Category Archives: Weather Reports

Weather Reports Jan 28 – Feb 3

Jan 28 Weather:

At 1030am it was 34 degrees and overcast. At 2pm it was 41 degrees and overcast, thinner clouds. At 530pm it was 35 degrees, overcast and starting to get a little foggy. Cloudy and calm at 8pm, less fog. At 11pm it was 32 degrees, clouds breaking up, fuzzy moon and a few stars, very light fog.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 29, 2018 at 10:30AM
Overcast
Max temperature 41 degrees F
Min temperature 29 degrees F
At observation 33 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 11 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 29 Weather:

At 1030am it was 33 degrees and overcast. At 230pm it was 40 degrees and overcast. Fog rolling in from the river just before 3pm. Sucker hole let in some sun for a bit around 4pm. At 6pm it was 35 degrees and cloudy. Breezy around 730pm. At 1030pm it was 35 degrees, overcast and a little breezy. Windy during the night.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 30, 2018 at 10:30AM
Overcast, starting to sprinkle
Max temperature 46 degrees F
Min temperature 33 degrees F <– yesterday morning
At observation 40 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 10 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 30 Weather:

At 1030am it was 40 degrees, overcast and just starting to sprinkle. Graupel coming down at 1207pm, bouncing like hail. Rain/snow mix 1214pm. Back to rain by 1225pm. Rain/snow mix 1245pm. Sprinkling at 105pm. Stopped raining at 110pm. At 150pm it was 38 degrees and cloudy. Rain/snow mix falling at 225pm until 330pm, trace covered the ground. Not raining at 430pm. Flaking snow at 520pm for about 5 min, no trace. At 545pm it was 31 degrees and partly clear. At 1030pm it was 24 degrees, partly clear (thin streaks of clouds) hazy full “blue” moon with small rainbow colored halo.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 31, 2018 at 10:30AM
Overcast
Max temperature 42 degrees F
Min temperature 18 degrees F
At observation 26 degrees F
Precipitation 0.07 inch
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 10 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 31 Weather:

At 1030am it was 26 degrees and overcast. At 215pm it was 33 degrees and overcast. At 6pm it was 29 degrees and overcast. At 1025pm it was 27 degrees and cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 01, 2018 at 10:00AM
Partly clear/cloudy (high haze)
Max temperature 34 degrees F
Min temperature 19 degrees F
At observation 21 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 10 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Feb 1 Weather:

At 10am it was 21 degrees with high haze, partly clear/cloudy. Overcast by noon. At 230pm it was 38 degrees and overcast. At 545pm it was 35 degrees, cloudy, slight breeze and 2 flakes of snow. Flaking snow very lightly around 8pm. At 1030pm it was 31 degrees, cloudy, snowing very lightly, scant skiff on the ground. At 1250am it was 31 degrees, not snowing, trace so far. Snowing at 125am, probably done by 2am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 02, 2018 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 38 degrees F
Min temperature 21 degrees F
At observation 33 degrees F
Precipitation 0.07 inch
Snowfall 0.5 inch
Snow depth 10 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Feb 2 Weather:

At 10am it was 33 degrees and mostly cloudy, some blue patches. Mostly cloudy at lunch time, blue cracks. At 220pm it was 39 degrees and overcast. Light sprinkles before 5pm. At 6pm it was 36 degrees, dark overcast and light steady rain. Light snow falling around 8pm (no trace of it on the ground, warm and wet.) At 1030pm it was a hair under 33 degrees, breaks in the clouds and light fog. Looked foggy and not precipitating at 1am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 03, 2018 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 43 degrees F
Min temperature 29 degrees F
At observation 34 degrees F
Precipitation 0.05 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 9 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Feb 3 Weather:

At 10am it was 34 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 12pm mostly cloudy, filtered sunshine. At 2pm it was 46 degrees and overcast. At 6pm it was 39 degrees and cloudy. At 1030pm it was 34 degrees and cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 04, 2018 at 10:00AM
Overcast, light fog, sprinkling
Max temperature 50 degrees F
Min temperature 33 degrees F
At observation 36 degrees F
Precipitation 0.06 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 8.5 inch
————————————-

Advertisements

Avalanche Advisory Feb 2, 2018

Bottom Line

A moderate avalanche hazard exists above 6,000 feet due to freshly formed and lingering wind slabs. New snow and ridgetop winds have created fresh slabs and older slabs remain from last week’s wind event. Warm temperatures have stabilized most of the lingering slabs, but isolated areas with sensitive wind slabs still exist. Travelers should avoid steep slopes with recent evidence of wind loading. Below 6,000 feet, the avalanche hazard is low.

