in town on the off days and will be available to open the store as needed. Their contact information is posted on the front door of the store if you need to reach either of them locally. The motel rooms and the laundry room are still available 7 days per week. Store phone: 208-633-3300 Email:
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed for the winter.
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Murph’s RV Park and Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Local Color Photography
Website
Facebook page
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 509-406-2221
FB page
Open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Our Elk & Deer hunts are booked for our 2021 season, we do have a couple openings for our 2022 Elk & Deer hunts. We Also have a couple openings for Mountain Lion hunts December 2021 through February 2022 and Spring Bear hunts May of 2022. Please see our Website site for further details.
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Big Creek Lodge
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 452-4361
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Arnold Aviation (208) 382-4844
Watkins Pharmacy Cascade (208) 382-4204
Call your doctor and have your Rx transferred until Watikns can rebuild.
Cascade Auto (208) 382-4224
Cascade Vet Clinic (208) 382-4590

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
Please help support local journalism and subscribe.
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine
Website:
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New Book
This is Dusty White. I was a vendor for many years for the Harmonica Festival many years ago: “The Lill Red Wagon + More”. I was born and raised in Idaho and as a child spent many summers with my parents and family in and around Yellow Pine and the Stibnite areas. My grandmother lived at Roosevelt as a child. I have just published my first book of my life, “Walking With An Open Heart” (link)
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Mar 7) overnight low of 8 degrees. Yesterday’s snow was around 1″ but half melted, so only 1/2″ on the board this morning (SWE=0.04 which is an undercatch due to breezes.) This morning it was 17 degrees at 930am, overcast and starting to snow (lasted about an hour), measured an average of 18″ on the ground. Lots of fox tracks. Pine squirrel, hairy woodpecker, nuthatches, small flock of juncos and several jays visiting. Still below freezing at lunch time and overcast with filtered sunlight. Partly clear mid-afternoon, warmer and light breezes, high of 39 degrees. Partly cloudy/hazy at dusk, light breeze and a little above freezing. Looked hazy or cloudy before midnight. Started snowing before sunrise.

Tuesday (Mar 8) 24 hour low of 17 degrees from Monday morning. This morning low foggy overcast, steady light snowfall and 27 degrees at 930am, half an inch of light fluffy new snow (SWE=0.02″) measured an average of 18″ on the ground. Jays, hairy woodpecker, pine squirrel and nuthatches visiting. Socked in low and snowing bigger flakes at lunch time. Break in the snow around 2pm, melting and breezy. Short, sharp snow flurry for around 30 minutes mid-afternoon, high of 38 degrees. Thinner overcast at dusk, cold light breeze and below freezing. Scant trace of snow fell after dark. Looked cloudy before midnight. Clearing after midnight and cold.

Wednesday (Mar 9) overnight low of 10 degrees, yesterday’s snow melted except the scant trace that fell after dark, (SWE=0.02″ (may be undercatch due to gusty breezes.) This morning it was 16 degrees just before sunrise, partly cloudy, breezy and an average of 18″ crusty snow on the ground. Juncos and jays visiting. Mostly cloudy, breezy and below freezing at lunch time. Mail truck was a bit early. Wind gusting up early afternoon. Flaking snow, below freezing and cold gusty breezes mid-afternoon, high of 30 degrees. Starlings are around crapping on everything. Partly clear/cloudy, cold and breezy at dusk. Lots of stars out and moon to the west before midnight.

Thursday (Mar 10) overnight low of -2 degrees, yesterday’s snow flurries didn’t accumulate. This morning high thin haze and 5 degrees at sunrise, measured an average of 18″ of old snow. Raven calling in the distance. Jays, juncos, nuthatches, downy woodpecker, red and white-breasted nuthatches, pine squirrel and a male red-winged blackbird visiting. High thin overcast and filtered sunlight at lunch time. High hazy overcast mid-afternoon, cold breezes and barely above freezing, high of 33 degrees. Partly hazy at dusk and calmer, temperature dropping quickly. Thin haze before midnight, some stars out after.

Friday (Mar 11) 24 hour low of 5 degrees from Thursday morning. This morning it was 22 degrees at sunrise, overcast and an average of 18″ old crusty snow on the ground. Raven calling in the distance, and hairy woodpecker “cheeping.” Jays, white and red-breasted nuthatches, hairy and downy woodpeckers, pine squirrel and red-winged blackbird visiting. Gray overcast at lunch time and calm. Gray overcast mid-afternoon, slight breeze and above freezing, high of 39 degrees. Gray overcast at dusk, calm and still above freezing.

Saturday (Mar 12) 24 hour low of 22 degrees from Friday morning. This morning it was 34 degrees at sunrise, high thin broken overcast and an average of 17″ old snow on the ground. Hairy woodpecker, jays, red-breasted nuthatch, pine squirrel and red-winged blackbird visiting. Airplane circling at 1015am. Bright and sunny by lunch time. Snowmobile traffic in the neighborhood. Getting blustery early afternoon. Breezy and warm mid-afternoon, mostly clear and strong sunshine, high of 56 degrees. Warm, calm and mostly clear at dusk, bright half moon high in the sky. Quite gusty before midnight, some haze and weak moonlight. Probably snowed between 5am and 7am.

Sunday (Mar 13) overnight low of 32 degrees, 1/2″ early morning snow (SWE=0.16). This morning 34 degrees at sunrise, thinning overcast, light breeze and melting, measured an average of 17″ snow on the ground. Junco and squirrel tracks in the fresh snow, jays calling, red-breasted nuthatches, red-winged blackbird and a rufous sided spotted towhee visited. Socked in and snowing big flakes after lunch time for less than half an hour – and melted. Overcast and breezy early afternoon. Mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, warm and breezy, high of 45 degrees. Shoveled paths are very muddy and puddles of melt-water. Short rain shower late afternoon. Still above freezing at dusk, mostly cloudy and calm.
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Idaho News:

COVID-19 Updates: 870 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 5 new deaths

March 11, 2022 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 870 new COVID-19 cases and 5 new deaths Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March 2020 to 437,931.

The state reports data for the most recent 2-week period are incomplete. Due to the recent surge in cases from Jan. 10 to Feb. 5, approximately 3,400 outstanding positive laboratory results are pending local public health district review and follow-up.

The state said 105,545 people have received one dose of a two dose series, and 398,487 people have received an additional or booster dose. 2,298,916 total doses have been administered. 926,286 people are fully vaccinated.

The state said 37 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 16,213 and 14 new cases have been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 2,786.

5 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 4,819.

full story: [Valley County 2581 casts, 16 deaths.]
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Idaho Hospitalizations March 7, 2022


150 hospitalized with COVID-19
32 in ICU

source: KTVB
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New Valley County COVID-19 cases fall to 3 in past week

By Tom Grote The Star-News March 10, 2022

Only three new cases of COVID-19 were reported in Valley County last week, according to the county’s two hospitals.

The three new cases reported is down from the 12 new cases reported the previous week and down from 17 cases the prior week.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have reported 2,659 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic started two years ago.

A total of 13 confirmed deaths and three probable deaths in Valley County from COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health.

Clinics & Tests

St. Luke’s Clinic – Payette Lakes Family Medicine is now offering the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine and boosters to anyone age 18 and older. Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines continue to be offered for anyone age 5 and older.

Also available are Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine boosters for ages 12 to 15 and to moderately or severely immunocompromised youths age 5 to 11.

Pfizer vaccines are offered on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fridays. The Moderna vaccine is offered on Wednesdays only.

Those wanting to get a vaccination can schedule through MyChart at (link) or call 208-381-9500.

Parents of minors should create a MyChart for eligible children and set up proxy access. Instructions are available at (link).

Walk-ins are welcome Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., for adults who are seeking their initial COVID-19 vaccine dose only.

St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center have take-home COVID-19 tests available. The saliva-based test offers results in two to three days.

The Cascade hospital is also providing free at-home COVID-19 antigen tests, which is a nasal swab test that gives results in 10 minutes, but is less accurate than the saliva-based test.

The tests can be picked up at the main entrance to St. Luke’s McCall at 1000 State St. in McCall or at the clinic at Cascade Medical Center at 402 Lake Cascade Pkwy in Cascade.

Cascade Medical Center offers a walk-in vaccination clinic from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.

The Moderna vaccine for those age 18 and older is available on Tuesdays and Thursdays along with the Moderna booster.

The Pfizer vaccine for those ages 5 and older is available in Cascade on Wednesdays.

full story: © Copyright 2009-2021 Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (used with permission.)
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Public health disaster emergency declaration to end April 15

March 8, 2022 Local News 8

Governor Brad Little announced Tuesday Idaho will end the public health emergency on April 15, 2022.

Governor Little’s statement follows:

continued:
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Americans can now order four more free at-home COVID-19 tests

March 8, 2022 Local News 8

Americans can now order a second set of free at-home COVID-19 rapid antigen tests from the federal government.