Avalanche Problem #1: Wind Slab

The past week provided a roller coaster of snowpack and avalanche conditions. Last weekend, heavy snowfall and winds created tender slabs that produced several avalanches and resulted in a partial burial.

Avalanche Deadwood Summit
https://payetteavalanche.org/sat-01272018-1600-avalanche-deadwood-summit

Warming temperatures stabilized many of the layers in the upper snowpack. Cold temperatures followed and left most of the zone with a melt/freeze crust at or just below the surface.

1-3 inches of new snow fell overnight. At uppper elevations, winds have been transporting snow and forming new wind slabs. Skiers and riders should look for signs of recent loading and should pay additional attention to lingering wind slabs that formed during last week’s wind events. These slabs may be found in steep terrain near ridges or exposed areas and may be large enough to injure and bury a person.

Weather

SHORT TERM…Today through Saturday…An exiting upper trough
will keep showers across the e-central Oregon and w-central Idaho
mountains through mid-morning. The break in precipitation is brief
as another wave drops into central Idaho tonight. It will follow
a similar path as recent systems, keeping the focus of light
rain/snow across Baker county Oregon and the central Idaho
mountains. The Snake Plain will remain on the southern edge of
precipitation chances overnight. Light showers continue in the
central Idaho mountains on Saturday with the passage of another
weak wave. Snow accumulation will be light (up to 2 inches) and
limited to areas above 6500 feet through Saturday. Southeast
Oregon, much of the Snake Plain and far southwest Idaho will
remain dry through Saturday with periods of cloud cover the
passage of each upper wave. Temperatures are mild, running 10-15
degrees above normal.

.LONG TERM…Saturday night through Thursday…A ridge of high
pressure lingers offshore through the long term forecast. A
series of waves will pass up and over this ridge with most of the
shower activity staying in our northern zones. There is a slight
chance Monday afternoon to see some showers push a little further
south. Tuesday onward precipitation will be limited to the central
Idaho mountains. Snow levels sit at or above 6k feet MSL through
the majority of the period meaning snow will be limited to the
highest elevations. Above normal temperatures are expected through
the entire period.

Recent Observations

Yesterday, we toured in the Lick Creek Summit area near Beaverdam Peak. Wind effected snow was present near ridges and in exposed areas. We found a pronounced melt/freeze layer close to the surface in most areas. Within the snowpack, several buried melt/freeze layers exist 40 to 100 cm below the surface from past warming events and/or rain. Snow stability tests on these layers demonstrated little to no results.

Disclaimer

This avalanche advisory is provided through a partnership between the Payette National Forest and the Payette Avalanche Center. This advisory covers the West Central Mountains between Hard Butte on the north and Council Mountain on the south. This advisory applies only to backcountry areas outside established ski area boundaries. This advisory describes general avalanche conditions and local variations always occur. This advisory expires at midnight on the posted day unless otherwise noted. The information in this advisory is provided by the USDA Forest Service who is solely responsible for its content.

source:
————————-

Weather Reports Jan 21-27

Jan 21 Weather:

At 1030am it was 17 degrees and almost clear. At 130pm it was 32 degrees and mostly clear, a few wispy clouds. Mostly cloudy by 240pm. At 530pm it was 27 degrees and overcast. At 630pm it was 27 degrees and cloudy. At 1030pm it was 28 degrees and cloudy. Snowing at 130am (probably started after 1am.) Looks like it may have snowed all night.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 22, 2018 at 10:30AM
Low overcast, light steady snow
Max temperature 36 degrees F
Min temperature 17 degrees F <– yesterday morning
At observation 29 degrees F
Precipitation 0.11 inch
Snowfall 2.0 inch
Snow depth 10 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 22 Weather:

At 1030am it was 29 degrees, low overcast, ridges socked in, light steady snow still falling. Just flaking lightly at noon. Not snowing at 1pm, trace accumulation, breaks in the clouds. Snowing again at 135pm, for 10-15 minutes. Breaks in the clouds at 2pm. At 3pm it was 35 degrees and partly clear. At 530pm it was partly cloudy. At 11pm it was 26 degrees, cloudy and 2 flakes of snow fell. Accumulation by morning looked like “freckles” on the porch.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 23, 2018 at 10:30AM
Mostly clear, high haze
Max temperature 38 degrees F
Min temperature 15 degrees F
At observation 23 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 9 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 23 Weather:

At 1030am it was 23 degrees, mostly clear but some high haze. At 230pm it was 38 degrees, high haze, filtered sun, gusty breezes. Increasing clouds at 3pm. Overcast at 5pm. At 530pm lighter breezes and overcast, above freezing. At 630pm it was 33 degrees, gusty winds and snowing lightly. At 8pm it was 30 degrees, overcast, not snowing, slight trace. At 1030pm it was 31 degrees, light breezes, thinner clouds (some fuzzy stars) big first quarter moon setting to the west.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 24, 2018 at 10:30AM
Mostly cloudy (high haze) and breezy
Max temperature 39 degrees F
Min temperature 23 degrees F <– yesterday morning
At observation 32 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 9 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 24 Weather:

At 1030am it was 32 degrees, mostly cloudy (high haze) filtered sun and breezy. Overcast by noon, windy, trees dumping snow. At 215pm it was 40 degrees, lighter breezes and overcast. At 6pm it was 34 degrees, overcast and light chilly breezes. At 8pm cloudy and breezy. At 1030pm it was 41 degrees, overcast and wind gusting up. Looks like it rained, then snowing at 2am. Break in the snow around 6am. Snowing at 930am, stopped snowing a little after 10am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 25, 2018 at 10:30AM
Overcast
Max temperature 44 degrees F
Min temperature 29 degrees F
At observation 30 degrees F
Precipitation 0.15 inch
Snowfall 1.0 inch
Snow depth 9 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 25 Weather:

At 1030am it was 30 degrees and overcast. Flaking snow 1115am to 1140am. Another snow flurry early afternoon put down a scant trace. At 2pm it was 34 degrees, partly cloudy – partly clear, light chilly breeze. Snowing around 315pm. Overcast at 430pm. Flaking snow at 444pm. Snowing and blowing at 450pm, trace of little snowballs. Back to flaking snow at 5pm. Not snowing at 520pm. At 6pm it was 28 degrees and cloudy. At 1015pm it was 26 degrees, low clouds, snowing, scant 1/4″ so far. At 1230am it was 23 degrees, still snowing (about 2″ so far.) Light snow falling at 9am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 26, 2018 at 10:30AM
Overcast, light snow falling
Max temperature 38 degrees F
Min temperature 22 degrees F
At observation 27 degrees F
Precipitation 0.10 inch
Snowfall 2.0 inch
Snow depth 11 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 26 Weather:

At 1030am it was 27 degrees, overcast and light snow falling. Snowing harder just after 1pm. Light snow falling at 145pm. At 2pm just a couple of flakes. At 230pm it was 29 degrees, overcast and occasional flake falling, scant 1/4″ new, and about done snowing. At 6pm it was 26 degrees and cloudy. At 1030pm it was 18 degrees, thinner clouds, a few fuzzy stars, hazy moon with large ‘halo’. Thicker clouds at 230am. Light snow started falling some time after 5am, still snowing lightly at 930am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 27, 2018 at 10:30AM
Overcast, light snow falling
Max temperature 31 degrees F
Min temperature 18 degrees F
At observation 26 degrees F
Precipitation 0.03 inch
Snowfall 0.3 inch
Snow depth 10 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 27 Weather:

At 1030am it was 26 degrees, overcast and light snow falling. Quit snowing around 12pm. Snowing again at 2pm, slight trace by 230pm and 32 degrees. Almost an inch by 5pm. At 6pm it was 30 degrees, overcast, light snow – big flakes, bit more than an inch new. At 10pm it was 30 degrees, steady snow, approx 3″ new since 6pm, gusty breezes. Still snowing at 2am. Still snowing at 445am. Snowing at 6am, quit by 7am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 28, 2018 at 10:30AM
Overcast
Max temperature 34 degrees F <– this morning
Min temperature 26 degrees F
At observation 34 degrees F
Precipitation 0.30 inch
Snowfall 4.5 inch
Snow depth 14 inch
————————————–

Avalanche Advisory January 28, 2018

Bottom Line

The Avalanche Hazard is Considerable today above 7,000 feet where new snow and gusty winds have created new wind slabs near ridges and on exposed terrain. Pay attention to changing conditions with the added wind and snow and warming temperatures today, and a possibility of rain on snow in the lower elevations. Below 7,000 feet the avalanche hazard is Moderate.