Covidtests.gov, the website to sign up for the free tests, launched in January, when people could order a maximum of four tests per household. Households that took part in that first round can now order an additional four.

Households that missed the first round of test giveaways can order up to eight tests through the website or by calling 1-800-232-0233.

continued:
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Here’s how to get free antiviral medicine if you test positive for COVID-19

March 8, 2022 Local News 8

The rollout of the US government’s COVID-19 test-to-treat program is underway, with in-pharmacy clinics ordering shipments of COVID-19 antiviral medications, and some locations expecting to offer the service within days.

The COVID-19 antiviral pills Paxlovid and molnupiravir are already available for free in the United States, but quick access can be challenging for some people.

Last week, in its new National COVID-19 Preparedness Plan, the White House announced the test-to-treat initiative, in which people can visit “one-stop” sites that offer free COVID-19 testing and that prescribe free antiviral pills on the spot if they test positive.

full story:
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Roseberry society receives $1,000 grant to digitize exhibits

The Long Valley Preservation Society received a $1,000 matching grant from the Idaho Humanities Council to digitize several existing exhibits in the Valley County Museum at Roseberry.

The grant money is made available through a Federal/State Partnership of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Several exhibits of Valley County’s history that currently are paper and poster board will be digitally formatted on very nice mounting backboards for display in the museum, which is located one mile east of Donnelly on Farm to Market Road.

The work should be completed by the end of June.

The Long Valley Preservation Society was established in 1973 to collect, preserve, interpret and display Valley County history at the Roseberry Museum Complex.

The Heritage Site depicts a late 19th/early 20th century Finnish homestead, including a modest, well-built home of hand-hewn logs with dove-tail joins, various sheds and out-buildings and the hub of Finnish hygiene and social life, the sauna.

source: The Star-News Thursday, March 10, 2022
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ITD: Work on Highway 55 continues, drivers can expect delays

By KIVI Staff Mar 07, 2022

The Idaho Transportation Department is warning drivers to expect delays on Highway 55 starting March 7.

ITD crews will set up equipment and prepare construction on Highway 55 near Smith’s Ferry Monday. Two lanes are open and will remain open until spring 2022, according to ITD.

This is an ongoing project to widen the road and to make the roadways safer for drivers. ITD expects the project to be completed by fall 2022.

For updates on this project click here.

source:
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3.8 magnitude earthquake strikes near Stanley

By Michael Coats March 11, 2022 Local News 8

A small earthquake struck north of Stanley Friday afternoon.

The United States Geological Survey reports, a magnitude 3.8 quake was centered about 5 miles north of the town of Stanley, in Custer County Idaho.

The quake happened just after 1:59 p.m.

continued:
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M 3.8 – 8 km N of Stanley, Idaho

44.295°N 114.956°W / 8.2 km depth

link: more info at USGS
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Scam Alert:

Phishing scam red flags to look for

By Anna Azallion Mar 08, 2022 KIVI

Now more than ever, experts say cybersecurity is something everyone needs to keep in mind when using personal devices, like smartphones and computers.

Hackers and nations like Russia that pose a cybersecurity threat to the US don’t just target large companies and the government. They target everyday people too.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Boise National Forest approves next steps for Tamarack Resort’s expansion

Boise, Idaho, March 8, 2022 — The Boise National Forest has reviewed and accepted Tamarack Resort’s special use application for its proposal to expand their footprint on 2,099 acres of National Forest System lands. Tamarack’s proposal was reviewed using the Special Uses Screening Criteria (36 CFR 251.54) which is the first set of requirements that a proposal must meet before being further analyzed.

“With the increase in outdoor recreation in the intermountain region, we recognize the need to expand the recreation opportunities to meet public needs, said Tawnya Brummett Boise National Forest Supervisor. “Tamarack Resort has shown they have the resources to move forward in the special use process and as a result, the proposal will enter into the beginning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process.”

The NEPA process includes extensive public involvement, including formal comment periods. “I’d like to emphasize that the acceptance of the proposal does not mean that the expansion will be permitted, instead it is just the first step in beginning the environmental analysis and public involvement that is required for this type of project,” said Brummett.

Tamarack Resort currently operates exclusively on Idaho State Endowment and private lands. The proposed project would expand to 2,099 acres of NFS lands, primarily to the south of the existing resort, significantly increasing year-round recreation opportunities. The proposal includes the installation of several new ski lifts and a variety of expanded summer recreation activities.

Due to the magnitude and complexity of the proposal, including a possible amendment of the Forest Plan, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) will be required. Next steps include developing a timeline and schedule for the NEPA process and decision.