Avalanche Problem #1: Storm Slab

Loose, unconsolidated snow has been the trend for over a week creating a soft and unconsolidated upper snowpack with a firm and strong slab below it. In our pit tests Friday, we saw several of these individual storm layers that were only partially bonded to the layers below creating moderate failures in compression but lacking propagation or the energy to spread out over large areas.

Over the last 24 hours, temperatures have been on the rise along with new snow which will have likely made the storm slab that much denser than the snow below it. You could trigger a weakness in one of these layers on steep terrain resulting in a slab a foot deep or more today. Worth noting and watching is a subtle crust created by a freezing mist event that occurred mid morning on Monday. It is buried around 12 inches down in the snowpack. This was one of the layers that is failing in compression and may become more reactive now that we have added new, heavier snow on top.

Avalanche Problem #2: Wind Slab

Recent winds and new snow have created wind slabs in leeward terrain. Winds have been gusty throughout the week and mostly out of the S and SW. North and South Valley areas have both seen the same weather this week with cornices slowly growing and wind loading occurring on mostly E, NE, N and NW facing slopes. We observed active wind loading and scouring on a SW aspect just south of Granite Mountain Friday with loading occurring on the NE throughout the day. These slabs have gotten denser with the added new snow, and increasing temperatures.

Recent Observations

See the photos below for a comparison of the difference in the snowpack on a SW facing slope at 7100 feet and a NNE slope at 7600 feet on Granite mountain from Friday. Notice the layering in the SW pit and the depth of the freezing mist crust and new snow between the two pits.

Please let us know what you are seeing in the West Central Mountains. Take the time to submit an observation or send us an email. It’s easy and may save a life. If you are having trouble adding photos to your observation, send us the photo at our email address and we will add it to your observation. Click on the observation tab on the advisory page or email us at: forecast@payetteavalanche.org

https://payetteavalanche.org/fri-01262018-1445-granite-ene

Weather

Area Forecast Discussion…CORRECTED
National Weather Service Boise ID
305 AM MST Sun Jan 28 2018

…ADDED INFORMATION ABOUT FOG IN SHORT TERM SECTION…

.SHORT TERM…Today through Monday…Will hold on to the Winter
Weather Advisory through 5 am MST due to continuing snow in the
mountains. McCall has picked up around 5 inches so far, and
Brundage around 7 inches. Fog is becoming widespread as some
clearing occurs in mid and high clouds. The fog is even dense in
patches. Will add this to the forecast and keep a close eye in
case a dense fog advisory becomes warranted. As upper level
ridging builds in from the west, moisture remaining over the
northern mountains will be pushed away to the northeast. Today, we
will still have snow showers there, but by this evening they
should be gone. This ridge will then keep us dry and around 10
degrees above normal for Sunday night and Monday. The ridge axis
will move through early Monday, allowing southwest flow aloft to
return. This will bring an increase in mid and high clouds from
west to east through the day. Southeast winds 10-15 mph will
develop Monday afternoon in the western Magic Valley westward
through the Mountain Home area. Otherwise, winds will be less than
10 mph through the period.

.LONG TERM…Monday night through Sunday…Moist westerly flow
aloft will bring mountain snow and valley rain to our northern
zones Monday night and Tuesday. Tuesday night and Wednesday the
flow will shift into the northwest as an upper level high pressure
ridge builds off the west coast. This pattern change will bring
cooler air, but temperatures are expected to stay a few degrees
above normal. Weak disturbances embedded in the flow will continue
the chance of mountain snow and valley rain, mainly for Baker
County Oregon and central Idaho.

.AVIATION…Areas of snow with IFR and local LIFR conditions will
continue this morning over the mountains of Baker County Oregon
and central Idaho. Snow will decrease in coverage this afternoon
and end by 00z Monday. Expect VFR conditions tonight except for
patchy valley fog and stratus after 06z. Surface winds will be
variable mainly less than 10 kts. Winds aloft at 10k ft MSL will
be northwest 25-35 kts.

Disclaimer

This avalanche advisory is provided through a partnership between the Payette National Forest and the Payette Avalanche Center. This advisory covers the West Central Mountains between Hard Butte on the north and Council Mountain on the south. This advisory applies only to backcountry areas outside established ski area boundaries. This advisory describes general avalanche conditions and local variations always occur. This advisory expires at midnight on the posted day unless otherwise noted. The information in this advisory is provided by the USDA Forest Service who is solely responsible for its content.

source:
—————————–

Avalanche Advisory January 26, 2018

Bottom Line

The Avalanche Hazard is Moderate today above 7000 feet where new snow and gusty winds have created new windslabs near ridges and on exposed, upper elevation, northerly terrain. In addition, local mountains received 10 and 15 inches of new snow over the last week, watch for shallow instabilities on steeper slopes in the layers created this week. A warmer and wetter storm will enter the area tonight, expect rising hazard and rapidly changing conditions over the next 24 hours.

Avalanche Problem #1: Wind Slab

This week produced another round of snow with accumulations in the 10-15 inch range above 6500 feet. Winds have been gusty throughout the week and mostly out of the S and SW. North and South Valley areas have both seen the same weather this week with cornices slowly growing and wind loading occurring on mostly E, NE, N and NW facing slopes. Yesterday’s touring conditions and ski conditions were perfect with light density snow on all aspects. We observed active wind loading and wind slab formation throughout our tour that was mostly confined to the Northerly aspects near Secesh Summit. These slabs ranged from a few inches thick to over a foot and were just becoming sensitive to the weight of a skier by mid afternoon.

A cold front is still dominating the weather throughout the West Central area but will begin to give way to a warm front as a major storm enters the area tonight. Expect gusty winds with this next front and a warming trend for tomorrow. Also, expect the avalanche hazard to increase tonight and through the day tomorrow as 10-15 inches of warmer, higher density snow is added to the new snow total for the week.

Avalanche Problem #2: Storm Slab

The snow that fell throughout the week this week came in small increments of light density snow that did not have a major effect on stability. Loose, unconsolidated snow has been the trend for over a week creating a soft and unconsolidated upper snowpack. In our pit tests yesterday we saw several of these individual storm layers that were only partially bonded to the layers below creating moderate failures in compression but lacking propagation or the energy to spread out over large areas. It is possible that you could trigger a weakness in one of these layers on steep terrain resulting in a shallow slab in the 3 to 12 inch range today. Worth noting and watching over the next 24 hours is a subtle crust that was created mid morning on Monday that is between 6 and 10 inches down in the snowpack. It is starting to disintegrate but has the potential to create a weakness with the addition of our next storm’s new snow and additional weight. We found this layer to be fairly widespread yesterday in the mid to upper elevations and had reports of it from the South Valley area as well.

Sluffing or loose, dry avalanche activity is also possible on steep slopes because of the light density snow right now. If you are skiing in steep, committing terrain, especially in confined terrain or above obstacles, be aware of the potential for sluffing and plan a route to avoid letting it push you where you don’t want to go.

Advisory Discussion

Please let us know what you are seeing in the West Central Mountains. Take the time to submit an observation or send us an email. It’s easy and may save a life. If you are having trouble adding photos to your observation, send us the photo at our email address and we will add it to your observation. Click on the observation tab on the advisory page or email us at: forecast@payetteavalanche.org

Recent Observations

Yesterday we were able to see a lot of terrain and multiple aspects, no recent avalanche activity was observed and none has been reported this week. The biggest factor affecting the snowpack was the wind yesterday. Gusts in the 20+ range were common throughout the day. These were actively transporting snow into the northern aspects and affecting the snowpack on exposed ridges and slopes.

The snowpack gained both strength and depth throughout the last week. We found just over 8 feet of snow around 8000 feet yesterday on a North facing slope and just under 6 feet of snow at 7500 feet in a protected basin yesterday. Basin wide snowpack surveys are showing a return to normal or above normal conditons across the mid and northern portions of Idaho. Snowpack tests are showing increasing stability and that our persistent weak layer is now getting enough weight to compress it and insulate it from the effects of skiers and riders in the McCall/ Valley County area. However, it is still present iin the snowpack and could still be a problem given the right combination of snowpack depth and additional loading. You should still be wary of slopes with a shallow snowpack where the layer is closer to the surface. and you are more likely to trigger the weak layer. This layer is also still active and producing avalanches in the mountains adjacent to the PAC advisory area.