Once the project is formally launched, the Forest will send out a detailed announcement and it will be available for public review and comment at: (link)

To subscribe to email updates about this project and others, visit: (link)
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Updated Environmental Assessment and Draft Decision Notice Released for the Cold July Forest Restoration Project – Objection Period Set

New Meadows, Idaho, March 9, 2022 – The Payette National Forest announces the release of the draft decision notice (DN), finding of no significant impact (FONSI), and updated environmental assessment (EA) for the Cold July Forest Restoration Project.

The 30,000 acre project area is located approximately five miles west of the town of New Meadows, Idaho in Adams County. The project’s responsible official has selected the proposed action as the selected alternative for the draft DN. The selected alternative meets the project’s purpose and need the health of forest stands; increase insect and disease resiliency; reduce tree densities and fuel loadings to result in less intense fire behavior and facilitate effective wildland fire response; and enhance habitat for the northern Idaho ground squirrel and white-headed woodpecker, while also minimizing environmental effects through project design features. The selected alternative includes commercial timber harvest, non-commercial thinning, and prescribed fire, as well as associated road management activities.

The draft DN, FONSI, and updated March 2022 EA provide more details on the proposed activities and decision. These documents, along with other project documents, are available online at (link). Additionally, a story map has been developed to provide an interactive opportunity to learn about the project (link).

Objections will be accepted for forty-five days from the publication of the legal notice in the newspaper of record, the Idaho Statesman. The legal notice provides details on how to submit an objection. A copy of the legal notice will be available on the project’s webpage.

A final decision on the project will not be made until after the objection process has been completed.
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Mountain Home Ranger District reduces and re-emphasizes restrictions in the Rainbow Basin

Boise, Idaho, March 11, 2022 — Mountain Home Ranger District is re-emphasizing restrictions in the Rainbow Basin area southeast of Big Trinity Lake. The restrictions have been in place for decades to protect natural resources in this rugged high elevation area. To make it easier for users to identify the restricted area, boundaries have been reduced to well defined natural features.

Rainbow Basin is known as a high-quality, alpine lake backcountry fishery and backcountry recreation (hiking). “This location is a very unique and special place for a variety of flora and wildlife,” said Mike Brady, Acting Mountain Home District Ranger. Our intention is to protect those resources while providing users an exceptional rustic experience within driving distance.”

The Trinity Lakes area features 4 campgrounds, a rental cabin, numerous lakes, trailheads and hiking trails where visitors may encounter a variety of wildlife. The Rainbow Basin is accessed by the trailhead starting at Big Trinity Lake. The Basin has 8 lakes and offers dispersed tent camping. The restriction is in place to protect the unique aspects of the basin and prevent disturbing wildlife while birthing.

The following acts are prohibited on National Forest System (NFS) lands, waters and trails within the area.

* Using a bicycle, motor vehicle, or operating or possessing a motorboat.
* Possessing a saddle, pack, or draft animal or possessing or transporting any motor or mechanical device capable of propelling a watercraft through the water.

To view the Order and Map in detail visit the alerts and notices page and scroll down to the Mountain Home District at: (link)
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BLM accepting comments on proposed 275-acre land purchase near Boise

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has completed the Harris Acquisition Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzing the proposed purchase of a 275-acre parcel of private land, located 5 miles east of downtown Boise, that has been directly offered to the BLM by the owner. The review period on the proposal ends April 11.

“Healthy public lands are important for many reasons. As places of solitude and beauty, they provide invaluable opportunities for recreation, conservation, and wildlife habitat,” said acting Boise District Manager Tanya Thrift. “This purchase would help maintain open space in the Boise Foothills, preserve intact big game winter range and enhance protection of wildlife habitat and recreation access.” Purchasing funds would come from the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

This review period allows the public, agencies, and other interested parties to review the EA and provide comments. Comments will be accepted through April 11 and are most helpful if they provide pertinent information about the impacts of the proposed action and alternatives.

Maps and information about the project are available at: (link) (case sensitive).

Comments will be accepted through the following means:

* Email: BLM_ID_FourRiversOffice@blm.gov
* Fax: (208) 384-3326
* Surface mail: Brent Ralston, Four Rivers Field Manager, 3948 Development Ave, Boise, ID 83705

Please note that before including their personal identifying information (address, email, phone number), commenters should be aware that their entire comment – including their personal identifying information – may be made publicly available at any time. While those commenting can ask in their comments to withhold this information from public review, the BLM cannot guarantee that they will be able to do so.