https://payetteavalanche.org/tue-01232018-1214-snow-pit-lone-tree

Weather

.SHORT TERM…Today through Saturday…Snow showers will continue
today and this evening, mainly in the higher elevations. Later
tonight, a major snowstorm will move into the region. This one
comes in the form of a warm front, but temperatures will initially
be cold enough for snow at almost all elevations. Precip will move
into eastern Oregon around midnight and rapidly spread east into
southwest Idaho. Winter Weather Warnings and Advisories have been
determined (see below) and will be issued shortly. Snow totals
will range from 5 to 15 inches in the mountains and 2 to 6 inches
in the valleys. Only the lowest elevations of the Snake Plain may
have enough rain mixed with the snow to limit accumulations to
under an inch. Snow levels will rise Saturday afternoon as the
warm front passes, turning snow to rain at elevations below 3500
feet. However, the West-Central and Boise Mountains will continue
with a significant snowfall into the evening hours. High temps
today will be slightly above normal for most areas, with highs
tomorrow above normal south and west of a line from Burns to the
Owyhees to south of Twin Falls, where the warm front will allow
warmer air to mix down to the surface during the afternoon. North
and east of that line, temps will be held down to near or below
normal due to snowfall. In the Boise area, we expect snow to begin
around 6 am and continue into mid-afternoon before changing to
rain and ending. A snowfall accumulation forecast map will be put
out on social media soon.

.LONG TERM…Saturday night through Friday…The active weather
pattern will continue as westerly flow aloft brings a series of
Pacific weather systems across our area. The upper level flow will
shift into the northwest on Wednesday, lowering temperatures to
near normal for the remainder of the week. Valley rain and
mountain snow Saturday night will end by Sunday evening as and
upper level high pressure ridge builds over the Intermountain
Region. We can expect dry weather through Monday, but
precipitation will spread into our northern zones Monday night as
the next Pacific weather system approaches. Precipitation will be
mainly confined to the mountains of Baker County Oregon and
central Idaho Tuesday through Friday as weak disturbances embedded
in northwest flow aloft cross our area.

Disclaimer

This avalanche advisory is provided through a partnership between the Payette National Forest and the Payette Avalanche Center. This advisory covers the West Central Mountains between Hard Butte on the north and Council Mountain on the south. This advisory applies only to backcountry areas outside established ski area boundaries. This advisory describes general avalanche conditions and local variations always occur. This advisory expires at midnight on the posted day unless otherwise noted. The information in this advisory is provided by the USDA Forest Service who is solely responsible for its content.

source:
——————————

Winter Weather Advisory Jan 27, 5am to Jan 27, 11pm

Yellow Pine Forecast

Today Snow, mainly before 11am. High near 30. West southwest wind 7 to 9 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. Total daytime snow accumulation of 1 to 2 inches possible.

Tonight A 40 percent chance of snow. Cloudy, with a low around 22. West southwest wind around 6 mph becoming calm in the evening. New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.

Saturday Snow. High near 32. South southwest wind 5 to 8 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 2 inches possible.

Saturday Night Snow before 11pm, then rain and snow likely. Low around 29. Southwest wind 5 to 7 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 2 inches possible.

Sunday Rain likely, mainly before 11am. Cloudy, with a high near 40. Light southwest wind. Chance of precipitation is 60%.

Winter Weather Advisory

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
352 AM MST Fri Jan 26 2018

...SIGNIFICANT SNOW HEADED TO THE AREA TONIGHT INTO SATURDAY
EVENING...

.A warm front will bring moderate to heavy snow to the area
tonight into Saturday evening. Snow will begin before midnight in
eastern Oregon, and spread rapidly east into southwest Idaho. As
the warm front moves northeast over the area, snow levels will
increase Saturday and snow will change to rain below around
3500 feet Saturday afternoon. Heavy snow will taper off to
showers Saturday night in the mountains, bringing a end to the
event.

West Central Mountains-Boise Mountains-
352 AM MST Fri Jan 26 2018

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 5 AM TO 11 PM
MST SATURDAY...

* WHAT...Snow expected. Plan on slippery road conditions. Total
  snow accumulations of 3 to 6 inches, with localized amounts up
  to 15 inches above 7000 feet, are expected.

* WHERE...West Central Mountains and Boise Mountains zones.

* WHEN...From 5 AM to 11 PM MST Saturday.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS...Be prepared for reduced visibilities at
  times.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A Winter Weather Advisory for snow means periods of snow will
cause primarily travel difficulties. Be prepared for snow covered
roads and limited visibilities, and use caution while driving.
The latest road conditions can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.

 

Weather Reports Jan 14-20

Jan 14 Weather:

At 1030am it was 24 degrees and almost clear. At 2pm it was 40 degrees and mostly clear (a little high haze to the south.) At 545pm it was 30 degrees and clear. At 1am it was 23 degrees and clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 15, 2018 at 10:30AM
Mostly clear (high haze to the south)
Max temperature 43 degrees F
Min temperature 18 degrees F
At observation 21 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 5.5 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 15 Weather:

At 1030am it was 21 degrees and mostly clear, high haze to the south. At 230pm it was 40 degrees and mostly clear, thin haze to the south. At 530pm it was 28 degrees and mostly clear. At 1am it was 23 degrees and mostly clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 16, 2018 at 10:30AM
Overcast
Max temperature 41 degrees F
Min temperature 19 degrees F
At observation 28 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 5.5 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 16 Weather:

At 1030am it was 28 degrees and overcast, moderate frost. Snowing lightly at 1230pm. Still flaking a bit at 1pm. Not snowing at 2pm (trace on the ground.) At 220pm it was 36 degrees and a couple cracks in the clouds. Bigger breaks in the clouds at 430pm. At 530pm it was 34 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 1130pm it was 26 degrees and mostly clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 17, 2018 at 10:30AM
Partly clear
Max temperature 40 degrees F
Min temperature 16 degrees F
At observation 20 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 6 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 17 Weather:

At 1030am it was 20 degrees and partly clear. Overcast by noon. At 230pm it was 38 degrees (felt cooler and a bit damp) and overcast. At 520pm it was 37 degrees, overcast and breezy. At 1130pm it was 31 degrees, cloudy and breezy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 18, 2018 at 10:30AM
Overcast, windy
Max temperature 48 degrees F <– this morning
Min temperature 20 degrees F <– yesterday morning
At observation 48 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 5 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 18 Weather:

At 1030am it was 48 degrees, overcast and windy. Started sprinkling before 2pm (probably around 130pm.) At 220pm the temp had dropped to 42 degrees, overcast, steady light rain and still rather breezy. Rain all afternoon, hard for a while then back to light rain by 5pm, low clouds and dark. At 545pm it was 33 degrees, low clouds (almost foggy) and steady rain, very light breeze. Snowing big fat flakes at 8pm, 1/4″ accumulation. At 11pm it was 32 degrees, rain/snow mix falling, slushy and melty. All rain at 130am. Did not appear to be precipitating at 3am. Snowing pretty good at 6am. Light snow falling before 930am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 19, 2018 at 10:30AM
Low overcast, snowing
Max temperature 50 degrees F <– yesterady morning
Min temperature 30 degrees F
At observation 30 degrees F
Precipitation 0.65 inch
Snowfall 2.3 inch
Snow depth 7 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 19 Weather:

At 1030am it was 30 degrees, low overcast, light snow falling. Snowing pretty good at 11am. Flaking snow at 1130am. Not snowing at noon, brief sucker hole. Snowing again a little after 1pm. Not snowing at 2pm, overcast and 30 degrees. Snowing at 240pm, stopped around 3pm. Cloudy at 430pm. Started snowing again around 515pm. At 540pm it was 27 degrees, very low clouds and steady snow, trace so far. Still snowing at 7pm, 830pm, 930pm and 1030pm. At 1130pm it was 25 degrees, just flaking a little, about an inch of new snow. May have quit snowing around midnight.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 20, 2018 at 10:30AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 31 degrees F
Min temperature 22 degrees F
At observation 25 degrees F
Precipitation 0.10 inch
Snowfall 1.2 inch
Snow depth 8 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 20 Weather:

At 1030am it was 25 degrees and mostly cloudy (cracks in the cloud cover), slight cold breeze. At 210pm it was a hair under 32 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 545pm it was 27 degrees and mostly cloudy (bigger cracks showing a little blue) and some color in the clouds. At 1030pm it was 25 degrees and partly clear. Snowed 1/2″ during the night, ending before 6am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 21, 2018 at 10:30AM
Almost clear
Max temperature 33 degrees F
Min temperature 17 degrees F
At observation 17 degrees F
Precipitation 0.02 inch
Snowfall 0.5 inch
Snow depth 8.5 inch
———————————–