For more information, contact the BLM Four Rivers Field Office at 208-384-3300.
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Officials ask people to respect Owyhee roads, trails

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, March 10th 2022

Owyhee County officials are urging people to respect and preserve roads and trails this spring.

“When Ridge to Rivers tells people to stay off muddy trails in the Boise Foothills, people often come out here in the Owyhee Front and look for trails and roads to ride as an alternative,” said Jerry Hoagland, an Owyhee County Commissioner and rancher. “But it’s just as important to avoid tearing up the trails and the land in Owyhee County as it is anywhere else.”

“It’s really important that people do their homework before they come here to know where it’s appropriate for them to recreate and do it responsibly.”

Owyhee County has 4.9 million acres of public lands to explore, featuring canyons, plateaus and lava features. County officials are asking people to remember the following:

continued:
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Critter News:

Hiker charged by moose on Gibson Jack Trail

March 10, 2022 Local News 8

On Wednesday morning, a hiker was charged by a moose on Gibson Jack trail south of Pocatello in the Caribou-Targhee National Forest.

The individual was hiking with his dog when a moose charged from behind. The hiker recounted he was not aware of the moose until the animal was already upon him. To escape, he jumped off the trail into deeper snow, quickly covering his head with his arms. The moose stomped him two or three times before withdrawing. The hiker says he remained in the snow quietly for a few seconds before standing up. The moose had moved down to the creek, keeping an eye on the hiker and his dog as they slowly passed the moose and returned to the trailhead parking lot.

continued:
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Fish and Game News:

Governor Brad Little petitions to have grizzly bears removed from Endangered Species Act

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Thursday, March 10, 2022

Petition recognizes Idaho’s continued efforts to protect, conserve and manage grizzly bears

Idaho Governor Brad Little submitted a petition to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to remove grizzly bears in the “Lower 48” United States from the Endangered Species Act and recognize states’ successful efforts to recover and manage grizzly populations.

continued:
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Lake Cascade and Payette Lake ice conditions – March 10, 2022

By Mike Thomas, Regional Fisheries Biologist
Friday, March 11, 2022

On Thursday, March 10 I checked surface and ice conditions on Cascade and Payette Lakes. While conditions remain safe for fishing, recent warm temperatures and rain have dramatically changed the ice profiles on each lake. In particular, much of the “white” ice in previous weeks has been compressed into a more uniform layer of clear ice at both lakes. As of Thursday, very little snow has accumulated on top of the ice – making conditions slick!! Please be careful walking around out there. If you are planning on taking a snowmobile out on Lake Cascade, we highly recommend using “scratchers” or air-cooled machines to avoid overheating. Conditions will likely change a lot over the coming weekend, with air temperatures forecasted to reach 50 degrees on Saturday, and rain and snow coming on Sunday. Remember, on Payette Lake we do not recommend any motorized forms of travel, as ice thickness varies widely.

continued:
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On the Move: March’s Wildlife Express takes a look at wandering wildlife

By Connor Liess, Public Information Specialist
Tuesday, March 8, 2022

Animals migrate for a plethora of reasons, but more often than not it’s to seek out food and safe areas to breed and raise young.

Idaho is home to many different kinds of migrating animals. From salmon and elk to birds and butterflies, migration can be witnessed all across the state at certain times of year.

Animals migrate for a plethora of reasons, but more often than not it’s to seek out food and safe areas to breed and raise young. Spring and fall are always great opportunities to witness critters on the move, and depending on the species, that “move” can be anywhere from thousands of miles to a hundred feet.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Researcher finds ‘stunning’ rate of COVID among deer.

March 9, 2022 Ari Daniel NPR


Two white-tailed deer forage in Pennsylvania’s Wyomissing Parklands. At the end of 2021, researchers swabbed the noses of 93 dead deer from across the state. Nearly 20% tested positive for the coronavirus.
Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images

Between October and December of last year, researchers swabbed the noses of 93 dead deer from across Pennsylvania. Nearly a fifth of the animals tested positive for the coronavirus.

This is one result from a new pair of soon-to-be-published studies with the latest evidence for coronavirus spillover from humans into wild white-tailed deer where the coronavirus picked up a raft of new mutations. In addition, in one case, the coronavirus most likely later spilled back from the deer into a human. That’s a first.

These new findings — which follow an earlier study about the coronavirus in the white-tailed deer population — are raising renewed concerns over the unpredictability of spillover events and the potential risks posed to humans. Here are a few questions being asked about the deer spillovers.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

DaylightSavingSucks-a
[h/t VC]

GasMemories-a
[h/t CP]

CovidWrongOrder-a
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